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Sample records for years clinical radiological

  1. Distributed radiology clerkship for the core clinical year of medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Felix S

    2002-11-01

    The central role that diagnostic radiology has in the modern practice of medicine has not always been reflected in radiology's place in the curriculum. We developed a new radiology clerkship for undergraduate medical students during their core clinical year that was supported by Web technology. The assumptions underlying the design of the clerkship were that radiology is best learned from radiologists and that students are most receptive to learning radiology when it is related to concurrent patient care experiences. Beginning in May 2000, a required radiology clerkship experience was incorporated into the core clinical year at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. The core clinical year was organized into three 16-week blocks of clerkships. Two or four independent half-day radiology tutorial sessions were included with each clerkship block, and attended by all students in the block (approximately 35 students), regardless of their specific clerkship assignments. There were ten different radiology tutorials, each given three times during the year as students rotated through the clerkship blocks. Thus, each student attended a radiology tutorial session every four to eight weeks during the year. The topics covered during the tutorials were correlated with the content of the clerkship blocks and included adult and pediatric chest radiology, adult and pediatric abdominal radiology, body CT, neuroradiology, obstetric ultrasound, gynecologic ultrasound, osteoporosis, adult and pediatric fractures, mammography, and cervical spine trauma. The tutorials included pre- and post-test, lectures, case presentations, and sometimes tours of the radiology department. The educational emphasis was on pragmatic case-based learning exercises, development of verbal and visual vocabulary, and learning when and where to seek more information. To provide continuity and organization, Web-based curriculum materials were designed and implemented as a component of the clerkship. The home

  2. Case report: Suspected clinical-radiological discord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Tombe

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available 17-year male student presented with vague constitutional symptoms and jaundice. His clinical chest findings initially suggested a discord with radiological findings. It turned out that the patient had a rare congenital disorder in addition to a seemingly common condition that brought him to the hospital. The purpose of this case presentation is to share some challenges of a clinical-radiological discord in a teaching hospital in Zimbabwe. It shows a flow of teamwork from House Officers to the Consultants as well as radiological back up.

  3. Analysis of the Radiology Reports from Radiology Clinics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Jin; Kwack, Kyu Sung; Cho, Jae Hyun; Jang, Eun Ho

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the form and content of the radiology reports from radiology clinics in Korea. One hundred and sixty six radiology reports from 49 radiology clinics were collected, and these reports were referred to the academic tertiary medical center from March 2008 to February 2009. These included reports for CT (n = 18), MRI (n = 146) and examinations not specified (n = 2). Each report was evaluated for the presence of required contents (demographics, technical information, findings, conclusion, the name, license number and signature of the radiologist and the referring facility). These requirements were based on the guideline of the American College of Radiology and the previous research. The name of the patient, the gender, the body part, the type of examination, the time of examination and the conclusion, the name of the radiologist and the name of facility were well recorded in over 90% of the radiology reports. However, the identification number of the patient, the referring facility, the referring physician, the use of contrast material, the clinical information, the time of dictation, the signature of the radiologist and the license number of the radiologist were poorly recorded (less than 50%). The optimal format of a radiology report should be established for reliable and valid communication with clinicians

  4. Streamlining interventional radiology admissions: The role of the interventional radiology clinic and physician's assistant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.I. Jr.; Rizer, D.M.; Shuman, K.; White, E.J.; Adams, P.; Doyle, K.; Kinnison, M.

    1987-01-01

    During a 5-year period (1982-1987), 376 patients were admitted to an interventional radiology service where they were managed by the senior physician and interventional radiology fellows. Sixty-eight percent of patients were admitted for angioplasty and 32% for elective embolotherapy/diagnostic angiography. A one-half-day, twice weekly interventional radiology clinic and employment of a physician's assistant who performed preadmission history and physicals and wrote orders accounted, in part, for a decrease in hospital stay length from 3.74 days (1982-1983) to 2.41 days (1986-1987). The authors conclude that use of the clinic and the physician's assistant streamlines patient flow and the admitting process and is partially responsible for a decreased length of stay for patients admitted to an interventional radiology service

  5. Clinical and radiological instability following standard fenestration discectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mascarenhas Amrithlal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post-surgical lumbar instability is an established complication but there is limited evidence in the literature regarding the incidence of lumbar instability following fenestration and discectomy. We analyzed our results following fenestration discectomy with a special focus on instability. Materials and Methods: Eighty-three patients between the age of 17 and 52 years who had undergone fenestration discectomy for a single-level lumbar intervertebral disc prolapse were followed-up for a period of 1-5 years. The criteria for instability included "instability catch,", "painful catch," and "apprehension." The working capacity of the patient and the outcome score of the surgery were assessed by means of the Oswestry disability score and the Prolo economic and functional outcome score. Flexion-extension lateral radiographs were taken and analyzed for abnormal tilt and translation. Results: Of the 83 patients included, 70 were men and 13 were women, with an average age of 37.35 years (17-52 years at 5 years follow-up. Clinical instability was seen in 10 (12.04% patients. Radiological instability was noted in 29 (34.9% patients. Only six (60% of the 10 patients who demonstrated clinical instability had radiological evidence of instability. Twenty (68.96% patients with radiological instability were asymptomatic. Three (10.34% patients with only radiological instability had unsatisfactory outcome. The Oswestry scoring showed an average score of 19.8%. Mild disability was noted in 59 (71.08% patients and moderate disability was seen in 24 (28.91% patients. None of the patients had severe disability. These outcomes were compared with the outcomes in other studies in the literature for microdiscectomy and the results were found to be comparable. Conclusion: The favorable outcome of this study is in good agreement with other studies on microdiscectomy. Clinical instability in 12.04% of the patients is in agreement with other studies. Radiological

  6. Radiology as part of an objective structured clinical examination on clinical skills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, I.A.H. van den; Ridder, J.M.M. van de; Schaik, J.P.J. van

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: An objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) assessess clinical competence in a standardised and context related manner. Compared with written tests, OSCE's are more susceptible to reliability errors because of the use of multiple cases and multiple examiners. In the pre-clinical phase of the medical curriculum of the University Medical Centre Utrecht, an OSCE is organised as a medical consult. We evaluated the radiology station. Method: Four questions were formulated: ·What is the internal consistency of the items of the radiology station? ·How do the scores on the radiology station compare with the scores on the test excluding radiology? ·How do different cases differ in scores? ·What are the differences in score between the examiners? We analysed the OSCE results of second year medical students in 2004. Results: Two hundred and sixty-five students were examined in the OSCE in 2004. Ninty-three Students were examined in the radiology station. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the radiology station was 0.92. The average score for the radiology station was 3.8 (0.87). The average score for the test without radiology was 3.9 (0.32). The range of the average scores for the six different cases was 0.5 (3.6-4.1). The range of the average scores for the five examiners was 1.0 (3.3-4.3). Conclusion: The internal consistency of the items in the radiology station is good. The average score for the radiology station is similar to that of the other stations. The range of the scores between the different cases was relatively small. The range of the scores between the different examiners was clearly larger.

  7. Radiology as part of an objective structured clinical examination on clinical skills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berk, I.A.H. van den, E-mail: i.a.h.van_den_berk@lumc.nl [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Postbus 9600, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Ridder, J.M.M. van de, E-mail: J.M.M.vandeRidder@umcutrecht.nl [School of Medical Sciences, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Schaik, J.P.J. van, E-mail: J.P.J.vanSchaik@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100 E01-132, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-06-15

    Introduction: An objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) assessess clinical competence in a standardised and context related manner. Compared with written tests, OSCE's are more susceptible to reliability errors because of the use of multiple cases and multiple examiners. In the pre-clinical phase of the medical curriculum of the University Medical Centre Utrecht, an OSCE is organised as a medical consult. We evaluated the radiology station. Method: Four questions were formulated: {center_dot}What is the internal consistency of the items of the radiology station? {center_dot}How do the scores on the radiology station compare with the scores on the test excluding radiology? {center_dot}How do different cases differ in scores? {center_dot}What are the differences in score between the examiners? We analysed the OSCE results of second year medical students in 2004. Results: Two hundred and sixty-five students were examined in the OSCE in 2004. Ninty-three Students were examined in the radiology station. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the radiology station was 0.92. The average score for the radiology station was 3.8 (0.87). The average score for the test without radiology was 3.9 (0.32). The range of the average scores for the six different cases was 0.5 (3.6-4.1). The range of the average scores for the five examiners was 1.0 (3.3-4.3). Conclusion: The internal consistency of the items in the radiology station is good. The average score for the radiology station is similar to that of the other stations. The range of the scores between the different cases was relatively small. The range of the scores between the different examiners was clearly larger.

  8. Pediatric interventional radiology clinic - how are we doing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubenstein, Jonathan; Zettel, Julie C.; Lee, Eric; Cote, Michelle; Aziza, Albert; Connolly, Bairbre L.

    2016-01-01

    Development of a pediatric interventional radiology clinic is a necessary component of providing a pediatric interventional radiology service. Patient satisfaction is important when providing efficient, high-quality care. To analyze the care provided by a pediatric interventional radiology clinic from the perspective of efficiency and parent satisfaction, so as to identify areas for improvement. The prospective study was both quantitative and qualitative. The quantitative component measured clinic efficiency (waiting times, duration of clinic visit, nurse/physician time allocation and assessments performed; n = 91). The qualitative component assessed parental satisfaction with their experience with the pediatric interventional radiology clinic, using a questionnaire (5-point Likert scale) and optional free text section for feedback (n = 80). Questions explored the family's perception of relevance of information provided, consent process and overall satisfaction with their pediatric interventional radiology clinic experience. Families waited a mean of 11 and 10 min to meet the physician and nurse, respectively. Nurses and physicians spent a mean of 28 and 21 min with the families, respectively. The average duration of the pediatric interventional radiology clinic consultation was 56 min. Of 80 survey participants, 83% were satisfied with their experience and 94% said they believed providing consent before the day of the procedure was helpful. Only 5% of respondents were not satisfied with the time-efficiency of the interventional radiology clinic. Results show the majority of patients/parents are very satisfied with the pediatric interventional radiology clinic visit. The efficiency of the pediatric interventional radiology clinic is satisfactory; however, adherence to stricter scheduling can be improved. (orig.)

  9. Integrating Preclinical and Clinical Oral Diagnosis and Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodus, Nelson L.; Brand, John W.

    1988-01-01

    A program providing second-year dental students with early experience in direct patient contact in an oral diagnosis/oral radiology clinic was well received by both students and faculty and was found to develop desirable skills and qualities in the students participating. (MSE)

  10. Retroperitoneal fibrosis: the clinical and radiological manifestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Weidong; Zhao Rongguo; Qin Mingwei; Xue Huadan; Liang Jixiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical and radiological features of retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF), and to deepen the understanding of this unusual disease and improve the diagnostic level at the early stage. Methods: Fourteen cases (10 males and 4 females, mean age 45.8 years) of pathologically diagnosed RPF from January 1990 to June 2004 were summarized. The clinical and radiological performance of the cases were analyzed. All patients received non-contrast CT scanning, 10 of them underwent enhanced CT scanning as well. 8 patients received MRI, 10 patients received IVP examination, and 11 received B-ultrasound. Results: (1) The very first symptoms usually included back pain, bellyache (10 cases), or urinary tract obstruction (3 cases), with increase of ESR, IgG, CRP value and abnormal renal function. (2) The result of radiological examination showed that 11 lesions of the 14 cases located at retroperitoneum. Ten cases were mass type and 4 cases were diffuse type. Non-contrast CT scanning revealed soft tissue mass at retroperitoneum with in homogenous or homogenous density. After contrast medium injection the lesions were enhanced with different extent. MRI results showed that the lesions presented low signal in T 1 WI, while in T 2 WI the signals had no obvious coherence but were different from one case to another. Conclusion: Radiological examination is one of the important methods for diagnosis of RPF. Based on the different characteristics of RPF in CT and MRI, together with the clinical findings, we will get valuable references for staging and follow-up of RPF. (authors)

  11. The evolution of radiology from paraclinical to clinical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boey, Hong Khim

    2009-07-01

    The perception of Radiology in the early 60s as paraclinical stems from the poor image the clinicians had for our limited resources in providing only plain fi lm studies, VIPs and the single contrast barium studies which exclude only gross lesions. The evolution to clinical status started as early as the mid 60s. My personal recollection and reflection of the histological events that took place covered here highlights the reasons for the transformation from paraclinical to clinical and these form the main theme for this paper. Radiologists' professionalism plays an infinite part in the evolution to clinical Radiology. Rapid technological advances in imaging help to propel Radiology to the forefront. But credit must go to the individual Radiologist for their personal efforts and contributions. Reflection on past events of Radiology in Singapore leading to the establishment of Clinical Radiology was presented. The future of Radiology is brought up for discussion on the role of Radiologists with reference to subspecialisation necessitated by the ever increasing advances in Medical Imaging and demand for Interventional Radiology.

  12. Osteosarcoma of limb bones: a clinical, radiological and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To measure the strength of agreement in clinical, radiological and histopathological diagnosis of osteosarcoma in a 5 year study period. Setting: Addis Ababa University, Black-Lion ('Tikur Anbessa') Hospital-BLH, is the country's highest tertiary level referral and teaching hospital. The departments involved in this ...

  13. Interventional radiology as clinical specialty and how this affects the radiology specialty as a whole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsetis, D.

    2015-01-01

    maintain high quality clinical standards, Radiology departments must carry out regular audit and where available submitting data to national or international registries. Furthermore, IRs have a duty of care to ensure that the IR procedures are safe and effective which can only be demonstrated by high quality research. For IR to survive as clinical specialty, IR training must be adapted in order to ensure that future IR’s will acquire both clinical knowledge and confidence in the disease processes as well as in dealing with patients. Core IR training must include communication skills, clinical assessment and knowledge of the various alternative treatments to IR both surgical and medical. In order to fulfill these expectations, IR training must move to a certified residency program; an attractive format would be one year of internship, three years of Diagnostic Radiology, and then two years of IR. this IR certification will hopefully have a huge impact on local organizational issues so that at a local institution the IR service will be listed next to surgery and medicine. towards this direction, appropriate curricula and formal assessment of the appropriate skills such as the european Board of Interventional Radiology (eBIR) examination are available to ensure the high standards of the future IR workforce. the CIRSe Clinical Practice in IR Manual provides a comprehensive approach to patient care, including numerous well-structured forms for gathering data on patient or social history and conducting examinations are part of its content (www.cirse.org/Clinical_Practice) In my opinion the continuous effort to upgrade IR practice, also points to the only direction for the entire Radiology specialty to survive: the radiologist should be part of clinical decision-making, a true active clinical partner, with up-to-date clinical knowledge about a medical subspecialty. the reality is that clinicians have started to learn about the images in their subspecialty territory, and through

  14. Clinical and radiological evaluation in vertebral artery dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Çabalar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, vertebral artery dissection (VAD is reported more frequently as a cause of young cerebrovascular accidents. It can occur spontaneously or following a neck manipulation and trauma. The patients were 3 females (mean age: 35±26 years and 7 males (mean age: 37.71±4.96 years. Only 2 patients described neck trauma. Cerebellar findings were prominent in all cases. On radiological investigation, vascular changes of vertebral arteries were detected bilaterally in 2 cases, right in 5 and left in 3 cases. All the cases were treated with anticoagulant therapy and cured but 1 with sequela. Prognosis of vertebral artery dissection is generally good by early diagnosis and treatment. In this article, we reported clinical and radiological properties of 10 vertebral artery dissection cases.

  15. Radiologic and clinical findings of mycoplasma pneumonia in children

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    Choi, Yong Jin; Oh, Ki Keun [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    Mycoplasma Pneumonia is a cause of primary atypical pneumonia, but it is asymptomatic mostly or may cause of only mild symptoms. School-aged children experienced high attack rate and manifestation if 'unusual pneumonia' are noted. So authors reviewed clinical and radiological features of 110 cases of serologically proven Mycoplasma pneumonia in hospitalized children between November 1984 and January 1987 retrospectively. The results were as follows ; 1. The sex distribution was 57:53 (1.1:1) in male to female ratio and 47% of them were 5 though 8 years old of age with peak incidence between 5 and 6 years old of age. 2. The symptoms were cough, fever, and sore throat in descending order of frequency and mean symptom duration before admission was 8.1 day. The prevalent season was earlier winter. 3. The radiologic findings were air-space consolidation with lobar, segmental distribution in 68%, interstitial infiltration in 12%, bronchopneumonia in 12%, chronic bronchitis pattern in 3.6%, normal in 4.5%, hilar LN enlargement in 37%, pleural effusion in 12%. 4. Radiologic resolution period was usually 10 days around (4-25 days) and after complete recovery, scarring change or calcification was not seen. 5. Extrapulmonary manifestations were uncommon but hepatitis, hematuria, skin rash, gastroenteritis, myocarditis, otitis media occurred. 6. With administration of tetracyclin and erythromycin, clinical and radiologic responses were promptly seen.

  16. Radiologic and clinical findings of mycoplasma pneumonia in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Jin; Oh, Ki Keun [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    Mycoplasma Pneumonia is a cause of primary atypical pneumonia, but it is asymptomatic mostly or may cause of only mild symptoms. School-aged children experienced high attack rate and manifestation if 'unusual pneumonia' are noted. So authors reviewed clinical and radiological features of 110 cases of serologically proven Mycoplasma pneumonia in hospitalized children between November 1984 and January 1987 retrospectively. The results were as follows ; 1. The sex distribution was 57:53 (1.1:1) in male to female ratio and 47% of them were 5 though 8 years old of age with peak incidence between 5 and 6 years old of age. 2. The symptoms were cough, fever, and sore throat in descending order of frequency and mean symptom duration before admission was 8.1 day. The prevalent season was earlier winter. 3. The radiologic findings were air-space consolidation with lobar, segmental distribution in 68%, interstitial infiltration in 12%, bronchopneumonia in 12%, chronic bronchitis pattern in 3.6%, normal in 4.5%, hilar LN enlargement in 37%, pleural effusion in 12%. 4. Radiologic resolution period was usually 10 days around (4-25 days) and after complete recovery, scarring change or calcification was not seen. 5. Extrapulmonary manifestations were uncommon but hepatitis, hematuria, skin rash, gastroenteritis, myocarditis, otitis media occurred. 6. With administration of tetracyclin and erythromycin, clinical and radiologic responses were promptly seen.

  17. Radiologic and clinical findings of mycoplasma pneumonia in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Jin; Oh, Ki Keun

    1987-01-01

    Mycoplasma Pneumonia is a cause of primary atypical pneumonia, but it is asymptomatic mostly or may cause of only mild symptoms. School-aged children experienced high attack rate and manifestation if 'unusual pneumonia' are noted. So authors reviewed clinical and radiological features of 110 cases of serologically proven Mycoplasma pneumonia in hospitalized children between November 1984 and January 1987 retrospectively. The results were as follows ; 1. The sex distribution was 57:53 (1.1:1) in male to female ratio and 47% of them were 5 though 8 years old of age with peak incidence between 5 and 6 years old of age. 2. The symptoms were cough, fever, and sore throat in descending order of frequency and mean symptom duration before admission was 8.1 day. The prevalent season was earlier winter. 3. The radiologic findings were air-space consolidation with lobar, segmental distribution in 68%, interstitial infiltration in 12%, bronchopneumonia in 12%, chronic bronchitis pattern in 3.6%, normal in 4.5%, hilar LN enlargement in 37%, pleural effusion in 12%. 4. Radiologic resolution period was usually 10 days around (4-25 days) and after complete recovery, scarring change or calcification was not seen. 5. Extrapulmonary manifestations were uncommon but hepatitis, hematuria, skin rash, gastroenteritis, myocarditis, otitis media occurred. 6. With administration of tetracyclin and erythromycin, clinical and radiologic responses were promptly seen

  18. Meniscectomy versus meniscal repair: 10 years radiological and clinical results in vertical lesions in stable knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, C; Dalmay, F; Ehkirch, F P; Cucurulo, T; Laporte, C; Le Henaff, G; Potel, J F; Pujol, N; Rochcongar, G; Salledechou, E; Seil, R; Gunepin, F-X; Sonnery-Cottet, B

    2015-12-01

    Surgical management of meniscal lesion consists of either a meniscectomy or meniscal repair. Although repair offers immediate recovery after surgery, it is also associated with higher rates of revision. A meniscectomy, on the other hand is known to be associated with an early onset of osteoarthritis. The present study compared clinical and radiological results at 10 years between meniscectomy and meniscal repair in isolated vertical lesion in an otherwise stable knee. The hypothesis was that repair shows functional and radiological benefit over meniscectomy. A multi-centric retrospective comparative study of 32 patients (24 male, 8 female). Mean follow-up was 10.6 years (range, 10-13 years). There were 10 meniscal repairs (group R) and 22 meniscectomies (group M), in 17 right and 15 left knees. Mean age at surgery was 33.45±12.3 years (range, 9-47 years). There were 28 medial and 4 lateral meniscal lesions; 26 were in the red-red zone and 6 in red-white zone. Functional score: KOOS score was significantly higher in group R than M on almost all parameters: 98±4.69 versus 77.38±21.97 for symptoms (P=0.0043), 96.89±7.20 versus 78.57±18.9 for pain (P=0.0052), 99.89±0.33 versus 80.88±19.6 for daily life activities (P=0.0002), 96.11±9.83 versus 54.05±32.85 for sport and leisure (P=0.0005), but 91±16.87 versus 68.15±37.7 for quality of life (P=0.1048). Radiology score: in group R, 7 patients had no features of osteoarthritis, and 2 had grade 1 osteoarthritis. In group M, 5 patients had grade 1 osteoarthritis, 10 grade 2, 3 grade 3 and 3 grade 4. Mean quantitative score was 0 (mean, 0.22±0.44) in-group R and 2 (mean, 2.19±0.98) in group M (P<0.0001). At more than 10year's follow-up, functional scores were significantly better with meniscal repair than meniscectomy on all parameters of the KOOS scale except quality of life. Functional and radiological scores correlated closely. These results show that meniscal repair for vertical lesions in stable knees

  19. Idiopathic granulomatous mastitis; Clinical presentation, radiological features and treatmant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldaqal, Saleh M.

    2004-01-01

    To determine the clinical characteristic, clinical presentations and radiological features of diopathic granulomatous mastitis, and the best treatment approaches of this clinical entity. Between 1996 and 2003 the files and histopathology reports of 25 patients with granulomatous mastitis at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital Jeddah, Kindom of Saudi Arabia were reviewed. The data were analyzed and a Medline search was carried out from 1970 to 2003 to review relevant cases. The age of patients ranged from 24-66 years and the mean age was 36.6+-9.43 years. All patients were females. The most common clinical presentation was palpable tender mass. The most common mammographic finding was ill-defined mass. However, mixed hypo- and hyper-echogenic lesions with tubular connections were the common ultrasonic findings. Treatment approaches were conservative or surgical excision or steroid. Conservative treatment associated with the higher rate of complications, while treatment with steroid showed complete remission of disease. Idiopathic granulomatous mastitis is a rare, benign breast disease that is usually underestimated or misdiagnosed. The clinical and radiological features resemble those of infectious mastitis or breast carcinoma. Early recognition and initiation of steroid treatment will result in complete remission of the disease and prevent complications. (author)

  20. Radiological and migration results of the DURALOC(R)-cup after two years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juen, F.

    2000-10-01

    In 1997 a study was conduced concerning 69 consecutive patients, all of whom consisted of DURALOC(R) series 100 acetabular components. The clinical, radiological and migrational aspect of each component was investigated 2 and 4 years postoperatively. In addition to this, a further 92 cups were analyzed in an identical manner, again 2 years after implantation. This therefore equated to a total of 161 investigated cups after a follow up interval of 2 years. In 144 of these cases the cup was combined with a cementless hydroxyapatite coated Spotorno shaft, with the remaining 17 involving a cemented Link-shaft (Lubinus SP II). A 28 mm Biolox(R) ceramic head was constant in all cases. Clinical data for each cup was collected via completion of a standard examination form, while acetabular migration, both vertical and horizontal, was measured on serial radiographs by the computer assisted EBRA method. From analyses of collected data, it was clearly shown that the clinical results remained very good over the 2- and 4-year-periods however, from radiological evidence it was indicated that for the period 3-4 years postoperatively, an increasing amount of radiolucencies around the cups were apparent. There was clearly no correlation between clinical and migration results. From the data taken from 106 migration curves, the mean total migration over the initial two-year-period was calculated to be 0.88 mm. From analysis of a further 56 migration curves, the mean total migration within 4 years of implantation was assessed to be 1.23 mm, however a decreasing speed of migration over the final 2-year-period was indicated. Our results demonstrate that statements relating to migration results of particular cups are more accurate after four years. However, statements about mean migration values are possible after two years. A migration speed of 1 mm total migration within the first 2 years after operation was predictive for radiological loosening of the cup after four years (p=0

  1. Fifty years of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    On 21 March 1957, the Steering Committee for Nuclear Energy of the Organisation for European Economic Co-operation established the Working Party on Public Health and Safety. From this early date onwards, radiological protection formed a central part of the work of what was to become the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. Now, 50 years later, the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has commissioned this historical review of half a century of work and accomplishments. Over this period, the key topics in radiological protection have been identified, debated and addressed by the CRPPH. This report brings this history to life, presenting the major questions in the context of their time, and of the personalities who worked to address them. The developments and views of the past condition how we are able to assess and manage radiological risks today, as well as how we may adjust to challenges that will or could emerge in the coming years. This heritage is thus an important element for the CRPPH to consider as it looks forward to its next 50 years of accomplishments. (author)

  2. Radiologic and clinical bronchiectasis associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Moua

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polycystin 1 and 2, the protein abnormalities associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD, are also found in airway cilia and smooth muscle cells. There is evidence of increased radiologic bronchiectasis associated with ADPKD, though the clinical and functional implications of this association are unknown. We hypothesized an increased prevalence of both radiologic and clinical bronchiectasis is associated with APDKD as compared to non-ADPKD chronic kidney disease (CKD controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective case-control study was performed at our institution involving consecutive ADPKD and non-ADPKD chronic kidney disease (CKD patients seen over a 13 year period with both chest CT and PFT. CTs were independently reviewed by two blinded thoracic radiologists. Manually collected clinical data included symptoms, smoker status, transplant history, and PFT findings. RESULTS: Ninety-two ADPKD and 95 non-ADPKD CKD control patients were compared. Increased prevalence of radiologic bronchiectasis, predominantly mild lower lobe disease, was found in ADPKD patients compared to CKD control (19 vs. 9%, P = 0.032, OR 2.49 (CI 1.1-5.8. After adjustment for covariates, ADPKD was associated with increased risk of radiologic bronchiectasis (OR 2.78 (CI 1.16-7.12. Symptomatic bronchiectasis occurred in approximately a third of ADPKD patients with radiologic disease. Smoking was associated with increased radiologic bronchiectasis in ADPKD patients (OR 3.59, CI 1.23-12.1. CONCLUSIONS: Radiological bronchiectasis is increased in patients with ADPKD particularly those with smoking history as compared to non-ADPKD CKD controls. A third of such patients have symptomatic disease. Bronchiectasis should be considered in the differential in ADPKD patients with respiratory symptoms and smoking history.

  3. Evolution of the clinical review station for enterprise-wide multimedia radiology reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, William B.; Valtchinov, Vladimir I.; Davis, Scott D.; Lester, James; Khorasani, Ramin; Carrino, John A.; Benfield, Andrew

    2000-05-01

    Efforts to develop Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (PACS) for the last ten years have concentrated mainly on developing systems for primary interpretation of digital radiological images. Much less attention has been paid to the clinical aspects of the radiology process. Clinical radiology services are an important component of the overall care delivery process, providing information and consultation services to referring physicians, the customers of radiology, in a timely fashion to aid in care decisions. Information management systems (IMS) are playing an increasingly central role in the care delivery process. No suitable commercial PACS or IMS products were available that could effectively provide for the requirements of the clinicians. We endeavored to fill this void at our institution by developing a system to deliver images and text reports electronically on-demand to the referring physicians. This system has evolved substantially since initial deployment eight years ago. As new technologies become available they are evaluated and integrated as appropriate to improve system performance and manageability. Not surprisingly, the internet and World Wide Web (WWW) technology has had the greatest impact on system design in recent years. Additional features have been added over time to provide services for teleradiology, teaching, and research needs. We also discovered that these value-added services give us a competitive edge in attracting new business to our department. Commercial web-based products are now becoming available which do a satisfactory job of providing many of these clinical services. These products are evaluated for integration into our system as they mature. The result is a system that impacts positively on patient care.

  4. Ambulatory phlebectomy at radiologic outpatient clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon; Choi, Sang Il; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate safety, efficacy, and patient's satisfaction of an ambulatory phlebectomy, performed at a radiology outpatient clinic. Between 2003 and 2006, an ambulatory phlebectomy was performed in 12 patients. Endovenous radiofrequency ablation was performed through a venotomy. The venotomy was ligated after RF ablation, and the ambulatory phlebectomy was performed. The patients visited the radiology outpatient clinic one day, one week, and 2 months after the procedure. The improvement in the clinical symptoms, cosmetic change in varicosity, and the procedure related complications were evaluated. The patient's satisfaction was evaluated using a 5-grade scale. RF ablation through a venotomy was performed successfully in all 12 patients. On average, 4.5 incisions were made, and 12.5 cm of varicosity had been removed. The mean procedure time was one hour and forty minutes. The complications of the ambulatory phlebectomy were bruising in one patient, and skin pigmentation in another. The complications associated with RF ablation were a hard palpable vein in 7 patients, numbness in 7 patients, and skin pigmentation along the vein in 2 patients. Follow-up duplex sonography was performed at 2 months after the procedure, showed complete occlusion in all 12 patients. The clinical symptoms had improved in 11 patients, and the varicosity disappeared cosmetically in 11 patients. An ambulatory phlebectomy, combined with RF ablation of the greater saphenous vein, can be performed safely and effectively at a radiology outpatient clinic

  5. Ambulatory phlebectomy at radiologic outpatient clinic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon; Choi, Sang Il [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University, Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    To evaluate safety, efficacy, and patient's satisfaction of an ambulatory phlebectomy, performed at a radiology outpatient clinic. Between 2003 and 2006, an ambulatory phlebectomy was performed in 12 patients. Endovenous radiofrequency ablation was performed through a venotomy. The venotomy was ligated after RF ablation, and the ambulatory phlebectomy was performed. The patients visited the radiology outpatient clinic one day, one week, and 2 months after the procedure. The improvement in the clinical symptoms, cosmetic change in varicosity, and the procedure related complications were evaluated. The patient's satisfaction was evaluated using a 5-grade scale. RF ablation through a venotomy was performed successfully in all 12 patients. On average, 4.5 incisions were made, and 12.5 cm of varicosity had been removed. The mean procedure time was one hour and forty minutes. The complications of the ambulatory phlebectomy were bruising in one patient, and skin pigmentation in another. The complications associated with RF ablation were a hard palpable vein in 7 patients, numbness in 7 patients, and skin pigmentation along the vein in 2 patients. Follow-up duplex sonography was performed at 2 months after the procedure, showed complete occlusion in all 12 patients. The clinical symptoms had improved in 11 patients, and the varicosity disappeared cosmetically in 11 patients. An ambulatory phlebectomy, combined with RF ablation of the greater saphenous vein, can be performed safely and effectively at a radiology outpatient clinic.

  6. Radiology research in mainland China in the past 10 years: a survey of original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Wang, Yun Fei; Yang, Zhen Lu; Schoepf, U Joseph; Xu, Jiaqian; Lu, Guang Ming; Li, Enzhong

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the features and trends of Radiology research in Mainland China through bibliometric analysis of the original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology (ER) between 2006 and 2015. We reviewed the original articles published in Radiology and ER between 2006 and 2015. The following information was abstracted: imaging subspecialty, imaging technique(s) used, research type, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study results, funding declarations, international collaborations, number of authors, department and province of the first author. All variables were examined longitudinally over time. Radiology research in Mainland China saw a substantial increase in original research articles published, especially in the last 5 years (P Radiology research, neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology were the most productive fields; MR imaging was the most used modality, and a distinct geographic provenience was observed for articles published in Radiology and ER. Radiology research in Mainland China has seen substantial growth in the past 5 years with neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology as the most productive fields. MR imaging is the most used modality. Article provenience shows a distinct geographical pattern. • Radiology research in Mainland China saw a substantial increase. • Neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology are the most productive fields. • MRI is the most used modality in Mainland China's Radiology research. • Guangdong, Shanghai, and Beijing are the most productive provinces.

  7. Radiology research in mainland China in the past 10 years: a survey of original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Wang, Yun Fei; Yang, Zhen Lu; Lu, Guang Ming; Schoepf, U.J.; Xu, Jiaqian; Li, Enzhong

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the features and trends of Radiology research in Mainland China through bibliometric analysis of the original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology (ER) between 2006 and 2015. We reviewed the original articles published in Radiology and ER between 2006 and 2015. The following information was abstracted: imaging subspecialty, imaging technique(s) used, research type, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study results, funding declarations, international collaborations, number of authors, department and province of the first author. All variables were examined longitudinally over time. Radiology research in Mainland China saw a substantial increase in original research articles published, especially in the last 5 years (P < 0.001). Within Mainland China's Radiology research, neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology were the most productive fields; MR imaging was the most used modality, and a distinct geographic provenience was observed for articles published in Radiology and ER. Radiology research in Mainland China has seen substantial growth in the past 5 years with neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology as the most productive fields. MR imaging is the most used modality. Article provenience shows a distinct geographical pattern. (orig.)

  8. Radiology research in mainland China in the past 10 years: a survey of original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Wang, Yun Fei; Yang, Zhen Lu; Lu, Guang Ming [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Xu, Jiaqian [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Li, Enzhong [National Natural Science Foundation of China, Department of Medical Science, Beijing (China)

    2017-10-15

    To evaluate the features and trends of Radiology research in Mainland China through bibliometric analysis of the original articles published in Radiology and European Radiology (ER) between 2006 and 2015. We reviewed the original articles published in Radiology and ER between 2006 and 2015. The following information was abstracted: imaging subspecialty, imaging technique(s) used, research type, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study results, funding declarations, international collaborations, number of authors, department and province of the first author. All variables were examined longitudinally over time. Radiology research in Mainland China saw a substantial increase in original research articles published, especially in the last 5 years (P < 0.001). Within Mainland China's Radiology research, neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology were the most productive fields; MR imaging was the most used modality, and a distinct geographic provenience was observed for articles published in Radiology and ER. Radiology research in Mainland China has seen substantial growth in the past 5 years with neuroradiology, vascular/interventional Radiology, and abdominal Radiology as the most productive fields. MR imaging is the most used modality. Article provenience shows a distinct geographical pattern. (orig.)

  9. The Society for Radiological Protection - 40 years on from 1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunster, H John

    2003-01-01

    The Society for Radiological Protection was created in 1963 at a time when the structure of radiological protection in the United Kingdom was already well established. From its creation 40 years ago to the present, most of the features of British radiological protection stem from the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. This review of the development of radiological protection has been produced to celebrate the 40 years of the Society's support of radiological protection, both in the United Kingdom and internationally. (review)

  10. Extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma: clinical and radiological presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Anna; Szymański, Marcin; Morshed, Kamal; Czekajska-Chehab, Elżbieta; Szczerbo-Trojanowska, Małgorzata

    2013-02-01

    Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (NA) is a rare, vascular tumor affecting adolescent males. Due to aggressive local growth, skull base location and risk of profound hemorrhage, NA is a challenge for surgeons. Angiofibromas have been sporadically described in extanasopharyngeal locations. We review ten cases of extranasopharyngeal angiofibroma (ENA) and discuss the incidence, clinical presentation and management of this pathology. The group consisted of 4 males and 5 females aged 8-49. There were 7 patients with nasal angiofibroma, 1 patient with laryngeal angiofibroma, 1 patient with oral angiofibroma and another patient with infratemporal fossa tumor. In patients with nasal angiofibroma most common presenting symptoms were nasal obstruction and epistaxis. Patients with laryngeal angiofibroma suffered from mild dysphagia and patients with the infratemporal fossa tumor had painless cheek swelling. In four patients with nasal tumor computed tomography (CT) demonstrated mass with strong to intermediate contrast enhancement. In one patient with nasal tumor carotid angiography demonstrated pathological vessels without intensive tumor blush. Infratemporal fossa tumor showed intensive contrast enhancement on CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and abundant vascularity on angiography. Laryngeal and oral angiofibroma required no radiological imaging. Three nasal tumors were evaluated before introduction of CT to clinical practice. All patients underwent surgery. No recurrences developed. ENAs differ significantly from NAs regarding clinical and radiological presentations. They lack typical clinical and radiological features as they develop in all age groups and in females, may be less vascularised, arise from various sites and produce a variety of symptoms.

  11. 100 years from the invention of X-rays. From the history of the radiology in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutarna, A.

    1996-01-01

    The survey of the development of radiology after the First World War (after disintegration of Austro-Hungarian Monarchy) as well as after the Second World War in Slovakia is given. Attention is dedicated to the development of radiodiagnostic and radiotherapeutic methods in Slovakia, as well as to personal occupation of the heads of radiologic clinics. In the last decade radiologic working-places and the departments are equipped with modern and efficient techniques. While in the year 1962 a number of the radiologists was about 90 doctors, in the year 1995 a number more than 360 doctors was registered from which are 80 doctors of radiotherapy. A number of radiologic assistants is about 1200. In Slovak hospitals are about 370 departments of radiology and more than 300 radiodiagnostic working-places and 12 departments of radiotherapy. 29 refs

  12. Recurrent Wernicke s Encephalopathy in a 16-Year-Old Girl with Atypical Clinical and Radiological Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lamdhade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Wernicke’s Encephalopathy (WE is a clinical diagnosis with serious neurological consequences. Its occurrence is underestimated in nonalcoholics and is uncommon in adolescents. We aim to draw the attention to a rare case, which had additional clinical and radiological features. Case. A 16-year-old girl presented with three-week history of vomiting secondary to intestinal obstruction. She developed diplopia soon after hospitalization. Neurological evaluation revealed restriction of bilateral lateral recti with horizontal nystagmus, and bilateral limb dysmetria. Brain MRI was normal. She had prompt improvement to thiamine. Four months later, she presented with headache, bilateral severe deafness, and tinnitus. Clinically, she had severe sensorineural hearing loss, bilateral lateral recti paresis, and gait ataxia. CT head showed bilateral caudate nucleus hypodensities. MRI brain revealed gadolinium enhancement of mamillary bodies and vermis. She had significant improvement after IV thiamine. Headache completely resolved while the ocular movements, hearing, and tinnitus improved partially in 72 hours. Conclusions. Recurrent WE in adolescence is uncommon. Headache, tinnitus, and deafness are rare clinical features. Although MRI study shows typical features of WE, the presence of bilateral caudate nuclei hypodensities on CT scan is uncommon. Prompt treatment with thiamine is warranted in suspected cases to prevent permanent neurological sequelae.

  13. Blending online techniques with traditional face to face teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology learning content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howlett, David, E-mail: david.howlett@esht.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, Kings Drive, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2UD (United Kingdom); Vincent, Tim [Department of IT, Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) (United Kingdom); Watson, Gillian; Owens, Emma [Department of Radiology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, Kings Drive, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2UD (United Kingdom); Webb, Richard; Gainsborough, Nicola [Department of Medicine, Royal Sussex County Hospital, Brighton (United Kingdom); Fairclough, Jil [Department of IT, Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) (United Kingdom); Taylor, Nick [Department of Medical Illustration, Eastbourne District General Hospital (United Kingdom); Miles, Ken [Department of Imaging, BSMS (United Kingdom); Cohen, Jon [Department of Infectious Diseases, BSMS (United Kingdom); Vincent, Richard [Department of Cardiology, BSMS (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    Aim: To review the initial experience of blending a variety of online educational techniques with traditional face to face or contact-based teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology content at a UK Medical School. Materials and methods: The Brighton and Sussex Medical School opened in 2003 and offers a 5-year undergraduate programme, with the final 5 spent in several regional centres. Year 5 involves several core clinical specialities with onsite radiology teaching provided at regional centres in the form of small-group tutorials, imaging seminars and also a one-day course. An online educational module was introduced in 2007 to facilitate equitable delivery of the year 5 curriculum between the regional centres and to support students on placement. This module had a strong radiological emphasis, with a combination of imaging integrated into clinical cases to reflect everyday practice and also dedicated radiology cases. For the second cohort of year 5 students in 2008 two additional online media-rich initiatives were introduced, to complement the online module, comprising imaging tutorials and an online case discussion room. Results: In the first year for the 2007/2008 cohort, 490 cases were written, edited and delivered via the Medical School managed learning environment as part of the online module. 253 cases contained a form of image media, of which 195 cases had a radiological component with a total of 325 radiology images. Important aspects of radiology practice (e.g. consent, patient safety, contrast toxicity, ionising radiation) were also covered. There were 274,000 student hits on cases the first year, with students completing a mean of 169 cases each. High levels of student satisfaction were recorded in relation to the online module and also additional online radiology teaching initiatives. Conclusion: Online educational techniques can be effectively blended with other forms of teaching to allow successful undergraduate delivery of

  14. Blending online techniques with traditional face to face teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology learning content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howlett, David; Vincent, Tim; Watson, Gillian; Owens, Emma; Webb, Richard; Gainsborough, Nicola; Fairclough, Jil; Taylor, Nick; Miles, Ken; Cohen, Jon; Vincent, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To review the initial experience of blending a variety of online educational techniques with traditional face to face or contact-based teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology content at a UK Medical School. Materials and methods: The Brighton and Sussex Medical School opened in 2003 and offers a 5-year undergraduate programme, with the final 5 spent in several regional centres. Year 5 involves several core clinical specialities with onsite radiology teaching provided at regional centres in the form of small-group tutorials, imaging seminars and also a one-day course. An online educational module was introduced in 2007 to facilitate equitable delivery of the year 5 curriculum between the regional centres and to support students on placement. This module had a strong radiological emphasis, with a combination of imaging integrated into clinical cases to reflect everyday practice and also dedicated radiology cases. For the second cohort of year 5 students in 2008 two additional online media-rich initiatives were introduced, to complement the online module, comprising imaging tutorials and an online case discussion room. Results: In the first year for the 2007/2008 cohort, 490 cases were written, edited and delivered via the Medical School managed learning environment as part of the online module. 253 cases contained a form of image media, of which 195 cases had a radiological component with a total of 325 radiology images. Important aspects of radiology practice (e.g. consent, patient safety, contrast toxicity, ionising radiation) were also covered. There were 274,000 student hits on cases the first year, with students completing a mean of 169 cases each. High levels of student satisfaction were recorded in relation to the online module and also additional online radiology teaching initiatives. Conclusion: Online educational techniques can be effectively blended with other forms of teaching to allow successful undergraduate delivery of

  15. Blending online techniques with traditional face to face teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology learning content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, David; Vincent, Tim; Watson, Gillian; Owens, Emma; Webb, Richard; Gainsborough, Nicola; Fairclough, Jil; Taylor, Nick; Miles, Ken; Cohen, Jon; Vincent, Richard

    2011-06-01

    To review the initial experience of blending a variety of online educational techniques with traditional face to face or contact-based teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology content at a UK Medical School. The Brighton and Sussex Medical School opened in 2003 and offers a 5-year undergraduate programme, with the final 5 spent in several regional centres. Year 5 involves several core clinical specialities with onsite radiology teaching provided at regional centres in the form of small-group tutorials, imaging seminars and also a one-day course. An online educational module was introduced in 2007 to facilitate equitable delivery of the year 5 curriculum between the regional centres and to support students on placement. This module had a strong radiological emphasis, with a combination of imaging integrated into clinical cases to reflect everyday practice and also dedicated radiology cases. For the second cohort of year 5 students in 2008 two additional online media-rich initiatives were introduced, to complement the online module, comprising imaging tutorials and an online case discussion room. In the first year for the 2007/2008 cohort, 490 cases were written, edited and delivered via the Medical School managed learning environment as part of the online module. 253 cases contained a form of image media, of which 195 cases had a radiological component with a total of 325 radiology images. Important aspects of radiology practice (e.g. consent, patient safety, contrast toxicity, ionising radiation) were also covered. There were 274,000 student hits on cases the first year, with students completing a mean of 169 cases each. High levels of student satisfaction were recorded in relation to the online module and also additional online radiology teaching initiatives. Online educational techniques can be effectively blended with other forms of teaching to allow successful undergraduate delivery of radiology. Efficient IT links and good image quality

  16. The clinical and radiological study of near drowning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, K.

    1982-01-01

    A survey is given of the literature on near drowning, discussing the aspects for all disciplines emphasising the radiological features. The radological pictures are demonstrated and case descriptions containing radiological features are cited extensively out of the literature. This survey should be of great value for the clinician in therapy and control of course. The correlation of the clinical and radiological features should promote a better interpretation of pathogenetic mechanisms. (orig.) [de

  17. Auditor recommendations resulting from three clinical audit rounds in Finnish radiology units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettunen, Kirsi; Metsälä, Eija

    2017-06-01

    Background The purpose of clinical audits performed in radiology units is to reduce the radiation dose of patients and staff and to implement evidence-based best practices. Purpose To describe auditor recommendations in three Finnish clinical audit rounds performed in 2002-2014, and to determine if auditor recommendations have had any impact on improving medical imaging practice. Material and Methods The retrospective observational study was performed in radiology units holding a radiation safety license issued by the Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority. The data comprised a systematic sample (n = 120) of auditor reports produced in three auditing rounds in these units during the years 2002-2014. The data were analyzed by descriptive methods and by using the Friedman two-way ANOVA test. Results The number of auditor recommendations given varied between clinical audit rounds and according to the type of imaging unit, as well as according to calculation method. Proportionally, the most recommendations in all three clinical audit rounds were given about defining and using quality assurance functions and about guidelines and practices for carrying out procedures involving radiation exposure. Demanding radiology units improved their practices more than basic imaging units towards the third round. Conclusion Auditor recommendations help to address the deficiencies in imaging practices. There is a need to develop uniform guidelines and to provide tutoring for clinical auditors in order to produce comparable clinical audit results.

  18. Clinic-Radiological Study of facial paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olier, J.; Bacaicoa, M.C.; Guridi, J.; Gil, J.L.; Elcarte, F.; Delgado, G.

    1992-01-01

    We have gathered 159 cases of facial paralysis from recent records in our hospital, including paralyses of central as well as peripheral origin, and presenting as the only symptom or as one of several major symptoms of the discomfort of each patient. Sixty-four percent of them were studied by CT scan and/or MR, confirming the existence of alterations in the pathway of nerve pair VII in 50% of the patients who underwent radiological study. Idiopathic facial paralysis was the most common type (42% of the total); while tumors and post-traumatic findings were the most constant radiological findings. From the analysis of the data, the importance of the clinical criteria for selection of the patients in the study and the protocol for radiological diagnosis employed can be deduced. (author)

  19. The clinical and radiologic consideration of osteosarcoma of the jaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Gi Young; Kim, Ki Duck; Park, Chang Seo

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to know the proper diagnosis and to establish the treatment plan of the osteosarcoma in the jaws through the clinical, radiological, and histopathologic considerations. The authors compared and analyzed t he clinicoradiologic features of the six cases of osteosarcoma, diagnosed at the dental college hospital in Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea, during the period from 1975 to 1995. The obtained results were as follows; 1. Osteosarcoma occurred in the mean age, 26.2 years, ranged from 14 to 35 years, and equally in men and women. 2. The swelling was the most common frequent presenting complaints. Other reported symptoms included pain, parasthesia of the lower lip or the lesion. 3. The average interval was seen 3.5 months before the patient had been seen by a doctor. 4. The frequency of the lesions was equally in the maxilla, 3 cases and mandible, 3 cases. 5. Radiologically, osteoblastic osteosarcoma which is seen in the 3 cases was the most frequent histologic type. Chondroblastic osteosarcoma were seen in the 2 cases. there was no correlation between the radiologic appearance and histopathologic type.

  20. [Non-cemented self-locking total arthroplasty of the hip. Clinical and radiological results after three years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, A L; Roy, A; Duchesne, R; Béliveau, P; Fallaha, M; Bornais, S

    1993-01-01

    We reviewed 47 patients who had fifty-one (51) primary, cementless biofit total hip arthroplasties (THA) implanted at Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital between 1986 and 1990. An independent observer rated the patients on the Harris Hip Score (HHS) by questionnaire, physical examination and radiological assessment. The average follow-up was 40 months. Twenty-two percent (22%) of the femoral components had been revised because of incapacitating pain, limping or a HHS inferior to 60. A little more than 20% of the unrevised prostheses had a mediocre result (HHS inferior to 70). There was no correlation between results and radiological signs of instability. The femoral component of the hip arthroplasty has a poor clinical performance which compares unfavourably with cemented prostheses.

  1. Radiological review of accident and emergency radiographs: A 1-year audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Stuart M.; Connelly, Daniel J.; Wadsworth, Susan; Wilson, David

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To assess the impact and cost effectiveness of a system of radiological review of accident and emergency (A and E) plain films. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Review documentation was studied retrospectively over a 1-year period. Six hundred and eighty-four actual or suspected errors in the initial radiological interpretation by A and E staff were highlighted by radiologists in training. These selected 'red reports' were then further reviewed by a musculoskeletal radiologist and a more senior member of the A and E team. RESULTS: Three hundred and fifty-one missed or strongly suspected fractures were detected, with ankle, finger and elbow lesions predominating. Other errors included 11 missed chest radiograph abnormalities and 24 A and E false-positives. Radiologists in training tended to over-report abnormalities with an 18% false-positive rate when compared to the subsequent musculoskeletal radiology opinion. Following review, further action was taken by A and E staff in 286 (42.6%) of cases. No operative intervention was required in those patients with a delayed or missed A and E diagnosis. Consideration is given to the cost of providing this form of review and the impact of medico-legal factors. CONCLUSION: Compared with the large numbers of patients seen and radiographed in a busy A and E department, the number of radiological errors was small. There were even fewer changes in management. Despite this, concern over litigation, clinical governance and future work patterns in A and E make this form of review a useful means of risk reduction in a teaching hospital. Williams, S.M. (2000). Clinical Radiology 55, 861-865

  2. Acute traumatic central cord syndrome: analysis of clinical and radiological correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, P; Gomez, P; Alday, R

    2008-12-01

    In patients with traumatic spinal cord injury, several studies correlate neurological impairment and radiological findings. However, little information is available about this correspondence in the particular group of acute traumatic central cord syndrome. The object of the present work was to describe the clinical and radiological features of a series of patients presenting with acute traumatic central cord syndrome and to analyze clinical and radiological correlations on admission and at last follow-up. Retrospective review of 15 patients diagnosed of acute traumatic central cord syndrome between 1995 and 2005. Global motor score and motor score in upper extremities were determined on admission and at last follow-up (6 months-4 years, mean 16 months). Plain films, cervical computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) were performed in every patient and retrieved for the study. In seven patients, serial MR studies were performed during follow-up. Clinical and radiological correlations were statistically analyzed with non-parametric tests. Cervical spondylosis appeared associated with older age, falls, and absence of fracture. Spinal cord edema was the most common finding in MR studies but hemorrhage was also observed. The length of spinal cord edema significantly correlated with initial motor score. The decrease in T2-weighted hyperintensity in serial MR studies correlated with the gain of motor power in upper limbs at last follow-up. Elderly patients with more degenerated cervical spines commonly develop acute traumatic central cord syndrome after incidental falls. Length of spinal cord edema correlates with neurological impairment on admission and may provide significant prognostic information.

  3. Central giant cell granuloma of the jaws: clinical and radiological evaluation of 22 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Yu; Zhao, Yi-Fang; Zwahlen, Roger A.; Zheng, Yun-Fei; Wang, Shi-Ping

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the clinical and radiological characteristics of central giant cell granulomas (CGCGs) of the jaws. A retrospective analysis of a 20-year database was performed regarding both clinical and radiological features of 22 patients affected with CGCGs of the jaws. Fourteen women and 8 men were included with the age range of 7-81 years (mean 31.7 years). Among the 22 lesions, 16 were located in the mandible and 6 in the maxilla. Painless swelling was the most common clinical feature in 18 of all cases. Limited mouth opening was noted in 2 patients where the lesions involved the condyle. Radiographically, 13 lesions were homogeneously osteolytic and 9 lesions were trabeculated. Fifteen lesions were unilocular and 14 lesions presented with well-defined but not sclerotic margins. CT images in 5 patients clearly showed the trabeculation within the lesions. The follow-up ranged from 1.5 to 11 years with a mean period of 5 years. Three out of 9 aggressive and 1 out of 13 nonaggressive lesions developed recurrence. Diagnosis of CGCGs of the jaws depends on both correct interpretation of clinical, radiographic and pathological data. Differentiation between aggressive and nonaggressive CGCGs should be considered to improve individual treatment planning. (orig.)

  4. Central giant cell granuloma of the jaws: clinical and radiological evaluation of 22 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Yu; Zhao, Yi-Fang [School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Wuhan University, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zwahlen, Roger A. [University of Hong Kong, Discipline of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry (China); Zheng, Yun-Fei [School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Wang, Shi-Ping [Wuhan University, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan (China)

    2009-09-15

    The objective was to investigate the clinical and radiological characteristics of central giant cell granulomas (CGCGs) of the jaws. A retrospective analysis of a 20-year database was performed regarding both clinical and radiological features of 22 patients affected with CGCGs of the jaws. Fourteen women and 8 men were included with the age range of 7-81 years (mean 31.7 years). Among the 22 lesions, 16 were located in the mandible and 6 in the maxilla. Painless swelling was the most common clinical feature in 18 of all cases. Limited mouth opening was noted in 2 patients where the lesions involved the condyle. Radiographically, 13 lesions were homogeneously osteolytic and 9 lesions were trabeculated. Fifteen lesions were unilocular and 14 lesions presented with well-defined but not sclerotic margins. CT images in 5 patients clearly showed the trabeculation within the lesions. The follow-up ranged from 1.5 to 11 years with a mean period of 5 years. Three out of 9 aggressive and 1 out of 13 nonaggressive lesions developed recurrence. Diagnosis of CGCGs of the jaws depends on both correct interpretation of clinical, radiographic and pathological data. Differentiation between aggressive and nonaggressive CGCGs should be considered to improve individual treatment planning. (orig.)

  5. Correlation Between Clinical and Radiological Outcomes After Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation in the Femoral Condyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Jay R; Smith, Anne; Fallon, Michael; Wood, David J; Ackland, Timothy R

    2014-08-01

    Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) is an established technique for the repair of knee chondral defects, although the correlation between clinical and radiological outcomes after surgery is poorly understood. To determine the correlation between clinical and radiological outcomes throughout the postoperative timeline to 5 years after MACI. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3. This retrospective study was undertaken in 83 patients (53 male, 30 female) with complete clinical and radiological follow-up at 1, 2, and 5 years after MACI. The mean age of patients was 38.9 years (range, 13-62 years), with a mean body mass index (BMI) of 26.6 kg/m(2) (range, 16.8-34.8 kg/m(2)), mean defect size of 3.3 cm(2) (range, 1-9 cm(2)), and mean preoperative duration of symptoms of 9.2 years (range, 1-46 years). Patients indicated for MACI in this follow-up were 13 to 65 years of age, although they were excluded if they had a BMI >35 kg/m(2), had undergone prior extensive meniscectomy, or had ongoing progressive inflammatory arthritis. Patients were assessed clinically using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate the graft using a 1.5-T or 3-T clinical scanner; the MRI assessment included 8 parameters of graft repair (infill, signal intensity, border integration, surface contour, structure, subchondral lamina, subchondral bone, and effusion) based on the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score as well as an MRI composite score. The degree of an association between the MRI parameters and the KOOS subscales at each postoperative time point was assessed with the Spearman correlation coefficient (SCC), and significance was determined at P correlations over time and statistically significant associations at 5 years with KOOS-Pain (SCC, 0.25; P = .020), KOOS-Activities of Daily Living (SCC, 0.26; P = .018), and KOOS-Sport (SCC, 0.32; P = .003). Apart

  6. Effectiveness of a radiology-anatomy instructional module in a clinical course on oral radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanaka, Masahiro; Tamaki, Yoh; Nomura, Yoshiaki

    2007-01-01

    An insufficient knowledge of anatomy often complicates the interpretation of radiological findings by students learning clinical medicine. During a 3-week clinical course in oral radiology, students attended lectures on anatomy for half of each day. Our objectives were to evaluate this program and determine why some students remained unmotivated to learn anatomy. Surveys were carried out using two questionnaires, one for evaluating the students' beliefs regarding the necessity of knowing anatomy and their understanding of radiology and anatomy, and the other for determining the value of the educational program. In total, 126 questionnaires were analyzed. Structural equation modeling and decision analysis were used to analyze the data obtained. Beliefs regarding the necessity of knowing anatomy were explained by three variables: the necessity of knowing imaging anatomy, the necessity of knowing gross anatomy, and understanding of anatomy. Awareness of the necessity of knowing anatomy and understanding of graphical images were not strongly correlated. The educational program was characterized by two factors: 'value' and 'appropriateness' These were strongly correlated. Student interest in the content of the course was found to be the most important factor in student evaluations of the educational program. Students who answered 'agree', 'disagree' or 'strongly disagree' to three items, interested in the content of the course', 'obtained knowledge through the course' and 'expected the course to be useful in the near future were likely to have insufficient understanding of and awareness of the necessity of radiology and anatomy. The inclusion of lectures on anatomy is beneficial for improving student understanding of oral radiology. Student interest in the content is important in evaluations of radiology-anatomy programs. (author)

  7. Diagnosis of cystocele--the correlation between clinical and radiological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Daniel; Mellgren, Anders; Kierkegaard, Jonas; Zetterström, Jan; Falconer, Christian; López, Annika

    2004-01-01

    In patients with genital prolapse involving several compartments simultaneously, radiologic investigation can be used to complement the clinical assessment. Contrast medium in the urinary bladder enables visualization of the bladder base at cystodefecoperitoneography (CDP). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlation between clinical examination using the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification system (POP-Q) and CDP. Thirty-three women underwent clinical assessment and CDP. Statistical analysis using Pearson's correlation coefficient ( r) demonstrated a wide variability between the current definition of cystocele at CDP and POP-Q ( r=0.67). An attempt to provide an alternative definition of cystocele at CDP had a similar outcome ( r=0.63). The present study demonstrates a moderate correlation between clinical and radiologic findings in patients with anterior vaginal wall prolapse. It does not support the use of bladder contrast at radiologic investigation in the routine preoperative assessment of patients with genital prolapse.

  8. Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in young children - clinical and radiological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penushliev, T.; Brankov, O.; Georgiev, Tz.; Stoilov, S.; Panov, M.; Totev, M.

    2007-01-01

    Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis is a bacterial infectious disease which mainly affects the paediatrics age group. The incidence seems to decline through the last decade. The authors analyzed the clinical, bacteriological and radiological features of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in 49 young children. Their age ranged from 12 days to 2.9 years (19 new-born and 30 babies). The most affected locus was the femur (46.9 %), followed by the humerus (40.9 %) and tibia (6.2 %). The adjacent joint was involved in 38.8 %. Up to the third day after onset of symptoms were admitted 32 children (65.3 %). A bacteriological diagnosis has been achieved in only 19 cases (38.8 %) which underwent different surgical procedures. Staphylococcus aureus (9 children; 64.3 %) was the most common causative microbe. Radiological characteristic showed mainly widening of joints, destruction of cartilage, bone destruction and osteoporosis. The median duration of antibiotic therapy was 31 days. Nine children underwent needle aspiration while another 10 required locus incision or open surgery with debridement or sequestrectomy. Definitive clinical restoration was observed in 42 cases (85.7%). (authors)

  9. The diagnostic significance of clinical and radiological findings in osteogenesis imperfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Deyong; Xu Zushan; Shen Qijie

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To define the diagnostic criteria of osteogenesis imperfection. Materials and methods: The clinical and radiologic manifestations of 68 patients with osteogenesis imperfection were studied retrospectively. Results: (1) A generalized decrease in osseous density (osteoporosis or osteopenia) with abnormal fragility of bone (68 cases). (2) Blue sclera (61 cases). (3) Dentinogenesis imperfection with opalescent bluish-gray tint (49 cases). (4) Progressive hearing loss (prior to the age of 40 years)-premature otosclerosis (38 cases). Other abnormalities such as abnormal contour and structure (68 cases), growth retardation (49 cases), episodic diaphoresis (24 cases), with abnormal temperature regulation (16 cases), hyperplastic scars (11 cases) and tendency of subcutaneous bruise (6 cases), all these were not characteristic features. Conclusion: Among all clinical and radiological findings, osteopenia with abnormal fragility of bone; blue sclera dentinogenesis imperfection with opalescent bluish-gray tint and premature otosclerosis are the most common and characteristic findings which can be taken as the diagnostic criteria of osteogenesis imperfection

  10. Comprehensive Clinical Audits of Diagnostic Radiology Practices: A Tool for Quality Improvement. Quality Assurance Audit for Diagnostic Radiology Improvement and Learning (QUAADRIL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Interest in quality assurance processes and quality improvement in diagnostic radiology is being driven by a number of factors. These include the high cost and complexity of radiological equipment, acknowledgement of the possibility of increasing doses to patients, and the importance of radiological diagnosis to patient management within the health care environment. To acknowledge these interests, clinical audits have been introduced and, in Europe, mandated under a European Directive (Council Directive 97/47/EURATOM). Comprehensive clinical audits focus on clinical management and infrastructure, patient related and technical procedures, and education and research. This publication includes a structured set of standards appropriate for diagnostic radiology, an audit guide to their clinical review, and data collection sheets for the rapid production of reports in audit situations. It will be a useful guide for diagnostic radiology facilities wishing to improve their service to patients through timely diagnosis with minimal radiation dose.

  11. Comprehensive Clinical Audits of Diagnostic Radiology Practices: A Tool for Quality Improvement. Quality Assurance Audit for Diagnostic Radiology Improvement and Learning (QUAADRIL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Interest in quality assurance processes and quality improvement in diagnostic radiology is being driven by a number of factors. These include the high cost and complexity of radiological equipment, acknowledgement of the possibility of increasing doses to patients, and the importance of radiological diagnosis to patient management within the health care environment. To acknowledge these interests, clinical audits have been introduced and, in Europe, mandated under a European Directive (Council Directive 97/47/EURATOM). Comprehensive clinical audits focus on clinical management and infrastructure, patient related and technical procedures, and education and research. This publication includes a structured set of standards appropriate for diagnostic radiology, an audit guide to their clinical review, and data collection sheets for the rapid production of reports in audit situations. It will be a useful guide for diagnostic radiology facilities wishing to improve their service to patients through timely diagnosis with minimal radiation dose.

