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Sample records for wyoming bentonite pellets

  1. Backfilling of deposition tunnels: Use of bentonite pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, David (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (Canada)); Sanden, Torbjoern (Clay Technology AB (Sweden)); Jonsson, Esther (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Mangaement Co. (Sweden)); Hansen, Johanna (Posiva Oy (Finland))

    2011-02-15

    The state of knowledge related to use of bentonite pellets as part of backfill or other gap filling components in repository applications is reviewed. How the pellets interact with adjacent sealing materials and the surrounding rock mass is a critical aspect in determining backfill behaviour. The key features and processes that determine how the pellet component of the KBS-3V deposition tunnel backfill will behave are discussed and recommendations related to what additional information needs to be developed are provided. Experiences related to pellet material composition, size, shape, placement options and more importantly, the density to which they can be placed all indicate that there are significant limitations to the achievable as-placed density of bentonite pellet fill. Low as-placed density of the pellet fill component of the backfill is potentially problematic as the outermost regions of tunnel backfill will be the first region of the backfill to be contacted by water entering the tunnels. It is also through this region that initial water movement along the length of the deposition tunnels will occur. This will greatly influence the operations in a tunnel, especially with respect to situations where water is exiting the downstream face of still open deposition tunnels. Pellet-filled regions are also sensitive to groundwater salinity, susceptible to development of piping features and subsequent mechanical erosion by through flowing water, particularly in the period preceding deposition tunnel closure. A review of the experiences of various organisations considering use of bentonite-pellet materials as part of buffer or backfill barriers is provided in this document. From this information, potential options and limitations to use of pellets or pellet-granule mixtures in backfill are identified. Of particular importance is identification of the apparent upper-limits of dry density to which such materials can to be placed in the field. These bounds will

  2. ALTERNATIVE BINDERS TO BENTONITE FOR IRON ORE PELLETIZING: PART I: EFFECTS ON PHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Sivrikaya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of conventional bentonite binder is favorable in terms of mechanical and metallurgical pellet properties, however, because of its acid constituents bentonite is considered as impurity especially for iron ores with high acidic content. Therefore, alternative binders to bentonite have been tested. Organic binders are the most studied binders and they yield pellets with good wet strength; they fail in terms of preheated and fired pellet strengths. This study was conducted to investigate how insufficient pellet strengths can be improved when organic binders are used as binder. The addition of a low-melting temperature and slag bonding/strength increasing constituent (free in acidic contents into pellet feed was proposed. Addition of boron compounds such as colemanite, tincal, borax pentahydrate, boric acid together with organic binders such as CMC, starch, dextrin and some organic based binders, into iron oxide pellet was tested. Wet and thermally treated pellet physical-mechanical qualities (balling - moisture content - size - shape - drop number - compressive strengths - porosity - dustiness were determined. The results showed that good quality wet, dry, preheated and fired pellets can be produced with combined binders (an organic binder plus a boron compound when compared with bentonite-bonded pellets. While organic binders provided sufficient wet and dry pellet strengths, the boron compounds provided the required preheated and fired pellet strengths at even lower firing temperature. Especially, the contribution of boron compound addition is most pronounced for hematite pellets which do not have strengthening mechanism through oxidation like magnetite pellets during firing. Therefore, addition of boron compound is beneficial to recover the low physical-mechanical qualities of pellets produced with organic binders through slag bonding mechanism. Furthermore, lowering the firing temperature thanks to low-melting boron compounds will be cost

  3. ALTERNATIVE BINDERS TO BENTONITE FOR IRON ORE PELLETIZING : PART II : EFFECTS ON METALLURGICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Sivrikaya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was started to find alternative binders to bentonite and to recover the low preheated and fired pellet mechanical strengths of organic binders-bonded pellets. Bentonite is considered as a chemical impurity for pellet chemistry due to acid constituents (SiO2 and Al2O3. Especially addition of silica-alumina bearing binders is detrimental for iron ore concentrate with high acidic content. Organic binders are the most studied binders since they are free in silica. Although they yield pellets with good wet strength; they have found limited application in industry since they fail to give sufficient physical and mechanical strength to preheated and fired pellets. It is investigated that how insufficient preheated and fired pellet strengths can be improved when organic binders are used as binder. The addition of a slag bonding/strength increasing constituent (free in acidic contents into pellet feed to provide pellet strength with the use of organic binders was proposed. Addition of boron compounds such as colemanite, tincal, borax pentahydrate, boric acid together with organic binders such as CMC, starch, dextrin and some organic based binders, into magnetite and hematite pellet mixture was tested. After determining the addition of boron compounds is beneficial to recover the low pellet physical and mechanical qualities in the first part of this study, in this second part, metallurgical and chemical properties (reducibility - swelling index – microstructure – mineralogy - chemical content of pellets produced with combined binders (an organic binder plus a boron compound were presented. The metallurgical and chemical tests results showed that good quality product pellets can be produced with combined binders when compared with the bentonite-bonded pellets. Hence, the suggested combined binders can be used as binder in place of bentonite in iron ore pelletizing without compromising the pellet chemistry.

  4. Reduction of Silica from Hematite Ore Concentrate Pellets by Supplementing Bentonite Clay with Starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Jacob Eugene Dale

    The replacement of bentonite as the standard iron ore binder is an important factor in the future of iron processing. Bentonite adds 0.7%-1.0% unwanted silica to the final iron product. Bentonite replacement requires an in-depth understanding of how alternative binders affect the agglomeration process. One such alternative binder is starch, which can be modified in a multitude of ways. It has been observed that the use of a highly soluble starch can greatly increase the dry compressive strength of a hematite concentrate pellet. By heating a starch solution or extruding a starch, its solubility can be altered. When using starch along with bentonite, a suitable pellet can be produced that can withstand all aspects of pellet handling. It was observed that at the highest solubility of starch there was a strength increase of approximately 15 lbf.

  5. Wyoming bentonites. Evidence from the geological record to evaluate the suitability of bentonite as a buffer material during the long-term underground containment of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smellie, J. [Conterra AB (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    In the Swedish programme for the deep, geological disposal of radioactive wastes, bentonite is planned to be used as a barrier material to reduce groundwater flow and minimise radionuclide migration into the geosphere. One of the possible threats to long-term bentonite stability is the gradual incursion of saline water into the repository confines which may reduce the swelling capacity of the bentonite, even to the extent of eliminating the positive effects of mixing bentonite into backfill materials. Important information may be obtained from the study of analogous processes in nature (i.e. natural analogue or natural system studies) where bentonite, during its formation, has been in long-term contact with reducing waters of brackish to saline character. Type bentonites include those mined from the Clay Spur bed at the top of the Cretaceous Mowry Formation in NE Wyoming and demarcated for potential use as a barrier material (e.g. MX-80 sodium bentonite) in the Swedish radioactive waste programme. This bentonite forms part of the Mowry Shale which was deposited in a southern embayment of the late Albian Western Interior Cretaceous sea (Mowry Sea). The question is whether these bentonite deposits show evidence of post-deposition alteration caused by the sea water in which they were deposited, and/or, have they been altered subsequently by contact with waters of increasing salinity? Bentonites are the product of pyroclastic fall deposits thought to be generated by the type of explosive, subaerial volcanic activity characteristic of Plinian eruptive systems. In Wyoming the overall composition of the original ash varied from dacite to rhyolite, or latite to trachyte. The ash clouds were carried to high altitudes and eastwards by the prevailing westerly winds before falling over the shallow Mowry Sea and forming thin but widespread and continuous horizons on sea floor muds and sands. Whilst bentonites were principally wind-transported, there is evidence of some water

  6. Effect of alcohols on the retention mechanisms of Cd and Zn on Wyoming bentonite and illite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, Rafif K; Mcdonald, Louis M

    2005-09-15

    The effects of ethanol- and methanol-water mixtures on Zn and Cd sorption onto bentonite and illite were investigated at low initial metal concentration (alcohol-water fraction and decreased after 10%. The same pattern was observed for the partitioning of Zn on illite in methanol-water mixtures. In ethanol-water mixtures, Kf for Zn on illite increased continuouslyfrom 0 to 50% ethanol. The decreased partitioning and hence mobility of Zn to bentonite and illite after 10% alcohol (only in methanol-water mixtures for illite) suggests a potential environmental threat resulting from increased transport of this metal in subsurface environments where these cosolvents are present.

  7. BENTONITE PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamarija Kutlić

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite has vide variety of uses. Special use of bentonite, where its absorbing properties are employed to provide water-tight sealing is for an underground repository in granites In this paper, bentonite processing and beneficiation are described.

