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Sample records for yac contigs covering

  1. Development of a YAC contig covering the minimal region of a CSNB1 locus in Xp11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boycott, K.M.; Gratton, K.J.; Moore, B.J. [Univ. of Calgary (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    X-linked congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB1) is an eye disorder that includes impairment of night vision, reduced visual acuity and, in some cases, myopia and congenital nystagmus. Electroretinography reveals a marked reduction of the b-wave in affected individuals suggesting that X-linked CSNB is due to a molecular defect in the bipolar layer of the retina. Based on our studies of a large four generation family with X-linked CSNB, a CSNB1 locus was mapped to a 4-5 cM region at Xp11.23-Xp11.22 bounded telomerically by DXS426 and centromerically by DXS988. Using a panel of radiation and conventional somatic cell hybrids, a detailed map of new and published STSs has been generated for the minimal region of CSNB1. PCR primer pairs for STSs has been generated for the minimal region of CSNB1. PCR primer pairs for twenty-five STSs, including eleven end-clones, were used to isolate YAC clones from CEPH, mega-CEPH, and X chromosome-specific YAC libraries. In total, fifty-two YACs were characterized for STS overlaps and assembled to provide a minimum of 3 Mb of physical coverage in the region between DXS426 and DXS988. Five gaps proximal to SYP are still to be closed. Our physical map suggests the following gene order: Xpter-OTAL1-GF1-DXS1011E-MG81-HUMCRAS2P-SYP-Xcen. STS analysis of the YACs revealed three subregions of the physical map which appear to be particularly susceptible to internal deletions and end-clone analysis demonstrated chimerism in six of seventeen YACs. A physical map of Xp11.23-Xp11.22 will provide a resource for the isolation of candidate genes for the X-linked CSNB gene which maps to this region.

  2. YAC contig information - RGP physicalmap | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8908/lsdba.nbdc00318-06-001 Description of data contents YAC contigs on the rice chromosomes Data file File name: rgp_physical...map_yac_contigs.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/rgp-physicalmap/LATEST/rgp_physical...sciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/rgp_physicalmap_yac_contigs#en Data acquisition method The range including YAC con...m Description Chrom. No. Chromosome number Region Region number Physical map image The file name of rice physical...n Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us YAC contig information - RGP physicalmap | LSDB Archive ...

  3. Construction of a YAC contig and STS map spanning 2.5 Mbp in Xq25, the critical region for the X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanyi, A.; Li, B.F.; Li, S. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is characterized by a marked vulnerability in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Infection of XLP patients with EBV invariably results in fatal mononucleosis, agammaglobulinemia or B-cell lymphoma. The XLP gene lies within a 10 cM region in Xq25 between DXS42 and DXS10. Initial chromosome studies revealed an interstitial, cytogenetically visible deletion in Xq25 in one XLP family (43-004). We estimated the size of the Xq25 deletion by dual laser flow karyotyping to involve 2% of the X chromosome, or approximately 3 Mbp of DNA sequences. To further delineate the deletion we performed a series of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analyses which showed that DXS6 and DXS100, two Xq25-specific markers, are missing from 45-004 DNA. Five yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) from a chromosome X specific YAC library containing sequences deleted in patient`s 43-004 DNA were isolated. These five YACs did not overlap, and their end fragments were used to screen the CEPH MegaYAC library. Seven YACs were isolated from the CEPH MegaYAC library. They could be arranged into a contig which spans between DXS6 and DXS100. The contig contains a minimum of 2.5 Mbp of human DNA. A total of 12 YAC end clone, lambda subclones and STS probes have been used to order clones within the contig. These reagents were also used in Southern blot and patients showed interstitial deletions in Xq25. The size of these deletions range between 0.5 and 2.5 Mbp. The shortest deletion probably represents the critical region for the XLP gene.

  4. A 1.7-Mb YAC contig around the human BDNF gene (11p13): integration of the physical, genetic, and cytogenetic maps in relation to WAGR syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosier, M.F.; Martin, A.; Houlgatte, R. [Genetique Moleculaire et Biologie du Development, Villejuif (France)] [and others

    1994-11-01

    WAGR (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genito-urinary abnormalities, mental retardation) syndrome in humans is associated with deletions of the 11p13 region. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene maps to this region, and its deletion seems to contribute to the severity of the patient`s mental retardation. Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) carrying the BDNF gene have been isolated and characterized. Localization of two known exons of this gene leads to a minimal estimation of its size of about 40 kb. Chimerism of the BDNF YACs has been investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization and chromosome assignment on somatic cell hybrids. Using the BDNF gene, YAC end sequence tagged sites (STS), and Genethon microsatellite markers, the authors constructed a 1.7-Mb contig and refined the cytogenetic map at 11p13. The resulting integrated physical, genetic, and cytogenetic map constitutes a resource for the characterization of genes that may be involved in the WAGR syndrome. 42 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Mapping of the locus for autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (AIH2) to a 4-Mb YAC contig on chromosome 4q11-q21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerrman, C.; Holmgren, G.; Forsman, K. [Univ. Hospital, Umea (Sweden)]|[Univ. of Umea (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-01-15

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (Al) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited enamel defects. We recently mapped a locus for autosomal dominant local hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AIH2) to the long arm of chromosome 4. The disease gene was localized to a 17.6-cM region between the markers D4S392 and D4S395. The albumin gene (ALB), located in the same interval, was a candidate gene for autosomal dominant AI (ADAI) since albumin has a potential role in enamel maturation. Here we describe refined mapping of the AIH2 locus and the construction of marker maps by radiation hybrid mapping and yeast artificial chromosome (YAC)-based sequence tagged site-content mapping. A radiation hybrid map consisting of 11 microsatellite markers in the 5-cM interval between D4S409 and D4S1558 was constructed. Recombinant haplotypes in six Swedish ADAI families suggest that the disease gene is located in the interval between D4S2421 and ALB. ALB is therefore not likely to be the disease-causing gene. Affected members in all six families share the same allele haplotypes, indicating a common ancestral mutation in all families. The AIH2 critical region is less than 4 cM and spans a physical distance of approximately 4 Mb as judged from radiation hybrid maps. A YAC contig over the AIH2 critical region including several potential candidate genes was constructed. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. A YAC contig and an EST map in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 13 surrounding the loci for neurosensory nonsyndromic deafness (DFNB1 and DFNA3) and Limb-Girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C (LGMD2C)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilford, P.; Crozet, F.; Blanchard, S. [Institut Pasteur, Paris (France)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Two forms of inherited childhood nonsyndromic deafness (DFNB1 and DFNA3) and a Duchenne-like form of progressive muscular dystrophy (LGMD2C) have been mapped to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 13. To clone the genes responsible for these diseases we constructed a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig spanning an 8-cM region between the polymorphic markers D13S221. The contig comprises 24 sequence-tagged sites, among which 15 were newly obtained. This contig allowed us to order the polymorphic markers centromere- D13S175-D13S141-D13S143-D13S115-AFM128yc1-D13S292-D13S283-AFM323vh5-D13S221-telomere. Eight expressed sequence tags, previously assigned to 13q11-q12 (D13S182E, D13S183E, D13S502E, D13S504E, D13S505E, D13S837E, TUBA2, ATP1AL1), were localized on the YAC contig. YAC screening of a cDNA library derived from mouse cochlea allowed us to identify an {alpha}-tubulin gene (TUBA2) that was subsequently precisely mapped within the candidate region. 36 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Refined mapping and YAC contig construction of the X-linked cleft palate and ankyloglossia locus (CPX) including the proximal X-Y homology breakpoint within Xq21.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, S.A.; Brennan, L.; Richardson, M. [Queen Charlotte`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    The gene for X-linked cleft palate (CPX) has previously been mapped in an Icelandic kindred between the unordered proximal markers DXS1002/DXS349/DXS95 and the distal marker DXYS1X, which maps to the proximal end of the X-Y homology region in Xq21.3. Using six sequence-tagged sites (STSs) within the region, a total of 91 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones were isolated and overlapped in a single contig that spans approximately 3.1 Mb between DXS1002 and DXYS1X. The order of microsatellite and STS markers in this was established as DXS1002-DXS1168-DXS349-DXS95-DXS364-DXS1196-DXS472-DXS1217-DXYS1X. A long-range restriction map of this region was created using eight nonchimeric, overlapping YAC clones. Analysis of newly positioned polymorphic markers in recombinant individuals from the Icelandic family has enabled us to identify DXS1196 and DXS1217 as the flanking markers for CPX. The maximum physical distance containing the CPX gene has been estimated to be 2.0 Mb, which is spanned by a minimum set of five nonchimeric YAC clones. In addition, YAC end clone and STS analyses have pinpointed the location of the proximal boundary of the X-Y homology region within the map. 40 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. High-resolution YAC-cosmid-STS map of human chromosome 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayanis, E; Russo, J J; Kalachikov, S; Ye, X; Park, S H; Sunjevaric, I; Bonaldo, M F; Lawton, L; Venkatraj, V S; Schon, E; Soares, M B; Rothstein, R; Warburton, D; Edelman, I S; Zhang, P; Efstratiadis, A; Fischer, S G

    1998-01-01

    We have assembled a high-resolution physical map of human chromosome 13 DNA (approximately 114 Mb) from hybridization, PCR, and FISH mapping data using a specifically designed set of computer programs. Although the mapping of 13p is limited, 13q (approximately 98 Mb) is covered by an almost continuous contig of 736 YACs aligned to 597 contigs of cosmids. Of a total of 10,789 cosmids initially selected from a chromosome 13-specific cosmid library (16,896 colonies) using inter-Alu PCR probes from the YACs and probes for markers mapped to chromosome 13, 511 were assembled in contigs that were established from cross-hybridization relationships between the cosmids. The 13q YAC-cosmid map was annotated with 655 sequence tagged sites (STSs) with an average spacing of 1 STS per 150 kb. This set of STSs, each identified by a D number and cytogenetic location, includes database markers (198), expressed sequence tags (93), and STSs generated by sequencing of the ends of cosmid inserts (364). Additional annotation has been provided by positioning 197 cosmids mapped by FISH on 13q. The final (comprehensive) map, a list of STS primers, and raw data used in map assembly are available at our Web site (genome1.ccc.columbia.edu/ approximately genome/) and can serve as a resource to facilitate accurate localization of additional markers, provide substrates for sequencing, and assist in the discovery of chromosome 13 genes associated with hereditary diseases.

  9. Construction of a yeast artifical chromosome contig spanning the spinal muscular atrophy disease gene region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleyn, P.W.; Wang, C.H.; Vitale, E.; Pan, J.; Ross, B.M.; Grunn, A.; Palmer, D.A.; Warburton, D.; Brzustowicz, L.M.; Gilliam, T.G. (New York State Psychiatric Institute, NY (United States)); Lien, L.L.; Kunkel, L.M. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-07-15

    The childhood spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are the most common, serious neuromuscular disorders of childhood second to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A single locus for these disorders has been mapped by recombination events to a region of 0.7 centimorgan (range, 0.1-2.1 centimorgans) between loci D5S435 and MAP1B on chromosome 5q11.2-13.3. By using PCR amplification to screen yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) DNA pools and the PCR-vectorette method to amplify YAC ends, a YAC contig was constructed across the disease gene region. Nine walk steps identified 32 YACs, including a minimum of seven overlapping YAC clones (average size, 460 kb) that span the SMA region. The contig is characterized by a collection of 30 YAC-end sequence tag sites together with seven genetic markers. The entire YAC contig spans a minimum of 3.2 Mb; the SMA locus is confined to roughly half of this region. Microsatellite markers generated along the YAC contig segregate with the SMA locus in all families where the flanking markers (D5S435 and MAP1B) recombine. Construction of a YAC contig across the disease gene region is an essential step in isolation of the SMA-encoding gene. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. COCACOLA: binning metagenomic contigs using sequence COmposition, read CoverAge, CO-alignment and paired-end read LinkAge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang Young; Chen, Ting; Fuhrman, Jed A; Sun, Fengzhu

    2017-03-15

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies enables researchers to sequence complex microbial communities directly from the environment. Because assembly typically produces only genome fragments, also known as contigs, instead of an entire genome, it is crucial to group them into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) for further taxonomic profiling and down-streaming functional analysis. OTU clustering is also referred to as binning. We present COCACOLA, a general framework automatically bin contigs into OTUs based on sequence composition and coverage across multiple samples. The effectiveness of COCACOLA is demonstrated in both simulated and real datasets in comparison with state-of-art binning approaches such as CONCOCT, GroopM, MaxBin and MetaBAT. The superior performance of COCACOLA relies on two aspects. One is using L 1 distance instead of Euclidean distance for better taxonomic identification during initialization. More importantly, COCACOLA takes advantage of both hard clustering and soft clustering by sparsity regularization. In addition, the COCACOLA framework seamlessly embraces customized knowledge to facilitate binning accuracy. In our study, we have investigated two types of additional knowledge, the co-alignment to reference genomes and linkage of contigs provided by paired-end reads, as well as the ensemble of both. We find that both co-alignment and linkage information further improve binning in the majority of cases. COCACOLA is scalable and faster than CONCOCT, GroopM, MaxBin and MetaBAT. The software is available at https://github.com/younglululu/COCACOLA . fsun@usc.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. Transfer of an expression YAC into goat fetal fibroblasts by cell fusion for mammary gland bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xufeng; Wu Guoxiang; Chen, Jian-Quan; Zhang Aimin; Liu Siguo; Jiao Binghua; Cheng Guoxiang

    2005-01-01

    Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) as transgenes in transgenic animals are likely to ensure optimal expression levels. Microinjection of YACs is the exclusive technique used to produce YACs transgenic livestock so far. However, low efficiency and high cost are its critical restrictive factors. In this study, we presented a novel procedure to produce YACs transgenic livestock as mammary gland bioreactor. A targeting vector, containing the gene of interest-a human serum albumin minigene (intron 1, 2), yeast selectable marker (G418R), and mammalian cell resistance marker (neo r ), replaced the α-lactalbumin gene in a 210 kb human α-lactalbumin YAC by homogeneous recombination in yeasts. The chimeric YAC was introduced into goat fetal fibroblasts using polyethylene glycol-mediated spheroplast fusion. PCR and Southern analysis showed that intact YAC was integrated in the genome of resistant cells. Perhaps, it may offer a cell-based route by nuclear transfer to produce YACs transgenic livestock

  12. YAC clone information - RGP physicalmap | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 08/lsdba.nbdc00318-06-002 Description of data contents YAC clones selected with DNA markers Data file File name: rgp_physical...map_yac_clones.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/rgp-physicalmap/LATEST/rgp_physical...sciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/rgp_physicalmap_yac_clones#en Data acquisition method YAC clones selected with RGP...rom. No. Chromosome number Region Region number Physical map image The file name of rice physical map Order ...bout This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us YAC clone information - RGP physicalmap | LSDB Archive ...

  13. Comparative genomic mapping of the bovine Fragile Histidine Triad (FHIT tumour suppressor gene: characterization of a 2 Mb BAC contig covering the locus, complete annotation of the gene, analysis of cDNA and of physiological expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boussaha Mekki

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Fragile Histidine Triad gene (FHIT is an oncosuppressor implicated in many human cancers, including vesical tumors. FHIT is frequently hit by deletions caused by fragility at FRA3B, the most active of human common fragile sites, where FHIT lays. Vesical tumors affect also cattle, including animals grazing in the wild on bracken fern; compounds released by the fern are known to induce chromosome fragility and may trigger cancer with the interplay of latent Papilloma virus. Results The bovine FHIT was characterized by assembling a contig of 78 BACs. Sequence tags were designed on human exons and introns and used directly to select bovine BACs, or compared with sequence data in the bovine genome database or in the trace archive of the bovine genome sequencing project, and adapted before use. FHIT is split in ten exons like in man, with exons 5 to 9 coding for a 149 amino acids protein. VISTA global alignments between bovine genomic contigs retrieved from the bovine genome database and the human FHIT region were performed. Conservation was extremely high over a 2 Mb region spanning the whole FHIT locus, including the size of introns. Thus, the bovine FHIT covers about 1.6 Mb compared to 1.5 Mb in man. Expression was analyzed by RT-PCR and Northern blot, and was found to be ubiquitous. Four cDNA isoforms were isolated and sequenced, that originate from an alternative usage of three variants of exon 4, revealing a size very close to the major human FHIT cDNAs. Conclusion A comparative genomic approach allowed to assemble a contig of 78 BACs and to completely annotate a 1.6 Mb region spanning the bovine FHIT gene. The findings confirmed the very high level of conservation between human and bovine genomes and the importance of comparative mapping to speed the annotation process of the recently sequenced bovine genome. The detailed knowledge of the genomic FHIT region will allow to study the role of FHIT in bovine cancerogenesis

  14. Comparative genomic mapping of the bovine Fragile Histidine Triad (FHIT) tumour suppressor gene: characterization of a 2 Mb BAC contig covering the locus, complete annotation of the gene, analysis of cDNA and of physiological expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uboldi, Cristina; Guidi, Elena; Roperto, Sante; Russo, Valeria; Roperto, Franco; Di Meo, Giulia Pia; Iannuzzi, Leopoldo; Floriot, Sandrine; Boussaha, Mekki; Eggen, André; Ferretti, Luca

    2006-05-23

    The Fragile Histidine Triad gene (FHIT) is an oncosuppressor implicated in many human cancers, including vesical tumors. FHIT is frequently hit by deletions caused by fragility at FRA3B, the most active of human common fragile sites, where FHIT lays. Vesical tumors affect also cattle, including animals grazing in the wild on bracken fern; compounds released by the fern are known to induce chromosome fragility and may trigger cancer with the interplay of latent Papilloma virus. The bovine FHIT was characterized by assembling a contig of 78 BACs. Sequence tags were designed on human exons and introns and used directly to select bovine BACs, or compared with sequence data in the bovine genome database or in the trace archive of the bovine genome sequencing project, and adapted before use. FHIT is split in ten exons like in man, with exons 5 to 9 coding for a 149 amino acids protein. VISTA global alignments between bovine genomic contigs retrieved from the bovine genome database and the human FHIT region were performed. Conservation was extremely high over a 2 Mb region spanning the whole FHIT locus, including the size of introns. Thus, the bovine FHIT covers about 1.6 Mb compared to 1.5 Mb in man. Expression was analyzed by RT-PCR and Northern blot, and was found to be ubiquitous. Four cDNA isoforms were isolated and sequenced, that originate from an alternative usage of three variants of exon 4, revealing a size very close to the major human FHIT cDNAs. A comparative genomic approach allowed to assemble a contig of 78 BACs and to completely annotate a 1.6 Mb region spanning the bovine FHIT gene. The findings confirmed the very high level of conservation between human and bovine genomes and the importance of comparative mapping to speed the annotation process of the recently sequenced bovine genome. The detailed knowledge of the genomic FHIT region will allow to study the role of FHIT in bovine cancerogenesis, especially of vesical papillomavirus-associated cancers of

  15. Contig Maps and Genomic Sequencing Identify Candidate Genes in the Usher 1C Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Michael J.; Day, Colleen D.; Smilinich, Nancy J.; Ni, L.; Cooper, Paul R.; Nowak, Norma J.; Davies, Chris; de Jong, Pieter J.; Hejtmancik, Fielding; Evans, Glen A.; Smith, Richard J.H.; Shows, Thomas B.

    1998-01-01

    Usher syndrome 1C (USH1C) is a congenital condition manifesting profound hearing loss, the absence of vestibular function, and eventual retinal degeneration. The USH1C locus has been mapped genetically to a 2- to 3-cM interval in 11p14–15.1 between D11S899 and D11S861. In an effort to identify the USH1C disease gene we have isolated the region between these markers in yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) using a combination of STS content mapping and Alu–PCR hybridization. The YAC contig is ∼3.5 Mb and has located several other loci within this interval, resulting in the order CEN-LDHA-SAA1-TPH-D11S1310-(D11S1888/KCNC1)-MYOD1-D11S902D11S921-D11S1890-TEL. Subsequent haplotyping and homozygosity analysis refined the location of the disease gene to a 400-kb interval between D11S902 and D11S1890 with all affected individuals being homozygous for the internal marker D11S921. To facilitate gene identification, the critical region has been converted into P1 artificial chromosome (PAC) clones using sequence-tagged sites (STSs) mapped to the YAC contig, Alu–PCR products generated from the YACs, and PAC end probes. A contig of >50 PAC clones has been assembled between D11S1310 and D11S1890, confirming the order of markers used in haplotyping. Three PAC clones representing nearly two-thirds of the USH1C critical region have been sequenced. PowerBLAST analysis identified six clusters of expressed sequence tags (ESTs), two known genes (BIR,SUR1) mapped previously to this region, and a previously characterized but unmapped gene NEFA (DNA binding/EF hand/acidic amino-acid-rich). GRAIL analysis identified 11 CpG islands and 73 exons of excellent quality. These data allowed the construction of a transcription map for the USH1C critical region, consisting of three known genes and six or more novel transcripts. Based on their map location, these loci represent candidate disease loci for USH1C. The NEFA gene was assessed as the USH1C locus by the sequencing of an amplified NEFA

  16. A 2-megabase physical contig incorporating 43 DNA markers on the human X chromosome at p11.23-p11.22 from ZNF21 to DXS255

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boycott, K.M.; Bech-Hansen, N.T. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Halley, G.R.; Schlessinger, D. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    A comprehensive physical contig of yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) and cosmid clones between ZNF21 and DXS255 has been constructed, spanning 2 Mb within the region Xp11.23-p11.22. As a portion of the region was found to be particularly unstable in yeast, the integrity of the contig is dependent on additional information provided by the sequence-tagged site (STS) content of cosmid clones and DNA marker retention in conventional and radiation hybrids. The contig was formatted with 43 DNA markers, including 19 new STSs from YAC insert ends and an internal Alu-PCR product. The density of STSs across the contig ranges from one marker every 20 kb to one every 60 kb, with an average density of one marker every 50 kb. The relative order of previously known gene and expressed sequence tags in this region is predicted to be Xpter-ZNF21-DXS7465E (MG66)-DXS7927E (MG81)-WASP, DXS1011E, DXS7467E (MG21)-DXS-7466E (MG44)-GATA1-DXS7469E (Xp664)-TFE3-SYP (DXS1007E)-Xcen. This contig extends the coverage in Xp11 and provides a framework for the future identification and mapping of new genes, as well as the resources for developing DNA sequencing templates. 47 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  17. Genetic and physical analysis of a YAC contig spanning the fungal disease resistance locus Asc of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesbah, L.A.; Kneppers, T.J.A.; Takken, F.L.W.; Laurent, P.; Hille, J.; Nijkamp, H.J.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Alternaria stem canker disease of tomato is caused by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici (AAL). The fungus produces AAL toxins that kill the plant tissue. Resistance to the fungus segregates as a single locus, called Asc, and has been genetically mapped on

  18. Genetic and physical analysis of a YAC contig spannig the fungal disease resistance locus Asc of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesbah, L.A.; Kneppers, T.J.A.; Takken, F.L.W.; Laurent, P.J.F.; Hille, J.; Nijkamp, H.J.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Alternaria in stem canker disease of tomato is caused by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici (AAL). The fungus produces AAL toxins that kill the plant tissue. Resistance to the fungus segregates as a single locus, called Asc, and has been genetically mapped

  19. The human MCP-2 gene (SCYA8): Cloning, sequence analysis, tissue expression, and assignment to the CC chemokine gene contig on chromosome 17q11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Coillie, E.; Fiten, P.; Van Damme, J.; Opdenakker, G. [Univ. of Leuven (Belgium)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCPs) form a subfamily of chemokines that recruit leukocytes to sites of inflammation and that may contribute to tumor-associated leukocyte infiltration and to the antiviral state against HIV infection. With the use of degenerate primers that were based on CC chemokine consensus sequences, the known MIP-1{alpha}/LD78{alpha}, MCP-1, and MCP-3 genes and the previously unidentified eotaxin and MCP-2 genes were isolated from a YAC contig from human chromosome 17q11.2. The amplified genomic MCP-2 fragment was used to isolate an MCP-2 cosmid from which the gene sequence was determined. The MCP-2 gene shares with the MCP-1 and MCP-3 genes a conserved intron-exon structure and a coding nucleotide sequence homology of 77%. By Northern blot analysis the 1.0-kb MCP-2 mRNA was predominantly detectable in the small intestine, peripheral blood, heart, placenta, lung, skeletal muscle, ovary, colon, spinal cord, pancreas, and thymus. Transcripts of 1.5 and 2.4 kb were found in the testis, the small intestine, and the colon. The isolation of the MCP-2 gene from the chemokine contig localized it on YAC clones of chromosome 17q11.2, which also contain the eotaxin, MCP-1, MCP-3, and NCC-1/MCP-4 genes. The combination of using degenerate primer PCR and YACs illustrates that novel genes can efficiently be isolated from gene cluster contigs with less redundancy and effort than the isolation of novel ESTs. 42 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. A method for high efficiency YAC lipofection into murine embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J T; Jaenisch, R

    1996-01-01

    We describe a modified protocol for introducing yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) into murine embryonic stem (ES) cells by lipofection. With a decreased DNA:cell ratio, increased concentration of condensing agents and altered culture conditions, this protocol reduces the requirement for YAC DNA to a few micrograms, improves the recovery of neomycin-resistant ES colonies and increases the yield of clones containing both flanking vector markers and insert. These modifications enable generation of sufficient 'intact' transgenic clones for biological analysis with a single experiment. PMID:9016681

  1. AcEST: CL1889Contig1 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CL1889Contig1 491 2 Adiantum capillus-veneris contig: CL1889contig1 sequence. Link ...apillus-veneris contig: CL1889contig1 sequence. Link to clone list Link to clone list Clone ID BP919609 BP91

  2. Efecto de gelificantes en la formulación de dulce de yacón

    OpenAIRE

    Maldonado,Silvina; Singh,Judith del Carmen

    2008-01-01

    El yacón (Smallanthus sonchifolius) es un tubérculo andino cultivado en las laderas de los Andes. Es una planta perenne que llega a su madurez entre 6-7 meses hasta 1 año, según la altura sobre el nivel del mar. Este trabajo propone la formulación de un producto alimenticio a partir de yacón por agregado de solutos: glucosa y sacarosa y combinación de barreras de estrés. Se estudió el efecto de gelificantes: agar-agar, pectina y goma arábiga, en tres concentraciones: 0,30, 0,41 y 0,48%. Se ag...

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12086-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U12086-1 gap included 1101 3 5710254 5711336 PLUS 1 2 U12086 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U12086-1 Contig ID Contig-U12086-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U12086-1 (Contig-U12086-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U12086...ATCGGATTA Gap gap included Contig length 1101 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 3 Chromosome length 6358359 Start ...te 2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U12086-1 (Contig-U12086-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig...Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value Contig-U12086-1 (Contig-U12086-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Conti... 404 e-113 Contig

  4. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09694-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U09694-1 gap included 1129 1 4027135 4026071 MINUS 3 4 U09694 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U09694-1 Contig ID Contig-U09694-1 Contig update 2002. 9.13 Contig sequence >Contig-U09694-1 (Contig-U09694-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U0969...TTAAATTAAAACAACAACAATTTCATAATATAAATAAT Gap gap included Contig length 1129 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 1 Chr...iklkqqqfklkqqqfhninn own update 2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U09694-1 (Contig-U09694-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig...E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value Contig-U09694-1 (Contig-U09694-1Q) /CSM_Contig

  5. Cellular, molecular and functional characterisation of YAC transgenic mouse models of Friedreich ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Anjomani Virmouni

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia (FRDA is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, caused by a GAA repeat expansion mutation within intron 1 of the FXN gene. We have previously established and performed preliminary characterisation of several human FXN yeast artificial chromosome (YAC transgenic FRDA mouse models containing GAA repeat expansions, Y47R (9 GAA repeats, YG8R (90 and 190 GAA repeats and YG22R (190 GAA repeats.We now report extended cellular, molecular and functional characterisation of these FXN YAC transgenic mouse models. FXN transgene copy number analysis of the FRDA mice demonstrated that the YG22R and Y47R lines each have a single copy of the FXN transgene while the YG8R line has two copies. Single integration sites of all transgenes were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH analysis of metaphase and interphase chromosomes. We identified significant functional deficits, together with a degree of glucose intolerance and insulin hypersensitivity, in YG8R and YG22R FRDA mice compared to Y47R and wild-type control mice. We also confirmed increased somatic GAA repeat instability in the cerebellum and brain of YG22R and YG8R mice, together with significantly reduced levels of FXN mRNA and protein in the brain and liver of YG8R and YG22R compared to Y47R.Together these studies provide a detailed characterisation of our GAA repeat expansion-based YAC transgenic FRDA mouse models that will help investigations of FRDA disease mechanisms and therapy.

  6. Evaluation of Texture Profile, Color and Determination of FOS in Yacón Products (Smallanthus sonchifolius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Cristina Del Castillo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Textural characteristics, color and fructooligosaccharides (FOS content, in yacón root products (syrup and dried snack subjected to different pretreatments with NaCl, blanching and ascorbic acid were evaluated. Yacón from Salta Capital, with 8 months of growth were used. Texture profiles and Color were evaluated instrumentally and FOS content by HPLC. There were significant differences between the samples treated with NaCl and the ones treated by blanching and ascorbic acid for fracture strength, fracture number and hardness according to pretreatment used, and for hardness and tackiness by the drying time. Regarding to color: longer drying time reduces sample brightness. In processed products the FOS content is lower than in fresh yacón, but higher in sucrose, glucose and fructose.

  7. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15828-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U15828-1 gap included 1593 1 4184040 4182448 MINUS 12 19 U15828 0 0 6 0 0 0 ...0 0 2 0 4 0 0 0 Show Contig-U15828-1 Contig ID Contig-U15828-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U15828-1 (Contig...-U15828-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U15828-1Q.Seq.d ATAAAAAAAATTAAAAAATTAAAAAAGTTATCCACCCAAGT...ACA AATATTATAACTGGTACTGCTACTGTTTCAATCCCTCAAAAAAATTTAAT TTATATTTTACCAAATTCAAATACAATTAATCAATCAACAATTACAATTA CAA Gap gap included Contig...SFNPANSDFSFSYNINTTITQPTQIYLNQDIYYPNGFTTNIITGTATVSIPQ KNLIYILPNSNTINQSTITIT own update 2004. 6.23 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig

  8. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U01750-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U01750-1 no gap 811 3 3337090 3336279 MINUS 2 2 U01750 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U01750-1 Contig ID Contig-U01750-1 Contig update 2001. 8.29 Contig sequence >Contig-U01750-1 (Contig...-U01750-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U01750-1Q.Seq.d GGAAGTTGTAATAATAAAAAAATAAAAATAAAAATAAAAAAATAAAAAAA...GAATACCAAGGTGAAAGAATTTTTCAAAAACTTCCTCAA ATCAACACAAATTTCGAAAAATTAACAATTTGGGAAAAGAAAATCGTTTC AAATCTTTATT Gap no gap Contig...crncnciwsktl*tywiyskiinpi**i*ipr *knfsktssnqhkfrkinnlgkenrfksl own update 2004. 6. 7 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U07021-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U07021-1 no gap 601 2 3862699 3862098 MINUS 1 2 U07021 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U07021-1 Contig ID Contig-U07021-1 Contig update 2001. 8.30 Contig sequence >Contig-U07021-1 (Contig...-U07021-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U07021-1Q.Seq.d AAAAAAACAAAATGAATAAATTTAATATTACATCATTATTTATTATTTTA...TTTAATATATTCAGAAGGAAATTC TTATTTACAACAAAATTTCCCATTACTTTCTTANTTAAANTCCGTTAAAA T Gap no gap Contig length 601 C...QACCRTTQLFINYADNSFLDSAGFSPFGKVISGFNNTLNFYGGYGEEPDQSLIYSE GNSYLQQNFPLLSXLXSVK own update 2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09640-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U09640-1 gap included 1368 2 219988 218635 MINUS 4 5 U09640 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Show Contig...-U09640-1 Contig ID Contig-U09640-1 Contig update 2002. 9.13 Contig sequence >Contig-U09640-1 (Contig...-U09640-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U09640-1Q.Seq.d ACTGTTGGCCTACTGGNAAAAAATAGTGTAATAATAACCAACAAT...AACAACAACAACAAAAACAAAAACAAATTTTAATT AAATAAAATAATAATATAAAATATAATA Gap gap included Contig...ate 2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U09640-1 (Contig-U09640-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig

  11. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09720-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U09720-1 gap included 1323 2 5906974 5908260 PLUS 1 2 U09720 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U09720-1 Contig ID Contig-U09720-1 Contig update 2002. 9.13 Contig sequence >Contig-U09720-1 (Contig-U09720-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U09720...ATNATTATTATAAAAATTT Gap gap included Contig length 1323 Chromosome number (1..6, ...QLEAEDIVKQSQLVRNTLLSILNKLFSNY NNSNETTATTTIGQDQEKLSTLKNQREIIAQSLKIXKKL*linqxll*kf ...AEMFDIDSRNNHAIENDGRLDDA LVCSVGIALAPQSIFQSWKSMSEHKREKYFEQLEAEDIVKQSQLVRNTLLSILNKLFSNY NNSNETTATTTIGQDQEKLSTLK

  12. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15005-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U15005-1 no gap 2023 1 1509217 1507616 MINUS 2 4 U15005 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U15005-1 Contig ID Contig-U15005-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U15005-1 (Contig...-U15005-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U15005-1Q.Seq.d AATTTTCTTTTCTTTTTAAAACTTAAGTACCATATGGCAGAATATACAC...ATAATAACGATATTAA Gap no gap Contig length 2023 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 1 Chro...HMAEYTHYFIQYNLTDIFYEDVNIEKYSCSICYESVYKKEIYQCKEIHWF CKTCWAESLFKKKECMICRCIVKSISELSRNRFIEQDFLNIKVNCPNSFKYIDENKNNNN KIKDLENGCKDIITIG

  13. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U07545-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U07545-1 no gap 439 3 4955441 4955098 MINUS 1 1 U07545 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U07545-1 Contig ID Contig-U07545-1 Contig update 2002. 5. 9 Contig sequence >Contig-U07545-1 (Contig...-U07545-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U07545-1Q.Seq.d ATATGAAATACTTAATACTTTTAATTTTCCTTTTAATAAATTCAACTTTT...ATGTTTCAGAGTCTGGTTG Gap no gap Contig length 439 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 3 Chromosome length 6358359 Sta...e MKYLILLIFLLINSTFGNIQFSKYISNSGNDNNSCGSFTSPCKTIGYSIQQIKSYEYNQY SIEILLDSGNYYSQNPINLYGLNISISAQNSNDLVQFLVPNINGT

  14. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15359-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U15359-1 no gap 1420 6 1334613 1333192 MINUS 3 3 U15359 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U15359-1 Contig ID Contig-U15359-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U15359-1 (Contig...-U15359-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U15359-1Q.Seq.d TATAGCATCATTTGCAAAGTTTAGTTTAAAGAAAAAAGAGAAAGCGGAA...A AAAAAAACTGGAAAAATTAA Gap no gap Contig length 1420 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 6 Chromosome length 3595308...SSGF DEPSLAVMYVDRALKGASAVQTIGRLSRVSKGKNACYIVDFVNTRREISDAFGQYWRETC LKGETRKTVLELKLNRVLGKLSAIEPLANGRLEESVEYILRD

  15. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09379-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U09379-1 gap included 899 2 1392012 1392912 PLUS 1 2 U09379 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U09379-1 Contig ID Contig-U09379-1 Contig update 2002. 9.13 Contig sequence >Contig-U09379-1 (Contig...-U09379-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U09379-1Q.Seq.d AAAAATTTTTTAAACTAAAAAATAAAAAAAATAAATAAAAAAAAA...TTTAAAAATAATAATAAAAGTGAATATTATAATATTAT AATCTTTTTGGTATAATTGAAAAAGATCAATAATATATTAAAATTTCCAA AAAAAAAAA Gap gap included Contig...VSVCRAYATETATIENKTQIMGKMSGAQGAGFVLGPGIGFLLNFCNFTIG--- ---INNK******sn*finykl***f*kikqphfknlkiiikvniiil*sfwyn

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09581-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U09581-1 gap included 1235 1 2575525 2576764 PLUS 1 2 U09581 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U09581-1 Contig ID Contig-U09581-1 Contig update 2002. 9.13 Contig sequence >Contig-U09581-1 (Contig-U09581-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U09581...ATCAAAATAAATTTTTGTAACATTAATAATAAATAAN Gap gap included Contig length 1235 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 1 Chro... VFD420Z ,579,1237 Translated Amino Acid sequence KKPGVVTIKGSSFCSQPTITIGDDSCSQPILSVGNDYDSLTCNFQSNAGLSNSTLLVS...ames) Frame A: KKPGVVTIKGSSFCSQPTITIGDDSCSQPILSVGNDYDSLTCNFQSNAGLSNSTLLVSII CDTIQ

  17. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16108-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U16108-1 gap included 1456 4 1889609 1888449 MINUS 4 6 U16108 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U16108-1 Contig ID Contig-U16108-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U16108-1 (Contig-U16108-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U1610...AAAATCA TAAAATCAAAAATTGTATAATTAAAATAAAAATAAAAAAAAAAACAAAAA TAAAAAAAAAAAACAA Gap gap included Contig length 1...DFLSQFYGELN QPSLNNLTENIITIDQSSFIPIGYTTITAGLNNFAYAYIPTSCKNDKSLCSIHVAFHGCL QTVATIGDNFYTKTGYNEIAETNNIIILYPQALET...---NYVNNDNIKTMFDIQSEHAFITNSFGNNCTYLGPDYINNCNFNAPWDFLSQFYGELN QPSLNNLTENIITIDQSSFIPIGYTTITAGLNNFAYAYIPTSCKNDKSLCSIHVAFHGCL QTVATIG

  18. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04729-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U04729-1 no gap 251 5 1037629 1037880 PLUS 1 1 U04729 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U04729-1 Contig ID Contig-U04729-1 Contig update 2001. 8.29 Contig sequence >Contig-U04729-1 (Contig...-U04729-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U04729-1Q.Seq.d TGGATTTATAACAGAGGTTATTGTAGGTGGTAAAACTTTTAGAGGAATCG ...CATTATCTAATGGG T Gap no gap Contig length 251 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 5 Chromosome length 5062330 Start ...ITEVIVGGKTFRGIVFEDLKSSNQTNNHSQNFSPNQSGTNLNNSNSNIPSSKKIKDKN ISPSSFLPTIGSTTSTSNPLSNG Translated Amino Acid seq

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06929-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U06929-1 no gap 726 5 4252576 4251850 MINUS 1 1 U06929 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U06929-1 Contig ID Contig-U06929-1 Contig update 2001. 8.30 Contig sequence >Contig-U06929-1 (Contig...-U06929-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U06929-1Q.Seq.d AGTTCATTCATTTAGTCGTATGATAGTATCACCATTTATAAATCCAAAAT...TAAATTAAATAAATA Gap no gap Contig length 726 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 5 Chromosome length 5062330 Start p...PSAISNNSNNS NNNDDNRPPILGLPFLFDYKNRITRGSRFFETIHYKIVHVTSATEFGIRRISKLYGTKWQ LEIGLKHQITQSGALQCLFTHTIGQTTIFGLSFGF

  20. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15566-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U15566-1 gap included 1830 4 3730704 3729599 MINUS 4 8 U15566 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U15566-1 Contig ID Contig-U15566-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U15566-1 (Contig-U15566-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U1556...CAAGATCCAA TGGAATTTTAATAATAAATAAGAATAATAAAAAAAAAAAA Gap gap included Contig length 1830 Chromosome number (1...ITLTPSEDIEKKLKEI QDENLSNSEIWFAVKSYLEDNNLKEHLYNLVFHYTMPRIDEPVTIGLDHLGNVLVSNR*c tflvvvvvytfgcriephni*qerivlqf*...asilnhirvelsqnqipilkrsfdqillphfekc iieeqqiftnekqrknflsllpisykrqdrkipltpsediekklkeiqdenlsnseiwfa vksylednnlkehlynlvfhytmpridepvtig

  1. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10406-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U10406-1 no gap 661 4 1621526 1620875 MINUS 1 1 U10406 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U10406-1 Contig ID Contig-U10406-1 Contig update 2002. 9.13 Contig sequence >Contig-U10406-1 (Contig...-U10406-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U10406-1Q.Seq.d NNNNNNNNNNATAAGTAAAAGAGTTATTGGTCCAAGATTAGATGATGACA...TACAAATAAGTAAAGTTG ATAAAGAACAT Gap no gap Contig length 661 Chromosome number (1....cid sequence XXXISKRVIGPRLDDDNNNNDNDKFNNNNKKAIGPSRIGPTIGPSIGPSRYNTNNNDSNH NSNNDDDDDSSEEDEEDTKSEWERVRNMIENNKN

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15525-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U15525-1 gap included 3361 6 202399 204109 PLUS 34 57 U15525 0 0 7 0 7 6 0 0 4 3 7 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U15525-1 Contig ID Contig-U15525-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U15525-1 (Contig-U15525-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U15525...ATTTAATTAAATAATAATA Gap gap included Contig length 3361 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 6 Chromosome length 3595...TEATCLILSVD ETVQNNQAEQAQAGPQINNQTRQALSRVEVFKQ--- ---LDTIGIKKESGGGLGDSQFIAGAAFKRTFFYAGFEQQPKHIKNPKVLCLNIELELK...lslnsiqslpqlkqlv*ssll mkpfkiiklnklklvhklitkhvklyhg*rcss--- ---LDTIGIKKESGGGLGDSQFIAGAAFKRTFFYAGFEQQPKHIKNPKV

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04334-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U04334-1 no gap 399 4 3746420 3746021 MINUS 3 3 U04334 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U04334-1 Contig ID Contig-U04334-1 Contig update 2001. 8.29 Contig sequence >Contig-U04334-1 (Contig...-U04334-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U04334-1Q.Seq.d CAAAAAAAAAAAAGTAAAACAATAAATTATATAAAAAAAATAAAAAAAAT...CTAATTTCA AACAATATCAATAAAATGTTATATAATTACTATTAAAATGAAAAAAAAA Gap no gap Contig len...ce QKKKSKTINYIKKIKKMSIINTISKLSLSNSLKSNITIGNLNGTTVNNYTHNETSSKFTE FFYKII*qnkrwf*kvkelnkkkrkkdyiissfcklysiyfvfs

  4. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10335-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U10335-1 no gap 1353 2 2769724 2768368 MINUS 3 6 U10335 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U10335-1 Contig ID Contig-U10335-1 Contig update 2002. 9.13 Contig sequence >Contig-U10335-1 (Contig...-U10335-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U10335-1Q.Seq.d ATTTTTTTTCTAAATATATAAAAAATAATAATAATAATAATAATATAAT...AAACATAATAAAACAAAAGATAAAAATAAAA ACA Gap no gap Contig length 1353 Chromosome numb...SSLATNNNINNNKRITIPDNH SNNPDKLLEIQLINKIFDISKAFDGKSNNLVSSFQNCTNNNNNNNNNTDNNNNNNISNNN NNNNVPTLQPLSFNNRNNLVNGNISSSSSSNSSNNNIGSSNSNNVTIG

  5. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13974-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U13974-1 no gap 1782 1 1265322 1267105 PLUS 29 32 U13974 0 0 0 1 2 0 22 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U13974-1 Contig ID Contig-U13974-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U13974-1 (Contig...-U13974-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U13974-1Q.Seq.d AAGAGTTAAAACAAAAATAAAAAAATAAAATAAAAAAAAAAAATTAA...TAAAACAAATAA ACATTAAAATGATATTTAGGTTTTAAATTTAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA Gap no gap Contig...TTRKIYVYDNQNFFPIDNQGFD VDPAKRIYLNEKKTYHNYHFCMKMNTVFTYKGYEVFNFRGDDDVWVFINNKLVIDLGGLH SPIGTSVDTMTLGLTIG

  6. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09822-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U09822-1 gap included 1255 3 5930658 5929418 MINUS 5 6 U09822 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U09822-1 Contig ID Contig-U09822-1 Contig update 2002. 9.13 Contig sequence >Contig-U09822-1 (Contig-U09822-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U0982...AAAAGAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAGATTTAATTAAATAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAA Gap gap included Contig length 1255 Chromosome n...,975 est6= VSA519Z ,780,1257 Translated Amino Acid sequence QPFYLVQSMFEPIQDSSFTSIGEIISYDTIG...rfn*ikkkkkk k Frame C: QPFYLVQSMFEPIQDSSFTSIGEIISYDTIGFDGKINTAVMSSLSPSTMYFYCVGDKS

  7. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16457-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U16457-1 no gap 1065 3 996438 997502 PLUS 6 5 U16457 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Show Contig...-U16457-1 Contig ID Contig-U16457-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U16457-1 (Contig...-U16457-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U16457-1Q.Seq.d ACAATTGGTGTTGCTGCTCTATTCGGTCTTCCAGCTATGGCACGTTCCGC A...TTTAACAAGATTGGAAGAC CAAAAAGAAAAAAAA Gap no gap Contig length 1065 Chromosome numb... Translated Amino Acid sequence TIGVAALFGLPAMARSAAMSLVFLIPFMWIVFSVHYPINSVVADICMSYNNNTGSIEQQL ANYTNPIVSEIFGTC

  8. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04768-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U04768-1 no gap 762 6 2607190 2606476 MINUS 3 3 U04768 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U04768-1 Contig ID Contig-U04768-1 Contig update 2001. 8.29 Contig sequence >Contig-U04768-1 (Contig...-U04768-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U04768-1Q.Seq.d AAAGTCTTATTTGTTTAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAATAAAAAACTTTATTCT...AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAAAA Gap no gap Contig length 762 Chromosome number (1..6, M...lknf*KMVMMHDEYISPTKLQFGFMIAVAFLG TIGVMGFCQNVFDILLGVISILSIYIGMRGVWKRKKRWLFVFMWLMMGMGFLHLVSFAVV VILHHKNPTKNTVF