  12. Foreign body aspiration in children: clinical aspects, radiological aspects and bronchoscopic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraga, Andrea de Melo Alexandre; Reis, Marcelo Conrado dos; Zambon, Mariana Porto; Toro, Ivan Contrera; Ribeiro, Jose Dirceu; Baracat, Emilio Carlos Elias

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical manifestations and bronchoscopic treatment of foreign body aspiration in children under 14 years of age, correlating the clinical aspects with the bronchoscopic findings. Methods: A retrospective, descriptive study analyzing data related to children under 14 years of age undergoing bronchoscopy due to clinical suspicion of foreign body aspiration at the State University at Campinas Hospital das Clinicas from January of 2000 to December of 2005. Results: The sample consisted of 69 patients, ranging in age from 8 months to 12 years/7 months (75.4% under 3 years of age), 62.3% of whom were male. The principal complaint was sudden-onset cough (75.4%), auscultation was abnormal in 74%, and dyspnea was observed in 29%. Radiological abnormalities were seen in 88% of the cases. Aspirations were primarily into the right lung (54.8%), and 30.7% of the foreign bodies were of vegetal origin (principally beans and peanuts). In the follow-up period, 29% presented complications (most commonly pneumonia), which were found to be associated with longer aspiration time (p = 0.03). Mechanical ventilation was required in 7 children (10.1%), and multiple bronchoscopies were performed in 5 (7.2%). Conclusions: A history of sudden-onset choking and cough, plus abnormal auscultation and radiological findings, characterizes the profile of foreign body aspiration. In such cases, bronchoscopy is indicated. Longer aspiration time translates to a higher risk of complications. The high prevalence of foreign bodies of vegetal origin underscores the relevance of prevention at children younger than three years of age. (author)

  13. Foreign body aspiration in children: clinical aspects, radiological aspects and bronchoscopic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraga, Andrea de Melo Alexandre; Reis, Marcelo Conrado dos; Zambon, Mariana Porto [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Pediatric Emergency Room]. E-mail: andreafrag@gmail.com; Toro, Ivan Contrera [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Thoracic Surgery; Ribeiro, Jose Dirceu; Baracat, Emilio Carlos Elias [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Pediatric Pulmonology

    2008-02-15

    Objective: To describe the clinical manifestations and bronchoscopic treatment of foreign body aspiration in children under 14 years of age, correlating the clinical aspects with the bronchoscopic findings. Methods: A retrospective, descriptive study analyzing data related to children under 14 years of age undergoing bronchoscopy due to clinical suspicion of foreign body aspiration at the State University at Campinas Hospital das Clinicas from January of 2000 to December of 2005. Results: The sample consisted of 69 patients, ranging in age from 8 months to 12 years/7 months (75.4% under 3 years of age), 62.3% of whom were male. The principal complaint was sudden-onset cough (75.4%), auscultation was abnormal in 74%, and dyspnea was observed in 29%. Radiological abnormalities were seen in 88% of the cases. Aspirations were primarily into the right lung (54.8%), and 30.7% of the foreign bodies were of vegetal origin (principally beans and peanuts). In the follow-up period, 29% presented complications (most commonly pneumonia), which were found to be associated with longer aspiration time (p = 0.03). Mechanical ventilation was required in 7 children (10.1%), and multiple bronchoscopies were performed in 5 (7.2%). Conclusions: A history of sudden-onset choking and cough, plus abnormal auscultation and radiological findings, characterizes the profile of foreign body aspiration. In such cases, bronchoscopy is indicated. Longer aspiration time translates to a higher risk of complications. The high prevalence of foreign bodies of vegetal origin underscores the relevance of prevention at children younger than three years of age. (author)

  14. Radiological evaluation of swallowing and clinical patterns of systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montesi, A.; Pesaresi, A.; Cavalli, M.L.; Serri, L.; Salmistraro, D.; Candela, M.; Gabrielli, A.

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) were studied by means of videofluoroscopy in order to evaluate the abnormalities in the oral-pharyngeal and esophageal phases of deglutition and to correlate the radiological patterns with the clinical features of the disease. Thirteen patients (25.5%) exhibited swallowing disorders such as oral leakage, retention, penetration, mild or moderate aspiration and abnormal upper esophageal sphincter behavior. These dysfunctions were more evident in patients with esophageal motility abnormalities. A normal radiological pattern in the esophagus was not associated with swallowing alterations. Remarkably, patients with oral-pharyngeal disorders had a higher incidence of lung diseases. Forty-five patients (88%) exhibited disorders of the esophageal phase of deglutition, such as mild or severe motility abnormalities or hiatal hernia, gastro-esophageal reflux, reflux esophagitis, and stricture. Radiological findings in the esophagus can be abnormal in the early stages of the disease. On the other hand, the radiological pattern of esophageal motility can be occasionally negative in advanced or extensive disease. This indicates a discrepancy between clinical symptoms and radiological picture of the esophagus. The radiological examination of the oral-pharyngeal and esophageal phases of deglutition is important in patients with scleroderma in order to evaluate visceral involvement, motility disorders, and risk of aspiration. Such radiological information can be useful in preventing esophagitis and pulmonary complications

  15. The clinical and radiological consideration of calcifying odontogenic cyst of the jaw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hae Rym; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Dental radiology, College of Dentistry, Yensei University, (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-15

    Nine cases presented with a calcifying odontogenic cyst to the Dental Hospital of the College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, from January 1987 to September June, 1996, Clinical or histopathological findings were observed according to each radiologic criteria. The results obtained are as follows:1. The male to female ratio was 2 : 1 with a mean age of 25 years. 2. The radiographic appearances of nine caes were well-defined radiolucent lesions in which eight cases were shown until ocular lesions and only one lesion was seen multilocular lesion. 3. Radiologically, three of nine cases were pure radiolucent lesion and others, six cases were radiolucent contained a variable amount of radiopaque material. 4. Histologically, two cases were classified simple cyst, five were cyst associated odontoma, two were neoplastic type. 5. Histological findings according to the radiological classification, two of three radiolucent lesions were simple cys ts; another was a cyst associated with odontoma. While, four of six radiologic mixed lesions turned out to be a cyst associated with odontoma, two was the neoplastic type.

  16. Medical management of radiological accidents in non-specialized clinics: mistakes and lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jikia, D.

    2009-01-01

    In 1996-2002 three radiological accidents were developed in Georgia. There were some people injured in those accidents. During medical management of the injured some mistakes and errors were revealed both in diagnostics and scheme of the treatment. The goal of this article is to summarize medical management of the mentioned radiological accidents, to estimate reasons of mistakes and errors, to present the lessons drawn in result of Georgia radiological accidents. There was no clinic with specialized profile and experience. Accordingly due to having no relevant experience late diagnosis can be considered as the main error. It had direct influence on the patients' health and results of treatment. Lessons to be drawn after analyzing Georgian radiological accidents: 1. informing medical staff about radiological injuries (pathogenesis, types, symptoms, clinical course, principles of treatment and etc.); 2. organization of training and meetings in non-specialized clinics or medical institutions for medical staff; 3. preparation of informational booklets and guidelines.(author)

  17. Evidence-based radiology: a new approach to evaluate the clinical practice of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, S.; Felder-Puig, R.

    2006-01-01

    Over the last several years, the concept and methodology of evidence-based medicine (EBM) have received significant attention in the scientific community. However, compared to therapeutic medical disciplines, EBM-based radiological publications are still underrepresented. This article summarizes the principles of EBM and discusses the possibilities of their application in radiology. The presented topics include the critical appraisal of studies on the basis on EBM principles, the explanation of EBM-relevant statistical outcome parameters (e.g., ''likelihood ratio'' for diagnostic and ''number needed to treat'' for interventional procedures), as well as the problems facing evidence-based radiology. Evidence-based evaluation of radiological procedures does not only address aspects of cost-effectiveness, but is also particularly helpful in identifying patient-specific usefulness. Therefore it should become an integral part of radiologist training. (orig.)

  18. 50 Years of the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF)

    OpenAIRE

    Marino, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is in its 50th year of operation. It was commissioned on April 1, 1967 as a collaboration between the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) of Columbia University, and members of the Medical Research Center of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). It was initially funded as a user facility for radiobiology and radiological physics, concentrating on monoenergetic neutrons. Facilities for irradiation with MeV light charged particles were d...

  19. Clinical and radiological characteristics of adult black Zimbabweans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical and radiological characteristics of adult black Zimbabweans with low back pain attending a specialist neurosurgery clinic. ... A past medical history of trauma, no significant illness in the past, smoking cigarettes, and drinking alcohol was observed in 25%, 38%, 23%, and 44% of the records respectively. The common ...

  20. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis: a radiological and clinical investigation of five cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demharter, J.; Bohndorf, K.; Michl, W.; Vogt, H.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. To make a detailed evaluation of the clinical and radiological course of five children with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO). Emphasis was laid on the correlation between clinical data and radiological findings. Design and patients. Clinical data, histology (n=11), bone scintigraphy (n=17), and the plain radiographs (n=198) of these patients were reviewed. The mean time of observation was 6.6 years (range 1-14.5 years). Thirty-two lesions seen at the time of primary diagnosis (n=22) or during the course of the disease (n=10) were evaluated. Twenty-seven foci were located in bone; in five cases the sacroiliac joints were involved. Results. Bone scintigrams showed nearly all foci (31/32) and were especially helpful in clinically asymptomatic lesions (14/32) or foci which were radiographically difficult to detect or not seen at all (8/32). Only 14 of 32 foci were locally symptomatic clinically. In all cases with a short interval (≤3 weeks) between the onset of local symptoms and evaluation by plain radiographs (n=5) osteolysis was shown without a sclerotic margin. All bone lesions with a longer duration of local symptoms (n=7) revealed a variable radiographic pattern: osteolysis with sclerotic rim in three, a mixed lytic-sclerotic lesion in three and pure sclerosis in one. In two cases low back pain could be ascribed to sacroiliitis. Conclusion. Only careful correlation between clinical, scintigraphy and radiographic features permits an accurate assessment of disease activity in CRMO. The bone lesions detected radiographically soon after the onset of symptoms resemble those of acute osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  1. Study of the clinical features and radiological findings for thoracic communicating arachnoid cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Masashi; Hanakita, Junya; Suwa, Hideyuki

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed retrospectively, the usefulness of the radiological examinations for 15 cases of communicating arachnoid cysts in thoracic lesions experienced by our department over the last 12 years. Severn men and eight women (age range 32-71 years, mean age 53.8 years) were analyzed. Their symptoms on admission were sensory disturbance of the legs (13 cases), leg weakness (4 cases), back pain (4 cases), and truncal abnormal sensations (2 cases), etc. We performed myelography in 12 patients, and an additional 5 patients were diagnosed by this examination. CT-myelography showed deformity of the spinal cord, deviation of the spinal cord and enlargement of the subarachnoid space in all 12 patients. The axial view in 1.0 T weighted MRI showed the same findings as CT-myelography. However, the cine 1.0 T weighted MRI seemed to be insufficient to detect any spinal arachnoid cysts. As the results of their operations, 13 patients improved, 2 patients remained unchanged, and no cases become worse. The clinical and radiological diagnosis for communicating arachnoid cysts is not easy. Neurological examinations and radiological examinations with detailed readings are essential to obtain a correct diagnosis, when considering the possibility of the disease. (author)

  2. History of the Clinical Institute of Radiology in Ljubljana on its 80th anniversary (1923-2003). Historia Magistra Vitae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevtic, V.

    2004-01-01

    Background. The manuscript presents a short history of the Clinical Radiology Institute in Ljubljana, University Clinical Centre, and the leading radiological institution in Slovenia since its establishment in 1923. Throughout its history the Institute has been faced with numerous obstacles. Its major problems have always included the lack of professional and economical independence, which has made it difficult for the Institute to keep up with the fast technological development of the world's radiology, as well as the shortage of radiologists and radiographers with the consequence of the excessive work load and difficulties in educational and research activities. Despite some serious problems the expertise of the Institute's leadership, together with the enthusiasm of all radiologists and radiographers, has enabled a continuous professional and technological development which is the basis of today's high quality diagnostic and interventional radiology. Many of the remarkable achievements would not have been possible without some extraordinary personalities who laid down the solid foundations of today's Institute. Conclusions. Eighty years of Clinical Radiology Institute in Ljubljana is a history of the successful development of the republic's leading radiological institution, a success based on determination, unity and the professional integrity of all its members and management. (author)

  3. Radiotherapy of malignant growths in the eosophagus with clinical and radiological course control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzhausen, B.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reports on clinical and radiological symptoms observed before during and after radiotherapy of 172 patients treated under high-voltage conditions at the radiological clinic in Muenster in the time from 1962 to 1977. The 1, 2, and 5 year survival rates are 26.5%, 13%, and 5.9%. The examination carried out retrospectively showed in 52% of the patients (46/90) after radiotherapy an expansion of the tumour stenosis. In 67% of the patients (67/101), the disphagia which had been stated before decreased. Thus the palliative effect of the treatment is the most important issue of the therapy. In the case of polypous and diffusely infiltrating tumours, the average survival rate was 11.2 months and 12.3 months which is significantly better than the results obtained with circular-stenosing tumours (6.4 months). (orig./APR) [de

  4. Radiology clinical synopsis: a simple solution for obtaining an adequate clinical history for the accurate reporting of imaging studies on patients in intensive care units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Mervyn D.; Alam, Khurshaid

    2005-01-01

    Lack of clinical history on radiology requisitions is a universal problem. We describe a simple Web-based system that readily provides radiology-relevant clinical history to the radiologist reading radiographs of intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Along with the relevant history, which includes primary and secondary diagnoses, disease progression and complications, the system provides the patient's name, record number and hospital location. This information is immediately available to reporting radiologists. New clinical information is immediately entered on-line by the radiologists as they are reviewing images. After patient discharge, the data are stored and immediately available if the patient is readmitted. The system has been in routine clinical use in our hospital for nearly 2 years. (orig.)

  5. Uniform access to clinical data in a distributed environment. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelhard, K.; Swoboda, N.; Nissen-Meyer, S.; Reiser, M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Providing medical reports on wards and ambulatory settings in electronic form can improve the quality of health care delivery. Radiology was chosen as an example to demonstrate how to implement uniform access to clinical data in a hospital. Method: Medical professionals at the university hospital in Munich, Grosshadern, have access to all radiological reports of their patients. Web browsers are used as a front end. A centralized administration of users and patients is in place. Results: Centralized access control and patient selection guarantee uniform access to all applicable data via intranet and controls access rights. The high acceptance of this service is reflected by the high number of 150 requests per day. Discussion: Access to radiological reports within the Grosshadern University Clinics was enabled via web browsers in a short time. The high acceptance of the system also proves its easy use. Integration of the system in a centralized user and patient identification system supports the unified access to clinical data. (orig.) [de

  6. Analysis of papers in radiological journals in recent years: a comparison of journal of Korean radiologic society and radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Suh; Kim, Jae Kyun; Han, Dong Bok; Lim, Tae Hwan

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine current trends and the mode of future development in the field of medical radiology and to promote research among the nation's radiologists by analyzing the contents of the Journal of the Korean Radiologic Society(JKRS) and Radiology. The number of articles published in JKRS each year between 1990 and 1994 was counted. The research articles in JKRS(n=740) and in Radiology(n=1748) between 1992 and 1994 were categorized according to the objective, type, topic, materials, and radiologic techniques of their contents on the basis of predetermined criteria. Domestic Masters theses(n=126) and doctoral dissertations(n=75) accepted between 1990 and 1994, and domestic materials published in international journals (n=416) between 1986 and 1994 were also categorized using the same criteria. The greatest increase in the number of articles published in JKRS was seen during 1994. The majority of these aimed to retrospectively analyse the findings of diseases while the majority of articles published in Radiology dealt prospectively with the development and/or evaluation of diagnostic methods. More variety of topics and issues was seen in Radiology than in JKRS. The number of articles of domestic materials published in international journals increased from 1986 to 1994, while the number of articles of foreign materials published in Korea was relatively stationary : A significant number of theses and dissertations dealt, mostly prospectively, with studies of pathophysiologic and/or pharmacologic mechanisms using animal models. In order to understand both current trends and the direction and mode of future developments in the field of radiology, and to be able to actively deal with challenges at the forefront of radiologic development, it is essential to review research articles published in radiology-related journals

  7. Gout. Radiological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix; Pena Cortes, Mario; Rondon Herrera, Federico; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Calvo Paramo, Enrique

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we reviewed the clinical and radiological aspects of gout, showing the most frequent radiological findings that can guide to the correct diagnosis of the disease. The cases that we presented here have been analyzed for many years in our rheumatology service, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Hospital San Juan de Dios, Bogota

  8. Radiology film tracking in a distributed clinical network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquette, D.D.; Arrildt, W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a system for tracking radiology films designed and installed at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The installation of database and network capabilities in a large hospital environment provide the opportunity to extend to all nursing units and clinics access to the hospital's film tracking system. Ethernet communication technology allows communication to remote libraries. The integration of film tracking with scheduling and order entry systems in radiology make it possible to attain a high level of automated database interface and film jacket label production

  9. Who will be the Radiologists of Tomorrow? A survey of radiology during the "Practical Year" in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Sabine; Fischer, Volkhard; Paeßens, Carolin; Meyer, Simone; Wacker, Frank K; Rodt, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Purpose  Aim of our study was to evaluate the motivation of medical students in their final year of medical school to choose radiology for further specialization by means of a Germany-wide survey. Materials and Methods  The survey was performed during the 2015/16 semester among German medical students in their four months radiology elective during the final year. Invitations for the study were distributed by the Student Secretariats of each university. The survey was web-based with EvaSys 7.0 software. Questions on radiology contents during medical studies and "practical year" were part of the survey. Plans for residency and possible advantages and disadvantages of radiology as medical specialty were inquired. Descriptive statistics and group comparisons were used as analysis methods. Results  89 students participated in the survey at the beginning and 60 students at the end of the practical year. Of these 39 students could be identified who answered both questionnaires. Most students were satisfied with their final year radiology elective (mean 1.8 on a range from 1 to 5). Nevertheless, they criticized mentoring during routine work (mean 2.1) and a lack of educational courses (mean 2.1). Most students (83 %) were uncertain about their residency choice at the beginning of their "practical year" and about one fifth changed their plans. From the students' point of view main advantages of radiology included contact with many other clinical disciplines (87 %) and the working conditions (68 %). The reduced patient contact (42 %), the large amount of work at a computer (43 %), and the dependency on referring physicians (42 %) were regarded as the main disadvantages. The students regarded the way radiology is taught during the studies as not practical enough. With regard to radiology the majority of students (63 %) felt poorly prepared for their future work. Conclusion  The "practical year" is important regarding the choice of future specialization

  10. Chondroblastoma: A clinical and radiological study of 104 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloem, J.L.; Mulder, J.D.

    1985-06-01

    The clinical and radiographic findings in 104 patients with chondroblastoma are presented. Pain was an almost constant presenting complaint, often accompanied in the case of para-articular lesions by impaired function of an adjacent joint. The majority (80%) were in long bones with a mean age of presentation of 16 years. The characteristic radiological image of these lesions was an eccentric radiolucency, having a sharply defined sclerotic margin and containing areas of calcification in approximately a third of cases. They were always related to a growth plate. Nearly half were confined to the affected epiphysis or apophysis itself, but most of the remainder had traversed the growth plate to involve also the adjacent metaphysis. The bones around the knee and the proximal ends of the humerus and femur were the sites of predilection. A minority (20%) affected flat bones and short tubular bones of the hand and foot, with a peculiar affinity for the calcaneus and talus. The mean age of presentation of these was 28 years. The radiological pattern was similar, except for a greater tendency to expand the affected bone. Complications included the formation of a secondary aneurysmal bone cyst in 16 cases (10 of them in long bones), one malignant chondroblastoma, and one fibrosarcoma developing after radiation of the original chondroblastoma.

  11. Results from the first year as a major trauma radiology unit in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adiotomre, A.; Chopra, A.; Kirwadi, A.; Kotnis, N.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To record and analyse data from all facets of practice in the first year as a newly set-up major trauma centre radiology department. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent whole-body computed tomography (WBCT) for suspected polytrauma over a 1 year period was performed. The mechanism, the time of day, the number of body parts injured, the type of injuries, and resulting surgical or radiological interventions were recorded. Also recorded was the time from the CT examination to the formal report. Where applicable, the consultant-verified reports were cross-referenced with the out-of-hours registrar reports to assess for discrepancies. Results: Two hundred and one patients underwent WBCT for suspected polytrauma. Sixty-four percent (128/201) of WBCT examinations were performed “out-of-hours”. Fifty-seven percent (115/201) were road traffic accidents (RTAs), 33% (66/201) were falls, and 6% (12/201) were assaults. At WBCT, 31% (63/201) had no injuries; 27% (54/201) had injury to one body area; 21% (43/201) had injury to two areas; and 20% (41/201) had injury to three or more areas. Nineteen percent (39/201) required urgent radiological or surgical intervention. The mean time from end-of-CT to a formal report was 27 min. There were discrepancies between consultant reports and registrar reports in 22% (31/142) of cases; 1% (2/142) led to a change in acute management. Conclusion: Based on our early experiences, nearly one-third of patients who undergo a WBCT scan for suspected polytrauma, will have no acute injury at WBCT. One-fifth of patients in our study required emergency surgical or radiological intervention for acute injuries found on WBCT. A low discrepancy rate was found between on-call registrar reports and the consultant-verified reports. - Highlights: • Almost one-third of patients with clinically suspected polytrauma had no acute injury at whole body CT. • One-fifth of clinically suspected polytrauma patients

  12. Uroradiology in 117 year history of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumov, N.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: ‘In order to understand the present and see the future, you must know the past'. This motto, used by Professor Jean-Franois Moreau in his presentation ‘A Century uroradiology in Europe 1896 -1996’, is the occasion, with his consent and participation to complement the presentation not only with what comes as a change in our profession in recent years, but also to celebrate milestones in the development of uroradiology in Bulgaria. One of the major health problems in Europe, not only in the late 19th century, but today is renal calculi. For this reason, five months after the described by Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen X- rays attempts to use them in medical practice by urologists namely in seeking opportunities to demonstrate calculi began. What you will learn: This justifies the first phase, covering 1896-1929, has not only uroradiology but of radiology as a whole, in which it is a hobby of the urologists. Summarizing the main points as in the technical development of radiological equipment, but above all the introduction of diagnostic methods, some of which have not lost their relevance and today, this period naturally ends with one of the most epochal discoveries in medicine and first diagnostic method combining morphological with functional diagnostics - excretory urography . The second step, covering the period of 1929-1960, is characterized by increasing further improvement of the equipment, but also of the applied diagnostic methods, as the urologist is still leading in applying these methods, but now with the technical assistance of the radiologist. After World War II, this approach began to change, besides the appearance of chapters on uroradiology in major guidelines in diagnostic radiology, new methods have been developed, and including vascular contrast diagnostic are made and implemented by radiologists. The third stage, cover the period 1960-1980, entitled ‘Fathers of uroradiology’ account entry of CT low-osmolar nonionic

  13. The year book of diagnostic radiology 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehouse, W.M.; Adams, D.F.; Bookstein, J.J.; Gabrielsen, T.O.; Holt, J.F.; Martel, W.; Silver, T.M.; Thornbury, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The 1981 edition of the Year Book of Diagnostic Radiology fulfills the standards of excellence established by previous volumes in this series. The abstracts were carefully chosen, are concise, and are well illustrated. The book is recommended for all practicing radiologists: for the resident it is a good source from which to select articles to be carefully studied, and as review source before board examinations; for the subspecialist it provides a means to maintain contact with all areas of diagnostic radiology; and for the general radiologist, it is a convenient and reliable guide to new developments in the specialty

  14. Clinical and Radiological Results over the Medium Term of Isolated Acetabular Revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Piolanti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetabular cup loosening is associated with pain, reduced function, and instability of the implant. If such event happens while the femoral implant is in a satisfactory position and is well fixed to the bone, isolated acetabular revision surgery is indicated. The aim of this single-center retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological results over the medium term (12-month follow-up mean 36, max 60 of isolated acetabular revisions surgery using a porous hemispheric revision shell matched with a cemented all-poly cup and large diameter femoral head (>32. 33 patients were enrolled. We collect any relevant data from the clinical board. Routine clinical and radiographic examinations were performed preoperatively; the postoperative follow-up was made at 1, 3, and 6 months and yearly thereafter. At the last available follow-up, we report satisfactory improvement of functional scores in all the patients; 2 patients (6.1% showed thigh pain and only 4 hips (12.11% presented mild groin pain; all the femoral components are well fixed and there were no potential or pending rerevisions. With bias due to the follow-up and to the retrospective design of the study, we report clinical, functional, and radiological satisfactory results.

  15. Clinical-radiological experiences in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, A; Bonse, G; Beck, B; Sauter, E; Sundermeyer, R; Gunkel, L V

    1986-09-01

    The hypertrophic cardiomyopathy shows a series of interesting clinical and radiological problems, discussed in case of selected patients. A special difficult problem arises in the differential diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and cardiac disease secondary to systemic hypertension.

  16. Urologic pathology with clinical and radiologic correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Someren, A.

    1989-01-01

    This book is devoted to the kidneys, urinary passages, renal transplantation, male genitalia, and adrenal glands. Each chapter has the same format: congenital conditions are discussed then, inflammatory and nonneoplastic disorders; and, finally, neoplasms. For each disease process, the clinical presentation, radiologic findings, pathologic characteristics, therapy, and prognosis are discussed

  17. Urologic pathology with clinical and radiologic correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Someren, A.

    1989-01-01

    This book is devoted to the kidneys, urinary passages, renal transplantation, male genitalia, and adrenal glands. Each chapter has the same format: congenital conditions are discussed then, inflammatory and nonneoplastic disorders; and, finally, neoplasms. For each disease process, the clinical presentation, radiologic findings, pathologic characteristics, therapy, and prognosis are discussed.

  18. The clinical and radiological evaluation of absence of the corpus callosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, S.E.; Radkowski, M.A.; McLone, D.G.; Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL; Flannery, A.

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective and prospective analysis of children with a diagnosis of complete absence of the corpus callosum (ACC) at the Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago over a 5-year period was performed. The diagnosis was based on the computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance (MR) images. From this material, 105 children with a diagnosis of ACC were analyzed on the basis of clinical symptomatology and radiological studies (CT, MR and ultrasound). Eighty-three percent of our children were symptomatic. The most common symptoms and signs were macrocephaly with hydrocephalus and seizures. MR was the best radiological imaging modality for evaluating children with ACC and associated brain anomalies. The most common associated brain anomalies with ACC in decreasing frequency in our children were: interhemispheric cyst with hydrocephalus, Dandy-Walker malformation, migrational disorders, absence of the inferior vermis, cephaloceles and lipoma aof the interhemispheric fissure. (author). 15 refs.; 8 figs.; 2 tabs

  19. A study on four-year college curriculum for the education of radiological technology in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong Hak; Lee, Sang Suk; Kim, Young Il; Kwon, Dal Gwan; Kim, Heung Tae; Lim, Han Young

    1995-01-01

    The education of radiologic technology began in the regular institute of higher education in Korea in 1963. Up to now from then, our education to bring up the radiologic technologists has developed greatly in quality and quantity, and now departments of radio-technology are founded in the 16 junior colleges in March, 1995. This study was done to verify the necessity and propriety to reform the education system of radiologic technology which was run as two or three year system of college curriculum for 32 years since 1963, and to search for the method to reform in the future. We got the following results from this research. 1. In the survey, on the desirable education year for radiologic technologists, 63.9 % of professors of department of radio-technology and 63.0 % of radiologic technologists chose the 4 year system, 27.9 % of professors and 34.6 % of radiologic technologists chose the 4 year system added to graduate school. 2. In the survey, on the future development of radiologic equipment and technique, 67.2 % of professors of department of radiologic technology and 86.4 % of radiologic technologists have a view of 'revolutional development'. Also, on the future tasks or roles

  20. Complications of nonbiliary laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery : Radiologic findings and clinical courses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Seon Ah; Lee, Sang Hoon; Won, Yong Sung; Park, Young Ha; Kim, Jun Gi [St. Vincent' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun [St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-05-01

    To evaluate the radiological findings and clinical course of the complications arising after nonbiliay laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery (NLGS). We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 131 patients who underwent NLGS (83 cases involving colorectal surgery, 18 splenectomies, 14 appendectomies, ten adrenalectomies, three lumbar sympathectomies, two Duhamel's operation, and one peptic ulcer perforation repair) over a four-year period. Among these 131 patients, the findings of fifteen in whom postoperative complications were confirmed were analysed. The radiologic examinations these patients underwent included CT (n=3D8), barium enema and fistulography (n=3D4), ultrasonography (n=3D3), ascending venography of the lower legs (n=3D2), and penile Doppler sonography (n=3D1). We evaluated the radiologic findings and clinical courses of early (within 2 weeks) and late (after 2 weeks) postoperative complications. Sixteen cases of postoperative complications developed in fifteen patients ; in 14 (17%) after colorectal surgery and in one (6%) after splenectomy. Eleven of the sixteen cases (69%) involved early complications, consisting of an abscess in three, ischemic colitis in two, hemoperitoneum in one, perforation of the colon in one, pancreatitis in one, recto-vaginal fistula in one, deep vein thrombosis after colorectal surgery in one, and abscess after splenectomy in one. The remaining five cases (31%) involved late complications which developed after colorectal surgery, comprising anastomosic site stricture in two, abdominal wall (trocar site) metastasis in one, colo-cutaneous fistula in one, and impotence in one. Among the 16 cases involving postoperative complications, recto-vaginal fistula, colon perforation, and abdominal wall metastasis were treated by surgery, while the other thirteen cases were treated conservatively. Various postoperative complications develop after NLGS, with a higher rate of these being noted in cases involving colorectal

  1. Complications of nonbiliary laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery : Radiologic findings and clinical courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Seon Ah; Lee, Sang Hoon; Won, Yong Sung; Park, Young Ha; Kim, Jun Gi; Kim, Hyun

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the radiological findings and clinical course of the complications arising after nonbiliay laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery (NLGS). We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 131 patients who underwent NLGS (83 cases involving colorectal surgery, 18 splenectomies, 14 appendectomies, ten adrenalectomies, three lumbar sympathectomies, two Duhamel's operation, and one peptic ulcer perforation repair) over a four-year period. Among these 131 patients, the findings of fifteen in whom postoperative complications were confirmed were analysed. The radiologic examinations these patients underwent included CT (n=3D8), barium enema and fistulography (n=3D4), ultrasonography (n=3D3), ascending venography of the lower legs (n=3D2), and penile Doppler sonography (n=3D1). We evaluated the radiologic findings and clinical courses of early (within 2 weeks) and late (after 2 weeks) postoperative complications. Sixteen cases of postoperative complications developed in fifteen patients ; in 14 (17%) after colorectal surgery and in one (6%) after splenectomy. Eleven of the sixteen cases (69%) involved early complications, consisting of an abscess in three, ischemic colitis in two, hemoperitoneum in one, perforation of the colon in one, pancreatitis in one, recto-vaginal fistula in one, deep vein thrombosis after colorectal surgery in one, and abscess after splenectomy in one. The remaining five cases (31%) involved late complications which developed after colorectal surgery, comprising anastomosic site stricture in two, abdominal wall (trocar site) metastasis in one, colo-cutaneous fistula in one, and impotence in one. Among the 16 cases involving postoperative complications, recto-vaginal fistula, colon perforation, and abdominal wall metastasis were treated by surgery, while the other thirteen cases were treated conservatively. Various postoperative complications develop after NLGS, with a higher rate of these being noted in cases involving colorectal

  2. Radiologically isolated syndrome: 5-year risk for an initial clinical event.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darin T Okuda

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report the 5-year risk and to identify risk factors for the development of a seminal acute or progressive clinical event in a multi-national cohort of asymptomatic subjects meeting 2009 RIS Criteria. METHODS: Retrospectively identified RIS subjects from 22 databases within 5 countries were evaluated. Time to the first clinical event related to demyelination (acute or 12-month progression of neurological deficits was compared across different groups by univariate and multivariate analyses utilizing a Cox regression model. RESULTS: Data were available in 451 RIS subjects (F: 354 (78.5%. The mean age at from the time of the first brain MRI revealing anomalies suggestive of MS was 37.2 years (y (median: 37.1 y, range: 11-74 y with mean clinical follow-up time of 4.4 y (median: 2.8 y, range: 0.01-21.1 y. Clinical events were identified in 34% (standard error=3% of individuals within a 5-year period from the first brain MRI study. Of those who developed symptoms, 9.6% fulfilled criteria for primary progressive MS. In the multivariate model, age [hazard ratio (HR: 0.98 (95% CI: 0.96-0.99; p=0.03], sex (male [HR: 1.93 (1.24-2.99; p=0.004], and lesions within the cervical or thoracic spinal cord [HR: 3.08 (2.06-4.62; p=<0.001] were identified as significant predictors for the development of a first clinical event. INTERPRETATION: These data provide supportive evidence that a meaningful number of RIS subjects evolve to a first clinical symptom. An age <37 y, male sex, and spinal cord involvement appear to be the most important independent predictors of symptom onset.

  3. Gender Trends in Radiology Authorship: A 35-Year Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Crystal L; Scheel, John R; Lee, Christoph I; Forman, Howard P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe trends over time in female authorship in the radiology literature and to investigate the tendency of female first authors to publish with female senior authors. Data on the gender of academic physician authors based in the United States for all major articles published in three general radiology journals--Radiology, AJR, and Academic Radiology--were collected and analyzed for the years 1978, 1988, 1998, 2008, and 2013. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify significant trends over time, and a chi-square test of independence was performed to determine significant relations between the genders of first and senior authors. The gender of 4182 of 4217 (99.17%) authors with MD degrees was determined. The proportion of original research articles published by women as first authors increased from 8.33% in 1978 to 32.35% in 2013 (p < 0.001). The proportion of original research articles with women as senior authors increased from 6.75% in 1978 to 21.90% in 2013 (p < 0.001). Female first and senior authorship increased significantly over time (first author, p < 0.001; senior author, p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant relation between the genders of first and senior authors of original research articles and guest editorials (p < 0.001). Over 35 years, there was a statistically significant upward linear trend of female physician participation in authorship of academic radiology literature. Female first authors were more likely to publish with female senior authors.

  4. Clinical, radiological and imunogenectical study in patients with Reiter's Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Meirelles, E. de.

    1987-01-01

    This study puspose was to investigate the clinical, radiological and immunogenetical parameters from a brazilian Reiter's Syndrome population. Twenty Reiter's Syndrome patients from ''Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo'' were prospectivelly studied in their demographical (sex, race, age at study, age at disease onset and disease duration), epidemiological (family history), clinical (general, articular, mucocutaneous, genitourinary, ocular and intestinal manifestations besides functional capacity at study), radiological (sacro-iliitis, spondylitis and calcaneal spur) and immunogenetical (HLA loci A, B and DR typing). The technique employed in the 61 aloantigens from loci HLA A (17), B (34) and DR (10) typing was Terasaki microlymphocitotoxicity modified by Danilovs, had being performed in the ''Laboratorio de Imunogenetica da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo''. We concluded that the clinical, radiological and immunogenetical Reiter's Syndrome expression in the brazilian population is similar to the others north american or european already studied populations and that the probability of one brazilian HLA B27 positie individual to develop Reiter's Syndrome is 19 fold larger when compared to one brazilian HLA B27 negative individual. (author) [pt

  5. Common Pediatric Urological Disorders: Clinical and radiological evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, Wm. Lane M.; Leung, Alexander K.C.; Boag, Graham S.

    1991-01-01

    The clinical and radiological presentations of 12 pediatric urological disorders are described. The described disorders include pyelonephritis, vesicoureteral reflux, ureteropelvic obstruction, ureterovesical obstruction, ectopic ureterocele, posterior urethral valves, multicystic dysplastic kidney, polycystic kidney disease, ectopic kidney, staghorn calculi, urethral diverticulum, and urethral meatal stenosis.

  6. Clinical and radiological diagnosis of chronic pneumonia in pneumoconiosis and dust bronchitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shniger, N.U.; Blokhina, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Clinical and radiologic symptomatology of chronic pneumonia is described for pneumoconiosis and chronic dust bronchitis. Combined X-ray methods of examination permit the physicians to discover this complication in dust diseases of the lungs in the presence of diffuse pneumosclerotic changes in 76.5+-3 % of cases. These data approach the values of chronic pneumonia incidence among the population. Chronic pneumonia diagnosis should be complex. If no less than 2 to 3 X-ray signs of the disease have been found simultaneously, the significance of radiologic diagnosis of chronic pneumonia in dust pathology of the lungs, rises. Radiologic examination, supported by clinical, anamnestic and laboratory data, allows one to differentiate chronic pneumonia from coniotuberculosis. Chest X-rays in dust pathology of the lungs, complicated by chronic pneumonia, should be carried out with regard to clinical indications

  7. [Ankylosing spondylitis in Shantou: clinical experience in fifteen years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Q; Chen, S; Xu, J; Xiao, Z; Lin, L; Liu, Y; Huang, S; Xie, S

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate the clinical features of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in Shantou area and improve the diagnostic level and therapeutic effect. Clinical and laboratory data, and the methods and effects of therapy were analyzed. Some patients were followed up. 94% of the cases had an insidious onset. Low back pain or discomfort, peripheral arthritis, positive "4" test and pressing tenderness over the sacroiliac joints and lumbar spine were the frequent symptoms and signs. The degree of sacroiliitis and involvement of hip and spine were related to the disease duration. However, hip joint involvement in juvenile onset AS did not relate to the disease duration. Some cases with disease duration as long as 16 years still remained at II of degree sacroiliitis. Clinical improvement was more obvious in the first two years of treatment. Although some patients came to a standstill condition after this period, yet the disease activity might still relapse with withdrawal of the treatment. The rate of adhering to the treatment for 1, 2, and over 5 years was 34.6%, 28.4%, and 10.3% respectively. The radiological changes frequently did not parallel with the clinical manifestations. Early diagnosis is of importance in improving the prognosis of AS and adherence to slow-acting anti-rheumatic drug therapy is beneficial in disease controlling. A follow up of more than 3 years is necessary to estimate the therapeutic efficacy, and the radiological change is the key indicator. AS is a heterogenic disease and the risk factors for prognosis should be further studied.

  8. Pediatric radiology malpractice claims - characteristics and comparison to adult radiology claims

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breen, Micheal A.; Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Dwyer, Kathy; Yu-Moe, Winnie [CRICO Risk Management Foundation, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Medical malpractice is the primary method by which people who believe they have suffered an injury in the course of medical care seek compensation in the United States and Canada. An increasing body of research demonstrates that failure to correctly diagnose is the most common allegation made in malpractice claims against radiologists. Since the 1994 survey by the Society of Chairmen of Radiology in Children's Hospitals (SCORCH), no other published studies have specifically examined the frequency or clinical context of malpractice claims against pediatric radiologists or arising from pediatric imaging interpretation. We hypothesize that the frequency, character and outcome of malpractice claims made against pediatric radiologists differ from those seen in general radiology practice. We searched the Controlled Risk Insurance Co. (CRICO) Strategies' Comparative Benchmarking System (CBS), a private repository of approximately 350,000 open and closed medical malpractice claims in the United States, for claims related to pediatric radiology. We further queried these cases for the major allegation, the clinical environment in which the claim arose, the clinical severity of the alleged injury, indemnity paid (if payment was made), primary imaging modality involved (if applicable) and primary International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision (ICD-9) diagnosis underlying the claim. There were a total of 27,056 fully coded claims of medical malpractice in the CBS database in the 5-year period between Jan. 1, 2010, and Dec. 31, 2014. Of these, 1,472 cases (5.4%) involved patients younger than 18 years. Radiology was the primary service responsible for 71/1,472 (4.8%) pediatric cases. There were statistically significant differences in average payout for pediatric radiology claims ($314,671) compared to adult radiology claims ($174,033). The allegations were primarily diagnosis-related in 70% of pediatric radiology claims. The most common imaging modality

  9. Pediatric radiology malpractice claims - characteristics and comparison to adult radiology claims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breen, Micheal A.; Taylor, George A.; Dwyer, Kathy; Yu-Moe, Winnie

    2017-01-01

    Medical malpractice is the primary method by which people who believe they have suffered an injury in the course of medical care seek compensation in the United States and Canada. An increasing body of research demonstrates that failure to correctly diagnose is the most common allegation made in malpractice claims against radiologists. Since the 1994 survey by the Society of Chairmen of Radiology in Children's Hospitals (SCORCH), no other published studies have specifically examined the frequency or clinical context of malpractice claims against pediatric radiologists or arising from pediatric imaging interpretation. We hypothesize that the frequency, character and outcome of malpractice claims made against pediatric radiologists differ from those seen in general radiology practice. We searched the Controlled Risk Insurance Co. (CRICO) Strategies' Comparative Benchmarking System (CBS), a private repository of approximately 350,000 open and closed medical malpractice claims in the United States, for claims related to pediatric radiology. We further queried these cases for the major allegation, the clinical environment in which the claim arose, the clinical severity of the alleged injury, indemnity paid (if payment was made), primary imaging modality involved (if applicable) and primary International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision (ICD-9) diagnosis underlying the claim. There were a total of 27,056 fully coded claims of medical malpractice in the CBS database in the 5-year period between Jan. 1, 2010, and Dec. 31, 2014. Of these, 1,472 cases (5.4%) involved patients younger than 18 years. Radiology was the primary service responsible for 71/1,472 (4.8%) pediatric cases. There were statistically significant differences in average payout for pediatric radiology claims ($314,671) compared to adult radiology claims ($174,033). The allegations were primarily diagnosis-related in 70% of pediatric radiology claims. The most common imaging modality implicated in

  10. Pediatric radiology malpractice claims - characteristics and comparison to adult radiology claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Micheál A; Dwyer, Kathy; Yu-Moe, Winnie; Taylor, George A

    2017-06-01

    Medical malpractice is the primary method by which people who believe they have suffered an injury in the course of medical care seek compensation in the United States and Canada. An increasing body of research demonstrates that failure to correctly diagnose is the most common allegation made in malpractice claims against radiologists. Since the 1994 survey by the Society of Chairmen of Radiology in Children's Hospitals (SCORCH), no other published studies have specifically examined the frequency or clinical context of malpractice claims against pediatric radiologists or arising from pediatric imaging interpretation. We hypothesize that the frequency, character and outcome of malpractice claims made against pediatric radiologists differ from those seen in general radiology practice. We searched the Controlled Risk Insurance Co. (CRICO) Strategies' Comparative Benchmarking System (CBS), a private repository of approximately 350,000 open and closed medical malpractice claims in the United States, for claims related to pediatric radiology. We further queried these cases for the major allegation, the clinical environment in which the claim arose, the clinical severity of the alleged injury, indemnity paid (if payment was made), primary imaging modality involved (if applicable) and primary International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision (ICD-9) diagnosis underlying the claim. There were a total of 27,056 fully coded claims of medical malpractice in the CBS database in the 5-year period between Jan. 1, 2010, and Dec. 31, 2014. Of these, 1,472 cases (5.4%) involved patients younger than 18 years. Radiology was the primary service responsible for 71/1,472 (4.8%) pediatric cases. There were statistically significant differences in average payout for pediatric radiology claims ($314,671) compared to adult radiology claims ($174,033). The allegations were primarily diagnosis-related in 70% of pediatric radiology claims. The most common imaging modality implicated in

  11. Hip osteoarthritis in Douala General Hospital: Clinical, radiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To describe the epidemiological, clinical and radiological profile of hip OA, and also treatment options offered to patients presenting with this condition at the Douala General Hospital, Cameroon. Methods: After prior ethical clearance, a hospital-based cross sectional descriptive study was carried out, including ...

  12. A clinical and radiological study on spontaneous pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Kyung Jae; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Byung Soo; Choi, Myung Gwon

    1982-01-01

    A clinical and radiological study was done on 96 cases of spontaneous pneumothorax, encountered in the Dept. of Radiology, Busan National University Hospital during last 3 years from March 1979 to March 1982. The result were summarized as follows: 1. In the age distribution, the ages between 20 and 39 years were most highest, as 54 cases (56.3%). In the sex distribution, the ratio of male to female was 5 : 1 in male predominance. 2. The underlying pathology of the total 96 cases of spontaneous pneumothorax were of tuberculous origin in 33.3 % and non-tuberculous origin in 66.7%. And below 20 years, most were of non- tuberculous origin. 3. In the cases of lung collapse over 2/3, non-tuberculous origin was more than tuberculous origin and had characteristics of significant mediastinal shifting, in contrast to lower percentage of fluid level by chest radiography. 4. The rupture of biebs or bullae was the main immediate causes of spontaneous pneumothorax, independent of the underlying pathology. 5. In only 27 cases (28.1%) among total 96 cases, bullae or biebs could be detected on the chest radiography. 6. In treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax, the closed thoracotomy with under water seal drainage is accepted to be the general method of treatment. But open thoracotomy is considered as the best useful therapeutic procedure to prevent the recurrence, whenever bullae or blebs are found on the chest radiography. 7. In the cases of closed thoracotomy, the recurrent rate was 25.0% and most cases were found at the ipsilateral side of the first attack. 8. Within a week, the collapsed lung were well expanded in most cases of total 96 cases, after closed thoracotomy

  13. Neurofibromatosis type 1: clinical and radiological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, Marcos Pontes; Souza, Antonio Soares; Bertelli, Erika Cristina Pavarino; Bertollo, Eny Maria Goloni

    2006-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a genetic disease with an incidence of approximately 1 in 3,000 people, characterized mainly by systemic and progressive involvement, manifesting by physical deformity and compromising of neurological functions. The diagnosis of the neurofibromatosis type 1 must be performed the earliest possible through clinical exams and familiar history. The use of imaging diagnosis as radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging is valuable for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up of patients and control of lesions, preventing complications. In this study we describe the clinical and radiological aspects of the neurofibromatosis type 1, considering clinical features, genetics, bone alterations in chest, vertebral column, upper and lower limbs, and craniofacial abnormalities. (author)

  14. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Pediatric Cancer: Clinical and Radiologic Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadiya Javed Khan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is associated with a range of medical conditions and medications. In this retrospective analysis, we present 19 pediatric patients with PRES who had undergone chemotherapy. Methods: We identified four female and 15 male patients diagnosed with PRES on the basis of clinical and radiologic features. Patient charts were reviewed from January 2013 to June 2016 after authorization from the institutional review board. Results: The average age of patients with PRES was 7 years. Primary diagnoses were non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 9, acute pre–B-cell leukemia (n = 5, relapsed pre–B-cell leukemia (n = 2, Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 2, and Ewing sarcoma (n = 1. PRES occurred during induction chemotherapy in 12 patients. Sixteen patients had hypertension when they developed PRES. Most of these patients (n = 13 were receiving corticosteroids on diagnosis of PRES. Common clinical features were hypertension, seizures, and altered mental status. With the exclusion of three patients, all others required antiepileptic therapy. Ten of these patients underwent additional magnetic resonance imaging. Ten patients are still alive. Conclusion: In patients who presented to our center with signs and symptoms of hypertension, seizures, visual loss, or altered mental status, PRES was mostly seen in those who were undergoing systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy. Approximately 40% of the patients had reversal of clinical and radiologic findings. Antiepileptic medications were discontinued after being seizure free for approximately 6 months.

  15. The Odontogenic Keratocysts: A Consideration of the Clinical and Radiologic Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Youn; Lee, Jang Yeol; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yensei University, Yensei (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-15

    To determine whether the significant relationship exists between radiographic appearance, whether it is unilocular or multilocular, and its corresponding clinical and histologic features by examining the odontogenic keratocyst clinically, radiologically and histologically. This study was conducted on 48 cases of odontogenic keratocyst from the files of Dental Hospital, Yonsei University for the years 1982 through 1995. The mean age of patients was 30.5 years in the unilocular group and 35.5 years in the multilocular group. The male to female ratio was 1:1.06 in the unilocular group and 1:1.75 in the multilocular group. The chief complaint was swelling in both groups (unilocular 35.1%, multilocular 54.5%). In the occurrence site, the border of the lesion, the displacement and external root resorption of the adjacent teeth, there were no statistically significant difference between the unilocular group and multilocular group, but in the border type, there was statistically significant difference (x{sup 2}-test, p<0.05). Two recurred cases were observed among 11 cases of odontogenic keratocyst. One was unilocular case and the other was multilocular case.

  16. The Odontogenic Keratocysts: A Consideration of the Clinical and Radiologic Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Youn; Lee, Jang Yeol; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether the significant relationship exists between radiographic appearance, whether it is unilocular or multilocular, and its corresponding clinical and histologic features by examining the odontogenic keratocyst clinically, radiologically and histologically. This study was conducted on 48 cases of odontogenic keratocyst from the files of Dental Hospital, Yonsei University for the years 1982 through 1995. The mean age of patients was 30.5 years in the unilocular group and 35.5 years in the multilocular group. The male to female ratio was 1:1.06 in the unilocular group and 1:1.75 in the multilocular group. The chief complaint was swelling in both groups (unilocular 35.1%, multilocular 54.5%). In the occurrence site, the border of the lesion, the displacement and external root resorption of the adjacent teeth, there were no statistically significant difference between the unilocular group and multilocular group, but in the border type, there was statistically significant difference (x 2 -test, p<0.05). Two recurred cases were observed among 11 cases of odontogenic keratocyst. One was unilocular case and the other was multilocular case.

  17. Dutch guideline for clinical foetal-neonatal and paediatric post-mortem radiology, including a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnemans, L J P; Vester, M E M; Kolsteren, E E M; Erwich, J J H M; Nikkels, P G J; Kint, P A M; van Rijn, R R; Klein, W M

    2018-06-01

    Clinical post-mortem radiology is a relatively new field of expertise and not common practice in most hospitals yet. With the declining numbers of autopsies and increasing demand for quality control of clinical care, post-mortem radiology can offer a solution, or at least be complementary. A working group consisting of radiologists, pathologists and other clinical medical specialists reviewed and evaluated the literature on the diagnostic value of post-mortem conventional radiography (CR), ultrasonography, computed tomography (PMCT), magnetic resonance imaging (PMMRI), and minimally invasive autopsy (MIA). Evidence tables were built and subsequently a Dutch national evidence-based guideline for post-mortem radiology was developed. We present this evaluation of the radiological modalities in a clinical post-mortem setting, including MIA, as well as the recently published Dutch guidelines for post-mortem radiology in foetuses, neonates, and children. In general, for post-mortem radiology modalities, PMMRI is the modality of choice in foetuses, neonates, and infants, whereas PMCT is advised in older children. There is a limited role for post-mortem CR and ultrasonography. In most cases, conventional autopsy will remain the diagnostic method of choice. Based on a literature review and clinical expertise, an evidence-based guideline was developed for post-mortem radiology of foetal, neonatal, and paediatric patients. What is Known: • Post-mortem investigations serve as a quality check for the provided health care and are important for reliable epidemiological registration. • Post-mortem radiology, sometimes combined with minimally invasive techniques, is considered as an adjunct or alternative to autopsy. What is New: • We present the Dutch guidelines for post-mortem radiology in foetuses, neonates and children. • Autopsy remains the reference standard, however minimal invasive autopsy with a skeletal survey, post-mortem computed tomography, or post

  18. Alflutop clinical efficacy assessment in osteoarthritis (two-years study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Chodyrev

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess alflutop clinical efficacy and safety during long-term course treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Methods. 51 pts with definite knee osteoarthritis of I-III stage according to Kellgren-Lawrence classification were included in an open controlled study. 20 pts received 6 intra-articular injections of alflutop 2 ml with subsequent intramuscular treatment during 3 months. Such courses were repeated 6 months apart for 2 years. 31 pts of control group received nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID only. Pain on visual analog scale, Leken functional score, changes of NSAID treatment and radiological picture were used for assessment of efficacy. Clinical examination was performed before and after every treatment course and 3 months after the last course. Results. Every alflutop treatment course provided significant stepwise decrease of pain with improvement of mobility, reduction of NSAID requirement and absence of osteoarthritis radiological progression. Doctor and pts clinical efficacy and safety assessment coincided. Conclusion. Alflutop is an effective drug for knee osteoarthritis treatment. It has anti-inflammatory and probably chondroprotective activity with good safety.

  19. Clinical and radiological features of pituitary stalk lesions in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Chul Yoon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe diagnosis of pituitary stalk lesion has been based on clinical feature, radiologic assessment for its critical location and role. This study aimed to investigate clinical symptoms, endocrine disturbance, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings of pituitary stalk lesions in children and adolescents and to evaluate differences between neoplastic lesions with the others.MethodsWe performed a retrospective review of patients under 18 years old with pituitary stalk lesions diagnosed at the Seoul National University Children's Hospital between 2000 and 2013, by a text search for head MRI reports by using 'pituitary stalk', 'infundibulum', and 'infundibular stalk', as keywords.ResultsFor the 76 patients, sixteen patients (21.1% had congenital lesions, and 52 (68.4% had neoplasms. No inflammatory lesions were found. Diabetes insipidus (DI was the most common endocrine defect, diagnosed in 38 patients (50%. There was male predominance especially in neoplastic group. Thickened pituitary stalk was, but enhancement of lesion was not, associated with neoplasm. DI was more prevalent in neoplastic stalk lesions. Anterior pituitary dysfunction such as growth hormone and adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiencies were less prevalent in neoplastic lesions of pituitary stalk.ConclusionIn conclusion, the etiology of pituitary stalk lesions in children and adolescents is diverse and different from that in adults. Neoplastic pituitary stalk lesions can be differentiated from nonneoplastic lesions by systemic evaluation of clinical, hormonal, radiological findings.

  20. The course of radiologic damage during the first six years of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsmans, H. M.; Jacobs, J. W.; van der Heijde, D. M.; van Albada-Kuipers, G. A.; Schenk, Y.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    To describe the radiologic course in a large cohort of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to analyze individual components of damage. Five hundred two patients with recent-onset RA (disease duration <1 year) underwent annual radiologic assessment for a maximum of 6 years in this

  1. Diseases of the inner ear. A clinical, radiologic, and pathologic atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motasaddi Zarandy, Masoud; Rutka, John

    2010-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive atlas of the clinical conditions that commonly involve the inner ear and lateral skull base. Each disorder or disease is meticulously and beautifully illustrated, with accompanying informative text. An important feature of the book is that no disorder is described from a single point of view. Instead, the clinical features are linked with both radiologic and pathologic findings to provide an all-encompassing picture of the condition in question. This is feasible because the book is the result of years of intense collaborative teamwork between departments at the University of Toronto and the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, and includes many clinical and pathologic images that could only be acquired in major referral units. It is anticipated that this atlas will assist greatly in improving collaboration between clinicians and surgeons in the diagnostic, therapeutic, and surgical management of disorders in this challenging area. (orig.)

  2. Diseases of the inner ear. A clinical, radiologic, and pathologic atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motasaddi Zarandy, Masoud [Tehran Univ. of Medical Sciences Amiralam Hospital (Iran). Cochlear Implant Dept.; Rutka, John [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. Otolaryngology-Head and Neck, Centre for Advanced Hearing

    2010-07-01

    This book is a comprehensive atlas of the clinical conditions that commonly involve the inner ear and lateral skull base. Each disorder or disease is meticulously and beautifully illustrated, with accompanying informative text. An important feature of the book is that no disorder is described from a single point of view. Instead, the clinical features are linked with both radiologic and pathologic findings to provide an all-encompassing picture of the condition in question. This is feasible because the book is the result of years of intense collaborative teamwork between departments at the University of Toronto and the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, and includes many clinical and pathologic images that could only be acquired in major referral units. It is anticipated that this atlas will assist greatly in improving collaboration between clinicians and surgeons in the diagnostic, therapeutic, and surgical management of disorders in this challenging area. (orig.)

  3. Radiological appearance from 250 patients of the Clinic and Policlinic for Radiology at the University of Munich with histologically detected bronchial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruckmayer, G.

    1982-01-01

    From 250 patients of the Clinic and Policlinic for Radiology at the University of Munich from 1975 to 1979 the radiomorphology of the central and peripheral bronchial carcinoma is demonstrated. The sex ratio of 6.3/1, the age distribution with its peak between 60 and 70 years of age and the localisations with a predominance in the right lung and a preferred infection of the upper lobes from our study agreed with the results from the literature. Characteristic early symptoms are missing with bronchial carcinoma, although clinical symptoms in the rule are the first evidence. For early recognition the first and easiest diagnostic procedure is the radiological examination of the thorax in two planes. Circular foci and peripheral tumor shadows, which occur with the spreading of the mediastinum or the hilus, in these patients about 50%, are in large amounts suspicious of a malignancy and indicate an advanced stage. Because the prognosis of the bronchial carcinoma depends on the histological structure of the tumor and on the point in time of diagnosis, an improvement of the life expectancy can only be reached by early detection. In the risk group of smokers over 40 years of age and of professionally exposed people, even minor changes should be considered as carcinoma until the opposite can be proven. (orig./TRV) [de

  4. Tibial condylar valgus osteotomy (TCVO) for osteoarthritis of the knee: 5-year clinical and radiological results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Ko; Yonekura, Akihiko; Miyamoto, Takashi; Osaki, Makoto; Chiba, Goji

    2017-03-01

    Tibial condylar valgus osteotomy (TCVO) is a type of opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy for advanced medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) with subluxated lateral joint. We report the concept, the current surgical technique with a locking plate, and the short-term clinical and radiological results of this procedure. 11 knees with medial OA and a widened lateral joint were treated by TCVO (KL stage III: 6, IV: 5). In this procedure, by the L-shaped osteotomy from the medial side of the proximal tibia to the intercondylar eminence and the valgus correction, lateralization of the mechanical axis and reduction of the subluxated lateral joint are obtained with early postoperative weight-bearing. Before, 6 months, 1, and 5 years after the operation, a visual analog scale (VAS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), alignment of the lower extremity, and congruency and stability of the femorotibial joint were investigated. The VAS improved from an average of 73 mm to 13 mm, and the total WOMAC score from 52 to 14 before to 5 years after the operation, respectively. The mechanical axis changed from 1 to 60%, and the FTA changed from 186° to 171°. The joint line convergence angle (JLCA) changed from 6° to 1°, and the angle difference of JLCA between varus and valgus stress improved from 8° to 4° after the procedure. Improvements in pain and activities of daily living were observed by TCVO along with valgus correction of the lower extremity and stabilization of the femorotibial joint.

  5. Deepening the reform of interventional radiology education and speeding up the development of interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Chuan; Liu Linxiang; Cheng Yongde

    2010-01-01

    For recent years, although interventional radiology in China has achieved rapid development, it is still facing some rigorous challenges, such as the lack of personnel in interventional field and the flowing-away of certain patients who are definitely suitable for interventional therapy. This paper aims to discuss the reform of interventional radiology education for the undergraduates, postgraduates and clinical practitioners in the medical colleges in order to seek effective solutions to these issues the interventional radiology has confronted with. (authors)

  6. Whole-body MRI in patients with Non-bacterial Osteitis: Radiological findings and correlation with clinical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnoldi, A.P.; Geyer, L.L. [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Munich (Germany); Schlett, C.L.; Weckbach, S. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Douis, H. [University Hospital Birmingham, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Voit, A.M.; Bleisteiner, F.; Jansson, A.F. [Dr. von Hauner Children' s Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Munich (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    To correlate clinical findings of Non-bacterial Osteitis (NBO) with whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) findings and determine a radiologic index for NBO (RINBO) which allows standardized reporting of WB-MRI. In a prospective study, 40 patients with diagnosis of NBO underwent clinical examination and WB-MRI in which STIR- and T1- weighted images were assessed for NBO-typical lesions. Parameters of interest for RINBO were: number of radiologically active lesions (RAL), size of the patients' maximum RAL presence of extramedullary and spinal involvement. Results were tested for statistical agreement of clinical and MR-based lesion detection. RINBO was tested for correlation with clinical activity. 62/95 clinically/radiologically active lesions were found in 30/33 patients. In 45 % of the cohort, more active lesions were detected by WB-MRI than by clinical examination. RINBO was a significant predictor for the presence of clinically active lesions. WB-MRI is a powerful diagnostic tool for patients with NBO which can reveal asymptomatic disease activity. With RINBO a standardized evaluation approach is proposed which helps assessing radiologic disease burden and predicts clinical disease activity. (orig.)

  7. The number of Japanese radiologic technologists will be increased in 40 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araseki, Miwa; Yokooka, Yuki; Ishikawa, Tomoki; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko

    2013-07-01

    It is essential to predict the long-term supply and demand for the number of radiologic technologists as medical resources. However, it is difficult to predict the number of Japanese radiologic technologists due to complex and intertwining factors. Our purpose in this study was to predict the future number of radiologic technologists using the concept of system dynamics (SD), and to clarify the effects of relevant factors. In order to estimate the number of Japanese radiologic technologists, we constructed a flow diagram using the concept of SD. We simulated the number of radiologic technologists for the following 4 cases: maintaining the status quo, a change in the pass rate for the national examination, a change in the post-graduate employment rate, and a change in the rate of continuing education. The result for the predicted number of radiologic technologists was 50,509 in 20 years, which is 4,394 (9.5%) more than the present number, and 50,166 in 40 years, which is 4,051 (8.8%) more than the present number. For the factors influencing the number of technologists, the influence of the pass rate on the national examination and that of the rate for post-graduate employment was larger than that of the rate of continuing education in graduate school. The number of Japanese radiologic technologists will increase until 2033 and decrease until 2042, and it does not change after 2042 in case of maintaining the status quo. Implementing the concept of SD allowed us easily to clarify the factors influencing the predicted number of radiologic technologists.

  8. Introductory lecture series for first-year radiology residents: implementation, investment and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Teresa; Chew, Felix S

    2013-03-01

    A lecture series aimed at providing new radiology residents a rapid course on the fundamental concepts of professionalism, safety, and interpretation of diagnostic imaging was established. Evaluation of the course's educational value was attempted through surveys. Twenty-six live 45-minute lectures presented by 16 or 17 faculty members were organized exclusively for the first class of radiology residents, held over a 2-month period at the beginning of certain weekdays. Online surveys were conducted after the course to gather feedback from residents. Average resident rotation evaluation scores were measured over the first semester for the two classes before and after this new course implementation. The lecture series was successfully organized and implemented. A total of 33 residents sat through the course over three summers. Faculty reported a reasonable number of preparation hours, and 100% of residents indicated they valued the course. Comparison of class average evaluation scores before and after the existence of this 2-month course did not significantly change. This collection of introductory lectures on professionalism, safety, and diagnostic imaging, delivered early in the first year of the radiology residency, requires a reasonable number of invested preparation hours by the faculty but results in a universal increase in resident confidence. However, we were unable to demonstrate an objective improvement in resident performance on clinical rotations. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acquired uterine vascular malformations: radiological and clinical outcome after transcatheter embolotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maleux, Geert; Heye, Sam; Wilms, Guy [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Timmerman, Dirk [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study is to assess the radiological and clinical outcome of transcatheter embolization of acquired uterine vascular malformations in patients presenting with secondary postpartum or postabortion vaginal hemorrhage. In a cohort of 17 patients (mean age: 29.7 years; standard deviation: 4.23; range: 25-38 years) 18 embolization procedures were performed. Angiography demonstrated a uterine parenchymal hyperemia with normal drainage into the large pelvic veins (''low-flow uterine vascular malformation'') in 83% (n=15) or a direct arteriovenous fistula (''high-flow uterine vascular malformation'') in 17% (n=3). Clinically, in all patients the bleeding stopped after embolization but in 1 patient early recurrence of hemorrhage occurred and was treated by hysterectomy. Pathological analysis revealed a choriocarcinoma. During follow-up (mean time period: 18.8 months; range: 1-36 months) 6 patients became pregnant and delivered a healthy child. Transcatheter embolization of the uterine arteries, using microparticles, is safe and highly effective in the treatment of a bleeding acquired uterine vascular malformation. In case of clinical failure, an underlying neoplastic disease should be considered. Future pregnancy is still possible after embolization. (orig.)