  8. Optimization of backfill pellet properties AASKAR DP2 - Laboratory tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Linus; Sanden, Torbjoern [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2012-12-15

    Bentonite pellets are planned to be used as a part of the backfill in the Swedish spent nuclear fuel deep repository concept KBS-3. This report describes testing and evaluation of different backfill pellet candidates. The work completed included testing of both pellet material and pellet type. The materials tested were sourced from India (ASHA), Greece (IBECO, 2 products) and Wyoming USA (MX-80 clay). The majority of the tests were completed on the ASHA clay as well as the IBECO-RWC-BF products, with only limited testing of the others. The pellets tested were manufactured using both extrusion and roller compaction techniques and had different sizes and geometries. The following tests have been performed and are presented in this report: 1. General tests. Water content, bulk density and dry density have been determined for both the pellet filling and the individual pellets. The compressibility of the pellet filling was tested with CRS-tests and the strength of the individual pellets was tested with a special compression test. The water content varied from 11.3% to 18.7% and was highest for the extruded pellets. The dry density was somewhat higher for the roller-compacted pellets and their compressibility was lower. The strength of the individual pellets was generally higher for the extruded pellets. 2. Erosion. The pellet filling will be exposed to groundwater inflow when installed in the tunnel. This flow could possibly cause significant erosion on the pellet filling. Erosion tests have been performed with comparisons in erosion resistance made on the various material- and pellet-types. The influence of variations in water salinity and flow rates was also tested. The IBECO extruded 6- and 10- mm diameter rods and the compacted Posiva spec.-A pellet filling seem to have the lowest tendency to erode. It is also the IBECO extruded pellet filling that withstands variations in water salinity and flow rates best. 3. Water storing capacity. The pellet filling

  9. Bentonite erosion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Martin; Boergesson, Lennart; Hedstroem, Magnus; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    Low saline water may reach KBS-3 repository depth, e.g. during periods of glaciation. Under such aqueous conditions, the montmorillonite part of the bentonite buffer might transform into a sol and thereby be transported away with flowing water in fractures. The primary aim with this report is to improve the understanding of the basic principles for this possible montmorillonite particle release. The report includes experimental and theoretical work performed at Clay Technology. Natural bentonite and ion-exchanged purified montmorillonite from three different geographical origins, Wyoming (U.S.), Milos (Greece) and Kutch (India) have been studied. Experimental and/or theoretical investigations have been performed with respect to: - Free swelling ability; - Rheological properties; - Rate of bentonite loss into fractures; - Filtering; - Ion exchange; - Sol formation ability; - Ion diffusion; - Mass loss due to erosion. The performed erosion experiments show that erosion does not occur in a mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite with at least 20% calcium in exchange positions, when the external solution contains above 4 mM charge equivalents. This result is in agreement with the presented conceptual view of sol formation and measured equilibrium properties in mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite. The findings imply that the buffer will be stable for non-glacial conditions. However, erosion due to sol formation cannot be ruled out for glacial conditions.

  10. Bentonite porewater chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    MICHAEL OCHS; BARBALA LOTHENBA; 柴田 雅博; 油井 三和

    1999-01-01

    Porewater composition in a compacted bentonite is dependent on the composition of the surrounding groundwater, and on the characteristics of the bentonite itself. Two mechanisms through which bentonite influences the respective porewater composition are distinguished: sulface chemical reactions (ion exchange, surface complexation) on smectite and dissolution of minerals and soluble impurities included in bentonite. This report provides the results of different activities related to the defini...

  11. Bentonite-supported catalase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. CEYLAN

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the clay bentonite as a support for enzyme immobilization were studied using the enzyme catalase. Such an immobilization does not result in enzyme inactivation and constitutes a valuable method for immobilizing catalase at high ionic strength. The bentonite-supported catalase was characterized in terms of pH and ionic strength dependencies, thermal and storage stability and kinetic parameters. These studies indicate that bentonite is a valuable support for the simple adsorption of enzymes.

  12. NORTH ABSAROKA WILDERNESS, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Willis H.; Williams, Frank E.

    1984-01-01

    The North Absaroka Wilderness in Wyoming was studied to evaluate the resource potential of the area. The results of geologic field mapping, field inspection of claims and prospects, analyses of bedrock and stream-sediment samples, and an aeromagnetic survey indicate that a small area of geologic terrane with probable mineral-resource potential for silver, lead, and zinc is present on the northern edge of the wilderness. Bentonite, low-quality coal, and localized deposits of uranium and chromite have been produced from surrounding areas; but such deposits, if present in the wilderness, are probably too deeply buried, too small, or too sporadically distributed to be classed as resources. Copper and gold mines and prospects are present on the fringes of the wilderness, but otherwise the area seems to be devoid of concentrations of metallic minerals. No surface evidence of geothermal energy resources was found.

  13. Thermal Conductivity of Compacted Bentonite and Bentonite-Sand Mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Won Jin; Lee, Jae Owan; Kwon, Sang Ki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    For the Kyungju bentonite which is considered as a candidate material for the buffer and backfill in the high-level waste repository, the thermal conductivities of compacted bentonite and a bentonite-sand mixture were measured. The thermal conductivities of the compacted bentonite with a dry density of 1.2 to 1.8 Mg/m{sup 3}and the bentonite-sand mixture with a dry density of 1.6 and 1.8 Mg/m{sup 3} were measured within the gravimetric water content range of 10wt% to 20wt% and the sand fraction range of 10 to 30wt%. The thermal conductivity of compacted bentonite and a bentonite-sand mixture increases with increasing dry density and sand weight fraction in the case of constant water weight fraction, and increases with increasing water weight fraction and sand weight fraction in the case of constant dry density. The empirical correlations to describe the thermal conductivity of compacted bentonite and a bentonite-sand mixture as a function of water fraction at each dry density were suggested. These correlations can predict the thermal conductivities of bentonite and a bentonite-sand mixture with a difference below 10%.

  14. Corrosion of high-level radioactive waste iron-canisters in contact with bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufhold, Stephan; Hassel, Achim Walter; Sanders, Daniel; Dohrmann, Reiner

    2015-03-21

    Several countries favor the encapsulation of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) in iron or steel canisters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite. In the present study the corrosion of iron in contact with different bentonites was investigated. The corrosion product was a 1:1 Fe layer silicate already described in literature (sometimes referred to as berthierine). Seven exposition test series (60 °C, 5 months) showed slightly less corrosion for the Na-bentonites compared to the Ca-bentonites. Two independent exposition tests with iron pellets and 38 different bentonites clearly proved the role of the layer charge density of the swelling clay minerals (smectites). Bentonites with high charged smectites are less corrosive than bentonites dominated by low charged ones. The type of counterion is additionally important because it determines the density of the gel and hence the solid/liquid ratio at the contact to the canister. The present study proves that the integrity of the multibarrier-system is seriously affected by the choice of the bentonite buffer encasing the metal canisters in most of the concepts. In some tests the formation of a patina was observed consisting of Fe-silicate. Up to now it is not clear why and how the patina formed. It, however, may be relevant as a corrosion inhibitor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Corrosion of high-level radioactive waste iron-canisters in contact with bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufhold, Stephan, E-mail: s.kaufhold@bgr.de [BGR, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany); Hassel, Achim Walter [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Straße 1, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Sanders, Daniel [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Straße 1, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Dohrmann, Reiner [BGR, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany); LBEG, Landesamt für Bergbau, Energie und Geologie, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany)

    2015-03-21

    Graphical abstract: Corrosion at the bentonite iron interface proceeds unaerobically with formation of an 1:1 Fe silicate mineral. A series of exposure tests with different types of bentonites showed that Na–bentonites are slightly less corrosive than Ca–bentonites and highly charges smectites are less corrosive compared to low charged ones. The formation of a patina was observed in some cases and has to be investigated further. - Highlights: • At the iron bentonite interface a 1:1 Fe layer silicate forms upon corrosion. • A series of iron–bentonite corrosion products showed slightly less corrosion for Na-rich and high-charged bentonites. • In some tests the formation of a patina was observed consisting of Fe–silicate, which has to be investigated further. - Abstract: Several countries favor the encapsulation of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) in iron or steel canisters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite. In the present study the corrosion of iron in contact with different bentonites was investigated. The corrosion product was a 1:1 Fe layer silicate already described in literature (sometimes referred to as berthierine). Seven exposition test series (60 °C, 5 months) showed slightly less corrosion for the Na–bentonites compared to the Ca–bentonites. Two independent exposition tests with iron pellets and 38 different bentonites clearly proved the role of the layer charge density of the swelling clay minerals (smectites). Bentonites with high charged smectites are less corrosive than bentonites dominated by low charged ones. The type of counterion is additionally important because it determines the density of the gel and hence the solid/liquid ratio at the contact to the canister. The present study proves that the integrity of the multibarrier-system is seriously affected by the choice of the bentonite buffer encasing the metal canisters in most of the concepts. In some tests the formation of a patina was observed consisting of Fe

  16. Gas Transport in Bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Gutierre-Rodrigo, V.; Martin, P. I.; Romero, F. J.; Barcala, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    The gas permeability of the Spanish FEBEX bentonite compacted at dry densities of between 1.4 and 1.8 g/cm{sup 3} with high water contents was measured for different confining, injection and back pressures. The results were compared with results obtained in previous investigations for lower degrees of saturation. It was checked that gas permeability was greatly affected by dry density, decreasing about three orders of magnitude when it increased from 1.5 to 1.8 g/cm{sup 3} for similar water content. The increase of water content caused also a decrease in gas permeability. It was found that both gas permeability and the relative gas permeability were mainly related to the accessible porosity. These relationships could be fitted to potential expressions with exponents between 3 and 4, as well as the relationship between intrinsic permeability and void ratio. For gas pressures below 1.2 MPa no effect of the injection or confining pressures on the value of permeability was detected. For a given confining pressure the permeability value decreased as the effective pressure increased, especially if the increase in effective pressure was due to a decrease in gas back pressure. It was checked that the Klinkenberg effect was not significant for this material in the range of pressures applied in the tests. The gas breakthrough pressure values in FEBEX saturated bentonite were determined for different dry densities. They increased clearly with dry density and were always higher than the swelling pressure of the bentonite. In high density samples gas flow tended to stop abruptly after breakthrough, whereas in lower density samples gas flow decreased gradually until a given pressure gradient was reached. The permeabilities computed after breakthrough (which usually did not stabilise) were inversely related to dry density. This would indicate that, even if the flow took place predominantly through preferential pathways that sometimes closed quickly after breakthrough and others

  17. Cement/bentonite interaction. Results from 16 month laboratory tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, O. [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    1997-12-01