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12399-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U12399-1 gap included 1358 3 4712677 4711450 MINUS 1 2 U12399 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U12399-1 Contig ID Contig-U12399-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U12399-1 (Contig-U12399-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U1239...GAAGATGATATTAGTCTGAGGAAGATATTCTTAAAGA ATTTAACAAATGTTAACA Gap gap included Contig ...*e iekkklnyl*eqkvkyqknhqkimiq*enxmks*LQIYHXFAXLIGEPIPNNDXXX--- ---XXXRHVIWKLYEEITIGLKRTISITXKRESCKSHYLANCIMH...kkklnyl*eqkvkyqknhqkimiq*enxmks*LQIYHXFAXLIGEPIPNNDXXX--- ---XXXRHVIWKLYEEITIGLKRTISITXKRESCKSHYLANCIMHVYWRL

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11883-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U11883-1 gap included 599 2 1457179 1457762 PLUS 1 2 U11883 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U11883-1 Contig ID Contig-U11883-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U11883-1 (Contig...-U11883-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U11883-1Q.Seq.d TACAAAATTTATATATATATATAATATTTTTAAATAATTATATTT...ATTTAGATGTATTTGGTATTCAAACATTA ACCGAACAACAAGCCTCTACAAAATTATTAACTTTTGTCATTTCAAAATC AGGTGAAAA Gap gap included Contig...ffkixn*kikkgfhvkxksflwfkxxx--- ---xxxx******************yprkyiniti*rn*kdil*ii*rne*rergtksc* nifs*kestpl*fnsxfktniilfstvfnttnvstig

  11. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13326-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U13326-1 no gap 240 6 1728259 1728019 MINUS 1 1 U13326 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U13326-1 Contig ID Contig-U13326-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U13326-1 (Contig...-U13326-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U13326-1Q.Seq.d AATGACTCAACAAATCTTGGAGAGTATGCAAAATACTTTCCAATCTATGG...CCTCGTTAAAGGTGCTGGTGC TGAATTAAGTTCTCGTGCTCATGAGTGTTTCATTAGTGCCTTGGATATTG CCTCTGATTATACCTACGAGAAAATTACCATTGGCTTGGA Gap no gap Contig...FQSMDGPTIKRLATTIQYGSKDVDEQQIHSTLVKGAGAELSSRAHECF ISALDIASDYTYEKITIGL Translated Amino Acid sequence (All Fra

  12. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15036-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U15036-1 no gap 3102 - - - - 16 24 U15036 0 5 1 2 0 1 1 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 Show Contig-U15036-1 Contig... ID Contig-U15036-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U15036-1 (Contig-U15036-1Q) /CSM_Contig.../Contig-U15036-1Q.Seq.d ATCTTTTTAAAAAAAAAAAAAATAAAACAAATAAAGAAAGAAATTAAATA AATATTAATAAT...AATTTAAAATTAATTTTTAG AT Gap no gap Contig length 3102 Chromosome number (1..6, M) - Chromosome length - Star...RKKQTDAVAEIPVD NPTSTSTTTTTTTTSNATSILSAIHTSTINSNTSSHNNNQQQQQQQQTILPTQPTIINTP TPVRSSVSRSQSPLPSGNGSSIISQEKTPLSTFVLSTCRPSALVLPPGSTIG

  13. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16008-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U16008-1 gap included 1557 5 1711154 1712676 PLUS 5 8 U16008 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 Show Contig...-U16008-1 Contig ID Contig-U16008-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U16008-1 (Contig-U16008-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U16008... TAAGGTTTATGATTTTTGATTTTAGATTTTATATTTTATTTATTTTAATA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA Gap gap included Contig length 1557 Ch...F LIFVHGSSTIIVLGIAIINFSISRIFERSKMLPAVTWIFNLIILWTCY--- ---PFGGFGARGPPSTIGYSRHTIGGMYGGHSPGPRLHLTGYLGIEPMNGKFLN...SSTIIVLGIAIINFSISRIFERSKMLPAVTWIFNLIILWTCY--- ---PFGGFGARGPPSTIGYSRHTIGGMYGGHSPGPRLHLTGYLGIEPMNGKFLNIGRTFR L

  14. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11404-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U11404-1 gap included 1618 6 1729583 1727965 MINUS 11 19 U11404 0 6 1 1 0 2 ...0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig-U11404-1 Contig ID Contig-U11404-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U11404-1 (Contig...-U11404-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U11404-1Q.Seq.d ATTTTAAGAGTTTTAATTTTAATAACTATACTTTTAATAAA...TTTTTCTTTTGAACCAGAAAAAAAAA Gap gap included Contig length 1618 Chromosome number ...AGARMLASLATDKLSNVIYLDVSENDFGDEGVSVICDGFVGNSTIKKLILNGNFKQ SK--- ---YEKITIGLDSVFKDLILEESQAQNEASGATPIPDSPVPTRSP

  15. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13680-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U13680-1 no gap 822 5 2371965 2372786 PLUS 2 2 U13680 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U13680-1 Contig ID Contig-U13680-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U13680-1 (Contig...-U13680-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U13680-1Q.Seq.d AAAAAGATTCTCAAGGAATTCACCGTGTTTATACTTCTTATGGTAGAACT ...GGGAATCAATGATTTAAATATCTACCAAATTCAAAAGG AAGGTGATGTCGAGTCACATTCATTACAATCACCATCGAAATTATTATTT CATGGTTCAAGAGCATCGAATT Gap no gap Contig...**sirtinkdig*kslc*snhsidk*ffsynh*twy*ntigclingt s*kw*tcfeknqylfewynqsiisrvgeikfrifhnyst*tw*rfrcclkeyh*kfgsie

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15718-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U15718-1 gap included 3735 6 2645446 2642451 MINUS 153 276 U15718 0 0 0 118 ...1 0 0 20 3 10 1 0 0 0 Show Contig-U15718-1 Contig ID Contig-U15718-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig...-U15718-1 (Contig-U15718-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U15718-1Q.Seq.d AAATTATTAAATTGTTTATTAATTTTTTTTTTTAC...CCTG Gap gap included Contig length 3735 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 6 Chromosome length 3595308 Start point...ptqtppptqtpt nhsigvnecdccpegqycllifghercfiandggdgipeetigcpgvttgtptstdggtg hytesgtgnphlcdrhhcrsgmechvingipecl

  17. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15573-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U15573-1 gap included 2005 4 5020093 5018210 MINUS 13 13 U15573 0 5 0 1 1 0 ...0 0 0 1 1 0 2 2 Show Contig-U15573-1 Contig ID Contig-U15573-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U15573-1 (Contig...-U15573-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U15573-1Q.Seq.d AGTCTTGAGCTTTTATTGGGTCAACCATTGGGTGAATATAC... AGCNTTAACNGGNAA Gap gap included Contig length 2005 Chromosome number (1..6, M) ...xxlfrsnxslxxxxxxsxnxx Frame C: s*afigstig*iyiylkrfhlfl*skryyqskw*fkifpilkqttiiyen

  18. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11342-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U11342-1 gap included 2051 2 611517 609465 MINUS 4 7 U11342 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U11342-1 Contig ID Contig-U11342-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U11342-1 (Contig...-U11342-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U11342-1Q.Seq.d GTCAACATTAACATCATCATCATCATCATCACCATCTAGTAATAA...GAATTTGGTAATTTTAAAATCACTNATTAATATATTAAACAAAATTA TAAAAATAAAA Gap gap included Contig...EFFFIDRKSLLVNFP RGSICAQILKLIGNLYGSNDIIFKINTNNVSFFDGTIGANNSTNNSNSNQPMTPQQVVIK YLNPTARWKRREISNFEYLMTLNTIAGRTYN

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11195-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U11195-1 gap included 2858 2 4308456 4311316 PLUS 16 27 U11195 0 2 0 8 1 0 0... 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 Show Contig-U11195-1 Contig ID Contig-U11195-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U11195-1 (Contig...-U11195-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U11195-1Q.Seq.d AGCATTGGAACAAATCGAATTACGTGAAAAGATACCATTGTT...TATCACCTGCTCTTTATCCTTCAAATTTAAGT AATTCAACATTGGCCCAAAGAGTTACATGGATAAATAAATTATAAATAAT GTATAAAATCATTCTCTC Gap gap included Contig... EYREKIPLLDLPWGASKPWTLVDLRDDYDEDLMVRFYNELMLPNFPVKNELEPLSNFISA LSEERRESFNPHLSEVHVLLALRWPTDSSDLQPTIGAGIIFEYFSN

  20. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13455-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U13455-1 no gap 750 2 945431 946181 PLUS 2 2 U13455 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U13455-1 Contig ID Contig-U13455-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U13455-1 (Contig...-U13455-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U13455-1Q.Seq.d TAATTCCAACAACATCAACAAATTCAACAACAATTACAAATGCAACAACA TA...CAATAATAATAATAATAACAATAACAATAATAATAA Gap no gap Contig length 750 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 2 Chromosome l...KMLEYIQKNPSATRPSCIQVVQQPSSKVVWKNRRLDTPFKVKVDLKAASAMA GTNLTTASVITIGIVTDHKGKLQIDSVENFTEAFNGQGLAVFQGLKMTKGTWGKE

  1. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U14400-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U14400-1 no gap 1939 4 4053811 4055750 PLUS 5 7 U14400 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U14400-1 Contig ID Contig-U14400-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U14400-1 (Contig...-U14400-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U14400-1Q.Seq.d CATTACCAATAAATTTATCTGCTTCAACACCTATACCAATGACATCACCA...AGGTTTATAAAATATATTGAATCAATTTTTGATTAAA Gap no gap Contig length 1939 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 4 Chromosome...HQQQQSKTVTSSTTSTETTTTVESSTTSTTITTSTSTPIPTTITTTPTTPI NSDNSWTFTSFSPKVFKEIRRYYGVDEEFLKSQENSSGIVKFLEVQTIGRSGSFFY

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09569-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U09569-1 gap included 1424 5 3658944 3660352 PLUS 8 14 U09569 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U09569-1 Contig ID Contig-U09569-1 Contig update 2002. 9.13 Contig sequence >Contig-U09569-1 (Contig-U09569-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U0956...TTAAAAA TAAAATAAATATAAAATAAAATAAAAATTAACAA Gap gap included Contig length 1424 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 5...NQTFQQKYYVNDQYYNYKNGGPIILYINGEGPVSSPPYSSDDGVVIYAQA LNCMIVTLEHRFYGESSPFSELTIENLQYLSHQQALEDLATFVVDFQSKLVGAGHIVTIG...YLSHQQALEDLATFVVDFQSKLVGAGHIVTIG GSYSGALSAWFRIKYPHITVGSIASLGVVHSILDFTAFDAYVSYA---

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10709-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U10709-1 gap included 1228 4 757921 759149 PLUS 2 3 U10709 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U10709-1 Contig ID Contig-U10709-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U10709-1 (Contig...-U10709-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U10709-1Q.Seq.d ATTAGTAACACAGACATTGGTAACACGAATTTATTACCACCATCAC...ATGTTTAGGTGATAATACTCATAGTCAA Gap gap included Contig length 1228 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 4 Chromosome le...LDIFLIQIGAAIMGSNQFIQHAINIYNLEDWFEIEPFNG SLNKSTEGTPTTTSSQPPSTPSKQTSLRNSAGTVPTTPSQSSSTIVPTLDTIGETTTTTT TTATTTT

  4. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15306-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U15306-1 no gap 2452 3 3887051 3889342 PLUS 54 91 U15306 0 0 0 49 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U15306-1 Contig ID Contig-U15306-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U15306-1 (Contig...-U15306-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U15306-1Q.Seq.d AAGCATAAACGGTGAATACCTCGACTCCTAAATCGATGAAGACCGTA...TTTTAGAACTTCAAAAAATAGTAC AAATTTTTTCAAATTAAGATAAAAAAAATAAAACAAAAATTAATTTAAAA CA Gap no gap Contig length 2452...*naagtgkgeegrt*hkslpywlapqvkgsvmprggqghygasrggrkhmgidfssivg qdivapisgkvvnfkgartkypmlqlypskkftefdylqmlyvhppvginmgasyqvsvg dtig

  5. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U01791-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U01791-1 no gap 527 2 7629792 7630319 PLUS 1 1 U01791 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U01791-1 Contig ID Contig-U01791-1 Contig update 2001. 8.29 Contig sequence >Contig-U01791-1 (Contig...-U01791-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U01791-1Q.Seq.d GTTTGATTATAATTTATATGAATGTGAAATTAGACAAGCATTATCAAATA ...TCGTTCCCTTATGATTTAAGAACAACTTT GAATAGTTACAGAAATGGTGAATTTAGTATTTATCAATAAATTTTTTTTT AAAGATTTATAATTAAAATAAAAAAAA Gap no gap Contig...SILWSIESIGSLIVSAQINDDRETMELLHRYQIPQKFLIPLF QILALIDQLEKDLSHQIELDKFTINRDYYFLKSFSNLIEPPLNCLGILKTSRPHFRIFKL VGKNMISQVLETIG

  6. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09412-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U09412-1 gap included 873 3 3953072 3953946 PLUS 1 2 U09412 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U09412-1 Contig ID Contig-U09412-1 Contig update 2002. 9.13 Contig sequence >Contig-U09412-1 (Contig...-U09412-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U09412-1Q.Seq.d ATTATCACAACTATTTTATAATAAACCAATTTTAAAGATTAAAGT...TGGTTCAATAAAAGAAATTAAATATAATTATCAATAAT AATAATAAATTAATTAATAAATTTAAATCAAAA Gap gap included Contig length 873 ...DCQCGFVSVVENNNNNNNNSDNENNENNENNENNE NNEDLEDFIPRKLLKKSSSTLQSRTYLVIYLGRRGILEIWGLKHRSREYFKTIG

  7. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10837-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U10837-1 gap included 1996 2 5280203 5282199 PLUS 8 9 U10837 0 3 0 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U10837-1 Contig ID Contig-U10837-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U10837-1 (Contig-U10837-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U10837...TCNT Gap gap included Contig length 1996 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 2 Chromosome...YSSKGYFKHLDSFLSEISVP LCESVSKSSTLVFSLLFNMLEYSTADYRYPILKILTALVKCGVNPAETKSSRVPEWFDTV TQFLNDHKTPHYIVSQAIRFIEITSGNSPTSLITIDNASLKPSKNTIG...SSRVPEWFDTV TQFLNDHKTPHYIVSQAIRFIEITSGNSPTSLITIDNASLKPSKNTIGTKKFSNKVDRGT LLAGNYFNKVLVDTVPGVRSSVNSLTKSIYSTTQI

  8. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12357-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U12357-1 gap included 1333 1 2827305 2828232 PLUS 5 6 U12357 0 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U12357-1 Contig ID Contig-U12357-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U12357-1 (Contig-U12357-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U12357...ATAAAATAAAATTTATTAATTTTCCAACT Gap gap included Contig length 1333 Chromosome numb...RYXEKKKXXXXDSXNXXXXXPXX XXLXXXXPXX--- ---QYEKMKLSGEKVDPTLDASIILGNRYLEKKKVTIGDSENYTITVPFSQILKNQKPLI IQRKTKGTL...-QYEKMKLSGEKVDPTLDASIILGNRYLEKKKVTIGDSENYTITVPFSQILKNQKPLI IQRKTKGTLYYSINLSYASLNPISKAIFNRGLNIKRTYYPVSNSNDVIY

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10996-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U10996-1 gap included 3017 2 5488454 5485454 MINUS 41 76 U10996 0 3 0 24 1 0... 0 8 0 5 0 0 0 0 Show Contig-U10996-1 Contig ID Contig-U10996-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U10996-1 (Contig...-U10996-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U10996-1Q.Seq.d TGGCCTACTGGTAAAAAAAATTCTAATTTTATTAAAACCC...CTATTTATAATGTATTGTTAAG GCAAAAATAAAAAAAAAAGNAAAAAAA Gap gap included Contig length...LTTTA SSSQQQQQELGLAVLTIRQGYEFENIVKELLDEKKKIEIWSMKPNSKQQWELIKKGSPGN TQMFEDVLLNGNCEGSVMMALKVTREKGSIVFGISFGDATFKTIG

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12049-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U12049-1 gap included 2563 4 3071598 3069091 MINUS 9 17 U12049 0 0 0 0 2 0 0... 1 4 1 1 0 0 0 Show Contig-U12049-1 Contig ID Contig-U12049-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U12049-1 (Contig...-U12049-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U12049-1Q.Seq.d TAATGAAGGTAGTAATAATAATATAGTTGAAGCATCAAAAGA...TATCATTTAAACTGAAAAAAGTC CAAAAGATTTATGCAATGATTGCTGCGAATATGCTGCAACTTGTTCTCAT TAAAAATAAACAAAAAAATAATA Gap gap included Contig...disngqcvyseiidcgsssienss nqesssdidittastlgstiastigstigltstttttttsqttgtpttppqtvseipisl astistspvsdegtiastiatt

  11. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U01204-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U01204-1 gap included 918 2 1928287 1927368 MINUS 2 3 U01204 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U01204-1 Contig ID Contig-U01204-1 Contig update 2001. 8.29 Contig sequence >Contig-U01204-1 (Contig-U01204-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U01204...AAAAATAATAA Gap gap included Contig length 918 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 2 Chromosome length 8467578 Start...LAWEVFWVGTPLFVLMASAFNQIHWALAWVLMVIILQSGFMN--- ---QHSHTIGNETIIIVMDSWVVDQIPDQVSWMEQ...fgwvlhyly*whqhsikfighwhgy*w*sfynlvl*--- ---QHSHTIGNETIIIVMDSWVVDQIPDQVSWMEQVLSDNN

  12. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U14772-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U14772-1 no gap 665 1 1988279 1987624 MINUS 1 1 U14772 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U14772-1 Contig ID Contig-U14772-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U14772-1 (Contig...-U14772-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U14772-1Q.Seq.d AAAAACAATAACCATCGTTTTTTATTTTTATTTTCAAAATATGGATTTAA...AAATTAATGAAGAAAAAA AAGTAANNNNNNNNN Gap no gap Contig length 665 Chromosome number...DADTTISFLSSQNLSQLSIIKNLVNGKTIG DKKVIVDFYDFKKVIPTPTPIPTPTPPTKTQEESNKKIKLTNEKPKEKKP

  13. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11141-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U11141-1 gap included 2122 2 1113359 1111236 MINUS 6 12 U11141 0 1 0 2 0 0 0... 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 Show Contig-U11141-1 Contig ID Contig-U11141-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U11141-1 (Contig...-U11141-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U11141-1Q.Seq.d AAAAAACAATCTTAAAACACACACACACTCAACACACTATCA...AAATCAAAATCAAAATCAAA ATAATAATAATTATAATAATAGCTATAATAAT Gap gap included Contig length 2122 Chromosome number ...HNYFGKVSRGIVSLSDYKYYGYLRSVHLIGYE QHEEELIKTIKSLPVGVSTLELSGHLNKIIFKEGSL--- ---DDSTIGAILNSFSSSSSRETFPRSVESLHLNI

  14. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12765-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U12765-1 no gap 1256 6 1467819 1466563 MINUS 3 3 U12765 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U12765-1 Contig ID Contig-U12765-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U12765-1 (Contig...-U12765-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U12765-1Q.Seq.d CAAAAAGGAAACACTAGTCCAGTTAGAACCCCAAATACTACTACTACTA...TATCGATTGTTCAAAGGTTTCAATGGTTGATACTAAT TTCTTA Gap no gap Contig length 1256 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 6 Chr...EYQEDLTPIFEPIFLDLIKIL STTTLTGNVFPYYKVFSRLVQFKAVSDLVGTLQCWNSPNFNGKEMERNTILGSLFSPSSA SDDGSTIKQYFSNASTMNKNTIGDA

  15. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09480-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U09480-1 gap included 705 5 4277527 4276817 MINUS 1 2 U09480 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U09480-1 Contig ID Contig-U09480-1 Contig update 2002. 9.13 Contig sequence >Contig-U09480-1 (Contig-U09480-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U09480...AAAAAAAAAA Gap gap included Contig length 705 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 5 Chromosome length 5062330 Start ...**********imaeinienpfhvntkidvntfvnqirgipngsrcdftnsvvkhf sslgynvfvchpnhavtgpyaklhcefrntkfstig...srcdftnsvvkhf sslgynvfvchpnhavtgpyaklhcefrntkfstigydvyiiargrkvtatnfgdggydn wasggh

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12043-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U12043-1 gap included 1898 6 2694437 2692539 MINUS 7 13 U12043 0 6 0 0 0 0 0... 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig-U12043-1 Contig ID Contig-U12043-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U12043-1 (Contig...-U12043-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U12043-1Q.Seq.d GAAACCATTCGTTTAAAGAAATGAAATATTTATATATATTAA...ATAAA AATAAATT Gap gap included Contig length 1898 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 6 Chromosome length 3595308 S...VPDIVSGILASKYASITLLNSGEM DLTNGITIGLLENSTSDQLFQINPILNTSLTNILVGQRFSIPFEISIKDSTISNQL

  17. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13202-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U13202-1 no gap 1083 4 1301578 1302630 PLUS 41 45 U13202 8 0 13 0 0 2 16 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U13202-1 Contig ID Contig-U13202-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U13202-1 (Contig...-U13202-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U13202-1Q.Seq.d ACTGTTGGCCTACTGGGATTTTCTGCAGTAATAATAAAATCAAATA...TTTGTAATTTTAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA Gap no gap Contig len...kvgqfirvprgaqpaqtskftlmih*gvkshffsmlqpnwpncttigpvq nqarcgsllgfwvlqnqlltvlcihnnekcsikfygygyl**nlitvvkvvmpslhg

  18. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15062-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U15062-1 no gap 1282 3 4759691 4758480 MINUS 5 6 U15062 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 Show Contig...-U15062-1 Contig ID Contig-U15062-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U15062-1 (Contig...-U15062-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U15062-1Q.Seq.d CAAATATTTAAATAAATTTAACATTATAAAAACAAAAATTAATAAAGTA...TTTTCAATAGATAATAATAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAATTATTTTAAAAATAAAAAAAAAA Gap no gap Contig length 1282 Chromos...KMSHNHNSNNNKTTTTTTNDSGSAIANGINLEKILADVKECN YNLVNSITATEAIQKEKESLENELSTKGTIGDGKRIKKLQYNISLQTETLMKTLMKLDSL SITG

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16467-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U16467-1 no gap 1261 2 7818565 7817305 MINUS 17 18 U16467 0 0 5 0 1 2 1 0 6 0 0 1 1 0 Show Contig...-U16467-1 Contig ID Contig-U16467-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U16467-1 (Contig...-U16467-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U16467-1Q.Seq.d CAACAATTAACATTACTTAAATATAATATTATTATATTTTTTTTTTT...TTCAAATAAATAATTGTTTAGAAATTTCTAGAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAAA Gap no gap Contig length 1261 Chromosome number (1..6, M...LK833Z ,1005,1249 Translated Amino Acid sequence qqltllkyniiiffffyllplhlyhy**LKKKTLTIIKYFFQKMNKIALLFTIFFALFAI SFACDEFNPNTSTIG

  20. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09345-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U09345-1 gap included 1216 4 3361857 3360637 MINUS 4 5 U09345 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U09345-1 Contig ID Contig-U09345-1 Contig update 2002. 9.13 Contig sequence >Contig-U09345-1 (Contig-U09345-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U0934...AATGGTATTTTAAAAATAA Gap gap included Contig length 1216 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 4 Chromosome length 5430...ALFTSSNPKYGCSGCVQLKNQIESFSLSYEPYL NSAGFLEKPIFIVILEVDYNMEVFQTIGLNTIPHLLFIPSGSKPITQKGYAYTGFEQTSS QSISDFIYSHSKI...LLALFTSSNPKYGCSGCVQLKNQIESFSLSYEPYL NSAGFLEKPIFIVILEVDYNMEVFQTIGLNTIPHLLFIPSGSKPI

  1. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09432-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U09432-1 gap included 993 5 741953 740957 MINUS 1 2 U09432 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U09432-1 Contig ID Contig-U09432-1 Contig update 2002. 9.13 Contig sequence >Contig-U09432-1 (Contig...-U09432-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U09432-1Q.Seq.d AGGAAATATTTTAATATTTTATTTTTTTTATTTTTTTTATTTATTA...TTTTGGTGGTAAATATAGATATGAAAATAAA CAAATCCAAATTTTAGTTGAATTAAATTTCACTGATACCACTCAAAAAAA AAA Gap gap included Contig...iy*sni*SVKFGICYNYAKYHLSICNHTIYPGSDNQSLYFKLSSIFDS PTILSGYAVIYNSLDQIITNGTYNLILDEDVPTIG

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15323-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U15323-1 no gap 1230 2 3760829 3759661 MINUS 76 108 U15323 2 0 21 0 9 4 0 0 22 4 13 0 1 0 Show Contig...-U15323-1 Contig ID Contig-U15323-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U15323-1 (Contig-U15323-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U1532...TAAAATTTAAGCAATCATTCCAT Gap no gap Contig length 1230 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 2 Chromosome length 846757...VGLLVFFNILYCTPLYYILFFFKMNSKFADELIATAKAIVAPGKGILAADESTNTIGAR FKKINLENNEENRRAYRELLIGTGNGVNEFIGGIILYEETLYQKMADG...MNSKFADELIATAKAIVAPGKGILAADESTNTIGAR FKKINLENNEENRRAYRELLIGTGNGVNEFIGGIILYEETLYQK

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U14236-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U14236-1 no gap 660 2 5626866 5627517 PLUS 1 1 U14236 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U14236-1 Contig ID Contig-U14236-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U14236-1 (Contig...-U14236-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U14236-1Q.Seq.d NNNNNNNNNNGAAAATCAAAAATTAAAAAGTAACATTACTCTATTATATG ...CAATCACTCCAATTAAA CCATAGTTTT Gap no gap Contig length 660 Chromosome number (1..6...MGSEKSPFNLKQYPSLVKIDDVS QCPKYKCLKRKSLNEWTIGLNIPAFCRESRYDCSLCYKYIECSFSDEF*tnlsalfv

  4. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06822-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U06822-1 no gap 468 3 438742 439211 PLUS 1 1 U06822 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U06822-1 Contig ID Contig-U06822-1 Contig update 2001. 8.30 Contig sequence >Contig-U06822-1 (Contig...-U06822-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U06822-1Q.Seq.d ATATTATTCTATTCACTCGTAATAATACATATAAATTGATATCAATCAGA AA...TGCTATTAAGACTTTGGAGCAAAAAAC TAACAAATCAATTCAAAA Gap no gap Contig length 468 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 3 Ch...*mmlklkeikllvllrlwskkltnqfk own update 2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U06822-1 (Contig-U06822-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig

  5. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U08861-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U08861-1 gap included 1295 5 2877914 2879217 PLUS 1 2 U08861 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U08861-1 Contig ID Contig-U08861-1 Contig update 2002. 9.13 Contig sequence >Contig-U08861-1 (Contig-U08861-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U08861...CACATTATAAAGTACCAAATAAGTTATTAATTTTAGAAAATA AATTCCAAAGAATGCAATGTCTAAAGTTAATAAAAAAGAATACTAAAATA TTTTC Gap gap included Contig...k**iwsryccnhcl*kkqkttnef*r i*nql*tkistl*stk*vinfrk*ipknamskvnkkey*nif own update 2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig...-U08861-1 (Contig-U08861-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U08861-1Q.Seq.d (1305 letters) Database: C

  6. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15058-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U15058-1 no gap 1987 4 4423139 4424727 PLUS 2 4 U15058 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U15058-1 Contig ID Contig-U15058-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U15058-1 (Contig...-U15058-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U15058-1Q.Seq.d AAAAAAGGTTACTCACAAAGTTAAAGAAATCAATGAAAGATTTACCACCC...ACTCAAGGGGGTAGGAGAATAAAATCAACCGATTATCCAGGCNTTAAG CGACCTTTTTCCCAAAAAAAAAAGATGTTCAGAAAAT Gap no gap Contig len...srx*atffpkkkdvq k own update 2004. 6.23 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U15058-1 (Contig-U15058-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig

  7. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06829-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U06829-1 no gap 449 5 4394444 4394893 PLUS 1 1 U06829 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U06829-1 Contig ID Contig-U06829-1 Contig update 2001. 8.30 Contig sequence >Contig-U06829-1 (Contig...-U06829-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U06829-1Q.Seq.d GTAAAAGAATGTAATGAAAATGAAAAAATTAATTTTATAATAAAATTATT ...ATGATTTAGAATTGGTACAATTAGTTTA Gap no gap Contig length 449 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 5 Chromosome length 50...04. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U06829-1 (Contig-U06829-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U06829-1Q.Seq.d (

  8. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U01997-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U01997-1 gap included 886 2 1683026 1682230 MINUS 3 4 U01997 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U01997-1 Contig ID Contig-U01997-1 Contig update 2001. 8.29 Contig sequence >Contig-U01997-1 (Contig-U01997-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U01997...ATTGAAATAATATTTATTTATTTTTTTAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA Gap gap included Contig...nfkvfgieiifiyffkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk own update 2004. 6. 9 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U01997-1 (Contig-U01997-1Q) /CSM_Contig.../Contig-U01997-1Q.Seq.d (896 letters) Database: CSM 6905 sequences; 5,674,871 total l

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U14745-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U14745-1 no gap 1780 6 3063854 3065579 PLUS 2 4 U14745 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U14745-1 Contig ID Contig-U14745-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U14745-1 (Contig...-U14745-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U14745-1Q.Seq.d GCGTCCGGACAATTTCAATAAAACAAATTTAAAAATAAATAATTTTTAAT...AATAAAATA ATTTAAATAAAAAAATATTTATTTTATTTTAAGATTAACAAAATAAAATA ATTTAAATAAAAAAATATTTATTTTAAAGA Gap no gap Contig...k*kniyfk own update 2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U14745-1 (Contig-U14745-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13254-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U13254-1 no gap 575 5 203798 203233 MINUS 1 1 U13254 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U13254-1 Contig ID Contig-U13254-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U13254-1 (Contig...-U13254-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U13254-1Q.Seq.d AAATAATTTATTTAATTTTAAAATTAATAGATAAAAAGATGGAAATGATA A...CATTTTAACATTATTGGATAAT GTCAATGATTGGCCAANNNNNNNNN Gap no gap Contig length 575 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 5 ...2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U13254-1 (Contig-U13254-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U13254-1Q.Seq.d

  11. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U03367-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U03367-1 no gap 323 - - - - 2 1 U03367 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Show Contig-U03367-1 Contig... ID Contig-U03367-1 Contig update 2001. 8.29 Contig sequence >Contig-U03367-1 (Contig-U03367-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig...TTGCGGGTTGGCAGGACTGTNGGNAGGCATGGNCATCGGTATNNTTGGAG ATGCTNGTGTGAGGGCGAATGCT Gap no gap Contig length 323 Chro...HLXXGLXCGLAGLXXGMXIGXXGDAXVRANA own update 2004. 6. 9 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U03367-1 (Contig...-U03367-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U03367-1Q.Seq.d (323 letters) Database: CSM 6905 sequ

  12. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13891-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U13891-1 no gap 1355 6 799802 798446 MINUS 4 4 U13891 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U13891-1 Contig ID Contig-U13891-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U13891-1 (Contig...-U13891-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U13891-1Q.Seq.d TTTTAAAATATTTCAAAATTAGCGAGCACGCATTCGCATATAAATATATT ...ACAAATAAAAAAAAAAAATAAAAAAAATA ATTTA Gap no gap Contig length 1355 Chromosome numb...own update 2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U13891-1 (Contig-U13891-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U138

  13. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16093-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U16093-1 gap included 1020 2 4899973 4899063 MINUS 29 31 U16093 7 0 0 0 0 2 ...18 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 Show Contig-U16093-1 Contig ID Contig-U16093-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U16093-1 (Contig...-U16093-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U16093-1Q.Seq.d TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTAATTTTTTTTTTTCATAAAACTT...AAAATTAAATT Gap gap included Contig length 1020 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 2 Chr...pdate 2004. 6.23 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U16093-1 (Contig-U16093-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U16093-1Q

  14. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12073-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U12073-1 gap included 912 2 2118980 2119867 PLUS 4 5 U12073 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U12073-1 Contig ID Contig-U12073-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U12073-1 (Contig...-U12073-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U12073-1Q.Seq.d CTGTTGGCCTACTGGNAATTGAAACAATTGTTTCAGCAAATATTA...AAGA Gap gap included Contig length 912 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 2 Chromosome length 8467578 Start point ...GPXSXDY*r own update 2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U12073-1 (Contig-U12073-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig

  15. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16086-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U16086-1 gap included 1018 - - - - 3 4 U16086 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Show Contig-U16086-1 Contig... ID Contig-U16086-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U16086-1 (Contig-U16086-1Q) /CSM_Contig.../Contig-U16086-1Q.Seq.d AATTTGATGAAGTAGTAGTAGAGGTAAAACATGTATCAAAACATTATAAG ATTGCAGG...ACTTGGATATAAATGAAG GTAGCTCATCAAATTTTTCAAATAATGATAATTTTAAATCGGTAGATCAA ATTACCAATGACCTTAGCCGTATTTTAT Gap gap included Contig...KSVDQI TNDLSRIL own update 2004. 6.23 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U16086-1 (Contig-U16086-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06384-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U06384-1 no gap 660 5 3008439 3007779 MINUS 2 2 U06384 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U06384-1 Contig ID Contig-U06384-1 Contig update 2001. 8.30 Contig sequence >Contig-U06384-1 (Contig...-U06384-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U06384-1Q.Seq.d TGAAAAAATTAGAGACAACAAGTGGATCAGCACGTAAAGTATGGCGTTTA...AAATAAAAATTAATTTCC AAAAATAAAA Gap no gap Contig length 660 Chromosome number (1.....own update 2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U06384-1 (Contig-U06384-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U063

  17. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13737-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U13737-1 no gap 672 6 1762420 1761754 MINUS 1 1 U13737 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U13737-1 Contig ID Contig-U13737-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U13737-1 (Contig...-U13737-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U13737-1Q.Seq.d NNNNNNNNNNAAAATTAGAAAATGGTACAATTGTTTTTAGAGATATTTCA...AGAATAGAAGGAAAATAT AGATCAATGGGGTGGCACAACA Gap no gap Contig length 672 Chromosome...gwhn own update 2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U13737-1 (Contig-U13737-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig

  18. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06307-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U06307-1 no gap 637 6 29174 29801 PLUS 4 5 U06307 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U06307-1 Contig ID Contig-U06307-1 Contig update 2002. 9.13 Contig sequence >Contig-U06307-1 (Contig...-U06307-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U06307-1Q.Seq.d CCCGCGTCCGAATGCCTCGTATTTTACACACTATGCTCCGTGTGGGTAAT TTAG...ATAGTATTTTTATTTTATT CTTTTTCTTTTAAAAATTTTTTATATTGTCAACAATATAATCAAATAAAT GTATTTAATTATCGGGTATTAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA Gap no gap Contig...own update 2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U06307-1 (Contig-U06307-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U063

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12545-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U12545-1 gap included 1165 3 3275272 3276395 PLUS 1 2 U12545 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U12545-1 Contig ID Contig-U12545-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U12545-1 (Contig-U12545-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U12545...CGTTCTAAATCACTCATTAAAAGATTAAAAATTAAANAAGGTAATATC TCACGACNGCTNNCTCATACACACN Gap gap included Contig length 11...vliknlskrkerkis*klyqlkriqlsl vknwlklvlnhslkd*klxkvishdxxliht own update 2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig...-U12545-1 (Contig-U12545-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U12545-1Q.Seq.d (1175 letters) Database: CSM 6905 s

  20. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09615-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U09615-1 gap included 1134 3 4459395 4458259 MINUS 1 2 U09615 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U09615-1 Contig ID Contig-U09615-1 Contig update 2002. 9.13 Contig sequence >Contig-U09615-1 (Contig-U09615-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U0961...TGCAAGATTAGAAAGATTAGAAAAAGATGCTATGCTAAAAATA Gap gap included Contig length 1134 Chromosome number (1..6, M) ...*wcnlyfrcre*emgkcn iefhiintrfkiwphrcidtighnvgicw**fnfecsfisleiqyrv**mgirfkyw*ww s*c*irpyfnnhafqyydyiwwskfwh*...4. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U09615-1 (Contig-U09615-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U09615-1Q.Seq.d (1

  1. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10823-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U10823-1 gap included 1750 1 3559501 3561234 PLUS 85 124 U10823 0 5 0 30 1 0... 0 20 0 29 0 0 0 0 Show Contig-U10823-1 Contig ID Contig-U10823-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U10823-1 (Contig...-U10823-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U10823-1Q.Seq.d ACTGTTGGCCTACTGGTATTTTTGGTAGTGTGTTAAAA...CAACAAATAAAATTAAAATTA GTTATATTTTTTTTAAATTAAAAAAAAAAATAAAAAAAATAAATTATTTA TTAAATTTTT Gap gap included Contig ...4. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U10823-1 (Contig-U10823-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U10823-1Q.Seq.d (1

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15541-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U15541-1 gap included 2750 - - - - 634 1127 U15541 1 129 1 375 19 0 2 32 4 69 1 0 1 0 Show Contig...-U15541-1 Contig ID Contig-U15541-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U15541-1 (Contig...-U15541-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U15541-1Q.Seq.d ATAATAAACGGTGAATACCTCGACTCCTAAATCGATGAAGACCGTAG...AAAAAT AAAAATAAAAATAAATAAATAATCATTTCATATTAATATTTTTTTTTATT TTTAAAAAAA Gap gap included Contig...ffyf*k own update 2004. 6.23 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U15541-1 (Contig-U15541-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10291-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U10291-1 no gap 932 4 3203354 3204286 PLUS 2 2 U10291 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U10291-1 Contig ID Contig-U10291-1 Contig update 2002. 9.13 Contig sequence >Contig-U10291-1 (Contig...-U10291-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U10291-1Q.Seq.d GTAAAGGTTTTATGTGTATATTTTTTAATGACCTTTTCGAATTAGTTTCA ...CAAAATAGATTAAATCTTAGTTACTCTCATGC TAATCAATATGTTGAGAGTTTTCCATCACAAATGTTATCAACAATTGCAA AATTCATTAGTTTCTTATTTGGTT...SLMYSL FNYIFDENGIIKSEFQDPTQRKRLSRGLSRRFMTIGILGLFTTPFIFFFLLINFFFEYAE ELKNRPGSLFSREWSPLARWEFRELNELPHYFQNRLNLSY

  4. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13065-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U13065-1 no gap 718 1 3561021 3561729 PLUS 1 1 U13065 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U13065-1 Contig ID Contig-U13065-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U13065-1 (Contig...-U13065-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U13065-1Q.Seq.d NNNNNNNNNNCAATCAAAGCAATCAATGGTAAATTAACTTTGTTACCATT ...TGATTCAACTCTCTCTG TTTCAAATTTACAACTTGCTTTAGATGAATCCTTTGAAGTTGATTTTGTA TTATATTAAAAATTATCA Gap no gap Contig...kny own update 2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U13065-1 (Contig-U13065-1Q) /CSM_Contig

  5. Mice lacking caspase-2 are protected from behavioral changes, but not pathology, in the YAC128 model of Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bissada Nagat

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington Disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder in which caspase activation and cleavage of substrates, including the huntingtin protein, has been invoked as a pathological mechanism. Specific changes in caspase-2 (casp2 activity have been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of HD, however unique casp2 cleavage substrates have remained elusive. We thus utilized mice completely lacking casp2 (casp2-/- to examine the role played by casp2 in the progression of HD. This 'substrate agnostic' approach allows us to query the effect of casp2 on HD progression without pre-defining proteolytic substrates of interest. Results YAC128 HD model mice lacking casp2 show protection from well-validated motor and cognitive features of HD, including performance on rotarod, swimming T-maze, pre-pulse inhibition, spontaneous alternation and locomotor tasks. However, the specific pathological features of the YAC128 mice including striatal volume loss and testicular degeneration are unaltered in mice lacking casp2. The application of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques validates specific neuropathology in the YAC128 mice that is not altered by ablation of casp2. Conclusions The rescue of behavioral phenotypes in the absence of pathological improvement suggests that different pathways may be operative in the dysfunction of neural circuitry in HD leading to behavioral changes compared to the processes leading to cell death and volume loss. Inhibition of caspase-2 activity may be associated with symptomatic improvement in HD.

  6. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04432-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U04432-1 no gap 600 1 1520578 1521098 PLUS 1 1 U04432 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U04432-1 Contig ID Contig-U04432-1 Contig update 2001. 8.29 Contig sequence >Contig-U04432-1 (Contig...-U04432-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U04432-1Q.Seq.d AATTATAATCAAAACAAATTAATAAAAAAAATGATTAATAGTTTTGTCTC ...TCAACAATATGAAATTGCAAGAT TAAATGGTTATGATAATGCCCATAATTTACCAAGAGATATTAGTCAAATA Gap no gap Contig length 600 Chro...ni**fkgrnsnknyfsrymgtiessti*n ckikwl**cp*ftkry*sn own update 2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U04432-1 (Contig

  7. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13894-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U13894-1 no gap 1550 2 2081463 2079913 MINUS 30 31 U13894 1 0 15 0 9 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U13894-1 Contig ID Contig-U13894-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U13894-1 (Contig...-U13894-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U13894-1Q.Seq.d CTTTTTGATTGTATAATTGAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA...TAAATTAAATAATTAAAAAAAACAAAAAAATTAAGTGAAAATCAAAAAA Gap no gap Contig length 1550 Chromosome number (1..6, M) ...V*kkkkikk*k*sk*fklnn*kkqkn*vkikk own update 2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U13894-1 (Contig

  8. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15462-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U15462-1 no gap 546 4 3384206 3383661 MINUS 2 2 U15462 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U15462-1 Contig ID Contig-U15462-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U15462-1 (Contig...-U15462-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U15462-1Q.Seq.d CTTTAGATTGGGGNTCAAGAAAAATATTGAAGTATTTGGTGGTGATAAGA...ATTCGATTCACTATCTTATA Gap no gap Contig length 546 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 4 Chromosome length 5430582 St...VMKLGFEVKDLITNDPKCDLFDSLS Y own update 2004. 6.23 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U15462-1 (Contig

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12682-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U12682-1 no gap 1408 4 4961739 4963050 PLUS 47 48 U12682 0 0 0 5 0 0 2 30 0 10 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U12682-1 Contig ID Contig-U12682-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U12682-1 (Contig...-U12682-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U12682-1Q.Seq.d AAACACATCATCCCGTTCGATCTGATAAGTAAATCGACCTCAGGCC...ATGA AACTACTG Gap no gap Contig length 1408 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 4 Chromosome length 5430582 Start po... kwniikwysyinwykswyn**fihsiklqwsy*qcke*si*yiir*ny own update 2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U03323-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U03323-1 no gap 533 2 4820223 4820756 PLUS 2 1 U03323 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Show Contig...-U03323-1 Contig ID Contig-U03323-1 Contig update 2001. 8.29 Contig sequence >Contig-U03323-1 (Contig...-U03323-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U03323-1Q.Seq.d ACATGTGACATTACTATTGGTAAATGTCAATGTTTAAAAAATACATGGTC ...TCAATAATGGTGGTGGTGGTGGTTTAGGT GAAACCCCCAATAGTAATAGTAATAGTGGTGAACTAGTTATCCCACCAAA ATCAAATACTACATTAAATGAAGAAACAGGTGG Gap no gap Contig... Link to clone list U03323 List of clone(s) est1= FC-IC0176F ,1,534 Translated Amino Acid sequence TCDITIGKC

  11. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15069-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U15069-1 no gap 1241 1 2719927 2720886 PLUS 37 43 U15069 16 2 0 0 0 5 8 0 0 1 1 0 4 0 Show Contig...-U15069-1 Contig ID Contig-U15069-1 Contig update 2004. 6.11 Contig sequence >Contig-U15069-1 (Contig...-U15069-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U15069-1Q.Seq.d TTTCAAACCAAAACATAAAATAATTAAAAATGACAACTGTTAAACCA...AAAAATAAAATAAATAAAAATAGTTTTAAA Gap no gap Contig length 1241 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 1 Chromosome length...07Z ,263,623 est42= VSJ431Z ,390,646 est43= CHB363Z ,460,1187 Translated Amino Acid sequence snqnik*lkmttvkptspenprvffditig

  12. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12316-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Contig-U12316-1 gap included 1238 4 1925901 1927143 PLUS 5 6 U12316 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Show Contig...-U12316-1 Contig ID Contig-U12316-1 Contig update 2002.12.18 Contig sequence >Contig-U12316-1 (Contig-U12316-1Q) /CSM_Contig/Contig-U12316...GAGTTGAAGATTTAGTTTTATCAGNANGAANAAATAAGAT Gap gap included Contig length 1238 Chromosome number (1..6, M) 4 C...,915,1174 Translated Amino Acid sequence lvqhhyh*liscvivllksmv*isqvhivvhlfmfvn*qyileih*iptlknlskiftig...lip*r*rtrkttn*kiknny*itketkiqs*t*rvmmmi*vedlvls xxxnk Frame B: lvqhhyh*liscvivllksmv*isqvhivvhlfmfvn*qyileih*iptlknlskiftig

  13. Projector : automatic contig mapping for gap closure purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hijum, SAFT; Zomer, AL; Kuipers, OP; Kok, J

    2003-01-01

    Projector was designed for automatic positioning of contigs from an unfinished prokaryotic genome onto a template genome of a closely related strain or species. Projector mapped 84 contigs of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 (corresponding to 81% of the assembly nucleotides) against the genome of L.lactis

  14. Physical mapping in highly heterozygous genomes: a physical contig map of the Pinot Noir grapevine cultivar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurman Irena

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most of the grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cultivars grown today are those selected centuries ago, even though grapevine is one of the most important fruit crops in the world. Grapevine has therefore not benefited from the advances in modern plant breeding nor more recently from those in molecular genetics and genomics: genes controlling important agronomic traits are practically unknown. A physical map is essential to positionally clone such genes and instrumental in a genome sequencing project. Results We report on the first whole genome physical map of grapevine built using high information content fingerprinting of 49,104 BAC clones from the cultivar Pinot Noir. Pinot Noir, as most grape varieties, is highly heterozygous at the sequence level. This resulted in the two allelic haplotypes sometimes assembling into separate contigs that had to be accommodated in the map framework or in local expansions of contig maps. We performed computer simulations to assess the effects of increasing levels of sequence heterozygosity on BAC fingerprint assembly and showed that the experimental assembly results are in full agreement with the theoretical expectations, given the heterozygosity levels reported for grape. The map is anchored to a dense linkage map consisting of 994 markers. 436 contigs are anchored to the genetic map, covering 342 of the 475 Mb that make up the grape haploid genome. Conclusions We have developed a resource that makes it possible to access the grapevine genome, opening the way to a new era both in grape genetics and breeding and in wine making. The effects of heterozygosity on the assembly have been analyzed and characterized by using several complementary approaches which could be easily transferred to the study of other genomes which present the same features.