  10. Clinical and radiological observations in the kidney injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. K.; Chung, I. T.; Choi, D. L.; Chung, W. K.; Kim, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    Renal injury resulting from external trauma continue to be common because of the speed and violence of modern transportation. The authors analysis 28 blunt abdominal trauma patients who suspected renal injury from January 1975 to December 1979. The results are based on clinical, physical and radiological examinations especially intravenous urography. The brief results are as follows: 1)Among all 28 patients, 23 cases were male and 5 cases were females. 10 patients were under 15 years old. 2) IVP findings are 8 cases were normal and 20 cases were abnormal. Among abnormal findings, extrarenal hematoma were 11, delayed or incomplete visualization were 4, parenchymal hematoma was 1, and extravasation was 1. 3) In most cases, conservative therapy was done without any significant complication. 4) Intravenous urography is very useful and universal method for diagnosis of renal injury. 5) Also a case reported, uriniferous pseudocyst following operation of renal injury

  11. Choroid plexus carcinoma: clinical and radiological features of four cases and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogacheski, Enio; Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo de; Nascimento, Alessandra Bettega; Jacob, Graciela Vanessa Vicelli; Delle, Linei Augusta Brolini; Liu, Christian Bark; Belggi-Torres, Luis Fernando

    1998-01-01

    Choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC) is rare central nervous system (CNS) tumor that accounts for nearly 0.06% of all intracranial neoplasms, most frequently occurring in patients less than 3 years of age. The authors present a clinical and radiological study of four patients with the diagnosis of CPC. The research was undertaken in the archives of radiology in the University Hospital of Curitiba, Parana State, Brazil, in the period from 1990 to 1997. The exams related to the CNS were catalogued and the CPC cases were looked into. Three of the patients were male and the mean age was 13.7 months. The clinical symptoms reported were due to intracranial hypertension, and the most common location was the lateral ventricles. Computed tomography scans show hydrocephalus and a mass hyperdense to the brain parenchyma, with marked enhancement post-contrast. Surgical resection was attempted in all patients. One of them died during the procedures. All of the other underwent relapse and died within an average of 7 months after the diagnosis. (author)

  12. Occupational Lung Disease: Clinical-Pathological-Radiological Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo Bayona, Jorge Alberto; Rivera Bernal, Aura Lucia; Ojeda Paulina; Paez Garcia, Diana Sofia

    2008-01-01

    People are exposed to hundreds of substances daily, some of which may induce pulmonary injury. Occupational Lung Disease diagnosis requires 4 elements: Exposure to the harmful agent, adequate latency between exposure and beginning of the symptoms, syndrome with post-exposure abnormalities, and exclusion of other conditions which may otherwise explain signs and symptoms. Several occupational lung disease classifications based on structural or functional injury, type of agent, or both have been proposed. Generally, 5 groups are considered: Pneumoconiosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, toxic fumes exposure, asthma, and occupational lung infections. Conventional radiographs and in specific situations, CT, are crucial elements for the diagnosis of Occupational Lung Disease. In the patient with respiratory symptoms and altered imaging studies, the possibility of Occupational Lung Disease should be considered. Radiologist should be familiar the variety of substances that cause these entities and their radiological features. In this article Occupational Lung diseases are reviewed, including diagnostic criteria, classification, physiopathology, clinical and radiological manifestations as well as their corresponding histopathological features.

  13. Scrub typhus: radiological and clinical findings in abdominopelvic involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kun Yung; Song, Ji Soo; Park, Eun Hae; Jin, Gong Yong

    2017-03-01

    To describe the clinical and radiological findings of abdominopelvic involvement in scrub typhus. Abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) of 78 patients with scrub typhus were evaluated by two readers. The presence of gallbladder wall thickening, arterial inhomogeneous enhancement of the liver, periportal edema, splenic infarction, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, ascites, pleural effusion, and sites of lymphadenopathy were evaluated. Patients were divided into four clinical subgroups according to laboratory findings. Association between imaging findings and subgroups was analyzed by Chi squared test or Fisher's exact test. The most common CT finding was hepatomegaly (74.4%), followed by splenomegaly (66.7%). The majority of patients had at least three areas of abdominopelvic lymphadenopathy (71.8%). Pelvic lymphadenopathy was most commonly seen when eschar was found in the ipsilateral lower extremity (left, n = 5/7; right, n = 8/13). Significant association between hepatic dysfunction and perigastric lymphadenopathy was documented (p = 0.03). Scrub typhus has a spectrum of variable clinical and radiological findings mimicking those of acute hepatitis. Diffuse abdominopelvic lymphadenopathy involving the retroperitoneum and pelvic area may aid in early diagnosis of scrub typhus. Perigastric lymphadenopathy could be a sign of severe scrub typhus combined with hepatic dysfunction.

  14. Clinical operations management in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondategui-Parra, Silvia; Gill, Ileana E; Bhagwat, Jui G; Intrieri, Lisa A; Gogate, Adheet; Zou, Kelly H; Nathanson, Eric; Seltzer, Steven E; Ros, Pablo R

    2004-09-01

    Providing radiology services is a complex and technically demanding enterprise in which the application of operations management (OM) tools can play a substantial role in process management and improvement. This paper considers the benefits of an OM process in a radiology setting. Available techniques and concepts of OM are addressed, along with gains and benefits that can be derived from these processes. A reference framework for the radiology processes is described, distinguishing two phases in the initial assessment of a unit: the diagnostic phase and the redesign phase.

  15. Clinical, radiological, surgical, and pathological determinants of olfactory groove schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Sadayandi Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Olfactory groove schwannomas (OGS are rare anterior cranial fossa base tumors with only 41 cases reported in literature. Olfactory ensheathing cell schwannoma (OECS has similar clinico-radiological features as OGS, but a different cell of origin. In recent years, there is growing interest in OECS as more cases are being reported. Aims: The objective was to study the clinico-radiological features of OGS and define the histological differentiation from OECS. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed clinical, radiological, surgical and histopathological picture of all cases of OGS managed in our institute. Immuno histochemical studies were performed in these tumors for differentiating from OECS. A comprehensive review of articles published until date describing the operative treatment was done. Results: All three cases had presented with seizures, two had anosmia and papilledema. Gross-total resection was achieved in all our patients. One patient expired in the postoperative period due to septicemia. Positive expression to newer immuno histochemical biomarker CD57 (Leu7, with negative staining to smooth muscle α-actin (SMA was helpful in confirming the diagnosis of OGS and differentiating it from OECS in all our cases. Conclusions: OECS, though rare has to be differentiated from OGS using immuno histochemistry. Gross-total resection of OGS with preservation of olfactory function is often possible and curative. Although these tumors are commonly treated with microsurgical skull base approaches, an endoscopic endonasal approach can be considered in some cases, with repair using mucoperiosteal pedicled flap to prevent cerebrospinal fluid leak.

  16. Clinical manifestations and pulmonary radiological features in patients with triphosgene poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Caier, Chen Weijian; Wu Enfu; Yang Yunjun; Ye Min; Liu Zaiyi

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the clinical manifestations and pulmonary radiological features in patients with triphosgene poisoning. Methods: Clinical manifestations, laboratory tests and CT scans were analyzed retrospectively in 17 patients with triphosgene poisoning. We focused on the severity, development and repair of pulmonary impairment. Results: Plain film and CT scans in five mild cases demonstrated bilateral scattered pulmonary patchy shadows. Of 12 cases with moderate to severe diseases, three showed bilateral multiple pulmonary patchy shadows and nodules with confluence of part of the lesions on plain film and CT scans; bilateral lungs were involved in nine cases with imaging findings of bilateral disseminated pulmonary round or ovary nodules with different size, ill-defined and partly-confluent patchy shadows and thickening of both interlobular septum and the wall of bronchus. Of clinical interests, imaging findings were closely correlated with clinical course and laboratory results. Conclusion: Radiological examinations with plain films and CT scans could reveal the severity, evolvement of pulmonary edema in patients with triphosgene poisoning, and these are of clinical benefit in the early management and prognostic evaluation of patients with triphosgene poisoning. (authors)

  17. Demographic, clinical and radiological characteristics of seronegative spondyloarthritis Egyptian patients: A rheumatology clinic experience in Mansoura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Abdelsalam

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: The demographic, clinical and radiological characteristics of Egyptian SpA patients are comparable to those from other countries except for the lower prevalence of extra-articular manifestations.

  18. Radiation protection and quality assurance in dental radiology: II. Panoramic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jodar-Porlan, S.; Alcaraz, M.; Martinez-Beneyto, Y.; Saura-Iniesta, A.M.; Velasco-Hidalgo, E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper studies 278 official reports on quality assurance in dental radiology in the context of the first revision of these dental clinics, as a result of the entry into force of the regulations establishing the duties for these types of facilities. In the results section we present a quantitative analysis of the facilities equipped with an panoramic radiology apparatus, making a special reference to the brands they have available, as well as their physical features (kV, mA, filtration) and the deviations detected in their operation. Some of their features in the process of obtaining radiological images at those facilities (film control, development time, liquid renewal) are determined, and the average dose of ionising radiation used in order to obtain the same tooth radiological image is presented. This paper shows, in a quantitative way, the characteristic features of panoramic radiology in our medium. The study is intended to be continued during the next years, which would allow the assessment of the prospective improvement in dental radiological performances as a result of the newly established regulations. (author)

  19. Characterization of Change and Significance for Clinical Findings in Radiology Reports Through Natural Language Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpour, Saeed; Bay, Graham; Langlotz, Curtis P

    2017-06-01

    We built a natural language processing (NLP) method to automatically extract clinical findings in radiology reports and characterize their level of change and significance according to a radiology-specific information model. We utilized a combination of machine learning and rule-based approaches for this purpose. Our method is unique in capturing different features and levels of abstractions at surface, entity, and discourse levels in text analysis. This combination has enabled us to recognize the underlying semantics of radiology report narratives for this task. We evaluated our method on radiology reports from four major healthcare organizations. Our evaluation showed the efficacy of our method in highlighting important changes (accuracy 99.2%, precision 96.3%, recall 93.5%, and F1 score 94.7%) and identifying significant observations (accuracy 75.8%, precision 75.2%, recall 75.7%, and F1 score 75.3%) to characterize radiology reports. This method can help clinicians quickly understand the key observations in radiology reports and facilitate clinical decision support, review prioritization, and disease surveillance.

  20. Schatzki ring in children and young adults: clinical and radiologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, K.; Buonomo, C. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Husain, K.; Nurko, S. [Division of Gastroenterology, Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Background. The Schatzki ring is a well-known clinical and radiologic entity in adults, but is thought to be rare in childhood. Objective. To review the clinical presentations and radiologic findings of children and young adults with Schatzki rings. Materials and methods. A retrospective review of all barium swallow examinations done between 1990 and 1996 revealed 20 patients with Schatzki rings. Results. The most frequent presenting symptoms of these patients were progressive dysphagia with solid food and acute food impaction. Radiographic findings of Schatzki rings were typical in all cases. Twelve patients had endoscopy and all had evidence of esophagitis. Conclusion. Schatzki rings are not rare in childhood. The patients are symptomatic, presenting with either progressive dysphagia with solids or acute food impaction. A thorough evaluation of the distal esophagus should be performed in patients with a suggestive clinical history. (orig.) With 2 figs., 8 refs.

  1. The future of radiological imaging information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Keon Joong; Park, Kyung Jin

    1981-01-01

    The future promises accelerated developments for radiology. W. Roentgen produced the first medical radiographic image on December 22, 1895. For the past 80 years, four major discoveries affected imaging. First, the discovery of the image intensifier. Second, the discovery of radioisotopes. Third, the discovery of ultrasonic imaging. Fourth, the discovery of computed tomography. The emphasis on radiology over the next 20 years will be develop: (1) more sophisticated way to collect qualitative and quantitative information about morphology; (2) technologies that focus on physiology; (3) technologies that assess metabolic processes before microscopic. 20 years from now, a radiology department might be totally photo electronic. We must redirect some of funding, possibly be defining a new radiologic sciences. Funds from such an institute could then be channeled into research for the new technologies. This would accelerate the solutions to the problems of clinical medicine, and better care for patients

  2. Radiologic-pathologic correlation of the mammographic findings retrospectively detected in inflammatory breast cancer. Usefulness in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caumo, F.; Manfrin, E.; Bonetti, F.; Pinali, L.; Procacci, C.

    2002-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical, mammographical and pathological characteristics of inflammatory carcinoma. Patients and methods. Clinical, mammographical and histological sections of twenty-two women (age range 28-60 years) were reviewed. The examinations had been performed over a period of four years. Results. The clinical findings were: erythema, edema, thickening of the skin and breast heat in ten patients; palpable mass in nine patients; nipple discharge in one patient; absent in two patients. Pathological findings were: tumor emboli in the dermal lymphatics in eight patients; tumor emboli in the vessels in ten patients; tumor emboli both in the dermal lymphatics and in the vessels in four patients. The radiologic findings were: skin thickening, trabecular thickening and blurring of structure in ten patients (common presentation); mass in nine patients; malignant-type calcifications in two patients (uncommon presentation); absent in one patient. The follow-up examination (eighteen months) detected that only one patient with common presentation of inflammatory carcinoma had no local or systemic recurrence against eight patients with uncommon presentation. Conclusions. The clinical and mammographical aspects, which suggest the presence of an inflammatory carcinoma, occur only in 45.4% of the patients. The radiological aspect seems to correlate with the different prognosis of the tumour, resulting in a better prognosis in those with an uncommon aspect. (author)

  3. Skeletal diseases. Diagnostic clinical radiology and differential diagnostics. 2. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyschmidt, J.

    1997-01-01

    The book focuses on the diagnostic evaluation of idiopathic diseases of the skeleton and bone joints, also including the fundamental healing processes of bone fractures, particularly of stress-induced and pathologic fractures. Ample space has been given to the description and imaging of the course of diseases under treatment by up-to-date therapies, as e.g. for ostitis deformans Paget's disease, or skeletal metastases. This second edition of the book incorporates the progress achieved over the last five years in skeletal diagnostics. The advances in this field have been resulting from basic research work, for instance in molecular biology, or from a variety of completed studies relating to clinical medicine, laboratory chemistry, histopathology and radiology of skeletal diseases, and from experience obtained with the diagnostic radiology methods and techniques, with the potentials and constraints of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) today being more critically assessed than five years ago. MRI is a modality currently meeting with interest in the context of search for additional diagnostic information, new definition of complete pictures of diseases, or false or overinterpretation of diagnostic findings. (orig./MG). 431 figs [de

  4. Do Clinical and Radiological Assessments Contribute to the Understanding of Biomaterials? Results From a Prospective Randomized Sinus Augmentation Split-Mouth Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Jonas; Korzinskas, Tadas; Chia, Poju; Maawi, Sarah Al; Eichler, Katrin; Sader, Robert A; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2018-02-01

    The present prospective randomized split-mouth trial reports on the 3-year clinical and radiological follow-up investigation of implants placed 7 months after sinus augmentation with 2 different bone substitute materials. The aim of the study was to complete the histologic observation of cellular reactions by analyses of the implants and the volumetric changes of the augmented bone substitute materials. A sinus augmentation split-mouth trial was performed in 14 patients with the synthetic bone substitute material Nanobone (NB) and the xenogeneic Bio-Oss (BO). Changes in volume and density of the augmented biomaterials were investigated by analysis of computed tomography scans, taken immediately after augmentation and after 7 months. Clinical implant parameters were assessed after 3 years of loading. Both bone substitute materials underwent nonsignificant volume reduction and significant increase in bone density over an integration period of 7 months. No significant differences concerning volume and bone density were observed between the groups. Three years after loading, 51 of 53 implants were in situ with no peri-implant infections, and only a few soft-tissue variations were present. The present prospective randomized study showed that no differences could be observed clinically and radiologically. Accordingly, it seems that both biomaterials, independent of their physicochemical composition, enable clinical success and long-time stability for dental implants. Interestingly, the histological results showed distinct differences in cellular reactions: While the xenogeneic BO induced a mild tissue reaction with only few multinucleated giant cells and comparably low vascularization, the synthetic NB induced a multinucleated giant cell-triggered tissue reaction with an increase of vascularization. Thus, the present study showed that a combination analysis-histological, clinical, and radiological-is necessary for a detailed assessment of a biomaterial's quality for

  5. [Clinical and radiological evolution of a group of untreated acoustic neuromas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escorihuela-García, Vicente; Llópez-Carratalá, Ignacio; Orts-Alborch, Miguel; Marco-Algarra, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic neuroma is a benign tumour that originates in the vestibular branch of the eighth cranial nerve. The main treatment is surgery, but many authors suggest that with elderly patients or in small neuromas we can opt for watchful waiting. This was a retrospective study from 2007 to 2013 that included 27 patients diagnosed of acoustic neuroma that had not been treated due to the size of the tumour, age and comorbidities, or by patient choice. We evaluated overall condition, hearing thresholds, degree of canal paresis and central disorders. After 6 years of follow up, clinical manifestations of 18 patients remained unchanged, 5 patients underwent hearing loss and developed tinnitus, 2 cases had more intense tinnitus and 2 cases had dizziness. The radiological controls by magnetic resonance imaging showed that the initial maximum diameters (5-16mm) increased by 1.7mm on average, with annual growth rates below 0.5mm. In selected cases, such as for small neuromas and in elderly patients, the conservative option of close monitoring with magnetic resonance imaging is an important alternative given that, in our cases, clinical features and radiological image did not suffer major changes. If there were any such changes, therapeutic options could be proposed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical and radiological findings in arnold chiari malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.A.; Bhatti, S.N.; Ahmed, E.; Aurangzeb, A.; Ali, A.; Khan, A.; Afzal, S.; Khan, G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The Chiari Malformation I (CMI) is a disorder of uncertain origin that has been traditionally defined as downward herniation of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum. The anomaly is a leading cause of syringomyelia and occurs in association with osseous abnormalities at the cranio vertebral junction. In contrast to other Chiari malformations, CMI tends to present in the second or third decade of life and is sometimes referred to as the 'adult-type' Chiari malformation. The objective was to document clinical and radiological findings in Arnold Chiari Malformation-I. Method: This was a descriptive study carried out in Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad at Neurosurgery Department during July 2008 - July 2010. We examined a prospective cohort of 60 symptomatic patients. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the head and spine. Results: There were 40 female and 20 male patients. The age of onset was 24.9 +- 15.8 years. Common associated radiological problems included syringomyelia (60%), scoliosis (25%), and basilar invagination (12%), increased cervical lordosis 5 (8.5%), and Klippel Feil syndrome 2 (3.3%). The most consistent magnetic resonance imaging findings were obliteration of the retrocerebellar cerebrospinal fluid spaces (70% patients), tonsillar herniation of at least 5 mm (100% patients), and varying degrees of post fossa anomalies. Linical manifestations were headaches, pseudotumor-like episodes, a Meniere's disease-like syndrome, lower cranial nerve signs, and spinal cord disturbances in the absence of syringomyelia. Conclusion: These data support accumulating evidence that CMI is a disorder of the para-axial mesoderm that is characterised by underdevelopment of the posterior cranial fossa and overcrowding of the normally developed hindbrain. Tonsillar herniation of less than 5 mm does not exclude the diagnosis. Clinical manifestations of CMI seem to be related to cerebrospinal fluid disturbances (which are responsible

  7. Clinical and radiological findings in arnold chiari malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, A A; Bhatti, S N; Ahmed, E; Aurangzeb, A; Ali, A; Khan, A; Afzal, S; Khan, G [Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad (Pakistan). Department of Neurosurgery

    2010-04-15

    Background: The Chiari Malformation I (CMI) is a disorder of uncertain origin that has been traditionally defined as downward herniation of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum. The anomaly is a leading cause of syringomyelia and occurs in association with osseous abnormalities at the cranio vertebral junction. In contrast to other Chiari malformations, CMI tends to present in the second or third decade of life and is sometimes referred to as the 'adult-type' Chiari malformation. The objective was to document clinical and radiological findings in Arnold Chiari Malformation-I. Method: This was a descriptive study carried out in Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad at Neurosurgery Department during July 2008 - July 2010. We examined a prospective cohort of 60 symptomatic patients. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the head and spine. Results: There were 40 female and 20 male patients. The age of onset was 24.9 +- 15.8 years. Common associated radiological problems included syringomyelia (60%), scoliosis (25%), and basilar invagination (12%), increased cervical lordosis 5 (8.5%), and Klippel Feil syndrome 2 (3.3%). The most consistent magnetic resonance imaging findings were obliteration of the retrocerebellar cerebrospinal fluid spaces (70% patients), tonsillar herniation of at least 5 mm (100% patients), and varying degrees of post fossa anomalies. Linical manifestations were headaches, pseudotumor-like episodes, a Meniere's disease-like syndrome, lower cranial nerve signs, and spinal cord disturbances in the absence of syringomyelia. Conclusion: These data support accumulating evidence that CMI is a disorder of the para-axial mesoderm that is characterised by underdevelopment of the posterior cranial fossa and overcrowding of the normally developed hindbrain. Tonsillar herniation of less than 5 mm does not exclude the diagnosis. Clinical manifestations of CMI seem to be related to cerebrospinal fluid disturbances (which are responsible

  8. Position and integration of radiology in a large clinical center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imhof, H.

    2005-01-01

    Radiology has undergone enormous technological and hence organizational changes in the last few decades. These changes occurred more or less in unison with total state expenditures for healthcare, whereas individual disposable income increased twice as much in the same timeframe (1988-2003). Costs for medical technology account for approximately 3-5% of national healthcare expenditures. On the national level, but also in a central hospital setting, radiology does not constitute a major cost factor. Tomographic investigations have increased by 2-3% in recent years and currently represent 30% of all radiological procedures. Increasing sophistication of diagnostics and treatment using genetic and molecular techniques, novel information technologies, and a critical evidence-based approach to all functional activity will result in a further explosion of knowledge. Radiology must meet these challenges head on by intensifying all forms of training, from basics to continuing professional education. (orig.) [de

  9. Monoplanar versus biplanar medial open-wedge proximal tibial osteotomy for varus gonarthrosis: a comparison of clinical and radiological outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmalı, Nurzat; Esenkaya, Irfan; Can, Murat; Karakaplan, Mustafa

    2013-12-01

    We compared clinical and radiological results of two proximal tibial osteotomy (PTO) techniques: monoplanar medial open-wedge osteotomy and biplanar retrotubercle medial open-wedge osteotomy, stabilised by a wedged plate. We evaluated 88 knees in 78 patients. Monoplanar medial open-wedge PTO was performed on 56 knees in 50 patients with a mean age of 55 ± 9 years. Biplanar retrotubercle medial open-wedge PTO was performed on 32 knees in 28 patients with a mean age of 57 ± 7 years. Mean follow-up periods were 40.6 ± 7 months for the monoplanar PTO group and 38 ± 5 months for the biplanar retrotubercle PTO group. Clinical outcome was evaluated using the hospital for special surgery scoring system, and radiological outcome was evaluated by the measurements of femorotibial angle (FTA), patellar height and tibial slope changes. In both groups, post-operative HSS scores increased significantly. No significant difference was found between groups in FTA alteration, but the FTA decreased significantly in both groups. Patellar index ratios decreased significantly in the monoplanar PTO group (Insall-Salvati Index by 0.07, Blackburne-Peel Index by 0.07), but not in the biplanar retrotubercle PTO group. Tibial slopes were increased significantly in the monoplanar PTO group, but not in the retrotubercle PTO group. Biplanar retrotubercle medial open-wedge osteotomy and monoplanar medial open-wedge osteotomy are both clinically effective for the treatment for varus gonarthrosis. Retrotubercle osteotomy also prevents patella infera and tibial slope changes radiologically.

  10. Radiological and clinical course of pneumonia in patients with avian influenza H5N1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bay, Ali; Etlik, Omer; Oner, A. Faik; Unal, Ozkan; Arslan, Halil; Bora, Aydin; Davran, Ramazan; Yuca, Sevil Ari; Dogan, Murat

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluated chest X-ray and clinical findings of patients with lower respiratory tract infection due to influenza H5N1 and presented the radiological findings and clinical course of the infection. Materials and methods: Between December 2005 and February 2006, eight hospitalized patients (median age 10, 5-15 years) with avian-flu were evaluated in this study. All patients were evaluated with chest X-ray and four of them with CT scan. Post mortem pathological characterization were also available for three of the patients. Results: A rapidly progressive pneumonia with high mortality rate was observed especially for cases with late admission. The major radiologic abnormalities were extensive pneumonic infiltration with segmental and multifocal distribution, mostly located in lower zones of the lung. No pleural effusion and hilar lymphadenopathy was noted. Conclusion: Avian flu may be presented as rapidly progressive pneumonia. The chest radiography has an important role in diagnosis and should be obtained daily because of rapid change of the findings that may necessitate prompt action

  11. Radiological and clinical course of pneumonia in patients with avian influenza H5N1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bay, Ali [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Van (Turkey)]. E-mail: bayalibay@yahoo.com; Etlik, Omer [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Van (Turkey); Oner, A. Faik [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Van (Turkey); Unal, Ozkan [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Van (Turkey); Arslan, Halil [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Van (Turkey); Bora, Aydin [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Van (Turkey); Davran, Ramazan [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Van (Turkey); Yuca, Sevil Ari [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Van (Turkey); Dogan, Murat [Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Van (Turkey)

    2007-02-15

    Introduction: We evaluated chest X-ray and clinical findings of patients with lower respiratory tract infection due to influenza H5N1 and presented the radiological findings and clinical course of the infection. Materials and methods: Between December 2005 and February 2006, eight hospitalized patients (median age 10, 5-15 years) with avian-flu were evaluated in this study. All patients were evaluated with chest X-ray and four of them with CT scan. Post mortem pathological characterization were also available for three of the patients. Results: A rapidly progressive pneumonia with high mortality rate was observed especially for cases with late admission. The major radiologic abnormalities were extensive pneumonic infiltration with segmental and multifocal distribution, mostly located in lower zones of the lung. No pleural effusion and hilar lymphadenopathy was noted. Conclusion: Avian flu may be presented as rapidly progressive pneumonia. The chest radiography has an important role in diagnosis and should be obtained daily because of rapid change of the findings that may necessitate prompt action.

  12. Open reduction and internal fixation of dislocated condylar fractures in children: long-term clinical and radiologic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleyiannis, Frederic W-B; Vecchione, Lisa; Martin, Brian; Jiang, Shao; Sotereanos, George

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term clinical and radiologic outcomes of treating dislocated condylar fractures sustained in childhood with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). Six children 14 years or younger with a condylar neck or subcondylar fracture with dislocation of the condyle from the glenoid fossa were treated with ORIF. Patients were followed for 27 to 92 months post-ORIF (mean: 67.6 months) with routine clinical and radiologic examinations. On the dislocated side, all patients radiographically showed signs of remodeling of the condylar process and shortening of the ramus. Subsequent to their fractures, 3 patients were classified with Angle class II malocclusion, retrognathism, and deviation of the mandibular symphysis. Four patients had objective and/or subjective signs of temporomandibular (TMJ) dysfunction. Until open surgery demonstrates a consistent functional advantage, nonsurgical management should be considered the first treatment option for the dislocated pediatric condylar fracture.

  13. A new brace treatment similar for adolescent scoliosis and kyphosis based on restoration of thoracolumbar lordosis. Radiological and subjective clinical results after at least one year of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Loon Piet JM

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Study design A prospective treatment study with a new brace was conducted Objective. To evaluate radiological and subjective clinical results after one year conservative brace treatment with pressure onto lordosis at the thoracolumbar joint in children with scoliosis and kyphosis. Summary of background data Conservative brace treatment of adolescent scoliosis is not proven to be effective in terms of lasting correction. Conservative treatment in kyphotic deformities may lead to satisfactory correction. None of the brace or casting techniques is based on sagittal forces only applied at the thoracolumbar spine (TLI= thoracolumbar lordotic intervention. Previously we showed in patients with scoliosis after forced lordosis at the thoracolumbar spine a radiological instantaneous reduction in both coronal curves of double major scoliosis. Methods A consecutive series of 91 children with adolescent scoliosis and kyphosis were treated with a modified symmetric 30 degrees Boston brace to ensure only forced lordosis at the thoracolumbar spine. Scoliosis was defined with a Cobb angle of at least one of the curves [greater than or equal to] 25 degrees and kyphosis with or without a curve Results Before treatment start ‘in brace’ radiographs showed a strong reduction of the Cobb angles in different curves in kyphosis and scoliosis groups (sagittal n = 5 all p Conclusion Conservative treatment using thoracolumbar lordotic intervention in scoliotic and kyphotic deformities in adolescence demonstrates a marked improvement after one year also in clinical and postural criteria. An effect not obtained with current brace techniques.

  14. A retrospective study on clinical and radiological outcomes of oral implants in patients followed up for a minimum of 20 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Kisch, Jenö; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2018-04-01

    Very long-term follow-up of oral implants is seldom reported in the literature. To assess oral implant failure rates and marginal bone loss (MBL) of patients followed up for a minimum of 20 years. Implants placed in patients followed up for 20+ years were included. Descriptive statistics, survival analyses, generalized estimating equations were performed. Three-hundred implants were randomly selected for MBL. 1,045 implants (227 patients) were included. Implant location, irradiation, and bruxism affected the implant survival rate. Thirty-five percent of the failures occurred within the first year after implantation, and another 26.8% in the second/third year. There was a cumulative survival rate of 87.8% after 36 years of follow-up. In the last radiological follow up, 35 implants (11.7%) had bone gain, and 35 implants (11.7%) presented at least 3 mm of MBL. Twenty-six out of 86 failed implants with available radiograms presented severe MBL in the last radiological register before implant failure. Most of the implant failures occurred at the first few years after implantation, regardless of a very long follow up. MBL can be insignificant in long-term observations, but it may, nevertheless, be the cause of secondary failure of oral implants in some cases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The clinical practice of interventional radiology: a European perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Aoife N

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current clinical environment in which interventional radiology (IR) is practiced throughout Europe. A survey, comprising 12 questions on IR clinical practice, was sent to 1800 CIRSE members. Members were asked to return one survey per department. Two hundred seventy-four departments returned completed questionnaires, 22% from the United Kingdom (n = 60), 11% from Germany (n = 30), 8% from Austria (n = 23), and the remainder spread over Europe. Experts, with more than 10 years of IR experience, comprised 74% of the survey group. Almost one-third of the radiologists dedicated more than 80% of their clinical sessions to IR alone (27%; n = 75), with two-thirds practicing in a university teaching hospital setting (66%; n = 179). Few institutions have dedicated IR inpatient hospital beds (17%; n = 46), however, to compensate, day case beds are available (31%), IR admitting rights are in place (64% overall, 86% for in-patients, and 89% for day cases), and elective IR admissions can be made through other clinicians (87%). IR outpatient clinics are run at 26% of departments, with an average of two sessions per week. Dedicated nurses staff the majority of IR suites (82%), but clinical junior doctors are lacking (46%). Hospital management\\'s refusing access to beds was the most commonly cited reason for not developing a clinical IR service (41%). In conclusion, there is marked variation across European centers in the current practice of IR. Half do not have dedicated junior doctors and only a small minority have inpatient hospital beds. If IR is to be maintained as a dedicated clinical specialty, these issues need to be addressed urgently.

  16. The Clinical Practice of Interventional Radiology: A European Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeling, Aoife N.; Reekers, Jim A.; Lee, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current clinical environment in which interventional radiology (IR) is practiced throughout Europe. A survey, comprising 12 questions on IR clinical practice, was sent to 1800 CIRSE members. Members were asked to return one survey per department. Two hundred seventy-four departments returned completed questionnaires, 22% from the United Kingdom (n = 60), 11% from Germany (n = 30), 8% from Austria (n = 23), and the remainder spread over Europe. Experts, with more than 10 years of IR experience, comprised 74% of the survey group. Almost one-third of the radiologists dedicated more than 80% of their clinical sessions to IR alone (27%; n = 75), with two-thirds practicing in a university teaching hospital setting (66%; n = 179). Few institutions have dedicated IR inpatient hospital beds (17%; n = 46), however, to compensate, day case beds are available (31%), IR admitting rights are in place (64% overall, 86% for in-patients, and 89% for day cases), and elective IR admissions can be made through other clinicians (87%). IR outpatient clinics are run at 26% of departments, with an average of two sessions per week. Dedicated nurses staff the majority of IR suites (82%), but clinical junior doctors are lacking (46%). Hospital management's refusing access to beds was the most commonly cited reason for not developing a clinical IR service (41%). In conclusion, there is marked variation across European centers in the current practice of IR. Half do not have dedicated junior doctors and only a small minority have inpatient hospital beds. If IR is to be maintained as a dedicated clinical specialty, these issues need to be addressed urgently.

  17. Clinical and radiologic study of odontogenic keratocyst in jaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong Ho; Park, Chang Seo

    1987-01-01

    The author has clinically and radiologically investigated 57 cases of odontogenic keratocyst in 47 patients consisted of 26 males and 21 females aged from 2 to 63 years, who were pathologically diagnosed as odontogenic keratocyst at infirmaries of dental colleges, Yonsei University and Seoul national university during 1965-1986. The results were as follows: 1. The peak incidence of the disease was on their teenagers (29.8%). The ratio of Male/Female was 1.23 : 1 and incidence rate of males showed higher than their counterpart. 2. The most frequent complains were swelling in (65.9%) followed by pus discharge, unknown mass, pain, residual root. 3. The most common site was mandibular third molar and mandibular ramus region (15.8%) followed by mandibular body and ramus, mandibular third molar, mandibular anterior teeth. Incidence of this disease in mandibule was higher than in maxilla. 4. The lesions not associated with adjacent teeth were (14.0%) and in the lesions associated with adjacent teeth (31.5%) showed root resorption, (50.9%) were without root resorption, (35.1%) showed tooth migration and (50.9%) were without tooth migration. 5. The border types of the lesions were scalloped type in (52.6%), smooth type in (47.4%) and morphological type were unilocular in (50.9%), multilocular in (49.1%). 6. The radiologic cyst type of the lesions were follicular type (42.1%) followed by primordial, unclassified odontogenic, residual, lateral periodontal, median mandibular, globulomaxillary type.

  18. Clinical and radiologic study of odontogenic keratocyst in jaws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jong Ho; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Dental Radiology, Dental Science, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-11-15

    The author has clinically and radiologically investigated 57 cases of odontogenic keratocyst in 47 patients consisted of 26 males and 21 females aged from 2 to 63 years, who were pathologically diagnosed as odontogenic keratocyst at infirmaries of dental colleges, Yonsei University and Seoul national university during 1965-1986. The results were as follows: 1. The peak incidence of the disease was on their teenagers (29.8%). The ratio of Male/Female was 1.23 : 1 and incidence rate of males showed higher than their counterpart. 2. The most frequent complains were swelling in (65.9%) followed by pus discharge, unknown mass, pain, residual root. 3. The most common site was mandibular third molar and mandibular ramus region (15.8%) followed by mandibular body and ramus, mandibular third molar, mandibular anterior teeth. Incidence of this disease in mandibule was higher than in maxilla. 4. The lesions not associated with adjacent teeth were (14.0%) and in the lesions associated with adjacent teeth (31.5%) showed root resorption, (50.9%) were without root resorption, (35.1%) showed tooth migration and (50.9%) were without tooth migration. 5. The border types of the lesions were scalloped type in (52.6%), smooth type in (47.4%) and morphological type were unilocular in (50.9%), multilocular in (49.1%). 6. The radiologic cyst type of the lesions were follicular type (42.1%) followed by primordial, unclassified odontogenic, residual, lateral periodontal, median mandibular, globulomaxillary type.

  19. Clinical dosimetry in diagnostic and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimcheva, M.; Sergieva, S.; Jovanovska, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Diagnostic and interventional procedures involving x-rays are the most significant contributor to total population dose form man made sources of ionizing radiation. Purpose and aim: X-ray imaging generally covers a diverse range of examination types, many of which are increasing in frequency and technical complexity. Materials and methods: The European Directives 96/29 and 97/43 EURATOM stress the importance of accurate dosimetry and require calibration of all measuring equipment related to application of ionizing radiation in medicine. Results: The paper gives and overview of current system of dosimetry of ionizing radiations that is relevant for metrology and clinical applications. It also reflects recently achieved international harmonization in the field promoted by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Discussion: Objectives of clinical dose measurements in diagnostic and interventional radiology are multiple, as assessment of equipment performance, or assessment of risk emerging from use of ionizing radiation Conclusion: Therefore, from the clinical point of view, the requirements for dosimeters and procedures to assess dose to standard dosimetry phantoms and patients in clinical diverse modalities, as computed tomography are presented

  20. Arthroscopic all-inside meniscal repair - Does the meniscus heal? A clinical and radiological follow-up examination to verify meniscal healing using a 3-T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffelner, Thomas; Resch, Herbert; Mayer, Michael; Tauber, Mark [Department of Traumatology and Sports Injuries, Salzburg (Austria); Forstner, Rosemarie [University Hospital of Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Minnich, Bernd [University of Salzburg, Department of Organismic Biology, Salzburg (Austria)

    2011-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to correlate clinical and radiological results using a 3-T MRI to verify meniscal healing after arthroscopic all-inside meniscus repair. We selected 27 patients (14 men and 13 women) with an average age of 31 {+-} 9 years and retrospective clinical examinations and radiological assessments using a 3-T MRI after all-inside arthroscopic meniscal repair were conducted. Repair of the medial meniscus was performed in 19 patients and of the lateral meniscus in eight. In 17 patients (63%), we performed concomitant anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The mean follow-up period was 4.5 {+-} 1.7 years. The Lysholm score and Tegner activity index were used for clinical evaluation. Four grades were used to classify the radiological signal alterations within the meniscus: central globular (grade 1); linear horizontal or band-like (grade 2); intrameniscal alterations and linear signal alterations communicating with the articular surface (grade 3); and complex tears (grade 4). At follow-up, the average Lysholm score was 76 {+-} 15 points, with ten of the patients placed in group 6 based on the Tegner activity index. MRI examinations revealed no signal alteration in three patients, grade 1 in 0, grade 2 in five, grade 3 in 13, and grade 4 in six. The MRI findings correlated positively with the clinical scores in 21 patients (78%). Correlation of clinical and radiological examination was performed using 3-T MRI. In spite of satisfactory clinical outcomes at follow-up, a radiological signal alteration may still be visible on MRI, which was believed to be scar tissue, but could not be proven definitively. Imaging with a 3-Tesla MRI after meniscal suture surgery provides good but no definitive reliability on meniscus healing and therefore gives no advantage compared to 1.5-T MRI, with good clinical outcome using an all-inside arthroscopic meniscal repair. 3T-MRI can not substitute diagnostic arthroscopy in patients with persistent complaints after

  1. Arthroscopic all-inside meniscal repair - Does the meniscus heal? A clinical and radiological follow-up examination to verify meniscal healing using a 3-T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffelner, Thomas; Resch, Herbert; Mayer, Michael; Tauber, Mark; Forstner, Rosemarie; Minnich, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate clinical and radiological results using a 3-T MRI to verify meniscal healing after arthroscopic all-inside meniscus repair. We selected 27 patients (14 men and 13 women) with an average age of 31 ± 9 years and retrospective clinical examinations and radiological assessments using a 3-T MRI after all-inside arthroscopic meniscal repair were conducted. Repair of the medial meniscus was performed in 19 patients and of the lateral meniscus in eight. In 17 patients (63%), we performed concomitant anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The mean follow-up period was 4.5 ± 1.7 years. The Lysholm score and Tegner activity index were used for clinical evaluation. Four grades were used to classify the radiological signal alterations within the meniscus: central globular (grade 1); linear horizontal or band-like (grade 2); intrameniscal alterations and linear signal alterations communicating with the articular surface (grade 3); and complex tears (grade 4). At follow-up, the average Lysholm score was 76 ± 15 points, with ten of the patients placed in group 6 based on the Tegner activity index. MRI examinations revealed no signal alteration in three patients, grade 1 in 0, grade 2 in five, grade 3 in 13, and grade 4 in six. The MRI findings correlated positively with the clinical scores in 21 patients (78%). Correlation of clinical and radiological examination was performed using 3-T MRI. In spite of satisfactory clinical outcomes at follow-up, a radiological signal alteration may still be visible on MRI, which was believed to be scar tissue, but could not be proven definitively. Imaging with a 3-Tesla MRI after meniscal suture surgery provides good but no definitive reliability on meniscus healing and therefore gives no advantage compared to 1.5-T MRI, with good clinical outcome using an all-inside arthroscopic meniscal repair. 3T-MRI can not substitute diagnostic arthroscopy in patients with persistent complaints after

  2. Study design in clinical radiology; Studiendesign in der klinisch radiologischen Forschung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knopp, M.V.; Floemer, F.; Zuna, I.; Kaick, G. van [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Heidelberg (Germany). Forschungsschwerpunkt Radiologische Diagnostik und Therapie

    1998-04-01

    Purpose: To review important aspects of study design in clinical radiology and to introduce the reader to the requirements of Good Clinical Practice (GCP). Methods: The European guidelines for GCP, the Declaration of Helsinki, the differentiation into study phases and the authors` own experience in open and sponsored clinical trials are the basis of this analysis. Results: Guideline such as GCP do not limit scientific freedom in research but define high standards for the well-being of patients and volunteers as well as guaranteeing scientific honesty. The benefits of defined data monitoring and the necessity of a prospective statistical concept are frequently underestimated. Conclusion: Correct study design has to be expected in radiology too. High standards guarantee accuracy and honesty of scientific studies. Only this can warrant the value for the patient of radiological diagnostics and therapy. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel dieses Artikels ist es, auf wesentliche Aspekte des Studiendesigns in der klinischen Radiologie aufmerksam zu machen und den Leser mit den Anforderungen der `good clinical practice` (GCP) vertraut zumachen. Die Europaeischen Richtlinien zur GCP, die Deklaration von Helsinki, die Einteilung in Studienphasen und eigene Erfahrungen in freien und gesponsorten klinischen Studien sind die Grundlage der Analyse. Richtlinien wie GCP und andere stellen keine Einschraenkung der wissenschaftlichen Freiheit dar, sondern definieren hohe Standards zum Schutz der Patienten und Probanden sowie zur Sicherstellung der wissenschaftlichen Wahrheit. Positive Auswirkungen eines definierten Datenmonitorings sowie die Notwendigkeit einer prospektiven statistischen Konzeption werden haeufig unterschaetzt. Regelrechtes Studiendesign ist auch in der Radiologie zu fordern. Hohe Standards garantieren die Aussagekraft und Wahrheit wissenschaftlicher Untersuchungen. Nur so kann die Wertigkeit radiologischer Diagnostik und Therapie fuer den Patienten sichergestellt werden. (orig.)

  3. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences of the fiscal year 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This annual report presents the activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan in the fiscal year 1987. The activities are divided into research, technical aids, training, medical services, management, library or editing, and international cooperation. Research activities are described under the following sections: (1) 5-year special projects concerning 'stochastic effects of radiation and risk estimation', 'assessment of human exposure to environmental radiation' and 'medical use of accelerated heavy ions'; (2) 6 titles in assigned research; (3) 60 titles in ordinary research covering physics, chemistry, biology, genetics, pathology and physiology, cell biology, internal exposure, environmental science, clinical research, clinical research for radiation injuries, medical use of heavy particles, environmental radiation ecology, and aquatic radiation ecology; (4) risk estimation of radiation; (5) actual surveys for Bikini victims, population doses of medical and occupational exposure, and thorotrast exposure; (6) project research; (7) radioactivity survey; (8) research supported by Science and Technology Agency aids. An outline of technical aids is given in terms of technical services, radiation safety, animal and plant management, and cyclotron management. Appendices give publications, organization, and staff. (N.K.)

  4. [Sacroiliac joint disorders in Abidjan: epidemiological, clinical, radiological and etiological characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diomandé, Mohamed; Eti, E; Ouattara, B; Cheteu, K E; Kouakou Ehaulier Soh, C L; Gbané-Koné, M; Djaha Kouassi, Jean-Mermoze; Kouakou N'zué, M

    2014-10-01

    The sacroiliac joint remains unknown in sub-Saharan Africa. Studies about the sacroiliac diseases are rare Aim : Describe the epidemiological, clinical, radiological and etiological characteristics of sacroiliac joint diseases in Abidjan Methods : Retrospective and descriptive study concerning 17 patients hospitalized from February 2003 to April 2010 in the department of rheumatology of university hospital center of Cocody (Abidjan) for buttock pain or others functional signs evoking sacroiliac joint which were attested by radiographic lesions. We were interested on the epidemiological, clinical and radiological characteristics and the etiologies in the sacroiliac disease. The hospital prevalence of sacroiliac diseases was 0.55% corresponding in 17 of 3067 rheumatological diseases. The female sex predominated (82.35%) and the mean age of 25.58 years. Gyneco-obstetric events were the predominant risk factors (47.05%). Sacroiliac damage was manifested by inflammatory pain (64.7%) localized at the buttock or lumbar spine, radiating to the thigh (52.9%) and was accompanied by functional disability (82.2%) and fever was not present every time (64.7%). The physical findings were the tripod sign positive (58.8%), the monopodal backing positive (41.2%) and palpation painful of sacroiliac joint. The standard radiograph revealed a blurring aspect and widening of joint space associated with demineralization (68.4%), a joint space narrowing and erosion of articular banks (23.5%). The etiologies found were bacterial arthritis (82.3%) mainly pyogenic (70.58%), osteoarthritis (11.7%) and ankylosing spondylitis (5.9%). Sacroiliac joint diseases are rare in rheumatology practice in Abidjan, concern younger subjects and are dominated by pyogenic sacroiliitis.

  5. Protracted Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Graves' Ophthalmopathy: A Pilot Study of Clinical and Radiologic Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casimiro de Deus Cardoso, Cejana; Giordani, Adelmo Jose [Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Borri Wolosker, Angela Maria [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Souhami, Luis [Department of Radiotherapy, McGill University Heath Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Gois Manso, Paulo [Department of Ophthalmology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Souza Dias, Rodrigo; Comodo Segreto, Helena Regina [Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Araujo Segreto, Roberto, E-mail: segreto.dmed@epm.br [Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and radiologic response of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy given low-dose orbital radiotherapy (RT) with a protracted fractionation. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients (36 orbits) received orbital RT with a total dose of 10 Gy, fractionated in 1 Gy once a week over 10 weeks. Of these, 9 patients received steroid therapy as well. Patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically at 6 months after treatment. Clinical response assessment was carried out using three criteria: by physical examination, by a modified clinical activity score, and by a verbal questionnaire considering the 10 most common signs and symptoms of the disease. Radiologic response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Improvement in ocular pain, palpebral edema, visual acuity, and ocular motility was observed in all patients. Significant decrease in symptoms such as tearing (p < 0.001) diplopia (p = 0.008), conjunctival hyperemia (p = 0.002), and ocular grittiness (p = 0.031) also occurred. Magnetic resonance imaging showed decrease in ocular muscle thickness and in the intensity of the T2 sequence signal in the majority of patients. Treatments were well tolerated, and to date no complications from treatment have been observed. There was no statistical difference in clinical and radiologic response between patients receiving RT alone and those receiving RT plus steroid therapy. Conclusion: RT delivered in at a low dose and in a protracted scheme should be considered as a useful therapeutic option for patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy.

  6. Emergency radiology elective improves second-year medical students' perceived confidence and knowledge of appropriate imaging utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leschied, Jessica R; Knoepp, Ursula S; Hoff, Carrie Nicole; Mazza, Michael B; Klein, Katherine A; Mullan, Patricia B; Kelly, Aine M

    2013-09-01

    Given recent advances in and wider availability of complex imaging, physicians are expected to understand imaging appropriateness. We introduced second-year medical students to the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria (ACR-AC) in an interactive case-based elective to demonstrate their use in imaging for common emergency department clinical complaints. Prospective pre- and post-test design assessed second-year medical students' performance on case-based knowledge applications and self-assessed confidence related to ACR-AC guidelines compared to second-year students participating in a different concurrent radiology elective. Students participated in a 3-day elective covering the ACR-AC, comparative effective imaging, and risks associated with imaging radiation exposure, with outcomes of perceived confidence using a 5-point Likert scale and knowledge of ACR-AC using case-based multiple choice questions. Analysis included computing mean scores and assessing effect sizes for changes in knowledge. Before the elective, 24 students scored an average of 3.45 questions correct of 8 (43.1%). On course completion, students scored an average of 5.3 questions correct of the same questions (66.3%) (P .85; effect size = 0.008). Students' confidence in ordering appropriate imaging improved nearly 2-fold from a range of 1.9 to 3.2 (on a scale of 1.0 to 5.0) to a range of 3.7 to 4.5. Following a short radiology elective, second-year medical students improved their knowledge of appropriate image utilization and perceived awareness of the indications, contraindications, and effects of radiation exposure related to medical imaging. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Slovenian experience from diagnostic angiography to interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavcnik, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of writing this article is to document the important events and people in the first 50 years of diagnostic angiography and interventional radiology in Slovenia. During this period not only did the name of the institutions and departments change, but also its governance. This depicted the important roles different people played at various times in the cardiovascular divisions inside and outside of the diagnostic and interventional radiology. Historical data show that Slovenian radiology has relatively immediately introduced the new methods of interventional radiology in clinical practice

  8. The evaluation of radiological and clinical findings of bronchiectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jung Keun; Kang, Sung Ihn; Kim, Kil Jung; Ko, Seung Sook; Kim, Young Sook; Kim, Young Chul

    1985-01-01

    Bronchiectasis means a permanent abnormal dilatation off one or more large bronchi owing to destruction of the elastic and muscular components of the bronchial wall. Radiological study is the most important and mandatory procedure. Especially bronchography is essential for the definitive diagnosis of bronchiectasis and for the precise delineation of the type and extent of the disease. The radiological and clinical findings of 48 cases of bronchiectasis diagnosed by bronchography and treated at Chosun University Hospital during the 5 years from January 1980 to December 1984 were analyzed retrospectively. The results were as follows; 1. Among the 48 cases, 34 cases (70.8%) were male and 14 cases (29.2%) were female. Peak incidence was in second decade. 2. Chronic cough productive sputum and hemoptysis are main symptoms and others are chest pain, dyspnea and recurrent bouts of pneumonia. The most common physical sign is persistent moist rales over the involved area in 23 cases (47.9%). Others are no sign in 17 cases (35.4%), wheezing in 11 cases (22.9%) and digit clubbing in 3 cases (6.3%). 3. The presumed causes were composed of not known in 30 cases (62.5%)> and complications of measles in 7 cases (14.6%), pertussis in 5 cases (10.4%) and pneumonia in 4 cases (8.3%). Two cases were Kartagener's syndrome and unilateral hyperlucent lung. 4. Plain chest common radiological findings was accentuation of lung marking in 36 cases (85.7%), the others are include in order of frequency; pneumonic infiltration, linear radiolucencies, cystic radiolucencies, decreased affected lung volume, air-fluid, level and pleural thickening. 5. Bilateral bronchiectasis was demonstrated in 11 cases (22.9%) and the disease was much more often involved left lung than right. The most commonly involved lobe is left lower lobe, and the most common site of involvement was the posterior basal segment of the lower lobe. The type of bronchiectasis is cylindrical in 22 cases (45.8%), varicose in 11

  9. The clinical and radiologic consideration of cementifying and ossifying fibroma of the jaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Eun Young; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to know the proper diagnosis and to establish the treatment plan of cementifying and ossifying fibroma in the jaws through the clinical, radiological, and histopathologic considerations. The authors compared and analyzed the clinicoradiologic features of the thirteen cases of cementifying and ossifying fibroma, diagnosed at the Dental college hospital in Yonsei university, Seoul, Korea, during the period from 1980 to 1995. The obtained results were as follows : 1. Cementifying and ossifying fibroma occurred in the mean age, 44 years, ranged from 29 to 65 years and the male to female ratio was approximately 1:5. 2. Swelling was the most common frequent presenting complaints. Other reported symptoms included pain, tooth mobility and symptom. 3. The frequency of the lesions was twelve cases in the mandible and one case in the maxilla. And eleven of thirteen cases were distributed on the premolar and molar region. 4. Radiologically, eight of thirteen cases were well defined lesions, five cases were relatively well defined lesions. And nine of thirteen cases were mixed lesions, three cases were radiopaque lesions, and only one case was purely radiolucent lesion. 5. Histologically, seven of thirteen cases were classified ossifying fibroma, four cases were cemento-ossifying fibroma, and two cases were cementifying fibroma.

  10. Diagnosis of Pediatric Foreign Body Ingestion: Clinical Presentation, Physical Examination, and Radiologic Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sink, Jacquelyn R; Kitsko, Dennis J; Mehta, Deepak K; Georg, Matthew W; Simons, Jeffrey P

    2016-04-01

    (1) To describe clinical and radiologic findings in patients with esophageal foreign bodies. (2) To examine the sensitivity and specificity of history, physical examination, and radiologic studies in children with suspected foreign body ingestion. A retrospective cohort study was performed evaluating all children who underwent esophagoscopy for suspected foreign body ingestion at our institution from 2006 to 2013. Five hundred forty-three patients were included (54% male). Average age was 4.7 years (SD = 4.1 years). Foreign bodies were identified on esophagoscopy in 497 cases (92%). Ingestion was witnessed in 23% of cases. Most common presenting symptoms were choking/gagging (49%), vomiting (47%), and dysphagia/odynophagia (42%). Most patients with foreign bodies had a normal exam (76%). Most foreign bodies were radiopaque (83%). In 59% of patients with normal chest radiographs, a foreign body was present. Sensitivity and specificity of 1 or more findings on history, physical examination, and imaging were 99% and 0%, 21% and 76%, and 83% and 100%, respectively. Most patients with esophageal foreign bodies are symptomatic. Although many patients will have a normal physical examination, an abnormal exam should increase suspicion for a foreign body. Most esophageal foreign bodies are radiopaque, but a normal chest radiograph cannot rule out a foreign body. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Prognosis of teeth in the line of mandibular fracture: 5 - year clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The focus was on 96 teeth in the line of mandibular fracture retained after reduction and immobilization of the fracture by closed reduction technique. The clinical and radiological follow-up period of patients ranged between six months and 3.5 years. RESULTS: Majority of the patients 33 (53.2%) were in their third decade of ...

  12. Goiania radiological accident: five years talking with the population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozental, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents an overview five years after the Goiania radiological accident. It reviews from a number of important aspects the psychological impact and conflicting opinions, the public hearings and debates and, particularly describes the victims that still have difficulties to understand the accident and its consequences. (B.C.A.). 05 refs

  13. Results of a survey by the European Society of Radiology (ESR): undergraduate radiology education in Europe-influences of a modern teaching approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oris, Elena; Verstraete, Koenraad; Valcke, Martin

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine in what way a conventional versus a modern medical curriculum influences teaching delivery in formal radiology education. A web-based questionnaire was distributed by the ESR to radiology teaching staff from 93 European teaching institutions. Early exposure to radiology in pre-clinical years is typically reported in institutions with a modern curriculum. The average number of teaching hours related to radiology is similar in both curriculum types (60 h). Radiology in modern curricula is mainly taught by radiologists, radiology trainees (50%), radiographers (20%) or clinicians (17%). Mandatory clerkships are pertinent to modern curricula (55% vs. 41% conventional curriculum), which start in the first (13% vs. 4% conventional curriculum) or second year of the training (9% vs. 2% conventional curriculum). The common core in both curricula consists of radiology examinations, to work with radiology teaching files, to attend radiology conferences, and to participate in multidisciplinary meetings. The influence of a modern curriculum on the formal radiology teaching is visible in terms of earlier exposure to radiology, involvement of a wider range of staff grades and range of profession involved in teaching, and radiology clerkships with more active and integrated tasks. • This study looks at differences in the nature of formal radiology teaching.

  14. Osteocondensant diseases. A new clinical-radiological Vision supported in genetics and osteoimmunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallejo, Jimi; Calvo, Enrique; Restrepo, Jose Felix

    2009-01-01

    The alterations in osseous remodeling lead to the increase or decrease of the osseous mass, generating damage to the osseous micro-architecture, which increases the risk of fracture. The pathologies with increase in osseous density lead to different genetically directed osteocondensing processes. The osteocondensing is currently explained by alteration in the function of the osteoclast, associated with a deficient function of the osseous resorption, an alteration in the osteoblast function, which generates an abnormal increase in the Osseous formation, or a homeostatic imbalance between the two processes; the clinical and radiological expression of these diseases can take place in early stages of the development, or in the adult life, depending on the recessive or dominant autosomic component, respectively. In this review, the classification based on the functional disorder of the bone cell is discussed, as well as the main clinical and radiological characteristics than permit a simple and applicable diagnostic approach in the clinical practice.

  15. Anesthesia Practice and Clinical Trends in Interventional Radiology: A European Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslam, Philip J.; Yap, Bernard; Mueller, Peter R.; Lee, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine current European practice in interventional radiology regarding nursing care, anesthesia, and clinical care trends.Methods: A survey was sent to 977 European interventional radiologists to assess the use of sedoanalgesia, nursing care, monitoring equipment, pre- and postprocedural care, and clinical trends in interventional radiology. Patterns of sedoanalgesia were recorded for both vascular and visceral interventional procedures. Responders rated their preferred level of sedoanalgesia for each procedure as follows: (a) awake/alert, (b) drowsy/arousable, (c) asleep/arousable, (d) deep sedation, and (e) general anesthesia. Sedoanalgesic drugs and patient care trends were also recorded. A comparison was performed with data derived from a similar survey of interventional practice in the United States.Results: Two hundred and forty-three of 977 radiologists responded (25%). The total number of procedures analyzed was 210,194. The majority (56%) of diagnostic and therapeutic vascular procedures were performed at the awake/alert level of sedation, 32% were performed at the drowsy/arousable level, and 12% at deeper levels of sedation. The majority of visceral interventional procedures were performed at the drowsy/arousable level of sedation (41%), 29% were performed at deeper levels of sedation, and 30% at the awake/alert level. In general, more sedoanalgesia is used in the United States. Eighty-three percent of respondents reported the use of a full-time radiology nurse, 67% used routine blood pressure/pulse oximetry monitoring, and 46% reported the presence of a dedicated recovery area. Forty-nine percent reported daily patient rounds, 30% had inpatient hospital beds, and 51% had day case beds.Conclusion: This survey shows clear differences in the use of sedation for vascular and visceral interventional procedures. Many, often complex, procedures are performed at the awake/alert level of sedation in Europe, whereas deeper levels of sedation are

  16. Corelations between radiological score with clinical and laboratory parameters in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Chicu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Staging in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and evaluating the effectiveness of drug treatment involves the determination of radiological scores (for narrowing and erosions, this being the most specific changes and most commonly found in RA.Matherials and methods: Our study was condacted over a period of 12 months in Medical Rehabilitation Clinic of „Sf. Spiridon” Iasi Hospital, on a group of 40 women patients with RA in various stages of evolution. X-ray examination was done on hands and feet at the beginning and the end of the study period. There were computed radiographic Sharp scores for narrowing and erosions and the total score. Erosions were examined for 16 joints in each hand. For narrowing five joints were evaluated. For accuracy, radiological examination was done on mammography film. Rezults:After calculating Sharp scores - Van der Heide version - I compared them with the levels of clinical (HAQ, NAT, NAD, DAS28, bone densitometry and laboratory (ESR, CRP, rheumatoid factor, IL-1β parameters.Conclusions: The values of radiological scores for narrowing and erosions are directly correlate with DAS28, HAQ, rheumatoid factors levels and IgG values, and indirectly correlated with IL-1β levels.

  17. Radiological signs of childhood Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mas, F.; Menor, F.; Moreno, A.; Vallcanera, A.; Esteban, M.J.; Muro, D.; Cortina, H.

    1997-01-01

    To describe the most prominent radiological sings of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) in childhood and review the general aspects of greatest interest to the general radiologist. The clinical and radiological histories of 40 children diagnosed on the basis of biopsy and/or cytology as having LCH in our center over a 16-year period were reviewed. Bone involvement was observed in 95% of patients; flat bones were affected in 95% of the cases, most frequently the cranium. Radiological changes in temporal bone were viewed in 15% of cases. There were long-bone lesions in 21% of the patients, involving, metaphyseal-diaphyseal bones in every case; multiple epiphyseal dysplasia was found in one and a purely cortical lesion in another. Vertebral involvement was detected in 18% of patients. Clinical evidence of diabetes insipidus (DI) was present in 22.5% of cases, while there were clinical or radiological signs of lung involvement in 15%. Bone involvement is the most common association reported in childhood LCH and is usually the reason for medical consultation. The flat bones, especially the cranium, are those most often affected. Diagnosis and follow-up studies are mainly based on plain radiography. DI due to hypothalamic infiltration in usually associated with normal CT scan. Lung involvement, uncommon in pediatric patients, is the major clinical and radiological difference with respect to the adult form. (Author) 33 refs

  18. Interventional radiology in cardiov ascular division of radiology department S.N.U hospital{sub s}taff roles and departmental management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ki Chul; Cheung, Hwan [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-11-15

    As the angiography in the field of radiological sciences is being increasingly diversified in its techniques, clinical applications of interventional radiology are rapidly increasing not only for its usefulness in simple diagnosis but for its capabilities of affording, by means of radiological surveillance, biological data such as those concerning tissues which are even substitutionary or supplementary to treatment of diseases. During the last 5 years from July 1980 to 1984 such applications in the cardiovascular division showed a trend of radical increase and thus emerging as a new domain of radiological medicine which has vast influence on diagnosis and treatment. The present treatise presents the results of research performed on the following: 1) Need for close coordination among physicians, radiologists, and nurses in the radiology department. 2) Need for prior explanation to the patient of the procedure to be followed to relieve his anxiety. 3) Checking of the angiographic equipment and selection of technical factors. 4) Proper management of manpower including medical radiologists and assistant radiologists. 5) Sterilization of auxiliary equipment required for surgical operation. 6) Selection of a catheter and control of clinical materials such as contrast agents. 7) Supplementary arrangements for speedy performance of clinical services.

  19. Neurological complications following liver transplant: a pictorial review of radiological and clinical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Kyung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, Sang Joon; Lee, Deok Hee; Lee, Ho Kyu; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-15

    Neurological complications are a rare but important and significant source of information about morbidity and mortality in liver transplant patients. Based on the clinical and radiological findings of 21 patients, neurological complications were categorized into five main groups; focal hemorrhagic or occlusive complications (n=11); diffuse hypoxic-ischemic injury (n=3); hypertensive encephalopathy (n=1); central pontine or extra-pontine myelinolysis (n=4); and infection (n=2). Neurological manifestations varied according to the location of the lesion, although seizures were the most common manifestation. In this pictorial review, we illustrate the radiological findings, focusing on MR and CT images, of a spectrum of neurological complications following liver transplants, as well as their clinical correlations.

  20. Neurological complications following liver transplant: a pictorial review of radiological and clinical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Kyung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, Sang Joon; Lee, Deok Hee; Lee, Ho Kyu; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul

    2005-01-01

    Neurological complications are a rare but important and significant source of information about morbidity and mortality in liver transplant patients. Based on the clinical and radiological findings of 21 patients, neurological complications were categorized into five main groups; focal hemorrhagic or occlusive complications (n=11); diffuse hypoxic-ischemic injury (n=3); hypertensive encephalopathy (n=1); central pontine or extra-pontine myelinolysis (n=4); and infection (n=2). Neurological manifestations varied according to the location of the lesion, although seizures were the most common manifestation. In this pictorial review, we illustrate the radiological findings, focusing on MR and CT images, of a spectrum of neurological complications following liver transplants, as well as their clinical correlations

  1. Radiological evaluation of esophageal motility and gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schima, W.; Pokieser, P.; Schober, E.