    The work concerns possible bentonite clay mineral alteration in constructions with bentonite in close contact with cement, and the effect of such changes on bentonite buffer properties. The investigation comprises a 16 months laboratory test series with hydrothermal cell tests, percolation tests and diffusion tests. MX-80 Wyoming bentonite was used in all tests. Two types of artificial cement pore water solutions were used in the percolation and diffusion tests. The swelling pressure and the hydraulic conductivity were measured continuously in the percolation tests. After termination, the clay was analyzed with respect to changes in element distribution, mineralogy and shear strength. The water solutions were analyzed with respect to pH, cations and major anions. The results concerning chemical and mineralogical changes are in summary: Ion exchange in the montmorillonite until equilibrium with cement pore-water ions was reached; Increase in cation exchange capacity; Dissolution of original cristobalite; Increase in quartz content; Minor increase in illite content; Minor formation of chlorite; Formation of CSH(I); Wash away of CSH-gel into surrounding water. A large decrease in swelling pressure and a moderate increase in hydraulic conductivity were recorded in the samples percolated by SULFACEM pore-water solution. The mineralogical alterations only concerned a minor part of the total bentonite mass and the changes in physical properties were therefore most likely due to the replacement of the original charge balancing cation by cement pore-water cations. Comparisons between the current test result and results from 4 month tests indicate that the rates of illite and chlorite formation were reduced during the tests. The presence of zeolites in the clay could not be ensured. However, the discovery of CSH material is important since CSH is expected to precede the formation of zeolites 5 refs, 48 figs, 11 tabs

  18. Bentonite erosion. Laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Mats (Div. of Nuclear Chemistry, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden), School of Chemical Science and Engineering)

    2009-11-15

    This report covers the laboratory studies that have been performed at Nuclear Chemistry, KTH in the project 'Bentonite Erosion'. Many of the experiments in this report were performed to support the work of the modelling group and were often relatively simple. One of the experiment series was performed to see the impact of gravity and concentration of mono- and di-valent cations. A clay suspension was prepared in a test tube. A net was placed in contact with the suspension, the test tube was filled with solutions of different concentrations and the system was left overnight to settle. The tube was then turned upside down and the behaviour was visually observed. Either the clay suspension fell through the net or stayed on top. By using this method surprisingly sharp determinations of the Critical Coagulation (Flocculation) Concentration (CCC/CFC) could be made. The CCC/CFC of Ca2+ was for sodium montmorillonite determined to be between 1 and 2 mM. An artificial fracture was manufactured in order to simulate the real case scenario. The set-up was two Plexiglas slabs separated by 1 mm thick spacers with a bentonite container at one side of the fracture. Water was pumped with a very low flow rate perpendicular to bentonite container and the water exiting the fracture was sampled and analyzed for colloid content. The bentonite used was treated in different ways. In the first experiment a relatively montmorillonite rich clay was used while in the second bentonite where only the readily soluble minerals had been removed was used. Since Plexiglas was used it was possible to visually observe the bentonite dispersing into the fracture. After the compacted bentonite (1,000 kg/m3) had been water saturated the clay had expanded some 12 mm out into the fracture. As the experiment progressed the clay expanded more out into the fracture and seemed to fractionate in two different phases with less material in the outmost phase. A dark rim which was later analyzed to contain

  19. Thermo-hydro-geochemical modelling of the bentonite buffer. LOT A2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sena, Clara; Salas, Joaquin; Arcos, David (Amphos 21 Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2010-12-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and waste management company (SKB) is conducting a series of long term buffer material (LOT) tests at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) to test the behaviour of the bentonite buffer under conditions similar to those expected in a KBS-3 deep geological repository for high level nuclear waste (HLNW). In the present work a numerical model is developed to simulate (i) the thermo-hydraulic, (ii) transport and (iii) geochemical processes that have been observed in the LOT A2 test parcel. The LOT A2 test lasted approximately 6 years, and consists of a 4 m long vertical borehole drilled in diorite rock, from the ground of the Aespoe HRL tunnel. The borehole is composed of a central heater, maintained at 130 deg C in the lower 2 m of the borehole, a copper tube surrounding the heater and a 100 mm thick ring of pre-compacted Wyoming MX-80 bentonite around the copper tube /Karnland et al. 2009/. The numerical model developed here is a 1D axis-symmetric model that simulates the water saturation of the bentonite under a constant thermal gradient; the transport of solutes; and, the geochemical reactions observed in the bentonite blocks. Two cases have been modelled, one considering the highest temperature reached by the bentonite (at 3 m depth in the borehole, where temperatures of 130 and 85 deg C have been recorded near the copper tube and near the granitic host rock, respectively) and the other case assuming a constant temperature of 25 deg C, representing the upper part of borehole, where the bentonite has not been heated. In the LOT A2 test, the initial partially saturated bentonite becomes progressively water saturated, due to the injection of Aespoe granitic groundwater at granite - bentonite interface. The transport of solutes during the bentonite water saturation stage is believed to be controlled by water uptake from the surrounding groundwater to the wetting front and, additionally, in the case of heated bentonite, by a cyclic evaporation

  20. Oxidizing Roasting Performances of Coke Fines Bearing Brazilian Specularite Pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Tiejun; Zhu, Deqing

    2016-06-01

    Oxidized pellets, consisting of Brazilian specularite fines and coke fines, were prepared by disc pelletizer using bentonite as binder. The roasting process of pellets includes preheating stage and firing stage. The compressive strength of preheated pellets and fired pellets reached the peak value at 1.5% coke fines dosage. During the initial stage of preheating, some original Fe2O3 was reduced to Fe3O4 because of partial reduction atmosphere in pellet. During the later stage of preheating and firing stage, coke fines were burnt out, and the secondary Fe2O3 (new generation Fe2O3) was generated due to the re-oxidization of Fe3O4, which improved the recrystallization of Fe2O3. Compared with the fired pellets without adding coke fines, fired pellets with 1.5% coke fines exhibited the comparable RSI (reduction swelling index) and RDI+3.15 mm (reduction degradation index), and slightly lower RI (reducibility index).

  1. Injection of Deuterium Pellets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.; Andersen, P.; Andersen, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    to velocities above 1400 m/s, deuterium pellets to velocities above 1300 m/s and neon pellets to velocities above 500 m/s. Finally, a new acceleration method where a pellet should be accelerated by means of a magnetically stabilised electrical discharge is discussed, and a set up for measuring of the pellet...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1155 - Bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... deposits of bentonite range in color from white to gray, yellow, green, or blue. Bentonite's fine particles... section do not exist or have been waived. [47 FR 43367, Oct. 1, 1982, as amended at 73 FR 8606, Feb. 14...

  3. Zeolite and bentonite as caesium binders in reindeer feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Åhman

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of zeolite and bentonite on the accumulation and excretion of radiocaesium (Cs-137 in reindeer were studied in two feeding experiments. Six animals in each experiment were given lichens contaminated with radiocaesium from fallout after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. In addition, they were fed pellets containing bentonite (Experiment I or zeolite (Experiment II. Two animals, controls, in each experiment received no caesium-binder. The activity concentration of radiocaesium in blood was used to evalute the radiocaesium level in the body. Faeces and urine were collected to measue the excration of radiocaesium. The animals in Experiment I were depleted of radiocaesium before the start of the experiment. After three weeks, with an intake of 17 - 18 kBq Cs-137/day, the controls had reached activity concentrations of radiocaesium in blood corresponding to 4 - 4.5 kBq Cs-137/kg in muscle. Reindeer fed 23 or 46 g of bentonite per day stabilized at values below 0.8 kfiq/kg in muscle. In Experiment II, the reindeer started with radiocaesium activity concentrations in blood corresponding to 2 - 4.5 kBq Cs-137/kg in muscle. After four weeks of feeding, with an intake at about 8.5 kBq Cs-137/day, controls had increased their radiocaesium values by an average of 40%. Reindeer receiving 25 or 50 g zeolite per day decreased with 18 and 45%, respectively. Net absorption of radiocaesium from the gastro-intestinal tract was calculated at 50 -70% in animals receiving no caesium-binder. Reindeer fed bentonite had an absorption below 10% while those fed zeolite absorbed around 35%.

  4. Composite pellets of coal - Binders and high temperature testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristensen, V.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper is a report on Phase III of Project B1-315, 'Technics for production and combustion of composite pellets', including environmental aspects on the method of application. Recipes were developed and tested for the following four binders: CMC, Slaggcement, water glass, and bentonite. Determinations of softening temperatures shows that all four pellet types are stable in nitrogen-atmosphere up to 1500/sup 0/C. When simulating combustion in air, softening starts at 1050 - 1200/sup 0/C, the best results being achieved with bentonite. Combusiton tests were first performed on separate pellets in order to keep conditions well within control. Very soon it showed that unsufficiently small retention of sulphur was achieved, in spite of low combustion temperature and high Ca/S-relation. As an explanation to this it was suggested that no reaction between SO/sub 2/ and CaO can be expected within pellets which still contain coal. The sulphur is presumable excaping as COS, H/sub 2/ S or elementary sulphur. These compounds do not react with CaO, but they are oxidized outside the pellets forming SO/sub 2/ which later is absorbed by CaO - containing ash. This pattern makes it less interesting to study the combustion of single pellets. So, the test programme was changed and combustion tests with bedded pellets were introduced which gave a better result. At 1050/sup 0/C lower retention was attained, possibly because the combustion was carried out too far. The burning time was long because of the low temperature.