  15. Report of the Fourth International Workshop on human X chromosome mapping 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlessinger, D.; Mandel, J.L.; Monaco, A.P.; Nelson, D.L.; Willard, H.F. [eds.

    1993-12-31

    Vigorous interactive efforts by the X chromosome community have led to accelerated mapping in the last six months. Seventy-five participants from 12 countries around the globe contributed progress reports to the Fourth International X Chromosome Workshop, at St. Louis, MO, May 9-12, 1993. It became clear that well over half the chromosome is now covered by YAC contigs that are being extended, verified, and aligned by their content of STSs and other markers placed by cytogenetic or linkage mapping techniques. The major aim of the workshop was to assemble the consensus map that appears in this report, summarizing both consensus order and YAC contig information.

  16. Genome scan identifies a locus affecting gamma-globin expression in human beta-cluster YAC transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, S.D.; Cooper, P.; Fung, J.; Weier, H.U.G.; Rubin, E.M.

    2000-03-01

    Genetic factors affecting post-natal g-globin expression - a major modifier of the severity of both b-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia, have been difficult to study. This is especially so in mice, an organism lacking a globin gene with an expression pattern equivalent to that of human g-globin. To model the human b-cluster in mice, with the goal of screening for loci affecting human g-globin expression in vivo, we introduced a human b-globin cluster YAC transgene into the genome of FVB mice . The b-cluster contained a Greek hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) g allele resulting in postnatal expression of human g-globin in transgenic mice. The level of human g-globin for various F1 hybrids derived from crosses between the FVB transgenics and other inbred mouse strains was assessed. The g-globin level of the C3HeB/FVB transgenic mice was noted to be significantly elevated. To map genes affecting postnatal g-globin expression, a 20 centiMorgan (cM) genome scan of a C3HeB/F VB transgenics [prime] FVB backcross was performed, followed by high-resolution marker analysis of promising loci. From this analysis we mapped a locus within a 2.2 cM interval of mouse chromosome 1 at a LOD score of 4.2 that contributes 10.4% of variation in g-globin expression level. Combining transgenic modeling of the human b-globin gene cluster with quantitative trait analysis, we have identified and mapped a murine locus that impacts on human g-globin expression in vivo.

  17. Efecto del smallanthus sonchifolius "yacón" en el tratamiento de hiperlipemias comparado con dieta sola y gemfibrozilo. Trujillo, 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes Beltrán, María Esther Daisy

    2009-01-01

    Autor: María Esther Daisy Reyes Beltrán Título Tesis Doctoral: Efecto del Smallanthus sonchifolius “yacón” en el tratamiento de hiperlipemias comparado con dieta sola y gemfibrozilo. Trujillo, 2007. Asesor: Dr. Juan Jorge Huamán Saavedra. Páginas Totales: 40 Institución: Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional de Trujillo. El aumento de LDL colesterol y de triglicéridos y la disminución de HDL colesterol son factores de riesgo coronario. Es de interés saber si existe alguna variació...

  18. Evaluación químico bromatológica de las variedades Yurac Llajum, Gello Llajum y Yurac Checche de Smallanthus Sonchifolius (Poepp & Endl).H. Robinson (Yacón) procedente de Puno

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos Zapana, Rubén; Arias Arroyo, Gladys

    2014-01-01

    Las variedades Yurac llajum, Qello llajum y Yurac checche de la especie Smallanthus sonchifolius (Poepp & Endl) (Yacón), procedente de la provincia de Sandia del Departamento de Puno, se desarrollan entre 1500 a 3000 msnm. Conocidas como “yacón”, “yakuma”, “llaqón”, “llacun” o “llacuma” en quechua; en aymara “aricoma” o “aricuma“; en español “Yacón”, “Jacón”, “llacón”, “arboloco”, “Puhe”, “jicama”, “jíquima”, “jikima” o “jiquimilla”. Estas raíces tuberosas de sabor dulce y refrescante, de asp...

  19. Two sequence-ready contigs spanning the two copies of a 200-kb duplication on human 21q: partial sequence and polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potier, M; Dutriaux, A; Orti, R; Groet, J; Gibelin, N; Karadima, G; Lutfalla, G; Lynn, A; Van Broeckhoven, C; Chakravarti, A; Petersen, M; Nizetic, D; Delabar, J; Rossier, J

    1998-08-01

    Physical mapping across a duplication can be a tour de force if the region is larger than the size of a bacterial clone. This was the case of the 170- to 275-kb duplication present on the long arm of chromosome 21 in normal human at 21q11.1 (proximal region) and at 21q22.1 (distal region), which we described previously. We have constructed sequence-ready contigs of the two copies of the duplication of which all the clones are genuine representatives of one copy or the other. This required the identification of four duplicon polymorphisms that are copy-specific and nonallelic variations in the sequence of the STSs. Thirteen STSs were mapped inside the duplicated region and 5 outside but close to the boundaries. Among these STSs 10 were end clones from YACs, PACs, or cosmids, and the average interval between two markers in the duplicated region was 16 kb. Eight PACs and cosmids showing minimal overlaps were selected in both copies of the duplication. Comparative sequence analysis along the duplication showed three single-basepair changes between the two copies over 659 bp sequenced (4 STSs), suggesting that the duplication is recent (less than 4 mya). Two CpG islands were located in the duplication, but no genes were identified after a 36-kb cosmid from the proximal copy of the duplication was sequenced. The homology of this chromosome 21 duplicated region with the pericentromeric regions of chromosomes 13, 2, and 18 suggests that the mechanism involved is probably similar to pericentromeric-directed mechanisms described in interchromosomal duplications. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  20. Tourette syndrome in a pedigree with a 7;18 translocation: Identification of a YAC spanning the translocation breakpoint at 18q22.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Overhauser, J. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Comings, D.E. [City of Hope Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the presence of multiple, involuntary motor and vocal tics. Associated pathologies include attention deficit disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Extensive linkage analysis based on an autosomal dominant mode of transmission with reduced penetrance has failed to show linkage with polymorphic markers, suggesting either locus heterogeneity or a polygenic origin for Tourette syndrome. An individual diagnosed with Tourette syndrome has been described carrying a constitutional chromosome translocation. Other family members carrying the translocation exhibit features seen in Tourette syndrome including motor tics, vocal tics, and OCD. Since the disruption of specific genes by a chromosomal rearrangement can elicit a particular phenotype, we have undertaken the physical mapping of the 7;18 translocation such that genes mapping at the site of the breakpoint can be identified and evaluated for a possible involvement in Tourette syndrome. Using somatic cell hybrids retaining either the der(7) or the der(18), a more precise localization of the breakpoints on chromosomes 7 and 18 have been determined. Furthermore, physical mapping has identified two YAC clones that span the translocation breakpoint on chromosome 18 as determined by FISH. These YAC clones will be useful for the eventual identification of genes that map to chromosomes 7 and 18 at the site of the translocation. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. difusividad, masa, humedad, volumen y sólidos en yacón (Smallantus sonchifolius deshidratado osmóticamente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Rojas Naccha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó la capacidad predictiva de la Red Neuronal Artificial (RNA en el efecto de la concentración (30,40, 50 y 60 % p/p y temperatura (30, 40 y 50°C de la solución de fructooligosacaridos (FOS en la masa,humedad, volumen y sólidos en cubos de yacón osmodeshidratados, y en el coeficiente de difusividad efectivamedia del agua, con y sin encogimiento. Se aplicó la RNA del tipoFeedforwardcon los algoritmos deentrenamientoBackpropagationy de ajuste de pesosLevenberg-Marquardt, usando la topología: error metade 10-5, tasa de aprendizaje de 0.01, coeficiente de momento de 0.5, 2 neuronas de entrada, 6 neuronas desalida, una capa oculta con 18 neuronas, 15 etapas de entrenamiento y funciones de transferencialogsig-purelin. El error promedio global por la RNA fue 3.44% y los coeficientes de correlación fueron mayores a0.9. No se encontraron diferencias significativas entre los valores experimentales con losvalores predichos porla RNA y con los valores predichos por un modelo estadístico de regresión polinomial de segundo orden (p >0.95.Palabras clave:Red Neuronal Artificial (RNA, difusividad efectiva, yacón, deshidratación osmótica

  2. Land Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Land Cover database depicts 10 general land cover classes for the State of Kansas. The database was compiled from a digital classification of Landsat Thematic...

  3. Efecto hepatoprotector del extracto acuoso de Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacón en un modelo de intoxicación con acetaminofén

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acela Inés Arnao-Salas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available En la medicina tradicional se ha publicado que las hojas de Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacón poseen efectos antidiabético y hepatoprotector. Objetivos: Evaluar en suero y hematíes el efecto hepatoprotector del extracto acuoso de hojas de yacón (EAY en un modelo de intoxicación con acetaminofén en ratas. Diseño: Experimental, transversal. Institución: Centro de Investigación de Bioquímica y Nutrición, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú. Material biológico: Hojas de yacón. Intervenciones: Se formó cinco grupos de ratas hembra (n=6 que recibieron por cinco días, por vía oral, suero fisiológico (SF, EAY o silimarina (Sil (50 mg/kg y luego de 1 hora, SF o acetaminofén (A 250 mg/kg, según lo siguiente: G1 (control; SF-SF, G2 (SF-A, G3 (EAY (200 mg/kg-A, G4 (EAY (400 mg/kg-A y G5 (Sil-A. Principales medidas de los resultados: Actividad de aspartato amino transferasas (AST, alanina amino transferasa (ALT, fosfatasa alcalina (FAL γ γ-amino transferasa (γ-GTP; niveles de bilirrubina total (BT, proteνnas y lipoperoxidaciσn (MDA. En hematíes, actividades de superóxido dismutasa (SOD, catalasa (CAT y hemoglobina. Resultados: Se observó aumento significativo (p<0,05 en la actividad de γ-GTP entre el grupo G2 y los grupos G3 y G4. Hubo disminuciσn significativa (p<0,05 de proteνnas en el grupo G2 con respecto G1. El nivel de MDA fue menor en el grupo que recibió 200 mg/kg de EAY con respecto al control. Las actividades de AST, ALT y FAL no mostraron diferencias significativas. La relación SOD/CAT fue similar entre los grupos G1, G4 y G5, evidencia de una recuperación del daño causado por el acetaminofén. Conclusiones: La administración del EAY tuvo un efecto hepatoprotector comparable a la silimarina.

  4. Car Covers | Outdoor Covers Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Covers, Outdoor

    2018-01-01

    Protect your car from the elements with Ultimate Touch Car Cover. The multi-layer non-woven fabric is soft on the finish and offers 4 seasons all weather protection.https://outdoorcovers.ca/car-covers/

  5. Physical mapping of the Bloom syndrome region by the identification of YAC and P1 clones from human chromosome 15 band q26.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straughen, J.; Groden, J. [Univ. of Cincinnati College of Medicine, OH (United States); Ciocci, S. [New York Blood Center, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    The gene for Bloom syndrome (BLM) has been mapped to human chromosome 15 band q26.1 by homozygosity mapping. Further refinement of the location of BLM has relied upon linkage-disequilibrium mapping and somatic intragenic recombination. In combination with these mapping approaches and to identify novel DNA markers and probes for the BLM candidate region, a contiguous representation of the 2-Mb region that contains the BLM gene was generated and is presented here. YAC and P1 clones from the region have been identified and ordered by using previously available genetic markers in the region along with newly developed sequence-tagged sites from radiation-restriction map of the 2-Mb region that allowed estimation of the distance between polymorphic microsatellite loci is also reported. This map and the DNA markers derived from it were instrumental in the recent identification of the BLM gene. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Benthic Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic cover (habitat) maps are derived from aerial imagery, underwater photos, acoustic surveys, and data gathered from sediment samples. Shallow to moderate-depth...

  7. A Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei BAC library - contig building and microsynteny studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C.; Wu, B.; Giese, H.

    2002-01-01

    A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei, containing 12,000 clones with an average insert size of 41 kb, was constructed. The library represents about three genome equivalents and BAC-end sequencing showed a high content of repetitive sequences, making...... contigs, at or close to avirulence loci, were constructed. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were developed from BAC-end sequences to link the contigs to the genetic maps. Two other BAC contigs were used to study microsynteny between B. graminis and two other ascomycetes, Neurospora crassa...

  8. Efecto de gelificantes en la formulación de dulce de yacón Efeito de gelificante na formulação do doce do yacon

    OpenAIRE

    Silvina Maldonado; Judith del Carmen Singh

    2008-01-01

    El yacón (Smallanthus sonchifolius) es un tubérculo andino cultivado en las laderas de los Andes. Es una planta perenne que llega a su madurez entre 6-7 meses hasta 1 año, según la altura sobre el nivel del mar. Este trabajo propone la formulación de un producto alimenticio a partir de yacón por agregado de solutos: glucosa y sacarosa y combinación de barreras de estrés. Se estudió el efecto de gelificantes: agar-agar, pectina y goma arábiga, en tres concentraciones: 0,30, 0,41 y 0,48%. Se ag...

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U14477-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available vmvvvivfylqviynlriivilmvqlivivf*mglvmvtviiivivii i*rinnnnsnnnnnsnnnkikmif*yqiinrlnnyf*shyqkfiiiqrldfwdyqrler* *hhlyqrlvnqvvivq*fhwisl...amvlaimxxx own update 2004. 6.10 Homology vs CSM-cDNA Query= Contig-U14477-1 (Conti

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16279-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ( AB254080 |pid:none) Streptomyces kanamyceticus kanam... 47 0.002 CP000964_3229( CP000964 |pid:none) Klebsiella pneumoni...nkkmtkpvasyeldekrfltllgkligetenlqnrppalipiednag rhviealtpylkanggvleleqvhcdpvnypkrgniiie... letters Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value Contig-U16279-1 (Contig-U16279-1Q....................................................done Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Val....................................done Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Val

  11. Cinética de la transferencia de masa durante la deshidratación osmótica de yacón (Smallanthus sonchifolius Cinética de transferência de massa durante a desidratação osmótica de yacón (Smallanthus sonchifolius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Maldonado

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available El yacón (Smallanthus sonchifolius es un tubérculo andino de vida útil muy corta bajo condiciones ambientales. Los objetivos de este trabajo fueron determinar: 1 la cinética de deshidratación osmótica de yacón, utilizando sacarosa como soluto; 2 el ajuste de la ecuación de Peleg a los datos experimentales; y 3 el coeficiente de difusión usando la ecuación de Hawkes y Flink. La fruta se peló y cortó en placas de 3 x 3 x 0,3 cm. Se la deshidrató osmóticamente con solución de sacarosa al 40% (p/p, hasta aw = 0,97. El proceso se realizó a temperatura de 25 °C y con agitación continua (105 rpm. Se determinó la pérdida de peso de las muestras, la ganancia de sólidos y la retención de agua. Los parámetros obtenidos para el ajuste de pérdida de agua y ganancia de sólidos son respectivamente: k1: 8,2 0,1 y k2: 0,53 ± 0,06; k1: 234 ± 8 y k2: 2,6 ± 0,5. La mayor transferencia de masa, tanto de agua como de soluto, ocurre durante los primeros 60 a 90 minutos de proceso, lográndose una ganancia media de sólidos de 9,5 [g.100 g-1 MF] y una pérdida de agua de 68,8 [g.100 g-1MF]. Se puede asegurar que es posible aplicar satisfactoriamente el proceso de deshidratación osmótica en yacón como pre tratamiento de conservación.O yacón (Smallanthus sonchifolius é um tubérculo andino de vida útil muito curta sob condições ambientais. Os objetivos deste trabalho foram determinar: 1 a cinética de desidratação osmótica do yacón, utilizando sacarose como soluto; 2 o ajuste da equação de Peleg aos dados experimentais; e 3 o coeficiente de difusão usando a equação de Hawkes e Flink. A fruta foi descascada e cortada em placas de 3 x 3 x 0,3 cm. Foi desidratada osmoticamente usando uma solução de sacarose aos 40% (p/p, até aw = 0,97. O processo foi conduzido mantendo a temperatura constante em 25 °C e com agitação orbital contínua (105 rpm. Determinou-se a perda de peso das mostras, o ganho de sólidos e a retenção de

  12. Scaffold filling, contig fusion and comparative gene order inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rounsley Steve

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been a trend in increasing the phylogenetic scope of genome sequencing without finishing the sequence of the genome. Increasing numbers of genomes are being published in scaffold or contig form. Rearrangement algorithms, however, including gene order-based phylogenetic tools, require whole genome data on gene order or syntenic block order. How then can we use rearrangement algorithms to compare genomes available in scaffold form only? Can the comparative evidence predict the location of unsequenced genes? Results Our method involves optimally filling in genes missing from the scaffolds, while incorporating the augmented scaffolds directly into the rearrangement algorithms as if they were chromosomes. This is accomplished by an exact, polynomial-time algorithm. We then correct for the number of extra fusion/fission operations required to make scaffolds comparable to full assemblies. We model the relationship between the ratio of missing genes actually absent from the genome versus merely unsequenced ones, on one hand, and the increase of genomic distance after scaffold filling, on the other. We estimate the parameters of this model through simulations and by comparing the angiosperm genomes Ricinus communis and Vitis vinifera. Conclusions The algorithm solves the comparison of genomes with 18,300 genes, including 4500 missing from one genome, in less than a minute on a MacBook, putting virtually all genomes within range of the method.

  13. Scaffold filling, contig fusion and comparative gene order inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Adriana; Zheng, Chunfang; Zhu, Qian; Albert, Victor A; Rounsley, Steve; Sankoff, David

    2010-06-04

    There has been a trend in increasing the phylogenetic scope of genome sequencing without finishing the sequence of the genome. Increasing numbers of genomes are being published in scaffold or contig form. Rearrangement algorithms, however, including gene order-based phylogenetic tools, require whole genome data on gene order or syntenic block order. How then can we use rearrangement algorithms to compare genomes available in scaffold form only? Can the comparative evidence predict the location of unsequenced genes? Our method involves optimally filling in genes missing from the scaffolds, while incorporating the augmented scaffolds directly into the rearrangement algorithms as if they were chromosomes. This is accomplished by an exact, polynomial-time algorithm. We then correct for the number of extra fusion/fission operations required to make scaffolds comparable to full assemblies. We model the relationship between the ratio of missing genes actually absent from the genome versus merely unsequenced ones, on one hand, and the increase of genomic distance after scaffold filling, on the other. We estimate the parameters of this model through simulations and by comparing the angiosperm genomes Ricinus communis and Vitis vinifera. The algorithm solves the comparison of genomes with 18,300 genes, including 4500 missing from one genome, in less than a minute on a MacBook, putting virtually all genomes within range of the method.

  14. Contig-Layout-Authenticator (CLA): A Combinatorial Approach to Ordering and Scaffolding of Bacterial Contigs for Comparative Genomics and Molecular Epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Sabiha; Kumar, Narender; Lankapalli, Aditya K; Tiwari, Sumeet K; Baddam, Ramani; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of genome sequencing platforms have emerged in the recent past. High-throughput platforms like Illumina and 454 are essentially adaptations of the shotgun approach generating millions of fragmented single or paired sequencing reads. To reconstruct whole genomes, the reads have to be assembled into contigs, which often require further downstream processing. The contigs can be directly ordered according to a reference, scaffolded based on paired read information, or assembled using a combination of the two approaches. While the reference-based approach appears to mask strain-specific information, scaffolding based on paired-end information suffers when repetitive elements longer than the size of the sequencing reads are present in the genome. Sequencing technologies that produce long reads can solve the problems associated with repetitive elements but are not necessarily easily available to researchers. The most common high-throughput technology currently used is the Illumina short read platform. To improve upon the shortcomings associated with the construction of draft genomes with Illumina paired-end sequencing, we developed Contig-Layout-Authenticator (CLA). The CLA pipeline can scaffold reference-sorted contigs based on paired reads, resulting in better assembled genomes. Moreover, CLA also hints at probable misassemblies and contaminations, for the users to cross-check before constructing the consensus draft. The CLA pipeline was designed and trained extensively on various bacterial genome datasets for the ordering and scaffolding of large repetitive contigs. The tool has been validated and compared favorably with other widely-used scaffolding and ordering tools using both simulated and real sequence datasets. CLA is a user friendly tool that requires a single command line input to generate ordered scaffolds.

  15. Área foliar del yacón (Smallanthus sonchifolius (Poep. & Endl. H. Rob. estimada mediante método indirecto.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Seminario-Cunya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue estimar el área foliar de ocho morfotipos de yacón mediante análisis de regresión lineal simple. La investigación se realizó entre los años 2014 y 2015, en el Programa de Raíces y Tubérculos Andinos de la Universidad Nacional de Cajamarca, Perú (7° 10’ 00’’ S, 78° 30’00’’ W, 2650 msnm. Se tomaron cien hojas de cada morfotipo, incluyendo hojas de los estratos basal, medio y terminal de plantas en plena oración. Las siluetas de las hojas frescas se dibujaron en papel y se midió el largo (L y ancho mayor de la lámina (W. El área medida (o real de la lámina se determinó con planímetro digital. Con el área medida (variable dependiente y los valores de largo, ancho, largo al cuadrado, ancho al cuadrado, largo x ancho y largo/ancho (como variables independientes, se realizó el análisis de regresión para cada morfotipo. En todos los morfotipos, excepto en dos, las mejores ecuaciones para estimar el área foliar, fueron aquellas en donde intervino el producto de L x W. La ecuación A= 20,41 + 0,4167 (L x W (r2 = 0,89 permitió estimar el área foliar de los ocho morfotipos en conjunto. El área del peciolo de los morfotipos en estudio signi có 15%, respecto del área total de la hoja.

  16. Sganzerla Cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor da Rosa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, realizo uma leitura do cinema de Rogério Sganzerla, desde o clássico O bandido da luz vermelha até os documentários filmados na década de oitenta, a partir de duas noções centrais: cover e over. Para isso, parto de uma controvérsia com o ensaio de Ismail Xavier, Alegorias do subdesenvolvimento, em que o crítico realiza uma leitura do cinema brasileiro da década de sessenta através do conceito de alegoria; depois releio uma série de textos críticos do próprio Sganzerla, publicados em Edifício Sganzerla, procurando repensar as ideias de “herói vazio” ou “cinema impuro” e sugerindo assim uma nova relação do seu cinema com o tempo e a representação; então busco articular tais ideias com certos procedimentos de vanguarda, como a falsificação, a cópia, o clichê e a colagem; e finalmente procuro mostrar que, no cinema de Sganzerla, a partir principalmente de suas reflexões sobre Orson Welles, a voz é usada de maneira a deformar a interpretação naturalista.

  17. AAV-dominant negative tumor necrosis factor (DN-TNF gene transfer to the striatum does not rescue medium spiny neurons in the YAC128 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Taylor Alto

    Full Text Available CNS inflammation is a hallmark of neurodegenerative disease, and recent studies suggest that the inflammatory response may contribute to neuronal demise. In particular, increased tumor necrosis factor (TNF signaling is implicated in the pathology of both Parkinson's disease (PD and Alzheimer's disease (AD. We have previously shown that localized gene delivery of dominant negative TNF to the degenerating brain region can limit pathology in animal models of PD and AD. TNF is upregulated in Huntington's disease (HD, like in PD and AD, but it is unknown whether TNF signaling contributes to neuronal degeneration in HD. We used in vivo gene delivery to test whether selective reduction of soluble TNF signaling could attenuate medium spiny neuron (MSN degeneration in the YAC128 transgenic (TG mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD. AAV vectors encoding cDNA for dominant-negative tumor necrosis factor (DN-TNF or GFP (control were injected into the striatum of young adult wild type WT and YAC128 TG mice and achieved 30-50% target coverage. Expression of dominant negative TNF protein was confirmed immunohistologically and biochemically and was maintained as mice aged to one year, but declined significantly over time. However, the extent of striatal DN-TNF gene transfer achieved in our studies was not sufficient to achieve robust effects on neuroinflammation, rescue degenerating MSNs or improve motor function in treated mice. Our findings suggest that alternative drug delivery strategies should be explored to determine whether greater target coverage by DN-TNF protein might afford some level of neuroprotection against HD-like pathology and/or that soluble TNF signaling may not be the primary driver of striatal neuroinflammation and MSN loss in YAC128 TG mice.

  18. ESTminer: a Web interface for mining EST contig and cluster databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yecheng; Pumphrey, Janie; Gingle, Alan R

    2005-03-01

    ESTminer is a Web application and database schema for interactive mining of expressed sequence tag (EST) contig and cluster datasets. The Web interface contains a query frame that allows the selection of contigs/clusters with specific cDNA library makeup or a threshold number of members. The results are displayed as color-coded tree nodes, where the color indicates the fractional size of each cDNA library component. The nodes are expandable, revealing library statistics as well as EST or contig members, with links to sequence data, GenBank records or user configurable links. Also, the interface allows 'queries within queries' where the result set of a query is further filtered by the subsequent query. ESTminer is implemented in Java/JSP and the package, including MySQL and Oracle schema creation scripts, is available from http://cggc.agtec.uga.edu/Data/download.asp agingle@uga.edu.

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U03802-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T-2KB Trichosurus... 48 3e-11 4 ( DY894715 ) CeleSEQ14351 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (... 58 4e-11 3... letters Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value Contig-U03802-1 (Contig-U... letters Searching..................................................done Score E Sequences producing significant al...1... 62 4e-05 1 ( EJ306703 ) 1095390099376 Global-Ocean-Sampling_GS-27-01-01-1... 62 4e-05 1 ( CP000238 ) Baumannia cicadellinicola... AY241394 |pid:none) Melopsittacus undulatus Mn superox... 244 2e-63 AF329270_1( AF329270 |pid:none) Gallus gallus manganes

  20. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11311-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available A from... 58 6e-07 2 ( AM481444 ) Vitis vinifera contig VV78X144362.4, whole genome... 68 1e-06 1 ( AY604469 ) Prodonto...117 4e-27 AY604469_1( AY604469 |pid:none) Prodontorhabditis wirthi strain DF... 125 5e-27 ( P25202 ) RecName

  1. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16102-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0 6 ( BJ408668 ) Dictyostelium discoideum cDNA clone:dds46g14, 3' ... 44 3.0 2 ( CV162186 ) CS_hyp_01d11_M13Reverse Blue crab hypoder...08_M13Reverse Blue crab hypodermis, nor... 42 3.6 2 ( AM474408 ) Vitis vinifera contig VV78X173370.5, whole

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05126-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CP000939 ) Clostridium botulinum B1 str. Okra, complete genome. 34 2.5 18 ( GE803619 ) EST_scau_evk_893885 ...scauevk mixed_tissue Sebastes... 32 2.6 3 ( AM462416 ) Vitis vinifera contig VV78X219254.19, whole genom...

  3. Land Cover - Minnesota Land Cover Classification System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Land cover data set based on the Minnesota Land Cover Classification System (MLCCS) coding scheme. This data was produced using a combination of aerial photograph...

  4. Efecto de gelificantes en la formulación de dulce de yacón Efeito de gelificante na formulação do doce do yacon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Maldonado

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available El yacón (Smallanthus sonchifolius es un tubérculo andino cultivado en las laderas de los Andes. Es una planta perenne que llega a su madurez entre 6-7 meses hasta 1 año, según la altura sobre el nivel del mar. Este trabajo propone la formulación de un producto alimenticio a partir de yacón por agregado de solutos: glucosa y sacarosa y combinación de barreras de estrés. Se estudió el efecto de gelificantes: agar-agar, pectina y goma arábiga, en tres concentraciones: 0,30, 0,41 y 0,48%. Se agregó benzoato de sodio, metabisulfito de sodio y ácido cítrico. Se desarrolló un dulce tipo pan. Se registró la evolución de temperatura durante la cocción. Se empacó y envasó el dulce en bandejas. Se analizaron parámetros de textura principales y secundarios. La formulación que alcanzó valores de textura similares a la referencia fue: 0,48% de agar-agar; 12% de sacarosa; 17% de glucosa; 23% de agua; 996,75 ppm de metabisulfito; 498,50 ppm de ácido cítrico y 1435,7 ppm de benzoato de sodio. Se realizó una prueba sensorial a través de la evaluación de los parámetros más representativos de la textura, utilizando para ello una escala hedónica, determinando la aceptación de la formulación seleccionada.O yacón (Smallanthus sonchifolius é um tubérculo andino cultivado nas encostas Dos Andes. É uma planta perene que chega a sua maduração entre 6 meses e 1 ano. Este trabalho propõe a formulação de um produto alimentício a partir do yacón agregando solutos: glicose, sacarose e combinação de barreiras de estresse. Estudou-se o efeito de gelificantes: ágar-ágar e arábica, em três concentrações 0.30, 0.41 e 0.48%. Agregou-se benzoato de sódio, metabisulfito de sódio, e ácido cítrico. Desenvolveu-se um doce tipo pão. Registrou-se a evolução da temperatura durate cozimento. Empacotou-se e envasou-se o doce em bandejas. Analisaram-se parâmetros de textura principais e secundários. A formulação que atingiu os

  5. The binning of metagenomic contigs for microbial physiology of mixed cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strous, Marc; Kraft, Beate; Bisdorf, Regina; Tegetmeyer, Halina E

    2012-01-01

    So far, microbial physiology has dedicated itself mainly to pure cultures. In nature, cross feeding and competition are important aspects of microbial physiology and these can only be addressed by studying complete communities such as enrichment cultures. Metagenomic sequencing is a powerful tool to characterize such mixed cultures. In the analysis of metagenomic data, well established algorithms exist for the assembly of short reads into contigs and for the annotation of predicted genes. However, the binning of the assembled contigs or unassembled reads is still a major bottleneck and required to understand how the overall metabolism is partitioned over different community members. Binning consists of the clustering of contigs or reads that apparently originate from the same source population. In the present study eight metagenomic samples from the same habitat, a laboratory enrichment culture, were sequenced. Each sample contained 13-23 Mb of assembled contigs and up to eight abundant populations. Binning was attempted with existing methods but they were found to produce poor results, were slow, dependent on non-standard platforms or produced errors. A new binning procedure was developed based on multivariate statistics of tetranucleotide frequencies combined with the use of interpolated Markov models. Its performance was evaluated by comparison of the results between samples with BLAST and in comparison to existing algorithms for four publicly available metagenomes and one previously published artificial metagenome. The accuracy of the new approach was comparable or higher than existing methods. Further, it was up to a 100 times faster. It was implemented in Java Swing as a complete open source graphical binning application available for download and further development (http://sourceforge.net/projects/metawatt).

  6. The binning of metagenomic contigs for microbial physiology of mixed cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eStrous

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available So far, microbial physiology has dedicated itself mainly to pure cultures. In nature, cross feeding and competition are important aspects of microbial physiology and these can only be addressed by studying complete communities such as enrichment cultures. Metagenomic sequencing is a powerful tool to characterize such mixed cultures. In the analysis of metagenomic data, well established algorithms exist for the assembly of short reads into contigs and for the annotation of predicted genes. However, the binning of the assembled contigs or unassembled reads is still a major bottleneck and required to understand how the overall metabolism is partitioned over different community members. Binning consists of the clustering of contigs or reads that apparently originate from the same source population.In the present study eight metagenomic samples originating from the same habitat, a laboratory enrichment culture, were sequenced. Each sample contained 13-23 Mb of assembled contigs and up to eight abundant populations. Binning was attempted with existing methods but they were found to produce poor results, were slow, dependent on non-standard platforms or produced errors. A new binning procedure was developed based on multivariate statistics of tetranucleotide frequencies combined with the use of interpolated Markov models. Its performance was evaluated by comparison of the results between samples with BLAST and in comparison to exisiting algorithms for four publicly available metagenomes and one previously published artificial metagenome. The accuracy of the new approach was comparable or higher than existing methods. Further, it was up to a hunderd times faster. It was implemented in Java Swing as a complete open source graphical binning application available for download and further development (http://sourceforge.net/projects/metawatt.

  7. CBrowse: a SAM/BAM-based contig browser for transcriptome assembly visualization and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei; Ji, Guoli; Dong, Min; Schmidt, Emily; Lenox, Douglas; Chen, Liangliang; Liu, Qi; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Jie; Liang, Chun

    2012-09-15

    To address the impending need for exploring rapidly increased transcriptomics data generated for non-model organisms, we developed CBrowse, an AJAX-based web browser for visualizing and analyzing transcriptome assemblies and contigs. Designed in a standard three-tier architecture with a data pre-processing pipeline, CBrowse is essentially a Rich Internet Application that offers many seamlessly integrated web interfaces and allows users to navigate, sort, filter, search and visualize data smoothly. The pre-processing pipeline takes the contig sequence file in FASTA format and its relevant SAM/BAM file as the input; detects putative polymorphisms, simple sequence repeats and sequencing errors in contigs and generates image, JSON and database-compatible CSV text files that are directly utilized by different web interfaces. CBowse is a generic visualization and analysis tool that facilitates close examination of assembly quality, genetic polymorphisms, sequence repeats and/or sequencing errors in transcriptome sequencing projects. CBrowse is distributed under the GNU General Public License, available at http://bioinfolab.muohio.edu/CBrowse/ liangc@muohio.edu or liangc.mu@gmail.com; glji@xmu.edu.cn Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  8. CSAR-web: a web server of contig scaffolding using algebraic rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kun-Tze; Lu, Chin Lung

    2018-05-04

    CSAR-web is a web-based tool that allows the users to efficiently and accurately scaffold (i.e. order and orient) the contigs of a target draft genome based on a complete or incomplete reference genome from a related organism. It takes as input a target genome in multi-FASTA format and a reference genome in FASTA or multi-FASTA format, depending on whether the reference genome is complete or incomplete, respectively. In addition, it requires the users to choose either 'NUCmer on nucleotides' or 'PROmer on translated amino acids' for CSAR-web to identify conserved genomic markers (i.e. matched sequence regions) between the target and reference genomes, which are used by the rearrangement-based scaffolding algorithm in CSAR-web to order and orient the contigs of the target genome based on the reference genome. In the output page, CSAR-web displays its scaffolding result in a graphical mode (i.e. scalable dotplot) allowing the users to visually validate the correctness of scaffolded contigs and in a tabular mode allowing the users to view the details of scaffolds. CSAR-web is available online at http://genome.cs.nthu.edu.tw/CSAR-web.

  9. LTC: a novel algorithm to improve the efficiency of contig assembly for physical mapping in complex genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feuillet Catherine

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical maps are the substrate of genome sequencing and map-based cloning and their construction relies on the accurate assembly of BAC clones into large contigs that are then anchored to genetic maps with molecular markers. High Information Content Fingerprinting has become the method of choice for large and repetitive genomes such as those of maize, barley, and wheat. However, the high level of repeated DNA present in these genomes requires the application of very stringent criteria to ensure a reliable assembly with the FingerPrinted Contig (FPC software, which often results in short contig lengths (of 3-5 clones before merging as well as an unreliable assembly in some difficult regions. Difficulties can originate from a non-linear topological structure of clone overlaps, low power of clone ordering algorithms, and the absence of tools to identify sources of gaps in Minimal Tiling Paths (MTPs. Results To address these problems, we propose a novel approach that: (i reduces the rate of false connections and Q-clones by using a new cutoff calculation method; (ii obtains reliable clusters robust to the exclusion of single clone or clone overlap; (iii explores the topological contig structure by considering contigs as networks of clones connected by significant overlaps; (iv performs iterative clone clustering combined with ordering and order verification using re-sampling methods; and (v uses global optimization methods for clone ordering and Band Map construction. The elements of this new analytical framework called Linear Topological Contig (LTC were applied on datasets used previously for the construction of the physical map of wheat chromosome 3B with FPC. The performance of LTC vs. FPC was compared also on the simulated BAC libraries based on the known genome sequences for chromosome 1 of rice and chromosome 1 of maize. Conclusions The results show that compared to other methods, LTC enables the construction of highly

  10. Branched polynomial covering maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    1999-01-01

    A Weierstrass polynomial with multiple roots in certain points leads to a branched covering map. With this as the guiding example, we formally define and study the notion of a branched polynomial covering map. We shall prove that many finite covering maps are polynomial outside a discrete branch...... set. Particular studies are made of branched polynomial covering maps arising from Riemann surfaces and from knots in the 3-sphere....

  11. Branched polynomial covering maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    2002-01-01

    A Weierstrass polynomial with multiple roots in certain points leads to a branched covering map. With this as the guiding example, we formally define and study the notion of a branched polynomial covering map. We shall prove that many finite covering maps are polynomial outside a discrete branch ...... set. Particular studies are made of branched polynomial covering maps arising from Riemann surfaces and from knots in the 3-sphere. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.......A Weierstrass polynomial with multiple roots in certain points leads to a branched covering map. With this as the guiding example, we formally define and study the notion of a branched polynomial covering map. We shall prove that many finite covering maps are polynomial outside a discrete branch...

  12. Landfill Top Covers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the final cover of a landfill is to contain the waste and to provide for a physical separation between the waste and the environment for protection of public health. Most landfill covers are designed with the primary goal to reduce or prevent infiltration of precipitation...... into the landfill in order to minimize leachate generation. In addition the cover also has to control the release of gases produced in the landfill so the gas can be ventilated, collected and utilized, or oxidized in situ. The landfill cover should also minimize erosion and support vegetation. Finally the cover...... is landscaped in order to fit into the surrounding area/environment or meet specific plans for the final use of the landfill. To fulfill the above listed requirements landfill covers are often multicomponent systems which are placed directly on top of the waste. The top cover may be placed immediately after...

  13. Armored Geomembrane Cover Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Foye

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Geomembranes are an important component of modern engineered barriers to prevent the infiltration of stormwater and runoff into contaminated soil and rock as well as waste containment facilities—a function generally described as a geomembrane cover. This paper presents a case history involving a novel implementation of a geomembrane cover system. Due to this novelty, the design engineers needed to assemble from disparate sources the design criteria for the engineering of the cover. This paper discusses the design methodologies assembled by the engineering team. This information will aid engineers designing similar cover systems as well as environmental and public health professionals selecting site improvements that involve infiltration barriers.

  14. Percent Forest Cover (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Forests provide economic and ecological value. High percentages of forest cover (FORPCTFuture) generally indicate healthier ecosystems and cleaner surface water....

  15. Percent Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Forests provide economic and ecological value. High percentages of forest cover (FORPCT) generally indicate healthier ecosystems and cleaner surface water. More...

  16. Covered Bridge Security Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett Phares; Terry Wipf; Ryan Sievers; Travis Hosteng

    2013-01-01

    The design, construction, and use of covered timber bridges is all but a lost art in these days of pre-stressed concrete, high-performance steel, and the significant growth both in the volume and size of vehicles. Furthermore, many of the existing covered timber bridges are preserved only because of their status on the National Registry of Historic Places or the...

  17. A post-assembly genome-improvement toolkit (PAGIT) to obtain annotated genomes from contigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Martin T; Tsai, Isheng J; Assefa, Samual A; Newbold, Chris; Berriman, Matthew; Otto, Thomas D

    2012-06-07

    Genome projects now produce draft assemblies within weeks owing to advanced high-throughput sequencing technologies. For milestone projects such as Escherichia coli or Homo sapiens, teams of scientists were employed to manually curate and finish these genomes to a high standard. Nowadays, this is not feasible for most projects, and the quality of genomes is generally of a much lower standard. This protocol describes software (PAGIT) that is used to improve the quality of draft genomes. It offers flexible functionality to close gaps in scaffolds, correct base errors in the consensus sequence and exploit reference genomes (if available) in order to improve scaffolding and generating annotations. The protocol is most accessible for bacterial and small eukaryotic genomes (up to 300 Mb), such as pathogenic bacteria, malaria and parasitic worms. Applying PAGIT to an E. coli assembly takes ∼24 h: it doubles the average contig size and annotates over 4,300 gene models.

  18. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U01541-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ula chromosome 7 BAC clone mth2-7... 36 3.7 5 ( FG283242 ) 1108457714276 New World Screwworm Egg 9261 ESTs C...1-1... 40 3.8 2 ( AM448784 ) Vitis vinifera contig VV78X077229.13, whole genom... 40 3.8 5 ( FG299281 ) 1108793334783 New World...malized cDNA li... 34 3.8 3 ( FG298782 ) 1108793320683 New World Screwworm Larvae 9387 EST... 40 3.8 2 ( AC2...) Populus trichocarpa clone POP011-A24, complete se... 38 3.9 5 ( FG298363 ) 1108793311332 New World Screwwo...rm Larvae 9387 EST... 40 3.9 2 ( AE017263 ) Mesoplasma florum L1 complete genome. 34 3.9 11 ( FG290177 ) 1108793315292 New World

  19. L’Anaphore associative: contigüité métonymique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Peña Martínez

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Cet article porte sur les rapports de contigüité exigés lors de la résolution des anaphores associatives. Il s’agit en général de relations métonymiques, car les différents rapports, à caractère notamment socioculturel, entre référent et marque anaphorique convergent dans un même cadre conceptuel, se faisant écho d’éléments ou caractéristiques du même domaine cognitif. L’anaphore associative reprenant ainsi un attribut concret du référent, nous envisageons donc une classification de ces marques anaphoriques d’après des rapports métonymiques, tels que partie à tout, objet à matière et caractéristique ou propriété à objet.

  20. Covering folded shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswin Aichholzer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Can folding a piece of paper flat make it larger? We explore whether a shape S must be scaled to cover a flat-folded copy of itself. We consider both single folds and arbitrary folds (continuous piecewise isometries \\(S\\to\\mathbb{R}^2\\. The underlying problem is motivated by computational origami, and is related to other covering and fixturing problems, such as Lebesgue's universal cover problem and force closure grasps. In addition to considering special shapes (squares, equilateral triangles, polygons and disks, we give upper and lower bounds on scale factors for single folds of convex objects and arbitrary folds of simply connected objects.

  1. Evapotranspiration (ET) covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Steve; Myers, Bill; Fiedler, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) cover systems are increasingly being used at municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills, hazardous waste landfills, at industrial monofills, and at mine sites. Conventional cover systems use materials with low hydraulic permeability (barrier layers) to minimize the downward migration of water from the surface to the waste (percolation), ET cover systems use water balance components to minimize percolation. These cover systems rely on soil to capture and store precipitation until it is either transpired through vegetation or evaporated from the soil surface. Compared to conventional membrane or compacted clay cover systems, ET cover systems are expected to cost less to construct. They are often aesthetic because they employ naturalized vegetation, require less maintenance once the vegetative system is established, including eliminating mowing, and may require fewer repairs than a barrier system. All cover systems should consider the goals of the cover in terms of protectiveness, including the pathways of risk from contained material, the lifecycle of the containment system. The containment system needs to be protective of direct contact of people and animals with the waste, prevent surface and groundwater water pollution, and minimize release of airborne contaminants. While most containment strategies have been based on the dry tomb strategy of keeping waste dry, there are some sites where adding or allowing moisture to help decompose organic waste is the current plan. ET covers may work well in places where complete exclusion of precipitation is not needed. The U.S. EPA Alternative Cover Assessment Program (ACAP), USDOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and others have researched ET cover design and efficacy, including the history of their use, general considerations in their design, performance, monitoring, cost, current status, limitations on their use, and project specific examples. An on-line database has been developed with information

  2. Percent of Impervious Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — High amounts of impervious cover (parking lots, rooftops, roads, etc.) can increase water runoff, which may directly enter surface water. Runoff from roads often...

  3. GAP Land Cover - Image

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This raster dataset is a simple image of the original detailed (1-acre minimum), hierarchically organized vegetation cover map produced by computer classification of...

  4. GAP Land Cover - Vector

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This vector dataset is a detailed (1-acre minimum), hierarchically organized vegetation cover map produced by computer classification of combined two-season pairs of...

  5. Percent Wetland Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Wetlands act as filters, removing or diminishing the amount of pollutants that enter surface water. Higher values for percent of wetland cover (WETLNDSPCT) may be...

  6. Percent Wetland Cover (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Wetlands act as filters, removing or diminishing the amount of pollutants that enter surface water. Higher values for percent of wetland cover (WETLNDSPCT) may be...

  7. Direct selection of expressed sequences on a YAC clone revealed proline-rich-like genes and BARE-1 sequences physically linked to the complex ¤Mla¤ powdery mildew resistance locus of barley (¤Hordeum vulgare¤ L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, G.; Michalek, W.; Jahoor, A.

    2002-01-01

    homology to the copia-like retroelement BA REI of barley, putatively involved in evolution of disease resistance loci. The high degree of clones representing barley rRNA sequences or false positives is a major disadvantage of direct selection of cDNAs in barley. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All...... gene. Of 22 selected cDNA clones, six were re-located on the YAC by southern analysis. Two of these clones are predicted to encode members of the hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein and proline-rich protein gene families which have been implicated in plant defense response. Four sequences showed high...

  8. Climate under cover

    CERN Document Server

    Takakura, Tadashi

    2002-01-01

    1.1. INTRODUCTION Plastic covering, either framed or floating, is now used worldwide to protect crops from unfavorable growing conditions, such as severe weather and insects and birds. Protected cultivation in the broad sense, including mulching, has been widely spread by the innovation of plastic films. Paper, straw, and glass were the main materials used before the era of plastics. Utilization of plastics in agriculture started in the developed countries and is now spreading to the developing countries. Early utilization of plastic was in cold regions, and plastic was mainly used for protection from the cold. Now plastic is used also for protection from wind, insects and diseases. The use of covering techniques started with a simple system such as mulching, then row covers and small tunnels were developed, and finally plastic houses. Floating mulch was an exception to this sequence: it was introduced rather recently, although it is a simple structure. New development of functional and inexpensive films trig...

  9. On Covering Approximation Subspaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Ge

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Let (U';C' be a subspace of a covering approximation space (U;C and X⊂U'. In this paper, we show that and B'(X⊂B(X∩U'. Also, iff (U;C has Property Multiplication. Furthermore, some connections between outer (resp. inner definable subsets in (U;C and outer (resp. inner definable subsets in (U';C' are established. These results answer a question on covering approximation subspace posed by J. Li, and are helpful to obtain further applications of Pawlak rough set theory in pattern recognition and artificial intelligence.

  10. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jian-Ying; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting ...