    1995-01-01

    Radiological evaluation of esophageal motility and the lower esophageal sphincter has gained increased attention in recent years. Videofluoroscopic investigation of esophageal motor function is superior to static film radiography, as repeated analysis of the videotaped recordings is possible. With emphasis on radiological techniques, normal esophagel physiology and motility and a variety of esophageal motor disorders are discussed in this review paper. Radiological evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux and reflux esophagitis is described. Clinical and radiological findings in esophageal motility disorders and gastroesophageal reflux disease and the radiological efficacy compared to that of manometry and pH-metry are discussed. (orig.) [de

  2. Clinical, Endoscopic, and Radiologic Features of Three Subtypes of Achalasia, Classified Using High-Resolution Manometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammed Q.; AlQaraawi, Abdullah; Al-Sohaibani, Fahad; Al-Kahtani, Khalid; Al-Ashgar, Hamad I.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: High-resolution manometry (HRM) has improved the accuracy of manometry in detecting achalasia and determining its subtypes. However, the correlation of achalasia subtypes with clinical, endoscopic, and radiologic findings has not been assessed. We aimed to evaluate and compare the clinical, endoscopic, and fluoroscopy findings associated with three subtypes of achalasia using HRM. Patients and Methods: The retrospective clinical data, HRM, endoscopy, and radiologic findings were obtained from the medical records of untreated achalasia patients. Results: From 2011 to 2013, 374 patients underwent HRM. Fifty-two patients (14%) were diagnosed with achalasia, but only 32 (8.5%) of these patients had not received treatment and were therefore included in this study. The endoscopy results were normal in 28% of the patients, and a barium swallow was inconclusive in 31% of the achalasia patients. Ten patients (31%) were classified as having type I achalasia, 17 (53%) were classified as type II, and 5 (16%) were classified as type III. Among the three subtypes, type I patients were on average the youngest and had the longest history of dysphagia, mildest chest pain, most significant weight loss, and most dilated esophagus with residual food. Chest pain was most common in type III patients, and frequently had normal fluoroscopic and endoscopic results. Conclusion: The clinical, radiologic, and endoscopic findings were not significantly different between patients with type I and type II untreated achalasia. Type III patients had the most severe symptoms and were the most difficult to diagnose based on varied clinical, radiologic, and endoscopic findings. PMID:26021774

  3. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasing technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for diagnostic radiology. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists based in the clinical setting. However, an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase academic educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Sciences for Asia and the Pacific. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in the Asia-Pacific region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specializing in diagnostic radiology started in 2007 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experiences of clinical training programmes in Australia and New Zealand, the UK and the USA, and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. This publication follows the approach of the IAEA publication Training Course Series No. 37, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists specializing in Radiation Oncology. This approach to clinical training has been successfully tested

  4. Radiological and clinical evaluation of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, O. J.; Chin, S. Y.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    One hundred thirty two cases of the pathologically proven colorectal cancer at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute Hospital in the period from January 1973 to June 1980 were analyzed radiologically and clinically. The results were as follows: 1. The colorectal cancer was prevalent in rectosigmoid area and in the fourth to seventh decade of life. 2. The clinical pictures were classified into two groups. The one was rectosigmoid cancer with bowel habit changes. The other was one with no specific symptoms or signs. The clinical pictures of the right colon cancer were rather indirected, chronic and systemic than those of the left one. 3. The roentgenological findings were classified into two groups. The one was rectum and left colon cancer with symmetrical annular narrowing and the other showed trumpet-like proximal dilatation. 4. The most frequent complication was intestinal obstruction. 5. The majority of colorectal cancer was adenocarcinoma. The squamous cell carcinoma and atypical cell carcinoma were most prevalent in rectum, but malignantly lymphoma often occurred in right colon. The rarest colorectal cancer was atypical cell carcinoma in rectum

  5. Congenital esophageal stenosis associated with esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula: clinical and radiologic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Hye Jin; Kim, Woo Sun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Shin, Su-Mi; Kim, In-One; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National University College of Medicine and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Yoo, So-Young [Seoul National University College of Medicine and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Park, Kwi-Won; Jung, Sung-Eun [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Seoul (Korea)

    2010-08-15

    Congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) can be associated with esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF). Because there are a variety of degrees of obstruction and symptoms of CES, it is frequently difficult to make a pre- and post-operative diagnosis of the distal CES associated with EA/TEF. To evaluate the clinical and radiologic features of congenital esophageal stenosis associated with esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula. We retrospectively reviewed postoperative esophagograms and medical records of 187 children (107 boys, 80 girls) who had primary repair of EA/TEF from 1992 to 2009 at our institution. We evaluated the incidence of CES, clinical findings, radiologic features and management of CES in these children. CES was diagnosed in 22 of 187 EA/TEF children (12%); one child had double CES lesions, for a total of 23 lesions. Ten of those 22 children (45%) had presented with significant symptoms of esophageal obstruction. The diagnosis of CES was delayed in 10 children (45%) until 1-10 years of age. On esophagogram, CES (n = 23) was located in the distal esophagus (n = 20, 87%) or mid-esophagus (n = 3, 13%). The degree of stenosis was severe (n = 6, 26%), moderate (n = 10, 43%), or mild (n = 7, 30%). Eight children, including two with unsuccessful esophageal balloon dilatation of CES, were treated surgically. Histologic examination revealed tracheobronchial remnant (n = 7) or fibromuscular hyperplasia (n = 1). One child with surgically treated CES developed achalasia at the age of 3 years 9 months. Esophagography after EA/TEF repair should be performed with a high index of suspicion for the presence of distal CES, because the diagnosis and adequate management of CES can often be delayed. (orig.)

  6. Quality control in dental diagnostic radiology : anomalous in the use of radiological equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, M.; Martinez-Beneyto, Y.; Jodar, S.; Velasco, E.; Garcia-Vera, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    7,176 official quality control reports on dental diagnostic radiology were studied, relating to dental clinics located in 37 Spanish provinces covering 16 different autonomous Regions. The reports were issued as a result of the entry into force of Royal Decree 2071/1995 on quality control in General Diagnostic Radiology facilities, this Royal Decree was replaced by R. D. 1976/1999. The reports were writen by the UTPR (Technical Unit of Radiological Protection) Agsigma S. A. L., a company approved by the Nuclear Safety Council, and they correspond with the official reports issued during 1996-2001. This meants that a 5-year period has been monitored in order to observe the impacts of the establlishment of this legislation on quality control in intraoral dental diagnostic radiology facilities. The results show that 72.79% of the reports checked in 2001 would comply with the European Union's official recommendation (70 kVp, 8 mA> 1.5 mm of Al and 20 cm collimator length). Significant alterations have detected in a third (30.59%) of the radiological equipment. (Author) 36 refs

  7. An evaluation of clinical, radiological and three-dimensional dental tomography findings in ectodermal dysplasia cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Mehmet-Sinan; Callea, Michele; Yavuz, Ìzzet; Aksoy, Orhan; Clarich, Gabriella; Günay, Ayse; Günay, Ahmet; Güven, Sedat; Maglione, Michele; Akkuş, Zeki

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to review the results related to head and jaw disorders in cases of ectodermal dysplasia. The evaluation of ectodermal dysplasia cases was made by clinical examination and examination of the jaw and facial areas radiologically and on cone-beam 3-dimensional dental tomography (CBCT) images. In the 36 cases evaluated in the study, typical clinical findings of pure hypohidrotic ectodermal displasia (HED) were seen, such as missing teeth, dry skin, hair and nail disorders. CBCT images were obtained from 12 of the 36 cases, aged 1.5- 45 years, and orthodontic analyses were made on these images. The clinical and radiological evaluations determined, hypodontia or oligodontia, breathing problems, sweating problems, a history of fever, sparse hair, saddle nose, skin peeling, hypopigmentation, hyperpigmentation, finger and nail deformities, conical teeth anomalies, abnormal tooth root formation, tooth resorption in the root, gingivitis, history of epilepsy, absent lachrymal canals and vision problems in the cases which included to the study. Ectodermal dysplasia cases have a particular place in dentistry and require a professional, multi-disciplinary approach in respect of the chewing function, orthognathic problems, growth, oral and dental health. It has been understood that with data obtained from modern technologies such as three-dimensional dental tomography and the treatments applied, the quality of life of these cases can be improved.

  8. Clinical, Radiological, Microbiological, and Histopathological Aspects of Acquired Dacryocystoceles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selam Yekta Sendul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study is to investigate the etiology and the clinical, microbiological, histopathological, and radiological findings of acquired dacryocystoceles. Methods. In this retrospective study, we reviewed the clinical records of 10 eyes of 8 patients with dacryocystoceles who underwent external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR surgery. Etiology, presenting symptoms and radiological findings as well as microbiological and histopathological assessment results and outcome were analyzed. Results. The records of 8 patients with dacryocystoceles were included in this study. In the histopathological evaluations of the samples collected from the lacrimal sac wall, chronic inflammation was found in all biopsied samples and fibrosis was observed in two histopathological evaluations. Computerized tomography (CT imaging showed fluid collection separated from adjacent tissues by a thin rim, corresponding to dacryocystoceles in the sac. In the microbiological culture examination of samples collected from the fluid within the cyst, no bacterial growth in 5 eyes, gram-negative bacillus growth in 3 eyes, and gram-positive cocci growth in 2 eyes were found. Conclusions. Acquired dacryocystoceles were observed extremely rarely and a definite pathogenic agent could not be identified in any of the cases, either microbiologically or histologically, whereas chronic inflammation was detected in all cases in our study.

  9. Promoting interventional radiology in clinical practice of emergency medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Bing; Yuan Jianhua

    2009-01-01

    Interventional radiology has lot of advantages in dealing with various emergencies. The technique is minimally-invasive, highly-effective and immediately-efficient, moreover, it integrates the diagnosis with the therapy perfectly. Besides, the interventional techniques applied in emergency medicine include not only the vascular interventions,such as embolization, embolectomy, etc, but also the nonvascular interventions, such as tracheal s tent implantation, percutaneous vertebroplasty and so forth. However, importance has not been attached to the clinical use of interventional therapy in emergency medicine so far. It is imperative for us to promote the acceptance of interventional therapy in emergency medicine as well as to popularize the technique in clinical practice. (authors)

  10. Highly cited works in radiology: the top 100 cited articles in radiologic journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagni, Matthew; Khan, Nickalus R; Cohen, Harris L; Choudhri, Asim F

    2014-08-01

    The number of citations a publication receives can be used to show its impact on a field of study. It may indicate the educational interest in a given population or underline a perceived or real educational gap. This article identifies and characterizes the 100 top cited publications in radiologic journals as of May 2013. All clinical radiologic journals listed by Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Reports in 2011 were identified. A total of 46 journals were identified, and all articles published within these journals were analyzed for citation counts. The top 100 highly cited articles were recorded. The most frequently cited radiologic articles appeared in 9 of the 46 journals. These included 59 articles in Radiology, 17 in Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 9 in the American Journal of Roentgenology, 5 in the British Journal of Radiology, 4 in Investigative Radiology, 2 in American Journal of Neuroradiology, 2 in European Radiology, 2 in Radiologic Clinics of North America, 1 in the Seminars in Nuclear Medicine, and 1 in Pediatric Radiology. The citation values ranged from 422 to 7506 with a mean of 751. Publication dates ranged from 1967 to 2006 with the 5-year period between 1986 and 1990 accounting for the largest percentage of articles. The most frequently studied radiologic modality was magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 28 articles), followed by vascular/interventional (19 articles) and nuclear medicine (13 articles). The central nervous system was the most frequently studied organ system (22 articles), followed by mixed organ systems (14 articles) and liver (12 articles). The top cited articles in radiologic journals span a wide range of imaging modalities, subspecialties, and organ systems. Topics that occurred frequently in the top 100 cited articles included contrast and radiopharmaceutical characterization, MRI of motion, percutaneous radiofrequency ablation in the liver and percutaneous vertebroplasty. We present a methodology that uses citation analysis to

  11. Comparison of fluoroscopy-guided pull-type percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (pull-type-PRG) with conventional percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (push-type-PRG): clinical results in 253 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yang; Schneider, J.; Dueber, C.; Pitton, M.B. [University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    To analyze the clinical results and complications of fluoroscopy guided internal-external pull-type percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (pull-type-PRG) and conventional external-internal percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (push-type-PRG). A total of 253 patients underwent radiological gastrostomy between January 2002 and January 2010. Data were collected retrospectively from radiology reports, Chart review of clinical notes, procedure reports, discharge summaries and subsequent hospital visits. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the two methods for gastrostomy with respect to peri-interventional aspects and clinical results. 128 patients received the Pull-type-PRG whereas the other 125 patients were served with the Push-type-PRG. Indications for gastrostomy were similar in these two groups. The most frequent indications for the both methods were stenotic oesophageal tumors or head/neck tumors (54.7% in pull-type-PRG, 68% in push-type-PRG). Gastrostomy procedures were successful in 98.3% in pull-type-PRG compared to 92% in push-type-PRG. There was no procedure-related mortality. Compared to Push-type-PRG, the peri-interventional complication rate was significantly reduced in pull-type-PRG (14.8% versus 34.4%, P = 0.002). Compared to the external-internal push-type-PRG, the internal-external Pull-type-PRG showed a high primary success rate and a decreased incidence of peri-interventional complications. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of fluoroscopy-guided pull-type percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (pull-type-PRG) with conventional percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (push-type-PRG): clinical results in 253 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yang; Schneider, J.; Dueber, C.; Pitton, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    To analyze the clinical results and complications of fluoroscopy guided internal-external pull-type percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (pull-type-PRG) and conventional external-internal percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (push-type-PRG). A total of 253 patients underwent radiological gastrostomy between January 2002 and January 2010. Data were collected retrospectively from radiology reports, Chart review of clinical notes, procedure reports, discharge summaries and subsequent hospital visits. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the two methods for gastrostomy with respect to peri-interventional aspects and clinical results. 128 patients received the Pull-type-PRG whereas the other 125 patients were served with the Push-type-PRG. Indications for gastrostomy were similar in these two groups. The most frequent indications for the both methods were stenotic oesophageal tumors or head/neck tumors (54.7% in pull-type-PRG, 68% in push-type-PRG). Gastrostomy procedures were successful in 98.3% in pull-type-PRG compared to 92% in push-type-PRG. There was no procedure-related mortality. Compared to Push-type-PRG, the peri-interventional complication rate was significantly reduced in pull-type-PRG (14.8% versus 34.4%, P = 0.002). Compared to the external-internal push-type-PRG, the internal-external Pull-type-PRG showed a high primary success rate and a decreased incidence of peri-interventional complications. (orig.)

  13. The Diagnostic importance of clinical and radiologic features of the Multiple Cemento-osseous dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, M. R.; Kim, Y. H.; Kang, B. C.

    1998-01-01

    This case was diagnosed as multiple cementoosseous dysplasia on the basis of clinical and radiological features but was diagnosed as ossifying fibroma on the basis of histopathological feature. The histopathologic features of the multiple cementoosseous dysplasia and cementoossifying fibroma have common features of cementum, fibrous network and bone. Multiple cementoosseous dysplasia is reactive lesion and shows restricted lesion size, occurred on anterior and posterior tooth of the mandible and needs no treatment except periodic follow up. But Cementoossifying fibroma is the true neoplasm and grows continuously and needs surgical removal. The final diagnosis of the multiple cementoosseous dysplasia requires good correlation of the clinical histopathological, and radiological features.

  14. Integrating radiology vertically into an undergraduate medical education curriculum: a triphasic integration approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Qahtani F

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fahd Al Qahtani,1 Adel Abdelaziz2,31Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Baha University, Al-Baha, Saudi Arabia; 2Medical Education Development Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Baha University, Al-Baha, Saudi Arabia; 3Medical Education Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, EgyptAbstract: Fulfilling the goal of integrating radiology into undergraduate medical curricula is a real challenge due to the enduring faith assuming that traditional medical disciplines are worthy of consuming the available study time. In this manner, radiology is addressed occasionally and with relevance to these traditional disciplines. In Al-Baha University Faculty of Medicine, Al-Baha, Saudi Arabia, efforts have been made to integrate radiology vertically and in a structured manner into the undergraduate curriculum from the first year to the sixth year. For achieving convenient integration of radiology, a triphasic approach to integration is adopted. This approach consists of the integration of radiology foundations into the basic sciences phase, development of a distinct 4-week module in year 4, and finally, integration of clinical applications of radiology in the clinical phase modules. Feedback of students and inferences obtained through assessment and program evaluation are in favor of this approach to integration. Minor reform and some improvement related to time allocated and content balancing are still indicated.Keywords: radiology foundations, radiology module, students assessment

  15. A guide to radiological research. The Research Sub-Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Radiology, the Royal College of Radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    There are broad categories of radiological research. Basic science research undertaken in universities or in manufacturing companies may lead to new techniques or even new products like MRI, CT or contrast media. MRI is a product of university based research, while CT developed within a manufacturing company. Basic science type research is vital for the continuing development of our speciality, but requires considerable resources, teamwork, and research/management expertise. The best place for an interested radiologist to learn such skills is within university departments, typically in the context of an MD, Ph.D. or similar degree course. Clinical radiological research is of equal importance and, in the UK, underpins our international reputation for radiological excellence. Clinical research may be defined as research requiring patients. It can therefore only be carried out in hospitals and clinics. New technologies, drugs, indications, procedures etc., all require clinical research to validate them. The role of the clinical radiologist is pivotal to the proper conduct of clinical imaging research and technology assessment. This is not confined to university and teaching centres, but is of equal importance in district general hospitals. Results from clinical research carried out 'in the field' are the true test of our specialty. This research guide is sponsored by the RCR. Its target is radiologists and others carrying out clinical research within departments of radiology. If it stimulates Fellows and Members of the RCR to conduct more and better research then it will have succeeded in its basic objective. Research is always planned. It is based on observation, measurement and the testing of ideas or hypotheses. It is presented to peers for criticism and then published to be available to all for review. Research is always hard work and requires discipline. Like many things the ability to conduct research improves with practice. Many radiologists have not had much

  16. CLINICAL, HISTOLOGICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL ASPECTS REGARDING THE INFLUENCE OF SOME EXTERNAL FACTORS ON THE PULP-DENTIN COMPLEX

    OpenAIRE

    C. Giuroiu; Maria Vataman; Liana Aminov; Mihaela Sălceanu; S. Andrian

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed at assesssing – by clinical, histological and radiological investigations – the influence of some external factors on the pulp-dentin complex, and at providing a causal interpretation of the structural changes observed. Materials and methods. Clinical and radiological exams were performed on 65 old patients with ages between 60-75, and also on 40 young patients with ages between 20-35, presenting different dental-periodontal pathologies. The ...

  17. Surgical treatment of acetabular fractures: clinical and radiological results and its complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, C; Rey, R.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to analyse a serie of consecutive cases of surigically treated acetabular fractures, evaluating middle-term clinical and radiological results. A retrospective analysis of clinical histories, surgical forms and X-rays was performed for 42 patients who underwent surgery in two centers (Instituto Nacional de Ortopedia y Traumatologia [INOT] and Banco de Protesis), from July 2001 through August 2007

  18. Radiological and clinical characterization of the lysosomal storage disorders: non-lipid disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E I; Xing, M; Moreno-De-Luca, A; Harmouche, E; Terk, M R

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a large group of genetic metabolic disorders that result in the accumulation of abnormal material, such as mucopolysaccharides, glycoproteins, amino acids and lipids, within cells. Since many LSDs manifest during infancy or early childhood, with potentially devastating consequences if left untreated, timely identification is imperative to prevent irreversible damage and early death. In this review, the key imaging features of the non-lipid or extralipid LSDs are examined and correlated with salient clinical manifestations and genetic information. Disorders are stratified based on the type of excess material causing tissue or organ dysfunction, with descriptions of the mucopolysaccharidoses, mucolipidoses, alpha-mannosidosis, glycogen storage disorder II and cystinosis. In addition, similarities and differences in radiological findings between each of these LSDs are highlighted to facilitate further recognition. Given the rare and extensive nature of the LSDs, mastery of their multiple clinical and radiological traits may seem challenging. However, an understanding of the distinguishing imaging characteristics of LSDs and their clinical correlates may allow radiologists to play a key role in the early diagnosis of these progressive and potentially fatal disorders.

  19. Discrepancy in clinical versus radiological parameters describing deformity due to brace treatment for moderate idiopathic scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szulc Andrzej

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The shape of the torso in patients with idiopathic scoliosis is considered to reflect the shape of the vertebral column, however the direct correlation between parameters describing clinical deformity and those characterizing radiological curvature was reported to be weak. It is not clear if the management proposed for scoliosis (physiotherapy, brace, surgery affects equally the shape of the axial skeleton and the surface of the body. The aim of the study was to compare clinical deformity of (1 idiopathic scoliosis girls being under brace treatment for radiological curves of 25 to 40 degrees and (2 non treated scoliotic girls matched for age and Cobb angle. Methods Cross-sectional study of 24 girls wearing the brace versus 26 girls without brace treatment, matched for age and Cobb angle. Hypothesis: Patients wearing the brace for more than 6 months, when comparing to patients without brace, may present different external morphology of the trunk, in spite of having similar Cobb angle. Material. Inclusion criteria: girls, idiopathic scoliosis, growing age (10–16 years, Cobb angle minimum 25°, maximum 40°. The braced group consisted of girls wearing a TLSO brace (Cheneau for more than 6 months with minimum of 16 hours per day. The non-braced group consisted of girls first seen for their spinal deformity, previously not treated. The groups presented similar curve pattern. Methods. Scoliometer exam: angle of trunk rotation at three levels of the spine: upper thoracic, main thoracic, lumbar or thoracolumbar. The maximal angle was noted at each level and the sum of three levels was calculated. Posterior trunk symmetry index (POTSI and Hump Sum were measured using surface topography. Results Cobb angle was 34.9° ± 4.8° in braced and 32.7° ± 4.9° in un-braced patients (difference not significant. The age was 14.1 ± 1.6 years in braced patients and 13.1 ± 1.9 years in un-braced group (p = 0.046. The value of angle of trunk

  20. Clinical and radiological findings of incidental Rathke's cleft cysts in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Joung Oh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available PurposeIn the pediatric population, Rathke's cleft cysts (RCCs are known to be an infrequent cause of headaches, visual disturbances, and pituitary dysfunction. We investigated the clinical characteristics of children in whom RCCs were incidentally discovered and evaluated whether RCCs influence the treatment response of patients with proven endocrinopathy.MethodsA retrospective analysis was conducted in 34 patients with RCCs who were diagnosed between 2006 and 2013 at Hallym University Medical Center. Their clinical, hormonal, and imaging findings were reviewed. We evaluated the clinical outcomes of the patients with concomitant RCCs and endocrinopathy compared to matched controls.ResultsTwenty-six of 34 patients with radiologically proven RCCs had endocrine disorders. They were 9 boys and 17 girls, with ages ranging from 4.8 to 17.4 years at the time of the diagnosis. Of these, 7 (27% had idiopathic short stature, 7 (27% had growth hormone deficiency (GHD, and 12 (46% had central precocious puberty (CPP. Nineteen of 26 patients (73.1% showed low signal intensities on T1-weighted images (T1WI and high signal intensities on T2-weighted images. The incidence of hypointensity on T1WI was higher in the patients with RCCs accompanied by endocrinopathy than in those without endocrinopathy (P=0.033. The treatment outcomes of the patients with CPP and GHD with and without RCCs were similar.ConclusionCPP and GHD patients with a small RCC (less than 20 mm expressing cystic magnetic resonance intensity can be managed with medical treatment, although the RCCs need to be closely monitored in radiological studies to observe their growth.

  1. Clinical and Radiologic Outcomes of Submerged and Nonsubmerged Bone-Level Implants with Internal Hexagonal Connections in Immediate Implantation: A 5-Year Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shiyu; Wu, Xiayi; Shrestha, Rachana; Lin, Jinying; Feng, Zhicai; Liu, Yudong; Shi, Yunlin; Huang, Baoxin; Li, Zhipeng; Liu, Quan; Zhang, Xiaocong; Hu, Mingxuan; Chen, Zhuofan

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the 5-year clinical and radiologic outcome of immediate implantation using submerged and nonsubmerged techniques with bone-level implants and internal hexagonal connections and the effects of potential influencing factors. A total of 114 bone-level implants (XiVE S plus) with internal hexagonal connections inserted into 72 patients were included. Patients were followed up for 5 years. A t-test was used to statistically evaluate the marginal bone loss between the submerged and nonsubmerged groups. The cumulative survival rate (CSR) was calculated according to the life table method and illustrated with Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Comparisons of the CSR between healing protocols, guided bone regeneration, implants with different sites, lengths, and diameters were performed using log-rank tests. The 5-year cumulative implant survival rates with submerged and nonsubmerged healing were 94% and 96%, respectively. No statistically significant differences in terms of marginal bone loss, healing protocol, application of guided bone regeneration, implant site, or length were observed. High CSRs and good marginal bone levels were achieved 5 years after immediate implantation of bone-level implants with internal hexagonal connections using both the submerged and nonsubmerged techniques. Factors such as implant length, site, and application of guided bone regeneration did not have an impact on the long-term success of the implants. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  2. Postpartum hemorrhage: Clinical and radiologic aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nam Kyung [Department of Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, 1-10, Ami-Dong, Seo-Gu, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suk [Department of Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, 1-10, Ami-Dong, Seo-Gu, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kimsuk@medimail.co.kr; Lee, Jun Woo; Sol, Yu Li; Kim, Chang Won [Department of Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, 1-10, Ami-Dong, Seo-Gu, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Hyun Sung, Kim [Department of Surgery, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Ho Jin; Suh, Dong Soo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a potentially life threatening condition, and it remains the leading cause of maternal morbidity. Uterine atony, lower genital tract lacerations, uterine rupture or inversion, retained products of conception and underlying coagulopathy are some of the common causes of PPH. Most conditions can be diagnosed based on clinical and laboratory evaluation supplemented by ultrasound information. Computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can provide information for the detection, localization and characterization of PPH in some difficult cases. CT can accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of significant arterial hemorrhage as sites of intravenous contrast material extravasation, which can be as a guide for angiographic intervention. The presence of focal or diffuse intravenous contrast extravasation or a hematoma within the enlarged postpartum uterine cavity on CT can help the diagnosis of uterine atony when the clinical diagnosis of uterine atony is unclear. CT can also provide the information of other alternative conditions such as a puerperal genital hematoma, uterine rupture and concealed hematoma in other sites. MR imaging may be considered as a valuable complement to ultrasound where the ultrasound findings are inconclusive in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of retained products of conception. Knowledge of the various radiologic appearances of PPH and the correlation with clinical information can ensure correct diagnosis and appropriate and prompt treatment planning in the patients with PPH.

  3. Postpartum hemorrhage: Clinical and radiologic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Suk; Lee, Jun Woo; Sol, Yu Li; Kim, Chang Won; Hyun Sung, Kim; Jang, Ho Jin; Suh, Dong Soo

    2010-01-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a potentially life threatening condition, and it remains the leading cause of maternal morbidity. Uterine atony, lower genital tract lacerations, uterine rupture or inversion, retained products of conception and underlying coagulopathy are some of the common causes of PPH. Most conditions can be diagnosed based on clinical and laboratory evaluation supplemented by ultrasound information. Computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can provide information for the detection, localization and characterization of PPH in some difficult cases. CT can accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of significant arterial hemorrhage as sites of intravenous contrast material extravasation, which can be as a guide for angiographic intervention. The presence of focal or diffuse intravenous contrast extravasation or a hematoma within the enlarged postpartum uterine cavity on CT can help the diagnosis of uterine atony when the clinical diagnosis of uterine atony is unclear. CT can also provide the information of other alternative conditions such as a puerperal genital hematoma, uterine rupture and concealed hematoma in other sites. MR imaging may be considered as a valuable complement to ultrasound where the ultrasound findings are inconclusive in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of retained products of conception. Knowledge of the various radiologic appearances of PPH and the correlation with clinical information can ensure correct diagnosis and appropriate and prompt treatment planning in the patients with PPH.

  4. Is There Value in Having Radiology Provide a Second Reading in Pediatric Orthopaedic Clinic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Vivek; Bosch, Patrick; Dede, Ozgur; Deeney, Vincent; Mendelson, Stephen; Ward, Timothy; Brooks, Maria; Kenkre, Tanya; Roach, James

    2017-06-01

    The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations specifically mandates the dual interpretation of musculoskeletal radiographs by a radiologist in addition to the orthopaedist in all hospital-based orthopaedic clinics. Previous studies have questioned the utility of this practice. The purpose of this study was to further investigate the clinical significance of having the radiologist provide a second interpretation in a hospital-based pediatric orthopaedic clinic. A retrospective review was performed of all patients who had plain radiographs obtained in the pediatric orthopaedic clinic at an academic children's hospital over a 4-month period. For each radiographic series, the orthopaedist's note and the radiology interpretation were reviewed and a determination was made of whether the radiology read provided new clinically useful information and/or a new diagnosis, whether it recommended further imaging, or if it missed a diagnosis that was reflected in the orthopaedist's note. The hospital charges associated with the radiology read for each study were also quantified. The charts of 1570 consecutive clinic patients who were seen in the pediatric orthopaedic clinic from January to April, 2012 were reviewed. There were 2509 radiographic studies performed, of which 2264 had both a documented orthopaedist's note and radiologist's read. The radiologist's interpretation added new, clinically important information in 1.0% (23/2264) of these studies. In 1.7% (38/2264) of the studies, it was determined that the radiologist missed the diagnosis or clinically important information that could affect treatment. The total amount of the professional fees charged for the radiologists' interpretations was $87,362. On average, the hospital charges for each occurrence in which the radiologist's read provided an additional diagnosis or clinically important information beyond the orthopaedist's note were $3798. The results of this study suggest that eliminating the

  5. Clinical, pathological, and radiological characteristics of solitary ground-glass opacity lung nodules on high-resolution computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu ZX

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Zhi-Xin Qiu,1 Yue Cheng,1 Dan Liu,1 Wei-Ya Wang,2 Xia Wu,2 Wei-Lu Wu,2 Wei-Min Li1,2 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, 2Department of Pathology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China Background: Lung nodules are being detected at an increasing rate year by year with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT being widely used. Ground-glass opacity nodule is one of the special types of pulmonary nodules that is confirmed to be closely associated with early stage of lung cancer. Very little is known about solitary ground-glass opacity nodules (SGGNs. In this study, we analyzed the clinical, pathological, and radiological characteristics of SGGNs on HRCT.Methods: A total of 95 resected SGGNs were evaluated with HRCT scan. The clinical, pathological, and radiological characteristics of these cases were analyzed.Results: Eighty-one adenocarcinoma and 14 benign nodules were observed. The nodules included 12 (15% adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS, 14 (17% minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA, and 55 (68% invasive adenocarcinoma (IA. No patients with recurrence till date have been identified. The positive expression rates of anaplastic lymphoma kinase and ROS-1 (proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase ROS were only 2.5% and 8.6%, respectively. The specificity and accuracy of HRCT of invasive lung adenocarcinoma were 85.2% and 87.4%. The standard uptake values of only two patients determined by 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT were above 2.5. The size, density, shape, and pleural tag of nodules were significant factors that differentiated IA from AIS and MIA. Moreover, the size, shape, margin, pleural tag, vascular cluster, bubble-like sign, and air bronchogram of nodules were significant determinants for mixed ground-glass opacity nodules (all P<0.05.Conclusion: We analyzed the clinical, pathological, and radiological characteristics of SGGNs on HRCT and found that the size, density

  6. Methadone-induced delayed posthypoxic encephalopathy: clinical, radiological, and pathological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Manoj; Wang, Yunxia; Reeves, Alan; Newell, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To describe the clinical, radiological and pathological findings in a patient with methadone-induced delayed posthypoxic encephalopathy (DPHE). Case Report. A Thirty-eight-year-old man was found unconscious for an unknown duration after methadone and diazepam ingestion. His initial vitals were temperature 104 degree Fahrenheit, heart rate 148/minute, respiratory rate 50/minute, and blood pressure 107/72 mmhg. He developed renal failure, rhabdomyolysis, and elevated liver enzymes which resolved completely in 6 days. After 2 weeks from discharge he had progressive deterioration of his cognitive, behavioral and neurological function. Brain MRI showed diffuse abnormal T2 signal in the corona radiata, centrum semiovale, and subcortical white matter throughout all lobes. Extensive work up was negative for any metabolic, infectious or autoimmune disorder. Brain biopsy showed significant axonal injury in the white matter. He was treated successfully with combination of steroids and antioxidants. Follow up at 2 year showed no residual deficits. Conclusion. Our observation suggests that patients on methadone therapy should be monitored for any neurological or psychiatric symptoms, and in suspected cases MRI brain may help to make the diagnosis of DPHE. A trial of steroids and antioxidants may be considered in these patients.

  7. Rapidly Progressive Osteoarthritis: a Review of the Clinical and Radiologic Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Donald J; Gustas-French, Cristy N

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the distinct clinical and radiographic features that may lead to prompt diagnosis of rapidly progressive osteoarthritis (RPOA) and thus obviate unnecessary and costly diagnostic workup. RPOA is uncommon but is more frequently seen in practice because of the aging population. RPOA is a destructive arthropathy that occurs most commonly in elderly women but can also be seen in patients that have sustained trauma. The dramatic radiologic manifestations of RPOA can lead to diagnostic confusion with other arthropathies, infection, and osteonecrosis. RPOA was originally described in the hip but may also involve the shoulder. The etiology of RPOA is not well understood, but subchondral fracture probably plays a role in the development of dramatic destruction of the joint that is seen in affected patients. Early diagnosis may reduce the complexity of surgical management. RPOA is an uncommon condition that occurs most frequently in elderly woman or in patients who have sustained trauma. Prompt recognition of the clinical and radiologic features of this arthropathy can reduce unnecessary diagnostic workup and complexity of surgical intervention.

  8. Radiological and clinical pattern of pulmonary Tuberculosis in selected TB clinics in Khartoum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongola, Nagwa Ali Mohammad [Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1998-12-31

    160 adult tuberculous patients were selected randomly from Al shaab and Abu Anja hospital, to (1) study the clino-radiological pattern of the disease, (2) to determine the percentage of radiologically-positive patients and (3) to study the frequency of the initial presenting symptoms and to correlate them with their x-ray findings. A flow-sheet was filled and proper clinical examination was conducted for each patient. Tuberclin test, 3 sputa examinations, ESR and chest x-ray were done for every patient. Three quarters of the patients were males in the young age group and most of the patients were of low socioeconomic status. The main presenting symptoms were productive cough, chest pain, dysnoea, fever, weight loss and malaise. Patients presented rather late, with a mean period of four months. 57 % of patients were sputum positive, 80% Tuberclin-positive and 98% had a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). 15% of patients had radiological features of primary diseases of which hilar lymph-adenopathy was the commonest, while consolidation was the commonest parenchymal lesion. In post-primary disease fibrocavitory type was the commonest and together with exudative lesions constituted 98% of parenchymal lesions. 90% of patients had typical upper or middle zone infiltrates and 10% had lower lung field tuberculosis. 14% of patients had pleural effusion. 60% of patients had moderate disease extent in the chest, 30% far-advanced and 10% minimal lesions in their chest x-ray.(Author) 134 ref. , 17 tabs. , 23 fig.

  9. Radiological and clinical pattern of pulmonary Tuberculosis in selected TB clinics in Khartoum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dongola, Nagwa Ali Mohammad

    1997-01-01

    160 adult tuberculous patients were selected randomly from Al shaab and Abu Anja hospital, to (1) study the clino-radiological pattern of the disease, (2) to determine the percentage of radiologically-positive patients and (3) to study the frequency of the initial presenting symptoms and to correlate them with their x-ray findings. A flow-sheet was filled and proper clinical examination was conducted for each patient. Tuberclin test, 3 sputa examinations, ESR and chest x-ray were done for every patient. Three quarters of the patients were males in the young age group and most of the patients were of low socioeconomic status. The main presenting symptoms were productive cough, chest pain, dysnoea, fever, weight loss and malaise. Patients presented rather late, with a mean period of four months. 57 % of patients were sputum positive, 80% Tuberclin-positive and 98% had a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). 15% of patients had radiological features of primary diseases of which hilar lymph-adenopathy was the commonest, while consolidation was the commonest parenchymal lesion. In post-primary disease fibrocavitory type was the commonest and together with exudative lesions constituted 98% of parenchymal lesions. 90% of patients had typical upper or middle zone infiltrates and 10% had lower lung field tuberculosis. 14% of patients had pleural effusion. 60% of patients had moderate disease extent in the chest, 30% far-advanced and 10% minimal lesions in their chest x-ray.(Author)

  10. Radiological input during paediatric multidisciplinary team meetings and its influence on clinical patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn-Jones, Glyn; Pereira, John

    2016-04-01

    There is little information about the role of the radiologist at multidisciplinary team meetings; in particular their influence on patient management. To evaluate the influence of radiologists on clinical patient management during multidisciplinary meetings. Prospective data were collected over a 5-week period from multidisciplinary team meetings across four paediatric clinical domains. Radiological input was recorded for each case discussion, including the type of influence and its potential effect on clinical patient management. One hundred and forty paediatric cases were reviewed. Radiological advice was requested from the radiologist for 25.7% (N = 36) of cases. In 17.9% (N = 25) this advice was judged to have influenced clinical patient management. There were two cases where new imaging findings were discovered. Radiologists influence clinical patient management during multidisciplinary team meetings primarily by providing differential diagnoses and guidance regarding future imaging, with respect to both the necessity and the modality. Occasionally, when imaging is reviewed at these meetings, new findings are discovered that impact on patient management. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  11. Soft tissue Burkitt's lymphoma: radiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Barredo, R.; Fernandez Echevarria, M.A.; Riego, M. del; Canga, A.

    1998-01-01

    An unusual case is reported of a soft tissue mass in the lower extremity, without bone involvement, in an 85-year-old woman; the histopathological diagnosis was Burkitt's lymphoma. Pertinent clinical history, histological examination, and imaging procedures allowed early diagnosis. To our knowledge, the radiological findings in Burkitt's lymphoma with this unusual clinical presentation have not been described previously. (orig.)

  12. The significance of reduced respiratory chain enzyme activities: clinical, biochemical and radiological associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordekar, S R; Guthrie, P; Bonham, J R; Olpin, S E; Hargreaves, I; Baxter, P S

    2006-03-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are an important group of neurometabolic disorders in children with varied clinical presentations and diagnosis that can be difficult to confirm. To report the significance of reduced respiratory chain enzyme (RCE) activity in muscle biopsy samples from children. Retrospective odds ratio was used to compare clinical and biochemical features, DNA studies, neuroimaging, and muscle biopsies in 18 children with and 48 without reduced RCE activity. Children with reduced RCE activity were significantly more likely to have consanguineous parents, to present with acute encephalopathy and lactic acidaemia and/or within the first year of life; to have an axonal neuropathy, CSF lactate >4 mmol/l; and/or to have signal change in the basal ganglia. There were positive associations with a maternal family history of possible mitochondrial cytopathy; a presentation with failure to thrive and lactic acidaemia, ragged red fibres, reduced fibroblast fatty acid oxidation and with an abnormal allopurinol loading test. There was no association with ophthalmic abnormalities, deafness, epilepsy or myopathy. The association of these clinical, biochemical and radiological features with reduced RCE activity suggests a possible causative link.

  13. Understanding Contamination; Twenty Years of Simulating Radiological Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emily Snyder; John Drake; Ryan James

    2012-02-01

    A wide variety of simulated contamination methods have been developed by researchers to reproducibly test radiological decontamination methods. Some twenty years ago a method of non-radioactive contamination simulation was proposed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that mimicked the character of radioactive cesium and zirconium contamination on stainless steel. It involved baking the contamination into the surface of the stainless steel in order to 'fix' it into a tenacious, tightly bound oxide layer. This type of contamination was particularly applicable to nuclear processing facilities (and nuclear reactors) where oxide growth and exchange of radioactive materials within the oxide layer became the predominant model for material/contaminant interaction. Additional simulation methods and their empirically derived basis (from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility) are discussed. In the last ten years the INL, working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC), has continued to develop contamination simulation methodologies. The most notable of these newer methodologies was developed to compare the efficacy of different decontamination technologies against radiological dispersal device (RDD, 'dirty bomb') type of contamination. There are many different scenarios for how RDD contamination may be spread, but the most commonly used one at the INL involves the dispersal of an aqueous solution containing radioactive Cs-137. This method was chosen during the DARPA projects and has continued through the NHSRC series of decontamination trials and also gives a tenacious 'fixed' contamination. Much has been learned about the interaction of cesium contamination with building materials, particularly concrete, throughout these tests. The effects of porosity, cation-exchange capacity of the material and the amount of dirt and debris on the surface are very important factors

  14. CADASIL: pathogenesis, clinical and radiological findings and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is the most common genetic cause of ischemic strokes and a most important model for the study of subcortical vascular dementia. This unrelentlessly progressive disease affects many hundreds of families all over the world but is not well studied in Brazil. This manuscript reviews pathogenetic, clinical, radiological and therapeutic features of CADASIL. The causal mutations are now very well known, but the same can not be said about its intimate pathogenetic mechanisms. The variable clinical presentation should lead physicians to actively pursue the diagnosis in many settings and to more thoroughly investigate family history in first degree relatives. A rational approach to genetic testing is however needed. Treatment of CADASIL is still largely empiric. High-quality therapeutic studies involving medications and cognitive interventions are strongly needed in CADASIL. (author)

  15. CADASIL: pathogenesis, clinical and radiological findings and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andre, Charles [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). School of Medicine

    2010-04-15

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is the most common genetic cause of ischemic strokes and a most important model for the study of subcortical vascular dementia. This unrelentlessly progressive disease affects many hundreds of families all over the world but is not well studied in Brazil. This manuscript reviews pathogenetic, clinical, radiological and therapeutic features of CADASIL. The causal mutations are now very well known, but the same can not be said about its intimate pathogenetic mechanisms. The variable clinical presentation should lead physicians to actively pursue the diagnosis in many settings and to more thoroughly investigate family history in first degree relatives. A rational approach to genetic testing is however needed. Treatment of CADASIL is still largely empiric. High-quality therapeutic studies involving medications and cognitive interventions are strongly needed in CADASIL. (author)

  16. Early resident-to-resident physics education in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansagra, Akash P

    2014-01-01

    The revised ABR board certification process has updated the method by which diagnostic radiology residents are evaluated for competency in clinical radiologic physics. In this work, the author reports the successful design and implementation of a resident-taught physics course consisting of 5 weekly, hour-long lectures intended for incoming first-year radiology residents in their first month of training. To the author's knowledge, this is the first description of a course designed to provide a very early framework for ongoing physics education throughout residency without increasing the didactic burden on faculty members. Twenty-six first-year residents spanning 2 academic years took the course and reported subjective improvement in their knowledge (90%) and interest (75%) in imaging physics and a high level of satisfaction with the use of senior residents as physics educators. Based on the success of this course and the minimal resources required for implementation, this work may serve as a blueprint for other radiology residency programs seeking to develop revised physics curricula. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiological response and clinical outcome in patients with femoral bone metastases after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Hideyuki; Katagiri, Hirohisa; Kamata, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the radiological response and clinical outcome in patients with femoral bone metastases after radiotherapy. 102 consecutive patients with femoral metastases without pathological fracture were treated by surgery or radiotherapy between 2002 and 2005. Twelve of them initially treated with surgery were excluded from this study. The remaining 90 patients with 102 lesions underwent radiation therapy as the initial treatment. Twelve patients who died within 30 days by disease progression and 6 who were lost to follow-up were excluded. The remaining 72 patients with 84 lesions including 43 impending fractures were enrolled in this analysis. Radiological changes were categorized into complete response, partial response, no change, and progressive disease based on plain radiograph findings. Pain relief was reviewed for 77 painful lesions. The median radiation dose was 30 Gy. No re-irradiation was performed. 35 lesions (42%) achieved radiological responses median 3 months after radiotherapy. Pain relief was obtained in 36 of 77 lesions (47%). There was no significant correlation between radiological response and pain relief (P=0.166). Eleven lesions eventually required surgery and considered as treatment failure. The treatment failure rate in the radiological progressive disease (PD) group (8/19, 42%) was significantly higher than that in the non-PD group (3/65, 5%) (P<0.001). Among 43 impending fracture lesions, 15 lesions (36%) experienced radiological response and 35 lesions (81%) required no surgical interventions. Our data suggest that radiotherapy can enable metastatic bone healing and avoid surgery in many lesions. However, radiological PD lesions often require surgery after radiotherapy. (author)

  18. Radiological protection and its organization in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.; Canizal, C.; Garcia, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    By means of a research carried out in Radiotherapy Centers in Mexico City, divided in 7 public institutions and 5 private, aspects related to the radiological safety and its organization in radiotherapy were evaluated. The population being studied was: medical and technical personnel, that works in the selected radiotherapy centers. The survey was made with 36 dichotomic variables, being obtained 90 surveys. The personnel characteristics are: 76% works for more than 3 years in radiotherapy, 93% has updated information about radiological protection, 67% knows the general radiological safety regulations, 93% knows the radiological emergency project and 95% makes use of personal dosemeter. As result of this research we found that the main problems that the radiological protection have are: lack of personnel training in radiological protection, although the 93% states to have updated information, the few number of persons that takes part in clinical meetings and professional associations. (authors). 7 refs., 3 tabs

  19. 1987 year book of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg, D.G.; Keats, T.E.; Kieffer, S.A.; Kirkpatrick, J.A. Jr.; Koehler, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    The book is divided into seven sections, which cover neuroradiology, the thorax, the abdomen, the musculoskeletal system, pediatric radiology, radiation physics, and cardiovascular and interventional radiology. Each of the seven editors was responsible for one section. These editors gleaned what they thought were the most important articles from 78 medical journals worldwide, wrote abstracts, and then commented on their relevance. For each journal article, the heading lists the title of the paper, the authors, the authors' affiliations, and the journal name. If an article contained an important table or figure, it was reproduced for the review

  20. The quality and impact of computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) in radiology case-based learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V.; Verstraete, Koenraad L.; Valcke, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this research was to explore (1) clinical years students' perceptions about radiology case-based learning within a computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) setting, (2) an analysis of the collaborative learning process, and (3) the learning impact of collaborative work on the radiology cases. Methods: The first part of this study focuses on a more detailed analysis of a survey study about CSCL based case-based learning, set up in the context of a broader radiology curriculum innovation. The second part centers on a qualitative and quantitative analysis of 52 online collaborative learning discussions from 5th year and nearly graduating medical students. The collaborative work was based on 26 radiology cases regarding musculoskeletal radiology. Results: The analysis of perceptions about collaborative learning on radiology cases reflects a rather neutral attitude that also does not differ significantly in students of different grade levels. Less advanced students are more positive about CSCL as compared to last year students. Outcome evaluation shows a significantly higher level of accuracy in identification of radiology key structures and in radiology diagnosis as well as in linking the radiological signs with available clinical information in nearly graduated students. No significant differences between different grade levels were found in accuracy of using medical terminology. Conclusion: Students appreciate computer supported collaborative learning settings when tackling radiology case-based learning. Scripted computer supported collaborative learning groups proved to be useful for both 5th and 7th year students in view of developing components of their radiology diagnostic approaches.

  1. The quality and impact of computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) in radiology case-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V; Verstraete, Koenraad L; Valcke, Martin

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this research was to explore (1) clinical years students' perceptions about radiology case-based learning within a computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) setting, (2) an analysis of the collaborative learning process, and (3) the learning impact of collaborative work on the radiology cases. The first part of this study focuses on a more detailed analysis of a survey study about CSCL based case-based learning, set up in the context of a broader radiology curriculum innovation. The second part centers on a qualitative and quantitative analysis of 52 online collaborative learning discussions from 5th year and nearly graduating medical students. The collaborative work was based on 26 radiology cases regarding musculoskeletal radiology. The analysis of perceptions about collaborative learning on radiology cases reflects a rather neutral attitude that also does not differ significantly in students of different grade levels. Less advanced students are more positive about CSCL as compared to last year students. Outcome evaluation shows a significantly higher level of accuracy in identification of radiology key structures and in radiology diagnosis as well as in linking the radiological signs with available clinical information in nearly graduated students. No significant differences between different grade levels were found in accuracy of using medical terminology. Students appreciate computer supported collaborative learning settings when tackling radiology case-based learning. Scripted computer supported collaborative learning groups proved to be useful for both 5th and 7th year students in view of developing components of their radiology diagnostic approaches. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiological and clinical observation on benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jai Hee; Kim, Young Chul; Kim, Yeon; Han, Jung Suh [College of Medicine, Cho-Sun University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-12-15

    A radiological and clinical observation was made on 77 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia admitted to the department of Urology, Cho-Sun University Hospital during the period from January 1972 to December 1979 and following results were obtained. 1. Incidence of PBH was 8.1% to 953 total inpatients, 11.3% to 679 male inpatients, and 34.5% to male inpatients of 50 years more. 2. Majority of cases was found in 7th and 8th decades (80.5%) with mean age of 69.4 years old. 3. A gradual tendency of annual increase of the cases was observed and the mean interval elapsed from initial symptoms to visit was 29.9 months. Common symptoms were dysuria in 72 cases (93.5%), hematuria in 53 cases (68.8%), frequency in 51 cases (66.2%) and 12 cases (15.6%) were acute urinary retention. 4. I. V. P. findings of BPH were elevation of the bladder base in 71 cases (92.2%), trabeculation of the bladder wall in 58 cases (75.3%), hypertrophy of the bladder in 24 cases (31.2%) and the complications-hydronephrosis and hydroureter 16 cases (20.8%), bladder diverticula 9 cases (11.7%) and bladder stone were 5 cases (6.5%). 5. Cystourethrographic findings of the posterior urethra with 33 cases of PBH were smooth, gentle sloping in 28 cases 84.8%), widening in sagittal plane in 23 cases (69.7%), elongation and narrowing of the urethra in 26 cases (78.8%)

  3. Radiological and clinical observation on benign prostatic hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jai Hee; Kim, Young Chul; Kim, Yeon; Han, Jung Suh

    1980-01-01

    A radiological and clinical observation was made on 77 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia admitted to the department of Urology, Cho-Sun University Hospital during the period from January 1972 to December 1979 and following results were obtained. 1. Incidence of PBH was 8.1% to 953 total inpatients, 11.3% to 679 male inpatients, and 34.5% to male inpatients of 50 years more. 2. Majority of cases was found in 7th and 8th decades (80.5%) with mean age of 69.4 years old. 3. A gradual tendency of annual increase of the cases was observed and the mean interval elapsed from initial symptoms to visit was 29.9 months. Common symptoms were dysuria in 72 cases (93.5%), hematuria in 53 cases (68.8%), frequency in 51 cases (66.2%) and 12 cases (15.6%) were acute urinary retention. 4. I. V. P. findings of BPH were elevation of the bladder base in 71 cases (92.2%), trabeculation of the bladder wall in 58 cases (75.3%), hypertrophy of the bladder in 24 cases (31.2%) and the complications-hydronephrosis and hydroureter 16 cases (20.8%), bladder diverticula 9 cases (11.7%) and bladder stone were 5 cases (6.5%). 5. Cystourethrographic findings of the posterior urethra with 33 cases of PBH were smooth, gentle sloping in 28 cases 84.8%), widening in sagittal plane in 23 cases (69.7%), elongation and narrowing of the urethra in 26 cases (78.8%)

  4. Comparison of clinical and radiological findings in patients with retrosternal and cervical goiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizner, B.; Vilibic, T.; Sikic, E.; Sekso, M.; Vrkljan, M.; Hat, J.

    1994-01-01

    We analyzed the correlation of clinical and radiological findings in the diagnosis of large cervical and retrosternal nodular goitres. Fourteen symptomatic patients were studied (12 female and 2 male). Nine of them had retrosternal goitre. All underwent computed tomography (CT) of the neck and upper mediastinum, thyroid scintigraphy using Tc-99m-pertechnetate and contrast radiology of the oesophagus. Problems with respiration (stridor) were present in five patients, but four of them had CT findings of tracheal compression. The other nine patients had no respiratory problems, and CT revealed tracheal compression in two cases. Nine patients had the dislocation of the trachea on CT. Dysphagia was present in eight cases but only three patients had radiological signs of oesophageal narrowing. These patients also had the dislocation of the oesophagus, revealed by contrast radiology, just as five others without any swallowing problems. The results demonstrate that all patients with respiratory problems do not necessary have tracheal compression (indicating the possible affection of the phrenic nerve). On the other hand, some patients can have tracheal narrowing without any respiratory problems. (author)

  5. Spinal Cord Injury without Radiographic Abnormality (SCIWORA) – Clinical and Radiological Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Szwedowski, Dawid; Walecki, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Summary The acronym SCIWORA (Spinal Cord Injury Without Radiographic Abnormality) was first developed and introduced by Pang and Wilberger who used it to define “clinical symptoms of traumatic myelopathy with no radiographic or computed tomographic features of spinal fracture or instability”. SCIWORA is a clinical-radiological condition that mostly affects children. SCIWORA lesions are found mainly in the cervical spine but can also be seen, although much less frequently, in the thoracic or l...

  6. [Instruction in dental radiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Kreulen, C.M.; Berkhout, W.E.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic use of oral radiology is an essential part of daily dental practice. Due to the potentially harmful nature of ionising radiation, the clinical use of oral radiology in the Netherlands is framed by clinical practice guidelines and regulatory requirements. Undergraduate students receive

  7. Clinical and Radiological Evaluation of Children with Subacute Sclerosan Panencephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet İrdem

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 65 children with Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis (SSPE who admittedto our clinic between September 1998 and December 2002 were retrospectively evaluated interms of clinical and radiological findings.The most common symptoms and findings at admission were myoklonia (31 patients, 47%, behaveral changes (18 patients, 27.7 % and convulsion (8 patients, 12 %. There was atrauma history initiating symptoms in 14 patients (21.5 %. Neurological symptoms presentedsignificantly earlier in patients who had measles before 2 years of age compared to others(p0.05. The clinical stage of the patients at admission was determined based on Risk veHaddad classification. The most frequent stage was IIA (21 patients, 32.2%, IIC (17patients, 26.2% and IIB (16 patients, 24.6%. At the follow-up period, 46 (71% patients wasdepended to bed. The mean time interval between SSPE initiation age and bed dependencywas 4.68 ± 4.05 months (1-17 months.Of the 31 patients who underwent cranial magnetic rezonans imaging (MRI, 15patients (48.38% had pathological findings, the most frequent findings were cortical vesubcortical lesions. Of the 24 patients who underwent cranial tomographi, 22 (91.6% werenormal. Of the remaining two, one had atrophy and the other had increase in contrast. All ofthe patients underwent rutine EEG test. Fifty-four (83.1% of these had periodic complexhigh slow wave activity.The clinical findings and Electro Encephalographi results are important parameters inthe diagnosis of SSPE. Cranial tomographi is not useful in the diagnosis of SSPE. However,cranial MRI findings is pathologic only in the half of the patients.

  8. Quality index of radiological devices: results of one year of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofani, Alessandro; Imbordino, Patrizia; Lecci, Antonio; Bonannini, Claudia; Del Corona, Alberto; Pizzi, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    The physical quality index (QI) of radiological devices summarises in a single numerical value between 0 and 1 the results of constancy tests. The aim of this paper is to illustrate the results of the use of such an index on all public radiological devices in the Livorno province over one year. The quality index was calculated for 82 radiological devices of a wide range of types by implementing its algorithm in a spreadsheet-based software for the automatic handling of quality control data. The distribution of quality index values was computed together with the associated statistical quantities. This distribution is strongly asymmetrical, with a sharp peak near the highest QI values. The mean quality index values for the different types of device show some inhomogeneity: in particular, mammography and panoramic dental radiography devices show far lower quality than other devices. In addition, our analysis has identified the parameters that most frequently do not pass the quality tests for each type of device. Finally, we sought some correlation between quality and age of the device, but this was poorly significant. The quality index proved to be a useful tool providing an overview of the physical conditions of radiological devices. By selecting adequate QI threshold values for, it also helps to decide whether a given device should be upgraded or replaced. The identification of critical parameters for each type of device may be used to improve the definition of the QI by attributing greater weights to critical parameters, so as to better address the maintenance of radiological devices.

  9. Pulmonary hypertension. Radiological diagnostics in the clinical context; Pulmonale Hypertonie. Radiologische Diagnostik im klinischen Kontext

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ley, Sebastian [Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Medical Imaging

    2012-06-15

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) has a broad differential and the radiological task is to define and characterize the pathophysiological background. The first part of the review is focused on the clinical categorization and specific features of the various groups of PH. Overall, PH is a rare disease and the clinical symptoms are non specific. Therefore, the disease is usually detected delayed. Each radiological technique, especially chest X-ray and CT, do show specific findings suggestive of PH, which will be discussed. Verification of the severity of PH is still a domain of invasive right heart catheterization. However, there are promising approaches using MRI to determine the pulmonary arterial pressure non-invasively. (orig.)

  10. Clinical and radiological manifestations of paraneoplastic syndrome of bronchogenic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldner Branislav

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to present some clinical and radiological manifestations of PNS in relation to bronchogenic carcinoma (BC and to evaluate the usefulness of imaging findings in the diagnosis of asymptomatic BC. In the study group of 204 patients (146 male and 58 female with proven bronchogenic carcinoma, PNS was present in 18 (8.62% patients. The patients with PNS were divided into two groups. The first one consisted of 13 (72.2% patients with symptoms related to primary tumours while the second one consisted of 5 (27.7% patients with symptoms, at initial appearance, indicative of disorders of other organs and systems. The predominant disorder was Lambert-Eaton Syndrome, associated with small-cell carcinoma. Endocrine manifestations included: inappropriate antidiuretic hormone production syndrome (small-cell carcinoma, a gonadotropin effect with gynaecomastia and testicular atrophy (planocellular carcinoma, small-cell carcinoma, a case of Cushing Syndrome (small-cell carcinoma, and hyper-calcaemia, due to the production of the parathyroid hormone-related peptide, which was associated with planocellular carcinoma. A rare case of bilateral exophthalmos was found as PNS at adenocarcinoma. Digital clubbing and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HO were associated with planocellular and adenocarcinoma, while clubbing was much more common than HO, especially among women. The differences between the two groups were related to the time of PNS appearance. In the first group, PNS occurred late on in the illness, while in the second group, PNS preceded the diagnosis of BC. Alternatively, the disappearance of a clinical or a radiological manifestation of PNS after surgery or chemotherapy may be an indicator of an improvement in health or PNS may be the first sign of illness recurrence. Radiological manifestations of PNS in asymptomatic patients may serve as a useful screen for identifying primary BC. In symptomatic patients, it may be an

  11. Radiological Outcomes in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Patients More Than 22 Years After Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simony, Ane; Christensen, Steen Bach; Carreon, Leah Y

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Longitudinal cohort. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the long-term radiologic outcomes in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients more than 22 years after treatment. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Although treatment for AIS is prophylactic and is aimed at preventing curve progression......, very few studies report long-term outcomes of treatment. METHODS: AIS patients treated with Boston brace or posterior spinal fusion (PSF) with Harrington-dorso-transverse traction (DTT) instrumentation from 1983 to 1990 were requested to return to clinic. Subsequently, 36-inch standing radiographs were...... obtained after patient consent. Cobb angles were compared with pretreatment and immediate posttreatment radiographs. Any evidence of adjacent-level disease or local kyphosis was also noted. RESULTS: One hundred fifty-nine (78%) of 219 patients were available for follow-up, 66 braced and 93 surgical...

  12. Clinical and radiological evolution of a hand arthrosis in twenty-five years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calonje, Julio H; Botero, Misael; Gersner, Jochen

    2004-01-01

    The clinical evolution and X rays of an arthrodosis of the hand followed for 25 years is presented. This is a complement of another article published in the magazine, arthrosis viewed by a doctor patient second part. An emphasis is placed on the good results obtained with a new program of exercises. The problems related to the Alignment and instability of the wrist and its collapse are analyzed in depth in both the example X rays as well as the scannography

  13. Diagnostic radiology 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulis, A.R.; Gooding, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    This is the latest version of the continuing education course on diagnostic radiology given yearly by the Department of Radiology at the University of California, San Francisco. The lectures are grouped into sections on gastrointestinal radiology, mammography, uroradiology, magnetic resonance, hepatobiliary radiology, pediatric radiology, ultrasound, interventional radiology, chest radiology, nuclear medicine, cardiovascular radiology, and skeletal radiology. Each section contains four to eight topics. Each of these consists of text that represents highlights in narrative form, selected illustrations, and a short bibliography. The presentation gives a general idea of what points were made in the lecture

  14. Changes in radiological protection and quality control in Spanish dental installations: 1996-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Baños, Miguel; Parra-Pérez, María del Carmen; Armero-Barranco, David; Velasco-Hidalgo, Francisco; Velasco-Hidalgo, Esteban

    2009-10-01

    The European Union has established specific directives concerning radiological protection which are obligatory for member States. In addition, all Spanish dental clinics with radiological equipment are required to have an annual quality control check. To analyze the effect of new European legislation on dental radiological practice in Spain and to determine whether it has resulted in lower doses being administered to patients. A total of 10,171 official radiological quality control reports on Spanish dental clinics, covering 16 autonomous regions, were studied following the passing of Royal Decree 2071/1995 on quality criteria in radiodiagnostic installations. The reports, compiled by U.T.P.R Asigma S.A., a company authorised by the Nuclear Safety Council, cover the years 1996 to 2003, which has enabled us to monitor the evolution of radiological procedures in dental clinics over a seven year period. According to the reports for 2003, 77.3 % of clinics complied with EU requirements, using equipment of 70 kVp, 8 mA, 1.5 mm Al filters, with a collimator length of 20 cm. However, non-compliance was detected in approximately a third (30.8%) of the equipment inspected: alterations in the kilovoltage used, exposure time, performance of the tubing, dosage, linearity/intensity of current and acoustic-luminous signal 6.86%. The mean skin dose reached 3.11 mGy for patients who received an x-ray of an upper molar, representing a decrease of 18% over the seven years studied. there has obviously been a general improvement in the parameters studied, but only 77.3% of the installations complied fully with official EU regulations concerning dental radiological protection.

  15. Arthroscopic-Assisted Repair in Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Ruptures: Functional and Radiologic Results of Five-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriç Uğurlar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In our study, we evaluated the post-operative 5-year clinical and radiological results and the ratio of re­current ruptures under magnetic resonance imaging of the patients diagnosed as wide and massive, full-thick­ness rotator cuff rupture and arthroscopic-assisted mini-open rotator cuff repair is applied. Methods: We evaluated the pre-operative and post-op­erative clinical and radiological results of 38 patients with wide and massive, full-thickness rotator cuff rupture and arthroscopic-assisted rotator cuff repair is applied after failure of conservative treatment. Results: Mean post-operative follow-up period was 60.4 months. According to UCLA scoring there were excellent results in 26 patients, good results in 10, and moderate results in 2 patients. According to Constant scoring there were excellent results in 24 patients, good results in 12, and moderate results in 2 patients. 34 of the 38 patients indicated that they were satisfied with the results. The continuity of the rotator cuffs are evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging at the last visits of the patients and there was recurrent ruptures at the 8 patients. Conclusion: Although recurrent rotator cuff rupture rates varies depending on the age of the patients, moderate clinical results are obtained in elder patients. Neverthe­less, despite the rupture rates in the treatment of wide and massive, full-thickness ruptures, satisfactory clinical results can be obtained with arthroscopic-assisted mini-open rotator cuff repair.

  16. Phyllodes tumor: clinical, radiological and pathological correlation in 50 cases; Tumor filodes: correlacion clinica, radiologica y anatomopatologica en 50 casos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higueras, A.; Alvarez, M.; Jimenez, A.; Garcia Revillo, J.; Cano, A. [Hospital Universitario Reina Sofia. Cordoba (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    To review the radiological features of the phyllodes tumor, correlating them with the clinical presentation, histological type and response to treatment. Fifty phyllodes tumors in 29 patients aged 16 to 59 years (mean: 41 years) were analyzed retrospectively. The series included 12 cases of recurrence, 1 of bilateral tumor and 6 of multiple tumor. Forty-five lesions were studied by mammography and 36 by ultrasound. Clinically guided fine-needle aspiration cytology was performed in 8 cases. The pathological diagnosis was obtained by means of surgical biopsy in every case (31 benign and 19 malignant). Twenty-four patients underwent postoperative clinical and radiological follow-up for a mean period of 32 months. Mammography revealed the presence of a nodule or mass in 42 cases, asymmetrical density in two and a generalized increase in density in one: Multifocal lesions were detected in six cases. The size varied widely, with masses measuring >5 cm showing a greater probability of malignancy (p<0.01). Calcifications were observed in 13% of the cases. Ultrasound revealed the presence of heterogeneous, hypoechoic nodules, with cystic areas in five tumors, all of which were malignant (p<0.01). Local recurrence was detected in 31% of the cases and bone metastases in one. The phyllodes tumor is an uncommon fibroepithelial tumor that has a potential for recurrence and distant metastasis. Mammographic and ultrasound features are similar to those of the fibroadenoma, a lesion with which it is occasionally associated. Multiple lesions are not infrequent and it can present with calcifications. The presence of cystic areas and a tumor size of >5 cm are the only radiological findings that are statistically associated with malignancy. The recurrence rate is greater in malignant tumors than in benign lesions, especially in patients treated by tumor resection. (Author) 28 refs.