  5. Diffusion, sorption, and retardation processes of anions in bentonite and organo-bentonites for multibarrier systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schampera, Birgit; Dultz, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    The low permeability, high cation exchange capacity (CEC) and plasticity of bentonites favor their use in multibarrier systems of waste deposits [1]. Bentonites have a high CEC but their ability to sorb anions is very low. There is, however, need for retardation of anions and organic pollutants in many applications. Bentonites, modified with certain organic cations, have the capacity to sorb anions and non-polar organic compounds in addition to cations. Investigations on organically modified clays address a wide variety of applications including immobilization of pollutants in contaminated soils, waste water treatment and in situ placement for the protection of ground water [2]. Many experiments on anion and cation sorption of organo-clays were conducted in the batch mode which does not reflect solid-liquid ratios and material densities in barrier systems. Diffusion experiments on compacted clays allow the evaluation of transport processes and sorption of pollutants at conditions relevant for repositories. For organo-clays only few diffusion studies are published e.g. [3] measured the diffusion of tritium and [4] the diffusion of H2O in bentonite and organo-bentonites. The organic cation hexadecylpyridinium (HDPy) was added to Wyoming bentonite (MX-80) in amounts corresponding to 2-400 % of the CEC. The uptake of organic cations was determined by the C-content, XRD and IR-spectroscopy. Wettability was analyzed by the contact angle. Physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of clays were characterized. Diffusion experiments were carried out in situ in a cell attached to the ATR-unit of a FTIR-spectrometer. For H2O-diffusion the compacted organo-clays are saturated first with D2O, afterwards H2O is supplied to the surface at the top of the clay platelet. Anion-diffusion was conducted with NO3--solution instead of H2O only having characteristic IR band positions at 1350 cm-1. Three different concentrations (0.25M, 0.5M and 1M) were used. Additional batch

  6. Organophilic bentonites based on Argentinean and Brazilian bentonites: part 2: potential evaluation to obtain nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Paiva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the preparation of composites of polypropylene and organophilic bentonites based on Brazilian and Argentinean bentonites. During the processing of the samples in a twin screw microextruder, torque and pressures of the extruder were accompanied and the viscosity values were calculated. No significant changes in the torque, pressure and viscosity were found for composites prepared with different bentonites. The samples were characterized by XRD and TEM to evaluate the structure and dispersion of the organophilic bentonites. Composites with exfoliated, partially exfoliated and intercalated structures were obtained and correlations between the intrinsic properties of the sodium clays and organophilic bentonites and their influence on the composites were studied. The cation exchange capacity of the sodium bentonites and the swelling capacity of the organophilic bentonites were the most important properties to obtain exfoliated structures in composites. All bentonites showed the potential to obtain polymer nanocomposites, but the ones from Argentina displayed the best results.

  7. An empirical model for the thermal conductivity of compacted bentonite and a bentonite-sand mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won-Jin; Lee, Jae-Owan; Kwon, Sangki

    2011-11-01

    The thermal conductivities of compacted bentonite and a bentonite-sand mixture were measured to investigate the effects of dry density, water content and sand fraction on the thermal conductivity. A single expression has been proposed to describe the thermal conductivity of the compacted bentonite and the bentonite-sand mixture once their primary parameters such as dry density, water content and sand fraction are known.

  8. Law in Wyoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyoming Law-Related Education Advisory Council, Cheyenne.

    This document is intended to give students an overview of laws in Wyoming. Subjects covered include civil and criminal law; courts in Wyoming; juvenile law, juvenile court procedure; rights of children; family law; employment law; automobile-related law; laws affecting the schools; and citizenship rights and responsibilities. The laws and courts…

  9. Bentonite Permeability at Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Daniels

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Repository designs frequently favour geological disposal of radioactive waste with a backfill material occupying void space around the waste. The backfill material must tolerate the high temperatures produced by decaying radioactive waste to prevent its failure or degradation, leading to increased hydraulic conductivity and reduced sealing performance. The results of four experiments investigating the effect of temperature on the permeability of a bentonite backfill are presented. Bentonite is a clay commonly proposed as the backfill in repository designs because of its high swelling capacity and very low permeability. The experiments were conducted in two sets of purpose-built, temperature controlled apparatus, designed to simulate isotropic pressure and constant volume conditions within the testing range of 4–6 MPa average effective stress. The response of bentonite during thermal loading at temperatures up to 200 °C was investigated, extending the previously considered temperature range. The results provide details of bentonite’s intrinsic permeability, total stress, swelling pressure and porewater pressure during thermal cycles. We find that bentonite’s hydraulic properties are sensitive to thermal loading and the type of imposed boundary condition. However, the permeability change is not large and can mostly be accounted for by water viscosity changes. Thus, under 150 °C, temperature has a minimal impact on bentonite’s hydraulic permeability.

  10. Mineralogy and sealing properties of various bentonites and smectite-rich clay materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, Ola; Olsson, Siv; Nilsson, Ulf (Clay Technology AB (SE))

    2006-12-15

    The present work includes a coherent study of Wyoming bentonite with respect to the most relevant properties for use in a repository, and a parallel study of other potential buffer and tunnel backfilling materials. The reason for this is twofold; to quantify the effect of mineralogical variations on the various important sealing properties of bentonite, and to verify that there are alternative potential sources of bentonite. The latter is motivated by the fact that Sweden alone plans to deposit at least 6,000 copper canisters which include approximately 130,000 metric tones bentonite buffer material and several times more as tunnel backfill material. Different types of sealing clay materials may also be relevant to use, since the demands on the clay will be different at the various locations in a repository. Alternative sources of bentonite would consequently be valuable in order to secure quality, supply, and price. Important aspects on buffer and tunnel backfilling materials may be summarized as: Original sealing properties. Hazardous substances in any respect. Short-term effects of ground-water chemistry. Long-term stability, i.e. effects of temperature and ground-water chemistry. Availability. Costs. The focus in this study is on the first three items. The long-term stability is indirectly considered in that mineralogical composition is determined. The availability is only considered in such a way that most of the analyzed materials represent huge clay formations, which contain much more material than needed for a repository. The cost aspects have not been included, mainly because the present day price is not relevant due to the time frame of the construction of a repository

  11. Structure and forces in bentonite MX-80

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joensson, Bo; Aakesson, Torbjoern; Joensson, Bengt; Meehdi, Segad; Janiak, John; Wallenberg, Reine (Theoretical Chemistry, Chemical Center, Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden))

    2009-03-15

    Wyoming bentonite (MX-80) and its ion exchanged forms, Na and Ca montmorillonite, have been studied experimentally and theoretically. A variety of experimental techniques have been used in order to gain insight into the structural conditions in dry clay as well as clay in equilibrium with a bulk solution of given ionic composition. The main objective has been the swelling behaviour and osmotic pressure of montmorillonite clay when the bulk solution contains a mix of monovalent sodium and divalent calcium ions. For a clay system in equilibrium with pure water, Monte Carlo simulations predict a large swelling when the clay counterions are monovalent, while in presence of divalent counterions a limited swelling is predicted with an aqueous layer between the clay lamellaes of about 1 nm. This latter result is in excellent agreement with small angle x-ray scattering data, but in disagreement with dialysis experiments, which gives a significantly larger swelling for Ca montmorillonite in pure water. Obviously, there is one lamellar swelling and a second 'extra-lamellar' swelling, which could be the result of a phase separation in the clay. Montmorillonite in contact with a salt reservoir with both Na+ and Ca2+ counterions will only show a modest swelling unless the sodium concentration in the bulk is several orders of magnitude larger than the calcium concentration. The limited swelling of clay in presence of divalent counterions is a consequence of ion-ion correlations, which reduce the entropic repulsion as well as give rise to an attractive component in the total osmotic pressure. Ion-ion correlations also favour divalent counterions in a situation where we have a competition with monovalent ones. A more fundamental result of ion-ion correlations is that the osmotic pressure as a function of clay sheet separation becomes nonmonotonic, which indicates the possibility of a phase separation into a concentrated and a dilute clay phase. This phenomenon could

  12. Thermal springs of Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

    1978-01-01

    This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

  13. Pellet plant energy simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeasu, D.; Vasquez Pulido, T.; Nielsen, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Pellet Plant energy simulator is a software based on advanced algorithms which has the main purpose to see the response of a pellet plant regarding certain location conditions. It combines energy provided by a combined heat and power, and/or by a combustion chamber with the energy consumption of the pellet factory and information regarding weather conditions in order to predict the biomass consumption of the pellet factory together with the combined heat and power, and/or with the biomass consumption of the combustion chamber. The user of the software will not only be able to plan smart the biomass acquisition and estimate its cost, but also to plan smart the preventive maintenance (charcoal cleaning in case of a gasification plant) and use the pellet plant at the maximum output regarding weather conditions and biomass moisture. The software can also be used in order to execute a more precise feasibility study for a pellet plant in a certain location. The paper outlines the algorithm that supports the Pellet Plant Energy Simulator idea and presents preliminary tests results that supports the discussion and implementation of the system

  14. Report on hydro-mechanical and chemical-mineralogical analyses of the bentonite buffer in Canister Retrieval Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueck, Ann; Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Kristensson, Ola; Olsson, Siv [Clay Technology AB (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    The effect of five years of exposure to repository-like conditions on compacted Wyoming bentonite was determined by comparing the hydraulic, mechanical, and mineralogical properties of samples from the bentonite buffer of the Canister Retrieval Test (CRT) with those of reference material. The CRT, located at the Swedish Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), was a full-scale field experiment simulating conditions relevant for the Swedish KBS-3 concept for disposal of high-level radioactive waste in crystalline host rock. The compacted bentonite, surrounding a copper canister equipped with heaters, had been subjected to heating at temperatures up to 95 deg C and hydration by natural Na-Ca-Cl type groundwater for almost five years at the time of retrieval. Under the thermal and hydration gradients that prevailed during the test, sulfate in the bentonite was redistributed and accumulated as anhydrite close to the canister. The major change in the exchangeable cation pool was a loss in Mg in the outer parts of the blocks, suggesting replacement of Mg mainly by Ca along with the hydration with groundwater. Close to the copper canister, small amounts of Cu were incorporated in the bentonite. A reduction of strain at failure was observed in the innermost part of the bentonite buffer, but no influence was seen on the shear strength. No change of the swelling pressure was observed, while a modest decrease in hydraulic conductivity was found for the samples with the highest densities. No coupling was found between these changes in the hydro-mechanical properties and the montmorillonite . the X-ray diffraction characteristics, the cation exchange properties, and the average crystal chemistry of the Na-converted < 1 {mu}m fractions provided no evidence of any chemical/structural changes in the montmorillonite after the 5-year hydrothermal test.