  11. Alternative cover design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    The special study on Alternative Cover Designs is one of several studies initiated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in response to the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater standards. The objective of this study is to investigate the possibility of minimizing the infiltration of precipitation through stabilized tailings piles by altering the standard design of covers currently used on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Prior. to the issuance of the proposed standards, UMTRA Project piles had common design elements to meet the required criteria, the most important of which were for radon diffusion, long-term stability, erosion protection, and groundwater protection. The standard pile covers consisted of three distinct layers. From top to bottom they were: rock for erosion protection; a sand bedding layer; and the radon barrier, usually consisting of a clayey sand material, which also functioned to limit infiltration into the tailings. The piles generally had topslopes from 2 to 4 percent and sideslopes of 20 percent

  12. ScaffoldScaffolder: solving contig orientation via bidirected to directed graph reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodily, Paul M; Fujimoto, M Stanley; Snell, Quinn; Ventura, Dan; Clement, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    The contig orientation problem, which we formally define as the MAX-DIR problem, has at times been addressed cursorily and at times using various heuristics. In setting forth a linear-time reduction from the MAX-CUT problem to the MAX-DIR problem, we prove the latter is NP-complete. We compare the relative performance of a novel greedy approach with several other heuristic solutions. Our results suggest that our greedy heuristic algorithm not only works well but also outperforms the other algorithms due to the nature of scaffold graphs. Our results also demonstrate a novel method for identifying inverted repeats and inversion variants, both of which contradict the basic single-orientation assumption. Such inversions have previously been noted as being difficult to detect and are directly involved in the genetic mechanisms of several diseases. http://bioresearch.byu.edu/scaffoldscaffolder. paulmbodily@gmail.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Yeast artificial chromosome cloning in the glycerol kinase and adrenal hypoplasia congenita region of Xp21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, K.C.; Ellison, K.A.; Zhang, Y.H.; Wang, D.F.; Mason, J.; Roth, E.J.; Adams, V.; Fogt, D.D.; Zhu, X.M.; Towbin, J.A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1993-05-01

    The adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and glycerol kinase (GK) loci are telomeric to the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus in Xp21. The authors developed a pair of yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs spanning at least 1.2 Mb and encompassing the region from the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus to beyond YHX39 (DXS727), including the genes for AHC and GK. The centromeric contig consists of 13 YACs reaching more than 600 kb from DMD through GK. The telomeric contig group consists of 8 YACs containing more than 600 kb including the markers YHX39 (DXS727) and QST-59 (DXS319). Patient deletion breakpoints in the region of the two YAC contigs define at least eight intervals, and seven deletion breakpoints are contained within these contigs. In addition to the probes developed from YAC ends, they have mapped eight Alu-PCR probes amplified from a radiation-reduced somatic cell hybrid, two anonymous DNA probes, and one Alu-PCR product amplified from a cosmid end, for a total of 26 new markers within this region of 2 Mb or less. One YAC in the centromeric contig contains an insert encompassing the minimum interval for GK deficiency defined by patient deletion breakpoints, and this clone includes all or part of the GK gene. 33 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jiong; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting...... tree is isomorphic to T? We prove that in the general setting, CST is NP-complete, which implies that the tree edit distance considered here is also NP-hard, even when both input trees having diameters bounded by 10. We also show that, when the number of distinct stars is bounded by a constant k, CTS...

  15. Alternate cover materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    As an effort to enhance compliance with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater standards, several special studies are being performed by the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to identify and evaluate various design features that may reduce groundwater-related releases from tailings piles. The objective of this special study is to assess the suitability of using alternate cover materials (other than geomembranes) as infiltration barriers in Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project piles to minimize leachate generation. The materials evaluated in this study include various types of asphalts, concretes, and a sodium bentonite clay/polypropylene liner system

  16. Physical and transcription map of a 25 Mb region on human chromosome 7 (region q21-q22)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, S. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)]|[Hosptial for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Little, S.; Vandenberg, A. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We are interested in the q21-q22 region of chromosome 7 because of its implication in a number of diseases. This region of about 25 Mb appears to be involved in ectrodactyly/ectodermal dysplasia/cleft plate (EEC) and split hand/split foot deformity (SHFD1), as well as myelodysplastic syndrome and acute non-lymphocyte leukemia. In order to identify the genes responsible for these and other diseases, we have constructed a physical map of this region. The proximal and distal boundaries of the region were operationally defined by the microsatellite markers D7S660 and D7S692, which are about 35 cM apart. This region between these two markers could be divided into 13 intervals on the basis of chromosome breakpoints contained in somatic cell hybrids. The map positions for 43 additional microsatellite markers and 25 cloned genes were determined with respect to these intervals. A physical map based on contigs of over 250 YACs has also been assembled. While the contigs encompass all of the known genetic markers mapped to the region and almost cover the entire 25-Mb region, there are 3 gaps on the map. One of these gaps spans a set of DNA markers for which no corresponding YAC clones could be identified. To connect the two adjacent contigs we have initiated cosmid walking with a chromosome 7-specific library (Lawrence Livermore Laboratory). A tiling path of 60 contiguous YAC clones has been assembled and used for direct cDNA selection. Over 300 cDNA clones have been isolated and characterized. They are being grouped into transcription units by Northern blot analysis and screening of full-length cDNA libraries. Further, exon amplification and direct cDNA library screening with evolutionarily conserved sequences are being performed for a 1-Mb region spanning the SHFD1 locus to ensure detection of all transcribed sequences.

  17. National Land Cover Database (NLCD) Land Cover Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The National Land Cover Database (NLCD) Land Cover Collection is produced through a cooperative project conducted by the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC)...

  18. Allegheny County Land Cover Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Land Cover dataset demarcates 14 land cover types by area; such as Residential, Commercial, Industrial, Forest, Agriculture, etc. If viewing this description on...

  19. On approximating restricted cycle covers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manthey, Bodo

    2008-01-01

    A cycle cover of a graph is a set of cycles such that every vertex is part of exactly one cycle. An $L$-cycle cover is a cycle cover in which the length of every cycle is in the set $L$. The weight of a cycle cover of an edge-weighted graph is the sum of the weights of its edges. We come close to

  20. Gainesville's urban forest canopy cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco Escobedo; Jennifer A. Seitz; Wayne Zipperer

    2009-01-01

    Ecosystem benefits from trees are linked directly to the amount of healthy urban forest canopy cover. Urban forest cover is dynamic and changes over time due to factors such as urban development, windstorms, tree removals, and growth. The amount of a city's canopy cover depends on its land use, climate, and people's preferences. This fact sheet examines how...

  1. Gene content and organization of a 281-kbp contig from the genome of the extremely thermophilic archaeon, Sulfolobus solfataricus P2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charlebois, R.; Confalonieri, F.; Curtis, B.; Doolittle, W.F.; Duguet, M.; Erauso, G.; Faguy, D.; Gaasterland, T.; Garrett, R.A.; Gordon, P.; Kozera, C.; Medina, N.; Oost, van der J.; Peng, X.; Ragan, M.; She, Q.; Singh, R.K.

    2000-01-01

    The sequence of a 281-kbp contig from the crenarchaeote Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 was determined and analysed. Notable features in this region include 29 ribosomal protein genes, 12 tRNA genes (four of which contain archaeal-type introns), operons encoding enzymes of histidine biosynthesis,

  2. Combinatorial aspects of covering arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J. Colbourn

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Covering arrays generalize orthogonal arrays by requiring that t -tuples be covered, but not requiring that the appearance of t -tuples be balanced.Their uses in screening experiments has found application in software testing, hardware testing, and a variety of fields in which interactions among factors are to be identified. Here a combinatorial view of covering arrays is adopted, encompassing basic bounds, direct constructions, recursive constructions, algorithmic methods, and applications.

  3. GLCF: Landsat GeoCover

    Science.gov (United States)

    satellite imagery provided in a standardized, orthorectified format, covering the entire land surface of the * Orthorectification * Distribution Status * Hard Media Orders * Letters Delivered Quick Links * Create True Color

  4. Climate Impacts of Cover Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardozzi, D.; Wieder, W. R.; Bonan, G. B.; Morris, C. K.; Grandy, S.

    2016-12-01

    Cover crops are planted in agricultural rotation with the intention of protecting soil rather than harvest. Cover crops have numerous environmental benefits that include preventing soil erosion, increasing soil fertility, and providing weed and pest control- among others. In addition to localized environmental benefits, cover crops can have important regional or global biogeochemical impacts by increasing soil organic carbon, changing emissions of greenhouse trace gases like nitrous oxide and methane, and reducing hydrologic nitrogen losses. Cover crops may additionally affect climate by changing biogeophysical processes, like albedo and latent heat flux, though these potential changes have not yet been evaluated. Here we use the coupled Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) - Community Land Model (CLM4.5) to test how planting cover crops in the United States may change biogeophysical fluxes and climate. We present seasonal changes in albedo, heat fluxes, evaporative partitioning, radiation, and the resulting changes in temperature. Preliminary analyses show that during seasons when cover crops are planted, latent heat flux increases and albedo decreases, changing the evaporative fraction and surface temperatures. Understanding both the biogeophysical changes caused by planting cover crops in this study and the biogeochemical changes found in other studies will give a clearer picture of the overall impacts of cover crops on climate and atmospheric chemistry, informing how this land use strategy will impact climate in the future.

  5. Landfill covers for dry environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1996-01-01

    A large-scale landfill cover field test is currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. It is intended to compare and document the performance of alternative landfill cover technologies of various costs and complexities for interim stabilization and/or final closure of landfills in arid and semi-arid environments. Test plots of traditional designs recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency for both RCRA Subtitle open-quote C close-quote and open-quote D close-quote regulated facilities have been constructed side-by-side with the alternative covers and will serve as baselines for comparison to these alternative covers. The alternative covers were designed specifically for dry environments. The covers will be tested under both ambient and stressed conditions. All covers have been instrumented to measure water balance variables and soil temperature. An on-site weather station records all pertinent climatological data. A key to acceptance of an alternative environmental technology is seeking regulatory acceptance and eventual permitting. The lack of acceptance by regulatory agencies is a significant barrier to development and implementation of innovative cover technologies. Much of the effort on this demonstration has been toward gaining regulatory and public acceptance

  6. Automatic design of magazine covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanian, Ali; Liu, Jerry; Tretter, Daniel R.; Lin, Qian; Damera-Venkata, Niranjan; O'Brien-Strain, Eamonn; Lee, Seungyon; Fan, Jian; Allebach, Jan P.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a system for automatic design of magazine covers that quantifies a number of concepts from art and aesthetics. Our solution to automatic design of this type of media has been shaped by input from professional designers, magazine art directors and editorial boards, and journalists. Consequently, a number of principles in design and rules in designing magazine covers are delineated. Several techniques are derived and employed in order to quantify and implement these principles and rules in the format of a software framework. At this stage, our framework divides the task of design into three main modules: layout of magazine cover elements, choice of color for masthead and cover lines, and typography of cover lines. Feedback from professional designers on our designs suggests that our results are congruent with their intuition.

  7. The art of the cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Nora

    2017-07-01

    Often, it's difficult to match up our cover artwork with the subjects of our lead articles and special reports. Of necessity, we sometimes turn to pure abstraction. How else to illustrate technical policy articles on subjects such as changing research protocols or informed consent, or abstract ideas like congruence, duality, imbalance, causality? At such times, we have to be pretty creative, and my search for cover art can be long and challenging. In the end, we hope that the reader will make the connection between cover and content. However, at other times, the subject of a lead article or special report overflows with artistic possibilities. © 2017 The Hastings Center.

  8. On numerically pluricanonical cyclic coverings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikov, V S; Kharlamov, V M

    2014-01-01

    We investigate some properties of cyclic coverings f:Y→X (where X is a complex surface of general type) branched along smooth curves B⊂X that are numerically equivalent to a multiple of the canonical class of X. Our main results concern coverings of surfaces of general type with p g =0 and Miyaoka-Yau surfaces. In particular, such coverings provide new examples of multi-component moduli spaces of surfaces with given Chern numbers and new examples of surfaces that are not deformation equivalent to their complex conjugates

  9. Special study on vegetative covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions. 28 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs

  10. Land-cover change detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuexia; Giri, Chandra; Vogelmann, James

    2012-01-01

    Land cover is the biophysical material on the surface of the earth. Land-cover types include grass, shrubs, trees, barren, water, and man-made features. Land cover changes continuously.  The rate of change can be either dramatic and abrupt, such as the changes caused by logging, hurricanes and fire, or subtle and gradual, such as regeneration of forests and damage caused by insects (Verbesselt et al., 2001).  Previous studies have shown that land cover has changed dramatically during the past sevearal centuries and that these changes have severely affected our ecosystems (Foody, 2010; Lambin et al., 2001). Lambin and Strahlers (1994b) summarized five types of cause for land-cover changes: (1) long-term natural changes in climate conditions, (2) geomorphological and ecological processes, (3) human-induced alterations of vegetation cover and landscapes, (4) interannual climate variability, and (5) human-induced greenhouse effect.  Tools and techniques are needed to detect, describe, and predict these changes to facilitate sustainable management of natural resources.

  11. Mekong Land Cover Dasboard: Regional Land Cover Mointoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saah, D. S.; Towashiraporn, P.; Aekakkararungroj, A.; Phongsapan, K.; Triepke, J.; Maus, P.; Tenneson, K.; Cutter, P. G.; Ganz, D.; Anderson, E.

    2016-12-01

    SERVIR-Mekong, a USAID-NASA partnership, helps decision makers in the Lower Mekong Region utilize GIS and Remote Sensing information to inform climate related activities. In 2015, SERVIR-Mekong conducted a geospatial needs assessment for the Lower Mekong countries which included individual country consultations. The team found that many countries were dependent on land cover and land use maps for land resource planning, quantifying ecosystem services, including resilience to climate change, biodiversity conservation, and other critical social issues. Many of the Lower Mekong countries have developed national scale land cover maps derived in part from remote sensing products and geospatial technologies. However, updates are infrequent and classification systems do not always meet the needs of key user groups. In addition, data products stop at political boundaries and are often not accessible making the data unusable across country boundaries and with resource management partners. Many of these countries rely on global land cover products to fill the gaps of their national efforts, compromising consistency between data and policies. These gaps in national efforts can be filled by a flexible regional land cover monitoring system that is co-developed by regional partners with the specific intention of meeting national transboundary needs, for example including consistent forest definitions in transboundary watersheds. Based on these facts, key regional stakeholders identified a need for a land cover monitoring system that will produce frequent, high quality land cover maps using a consistent regional classification scheme that is compatible with national country needs. SERVIR-Mekong is currently developing a solution that leverages recent developments in remote sensing science and technology, such as Google Earth Engine (GEE), and working together with production partners to develop a system that will use a common set of input data sources to generate high

  12. The National Land Cover Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Collin G.; Fry, Joyce A.; Barnes, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    The National Land Cover Database (NLCD) serves as the definitive Landsat-based, 30-meter resolution, land cover database for the Nation. NLCD provides spatial reference and descriptive data for characteristics of the land surface such as thematic class (for example, urban, agriculture, and forest), percent impervious surface, and percent tree canopy cover. NLCD supports a wide variety of Federal, State, local, and nongovernmental applications that seek to assess ecosystem status and health, understand the spatial patterns of biodiversity, predict effects of climate change, and develop land management policy. NLCD products are created by the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium, a partnership of Federal agencies led by the U.S. Geological Survey. All NLCD data products are available for download at no charge to the public from the MRLC Web site: http://www.mrlc.gov.

  13. Giant panda BAC library construction and assembly of a 650-kb contig spanning major histocompatibility complex class II region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Hui-Juan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Giant panda is rare and endangered species endemic to China. The low rates of reproductive success and infectious disease resistance have severely hampered the development of captive and wild populations of the giant panda. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC plays important roles in immune response and reproductive system such as mate choice and mother-fetus bio-compatibility. It is thus essential to understand genetic details of the giant panda MHC. Construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library will provide a new tool for panda genome physical mapping and thus facilitate understanding of panda MHC genes. Results A giant panda BAC library consisting of 205,800 clones has been constructed. The average insert size was calculated to be 97 kb based on the examination of 174 randomly selected clones, indicating that the giant panda library contained 6.8-fold genome equivalents. Screening of the library with 16 giant panda PCR primer pairs revealed 6.4 positive clones per locus, in good agreement with an expected 6.8-fold genomic coverage of the library. Based on this BAC library, we constructed a contig map of the giant panda MHC class II region from BTNL2 to DAXX spanning about 650 kb by a three-step method: (1 PCR-based screening of the BAC library with primers from homologous MHC class II gene loci, end sequences and BAC clone shotgun sequences, (2 DNA sequencing validation of positive clones, and (3 restriction digest fingerprinting verification of inter-clone overlapping. Conclusion The identifications of genes and genomic regions of interest are greatly favored by the availability of this giant panda BAC library. The giant panda BAC library thus provides a useful platform for physical mapping, genome sequencing or complex analysis of targeted genomic regions. The 650 kb sequence-ready BAC contig map of the giant panda MHC class II region from BTNL2 to DAXX, verified by the three-step method, offers a

  14. Emerging Infectious Diseases Cover Art

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-07-26

    Byron Breedlove, managing editor of the EID Journal, discusses his approach to cover art.  Created: 7/26/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/26/2017.

  15. Cover Crops in Hillside Agriculture

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Our study focuses on the wet tropical hillsides of northern Honduras (Figure 1). ..... The eastern extreme of the region (Jutiapa) is a dry spot, with less rainfall (2 000 mm a-1) as a result ...... Paper presented at the International Workshop on Green Manure–Cover Crops for Smallholders in ..... Lamaster, J.P.; Jones, I.R. 1923.

  16. Cover times of random searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupeau, Marie; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphaël

    2015-10-01

    How long must one undertake a random search to visit all sites of a given domain? This time, known as the cover time, is a key observable to quantify the efficiency of exhaustive searches, which require a complete exploration of an area and not only the discovery of a single target. Examples range from immune-system cells chasing pathogens to animals harvesting resources, from robotic exploration for cleaning or demining to the task of improving search algorithms. Despite its broad relevance, the cover time has remained elusive and so far explicit results have been scarce and mostly limited to regular random walks. Here we determine the full distribution of the cover time for a broad range of random search processes, including Lévy strategies, intermittent strategies, persistent random walks and random walks on complex networks, and reveal its universal features. We show that for all these examples the mean cover time can be minimized, and that the corresponding optimal strategies also minimize the mean search time for a single target, unambiguously pointing towards their robustness.

  17. A contig-based strategy for the genome-wide discovery of microRNAs without complete genome resources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Zhi Wen

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are important regulators of many cellular processes and exist in a wide range of eukaryotes. High-throughput sequencing is a mainstream method of miRNA identification through which it is possible to obtain the complete small RNA profile of an organism. Currently, most approaches to miRNA identification rely on a reference genome for the prediction of hairpin structures. However, many species of economic and phylogenetic importance are non-model organisms without complete genome sequences, and this limits miRNA discovery. Here, to overcome this limitation, we have developed a contig-based miRNA identification strategy. We applied this method to a triploid species of edible banana (GCTCV-119, Musa spp. AAA group and identified 180 pre-miRNAs and 314 mature miRNAs, which is three times more than those were predicted by the available dataset-based methods (represented by EST+GSS. Based on the recently published miRNA data set of Musa acuminate, the recall rate and precision of our strategy are estimated to be 70.6% and 92.2%, respectively, significantly better than those of EST+GSS-based strategy (10.2% and 50.0%, respectively. Our novel, efficient and cost-effective strategy facilitates the study of the functional and evolutionary role of miRNAs, as well as miRNA-based molecular breeding, in non-model species of economic or evolutionary interest.

  18. Sky cover from MFRSR observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kassianov

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The diffuse all-sky surface irradiances measured at two nearby wavelengths in the visible spectral range and their modeled clear-sky counterparts are the main components of a new method for estimating the fractional sky cover of different cloud types, including cumuli. The performance of this method is illustrated using 1-min resolution data from a ground-based Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR. The MFRSR data are collected at the US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP site during the summer of 2007 and represent 13 days with cumuli. Good agreement is obtained between estimated values of the fractional sky cover and those provided by a well-established independent method based on broadband observations.

  19. Covering and Reimbursing Telehealth Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Policymakers who are striving to achieve better health care, improved health outcomes and lower costs are considering new strategies and technologies. Telehealth is a tool that uses technology to provide health services remotely, and state leaders are looking to it now more than ever as a way to address workforce gaps and reach underserved patients. Among the challenges facing state lawmakers who are working to introduce or expand telehealth is how to handle covering patients and reimbursing providers.

  20. Media framing of natural disasters in Kwazulu-Natal province: Impact of contigency plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethuel Sibongiseni Ngcamu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explores how the media frame disaster contingency plans which include preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery of the KwaZulu-Natal province before, during and in the aftermath of natural disasters. The province has been stricken by natural disasters. Although newspapers report the disasters they fail to give details of disaster contingency plans that should be available to those who are susceptible to, and the victims of disasters. Based on a content analysis of 114 online newspaper articles between 2000 and 2013 to examine how the media framed the KZN government’s disaster contingency plans. This study concludes that the highest occurrence of disasters (71% was from 2011 onwards as compared to previous years, and most of these were associated with areas that are susceptible to floods (34%. The findings of the study highlight that the media placed an emphasis on disaster response (41% over preparedness (24% and mitigation (7%. The outcomes suggest that newspaper organisations need to appoint a designated reporter responsible for disaster management issues. This is relevant because this study conveys findings that have the potential to persuade government and newspaper organisations to collaborate and to ensure that their officials are multi-skilled and able to cover all phases of disaster management in their articles, in order for these to be understood at all levels of society. This study further adds to the growing body of knowledge regarding quality journalism that meets its objectives.

  1. Braids and coverings selected topics

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    1989-01-01

    This book is based on a graduate course taught by the author at the University of Maryland, USA. The lecture notes have been revised and augmented by examples. The work falls into two strands. The first two chapters develop the elementary theory of Artin Braid groups both geometrically and via homotopy theory, and discuss the link between knot theory and the combinatorics of braid groups through Markov's Theorem. The final two chapters give a detailed investigation of polynomial covering maps, which may be viewed as a homomorphism of the fundamental group of the base space into the Artin braid

  2. The value of snow cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokratov, S. A.

    2009-04-01

    only and not even the main outcome from snow cover use. The value of snow cover for agriculture, water resources, industry and transportation is so naturally inside the activities that is not often quantified. However, any considerations of adaptation strategies for climate change with changing snow conditions need such quantification.

  3. Statistical Monitoring of Changes to Land Cover

    KAUST Repository

    Zerrouki, Nabil; Harrou, Fouzi; Sun, Ying

    2018-01-01

    Accurate detection of changes in land cover leads to better understanding of the dynamics of landscapes. This letter reports the development of a reliable approach to detecting changes in land cover based on remote sensing and radiometric data

  4. VT National Land Cover Dataset - 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The NLCD2001 layer available from VCGI is a subset of the the National Land Cover Database 2001 land cover layer for mapping zone 65 was produced...

  5. Watershed impervious cover relative to stream location

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Estimates of watershed (12-digit huc) impervious cover and impervious cover near streams and water body shorelines for three dates (2001, 2006, 2011) using NLCD...

  6. 1990 Kansas Land Cover Patterns Update

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — In 2008, an update of the 1990 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) database was undertaken. The 1990 KLCP database depicts 10 general land cover classes for the State...

  7. Climatological determinants of woody cover in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Good, Stephen P.; Caylor, Kelly K.

    2011-01-01

    Determining the factors that influence the distribution of woody vegetation cover and resolving the sensitivity of woody vegetation cover to shifts in environmental forcing are critical steps necessary to predict continental-scale responses of dryland ecosystems to climate change. We use a 6-year satellite data record of fractional woody vegetation cover and an 11-year daily precipitation record to investigate the climatological controls on woody vegetation cover across the African continent....

  8. [Snow cover pollution monitoring in Ufa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daukaev, R A; Suleĭmanov, R A

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the results of examining the snow cover polluted with heavy metals in the large industrial town of Ufa. The level of man-caused burden on the snow cover of the conventional parts of the town was estimated and compared upon exposure to a wide range of snow cover pollutants. The priority snow cover pollutants were identified among the test heavy metals.

  9. Measuring and analyzing urban tree cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Rowan A. Rowntree; E. Gregory McPherson; Susan M. Sisinni; Esther R. Kirkmann; Jack C. Stevens

    1996-01-01

    Measurement of city tree cover can aid in urban vegetation planning, management, and research by revealing characteristics of vegetation across a city. Urban tree cover in the United States ranges from 0.4% in Lancaster, California, to 55% in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Two important factors that affect the amount of urban tree cover are the natural environment and land...

  10. Land cover changes in central Sonora Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Valdez-Zamudio; Alejandro Castellanos-Villegas; Stuart Marsh

    2000-01-01

    Remote sensing techniques have been demonstrated to be very effective tools to help detect, analyze, and evaluate land cover changes in natural areas of the world. Changes in land cover can generally be attributed to either natural or anthropogenic forces. Multitemporal satellite imagery and airborne videography were used to detect, analyze, and evaluate land cover...

  11. Completion of the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 1992-2001 Land Cover Change Retrofit Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics Consortium has supported the development of two national digital land cover products: the National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) 1992 and National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 2001. Substantial differences in imagery, legends, and methods betwe...

  12. Evaluation of burial ground soil covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenimore, J.W.

    1976-11-01

    Solid radioactive waste burial at the Savannah River Plant between 1955 and 1972 filled a 76-acre site. Burial operations then were shifted to an adjacent site, and a program was begun to develop a land cover that would: (1) minimize soil erosion; and (2) protect the buried waste from deep-rooted plants, since radionuclides can be recycled by uptake through root systems. In anticipation of the need for a suitable soil cover, five grass species were planted on 20 plots (4 plots of each species) at the burial ground (Facility 643-G) in 1969. The grass plots were planted for evaluation of viability, root depth, and erosion protection existing under conditions of low fertility and minimum care. In addition, 16 different artificial soil covers were installed on 32 plots (each cover on two plots) to evaluate: (1) resistance of cover to deterioration from weathering; (2) resistance of cover to encroachment by deep-rooted plants; and (3) soil erosion protection provided by the cover. All test plots were observed and photographed in 1970 and in 1974. After both grass and artificial soil covers were tested five years, the following results were observed: Pensacola Bahia grass was the best of the five cover grasses tested; and fifteen of the sixteen artificial covers that were tested controlled vegetation growth and soil erosion. Photographs of the test plots will be retaken at five-year intervals for future documentation

  13. 77 FR 48733 - Transitional Program for Covered Business Method Patents-Definitions of Covered Business Method...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... Office 37 CFR Part 42 Transitional Program for Covered Business Method Patents--Definitions of Covered... Business Method Patents-- Definitions of Covered Business Method Patent and Technological Invention AGENCY... forth in detail the definitions of the terms ``covered business method patent'' and ``technological...

  14. Structural integrity assessment of HANARO pool cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jeong Soo

    2001-11-01

    This report is for the seismic analysis and the structural integrity evaluation of HANARO Pool Cover in accordances with the requirement of the Technical Specification for Seismic Analysis of HANARO Pool Cover. For performing the seismic analysis and evaluating the structural integrity for HANARO Pool Cover, the finite element analysis model using ANSYS 5.7 was developed and the dynamic characteristics were analyzed. The seismic response spectrum analyses of HANARO Pool Cover under the design floor response spectrum loads of OBE and SSE were performed. The analysis results show that the stress values in HANARO Pool Cover for the seismic loads are within the ASME Code limits. It is also confirmed that the fatigue usage factor is less than 1.0. Therefore any damage on structural integrity is not expected when an HANARO Pool Cover is installed in the upper part of the reactor pool

  15. Factors influencing radon attenuation by tailing covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silker, W.B.; Rogers, V.C.

    1981-07-01

    The US NRC, in its Generic Environmental Impact Statement on uranium milling has specified that the radon flux escaping a uranium mill tailings pile will be reduced to pCi/m 2 s by application of covering layers of soils and clays. These covers present a radon diffusion barrier, which sufficiently increases the time required for radon passage from the tailings to the atmosphere to allow for decay of 222 Rn within the cover. The depth of cover necessary to reduce the escaping radon flux to the prescribed level is to be determined by calculation, and requires precise knowledge of the radon diffusion coefficient in the covering media. A Radon Attenuation Test Facility was developed to determine rates of radon diffusion through candidate cover materials. This paper describes this facility and its application for determining the influence of physical properties of the soil column on the radon diffusion coefficient

  16. Geometric covers, graph orientations, counter games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berglin, Edvin

    -directed graph is dynamic (can be altered by some outside actor), some orientations may need to be reversed in order to maintain the low out-degree. We present a new algorithm that is simpler than earlier work, yet matches or outperforms the efficiency of these results with very few exceptions. Counter games...... example is Line Cover, also known as Point-Line Cover, where a set of points in a geometric space are to be covered by placing a restricted number of lines. We present new FPT algorithms for the sub-family Curve Cover (which includes Line Cover), as well as for Hyperplane Cover restricted to R 3 (i...... are a type of abstract game played over a set of counters holding values, and these values may be moved between counters according to some set of rules. Typically they are played between two players: the adversary who tries to concentrate the greatest value possible in a single counter, and the benevolent...

  17. Detection of a Usp-like gene in Calotropis procera plant from the de novo assembled genome contigs of the high-throughput sequencing dataset

    KAUST Repository

    Shokry, Ahmed M.

    2014-02-01

    The wild plant species Calotropis procera (C. procera) has many potential applications and beneficial uses in medicine, industry and ornamental field. It also represents an excellent source of genes for drought and salt tolerance. Genes encoding proteins that contain the conserved universal stress protein (USP) domain are known to provide organisms like bacteria, archaea, fungi, protozoa and plants with the ability to respond to a plethora of environmental stresses. However, information on the possible occurrence of Usp in C. procera is not available. In this study, we uncovered and characterized a one-class A Usp-like (UspA-like, NCBI accession No. KC954274) gene in this medicinal plant from the de novo assembled genome contigs of the high-throughput sequencing dataset. A number of GenBank accessions for Usp sequences were blasted with the recovered de novo assembled contigs. Homology modelling of the deduced amino acids (NCBI accession No. AGT02387) was further carried out using Swiss-Model, accessible via the EXPASY. Superimposition of C. procera USPA-like full sequence model on Thermus thermophilus USP UniProt protein (PDB accession No. Q5SJV7) was constructed using RasMol and Deep-View programs. The functional domains of the novel USPA-like amino acids sequence were identified from the NCBI conserved domain database (CDD) that provide insights into sequence structure/function relationships, as well as domain models imported from a number of external source databases (Pfam, SMART, COG, PRK, TIGRFAM). © 2014 Académie des sciences.

  18. Covering Materials for Anaerobic Digesters Producing Biogas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itodo, I. N.; Philips, T. K.

    2002-01-01

    The suitability of foam, concrete and clay soil as covering material on anaerobic digesters producing biogas was investigated using four batch-type digesters of 20 litres volume. The methane yield from the digesters was of the order: foam >control> concrete > clay soil. The digester covered with foam had the highest methane yield, best temperature control and most favourable pH conditions. It is most suitable as cover material on anaerobic digesters

  19. Optimal shortening of uniform covering arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Torres-Jimenez

    Full Text Available Software test suites based on the concept of interaction testing are very useful for testing software components in an economical way. Test suites of this kind may be created using mathematical objects called covering arrays. A covering array, denoted by CA(N; t, k, v, is an N × k array over [Formula: see text] with the property that every N × t sub-array covers all t-tuples of [Formula: see text] at least once. Covering arrays can be used to test systems in which failures occur as a result of interactions among components or subsystems. They are often used in areas such as hardware Trojan detection, software testing, and network design. Because system testing is expensive, it is critical to reduce the amount of testing required. This paper addresses the Optimal Shortening of Covering ARrays (OSCAR problem, an optimization problem whose objective is to construct, from an existing covering array matrix of uniform level, an array with dimensions of (N - δ × (k - Δ such that the number of missing t-tuples is minimized. Two applications of the OSCAR problem are (a to produce smaller covering arrays from larger ones and (b to obtain quasi-covering arrays (covering arrays in which the number of missing t-tuples is small to be used as input to a meta-heuristic algorithm that produces covering arrays. In addition, it is proven that the OSCAR problem is NP-complete, and twelve different algorithms are proposed to solve it. An experiment was performed on 62 problem instances, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of solving the OSCAR problem to facilitate the construction of new covering arrays.

  20. Border Lakes land-cover classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin Bauer; Brian Loeffelholz; Doug. Shinneman

    2009-01-01

    This document contains metadata and description of land-cover classification of approximately 5.1 million acres of land bordering Minnesota, U.S.A. and Ontario, Canada. The classification focused on the separation and identification of specific forest-cover types. Some separation of the nonforest classes also was performed. The classification was derived from multi-...

  1. AsMA journal covers, a history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Pamela C

    2014-01-01

    The cover of our journal has changed quite often over the years. As we look forward to changing the name and design of the journal, it seems appropriate to reflect on the previous journal titles and covers. A brief history follows.

  2. 19 CFR 212.03 - Proceedings covered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Proceedings covered. 212.03 Section 212.03 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION INVESTIGATIONS OF UNFAIR PRACTICES IN IMPORT TRADE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT General Provisions § 212.03 Proceedings covered. (a) The Act...

  3. 49 CFR 633.11 - Covered projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Covered projects. 633.11 Section 633.11..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Oversight Services § 633.11 Covered projects. The Administrator may contract for project management oversight services when the...

  4. 39 CFR 233.3 - Mail covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... For purpose of these regulations, the following terms are hereby defined. (1) Mail cover is the... criminal law. (3) When time is of the essence, the Chief Postal Inspector, or designee, may act upon an... furnish information as defined in § 233.3(c)(1) to any person, except as authorized by a mail cover order...

  5. "Lolita": Genealogy of a Cover Girl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Shari L.

    2015-01-01

    At the publication of Vladimir Nabokov's controversial novel "Lolita" (1958), the author insisted that a girl never appear on the cover. This discourse analysis of 185 "Lolita" book covers, most of which feature a girl, considers the genealogy of "Lolita" in relation to representation, myth, and tacit knowledge…

  6. Well-covered graphs and factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randerath, Bert; Vestergaard, Preben D.

    2006-01-01

    A maximum independent set of vertices in a graph is a set of pairwise nonadjacent vertices of largest cardinality α. Plummer defined a graph to be well-covered, if every independent set is contained in a maximum independent set of G. Every well-covered graph G without isolated vertices has a perf...

  7. Covering sources of toxic vapors with foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aue, W. P.; Guidetti, F.

    2009-01-01

    In a case of chemical terrorism, first responders might well be confronted with a liquid source of toxic vapor which keeps spreading out its hazardous contents. With foam as an efficient and simple means, such a source could be covered up in seconds and the spread of vapors mitigated drastically. Once covered, the source could then wait for a longer time to be removed carefully and professionally by a decontamination team. In order to find foams useful for covering up toxic vapor sources, a large set of measurements has been performed in order to answer the following questions: - Which foams could be used for this purpose? - How thick should the foam cover be? - For how long would such a foam cover be effective? - Could the practical application of foam cause a spread of the toxic chemical? The toxic vapors sources included GB, GD and HD. Among the foams were 10 fire fighter foams (e.g. AFFF, protein) and the aqueous decontamination foam CASCAD. Small scale experiments showed that CASCAD is best suited for covering a toxic source; a 10 cm layer of it covers and decontaminates GB. The large scale experiments confirmed that any fire fighter foam is a suitable cover for a longer or shorter period.(author)

  8. Liquidity in Government versus Covered Bond Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Jens; Gyntelberg, Jacob; Sangill, Thomas

    We present findings on the secondary market liquidity of government and covered bonds in Denmark before, during and after the 2008 financial crisis. The analysis focuses on wholesale trading in the two markets and is based on a complete transaction level dataset covering November 2007 until end...... 2011. Overall, our findings suggest that Danish benchmark covered bonds by and large are as liquid as Danish government bonds - including in periods of market stress. Before the financial crisis of 2008, government bonds were slightly more liquid than covered bonds. During the crisis, trading continued...... in both markets but the government bond market experienced a brief but pronounced decline in market liquidity while liquidity in the covered bond market was more robust - partly reflective of a number of events as well as policy measures introduced in the autumn of 2008. After the crisis, liquidity...

  9. Climatological determinants of woody cover in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Stephen P; Caylor, Kelly K

    2011-03-22

    Determining the factors that influence the distribution of woody vegetation cover and resolving the sensitivity of woody vegetation cover to shifts in environmental forcing are critical steps necessary to predict continental-scale responses of dryland ecosystems to climate change. We use a 6-year satellite data record of fractional woody vegetation cover and an 11-year daily precipitation record to investigate the climatological controls on woody vegetation cover across the African continent. We find that-as opposed to a relationship with only mean annual rainfall-the upper limit of fractional woody vegetation cover is strongly influenced by both the quantity and intensity of rainfall events. Using a set of statistics derived from the seasonal distribution of rainfall, we show that areas with similar seasonal rainfall totals have higher fractional woody cover if the local rainfall climatology consists of frequent, less intense precipitation events. Based on these observations, we develop a generalized response surface between rainfall climatology and maximum woody vegetation cover across the African continent. The normalized local gradient of this response surface is used as an estimator of ecosystem vegetation sensitivity to climatological variation. A comparison between predicted climate sensitivity patterns and observed shifts in both rainfall and vegetation during 2009 reveals both the importance of rainfall climatology in governing how ecosystems respond to interannual fluctuations in climate and the utility of our framework as a means to forecast continental-scale patterns of vegetation shifts in response to future climate change.

  10. Summary of decontamination cover manufacturing experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, G.B.; Berry, H.W.

    1995-02-01

    Decontamination cover forming cracks and vent cup assembly leaks through the decontamination covers were early manufacturing problems. The decontamination cover total manufacturing process yield was as low as 55%. Applicable tooling and procedures were examined. All manufacturing steps from foil fabrication to final assembly leak testing were considered as possible causes or contributing factors to these problems. The following principal changes were made to correct these problems: (1) the foil annealing temperature was reduced from 1375 degrees to 1250 degrees C, (2) the decontamination cover fabrication procedure (including visual inspection for surface imperfections and elimination of superfluous operations) was improved, (3) the postforming dye penetrant inspection procedure was revised for increased sensitivity, (4) a postforming (prewelding) 1250 degrees C/1 h vacuum stress-relief operation was added, (5) a poststress relief (prewelding) decontamination cover piece-part leak test was implemented, (6) the hold-down fixture used during the decontamination cover-to-cup weld was modified, and concomitantly, and (7) the foil fabrication process was changed from the extruding and rolling of 63-mm-diam vacuum arc-remelted ingots (extrusion process) to the rolling of 19-mm-square arc-melted drop castings (drop cast process). Since these changes were incorporated, the decontamination cover total manufacturing process yield has been 91 %. Most importantly, more than 99% of the decontamination covers welded onto vent cup assemblies were acceptable. The drastic yield improvement is attributed primarily to the change in the foil annealing temperature from 1375 degrees to 1250 degrees C and secondarily to the improvements in the decontamination cover fabrication procedure

  11. Mean species cover: a harmonized indicator of shrub cover for forest inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iciar Alberdi; Sonia Condés; Ronald E. Mcroberts; Susanne Winter

    2018-01-01

    Because shrub cover is related to many forest ecosystem functions, it is one of the most relevant variables for describing these communities. Nevertheless, a harmonized indicator of shrub cover for large-scale reporting is lacking. The aims of the study were threefold: to define a shrub indicator that can be used by European countries for harmonized shrub cover...

  12. C-CAP Niihau 2005 Land Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of land cover derived from high resolution imagery according to the Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) protocol. This data set utilized 1...

  13. 49 CFR 192.327 - Cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... locations 36 (914) 24 (610) Drainage ditches of public roads and railroad crossings 36 (914) 24 (610) (b... least 24 inches (610 millimeters) of cover. (c) Where an underground structure prevents the installation...

  14. The Thermal Collector With Varied Glass Covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luminosu, I.; Pop, N.

    2010-01-01

    The thermal collector with varied glass covers represents an innovation realized in order to build a collector able to reach the desired temperature by collecting the solar radiation from the smallest surface, with the highest efficiency. In the case of the thermal collector with variable cover glasses, the number of the glass plates covering the absorber increases together with the length of the circulation pipe for the working fluid. The thermal collector with varied glass covers compared to the conventional collector better meet user requirements because: for the same temperature increase, has the collecting area smaller; for the same collection area, realizes the highest temperature increase and has the highest efficiency. This works is addressed to researchers in the solar energy and to engineers responsible with air-conditioning systems design or industrial and agricultural products drying.

  15. ISLSCP II Potential Natural Vegetation Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set was developed to describe the state of the global land cover in terms of 15 major vegetation types, plus water, before alteration by humans....

  16. Expansion of Medicaid Covered Smoking Cessation Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Expansionof Medicaid Covered Smoking Cessation Services - Maternal Smoking and Birth Outcomes. To assess whether Medicaid coverage of smoking cessation services...

  17. Central Asian Snow Cover from Hydrometeorological Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Central Asian Snow Cover from Hydrometeorological Surveys data are based on observations made by personnel for three river basins: Amu Darya, Sir Darya, and...

  18. Statistical Monitoring of Changes to Land Cover

    KAUST Repository

    Zerrouki, Nabil

    2018-04-06

    Accurate detection of changes in land cover leads to better understanding of the dynamics of landscapes. This letter reports the development of a reliable approach to detecting changes in land cover based on remote sensing and radiometric data. This approach integrates the multivariate exponentially weighted moving average (MEWMA) chart with support vector machines (SVMs) for accurate and reliable detection of changes to land cover. Here, we utilize the MEWMA scheme to identify features corresponding to changed regions. Unfortunately, MEWMA schemes cannot discriminate between real changes and false changes. If a change is detected by the MEWMA algorithm, then we execute the SVM algorithm that is based on features corresponding to detected pixels to identify the type of change. We assess the effectiveness of this approach by using the remote-sensing change detection database and the SZTAKI AirChange benchmark data set. Our results show the capacity of our approach to detect changes to land cover.

  19. Nielsen number of a covering map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jezierski Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a finite regular covering over a compact polyhedron and a map admitting a lift . We show some formulae expressing the Nielsen number as a linear combination of the Nielsen numbers of its lifts.

  20. Cover Art: River's Edge: Downward, Outward, Upward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonee Kulman Brigham

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Artist's Statement for the cover art of IJPS volume 4, issue 3: River's Edge: Downward, Outward, Upward, 2015. Mixed Media: photograph, inkjet printed on presentation matte of colored pencil over photograph.

  1. Land cover fire proneness in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Gonzalez Pereira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: This study aims to identify and characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of the types of vegetation that are most affected by forest fires in Europe. The characterization of the fuels is an important issue of the fire regime in each specific ecosystem while, on the other hand, fire is an important disturbance for global vegetation dynamics.Area of study: Southern European countries: Portugal, Spain, France, Italy and Greece.Material and Methods: Corine Land Cover maps for 2000 and 2006 (CLC2000, CLC2006 and burned area (BA perimeters, from 2000 to 2013 in Europe are combined to access the spatial and temporal evolution of the types of vegetation that are most affected by wild fires using descriptive statistics and Geographical Information System (GIS techniques.Main results: The spatial and temporal distribution of BA perimeters, vegetation and burnt vegetation by wild fires was performed and different statistics were obtained for Mediterranean and entire Europe, confirming the usefulness of the proposed land cover system. A fire proneness index is proposed to assess the fire selectivity of land cover classes. The index allowed to quantify and to compare the propensity of vegetation classes and countries to fire.Research highlights: The usefulness and efficiency of the land cover classification scheme and fire proneness index. The differences between northern Europe and southern Europe and among the Mediterranean region in what concerns to vegetation cover, fire incidence, area burnt in land cover classes and fire proneness between classes for the different countries.Keywords: Fire proneness; Mixed forests; Land cover/land use; Fire regime; Europe; GIS; Corine land cover

  2. Covered by lines and Conic connected varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Massarenti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We study some properties of an embedded variety covered by lines and give a numerical criterion ensuring the existence of a singular conic through two of its general points. We show that our criterion is sharp. Conic-connected, covered by lines, QEL, LQEL, prime Fano, defective, and dual defective varieties are closely related. We study some relations between the above mentioned classes of objects using basic results by Ein and Zak.

  3. Vacuum-plasma coverings on the aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvetsov, V.D.; Teksin, Eh.K.; Lysyak, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    In the article are considered the perspectives of vacuum-plasma coverings using for engine components protection. The influence of operating factors on the durability of components which has the vacuum-plasma coverings is show.Leads in using the concept of informational parameter of quality.The recommendation about organization of engine with abolished components maintenance by methods of flyable conditions or reliability level are given

  4. Natural attenuation of biogas in landfill covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossu, R.; Privato, A.; Raga, R.

    2005-01-01

    In the risk evaluation of uncontrolled biogas emissions from landfills, the process of natural attenuation in landfill covers assumes a very important role. The capacity of biogas oxidation in the cover soils seems to be the most important control to mitigate the biogas emission during the aftercare period when the biogas collection system might fail. In the present paper laboratory experiences on lab columns to study the biogas oxidation are discussed [it

  5. Estimating Snow Cover from Publicly Available Images

    OpenAIRE

    Fedorov, Roman; Camerada, Alessandro; Fraternali, Piero; Tagliasacchi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the problem of estimating snow cover in mountainous regions, that is, the spatial extent of the earth surface covered by snow. We argue that publicly available visual content, in the form of user generated photographs and image feeds from outdoor webcams, can both be leveraged as additional measurement sources, complementing existing ground, satellite and airborne sensor data. To this end, we describe two content acquisition and processing pipelines that are tailored to...