  17. A snapshot of patients' awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with medical imaging examinations at an Australian radiology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N; Mohacsy, A; Connell, D A; Schneider, M E

    2017-05-01

    Cumulative radiation exposure is linked to increasing the lifetime attributable risk of cancer. To avoid unnecessary radiation exposure and facilitate shared decision making, patients should be aware of these issues. This paper examines patients' awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with medical imaging examinations. Consecutive patients attending a private radiology clinic over a nine week period in 2014 in Metropolitan Melbourne were surveyed while waiting to undergo an imaging examination. Patients who were under 18 years of age, did not speak English and/or were referred for interventional imaging procedures were excluded from participation. Survey questions addressed patients' awareness of radiation dose associated with various imaging modalities' and patients' experience and preferences regarding communication of information about radiation. Data was analysed using SPSS (Ver 20.1). A total of 242 surveys were completed. Most participants were male (143/239, 59.8%) and aged between 33 and 52 years (109/242, 45%). Over half of participants were not concerned about radiation from medical imaging (130/238, 54.6%). Only a third of participants (80/234, 34.2%) correctly reported that CT has a higher radiation dose than X-ray. Very few participants correctly identified mammography, DEXA, PET and PET/CT as radiation emitting examinations. The majority of participants (202/236, 85.6%) indicated that they were not informed about radiation dose and risks by their referring doctor in advance. This paper provides information relevant to a single private radiology clinic in Australia. Nevertheless, our results have shown that patients presenting for medical imaging have little awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with these examinations and received little information by their referring physicians or staff at the radiology clinic. Copyright © 2016 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. SU-E-E-01: ABR Diagnostic Radiology Core Exam: Was Our Redesigned Physics Course Successful in Teaching Physics to Radiology Residents?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanal, K; Hoff, M; Dickinson, R; Zamora, D; Stewart, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Our purpose is to evaluate the effectiveness of our two year physics course in preparing radiology residents for the American Board of Radiology (ABR) diagnostic radiology exam. Methods: We designed a new two-year physics course that integrates radiology clinical content and practice and is primarily based on the AAPM curriculum and RSNA/AAPM physics modules. Biweekly classes focus on relevant concepts from assigned reading and use audience response systems to encourage participation. Teaching efficiency is optimized through lecturer rotations of physicists, radiologists, and guest speakers. An emphasis is placed on clinical relevance by requiring lab work and providing equipment demonstrations. Periodic quiz were given during the course. The course website was also redesigned for usability, and physics review lectures were conducted two weeks before the board exam to refresh key concepts. At the completion of our first two-year course, we conducted a confidential evaluation of the faculty and course. The evaluation assessed metrics such as overall organization, clinical relevance of content, and level of difficulty, with a rating scale from poor to excellent. Results: Our evaluation indicated that the redesigned course provided effective board exam preparation, with most responses between good and excellent. There was some criticism on the course length and on chronological discontinuity, but the review lectures were appreciated by the residents. All of our residents passed the physics component of the ABR exam with scores exceeding the minimum passing score by a significant margin. Conclusion: The course evaluation and board exam results indicate that our new two-year course format provides valuable board exam preparation. This is possible thanks to the time and effort taken by the physics faculty on ensuring the residents get quality physics education

  19. Sampling on radiological protection training in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.

    2001-01-01

    Radiological security aspects were evaluated in radiology departments from Mexico City. The study was carried out in two stages, the first one evaluated 40 departments just before the implementation of the new Official Mexican Standards related to Radiological Security and Quality Control in Radiology; in the second stage 33 departments were evaluated 2 years after those standards were implanted, showing a favorable impact of the training programs for the type of answers obtained [es

  20. Status of SRNL radiological field lysimeter experiment-Year 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Roberts, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Bagwell, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-10-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Radiological Field Lysimeter Experiment is a one-of-a-kind field facility designed to study radionuclide geochemical processes at a larger spatial scale (from grams to tens of kilograms sediment) and temporal scale (from months to 10 years) than is readily afforded through laboratory studies. The lysimeter facility is intended to capture the natural heterogeneity of moisture and temperature regimes in the vadose zone, the unsaturated subsurface region between the surface soil and the underlying aquifer. The 48 lysimeter columns, which contain various radionuclides (and stable iodine), were opened to rainfall infiltration on July 5, 2012. The objective of this report is to provide a status of the lysimeter facility operations and to compile data collected during FY13, including leachate volume, rainfall, and soil moisture and temperature in situ probe data. Radiological leachate data are not presented in this document but will be the subject of a separate document.1 Leachate samples were collected quarterly and shipped to Clemson University for radiological analyses. Rainfall, leachate volume, moisture and temperature probe data were collected continuously. During operations of the facility this year, there were four safety or technical concerns that required additional maintenance: 1) radioactivity was detected in one of the overflow bottles (captured water collected from the secondary containment that does not come in contact with the radiological source material); 2) rainwater accumulated within the sample-bottle storage sheds; 3) overflow containers collected more liquid than anticipated; and 4) significant spider infestation occurred in the sample-bottle storage sheds. To address the first three concerns, each of the lysimeter columns was re-plumbed to improve and to minimize the number of joint unions. To address the fourth concern regarding spiders, new sample-bottle water sheds were purchased and a pest control

  1. Integration of basic sciences and clinical sciences in oral radiology education for dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdady, Mariam T; Carnahan, Heather; Lam, Ernest W N; Woods, Nicole N

    2013-06-01

    Educational research suggests that cognitive processing in diagnostic radiology requires a solid foundation in the basic sciences and knowledge of the radiological changes associated with disease. Although it is generally assumed that dental students must acquire both sets of knowledge, little is known about the most effective way to teach them. Currently, the basic and clinical sciences are taught separately. This study was conducted to compare the diagnostic accuracy of students when taught basic sciences segregated or integrated with clinical features. Predoctoral dental students (n=51) were taught four confusable intrabony abnormalities using basic science descriptions integrated with the radiographic features or taught segregated from the radiographic features. The students were tested with diagnostic images, and memory tests were performed immediately after learning and one week later. On immediate and delayed testing, participants in the integrated basic science group outperformed those from the segregated group. A main effect of learning condition was found to be significant (pbasic sciences integrated with clinical features produces higher diagnostic accuracy in novices than teaching basic sciences segregated from clinical features.

  2. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences of the fiscal year 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This annual report presents the activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan in the fiscal year 1988. The activities are divided into research, technical aids, training, medical services, management, library or editing, and international cooperation. Research activities are described under the following sections: (I) newly started special researches for 'biological risk evaluation in public exposure' and 'exposure assessment in the environment and the public involved in food chain', and the continuing special research for 'medical use of accelerated heavy ions'; (II) five assigned researches; (III) ordinary researches concerning physics, pharmachochemistry, biology, genetics, pathology and physiology, cell biology, internal exposure, environmental science, clinical research, clinical research for radiation injuries, medical use of heavy particles, environmental radiation ecology, and aquatic radiation ecology; (IV) risk estimation of radiation; (V) actual surveys for Bikini victims, population doses of medical and occupational exposure, and thorotrast exposure; (VI) project research; (VII) radioactivity survey; (VIII) research supported by Science and Technology Agency aids. Appendices include the personnel list and the bibliography of articles reported by the staff. (N.K.)

  3. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences of the fiscal year 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    This annual report presents the activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan in the fiscal year 1989. The activities are divided into research, technical aids, training, medical services, management, library or editing, and international cooperation. Research activities are described under the following sections: (I) newly started special researches for 'biological risk evaluation in public exposure' and 'exposure assessment in the environment and the public involved in food chain', and the continuing special research for 'medical use of accelerated heavy ions'; (II) six assigned researches; (III) ordinary researches concerning physics, pharmachochemistry, biology, genetics, pathology and physiology, cell biology, internal exposure, environmental science, clinical research, clinical research for radiation injuries, medical use of heavy particles, environmental radiation ecology, and aquatic radiation ecology; (IV) risk estimation of radiation; (V) actual surveys for Bikini victims, population doses of medical and occupational exposure, and thorotrast exposure; (VI) project research; (VII) radioactivity survey; (VIII) research supported by Science and Technology Agency aids. Appendices include the personnel list and the bibliography of articles reported by the staff. (N.K.) 809 refs

  4. Journal of Medical Chemical, Biological and Radiological Defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, B.

    2007-01-01

    The Journal of Medical Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Defense is a free, on-line journal dedicated to providing an international, peer-reviewed journal of original scientific research and clinical and doctrinal knowledge in the area of medical treatment and countermeasures for chemical, biological and radiological defense; and to developing and maintaining an archive of current research and development information on training, doctrine, and professional discussions of problems related to chemical, biological and radiological casualties. The Journal, www.JMedCBR.org, now in its fifth year, is sponsored by the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to: Neuroprotectants; Bioscavengers for Nerve Agents; Medical Diagnostic Systems and Technologies; Medical Effects of Low Level Exposures; Toxicology and Biological Effects of TICs and TIMs; Broad Spectrum Medical Countermeasures; Treatments and Therapeutics for Bacterial, Viral and Toxin Agents; Radiological Medical Countermeasures; Clinical Treatment of Chemical, Biological or Radiological Casualties; Toxins Structures and Treatments. The Journal is supported by an editorial advisory board of distinguished scientists and researchers in the fields of CBR defense and medical treatment and countermeasures in eleven countries.(author)

  5. Implantation of a double reading process for radiological exams of the radiology service of the Clinical Hospital of Porto Alegre using the IMPAX client system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, A.L.; Goulart, J.M.; Lucena, R.A.; Bacelar, A.; Pinto, A.L.A.

    2017-01-01

    A Quality Management System consists of several processes that qualify and quantify the performance of a service, minimizing the possibility of errors in the radiological diagnosis that may result in clinical consequences. One of these processes is the implantation of double reading, which consists in the evaluation of the report interpreted by a radiologist and the subsequent conference by another radiologist, through the analysis of archived PACS exams. The classification of the results of these analyzes was based on the recommendations of the American College of Radiology (ACR). Double reading is an extremely effective process for increasing the quality of the radiological report, in addition to contributing to the continuing education between the pairs

  6. Medical student knowledge regarding radiology before and after a radiological anatomy module: implications for vertical integration and self-directed learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kevin P; Crush, Lee; O'Malley, Eoin; Daly, Fergus E; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P; O'Connor, Owen J; Cryan, John F; Maher, Michael M

    2014-10-01

    To examine the impact that anatomy-focused radiology teaching has on non-examined knowledge regarding radiation safety and radiology as a specialty. First-year undergraduate medical students completed surveys prior to and after undertaking the first-year anatomy programme that incorporates radiological anatomy. Students were asked opinions on preferred learning methodology and tested on understanding of radiology as a specialty and radiation safety. Pre-module and post-module response rates were 93 % (157/168) and 85 % (136/160), respectively. Pre-module and post-module, self-directed learning (SDL) ranked eighth (of 11) for preferred gross-anatomy teaching formats. Correct responses regarding radiologist/radiographer roles varied from 28-94 % on 16 questions with 4/16 significantly improving post-module. Identification of modalities that utilise radiation significantly improved for five of eight modalities post-module but knowledge regarding relative amount of modality-specific radiation use was variable pre-module and post-module. SDL is not favoured as an anatomy teaching method. Exposure of students to a radiological anatomy module delivered by senior clinical radiologists improved basic knowledge regarding ionising radiation use, but there was no improvement in knowledge regarding radiation exposure relative per modality. A possible explanation is that students recall knowledge imparted in didactic lectures but do little reading around the subject when the content is not examined. • Self-directed learning is not favoured as a gross anatomy teaching format amongst medical students. • An imaging anatomy-focused module improved basic knowledge regarding ionising radiation use. • Detailed knowledge of modality-specific radiation exposure remained suboptimal post-module. • Knowledge of roles within a clinical radiology department showed little change post-module.

  7. Radiology and the mobile device: Radiology in motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar G Panughpath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of mobile devices is revolutionizing the way we communicate, interact, are entertained, and organize our lives. With healthcare in general and radiology in particular becoming increasingly digital, the use of such devices in radiologic practice is inevitable. This article reviews the current status of the use of mobile devices in the clinical practice of radiology, namely in emergency teleradiology. Technical parameters such as luminance and resolution are discussed. The article also discusses the benefits of such mobility vis-à-vis the current limitations of the technologies available.

  8. Radiology and the mobile device: Radiology in motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panughpath, Sridhar G; Kalyanpur, Arjun

    2012-01-01

    The use of mobile devices is revolutionizing the way we communicate, interact, are entertained, and organize our lives. With healthcare in general and radiology in particular becoming increasingly digital, the use of such devices in radiologic practice is inevitable. This article reviews the current status of the use of mobile devices in the clinical practice of radiology, namely in emergency teleradiology. Technical parameters such as luminance and resolution are discussed. The article also discusses the benefits of such mobility vis-à-vis the current limitations of the technologies available

  9. Rational use of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racoveanu, N.T.; Volodin, V.

    1992-01-01

    Radiologists in USA and UK have since early 1970 questioned the efficacy of various radiological investigations and produced substantial evidence that more rational approaches are necessary. WHO initiated, in 1977, a programme which has issued four technical reports giving practical recommendations on how to rationalise the use of radiological examinations. Three main directions are considered: (1) Abandonment of routine radiological examinations, as procedures with no clinical or epidemiologic significance and which represent a waste of resources and patient dose. (2) Patient selection for various radiological investigations based on clinical criteria (high, intermediate, low yield). Selected patients have an increased prevalence of the given disease and the predictive value of radiological investigation is much higher. (3) Use of diagnostic algorithms with higher cost/efficiency and risk/benefit ratios, improving the outcome of radiological examinations. (author)

  10. The clinical and radiological evaluation of pyogenic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Kyung Joo; Yoo, Jung Keun; Kim, Young Chul; Hur, Don [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-12-15

    Pyogenic arthritis remain a difficult problem, despite the availability of a wide range of powerful modern antibiotics. Early and correct diagnosis is imperative to assure the prompt initiation of an effective therapeutic regimen and the prevent of late sequela. Careful clinical, laboratory and roentgenological analysis are fundamental to early and precise diagnosis. Therefore, plain roentgenogram should not be overlooked. A radiological and clinical observation was made in 51 cases of pyogenic arthritis admitted to Chosun University Hospital during the period from January 1976 to December 1983 and following results were obtained. 1. Among the 51 cases, 36 cases (70.6%) were male and 15 cases (29.4%) were females. The most prevalent age was 5 to 9 (27.6%). 2. Symptom duration less than 5 days was in 21 cases (41.2%) and more than 31 days was in 6 cases (11.7%). 3. The most common symptom on admission was pain around the involved joint and others are limitation of motion, swelling, tenderness, fever, local heating and erythema. 4. The underlying causes were composed of unknown in 21 cases (41.2%), trauma in 18 cases (35.3%), infections focus in 8 cases (15.7%) and iatrogenic reason 4 cases (7.8%). 5. The most commonly affected joint was hip joint (45.1%). The other affected sites in order of frequency were knee, ankle, shoulder, S-I and elbow joint. In infants and children, hip and knee joint are commonly affected: in adults, knee joint is most is most commonly affected. 6. In laboratory findings, the number of W.B.C and E.S.R were increased in 56.9%. Symptom duration more than 31 days in 5 cases were increased E.S.R only. Causative microorganism was isolated in 31 cases: the most common microorganism was Staphylococcus aureus in 22 cases. Others are B-hemolytics Stretoocccus, Enterobacteriaceae species and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. 7. In 26 cases (50.9%) of the patients, roentgenographic findings was negative. The most common radiological findings was soft tissue

  11. The clinical and radiological evaluation of pyogenic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Kyung Joo; Yoo, Jung Keun; Kim, Young Chul; Hur, Don

    1984-01-01

    Pyogenic arthritis remain a difficult problem, despite the availability of a wide range of powerful modern antibiotics. Early and correct diagnosis is imperative to assure the prompt initiation of an effective therapeutic regimen and the prevent of late sequela. Careful clinical, laboratory and roentgenological analysis are fundamental to early and precise diagnosis. Therefore, plain roentgenogram should not be overlooked. A radiological and clinical observation was made in 51 cases of pyogenic arthritis admitted to Chosun University Hospital during the period from January 1976 to December 1983 and following results were obtained. 1. Among the 51 cases, 36 cases (70.6%) were male and 15 cases (29.4%) were females. The most prevalent age was 5 to 9 (27.6%). 2. Symptom duration less than 5 days was in 21 cases (41.2%) and more than 31 days was in 6 cases (11.7%). 3. The most common symptom on admission was pain around the involved joint and others are limitation of motion, swelling, tenderness, fever, local heating and erythema. 4. The underlying causes were composed of unknown in 21 cases (41.2%), trauma in 18 cases (35.3%), infections focus in 8 cases (15.7%) and iatrogenic reason 4 cases (7.8%). 5. The most commonly affected joint was hip joint (45.1%). The other affected sites in order of frequency were knee, ankle, shoulder, S-I and elbow joint. In infants and children, hip and knee joint are commonly affected: in adults, knee joint is most is most commonly affected. 6. In laboratory findings, the number of W.B.C and E.S.R were increased in 56.9%. Symptom duration more than 31 days in 5 cases were increased E.S.R only. Causative microorganism was isolated in 31 cases: the most common microorganism was Staphylococcus aureus in 22 cases. Others are B-hemolytics Stretoocccus, Enterobacteriaceae species and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. 7. In 26 cases (50.9%) of the patients, roentgenographic findings was negative. The most common radiological findings was soft tissue

  12. Paediatric radiology and scientific contributions to radiation dose at the meeting of the German Radiological Society-An analysis of an 11-year period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyer, Christoph M.; Lemburg, Stefan P.; Peters, Soeren A.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Evaluation of the emphasis on themes pertaining to paediatric radiology and radiation dose at the Meeting of the German Radiological Society from 1998 to 2008 in comparison to international data. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of 9440 abstracts with documentation of type of contribution, imaging modality, and examined body region. Abstracts primarily dealing with paediatric radiology and those stating radiation dose were documented. Results were compared with a Pubmed query. Results: 448 contributions in paediatric radiology were presented corresponding to 5% of all abstracts with an increase from 5 (1998) to 7% (2008). The proportion of prospective studies of all congress contributions was 10%, whereas in paediatric radiology, the share of prospective studies was 6%. From 1998 to 2008, the share of MRI fell from 48 to 38%, while CT contributions rose from 30 to 34%. Within paediatric radiology, the proportion of CT rose from 23 to 29%, while MRI and ultrasound fell from 63 to 48% and 35 to 19%, respectively. The share of abstracts dealing with radiation dose rose from 7 to 10% while that primarily pertaining to dose reduction grew from 2 to 4%. Of all abstracts concerning CT, 15% touched on radiation dose, whereas 6% primarily dealt with dose reduction. Among all abstracts dealing with paediatric radiology, 20 and 6% mentioned radiation dose and dose reduction, respectively. In the subgroup of paediatric radiology CT abstracts, radiation dose and dose reduction were mentioned in 34 and 16%, respectively. An online query produced 137,791 publications on CT, of whose abstracts 3% mentioned radiation dose and 0.5% mentioned dose reduction. 11% of all CT publications dealt with paediatric populations and 2% of these publications examined questions of radiation dose. Conclusions: In the last 11 years the Meeting of the German Radiological Society has presented a growing number of contributions pertaining to paediatric radiology. CT has shown the

  13. Clinical and radiological outcomes after treatment of sagittal fracture of mandibular condyle (SFMC) by using occlusal splint in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Kui; Meng, Fan-Wen; Tan, Xin-Ying; Xu, Juan; Liu, Hua-Wei; Liu, San-Xia; Huang, Hai-Tao; Yan, Rong-Zeng; Hu, Min; Hu, Kai-Jin

    2014-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of occlusal splints in the treatment of sagittal fractures of the mandibular condyle in children. From January 1995 to December 2011, 37 sagittal fractures of the mandibular condyle in 30 patients aged 4-8 years old were included in this study. All the patients were treated with 1-2mm occlusal splints in the molar region. The mouths of the patients were kept slightly open by the occlusal splints for 3-6 months, and we reviewed the clinical and radiological remodelling of the affected condyles after treatment. Excellent (n=20) and good (n=10) clinical outcomes were achieved with full radiological remodelling seen in 19 and partial remodelling in 11. Treatment with occlusal splints is effective in delivering good results and function with minimal morbidity in children with sagittal fractures of the condyle, while permitting ongoing remodelling and growth in the short term. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with 4-strand hamstring autograft and accelerated rehabilitation: a 10-year prospective study on clinical results, knee osteoarthritis and its predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Rob P A; du Mée, Arthur W F; van Valkenburg, Juliette; Sala, Harm A G M; Tseng, Carroll M

    2013-09-01

    Analysis of long-term clinical and radiological outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with special attention to knee osteoarthritis and its predictors. A prospective, consecutive case series of 100 patients. Arthroscopic transtibial ACL reconstruction was performed using 4-strand hamstring tendon autografts with a standardized accelerated rehabilitation protocol. Analysis was performed preoperatively and 10 years postoperatively. Clinical examination included Lysholm and Tegner scores, IKDC, KT-1000 testing (MEDmetric Co., San Diego, CA, USA) and leg circumference measurements. Radiological evaluation included AP weight bearing, lateral knee, Rosenberg and sky view X-rays. Radiological classifications were according to Ahlbäck and Kellgren & Lawrence. Statistical analysis included univariate and multivariate logistic regressions. RESULTS CLINICAL OUTCOME: A significant improvement (p test, IKDC score and one-leg hop test. A pivot shift phenomenon (glide) was still present in 43 (50%) patients and correlated with lower levels of activity (p test. Transtibial ACL reconstruction with 4-strand hamstring autograft and accelerated rehabilitation restored anteroposterior knee stability. Clinical parameters and patient satisfaction improved significantly. At 10-year follow-up, radiological signs of OA were present in 53.5 % of the subjects. Risk factors for OA were meniscectomy prior to or at the time of ACL reconstruction and chondral lesions at the time of ACL reconstruction. II.

  15. Methadone-Induced Delayed Posthypoxic Encephalopathy: Clinical, Radiological, and Pathological Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Mittal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe the clinical, radiological and pathological findings in a patient with methadone-induced delayed posthypoxic encephalopathy (DPHE. Case Report. A Thirty-eight-year-old man was found unconscious for an unknown duration after methadone and diazepam ingestion. His initial vitals were temperature 104 degree Fahrenheit, heart rate 148/minute, respiratory rate 50/minute, and blood pressure 107/72 mmhg. He developed renal failure, rhabdomyolysis, and elevated liver enzymes which resolved completely in 6 days. After 2 weeks from discharge he had progressive deterioration of his cognitive, behavioral and neurological function. Brain MRI showed diffuse abnormal T2 signal in the corona radiata, centrum semiovale, and subcortical white matter throughout all lobes. Extensive work up was negative for any metabolic, infectious or autoimmune disorder. Brain biopsy showed significant axonal injury in the white matter. He was treated successfully with combination of steroids and antioxidants. Follow up at 2 year showed no residual deficits. Conclusion. Our observation suggests that patients on methadone therapy should be monitored for any neurological or psychiatric symptoms, and in suspected cases MRI brain may help to make the diagnosis of DPHE. A trial of steroids and antioxidants may be considered in these patients.

  16. Radiological Approach to Forefoot Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Chung Ho

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Forefoot pain is a common clinical complaint in orthopaedic practice. In this article, we discuss the anatomy of the forefoot, clinical and radiological approaches to forefoot pain, and common painful forefoot disorders and their associated radiological features.

  17. Radiological findings and interventions for iatrogenic vascular injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung Ho; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Han, Sang Wook; Lee, Jong Seog; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Jong Hyo; Han, Man Chung

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the radiological findings and effectiveness of radiological interventions in patients with iatrogenic vascular injuries. We analyzed 50 patients with iatrogenic vascular injuries treated with radiological intervention. The causes of injuries were surgery (n=20), cardiovascular intervention (n=15), non-cardiovascular radiological intervention (n=14), and endoscopic intervention (n=1). The injury had resulted in hemorrhage in 35 cases. The iliac and/or femoral, hepatic, and renal vessels were commonly injured. Angiography, ultrasonography with Doppler examination, CT, and CT angiography were performed to diagnose vascular injuries and guide the radiological intervention. The mean follow-up period was 23 months and in 16 cases was more than one year. the major radiological findings were extravasation, pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous shunt, or vascular obstruction. To control these lesions, radiological interventions such as embolization (n=36), local urokinase administration, stent insertion, foreign body removal, ultrasonography-guided compression, or stent-graft insertion were performed. The clinical problems were immediately controlled by the single trials of radiological interventions and did not recur in 40 cases (80%). Radiological examinations and interventions are useful in cases with iatrogenic vascular injuries. (author). 14 refs., 4 figs

  18. An investigation on clinical, radiological and biochemical methods for assessing periodontitis activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, P.T.M.

    1987-01-01

    In order to recognize in which stage rapidly progressing destruction of periodontal ligament fibers occurs, a number of diagnostic methods are studied in this thesis. It turns out that the actual much utilized clinical methods can not be improved while radiological and biochemical diagnositic methods are much more promising. 106 refs.; 20 figs.; 36 tabs

  19. Emergencies in radiology: a survey of radiologist and radiology trainees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, Simon; Naidoo, Parmanand

    2014-01-01

    Emergencies in radiology are infrequent but potentially lethal. Australian and New Zealand radiologists are advised to undergo resuscitation training at least every three years; however, little is known about their experience and confidence in managing common emergencies relevant to their clinical practice. This paper describes the current experience and confidence of radiologists and radiology trainees in Australia and New Zealand in the management of common medical emergencies. A cross-sectional online survey of trainees and fellows of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiology collected data on training and learning preferences relating to resuscitation and life-support skills, access to emergency medical care, and knowledge, confidence and ability in managing a variety of medical emergencies. There were 602 responses to the survey (response rate 23.4%). The majority of respondents were interested in learning more about the management of contrast reactions, cardiac arrest, ischaemic chest pain and basic life support. Self-rated knowledge, confidence and ability were higher in respondents who had completed life-support training within the previous three years. In this group, however, more than 40% rated their ability at managing contrast reactions as poor or fair, while more than 60% rated their ability as poor or fair for management of cardiac arrest, basic life support, advanced life support and dosing of adrenaline. Preferred resuscitation training modalities included simulation, small-group tutorials and workshops. Self-reported level of skill and expertise in the management of potential emergencies in radiology is suboptimal among a large number of respondents. Consideration should be given to addressing this by improving access to specific training.

  20. Characterization of mammographic findings radiological studies, in radiology service Hospital Doctor Rafael Angel Calderon Guardia during the year 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugalde Gatjens, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    The radiological findings are determined in reading mammography studies between the months of May and June 2012 in the radiology service of Hospital Calderon Guardia. The association of pathologies is determined between breast pathology, age group and sex. A control allowing identification of geographic areas with higher reference is established for realization of mammograms. The pathologies resulting from the reading of mammographic studies are quantified and classified. The patients have presented 42% of risk factors with the potential predisposition to develop breast cancer. Mammography applications have been coming in 22% of Montes de Oca EBAIS and Curridabat, being presented in most lesions in women between 45 and 74 years old. Mammograms analyzed are classified as BIRADS 2 and to a lesser extent as BIRADS 0 [es

  1. Potential clinical impact of advanced imaging and computer-aided diagnosis in chest radiology: importance of radiologist's role and successful observer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng

    2015-07-01

    This review paper is based on our research experience in the past 30 years. The importance of radiologists' role is discussed in the development or evaluation of new medical images and of computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes in chest radiology. The four main topics include (1) introducing what diseases can be included in a research database for different imaging techniques or CAD systems and what imaging database can be built by radiologists, (2) understanding how radiologists' subjective judgment can be combined with technical objective features to improve CAD performance, (3) sharing our experience in the design of successful observer performance studies, and (4) finally, discussing whether the new images and CAD systems can improve radiologists' diagnostic ability in chest radiology. In conclusion, advanced imaging techniques and detection/classification of CAD systems have a potential clinical impact on improvement of radiologists' diagnostic ability, for both the detection and the differential diagnosis of various lung diseases, in chest radiology.

  2. Rational use of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racoveanu, N.T.; Volodin, V.

    1992-01-01

    The escalating number of radiodiagnostic investigations has, as a consequence, an increase in medical irradiation of patients and of cost of radiological services. Radiologists in USA and UK have since early 1970 questioned the efficacy of various radiological investigations and produced substantial evidence that more rational approaches are necessary. WHO initiated, in 1977, a programme in this direction which has issued four technical reports which give practical recommendations on how to rationalize the use of radiological examinations. Three main directions are considered: (1) Abandonment of routine radiological examinations, as procedures with no clinical or epidemiologic significance and which represent a waste of resources and patient dose. (2) Patient selection for various radiological investigations based on clinical criteria (high, intermediate, low yield). Selected patients have an increased prevalence of the given disease and the predictive value of radiological investigation is much higher. (3) Use of diagnostic algorithms with higher cost/efficiency and risk/benefit ratios, improving the outcome of radiological examinations

  3. Radiological clerkships as a critical curriculum component in radiology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V.; Verstraete, Koenraad L.; Valcke, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this research was to explore the perceived value of clinical clerkships in the radiology curriculum as well as the impact of radiology clerkship on students' beliefs about the profession of radiology as a whole and as a career. Methods: This study is a sequel to a previous survey in which student perceptions about radiology curriculum components were investigated. The present study focuses on a further analysis of a subsection in this study, based on 14 statements about radiology clerkship and two statements about radiology as a career. Results: Perceived usefulness of the aspects of radiology clerkship as 'radiology examination', 'skills development' and 'diagnosis focus' were awarded the highest scores. The predict value of the subscale 'radiology examination' on the level of performance was very high (adjusted R 2 = 0.19, p < .001). Conclusion: Students expressed highly favorable evaluation of clerkship as a learning environment to learn to order and to interpret imaging studies as well as an unique possibility to attend various radiological examinations and to access to specific radiology software systems, as well as to get a better view on radiology and to improve image interpretation skills. This positive attitude towards clerkship is closely tied to students' beliefs about the profession of radiology as a whole. These aspects of dedicated radiology clerkship are crucial for effective and high-quality education as well as for the choice of radiology as a career.

  4. Required internship in diagnostic radiology in the fifth year of medicine at Montreal University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Georges, G.; Raymond-Tremblay, D.; Danais, S.; Dussault, R.; Grignon, A.; Lafortune, M.; Saltiel, J.

    1984-01-01

    Problems of methodology, organization, and evaluation confronting the radiology departments of the university hospitals affiliated with the University of Montreal, the medical students, and the University itself in connection with an elective internship in radiology offered in the fifth year of medicine, resulted in the formation of a committee to reorganize the course of study. In this concise article the authors describe this and other measures taken by the University to solve these problems. The committees' main purpose was to restructure the internship which was made compulsory so that future physicians would be prepared to draw on the resources of diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. To this end, the committee formulated the objectives, content, evaluation system, and pedagogical methods to be used in those courses. The 25 self-teaching modules, together with the observation and practical interpretation of radiology sessions, proved highly useful in solving the initial problems, and were of particular interest to the students. (author)

  5. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Diagnostic Radiology (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasing technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for diagnostic radiology. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists based in the clinical setting. However, an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase academic educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Sciences for Asia and the Pacific. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in the Asia-Pacific region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specializing in diagnostic radiology started in 2007 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experiences of clinical training programmes in Australia and New Zealand, the UK and the USA, and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. This publication follows the approach of the IAEA publication Training Course Series No. 37, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists specializing in Radiation Oncology. This approach to clinical training has been successfully tested

  6. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Diagnostic Radiology (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasing technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for diagnostic radiology. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists based in the clinical setting. However, an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase academic educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Sciences for Asia and the Pacific. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in the Asia-Pacific region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specializing in diagnostic radiology started in 2007 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experiences of clinical training programmes in Australia and New Zealand, the UK and the USA, and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. This publication follows the approach of the IAEA publication Training Course Series No. 37, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists specializing in Radiation Oncology. This approach to clinical training has been successfully tested

  7. Clinical and radiological outcomes after a quasi-anatomical reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament with gracilis tendon autograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monllau, Joan C; Masferrer-Pino, Àngel; Ginovart, Gerard; Pérez-Prieto, Daniel; Gelber, Pablo E; Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente

    2017-08-01

    To analyse the clinical and radiological outcomes of a quasi-anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) with a gracilis tendon autograft. Patients with objective recurrent patellar instability that were operated on from 2006 to 2012 were included. A quasi-anatomical surgical technique was performed using a gracilis tendon autograft. It was anatomically attached at the patella, and the adductor magnus tendon was also used as a pulley for femoral fixation (non-anatomical reconstruction). The IKDC, Kujala and Lysholm scores as well as Tegner and VAS for pain were collected preoperatively and at final follow-up. Radiographic measurements of patellar position tilt and signs of osteoarthritis (OA) as well as trochlear dysplasia were also recorded. Thirty-six patients were included. The mean age at surgery was 25.6 years. After a minimum 27 months of follow-up, all functional scores significantly improved (p patellofemoral surfaces at the short term, as shown by the absence of radiological signs of OA in the CT scan. The procedure has been shown to be safe and suitable for the treatment of chronic patellar instability, including in adolescents with open physis. A new effective, inexpensive and easy-to-perform technique is described to reconstruct MPFL in the daily clinical practice. Therapeutic case series, Level IV.

  8. Radiation dose to children in diagnostic radiology. Measurements and methods for clinical optimisation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almen, A J

    1995-09-01

    A method for estimating mean absorbed dose to different organs and tissues was developed for paediatric patients undergoing X-ray investigations. The absorbed dose distribution in water was measured for the specific X-ray beam used. Clinical images were studied to determine X-ray beam positions and field sizes. Size and position of organs in the patient were estimated using ORNL phantoms and complementary clinical information. Conversion factors between the mean absorbed dose to various organs and entrance surface dose for five different body sizes were calculated. Direct measurements on patients estimating entrance surface dose and energy imparted for common X-ray investigations were performed. The examination technique for a number of paediatric X-ray investigations used in 19 Swedish hospitals was studied. For a simulated pelvis investigation of a 1-year old child the entrance surface dose was measured and image quality was estimated using a contrast-detail phantom. Mean absorbed doses to organs and tissues in urography, lung, pelvis, thoracic spine, lumbar spine and scoliosis investigations was calculated. Calculations of effective dose were supplemented with risk calculations for special organs e g the female breast. The work shows that the examination technique in paediatric radiology is not yet optimised, and that the non-optimised procedures contribute to a considerable variation in radiation dose. In order to optimise paediatric radiology there is a need for more standardised methods in patient dosimetry. It is especially important to relate measured quantities to the size of the patient, using e g the patient weight and length. 91 refs, 17 figs, 8 tabs.

  9. Radiation dose to children in diagnostic radiology. Measurements and methods for clinical optimisation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, A.J.

    1995-09-01

    A method for estimating mean absorbed dose to different organs and tissues was developed for paediatric patients undergoing X-ray investigations. The absorbed dose distribution in water was measured for the specific X-ray beam used. Clinical images were studied to determine X-ray beam positions and field sizes. Size and position of organs in the patient were estimated using ORNL phantoms and complementary clinical information. Conversion factors between the mean absorbed dose to various organs and entrance surface dose for five different body sizes were calculated. Direct measurements on patients estimating entrance surface dose and energy imparted for common X-ray investigations were performed. The examination technique for a number of paediatric X-ray investigations used in 19 Swedish hospitals was studied. For a simulated pelvis investigation of a 1-year old child the entrance surface dose was measured and image quality was estimated using a contrast-detail phantom. Mean absorbed doses to organs and tissues in urography, lung, pelvis, thoracic spine, lumbar spine and scoliosis investigations was calculated. Calculations of effective dose were supplemented with risk calculations for special organs e g the female breast. The work shows that the examination technique in paediatric radiology is not yet optimised, and that the non-optimised procedures contribute to a considerable variation in radiation dose. In order to optimise paediatric radiology there is a need for more standardised methods in patient dosimetry. It is especially important to relate measured quantities to the size of the patient, using e g the patient weight and length. 91 refs, 17 figs, 8 tabs

  10. Computational radiology in skeletal radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peloschek, Ph.; Nemec, S.; Widhalm, P.; Donner, R.; Birngruber, E.; Thodberg, H.H.; Kainberger, F.; Langs, G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have brought rapid developments in computational image analysis in musculo-skeletal radiology. Meanwhile the algorithms have reached a maturity that makes initial clinical use feasible. Applications range from joint space measurement to erosion quantification, and from fracture detection to the assessment of alignment angles. Current results of computational image analysis in radiography are very promising, but some fundamental issues remain to be clarified, among which the definition of the optimal trade off between automatization and operator-dependency, the integration of these tools into clinical work flow and last not least the proof of incremental clinical benefit of these methods.

  11. Analysis of radiology education in undergraduate medical doctors training in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V.; Valcke, Martin; Derese, Anselme; Verstraete, Koenraad L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the present study is to describe how undergraduate radiology teaching is organized in Europe and to identify important characteristics of undergraduate radiology curriculum. Methods: An electronic survey on undergraduate teaching was distributed by the European Society of Radiology (ESR) to 38 national delegates of the ESR Education Committee. Results: The 'classic type' of radiology teaching method is more frequent than the 'modular type'. In 38% of medical training centres the first experience with radiology is in pre-clinical years. The students enrolled in the fourth medical year experience the largest involvement in radiology education. The total number of teaching hours (mean 89 h, median 76 h) varies across the countries and differs depending on the radiological topic (mean across all topics 14.8 h, median 13). Written tests and oral exams were the most frequently used examination modes. Clerkships are reported as a key part of training. Conclusion: This first international comparative study of undergraduate radiological curriculum in Europe identifies a large number of differences in curriculum content and teaching methods throughout Europe. More research is needed to establish the radiological educational competences resulting from these differing curricula's to improve and to standardize the teaching according to (inter)national and institutional needs.

  12. Externally Acquired Radiological Data for the Clinical Routine - A Review of the Reimbursement Situation in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, Andreas G; Steinhäuser, René T; Rosenberg, Britta

    2018-02-07

     Interdisciplinary radiological conferences and boards can improve therapeutic pathways. Because of the reinterpretation and presentation of external image data, which already was read, an additional workload is created which is currently not considered by health care providers. In this review we discuss the ongoing basics and possibilities in health economy for a radiological second opinion for the outpatient and inpatient sector in Germany.  Based on up-to-date literature and jurisdiction, we discuss the most important questions for the reimbursement for second opinions and conference presentations of external image data in an FAQ format. Additionally, we focus on the recently introduced E-Health law accordingly.  Radiological services considering second opinion or board presentation of externally acquired image data are currently not adequately covered by health care providers. In particular, there is no reimbursement possibility for the inpatient sector. Only patients with private insurance or privately paid second opinions can be charged when these patients visit the radiologist directly.  Currently there is no adequate reimbursement possibility for a radiological second opinion or image demonstrations in clinical conferences. It will be essential to integrate adequate reimbursement by health care providers in the near future because of the importance of radiology as an essential diagnostic and therapeutic medical partner.   · Currently there is no reimbursement for image interpretation and presentation in boards.. · Second opinions can only be reimbursed for patients with private insurance or privately recompensed.. · The E-Health law allows reimbursement for tele-counsel in very complex situations.. · It will be crucial to integrate radiological second opinion in future reimbursement policies by health care providers.. · Schreyer AG, Steinhäuser RT, Rosenberg B. Externally Acquired Radiological Data for the Clinical Routine - A Review of

  13. Prognosis in contre-coup intracranial haematomas - a clinical and radiological study of 63 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, P.N.; Sastry Kolluri, V.R.; Basavakumar, D.G.; Subbakrishna, D.K.; Arya, B.Y.T.; Das, B.S.; Narayana Reddy, G.N.

    1991-01-01

    The clinical and radiological profiles of 63 patients with contre-coup haematomas were studied. The overall mortality was 53 %. The mortality in patients with contre-coup haematomas alone was only half of that found in patients with associated coup injury (80 %). (Authors)

  14. Post-mortem radiology-a new sub-speciality?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, C.; Woodford, N.

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of deceased individuals are increasingly being utilized in the field of forensic pathology. However, there are differences in the interpretation of post-mortem and clinical imaging. Radiologists with only occasional experience in post-mortem imaging are at risk of misinterpreting the findings if they rely solely on clinical experience. Radiological specialists working in a co-operative environment with pathologists are pivotal in the understanding of post-mortem CT and MRI, and its appropriate integration into the autopsy. This has spawned a novel subspecialty called post-mortem radiology or necro-radiology (radiology of the deceased). In the future it is likely that whole-body CT will be incorporated into the routine forensic autopsy due its ability to accurately detect and localise abnormalities commonly seen in forensic practice, such as haematoma, abnormal gas collections, fractures, and metallic foreign bodies. In the next 5-10 years most forensic institutes will seek regular access to such CT facilities or install machines into their own mortuaries. MRI is technically more problematic in the deceased but the improved tissue contrast over CT means that it is also very useful for investigation of pathology in the cranial, thoracic, and abdominal cavities, as well as the detection of haematoma in soft tissue. In order for radiologists to be an integral part of this important development in forensic investigation, radiological organizations must recognize the subspecialty of post-mortem radiology and provide a forum for radiologists to advance scientific knowledge in the field

  15. Association of Haematological and Radiological Findings with Clinical Outcome in Hospitalized Children 2-36 Months Old with Severe Lower Respiratory Tract Infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waris, R.; Bhatti, N.; Nisar, Y. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite reduction in ld mortality during last decade, lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) remained number one killer of under-five. The current study aimed to assess the association of haematological and radiological findings with clinical outcome in hospitalized children 2-36 months old with severe LRTI. Methods: In the current cross sectional study, 581 children 2-36 months old with severe LRTI were enrolled and followed at the Children Hospital, Islamabad, between 2011 and 2014. At the time of enrolment, complete history of present illness, anthropometric measurements, blood sample and chest radiograph were obtained. The primary outcome was either early clinical response (within 72 hours) or delayed clinical response (>72 hours). Multivariable logistic regression was performed to examine the association between haematological and radiological findings with clinical outcome, adjusted for potential confounding factors. Results: Of 581 enrolled children, 292 (50.3 percent) children had early, and 289 (49.7 percent) had delayed clinical response. The multivariable logistic regression showed that leucocytosis (OR 1.79, 95 percent CI 1.15-2.79), neutrophilia (OR 1.91, 95 percent CI 1.29-2.84), radiological interstitial pneumonia (OR 2.49, 95 percent CI 1.70-3.64), and lobar consolidation (OR 6.00, 95 percent CI 2.41-14.96) were significantly associated with delayed clinical response, after adjusted for potential confounding factors. Conclusions: Delayed clinical response was significantly associated with abnormal haematological and radiological findings at the time of admission in children 2-36 months old with severe LRTI. Haematological and radiological findings at the time of presentation are useful for predicting delayed clinical response in children 2-36 months old with severe LRTI. (author)

  16. Cleidocranial dysplasia in a 15-month-old boy and a 14-year-old girl: clinical and radiological presentation; Dysplazja obojczykowo-czaszkowa u 15-miesiecznego chlopca i 14-letniej dziewczynki - prezentacja kliniczna i obraz radiologiczny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizewska, M; Walczak, M; Bich, W [II Klinika Chorob Dzieci Pomorskiej Akademii Medycznej, Szczecin (Poland); Walecka, A [Zaklad Diagnostyki Obrazowej i Radiologii Interwencyjnej Pomorskiej Akademii Medycznej, Szczecin (Poland); Rosinska, Z [Oddzial Noworodkow, Patologii i Intensywnej Terapii, SPS ' ' Zdroje ' ' , Szczecin (Poland); Doniec-Zawidzka, I [Katedra i Zaklad Ortodoncji Pomorskiej Akademii Medycznej, Szczecin (Poland)

    2005-07-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a rare, autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia with a relatively mild course. The most characteristic symptoms are clavicle hypoplasia or aplasia, abnormalities in the skull ossification, and a variety of dental pathologies. The clinical course and radiological presentation of two cases (a 15-month-old boy and a 14-year-old girl) of CCD are presented. Among the characteristic phenotype features the patients demonstrated were abnormalities in the skull formation, with wide sutures and large, delayed closure of the fontanelles, additional Wormian bones, and significant dental abnormalities, in both cases with delayed eruption of teeth and, in the girl, intensive caries, cross bite, and impacted teeth. The boy presented hypoplasia of the clavicles, while aplastic clavicles were confirmed in the girl. In both cases clavicle defects resulted in descended shoulders with abnormal movement faculty. Metacarpal and phalangeal defects were also found in both children as well as abnormalities in pelvic structure, with wide pubic symphysis and vertical arrangement of the pelvic bones in the girl. CCD is a skeletal dysplasia with characteristic clinical and radiological presentation. Although the course of the disorder is relatively mild, early orthopedic, dental, and orthodontic care, as well as rehabilitation, are essential in limiting complications resulting from the congenital malformation of the skeletal system. (author)

  17. Clinical, Radiologic, and Legal Significance of "Extensor Response" in Posttraumatic Coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firsching, Raimund; Woischneck, Dieter; Langejürgen, Alexander; Parreidt, Andreas; Bondar, Imre; Skalej, Martin; Röhl, Friedrich; Voellger, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    The timely detection of neurologic deterioration can be critical for the survival of a neurosurgical patient following head injury. Because little reliable evidence is available on the prognostic value of the clinical sign "extensor response" in comatose posttraumatic patients, we investigated the correlation of this clinical sign with outcome and with early radiologic findings from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This retrospective analysis of prospectively obtained data included 157 patients who had remained in a coma for a minimum of 24 hours after traumatic brain injury. All patients received a 1.5-T MRI within 10 days (median: 2 days) of the injury. The correlations between clinical findings 12 and 24 hours after the injury-in particular, extensor response and pupillary function, MRI findings, and outcome after 1 year-were investigated. Statistical analysis included contingency tables, Fisher exact test, odds ratios (ORs) with confidence intervals (CIs), and weighted κ values. There were 48 patients with extensor response within the first 24 hours after the injury. Patients with extensor response (World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies coma grade III) statistically were significantly more likely to harbor MRI lesions in the brainstem when compared with patients in a coma who had no further deficiencies (coma grade I; p = 0.0004 by Fisher exact test, OR 10.8 with 95% CI, 2.7-42.5) and patients with unilateral loss of pupil function (coma grade II; p = 0.0187, OR 2.8 with 95% CI, 1.2-6.5). The correlation of brainstem lesions as found by MRI and outcome according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale after 1 year was also highly significant (p ≤ 0.016). The correlation of extensor response and loss of pupil function with an unfavorable outcome and with brainstem lesions revealed by MRI is highly significant. Their sudden onset may be associated with the sudden onset of brainstem dysfunction and should therefore be regarded as one of the most

  18. Assessment of radiological technologist health condition by Todai health index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ham Gyum [Ansan College, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Wha Sun [College of Medicine, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the general health status of radiological technologists by using Todai Health Index(THI) that has been employed as a standard health assessment tool for a specific group. The subjects in this study were 800 radiological technologists who were working in clinics, hospitals and university hospitals in and around Seoul and in some provincial cities. A survey was conducted directly or by mail in June and July, 2001. And the response rate was 68%. Using THI, the following findings were acquired: 1. By gender, both male and female radiological technologists complained about multiple subjective symptom(I) the most, And the women made more significant complaint of eight items including irregular life. 2. By age group, the radiological technologists whose age ranged from 20 to 24 got higher marks in most of the items, including multiple subjective symptom(I) and symptoms related to eyes and skin. 3. For career, those who had worked for a year or less or for one to five years got higher marks in most of the items. 4. Concerning marital status, the unmarried people complained about many items more, and the married people's symptom was more associated with live scale(L). 5. By the type of medical institution, the radiological technologists in the university hospitals got higher marks in two items including aggressiveness(F), but those in the clinics complained about the others more. 6. Regarding a place of service, there were little differences between the radiological technologists in basement and on the ground.

  19. Assessment of radiological technologist health condition by Todai health index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ham Gyum; Kim, Wha Sun

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the general health status of radiological technologists by using Todai Health Index(THI) that has been employed as a standard health assessment tool for a specific group. The subjects in this study were 800 radiological technologists who were working in clinics, hospitals and university hospitals in and around Seoul and in some provincial cities. A survey was conducted directly or by mail in June and July, 2001. And the response rate was 68%. Using THI, the following findings were acquired: 1. By gender, both male and female radiological technologists complained about multiple subjective symptom(I) the most, And the women made more significant complaint of eight items including irregular life. 2. By age group, the radiological technologists whose age ranged from 20 to 24 got higher marks in most of the items, including multiple subjective symptom(I) and symptoms related to eyes and skin. 3. For career, those who had worked for a year or less or for one to five years got higher marks in most of the items. 4. Concerning marital status, the unmarried people complained about many items more, and the married people's symptom was more associated with live scale(L). 5. By the type of medical institution, the radiological technologists in the university hospitals got higher marks in two items including aggressiveness(F), but those in the clinics complained about the others more. 6. Regarding a place of service, there were little differences between the radiological technologists in basement and on the ground

  20. Radiological characterization of invasive prolactinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauricio, J.C.; Goulao, A.; Ribeiro, C.; Campos, J.

    1983-01-01

    Clinical problems are analized of invasive prolactinomas, from the radiographic records of the Hospital Egas Moniz (Neuro-radiological Departament). The purpose of this paper is contribute for the anatomic-radiological knowledge and clinical progress, under medical treatment, of the macroprolactinomas that have some characteristics that differentiate them from the small adenomas. (Author) [pt

  1. Analyzing the glass ceiling effect among radiologic technologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinsky, Susan B; Blagg, James D

    2011-01-01

    The literature has suggested that advancement within politics, academia and the health professions is influenced by gender. Purpose The authors conducted a survey to determine whether advancement was equal by gender in the radiologic science disciplines of nuclear medicine technology, radiation therapy and radiography. The survey was mailed to 900 subjects, 300 from each discipline. The discipline groups were further stratified by initial year of American Registry of Radiologic Technology certification; the authors selected 100 subjects from each discipline who initially were certified in 1978, 100 in 1988 and 100 in 1998. Approximately 33% of those selected responded. The findings of the study provided no evidence that men are promoted differentially than women. Women perceived that men were paid more for the same work. It appears that gender bias is pervasive outside of promotion decisions and, indeed, that some illegal actions (eg, sexual harassment, inappropriate gender-related interview questions) take place in radiologic science clinical settings. It is hoped that this study will set a baseline for future research on whether there is a glass ceiling effect in radiologic clinical practice and stimulate discussion of the importance of equal opportunity regardless of gender.

  2. Teleradiology in clinical practices and teaching of pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    A software program developed by OPTEL has been evaluated for use in consultation and interactive teaching in pediatric radiology in a university system with three interconnected hospitals. The system uses IBM PC hardware. Screen capture allows users to run graphics and text in foreground and permits conventional television images to be grabbed and stored. Images are retrieved using a graphics tablet and pen. Annotation of the graphics tablet permits arrows and other indicators to be superimposed on radiographs. Color and black-and-white images can be transmitted from any hospital site with television imaging capability and a PC. Applications in clinical practice and teaching programs via interactive telephone communication are described

  3. Radiologic and clinical features of idiopathic granulomatous lobular mastitis mimicking advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jei Hee; Oh, Ki Keun; Kim, Eun-kyung; Kwack, Kyu Sung; Jung, Woo Hee; Lee, Han Kyung

    2006-02-28

    Idiopathic granulomatous lobular mastitis (IGLM), also known as idiopathic granulomatous mastitis, is a rare chronic inflammatory lesion of the breast that can clinically and radiographically mimic breast carcinoma. The aim of this study was to describe the radiological imaging and clinical features of IGLM in order to better differentiate this disorder from breast cancer. We performed a retrospective analysis of the clinical and radiographic features of 11 women with a total of 12 IGLM lesions. The ages of these women ranged between 29 and 42 years, with a mean age of 34.8 years. Ten patients were examined by both mammography and sonography and one by sonography alone. The sites that were the most frequently involved were the peripheral (6/12), diffuse, (3/12), and subareolar (3/12) regions of the breast. The patient mammograms showed irregular ill-defined masses (7/11), diffuse increased densities (3/11), and one oval obscured mass. In addition, patient sonograms showed irregular tubular lesions (7/12) or lobulated masses with minimal parenchymal distortion (2/12), parenchymal distortion without definite mass lesions (2/12), and one oval mass. Subcutaneous fat obliteration (12/12) and skin thickening (11/12) were also observed in these patients. Contrary to previous reports, skin changes and subareolar involvement were not rare occurrences in IGLM. In conclusion, the sonographic features of IGLM show irregular or tubular hypoechoic masses with minimal parenchymal distortion. Both clinical information and the description of radiographic features of IGLM may aid in the differentiation between IGLM and breast cancer, however histological confirmation is still required for the proper diagnosis and treatment of the disorder.

  4. Diagnostic radiology on multiple injured patients: interdisciplinary management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsenmaier, U.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Kanz, K.G.; Mutschler, W.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of a radiologist within the admitting area of an emergency department and his capability as a member of the trauma team have a major impact on the role of diagnostic radiology in trauma care. The knowledge of clinical decision criteria, algorithms, and standards of patient care are essential for the acceptance within a trauma team. We present an interdisciplinary management concept of diagnostic radiology for trauma patients, which comprises basic diagnosis, organ diagnosis, radiological ABC, and algorithms of early clinical care. It is the result of a prospective study comprising over 2000 documented multiple injured patients. The radiologist on a trauma team should support trauma surgery and anesthesia in diagnostic and clinical work-up. The radiological ABC provides a structured approach for diagnostic imaging in all steps of the early clinical care of the multiple injured patient. Radiological ABC requires a reevaluation in cases of equivocal findings or difficulties in the clinical course. Direct communication of radiological findings with the trauma team enables quick clinical decisions. In addition, the radiologist can priority-oriented influence the therapy by using interventional procedures. The clinical radiologist is an active member of the interdisciplinary trauma team, not only providing diagnostic imaging but also participating in clinical decisions. (orig.) [de

  5. Radiological evaluation of familial osteopetrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Moo Chang; Kang, Shin Wha; Won, Jong Jin; Rhee, Song Joo; Choi, Ki Chul

    1980-01-01

    Authors found 16 patients with benign osteopetrosis out of 62 members of 4 families and analysed these patients clinically, radiologically, hematologically and biochemically at the Department of Radiology, Jeonbug National University Hospital from October 1977 to June 1980. The results are as follows; 1. We obtained that there is evidence of familial tendency in developing osteopetrosis because of the fact that 15 patients (94%) developed in 3 families and more than 2 patients in each family. In genetical point of view we suspected dominant trait of inheritance and could rule out recessive trait because patients were found in successive generations except for one family. There were no consangulneous marriages among the parents of these patients. 2. The majority of patients were adolescent or adult above 10 years of age when the disease was diagnosed. The incidence was identical in both sex. 3. No clinical symptoms and historical abnormalities were found in 11 patients (69%) and 5 patients (31%) showed only mild symptoms. Among 5 patients with clinical symptoms 3 patients showed pathologic fractures. In all 3 patients, fractures occurred only by mild trauma and affected sites were tubular bones and they were transverse type. 4. There were no specific relationship between ABO types and Rh reactions in developing osteopetrosis and no specific findings in hematological, biochemical and routine urinalysis. 5. The only diagnostic finding in most patients were the typical and specific radiological findings

  6. A practical description and student perspective of the integration of radiology into lower limb musculoskeletal anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, S; O'Keeffe, G W; Mahony, N; Phelan, N; Barry, D S

    2017-05-01

    Anatomy educators are increasing their utilisation of radiology in anatomy education in line with growing requirements for undergraduate radiology competency and clinical need. We aimed to evaluate student perceptions of radiology and to outline the technical and academic considerations underlying the integration of radiology into musculoskeletal practical anatomy sessions. The formal integration of radiology into anatomy practical sessions took place over a 5-week period during the lower limb musculoskeletal component of the anatomy course taught to first-year medical students. During practical sessions, students were required to rotate between aligned audio-visual radiology presentations, osteology/anatomical models, and prosection/dissection learning stations. After completing the course, students were invited to complete a survey to establish their opinions on radiology as a mode of learning and their satisfaction with radiological integration in anatomical practical sessions. Most students were not familiar with radiology prior to attending our university. All our students agreed or strongly agreed that learning to read radiographs in anatomy is important and most agreed that radiology is a valid assessment tool. Sixty percent stated that radiology facilitated their understanding of anatomy. The majority believed that radiology was best suited to clinically relevant anatomy and X-rays were their preferred learning tool. The practical approach to integrating radiology into undergraduate musculoskeletal anatomy described here did not place strain on existing academic resources. Most students agreed that radiology should be increased in anatomy education and that learning to understand radiographs in anatomy was important for clinical practice.

  7. Effects of extracorporal shock wave therapy on symptomatic heel spurs: a correlation between clinical outcome and radiologic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, E; Keskin Akca, A; Selcuk, B; Kurtaran, A; Akyuz, M

    2012-02-01

    Plantar heel pain, a chronic and disabling foot alignment, occurs in the adult population. Extracorporal shock wave therapy (ESWT) offers a nonsurgical option in addition to stretching exercises, heel cups, NSAI, and corticosteroid injections. This study aimed to investigate the effects of ESWT on calcaneal bone spurs and the correlation between clinical outcomes and radiologic changes. The study involved 108 patients with heel pain and radiologically diagnosed heel spurs. All patients underwent ESWT once a week for 5 weeks at the clinic. Each patient received 2,000 impulses of shock waves, starting with 0.05 mJ/mm2 (1.8 bar) and increasing to 0.4 mJ/mm2 (4.0 bar). Standard radiographies of the affected heels were obtained before and after the therapy. Clinical results demonstrated excellent (no pain) in 66.7% of the cases, good (50% of pain reduced) in 15.7% of the cases, and unsatisfactory (no reduction in pain) in 17.6%. After five ESWT treatments, no patients who received shock wave applications had significant spur reductions, but 19 patients (17.6%) had a decrease in the angle of the spur, 23 patients (21.3%) had a decrease in the dimensions of the spur, and one patient had a broken spur. Therefore, results showed no correlation between clinical outcome and radiologic changes. The present study supports the finding that even with no radiologic change after ESWT therapy, the therapy produces significant effects in reducing patients' complaints about heel spurs.

  8. ABR Core examination preparation: results of a survey of fourth-year radiology residents who took the 2013 examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Anup S; Grajo, Joseph R; Decker, Summer; Heitkamp, Darel E; DeStigter, Kristen K; Mezwa, Duane G; Deitte, Lori

    2015-01-01

    A survey was administered to fourth-year radiology residents after receiving their results from the first American Board of Radiology (ABR) Core examination in 2013. The purpose was to gather information regarding resources and study strategies to share with program directors and future resident classes. An online survey was distributed to examinees nationwide. The survey included free-response and multiple choice questions that covered examination results, perceived value of enumerated study resources, case-based and didactic teaching conferences, board reviews, study materials for noninterpretive skills, multidisciplinary conference attendance, and free-form comments. Two hundred sixty-six of 1186 residents who took the Core examination responded to the survey. Some resources demonstrated a significant difference in perceived value between residents who passed the examination and residents who failed, including internal board reviews (1.10, P multiple choice questions, audience response, and integration of clinical physics and patient safety topics compared to residents who failed. Radiology residents and residency programs have adapted their preparations for the ABR Core examination in a variety of ways. Certain practices and study tools, including daily conferences and internal board reviews, had greater perceived value by residents who passed the examination than by residents who failed. This survey provides insights that can be used to assess and modify current preparation strategies for the ABR Core examination. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiologic Predictors for Clinical Stage IA Lung Adenocarcinoma with Ground Glass Components: A Multi-Center Study of Long-Term Outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Li

    risk classification (p<0.001. Univariate Cox regression model identified clinical risk classification (RR: 3.011, 95%CI: 0.796-7.882, P = 0.095 as a good predictor for recurrence-free survival (RFS in patients with clinical stage IA lung adenocarcinoma. Statistical significance of 5-year OS and RFS was noted among clinical low-, moderate- and high-risk groups (log-rank, p = 0.024 and 0.010.The AVG and the S/T ratio by reconstructed 3D-CT are important preoperative radiologic predictors for pathologic risk grading. The two cutoff values of AVG and S/T ratio are recommended in decision-making for patients with clinical stage IA lung adenocarcinoma with ground glass components.

  10. Clinical Course, Radiological Manifestations, and Outcome of Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia in HIV Patients and Renal Transplant Recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Ebner

    Full Text Available Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP is a frequent opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients. In literature, presentation and outcome of PCP differs between patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and renal transplant recipients (RTRs.We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients with PCP based on the HIV and renal transplant registries at our institution. Radiological and clinical data from all confirmed PCP cases between 2005 and 2012 were compared.Forty patients were included: 16 with HIV and 24 RTRs. Radiologically, HIV patients had significantly more areas of diffuse lung affection (81% HIV vs. 25% RTR; p = 0.02, more ground glass nodules 5-10 mm (69% vs. 4%; p = 80% in both groups. Duration from illness onset to hospital presentation was longer in the HIV patients (median of 18 vs. 10 days (p = 0.02, implying a less fulminant clinical course. Sixty percent of PCP cases in RTRs occurred >12 months after transplantation. Lengths of hospitalization, admission rates to the intensive care unit, and requirements for mechanical ventilation were similar. Outcome in both groups was favourable.While important differences in radiological presentation of PCP between HIV patients and RTRs were found, clinical presentation was similar. PCP only rarely presented with fulminant respiratory symptoms requiring ICU admission, with similar results and outcomes for HIV patients and RTRs. Early diagnosis and treatment is mandatory for clinical success.