  15. Assessment Criteria of Bentonite Binding Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Żymankowska-Kumon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The criteria, with which one should be guided at the assessment of the binding properties of bentonites used for moulding sands, areproposed in the paper. Apart from the standard parameter which is the active bentonite content, the unrestrained growth indicator should be taken into account since it seems to be more adequate in the estimation of the sand compression strength. The investigations performed for three kinds of bentonites, applied in the Polish foundry plants, subjected to a high temperature influences indicate, that the pathway of changes of the unrestrained growth indicator is very similar to the pathway of changes of the sand compression strength. Instead, the character of changes of the montmorillonite content in the sand in dependence of the temperature is quite different. The sand exhibits the significant active bentonite content, and the sand compression strength decreases rapidly. The montmorillonite content in bentonite samples was determined by the modern copper complex method of triethylenetetraamine (Cu(II-TET. Tests were performed for bentonites and for sands with those bentonites subjected to high temperatures influences in a range: 100-700ºC.

  16. Evaluation of Egyptian bentonite and nano-bentonite as drilling mud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Abdou

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nano-particles of bentonite have been prepared by nano-grinding. The nano-bentonite was characterized by X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The bentonite particles had been ground to the size ranging from 4 to 9 nm. Both natural and nano-bentonite were evaluated as drilling mud. The evaluation involved the study of the rheological properties, filtration and gel strength before and after treatment with viscosities and filter loss agent, and compared with the American Petroleum Institute API bentonite. With decreasing the grain size of bentonite to the nano-scale, the results were not satisfied to the API -standard.

  17. Bentonite mat demonstration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrato, M.G.

    1994-12-30

    The Bentonite Mat Demonstration was developed to provide the Environmental Restoration Department with field performance characteristics and engineering data for an alternative closure cover system configuration. The demonstration was initiated in response to regulatory concerns regarding the use of an alternative cover system for future design configurations. These design considerations are in lieu of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Recommended Design for Closure Cover Systems and specifically a single compacted kaolin clay layer with a hydraulic conductivity of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec. This alternative configuration is a composite geosynthetic material hydraulic barrier consisting from bottom to top: 2 ft compacted sandy clay layer (typical local Savannah River Site soil type) that is covered by a bentonite mat--geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) and is overlaid by a 40 mil High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane--flexible membrane liner. This effort was undertaken to obtain and document the necessary field performance/engineering data for future designs and meet regulatory technical requirements for an alternative cover system configuration. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is the recommended alternative cover system configuration for containment of hazardous and low level radiological waste layers that have a high potential of subsidence to be used at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This alternative configuration mitigates subsidence effects in providing a flexible, lightweight cover system to maintain the integrity of the closure. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is recommended for the Sanitary Landfill and Low Level Radiological Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) Closures.

  18. Mobile Biomass Pelletizing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Mason

    2009-04-16

    This grant project examines multiple aspects of the pelletizing process to determine the feasibility of pelletizing biomass using a mobile form factor system. These aspects are: the automatic adjustment of the die height in a rotary-style pellet mill, the construction of the die head to allow the use of ceramic materials for extreme wear, integrating a heat exchanger network into the entire process from drying to cooling, the use of superheated steam for adjusting the moisture content to optimum, the economics of using diesel power to operate the system; a break-even analysis of estimated fixed operating costs vs. tons per hour capacity. Initial development work has created a viable mechanical model. The overall analysis of this model suggests that pelletizing can be economically done using a mobile platform.

  19. Experimental studies on the interactions between anaerobically corroding iron and bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Liisa (Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland)); Karnland, Ola; Olsson, Siv (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)); Rance, Andy; Smart, Nick (Serco Assurance, Hook (United Kingdom))

    2008-06-15

    Anaerobic corrosion experiments using compacted bentonite, carbon steel and cast iron coupons, and carbon steel wires, were performed at temperatures of 30 deg C and 50 deg C. Dry Wyoming bentonite MX-80 powder was mixed with pieces of wire, and then compacted in stainless steel holders. The samples were evacuated and placed in test cells under nitrogen. For the coupon tests, the coupons were placed in the upper and lower part of cells filled with compacted bentonite. The compacted bentonite samples were immersed in deaerated artificial ground water containing sodium chloride and sodium carbonate at pH 10.4. The experiments with coupons ran for 356 days at 50 deg C and for 900 days at 30 deg C and the experiments with wires ran for 829 days at 30 deg C and for 911 days at 50 deg C. Corrosion products on the surface of wires and coupons were examined using Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe analysis. A mixture of magnetite, hematite and goethite was found on the surface of coupons. Only magnetite was observed on the surface of wires. The bentonite was examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis (EPMA), Raman spectroscopy, Moessbauer transmission spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and selected area electron diffraction. In addition, cation exchange capacity and exchangeable cations as well as total chemical composition were determined. Hydraulic conductivity and swelling pressure were also measured. In the coupon tests, increased iron contents could be observed in a thin contact zone. Sodium from the synthetic ground water had substituted for a fraction of the calcium in the interlayer positions of montmorillonite, which could be seen also in the total contents of these elements. A small increase in hydraulic conductivity was observed. In the wire tests a high

  20. The Asian Wood Pellet Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph A. Roos; Allen Brackley

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the three major wood pellet markets in Asia: China, Japan, and South Korea. In contrast to the United States, where most wood pellets are used for residential heating with pellet stoves, a majority of the wood pellets in Asia are used for co-firing at coal-fired power plants. Our analysis indicated that Japan is the largest importer of wood pellets...

  1. Modeling pellet impact drilling process

    OpenAIRE

    Kovalev, Artem Vladimirovich; Ryabchikov, Sergey Yakovlevich; Isaev, Evgeniy Dmitrievich; Ulyanova, Oksana Sergeevna

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes pellet impact drilling which could be used to increase the drilling speed and the rate of penetration when drilling hard rocks. Pellet impact drilling implies rock destruction by metal pellets with high kinetic energy in the immediate vicinity of the earth formation encountered. The pellets are circulated in the bottom hole by a high velocity fluid jet, which is the principle component of the ejector pellet impact drill bit. The experiments conducted has allowed modeling t...

  2. Organophilic bentonites based on argentinean and Brazilian bentonites: Part 1: influence of intrinsic properties of sodium bentonites on the final properties of organophilic bentonites prepared by solid-liquid and semisolid reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Paiva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the influence of the intrinsic properties of raw materials on the organophilization of bentonites from Argentinean raw sodium bentonites and Brazilian sodium activated bentonites. The organophilization was done with two methodologies: solid-liquid and semisolid reactions. Correlations between the properties of sodium and organophilic bentonites were established. The effectiveness of the treatments was verified by X-ray diffraction, swelling capacity in water and xylene and SEM to evaluate the morphology of the particles. The analysis was done before and after the modification process. The bentonites had organic cations intercalated, as shown by the increase of the basal spacings, and the organophilic character was confirmed because the bentonites showed xylene swelling capacity and particles with an expanded aspect in comparison to those of the sodium bentonites. Both methodologies were efficient to obtain organophilic clays. The organophilic bentonites obtained from raw sodium bentonites gave better results.

  3. Energy Development Opportunities for Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01

    The Wyoming Business Council, representing the state’s interests, is participating in a collaborative evaluation of energy development opportunities with the NGNP Industry Alliance (an industry consortium), the University of Wyoming, and the US Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory. Three important energy-related goals are being pursued by the State of Wyoming: Ensuring continued reliable and affordable sources of energy for Wyoming’s industries and people Restructuring the coal economy in Wyoming Restructuring the natural gas economy in Wyoming

  4. Role of bentonite clays on cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Ramírez-Apan, María Teresa; Kaufhold, Stephan; Ufer, Kristian; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención

    2016-04-01

    Bentonites, naturally occurring clays, are produced industrially because of their adsorbent capacity but little is known about their effects on human health. This manuscript reports on the effect of bentonites on cell growth behaviour. Bentonites collected from India (Bent-India), Hungary (Bent-Hungary), Argentina (Bent-Argentina), and Indonesia (Bent-Indonesia) were studied. All four bentonites were screened in-vitro against two human cancer cell lines [U251 (central nervous system, glioblastoma) and SKLU-1 (lung adenocarcinoma)] supplied by the National Cancer Institute (USA). Bentonites induced growth inhibition in the presence of U251 cells, and growth increment in the presence of SKLU-1 cells, showing that interactions between bentonite and cell surfaces were highly specific. The proliferation response for U251 cells was explained because clay surfaces controlled the levels of metabolic growth components, thereby inhibiting the development of high-grade gliomas, particularly primary glioblastomas. On the other hand, the proliferation response for SKLU-1 was explained by an exacerbated growth favoured by swelling, and concomitant accumulation of solutes, and their hydration and transformation via clay-surface mediated reactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of water inflow into a deposition hole - Influence of pellets type and of buffer block manufacturing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Jense, Viktor [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2012-10-15

    During the installation of buffer and canister in a deposition hole a number of different problems can arise. The problems are mainly connected to water flow from fractures in the rock into the deposition hole. According to the reference design for the KBS-3V concept, the buffer is protected with a special sheet made of rubber during the installation phase. This protection sheet will at some stage be removed and the outer gap between the buffer blocks and the rock surface will be filled with bentonite pellets. The interaction of buffer blocks and pellets have previously been investigated. The focuses of those studies were the following processes: 1. Erosion. Erosion of bentonite from the deposition hole up into the tunnel backfill material. This process will continue until a tunnel plug has been installed and the backfill is saturated. 2. Heave. Early wetting of the pellets filling may cause a heave of the buffer blocks into the backfill that will decrease the density of the buffer. The laboratory tests presented in this study are complementing previous investigations by focusing on how the choice of manufacturing process for the bentonite blocks (isostatic or uniaxial compaction) and pellets (roller compaction or extrusion) are affecting erosion and the heaving effect.