  6. Covering of the electric power service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unidad de Planeacion Minero Energetica, UPME

    2000-01-01

    In this article it is sought to deepen more in the topic of the covering of the electric power service, especially in the related with the mechanisms that could facilitate their amplification. In the new market outline, in the one that the participation of the agents is encouraged in all the activities of the chain of services in which the state is not direct lender of the same one, it is confused the form like a covering will be achieved that is of agreement with the goals that intend in the national plan of development and in the sub sectorial plans. Although the rules of the market one comes consolidating, the process of linking of the private capital, especially in the distribution activity, it evidences the importance of to settle down and to define responsibilities and explicit mechanisms in the topic of expansion of the covering. A first interpretation of the ruled indicates the obligation of the state of extending the covering to 100% and of assuming the projects that don't undertake the matters. This would be the reading from the traditional mentality. However, the regulation of you public services of electricity don't demand a total covering, but rather it covers to the users that have the capacity to assume, with their own resources, the efficient costs of benefit. The service will also be lent to residential users that don't have payment capacity, when there are contribution resources or fiscal resources for subsidiary

  7. Scenarios of land cover in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Tian Xiang; Fan, Ze Meng; Liu, Ji Yuan

    2007-02-01

    A method for surface modeling of land cover change (SMLC) is developed on the basis of establishing transition probability matrixes between land cover types and HLZ types. SMLC is used to simulate land cover scenarios of China for the years 2039, 2069 and 2099, for which HLZ scenarios are first simulated in terms of HadCM3 climatic scenarios that are downscaled in zonal model of spatial climate change in China. This paper also analyzes spatial distribution of land cover types, area change and mean center shift of each land cover type, ecotope diversity, and patch connectivity under the land cover scenarios. The results show that cultivated land would decrease and woodland would expand greatly with climatic change, which coincides with consequences expected by implementation of Grain-for-Green policy. Nival area would shrink, and desertification area would expand at a comparatively slow rate in future 100 years. Climate change would generally cause less ecotope diversity and more patch connectivity. Ecosystems in China would have a pattern of beneficial cycle after efficient ecological conservation and restoration. However, if human activities would exceed regulation capacity of ecosystems themselves, the ecosystems in China might deteriorate more seriously.

  8. Silicone covered vs. Non- covered endotracheal self expandable metallic stent: An experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Young Soo; Lee, Byung Hee; Kim, Soo Ah; Kim, Kie Hwan; Chin, Soo Yil; Cho, Kyung Ja; Cho, Dae Soon [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-15

    To evaluate pathologic changes of the trachea and the lung after insertion of silicone covered and non covered Gianturco stent in the trachea of dog. Silicone covered(covered) and non covered(bare) Gianturco stent, six in each, were inserted into the tracheal lumen of six consecutive dogs. After 1-10 weeks observation, the dogs were sacrificed and their tracheas and lungs were examined grossly and histopathologically. Serial chest radiographs were performed to evaluate pneumonia and stent migration every 3-5 days. Pneumonia was observed in one of bare stent group and five of covered stent group. Stent migration was noted in three of covered stent group. In bare stent group, the epithelium of the trachea was markedly thickened by hyperplasia and stent was covered by granulation tissue from 6 weeks after stent insertion. Inflammation was focal at contact site between the stent and the trachea. In covered stent group, the epithelium was denuded at multiple areas and there were multifocal squamous metaplasia of the mucosa. Inflammatory reaction of the trachea was diffuse. Inflammatory reaction was more severe and stent migration was more frequent in covered stent group. The use of covered stent in the trachea should be studied further.

  9. Mathematical Foundation for Plane Covering Using Hexagons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gordon G.

    1999-01-01

    This work is to indicate the development and mathematical underpinnings of the algorithms previously developed for covering the plane and the addressing of the elements of the covering. The algorithms are of interest in that they provides a simple systematic way of increasing or decreasing resolution, in the sense that if we have the covering in place and there is an image superimposed upon the covering, then we may view the image in a rough form or in a very detailed form with minimal effort. Such ability allows for quick searches of crude forms to determine a class in which to make a detailed search. In addition, the addressing algorithms provide an efficient way to process large data sets that have related subsets. The algorithms produced were based in part upon the work of D. Lucas "A Multiplication in N Space" which suggested a set of three vectors, any two of which would serve as a bases for the plane and also that the hexagon is the natural geometric object to be used in a covering with a suggested bases. The second portion is a refinement of the eyeball vision system, the globular viewer.

  10. Determinants of woody cover in African savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, M.; Hanan, N.P.; Scholes, Robert J.; Ratnam, J.; Augustine, D.J.; Cade, B.S.; Gignoux, J.; Higgins, S.I.; Le, Roux X.; Ludwig, F.; Ardo, J.; Banyikwa, F.; Bronn, A.; Bucini, G.; Caylor, K.K.; Coughenour, M.B.; Diouf, A.; Ekaya, W.; Feral, C.J.; February, E.C.; Frost, P.G.H.; Hiernaux, P.; Hrabar, H.; Metzger, K.L.; Prins, H.H.T.; Ringrose, S.; Sea, W.; Tews, J.; Worden, J.; Zambatis, N.

    2005-01-01

    Savannas are globally important ecosystems of great significance to human economies. In these biomes, which are characterized by the co-dominance of trees and grasses, woody cover is a chief determinant of ecosystem properties 1-3. The availability of resources (water, nutrients) and disturbance regimes (fire, herbivory) are thought to be important in regulating woody cover1,2,4,5, but perceptions differ on which of these are the primary drivers of savanna structure. Here we show, using data from 854 sites across Africa, that maximum woody cover in savannas receiving a mean annual precipitation (MAP) of less than ???650 mm is constrained by, and increases linearly with, MAP. These arid and semi-arid savannas may be considered 'stable' systems in which water constrains woody cover and permits grasses to coexist, while fire, herbivory and soil properties interact to reduce woody cover below the MAP-controlled upper bound. Above a MAP of ???650 mm, savannas are 'unstable' systems in which MAP is sufficient for woody canopy closure, and disturbances (fire, herbivory) are required for the coexistence of trees and grass. These results provide insights into the nature of African savannas and suggest that future changes in precipitation 6 may considerably affect their distribution and dynamics. ?? 2005 Nature Publishing Group.

  11. COVERS Neonatal Pain Scale: Development and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan L. Hand

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Newborns and infants are often exposed to painful procedures during hospitalization. Several different scales have been validated to assess pain in specific populations of pediatric patients, but no single scale can easily and accurately assess pain in all newborns and infants regardless of gestational age and disease state. A new pain scale was developed, the COVERS scale, which incorporates 6 physiological and behavioral measures for scoring. Newborns admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit or Well Baby Nursery were evaluated for pain/discomfort during two procedures, a heel prick and a diaper change. Pain was assessed using indicators from three previously established scales (CRIES, the Premature Infant Pain Profile, and the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale, as well as the COVERS Scale, depending upon gestational age. Premature infant testing resulted in similar pain assessments using the COVERS and PIPP scales with an r=0.84. For the full-term infants, the COVERS scale and NIPS scale resulted in similar pain assessments with an r=0.95. The COVERS scale is a valid pain scale that can be used in the clinical setting to assess pain in newborns and infants and is universally applicable to all neonates, regardless of their age or physiological state.

  12. The canine sarcoglycan delta gene: BAC clone contig assembly, chromosome assignment and interrogation as a candidate gene for dilated cardiomyopathy in Dobermann dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabej, P; Leegwater, P A J; Imholz, S; Versteeg, S A; Zijlstra, C; Stokhof, A A; Domanjko-Petriè, A; van Oost, B A

    2005-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a common disease of the myocardium recognized in human, dog and experimental animals. Genetic factors are responsible for a large proportion of cases in humans, and 17 genes with DCM causing mutations have been identified. The genetic origin of DCM in the Dobermann dogs has been suggested, but no disease genes have been identified to date. In this paper, we describe the characterization and evaluation of the canine sarcoglycan delta (SGCD), a gene implicated in DCM in human and hamster. Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) containing the canine SGCD gene were isolated with probes for exon 3 and exons 4-8 and were characterized by Southern blot analysis. BAC end sequences were obtained for four BACs. Three of the BACs overlapped and could be ordered relative to each other and the end sequences of all four BACs could be anchored on the preliminary assembly of the dog genome sequence (www. ensembl.org). One of the BACs of the partial contig was localized by fluorescent in situ hybridization to canine chromosome 4q22, in agreement with the dog genome sequence. Two highly informative polymorphic microsatellite markers in intron 7 of the SGCD gene were identified. In 25 DCM-affected and 13 non DCM-affected dogs seven different haplotypes could be distinguished. However, no association between any of the SGCD variants and the disease locus was apparent.

  13. Replacing fallow by cover crops: economic sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, José Luis; Garrido, Alberto; Quemada, Miguel

    2013-04-01

    Replacing fallow by cover crops in intensive fertilized systems has been demonstrated as an efficient tool for reducing nitrate leaching. However, despite the evident environmental services provided and the range of agronomic benefits documented in the literature, farmers' adoption of this new technology is still limited because they are either unwilling or unable, although adoption reluctance is frequently rooted in low economic profitability, low water se efficiency or poor knowledge. Economic analyses permit a comparison between the profit that farmers obtain from agricultural products and the cost of adopting specific agricultural techniques. The goal of this study was to evaluate the economic impact of replacing the usual winter fallow with cover crops (barley (Hordeum vulgare L., cv. Vanessa), vetch (Vicia villosa L., cv. Vereda) and rapeseed (Brassica napus L., cv. Licapo)) in irrigated maize systems and variable Mediterranean weather conditions using stochastic Monte-Carlo simulations of key farms' financial performance indicators. The three scenarios studied for each cover crop were: i) just leaving the cover crop residue in the ground, ii) leaving the cover crop residue but reduce following maize fertilization according to the N available from the previous cover crop and iii) selling the cover crop residue for animal feeding. All the scenarios were compared with respect to a typical maize-fallow rotation. With observed data from six different years and in various field trials, looking for different weather conditions, probability distribution functions of maize yield, cover crop biomass production and N fertilizer saving was fitted. Based in statistical sources maize grain price, different forage prices and the cost of fertilizer were fitted to probability distribution functions too. As result, introducing a cover crop involved extra costs with respect to fallow as the initial investment, because new seed, herbicide or extra field operations. Additional

  14. Is Eurasian October snow cover extent increasing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R D; Derksen, C

    2013-01-01

    A number of recent studies present evidence of an increasing trend in Eurasian snow cover extent (SCE) in the October snow onset period based on analysis of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) historical satellite record. These increases are inconsistent with fall season surface temperature warming trends across the region. Using four independent snow cover data sources (surface observations, two reanalyses, satellite passive microwave retrievals) we show that the increasing SCE is attributable to an internal trend in the NOAA CDR dataset to chart relatively more October snow cover extent over the dataset overlap period (1982–2005). Adjusting the series for this shift results in closer agreement with other independent datasets, stronger correlation with continentally-averaged air temperature anomalies, and a decrease in SCE over 1982–2011 consistent with surface air temperature warming trends over the same period. (letter)

  15. Towards Seamless Validation of Land Cover Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuprikova, Ekaterina; Liebel, Lukas; Meng, Liqiu

    2018-05-01

    This article demonstrates the ability of the Bayesian Network analysis for the recognition of uncertainty patterns associated with the fusion of various land cover data sets including GlobeLand30, CORINE (CLC2006, Germany) and land cover data derived from Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) such as Open Street Map (OSM). The results of recognition are expressed as probability and uncertainty maps which can be regarded as a by-product of the GlobeLand30 data. The uncertainty information may guide the quality improvement of GlobeLand30 by involving the ground truth data, information with superior quality, the know-how of experts and the crowd intelligence. Such an endeavor aims to pave a way towards a seamless validation of global land cover data on the one hand and a targeted knowledge discovery in areas with higher uncertainty values on the other hand.

  16. Cover song identification by sequence alignment algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Li; Zhong, Qian; Wang, Szu-Ying; Roychowdhury, Vwani

    2011-10-01

    Content-based music analysis has drawn much attention due to the rapidly growing digital music market. This paper describes a method that can be used to effectively identify cover songs. A cover song is a song that preserves only the crucial melody of its reference song but different in some other acoustic properties. Hence, the beat/chroma-synchronous chromagram, which is insensitive to the variation of the timber or rhythm of songs but sensitive to the melody, is chosen. The key transposition is achieved by cyclically shifting the chromatic domain of the chromagram. By using the Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to obtain the time sequences of songs, the system is made even more robust. Similar structure or length between the cover songs and its reference are not necessary by the Smith-Waterman Alignment Algorithm.

  17. Smart cover glass for automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sang Kug

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a smart cover glass based on electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) actuation for automotive applications. It can remove water droplets in a wide range of sizes to allow the camera's lens to get clean at any time. The proposed cover glass offers a simple design structure to be easily installed on any device but provides a fast and energy efficient droplet cleaning operation. As proof of concept, a real imaging test is carried out using a mobile smartphone camera and landscape photography. When water droplets with different volumes are on the camera cover glass, the image of landscape photography is distorted with blurred spots. However, the distorted image is restored by removing the droplets through EWOD actuation.

  18. Nuclear reactor coolant and cover gas system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.A.; Redding, A.H.; Tower, S.N.

    1976-01-01

    A core cooling system is disclosed for a nuclear reactor of the type utilizing a liquid coolant with a cover gas above free surfaces of the coolant. The disclosed system provides for a large inventory of reactor coolant and a balanced low pressure cover gas arrangement. A flow restricting device disposed within a reactor vessel achieves a pressure of the cover gas in the reactor vessel lower than the pressure of the reactor coolant in the vessel. The low gas pressure is maintained over all free surfaces of the coolant in the cooling system including a coolant reservoir tank. Reactor coolant stored in the reservoir tank allows for the large reactor coolant inventory provided by the invention

  19. CLC2000 land cover database of the Netherlands; monitoring land cover changes between 1986 and 2000

    OpenAIRE

    Hazeu, G.W.

    2003-01-01

    The 1986 CORINE land cover database of the Netherlands was revised and updated on basis of Landsat satellite images and ancillary data. Interpretation of satellite images from 1986 and 2000 resulted in the CLC2000, CLC1986rev and CLCchange databases. A standard European legend and production methodology was applied. Thirty land cover classes were discerned. Most extended land cover types were pastures (231), arable land (211) and complex cultivation patterns (242). Between 1986 and 2000 aroun...

  20. Covering radii are not matroid invariants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Britz, Thomas Johann; Rutherford, Carrie G.

    2005-01-01

    We show by example that the covering radius of a binary linear code is not generally determined by the Tutte polynomial of the matroid. This answers Problem 361 (P.J. Cameron (Ed.), Research problems, Discrete Math. 231 (2001) 469–478).......We show by example that the covering radius of a binary linear code is not generally determined by the Tutte polynomial of the matroid. This answers Problem 361 (P.J. Cameron (Ed.), Research problems, Discrete Math. 231 (2001) 469–478)....

  1. Coatings and floor covers for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, S.

    1998-01-01

    To prevent damage to, or even the destruction of, components of very sensitive electrical equipment in rooms in which unsealed radioactive emitters are handled, floors must be antistatic and capable of being decontaminated. Conductive additives to the cover compounds achieve the desired leakage resistance of 5.10 4 to 10 6 Ω. Investigations have shown the decontamination capability of all floor covers and coatings to be excellent in most cases, and good in a few cases. Except for one coating, the coatings examined after radiation exposure also meet the requirements applying to nuclear installations. (orig.) [de

  2. On some covering graphs of a graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shariefuddin Pirzada

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available For a graph $G$ with vertex set $V(G=\\{v_1, v_2, \\dots, v_n\\}$, let $S$ be the covering set of $G$ having the maximum degree over all the minimum covering sets of $G$. Let $N_S[v]=\\{u\\in S : uv \\in E(G \\}\\cup \\{v\\}$ be the closed neighbourhood of the vertex $v$ with respect to $S.$ We define a square matrix $A_S(G= (a_{ij},$ by $a_{ij}=1,$ if $\\left |N_S[v_i]\\cap N_S[v_j] \\right| \\geq 1, i\

  3. MANAGEMENT EFFECTS ON GROUND COVER CLUMPINESS: SCALING FROM FIELD TO SENTINEL-2 COVER ESTIMATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Scarth

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been made in the development of cover data and derived products based on remotely sensed fractional cover information and field data across Australia, and these cover data sets are now used for quantifying and monitoring grazing land condition. The availability of a dense time-series of nearly 30 years of cover data to describe the spatial and temporal patterns in landscape changes over time can help with monitoring the effectiveness of grazing land management practice change. With the advent of higher spatial resolution data, such as that provided by the Copernicus Sentinel 2 series of satellites, we can look beyond reporting purely on cover amount and more closely at the operational monitoring and reporting on spatial arrangement of cover and its links with land condition. We collected high spatial resolution cover transects at 20 cm intervals over the Wambiana grazing trials in the Burdekin catchment in Queensland, Australia. Spatial variance analysis was used to determine the cover autocorrelation at various support intervals. Coincident Sentinel-2 imagery was collected and processed over all the sites providing imagery to link with the field data. We show that the spatial arrangement and temporal dynamics of cover are important indicators of grazing land condition for both productivity and water quality outcomes. The metrics and products derived from this research will assist land managers to prioritize investment and practice change strategies for long term sustainability and improved water quality, particularly in the Great Barrier Reef catchments.

  4. Completion of the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 1992–2001 Land Cover Change Retrofit product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, J.A.; Coan, Michael; Homer, Collin G.; Meyer, Debra K.; Wickham, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    The Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics Consortium has supported the development of two national digital land cover products: the National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) 1992 and National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 2001. Substantial differences in imagery, legends, and methods between these two land cover products must be overcome in order to support direct comparison. The NLCD 1992-2001 Land Cover Change Retrofit product was developed to provide more accurate and useful land cover change data than would be possible by direct comparison of NLCD 1992 and NLCD 2001. For the change analysis method to be both national in scale and timely, implementation required production across many Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) path/rows simultaneously. To meet these requirements, a hybrid change analysis process was developed to incorporate both post-classification comparison and specialized ratio differencing change analysis techniques. At a resolution of 30 meters, the completed NLCD 1992-2001 Land Cover Change Retrofit product contains unchanged pixels from the NLCD 2001 land cover dataset that have been cross-walked to a modified Anderson Level I class code, and changed pixels labeled with a 'from-to' class code. Analysis of the results for the conterminous United States indicated that about 3 percent of the land cover dataset changed between 1992 and 2001.

  5. Quantization of noncompact coverings and its physical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivankov, Petr

    2018-02-01

    A rigorous algebraic definition of noncommutative coverings is developed. In the case of commutative algebras this definition is equivalent to the classical definition of topological coverings of locally compact spaces. The theory has following nontrivial applications: • Coverings of continuous trace algebras, • Coverings of noncommutative tori, • Coverings of the quantum SU(2) group, • Coverings of foliations, • Coverings of isospectral deformations of Spin - manifolds. The theory supplies the rigorous definition of noncommutative Wilson lines.

  6. Land cover mapping of North and Central America—Global Land Cover 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifovic, Rasim; Zhu, Zhi-Liang

    2004-01-01

    The Land Cover Map of North and Central America for the year 2000 (GLC 2000-NCA), prepared by NRCan/CCRS and USGS/EROS Data Centre (EDC) as a regional component of the Global Land Cover 2000 project, is the subject of this paper. A new mapping approach for transforming satellite observations acquired by the SPOT4/VGTETATION (VGT) sensor into land cover information is outlined. The procedure includes: (1) conversion of daily data into 10-day composite; (2) post-seasonal correction and refinement of apparent surface reflectance in 10-day composite images; and (3) extraction of land cover information from the composite images. The pre-processing and mosaicking techniques developed and used in this study proved to be very effective in removing cloud contamination, BRDF effects, and noise in Short Wave Infra-Red (SWIR). The GLC 2000-NCA land cover map is provided as a regional product with 28 land cover classes based on modified Federal Geographic Data Committee/Vegetation Classification Standard (FGDC NVCS) classification system, and as part of a global product with 22 land cover classes based on Land Cover Classification System (LCCS) of the Food and Agriculture Organisation. The map was compared on both areal and per-pixel bases over North and Central America to the International Geosphere–Biosphere Programme (IGBP) global land cover classification, the University of Maryland global land cover classification (UMd) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Global land cover classification produced by Boston University (BU). There was good agreement (79%) on the spatial distribution and areal extent of forest between GLC 2000-NCA and the other maps, however, GLC 2000-NCA provides additional information on the spatial distribution of forest types. The GLC 2000-NCA map was produced at the continental level incorporating specific needs of the region.

  7. Do cover crop mixtures have the same ability to suppress weeds as competitive monoculture cover crops?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brust, Jochen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of farmers use cover crop mixtures instead of monoculture cover crops to improve soil and crop quality. However, only little information is available about the weed suppression ability of cover crop mixtures. Therefore, two field experiments were conducted in Baden-Württemberg between 2010 and 2012, to compare growth and weed suppression of monoculture cover crops and cover crop mixtures. In the first experiment, heterogeneous results between yellow mustard and the cover crop mixture occurred. For further research, a field experiment was conducted in 2012 to compare monocultures of yellow mustard and hemp with three cover crop mixtures. The evaluated mixtures were: “MELO”: for soil melioration; “BETA”: includes only plant species with no close relation to main cash crops in Central Europe and “GPS”: for usage as energy substrate in spring. Yellow mustard, MELO, BETA and GPS covered 90% of the soil in less than 42 days and were able to reduce photosynthetically active radiation (PAR on soil surface by more than 96% after 52 days. Hemp covered 90% of the soil after 47 days and reduced PAR by 91% after 52 days. Eight weeks after planting, only BETA showed similar growth to yellow mustard which produced the highest dry matter. The GPS mixture had comparatively poor growth, while MELO produced similar dry matter to hemp. Yellow mustard, MELO and BETA reduced weed growth by 96% compared with a no cover crop control, while hemp and GPS reduced weeds by 85% and 79%. In spring, weed dry matter was reduced by more than 94% in plots with yellow mustard and all mixtures, while in hemp plots weeds were only reduced by 71%. The results suggest that the tested cover crop mixtures offer similar weed suppression ability until spring as the monoculture of the competitive yellow mustard.

  8. Mine Waste Technology Program Electrochemical Tailings Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 40, Electrochemical Tailings Cover, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). MSE Technology A...

  9. 5 CFR 890.903 - Covered services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS PROGRAM Limit on Inpatient Hospital Charges, Physician Charges, and FEHB Benefit... inpatient hospital services apply to inpatient hospital services which are: (1) Covered under both Medicare...

  10. Focusing on Concepts by Covering Them Simultaneously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwartz, Pete

    2017-01-01

    "Parallel" pedagogy covers the four mechanics concepts of momentum, energy, forces, and kinematics simultaneously instead of building each concept on an understanding of the previous one. Course content is delivered through interactive videos, allowing class time for group work and student-centered activities. We start with simple…

  11. 16 CFR 436.3 - Cover page.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Buying a franchise is a complex investment. The information in this disclosure document can help you make up your mind. More information on franchising, such as “A Consumer's Guide to Buying a Franchise... with a cover page, in the order and form as follows: (a) The title “FRANCHISE DISCLOSURE DOCUMENT” in...

  12. Soybean growth and yield under cover crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila de Oliveira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of cover crops in no-tillage systems can provide better conditions for the development of soybean plants with positive effects on grain yield and growth analysis techniques allow researchers to characterize and understand the behavior of soybean plants under different straw covers. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize, using growth analysis, yield components and agronomic performance of soybean under common bean, Brachiaria brizantha and pearl millet straws. The experiment was performed on a soil under cerrado in the municipality of Santo Antônio de Goiás, GO. The experiment was arranged in a randomized complete block design with three treatments (cover crops and five replications. Soybean grain yield was lower in the B. brizantha straw treatment (3,708 kg ha-1 than both in the pearl millet (4.772 kg ha-1 and common bean straw treatments (5,200 kg ha-1. The soybean growth analysis in B. brizantha, pearl millet and common bean allowed characterizing the variation in the production of dry matter of leaves, stems, pods and total and leaf area index that provided different grain yields. The cover crop directly affects the soybean grain yield.

  13. Kenaf and cowpea as sugarcane cover crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of cover crops during the fallow period prior to planting sugarcane has the potential to influence not only the following sugarcane crop, but the economics of the production system as a whole. Typically, a Louisiana sugarcane field is replanted every four years due to declining yields, and,...

  14. Fluorescence imaging to quantify crop residue cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Chappelle, E. W.

    1994-01-01

    Crop residues, the portion of the crop left in the field after harvest, can be an important management factor in controlling soil erosion. Methods to quantify residue cover are needed that are rapid, accurate, and objective. Scenes with known amounts of crop residue were illuminated with long wave ultraviolet (UV) radiation and fluorescence images were recorded with an intensified video camera fitted with a 453 to 488 nm band pass filter. A light colored soil and a dark colored soil were used as background for the weathered soybean stems. Residue cover was determined by counting the proportion of the pixels in the image with fluorescence values greater than a threshold. Soil pixels had the lowest gray levels in the images. The values of the soybean residue pixels spanned nearly the full range of the 8-bit video data. Classification accuracies typically were within 3(absolute units) of measured cover values. Video imaging can provide an intuitive understanding of the fraction of the soil covered by residue.

  15. 29 CFR 16.104 - Proceedings covered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... future rate or is primarily rule-making is not covered. Proceedings to grant or renew licenses are also... Administration: (i) Proceedings under the Workforce Investment Act at 29 U.S.C. 2936, where the Department... implementing regulations. (ii) Conformity and compliance under the Federal Unemployment Tax Act at 26 U.S.C...

  16. 29 CFR 1904.31 - Covered employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., salary, part-time, seasonal, or migrant workers. You also must record the recordable injuries and... partners are not considered employees for recordkeeping purposes. (b) Implementation—(1) If a self-employed... illness? No, self-employed individuals are not covered by the OSH Act or this regulation. (2) If I obtain...

  17. 31 CFR 800.207 - Covered transaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Covered transaction. 800.207 Section 800.207 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF..., which could result in control of a U.S. business by a foreign person. ...

  18. 29 CFR 2204.104 - Proceedings covered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION IMPLEMENTATION OF THE EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT IN PROCEEDINGS BEFORE THE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW... covered are the following proceedings under section 10(c), 29 U.S.C. 659(c), of the OSH Act: (a) Contests...

  19. State financial cover for nuclear incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsson, M.

    1985-01-01

    Some States have introduced systems of compensation out of public funds in case the compensation under the Paris Convention and the Brussels Supplementary Convention is insufficient to cover the damage caused by a nuclear incident. The systems are described in this paper as well as that in Switzerland, which is not Party to these Conventions. (NEA) [fr

  20. Emerging Infectious Disease Journal Cover Art

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-04

    Polyxeni Potter discusses the art used on the covers of the Emerging Infectious Diseases journal.  Created: 4/4/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/5/2012.

  1. Covered Storage. Design Manual 32.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    laboratories, snack bars, stairways, etc., are covered in the PBS Mechanical and Elec’rical Engineering Handbook and/or the Illuminating Engineering...laid. Scuttles shall be gasketed and fitted with inside and outside locks. d. Doors. Active cargo doors shall be gasketed by means of extruded

  2. Interrelationships between soil cover and plant cover depending on land use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina Köster

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Interrelationships between soil cover and plant cover of normally developed (or postlithogenic mineral soils are analysed on the basis of four sampling soil groups. The four-link pedo-ecological sequence of analysed soils, rendzinas → brown soils → pseudopodzolic soils → gley-podzols, forms a representative cross section in relation to the normal mineral soils of Estonia. All groups differ substantially from each other in terms of soil properties (calcareousness, acidity, nutrition conditions, profile fabric and humus cover. The primary tasks of the research were (1 to elucidate the main pedo-ecological characteristics of the four soil groups and their suitability for plant cover, (2 to evaluate comparatively soils in terms of productivity, sustainability, biodiversity and environmental protection ability and (3 to analyse possibilities for ecologically sound matching of soil cover with suitable plant cover. On the basis of the same material, the influence of land-use change on humus cover (epipedon fabric, properties of the entire soil cover and soil–plant interrelationship were also analysed. An ecosystem approach enables us to observe particularities caused by specific properties of a soil type (species, variety in biological turnover and in the formation of biodiversity.

  3. Automorphisms of double coverings of curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, F.

    1994-11-01

    We study automorphisms of curves that commute with each other. We prove that the order and the number of fixed points of one of them satisfy certain relations involving those of the other. Then, we specialize our results to the case of double coverings of curves. For instance, if the genus of the curve is at least 4γ + 2 and γ >= 1 (γ = the genus of the covered curve) we prove that the order of an automorphism is bounded above by 2γ + 1 (resp. 4γ + 2) provided it is prime (resp. it has at least five fixed points). We also improve Farkas' bound on the number of fixed points namely 4γ + 4 by showing that it involves the order of the automorphism except in the case of even order when such an improvement is obtained provided the automorphism and the γ-involution has at least one common fixed point. (author). 15 refs

  4. Covering and piercing disks with two centers

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Heekap; Kim, Sangsub; Knauer, Christian; Schlipf, Lena; Shin, Chansu; Vigneron, Antoine E.

    2013-01-01

    We give exact and approximation algorithms for two-center problems when the input is a set D of disks in the plane. We first study the problem of finding two smallest congruent disks such that each disk in D intersects one of these two disks. Then we study the problem of covering the set D by two smallest congruent disks. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  5. RELAXATION HEURISTICS FOR THE SET COVERING PROBLEM

    OpenAIRE

    Umetani, Shunji; Yagiura, Mutsunori; 柳浦, 睦憲

    2007-01-01

    The set covering problem (SCP) is one of representative combinatorial optimization problems, which has many practical applications. The continuous development of mathematical programming has derived a number of impressive heuristic algorithms as well as exact branch-and-bound algorithms, which can solve huge SCP instances of bus, railway and airline crew scheduling problems. We survey heuristic algorithms for SCP focusing mainly on contributions of mathematical programming techniques to heuri...

  6. Decision support system to select cover systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, K.V.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this technology is to provide risk managers with a defensible, objective way to select capping alternatives for remediating radioactive and mixed waste landfills. The process of selecting containment cover technologies for mixed waste landfills requires consideration of many complex and interrelated technical, regulatory, and economic issues. A Decision Support System (DSS) is needed to integrate the knowledge of experts from scientific, engineering, and management disciplines to help in selecting the best capping practice for the site

  7. Domination, Eternal Domination, and Clique Covering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klostermeyer William F.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eternal and m-eternal domination are concerned with using mobile guards to protect a graph against infinite sequences of attacks at vertices. Eternal domination allows one guard to move per attack, whereas more than one guard may move per attack in the m-eternal domination model. Inequality chains consisting of the domination, eternal domination, m-eternal domination, independence, and clique covering numbers of graph are explored in this paper.

  8. Concrete quantum logics with covering properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Vladimir; Pták, Pavel; Tkadlec, Josef

    1992-05-01

    Let L be a concrete (=set-representable) quantum logic. Let n be a natural number (or, more generally, a cardinal). We say that L admits intrinsic coverings of the order n, and write L∈ C n , if for any pair A, B∈L we can find a collection { C i ∶ i∈ I}, where card IJauch-Piron states). We then consider conditions on which a class of concrete logics reduce to Boolean algebras. We conclude with some open questions.

  9. Covering and piercing disks with two centers

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Heekap

    2013-04-01

    We give exact and approximation algorithms for two-center problems when the input is a set D of disks in the plane. We first study the problem of finding two smallest congruent disks such that each disk in D intersects one of these two disks. Then we study the problem of covering the set D by two smallest congruent disks. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  10. National Land Cover Database 2001 (NLCD01)

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    This 30-meter data set represents land use and land cover for the conterminous United States for the 2001 time period. The data have been arranged into four tiles to facilitate timely display and manipulation within a Geographic Information System (see http://water.usgs.gov/GIS/browse/nlcd01-partition.jpg). The National Land Cover Data Set for 2001 was produced through a cooperative project conducted by the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium. The MRLC Consortium is a partnership of Federal agencies (http://www.mrlc.gov), consisting of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), the National Park Service (NPS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). One of the primary goals of the project is to generate a current, consistent, seamless, and accurate National Land Cover Database (NLCD) circa 2001 for the United States at medium spatial resolution. For a detailed definition and discussion on MRLC and the NLCD 2001 products, refer to Homer and others (2004), (see: http://www.mrlc.gov/mrlc2k.asp). The NLCD 2001 was created by partitioning the United States into mapping zones. A total of 68 mapping zones (see http://water.usgs.gov/GIS/browse/nlcd01-mappingzones.jpg), were delineated within the conterminous United States based on ecoregion and geographical characteristics, edge-matching features, and the size requirement of Landsat mosaics. Mapping zones encompass the whole or parts of several states. Questions about the NLCD mapping zones can be directed to the NLCD 2001 Land Cover Mapping Team at the USGS/EROS, Sioux Falls, SD (605) 594-6151 or mrlc@usgs.gov.

  11. Covering and piercing disks with two centers

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Heekap; Kim, Sangsub; Knauer, Christian; Schlipf, Lena; Shin, Chansu; Vigneron, Antoine E.

    2011-01-01

    We consider new versions of the two-center problem where the input consists of a set D of disks in the plane. We first study the problem of finding two smallest congruent disks such that each disk in intersects one of these two disks. Then we study the problem of covering the set D by two smallest congruent disks. We give exact and approximation algorithms for these versions. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Front Cover Photograph & Interview for FREEYE Magazine

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Matthew Murray Front Cover Photograph & Interview for FREEYE Magazine - Dutch Quarterly For Exceptional International Photography, Holland.\\ud The article focuses on Murray's practice, his personal work, commissioned work, advertising, gallery and exhibition work along with his methodology. Looking at Murray's inspirations and how they feed into his personal projects and how this personal work feeds into shooting above the line advertising campaigns. Murray's work blurs the lines between pers...

  13. Global warming: Sea ice and snow cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    In spite of differences among global climate simulations under scenarios where atmospheric CO 2 is doubled, all models indicate at least some amplification of greenouse warming at the polar regions. Several decades of recent data on air temperature, sea ice, and snow cover of the high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere are summarized to illustrate the general compatibility of recent variations in those parameters. Despite a data void over the Arctic Ocean, some noteworthy patterns emerge. Warming dominates in winter and spring, as projected by global climate models, with the warming strongest over subpolar land areas of Alaska, northwestern Canada, and northern Eurasia. A time-longitude summary of Arctic sea ice variations indicates that timescales of most anomalies range from several months to several years. Wintertime maxima of total sea ice extent contain no apparent secular trends. The statistical significance of trends in recent sea ice variations was evaluated by a Monte Carlo procedure, showing a statistically significant negative trend in the summer. Snow cover data over the 20-y period of record show a noticeable decrease of Arctic snow cover in the late 1980s. This is of potential climatic significance since the accompanying decrease of surface albedo leads to a rapid increase of solar heating. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  14. Land cover and water yield: inference problems when comparing catchments with mixed land cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. J. M. van Dijk

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Controlled experiments provide strong evidence that changing land cover (e.g. deforestation or afforestation can affect mean catchment streamflow (Q. By contrast, a similarly strong influence has not been found in studies that interpret Q from multiple catchments with mixed land cover. One possible reason is that there are methodological issues with the way in which the Budyko framework was used in the latter type studies. We examined this using Q data observed in 278 Australian catchments and by making inferences from synthetic Q data simulated by a hydrological process model (the Australian Water Resources Assessment system Landscape model. The previous contrasting findings could be reproduced. In the synthetic experiment, the land cover influence was still present but not accurately detected with the Budyko- framework. Likely sources of interpretation bias demonstrated include: (i noise in land cover, precipitation and Q data; (ii additional catchment climate characteristics more important than land cover; and (iii covariance between Q and catchment attributes. These methodological issues caution against the use of a Budyko framework to quantify a land cover influence in Q data from mixed land-cover catchments. Importantly, however, our findings do not rule out that there may also be physical processes that modify the influence of land cover in mixed land-cover catchments. Process model simulations suggested that lateral water redistribution between vegetation types and recirculation of intercepted rainfall may be important.

  15. Estimation of snow cover distribution in Beas basin, Indian Himalaya ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present paper, a methodology has been developed for the mapping of snow cover in Beas ... Different snow cover mapping methods using snow indices are compared to find the suitable ... cover are important factors for human activities,.

  16. EnviroAtlas - Land Cover for the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset represents the percentage of land area that is classified as forest land cover, modified forest land cover, and natural land cover using the 2006...

  17. Cover gas purification experience at KNK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, H; Stade, K Ch [Kernkraftwerk-Betriebsgesellschaft m.b.H., Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Stamm, H H [Institute of Radiochemistry, Nuclear Research Center, Karsruhe (Germany)

    1987-07-01

    KNK II is an experimental, sodium cooled fast breeder reactor. The reactor was operated until 1974 with a thermal core (KNK I). The plant was converted into a fast breeder reactor (KNK II) from 1974 to 1977. The commissioning of KNK II was started in October 1977 with the first fast core KNK 11/1. After 400 effective full power days (EFPD) the reactor was shut down in August 1982. After replacing the complete core by the second fast core KNK 11/2, the plant went into operation again in August 1983. In August 1986 nearly 400 EFPD were achieved with the second fast core. Argon is used as cover gas in the primary and secondary sodium systems of KNK. In former times fresh argon was supplied by a bundle of gas cylinders. Later on a liquid argon supply was installed. Purification of cover gas is done by flushing only. During KNK I operation no fuel failures occurred. The primary cover gas activity was characterized by the formation of Ar-41, only small quantities of fission gas were measured, released from 'tramp uranium'. Therefore, no problems existed during KNK I operation with regard to radioactive gas disposal. However, after start-up of KNK II, several fuel elements failed. Until August 1986, five fuel failures were observed, two in KNK 11/1, and three in KNK 11/2. Sometimes, operation with defective fuel pins caused problems when fission gases leaked into the containment atmosphere, and the access had to be restricted. The purging rate of the primary cover gas was limited by the capacity of the charcoal filters in the delay line. Of all non-radioactive impurities, hydrogen (H{sub z}) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) were of most importance in the primary cover gas. Main source of both impurities was the ingress of air and atmospheric moisture during handling operations in shutdown periods. An other possible source for hydrogen might be a release from the steel-clad zirconium hydride, used as moderator in the moderated driver fuel elements. Additional nitrogen may diffuse

  18. Land Use and Land Cover - MO 2015 Silver Land Cover (GDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — MoRAP produced and integrated data to map land cover and wetlands for the Upper Silver Creek Watershed in Illinois. LiDAR elevation and vegetation height information...

  19. Carbon Assessment of Hawaii Land Cover Map (CAH_LandCover)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — While there have been many maps produced that depict vegetation for the state of Hawai‘i only a few of these display land cover for all of the main Hawaiian Islands,...

  20. Land Use and Land Cover - MO 2015 Meramec Land Cover (GDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — MoRAP produced and integrated data to map land cover and wetlands for the Meramec River bottomland in Missouri. LiDAR elevation and vegetation height information and...

  1. A globally complete map of supraglacial debris cover and a new toolkit for debris cover research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreid, Sam; Pellicciotti, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    A growing canon of literature is focused on resolving the processes and implications of debris cover on glaciers. However, this work is often confined to a handful of glaciers that were likely selected based on criteria optimizing their suitability to test a specific hypothesis or logistical ease. The role of debris cover in a glacier system is likely to not go overlooked in forthcoming research, yet the magnitude of this role at a global scale has not yet been fully described. Here, we present a map of debris cover for all glacierized regions on Earth including the Greenland Ice Sheet using 30 m Landsat data. This dataset will begin to open a wider context to the high quality, localized findings from the debris-covered glacier research community and help inform large-scale modeling efforts. A global map of debris cover also facilitates analysis attempting to isolate first order geomorphological and climate controls of supraglacial debris production. Furthering the objective of expanding the inclusion of debris cover in forthcoming research, we also present an under development suite of open-source, Python based tools. Requiring minimal and often freely available input data, we have automated the mapping of: i) debris cover, ii) ice cliffs, iii) debris cover evolution over the Landsat era and iv) glacier flow instabilities from altered debris structures. At the present time, debris extent is the only globally complete quantity but with the expanding repository of high quality global datasets and further tool development minimizing manual tasks and computational cost, we foresee all of these tools being applied globally in the near future.

  2. Mapping land cover through time with the Rapid Land Cover Mapper—Documentation and user manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotillon, Suzanne E.; Mathis, Melissa L.

    2017-02-15

    The Rapid Land Cover Mapper is an Esri ArcGIS® Desktop add-in, which was created as an alternative to automated or semiautomated mapping methods. Based on a manual photo interpretation technique, the tool facilitates mapping over large areas and through time, and produces time-series raster maps and associated statistics that characterize the changing landscapes. The Rapid Land Cover Mapper add-in can be used with any imagery source to map various themes (for instance, land cover, soils, or forest) at any chosen mapping resolution. The user manual contains all essential information for the user to make full use of the Rapid Land Cover Mapper add-in. This manual includes a description of the add-in functions and capabilities, and step-by-step procedures for using the add-in. The Rapid Land Cover Mapper add-in was successfully used by the U.S. Geological Survey West Africa Land Use Dynamics team to accurately map land use and land cover in 17 West African countries through time (1975, 2000, and 2013).

  3. Advantages of floating covers with LLDPE Liners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz Gomez, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Using floating covers in irrigation pounds and waste dam gives many advantages. It is a very interesting investment for those place with a high evaporation ratio. this is an easy system which improves several aspects in irrigation or drinkable water reservoirs, mainly it saves water and it saves clean-works (time and cost). It is also used in waste dam to deodorization. Time ago this application was developed with PVC liners and TPO liners, now the innovation is LLDPE liners which improve mechanical properties, durability and an easier installation. This paper develops the state of art of this design technology, and the back ground of our experience. (Author)

  4. Covering a Crucible with Metal Containing Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    2006-01-01

    In a procedure that partly resembles the lost-wax casting process, a crucible made of a brittle material (ceramic, quartz, or glass) is covered with a layer of metal containing channels. The metal cover and the channels can serve any or all of several purposes, depending upon the application: Typically, the metal would serve at least partly to reinforce the crucible. The channels could be used as passages for narrow objects that could include thermocouples and heat-transfer strips. Alternatively or in addition, channels could be used as flow paths for liquid or gaseous coolants and could be positioned and oriented for position- or direction-selective cooling. In some cases, the channels could be filled with known gases and sealed so that failure of the crucibles could be indicated by instruments that detect the gases. The process consists of three main steps. In the first step, a pattern defining the channels is formed by wrapping or depositing a material in the desired channel pattern on the outer surface of the crucible. The pattern material can be a plastic, wax, low-ash fibrous material, a soluble material, or other suitable material that can subsequently be removed easily. In a proof-of-concept demonstration (see figure), the crucible was an alumina cylinder and the mold material was plastic tie-down tape. In the second step, the patterned crucible is coated with metal. In one variation of the second step, a very thin layer containing or consisting of an electrically conductive material (e.g., gold, silver, or carbon) is painted or otherwise deposited on the mold-covered crucible, then the covering metal required for the specific application is electrodeposited on the very thin conducting layer. In another variation of the second step, the metal coat is formed by chemical vapor deposition. In the proof-of-concept demonstration, a layer of nickel 0.003 in. ( 0.08 mm) thick was electrodeposited. In the third step, the patterned material is removed. This is

  5. EDXRF analysis of Marajoara pubic covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calza, C.; Anjos, M.J.; Bueno, M.I.M.S.; Lima, T.A.; Lopes, R.T.

    2007-01-01

    This work evaluated the elemental composition of decorated pottery pubic covers (tangas) from the Marajoara culture of Marajo Island (at the mouth of the Amazon River, Brazil) using EDXRF technique. The XRF system used in this work consists in a Si(Li) detector from ORTEC, with resolution of 180 eV, at 5.9 keV, and a mini X-ray tube with Mo anode. The elements identified in the samples were: S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr and Pb. Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to evaluated the provenance of the samples

  6. Nielsen number of a covering map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Jezierski

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider a finite regular covering pH:X˜H→X over a compact polyhedron and a map f:X→X admitting a lift f˜:X˜H→X˜H. We show some formulae expressing the Nielsen number N(f as a linear combination of the Nielsen numbers of its lifts.

  7. The Regional Land Cover Monitoring System: Building regional capacity through innovative land cover mapping approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saah, D.; Tenneson, K.; Hanh, Q. N.; Aekakkararungroj, A.; Aung, K. S.; Goldstein, J.; Cutter, P. G.; Maus, P.; Markert, K. N.; Anderson, E.; Ellenburg, W. L.; Ate, P.; Flores Cordova, A. I.; Vadrevu, K.; Potapov, P.; Phongsapan, K.; Chishtie, F.; Clinton, N.; Ganz, D.

    2017-12-01

    Earth observation and Geographic Information System (GIS) tools, products, and services are vital to support the environmental decision making by governmental institutions, non-governmental agencies, and the general public. At the heart of environmental decision making is the monitoring land cover and land use change (LCLUC) for land resource planning and for ecosystem services, including biodiversity conservation and resilience to climate change. A major challenge for monitoring LCLUC in developing regions, such as Southeast Asia, is inconsistent data products at inconsistent intervals that have different typologies across the region and are typically made in without stakeholder engagement or input. Here we present the Regional Land Cover Monitoring System (RLCMS), a novel land cover mapping effort for Southeast Asia, implemented by SERVIR-Mekong, a joint NASA-USAID initiative that brings Earth observations to improve environmental decision making in developing countries. The RLCMS focuses on mapping biophysical variables (e.g. canopy cover, tree height, or percent surface water) at an annual interval and in turn using those biophysical variables to develop land cover maps based on stakeholder definitions of land cover classes. This allows for flexible and consistent land cover classifications that can meet the needs of different institutions across the region. Another component of the RLCMS production is the stake-holder engagement through co-development. Institutions that directly benefit from this system have helped drive the development for regional needs leading to services for their specific uses. Examples of services for regional stakeholders include using the RLCMS to develop maps using the IPCC classification scheme for GHG emission reporting and developing custom annual maps as an input to hydrologic modeling/flood forecasting systems. In addition to the implementation of this system and the service stemming from the RLCMS in Southeast Asia, it is

  8. Cross recurrence quantification for cover song identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, Joan; Serra, Xavier; Andrzejak, Ralph G [Department of Information and Communication Technologies, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Roc Boronat 138, 08018 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: joan.serraj@upf.edu

    2009-09-15

    There is growing evidence that nonlinear time series analysis techniques can be used to successfully characterize, classify, or process signals derived from real-world dynamics even though these are not necessarily deterministic and stationary. In the present study, we proceed in this direction by addressing an important problem our modern society is facing, the automatic classification of digital information. In particular, we address the automatic identification of cover songs, i.e. alternative renditions of a previously recorded musical piece. For this purpose, we here propose a recurrence quantification analysis measure that allows the tracking of potentially curved and disrupted traces in cross recurrence plots (CRPs). We apply this measure to CRPs constructed from the state space representation of musical descriptor time series extracted from the raw audio signal. We show that our method identifies cover songs with a higher accuracy as compared to previously published techniques. Beyond the particular application proposed here, we discuss how our approach can be useful for the characterization of a variety of signals from different scientific disciplines. We study coupled Roessler dynamics with stochastically modulated mean frequencies as one concrete example to illustrate this point.