  11. Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis in adults: clinical and radiological findings in diffuse and focal forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loffroy, R.; Guiu, B.; Watfa, J.; Michel, F.; Cercueil, J.P.; Krause, D.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To describe the clinical and radiological features of focal and diffuse xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGP) in adults. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the clinical data, laboratory findings, imaging features, and surgical treatment of 13 cases of histologically proven XGP diagnosed between January 1993 and December 2005 was undertaken. There were 10 women and three men with a mean age of 55.2 years (range 30-87 years). All patients underwent both sonography and computed tomography (CT) of the kidneys. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in two patients. Results: XGP was diffuse in 11 patients and focal in two patients. Fever, anorexia and weight loss, urinary symptoms, and flank pain were the most common manifestations. Urinary tract infection was found in eight patients. Sonography and CT showed diffuse kidney enlargement in seven cases and atrophy in five cases; a solitary solid mass was found in two patients. Hydronephrosis was noted in nine cases, staghorn calculus in six, and extensive pararenal disease in six. MRI failed to provide the preoperative diagnosis in the two patients with focal XGP. Total or partial nephrectomy was performed without postoperative complications. Conclusion: Although rare, XGP is the main differential diagnosis of malignant renal neoplasia. The definitive diagnosis depends on histological examination of the operative specimen. Preoperatively, the diagnosis can often be suspected based on imaging studies, primarily CT

  12. Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis in adults: clinical and radiological findings in diffuse and focal forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loffroy, R. [Department of Radiology, Bocage Hospital, University Hospital Center, Dijon (France)]. E-mail: loffroy.romaric@neuf.fr; Guiu, B. [Department of Radiology, Bocage Hospital, University Hospital Center, Dijon (France); Watfa, J. [Department of Urology, Bocage Hospital, University Hospital Center, Dijon (France); Michel, F. [Department of Urology, Bocage Hospital, University Hospital Center, Dijon (France); Cercueil, J.P. [Department of Radiology, Bocage Hospital, University Hospital Center, Dijon (France); Krause, D. [Department of Radiology, Bocage Hospital, University Hospital Center, Dijon (France)

    2007-09-15

    Aim: To describe the clinical and radiological features of focal and diffuse xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGP) in adults. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the clinical data, laboratory findings, imaging features, and surgical treatment of 13 cases of histologically proven XGP diagnosed between January 1993 and December 2005 was undertaken. There were 10 women and three men with a mean age of 55.2 years (range 30-87 years). All patients underwent both sonography and computed tomography (CT) of the kidneys. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in two patients. Results: XGP was diffuse in 11 patients and focal in two patients. Fever, anorexia and weight loss, urinary symptoms, and flank pain were the most common manifestations. Urinary tract infection was found in eight patients. Sonography and CT showed diffuse kidney enlargement in seven cases and atrophy in five cases; a solitary solid mass was found in two patients. Hydronephrosis was noted in nine cases, staghorn calculus in six, and extensive pararenal disease in six. MRI failed to provide the preoperative diagnosis in the two patients with focal XGP. Total or partial nephrectomy was performed without postoperative complications. Conclusion: Although rare, XGP is the main differential diagnosis of malignant renal neoplasia. The definitive diagnosis depends on histological examination of the operative specimen. Preoperatively, the diagnosis can often be suspected based on imaging studies, primarily CT.

  13. Public transparency Web sites for radiology practices: prevalence of price, clinical quality, and service quality information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Doshi, Ankur M

    2016-01-01

    To assess information regarding radiology practices on public transparency Web sites. Eight Web sites comparing radiology centers' price and quality were identified. Web site content was assessed. Six of eight Web sites reported examination prices. Other reported information included hours of operation (4/8), patient satisfaction (2/8), American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation (3/8), on-site radiologists (2/8), as well as parking, accessibility, waiting area amenities, same/next-day reports, mammography follow-up rates, examination appropriateness, radiation dose, fellowship-trained radiologists, and advanced technologies (1/8 each). Transparency Web sites had a preponderance of price (and to a lesser extent service quality) information, risking fostering price-based competition at the expense of clinical quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. White Paper: Curriculum in Interventional Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnken, Andreas H; Bücker, Arno; Hohl, Christian; Berlis, Ansgar

    2017-04-01

    Purpose  Scope and clinical importance of interventional radiology markedly evolved over the last decades. Consequently it was acknowledged as independent subspecialty by the "European Union of Medical Specialists" (UEMS). Based on radiological imaging techniques Interventional Radiology is an integral part of Radiology. Materials und Methods  In 2009 the German Society for Interventional Radiology and minimally-invasive therapy (DeGIR) developed a structured training in Interventional Radiology. In cooperation with the German Society of Neuroradiology (DGNR) this training was extended to also cover Interventional Neuroradiology in 2012. Tailored for this training in Interventional Radiology a structured curriculum was developed, covering the scope of this modular training. Results  The curriculum is based on the DeGIR/DGNR modular training concept in Interventional Radiology. There is also an European Curriculum and Syllabus for Interventional Radiology developed by the "Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe" (CIRSE). The presented curriculum in Interventional Radiology is designed to provide a uniform base for the training in Interventional Radiology in Germany, based on the competencies obtained during residency. Conclusion  This curriculum can be used as a basis for training in Interventional Radiology by all training sites. Key Points: · Interventional Radiology is an integral part of clinical radiology. · The German Society for Interventional Radiology and minimally-invasive therapy (DeGIR) developed a curriculum in Interventional Radiology. · This curriculum is an integrative basis for the training in interventional. Citation Format · Mahnken AH, Bücker A, Hohl C et al. White Paper: Curriculum in Interventional Radiology. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 189: 309 - 311. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. A Clinical and Radiological Observation on Urolithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Young Sun; Byun, Moung Ho; Yoon, I Ho

    1983-01-01

    A clinical and radiological observation was made on 167 cases of urolithiasis among the number of 150 patients during 1 year and 6 months from June, 1981 to November, 1982. The results were summarized as follows. 1. There were 101 man and 49 women, a ratio of 2:1. The ages of the patients ranged from 2 to 74 years, showing the highest incidence in 31 to 60 years (68.1%). 2. Locational distributions of urolithiasis were 80 cases (47.9%) in the ureter, 66 cases (39.5%) in the kidney, 11 cases (6.5%) in the urethra and 10 cases (5.9%) in the bladder. 3. Among the 66 cases of renal stone, pelvis stone was 55 cases (83.3%) with staghorn types in 23 cases (34.8%), and calyceal stone was 11 cases (16.6%). 4. The location of ureteral stone was 47.5% in lower, 40% in upper ureter and 12.5% in mid-ureter. 5. The location of urethra stone was 82% in the anterior urethra and 18% in the posterior urethra. 6. The chief complain of urolithiasis was flank pain in 59.2%, gross hematuria in 20.3%, renal colic in 13.1%, dysuria in 8.3%, nausea and vomiting in 4.7%, and sudden stoppage of urine stream in 3.5%. 7. On urinalysis, gross hematuria was found in 54.4%, pyuria in 28.7%, bacteriuria in 23.3%, microscopic hematuria in 18.5% and normal in 7.1%. 8. The size of urinary stone was 0.6-2.0 cm in length in 105 cases (62.8%). 9. On I.V.P. study of renal stones (66 cases), mild and moderate hydro nephrotic changes were detected in 38 kidneys (57.5%), and the relationship between the urinary stasis and renal stone size was relatively good. 10. On I.V.P. study of ureteral stones (80 cases), mild to severe hydro nephrotic changes were detected in 64 kidneys (80%). 11. On K.U.B. film, paralytic ileus was found in 25 cases (14.9%). 12. Among the urinary stones, the radiolucent stones were detected in 8 cases (4.7%). 13. Urinary stones disappeared in 11 cases (6.5%) spontaneously or medical treatment.

  16. A Clinical and Radiological Observation on Urolithiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Young Sun; Byun, Moung Ho; Yoon, I Ho [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-09-15

    A clinical and radiological observation was made on 167 cases of urolithiasis among the number of 150 patients during 1 year and 6 months from June, 1981 to November, 1982. The results were summarized as follows. 1. There were 101 man and 49 women, a ratio of 2:1. The ages of the patients ranged from 2 to 74 years, showing the highest incidence in 31 to 60 years (68.1%). 2. Locational distributions of urolithiasis were 80 cases (47.9%) in the ureter, 66 cases (39.5%) in the kidney, 11 cases (6.5%) in the urethra and 10 cases (5.9%) in the bladder. 3. Among the 66 cases of renal stone, pelvis stone was 55 cases (83.3%) with staghorn types in 23 cases (34.8%), and calyceal stone was 11 cases (16.6%). 4. The location of ureteral stone was 47.5% in lower, 40% in upper ureter and 12.5% in mid-ureter. 5. The location of urethra stone was 82% in the anterior urethra and 18% in the posterior urethra. 6. The chief complain of urolithiasis was flank pain in 59.2%, gross hematuria in 20.3%, renal colic in 13.1%, dysuria in 8.3%, nausea and vomiting in 4.7%, and sudden stoppage of urine stream in 3.5%. 7. On urinalysis, gross hematuria was found in 54.4%, pyuria in 28.7%, bacteriuria in 23.3%, microscopic hematuria in 18.5% and normal in 7.1%. 8. The size of urinary stone was 0.6-2.0 cm in length in 105 cases (62.8%). 9. On I.V.P. study of renal stones (66 cases), mild and moderate hydro nephrotic changes were detected in 38 kidneys (57.5%), and the relationship between the urinary stasis and renal stone size was relatively good. 10. On I.V.P. study of ureteral stones (80 cases), mild to severe hydro nephrotic changes were detected in 64 kidneys (80%). 11. On K.U.B. film, paralytic ileus was found in 25 cases (14.9%). 12. Among the urinary stones, the radiolucent stones were detected in 8 cases (4.7%). 13. Urinary stones disappeared in 11 cases (6.5%) spontaneously or medical treatment.

  17. Education of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology in South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soon Chul

    2009-01-01

    Although x-ray had been used in Dental Clinic and taught as Roentgenology as a part of other lectures, the independent lecture was established at Seoul National University in 1953. The first independent Department was separated from the Department of Oral Surgery at Seoul National University in 1963. Nowadays, there are 6 national and 5 private dental schools in South Korea. Each dental school has a Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, which fulfills its role in student education and clinical service. What is specially noteworthy is that 8 of the 11 dental schools have changed or will change from the 2+4 year system to 4+4 year system (postgraduate course). The curriculum has also been or is being amended according to this change. Although the contents of courses for Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology are not much different among dental schools, the methods and structure of education are various. We have to do a systematic and comprehensive analysis of the present educational methods and structure of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and need to seek the new and more suitable ones based on competency.

  18. Education of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology in South Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soon Chul [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    Although x-ray had been used in Dental Clinic and taught as Roentgenology as a part of other lectures, the independent lecture was established at Seoul National University in 1953. The first independent Department was separated from the Department of Oral Surgery at Seoul National University in 1963. Nowadays, there are 6 national and 5 private dental schools in South Korea. Each dental school has a Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, which fulfills its role in student education and clinical service. What is specially noteworthy is that 8 of the 11 dental schools have changed or will change from the 2+4 year system to 4+4 year system (postgraduate course). The curriculum has also been or is being amended according to this change. Although the contents of courses for Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology are not much different among dental schools, the methods and structure of education are various. We have to do a systematic and comprehensive analysis of the present educational methods and structure of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and need to seek the new and more suitable ones based on competency.

  19. New era of the relationship between Chinese interventional radiology sub-society and journal of interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Linsun

    2009-01-01

    The past decades have witnessed interventional radiology in China to go from a very initial clinical practice to an important medical player in modern medicine. Recently, a friendly collaboration has been successfully established between the Chinese Interventional Radiology Sub-society and the Journal of Interventional Radiology. The Chinese Interventional Radiology Sub-society will take the full responsibility for the academic governance of the Journal of Interventional Radiology and the Journal of Interventional Radiology will formally become the sole interventional academic periodical of the Chinese Interventional Radiology Sub-society in China. This collaboration will surely make Chinese interventional radiology to initiate a new era,promote the further development of interventional radiology at home and enable the Journal of Interventional Radiology to step into the international medical circle. (authors)

  20. Clinical, radiological and sonographic correlation in secondary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuseppetti, G.M.; Giovannoni, A.; Baldelli, S.; Bordoni, E.

    1986-01-01

    The results of US study on parathyroid glands, performed in 75 hemodialysed patients are reported. The correlation between morphological feature of the glands, biochemical and radiological pattern of secondary hyperparathyroidism is stressed. The results show a significant link between gland volume and hematic level of PTH: less interesting appears the correlation with radiological pattern of uremic osteodystrophy

  1. Information extraction from multi-institutional radiology reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpour, Saeed; Langlotz, Curtis P

    2016-01-01

    The radiology report is the most important source of clinical imaging information. It documents critical information about the patient's health and the radiologist's interpretation of medical findings. It also communicates information to the referring physicians and records that information for future clinical and research use. Although efforts to structure some radiology report information through predefined templates are beginning to bear fruit, a large portion of radiology report information is entered in free text. The free text format is a major obstacle for rapid extraction and subsequent use of information by clinicians, researchers, and healthcare information systems. This difficulty is due to the ambiguity and subtlety of natural language, complexity of described images, and variations among different radiologists and healthcare organizations. As a result, radiology reports are used only once by the clinician who ordered the study and rarely are used again for research and data mining. In this work, machine learning techniques and a large multi-institutional radiology report repository are used to extract the semantics of the radiology report and overcome the barriers to the re-use of radiology report information in clinical research and other healthcare applications. We describe a machine learning system to annotate radiology reports and extract report contents according to an information model. This information model covers the majority of clinically significant contents in radiology reports and is applicable to a wide variety of radiology study types. Our automated approach uses discriminative sequence classifiers for named-entity recognition to extract and organize clinically significant terms and phrases consistent with the information model. We evaluated our information extraction system on 150 radiology reports from three major healthcare organizations and compared its results to a commonly used non-machine learning information extraction method. We

  2. Pitfalls in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peh, Wilfred C.G.

    2015-01-01

    Only textbook to focus primarily on the topic of pitfalls in diagnostic radiology. Highlights the pitfalls in a comprehensive and systematic manner. Written by experts in different imaging modalities and subspecialties from reputable centers across the world. The practice of diagnostic radiology has become increasingly complex, with the use of numerous imaging modalities and division into many subspecialty areas. It is becoming ever more difficult for subspecialist radiologists, general radiologists, and residents to keep up with the advances that are occurring year on year, and this is particularly true for less familiar topics. Failure to appreciate imaging pitfalls often leads to diagnostic error and misinterpretation, and potential medicolegal problems. Diagnostic errors may be due to various factors such as inadequate imaging technique, imaging artifacts, failure to recognize normal structures or variants, lack of correlation with clinical and other imaging findings, and poor training or inexperience. Many, if not most, of these factors are potentially recognizable, preventable, or correctable. This textbook, written by experts from reputable centers across the world, systematically and comprehensively highlights the pitfalls that may occur in diagnostic radiology. Both pitfalls specific to different modalities and techniques and those specific to particular organ systems are described with the help of numerous high-quality illustrations. Recognition of these pitfalls is crucial in helping the practicing radiologist to achieve a more accurate diagnosis.

  3. Pitfalls in diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peh, Wilfred C.G. (ed.) [Khoo Teck Puat Hospital (Singapore). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    2015-04-01

    Only textbook to focus primarily on the topic of pitfalls in diagnostic radiology. Highlights the pitfalls in a comprehensive and systematic manner. Written by experts in different imaging modalities and subspecialties from reputable centers across the world. The practice of diagnostic radiology has become increasingly complex, with the use of numerous imaging modalities and division into many subspecialty areas. It is becoming ever more difficult for subspecialist radiologists, general radiologists, and residents to keep up with the advances that are occurring year on year, and this is particularly true for less familiar topics. Failure to appreciate imaging pitfalls often leads to diagnostic error and misinterpretation, and potential medicolegal problems. Diagnostic errors may be due to various factors such as inadequate imaging technique, imaging artifacts, failure to recognize normal structures or variants, lack of correlation with clinical and other imaging findings, and poor training or inexperience. Many, if not most, of these factors are potentially recognizable, preventable, or correctable. This textbook, written by experts from reputable centers across the world, systematically and comprehensively highlights the pitfalls that may occur in diagnostic radiology. Both pitfalls specific to different modalities and techniques and those specific to particular organ systems are described with the help of numerous high-quality illustrations. Recognition of these pitfalls is crucial in helping the practicing radiologist to achieve a more accurate diagnosis.

  4. Congenital hip dislocation: Radiological screening or diagnosis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalifa, G.; Faure, C.

    1987-01-01

    Congenital hip dislocation is a perfect example of public health problems: its incidence is high 0.6, to 2% of newborns in France and an early detection allows an easy and successful treatment. The current situation in our country is not satisfactory for several reasons: - Too many children are treated without reasons because of misleading radiological pictures; - Conversely, some dislocations are discovered only at the walking age, the treatment becoming then more difficult and less effective; - Almost 300,000 radiological examinations of the hip for screening are performed each year and among them 100,000 in newborns. This is not satisfactory as it is commonly admitted now that radiological examination at birth is unreliable and frequently misleading. For all these reasons a special working group has been settled up by the General Direction of Health, including physicians of different practices, from different specialities. The conclusion of this group will be published in a special booklet and can be summarized as follows: The group recommends to perform detection of congenital hip dislocation mainly by the clinical examination. This examination may be difficult but it must be performed very early, the first day of life, repeated several times, at the end of the first week and during the first, second, and third month. Every baby in this country must undergo several clinical examinations up to one year of age

  5. Clinical and radiological findings in chlorfenapyr poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vemuri Rama Tharaknath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of suicidal ingestion of chlorfenapyr, presenting with neurological complications after a latent period of more than a week, and rapidly progressing to death within days of symptoms. Chlorfenapyr is a moderately hazardous pesticide according to World Health Organization toxicity classification, and kills target organism by depriving it of energy through interference with oxidative phosphorylation at mitochondrial level. A pro-pesticide, chlorfenapyr takes time to convert to its active form and either this active form or a toxic metabolite causes delayed neurological symptoms. It causes significant neurotoxicity in rat models. This case report provides for the first time from India (second worldwide, clinical and "radiological evidence" (magnetic resonance imaging showing demyelinating/oedematous changes of "chlorfenapyr neurotoxicity in humans." It also highlights the "latent period" between ingestion and onset of fatal manifestations. Earlier, similar case reports of human deaths with delayed onset neurological symptoms, due to chlorfenapyr poisoning have been reported, from Japan, Columbia, and Korea.

  6. T1- Thresholds in Black Holes Increase Clinical-Radiological Correlation in Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Christian; Faizy, Tobias; Sedlacik, Jan; Holst, Brigitte; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Young, Kim Lea; Heesen, Christoph; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an established tool in diagnosing and evaluating disease activity in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). While clinical-radiological correlations are limited in general, hypointense T1 lesions (also known as Black Holes (BH)) have shown some promising results. The definition of BHs is very heterogeneous and depends on subjective visual evaluation. We aimed to improve clinical-radiological correlations by defining BHs using T1 relaxation time (T1-RT) thresholds to achieve best possible correlation between BH lesion volume and clinical disability. 40 patients with mainly relapsing-remitting MS underwent MRI including 3-dimensional fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MPRAGE) before and after Gadolinium (GD) injection and double inversion-contrast magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MP2RAGE) sequences. BHs (BHvis) were marked by two raters on native T1-weighted (T1w)-MPRAGE, contrast-enhancing lesions (CE lesions) on T1w-MPRAGE after GD and FLAIR lesions (total-FLAIR lesions) were detected separately. BHvis and total-FLAIR lesion maps were registered to MP2RAGE images, and the mean T1-RT were calculated for all lesion ROIs. Mean T1 values of the cortex (CTX) were calculated for each patient. Subsequently, Spearman rank correlations between clinical scores (Expanded Disability Status Scale and Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite) and lesion volume were determined for different T1-RT thresholds. Significant differences in T1-RT were obtained between all different lesion types with highest T1 values in visually marked BHs (BHvis: 1453.3±213.4 ms, total-FLAIR lesions: 1394.33±187.38 ms, CTX: 1305.6±35.8 ms; p1500 ms (Expanded Disability Status Scale vs. lesion volume: rBHvis = 0.442 and rtotal-FLAIR = 0.497, p<0.05; Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite vs. lesion volume: rBHvis = -0.53 and rtotal-FLAIR = -0.627, p<0.05). Clinical-radiological correlations in MS patients are

  7. Comparable clinical and radiological outcomes between skipped-level and all-level plating for open-door laminoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Cheung, Prudence Wing Hang; Cheung, Amy Yim Ling; Lui, Darren; Cheung, Kenneth M C

    2018-06-01

    To compare the clinical and radiological outcomes between skipped-level and all-level plating for cervical laminoplasty. Patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) treated by open-door laminoplasty with minimum 2-year postoperative follow-up were included. All patients had opening from C3-6 or C3-7 and were divided into skipped-level or all-level plating groups. Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores and canal measurements were obtained preoperatively, immediate (within 1 week) postoperatively, and at 2, 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Paired t test was used for comparative analysis. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to determine the canal expansion cutoff for spring-back closure. A total of 74 subjects were included with mean age of 66.1 ± 11.3 years at surgery. Of these, 32 underwent skipped-level plating and 42 underwent all-level plating. No significant differences were noted between the two groups at baseline and follow-up. Spring-back closure was observed in up to 50% of the non-plated levels within 3 months postoperatively. The cutoff for developing spring-back closure was 7 mm canal expansion for C3-6. No differences were observed in JOA scores and recovery rates between the two groups. None of the patients with spring-back required reoperation. There were no significant differences between skipped-level and all-level plating in terms of JOA or recovery rate, and canal diameter differences. This has tremendous impact on saving costs in CSM management as up to two plates per patient undergoing a standard C3-6 laminoplasty may be omitted instead of four plates to every level to achieve similar clinical and radiological outcomes. III. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.

  8. Medical Ethics in Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Won; Park, Jae Hyung; Yoon, Soon Ho

    2010-01-01

    According to the recent developments in radiological techniques, the role of radiology in the clinical management of patients is ever increasing and in turn, so is the importance of radiology in patient management. Thus far, there have been few open discussions about medical ethics related to radiology in Korea. Hence, concern about medical ethics as an essential field of radiology should be part of an improved resident training program and patient management. The categories of medical ethics related with radiology are ethics in the radiological management of patient, the relationship of radiologists with other medical professionals or companies, the hazard level of radiation for patients and radiologists, quality assurance of image products and modalities, research ethics, and other ethics issues related to teleradiology and fusion imaging. In order to achieve the goal of respectful progress in radiology as well as minimizing any adverse reaction from other medical professions or society, we should establish a strong basis of medical ethics through the continuous concern and self education

  9. Radiologic sciences. Faculty needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Kevin J

    2005-01-01

    A total of 326 programs are represented in the data collected. Based on the average number of full- and part-time faculty members reported per program, this survey represents more than 1500 faculty positions. Based on the forecast of retirement and career change for all faculty members, there will be a turnover of 700 to 800 positions over the next 5 to 10 years. Part-time/adjunct faculty vacancies are expected to create the greatest number of opportunities for technologists to make the transition to education, with approximately one third of current part-time/adjunct educators planning on leaving radiologic sciences education within 5 years. To encourage retention of part-time/adjunct educators, annual evaluations should be modified to recognize the important educational role these instructors play. There is a need to create enthusiasm and interest in education as a career pathway for radiologic technologists. Resources are needed that help radiologic technologists make the transition to teaching. Finally, the retention of educators must be emphasized. Program applicant trends indicate radiologic technology students are older, have prior postsecondary education experience or are making a career change. This data emphasizes the need for educators, both full time and part time, to understand the characteristics and needs of the adult learner. Adult learners bring a wealth of education, experience and life skills that create both opportunities and challenges in the classroom and clinical setting. All categories of respondents indicated that their current salaries were greater than those of program graduates in their firstjob. Of interest is that 1 in 5 (20%) of part-time/adjunct educators indicated the opposite--that program graduates earn more in their firstjob than educators earn. When asked about salaries if working full time in clinical practice, the majority of all groups indicated their salary would be about the same or would decrease. Only 20% of program

  10. Radiology of syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taybi, H.

    1982-01-01

    In the course of 20 years, the author has investigated the radiological aspects of many different syndromes. 541 of them are listed in this book, together with their typical X-ray pictures. Congenital deformities, genetic diseases, and acquired diseases with typical combinations of sigs and symptoms are presented with information on how to identify them. Clinical manifestations are briefly characterized, and hereditary aspects are mentioned. Pathological characteristics and names of the syndromes are presented. A bibliography is given for every syndrome for those who intend to deepen their knowledge. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Test objects for evaluating the performance of radiological imaging systems. Leeds radiological test objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowen, A.R.; Clarke, O.F.; Haywood, J.M.; Parker, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    A range of test objects has been developed to assess the imaging performance of conventional and digital radiological imaging systems. These test objects have arisen as a result of involvement in both the laboratory evaluation of radiological imaging systems and the routine maintenance of such equipment in a large diagnostic radiology department. The philosophy behind the design and application of the test objects is briefly described. Particular attention is paid to the advantages of using the threshold-contrast detail-detectability technique to assess overall imaging performance. The great importance of ensuring optimum imaging performance prior to clinical acceptance is stressed. A strategy for implementing the test objects in a clinical department is present. The diagnostic information content of the clinical images which result measures the success of the quality control procedure adopted. (author)

  12. The colon. Clinical radiology and endoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbusch, G.; Reeders, J.W.A.J.

    1993-01-01

    This comprehensive reference work presents in-depth information on the diagnostic radiology and endoscopy of the colon. After a brief review of the history of colon examinations, two chapters explain the anatomy, physiology and pharmacology of the large intestine as well as the methods and techniques applied for radiological examination of the colon. The pathology and characteristical findings and the diagnostic evaluation of the various types of disease are the main subject, with the chapters discussing inflammations and tumors consuming by far most of the space, but there is also valuable information on vascular lesions, traumata, latrogenous or post-surgery lesions, among others, and on the characteristical findings in children. Numerous tables, radiographs and endoscopic images together with drawings illustrate and accompany the textbook information. (orig.). 492 figs., 95 tabs [de

  13. 35 Years of Experience From the American Association for Women Radiologists: Increasing the Visibility of Women in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalluto, Lucy B; Arleo, Elizabeth K; Macura, Katarzyna J; Rumack, Carol M

    2017-03-01

    Women radiologists remain in minority, unchanged for the past several decades. In 1981, the American Association for Women Radiologists (AAWR) was founded to address the problems that women radiologists were experiencing in being subordinate to male radiologists in the workplace and at the national level in organizations with respect to political power and financial compensation, as well as additional issues unique to women in radiology. The AAWR defined goals to meet the needs of women in radiology: improve the visibility of women radiologists, advance the professional and academic standing of women in radiology, and identify and address issues faced by women in radiology. AAWR efforts have included providing opportunities for career development and award recognition, hosting educational programs at national meetings, and publishing numerous manuscripts on issues faced by women in radiology. The AAWR recognizes that although there has been significant progress in the standing of women in radiology over the past 35 years, there is much room for improvement. The AAWR will continue to advocate for the needs of women in radiology. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Potential and limits of mammography (Statistical and casuistic investigation of clinically positive, mammographically negative cases among the patients of Goettingen Radiological University Hospital)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pforte, A.

    1978-01-01

    In the radiological clinic of the Goettingen University, 23,945 patients were mammographed from 1971 to 1977. For 612 patients with existing clinical findings, a negative radiological finding was established; as for the 202 patients who are dealt with in this paper, in 192 of these cases a histological or cytological clarification was carried out; 10 other cases were observed over a longer period. The average age of the patients examined was 39.7 years. The maximum frequency with regard to the age lies in the 5th life decade with 26.2%. Corresponding to the Goettingen model, the patients examined were assigned to 4 main groups in accordance to their parenchymal structure. In relation to the mamma structure, the clinical finding in 53.9% is hardening and in 46.1% nodes. As for the nodes, most have the size of cherry or plum (21.3%), this is followed by those with the size of beans (13,8%) and lenses (10.9%). A coherence between age and size of the clinical finding cannot be manifested definitely. In nearly half of the cases, the histological or cytological examination revealed a mastopathy (48.9%). In 10.4% a fibroadenoma was found and in 2.1% a carcinoma. In the remaining 32,8% the finding referred to lipomas, mastitis, atypical cells or negative cytological results. Related to the age, mastopathy is dominant in women between 20 and 60 years of age. In women below 20 years, fibroadenomas are dominant, in women in their 7th decade other benign diagnoses which in the 8th decade are of the same frequency as carcinomas. With increasing age, the number of fibroadenomas decreases.

  15. Bacteriological Monitoring of Radiology Room Apparatus in the Department of Radiological Technology and Contamination on Hands of Radiological Technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seon Chil

    2008-01-01

    Distribution of microorganisms were examined for the bucky tables in the radiology rooms of the department of radiological technology, the aprons, handles of various apparatus, handles of mobile radiological apparatus, and hands of the radiological technologists. As a result, relatively larger amounts of bacteria were found on the handles of the mobile radiological apparatus and the aprons. Among the isolated bacteria, Acinetobacter baumanni (7.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (6.7%), Staphylococcus aureus (3.9%), Serratia liquefaciens (1.7%), Enterobacter cloaceae (0.6%), Providenica rettgeri (0.6%) are known as the cause of nosocomial infection (hospital acquired infection). In addition, similar colonies were also found on the hands of the radiological technologists such as microorganisms of Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (6.6%), Yersinia enterocolotica (5.4%), Acinetobacter baumanni (4.2%), Enterobacter cloaceae (2.4%), Serratia liquefaciens (1.8%), Yersinia pseuotuberculosis (18%), Enterobacter sakazakii (1.2%), and Escherichia coli (0.6%). In particular, this result indicates clinical significance since Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli show strong pathogenicity. Therefore, a continuous education is essential for the radiological technologists to prevent the nosocomial infection.

  16. Bacteriological Monitoring of Radiology Room Apparatus in the Department of Radiological Technology and Contamination on Hands of Radiological Technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seon Chil [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Distribution of microorganisms were examined for the bucky tables in the radiology rooms of the department of radiological technology, the aprons, handles of various apparatus, handles of mobile radiological apparatus, and hands of the radiological technologists. As a result, relatively larger amounts of bacteria were found on the handles of the mobile radiological apparatus and the aprons. Among the isolated bacteria, Acinetobacter baumanni (7.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (6.7%), Staphylococcus aureus (3.9%), Serratia liquefaciens (1.7%), Enterobacter cloaceae (0.6%), Providenica rettgeri (0.6%) are known as the cause of nosocomial infection (hospital acquired infection). In addition, similar colonies were also found on the hands of the radiological technologists such as microorganisms of Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (6.6%), Yersinia enterocolotica (5.4%), Acinetobacter baumanni (4.2%), Enterobacter cloaceae (2.4%), Serratia liquefaciens (1.8%), Yersinia pseuotuberculosis (18%), Enterobacter sakazakii (1.2%), and Escherichia coli (0.6%). In particular, this result indicates clinical significance since Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli show strong pathogenicity. Therefore, a continuous education is essential for the radiological technologists to prevent the nosocomial infection.

  17. Development of an instrument to measure the clinical learning environment in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, L.; Subramaniam, R.

    2008-01-01

    A clinical learning environment survey instrument was developed that provided insights into diagnostic radiology trainees' perceptions of the culture and context of the hospital-based training programme. The survey was completed by trainees allocated to 37 important training hospitals in Australia, New Zealand and Singapore in 2006. The main findings were that most obvious strengths of the diagnostic radiology programme are the wide variety of work-based learning opportunities and the social atmosphere. These were well regarded in all training sites. Work overload was seen as a significant problem in most hospitals and will probably remain a challenge. The areas that are most likely to repay efforts to bring about change are supervision and feedback. The study provides baseline data against which the influence of changes to the training programme may be evaluated.

  18. Acrylic kyphoplasty in recent nonosteoporotic fractures of the thoracolumbar junction: a prospective clinical and 3D radiologic study of 54 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saget, Mathieu; Teyssedou, Simon; Prebet, Remi; Vendeuvre, Tanguy; Gayet, Louis-Etienne; Pries, Pierre

    2014-08-01

    Prospective clinical and radiological study. To evaluate the impact of stand-alone acrylic kyphoplasty in the treatment of recent traumatic fractures of the thoracolumbar spine in young patients. The management of fractures of the thoracolumbar spine without neurological deficit remains controversial. For a long time clinicians could only chose between functional treatment, orthopedic treatment, and traditional surgery. The recent advent of minimally invasive surgical techniques is an interesting alternative. Fifty-four patients with a mean age of 45.8±18.2 years and who had recently sustained a fracture of the thoracolumbar junction were enrolled into the study. Balloon kyphoplasty was performed using acrylic cement. Radiologic assessments (computed tomography scans) and clinical assessments (including Visual Analog Scale and Oswestry Disability Index scores) were used to determine kyphoplasty success and measure patient recovery over 2 years. Kyphoplasty reduced mean vertebral kyphosis from 12.8±5.0 degrees at trauma to 8.2±5.1 degrees at 2-year follow-up. Mean vertebral kyphosis was corrected by -5.7±4.7 degrees (P=0.0001) at the point of first verticalization, with no significant change at the 2-year follow-up visit (+1.1±4.3 degrees, P=0.1058). Kyphoplasty significantly augmented the height of the 6 anterior and intermediate segments. Maximum mean augmentation of intermediate vertebral height after 6 months was (11.6%±15.5%, P<0.0001). Patients tolerated the procedure well and 56% of them returned to work 3 months after kyphoplasty. Kyphoplasty is safe and effective in the correction of nonosteoporotic fractures of the thoracolumbar junction in young patients, and remains stable for at least 2 years postsurgery.

  19. The Perceived long-term impact of the radiological curriculum innovation in the medical doctors training at Ghent University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V., E-mail: elena.kourdioukova@ugent.be [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital (UZG), MR/-1K12, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Valcke, Martin [Department of Educational Studies, Ghent University, H. Dunantlaan 2, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Verstraete, Koenraad L. [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital (UZG), MR/-1K12, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2011-06-15

    Objectives: How do students experience and perceive the innovative undergraduate radiology curriculum at Ghent University, and what explains differences in student perception? Methods: A survey was presented to the 2008 cohort of students enrolled in the undergraduate medical curriculum at Ghent University. The survey focused on their experiences and perceptions in relation to the innovative undergraduate radiology teaching. Results and conclusion: The present research results point at a favorable perception of the innovative radiology curriculum components. The study points - both during pre-clinical and clinical years - at the appreciation for curriculum components that combine traditional curriculum components (ex-cathedra lessons with syllabus) with distance learning components such as E-learning and E-testing. In clinical years - as expected - students switch to the application of knowledge and skills and therefore heavily appreciate practice linked curriculum components.

  20. The Perceived long-term impact of the radiological curriculum innovation in the medical doctors training at Ghent University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V.; Valcke, Martin; Verstraete, Koenraad L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: How do students experience and perceive the innovative undergraduate radiology curriculum at Ghent University, and what explains differences in student perception? Methods: A survey was presented to the 2008 cohort of students enrolled in the undergraduate medical curriculum at Ghent University. The survey focused on their experiences and perceptions in relation to the innovative undergraduate radiology teaching. Results and conclusion: The present research results point at a favorable perception of the innovative radiology curriculum components. The study points - both during pre-clinical and clinical years - at the appreciation for curriculum components that combine traditional curriculum components (ex-cathedra lessons with syllabus) with distance learning components such as E-learning and E-testing. In clinical years - as expected - students switch to the application of knowledge and skills and therefore heavily appreciate practice linked curriculum components.

  1. Radiological follow-up of uncemented knee prostheses. Preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Hervas, C.; Gomez Barrena, E.; Marquez Moreno, I.; Calle Yuste, F.; Ordonez Parra, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The preliminary results of a prospective study of 40 uncemented total knee prostheses (TKP) are presented following a radiological protocol with fluoroscopic control and follow-up of over 2 years. The prosthesis-bone interface and the components alignment were assessed. Several radiological signs were studied to assess this interface with respect to the fixing of the component, but they showed little clinical correlation. Statistical significance (p<0.05, chisquare) was found only in the observation of sclerosis in areas of support for the tibital tray as a reaction of the bone. This radiological follow-up is of interest to determine the evolution of the interface and position of the implant to prevent complications (especially loosening) in patients, particularly those under 60 years old, who represent the group that can most benefit from prosthetic systems with uncemented anchorage because of their life expectation and level of activity. Author

  2. Pylon fractures of the ankle: A distinct clinical and radiological entity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainwaring, B.L.; Daffner, R.H.; Riemer, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Pylon fractures are a distinct clinical and radiological entity that should not be confused with trimalleolar fractures. Radiographic and clinical comparison of 20 cases of each fracture type revealed definite distinguishing features. First, pylon fractures inevitably were associated with profound comminution of the distal tibia. The trimalleolar injury was associated with fractures of the medial, lateral, and posterior malleoli without comminution. Second, in contrast to timalleolar fractures, pylon fractures had intraarticular extension of at least one tibial fracture through the dome of the plafond. Third, 60% of all pylon fractures were associated with a fractured talus; the talus was intact in all trimalleolar fractures. Fourth, the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis was constant in the pylon fractures but was separated in all trimalleolar fractures

  3. The Development of Radiology among Slovenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonka Zupanič Slavec

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Few discoveries in the history of science brought such significant progress as did the discovery of X-rays by the German physicist Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen in 1895. The finding did not only bring a revolution to the field of medicine but also to many other technical branches. With technological progress in the 20th century, medical roentgenology swiftly developed. The first significant step forward was the introduction of contrast media followed by others including computerised image data management and digital techniques. Medical diagnostics embraced other imaging methods based on other types of energy such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The beginnings of roentgenology in the Slovene Lands go back to the year 1900. Bone fractures were the first to be imaged, followed by thoracic imaging and contrast imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. The use of roentgenology spread significantly after World War I, with the implementation in the following years of X-ray machines in all Slovenian hospitals, some spas and sanatoria. Gradually the need for an independent scientific institution emerged, which led to the establishment of the Roentgenological Institute for Slovenia and Istria in Ljubljana in 1923. At the same time radiology was developing also by other Slovenian hospitals.In the 1950s, Slovenian roentgenology increasingly stayed in touch with contemporary international development, updated its equipment and introduced new methods. The modern concept of centralised radiological management, comparable with that of modern European institutions, was realised in Ljubljana in 1973 after the relocation of the Radiological Institute to the new facilities at the Ljubljana University Medical Centre. The first computer tomography machine was installed in 1980, the first ultrasound machine was acquired in 1981, the first digital subtraction angiography (DSA machine was introduced in 1986 and the first magnetic resonance machine was installed in

  4. Cancer diagnosis in a ''breast clinic''. A 15 years retrospection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghys, R

    1987-01-01

    Conflicting opinions have been expressed in the world literature over the last 15 years about the value of radiological techniques in breast cancer diagnosis. We reviewed 111 breast cancers which we diagnosed between 1971 and 1985, in unselected patients, by the combined use of palpation, thermography and mammography, complemented, since 1980, by diaphanoscopy. Considerable clinical experience is necessary to interpret both mammograms and thermograms. Each of these approaches, when rated independently, has a very high false negative rate ranging from 41% for clinical examination to 32% for mammography. In cases which are not clinically obvious, diaphanoscopy ''retrieves'' the most cancers, with thermography a close second (definitely malignant in 35% of the cases over the whole age range). Mammography comes third and its efficacy drops to 12.5% in premenopausal women. However, by combining this information with the one derived from anamnesis, the ACDTM scoring system gives us a false negative rate - before biopsy - of 5.5% and a false positive rate of <1%. This approach also drastically reduces the number of unnecessary biopsies.

  5. Dynamic statistics on radiology-related examinations of the department of dental radiology at the Kyushu Dental College Hospital during the past 10 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasugi, Nao; Oda, Masahumi; Okabe, Sachiko; Kitou, Shinji; Tanaka, Tatsurou; Morimoto, Yasuhiro

    2008-01-01

    We have reported dynamic statistics on radiology-related examinations and patients in our department every 10 years in order to clarify the role and characteristics of the Department of Dental Radiology at the Kyushu Dental College Hospital. In the last 10 years, the latest models of X-ray CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment have been used, as they were installed when the newly built Kyushu Dental College hospital was opened in September 1999. Therefore, we can now treat more types of disease in the soft tissues of the oral and maxillofacial regions than before. In the present study, we examined the precise numbers of radiology-related examinations and patients, and analyzed the purpose of radiology-related examinations in each modality. Plain radiography, X-ray CT scanning, MRI and ultrasonography were performed at our department from April 1, 1995 to March 31, 2007, and were analyzed for examination number and purpose. The results were as follows. The number of patients visiting our hospital and our department increased markedly when the newly built hospital was opened 10 years ago. The annual number of imaging examinations during the same period also increased substantially. However, the annual number of patients has remained relatively constant since the initial increase. There is an apparent relationship between the number of outpatients and the number of imaging examinations. Because our department began to offer MRI examinations in September 1999, the frequency of these examinations has increased annually for the purpose of soft tissue-related diseases in the oral and maxillofacial regions. X-ray CT examination was mainly used for the detection of diseases occurring in the maxilla and mandible, or of calcification-related diseases such as sialolithiasis. On the other hand, the purpose of MRI examination was the precise detection of diseases occurring in the soft tissues, such as salivary glands. The results suggest that the dentists in our

  6. Radiological and clinical predictors of long-term outcome in rotator cuff calcific tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Witte, Pieter Bas; van Adrichem, Raymond A; Selten, Jasmijn W; Nagels, Jochem; Reijnierse, M; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge on the epidemiology and long-term course of rotator cuff calcific tendinitis (RCCT) is scarce. We assessed demographics, radiological characteristics, and their association with long-term outcomes in a large patient group. Baseline demographics, radiological characteristics and treatment were recorded in 342 patients. Interobserver agreement of radiological measures was analyzed. Long-term outcome was evaluated with questionnaires (WORC, DASH). The association of baseline characteristics with outcome was assessed. Mean age was 49.0 (SD = 10.0), and 59.5 % were female. The dominant arm was affected in 66.0 %, and 21.3 % had bilateral disease. Calcifications were on average 18.7 mm (SD = 10.1, ICC = 0.84 (p < 0.001)) and located 10.1 mm (SD = 11.8) medially to the acromion (ICC = 0.77 (p < 0.001)). Gärtner type I calcifications were found in 32.1 % (Kappa = 0.47 (p < 0.001)). After 14 years (SD = 7.1) of follow-up, median WORC was 72.5 (range, 3.0-100.0; WORC < 60 in 42 %) and median DASH 17.0 (range, 0.0-82.0). Female gender, dominant arm involvement, bilateral disease, longer duration of symptoms, and multiple calcifications were associated with inferior WORC. DASH results were similar. Many subjects have persisting shoulder complaints years after diagnosis, regardless of treatment. Female gender, dominant arm involvement, bilateral disease, longer duration of symptoms, and multiple calcifications were associated with inferior outcome. Radiological measures had moderate-to-good reliability and no prognostic value. • Most RCCT studies report on short-term outcome and/or small patients groups. • In this large, long-term observational study, RCCT appeared to not be self-limiting in many subjects. • Negative prognostic factors included female gender, more calcifications, dominant arm affected, and longer duration of symptoms. • Interobserver agreement of general radiological RCCT measures is

  7. Analysis of the Importance of Subjects to Improve the Educational Curriculum in the Radiological Science: Focused on Radiological Technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Ko, Seong Jin; Kang, Se Sik; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Chang Soo

    2012-01-01

    In this study a group of experts and clinical radiological technologists were surveyed to evaluate the clinical importance of current subjects in the radiological sciences. For the data collection and analysis, an open-ended questionnaire was distributed to the group of experts, and a multiple choice questionnaire was distributed to radiological technologists. Subjects were classified into 9 groups for analysis of the importance of subjects, and in regard to the questionnaire design for measurement of variables, departments and type of hospital were set up as independent variables, and the 9 groups of subjects were set up as dependent variables. As a result, clinical radiological technologists perceived Diagnostic Imaging Technology and practical courses, including general radiography, CT and MRI, as the most clinically necessary subjects, and the group of experts placed most weight on basic courses for the major. The result of this study suggests that the curriculum should be revised in a way that combines theory and practice in order to foster radiological technologists capable of adapting to the rapidly changing healthcare environment.

  8. Evaluation of use of e-Learning in undergraduate radiology education: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Saad; Safdar, Saima; Zafar, Aasma N

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this review is to investigate the evaluative outcomes present in the literature according to Kirkpatrick's learning model and to examine the nature and characteristics of the e-Learning interventions in radiology education at undergraduate level. Four databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Eric) are searched for publications related to the application of e-Learning in undergraduate radiology education. The search strategy is a combination of e-Learning and Mesh and non Mesh radiology and undergraduate related terms. These search strategies are established in relation to experts of respective domains. The full text of thirty pertinent articles is reviewed. Author's country and study location data is extracted to identify the most active regions and year's are extracted to know the existing trend. Data regarding radiology subfields and undergraduate year of radiology education is extracted along with e-Learning technologies to identify the most prevalent or suitable technologies or tools with respect to radiology contents. Kirkpatricks learning evaluation model is used to categorize the evaluative outcomes reported in the identified studies. The results of this analysis reveal emergence of highly interactive games, audience response systems and designing of wide range of customized tools according to learner needs assessment in radiology education at undergraduate level. All these initiatives are leading toward highly interactive self directed learning environments to support the idea of life-long independent learners. Moreover, majority of the studies in literature regarding e-Learning in radiology at undergraduate level are based on participant satisfaction followed by participant results or outcomes either before or after an intervention or both. There was no research particularly demonstrating performance change in clinical practice or patient outcome as they may be difficult to measure in medical education. Thus clinical competences and performances are

  9. Retrospective analysis and think of original papers of gastrointestinal imageology for 46 years in chinese journal of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yingsheng; Shang Kezhong

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze and think the original papers of gastrointestinal (GI) imageology for 46 years in Chinese Journal of Radiology (CJR), meeting a huge challenge of Chinese GI imageology in alternation of generations. Methods: From October 1953 to October 1999, a review of original articles of GI imageology in CJR was conducted. Results: Within 46 years of GI imageology evolution, 211 published original articles of CJR included 79 original papers of radiography and single contrast radiography, 73 original papers of double contrast radiography, 21 original paper of interventional radiology, 15 original papers of CT and MR and CR (computed radiography), 9 original papers of experiment study, and 4 original papers of comprehensive imaging applications. There were different dominant imaging applications at different times, radiography and single contrast radiography in fifties and sixties, double contrast radiography and CT diagnosis in seventies and eighties, and comprehensive applications of CT and MR and CR and interventional radiology in nineties. Conclusion: In GI imageology for 46 years, double contrast radiography in X-ray diagnosis was the main method of imaging diagnosis, CT and MR and CR diagnosis were important means of recruit; interventional radiology was an important section of GI imageology in nineties

  10. Machine Learning and Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  11. The preference of radiology as a postgraduate medical specialty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Recruitment into medical specialties outside the core clinical departments remains a stumbling block to advancing medical practice in Nigeria. We set out to determine the factors influencing choice of diagnostic radiology as a field of specialization by the final year medical students in Usmanu Danfodiyo ...

  12. Clinical and radiological outcomes after management of traumatic knee dislocation by open single stage complete reconstruction/repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorez Lukas G

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of our study was to analyze the clinical and radiological long-term outcomes of surgically treated traumatic knee dislocations and determine prognostic factors for outcome. Methods Retrospective consecutive series of patients treated surgically for traumatic knee dislocation with reconstruction/refixation of the anterior (ACL and posterior cruciate ligaments (PCL and primary complete repair of collaterals and posteromedial and posteromedial corner structures. 68 patients were evaluated clinically (IKDC score, SF36 health survey, Lysholm score, Knee Society score, Tegner score, visual analogue scale - VAS pain and satisfaction, Cooper test and radiologically (weight bearing and stress radiographs with a mean follow up of 12 ± 8 years. Instrumented anterior-posterior translation was measured (Rolimeter, KT-1000. Pearson correlation and stepwise regression analysis was used. Results 82% of patients (n = 56 returned to their previous work. At final follow-up 6 patients (9% suffered from pain VAS > 3. The mean side-to-side difference of anterior/posterior translation (KT-1000, 134N was 1.6 ± 1.6 mm and 2.6 ± 1.4 mm. Valgus and varus stress testing in 30° flexion was 40 days were significantly associated with worse outcome (p Conclusions Early complete reconstruction can achieve good functional results and patient satisfaction with overall restoration of sports and working capacity. Negative predictive factors for outcome were injury pattern, type of surgical procedure and timing of surgery.

  13. The Impact Factor of Radiological Journals: Associations with Journal Content and Other Characteristics Over a Recent 12-Year Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Ayoola, Abimbola

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the trends in the impact factor (IF) of radiological journals over a recent 12-year period, including associations between IF and journal topic. Journal Citation Reports (JCR) was used to identify all biomedical journals and all radiological journals (assigned a JCR category of "Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, & Medical Imaging"), along with journal IF, in 2003 and 2014. Radiological journals were manually classified by topic. Trends in median IF (mIF) were assessed. The number of radiological journals increased from 83 (2003) to 125 (2014) (all biomedical journals: 5907 to 8718, respectively). mIF of radiological journals increased from 1.42 (2003) to 1.75 (2014) (all biomedical journals: 0.93 to 1.46, respectively). The most common topic among new radiological journals was general (nonspecialized) radiology (8). Five new radiological journals in 2014 were in topics (cancer imaging and molecular imaging) having no journals in 2003. mIF of general radiological journals was 1.49. Topics having highest mIF were cardiac imaging (2.94), optics (2.86), molecular imaging (2.77), radiation oncology (2.60), and neuroradiology (2.25). Topics with lowest mIF were ultrasound (1.19) and interventional radiology (1.44). Topics with the largest increase in mIF were cardiac imaging (from 1.17 to 2.94) and neuroradiology (from 1.07 to 2.25). Radiological journals exhibited higher mIF than biomedical journals overall. Among radiological journals, subspecialty journals had highest mIF. While a considerable number of new radiological journals since 2003 were general radiology journals having relatively low IF, there were also new journal topics representing emerging areas of subspecialized radiological research. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Joubert syndrome: Clinical and radiological characteristics of nine patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Farag Elhassanien

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Joubert Syndrome (JS is a rare genetic developmental disorder, first identified in 1969. In patients with JS, certain regions of the brain (mainly cerebellar vermis and brainstem are underdeveloped or malformed. This can lead to impaired attention, visual, spatial, motor, language and social functional skills. JS is characterized by a host of features, many of which do not occur in every patient. Aim of the Study: To spotlight and increase awareness of clinical profile and neuroimaging findings of children with Joubert syndrome. Methods: This is a retrospective case series study of patients with JS who attended the Pediatric Neurology Clinic in Aladan and Alfarawanya Hospitals in Kuwait, from September 2007 to September 2012. Clinical and radiological data were obtained from the patient medical records. Results: Cerebellar vermis hypoplasia/aplasia and apnea were present in all patients, polydactly in 3 of 16, renal problems with cysts in 5 patients and 11 of 16 had abnormal electroretinograms (ERGs. Blood investigations of organic acids, amino acids and very-long-chain fatty acid, were normal in the all the nine patients. Conclusion: JS is a rare genetic brain malformation with association of retinal dystrophy and renal abnormalities. The retinal dystrophy may be progressive. The prognosis of patients depends mainly on the degree of brain malformation.

  15. Neuronal migration and proliferation disorders: Radiologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tampieri, D.; Melanson, D.; Ethier, R.

    1987-01-01

    Loss of control of normal neuronal migration and proliferation can cause a malformation in the central nervous system (CNS). Depending on its chronologic occurrence, the authors can distinguish different types of disorders characterized by a more or less diffuse involvement of the brain. Seven patients, aged 10 months to 18 years, with uncontrolled seizures underwent a complete clinical and radiological (skull radiography, CT, MR imaging) evaluation. In five patients surgery was performed. The aim of the study was to match the radiologic and the pathologic findings in order to establish a radiologic nomenclature. Three types of disorders were found: diffuse dysplasia (two cases), unilateral dysplasis (two cases), and focal cortical dysplasia (three cases). MR imaging, because of its superb ability to display anatomy and to distinguish between gray and white matter, is superior to CT as it allows the complete assessment of these rare cerebral disorders

  16. Evidence-based radiology: a new approach to evaluate the clinical practice of radiology; Evidenzbasierte Radiologie: Ein neuer Ansatz zur Bewertung von klinisch angewandter radiologischer Diagnostik und Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, S. [Univ.Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Medizinische Univ. Wien (Austria); Forschungsprogramm fuer Evidenzbasierte Medizinische Diagnostik, Inst. fuer Public Health, Paracelsus Medizinische Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Felder-Puig, R. [Ludwig-Boltzmann-Inst. fuer Health Technology Assessment, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-07-15

    Over the last several years, the concept and methodology of evidence-based medicine (EBM) have received significant attention in the scientific community. However, compared to therapeutic medical disciplines, EBM-based radiological publications are still underrepresented. This article summarizes the principles of EBM and discusses the possibilities of their application in radiology. The presented topics include the critical appraisal of studies on the basis on EBM principles, the explanation of EBM-relevant statistical outcome parameters (e.g., ''likelihood ratio'' for diagnostic and ''number needed to treat'' for interventional procedures), as well as the problems facing evidence-based radiology. Evidence-based evaluation of radiological procedures does not only address aspects of cost-effectiveness, but is also particularly helpful in identifying patient-specific usefulness. Therefore it should become an integral part of radiologist training. (orig.)

  17. Radiological anatomy - evaluation of integrative education in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, S; Schmiedl, A; Meyer, S; Giesemann, A; Pabst, R; Weidemann, J; Wacker, F K; Kirchhoff, T

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation and analysis of the integrative course "Radiological Anatomy" established since 2007 at the Medical School Hannover (MHH) in comparison with conventional education. Anatomy and radiology are usually taught separately with a considerable time lag. Interdisciplinary teaching of these associated subjects seems logical for several reasons. Therefore, the integrative course "Radiological Anatomy" was established in the second year of medical education, combining these two closely related subjects. This interdisciplinary course was retrospectively evaluated by consideration of a student questionnaire and staff observations. The advantages and disadvantages of integrative teaching in medical education are discussed. The course ratings were excellent (median 1; mean 1.3 on a scale of 1 to 6). This is significantly (p radiology increased during the course (88 %). According to the students' suggestions the course was enhanced by a visitation in the Department of Radiology and the additional topic central nervous system. Integrative teaching of anatomy and radiology was well received by the students. Both, anatomical and radiological comprehension and the motivation to learn were improved. However, it should be considered, that the amount of work and time required by the teaching staff is considerably increased compared to traditional teaching. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Understanding and Applying the Concept of Value Creation in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, David B; Durand, Daniel J; Siegal, Daniel S

    2017-04-01

    The concept of value in radiology has been strongly advocated in recent years as a means of advancing patient care and decreasing waste. This article explores the concept of value creation in radiology and offers a framework for how radiology practices can create value according to the needs of their referring clinicians. Value only exists in the eyes of a customer. We propose that the primary purpose of diagnostic radiology is to answer clinical questions using medical imaging to help guide management of patient care. Because they are the direct recipient of this service, we propose that referring clinicians are the direct customers of a radiology practice and patients are indirect customers. Radiology practices create value as they understand and fulfill their referring clinicians' needs. To narrow those needs to actionable categories, we propose a framework consisting of four major dimensions: (1) how quickly the clinical question needs to be answered, (2) the degree of specialization required to answer the question, (3) how often the referring clinician uses imaging, and (4) the breadth of imaging that the referring clinician uses. We further identify three major settings in which referring clinicians utilize radiological services: (1) emergent or urgent care, (2) primary care, and (3) specialty care. Practices best meet these needs as they engage with their referring clinicians, create a shared vision, work together as a cohesive team, structure the organization to meet referring clinicians' needs, build the tools, and continually improve in ways that help referring clinicians care for patients. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Medical students' preferences in radiology education a comparison between the Socratic and didactic methods utilizing powerpoint features in radiology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lily; King, Alexander; Soman, Salil; Lischuk, Andrew; Schneider, Benjamin; Walor, David; Bramwit, Mark; Amorosa, Judith K

    2011-02-01

    The Socratic method has long been a traditional teaching method in medicine and law. It is currently accepted as the standard of teaching in clinical wards, while the didactic teaching method is widely used during the first 2 years of medical school. There are arguments in support of both styles of teaching. After attending a radiology conference demonstrating different teaching methods, third-year and fourth-year medical students were invited to participate in an online anonymous survey. Of the 74 students who responded, 72% preferred to learn radiology in an active context. They preferred being given adequate time to find abnormalities on images, with feedback afterward from instructors, and they thought the best approach was a volunteer-based system of answering questions using the Socratic method in the small group. They desired to be asked questions in a way that was constructive and not belittling, to realize their knowledge deficits and to have daily pressure to come prepared. The respondents thought that pimping was an effective teaching tool, supporting previous studies. When teaching radiology, instructors should use the Socratic method to a greater extent. Combining Socratic teaching with gentle questioning by an instructor through the use of PowerPoint is a preferred method among medical students. This information is useful to improve medical education in the future, especially in radiology education. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sacroiliitis detected by bone scintiscanning: a clinical, radiological, and scintigraphic follow-up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalmers, I.M.; Lentle, B.C.; Percy, J.S.; Russell, A.S.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-four patients had abnormal sacroiliac joints detected by quantitative sacroiliac scintigraphy but no radiological evidence of sacroiliitis on original investigation. They were studied again after intervals of 12 to 36 months. Four patients developed radiological change. Two young, HLA B27-positive men had undoubted ankylosing spondylitis, and a young woman had possible ankylosing spondylitis. A middle-aged man had changes that could be attributed to post-traumatic osteoarthrosis. Of the remaining 20 cases, 15 had symptoms and signs suggestive of inflammatory disease of the axial skeleton (and peripheral arthropathy in 5 cases). The sexes were affected equally (8 females, 7 Males), and only 2 of the 15 were B27-positive. The response to anti-inflammatory medication was generally good to excellent, and scintiscans tended to improve. Of the remaining 5 patients, 3 had mechanical or traumatic problems, and in 2 there was no explanation for the abnormal sacroiliac scintiscan. It is concluded that quantitative sacroiliac scintigraphy may detect ankylosing spondylitis prior to the development of radiological change and that it can identify an organic basis for backache in patients with a spondylitis-like syndrome. The clinical circumstances must be taken into account, as scintigraphic abnormalities are not diagnostic of any specific disease entity. (author)

  1. Clinical and Radiological Evaluation of the Radius-Ulna- Humerus Joint in Police Dogs in the City of Concepción, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Luzio Quiroga

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the elbow joint in police dogs through a clinical orthopedic exam and a radiological exam. Fifteen dogs were studied (13 males and 2 females between the ages of 3 and 10 that perform police work in Concepción, Chile. Method: Individuals were subjected to a general and orthopedic physical examination focused on the elbow joint, and then a radiological study was carried out, in which both elbows were assessed through 4 projections including an extended medial lateral (ML, craniocaudal (CrCa, medial lateral flexed at 45º (ML 45º flex and craniolateral-caudomedial oblique (Cr15° LCdMO, in order to establish the appearance of osteoarticular disorders. Results: Only 2 dogs showed clinical signs (13.33 % in which pain and crepitation were observed through palpation and manipulation of the joint; 8 individuals showed radiological signs (53.33 %. The most common signs were osteophytes (40 %, sclerosis (20 %, joint incongruity (20 %, unevenness between radius and ulna (20 %, absence of the medial coronoid process of the ulna (6.67 % and unbound anconeus process (6.67 %. Conclusion: This study showed a low correlation between the presence of clinical signs and the presence of radiological signs (r: 0.327.

  2. Spanish Radiology in the second half of the XX Century: A view from inside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonmati, Jose

    2008-01-01

    Radiology was born in 1896 with the immediate recognition of the diagnostic value of X-rays in medicine and progressed throughout the XX Century with the increasing knowledge of its properties and clinical applications. By mid-century Radiology was a respected clinical specialty in advanced countries, the radiological report was a requirement in hospital practice and radiologists' opinions requested in scientific meetings. In the last decades of the century has had a spectacular expansion with the emergence of new imaging modalities and revolutionary technologies that have transformed the specialty worldwide. In Spain Radiology lagged behind needs and demand in 1950. Radiological practice was unregulated and performance of X-ray exams by non-radiologists was common. Teaching of Radiology was non-existent in Medical Schools or postgraduation. The diagnostic value of the specialty was unrecognized by physicians and the role of radiologists ignored. Most hospital radiology services were poorly equipped and functionally inadequate. The shadow of the Civil War (1936-39) was conditioning Radiology in the country. The point of inflexion in the development of Radiology in Spain was the inclusion of film reading sessions in the 1965 academic program of the Society of Radiology. It was in the presentation of cases at these conferences that Clinical Radiology found the finest demonstration ground and as a result was immediately adopted by radiologists and progressively applied in scientific meetings, clinical practices and training programs. Its influence was important in reforming hospital practice, legislation on specialization and education, as well as in national health care plans. At the end of the century radiology in Spain was at a par with the standards of other western nations. The author was a witness of the evolution of Radiology during his 50 years of professional life. This article does not pretend to be exhaustive in names or contributions. It is an overview of

  3. General practitioners’ views on radiology reports of plain radiography for back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeland, Ansgar; Baerheim, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Objective To identify and describe general practitioners’ (GPs’) views on radiology reports, using plain radiography for back pain as the case. Design Qualitative study with three focus-group interviews analysed using Giorgi's method as modified by Malterud. Setting Southern Norway. Subjects Five female and eight male GPs aged 32–57 years who had practised for 3–15 years and were from 11 different practices. Main outcome measures Descriptions of GPs’ views. Results GPs wanted radiology reports to indicate more clearly the meaning of radiological terminology, the likelihood of disease, the clinical relevance of the findings, and/or the need for further investigations. GPs stated that good referral information leads to better reports. Conclusion These results can help to improve communication between radiologists and GPs. The issues identified in this study could be further investigated in studies that can quantify GPs’ satisfaction with radiology reports in relation to characteristics of the GP, the radiologist, and the referral information. PMID:17354154

  4. Annual report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences of the fiscal year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This annual report presents the activities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan in the fiscal year 1990. The activities are divided into research, technical aids, training, medical services, management affairs at the Nakaminato Laboratory Branch Office, library or editing, international cooperation, and general affairs. Research activities are described under the following sections: (1) special researches covering 'biological risk evaluation in public exposure' and 'exposure assessment in the environment and the public involved in food chain', 'medical use of accelerated heavy ions', and 'survey for the demonstration of dose-response relationships in low dose irradiation'; (2) five assigned researches; (3) ordinary researches concerning physics, pharmacochemistry, biology, genetics, pathology and physiology, cell biology, internal exposure, envionmental science, clinical research, clinical research for radiation injuries, medical use of heavy particles, environmental radiation ecology, and aquatic radiation ecology; (4) risk estimation of radiation; (5) survey for radiation response phenomena in fish and in immunity associated with low dose irradiation; (6) actual surveys for Bikini victims, population doses of medical and occupational exposure, and thorotrast exposure; (7) project research; (8) integrated atomic energy-based technological research; (9) radioactivity survey; (10) research supported by Science and Technology Agency aids; (11) International research cooperation; (12) government-private joint cooperative study. Appendices include the personnel list and the bibliography of articles reported by the staff. (N.K.) 870 refs

  5. The first 50 years of military radiology 1895-1945

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Adrian M.K.