  6. Modeling pellet impact drilling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalyov, A. V.; Ryabchikov, S. Ya; Isaev, Ye D.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    The paper describes pellet impact drilling which could be used to increase the drilling speed and the rate of penetration when drilling hard rocks. Pellet impact drilling implies rock destruction by metal pellets with high kinetic energy in the immediate vicinity of the earth formation encountered. The pellets are circulated in the bottom hole by a high velocity fluid jet, which is the principle component of the ejector pellet impact drill bit. The experiments conducted has allowed modeling the process of pellet impact drilling, which creates the scientific and methodological basis for engineering design of drilling operations under different geo-technical conditions.

  7. KARAKTERISASI BENTONIT TEKNIS SEBAGAI ADSORBEN INDIGO BIRU (Characterisation of Technical Bentonite as Indigo Blue Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toeti Koestiari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui karakter Bentonit teknis yang dapat digunakan untuk menyerap sisa-sisa Indigo bim di lingkungan. Penelitian eksperimental laboratoris dilakukan melalui dua tahap, yaitu karakterisasi Bentonit teknis menggunakan SEM-Edx, Spektrofotometer IR, Gas Sorption Analyzer, dan proses adsorpsi Indigo bim oleh Bentonit teknis pada pH sistem 1, 5, 7, dan 9. Hasil penelitian menggunakan SEM-Edx menunjukkan bahwa Bentonit teknis mengandung senyawa Na20:2,64%, Ah03: 20,75%, Si02: 57,55%, dan FeO : 13,73%. Melalui spektrofotometer IR diketahui bahwa Bentonit teknis mengandung senyawa kimia yang merniliki vibrasi H-O-H, ikatan CO2, deformasi H-O-H, regang Si-O, vibrasi AI-OH atau deformasi OH-kation, deformasi SiO. Menggunakan Gas Sorption Analyzer diketahui bahwa luas permukaan Bentonit teknis : 51,935 m2/g, volume pori total: 1,302 x 10-1 cc/g dengan radius pori: <1013,9 A. Kemampuan adsorpsi Bentonit teknis terhadap 56,761 ppm Indigo bim pada pH 1, 5, 7, dan 9 berturut-tumt : 5,78; 7,89; 8,84; dan 9,64%. ABSTRACT The objective of this research was to determine the Technical Bentonite characters that can be used to adsorb the pollutant of Indigo blue in the environment. Laboratory experimental study consist of two stages, characterization phase of Technical Bentonite using SEM-EDX , IR spectrophotometer, Gas Analyzer sorption, and proses of adsorption Indigo blue by technical Bentonite at pH sistem1, 5, 7, and 9. By using SEM EDX showed that the technical Bentonite contain compounds as Na2O: 2.64%,  Al2O3: 20.75%,  SiO2: 57.55%, and FeO: 13.73%. Through IR spectro- photometer, the functional group of compound in technical Bentonite are H-O-H vibration, CO2 bonding, H-O-H deformation, Si-O stretcing, Al-OH vibration or deformation OH-cation, SiO deformation. By using Gas Sorption Analyzer is known that the surface area of technical Bentonite: 51.935 m2 / g, total pore volume: 1.302 x 10-1 cc / g with pore

  8. Modelling of geochemical reactions and experimental cation exchange in MX 80 bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-H, G; Fritz, B; Clement, A; Michau, N

    2005-10-01

    Bentonites are widely used for waste repository systems because of their hydrodynamic, surface and chemical-retention properties. MX 80 bentonite (bentonite of Wyoming) contains approximately 85% Na/Ca-montmorillonite and 15% accessory minerals. The dominant presence of Na/Ca-montmorillonite in this clay mineral could cause it to perform exceptionally well as an engineered barrier for a radioactive waste repository because this buffer material is expected to fill up by swelling the void between canisters containing waste and the surrounding ground. However, the Na/Ca-montmorillonite could be transformed to other clay minerals as a function of time under repository conditions. Previous modelling studies based on the hydrolysis reactions have shown that the Na/Ca-montmorillonite-to-Ca-montmorillonite conversion is the most significant chemical transformation. In fact, this chemical process appears to be a simple cation exchange into the engineered barrier. The purpose of the present study was two-fold. Firstly, it was hoped to predict the newly formed products of bentonite-fluid reactions under repository conditions by applying a thermokinetic hydrochemical code (KIRMAT: Kinetic Reactions and Mass Transport). The system modelled herein was considered to consist of a 1-m thick zone of water-saturated engineered barrier. This non-equilibrated system was placed in contact with a geological fluid on one side, which was then allowed to diffuse into the barrier, while the other side was kept in contact with iron-charged water. Reducing initial conditions ( [P(O)2 approximately equals 0] ; Eh=-200 mV) and a constant reaction temperature (100 degrees C) were considered. Secondly, it was hoped to estimate the influence of inter-layer cations (Ca and Na) on the swelling behaviour of the MX 80 bentonite by using an isothermal system of water vapour adsorption and an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) coupled with a digital image analysis (DIA) program. Here, the

  9. Tests for evaluation of pellets as foundation bed material KBP1003 - ASKAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsson, Anna (ES-Konsult AB (Sweden))

    2011-12-15

    The reference design for the backfill of deposition tunnels, described in SKB (2010), include bentonite blocks, bentonite pellets and a foundation bed of bentonite pellets or granulate. The tunnel floor needs to be flat and have sufficient bearing capacity to make it possible to stack the backfill blocks according to the reference design. To achieve a flat foundation the tunnel floor will be covered with a bed of pellets or granulate made of bentonite clay. The bed can be either compacted or non compacted. Bed tests have been performed as a part of the project KBP1003 DP1 Design, which is a subproject of KBP1003 ASKAR. The main objectives for KBP1003 DP1 is to define all requirements for the backfill and its production and installation prior to start of the large scale tests, based on given perquisites. KBP1003 is based on the reference design for the backfill of deposition tunnels which was developed in 2010 (SKB 2010). The concept for installation and block design has been further developed during the project. A new dimension of the backfill blocks has been developed; the chosen dimension makes it possible to gain overlapping joints between the blocks by block stacking. The further developed concept is hereinafter referred to as the ASKAR-concept. The purpose of the performed bed tests was to define the bed requirements in the backfill installation to enable stable stacking of backfill blocks. The tests included stacking of blocks on different bed materials, on blasted and wire sawn floor, with and without concurrent water inflow. The bed tests was subdivided into four main parts: - block stacking on different bed compositions - block stacking on bed during water inflow - block stacking in a realistic test tunnel - block stacking on the upper part of the deposition hole and bevel

  10. Microbial activity in bentonite buffers. Literature study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratto, M.; Itavaara, M.

    2012-07-01

    The proposed disposal concept for high-level radioactive wastes involves storing the wastes underground in copper-iron containers embedded in buffer material of compacted bentonite. Hydrogen sulphide production by sulphate-reducing prokaryotes is a potential mechanism that could cause corrosion of waste containers in repository conditions. The prevailing conditions in compacted bentonite buffer will be harsh. The swelling pressure is 7-8 MPa, the amount of free water is low and the average pore and pore throat diameters are small. This literature study aims to assess the potential of microbial activity in bentonite buffers. Literature on the environmental limits of microbial life in extreme conditions and the occurrence of sulphatereducing prokaryotes in extreme environments is reviewed briefly and the results of published studies characterizing microbes and microbial processes in repository conditions or in relevant subsurface environments are presented. The presence of bacteria, including SRBs, has been confirmed in deep groundwater and bentonite-based materials. Sulphate reducers have been detected in various high-pressure environments, and sulphate-reduction based on hydrogen as an energy source is considered a major microbial process in deep subsurface environments. In bentonite, microbial activity is strongly suppressed, mainly due to the low amount of free water and small pores, which limit the transport of microbes and nutrients. Spore-forming bacteria have been shown to survive in compacted bentonite as dormant spores, and they are able to resume a metabolically active state after decompaction. Thus, microbial sulphide production may increase in repository conditions if the dry density of the bentonite buffer is locally reduced. (orig.)

  11. Wyoming : ITS/CVO business plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Commercial Vehicle Operations (CVO) in Wyoming are among the safest and most efficient in the United States. This Business Plan recognizes the successes of Wyoming CVO and proposes seven elements to keep Wyoming a trucking leader. The Plan recommends...

  12. Pelletizing bagasse for fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouvet, P.E.; Suzor, N.L.C.

    1980-08-01

    Prior to 1979, the Davies Hawakua Sugar Co. of Hawaii, burned its bagasse in bulk in large furnaces. Because of storage difficulties, however, the company decided to erect a bagasse - pelletizing plant adjacent to its Hawaii sugar factory. The plant, based on the Woodex process, has been very successful and the net energy gain has been calculated in the order of 41%.