  9. Glass microspheres covering film: first field evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnani, G.; Filippi, F.

    2006-01-01

    A trial was carried out to evaluate, in the North-Centre of Italy, the behaviour in field of a new plastic covering film, prepared with the inclusion of empty glass microspheres (Solex). The trial was conducted on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) and eggplant (Solanum melongena L.). The new film was compared to a covering film with the same optical (diffuse light) and constitutional (co-extruded three layers EVA-WPE) characteristics. Since the first results, the innovative film showed a better behaviour than the control one. It presented light and thermal conditions (lower temperature during the day and slightly higher temperature in the night, compared to the control film) that allowed a better growth and yield than the control film. The growth analysis of tomato showed that plants grown under glass microsphere film had an higher growth rate (dry weight/days) and thickness of leaves compared to the control one. The yield of tomato and eggplant presented an increase in plants cultivated under the innovative film, especially for number and weight of fruits. The commercial quality did not show any differences between the films, except for the flesh hardness of tomato: this could be explained with the fact that the glass microspheres film provides environmental conditions avoiding plant stress during some stages of its cycle [it

  10. Cross recurrence quantification for cover song identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra, Joan; Serra, Xavier; Andrzejak, Ralph G

    2009-01-01

    There is growing evidence that nonlinear time series analysis techniques can be used to successfully characterize, classify, or process signals derived from real-world dynamics even though these are not necessarily deterministic and stationary. In the present study, we proceed in this direction by addressing an important problem our modern society is facing, the automatic classification of digital information. In particular, we address the automatic identification of cover songs, i.e. alternative renditions of a previously recorded musical piece. For this purpose, we here propose a recurrence quantification analysis measure that allows the tracking of potentially curved and disrupted traces in cross recurrence plots (CRPs). We apply this measure to CRPs constructed from the state space representation of musical descriptor time series extracted from the raw audio signal. We show that our method identifies cover songs with a higher accuracy as compared to previously published techniques. Beyond the particular application proposed here, we discuss how our approach can be useful for the characterization of a variety of signals from different scientific disciplines. We study coupled Roessler dynamics with stochastically modulated mean frequencies as one concrete example to illustrate this point.

  11. Infinity-Norm Permutation Covering Codes from Cyclic Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Karni, Ronen; Schwartz, Moshe

    2017-01-01

    We study covering codes of permutations with the $\\ell_\\infty$-metric. We provide a general code construction, which uses smaller building-block codes. We study cyclic transitive groups as building blocks, determining their exact covering radius, and showing linear-time algorithms for finding a covering codeword. We also bound the covering radius of relabeled cyclic transitive groups under conjugation.

  12. Modeling percent tree canopy cover: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Coulston; Gretchen G. Moisen; Barry T. Wilson; Mark V. Finco; Warren B. Cohen; C. Kenneth Brewer

    2012-01-01

    Tree canopy cover is a fundamental component of the landscape, and the amount of cover influences fire behavior, air pollution mitigation, and carbon storage. As such, efforts to empirically model percent tree canopy cover across the United States are a critical area of research. The 2001 national-scale canopy cover modeling and mapping effort was completed in 2006,...

  13. Preheating Water In The Covers Of Solar Water Heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Pradeep

    1995-01-01

    Solar water heaters that include glass covers over absorber plates redesigned to increase efficiencies according to proposal. Redesign includes modification of single-layer glass cover into double-layer glass cover and addition of plumbing so cool water to be heated made to flow between layers of cover before entering absorber plate.

  14. On the Structure of Covers of Sofic Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Rune

    2011-01-01

    A canonical cover generalizing the left Fischer cover to arbitrary sofic shifts is introduced and used to prove that the left Krieger cover and the past set cover of a sofic shift can be divided into natural layers. These results are used to find the range of a flow-invariant and to investigate t...

  15. 21 CFR 1404.200 - What is a covered transaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is a covered transaction? 1404.200 Section 1404.200 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Covered Transactions § 1404.200 What is a covered transaction? A covered transaction is a...

  16. Fuel element transport container with a removable cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannehl, G.; Fink, W.; Haenle, G.

    1980-01-01

    The cover of the fuel element transport container is removably fixed with screws on a flange as mechanical loads have to be expected during the transfer to the disposal plant. A ring-shaped or star-shaped clamping device grips over the cover. It has a clamp claw to lock the cover and permits unscrewing without unlocking the cover. (DG) [de

  17. Analysis of radon protection cover on uranium tailings pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhe

    1993-01-01

    The average radon emanation rate of the whole surface over one year was used for evaluating the radon release of uranium tailings pile. The effective of radon protection cover depends on the shape and property of the tailings pile, the properties of covering and the control of air vadose in the pile. It was indicated that the covering with low diffusion coefficient, small porosity and bad permeability was suitable to cover the pile. The analytical formula of the covering layer thickness was given

  18. Weed Control with Cover Crops in Irrigated Potatoes

    OpenAIRE

    G.H. Mehring; J.E. Stenger; H.M. Hatterman-Valenti

    2016-01-01

    Field experiments at Oakes, ND, USA in 2010 and Carrington, ND, USA in 2011 were conducted to evaluate the potential for cover crops grown in the Northern Great Plains, USA in order to reduce weed emergence and density in irrigated potatoes. Treatments included five cover crop treatments and three cover crop termination treatments. Termination of cover crops was done with glyphosate, disk-till, and roto-till. Cover crop biomass accumulation was greatest for rye/canola and triticale at Oakes, ...

  19. PROTECTIVELY COVERED ARTICLE AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plott, R.F.

    1958-10-28

    A method of casting a protective jacket about a ura nium fuel element that will bond completely to the uranium without the use of stringers or supports that would ordinarily produce gaps in the cast metal coating and bond is presented. Preformed endcaps of alumlnum alloyed with 13% silicon are placed on the ends of the uranium fuel element. These caps will support the fuel element when placed in a mold. The mold is kept at a ing alloy but below that of uranium so the cast metal jacket will fuse with the endcaps forming a complete covering and bond to the fuel element, which would otherwise oxidize at the gaps or discontinuities lefi in the coating by previous casting methods.

  20. Acoustic excitation of containment insulation cover plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenech, H.; Rao, A.K.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical program has been implemented by NRC-BNL since 1975 at the University of California, Santa Barbara to assess the reliability of the PCRV thermal insulation cover plate and the possible safety problem caused by the failure of this plate. A typical large HTGR PCRV unit [1160 MW(e)] and thermal insulation class A were selected. The upper core cavity is estimated to be the most critical volume where the noise pressure levels are expected to reach 110 to 130 dB (rel. to 2 x 10 -4 dynes/cm 2 ). The noise spectrum in that cavity is a composite of circulator noise, vortex shedding boundary layer turbulence, and flow impingement. Some anticipated safety related problems associated with the thermal insulation failure are examined

  1. Selective covers for natural cooling devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addeo, A.; Monza, E.; Peraldo, M.; Bartoli, B.; Coluzzi, B.; Silvestrini, V.; Troise, G.

    1978-01-01

    Extra-atmospheric space is practically a pure sink of radiation, and can be used as a nonconventional energy source. In previous papers it has been shown that surfaces with an emissivity matched with the atmospheric (8/13)μm ''transparency window'' (natural emitters) interact with cold space when exposed to clear sky at night, and undergo a sizable cooling effect. In this paper, starting from experimental results concerning the diurnal performances of natural emitters, the problem of their interaction with solar radiation is discussed, and the use is proposed of selective covers which shade the emitter from solar radiation, without preventing the interaction with cold space via emission of infra-red radiation. (author)

  2. CASA Forest Cover Change Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    Deforestation and forest fires are global land cover changes that can be caused by both natural and human factors. Although monitoring forest fires in near-real time is critical for operational wildfire management, mapping historical wildfires in a spatially explicit fashion is also important for a number of reasons, including climate change studies (e.g., examining the relationship between rising temperatures and frequency of fires), fuel load management (e.g., deciding when and where to conduct controlled burns), and carbon cycle studies (e.g., quantifying how much CO2 is emitted by fires and for emissions reduction efforts under the United Nations programs for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation -- REDD).

  3. Image based book cover recognition and retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhadan, Kalyani; Vijayarajan, V.; Krishnamoorthi, A.; Bessie Amali, D. Geraldine

    2017-11-01

    In this we are developing a graphical user interface using MATLAB for the users to check the information related to books in real time. We are taking the photos of the book cover using GUI, then by using MSER algorithm it will automatically detect all the features from the input image, after this it will filter bifurcate non-text features which will be based on morphological difference between text and non-text regions. We implemented a text character alignment algorithm which will improve the accuracy of the original text detection. We will also have a look upon the built in MATLAB OCR recognition algorithm and an open source OCR which is commonly used to perform better detection results, post detection algorithm is implemented and natural language processing to perform word correction and false detection inhibition. Finally, the detection result will be linked to internet to perform online matching. More than 86% accuracy can be obtained by this algorithm.

  4. MODIS Snow Cover Recovery Using Variational Interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, H.; Nguyen, P.; Hsu, K. L.; Sorooshian, S.

    2017-12-01

    Cloud obscuration is one of the major problems that limit the usages of satellite images in general and in NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) global Snow-Covered Area (SCA) products in particular. Among the approaches to resolve the problem, the Variational Interpolation (VI) algorithm method, proposed by Xia et al., 2012, obtains cloud-free dynamic SCA images from MODIS. This method is automatic and robust. However, computational deficiency is a main drawback that degrades applying the method for larger scales (i.e., spatial and temporal scales). To overcome this difficulty, this study introduces an improved version of the original VI. The modified VI algorithm integrates the MINimum RESidual (MINRES) iteration (Paige and Saunders., 1975) to prevent the system from breaking up when applied to much broader scales. An experiment was done to demonstrate the crash-proof ability of the new algorithm in comparison with the original VI method, an ability that is obtained when maintaining the distribution of the weights set after solving the linear system. After that, the new VI algorithm was applied to the whole Contiguous United States (CONUS) over four winter months of 2016 and 2017, and validated using the snow station network (SNOTEL). The resulting cloud free images have high accuracy in capturing the dynamical changes of snow in contrast with the MODIS snow cover maps. Lastly, the algorithm was applied to create a Cloud free images dataset from March 10, 2000 to February 28, 2017, which is able to provide an overview of snow trends over CONUS for nearly two decades. ACKNOWLEDGMENTSWe would like to acknowledge NASA, NOAA Office of Hydrologic Development (OHD) National Weather Service (NWS), Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites (CICS), Army Research Office (ARO), ICIWaRM, and UNESCO for supporting this research.

  5. Influence of cover defects on the attenuation of radon with earthen covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkwarf, D.R.; Mayer, D.W.

    1983-11-01

    Experimental and theoretical evaluations of radon flux through laboratory-scale defective soil columns are presented together with a survey of literature on the formation and prevention of defects in soil covers. This report focuses on air-filled, centimeter-scale defects that are most probable in earthen covers for attenuating radon emission from uranium-mill tailings. Examples include shirnkage and erosion cracks, erosion piping, animal burrows and air channels formed by the biodegradation of vegetation roots. Calculations based on mathematical models indicate that collections of defects which could increase the radon flux from an earthen cover by a factor of two would be easily detected by visual inspection. However, these models ignore air-turbulence in the defect and drying of the soil around the defect. Laboratory measurements showed that turbulent diffusion of radon occurred through defects as narrow as 0.3 cm when subjected to a transverse air velocity of 1 to 6 miles per hour at the surface. Both turbulence and more-rapid drying of soil can accelerate radon flux to the cover surface. Consequently, recommended methods to inhibit defect formation should be applied. 29 references, 3 figures, 5 tables

  6. CLC2000 land cover database of the Netherlands; monitoring land cover changes between 1986 and 2000

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazeu, G.W.

    2003-01-01

    The 1986 CORINE land cover database of the Netherlands was revised and updated on basis of Landsat satellite images and ancillary data. Interpretation of satellite images from 1986 and 2000 resulted in the CLC2000, CLC1986rev and CLCchange databases. A standard European legend and production

  7. Babes and boobs? analysis of JAMA cover art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J P

    To determine the representation of the sexes in JAMA cover art. Review of 50 consecutive issues. JAMA, March 1997-March 1998. Numbers and nature of covers portraying men and women. Of the 50 covers, 34 depicted humans. 15 depicted women, 13 men, and 6 were of mixed or indeterminate sex. 11 pictures of women included a child and five included nudity. One cover showed a man with a child (not as a father) and none depicted nudity. Men were depicted exclusively in authoritative roles. Much of the cover art gives strong messages about sexual stereotypes that are inappropriate in modern society. JAMA should consider reviewing its policy for choosing cover art.

  8. Cover gas box for handling sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuenstler, K.; Betzl, K.

    1978-01-01

    An inert atmosphere box has been developed to work with sodium experimentally and analytically. The volumen of the box is 0.6 m 3 . A blower mounted inside the work chamber constantly circulates the argon from the work chamber through a gas purification system (nickel-catalyst 6525 and molecular sieve 4A). The flow rate is 450 l/h. The box is equipped with neoprene gloves. The glove ports can be closed with interior flanges. The work chamber is constantly kept to a low superpressure of 25 mm water gange. In a bypass the oxygen concentration is measured with the OXYLYT-electrolyte cell and the water vapour concentration with the KEIDEL-electrolytic hygrometer. During long-term operation oxygen levels of 35 vpm and water vapour levels of 50 vpm can be hold even when the gloves are not covered. By means of putting a vessel with liquid sodium in the work chamber oxygen levels of 8 vpm and water vapour levels of 20 vpm can be attained for short times. The inert atmosphere purity can be improved by means of increasing the gas flow rate. (author)

  9. PARAMETRIC INSURANCE COVER FOR NATURAL CATASTROPHE RISKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serghei Margulescu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available With economic losses of over USD 370 bn caused by 325 catastrophic events, 2011 ranks as the worst ever year in terms of costs to society due to natural catastrophes and man-made disasters. Inthe same time, 2011 is the second most expensive year in the history for the insurance industry, with insured losses from catastrophic events amounting to USD 116 bn. Both the high level of damages and insured losses, as well as the unprecedented gap between the two values, made insurers and reinsurers worldwide to understand that some risks had so far been underestimated and they have to be better integrated in the catastrophes modelling.On the other hand, governments have to protect themselves against the financial impact of natural catastrophes and new forms of cooperation between the public and private sectors can help countries finance disaster risks. Viewed in a country’s wider risk management context, the purchase of parametric insurance cover, which transfers natural catastrophe risk to the private sector using an index- based trigger, is a necessary shift towards a pre-emptive risk management strategy. This kind of approach can be pursued by central governments or at the level of provincial or municipal governments, and a number of case studies included in the publication “Closing the financial gap” by Swiss Re (2011 illustrates how new forms of parametric insurance can help countries finance disaster risks.

  10. EDXRF analysis of Marajoara pubic covers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calza, Cristiane; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mail: ccalza@lin.ufrj.br; ricardo@lin.ufrj.br; Anjos, Marcelino Jose dos [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica]. E-mail: marcelin@lin.ufrj.br; Lima, Tania Andrade [Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: talima@montreal.com.br

    2005-07-01

    This work evaluated the elemental composition of decorated pottery pubic covers (tangas) from the Marajoara culture of Marajo Island (located at the mouth of the Amazon River, Brazil). The tangas were used by Marajoara girls probably as part of puberty rites and were anatomically adjustable to the body, containing holes on its corners for string attachment. The samples included two tangas and four fragments from the National Museum collection. One fragment (sample 22245) presented a different design pattern that seemed to indicate a different provenance. EDXRF was performed at the Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory (COPPE/UFRJ), using a Si(Li) detector from ORTEC with resolution of 180 eV at 5.9 keV and a mini x-ray tube with Mo anode. The angle of the incident x-ray beam was 16 deg and the detector was placed at 90 deg to the sample surface. The elements identified in the samples were: S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr and Pb. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to evaluate the provenance of the samples. (author)

  11. Final vegetative cover for closed waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.; Salvo, S.K.

    1993-01-01

    Low-level, hazardous, and mixed waste disposal sites normally require some form of plant material to prevent erosion of the final closure cap. Waste disposal sites are closed and capped in a complex scientific manner to minimize water infiltration and percolation into and through the waste material. Turf type grasses are currently being used as an interim vegetative cover for most sites. This coverage allows for required monitoring of the closure cap for settlement and maintenance activities. The purpose of this five year study was to evaluate plant materials for use on wastes sites after the post-closure care period that are quickly and easily established and economically maintained, retard water infiltration, provide maximum year-round evapotranspiration, are ecologically acceptable and do not harm the closure cap. The results of the study suggest that two species of bamboo (Phyllostachys (P.) bissetii and P. rubromarginata) can be utilized to provide long lived, low maintenance, climax vegetation for the waste sites after surveillance and maintenance requirements have ceased

  12. Millennium Ecosystem Assessment: MA Rapid Land Cover Change

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment: MA Rapid Land Cover Change provides data and information on global and regional land cover change in raster format for...

  13. ISLSCP II Historical Croplands Cover, 1700-1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Historical Croplands Cover data set was developed to understand the consequences of historical changes in land use and land cover for ecosystem goods and...

  14. South African National Land-Cover Change Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fritz Schoeman

    monitoring land-cover change at a national scale over time using EO data. 2. .... assist with final results reporting and analysis on a sub-national level. ..... South African Land-Cover Characteristics Database: A synopsis of the landscape.

  15. Quantifying Savanna Woody Cover in the Field and on Historical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jed1z

    ... mapping woody cover on such imagery in bush encroachment studies are the use of traditional pixel-based ... cover by testing it against detailed field validation data. We then assess ..... Mexico', Remote Sensing of Environment, vol. 93, pp.

  16. ISLSCP II Historical Croplands Cover, 1700-1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Historical Croplands Cover data set was developed to understand the consequences of historical changes in land use and land cover for ecosystem goods...

  17. Mapping Forest Cover and Forest Cover Change with Airborne S-Band Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh K. Ningthoujam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Assessments of forest cover, forest carbon stocks and carbon emissions from deforestation and degradation are increasingly important components of sustainable resource management, for combating biodiversity loss and in climate mitigation policies. Satellite remote sensing provides the only means for mapping global forest cover regularly. However, forest classification with optical data is limited by its insensitivity to three-dimensional canopy structure and cloud cover obscuring many forest regions. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR sensors are increasingly being used to mitigate these problems, mainly in the L-, C- and X-band domains of the electromagnetic spectrum. S-band has not been systematically studied for this purpose. In anticipation of the British built NovaSAR-S satellite mission, this study evaluates the benefits of polarimetric S-band SAR for forest characterisation. The Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering (MIMICS-I radiative transfer model is utilised to understand the scattering mechanisms in forest canopies at S-band. The MIMICS-I model reveals strong S-band backscatter sensitivity to the forest canopy in comparison to soil characteristics across all polarisations and incidence angles. Airborne S-band SAR imagery over the temperate mixed forest of Savernake Forest in southern England is analysed for its information content. Based on the modelling results, S-band HH- and VV-polarisation radar backscatter and the Radar Forest Degradation Index (RFDI are used in a forest/non-forest Maximum Likelihood classification at a spatial resolution of 6 m (70% overall accuracy, κ = 0.41 and 20 m (63% overall accuracy, κ = 0.27. The conclusion is that S-band SAR such as from NovaSAR-S is likely to be suitable for monitoring forest cover and its changes.

  18. 26 CFR 31.3121(j)-1 - Covered transportation service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Covered transportation service. 31.3121(j)-1... § 31.3121(j)-1 Covered transportation service. (a) Transportation systems acquired in whole or in part... operation of a public transportation system constitutes covered transportation service if any part of the...

  19. 77 FR 5317 - Medicaid Program; Covered Outpatient Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Part 447 Medicaid Program; Covered Outpatient Drugs; Proposed... Part 447 [CMS-2345-P] RIN 0938-AQ41 Medicaid Program; Covered Outpatient Drugs AGENCY: Centers for... requirements pertaining to Medicaid reimbursement for covered outpatient drugs to implement provisions of the...

  20. Land Use and Land Cover Change Analysis along the Coastal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agribotix GCS 077

    are carried out on the land usually effect changes in its cover. ... The FAO document on land cover classification systems, (2000) partly answers this ... over the surface land, including water, vegetation, bare soils and or artificial structures. ... diseases may occur more readily in areas exposed by Land Use and Land Cover ...

  1. Winter rye cover crop effect on corn seedling pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover crops have been grown successfully in Iowa, but sometimes a cereal rye cover crop preceding corn can reduce corn yields. Our research examines the effect of a rye cover crop on infections of the succeeding corn crop by soil fungal pathogens. Plant measurements included: growth stage, height, r...

  2. Winter cover crop effect on corn seedling pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover crops are an excellent management tool to improve the sustainability of agriculture. Winter rye cover crops have been used successfully in Iowa corn-soybean rotations. Unfortunately, winter rye cover crops occasionally reduce yields of the following corn crop. We hypothesize that one potential...

  3. 16 CFR 501.5 - Paper table covers, bedsheets, pillowcases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Paper table covers, bedsheets, pillowcases... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.5 Paper table covers, bedsheets, pillowcases. Table covers, bedsheets, and pillowcases, fabricated from paper, are exempt from the requirements of § 500.12 of this...

  4. Insurance Cover for Revised Nuclear Liability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, S. M. S.

    2008-01-01

    The financial security to be provided to victims of an incident at a nuclear installation is the main objective of international nuclear liability conventions. As from the introduction of the Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy in 1960 and the Vienna Convention on Liability for Nuclear Damage in 1963 insurers have been prepared to provide the financial capacity needed to cover the liability under both conventions. They did so in close co-operation with the competent national and international authorities, which has resulted in the insurability of as much of the nuclear liability under the conventions as possible. This tradition of co-operation between authorities and insurers was extended to include the revision negotiations regarding the above conventions, which were concluded in 1997 and 2004 respectively. This has resulted in the insurability of by far the largest part of the convention based liability. However, some heads of damage have been introduced about which insurers had expressed concerns as to their likelihood to attract insurance support. In view of the explicit choice by Convention States to include the uninsurable heads of damage into the revised conventions one would expect that liability for them would fall upon national Governments. This would reflect practice in a number of States, which already assume liability for uninsurable mandatory liabilities for a long time. Nonetheless some other States now seem reluctant to do so, the resulting deadlock having a tendency to manifest itself in a negative perception of the insurance industry. Insurers are therefore appreciative of the forum provided by the CNS to once again explain the areas where problems as regards insurability have arisen and why this is the case. This presentation will show that those areas are few in number and notably relate to a limited number of environmental damages as well as the extension of prescription periods. Furthermore, thoughts will

  5. Cover gases in nuclear reactors with special reference to argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jose, C.J.; Shah, G.C.; Prabhu, L.H.; Vartak, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    The report describes the specifications of an ideal cover gas for the smooth operation of a nuclear reactor. The advantages of using helium as cover gas, the sources of impurities in helium cover gas and the methods of purification of helium are given in detail. Various problems associated with the use of argon as cover gas and methods to purify and decontaminate argon cover gas are discussed on the basis of experimental data collected. A laboratory model of the system which can be used to evaluate the performance of the gas purification adsorbents is also described. (author)

  6. THz TDS of substance covered by disordered structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, V. A.; Zagursky, D. Y.; Zakharova, I. G.

    2016-04-01

    Computer simulation of a few-cycle pulse interaction with a substance covered by disordered structure is performed in order to study the effects imposed on spectra of transmitted and reflected pulses by presence of the cover. The substance is described by semi-classic approach and the cover is described by classic electrodynamics equations for linear isotropic medium. The cover consists of a number of layers with different properties which is considered to be the cause of the distortions. The influence of relation between pulse wavelength and cover layer thickness is illustrated. Computer simulation results are compared with those of physical experiments conducted for paper and other common materials.

  7. Sensitivity of selected landscape pattern metrics to land-cover misclassification and differences in land-cover composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    James D. Wickham; Robert V. O' Neill; Kurt H. Riitters; Timothy G. Wade; K. Bruce Jones

    1997-01-01

    Calculation of landscape metrics from land-cover data is becoming increasingly common. Some studies have shown that these measurements are sensitive to differences in land-cover composition, but none are known to have tested also their a sensitivity to land-cover misclassification. An error simulation model was written to test the sensitivity of selected land-scape...

  8. Weed Control with Cover Crops in Irrigated Potatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.H. Mehring

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments at Oakes, ND, USA in 2010 and Carrington, ND, USA in 2011 were conducted to evaluate the potential for cover crops grown in the Northern Great Plains, USA in order to reduce weed emergence and density in irrigated potatoes. Treatments included five cover crop treatments and three cover crop termination treatments. Termination of cover crops was done with glyphosate, disk-till, and roto-till. Cover crop biomass accumulation was greatest for rye/canola and triticale at Oakes, and hairy vetch and hairy vetch/rye at Carrington. Cover crop and termination affected weed control 14, 29, and 51 days after planting (DAP at Oakes. Weed control at Carrington was at least 90% for all cover crop and termination treatments at all three evaluation timings. Marketable yield at Oakes was greater when roto-till was used to terminate the cover crops compared with disk-till or herbicide, which is beneficial for organic systems where herbicides are not used. Marketable yield at Carrington was not affected by cover crop or termination treatments. Results suggest that cover crops can successfully be integrated into irrigated potato production for weed control with yields equal to no cover crop, and with attention to potential mechanical difficulties.

  9. Land cover changes and greenhouse gas emissions in two different soil covers in the Brazilian Caatinga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Kelly; Sousa-Neto, Eráclito Rodrigues de; Carvalho, João Andrade de; Sousa Lima, José Romualdo de; Menezes, Rômulo Simões Cezar; Duarte-Neto, Paulo José; da Silva Guerra, Glauce; Ometto, Jean Pierre Henry Baulbaud

    2016-11-15

    The Caatinga biome covers an area of 844,453km(2) and has enormous endemic biodiversity, with unique characteristics that make it an exclusive Brazilian biome. It falls within the earth's tropical zone and is one of the several important ecoregions of Brazil. This biome undergoes natural lengthy periods of drought that cause losses in crop and livestock productivity, having a severe impact on the population. Due to the vulnerability of this ecosystem to climate change, livestock has emerged as the main livelihood of the rural population, being the precursor of the replacement of native vegetation by grazing areas. This study aimed to measure GHG emissions from two different soil covers: native forest (Caatinga) and pasture in the municipality of São João, Pernambuco State, in the years 2013 and 2014. GHG measurements were taken by using static chamber techniques in both soil covers. According to a previous search, so far, this is the first study measuring GHG emissions using the static chamber in the Caatinga biome. N2O emissions ranged from -1.0 to 4.2mgm(-2)d(-1) and -1.22 to 3.4mgm(-2)d(-1) in the pasture and Caatinga, respectively, and they did not significantly differ from each other. Emissions were significantly higher during dry seasons. Carbon dioxide ranged from -1.1 to 14.1 and 1.2 to 15.8gm(-2)d(-1) in the pasture and Caatinga, respectively. CO2 emissions were higher in the Caatinga in 2013, and they were significantly influenced by soil temperature, showing an inverse relation. Methane emission ranged from 6.6 to 6.8 and -6.0 to 4.8mgm(-2)d(-1) in the pasture and Caatinga, respectively, and was significantly higher only in the Caatinga in the rainy season of 2014. Soil gas fluxes seemed to be influenced by climatic and edaphic conditions as well as by soil cover in the Caatinga biome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Validation of Land Cover Products Using Reliability Evaluation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhong Shi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Validation of land cover products is a fundamental task prior to data applications. Current validation schemes and methods are, however, suited only for assessing classification accuracy and disregard the reliability of land cover products. The reliability evaluation of land cover products should be undertaken to provide reliable land cover information. In addition, the lack of high-quality reference data often constrains validation and affects the reliability results of land cover products. This study proposes a validation schema to evaluate the reliability of land cover products, including two methods, namely, result reliability evaluation and process reliability evaluation. Result reliability evaluation computes the reliability of land cover products using seven reliability indicators. Process reliability evaluation analyzes the reliability propagation in the data production process to obtain the reliability of land cover products. Fuzzy fault tree analysis is introduced and improved in the reliability analysis of a data production process. Research results show that the proposed reliability evaluation scheme is reasonable and can be applied to validate land cover products. Through the analysis of the seven indicators of result reliability evaluation, more information on land cover can be obtained for strategic decision-making and planning, compared with traditional accuracy assessment methods. Process reliability evaluation without the need for reference data can facilitate the validation and reflect the change trends of reliabilities to some extent.

  11. Engineered soil covers for management of salt impacted sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, D.A.; Tratch, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    The use of engineered soil cover systems to mitigate environmental impacts from tailings and waste rock piles is becoming an accepted practice. This paper presented design concepts for soil covers related to reclamation practices in the mining industry as an effective risk management practice at salt impacted sites. Research and field programs have demonstrated that a layered engineered soil cover can reduce or eliminate infiltration. Key components of the system included re-establishing surface vegetation to balance precipitation fluxes with evapotranspiration potential, and design of a capillary break below the rooting zone to minimize deeper seated infiltration. It was anticipated that the incorporation of a vegetation cover and a capillary break would minimize infiltration into the waste rock or tailing pile and reduce the generation of acid rock drainage (ARD). Design of a layered soil cover requires the incorporation of meteorological data, moisture retention characteristics of the impacted soils, and proposed engineered cover materials. Performance of the soil cover was predicted using a finite element model combined with meteorological data from the site area, unsaturated soil properties of the parent sub-surface soils and potential covered materials. The soil cover design consisted of re-vegetation and a loose clay cover overlying a compacted till layer. The design was conducted for an off site release of salt impacted pasture land adjacent to a former highway maintenance yard. The model predicted minimal infiltration during high precipitation events and no infiltration during low precipitation events. Results indicated that the proposed soil cover would enable re-establishment of a productive agricultural ground cover, as well as minimizing the potential for additional salt migration. It was concluded that further research and development is needed to ensure that the cover system is an acceptable method for long-term risk management. 17 refs., 5 figs

  12. Integration of multiple, excess, backup, and expected covering models

    OpenAIRE

    M S Daskin; K Hogan; C ReVelle

    1988-01-01

    The concepts of multiple, excess, backup, and expected coverage are defined. Model formulations using these constructs are reviewed and contrasted to illustrate the relationships between them. Several new formulations are presented as is a new derivation of the expected covering model which indicates more clearly the relationship of the model to other multi-state covering models. An expected covering model with multiple time standards is also presented.

  13. FP 6 EU - COVERS. Coordination action - VVER safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasa, I.

    2008-01-01

    In this work research program of the European Union FP 6 - COVERS coordinated by the NRI Rez is presented. COVERS is designed to improve professional and communication environment in the specific area covering all aspects of safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants with VVER-440 and VVER-1000 reactors. Project Consortium is composed of 26 research and development, engineering and technical support organisations of European VVER-operating and other EU and non-EU countries.

  14. Tree and impervious cover change in U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Eric J. Greenfield

    2012-01-01

    Paired aerial photographs were interpreted to assess recent changes in tree, impervious and other cover types in 20 U.S. cities as well as urban land within the conterminous United States. National results indicate that tree cover in urban areas of the United States is on the decline at a rate of about 7900 ha/yr or 4.0 million trees per year. Tree cover in 17 of the...

  15. Cover Crop (Rye) and No-Till System in Wisconsin

    OpenAIRE

    Alföldi, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Erin Silva, University of Wisconsin, describes an organic no-till production technique using rye as cover crop to suppress weeds in the following production season. Using a roller-crimper, the overwintering rye is terminated at the time of cash crop planting, leaving a thick mat of plant residue on the soil surface. Soybeans are sown directly into the cover crop residue, allowing the cash crop to emerge through the terminated cover crop while suppressing weeds throughout the season. W...

  16. UMTRAP research on cover design for uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, V.C.; Nielson, K.K.

    1984-01-01

    As a result of the UMTRAP research on radon attenuation and tailings cover design, the basis and general procedures are available for designing covers for uranium tailings piles to meet present criteria for radon emissions. The general procedures involve assessment of the radon source strength of the tailings, definition of candidate cover materials, assessment of their moisture retention and radon diffusion properties, computing the required thicknesses of these materials, comparing costs, and evaluating long-term performance criteria. Final selection of the cover design must assure adequate long-term performance and radon retention as first priority, and keep costs to a minimum in achieving this goal

  17. Experimental study and simulations of infiltration in evapotranspiration landfill covers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-xian Zhang

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Various cover systems have been designed for landfill sites in order to minimize infiltration (percolation into the underlying waste. This study evaluated the soil water balance performance of evapotranspiration covers (ET covers and simulated percolation in the systems using the active region model (ARM. Experiments were conducted to measure water flow processes and water balance components in a bare soil cover and different ET covers. Results showed that vegetation played a critical role in controlling the water balance of the ET covers. In soil profiles of 60-cm depth with and without vegetation cover, the maximum soil water storage capacities were 97.2 mm and 62.8 mm, respectively. The percolation amount in the bare soil was 2.1 times that in the vegetation-covered soil. The ARM simulated percolation more accurately than the continuum model because it considered preferential flow. Numerical simulation results also indicated that using the ET cover system was an effective way of removing water through evapotranspiration, thus reducing percolation.

  18. Moisture content analysis of covered uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, D.W.; Beedlow, P.A.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1981-12-01

    The use of vegetation and rock covers to stabilize uranium mill tailings cover systems is being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. A modeling study of moisture movement through the tailings and cover layers was initiated to determine the effect of the stabilizing techniques. The cover system was simulated under climatic conditions occurring at Grand Junction, Colorado. The cover consisted of a layer of wet clay/gravel mix followed by a capillary barrier of washed rock and a surface layer of fill soil. Vegetation and rock were used to stabilize the surface layer. The simulation yielded moisture content and moisture storage values for the tailings and cover system along with information about moisture losses due to evaporation, transpiration, and drainage. The study demonstrates that different surface stabilization treatments lead to different degrees of moisture retention in the covered tailings pile. The evapotranspiration from vegetation can result in a relatively stable moisture content. Rock covers, however, may cause drainage to occur because they reduce evaporation and lead to a subsequent increase in moisture content. It is important to consider these effects when designing a surface stabilization treatment. Drainage may contribute to a groundwater pollution problem. A surface treatment that allows the cover system to dry out can increase the risk of atmospheric contamination through elevated radon emission rates

  19. [Cover motifs of the Tidsskrift. A 14-year cavalcade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylenna, M

    1998-12-10

    In 1985 the Journal of the Norwegian Medical Association changed its cover policy, moving the table of contents inside the Journal and introducing cover illustrations. This article provides an analysis of all cover illustrations published over this 14-year period, 420 covers in all. There is a great variation in cover motifs and designs and a development towards more general motifs. The initial emphasis on historical and medical aspects is now less pronounced, while the use of works of art and nature motifs has increased, and the cover now more often has a direct bearing on the specific contents of the issue. Professor of medical history Oivind Larsen has photographed two thirds of the covers and contributed 95% of the inside essay-style reflections on the cover motif. Over the years, he has expanded the role of the historian of medicine disseminating knowledge to include that of the raconteur with a personal tone of voice. The Journal's covers are now one of its most characteristic features, emblematic of the Journal's ambition of standing for quality and timelessness vis-à-vis the news media, and of its aim of bridging the gap between medicine and the humanities.

  20. Analysis of BY-106 pump pit cover plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coverdell, B.L.

    1994-01-01

    A new cover for the pump pit of Tank 241-BY-106 has been designed to allow the rotary core exhauster to be hooked up without requiring pit entry, riser modification, or equipment removal. The new pit cover is necessary to allow installation of two risers for reducing exposure, contamination, and waste. Computer analysis indicates that the safety margin of the pit cover plate with two risers is adequate. The computer stress model and input files are attached. The pit cover plate is a replacement for an existing plate; therefore seismic and wind loads were considered for the plate only

  1. Central American Vegetation/Land Cover Classification and Conservation Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Central American Vegetation/Land Cover Classification and Conservation Status data set consists of GIS coverages of vegetation classes (forests, woodlands,...

  2. CORINE land cover and floristic variation in a Mediterranean wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giallonardo, Tommaso; Landi, Marco; Frignani, Flavio; Geri, Francesco; Lastrucci, Lorenzo; Angiolini, Claudia

    2011-11-01

    The aims of the present study were to: (1) investigate whether CORINE land cover classes reflect significant differences in floristic composition, using a very detailed CORINE land cover map (scale 1:5000); (2) decompose the relationships between floristic assemblages and three groups of explanatory variables (CORINE land cover classes, environmental characteristics and spatial structure) into unique and interactive components. Stratified sampling was used to select a set of 100-m(2) plots in each land cover class identified in the semi-natural wetland surrounding a lake in central Italy. The following six classes were considered: stable meadows, deciduous oak dominated woods, hygrophilous broadleaf dominated woods, heaths and shrublands, inland swamps, canals or watercourses. The relationship between land cover classes and floristic composition was tested using several statistical techniques in order to determine whether the results remained consistent with different procedures. The variation partitioning approach was applied to identify the relative importance of three groups of explanatory variables in relation to floristic variation. The most important predictor was land cover, which explained 20.7% of the variation in plant distribution, although the hypothesis that each land cover class could be associated with a particular floristic pattern was not verified. Multi Response Permutation Analysis did not indicate a strong floristic separability between land cover classes and only 9.5% of species showed a significant indicator value for a specific land cover class. We suggest that land cover classes linked with hygrophilous and herbaceous communities in a wetland may have floristic patterns that vary with fine scale and are not compatible with a land cover map.

  3. Monitoring and evaluation of seasonal snow cover in Kashmir valley ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    89 to 2007–08) climatic conditions prevailed in both ranges of Kashmir valley. Region-wise ... effective use of snowmelt runoff models (Rango and Martinec ... J. Earth Syst. Sci. 118, No. ... of cloud cover can affect delineation of snow cover,.

  4. Chemical behaviour of zinc in cover gas environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorley, A.W; Blundell, A.; Lloyd, R.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility that enhancement of 65-Zn in the cover gas regions of reactor plant may increase levels of radioactivity and provide potential embrittlement situations has lead to a limited metallurgical and chemical investigation into how this element behaves in cover gas environments. This paper reports the chemical findings from those investigations and compare results obtained with those anticipated from thermodynamic predictions

  5. Establishment and function of cover crops interseeded into corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover crops can provide ecological services and improve the resiliency of annual cropping systems; however, cover crop use is low in corn (Zea mays L.)-soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] rotations in the upper Midwest due to challenges with establishment. Our objective was to compare three planting me...

  6. 31 CFR 363.9 - What does this subpart cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What does this subpart cover? 363.9 Section 363.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL... cover? This subpart provides general rules governing securities held within the TreasuryDirect ® system...

  7. 12 CFR 559.1 - What does this part cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What does this part cover? 559.1 Section 559.1 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SUBORDINATE ORGANIZATIONS § 559.1 What does this part cover? (a) OTS is issuing this part 559 pursuant to its general rulemaking...

  8. Guidelines to restoring structural integrity of covered bridge members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald W. Anthony

    2018-01-01

    These guidelines are designed for decision makers (selectmen, county commissioners, city planners, preservation officers, etc.) that have responsibility for repairing and maintaining existing covered bridges to help them understand what goes into making effective decisions about how, and when, to repair a covered bridge. The purpose of these guidelines is to present...

  9. Development of 2010 national land cover database for the Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Kabir; Shrestha, Him Lal; Murthy, M S R; Bajracharya, Birendra; Shrestha, Basanta; Gilani, Hammad; Pradhan, Sudip; Dangol, Bikash

    2015-01-15

    Land cover and its change analysis across the Hindu Kush Himalayan (HKH) region is realized as an urgent need to support diverse issues of environmental conservation. This study presents the first and most complete national land cover database of Nepal prepared using public domain Landsat TM data of 2010 and replicable methodology. The study estimated that 39.1% of Nepal is covered by forests and 29.83% by agriculture. Patch and edge forests constituting 23.4% of national forest cover revealed proximate biotic interferences over the forests. Core forests constituted 79.3% of forests of Protected areas where as 63% of area was under core forests in the outside protected area. Physiographic regions wise forest fragmentation analysis revealed specific conservation requirements for productive hill and mid mountain regions. Comparative analysis with Landsat TM based global land cover product showed difference of the order of 30-60% among different land cover classes stressing the need for significant improvements for national level adoption. The online web based land cover validation tool is developed for continual improvement of land cover product. The potential use of the data set for national and regional level sustainable land use planning strategies and meeting several global commitments also highlighted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 30 CFR 56.7013 - Covering or guarding drill holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Covering or guarding drill holes. 56.7013 Section 56.7013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7013 Covering or guarding drill holes. Drill holes large enough to...

  11. 30 CFR 57.7013 - Covering or guarding drill holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Covering or guarding drill holes. 57.7013 Section 57.7013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7013 Covering or guarding drill holes. Drill holes...

  12. Monitoring land Cover Changes and Fragmentation dynamics in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Monitoring land Cover Changes and Fragmentation dynamics in the subtropical thicket of the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. ... Baseline land use/cover maps and fragmentation analyses in a temporal framework are valuable for gaining insights into, among other things, carbon stock change trends. Keywords: Land ...

  13. Assessment of human impacts on landuse and vegetation cover ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is an assessment of the impact of man's activities on the landuse and vegetation cover of Mubi region. Landsat MSS Landuse/vegetation image of 1978 and Spot XS landuse/vegetation image of 1995 were used to study the landuse/vegetation cover changes of the region between 1978 and 1995 – a period of 17 ...

  14. The average covering tree value for directed graph games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khmelnitskaya, Anna Borisovna; Selcuk, Özer; Talman, Dolf

    We introduce a single-valued solution concept, the so-called average covering tree value, for the class of transferable utility games with limited communication structure represented by a directed graph. The solution is the average of the marginal contribution vectors corresponding to all covering

  15. Profitability of cover crops for single and twin row cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the increased interest in cover crops, the impact of adoption on profitability of cash crops is a common question from producers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the profitability of cover crops for single and twin row cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) in Alabama. This experiment inclu...

  16. Modeled impact of anthropogenic land cover change on climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findell, K.L.; Shevliakova, E.; Milly, P.C.D.; Stouffer, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Equilibrium experiments with the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's climate model are used to investigate the impact of anthropogenic land cover change on climate. Regions of altered land cover include large portions of Europe, India, eastern China, and the eastern United States. Smaller areas of change are present in various tropical regions. This study focuses on the impacts of biophysical changes associated with the land cover change (albedo, root and stomatal properties, roughness length), which is almost exclusively a conversion from forest to grassland in the model; the effects of irrigation or other water management practices and the effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide changes associated with land cover conversion are not included in these experiments. The model suggests that observed land cover changes have little or no impact on globally averaged climatic variables (e.g., 2-m air temperature is 0.008 K warmer in a simulation with 1990 land cover compared to a simulation with potential natural vegetation cover). Differences in the annual mean climatic fields analyzed did not exhibit global field significance. Within some of the regions of land cover change, however, there are relatively large changes of many surface climatic variables. These changes are highly significant locally in the annual mean and in most months of the year in eastern Europe and northern India. They can be explained mainly as direct and indirect consequences of model-prescribed increases in surface albedo, decreases in rooting depth, and changes of stomatal control that accompany deforestation. ?? 2007 American Meteorological Society.

  17. 45 CFR 310.0 - What does this part cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION General Provisions § 310.0 What does this part cover... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What does this part cover? 310.0 Section 310.0... and Office Automation including: (a) The automated systems options for comprehensive Tribal IV-D...

  18. Validation of land use / land cover changes for Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Gregor; Johannsen, Vivian Kvist; Caspersen, Ole Hjort

    2018-01-01

    This report presents applied methods and results for a validation of land use and land cover changes for 1990 and 2014-2016. Results indicate that generally, accuracies of land use and land cover. However, afforestation and particularly deforestation are significantly overestimated....

  19. Consistent seasonal snow cover depth and duration variability over ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Decline in consistent seasonal snow cover depth, duration and changing snow cover build- up pattern over the WH in recent decades indicate that WH has undergone considerable climate change and winter weather patterns are changing in the WH. 1. Introduction. Mountainous regions around the globe are storehouses.

  20. 29 CFR 4.110 - What contracts are covered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...'Hara Service Contract Act Covered Contracts Generally § 4.110 What contracts are covered. The Act... mean that the contract is not within the coverage of the Act. The amount of the contract is not determinative of the Act's coverage, although the requirements are different for contracts in excess of $2,500...

  1. Remote sensing to monitor cover crop adoption in southeastern Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the Chesapeake Bay watershed, winter cereal cover crops are often planted in rotation with summer crops to reduce the loss of nutrients and sediment from agricultural systems. Cover crops can also improve soil health, control weeds and pests, supplement forage needs, and support resilient croppin...

  2. Exact Cover Problem in Milton Babbitt's All-partition Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bemman, Brian; Meredith, David

    2015-01-01

    One aspect of analyzing Milton Babbitt’s (1916–2011) all- partition arrays requires finding a sequence of distinct, non-overlapping aggregate regions that completely and exactly covers an irregular matrix of pitch class integers. This is an example of the so-called exact cover problem. Given a set...

  3. 12 CFR 207.6 - Disclosure of covered agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... DISCLOSURE AND REPORTING OF CRA-RELATED AGREEMENTS (REGULATION G) § 207.6 Disclosure of covered agreements... CRA public file by insured depository institution or affiliate. An insured depository institution and...) by placing a copy of the covered agreement in the insured depository institution's CRA public file if...

  4. Cover Image, Volume 233, Number 7, July 2018.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chong; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Lifang; Tian, Ye; Chen, Zhihao; Li, Dijie; Zhao, Fan; Su, Peihong; Ma, Xiaoli; Zhang, Ge; Miao, Zhiping; Wang, Liping; Qian, Airong; Xian, Cory J

    2018-07-01

    Cover: The cover image, by Yin et al., is based on the Original Research Article, Mechanical unloading reduces microtubule actin crosslinking factor 1 expression to inhibit β-Catenin Signaling and osteoblast proliferation, DOI: 10.1002/jcp.26374. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Minimum Covers of Fixed Cardinality in Weighted Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Lee J.