    2007-01-01

    Following the discovery of X-rays in 1895 by Wilhelm Roentgen the value to the military surgeon of the new technique was soon realised. The localisation of retained bullets by radiography avoided inappropriate exploration of the wound. The X-rays were first used on casualties from the Abyssinian War of 1896 and the developing radiological technology was progressively applied to military surgery. In addition the needs of warfare stimulated the development of all aspects of radiology

  6. Machine learning and radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Neurofilament light chain and oligoclonal bands are prognostic biomarkers in radiologically isolated syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matute-Blanch, Clara; Villar, Luisa M; Álvarez-Cermeño, José C; Rejdak, Konrad; Evdoshenko, Evgeniy; Makshakov, Gleb; Nazarov, Vladimir; Lapin, Sergey; Midaglia, Luciana; Vidal-Jordana, Angela; Drulovic, Jelena; García-Merino, Antonio; Sánchez-López, Antonio J; Havrdova, Eva; Saiz, Albert; Llufriu, Sara; Alvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Schroeder, Ina; Zettl, Uwe K; Galimberti, Daniela; Ramió-Torrentà, Lluís; Robles, René; Quintana, Ester; Hegen, Harald; Deisenhammer, Florian; Río, Jordi; Tintoré, Mar; Sánchez, Alex; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2018-04-01

    The prognostic role of cerebrospinal fluid molecular biomarkers determined in early pathogenic stages of multiple sclerosis has yet to be defined. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the prognostic value of chitinase 3 like 1 (CHI3L1), neurofilament light chain, and oligoclonal bands for conversion to clinically isolated syndrome and to multiple sclerosis in 75 patients with radiologically isolated syndrome. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of CHI3L1 and neurofilament light chain were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Uni- and multivariable Cox regression models including as covariates age at diagnosis of radiologically isolated syndrome, number of brain lesions, sex and treatment were used to investigate associations between cerebrospinal fluid CHI3L1 and neurofilament light chain levels and time to conversion to clinically isolated syndrome and multiple sclerosis. Neurofilament light chain levels and oligoclonal bands were independent risk factors for the development of clinically isolated syndrome (hazard ratio = 1.02, P = 0.019, and hazard ratio = 14.7, P = 0.012, respectively) and multiple sclerosis (hazard ratio = 1.03, P = 0.003, and hazard ratio = 8.9, P = 0.046, respectively). The best cut-off to classify cerebrospinal fluid neurofilament light chain levels into high and low was 619 ng/l, and high neurofilament light chain levels were associated with a trend to shorter time to clinically isolated syndrome (P = 0.079) and significant shorter time to multiple sclerosis (P = 0.017). Similarly, patients with radiologically isolated syndrome presenting positive oligoclonal bands converted faster to clinically isolated syndrome and multiple sclerosis (P = 0.005 and P = 0.008, respectively). The effects of high neurofilament light chain levels shortening time to clinically isolated syndrome and multiple sclerosis were more pronounced in radiologically isolated syndrome patients with ≥37 years compared to younger patients. Cerebrospinal fluid

  8. Septo-optic dysplasia complex: Clinical and radiological manifestations in Omani children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Al-Senawi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: SOD is a clinically heterogeneous disorder with a wide spectrum of ophthalmic, endocrine, and neurologic manifestations. All features might not be present in a single patient. A high consanguinity rate and lack of history of alcohol and drug use were observed in our cohort. Most affected children present first to the pediatrician with failure to thrive. Radiological confirmation of ONH necessitates high-resolution imaging and interpretation by an experienced neuro-radiologist. In our cohort, all patients with ONH had associated optic chiasmal hypoplasia. Early detection and treatment reduces disease-related morbidity, and can be life saving.

  9. Osteoarticular radiological manifestations of the leukemia in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esguerra E, Monica; Morales A, Nilson

    1992-01-01

    During the first six years of the 80's decade, at the National Institute of Cancer, paediatric patients who clinically suspected of having leukaemia underwent a radiological bone series as a part of their initial evaluation. In this work we describe the bone abnormalities found, their frequency and we correlate them with the ones described in the world literature

  10. Subcutaneous granuloma annulare: radiologic appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kransdorf, M.J.; Murphey, M.D.; Temple, H.T.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. Granuloma annulare is an uncommon benign inflammatory dermatosis characterized by the formation of dermal papules with a tendency to form rings. There are several clinically distinct forms. The subcutaneous form is the most frequently encountered by radiologists, with the lesion presenting as a superficial mass. There are only a few scattered reports of the imaging appearance of this entity in the literature. We report the radiologic appearance of five cases of subcutaneous granuloma annulare. Design and patients. The radiologic images of five patients (three male, two female) with subcutaneous granuloma annulare were retrospectively studied. Mean patient age was 6.4 years (range, 2-13 years). The lesions occurred in the lower leg (two), foot, forearm, and hand. MR images were available for all lesions, gadolinium-enhanced imaging in three cases, radiographs in four, and bone scintigraphy in one. Results. Radiographs showed unmineralized nodular masses localized to the subcutaneous adipose tissue. The size range, in greatest dimension on imaging studies, was 1-4 cm. MR images show a mass with relatively decreased signal intensity on all pulse sequences, with variable but generally relatively well defined margins. There was extensive diffuse enhancement following gadolinium administration. Conclusion. The radiologic appearance of subcutaneous granuloma annulare is characteristic, typically demonstrating a nodular soft-tissue mass involving the subcutaneous adipose tissue. MR images show a mass with relatively decreased signal intensity on all pulse sequences and variable but generally well defined margins. There is extensive diffuse enhancement following gadolinium administration. Radiographs show a soft-tissue mass or soft-tissue swelling without evidence of bone involvement or mineralization. This radiologic appearance in a young individual is highly suggestive of subcutaneous granuloma annulare. (orig.)

  11. Morquio syndrome: A radiological diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhanandham Shrinuvasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS are a family of inherited metabolic diseases that results from the deficiency of lysosomal enzymes involved in the degradation of the glycosaminoglycans (MPS. We report here a 7-year-old female child who presented with complaints of short stature, skeletal deformities, and difficulty in walking with normal intelligence. A clinical diagnosis with differential diagnosis of achondroplasia/rickets was considered. Skeletal survey showed radiological features characteristic of Morquio syndrome (MPS IV which lead to diagnosis in this case.

  12. A snapshot of patients' awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with medical imaging examinations at an Australian radiology clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.; Mohacsy, A.; Connell, D.A.; Schneider, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cumulative radiation exposure is linked to increasing the lifetime attributable risk of cancer. To avoid unnecessary radiation exposure and facilitate shared decision making, patients should be aware of these issues. This paper examines patients' awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with medical imaging examinations. Methods: Consecutive patients attending a private radiology clinic over a nine week period in 2014 in Metropolitan Melbourne were surveyed while waiting to undergo an imaging examination. Patients who were under 18 years of age, did not speak English and/or were referred for interventional imaging procedures were excluded from participation. Survey questions addressed patients' awareness of radiation dose associated with various imaging modalities' and patients' experience and preferences regarding communication of information about radiation. Data was analysed using SPSS (Ver 20.1). Results: A total of 242 surveys were completed. Most participants were male (143/239, 59.8%) and aged between 33 and 52 years (109/242, 45%). Over half of participants were not concerned about radiation from medical imaging (130/238, 54.6%). Only a third of participants (80/234, 34.2%) correctly reported that CT has a higher radiation dose than X-ray. Very few participants correctly identified mammography, DEXA, PET and PET/CT as radiation emitting examinations. The majority of participants (202/236, 85.6%) indicated that they were not informed about radiation dose and risks by their referring doctor in advance. Conclusion: This paper provides information relevant to a single private radiology clinic in Australia. Nevertheless, our results have shown that patients presenting for medical imaging have little awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with these examinations and received little information by their referring physicians or staff at the radiology clinic. - Highlights: • Patients' awareness regarding

  13. Report of two patients with Paget′s disease - one with typical clinical and radiological manifestations including cardiac involvement and the other subclinical but with radiological changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sivapatha Sundharam

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteitis deformans or Paget′s disease of bone, fondly referred to as the ′collage of matrix madness′, is a unique skeletal disease characterized by furious osteoclastic bone resorption followed by a period of hectic bone formation, resulting in again in the bone mass wherein the newly formed bone is disordered and architecturally unsound. A disease of obscure etiology, it usually manifests as progressive enlargement of one or multiple bones of the skeleton. Herewith we present a typical example of a polyostotic form of Paget′s disease with classical clinical features and radiologic changes in one patient and a subclinical form of Paget′s disease with marked radiological changes in the other patient.

  14. Quality assurance programme in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacovenco, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    One hundred years after the discovery of X-rays, they continue being nowadays part of physicians' daily activities, and the diagnosis through the use of X-ray equipment is one of the most important fields in clinical medicine, thus becoming the most important cause of human exposure to artificial sources. For this reason, in the last twenty years, most of the developed countries did the utmost to establish programs which could warrant the quality of the radiographic image. Aiming the protection of human being against the harmful effects of ionizing radiations, in December 1980, World Health Organization decided to form a group of professionals highly experienced in medical radiology, and initiate an inspection and quality control program. In September 1988, the Group of Studies of the Program Related to Radiological Protection of the Commission in the European Communities, prepared a working paper in which guidelines were set up regarding quality of images, dosage to patient, and associated radiographic factors, necessary to obtain acceptable radiologic performance. In Brazil, efforts driven in this direction, guided by some equipment testing, starting in 1990, began to be more known. When the Director and the Head of Radiology in the Military Police Hospital of the State of Rio de Janeiro (HPM) reamed about these efforts, they decided to contact the Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry (IRD) of Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear and submit the problem of low radiologic performance and increasing rates of rejection. Thus, with the coincidence of interests and needs, along with a proposal from the Commission of the European Communities (CEC), IRD decided to offer the author laboratory support to elaborate a Quality Assurance Program (QAP) to be implemented in HPM. (author)

  15. Lateral epicondylitis and beyond: imaging of lateral elbow pain with clinical-radiologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotnis, Nikhil A.; Chiavaras, Mary M.; Harish, Srinivasan

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis is often straightforward and can be made on the basis of clinical findings. However, radiological assessment is valuable where the clinical picture is less clear or where symptoms are refractory to treatment. Demographics, aspects of clinical history, or certain physical signs may suggest an alternate diagnosis. Knowledge of the typical clinical presentation and imaging findings of lateral epicondylitis, in addition to other potential causes of lateral elbow pain, is necessary. These include entrapment of the posterior interosseous and lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerves, posterolateral rotatory instability, posterolateral plica syndrome, Panner's disease, osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum, radiocapitellar overload syndrome, occult fractures and chondral-osseous impaction injuries, and radiocapitellar arthritis. Knowledge of these potential masquerades of lateral epicondylitis and their characteristic clinical and imaging features is essential for accurate diagnosis. The goal of this review is to provide an approach to the imaging of lateral elbow pain, discussing the relevant anatomy, various causes, and discriminating factors, which will allow for an accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. Malpractice claims in interventional radiology: frequency, characteristics and protective measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnavita, N; Fileni, A; Mirk, P; Magnavita, G; Ricci, S; Cotroneo, A R

    2013-04-01

    The use of interventional radiology procedures has considerably increased in recent years, as has the number of related medicolegal litigations. This study aimed to highlight the problems underlying malpractice claims in interventional radiology and to assess the importance of the informed consent process. The authors examined all insurance claims relating to presumed errors in interventional radiology filed by radiologists over a period of 14 years after isolating them from the insurance database of all radiologists registered with the Italian Society of Medical Radiology (SIRM) between 1 January1993 and 31 December 2006. In the period considered, 98 malpractice claims were filed against radiologists who had performed interventional radiology procedures. In 21 cases (21.4%), the event had caused the patient's death. In >80% of cases, the event occurred in a public facility. The risk of a malpractice claim for a radiologist practising interventional procedures is 47 per 1,000, which corresponds to one malpractice claim for each 231 years of activity. Interventional radiology, a discipline with a biological risk profile similar to that of surgery, exposes practitioners to a high risk of medicolegal litigation both because of problems intrinsic to the techniques used and because of the need to operate on severely ill patients with compromised clinical status. Litigation prevention largely depends on both reducing the rate of medical error and providing the patient with correct and coherent information. Adopting good radiological practices, scrupulous review of procedures and efficiency of the instruments used and audit of organisational and management processes are all factors that can help reduce the likelihood of error. Improving communication techniques while safeguarding the patient's right to autonomy also implies adopting clear and rigorous processes for obtaining the patient's informed consent to the medical procedure.

  17. Results of clinical and radiologic mass-screening tests of the locomotor system of miners in Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bene, E.; Temesvary, P.; Szilagyi, M.; Pera, F.

    Clinical and radiological screening tests on the locomotor system of 250 workers being active in mines were accomplished by the authors. The test results of 125 miners working underground were compared with those of a control group consisting of equally 125 workers of the same age category, but engaged in open mining. As a result of the investigation it could be stated that miners working in underground mines were affected by diseases of the organs of motion at a very early stage, and in a greater proportion. The most serious deformations were observed with development irregularities and development variations. The development of degenerative locomotor diseases is promoted in Hungary by the working conditions prevailing underground. The completion of the examination procedure of fitness for work by clinical and radiological examinations of the locomotor system is important and highly recommended. The investigation carried out by the authors may serve as a model for the screening tests to be made on the locomotor system of industrial workers.

  18. Digital imaging in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newell, J.D. Jr.; Kelsey, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    This monograph on digital imaging provides a basic overview of this field at the present time. This paper covers clinical application, including subtraction angiography; chest radiology; genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and breast radiology; and teleradiology. The chest section also includes an explanation of multiple beam equalization radiography. The remaining chapters discuss some of the technical aspects of digital radiology. It includes the basic technology of digital radiography, image compression, and reconstruction information on the economics of digital radiography

  19. Adoption of an integrated radiology reading room within a urologic oncology clinic: initial experience in facilitating clinician consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Lepor, Herbert; Taneja, Samir S; Recht, Michael P

    2014-05-01

    The authors describe their initial experience in implementing an integrated radiology reading room within a urologic oncology clinic, including the frequency and nature of clinician consultations and the perceived impact on patient management by clinicians. A radiology reading room was established within an office-based urologic oncology clinic in proximity to the surgeon's work area. A radiologist was present in this reading room for a 3-hour shift each day. The frequency and nature of consultations during these shifts were recorded. Also, the clinic's staff completed a survey assessing perceptions of the impact of the integrated reading room on patient management. One hundred two consultations occurred during 57 included dates (average, 1.8 consultations per shift): 52% for review of external cases brought in by patients on discs, 43% for review of internal cases, and 5% for direct review by the radiologist of imaging with patients. The maximum number of consultations during a single shift was 8. All of the clinic's urologists indicated that >90% of consultations benefited patient care. The clinicians indicated tendencies to view consultations as affecting management in the majority of cases, to be more likely to seek consultation for outside imaging when the radiologist was on site, and to be less likely to repeat outside imaging when the radiologist was on site. The integrated reading room within the clinic has potential to improve the quality of care, for instance by facilitating increased review of outside imaging studies and thereby potentially reducing duplicate ordering and by enabling occasional direct image review with patients by radiologists. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Reforma peripheral clinic, PEMEX. - I. - May-June of 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres P, A.; Garcia A, J.; Rodriguez A, F.

    2003-07-01

    The Reforma peripheral clinic, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the clinic can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  1. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy

  2. Radiological imaging of congenital hand anomalies - a 6-year single-centre experience and what the hand surgeons want to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerety, E.L.; Hopper, M.A.; Grant, I.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital hand anomalies present a rare but important physical and emotional challenge for children and parents. Radiological imaging is important for accurate diagnosis, to aid decision making and to monitor changes in the growing hand. The goal of any treatment is to help the child achieve his/her maximum potential, to provide a useful hand with attention to cosmesis. We investigated the range of congenital hand anomalies imaged in a tertiary referral centre. We examined the timing of imaging and the key clinical questions. The radiology imaging system was searched retrospectively for radiographs of congenital hand anomalies over a 6-year period. The images were reviewed and patient demographics, diagnosis and other imaging recorded. Over 6 years, 85 patients had imaging. Twenty-three patients had bilateral problems and 11 had recognised syndromes. The most common abnormalities imaged were duplicated thumbs (28 %), followed by syndactyly (18 %). Children were first imaged as early as 1 day old, with the median age of initial imaging 12 months. Thumb duplication and syndactyly are the most common conditions for which radiographs are requested at our hospital, although overall syndactyly is considered the most common congenital hand anomaly. For a variety of reasons, children are often imaged very early, before review by the Specialist in Children's Hand Surgery (despite surgery being unlikely before 1 year of age.) We discuss the classification systems and specific issues that hand surgeons want to know from the radiologists. (orig.)

  3. Radiological imaging of congenital hand anomalies - a 6-year single-centre experience and what the hand surgeons want to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerety, E.L.; Hopper, M.A. [Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Grant, I. [Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Plastic Surgery, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-19

    Congenital hand anomalies present a rare but important physical and emotional challenge for children and parents. Radiological imaging is important for accurate diagnosis, to aid decision making and to monitor changes in the growing hand. The goal of any treatment is to help the child achieve his/her maximum potential, to provide a useful hand with attention to cosmesis. We investigated the range of congenital hand anomalies imaged in a tertiary referral centre. We examined the timing of imaging and the key clinical questions. The radiology imaging system was searched retrospectively for radiographs of congenital hand anomalies over a 6-year period. The images were reviewed and patient demographics, diagnosis and other imaging recorded. Over 6 years, 85 patients had imaging. Twenty-three patients had bilateral problems and 11 had recognised syndromes. The most common abnormalities imaged were duplicated thumbs (28 %), followed by syndactyly (18 %). Children were first imaged as early as 1 day old, with the median age of initial imaging 12 months. Thumb duplication and syndactyly are the most common conditions for which radiographs are requested at our hospital, although overall syndactyly is considered the most common congenital hand anomaly. For a variety of reasons, children are often imaged very early, before review by the Specialist in Children's Hand Surgery (despite surgery being unlikely before 1 year of age.) We discuss the classification systems and specific issues that hand surgeons want to know from the radiologists. (orig.)

  4. Radiological aspects of childhood pulmonary blastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J.; Lopez, A.M.; Martinez, F.; Pineda, G.; Martinez, A.

    1996-01-01

    The objective is to present different clinical and radiological aspects of an uncommon primary lung tumor. Patients, Between 1974 and 1994, this rare pathology, which has seldom been reported in the literature, was diagnosed in four patients in our hospital. The clinical, radiological and pathological findings are presented. the prognosis is poor. Two of the four patients is disease-free-and the fourth is undergoing cytoreduction. (Author) 8 refs

  5. Type II autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (Albers-Schönberg disease): clinical and radiological manifestations in 42 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénichou, O D; Laredo, J D; de Vernejoul, M C

    2000-01-01

    Type II autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO II, Albers-Schonberg disease) is a genetic condition characterized by generalized osteosclerosis predominating in some skeletal sites such as the spine and pelvis. ADO II is rare, and most available clinical descriptions are based on small numbers of patients. We report the clinical and radiological manifestations in 42 ADO II patients. To our knowledge, this is the largest series reported so far. Our inclusion criterion was presence on radiographs of the spine of vertebral endplate thickening, producing the classic sandwich vertebra appearance. We found various patterns of sandwich vertebra, of which we provide a description to assist physicians in diagnosing ADO II. The classic bone-within-bone appearance was present in most but not all skeletal sites. The radiological penetrance of the disease was high (90%) and increased after 20 years of age. As many as 81% of our patients experienced clinical manifestations. Fractures were common (78% of patients) and healed slowly. Hip osteoarthritis developed in 27% of patients and required arthroplasty in 9 of the 16 affected hips. Nonmandibular osteomyelitis occurred in 4 cases (11%). Twenty-four percent of patients had thoracic or lumbar scoliosis. Orthopedic surgery was performed in 52.8% of patients, of whom half had at least three surgical procedures for internal fracture fixation, arthroplasty, limb deformity correction, or treatment of surgical complications. There was a high rate of surgical complications including nonunion, infection, prosthesis loosening, and intraoperative fractures. Nearly two-thirds of patients (64%) had stomatologic manifestations, including mandibular osteomyelitis in 4 patients (11%). Cranial nerve involvement responsible for hearing loss, bilateral optic atrophy, and/or facial palsy was present in 14 patients but was clearly attributable to ADO II in only 6 cases (16%). This large series sheds new light on several aspects of ADO II, most

  6. [Controlling instruments in radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, M

    2013-10-01

    Due to the rising costs and competitive pressures radiological clinics and practices are now facing, controlling instruments are gaining importance in the optimization of structures and processes of the various diagnostic examinations and interventional procedures. It will be shown how the use of selected controlling instruments can secure and improve the performance of radiological facilities. A definition of the concept of controlling will be provided. It will be shown which controlling instruments can be applied in radiological departments and practices. As an example, two of the controlling instruments, material cost analysis and benchmarking, will be illustrated.

  7. Morphological, clinical and radiological aspects in diagnostics of bronchopulmonary diseases and their complications in children with dysplasia of connective tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palchik S.M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article provides an overview of the literature devoted to study of radiological, morphological and clinical aspects of diagnostics of respiratory diseases and their complications in children with dysplasia of connective tissue nowadays. We made an analysis of the role of connective tissue disorders in pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary diseases. Theoretically was substantiated the importance of radiological methods in early diagnostics of this disease in children.

  8. Radiation protection study of radiology medical workers in radiodiagnosis area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.; Canizal, C.; Garcia, M.A.; Orozco, M.; Rincon, A.; Padilla, Y.; Martinez, A.

    1996-01-01

    Aspects related to radiological safety and its organization in radiodiagnosis were evaluated by means of scanning carried out in 18 hospitals of Mexico City, divided in 11 public institutions and 7 private ones. The population being studied was: hospital personnel that works in radiodiagnosis. The survey was made with 31 dichotomic variables, being obtained 132 surveys. The personnel characteristics are 83% works in public institutions, 49% works in radiodiagnosis, 3% has an academic degree, 13% is member of a hospital professional association, 13% has updated information on radiological protection, 36% was trained, 45% works for more than 2 years, 52% uses personal dosemeter, less than the 20% knows about the fundamentals of the radiological protection and 24% states to suffer from biological radiation effects, due to the exposure to x-rays. As result of the study, it was found that the main problems that the radiological protection has, are: lack of training programs in radiological protection and supervision, medical surveillance and the few number of persons that takes part in clinical meetings and professional associations. (authors). 7 refs., 3 tabs

  9. Common carotid artery thrombosis; Clinical and radiological evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Yasuhiro; Yasuda, Takeshi; Hakusui, Shigetaka; Yanagi, Tsutomu (Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital (Japan)); Ito, Eiichi

    1994-02-01

    Common carotid artery thrombosis (CCAT) is not common. We studied 4 patients with CCAT to clarify the clinical and radiological features of this disorder. Case 1 had only episodes of TIA. Case 2 was diagnosed by chance as having CCAT at the time of admission due to cerebellar infarction. On the contrary, Cases 3 and 4 were admitted because of disturbance of consciousness and hemiparesis. Case 4 died soon after his stroke because of complications. We evaluated cases 1, 2 and 3 using head CT, head MRI, neck MRI, MR angiography, SPECT and cerebral angiography. Case 4, who was evaluated with head CT and cerebral angiography, was autopsied to confirm the occlusion of the common carotid artery. The clinical severity of CCAT varies from asymptomatic to severe, because each case differs in the time taken for complete occlusion of the common carotid artery; the development of collateral circulation; and hemodynamics of the brain. As for the collaterals their contribution is variable; for example, the thyrocervical and other arteries function as the bypass. We can diagnose CCAT easily and noninvasively using MR angiography and neck MRI based on disappearance of the flow void in the common carotid artery or internal carotid artery. On physical examination, it is important to detect faded pulsation of the superficial temporal artery that is ipsilateral to the occluded common carotid artery. (author).

  10. Changes in the American Interventional Radiology Literature: Comparison over a 10-Year Time Period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Charles E.; Gupta, Rajan; Blackwell, John

    2006-01-01

    < 0.001), the primary field of investigation, with significant increases noted for primary cancer interventions (6.5% vs. 13.3%; p < 0.001), gynecologic interventions (0.2% vs. 4.5%; p < 0.001), stent-grafts (0 vs. 2.9%; p < 0.001), and spine interventions (0 vs. 1.8%; p < 0.01). Studies receiving funding also demonstrated a significant increase when comparing the early and late data sets (11.3% vs. 23.0%, respectively; p < 0.001). Conclusions. Articles published in the American radiologic literature have changed significantly over the past 10 years. Primary authors are more likely to be nonradiologists and less likely to be American. Investigations dealing primarily with nonvascular interventions are less common; however, some forms of intervention (particularly cancer interventions) are seen more frequently in the literature. The percentage of funded projects has more than doubled in the same time frame

  11. Radiological protection in the interventional techniques: experience in the Pain Clinic of the CIMEQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero C, M. C.; Benitez N, P. P.; Gonzalez G, Y.; Martinez G, A.; Gonzalez R, N.; Sanchez Z, L. R.

    2014-08-01

    The Pain Clinic of the CIMEQ offers treatment to patients with different pathologies, using interventional techniques as the radiology like visual guide to reach the target structure and to apply the election technique. The personnel that carry out these procedures are inserted in the program of radiological surveillance of the institution, reason for which a radiological event could be detected where the main physician responsible of the service was implied. In this work the results of an investigation are presented realized with the objective of to know the causes of the event and to determine the necessary measures to avoid that this repeats again. The investigation was oriented to three fundamental aspects: medical exam of the affected worker; evaluation of the operational procedures from the radiological protection view point; and dosimetric measurements simulating the real conditions of work for which were used ionization chamber, radiometer and PMMA mannequin. As a result of the medical exam was detected that the main physician of the service did not use during the execution of all the procedures the extremities dosimetry and that he presented a radio induced erythema in the right hand, reason for which he was separated of the activity with ionizing radiations, until the conclusion of the investigation. With relationship to the evaluation of the operational procedures from the radiological protection view point, was verified that the medical physician not carried out any collimation of the beam and he was located in the positions where the dose rate reached the maximum values, frequently introducing the hands in the direct beam; that which implied an overexposure of the superior extremities and a not optimized exposure for whole body. This result was proven with the realized experimental measurements, which gave dose estimated values in extremities of the order of the deterministic effects. The investigation facilitated to introduce modifications in the

  12. Driving Innovation in Radiology: A Summary of the 2015 Intersociety Committee Summer Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Gerald D; Restauri, Nicole L; Kondo, Kimi L; Lewis, Petra J

    2016-12-01

    The membership of the Intersociety Committee convened to consider how best to continue to stimulate, nurture, and support innovation in radiologic research and education in the face of ever increasing clinical demands and financial constraints. The topic was chosen in recognition that the growth and success of radiology over the past 50-plus years have been driven by spectacular technological developments in imaging and intervention and that the future relevance of the specialty will hinge on how the specialty continues to evolve. To keep radiology a dynamic and vital component of the health care enterprise will require continued innovation in technology and the requisite education that goes with it. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology: part III--interstitium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in the medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in the medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the science of medicine. In this third installment of this series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to the pulmonary interstitium, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographical information of the respective eponym's namesake. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology: Part I. Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the field of medicine. In this article, the first of a multipart series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to neoplasms, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographic information of the respective eponym׳s namesake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of papers in the journal of Korean radiologic society of recent three years with special emphasis on citation index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seoung Oh; Choi, Sang Hee; Jeong, Cheol Hwe; Lee, Yung Il

    1990-01-01

    The papers in the Journal of the Korean Radiologic Society (JKRS) during recent three years were surveyed by analysis of their types, topics, organs, employed modalities, and cited literatures. Citation analysis is a method of studying interrelationships between papers and journals, and the most important application of citation analysis is in studies of science policy and research evaluation to evaluate the implementation of science policy and to monitor research performance. Using these citation analysis to map the journal communications network may indicate to more efficient scientific progress. Total number of papers published by JKRS for recent 3 years was 473 papers (Clinical : 354, Case report : 91, Experimental : 26, Educational : 2). The most common organ system of the papers was abdomen (head and neck, chest, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and urologic system in the order of decreasing frequency). The most popular topic was techniques including newer modalities and interventional radiology, and normal measurement, tuberculosis, hepatoma, normal anatomy and the like followed. Total number of cited references was 8,642 (18.26 per one paper), and the average number of authors per paper was 4.83. The most frequently used modality was CT (41%) followed by simple radiography, ultrasonogram, fluoroscopic study, angiography, nuclear imaging, and MRI. Using this kind of analysis as a guide for writing a paper for the JKRS, it could be well-organized and uplifted in its format and contents

  16. Radiological and clinical outcomes of medial approach open reduction by using two intervals in developmental dysplasia of the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsar T. Ozkut

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the midterm clinical and radiological outcomes of the medial approach using two intervals for developmental hip dysplasia (DDH. Methods: The study involved 62 hips of 47 patients (41 girls, 6 boys treated with medial approach for DDH from 1999 to 2010. The age of the patients at surgery was 18.7 ± 2.25 months. Follow up of the patients was 11.3 ± 3.07 years. The age of the patients at the last follow up was 12.6 ± 1.74 years. According to the Tönnis classification, 13 hips were grade II, 27 hips were grade III and 22 hips were grade IV. Patients were evaluated according to Omeroglu radiological criteria and modified McKay functional criteria. The presence of avascular necrosis (AVN of the hip was questioned using the KalamchiMacEwen classification. Results: Radiologically, forty eight (77% hips were evaluated as “excellent”, 8 (13% hips as “good” and 5 (8% hips as “fair plus” and 1 (%2 hip as “fair minus”. Two (3% patients had type 1 temporary AVN and one (1% patient had type 4 AVN with coxa magna and overgrowth of the greater trochanter. According to McKay functional criteria, 56 (90% hips had “excellent” and 6 (10% had “good” results. Two (3.2% hips of one patient had to be reoperated with Salter osteotomy and femoral shortening + derotation osteotomy. Conclusion: Medial approach using two separate intervals for tenotomy and capsulotomy does not jeopardize the medial circumflex or the femoral vessels and yields satisfactory midterm results for children 18 months old with dysplasia of the hip. Level of evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. Keywords: Developmental hip dysplasia, Safety, Avascular necrosis of the femoral head, Medial approach, Surgical approach

  17. Annual report of national institute of radiological sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This annual report is a compilation of the research activities and achievement in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan during the fiscal year 1992 (from April 1992 through March 1993). Construction of the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) has reached semi-final stage. The research covers a wide range of radiological sciences from molecular biology to environmental studies and medicine including engineering for heavy ion therapy of cancer. Topics consists of physics, chemistry, biomedical science, clinical research, and environmental sciences, covering a total of 84 titles. A list of publications by staff members, activities of research divisions, and organization chart of the NIRS are given in Appendix. (J.P.N.) 78 refs

  18. Laenderyggens degeneration og radiologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2006-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions, and at the same time one of the most complex nosological entities. The lifetime prevalence is approximately 80%, and radiological features of lumbar degeneration are almost universal in adults. The individual risk factors for LBP and signi......Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions, and at the same time one of the most complex nosological entities. The lifetime prevalence is approximately 80%, and radiological features of lumbar degeneration are almost universal in adults. The individual risk factors for LBP...... and significant relationships between radiological findings and subjective symptoms have both been notoriously difficult to identify. The lack of consensus on clinical criteria and radiological definitions has hampered the undertaking of properly executed epidemiological studies. The natural history of LBP...

  19. Internet technology for clinical application in a digital radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergh, B.; Pietsch, M.; Vogl, T.J.

    2000-01-01

    Problem: To provide an overview and to assess the clinical feasibility of internet technology-based systems for hospital-wide image and report distribution as well as for video conferencing. Methods: The paper describes the theoretical concept behind, the various technical approaches and the experience gained from different systems. Results: Image and report distribution: Advantages include the universal availability of images and reports inside and outside hospitals; ease of use; security features; image and report integration; cost savings by reducing support and training efforts and by optimising available hardware. The main critical issues are performance and workflow integration with RIS and PACS. Video conferencing: Main advantages are the standardised, software-based approach and the low investments for hard- and software. Depending on the desired usage the communication performance can be seen as inappropriate. Conclusion: Today, internet technology-based systems appear to satisfy the main clinical needs in radiology. The mentioned drawbacks could be eliminated by means of modified software implementation and focused standardisation efforts. Considering the numerous advantages of these systems a further distribution can be expected for the future. (orig.) [de

  20. Gastrointestinal transit after transverse colostomy: study of solid radiopaque markers progression and others clinical and radiological events - analysis of 20 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, Claudio Roberto

    1988-01-01

    The gastrointestinal transit was studied in 20 patients with loop transverse colostomies and previously normal colons. This analysis was performed through radiological observation of progression of 20 radiopaque pellets and measurements of its transit time in the various segments of the digestive tract. An evaluation of other related clinical and radiological events was carried out sentimentality's. In order to better understand the influence of the surgical procedure, the study was performed under similar dietary and supportive care conditions and standard radiological studies before and after the re-establishment of transit, thus enabling a comparison with the same individual. (author)

  1. Progress in diagnosis of breast cancer: Advances in radiology technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mari Beth Linder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer in females between the ages of 15 and 54, and the second leading cause of cancer death in women in the United States. Diagnosis begins with detection by breast examination (clinical breast exam or breast self-exam or by radiologic studies, like mammography. Many advances in the diagnosis of breast cancer have taken place in recent years. This article will review the history of radiologic advances in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Use of technological advancements in digital breast tomosynthesis, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound in breast cancer diagnosis will be presented. Advantages and disadvantages of these diagnostic interventions when compared to older, traditional X-ray films will be discussed. It is important for all nurses, including radiology and oncology nurses, to be well informed about these varied diagnostic modalities, and appreciate the fact that advances in radiologic imaging technologies can yield improved outcomes for breast cancer patients.

  2. The radiological spectrum of invasive aspergillosis in children: a 10-year review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Karen E. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Great Ormond Street, London (United Kingdom); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto M5G 1X8 (Canada); Owens, Catherine M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Great Ormond Street, London (United Kingdom); Veys, Paul A.; Novelli, Vas; Costoli, Vera [Host Defence Unit, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is an uncommon but life-threatening event in the immunocompromised child. Attempts at fungal isolation are often unrewarding and a high index of radiological suspicion is essential in the early diagnosis of infected children. To document the radiological spectrum of disease in invasive aspergillosis in the paediatric population. A retrospective review of the imaging performed in 27 consecutive patients (age 7 months to 18 years) with documented invasive Aspergillosis encountered over a 10-year period at a single institution. Radiographic findings of pulmonary disease (20 patients) included segmental and multilobar consolidation, perihilar infiltrates, multiple small nodules, peripheral nodular masses and pleural effusions. No cavitating lesions were seen on CXR. Small cavitating nodules were present on CT in two of eight children. Chest wall disease was particularly associated with underlying chronic granulomatous disease. Disseminated disease manifested as osteomyelitis (n=5), cerebral (n=3), oesophageal (n=1), hepatic (n=2), renal (n=2) and cutaneous (n=5) involvement. Imaging findings are discussed. Twelve patients (44%) subsequently died from Aspergillus-related complications. Invasive aspergillosis presents with a wide variety of radiographic findings involving multiple organ systems. Respiratory findings are varied but often non-specific, and a high index of suspicion is necessary in immunocompromised patients. In contrast to adult disease, the incidence of cavitation of pulmonary lesions appears low. (orig.)

  3. The radiological spectrum of invasive aspergillosis in children: a 10-year review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Karen E.; Owens, Catherine M.; Veys, Paul A.; Novelli, Vas; Costoli, Vera

    2003-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is an uncommon but life-threatening event in the immunocompromised child. Attempts at fungal isolation are often unrewarding and a high index of radiological suspicion is essential in the early diagnosis of infected children. To document the radiological spectrum of disease in invasive aspergillosis in the paediatric population. A retrospective review of the imaging performed in 27 consecutive patients (age 7 months to 18 years) with documented invasive Aspergillosis encountered over a 10-year period at a single institution. Radiographic findings of pulmonary disease (20 patients) included segmental and multilobar consolidation, perihilar infiltrates, multiple small nodules, peripheral nodular masses and pleural effusions. No cavitating lesions were seen on CXR. Small cavitating nodules were present on CT in two of eight children. Chest wall disease was particularly associated with underlying chronic granulomatous disease. Disseminated disease manifested as osteomyelitis (n=5), cerebral (n=3), oesophageal (n=1), hepatic (n=2), renal (n=2) and cutaneous (n=5) involvement. Imaging findings are discussed. Twelve patients (44%) subsequently died from Aspergillus-related complications. Invasive aspergillosis presents with a wide variety of radiographic findings involving multiple organ systems. Respiratory findings are varied but often non-specific, and a high index of suspicion is necessary in immunocompromised patients. In contrast to adult disease, the incidence of cavitation of pulmonary lesions appears low. (orig.)

  4. An autopsy study of combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema: correlations among clinical, radiological, and pathological features

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical evaluation to differentiate the characteristic features of pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema is often difficult in patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE), but diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis is important for evaluating treatment options and the risk of acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia of such patients. As far as we know, it is the first report describing a correlation among clinical, radiological, and whole-lung pathological features in an autopsy cases of CPFE patients. Methods Experts retrospectively reviewed the clinical charts and examined chest computed tomography (CT) images and pathological findings of an autopsy series of 22 CPFE patients, and compared these with findings from 8 idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients and 17 emphysema-alone patients. Results All patients had a history of heavy smoking. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC%) was significantly lower in the emphysema-alone group than the CPFE and IPF-alone groups. The percent predicted diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO%) was significantly lower in the CPFE group than the IPF- and emphysema-alone groups. Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern was observed radiologically in 15 (68.2%) CPFE and 8 (100%) IPF-alone patients and was pathologically observed in all patients from both groups. Pathologically thick-cystic lesions involving one or more acini with dense wall fibrosis and occasional fibroblastic foci surrounded by honeycombing and normal alveoli were confirmed by post-mortem observation as thick-walled cystic lesions (TWCLs). Emphysematous destruction and enlargement of membranous and respiratory bronchioles with fibrosis were observed in the TWCLs. The cystic lesions were always larger than the cysts of honeycombing. The prevalence of both radiological and pathological TWCLs was 72.7% among CPFE patients, but no such lesions were observed in patients with IPF or emphysema

  5. Invited review: study design considerations for clinical research in veterinary radiology and radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivani, Peter V; Erb, Hollis N

    2013-01-01

    High quality clinical research is essential for advancing knowledge in the areas of veterinary radiology and radiation oncology. Types of clinical research studies may include experimental studies, method-comparison studies, and patient-based studies. Experimental studies explore issues relative to pathophysiology, patient safety, and treatment efficacy. Method-comparison studies evaluate agreement between techniques or between observers. Patient-based studies investigate naturally acquired disease and focus on questions asked in clinical practice that relate to individuals or populations (e.g., risk, accuracy, or prognosis). Careful preplanning and study design are essential in order to achieve valid results. A key point to planning studies is ensuring that the design is tailored to the study objectives. Good design includes a comprehensive literature review, asking suitable questions, selecting the proper sample population, collecting the appropriate data, performing the correct statistical analyses, and drawing conclusions supported by the available evidence. Most study designs are classified by whether they are experimental or observational, longitudinal or cross-sectional, and prospective or retrospective. Additional features (e.g., controlled, randomized, or blinded) may be described that address bias. Two related challenging aspects of study design are defining an important research question and selecting an appropriate sample population. The sample population should represent the target population as much as possible. Furthermore, when comparing groups, it is important that the groups are as alike to each other as possible except for the variables of interest. Medical images are well suited for clinical research because imaging signs are categorical or numerical variables that might be predictors or outcomes of diseases or treatments. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  6. Interactive radiological anatomy eLearning solution for first year medical students: Development, integration, and impact on learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Alexandra Louise; Choi, Sunhea

    2014-01-01

    A technology enhanced learning and teaching (TELT) solution, radiological anatomy (RA) eLearning, composed of a range of identification-based and guided learning activities related to normal and pathological X-ray images, was devised for the Year 1 nervous and locomotor course at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton. Its effectiveness was evaluated using a questionnaire, pre- and post-tests, focus groups, summative assessment, and tracking data. Since introduced in 2009, a total of 781 students have used RA eLearning, and among them 167 Year 1 students in 2011, of whom 116 participated in the evaluation study. Students enjoyed learning (77%) with RA eLearning, found it was easy to use (81%) and actively engaged them in their learning (75%), all of which were associated to the usability, learning design of the TELT solution and its integration in the curriculum; 80% of students reported RA eLearning helped their revision of anatomy and 69% stated that it facilitated their application of anatomy in a clinical context, both of which were associated with the benefits offered by the learning and activities design. At the end of course summative assessment, student knowledge of RA eLearning relevant topics (mean 80%; SD ±16) was significantly better as compared to topics not relevant to RA eLearning (mean 63%; SD ±15) (mean difference 18%; 95% CI 15% to 20%; P < 0.001). A well designed and integrated TELT solution can be an efficient method for facilitating the application, integration, and contextualization of anatomy and radiology to create a blended learning environment. © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

  7. Handbooks in radiology: Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datz, F.L.

    1988-01-01

    This series of handbooks covers the basic facts, major concepts and highlights in seven radiological subspecialties. ''Nuclear Medicine'' is a review of the principles, procedures and clinical applications that every radiology resident and practicing general radiologist should know about nuclear medicine. Presented in an outline format it covers all of the organ systems that are imaged by nuclear medicine

  8. Radiology in the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, P.L.; Seltzer, S.E.; Gore, J.C.; Heiiman, R.S.; Abrams, H.L.; Davis, K.A.; Henkelman, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    On the leading edge in ''high-tech'' medicine, radiology is experiencing several revolutions simultaneously that promise an exciting future. New imaging methods and digital technologies not only offer novel ways to view tissues but also provide opportunities for quantitative evaluation of function and even permit determination of metabolic status. New approaches to technology assessment are being explored that alter the ways in which equipment and procedures are introduced into clinical medicine. With the plethora of radiology services available, the radiologist must serve as a consultant in the triage of patients in radiology and the dissemination of information from radiology. For similar reasons, training in diagnostic radiology may eventually accommodate to the concept of specialization along organ-system lines. Without question, radiology is destined for an exciting period as it moves into the 21st century

  9. Law No.12.069 clinical analyses laboratories and radiological surgery it state included into retirement rules to workers from particularly establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1953-01-01

    It is declared understood in the pension laws that manage the Jubilations and Pensions Office of the Industry and Commerce the personnel that has lent or lend services in the Laboratories of Clinical analysis and in clinics radiological matters [es

  10. A Vertically Integrated Online Radiology Curriculum Developed as a Cognitive Apprenticeship: Impact on Student Performance and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim-Dunham, Jennifer E; Ensminger, David C; McNulty, John A; Hoyt, Amy E; Chandrasekhar, Arcot J

    2016-02-01

    The principles of Collins' cognitive apprenticeship model were used to design a radiology curriculum in which medical students practice radiological skills using online case-based modules. The modules are embedded within clinical third-year clerkships, and students are provided with personalized feedback from the instructors. We describe the development of the vertical online radiology curriculum and evaluate its impact on student achievement and learning process using a mixed method approach. The curriculum was developed over a 2-year period. Student participation was voluntary in the first year and mandatory in the second year. For quantitative curriculum evaluation, student metrics for voluntary versus mandatory groups were assessed using independent sample t tests and variable entry method regression analysis. For qualitative analysis, responses from a survey of students about the value of the curriculum were organized into defined themes using consensus coding. Mandatory participation significantly improved (p = .001) the mean radiology examination score (82 %) compared to the voluntary group (73%), suggesting that mandatory participation had a beneficial effect on student performance. Potential preexisting differences in underlying general academic performance were accounted for by including mean basic science grades as the first variable in the regression model. The significant increase in R(2) from .16 to .28 when number of radiology cases completed was added to the original model, and the greater value of the standardized beta for this variable, suggest that the curriculum made a significant contribution to students' radiology examination scores beyond their baseline academic performance. Five dominant themes about curricular characteristics that enhanced student learning and beneficial outcomes emerged from consensus coding. These themes were (1) self-paced design, (2) receiving feedback from faculty, (3) clinical relevance of cases, (4) gaining

  11. Nasal polyps. A clinical radiological histopathological and mycological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babiker, Babiker Eltayeb [Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1997-12-01

    Forty patients with nasal polyposis were studied. This study included clinical, haematological and mycological aspects. There were 24 females (60% of patients) and 16 males (40%). We found that all patients presented with nasal obstruction and nasal tone and the majority of them had allergic nasal symptoms such as sneezing and watery discharge. Thirty five percent of the patients were recurrent cases, being operated before for nasal polyps. Radiological investigations showed high of sinusitis and that 10% of the patients had complicated disease with orbital or intracranial extensions. Mycological studies revealed the presence of fungal infection in 4 patient (10%) and it was caused by Aspergillus flavus. Histological studies identified the allergic nature of the polyps in all patients. Surgical treatment was carried out in all patients and operations varied from simple intranasal polypectomy, intranasal ethmiodectomy, external ethmoidectomy to Caldwell-Luc operation for patients with antrochanal polyps.(Author)

  12. Lateral epicondylitis and beyond: imaging of lateral elbow pain with clinical-radiologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotnis, Nikhil A. [McMaster University, Departments of Radiology, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, Department of Medical Physics and Medical Imaging, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Chiavaras, Mary M. [McMaster University, Departments of Radiology, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Harish, Srinivasan [McMaster University, Departments of Radiology, Hamilton, ON (Canada); St. Joseph' s Healthcare, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2012-04-15

    The diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis is often straightforward and can be made on the basis of clinical findings. However, radiological assessment is valuable where the clinical picture is less clear or where symptoms are refractory to treatment. Demographics, aspects of clinical history, or certain physical signs may suggest an alternate diagnosis. Knowledge of the typical clinical presentation and imaging findings of lateral epicondylitis, in addition to other potential causes of lateral elbow pain, is necessary. These include entrapment of the posterior interosseous and lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerves, posterolateral rotatory instability, posterolateral plica syndrome, Panner's disease, osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum, radiocapitellar overload syndrome, occult fractures and chondral-osseous impaction injuries, and radiocapitellar arthritis. Knowledge of these potential masquerades of lateral epicondylitis and their characteristic clinical and imaging features is essential for accurate diagnosis. The goal of this review is to provide an approach to the imaging of lateral elbow pain, discussing the relevant anatomy, various causes, and discriminating factors, which will allow for an accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  13. Clinical and Radiological Long-Term Follow-up After Embolization of Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Kjeldsen, Anette D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the clinical and radiological long-term results of embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and to assess the quality of life after treatment. A clinical follow-up was undertaken after 67 months (mean) in 35 consecutive patients with 106 PAVMs. Outcome parameters at follow-up were PaO 2 and patients' satisfaction. During follow-up, the patients had a clinical examination, measurement of arterial blood gases, chest X-ray, and contrast echocardiography performed and were asked to fill in a questionnaire exploring experience of the treatment and subjective effect of treatment on physical and social functioning. A significant rise in oxygenation of the blood after embolization was measured. In 77% of the patients symptoms improved, and 71% felt better performance. In eight patients, one of the PAVMs was found insufficiently embolized or recanalized at follow-up angiography and therefore were re-embolized. Endovascular embolization for PAVMs is effective. Clinical parameters and quality of life improved significantly. Regular clinical controls after therapy are necessary to discover insufficiently embolized, recanalized or new PAVMs

  14. Research Resources Survey: Radiology Junior Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Votaw, John R

    2015-07-01

    To assess resources available to junior faculty in US academic radiology departments for research mentorship and funding opportunities and to determine if certain resources are more common in successful programs. An anonymous survey covering scientific environment and research mentorship and was sent to vice-chairs of research of radiology departments. Results were evaluated to identify practices of research programs with respect to mentorship, resources, and opportunities. Academy of Radiology Research's 2012 National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants and awards list was used to determine if environment and practices correlate with funding. There was a 51% response rate. A greater fraction of clinical faculty gets promoted from assistant to associate professor than research faculty. Research faculty overall submits more funding applications. Most programs support start-up costs and K-awards. Over half of the departments have a vice-chair for faculty development, and most have formal mentorship programs. Faculty members are expected to teach, engage in service, publish, and apply for and get research funding within 3 years of hire. Top-tier programs as judged by NIH awards have a combination of MDs who devote >50% effort to research and PhD faculty. Key factors holding back both clinical and research junior faculty development were motivation, resources, and time, although programs reported high availability of resources and support at the department level. Better marketing of resources for junior faculty, effort devoted to mentoring clinical faculty in research, and explicit milestones/expectations for achievement could enhance junior faculty success, promote interest in the clinician–scientist career path for radiologists, and lead to greater research success.

  15. Clinical and radiological study of osteoarticular manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, E.S.; Rocha Correa Fernandes, A. da; Wichrowski, M.

    1990-01-01

    The ostearticular involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most frequent manifestation of this illness, which develops with activity and remission periods. In spite of the recurrence, it presents without clinic sequelae in great part of the cases. The objective of this study was to evaluate patients with prolonged osteoarticular involvement, remaining with or without sequelae. Within a total of 115 patients with SLE there have been studied 21 patients that presented clinic evidences of chronic synovitis, deforming arthropathy with the presence of cysts, erosions, narrowing of the articular space, periepiphyseal osteopenia, and 4 cases with deforming arthropathy alone. In just 2 cases of chronic synovitis with radiologic changes there have been association with deforming arthropathy. Asseptic necrosis occurred in 8 cases being multiple and symmetric in 7 cases. The association with previous corticosteroid use was found in all patients, as well as an important systemic activity of the illness in the precedent period of the asseptic necrosis diagnosis. (author) [pt

  16. Radiology education. The evaluation and assessment of clinical competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hibbert, Kathryn M.; Van Deven, Teresa; Chhem, Rethy K.; Nagasaki Univ.; Wang, Shih-chang; Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists, Sydney

    2012-01-01

    Third volume of a trilogy devoted to radiology education and improvement of medical imaging students' learning, teaching, and scholarship. Reviews the philosophies, theories, and principles that underpin assessment and evaluation in radiology education. Includes a series of rich case studies. Written by an international group of experienced educators and medical professionals. This book reviews the philosophies, theories, and principles that underpin assessment and evaluation in radiology education, highlighting emerging practices and work done in the field. The sometimes conflicting assessment and evaluation needs of accreditation bodies, academic programs, trainees, and patients are carefully considered. The final section of the book examines assessment and evaluation in practice, through the development of rich case studies reflecting the implementation of a variety of approaches. This is the third book in a trilogy devoted to the scholarship of radiology education and is the culmination of an important initiative to improve medical imaging students' learning, teaching, and scholarship by bringing together experienced educators and medical professionals. The previous two books focused on the culture and the learning organizations in which our future radiologists are educated and on the application of educational principles in the education of radiologists. Here, the trilogy comes full circle: attending to the assessment and evaluation of the education of its members has much to offer back to the learning of the organization.

  17. [The future of radiology: What can we expect within the next 10 years?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nensa, F; Forsting, M; Wetter, A

    2016-03-01

    More than other medical discipline, radiology is marked by technical innovation and continuous development, as well as the optimization of the underlying physical principles. In this respect, several trends that will crucially change and develop radiology over the next decade can be observed. Through the use of ever faster computer tomography, which also shows an ever-decreasing radiation exposure, the "workhorse" of radiology will have an even greater place and displace conventional X‑ray techniques further. In addition, hybrid imaging, which is based on a combination of nuclear medicine and radiological techniques (keywords: PET/CT, PET/MRI) will become much more established and, in particular, will improve oncological imaging further, allowing increasingly individualized imaging for specific tracers and techniques of functional magnetic resonance imaging for a particular tumour. Future radiology will be strongly characterized by innovations in the software and Internet industry, which will enable new image viewing and processing methods and open up new possibilities in the context of the organization of radiological work.

  18. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Reforma peripheral clinic, PEMEX. - III. - September and October of 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeles C, A.; Rodriguez A, F.; Garcia A, J.

    2003-02-01

    The Reforma peripheral clinic, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the clinic can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  19. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Macuspana peripheral clinic, PEMEX. - IV. - November and December of 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeles C, A.; Hernandez C, J. E.; Garcia A, J.; Rodriguez A, F.

    2003-02-01

    The Macuspana peripheral clinic, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the clinic can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  20. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Reforma peripheral clinic, PEMEX. - IV. - November and December of 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeles C, A.; Hernandez C, J. E.; Rodriguez A, F.; Garcia A, J.

    2003-02-01

    The Reforma peripheral clinic, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray quipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the clinic can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  1. Multiple sclerosis masquerading as Alzheimer-type dementia: Clinical, radiological and pathological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, W O; Popescu, B F; Lowe, V; Pirko, I; Parisi, J E; Kantarci, K; Fields, J A; Bruns, M B; Boeve, B F; Lucchinetti, C F

    2016-04-01

    We report a comprehensive clinical, radiological, neuropsychometric and pathological evaluation of a woman with a clinical diagnosis of AD dementia (ADem), but whose autopsy demonstrated widespread demyelination, without Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology. Initial neuropsychometric evaluation suggested amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Serial magnetic resonance images (MRI) images demonstrated the rate of increase in her ventricular volume was comparable to that of 46 subjects with aMCI who progressed to ADem, without accumulating white matter disease. Myelin immunohistochemistry at autopsy demonstrated extensive cortical subpial demyelination. Subpial lesions involved the upper cortical layers, and often extended through the entire width of the cortex. Multiple sclerosis (MS) can cause severe cortical dysfunction and mimic ADem. Cortical demyelination is not well detected by standard imaging modalities and may not be detected on autopsy without myelin immunohistochemistry. © The Author(s), 2015.

  2. The radiological manifestation of hypophosphatasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haisong; Li Xiaofei; Han Yan; Cao Qingxuan; Xu Wenjian

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the radiological features of hypophosphatasia. Methods: Five cases of hypophosphatasia were definitely diagnosed, which included 3 males and 2 females aged from 5 months to 23 years. The laboratory assays were analyzed, radiological appearances of bone were determined and differential diagnoses were made. Results: The alkaline phosphatase in blood serum of five patients decreased, which were 8, 20, 13, 21, and 18 U/L respectively. Phosphoethanolamine increased in blood serum of the five patients, which were 16.5, 13.5, 21.6, 18.7, and 28.9 μmol/L respectively. Phosphoethanolamine also increased in urine,which were 2350, 9120, 3520, 5280, and 1820 μmol/L respectively. Calcium in blood serum increased, which were 4.2, 5.6, 4.9, 6.1, and 3.5 mmol/L respectively. X-ray images displayed that the density of bone decreased in 5 cases, the metaphyses exhibited widening and cupping in 4 cases, the provisional calcification zone of the metaphysis became thinning or disappearing in 4 cases, long bone bended in 4 cases and pathologically fractured in 1 case. Conclusion: Hypophosphatasia can be indicated by its relatively special radiological appearance, and it can be diagnosed and differentiated from rickets, osteomalacia and osteogenesis imperfect by the laboratory examination combined with its clinical presentation. (authors)

  3. A clinical audit programme for diagnostic radiology: The Approach adopted by the international atomic energy agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Jaervinen, H.; Butler, P.; McLean, I. D.; Pentecost, M.; Rickard, M.; Abdullah, B.

    2010-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a mandate to assist member states in areas of human health and particularly in the use of radiation for diagnosis and treatment. Clinical audit is seen as an essential tool to assist in assuring the quality of radiation medicine, particularly in the instance of multidisciplinary audit of diagnostic radiology. Consequently, an external clinical audit programme has been developed by the IAEA to examine the structure and processes existent at a clinical site, with the basic objectives of: (1) improvement in the quality of patient care; (2) promotion of the effective use of resources; (3) enhancement of the provision and organisation of clinical services; (4) further professional education and training. These objectives apply in four general areas of service delivery, namely quality management and infrastructure, patient procedures, technical procedures and education, training and research. In the IAEA approach, the audit process is initiated by a request from the centre seeking the audit. A three-member team, comprising a radiologist, medical physicist and radiographer, subsequently undertakes a 5-d audit visit to the clinical site to perform the audit and write the formal audit report. Preparation for the audit visit is crucial and involves the local clinical centre completing a form, which provides the audit team with information on the clinical centre. While all main aspects of clinical structure and process are examined, particular attention is paid to radiation-related activities as described in the relevant documents such as the IAEA Basic Safety Standards, the Code of Practice for Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and related equipment and quality assurance documentation. It should be stressed, however, that the clinical audit does not have any regulatory function. The main purpose of the IAEA approach to clinical audit is one of promoting quality improvement and learning. This paper describes the background to

  4. A clinical audit programme for diagnostic radiology: the approach adopted by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, K; Järvinen, H; Butler, P; McLean, I D; Pentecost, M; Rickard, M; Abdullah, B

    2010-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a mandate to assist member states in areas of human health and particularly in the use of radiation for diagnosis and treatment. Clinical audit is seen as an essential tool to assist in assuring the quality of radiation medicine, particularly in the instance of multidisciplinary audit of diagnostic radiology. Consequently, an external clinical audit programme has been developed by the IAEA to examine the structure and processes existent at a clinical site, with the basic objectives of: (1) improvement in the quality of patient care; (2) promotion of the effective use of resources; (3) enhancement of the provision and organisation of clinical services; (4) further professional education and training. These objectives apply in four general areas of service delivery, namely quality management and infrastructure, patient procedures, technical procedures and education, training and research. In the IAEA approach, the audit process is initiated by a request from the centre seeking the audit. A three-member team, comprising a radiologist, medical physicist and radiographer, subsequently undertakes a 5-d audit visit to the clinical site to perform the audit and write the formal audit report. Preparation for the audit visit is crucial and involves the local clinical centre completing a form, which provides the audit team with information on the clinical centre. While all main aspects of clinical structure and process are examined, particular attention is paid to radiation-related activities as described in the relevant documents such as the IAEA Basic Safety Standards, the Code of Practice for Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and related equipment and quality assurance documentation. It should be stressed, however, that the clinical audit does not have any regulatory function. The main purpose of the IAEA approach to clinical audit is one of promoting quality improvement and learning. This paper describes the background to

  5. The evolution of radiology information management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patacsil, L.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The use of PACS and the need for images and clinical data is increasing exponentially. This presentation will provide a historical overview of radiology information systems (RIS) and their interaction with hospital information systems (HIS), PACS systems and modalities. Materials and Methods: The various approaches to interfacing and integrating RIS and PACS systems will be described as well as their impact on radiology departmental work-flow and the productivity of radiologists, technologists and other RIS users. Specifically, the image-centric and RIS-centric approaches to PACS will be compared. Results: Instant access to vital clinical information enables radiology departments to go beyond simply managing processes to making fundamental improvements in productivity and care processes. Unity of design translates into simplicity of operations. Integration of historically separate applications makes the environment easier to support, reduces turnaround time, and improves patient care. Conclusion: Finally, insight on new technologies and future trends in PACS, system integration and work-flow strategies will be presented in light of delivery of both clinical images and clinical data

  6. Radiation effects on clinical examination data in Japanese radiological technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Hisayoshi; Okumura, Yutaka; Sugahara, Tsutomu; Aoyama, Takashi; Hashimoto, Tetsuaki; Yamamoto, Yoichi.

    1992-01-01

    Health survey for 1014 radiological technologists was undertaken in 10 districts in Japan. Estimated radiation doses were based on work duration, the status of radiation protection, X-ray equipments to be used, and exposure conditions. Two hundred and eighty-three technologists aged between 45 and 59 were enrolled in this study. Exposure doses ranged from 2 cGy to 337 cGy. According to exposure doses of either 40 cGy, smoking habits, and drinking habits, the subjects were classified into 7 groups. Clinical laboratory data, in addition to systolic and diastolic blood pressures, were analyzed. In comparing the sole effect of irradiation with that of smoking or drinking, the degree of irradiation effect was less than the other two factors. Smoking had a higher synergistic action than irradiation and drinking. (N.K.)

  7. Radiological analysis of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia in skeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ma Rie; Kim, Jin Sik; Kim, Han Suk; Park, Soo Soung

    1984-01-01

    Over a period of recent 3 years, the 5 cases of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia were proven histologically at National Medical Center, and they were evaluated and analyzed radiologically and clinically. The results were as follows: 1. The age of 5 patients ranged from 12 to 21. 2. In general, clinical symptoms of these patients were pain of affected sites and swelling , fracture, walking disturbance of lower extremities. 3. The order of frequent site of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia was skull (4 cases), femur (3 cases), maxilla (2 case), humerus, tibia, rib, radius, metacarpal bone and phalanx. 4. The characteristic radiological findings of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia were multicystic lesions with ground glass appearance, osteosclerosis, cortical thinning and pathologic fracture and deformity of long bones. Particularly, in the extremities, multicystic radiolucencies, groud glass appearance, shepherd's crook and coxa vara deformities were noticed, and in the skull and maxilla, sclerotic changes were principally demonstrated.

  8. Selective versus hyperselective posterior fusions in Lenke 5 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: comparison of radiological and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilharreborde, B; Ferrero, E; Angelliaume, A; Lefèvre, Y; Accadbled, F; Simon, A L; de Gauzy, J Sales; Mazda, K

    2017-06-01

    Recent literature has reported that the ]progression risk of Lenke 5 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) during adulthood had been underestimated. Surgery is, therefore, proposed more to young patients with progressive curves. However, choice of the approach and fusion levels remains controversial. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of the length of posterior fusion on clinical and radiological outcomes in Lenke 5 AIS. All Lenke 5 AIS operated between 2008 and 2012 were included with a minimum 2-year follow-up. Patients were divided into two groups according to the length of fusion. In the first group (selective), the upper instrumented level (UIV) was the upper end vertebra of the main structural curve and distally the fusion was extended to the stable and neutral vertebra, according to Lenke's classification. In the second group (hyperselective), shorter fusions were performed and the number of levels fused depended on the location of the apex of the curve (at maximum, 2 levels above and below, according to Hall's criteria). Apart from the fusion level selection, the surgical procedure was similar in both groups. Radiological outcomes and SRS-22 scores were reported. 78 patients were included (35 selective and 43 hyperselective). The number of levels fused was significantly higher in the first group (7.8 ± 3 vs 4.3 ± 0.6). None of the patients was fused to L4 in selective group. No correlation was found between length of fusion and complication rate. Eight patients had adding-on phenomenon among which 6 (75%) had initially undergone hyperselective fusions and had significantly higher postoperative lower instrumented vertebra (LIV) tilt. In the adding-on group, LIV was located above the last touching vertebra (LTV) in 62.5% of the cases and above the stable vertebra (SV) in 87.5%. Patients in the selective group reported a significantly lower score in the SRS function domain. Coronal alignment was restored in both groups. Hyperselective

  9. Practical interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, J.; Schreyer, H.

    1991-01-01

    The book is intended as a practical guide and manual for interventional radiology applications. Main emphasis is placed on the performance of the various techniques, with explanations of the various steps to be taken, illustrated by drawings or pictures. Indications, contra-indications and clinical achievements are given in brief. There is one chapter each for the following techniques: angioplasty - intra-arterial fibrinolysis - vascular stents - neuroembolisation - embolisation of other vessels - biliary interventions - abscess drainage - nephrostomy and ureteral manipulations -percutaneous fine-needle biopsy - vena cava filters - interventional radiology in infants. (orig.)

  10. Continuous distal migration and internal rotation of the C-stem prosthesis without any adverse clinical effects: an RSA study of 33 primary total hip arthroplasties followed for up to ten years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schewelov, T; Carlsson, A; Sanzén, L; Besjakov, J

    2014-05-01

    In 2005, we demonstrated that the polished triple-tapered C-stem at two years had migrated distally and rotated internally. From that series, 33 patients have now been followed radiologically, clinically and by radiostereometric analysis (RSA) for up to ten years. The distal migration within the cement mantle had continued and reached a mean of 2 mm (0.5 to 4.0) at ten years. Internal rotation, also within the cement mantle, was a mean 3.8° (external 1.6° to internal 6.6°) The cement mantle did not show any sign of migration or loosening in relation to the femoral bone. There were no clinical or radiological signs indicating that the migration or rotation within the cement mantle had had any adverse effects for the patients.