  13. Owl Pellet Paleontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Lisa K.

    2013-01-01

    In this activity for the beginning of a high school Biology 1 evolution unit, students are challenged to reconstruct organisms found in an owl pellet as a model for fossil reconstruction. They work in groups to develop hypotheses about what animal they have found, what environment it inhabited, and what niche it filled. At the end of the activity,…

  14. The effect of ratio chitosan-bentonite and processing time on the characterization of chitosan-bentonite composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitri, E.; Budhyantoro, A.

    2017-07-01

    Chitosan/bentonite composite was synthesized to modify and enhance its characteristics to adsorp both anionic and cationic substances. The influence of several factors on synthesis of the chitosan/bentonite composite were investigated. The study focused on obtaining the best operating conditions that would produce homogenous chitosan/bentonite composite. The effect of weight ratio of bentonite to chitosan, reaction times and pre-treatment were investigated. The composite were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Scanning electron microscopy. The optimum chitosan/bentonite composite was obtained at weight ratio of bentonite to chitosan 1 : 2 and 12 hours reaction. On these conditions, more chitosan can interact with the matrix of bentonite to form chitosan - bentonite composite.

  15. Degradation of copepod fecal pellets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Louise K.; Iversen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    amount of fecal pellets. The total degradation rate of pellets by the natural plankton community of Oresund followed the phytoplankton biomass, with maximum degradation rate during the spring bloom (2.5 +/- 0.49 d(-1)) and minimum (0.52 +/- 0.14 d(-1)) during late winter. Total pellet removal rate ranged...

  16. Sealing performance of bentonite and bentonite/crushed rock borehole plugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, S.; Daemen, J.J.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mining and Geological Engineering

    1992-07-01

    This study includes a systematic investigation of the sealing performance of bentonite and bentonite/crushed rock plugs. American Colloid C/S granular bentonite and crushed Apache Leap tuff have been mixed to prepare samples for laboratory flow testing. Bentonite weight percent and crushed tuff gradation are the major variables studied. The sealing performance assessments include high injection pressure flow tests, polyaxial flow tests, high temperature flow tests, and piping tests. The results indicate that a composition to yield a permeability lower than 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm/s would have at least 25% bentonite by weight mixed with well-graded crushed rock. Hydraulic properties of the mixture plugs may be highly anisotropic if significant particle segregation occurs during sample installation and compaction. Temperature has no significant effect on the sealing performance within the test range from room temperature to 600{degree}C. Piping damage to the sealing performance is small if the maximum hydraulic gradient does not exceed 120 and 280 for samples with a bentonite content of 25 and 35%, respectively. The hydraulic gradients above which flow of bentonite may take place are deemed critical. Analytical work includes the introduction of bentonite occupancy percentage and water content at saturation as two major parameters for plug design. A permeability model is developed for the prediction of permeability in clays, especially in view of the difficulties in obtaining this property experimentally. A piping model is derived based on plastic flow theory. This piping model permits the estimation of critical hydraulic gradients at which flow of bentonite takes place. The model can also be used to define the maximum allowable pore diameter of a protective filter layer.

  17. Thermal Properties of Lignocellulose Pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Igor; Hirle, Siegfried; Balog, Karol

    2017-06-01

    This article deals with the characterization of biomass pellets using Differential Scanning Calorimetry. We used three types of industrially produced and commercially available pellets as samples: wood pellets containing grass, wood pellet containing bark and wood pellets without bark. Each of the samples were examined using the DSC method. Based on the measurements in atmosphere of air and nitrogen temperature, the changes caused by thermal degradation of various kinds of test fuels were observed. Subsequently, limits of exothermic processes, reaction enthalpy changes and the temperature at which exothermic reactions reached peaks were determined.

  18. Fundamentals of Biomass pellet production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jens Kai; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Hustad, Johan Einar

    2005-01-01

    Pelletizing experiments along with modelling of the pelletizing process have been carried out with the aim of understanding the fundamental physico-chemical mechanisms that control the quality and durability of biomass pellets. A small-scale California pellet mill (25 kg/h) located with the Biomass...... Gasification Group at MEK-DTU has been installed for experiments with different types of wood, straw, waste materials and additives such as adhesives and inorganic compounds. A series of pelletizing tests has been performed using a ring die with a compression ratio of 6.5. Pine shavings and beech wood dust has...

  19. Thermal Properties of Lignocellulose Pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wachter Igor

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the characterization of biomass pellets using Differential Scanning Calorimetry. We used three types of industrially produced and commercially available pellets as samples: wood pellets containing grass, wood pellet containing bark and wood pellets without bark. Each of the samples were examined using the DSC method. Based on the measurements in atmosphere of air and nitrogen temperature, the changes caused by thermal degradation of various kinds of test fuels were observed. Subsequently, limits of exothermic processes, reaction enthalpy changes and the temperature at which exothermic reactions reached peaks were determined.

  20. From a single pellet press to a bench scale pellet mill - Pelletizing six different biomass feedstocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puig Arnavat, Maria; Shang, Lei; Sárossy, Zsuzsa

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for biomass pellets requires the investigation of alternative raw materials for pelletizetion. In the present paper, the pelletization process of fescue, alfalfa, sorghum, triticale, miscanthus and willow is studied to determine if results obtained in a single pellet press...

  1. Study of the treated and magnetically modified bentonite as possible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Vereš

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite with its unique structural properties is a valuable material for environmental application. Its sorption propertiesare usually improved by the different ways of modification. In this work, the special sedimentation method was used for the treatment ofthe natural bentonite to obtain monomineral fraction of montmorillonite. The modification by iron oxide particles was used with the aimto prepare the magnetic sorbent with enhanced sorption properties of treated bentonite. The removal of nickel from aqueous solutions bythe natural, treated and magnetically modified bentonite was studied in batch adsorption-equilibrium experiments. The experimentaldata were fitted with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The sorption capacities of the natural, treated and modified bentonite werecompared.

  2. Bentonite as a waste isolation pilot plant shaft sealing material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daemen, J.; Ran, Chongwei [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Current designs of the shaft sealing system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) propose using bentonite as a primary sealing component. The shaft sealing designs anticipate that compacted bentonite sealing components can perform through the 10,000-year regulatory period and beyond. To evaluate the acceptability of bentonite as a sealing material for the WIPP, this report identifies references that deal with the properties and characteristics of bentonite that may affect its behavior in the WIPP environment. This report reviews published studies that discuss using bentonite as sealing material for nuclear waste disposal, environmental restoration, toxic and chemical waste disposal, landfill liners, and applications in the petroleum industry. This report identifies the physical and chemical properties, stability and seal construction technologies of bentonite seals in shafts, especially in a saline brine environment. This report focuses on permeability, swelling pressure, strength, stiffness, longevity, and densification properties of bentonites.

  3. (AJST) PHYSICO-CHEMISTRY OF CONTINENTAL BENTONITES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT:- Growing demand for bentonite and kaolin applications in the ceramic industry motivated this study which aimed at physico-chemically characterizing some selected continental clayey materials from Botswana, Mozambique, Pakistan, Senegal, South Africa and the United. States of America. The hydrogen ion ...

  4. Pemanfaatan Bentonite sebagai Media Pembumian Elektroda Batang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winanda Riga Tamma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sistem pentanahan merupakan suatu sistem yang bertujuan untuk mengamankan sistem tenaga listrik dari gangguan ke tanah maupun gangguan hubung singkat. Pada sistem pentanahan yang baik, resistansi pentanahan harus bernilai dibawah lima ohm. Resistansi pentanahan bergantung pada berbagai aspek antara lain yaitu struktur tanah, kelembapan tanah, dan kandungan yang ada dalam tanah itu sendiri. Dalam pengujian pada penelitian ini akan dilakukan perbaikan pada tanah dengan mencampurkan bentonite ke dalam tanah sebagai media pentanahan. Pencampuran bentonite bertujuan agar mendapatkan nilai resistansi pentanahan yang baik sesuai dengan standar sistem pentanahan. Pengujian dilakukan menggunakan elektroda batang dan alat earth resistance tester dengan metode tiga titik dimana elektroda utama atau elektroda pengukuran diberikan treatment sesuai dengan kondisi yang telah ditentukan. Diharapkan pada pengujian ini akan diketahui dampak dari bentonite terhadap penurunan nilai resistansi pentanahan. Hasil pengujian menunjukkan bahwa dengan mencampurkan bentonite pada media pentanahan, resistansi pentanahan menjadi lebih baik. Meskipun tidak terlalu signifikan, rata-rata penurunan dari setiap masing-masing treatment adalah sebesar 2 ohm.

  5. Pelleting of feed for broiler chickens: Factors affecting pellet quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel José Antoniol Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of the pellet can be translated by the quality of the pellet which is defined as the proportion of intact pellets that come to feeders for chickens, i.e., its resistance to breakage between the feed mill and farms. The use of diets with a higher percentage of intact pellets results in better performance of birds when compared with the feed rations. The main factors that affect pellet quality are: characteristics of pelleting, the feed composition, particle size, pelleting temperature, moisture and steam injection. From a nutritional standpoint, one can consider that the smaller the particle size of food increased their contact with the digestive juices, which aids digestion and absorption of nutrients. However, finely ground lead to less stimulation and growth of intestinal ephitellium. But from the standpoint of production of feed, the larger the particle size of ingredients largest economy with energy and greater efficiency (tons / hour milling. Because of this, it is suggested that the particle sizes used vary between 500 and 700 ìm to not to cause loss of performance of the birds, nor the income from the factory. Increased energy, through the addition of oils and fats, have much influence on performance parameters of broilers and the quality of the pellet produced. The presence of oils and / or fat, depending on the amount, on its hydrophoby characteristic, causing damage to the particles aggregation acting as a lubricant between food particles and the matrix of pelleting, decreasing the pelleting pressure and its gelatinization, resulting into poor quality pellets.