    Reported is the result of research on combinatorial and algorithmic techniques for information processing. A method is discussed for obtaining minimum covers of specified cardinality from a given weighted graph. By the indicated method, it is shown that the family of minimum covers of varying cardinality is related to the minimum spanning tree of…

  6. Cover crop-based ecological weed management: exploration and optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruidhof, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Keywords: organic farming, ecologically-based weed management, cover crops, green manure, allelopathy, Secale cereale, Brassica napus, Medicago sativa

    Cover crop-based ecological weed management: exploration and optimization. In organic farming systems, weed control is recognized as one

  7. Limits and dynamics of methane oxidation in landfill cover soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to understand the limits and dynamics of methane (CH4) oxidation in landfill cover soils, we investigated CH4 oxidation in daily, intermediate, and final cover soils from two California landfills as a function of temperature, soil moisture and CO2 concentration. The results indicate a signi...

  8. 12 CFR 35.2 - Definition of covered agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the interest rate on the loan or whether the organization intends or is authorized to re-loan the... covered agreement. A covered agreement is any contract, arrangement, or understanding that meets all of... arrangements or understandings—(1) Example 1. A NGEP meets with an insured depository institution and states...

  9. 12 CFR 533.2 - Definition of covered agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the interest rate on the loan or whether the organization intends or is authorized to re-loan the... covered agreement. A covered agreement is any contract, arrangement, or understanding that meets all of... arrangements or understandings—(1) Example 1. A NGEP meets with an insured depository institution and states...

  10. Enhanced Cover Assessment Project:Soil Manipulation and Revegetation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, W. Joseph [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc.; Albright, Dr. Bill [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Benson, Dr. Craig [University of Wisconsin-Madison

    2014-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management is evaluating methods to enhance natural changes that are essentially converting conventional disposal cell covers for uranium mill tailings into water balance covers. Conventional covers rely on a layer of compacted clayey soil to limit exhalation of radon gas and percolation of rainwater. Water balance covers rely on a less compacted soil “sponge” to store rainwater, and on soil evaporation and plant transpiration (evapotranspiration) to remove stored water and thereby limit percolation. Over time, natural soil-forming and ecological processes are changing conventional covers by increasing hydraulic conductivity, loosening compaction, and increasing evapotranspiration. The rock armor on conventional covers creates a favorable habitat for vegetation by slowing soil evaporation, increasing soil water storage, and trapping dust and organic matter, thereby providing the water and nutrients needed for plant germination, survival, and sustainable transpiration. Goals and Objectives Our overall goal is to determine if allowing or enhancing these natural changes could improve cover performance and reduce maintenance costs over the long term. This test pad study focuses on cover soil hydrology and ecology. Companion studies are evaluating effects of natural and enhanced changes in covers on radon attenuation, erosion, and biointrusion. We constructed a test cover at the Grand Junction disposal site to evaluate soil manipulation and revegetation methods. The engineering design, construction, and properties of the test cover match the upper three layers of the nearby disposal cell cover: a 1-foot armoring of rock riprap, a 6-inch bedding layer of coarse sand and gravel, and a 2-foot protection layer of compacted fine soil. The test cover does not have a radon barrier—cover enhancement tests leave the radon barrier intact. We tested furrowing and ripping as means for creating depressions parallel to the slope

  11. Land Cover Classification Using ALOS Imagery For Penang, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, C K; Abdullah, K; MatJafri, M Z; Lim, H S

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the potential of integrating optical and radar remote sensing data to improve automatic land cover mapping. The analysis involved standard image processing, and consists of spectral signature extraction and application of a statistical decision rule to identify land cover categories. A maximum likelihood classifier is utilized to determine different land cover categories. Ground reference data from sites throughout the study area are collected for training and validation. The land cover information was extracted from the digital data using PCI Geomatica 10.3.2 software package. The variations in classification accuracy due to a number of radar imaging processing techniques are studied. The relationship between the processing window and the land classification is also investigated. The classification accuracies from the optical and radar feature combinations are studied. Our research finds that fusion of radar and optical significantly improved classification accuracies. This study indicates that the land cover/use can be mapped accurately by using this approach

  12. Snow cover and temperature relationships in North America and Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J.; Owe, M.; Rango, A.

    1983-01-01

    In this study the snow cover extent during the autumn months in both North America and Eurasia has been related to the ensuing winter temperature as measured at several locations near the center of each continent. The relationship between autumn snow cover and the ensuing winter temperatures was found to be much better for Eurasia than for North America. For Eurasia the average snow cover extent during the autumn explained as much as 52 percent of the variance in the winter (December-February) temperatures compared to only 12 percent for North America. However, when the average winter snow cover was correlated with the average winter temperature it was found that the relationship was better for North America than for Eurasia. As much as 46 percent of the variance in the winter temperature was explained by the winter snow cover in North America compared to only 12 percent in Eurasia.

  13. Automated energy conserving cover for refrigerated cabinet access openings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, F.F.

    1984-01-01

    An automatically operated flexible barrier cover for the access openings of refrigerated display cabinets. The barrier cover limits the contact between the refrigerated air within the cabinet and the ambient air. The barrier cover can be moved over the access opening during non-customer use time periods when the retail food outlet is closed. The barrier cover can be arranged as a unitary assembly which can be manufactured and sold separately from the display cabinet as a retrofit device to effect energy savings. The flexible barrier cover can be stored in a reeled-up position or can be arranged as a folded flexible barrier which can be fanned out across the access opening. Various traction means are provided for moving the flexible barrier across the access opening

  14. Towards realistic Holocene land cover scenarios: integration of archaeological, palynological and geomorphological records and comparison to global land cover scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Brue, Hanne; Verstraeten, Gert; Broothaerts, Nils; Notebaert, Bastiaan

    2016-04-01

    Accurate and spatially explicit landscape reconstructions for distinct time periods in human history are essential for the quantification of the effect of anthropogenic land cover changes on, e.g., global biogeochemical cycles, ecology, and geomorphic processes, and to improve our understanding of interaction between humans and the environment in general. A long-term perspective covering Mid and Late Holocene land use changes is recommended in this context, as it provides a baseline to evaluate human impact in more recent periods. Previous efforts to assess the evolution and intensity of agricultural land cover in past centuries or millennia have predominantly focused on palynological records. An increasing number of quantitative techniques has been developed during the last two decades to transfer palynological data to land cover estimates. However, these techniques have to deal with equifinality issues and, furthermore, do not sufficiently allow to reconstruct spatial patterns of past land cover. On the other hand, several continental and global databases of historical anthropogenic land cover changes based on estimates of global population and the required agricultural land per capita have been developed in the past decennium. However, at such long temporal and spatial scales, reconstruction of past anthropogenic land cover intensities and spatial patterns necessarily involves many uncertainties and assumptions as well. Here, we present a novel approach that combines archaeological, palynological and geomorphological data for the Dijle catchment in the central Belgium Loess Belt in order to arrive at more realistic Holocene land cover histories. Multiple land cover scenarios (> 60.000) are constructed using probabilistic rules and used as input into a sediment delivery model (WaTEM/SEDEM). Model outcomes are confronted with a detailed geomorphic dataset on Holocene sediment fluxes and with REVEALS based estimates of vegetation cover using palynological data from

  15. Forest Cover Estimation in Ireland Using Radar Remote Sensing: A Comparative Analysis of Forest Cover Assessment Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaney, John; Barrett, Brian; Barrett, Frank; Redmond, John; O`Halloran, John

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of spatial and temporal changes in forest cover is an essential component of forest monitoring programs. Due to its cloud free capability, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is an ideal source of information on forest dynamics in countries with near-constant cloud-cover. However, few studies have investigated the use of SAR for forest cover estimation in landscapes with highly sparse and fragmented forest cover. In this study, the potential use of L-band SAR for forest cover estimation in two regions (Longford and Sligo) in Ireland is investigated and compared to forest cover estimates derived from three national (Forestry2010, Prime2, National Forest Inventory), one pan-European (Forest Map 2006) and one global forest cover (Global Forest Change) product. Two machine-learning approaches (Random Forests and Extremely Randomised Trees) are evaluated. Both Random Forests and Extremely Randomised Trees classification accuracies were high (98.1–98.5%), with differences between the two classifiers being minimal (forest area and an increase in overall accuracy of SAR-derived forest cover maps. All forest cover products were evaluated using an independent validation dataset. For the Longford region, the highest overall accuracy was recorded with the Forestry2010 dataset (97.42%) whereas in Sligo, highest overall accuracy was obtained for the Prime2 dataset (97.43%), although accuracies of SAR-derived forest maps were comparable. Our findings indicate that spaceborne radar could aid inventories in regions with low levels of forest cover in fragmented landscapes. The reduced accuracies observed for the global and pan-continental forest cover maps in comparison to national and SAR-derived forest maps indicate that caution should be exercised when applying these datasets for national reporting. PMID:26262681

  16. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, C.H. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin; Waugh, W.J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado; Albright, W.H. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada; Smith, G.M. [Geo-Smith Engineering, Grand Junction, Colorado; Bush, R.P. [U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado

    2011-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

  17. Monitoring Areal Snow Cover Using NASA Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshburger, Brian J.; Blandford, Troy; Moore, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop products and tools to assist in the hydrologic modeling process, including tools to help prepare inputs for hydrologic models and improved methods for the visualization of streamflow forecasts. In addition, this project will facilitate the use of NASA satellite imagery (primarily snow cover imagery) by other federal and state agencies with operational streamflow forecasting responsibilities. A GIS software toolkit for monitoring areal snow cover extent and producing streamflow forecasts is being developed. This toolkit will be packaged as multiple extensions for ArcGIS 9.x and an opensource GIS software package. The toolkit will provide users with a means for ingesting NASA EOS satellite imagery (snow cover analysis), preparing hydrologic model inputs, and visualizing streamflow forecasts. Primary products include a software tool for predicting the presence of snow under clouds in satellite images; a software tool for producing gridded temperature and precipitation forecasts; and a suite of tools for visualizing hydrologic model forecasting results. The toolkit will be an expert system designed for operational users that need to generate accurate streamflow forecasts in a timely manner. The Remote Sensing of Snow Cover Toolbar will ingest snow cover imagery from multiple sources, including the MODIS Operational Snowcover Data and convert them to gridded datasets that can be readily used. Statistical techniques will then be applied to the gridded snow cover data to predict the presence of snow under cloud cover. The toolbar has the ability to ingest both binary and fractional snow cover data. Binary mapping techniques use a set of thresholds to determine whether a pixel contains snow or no snow. Fractional mapping techniques provide information regarding the percentage of each pixel that is covered with snow. After the imagery has been ingested, physiographic data is attached to each cell in the snow cover image. This data

  18. Multidimensional simulation of radon diffusion through earthen covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, D.W.; Gee, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document applications of the RADMD model used at PNL to perform analyses of radon diffusion through uranium mill tailings cover systems. The accuracy of the numerical formulation of the RADMD model was demonstrated through a comparison with a two-dimensional analytic solution to the radon diffusion equation. Excellent agreement was obtained between two-dimensional radon concentration profiles predicted by RADMD and those obtained with the analytic solution. A simulation was made of radon diffusion into a test canister using the two dimensional capabilities of RADMD. The radon flux profile was computed and illustrates the effects of the canister on the surface radon flux. The influence of the canister on the radon flux was shown to be significant under certain circumstances. Defects in earthen cover systems were evaluated using the three dimensional capabilities of RADMD. The results support the expectation that defective covers can increase the surface flux from a covered talings pile. Compared to a cover with no defects, radon flux could be elevated by as much as a factor of three when 20% of the radon control layer area contained pockets of reduced moisture. The effects of temporal and spatial variations in moisture content have been modeled by coupling RADMD with a variable saturated flow model. Two dimensional simulations were made of the time dependence of radon flux from a tailings site before and after cover placement. The results demonstrated the expected flux reduction produced by a thick earthen cover. Time dependence of the radon flux after cover placement was attributed to slight changes in moisture content of the cover material with time. The particular cover studied had a compacted clay layer that effectively attenuated the radon

  19. Land cover mapping of Greater Mesoamerica using MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Chandra; Jenkins, Clinton N.

    2005-01-01

    A new land cover database of Greater Mesoamerica has been prepared using moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS, 500 m resolution) satellite data. Daily surface reflectance MODIS data and a suite of ancillary data were used in preparing the database by employing a decision tree classification approach. The new land cover data are an improvement over traditional advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) based land cover data in terms of both spatial and thematic details. The dominant land cover type in Greater Mesoamerica is forest (39%), followed by shrubland (30%) and cropland (22%). Country analysis shows forest as the dominant land cover type in Belize (62%), Cost Rica (52%), Guatemala (53%), Honduras (56%), Nicaragua (53%), and Panama (48%), cropland as the dominant land cover type in El Salvador (60.5%), and shrubland as the dominant land cover type in Mexico (37%). A three-step approach was used to assess the quality of the classified land cover data: (i) qualitative assessment provided good insight in identifying and correcting gross errors; (ii) correlation analysis of MODIS- and Landsat-derived land cover data revealed strong positive association for forest (r2 = 0.88), shrubland (r2 = 0.75), and cropland (r2 = 0.97) but weak positive association for grassland (r2 = 0.26); and (iii) an error matrix generated using unseen training data provided an overall accuracy of 77.3% with a Kappa coefficient of 0.73608. Overall, MODIS 500 m data and the methodology used were found to be quite useful for broad-scale land cover mapping of Greater Mesoamerica.

  20. Estimating pinyon and juniper cover across Utah using NAIP imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell B. Roundy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Expansion of Pinus L. (pinyon and Juniperus L. (juniper (P-J trees into sagebrush (Artemisia L. steppe communities can lead to negative effects on hydrology, loss of wildlife habitat, and a decrease in desirable understory vegetation. Tree reduction treatments are often implemented to mitigate these negative effects. In order to prioritize and effectively plan these treatments, rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods are needed to estimate tree canopy cover at the landscape scale. We used object based image analysis (OBIA software (Feature AnalystTM for ArcMap 10.1®, ENVI Feature Extraction®, and Trimble eCognition Developer 8.2® to extract tree canopy cover using NAIP (National Agricultural Imagery Program imagery. We then compared our extractions with ground measured tree canopy cover (crown diameter and line point intercept on 309 plots across 44 sites in Utah. Extraction methods did not consistently over- or under-estimate ground measured P-J canopy cover except where tree cover was >45%. Estimates of tree canopy cover using OBIA techniques were strongly correlated with estimates using the crown diameter method (r = 0.93 for ENVI, 0.91 for Feature AnalystTM, and 0.92 for eCognition. Tree cover estimates using OBIA techniques had lower correlations with tree cover measurements using the line-point intercept method (r = 0.85 for ENVI, 0.83 for Feature AnalystTM, and 0.83 for eCognition. All software packages accurately and inexpensively extracted P-J canopy cover from NAIP imagery when the imagery was not blurred, and when P-J cover was not mixed with Amelanchier alnifolia (Utah serviceberry and Quercus gambelii (Gambel’s oak, which had similar spectral values as P-J.

  1. Cover crops support ecological intensification of arable cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittwer, Raphaël A.; Dorn, Brigitte; Jossi, Werner; van der Heijden, Marcel G. A.

    2017-02-01

    A major challenge for agriculture is to enhance productivity with minimum impact on the environment. Several studies indicate that cover crops could replace anthropogenic inputs and enhance crop productivity. However, so far, it is unclear if cover crop effects vary between different cropping systems, and direct comparisons among major arable production systems are rare. Here we compared the short-term effects of various cover crops on crop yield, nitrogen uptake, and weed infestation in four arable production systems (conventional cropping with intensive tillage and no-tillage; organic cropping with intensive tillage and reduced tillage). We hypothesized that cover cropping effects increase with decreasing management intensity. Our study demonstrated that cover crop effects on crop yield were highest in the organic system with reduced tillage (+24%), intermediate in the organic system with tillage (+13%) and in the conventional system with no tillage (+8%) and lowest in the conventional system with tillage (+2%). Our results indicate that cover crops are essential to maintaining a certain yield level when soil tillage intensity is reduced (e.g. under conservation agriculture), or when production is converted to organic agriculture. Thus, the inclusion of cover crops provides additional opportunities to increase the yield of lower intensity production systems and contribute to ecological intensification.

  2. Forest cover disturbances in the South Taiga of West Siberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyukarev, E A; Pologova, N N; Golovatskaya, E A; Dyukarev, A G, E-mail: egor@imces.ru [Institute of Monitoring of Climatic and Ecological Systems SB RAS, Akademicheskii Prospekt 10/3 (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15

    Analysis of vegetation cover and tendencies in forest cover changes at a typical site in the south of West Siberia was performed using remote sensing observations from Landsat. The Northern Eurasia Land Cover legend was used for the assessment of unsupervised classification results. The land cover maps constructed have shown that about half of the study area is occupied by wetlands with several distinctively different vegetation types. The area studied is typical for the South Taiga zone (ecoregion) of Western Siberia from the Ob' river to the Irtysh river, where loamy and clayey soil forming rocks are widespread. Similar vegetation structures dominate over 600 000 km{sup 2}, or about 20%, of the West Siberia area. Analyses of the forest cover changes show that the forest cover loss is not very significant. The area of forest disturbed in 1990-9 is equal to 16 008 ha. The area of forest disturbances during the 2000-7 period was about twice as high (30 907 ha). The main reasons for the forest reduction are intensive forest harvesting and strong windthrow. The high sustainability of the region studied against anthropogenic impacts is explained by the high overall wetness of the territory, the small population density, and the prevalence of deciduous forests at different succession stages with rich vegetation cover.

  3. Impacts of Land Cover Changes on Climate over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.; Frauenfeld, O. W.

    2014-12-01

    Land cover changes can influence regional climate through modifying the surface energy balance and water fluxes, and can also affect climate at large scales via changes in atmospheric general circulation. With rapid population growth and economic development, China has experienced significant land cover changes, such as deforestation, grassland degradation, and farmland expansion. In this study, the Community Earth System Model (CESM) is used to investigate the climate impacts of anthropogenic land cover changes over China. To isolate the climatic effects of land cover change, we focus on the CAM and CLM models, with prescribed climatological sea surface temperature and sea ice cover. Two experiments were performed, one with current vegetation and the other with potential vegetation. Current vegetation conditions were derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite observations, and potential vegetation over China was obtained from Ramankutty and Foley's global potential vegetation dataset. Impacts of land cover changes on surface air temperature and precipitation are assessed based on the difference of the two experiments. Results suggest that land cover changes have a cold-season cooling effect in a large region of China, but a warming effect in summer. These temperature changes can be reconciled with albedo forcing and evapotranspiration. Moreover, impacts on atmospheric circulation and the Asian Monsoon is also discussed.

  4. Quantifying environmental limiting factors on tree cover using geospatial data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jonathan A; Santos, Maria J; Dobrowski, Solomon Z; Vanderbilt, Vern C; Ustin, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    Environmental limiting factors (ELFs) are the thresholds that determine the maximum or minimum biological response for a given suite of environmental conditions. We asked the following questions: 1) Can we detect ELFs on percent tree cover across the eastern slopes of the Lake Tahoe Basin, NV? 2) How are the ELFs distributed spatially? 3) To what extent are unmeasured environmental factors limiting tree cover? ELFs are difficult to quantify as they require significant sample sizes. We addressed this by using geospatial data over a relatively large spatial extent, where the wall-to-wall sampling ensures the inclusion of rare data points which define the minimum or maximum response to environmental factors. We tested mean temperature, minimum temperature, potential evapotranspiration (PET) and PET minus precipitation (PET-P) as potential limiting factors on percent tree cover. We found that the study area showed system-wide limitations on tree cover, and each of the factors showed evidence of being limiting on tree cover. However, only 1.2% of the total area appeared to be limited by the four (4) environmental factors, suggesting other unmeasured factors are limiting much of the tree cover in the study area. Where sites were near their theoretical maximum, non-forest sites (tree cover demand, and closed-canopy forests were not limited by any particular environmental factor. The detection of ELFs is necessary in order to fully understand the width of limitations that species experience within their geographic range.

  5. Updating the 2001 National Land Cover Database land cover classification to 2006 by using Landsat imagery change detection methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, George; Homer, Collin G.; Fry, Joyce

    2009-01-01

    The recent release of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 2001, which represents the nation's land cover status based on a nominal date of 2001, is widely used as a baseline for national land cover conditions. To enable the updating of this land cover information in a consistent and continuous manner, a prototype method was developed to update land cover by an individual Landsat path and row. This method updates NLCD 2001 to a nominal date of 2006 by using both Landsat imagery and data from NLCD 2001 as the baseline. Pairs of Landsat scenes in the same season in 2001 and 2006 were acquired according to satellite paths and rows and normalized to allow calculation of change vectors between the two dates. Conservative thresholds based on Anderson Level I land cover classes were used to segregate the change vectors and determine areas of change and no-change. Once change areas had been identified, land cover classifications at the full NLCD resolution for 2006 areas of change were completed by sampling from NLCD 2001 in unchanged areas. Methods were developed and tested across five Landsat path/row study sites that contain several metropolitan areas including Seattle, Washington; San Diego, California; Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Jackson, Mississippi; and Manchester, New Hampshire. Results from the five study areas show that the vast majority of land cover change was captured and updated with overall land cover classification accuracies of 78.32%, 87.5%, 88.57%, 78.36%, and 83.33% for these areas. The method optimizes mapping efficiency and has the potential to provide users a flexible method to generate updated land cover at national and regional scales by using NLCD 2001 as the baseline.

  6. Deriving Snow Cover Metrics for Alaska from MODIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuck Lindsay

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS daily snow cover products provide an opportunity for determining snow onset and melt dates across broad geographic regions; however, cloud cover and polar darkness are limiting factors at higher latitudes. This study presents snow onset and melt dates for Alaska, portions of western Canada and the Russian Far East derived from Terra MODIS snow cover daily 500 m grid data (MOD10A1 and evaluates our method for filling data gaps caused by clouds or polar darkness. Pixels classified as cloud or no data were reclassified by: spatial filtering using neighboring pixel values; temporal filtering using pixel values for days before/after cloud cover; and snow-cycle filtering based on a time series assessment of a pixel’s position within snow accumulation, cover or melt periods. During the 2012 snow year, these gap-filling methods reduced cloud pixels from 27.7% to 3.1%. A total of 12 metrics (e.g., date of first and last snow, date of persistent snow cover and periods of intermittence for each pixel were calculated by snow year. A comparison of MODIS-derived snow onset and melt dates with in situ observations from 244 weather stations generally showed an early bias in MODIS-derived dates and an effect of increasing cloudiness exacerbating bias. Our results show that mean regional duration of seasonal snow cover is 179–311 days/year and that snow cover is often intermittent, with 41% of the area experiencing ≥2 snow-covered periods during a snow season. Other regional-scale patterns in the timing of snow onset and melt are evident in the yearly 500 m gridded products publically available at http://static.gina.alaska.edu/NPS_products/MODIS_snow/.

  7. Building a Continental Scale Land Cover Monitoring Framework for Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thankappan, Medhavy; Lymburner, Leo; Tan, Peter; McIntyre, Alexis; Curnow, Steven; Lewis, Adam

    2012-04-01

    Land cover information is critical for national reporting and decision making in Australia. A review of information requirements for reporting on national environmental indicators identified the need for consistent land cover information to be compared against a baseline. A Dynamic Land Cover Dataset (DLCD) for Australia has been developed by Geoscience Australia and the Australian Bureau of Agriculture and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES) recently, to provide a comprehensive and consistent land cover information baseline to enable monitoring and reporting for sustainable farming practices, water resource management, soil erosion, and forests at national and regional scales. The DLCD was produced from the analysis of Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) data at 250-metre resolution derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for the period from 2000 to 2008. The EVI time series data for each pixel was modelled as 12 coefficients based on the statistical, phenological and seasonal characteristics. The time series were then clustered in coefficients spaces and labelled using ancillary information on vegetation and land use at the catchment scale. The accuracy of the DLCD was assessed using field survey data over 25,000 locations provided by vegetation and land management agencies in State and Territory jurisdictions, and by ABARES. The DLCD is seen as the first in a series of steps to build a framework for national land cover monitoring in Australia. A robust methodology to provide annual updates to the DLCD is currently being developed at Geoscience Australia. There is also a growing demand from the user community for land cover information at better spatial resolution than currently available through the DLCD. Global land cover mapping initiatives that rely on Earth observation data offer many opportunities for national and international programs to work in concert and deliver better outcomes by streamlining efforts on development and

  8. Non-commutative covering spaces and their symmetries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canlubo, Clarisson

    dened and its corresponding Galois theory. Using this and basic concepts from algebraic geometryand spectral theory, we will give a full description of the general structure of non-centralcoverings. Examples of coverings of the rational and irrational non-commutative tori will alsobe studied. Using...... will explain this and relate it to bi-Galois theory.Using the OZ-transform, we will show that non-commutative covering spaces come in pairs.Several categories of covering spaces will be dened and studied. Appealing to Tannaka duality,we will explain how this lead to a notion of an etale fundamental group...

  9. MATERIALS FOR THE FINAL COVER OF SANITARY LANDFILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Kovačić

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the selection of materials for the sea¬ling layer in the final cover of sanitary landfills. The sealing la¬yer is the most critical component of the final cover. Its role is to minimize percolation of water through the final cover. Ma¬terials used for the construction of the sealing layer are either of mineral origin (compacted clay or geosynthetic (geomem¬brane. They are most often used in combination creating com¬posite liners. Recently alternative materials are also used like paper mill sludge or discarded swelling clay.

  10. ON f-EDGE COVER-COLOURING OF SIMPLE GRAPHS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Huimin; Liu Guizhen

    2005-01-01

    An f-edge cover-colouring of a graph G = (V, E) is an assignment of colours to the edges of G such that every colour appears at each vertex υ∈ V at least f(υ) times.The maximum number of colours needed to f-edge cover colour G is called the f-edge cover chromatic index of G, denoted by χfc(G). This paper gives that min[d(ν)-1/f(ν)] ≤χfc(G) ≤min[d(υ)/f(υ)].

  11. Exact Cover Problem in Milton Babbitt's All-partition Array

    OpenAIRE

    Bemman, Brian; Meredith, David

    2015-01-01

    One aspect of analyzing Milton Babbitt’s (1916–2011) all- partition arrays requires finding a sequence of distinct, non-overlapping aggregate regions that completely and exactly covers an irregular matrix of pitch class integers. This is an example of the so-called exact cover problem. Given a set, A, and a collection of distinct subsets of this set, S, then a subset of S is an exact cover of A if it exhaustively and exclu- sively partitions A. We provide a backtracking algorithm for solving ...

  12. MATERIALS FOR THE FINAL COVER OF SANITARY LANDFILLS

    OpenAIRE

    Davorin Kovačić

    1994-01-01

    The paper deals with the selection of materials for the sea¬ling layer in the final cover of sanitary landfills. The sealing la¬yer is the most critical component of the final cover. Its role is to minimize percolation of water through the final cover. Ma¬terials used for the construction of the sealing layer are either of mineral origin (compacted clay) or geosynthetic (geomem¬brane). They are most often used in combination creating com¬posite liners. Recently alternative materials are also ...

  13. USING OF THE COVER AMOUNTS METHOD FOR OPTIMIZATION OF INCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Volkov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of cover amounts (marginal income gives possibility to determine profitableness of each kind of the production and their real contribution into the result of work of enterprise.

  14. Data mining algorithms for land cover change detection: a review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sangram Panigrahi

    2017-11-24

    Nov 24, 2017 ... values, poor quality measurement, high resolution and high dimensional data. The land cover .... These data sets also include quality assurance information, ...... 2012 A new data mining framework for forest fire mapping.

  15. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level I, Kansas River Watershed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Upper Kansas River Watershed Land Cover Patterns map represents Phase 1 of a two-phase mapping initiative occurring over a three-year period as part of a...

  16. Tree cover changes in- and ouside protected areas in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nüchel, Jonas; Bøcher, Peder Klith; Svenning, J.-C.

    Protected areas (PAs) are one of the main tools in the global conservation of biodiversity and ecosystems. This is also the case for China. However, only few studies have investigated protected areas´ efficiency in maintaining ecosystems and biodiversity. One way to investigate this is to look...... at tree cover changes inside the PAs and on the surrounding areas. Using MODIS Vegetation Continuous Fields we mapped tree-cover changes between 2000-2010 in- and outside PAs in China. The PAs were extracted from the World Database on Protected Areas. Our aim were to investigated the following four...... between tree cover change and general human pressure. We did not find a significant correlation between tree cover change inside and outside PAs with increasing general human pressures. The lack of correlation could be due to the huge reforestation China has carried out the last years, mainly to stop...

  17. Assessment of human impacts on landuse and vegetation cover ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of human impacts on landuse and vegetation cover changes in Mubi region, Adamawa state, Nigeria; remote sensing and GIS approach. ... Global Journal of Environmental Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL ...

  18. Supraglacial Ponds Regulate Runoff From Himalayan Debris-Covered Glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine-Fynn, Tristram D. L.; Porter, Philip R.; Rowan, Ann V.; Quincey, Duncan J.; Gibson, Morgan J.; Bridge, Jonathan W.; Watson, C. Scott; Hubbard, Alun; Glasser, Neil F.

    2017-12-01

    Meltwater and runoff from glaciers in High Mountain Asia is a vital freshwater resource for one-fifth of the Earth's population. Between 13% and 36% of the region's glacierized areas exhibit surface debris cover and associated supraglacial ponds whose hydrological buffering roles remain unconstrained. We present a high-resolution meltwater hydrograph from the extensively debris-covered Khumbu Glacier, Nepal, spanning a 7 month period in 2014. Supraglacial ponds and accompanying debris cover modulate proglacial discharge by acting as transient and evolving reservoirs. Diurnally, the supraglacial pond system may store >23% of observed mean daily discharge, with mean recession constants ranging from 31 to 108 h. Given projections of increased debris cover and supraglacial pond extent across High Mountain Asia, we conclude that runoff regimes may become progressively buffered by the presence of supraglacial reservoirs. Incorporation of these processes is critical to improve predictions of the region's freshwater resource availability and cascading environmental effects downstream.

  19. Multi-temporal Assessment of Forest Cover, Stocking parameters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The study assessed forest cover, stocking parameters and above-ground tree .... deration new emerging ideas on REDD+, this study .... representing areas of change and zero values representing no ..... John Wiley & Sons, Inc. New York.

  20. Land cover change in coastal watersheds 1996 to 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nate Herold

    2016-01-01

    Land use and land cover play a significant role as drivers of environmental change. Information on what is changing and where those changes are occurring is essential if we are to improve our understanding of...

  1. Forest value and optimal rotations in continuous cover forestry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl; Jensen, Frank; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark

    2018-01-01

    The Faustmann forest rotation model is a celebrated contribution in economics. The model provides a forest value expression and allows a solution to the optimal rotation problem valid for perpetual rotations of even-aged forest stands. However, continuous forest cover forest management systems......, but rigorous mathematical model of the continuous cover forest, which strictly focuses on the area use dynamics that such an uneven-aged forest must have in equilibrium. This implies explicitly accounting for area reallocation and for weighting the productivity of each age class by the area occupied. We...... present results for unrestricted as well as area-restricted versions of the models. We find that land values are unambiguously higher in the continuous cover forest models compared with the even-aged models. Under area restrictions, the optimal rotation age in a continuous cover forest model...

  2. LandSat-Based Land Use-Land Cover (Raster)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Raster-based land cover data set derived from 30 meter resolution Thematic Mapper satellite imagery. Classification is divided into 16 classes with source imagery...

  3. National Land Cover Database (NLCD) Percent Tree Canopy Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The National Land Cover Database (NLCD) Percent Tree Canopy Collection is a product of the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), and is produced through a cooperative project...

  4. Unsupervised land cover change detection: meaningful sequential time series analysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salmon, BP

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An automated land cover change detection method is proposed that uses coarse spatial resolution hyper-temporal earth observation satellite time series data. The study compared three different unsupervised clustering approaches that operate on short...

  5. LandSat-Based Land Use-Land Cover (Vector)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Vector-based land cover data set derived from classified 30 meter resolution Thematic Mapper satellite imagery. Classification is divided into 16 classes with source...

  6. 2005 C-CAP Land Cover of Oahu, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of land cover derived from high resolution imagery according to the Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) protocol. This data set utilized...

  7. Assessment of environmental responses to land use/land cover ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    2013-12-17

    Dec 17, 2013 ... 49.86% of the land cover has been converted to other land uses, ... management information system and policies that will ensure sustainable management of fragile ...... growth in agricultural output such as food and fiber.

  8. Physical security of cut-and-cover underground facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morse, W.D.

    1998-01-01

    To aid designers, generic physical security objectives and design concepts for cut-and-cover underground facilities are presented. Specific aspects addressing overburdens, entryways, security doors, facility services, emergency egress, security response force, and human elements are discussed

  9. On the impact of snow cover on daytime pollution dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, M.; Garratt, J. R.; Pielke, R. A.; Hildebrand, P.; Rogers, F. A.; Cramer, J.; Schanot, A.

    A preliminary evaluation of the impact of snow cover on daytime pollutant dispersion conditions is made by using conceptual, scaling, and observational analyses. For uniform snow cover and synoptically unperturbed sunny conditions, observations indicate a considerate suppression of the surface sensible heat flux, the turbulence, and the development of the daytime atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) when compared to snow-free conditions. However, under conditions of non-uniform snow cover, as in urban areas, or associated with vegetated areas or bare ground patches, a milder effect on pollutant dispersion conditions would be expected. Observed concentrations of atmospheric particles within the ABL, and surface pollutant concentrations in urban areas, reflect the impact of snow cover on the modification of ABL characteristics.

  10. Stakes and modalities of the climatic risk covering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marteau, D.

    2006-01-01

    Several econometric works show that climatic volatility is at the first rank of the risk factors in several economic sectors like energy, textile, agriculture and food, tourism, leisure, building industries etc. However, climate remains an underestimated economic factor for several reasons: lack of awareness about the comparative stakes of climate risks management and market risks management, difficulties in the measurement of climate risk exposure, weak knowledge of covering techniques for private contract and organized markets, and unsolved question of risk sharing between shareholders and managers. This document analyzes the sensitivity of companies with respect to climate risk and describes the 5 steps of implementation of a climate covering policy: risk exposure measurement, risk bearing or transfer decision, definition of the optimum covering profile, choice of markets and covering instruments, efficiency measurement. A practical example is shown with its related questions. (J.S.)

  11. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level IV, Kansas River Watershed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) Mapping Initiative was a two-phase mapping endeavor that occurred over a three-year period (2007-2009). Note that while...

  12. Assessing Wetland Health Using a Newly Developed Land Cover ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Citizen science combines environmental research with environmental education .... health of the wetland using land cover type impacts. Once the impact is ... to interpret the findings of the quantitative method using the qualitative findings.

  13. USGS National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) Downloadable Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — NLCD 1992, NLCD 2001, NLCD 2006, and NLCD 2011 are National Land Cover Database classification schemes based primarily on Landsat data along with ancillary data...

  14. Benefits from cover crops based on plant-microbial interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Manici , L.M.; Kelderer, M.; Caputo, F.; De Luca Picione , F.; Topp, A.

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed on the impact of two different cover crops (cereal and legume) on composition of root fungal endophytes and rhizospheric bacterial communities as a function of crop health in replanted apple orchards.

  15. the implications of land use/cover dynamics on resources

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-04

    Dec 4, 2017 ... Land use maps were produced using the GIS software packages of ... Keywords: Land use/cover, Dynamics, Remote Sensing Techniques, Geographic Information System, .... sporadic floods and landslides in Bambui which.

  16. National Land Cover Database (NLCD) Percent Developed Imperviousness Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The National Land Cover Database (NLCD) Percent Developed Imperviousness Collection is produced through a cooperative project conducted by the Multi-Resolution Land...

  17. BOREAS SERM Forest Cover Data of Saskatchewan in Vector Format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A condensed forest cover type digital map of Saskatchewan and is a product of the Saskatchewan Environment and Resource Management, Forestry Branch-Inventory Unit...

  18. Importance of husk covering on field infestation of maize by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... An experiment was conducted to determine the importance of husk covering on field infestation of maize by the maize ... high yielding plants with no consideration for resistance ..... provided financial support for the study.

  19. [Characteristics of chemical pollution of snow cover in Aktobe areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskakov, A Zh

    2010-01-01

    The paper gives data on the nature of snow cover pollution in the urbanized areas in relation to the remoteness from the basic sources of ambient air pollution. The total snow content of carcinogens has been estimated.

  20. Effect of plant cover on presence of Black Francolin (Francolinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-06-21

    Jun 21, 2010 ... factors threatening the populations of these birds in Khouzestan Province, southwestern Iran. Using plot sampling ... Key words: Black francolin, Francolinus francolinus, plant cover, habitat, Iran. INTRODUCTION ... to get food.

  1. University of Colorado Students Join Pros in Covering Columbine Incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litherland, Chip

    1999-01-01

    Describes the experiences and feelings of a university photojournalist as he covered the shootings at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado. Notes the onslaught of the media presence and the overwhelming emotion he witnessed. (RS)

  2. Effect of Feature Dimensionality on Object-based Land Cover ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Myburgh, G, Mnr

    features, it has not been demonstrated with land cover mapping in an ... classifiers were chosen for benchmarking as the latter is the most commonly .... Additional open-source libraries were acquired to complete the implementation of the.

  3. GLOBAL LAND COVER CLASSIFICATION USING MODIS SURFACE REFLECTANCE PROSUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Fukue

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to develop high accuracy land cover classification algorithm for Global scale by using multi-temporal MODIS land reflectance products. In this study, time-domain co-occurrence matrix was introduced as a classification feature which provides time-series signature of land covers. Further, the non-parametric minimum distance classifier was introduced for timedomain co-occurrence matrix, which performs multi-dimensional pattern matching for time-domain co-occurrence matrices of a classification target pixel and each classification classes. The global land cover classification experiments have been conducted by applying the proposed classification method using 46 multi-temporal(in one year SR(Surface Reflectance and NBAR(Nadir BRDF-Adjusted Reflectance products, respectively. IGBP 17 land cover categories were used in our classification experiments. As the results, SR and NBAR products showed similar classification accuracy of 99%.

  4. Land cover classification using reformed fuzzy C-means

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper uses segmentation based on unsupervised clustering techniques for classification of land cover. ∗ ... and unsupervised classification can be solved by FCM. ..... They also act as input to the development and monitoring of a range of ...

  5. Fractional cover data retrieval using eCognition

    OpenAIRE

    Wellens, Joost; Denis, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    For the overall calibration and validation of the AquaCrop model decent information on the development of the canopy cover is crucial. Throughout the growing season overhead canopy pictures were taken. Different image treatment programs have been evaluated on their capacity to retrieve the fractional cover data from these images. The findings are presented in this technical note. The objectives (and/or constraints) were manifold: - determine for each image the percentage of can...

  6. Forest cover of Champaign County, Illinois in 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus Danilo Chinea; Louis R. Iverson

    1997-01-01

    The forest cover of Champaign County, in east-central Illinois, was mapped from 1993 aerial photography and entered in a geographical information system database. One hundred and six forest patches cover 3,380 ha. These patches have a mean area of 32 ha, a mean perimeter of 4,851 m, a mean perimeter to area ratio of 237, a fractal dimension of 1.59, and a mean nearest...

  7. UMTRA project disposal cell cover biointrusion sensitivity assessment, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    This study provides an analysis of potential changes that may take place in a Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cell cover system as a result of plant biointrusion. Potential changes are evaluated by performing a sensitivity analysis of the relative impact of root penetrations on radon flux out of the cell cover and/or water infiltration into the cell cover. Data used in this analysis consist of existing information on vegetation growth on selected cell cover systems and information available from published studies and/or other available project research. Consistent with the scope of this paper, no new site-specific data were collected from UMTRA Project sites. Further, this paper does not focus on the issue of plant transport of radon gas or other contaminants out of the disposal cell cover though it is acknowledged that such transport has the potential to be a significant pathway for contaminants to reach the environment during portions of the design life of a disposal cell where plant growth occurs. Rather, this study was performed to evaluate the effects of physical penetration and soil drying caused by plant roots that have and are expected to continue to grow in UMTRA Project disposal cell covers. An understanding of the biological and related physical processes that take place within the cover systems of the UMTRA Project disposal cells helps the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determine if the presence of a plant community on these cells is detrimental, beneficial, or of mixed value in terms of the cover system's designed function. Results of this investigation provide information relevant to the formulation of a vegetation control policy

  8. Specialists' meeting on fast reactor cover gas purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The tentative agenda was adopted by the participants without comment and was followed throughout the meeting. The following topics were discussed at the subsequent sessions of the meeting on 'Fast Reactor Cover Gas Purification': National Position Papers; Impurities: Sources and Measurement; Cover Gas Purification Techniques; Sodium Aerosol Trapping; Radiological Considerations. Based on the papers presented and the discussions following, session summaries and conclusions were prepared and are included in this report

  9. Specialists' meeting on fast reactor cover gas purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1987-07-01

    The tentative agenda was adopted by the participants without comment and was followed throughout the meeting. The following topics were discussed at the subsequent sessions of the meeting on 'Fast Reactor Cover Gas Purification': National Position Papers; Impurities: Sources and Measurement; Cover Gas Purification Techniques; Sodium Aerosol Trapping; Radiological Considerations. Based on the papers presented and the discussions following, session summaries and conclusions were prepared and are included in this report.

  10. Quantifying environmental limiting factors on tree cover using geospatial data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Greenberg

    Full Text Available Environmental limiting factors (ELFs are the thresholds that determine the maximum or minimum biological response for a given suite of environmental conditions. We asked the following questions: 1 Can we detect ELFs on percent tree cover across the eastern slopes of the Lake Tahoe Basin, NV? 2 How are the ELFs distributed spatially? 3 To what extent are unmeasured environmental factors limiting tree cover? ELFs are difficult to quantify as they require significant sample sizes. We addressed this by using geospatial data over a relatively large spatial extent, where the wall-to-wall sampling ensures the inclusion of rare data points which define the minimum or maximum response to environmental factors. We tested mean temperature, minimum temperature, potential evapotranspiration (PET and PET minus precipitation (PET-P as potential limiting factors on percent tree cover. We found that the study area showed system-wide limitations on tree cover, and each of the factors showed evidence of being limiting on tree cover. However, only 1.2% of the total area appeared to be limited by the four (4 environmental factors, suggesting other unmeasured factors are limiting much of the tree cover in the study area. Where sites were near their theoretical maximum, non-forest sites (tree cover < 25% were primarily limited by cold mean temperatures, open-canopy forest sites (tree cover between 25% and 60% were primarily limited by evaporative demand, and closed-canopy forests were not limited by any particular environmental factor. The detection of ELFs is necessary in order to fully understand the width of limitations that species experience within their geographic range.

  11. Cover of tall trees best predicts California spotted owl habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm P. North; Jonathan T. Kane; Van R. Kane; Gregory P. Asner; William Berigan; Derek J. Churchill; Scott Conway; R.J. Gutiérrez; Sean Jeronimo; John Keane; Alexander Koltunov; Tina Mark; Monika Moskal; Thomas Munton; Zachary Peery; Carlos Ramirez; Rahel Sollmann; Angela White; Sheila Whitmore

    2017-01-01

    Restoration of western dry forests in the USA often focuses on reducing fuel loads. In the range of the spotted owl, these treatments may reduce canopy cover and tree density, which could reduce preferred habitat conditions for the owl and other sensitive species. In particular, high canopy cover (≥70%) has been widely reported to be an important feature of spotted owl...

  12. Declining urban and community tree cover in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Eric J. Greenfield

    2018-01-01

    Paired aerial photographs were interpreted to assess recent changes (c. 2009–2014) in tree, impervious and other cover types within urban/community and urban land in all 50 United States and the District of Columbia. National results indicate that tree cover in urban/community areas of the United States is on the decline at a rate of about 175,000 acres per year, which...

  13. Next generation of global land cover characterization, mapping, and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Chandra; Pengra, Bruce; Long, J.; Loveland, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Land cover change is increasingly affecting the biophysics, biogeochemistry, and biogeography of the Earth's surface and the atmosphere, with far-reaching consequences to human well-being. However, our scientific understanding of the distribution and dynamics of land cover and land cover change (LCLCC) is limited. Previous global land cover assessments performed using coarse spatial resolution (300 m–1 km) satellite data did not provide enough thematic detail or change information for global change studies and for resource management. High resolution (∼30 m) land cover characterization and monitoring is needed that permits detection of land change at the scale of most human activity and offers the increased flexibility of environmental model parameterization needed for global change studies. However, there are a number of challenges to overcome before producing such data sets including unavailability of consistent global coverage of satellite data, sheer volume of data, unavailability of timely and accurate training and validation data, difficulties in preparing image mosaics, and high performance computing requirements. Integration of remote sensing and information technology is needed for process automation and high-performance computing needs. Recent developments in these areas have created an opportunity for operational high resolution land cover mapping, and monitoring of the world. Here, we report and discuss these advancements and opportunities in producing the next generations of global land cover characterization, mapping, and monitoring at 30-m spatial resolution primarily in the context of United States, Group on Earth Observations Global 30 m land cover initiative (UGLC).

  14. LMFBR technology. FFTF cover-gas leakage calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deboi, H.

    1974-01-01

    The FFTF LMFBR is intended to have a near zero release of radioactive gases during normal reactor operation with 1% failed fuel. This report presents calculations which provide an approximation of these cover gas leakages. Data from ongoing static and dynamic seal leak tests at AI are utilized. Leakage through both elastomeric and metallic seals in all sub-assemblies and penetrations comprising the reactor cover gas containment during reactor operation system are included

  15. Technical specification for fabrication of HANARO pool cover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jeong Soo; Woo, Sang Ik

    2001-06-01

    This technical specification details the requirements and the acceptance criteria for design, seismic analysis, function test, installation and quality assurance for HANARO pool cover which will be installed at the top of reactor pool. The pool cover is classified as non-nuclear safety, seismic category II and quality class T. The basic design of the pool cover for increasing HANARO applications has been carried out for supporting the driving devices which can load, unload and rotate the irradiation targets in the in-core and out-core vertical irradiation holes under on-power operation. The comments of HANARO user group related with irradiation tests have optimally considered in the process of design. The interference between fuel handling and control absorber units in the reactor pool and activities to load, unload and rotate the irradiation targets at the top of the reactor pool have been minimized. The pool cover can be moved for maintenance and can protect the reactor pool from unexpected drop of foreign materials. It provides the space to vertical access of driving devices for NTD, CT/IR and OR4/OR5 under on-power operation. And the pool cover assembly must maintain its structural integrity under seismic load. Based on the above design concept, the HANARO pool cover has been proposed as supporting structure of driving devices for NTD, fission moly and RI production under on-power operation.