  11. Clinical and radiological analysis on the double contrast arthrography of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sol, Chang Hyo; Lee, Suck Hong; Moon, Tae Yong; Kim, Byung Soo

    1980-01-01

    The author has performed double contrast arthrography of knee in 96 cases at Busan National University Hospital for about 4 years from May 1976 to April 1980. The 31 cases of them were analyzed both clinically and radiographycally with the background of definite diagnosis confirmed by operation. The results are as follows. 1. Of the 31 cases, 25 cases were male (80.6%), and 6 cases were female (19.4%). Male exceeded female in ratio of 5 : 1. 2. 22 cases (70.1%) were distributed from 15 to 26 years of age. 3. The left knee joint was a more prevalent site. The ratio of left to right was 16 : 14. One case was bilateral. 4. In 17 cases (45.2%) of the 31 cases, there was a positive history of trauma. 14 cases had no specific history (54.8%). 5. The operative findings showed lateral meniscus lesion in 25 cases (80.6%): medical meniscus lesion in 2 cases (6.5%); discoid meniscus in 2 cases (6.5%); lateral menisectomy in 1 cases (3.2%); and lateral meniscus lesion with medial collateral ligament tearing in 1 case (3.2%). 6. In 25 cases of the 31 cases, the radiologic abnormal findings corresponded to the operative findings. 5 cases revealed somewhat different features with the operative findings. One case which showed no abnormal roentgenographic findings was found to have abnormality at operation. As a result, the diagnostic accuracy of arthrography was 96.8%

  12. Digitalization in radiology--6 years in the St. Elisabeth Oncology Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkovic, L; Lehotska, V; Magula, J; Tothova, L

    2008-01-01

    To determine advantages and specific problems of film-free digital hospital focused on radiology department. In the St. Elisabeth Oncology Institute in Bratislava we have more than 6-year experience with digital modalities and the PACS system. During this period many difficulties occurred and are expected to rise with an increasing number of digital modalities. Statistical evaluation of a 6-year period in numerous graphs and schemes. The amount of data can be seen in graphs, which show the amount of examinations and data volume from different modalities for specific time period to October 2007 and present volumes and increase of data amount in megabytes (MB) in the last 6 years. Despite of systematic capacity increase it is a long-term archiving and economical problem. It is crucial to solve the daily amount of data, backup copies, type of archiving media, and priority of data accessibility (Tab. 1, Fig. 5, Ref. 9). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  13. Biomarkers of Host Response Predict Primary End-Point Radiological Pneumonia in Tanzanian Children with Clinical Pneumonia: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura K Erdman

    Full Text Available Diagnosing pediatric pneumonia is challenging in low-resource settings. The World Health Organization (WHO has defined primary end-point radiological pneumonia for use in epidemiological and vaccine studies. However, radiography requires expertise and is often inaccessible. We hypothesized that plasma biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial activation may be useful surrogates for end-point pneumonia, and may provide insight into its biological significance.We studied children with WHO-defined clinical pneumonia (n = 155 within a prospective cohort of 1,005 consecutive febrile children presenting to Tanzanian outpatient clinics. Based on x-ray findings, participants were categorized as primary end-point pneumonia (n = 30, other infiltrates (n = 31, or normal chest x-ray (n = 94. Plasma levels of 7 host response biomarkers at presentation were measured by ELISA. Associations between biomarker levels and radiological findings were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis test and multivariable logistic regression. Biomarker ability to predict radiological findings was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and Classification and Regression Tree analysis.Compared to children with normal x-ray, children with end-point pneumonia had significantly higher C-reactive protein, procalcitonin and Chitinase 3-like-1, while those with other infiltrates had elevated procalcitonin and von Willebrand Factor and decreased soluble Tie-2 and endoglin. Clinical variables were not predictive of radiological findings. Classification and Regression Tree analysis generated multi-marker models with improved performance over single markers for discriminating between groups. A model based on C-reactive protein and Chitinase 3-like-1 discriminated between end-point pneumonia and non-end-point pneumonia with 93.3% sensitivity (95% confidence interval 76.5-98.8, 80.8% specificity (72.6-87.1, positive likelihood ratio 4.9 (3.4-7.1, negative likelihood ratio 0

  14. Biomarkers of Host Response Predict Primary End-Point Radiological Pneumonia in Tanzanian Children with Clinical Pneumonia: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdman, Laura K.; D’Acremont, Valérie; Hayford, Kyla; Kilowoko, Mary; Kyungu, Esther; Hongoa, Philipina; Alamo, Leonor; Streiner, David L.; Genton, Blaise; Kain, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diagnosing pediatric pneumonia is challenging in low-resource settings. The World Health Organization (WHO) has defined primary end-point radiological pneumonia for use in epidemiological and vaccine studies. However, radiography requires expertise and is often inaccessible. We hypothesized that plasma biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial activation may be useful surrogates for end-point pneumonia, and may provide insight into its biological significance. Methods We studied children with WHO-defined clinical pneumonia (n = 155) within a prospective cohort of 1,005 consecutive febrile children presenting to Tanzanian outpatient clinics. Based on x-ray findings, participants were categorized as primary end-point pneumonia (n = 30), other infiltrates (n = 31), or normal chest x-ray (n = 94). Plasma levels of 7 host response biomarkers at presentation were measured by ELISA. Associations between biomarker levels and radiological findings were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis test and multivariable logistic regression. Biomarker ability to predict radiological findings was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and Classification and Regression Tree analysis. Results Compared to children with normal x-ray, children with end-point pneumonia had significantly higher C-reactive protein, procalcitonin and Chitinase 3-like-1, while those with other infiltrates had elevated procalcitonin and von Willebrand Factor and decreased soluble Tie-2 and endoglin. Clinical variables were not predictive of radiological findings. Classification and Regression Tree analysis generated multi-marker models with improved performance over single markers for discriminating between groups. A model based on C-reactive protein and Chitinase 3-like-1 discriminated between end-point pneumonia and non-end-point pneumonia with 93.3% sensitivity (95% confidence interval 76.5–98.8), 80.8% specificity (72.6–87.1), positive likelihood ratio 4.9 (3.4–7

  15. Virtual anthropology: useful radiological tools for age assessment in clinical forensic medicine and thanatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedouit, Fabrice; Saint-Martin, Pauline; Mokrane, Fatima-Zohra; Savall, Frédéric; Rousseau, Hervé; Crubézy, Eric; Rougé, Daniel; Telmon, Norbert

    2015-09-01

    Virtual anthropology consists of the introduction of modern slice imaging to biological and forensic anthropology. Thanks to this non-invasive scientific revolution, some classifications and staging systems, first based on dry bone analysis, can be applied to cadavers with no need for specific preparation, as well as to living persons. Estimation of bone and dental age is one of the possibilities offered by radiology. Biological age can be estimated in clinical forensic medicine as well as in living persons. Virtual anthropology may also help the forensic pathologist to estimate a deceased person's age at death, which together with sex, geographical origin and stature, is one of the important features determining a biological profile used in reconstructive identification. For this forensic purpose, the radiological tools used are multislice computed tomography and, more recently, X-ray free imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound investigations. We present and discuss the value of these investigations for age estimation in anthropology.

  16. Study of the radiological procedures used in odontologic clinics of Boa Vista, Roraima, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Jaberson Luiz Leitao

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiological procedures used at the odontologic clinics of Boa Vista, Roraima-Brazil. The following parameters were recorded: field diameter, half value layer, total filtration, discrepancy between the preset and the applied kilovoltage and exposure time. Dose to the patient's skin from radiography of the upper molar tooth was also estimated. The results showed that 78% of the inspected units had field diameters larger than 6,0 cm, which is outside the limits recommended by the Brazilian Health Ministry. The results also showed that 14% of the equipment presented a discrepancy of more than 10% between preset and applied kilovoltage. On the other hand, the discrepancy between preset and applied exposure time is higher than 10% in 70% of the tested units. The total filtration of 77% units is lower than 1,5 mm of Al, a value recommended by the Brazilian Health Ministry for equipment that operates in the range of 50 kV to 70 kV. The survey also indicates that for 35% of the units the entrance dose in high than 3,5 mGy that is the reference value established by the Brazilian Health Ministry for dental radiography with film type. It was observed that the majority of the clinics use neither aprons nor collars for patients and that films are processed manually, without controlling temperature or processing time. Based on the results obtained it is strongly recommended that a quality control program be implemented in dental radiological clinics in Boa Vista, Roraima. (author)

  17. Radiology – Changing Role in Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Khalilur Rahman

    2014-01-01

    differing physical principles of varying complexity.3 Accurate and timely diagnosis has always been the cornerstone of medical care. In the vast majority of conditions this involves clinical radiology, from the relatively simple chest X-ray to diagnose pneumonia to the complexities of computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI or positron emission tomography (PET in the management of cancer. This diagnosis relies on the combination of imaging technology and the medical and diagnostic skills of the clinical radiologists making the diagnosis from the images.4 The value of different modalities varies by disease and clinical situation and some modalities have certain limitations in some organ systems. The discipline of musculoskeletal radiology has evolved into a major imaging subspecialty in the years since the first use of X-rays to diagnose fractures. Musculoskeletal radiology expertise has experienced enormous developments in diagnostic sensitivity and specificity and in image guided treatment options, in addition to technologic advances far beyond X-rays through advances in cross-sectional imaging such as CT and MR imaging. These two modern radiographic tools also play predominant role in neuroradiography.5 The field of radiation medicine and nuclear imaging are both progressing rapidly with respect to technologic sophistication and multiplatform interface capabilities. Though PET is not really a new field, it has recently undergone a dramatic revitalization as new clinical indicators are validated for this type of functional imaging. PET recently has an immense positive role in the diagnosis and monitoring of cancer patients. PET-CT is now an indispensable tool in the detection of cancer and cancer therapy.6 Most of us are familiar with the concept of diagnostic radiology in the field of medicine. However, numerous advancements in research have led radiology to play an increasingly promising part in health care not in just terms of spotting problems, but

  18. Use of dynamic images in radiology education: Movies of CT and MRI in the anatomy classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hye Won; Oh, Chang-Seok; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Jang, Dong Su

    2018-04-19

    Radiology education is a key component in many preclinical anatomy courses. However, the reported effectiveness of radiology education within such anatomy classrooms has varied. This study was conducted to determine if a novel educational method using dynamic images of movies of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was effective in radiology education during a preclinical anatomy course, aided by clay modeling, specific hand gestures (digit anatomy), and reports from dissection findings uploaded to the anatomy course website (digital reports). Feedback surveys using a five-point Likert scale were administered to better clarify students' opinions regarding their understanding of CT and MRI of anatomical structures, as well as to determine if such preclinical radiology education was helpful in their clinical studies. After completion of the anatomy course taught with dynamic images of CT and MRI, most students demonstrated an adequate understanding of basic CT and MR images. Additionally, students in later clinical years generally believed that their study of radiologic images during the preclinical anatomy course was helpful for their clinical studies and clerkship rotations. Moreover, student scores on imaging anatomy examinations demonstrated meaningful improvements in performance after using dynamic images from movies of CT and MRI. Anat Sci Educ. © 2018 American Association of Anatomists. © 2018 American Association of Anatomists.

  19. A Clinical Decision Support System Using Ultrasound Textures and Radiologic Features to Distinguish Metastasis From Tumor-Free Cervical Lymph Nodes in Patients With Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasian Ardakani, Ali; Reiazi, Reza; Mohammadi, Afshin

    2018-03-30

    This study investigated the potential of a clinical decision support approach for the classification of metastatic and tumor-free cervical lymph nodes (LNs) in papillary thyroid carcinoma on the basis of radiologic and textural analysis through ultrasound (US) imaging. In this research, 170 metastatic and 170 tumor-free LNs were examined by the proposed clinical decision support method. To discover the difference between the groups, US imaging was used for the extraction of radiologic and textural features. The radiologic features in the B-mode scans included the echogenicity, margin, shape, and presence of microcalcification. To extract the textural features, a wavelet transform was applied. A support vector machine classifier was used to classify the LNs. In the training set data, a combination of radiologic and textural features represented the best performance with sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and area under the curve (AUC) values of 97.14%, 98.57%, 97.86%, and 0.994, respectively, whereas the classification based on radiologic and textural features alone yielded lower performance, with AUCs of 0.964 and 0.922. On testing the data set, the proposed model could classify the tumor-free and metastatic LNs with an AUC of 0.952, which corresponded to sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 93.33%, 96.66%, and 95.00%. The clinical decision support method based on textural and radiologic features has the potential to characterize LNs via 2-dimensional US. Therefore, it can be used as a supplementary technique in daily clinical practice to improve radiologists' understanding of conventional US imaging for characterizing LNs. © 2018 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  20. Quality control in diagnostic radiology: experience and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli; Mohd Ramli Arshad; Mohd Khalid Matori; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Husaini Salleh; Abdullah Tahir Aliyasak; Zainal Jamaluddin; Hasrul Hisham Hussain

    2005-01-01

    Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research through its Medical Physics Group has been providing Quality Control (QC) services for medical x-ray apparatus used in diagnostic radiology to private clinics and hospitals since the year 1997. The quality control (QC) in diagnostic radiology is considered as part of quality assurance program which provide accurate diagnostic information at the lowest cost and the least exposure of the patients to radiation. Many experience and obstacles were faced by Medical Physics Group. This paper will discuss on some of the experiences and challenges that could be shared together with MINT staff especially in the safety aspect related to electrical and mechanical, radiation protection, performance and standard. The challenging in administrative aspect also will discuss. (Author)

  1. Congenital segmental dilatation of jejunoileal region in a newborn: Unusual clinical and radiologic presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harjai M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Segmental dilatation of the ileum is one of the uncommon causes of intestinal obstruction in neonates. We present a case of slow transit of bowel contents leading to suspicion of functional bowel obstruction in a new born, which on exploration turned out to be a case of segmental dilatation of the jejuno-ileal region. The clinical and radiological evaluation was suggestive of hypomotility disorder of gut, resulting in diagnostic dilemma and delayed surgical intervention.

  2. Annual Report of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, April 1991 - March 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This annual report is a compilation of the research activities and achievement in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan during the fiscal year 1991 (from April 1991 through March 1992). The research covers a wide range of radiological sciences from molecular to environmental studies and medicine including engineering. Topics consists of physics, chemistry, biomedical science, clinical research, and environmental sciences, covering a total of 69 titles. A list of publications by staff members, activities of research divisions, and organization chart of the NIRS are given in Appendix. (J.P.N.) 64 refs

  3. Radiologic Equipment and Technicians according to the Distribution of the Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Chul Ho; Choi, Jun Gu

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide basic data in order to systematize the management of demand and supply of radiologic technicians, to pursue a fair regional distribution of educational institutions, and furthermore to keep reasonable medical treatment and fee. This research was carried out through the investigation of radiologic equipment and technicians according to the distribution of the population. We compared and analyzed the correlation between regional population, the number of clinics and hospitals, the number of medical imaging devices, and the number of radiologists and radiologic technicians in 5 cities without 'Gu' administrative units in 2008. 27,317 radiologic technicians have been produced since the administration of the national qualifying exam for radiologic technicians. About 18,000 radiologic technicians are currently working. There are 39 colleges or universities with Departments of Radiology and the admission quota is 2,120 students excluding one college. The ratio of radiologic equipment to radiologic technicians is 2.6 to 1. There is a dilemma in which some radiologic technicians fail to find appropriate jobs while some clinics or hospitals are in need of radiologic technicians. This dilemma is due to unreasonable regional discrepancies in pay system and welfare situation, and excessive profit-oriented recruiting system of clinics and hospitals. The increase of students of Radiologic Departments and approval of additional departments will end up with producing superfluous high academic degree holders, which is on the contrary to the government policy to produce more job opportunities. So the policy of increasing Radiologic Departments should be reconsidered.

  4. Radiation exposure and image quality in X-ray diagnostic radiology. Physical principles and clinical applications. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saebel, Manfred; Aichinger, Horst; Dierker, Joachim; Joite-Barfuss, Sigrid

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic X-rays are the largest contributor to radiation exposure to the general population, and protecting the patient from radiation damage is a major aim of modern health policy. Once the decision has been taken to use ionising radiation for imaging in a particular patient, it is necessary to optimize the image acquisition process taking into account the diagnostic quality of the images and the radiation dose to the patient. Both image quality and radiation dose are affected by a number of parameters, knowledge of which permits scientifically based decision making. The authors of this second edition of Radiation Exposure and Image Quality in X-ray Diagnostic Radiology have spent many years studying the optimization of radiological imaging. In this book they present in detail the basic physical principles of diagnostic radiology and their application to clinical problems. Particular attention is devoted to evaluation of the dose to the patient, the influence of scattered radiation on image quality, the use of antiscatter grids, and optimization of image quality and dose. The final section is a supplement containing tables of data and graphical depictions of X-ray spectra, interaction coefficients, characteristics of X-ray beams, and other aspects relevant to patient dose calculations. In addition, a complementary CD-ROM contains a user-friendly Excel file database covering these aspects that can be used in the reader's own programs. Since the first edition, the text, figures, tables, and references have all been thoroughly updated, and more detailed attention is now paid to image quality and radiation exposure when using digital imaging and computed tomography. This book will be an invaluable aid to medical physicists when performing calculations relating to patient dose and image quality, and will also prove useful for diagnostic radiologists and engineers. (orig.)

  5. Trends in the value and consequences of radiologic imaging of perforated gastroduodenal ulcer; A 50-year experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svanes, C.; Salvesen, H.; Larsen, T.B.; Svanes, K.; Soereide, O. (Haukeland Sykehus, Bergen (Norway))

    1990-01-01

    The trends in and value and consequences of radiologic imaging in 1128 patients with perforated gastroduodenal ulcer have been studied over the 50-year period 1935 to 1985. The proportion of patients undergoing plain X-ray studies increased from 4% in the first 5-year period (1935 to 1939) to 94% in the last (1980 to 1985). Pneumoperitoneum was found in 77% of those undergoing X-ray studies. Water-soluble contrast studies were introduced in 1960, and in the three 5-year periods 1970 to 1985 from 8% to 13% underwent such imaging. Leakage was demonstrated in 60% of those undergoing contrast studies. Contrast studies have had a limited role in the pretreatment evaluation of these patients. The frequency of pneumoperitoneum was fairly constant over the 50-year period, and the only patient characteristic that influenced the occurrence of free gas in the abdominal cavity was age, with a higher proportion of patients with pneumoperitoneum in old patients. Any radiologic study increased treatment delay by at least 2 h. 18 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Late clinical and radiological complications of stereotactical radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkhutik, Vera [Hospital Universitario la Fe, Department of Neurology, Valencia (Spain); Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, PhD Program of the Department of Medicine, Barcelona (Spain); Lago, Aida; Vazquez, Juan Francisco; Tembl, Jose Ignacio [Hospital Universitario la Fe, Department of Neurology, Valencia (Spain); Aparici, Fernando; Guillen, Lourdes; Mainar, Esperanza; Vazquez, Victor [Hospital Universitario la Fe, Department of Neuroradiology, Valencia (Spain)

    2013-04-15

    Post-radiation injury of patients with brain arteriovenous malformations (AVM) include blood-brain barrier breakdown (BBBB), edema, and necrosis. Prevalence, clinical relevance, and response to treatment are poorly known. We present a series of consecutive brain AVM treated with stereotactic radiosurgery describing the appearance of radiation injury and clinical complications. Consecutive patients with annual clinical and radiological follow-up (median length 63 months). Edema and BBBB were classified in four groups (minimal, perilesional, moderate, or severe), and noted together with necrosis. Clinical symptoms of interest were intracranial hypertension, new neurological deficits, new seizures, and brain hemorrhages. One hundred two cases, median age 34 years, 52 % male. Median irradiated volume 3.8 cc, dose to the margin of the nidus 18.5 Gy. Nineteen patients underwent a second radiosurgery. Only 42.2 % patients remained free from radiation injury. Edema was found in 43.1 %, blood-brain barrier breakdown in 20.6 %, necrosis in 6.9 %. Major injury (moderate or severe edema, moderate or severe BBBB, or necrosis) was found in 20 of 102 patients (19.6 %). AVM diameter >3 cm and second radiosurgery were independent predictors. Time to the worst imaging was 60 months. Patients with major radiation injury had a hazard ratio for appearance of focal deficits of 7.042 (p = 0.04), of intracranial hypertension 2.857 (p = 0.025), hemorrhage into occluded nidus 9.009 (p = 0.079), appearance of new seizures not significant. Major radiation injury is frequent and increases the risk of neurological complications. Its late appearance implies that current follow-up protocols need to be extended in time. (orig.)

  7. Radiologic evaluation of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Joong; Kang, Hee Tae; Kim, Jong Deok; Rhee, Hak Song

    1984-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer of Korea is much lower than that of Western countries, but has shown a tendency to a slight increase recently. Barium enema is the most valuable, noninvasive and inexpensive method available to evaluate the size, shape and site of colorectal cancer. The authors reviewed and radiologically classified barium enema studies of 232 cases of colorectal cancer from Aug. 1967 to July 1982 at Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju, Confirmed clinically, operatively and pathologically. The results were as follows; 1. The ratio of male and female was 1.3:1, and youngest was 13 year-old and the oldest 86 year-old. 2. The peak incidence occurred from 5th to 7th decades, accounting for 78% of all cases (181/232), and there was a relatively high incidence of the disease in patients below 30 years of age at 7.8% (18/232). 3. Rectum and rectosigmoid region are the most frequently involved regions (127/232:54.8%). 4. The positivity of barium enema examination was 4.0% (232/5807), and its accuracy was 96.5% (224/232). 5. The radiologic findings were classified into 4 groups, and they were annular encircling 62.9% (146/232). polypoid fungating 26.8% (62/232), infiltrating 8.6% (20/232), and primary ulcerating 1.7% (4/232) in order of frequency. 6. The linear length of the cancer ranged from 1.5 Cm to 15 Cm, and the average length was 5.5 Cm. 7. There was no statistical correlation between the length of lesion, the site, and the radiologic findings, and stages of the lesion (P:0.750-0.250). 8. The majority of colorectal cancers was adenocarcinoma (217/232:93.6%)

  8. Clinical and radiological outcome following pneumothorax after endoscopic lung volume reduction with valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gompelmann D

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available D Gompelmann,1,2 N Benjamin,1 K Kontogianni,1 FJF Herth,1,2 CP Heussel,2–4 H Hoffmann,2,5 R Eberhardt1,2 1Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Thoraxklinik at University of Heidelberg, 2German Center for Lung Research, 3Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Thoraxklinik at University of Heidelberg, 4Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, 5Thoracic Surgery, Thoraxklinik at University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Introduction: Valve implantation has evolved as a therapy for patients with advanced emphysema. Although it is a minimally invasive treatment, it is associated with complications, the most common being pneumothorax. Pneumothorax occurs due to the rapid target lobe volume reduction and may be a predictor of clinical benefit despite this complication. Objective: The objective of this study was to conduct an exploratory data analysis of patients who developed a pneumothorax following endoscopic valve therapy for emphysema. Materials and methods: This study performed a retrospective evaluation of pneumothorax management and the impact of pneumothorax on clinical outcomes in 70 patients following valve therapy in 381 consecutive patients. Results: Pneumothorax rate following valve therapy was 18%. Pneumothorax management consisted of chest tube insertion, valve removal, and surgical intervention in 87% (61/70, 44% (31/70, and 19% (13/70 of the patients, respectively. Despite pneumothorax, patients experienced modest but significant improvements in lung function parameters (forced expiratory volume in 1 second: 55±148 mL, residual volume: -390±964 mL, total lung capacity: -348±876; all P<0.05. Persistent lobar atelectasis 3 months after recovering from pneumothorax, which was associated with relevant clinical improvement, was observed in only 21% (15/70 of the patients. Conclusion: Pneumothorax is a frequent severe complication following valve therapy that requires further intervention

  9. Radiological classification of mandibular fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihailova, H.

    2009-01-01

    Mandibular fractures present the biggest part (up to 97%) of the facial bone fractures. Method of choice for diagnosing of mandibular fractures is conventional radiography. The aim of the issue is to present an unified radiological classification of mandibular fractures for the clinical practice. This classification includes only those clinical symptoms of mandibular fracture which could be radiologically objectified: exact anatomical localization (F1-F6), teeth in fracture line (Ta,Tb), grade of dislocation (D I, D II), occlusal disturbances (O(+), O(-)). Radiological symptoms expressed by letter and number symbols are systematized in a formula - FTDO of mandibular fractures similar to TNM formula for tumours. FTDO formula expresses radiological diagnose of each mandibular fracture but it doesn't include neither the site (left or right) of the fracture, nor the kind and number of fractures. In order to express topography and number of fractures the radiological formula is transformed into a decimal fraction. The symbols (FTD) of right mandible fracture are written in the numerator and those of the left site - in the denominator. For double and multiple fractures between the symbols for each fracture we put '+'. Symbols for occlusal disturbances are put down opposite, the fractional line. So topographo-anatomical formula (FTD/FTD)xO is formed. In this way the whole radiological information for unilateral, bilateral, single or multiple fractures of the mandible is expressed. The information in the radiological topography anatomic formula, resp. from the unified topography-anatomic classification ensures a quick and exact X-ray diagnose of mandibular fracture. In this way contributes to get better, make easier and faster X-ray diagnostic process concerning mandibular fractures. And all these is a precondition for prevention of retardation of the diagnosis mandibular fracture. (author)

  10. Nuclear medicine and its radiological protection in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J.

    2001-01-01

    The China Society of Nuclear Medicine was established on 27 May 1980. Since then, nuclear medicine in clinical diagnosis and therapy has been developed rapidly in China. So far there are more than 4000 members of the Society, and more than 350 sets of SPECT and 12 sets of PET have been installed and are busily running in clinic nowadays and about 1 million patients with different types of diseases have obtained nuclear medicine imaging examinations per year. Concerning the nuclear medicine therapy, a lot of patients with many types of diseases obtained benefit from radioisotope therapy. Accordingly, several Policies and Regulations have been enacted by the Government for the radiological protection. Furthermore, a special book titled 'Standardization in Diagnostic and Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine' has been promulgated in June, 1997 by the Health Administration of People's Republic of China, and this book is distributed to almost every nuclear medicine physician and technician in China for their reference in routine nuclear medicine work or research. In this book three parts of the contents are covered: Policies and Regulations for the radiological protection, basic knowledge and clinical nuclear medicine applications. (author)

  11. Endoscopy versus radiology in post-procedural monitoring after peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nast, Jan Friso; Berliner, Christoph; Rösch, Thomas; von Renteln, Daniel; Noder, Tania; Schachschal, Guido; Groth, Stefan; Ittrich, Harald; Kersten, Jan F; Adam, Gerhard; Werner, Yuki B

    2018-03-15

    The newly developed technique of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been shown to be effective in several short- and mid-term studies. Limited information is available about the adequacy of immediate post-POEM monitoring tests. POEM was performed under general anesthesia in 228 patients (59.6% male, mean age 45.6 ± 15.5 years). Post-procedural checks comprised clinical and laboratory examination, and, during post-procedure days 1-5, endoscopy and-in the first 114 cases-radiologic examination using water-soluble contrast (1st group); the remaining patients underwent post-procedure controls without radiology (2nd group). Main outcome was value of endoscopic compared to radiologic control for recognition of early adverse events. In the first group, routine fluoroscopic contrast swallow suggested minor leakages at the mucosal entry site in two cases which was confirmed endoscopically in only one. Endoscopy revealed two minor entry site leakages and, in six additional cases, dislocated clips without leakage (overall 5.3%). All eight patients underwent reclipping and healed without clinical sequelae. In the 2nd group, endoscopy showed 5 clip dislocations (all reclipped) and one ischemic cardiac perforation in a patient with clinical deterioration on post-POEM day 1 who had to undergo surgery after confirmation of leakage by CT. Radiologic monitoring (contrast swallow) after POEM is not useful and can be omitted. Even routine endoscopic monitoring for detection and closure of minor defects of the mucosal entry site yields limited information with regards to final outcome; major complications are very rare and probably associated with clinical deterioration. Clinical Trials Gov Registration number of the main study: NCT01405417.

  12. Radiological characteristics, histological features and clinical outcomes of lung cancer patients with coexistent idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, K A; Kennedy, M P; Moore, E; Crush, L; Prendeville, S; Maher, M M; Burke, L; Henry, M T

    2015-02-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis and management, the outcomes for both lung cancer and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are still unfavourable. The pathophysiology and outcomes for patients with concomitant lung cancer and IPF remains unclear. A retrospective analysis was performed of all patients presenting with concomitant IPF and lung cancer to our centre over a 3-year period. Patients with connective tissue disease, asbestos exposure, sarcoidosis, previous thoracic radiation, radiological evidence of fibrosis but no histological confirmation of lung cancer, or the use of medications known to cause pulmonary fibrosis were excluded. We describe clinical, radiological and pathological characteristics of this group. We also report the response to standardized lung cancer therapy in this cohort. Of 637 lung cancer patients, 34 were identified with concomitant IPF (5.3 %) and all were smokers. 85 % had non-small cell lung cancer, 41 % were squamous cell cancers. The majority of tumours were located in the lower lobes, peripheral and present in an area of honeycombing. Despite the fact that approximately 2/3rds of the patients had localised or locally advanced lung cancer, the outcome of therapy for lung cancer was extremely poor regardless of tumour stage or severity of IPF. At our centre, 1/20 patients with lung cancer have concomitant IPF. The majority of these tumours are small in size, peripheral in location and squamous cell carcinoma; in an area of honey combing. The outcome for concomitant lung cancer and IPF regardless of stage or therapy is poor.

  13. Virtual radiology rounds: adding value in the digital era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fefferman, Nancy R.; Strubel, Naomi A.; Prithiani, Chandan; Chakravarti, Sujata; Caprio, Martha; Recht, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    To preserve radiology rounds in the changing health care environment, we have introduced virtual radiology rounds, an initiative enabling clinicians to remotely review imaging studies with the radiologist. We describe our initial experience with virtual radiology rounds and referring provider impressions. Virtual radiology rounds, a web-based conference, use remote sharing of radiology workstations. Participants discuss imaging studies by speakerphone. Virtual radiology rounds were piloted with the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and the Congenital Cardiovascular Care Unit (CCVCU). Providers completed a survey assessing the perceived impact and overall value of virtual radiology rounds on patient care using a 10-point scale. Pediatric radiologists participating in virtual radiology rounds completed a survey assessing technical, educational and clinical aspects of this methodology. Sixteen providers responded to the survey; 9 NICU and 7 CCVCU staff (physicians, nurse practitioners and fellows). Virtual radiology rounds occurred 4-5 sessions/week with an average of 6.4 studies. Clinicians rated confidence in their own image interpretation with a 7.4 average rating for NICU and 7.5 average rating for CCVCU. Clinicians unanimously rated virtual radiology rounds as adding value. NICU staff preferred virtual radiology rounds to traditional rounds and CCVCU staff supported their new participation in virtual radiology rounds. Four of the five pediatric radiologists participating in virtual radiology rounds responded to the survey reporting virtual radiology rounds to be easy to facilitate (average rating: 9.3), to moderately impact interpretation of imaging studies (average rating: 6), and to provide substantial educational value for radiologists (average rating: 8.3). All pediatric radiologists felt strongly that virtual radiology rounds enable increased integration of the radiologist into the clinical care team (average rating: 8.8). Virtual radiology rounds are a

  14. Virtual radiology rounds: adding value in the digital era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fefferman, Nancy R.; Strubel, Naomi A.; Prithiani, Chandan; Chakravarti, Sujata; Caprio, Martha; Recht, Michael P. [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-11-15

    To preserve radiology rounds in the changing health care environment, we have introduced virtual radiology rounds, an initiative enabling clinicians to remotely review imaging studies with the radiologist. We describe our initial experience with virtual radiology rounds and referring provider impressions. Virtual radiology rounds, a web-based conference, use remote sharing of radiology workstations. Participants discuss imaging studies by speakerphone. Virtual radiology rounds were piloted with the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and the Congenital Cardiovascular Care Unit (CCVCU). Providers completed a survey assessing the perceived impact and overall value of virtual radiology rounds on patient care using a 10-point scale. Pediatric radiologists participating in virtual radiology rounds completed a survey assessing technical, educational and clinical aspects of this methodology. Sixteen providers responded to the survey; 9 NICU and 7 CCVCU staff (physicians, nurse practitioners and fellows). Virtual radiology rounds occurred 4-5 sessions/week with an average of 6.4 studies. Clinicians rated confidence in their own image interpretation with a 7.4 average rating for NICU and 7.5 average rating for CCVCU. Clinicians unanimously rated virtual radiology rounds as adding value. NICU staff preferred virtual radiology rounds to traditional rounds and CCVCU staff supported their new participation in virtual radiology rounds. Four of the five pediatric radiologists participating in virtual radiology rounds responded to the survey reporting virtual radiology rounds to be easy to facilitate (average rating: 9.3), to moderately impact interpretation of imaging studies (average rating: 6), and to provide substantial educational value for radiologists (average rating: 8.3). All pediatric radiologists felt strongly that virtual radiology rounds enable increased integration of the radiologist into the clinical care team (average rating: 8.8). Virtual radiology rounds are a

  15. The American Board of Radiology perspective on maintenance of certification: Part IV: Practice quality improvement in radiologic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, G. Donald; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Morin, Richard L.; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.; Thomas, Stephen R.; Bosma, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    , participate in a project within a clinical department, participate in a peer review of a self-assessment report, or choose a qualified national project sponsored by a society. Once a project has been selected, the steps are: (1) Collect baseline data relevant to the chosen project, (2) review and analyze the data, (3) create and implement an improvement plan, (4) remeasure and track, and (5) report participation to the ABR, using the template provided by the ABR. These steps begin in Year 2, following training in Year 1. Specific examples of individual PQI projects for each of the three disciplines of radiologic physics are provided. Now, through the MOC programs, the relationship between the radiologic physicist and the ABR will be continuous through the diplomate's professional career. The ABR is committed to providing an effective infrastructure that will promote and assist the process of continuing professional development including the enhancement of practice quality improvement for radiologic physicists

  16. How Secure Is Your Radiology Department? Mapping Digital Radiology Adoption and Security Worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stites, Mark; Pianykh, Oleg S

    2016-04-01

    Despite the long history of digital radiology, one of its most critical aspects--information security--still remains extremely underdeveloped and poorly standardized. To study the current state of radiology security, we explored the worldwide security of medical image archives. Using the DICOM data-transmitting standard, we implemented a highly parallel application to scan the entire World Wide Web of networked computers and devices, locating open and unprotected radiology servers. We used only legal and radiology-compliant tools. Our security-probing application initiated a standard DICOM handshake to remote computer or device addresses, and then assessed their security posture on the basis of handshake replies. The scan discovered a total of 2774 unprotected radiology or DICOM servers worldwide. Of those, 719 were fully open to patient data communications. Geolocation was used to analyze and rank our findings according to country utilization. As a result, we built maps and world ranking of clinical security, suggesting that even the most radiology-advanced countries have hospitals with serious security gaps. Despite more than two decades of active development and implementation, our radiology data still remains insecure. The results provided should be applied to raise awareness and begin an earnest dialogue toward elimination of the problem. The application we designed and the novel scanning approach we developed can be used to identify security breaches and to eliminate them before they are compromised.

  17. Clinical and radiological characterization of the pulmonary commitment for acute toxoplasmosis disseminated in nine immunocompetent patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas, Jorge E; Pino, Luis Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    The acute toxoplasmosis in the immunocompetent individual generally has a benign and autoresolutive course. However, in patient coming from wild area severe cases of visceral commitment, the most frequent in them, the pulmonary commitment has been reported. The clinical and radiological description of nine individuals members of the military forces of Colombia, with acute toxoplasmosis and pulmonary commitment was carried. 55% of the cases presented dysnea functional class II/IV; 33% functional class III/IV and only 1/9 patients presented functional class IV/IV. The most common radiological image was the uni focal or multifocal consolidation pulmonary (66%), and in smaller frequency the presence of having infiltrated reticular, reticulo nodular and pleural effusion. The entirety of the patients evolved in satisfactory form, two of them with support with noninvasive ventilation.

  18. Radiologic study of silicosis in Korean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sun Ok; Rhee, Chung Sik; Kim, Hee Seap

    1982-01-01

    These radiologic studies were carried out on 265 cases of silicosis which were diagnosed clinically at Industrial Accident Hospital affiliated with Catholic Medical College, during the period of 3 years from 1974 to 1976. 265 cases od silicosis consisted of 96 cases (35%) of coal miner, 91 cases (34%) of coal choicer and 82 cases (31%) of others. The average age was 42.2 years and average working period was 9.2 years. Qualitative and quantitative features in the analysis of roentgen findings were based on UICC/Cincinnati and KLO classification. The qualitative features showed 26% of 'p' opacity, 46% of 'q' opacity, 4% of 'r' opacity as rounded profusion and 5% of 's' opacity, 11% of 't' opacity, 2% of 'u' opacity as irregular profusion of small opacities. Large opacities showed 3% of group A, 2% of group B and 1% of group C. Quantitative features revealed 25% of Type 1, 54% of Type 2, 16% of Type 3 and 5% of Type 4. The qualitative and quantitative features showed significant differences as age and working period increased. 70% of this study group were associated with radiological complications and complication rate was increased with age and working period. Major complications were pulmonary emphysema, tuberculosis and pleural abnormalities

  19. Internal medicine. An illustrated radiological guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Tubaikh, Jarrah Ali; Sabah Hospital, Kuwait

    2010-01-01

    This book explains how radiology can be a powerful tool for establishing the diagnosis of many internal medicine diseases that are usually diagnosed on the basis of their laboratory or clinical presentation. It is organized in the classic fashion for internal medicine books, with eleven chapters covering the different internal medicine specialties. Within these chapters, more than 450 diseases are considered, some of which are rarely encountered but are nonetheless significant. For each disease, radiological and clinical features are displayed in images and high-quality digital medical illustrations, and those differential diagnoses are identified that can be ruled out by imaging alone. In addition, the pathophysiology underlying the radiological features is described, enabling the reader to understand why a particular sign is seen on MR images, CT scans, or plain radiographs. The book will serve as an excellent radiological atlas for internal medicine practitioners and family physicians, showing disease presentations that may be hard to find in standard medical textbooks and explaining which imaging modalities are likely to be most informative in particular patients. (orig.)

  20. MEDIASTINAL SHIFT: A SIGN OF SIGNIFICANT CLINICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE IN DIAGNOSIS OF MALIGNANT PLEURAL EFFUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Khajotia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mediastinal shift (upper and lower is a clinical and radiologicalmarker of significant importance, which at times helps todetermine the aetiological cause of the underlying pathology.Tracheal shift is an indicator of upper mediastinal shift, whilea shift in the position of the heart indicates a lower mediastinalshift. Since the pleural cavity is confined by the rib cage, incase of a moderately large pleural effusion, the structures inthe thoracic cavity normally get ‘pushed’ to the opposite sideresulting in a shift of the upper and lower mediastinum. Thisis clinically and radiologically detected by a shift in the tracheaand heart to the side opposite to the pleural effusion. This iscommonly seen in pleural effusions resulting from tuberculosisor other infections. However, in some cases even a largepleural effusion fails to shift the mediastinum to the oppositeside. In fact, in some cases, the trachea and heart areobserved to be central or even shifted to the same side asthe effusion. This finding is of immense importance as it is aclinical indicator of a more serious condition which needsprompt diagnosis and urgent management. We report here,one such case of a middle-aged man who presented to theemergency department with complaints of increasingbreathlessness and whose clinical and radiological examinationrevealed a moderately large right-sided pleural effusion withthe trachea and heart also shifted to the right side.

  1. Laenderyggens degeneration og radiologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2006-01-01

    and significant relationships between radiological findings and subjective symptoms have both been notoriously difficult to identify. The lack of consensus on clinical criteria and radiological definitions has hampered the undertaking of properly executed epidemiological studies. The natural history of LBP...... is cyclic: exacerbations relieved by asymptomatic periods. New imaging modalities, including the combination of MR imaging and multiplanar 3-D CT scans, have broadened our awareness of possible pain-generating degenerative processes of the lumbar spine other than disc degeneration....

  2. Radiologic errors, past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    During the 10-year period beginning in 1949 with publication of five articles in two radiology journals and UKs The Lancet, a California radiologist named L.H. Garland almost single-handedly shocked the entire medical and especially the radiologic community. He focused their attention on the fact now known and accepted by all, but at that time not previously recognized and acknowledged only with great reluctance, that a substantial degree of observer error was prevalent in radiologic interpretation. In the more than half-century that followed, Garland's pioneering work has been affirmed and reaffirmed by numerous researchers. Retrospective studies disclosed then and still disclose today that diagnostic errors in radiologic interpretations of plain radiographic (as well as CT, MR, ultrasound, and radionuclide) images hover in the 30% range, not too dissimilar to the error rates in clinical medicine. Seventy percent of these errors are perceptual in nature, i.e., the radiologist does not "see" the abnormality on the imaging exam, perhaps due to poor conspicuity, satisfaction of search, or simply the "inexplicable psycho-visual phenomena of human perception." The remainder are cognitive errors: the radiologist sees an abnormality but fails to render a correct diagnoses by attaching the wrong significance to what is seen, perhaps due to inadequate knowledge, or an alliterative or judgmental error. Computer-assisted detection (CAD), a technology that for the past two decades has been utilized primarily in mammographic interpretation, increases sensitivity but at the same time decreases specificity; whether it reduces errors is debatable. Efforts to reduce diagnostic radiological errors continue, but the degree to which they will be successful remains to be determined.

  3. Hands-on Physics Education of Residents in Diagnostic Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Hardy, Peter A; DiSantis, David J; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2017-06-01

    The American Board of Radiology Core Examination integrates assessment of physics knowledge into its overall testing of clinical radiology, with an emphasis on understanding image quality and artifacts, radiation dose, and patient safety for each modality or subspecialty organ system. Accordingly, achieving a holistic approach to physics education of radiology residents is a huge challenge. The traditional teaching of radiological physics-simply through didactic lectures-was not designed for such a holistic approach. Admittedly, time constraints and clinical demands can make incorporation of physics teaching into clinical practice problematic. We created and implemented a week-long, intensive physics rotation for fledgling radiology residents and evaluated its effectiveness. The dedicated physics rotation is held for 1 week during the first month of radiology residency. It comprises three components: introductory lectures, hands-on practical clinical physics operations, and observation of clinical image production. A brief introduction of the physics pertinent to each modality is given at the beginning of each session. Hands-on experimental demonstrations are emphasized, receiving the greatest allotment of time. The residents perform experiments such as measuring radiation dose, studying the relationship between patient dose and clinical practice (eg, fluoroscopy technique), investigating the influence of acquisition parameters (kV, mAs) on radiographs, and evaluating image quality using computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and gamma camera/single-photon emission computed tomography/positron emission tomography phantoms. Quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of the rotation is based on an examination that tests the residents' grasp of basic medical physics concepts along with written course evaluations provided by each resident. The pre- and post-rotation tests show that after the physics rotation, the average correct score of 25

  4. Evaluation of use of e-Learning in undergraduate radiology education: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zafar, Saad, E-mail: saad.zafar@riphah.edu.pk [Riphah International University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Safdar, Saima, E-mail: saima.safdar@riphah.edu.pk [Riphah International University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Zafar, Aasma N., E-mail: aasmarad@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Senior Registrar Shifa College of Medicine and Assistant Consultant Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We have systematically reviewed the literature on use of e-Learning in Radiology at the undergraduate level. • Kirkpatrick's Learning Model is used to evaluate the learning outcomes of the reported studies. • There is an increase in positive response for learning management systems used in blended learning environments. • There are wide range of technologies being used for e-Learning including use of audio response system and customized PAC solutions. • There is a clear trend toward highly interactive, self directed learning environment to support the concept of life long independent learners. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this review is to investigate the evaluative outcomes present in the literature according to Kirkpatrick's learning model and to examine the nature and characteristics of the e-Learning interventions in radiology education at undergraduate level. Materials and methods: Four databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Eric) are searched for publications related to the application of e-Learning in undergraduate radiology education. The search strategy is a combination of e-Learning and Mesh and non Mesh radiology and undergraduate related terms. These search strategies are established in relation to experts of respective domains. The full text of thirty pertinent articles is reviewed. Author's country and study location data is extracted to identify the most active regions and year's are extracted to know the existing trend. Data regarding radiology subfields and undergraduate year of radiology education is extracted along with e-Learning technologies to identify the most prevalent or suitable technologies or tools with respect to radiology contents. Kirkpatricks learning evaluation model is used to categorize the evaluative outcomes reported in the identified studies. Results: The results of this analysis reveal emergence of highly interactive games, audience response systems and designing of wide range of

  5. Evaluation of use of e-Learning in undergraduate radiology education: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, Saad; Safdar, Saima; Zafar, Aasma N.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We have systematically reviewed the literature on use of e-Learning in Radiology at the undergraduate level. • Kirkpatrick's Learning Model is used to evaluate the learning outcomes of the reported studies. • There is an increase in positive response for learning management systems used in blended learning environments. • There are wide range of technologies being used for e-Learning including use of audio response system and customized PAC solutions. • There is a clear trend toward highly interactive, self directed learning environment to support the concept of life long independent learners. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this review is to investigate the evaluative outcomes present in the literature according to Kirkpatrick's learning model and to examine the nature and characteristics of the e-Learning interventions in radiology education at undergraduate level. Materials and methods: Four databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Eric) are searched for publications related to the application of e-Learning in undergraduate radiology education. The search strategy is a combination of e-Learning and Mesh and non Mesh radiology and undergraduate related terms. These search strategies are established in relation to experts of respective domains. The full text of thirty pertinent articles is reviewed. Author's country and study location data is extracted to identify the most active regions and year's are extracted to know the existing trend. Data regarding radiology subfields and undergraduate year of radiology education is extracted along with e-Learning technologies to identify the most prevalent or suitable technologies or tools with respect to radiology contents. Kirkpatricks learning evaluation model is used to categorize the evaluative outcomes reported in the identified studies. Results: The results of this analysis reveal emergence of highly interactive games, audience response systems and designing of wide range of

  6. Federal support of radiological research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendee, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    Pervading the plans and objective outlined herein for continued and enhanced federal support of research in radiology is a challenge of unparalleled magnitude, for the economic foundation on which this support is based has rarely been more precarious. The new administration in Washington may well be the most fiscally constrained in half a century, and its stated interest in reducing federal expenditures could have disastrous consequences for the scientific research effort in this country, including that in radiology and the radiological sciences. The circumvention of these consequences may well require the dedicated effort of the entire scientific community over the next few months and years, including that part representing radiology and the radiological sciences

  7. Radiology Resident Supply and Demand: A Regional Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Cory M

    2017-09-01

    Radiology was subject to crippling deficits in the number of jobs available to graduates of training programs from 2012 through 2015. As the specialty transitions to the assimilation of osteopathic training programs and the welcoming of direct competition from new integrated interventional radiology programs, the assessment of growth in radiology training positions over the 10 years preceding this pivotal time will serve to characterize the genesis of the crisis while inspiring stakeholders to avoid similar negative fluctuations in the future. The number of per capita radiology trainees in each region was derived from data published by the National Resident Matching Program, as were annual match statistics over the years 2012 through 2016. Data regarding new interventional radiology and diagnostic radiology enrollees were also obtained from the National Resident Matching Program. The seven states with the most per capita radiology residents were in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern United States in both 2006 and 2016, and three of these seven also showed the greatest per capita growth over the course of the 10 years studied. New radiology programs were accredited during the peak of the job shortage. Integrated interventional radiology training created 24 de novo radiology residents in the 2017 match. Fill rates are weakly positively correlated with program size. Unregulated radiology program growth persisted during the decade leading up to 2016. The region with the fewest jobs available since 2012 is also home to the greatest number of per capita radiology residents. Numerous published opinions during the crisis did not result in enforced policy change. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Health Risks of Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oraby, M.N.A.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation during diagnostic radiologic procedures carries small but real risks. Children, young adults and pregnant women are especially vulnerable. Exposure of patients to diagnostic energy levels of ionizing radiation should be kept to the minimum necessary to provide useful clinical information and allay patients concerns about radiation-related risks. Computerized Tomography (CT) accounts for two thirds of the cumulative patient dose from diagnostic radiological procedures and the cumulative dose from CT is rising as technological advances increase the number of indications and the capabilities of CT. Carcinogenesis and teratogenesis are the main concerns with ionizing radiation. The risk increases as the radiation dose increases. There is no minimum threshold and the risk is cumulative: a dose of 1 mSv once a year for 10 years is equivalent to a single dose of 10 mSv. Whenever practical, choose an imaging test that uses less radiation or no radiation and lengthen the periods between follow-up imaging tests. Some patients may avoid screening mammography because of fear of radiation-induced cancer, yet this test uses a very small radiation dose (0.6 mSv, much less than the annual dose from background radiation, 3.6 mSv). (author)

  9. Educational treasures in Radiology: The Radiology Olympics - striving for gold in Radiology education

    OpenAIRE

    Talanow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on Radiology Olympics (www.RadiologyOlympics.com) - a collaboration with the international Radiology community for Radiology education, Radiolopolis (www.Radiolopolis.com). The Radiology Olympics honour the movers and shakers in Radiology education and offer an easy to use platform for educating medical professionals based on Radiology cases.

  10. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, J.M.; Moreau, J.F.; Nahum, H.; Bellet, M.

    1990-01-01

    The 17th International Congress of Radiology was conducted in two separate scientific sessions, one for radiodiagnosis and one for radiation oncology. Topics covered are: Radiobiology -radioprotection; imaging and data processing; contrast media; MRI; nuclear medicine; radiology and disasters; radiology of tropical diseases; cardiovascular radiology; interventional radiology; imaging of trauma; imaging of chest, gastro-intestinal tract, breast and genito-urinary tract; imaging in gynecology;imaging in oncology; bone and joint radiology; head and neck-radiology; neuro-radiology. (H.W.). refs.; fig.; tabs

  11. Occipito-atlanto-axial osteoarthritis: a cross sectional clinico-radiological prevalence study in high risk and general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badve, Siddharth A; Bhojraj, Shekhar; Nene, Abhay; Raut, Abhijit; Ramakanthan, Ravi

    2010-02-15

    A cross-sectional clinico-radiologic evaluation of occipito-atlantoaxial (OC1C2) region of 2 population groups. Determine the prevalence of OC1C2 osteoarthritis in porters involved in carrying loads on the head and general male population. Describe its clinico-radiologic manifestations. In addition to age, head loading is a known cause of degeneration affecting the occipito-cervical region. The impact of head loading in the population aged between third and sixth decade is unknown. Head loading is a common custom in the developing countries. Study group (n = 107) included randomly selected male porters from railway stations who underwent computed tomography (CT) study of the OC1C2 region, plain radiographs of the cervical spine and detailed clinical examination. Control group (n = 107) included randomly selected male patients undergoing CT scan study for diseases of paranasal sinuses with coincidental screening of OC1C2 region along with clinical assessment. The data were analyzed using SPSS 15 software. Mean age for study group was 32.6 years and controls was 34.6 years (P = 0.156). In the study group, duration of occupational exposure was 10.9 (+/-8.7) years; 81.3% porters being symptomatic with an age of 33.4 (+/-9.6) years. Radiologic prevalence of OC1C2 osteoarthritis in study group was 91.6% and in control group was 6.8%; age of affected individuals was 33.4 (+/-9.3) and 47.9 (+/-8.0) years, respectively. Most common complaint was suboccipital neck pain (69.7%); while the CT finding was decreased joint space with sclerosis and irregularity of the margins (81.3%). No statistically significant association was found between presence of radiologic changes and symptoms. Age, duration of occupational exposure and its relationship with various clinico-radiologic manifestations was studied. This condition has significant prevalence in porters, beginning at an early age. Diagnosis is based on the clinico-radiologic presentation. CT is the investigation of choice

  12. Routine use of radiologic investigations WHO recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racoveanu, N.T.

    1987-01-01

    The concern for unjustified radiological investigations started in the early fifties when medical irradiation was recognized to be the major source of population exposure to man-made ionizing radiations. This continues to be of major concern to many national and international bodies when analyzing the data on x-ray investigations and attempting to develop measures to limit their use. The Commission of European Communities (CEC) has also been motivated by the same approach - the decrease of the population dose commitment - in the studies made on radiological mass screening within the Member States of the European Community presented at a Technical Workshop held on 4-5 December 1985 in Luxembourg. Although such an approach seems to be appealing to a very large number of people sensitive to the potential hazards represented by ionizing radiations for exposed individuals and their offspring, a number of other factors, with more direct implications for the health authorities, have been recognized in the last 10-15 years as major reasons for limiting the use of radiologic procedures. As such factors are fully recognized and endorsed by WHO policy, and expressed in WHO Technical Reports Nos 689 and 723, this presentation will take into consideration these factors and not the problem of patient and population protection, which is directly implied when the radiologic investigations are limited only to those clinically justified

  13. Radiological evaluation of the cervical spinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, W. K.; Koh, B. H.; Hahm, C. K.; Kim, J. J. [School of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-03-15

    Acute injuries of the cervical spine are the most common causes of severe disability following trauma, yet the diagnosis of these injuries are often delayed and the treatment, inadequate. Traumatic injuries of the cervical spine are diagnosed by radiological examinations. And complete evaluations of bony structures and soft tissue changes on conventional radiograms are very important for determining the therapeutic plans and prognoses of the injuries patients. During the period of 5 years from June 1976 to May 1981, the radiological and clinical evaluation had been made on 38 patients suffered from acute cervical spinal injuries which were confirmed by the radiological examinations. The results were as follows. 1. Age distribution of total 38 patients was broad ranging from 19 years to 72 years. 2. The most common cause of injury was traffic accident, next fall down, other accident respectively. 3. Levels of the cervical spinal injuries were as follows: Upper cervical spine in 15.8%, lower cervical spine in 84.2%, and the most common injuries level was C 5. Most of the lower cervical spinal injuries were located in the vertebral body and spinous process. 4. Anatomical sites of the cervical spinal injuries were as follows; vertebral body in 55.5%, spinous process in 23.7%, neural arch in 15.8%, and locked facet in 18.4%, etc. 5. Most of the patients with severe mental changes were injuries in upper cervical spine rather than lower. And most of the patients with quadriplegia or paraplegia were shown marked disruption of spinal canal.

  14. Radiological evaluation of the cervical spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, W. K.; Koh, B. H.; Hahm, C. K.; Kim, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Acute injuries of the cervical spine are the most common causes of severe disability following trauma, yet the diagnosis of these injuries are often delayed and the treatment, inadequate. Traumatic injuries of the cervical spine are diagnosed by radiological examinations. And complete evaluations of bony structures and soft tissue changes on conventional radiograms are very important for determining the therapeutic plans and prognoses of the injuries patients. During the period of 5 years from June 1976 to May 1981, the radiological and clinical evaluation had been made on 38 patients suffered from acute cervical spinal injuries which were confirmed by the radiological examinations. The results were as follows. 1. Age distribution of total 38 patients was broad ranging from 19 years to 72 years. 2. The most common cause of injury was traffic accident, next fall down, other accident respectively. 3. Levels of the cervical spinal injuries were as follows: Upper cervical spine in 15.8%, lower cervical spine in 84.2%, and the most common injuries level was C 5. Most of the lower cervical spinal injuries were located in the vertebral body and spinous process. 4. Anatomical sites of the cervical spinal injuries were as follows; vertebral body in 55.5%, spinous process in 23.7%, neural arch in 15.8%, and locked facet in 18.4%, etc. 5. Most of the patients with severe mental changes were injuries in upper cervical spine rather than lower. And most of the patients with quadriplegia or paraplegia were shown marked disruption of spinal canal

  15. Clinical chemistry reference values for 75-year-old apparently healthy persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Klaus Roland; Mostafaie, Nazanin; Stangl, Gerhard; Worofka, Brigitte; Kittl, Eva; Hofmann, Jörg; Hejtman, Milos; Michael, Rainer; Weissgram, Silvia; Leitha, Thomas; Jungwirth, Susanne; Fischer, Peter; Tragl, Karl-Heinz; Bauer, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    Clinical chemistry reference values for elderly persons are sparse and mostly intermixed with those for younger subjects. To understand the links between metabolism and aging, it is paramount to differentiate between "normal" physiological processes in apparently healthy elderly subjects and metabolic changes due to long-lasting diseases. The Vienna Transdanube Aging (VITA) study, which began in 2000 and is continuing, will allow us to do just that, because more than 600 male and female volunteers aged exactly 75 years (to exclude any influence of the "aging" factor in this cohort) are participating in this study. Extensive clinical, neurological, biochemical, psychological, genetic, and radiological analyses, with a special emphasis on consumption of medication and abuse of drugs, were performed on each of the probands. The multitude of data and questionnaires obtained made possible an a posteriori approach to select individuals fulfilling criteria for a reference sample group of apparently healthy 75-year-old subjects for our study. Specific analytes were quantified on automated clinical analyzers, while manual methods were used for hormonal analytes. All clinical chemistry analytes were evaluated using in-depth statistical analyses with SPSS for Windows. In all, reference intervals for 45 analytes could be established. These include routine parameters for the assessment of organ functions, as well as hormone concentrations and hematological appraisals. Because all patients were reevaluated after exactly 30 months in the course of this study, we had the opportunity to reassess their health status at the age of 77.5 years. This was very useful for validation of the first round data set. Data of the second round evaluation corroborate the reference limits of the baseline analysis and further confirm our inclusion and exclusion criteria. In summary, we have established a reliable set of reference data for hormonal, hematological, and clinical chemistry analytes for

  16. Radiological versus clinical evidence of malrotation, a tortuous tale--10-year review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stephens, Linda Ruth

    2012-06-01

    Malrotation is a common abnormality, often diagnosed in the neonatal period. Symptoms may be nonspecific and clinical signs of volvulus are often only seen in the late stages when there has been significant ischemic insult to the bowel. The gold standard diagnostic investigation is the upper gastrointestinal (UGI) contrast study. This study was designed to assess the incidence of negative laparotomy in patients with malrotation diagnosed on UGI contrast study and to identify the clinical signs and symptoms at presentation.

  17. A Comprehensive Analysis of Authorship in Radiology Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Wilfred; McInnes, Matthew D F; Kielar, Ania Z; Hong, Jiho

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate authorship trends in radiology journals, and whether International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) recommendations have had an impact on these trends. A secondary objective was to explore other variables associated with authorship trends. A retrospective, bibliometric analysis of 49 clinical radiology journals published from 1946-2013 was conducted. The following data was exported from MEDLINE (1946 to May 2014) for each article: authors' full name, year of publication, primary author institution information, language of publication and publication type. Microsoft Excel Visual Basics for Applications scripts were programmed to categorize extracted data. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the overall mean number of authors per article over time, impact of ICMJE guidelines, authorship frequency per journal, country of origin, article type and language of publication. 216,271 articles from 1946-2013 were included. A univariate analysis of the mean authorship frequency per year of all articles yielded a linear relationship between time and authorship frequency. The mean number of authors per article in 1946 (1.42) was found to have increased consistently by 0.07 authors/ article per year (R² = 0.9728, Pjournals, country of origin, language of publication and article type. Overall authorship for 49 radiology journals across 68 years has increased markedly with no demonstrated impact from ICMJE guidelines. A higher number of authors per article was seen in articles from: higher impact journals, European and Asian countries, original research type, and those journals who explicitly endorse the ICMJE guidelines.

  18. Technical aspects and complications of laparoscopic banding for morbid obesity--a radiological perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy-Choudhury, S.H.; Nelson, W.M.; EI Cast, J.; Zacharoulis, D.; Kirkwood, B.; Sedman, P.C.; Royston, C.M.S.; Breen, D.J. E-mail: david.breen@suht.swest.nhs.uk

    2004-03-01

    Morbid obesity is a significant clinical problem in the western world. Various surgical restrictive procedures have been described as an aid to weight reduction when conservative treatments fail. Adjustable laparoscopic gastric banding (LAPBAND) has been popularized as an effective, safe, minimally invasive, yet reversible technique for the treatment of morbid obesity. Radiological input is necessary in the follow-up of these patients and the diagnosis of complications peculiar to this type of surgery. In this review we will highlight the technical aspects of radiological follow-up and the lessons learnt over the last 5 years.

  19. Radiological Diagnosis of a Rare Premature Aging Genetic Disorder: Progeria (Hutchinson-Gilford Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haji Mohammed Nazir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is a rare disease with a combination of short stature, bone abnormalities, premature ageing, and skin changes. Though the physical appearance of these patients is characteristic, there is little emphasis on the characteristic radiological features. In this paper, we report a 16-year-old boy with clinical and radiological features of this rare genetic disorder. He had a characteristic facial appearance with a large head, large eyes, thin nose with beaked tip, small chin, protruding ears, prominent scalp veins, and absence of hair.

  20. Diagnostic Efficacy of Radiology in the Diagnosis of Giant Cell Tumour of Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afia Akhter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Giant cell tumour (GCT is an aggressive and potentially malignant lesion. Microscopic feature reveals osteoclast like giant cells in a mononuclear stromal cells background. The mononuclear stromal cell is interpreted as neoplastic. Objective: As radiological diagnosis is non invasive and cost effective in comparison to histopathological diagnosis, considering the patients’ compliance, the aim of the study was to observe the diagnostic efficacy of radiology in diagnosis of GCT. Materials and method: This cross sectional study was carried out in the department of Pathology, Delta Hopital Ltd., Dhaka, Bangladesh from July 2011 to December 2012. A total of 30 study subjects were enrolled in the study irrespective of age and sex. Biopsy material and relevant data of clinically suspected cases of GCT along with radiology report were sent from National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation (NITOR, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Histopathological diagnosis was made by expert pathologists. Results: Mean (±SD age of the study subjects was 29.20 (±7.34 years with highest number of patients were observed in 3rd decade and female was predominant (60% with a male female ratio of 1:1.5. Common site of GCT was around knee (50%. Among 30 clinically diagnosed GCT, 25 (83.3% cases were radiologically diagnosed as GCT, 2 (6.7% diagnosed as fibrous dysplasia, 1 (3.3% as chondroblastoma, 1 (3.3% as simple bone cyst and 1 (3.3% as aneurysmal bone cyst. However among 30 clinically diagnosed GCT, 28 (93.3% patients were histopathologically diagnosed as Giant cell lesion and rest 2 (6.7% patients diagnosed as fibrous dysplasia. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of radiological diagnosis of GCT were found to be 92.6%, 100.0%, 100.0%, 40.0% and 90.0%, respectively. Conclusion: Radiology can be effectively used as a screening tool in diagnosing GCT.

  1. Radiology in Medical Education: A Pediatric Radiology Elective as a Template for Other Radiology Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmes, Melissa A; Hyatt, Eddie; Penrod, Cody H; Fleming, Amy E; Singh, Sudha P

    2016-03-01

    Traditionally, the pediatric radiology elective for medical students and pediatric residents constituted a morning teaching session focused mainly on radiography and fluoroscopy. A more structured elective was desired to broaden the exposure to more imaging modalities, create a more uniform educational experience, and include assessment tools. In 2012, an introductory e-mail and formal syllabus, including required reading assignments, were sent to participants before the start date. A rotating weekly schedule was expanded to include cross-sectional imaging (ultrasound, CT, MR) and nuclear medicine. The schedule could accommodate specific goals of the pediatric resident or medical student, as requested. Starting in 2013, an online pre-test and post-test were developed, as well as an online end-of-rotation survey specific to the pediatric radiology elective. Taking the Image Gently pledge was required. A scavenger hunt tool, cue cards, and electronic modules were added. Pre-test and post-test scores, averaged over 2 years, showed improvement in radiology knowledge, with scores increasing by 27% for medical students and 21% for pediatric residents. Surveys at the end of the elective were overwhelmingly positive, with constructive criticism and complimentary comments. We have successfully created an elective experience in radiology that dedicates time to education while preserving the workflow of radiologists. We have developed tools to provide a customized experience with many self-directed learning opportunities. Our tools and techniques are easily translatable to a general or adult radiology elective. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A project: 'Radiological protection in radiology', IAEA - Universidad Central de Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, A.R.; Salazar, G.; Fermin, R.; Gonzalez, M.

    2001-01-01

    For several years a reference center of the UCV has been working on the project VEN/9/007 on dose reduction in diagnostic radiology sponsored by the IAEA. The dose and quality image was evaluated for different types of radiological study (conventional radiology, CT, mammography, interventional radiology) in different facilities at Caracas and others regions of the Venezuela. TL dosimeters were used to assess dose and reduction in dose. Based on the recommendations given by CEC documents on diagnostic quality criteria, a quality control program in radiological protection of patients and staff has been developed, for example: Pilot study by using TLD in personnel radiation monitoring. Comparative study between high and low kVp in chest. Evaluation and dose reduction in chest pediatric. Reduction of radiation dose in studies of billiards via Quality Image and reduction of the dose in studies of colon by enema. Radiation dose of staff in fluoroscopy procedures. Evaluation and dose reduction in dental radiography in public Institutions. A mammography accreditation program for Venezuela, applied to public hospitals. (author)

  3. Clinical audit as a tool of continuous improvement of quality in radiology