  16. Optimization of composite sandwich cover panels subjected to compressive loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Juan R.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis and design method is presented for the design of composite sandwich cover panels that include the transverse shear effects and damage tolerance considerations. This method is incorporated into a sandwich optimization computer program entitled SANDOP. As a demonstration of its capabilities, SANDOP is used in the present study to design optimized composite sandwich cover panels for for transport aircraft wing applications. The results of this design study indicate that optimized composite sandwich cover panels have approximately the same structural efficiency as stiffened composite cover panels designed to satisfy individual constraints. The results also indicate that inplane stiffness requirements have a large effect on the weight of these composite sandwich cover panels at higher load levels. Increasing the maximum allowable strain and the upper percentage limit of the 0 degree and +/- 45 degree plies can yield significant weight savings. The results show that the structural efficiency of these optimized composite sandwich cover panels is relatively insensitive to changes in core density. Thus, core density should be chosen by criteria other than minimum weight (e.g., damage tolerance, ease of manufacture, etc.).

  17. Temporal Land Cover Analysis for Net Ecosystem Improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2013-04-09

    We delineated 8 watersheds contributing to previously defined river reaches within the 1,468-km2 historical floodplain of the tidally influenced lower Columbia River and estuary. We assessed land-cover change at the watershed, reach, and restoration site scales by reclassifying remote-sensing data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Change Analysis Program’s land cover/land change product into forest, wetland, and urban categories. The analysis showed a 198.3 km2 loss of forest cover during the first 6 years of the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program, 2001–2006. Total measured urbanization in the contributing watersheds of the estuary during the full 1996-2006 change analysis period was 48.4 km2. Trends in forest gain/loss and urbanization differed between watersheds. Wetland gains and losses were within the margin of error of the satellite imagery analysis. No significant land cover change was measured at restoration sites, although it was visible in aerial imagery, therefore, the 30-m land-cover product may not be appropriate for assessment of early-stage wetland restoration. These findings suggest that floodplain restoration sites in reaches downstream of watersheds with decreasing forest cover will be subject to increased sediment loads, and those downstream of urbanization will experience effects of increased impervious surfaces on hydrologic processes.

  18. Persistent solar signatures in cloud cover: spatial and temporal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voiculescu, M; Usoskin, I

    2012-01-01

    A consensus regarding the impact of solar variability on cloud cover is far from being reached. Moreover, the impact of cloud cover on climate is among the least understood of all climate components. This motivated us to analyze the persistence of solar signals in cloud cover for the time interval 1984–2009, covering two full solar cycles. A spatial and temporal investigation of the response of low, middle and high cloud data to cosmic ray induced ionization (CRII) and UV irradiance (UVI) is performed in terms of coherence analysis of the two signals. For some key geographical regions the response of clouds to UVI and CRII is persistent over the entire time interval indicating a real link. In other regions, however, the relation is not consistent, being intermittent or out of phase, suggesting that some correlations are spurious. The constant in phase or anti-phase relationship between clouds and solar proxies over some regions, especially for low clouds with UVI and CRII, middle clouds with UVI and high clouds with CRII, definitely requires more study. Our results show that solar signatures in cloud cover persist in some key climate-defining regions for the entire time period and supports the idea that, if existing, solar effects are not visible at the global level and any analysis of solar effects on cloud cover (and, consequently, on climate) should be done at the regional level. (letter)

  19. Oxygen diffusion through soil covers on sulphidic mine tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanful, E.K.

    1993-01-01

    Engineered soil covers are being evaluated under Canada's Mine Environment Neutral Drainage (MEND) program for their effectiveness in preventing and controlling acid generation in sulfidic mill tailings. A critical parameter for predicting the performance of these covers is the diffusion coefficient of gaseous oxygen in the cover materials. Laboratory experiments conducted to determine the effective diffusion coefficient of a candidate cover material, a glacial till from an active mine site, are described. The diffusion coefficient is determined by fitting a semianalytic solution of the one-dimensional, transient diffusion equation to experimental gaseous oxygen concentration versus time graphs. Effective diffusion coefficients determined at high water saturations (85%--95%) were of the order of 8 x 10 -8 m 2 /s. The diffusion coefficients decreased with increase in water saturation as a result of the low diffusivity of gaseous oxygen in water relative to that in air and the low solubility of oxygen in water. Placement of soil covers in high saturation conditions would ensure that the flux of oxygen into tailings underneath such covers is low, resulting in low acid flux. This is confirmed by combined laboratory, field, and modeling studies

  20. Final covering of the Ronneburg uranium mining site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoepfner, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    The rehabilitation of WISMUT's former Ronneburg uranium mining site involves backfilling of waste rock to the Lichtenberg open pit. The relocation project comprises about 110 million m 3 of sulphide-bearing and AMD-generating waste rock which makes it the most important and most cost-intensive single surface restoration project conducted by WISMUT at the Ronneburg site. The backfilled waste rock has to be covered on an area of about 220 ha to control water infiltration and gas diffusion. Design planning for the final cover placement which began in 2004 had to be based on a comprehensive cost-benefit analysis as well on field tests of alternative cover options which are in compliance with legal requirements. An intensive testing program concerning the vadose zone of soil covers has therefore been started in 2000. The paper presents an overview of the monitoring program and the results of the vadose zone measurements. The water of soil covers have to be predicted for extended evaluation periods. Therefore water balance simulations of single layer covers (storage and evaporation concept) taking current and future soil and climate conditions into account are performed with the HYDRUS 2D code. (author)

  1. Interfacial stability of soil covers on lined surface impoundments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.H.; Gates, T.E.

    1986-04-01

    The factors affecting the interfacial stability of soil covers on geomembranes were examined to determine the maximum stable slopes for soil cover/geomembrane systems. Several instances of instability of soil covers on geomembranes have occurred at tailings ponds, leaving exposed geomembranes with the potential for physical ddamage and possibly chemical and ultraviolet degradation. From an operator's viewpoint, it is desirable to maximize the slope of lined facilities in order to maximize the volume-to-area ratio; however, the likelihood for instability also increases with increasing slope. Frictional data obtained from direct shear tests are compared with stability data obtained using a nine-square-meter (m 2 ) engineering-scale test stand to verify that direct shear test data are valid in slope design calculations. Interfacial frictional data from direct shear tests using high-density polyethylene and a poorly graded sand cover agree within several degrees with the engineering-scale tests. Additional tests with other soils and geomembranes are planned. The instability of soil covers is not always an interfacial problem; soil erosion and limited drainage capacity are additional factors that must be considered in the design of covered slopes. 7 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Use of UAV-Borne Spectrometer for Land Cover Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmya Natesan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV are being used for low altitude remote sensing for thematic land classification using visible light and multi-spectral sensors. The objective of this work was to investigate the use of UAV equipped with a compact spectrometer for land cover classification. The UAV platform used was a DJI Flamewheel F550 hexacopter equipped with GPS and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU navigation sensors, and a Raspberry Pi processor and camera module. The spectrometer used was the FLAME-NIR, a near-infrared spectrometer for hyperspectral measurements. RGB images and spectrometer data were captured simultaneously. As spectrometer data do not provide continuous terrain coverage, the locations of their ground elliptical footprints were determined from the bundle adjustment solution of the captured images. For each of the spectrometer ground ellipses, the land cover signature at the footprint location was determined to enable the characterization, identification, and classification of land cover elements. To attain a continuous land cover classification map, spatial interpolation was carried out from the irregularly distributed labeled spectrometer points. The accuracy of the classification was assessed using spatial intersection with the object-based image classification performed using the RGB images. Results show that in homogeneous land cover, like water, the accuracy of classification is 78% and in mixed classes, like grass, trees and manmade features, the average accuracy is 50%, thus, indicating the contribution of hyperspectral measurements of low altitude UAV-borne spectrometers to improve land cover classification.

  3. Tree Cover Mapping Tool—Documentation and user manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotillon, Suzanne E.; Mathis, Melissa L.

    2016-06-02

    The Tree Cover Mapping (TCM) tool was developed by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science Center to allow a user to quickly map tree cover density over large areas using visual interpretation of high resolution imagery within a geographic information system interface. The TCM tool uses a systematic sample grid to produce maps of tree cover. The TCM tool allows the user to define sampling parameters to estimate tree cover within each sample unit. This mapping method generated the first on-farm tree cover maps of vast regions of Niger and Burkina Faso. The approach contributes to implementing integrated landscape management to scale up re-greening and restore degraded land in the drylands of Africa. The TCM tool is easy to operate, practical, and can be adapted to many other applications such as crop mapping, settlements mapping, or other features. This user manual provides step-by-step instructions for installing and using the tool, and creating tree cover maps. Familiarity with ArcMap tools and concepts is helpful for using the tool.

  4. About soil cover heterogeneity of agricultural research stations' experimental fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannik, Kaire; Kõlli, Raimo; Kukk, Liia

    2013-04-01

    Depending on local pedo-ecological conditions (topography, (geo) diversity of soil parent material, meteorological conditions) the patterns of soil cover and plant cover determined by soils are very diverse. Formed in the course of soil-plant mutual relationship, the natural ecosystems are always influenced to certain extent by the other local soil forming conditions or they are site specific. The agricultural land use or the formation of agro-ecosystems depends foremost on the suitability of soils for the cultivation of feed and food crops. As a rule, the most fertile or the best soils of the area, which do not present any or present as little as possible constraints for agricultural land use, are selected for this purpose. Compared with conventional field soils, the requirements for the experimental fields' soil cover quality are much higher. Experimental area soils and soil cover composition should correspond to local pedo-ecological conditions and, in addition to that, represent the soil types dominating in the region, whereas the fields should be as homogeneous as possible. The soil cover heterogeneity of seven arable land blocks of three research stations (Jõgeva, Kuusiku and Olustvere) was studied 1) by examining the large scale (1:10 000) digital soil map (available via the internet), and 2) by field researches using the transect method. The stages of soils litho-genetic and moisture heterogeneities were estimated by using the Estonian normal soils matrix, however, the heterogeneity of top- and subsoil texture by using the soil texture matrix. The quality and variability of experimental fields' soils humus status, was studied more thoroughly from the aspect of humus concentration (g kg-1), humus cover thickness (cm) and humus stocks (Mg ha-1). The soil cover of Jõgeva experimental area, which presents an accumulative drumlin landscape (formed during the last glacial period), consist from loamy Luvisols and associated to this Cambisols. In Kuusiku area

  5. Differences in breeding bird assemblages related to reed canary grass cover cover and forest structure on the Upper Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Eileen M.; Gray, Brian R.

    2017-01-01

    Floodplain forest of the Upper Mississippi River provides habitat for an abundant and diverse breeding bird community. However, reed canary grass Phalaris arundinacea invasion is a serious threat to the future condition of this forest. Reed canary grass is a well-known aggressive invader of wetland systems in the northern tier states of the conterminous United States. Aided by altered flow regimes and nutrient inputs from agriculture, reed canary grass has formed dense stands in canopy gaps and forest edges, retarding tree regeneration. We sampled vegetation and breeding birds in Upper Mississippi River floodplain forest edge and interior areas to 1) measure reed canary grass cover and 2) evaluate whether the breeding bird assemblage responded to differences in reed canary grass cover. Reed canary grass was found far into forest interiors, and its cover was similar between interior and edge sites. Bird assemblages differed between areas with more or less reed canary grass cover (.53% cover breakpoint). Common yellowthroat Geothlypis trichas, black-capped chickadee Parus atricapillus, and rose-breasted grosbeak Pheucticus ludovicianus were more common and American redstart Setophaga ruticilla, great crested flycatcher Myiarchus crinitus, and Baltimore oriole Icterus galbula were less common in sites with more reed canary grass cover. Bird diversity and abundance were similar between sites with different reed canary grass cover. A stronger divergence in bird assemblages was associated with ground cover ,15%, resulting from prolonged spring flooding. These sites hosted more prothonotary warbler Protonotaria citrea, but they had reduced bird abundance and diversity compared to other sites. Our results indicate that frequently flooded sites may be important for prothonotary warblers and that bird assemblages shift in response to reed canary grass invasion.

  6. Using ASTER Imagery in Land Use/cover Classification of Eastern Mediterranean Landscapes According to CORINE Land Cover Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Gundogan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The satellite imagery has been effectively utilized for classifying land covertypes and detecting land cover conditions. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emissionand Reflection Radiometer (ASTER sensor imagery has been widely used in classificationprocess of land cover. However, atmospheric corrections have to be made by preprocessingsatellite sensor imagery since the electromagnetic radiation signals received by the satellitesensors can be scattered and absorbed by the atmospheric gases and aerosols. In this study,an ASTER sensor imagery, which was converted into top-of-atmosphere reflectance(TOA, was used to classify the land use/cover types, according to COoRdination ofINformation on the Environment (CORINE land cover nomenclature, for an arearepresenting the heterogonous characteristics of eastern Mediterranean regions inKahramanmaras, Turkey. The results indicated that using the surface reflectance data ofASTER sensor imagery can provide accurate (i.e. overall accuracy and kappa values of83.2% and 0.79, respectively and low-cost cover mapping as a part of inventory forCORINE Land Cover Project.

  7. Biocompatibility of a new device of self-expandable covered and non-covered tracheal stent: comparative study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olavo Ribeiro Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the compatibility of a new model of self-expandable tracheal stent in rats. METHODS: A new device of polyurethane covered and non - covered stent was placed in the trachea of Wistar rats. Animals were distributed in two groups: the polyurethane covered and non-covered group. Macroscopic parameters included position within the tracheal lumen, adherence to the mucosa, degree of dilatation, permeability and internal diameter. Microscopic findings evaluated were: incorporation, inflammatory activity, granulation tissue and epithelial revetment injuries. The observation follow-up was six weeks. All parameters were quantified based on determined score values. Incorporation of the stents was evaluated based on the observation if the stent was fixed into the trachea or if it could be removed. Degree of dilatation was performed by external diameter measurements. Granulation tissue was evaluated by measurements of height of the tissue growing into the tracheal lumen. RESULTS: 100% of non-covered stents had total attachment to mucosa and 100% of polyurethane covered type had adherence only. Regarding dilatation, granulation tissue, inflammatory activity and internal diameter measurements, there were no significant differences between the groups. Pathological tracheal wall injuries were present in both groups. CONCLUSION: Both models of stent demonstrated biocompatibility with the trachea. Rats are suitable for an experimental model of tracheal stent study.

  8. Spatio-temporal change in forest cover and carbon storage considering actual and potential forest cover in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kijun; Lee, Woo-Kyun; Kim, Moonil; Kwak, Doo-Ahn; Byun, Woo-Hyuk; Yu, Hangnan; Kwak, Hanbin; Kwon, Taesung; Sung, Joohan; Chung, Dong-Jun; Lee, Seung-Ho

    2015-07-01

    This study analyzes change in carbon storage by applying forest growth models and final cutting age to actual and potential forest cover for six major tree species in South Korea. Using National Forest Inventory data, the growth models were developed to estimate mean diameter at breast height, tree height, and number of trees for Pinus densiflora, Pinus koraiensis, Pinus rigida, Larix kaempferi, Castanea crenata and Quercus spp. stands. We assumed that actual forest cover in a forest type map will change into potential forest covers according to the Hydrological and Thermal Analogy Groups model. When actual forest cover reaches the final cutting age, forest volume and carbon storage are estimated by changed forest cover and its growth model. Forest volume between 2010 and 2110 would increase from 126.73 to 157.33 m(3) hm(-2). Our results also show that forest cover, volume, and carbon storage could abruptly change by 2060. This is attributed to the fact that most forests are presumed to reach final cutting age. To avoid such dramatic change, a regeneration and yield control scheme should be prepared and implemented in a way that ensures balance in forest practice and yield.

  9. Development of a 30 m Spatial Resolution Land Cover of Canada: Contribution to the Harmonized North America Land Cover Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, D.; Latifovic, R.; Olthof, I.

    2017-12-01

    Land cover is needed for a large range of environmental applications regarding climate impacts and adaption, emergency response, wildlife habitat, air quality, water yield, etc. In Canada a 2008 user survey revealed that the most practical scale for provision of land cover data is 30 m, nationwide, with an update frequency of five years (Ball, 2008). In response to this need the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing has generated a 30 m land cover of Canada for the base year 2010 as part of a planned series of maps at the recommended five year update frequency. This land cover is the Canadian contribution to the North American Land Change Monitoring System initiative, which seeks to provide harmonized land cover across Canada, the United States, and Mexico. The methodology developed in this research utilized a combination of unsupervised and machine learning techniques to map land cover, blend results between mapping units, locally optimize results, and process some thematic attributes with specific features sets. Accuracy assessment with available field data shows it was on average 75% for the five study areas assessed. In this presentation an overview of the unique processing aspects, example results, and initial accuracy assessment will be discussed.

  10. Terrorism cover in France for property damage including nuclear risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanislas, A.

    2004-01-01

    The obligation to include terrorism cover in all Property Damage policies issued on the French Market is ruled by an Act of 1986 and introduced under Section R 126-2 of the French Code of Insurance. This section stipulates that Property Damage policies must provide cover for damage resulting from acts of terrorism, with the same deductible and the same limit than that of the other damage covered in the policy. Soon after the dramatic events of September 11, 2001 in the United States and although reinsurers worldwide restricted their offer of capacities, French insurers recognized that they had to maintain this global cover for the benefit of their insurers. After difficult discussions between insurers, reinsurers, brokers, risk managers and representatives of the State, the creation of a new Pool, backed with a State guarantee, was decided in less than three months. Effective January 1, 2002 and called Gestion d'Assurance et de Reassurance des Risques Attentats et Actes de Terrorisme (GAREAT), the Pool offers a multiple layers stop-loss cover for Property Damage only, i.e. excluding TPL policies. Considering that nuclear risks should be treated in the same way as other industrial risks, it was decided that they would be covered by GAREAT as well. In the meantime, by a Decree of December 28, 2001 modifying Section R 126-2, a special provision, aiming at reducing the limit and thus the price of this cover, was introduced in the Code. The purpose of this paper is to expose the present situation applying through GAREAT and, after two years of operation to discuss future developments, including other sources of capacity for the coverage of acts of terrorism in nuclear risks insurance.(author)

  11. T Tank Farm Interim Cover Test - Design Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Keller, Jason M.

    2006-01-01

    The Hanford Site has 149 underground single-shell tanks that store hazardous radioactive waste. Many of these tanks and their associated infrastructure (e.g., pipelines, diversion boxes) have leaked. Some of the leaked waste has entered the groundwater. The largest known leak occurred from the T-106 Tank in 1973. Many of the contaminants from that leak still reside within the vadose zone beneath the T Tank Farm. CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. seeks to minimize movement of this residual contaminant plume by placing an interim cover on the surface. Such a cover is expected to prevent infiltrating water from reaching the plume and moving it further. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has prepared a design plan to monitor and determine the effectiveness of the interim cover. A three-dimensional numerical simulation of water movement beneath a cover was conducted to guide the design of the plan. Soil water content, water pressure, and temperature will be monitored using off-the-shelf equipment that can be installed by the hydraulic hammer technique. In fiscal year 2006, two instrument nests will be installed, one inside and one outside of the proposed cover. In fiscal year 2007, two additional instrument nests, both inside the proposed cover, will be installed. Each instrument nest contains a neutron access tube and a capacitance probe (to measure water content), and four heat-dissipation units (to measure pressure head and temperature). A datalogger and a meteorological station will be installed outside of the fence. Two drain gauges will be installed in locations inside and outside the cover for the purpose of measuring soil water flux.

  12. Forest Cover Mapping in Iskandar Malaysia Using Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanniah, K. D.; Mohd Najib, N. E.; Vu, T. T.

    2016-09-01

    Malaysia is the third largest country in the world that had lost forest cover. Therefore, timely information on forest cover is required to help the government to ensure that the remaining forest resources are managed in a sustainable manner. This study aims to map and detect changes of forest cover (deforestation and disturbance) in Iskandar Malaysia region in the south of Peninsular Malaysia between years 1990 and 2010 using Landsat satellite images. The Carnegie Landsat Analysis System-Lite (CLASlite) programme was used to classify forest cover using Landsat images. This software is able to mask out clouds, cloud shadows, terrain shadows, and water bodies and atmospherically correct the images using 6S radiative transfer model. An Automated Monte Carlo Unmixing technique embedded in CLASlite was used to unmix each Landsat pixel into fractions of photosynthetic vegetation (PV), non photosynthetic vegetation (NPV) and soil surface (S). Forest and non-forest areas were produced from the fractional cover images using appropriate threshold values of PV, NPV and S. CLASlite software was found to be able to classify forest cover in Iskandar Malaysia with only a difference between 14% (1990) and 5% (2010) compared to the forest land use map produced by the Department of Agriculture, Malaysia. Nevertheless, the CLASlite automated software used in this study was found not to exclude other vegetation types especially rubber and oil palm that has similar reflectance to forest. Currently rubber and oil palm were discriminated from forest manually using land use maps. Therefore, CLASlite algorithm needs further adjustment to exclude these vegetation and classify only forest cover.

  13. Soil cover by natural trees in agroforestry systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Ambrona, C. G. H.; Almoguera Millán, C.; Tarquis Alfonso, A.

    2009-04-01

    The dehesa is common agroforestry system in the Iberian Peninsula. These open oak parklands with silvo-pastoral use cover about two million hectares. Traditionally annual pastures have been grazed by cows, sheep and also goats while acorns feed Iberian pig diet. Evergreen oak (Quercus ilex L.) has other uses as fuelwood collection and folder after tree pruning. The hypothesis of this work is that tree density and canopy depend on soil types. We using the spanish GIS called SIGPAC to download the images of dehesa in areas with different soil types. True colour images were restoring to a binary code, previously canopy colour range was selected. Soil cover by tree canopy was calculated and number of trees. Processing result was comparable to real data. With these data we have applied a dynamic simulation model Dehesa to determine evergreen oak acorn and annual pasture production. The model Dehesa is divided into five submodels: Climate, Soil, Evergreen oak, Pasture and Grazing. The first three require the inputs: (i) daily weather data (maximum and minimum temperatures, precipitation and solar radiation); (ii) the soil input parameters for three horizons (thickness, field capacity, permanent wilting point, and bulk density); and (iii) the tree characterization of the dehesa (tree density, canopy diameter and height, and diameter of the trunk). The influence of tree on pasture potential production is inversely proportional to the canopy cover. Acorn production increase with tree canopy cover until stabilizing itself, and will decrease if density becomes too high (more than 80% soil tree cover) at that point there is competition between the trees. Main driving force for dehesa productivity is soil type for pasture, and tree cover for acorn production. Highest pasture productivity was obtained on soil Dystric Planosol (Alfisol), Dystric Cambisol and Chromo-calcic-luvisol, these soils only cover 22.4% of southwest of the Iberian peninssula. Lowest productivity was

  14. Recent land cover history and nutrient retention in riparian wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, D.M.; Walbridge, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    Wetland ecosystems are profoundly affected by altered nutrient and sediment loads received from anthropogenic activity in their surrounding watersheds. Our objective was to compare a gradient of agricultural and urban land cover history during the period from 1949 to 1997, with plant and soil nutrient concentrations in, and sediment deposition to, riparian wetlands in a rapidly urbanizing landscape. We observed that recent agricultural land cover was associated with increases in Nitrogen (N) and Phosphorus (P) concentrations in a native wetland plant species. Conversely, recent urban land cover appeared to alter receiving wetland environmental conditions by increasing the relative availability of P versus N, as reflected in an invasive, but not a native, plant species. In addition, increases in surface soil Fe content suggests recent inputs of terrestrial sediments associated specifically with increasing urban land cover. The observed correlation between urban land cover and riparian wetland plant tissue and surface soil nutrient concentrations and sediment deposition, suggest that urbanization specifically enhances the suitability of riparian wetland habitats for the invasive species Japanese stiltgrass [Microstegium vimenium (Trinius) A. Camus]. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  15. Soundscape and the Adaptation of Soundscape to Covered Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslı ÖZÇEVİK

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Soundscape, as urban noise is termed, is essentially a qualitative approach which aims to discover ways to improve the “sonic environment”. A possible analogy can be assumed for the acoustic quality of some types of covered spaces which have a function similar to urban spaces. Furthermore, it can be proposed that such covered spaces may have a specific, distinct and recognizable sound environment - hence, a “soundscape” occurs which is created both by the architecture and the sound sources. This study takes a further step in suggesting that the acoustic comfort or sound quality of these spaces cannot be sufficiently dealt with via noise parameters. This paper aims to show the possibility of evaluating the acoustical quality of covered spaces, such as shopping centers, through soundscape studies. The formation of streets is the basic spatial design concept that connects open and closed shopping areas. For this reason the researchers chose to study a modern and an historical shopping center and a modern and a traditional street, both of which have shopping as a basic function, The soundscapes of these open and closed shopping areas were determined by soundwalks and listening tests. The objective and subjective findings of this study showed that covered shopping areas have a specific soundscape that can be evaluated by the soundwalk method regardless of whether the environment is open or covered.

  16. Clouds cover variability in São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Machado de Moura

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Clouds cover observations are performed by visual inspection which determines the fraction of the sky that is overcast. However, visual observation of clouds cover is a very subjective method, and can vary significantly among observers. This study examined the variability in clouds cover over the city of São Paulo between 1961 and 2013, using clouds cover fraction data observed at the weather station operated by IAG / USP. The study also used two techniques based on visible radiance data observed by the GOES-10 satellite in order to indirectly estimate clouds cover. In order to ensure consistency, the estimated and observed cloudiness was compared with the clearness index, which is the ratio between the total solar radiation observed at the weather station and the incoming solar irradiation at the top of atmosphere. The study found consistency between the various databases that showed similar behavior in all of the seasons of the year. The largest cloudiness values occurred in the summer and lowest in the winter.

  17. Economic Development and Forest Cover: Evidence from Satellite Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo Cuaresma, Jesús; Danylo, Olha; Fritz, Steffen; McCallum, Ian; Obersteiner, Michael; See, Linda; Walsh, Brian

    2017-01-16

    Ongoing deforestation is a pressing, global environmental issue with direct impacts on climate change, carbon emissions, and biodiversity. There is an intuitive link between economic development and overexploitation of natural resources including forests, but this relationship has proven difficult to establish empirically due to both inadequate data and convoluting geo-climactic factors. In this analysis, we use satellite data on forest cover along national borders in order to study the determinants of deforestation differences across countries. Controlling for trans-border geo-climactic differences, we find that income per capita is the most robust determinant of differences in cross-border forest cover. We show that the marginal effect of per capita income growth on forest cover is strongest at the earliest stages of economic development, and weakens in more advanced economies, presenting some of the strongest evidence to date for the existence of at least half of an environmental Kuznets curve for deforestation.

  18. Cherry tomato yield in greenhouses with different plastic covers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Holcman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of different plastic covers on microclimate and cherry tomato yield in greenhouses. The experiments were carried out in Piracicaba, state of São Paulo (Brazil, during three growing periods (2008/2009/2010. A greenhouse was divided in: Environment I (EI - covered with plastic film anti-UV and thermo-reflective shading screen, and Environment II (EII - covered with diffusive plastic film; monitored with automatic weather sensors; and cultivated with cherry tomato (‘Sweet Grape’ and ‘Sweet Million’. Use of diffusive plastic in greenhouses provides a better inside distribution of solar energy without causing major changes in air temperature and relative humidity, resulting in higher yield (kg plant-1, fruits quantity (number plant-1 and fruits average weight than those obtained under thermo-reflective shading screen.

  19. Cover estimation and payload location using Markov random fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Tu-Thach

    2014-02-01

    Payload location is an approach to find the message bits hidden in steganographic images, but not necessarily their logical order. Its success relies primarily on the accuracy of the underlying cover estimators and can be improved if more estimators are used. This paper presents an approach based on Markov random field to estimate the cover image given a stego image. It uses pairwise constraints to capture the natural two-dimensional statistics of cover images and forms a basis for more sophisticated models. Experimental results show that it is competitive against current state-of-the-art estimators and can locate payload embedded by simple LSB steganography and group-parity steganography. Furthermore, when combined with existing estimators, payload location accuracy improves significantly.

  20. Monitoring of covering model of the National radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jezikova, M.

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this rigorous report is justification of cover model building at radioactive waste repository in Mochovce as a very important engineering barrier preventing significant release of radioactive substances into the environment and providing protection against ionizing radiation. This rigorous report includes a theoretical part, which describes radioactive waste characterization, radioactive waste management and summary of the preliminary activities prior to the building cover model, particularly involving the selection of appropriate variables and parameters and creation of monitoring plan during the long term monitoring for evaluation of this barrier in order to ensure minimization of any leak of radioactive substances from RAW. The next part includes evaluation of the values of parameters and variables to build cover model of RAW in Mochovce during 2006-2008 (author)

  1. Concrete cover cracking due to uniform reinforcement corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe; Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2013-01-01

    and reinforcement de-passivation is a frequently used limit state. The present paper investigates an alternative limit state: corrosion-induced cover cracking. Results from numerical simulations of concrete cover cracking due to reinforcement corrosion are presented. The potential additional service life...... is calculated using literature data on corrosion rate and Faraday’s law. The parameters varied comprise reinforcement diameter, concrete cover thickness and concrete material properties, viz. concrete tensile strength and ductility (plain concrete and fibre reinforced concrete). Results obtained from......Service life design (SLD) is an important tool for civil engineers to ensure that the structural integrity and functionality of the structure is not compromised within a given time frame, i.e. the service life. In SLD of reinforced concrete structures, reinforcement corrosion is of major concern...

  2. Evolution of the soil cover of soccer fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belobrov, V. P.; Zamotaev, I. V.

    2014-04-01

    A soccer field can be considered a soil-like technogenic formation (STF). According to the theory of soil cover patterns, the artificially constructed (anthropogenic) soil cover of a soccer field is an analogue of a relatively homogeneous elementary soil area. However, the spatial homogeneity of the upper part (50-80 cm) of the STF of soccer fields is unstable and is subjected to gradual transformation under the impact of pedogenetic processes, agrotechnical loads, and mechanical loads during the games. This transformation is favored by the initial heterogeneity of the deep (buried) parts of the STF profile. The technogenic factors and elementary pedogenetic processes specify the dynamic functioning regime of the STF. In 50-75 years, the upper part of the STF is transformed into soil-like bodies with properties close to those in zonal soils. Certain micro- and nanopatterns of the soil cover are developed within the field creating its spatial heterogeneity.

  3. Economic Development and Forest Cover: Evidence from Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo Cuaresma, Jesús; Danylo, Olha; Fritz, Steffen; McCallum, Ian; Obersteiner, Michael; See, Linda; Walsh, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Ongoing deforestation is a pressing, global environmental issue with direct impacts on climate change, carbon emissions, and biodiversity. There is an intuitive link between economic development and overexploitation of natural resources including forests, but this relationship has proven difficult to establish empirically due to both inadequate data and convoluting geo-climactic factors. In this analysis, we use satellite data on forest cover along national borders in order to study the determinants of deforestation differences across countries. Controlling for trans-border geo-climactic differences, we find that income per capita is the most robust determinant of differences in cross-border forest cover. We show that the marginal effect of per capita income growth on forest cover is strongest at the earliest stages of economic development, and weakens in more advanced economies, presenting some of the strongest evidence to date for the existence of at least half of an environmental Kuznets curve for deforestation.

  4. Esophagorespiratory fistula: treatment with self-expanding covered stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang Jian; Dou Yongchong; Wang Zheng; Kong Jian

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate self-expanding covered stent in the management of esophagorespiratory fistula. Methods: A self-expanding esophageal covered stent was implanted under fluoroscopic guidance in 13 patients with esophagorespiratory fistula. In this series patients aged 31-73 years (60.2 years in average). All patients had a pre-procedure fast of 6-41 days (17.3 days in average), in which 12 patients had pulmonary infection. Results: All fistulas were excluded and swallowing function was restored. No stend-related complication was observed. Pulmonary infection was managed in 10 patients out of 13. The mean survived time was 33.3 wks (1-178 wks) in follow-up. Conclusion: Covered self-expanding stent implantation is a safe and effective treatment of ERF

  5. Self-stabilizing Synchronization in Mobile Sensor Networks with Covering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauquier, Joffroy; Burman, Janna

    Synchronization is widely considered as an important service in distributed systems which may simplify protocol design. Phase clock is a general synchronization tool that provides a form of a logical time. This paper presents a self-stabilizing (a tolerating state-corrupting transient faults) phase clock algorithm suited to the model of population protocols with covering. This model has been proposed recently for sensor networks with a very large, possibly unknown number of anonymous mobile agents having small memory. Agents interact in pairs in an asynchronous way subject to the constraints expressed in terms of the cover times of agents. The cover time expresses the "frequency" of an agent to communicate with all the others and abstracts agent's communication characteristics (e.g. moving speed/patterns, transmitting/receiving capabilities). We show that a phase clock is impossible in the model with only constant-state agents. Hence, we assume an existence of resource-unlimited agent - the base station.

  6. Validation of MODIS snow cover images over Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Parajka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS snow cover product over the territory of Austria. The aims are (a to analyse the spatial and temporal variability of the MODIS snow product classes, (b to examine the accuracy of the MODIS snow product against in situ snow depth data, and (c to identify the main factors that may influence the MODIS classification accuracy. We use daily MODIS grid maps (version 4 and daily snow depth measurements at 754 climate stations in the period from February 2000 to December 2005. The results indicate that, on average, clouds obscured 63% of Austria, which may significantly restrict the applicability of the MODIS snow cover images to hydrological modelling. On cloud-free days, however, the classification accuracy is very good with an average of 95%. There is no consistent relationship between the classification errors and dominant land cover type and local topographical variability but there are clear seasonal patterns to the errors. In December and January the errors are around 15% while in summer they are less than 1%. This seasonal pattern is related to the overall percentage of snow cover in Austria, although in spring, when there is a well developed snow pack, errors tend to be smaller than they are in early winter for the same overall percent snow cover. Overestimation and underestimation errors balance during most of the year which indicates little bias. In November and December, however, there appears to exist a tendency for overestimation. Part of the errors may be related to the temporal shift between the in situ snow depth measurements (07:00 a.m. and the MODIS acquisition time (early afternoon. The comparison of daily air temperature maps with MODIS snow cover images indicates that almost all MODIS overestimation errors are caused by the misclassification of cirrus clouds as snow.

  7. Fast reactor primary cover gas system proposals for CDFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, L.M.T.

    1987-01-01

    A primary sodium gas cover has been designed for CDFR, it comprises plant to maintain and control; cover gas pressure for all reactor operating at fault conditions, cover gas purity by both blowdown and by a special clean-up facility and the clean argon supply for the failed fuel detection system and the primary pump seal purge. The design philosophy is to devise a cover gas system that can be specified for any LMFBR where only features like vessel and pipework size need to be altered to suit different design and operating conditions. The choice of full power and shutdown operating pressures is derived and the method chosen to control these values is described. A part active/part passive system is proposed for this duty, a surge volume of 250 m 3 gives passive control between full power and hot shutdown. Pressure control operation criteria is presented for various reactor operating conditions. A design for a sodium aerosol filter, based on that used on PFR is presented, it is specifically designed so that it can be fitted with an etched disc type particulate filter and maintenance is minimised. Two methods that maintain cover gas purity are described. The first, used during normal reactor operation with a small impurities ingress, utilises the continuous blowdown associated with the inevitable clean argon purge through the various reactor component seals. The second method physically removes the impurities xenon and krypton from the cover gas by their adsorption, at cryogenic temperature, onto a bed of activated carbon. The equipment required for these two duties and their mode of operation is described with the aid of a system flow diagram. The primary pump seals requires a gas purge to suppress aerosol migration. A system where the argon used for this task is recirculated and partially purified is described. (author)

  8. Snow cover distribution over elevation zones in a mountainous catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagoulia, D.; Panagopoulos, Y.

    2009-04-01

    A good understanding of the elevetional distribution of snow cover is necessary to predict the timing and volume of runoff. In a complex mountainous terrain the snow cover distribution within a watershed is highly variable in time and space and is dependent on elevation, slope, aspect, vegetation type, surface roughness, radiation load, and energy exchange at the snow-air interface. Decreases in snowpack due to climate change could disrupt the downstream urban and agricultural water supplies, while increases could lead to seasonal flooding. Solar and longwave radiation are dominant energy inputs driving the ablation process. Turbulent energy exchange at the snow cover surface is important during the snow season. The evaporation of blowing and drifting snow is strongly dependent upon wind speed. Much of the spatial heterogeneity of snow cover is the result of snow redistribution by wind. Elevation is important in determining temperature and precipitation gradients along hillslopes, while the temperature gradients determine where precipitation falls as rain and snow and contribute to variable melt rates within the hillslope. Under these premises, the snow accumulation and ablation (SAA) model of the US National Weather Service (US NWS) was applied to implement the snow cover extent over elevation zones of a mountainous catchment (the Mesochora catchment in Western-Central Greece), taking also into account the indirectly included processes of sublimation, interception, and snow redistribution. The catchment hydrology is controlled by snowfall and snowmelt and the simulated discharge was computed from the soil moisture accounting (SMA) model of the US NWS and compared to the measured discharge. The elevationally distributed snow cover extent presented different patterns with different time of maximization, extinction and return during the year, producing different timing of discharge that is a crucial factor for the control and management of water resources systems.

  9. Patient Handoffs: Is Cross Cover or Night Shift Better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Alanna; Brannen, Melissa L; Heiman, Heather L; Adler, Mark D

    2017-06-01

    Studies show singular handoffs between health care providers to be risky. Few describe sequential handoffs or compare handoffs from different provider types. We investigated the transfer of information across 2 handoffs using a piloted survey instrument. We compared cross-cover (every fourth night call) with dedicated night-shift residents. Surveys assessing provider knowledge of hospitalized patients were administered to pediatric residents. Primary teams were surveyed about their handoff upon completion of daytime coverage of a patient. Night-shift or cross-covering residents were surveyed about their handoff of the same patient upon completion of overnight coverage. Pediatric hospitalists rated the consistency of information between the surveys. Absolute difference was calculated between the 2 providers' rating of a patient's (a) complexity and (b) illness severity. Scores were compared across provider type. Fifty-nine complete handoff pairs were obtained. Fourteen and 45 handoff surveys were completed by a cross-covering and a night-shift provider, respectively. There was no significant difference in information consistency between primary and night-shift (median, 4.0; interquartile range [IQR], 3-4) versus primary and cross-covering providers (median, 4.0; IQR, 3-4). There was no significant difference in median patient complexity ratings (night shift, 3.0; IQR, 1-5, versus cross cover, 3.5; IQR, 1-5) or illness severity ratings (night shift, 2.0; IQR, 1-4, versus cross-cover, 3.0; IQR, 1-6) when comparing provider types giving a handoff. We did not find a difference in physicians' transfer of information during 2 handoffs among providers taking traditional call or on night shift. Development of tools to measure handoff consistency is needed.

  10. Cover technology demonstration for low-level radioactive sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, F.J.; Warren, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of a shallow land burial site in isolating low-level radioactive and mixed waste is strongly influenced by the behavior of the precipitation falling on the site. Predicting the long-term integrity of a cover design requires a knowledge of the water balance dynamics, and the use of predictive models. The multiplicity of factors operating on a site in the years post-closure (precipitation intensity and duration, soil conditions, vegetation seasonality and variability) have made it extremely difficult to predict the effects of natural precipitation with accuracy. Preliminary results are presented on a three-year field demonstration at Los Alamos National Laboratory to evaluate the influence of different waste trench cap designs on water balance under natural precipitation. Erosion plots having two different vegetative covers (shrubs and grasses) and with either gravel-mulched or unmulched soil surface treatments have been established on three different soil profiles on an inactive waste site. Total runoff and soil loss from each plot are measured biweekly while plant canopy cover is measured seasonally. Preliminary results from the first year show that the application of a gravel mulch reduced runoff by 73 to 90%. Total soil loss was reduced by 83 to 93% by the mulch treatment. On unmulched plots, grass cover reduced both runoff and soil loss by about 50% compared to the shrub plots. Soil moisture reduction during the growing season was more pronounced on the shrub plots. This indicates that a more complex vegetative cover provides greater soil moisture storage capacity for winter precipitation than the usual grass cover

  11. A NEW HYBRID GENETIC ALGORITHM FOR VERTEX COVER PROBLEM

    OpenAIRE

    UĞURLU, Onur

    2015-01-01

    The minimum vertex cover  problem belongs to the  class  of  NP-compl ete  graph  theoretical problems. This paper presents a hybrid genetic algorithm to solve minimum ver tex cover problem. In this paper, it has been shown that when local optimization technique is added t o genetic algorithm to form hybrid genetic algorithm, it gives more quality solution than simple genet ic algorithm. Also, anew mutation operator has been developed especially for minimum verte...

  12. Cover gas purification in the German LMFBR-programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schillings, K.-L.; Wagner, J.; Stade, K. Ch.

    1987-01-01

    A specific problem of sodium-cooled reactor plants is the purity of the noble gas argon which is used to protect the liquid alkali metal sodium in its systems in order to avoid or reduce disagreeable reactions between sodium and gaseous compounds like moisture or air and organic products like oil and grease. But as this contact cannot completely be excluded, we have to recycle such soiled cover gas. Simultaneously this procedure has to correct the release of radioactivity. Therefore the cover gas purification of primary systems of reactor plants contains the removal of the inorganic chemical disposal and of the nuclear waste. (author)

  13. EFFECTS OF EDGE COVERING ON TENSILE STRENGTH OF MDF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalçın ÖRS

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Dowels, 6, 8 and 10 mm ? diameters were bonded with PVAc adhesive on Medium Density Fiberboard (MDF. Edges were covered with 5, 8 and 12 mm beech wood materials, drilled 25 mm depth. Tensile strength measurments were made on the samples. The highest tensile strength value was given as 6 mm ? dowel and MDF covered with 8 mm thickness beech wood material (2.294 N/mm2, the lowest value was obtained with 10 mm ? dowel and with unprocessed MDF (1.314 N/mm2.

  14. Hands on with ASP.NET MVC covering MVC 6

    CERN Document Server

    Sahay, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    MVC (Model-View-Controller) is the popular Microsoft technology which enables you to build dynamic, data-driven, mobile websites, TDD site. Hands-On with ASP.NET MVC is not only written for those who are going to have affair with MVC for the 1st time, rather it is written in such a way that even experienced professional will love reading this book. This book covers all the tiny steps on using MVC at its best. With complete practical tutorials to illustrate the concepts, you will step by step build one End to End application which covers below mentioned techniques - Controllers, Views, Models,

  15. Petri nets SM-cover-based on heuristic coloring algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkacz, Jacek; Doligalski, Michał

    2015-09-01

    In the paper, coloring heuristic algorithm of interpreted Petri nets is presented. Coloring is used to determine the State Machines (SM) subnets. The present algorithm reduces the Petri net in order to reduce the computational complexity and finds one of its possible State Machines cover. The proposed algorithm uses elements of interpretation of Petri nets. The obtained result may not be the best, but it is sufficient for use in rapid prototyping of logic controllers. Found SM-cover will be also used in the development of algorithms for decomposition, and modular synthesis and implementation of parallel logic controllers. Correctness developed heuristic algorithm was verified using Gentzen formal reasoning system.

  16. Esprit HR mattress cover in pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoulowa, J

    Modern mattresses provide soft dense foam, which permits the redistribution of pressure on the patient over a wider area - away from bony prominences where pressure ulcers usually occur. The material used in producing multistretch covers for the new mattresses had a tendency to delaminate as a result of a combination of heat, moisture and inappropriate cleansing techniques causing the water barriers to fall. In partnership with York Health NHS Trust and the material manufacturer, STM Healthcare produced a mattress cover (Esprit HR) which was able to withstand higher pressure from heat and moisture and greatly extended the life expectancy of the Esprit HR mattress.

  17. Cover stones on liquefiable soil bed under waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Hatipoglu, Figen; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes the results of an experimental study on the behavior of cover stones on a liquefiable soil bed exposed to a progressive wave. The soil was silt with d50=0.098mm. Stones, the size of 4cm, were used as cover material. The effect of packing density of stones, and that of number...... of stone layers (including the effect of an intermediate filter layer) were investigated. Pore pressure was measured across the soil depth. The experiments show that the soil liquefaction depended mainly on two parameters: the packing density of stones, and the number of stone layers. When the liquefaction...

  18. STRENGTHENING OF TRENCH COVER PLATES FOR SWITCHGEAR BUILDING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.S. RUBEN

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to strengthen the existing trench cover plates of the Electrical Switchgear Building (BLDG 5010) of the Exploratory Studies Facility. A remodeling effort will change the portion of the facility that has the trenches for electrical cables to a craft/shop area. The users of the building will be using a forklift in this area (Clark CGP 30 forklift with a capacity of 3 tons). The trench covers require strengthening to support the wheel loads from the forklift. The output of this calculation will be sketches revising the floor plate details of DWG YMP-025-1-7007-ST103,2. (Details 4 and 5)

  19. A reduction of the globalization and U(1)-covering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Dao Dong.

    1993-03-01

    We suggest a reduction of the globalization and multidimensional quantization to the case of reductive Lie groups by lifting to U(1)-covering. our construction is connected with M. Duflo's third method for algebraic groups. From a reductive datum of the given real algebraic Lie group we firstly construct geometric complexes with respect to U(1)-covering by using the unipotent positive distributions. Then we describe in terms of local cohomology the maximal globalization of Harish-Chandra modules which correspond to the geometric complexes. (author). 9 refs

  20. Is cost-covering remuneration fully booked? - Teething problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niederhaeusern, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this interview with Michael Kaufmann, director of the SwissEnergy programme, possible strategies for the correct pricing of electricity and measures for the correction of the dissatisfactory situation now prevailing concerning the cost-covering remuneration of power from renewable sources are discussed. The pricing of electricity from various sources and the indirect costs that are at present not met by non-renewable resources are commented on. Further topics covered include suggestions for strategies for relieving the presently blocked financial promotion of renewables, the goals set for the role to be played by renewable energy in Swiss electricity production in 2030 and suggestions for future political action