  6. Bentonite. Geotechnical barrier and source for microbial life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matschiavelli, Nicole; Kluge, Sindy; Cherkouk, Andrea [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). HZDR Young Investigator Group; Steglich, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    Due to their properties, namely a high swelling capacity and a low hydraulic conductivity, Bentonites fulfil as geotechnical barrier a sealing and buffering function in the nuclear waste repository. Depending on the mineral composition Bentonites contain many suitable electron-donors and -acceptors, enabling potential microbial life. For the potential repository of highly radioactive waste the microbial mediated transformation of Bentonite could influence its properties as a barrier material. Microcosms were set up containing Bentonite and anaerobic synthetic Opalinus-clay-pore water solution under an N{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}-atmosphere to elucidate the microbial potential within selected Bentonites. Substrates like acetate and lactate were supplemented to stimulate potential microbial activity. First results show that bentonites represent a source for microbial life, demonstrated by the consumption of lactate and the formation of pyruvate. Furthermore, microbial iron-reduction was determined, which plays a crucial role in Betonite-transformation.

  7. Pelletizing properties of torrefied spruce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang; Clemons, Craig; Holm, Jens K.

    2011-01-01

    analysis revealed a cohesive failure mechanism due to strong inter-particle bonding in spruce pellets as a resulting from a plastic flow of the amorphous wood polymers, forming solid polymer bridges between adjacent particles. Fracture surfaces of pellets made from torrefied spruce possessed gaps and voids...

  8. Pelletizing properties of torrefied spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang Stelte; Craig Clemons; Jens K. Holm; Anand R. Sanadi; Jesper Ahrenfeldt; Lei Shang; Ulrik B. Henriksen

    2011-01-01

    Torrefaction is a thermo-chemical conversion process improving the handling, storage and combustion properties of wood. To save storage space and transportation costs, it can be compressed into fuel pellets of high physical and energetic density. The resulting pellets are relatively resistant to moisture uptake, microbiological decay and easy to comminute into small...

  9. [Shotgun injury--multiple pellets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejna, P; Pleskot, J

    2009-01-01

    Both typical and less frequent features of gunshot wounds caused by shotguns are reported in the following article. The pattern of shotgun injury predominantly depends on gauge, choke, number and diameter of used pellets, muzzle-victim distance and on character of the afflicted area of the body. Characteristic ballistic properties of shotgun pellets, their wounding potential and significance in forensic patology are presented.

  10. METHODICAL ASPECTS OF DETERMINATION OF THE BENTONITIC MOLDING CLAYS CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Fedorov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The features of different methods for determining the strength properties of bentonite molding clays are considered. It is shown that GOST 28177–89 not adequately characterizes the strength characteristics of bentonite important for its use in automatic molding lines. The expediency of mixing bentonite clays from different deposits, that allows to obtain a higher technological parameters of bentopowders in comparison with a variant of their manufacture from raw materials of one deposit is shown.

  11. Synthesis of PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite nanocomposite through sonication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitompul, Johnner, E-mail: sitompul@che.itb.ac.id; Setyawan, Daru, E-mail: daru.setyawan@gmail.com; Kim, Daniel Young Joon, E-mail: daniel.kim12321@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Industrial Technology, Institute of Technology Bandung Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung, West Java, 40132 (Indonesia); Lee, Hyung Woo, E-mail: leehw@che.itb.ac.id [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Industrial Technology, Institute of Technology Bandung Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung, West Java, 40132 (Indonesia); Research and Business Foundation, Sungkyunkwan University, 2066 Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-19

    This paper concerns the synthesis of poly(D,L-lactic acid)/poly(L-lactic acid) bentonite nanocomposites. Poly (D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) was synthesized using lactic acid through the ZnO-catalyzed direct polycondensation method at vacuum pressure and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) was synthesized with L-lactide by ring-opening polymerization method. The PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite nanocomposite films were synthesized using the solvent casting method. The nanoclay, bentonite, was prepared using the solution-intercalation method by dissolving the nanoparticles into chloroform before sonication. In this study, PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite nanocomposite films were produced using variable amounts of nanoclay and sonication times during the mixing of PDLLA/PLLA and bentonite. The properties of the PDLLA/PLLA nanocomposites were then characterized using the X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Universal Testing Machine (UTM), Water Vapor Permeability (WVP) tests, and the enzymatic biodegradability test. The XRD test was used to measure the intercalation of nanoclay layers in the PDLLA/PLLA matrix and the PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite intercalated nanocomposite films. It was found through these various tests that adding bentonite to the PDLLA/PLLA increases tensile strength to 56.76 MP. Furthermore, the biodegradability increases as well as the barrier properties of the polymers The different sonication time used during the mixing of the polymer solution with bentonite also affected the properties of the PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite nanocomposite films.

  12. Compacted sand-bentonite mixtures for hydraulic containment liners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanit Chalermyanont

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Sand is a pervious material in nature. Mixing sand with appropriate bentonite contents yields sandbentonite mixtures having low hydraulic conductivity that can be used as hydraulic containment liners. In this study, compaction tests were conducted to determine the optimum water content and maximum dry unit weight of compacted sand-bentonite mixtures. Direct shear and hydraulic conductivity tests were conducted to assess the shear strength parameters and hydraulic conductivity of compacted sand-bentonite mixtures. Test results indicate that hydraulic conductivity of mixtures decreases about four orders of magnitude when mixed with 5% bentonite or more. Mixing sand with bentonite, however, results in a decreased shear strength of the mixtures due to the swell of bentonite when soaked with water. For the mixtures with bentonite content varying from 0 to 9%, the hydraulic conductivity of the mixtures decreases from 3.60×10-5 to 4.13×10-9 cm/s; while the corresponding friction angle and swell ranges from 49 to 22 degrees and 0.85 to 10.32%, respectively. In addition, the compacted sand-bentonite mixture with 3% bentonite content could achieve low hydraulic conductivity of 1×10-7 cm/s which is a regular requirement for hydraulic containment liners, while still having relatively high shear strength.

  13. Environmental Contaminants Issues in Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The environmental contaminants program at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Ecological Services Office in Cheyenne, Wyoming was initiated in May 1988. The goal of...

  14. Wyoming: "A Net Positive Session"

    OpenAIRE

    Schuhmann, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Wyoming’s general legislative session concluded March 6, 2015 with the passage of 185 bills and nearly $285 million in new spending.[1] Because this was a general session rather than a budget session, very few budget issues were addressed. However, key budgetary matters this year included: (1) addressing a $222 million shortfall brought about by falling oil prices and (2) several new capital construction projects spread across the state and at the University of Wyoming. Wyoming democrats in t...

  15. SNOWY RANGE WILDERNESS, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Robert S.; Bigsby, Philip R.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Snowy Range Wilderness in Wyoming was undertaken and was followed up with more detailed geologic and geochemical surveys, culminating in diamond drilling of one hole in the Snowy Range Wilderness. No mineral deposits were identified in the Snowy Range Wilderness, but inasmuch as low-grade uranium and associated gold resources were identified in rocks similar to those of the northern Snowy Range Wilderness in an area about 5 mi northeast of the wilderness boundary, the authors conclude that the northern half of the wilderness has a probable-resource potential for uranium and gold. Closely spaced drilling would be required to completely evaluate this mineral potential. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuels.

  16. Libraries in Wyoming: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/wyoming.html Libraries in Wyoming To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. Gillette Campbell County Health Medical Library 501 S. Burma Ave. PO Box 3011 Gillette, WY ...

  17. A comparative study of the flow enhancing properties of bentonite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative study of granule flow enhancing property of bentonite, magnesium stearate, talc and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was undertaken. Bentonite was processed into fine powder. A 10 %w/w of starch granules was prepared and separated into different sizes (˂180, 180-500, 500-710 and 710-850 μm).

  18. Uranium sorption on bentonite modified by octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdan, Marek; Pikus, Stanisław; Gajowiak, Agnieszka; Sternik, Dariusz; Zięba, Emil

    2010-12-15

    The sorption of U(VI) on octadecyltrimethyl-bentonite was investigated at the pH values of the aqueous phase ranging from 3 to 10 and the concentrations of U(VI): 0.1-1 mmol/dm(3). The concentrations of alkylammonium cation in bentonite were increased from 21% to 150% of CEC (cation exchange capacity). It was determined that the sorption of U(VI) on modified bentonite, i.e. the distribution constant -K(d) decreases with the percent of mineral modification until it attains a minimum at 76% of CEC and then increases again. The effective sorption of U(VI) was found to be in the pH range: 6-10 for the modified bentonite and was explained as the consequence of U(VI) anionic hydroxy complexes sorption. Both FT-IR and XRD spectra of the modified bentonite were analyzed and provided arguments for the existence of surfactant cations in the form of monolayer and bilayer in the interlamellar space of bentonite. In turn the luminescence spectra of bentonite suspensions, i.e. their character at different values of pH, proved the existence of hydroxide-like planar polymeric U(VI) species in the bentonite phase at pH 9. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-term Corrosion of Copper Container in Bentonite Buffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Soo; Choi, Jong Won; Choi, Heui Joo; Lee, Jong Youl; Jeong, Jong Tae; Kim, Sung Ki; Cho, Dong Keun

    2007-05-15

    The experimental method for the evaluation of copper corrosion was discussed in this report. Especially, the corrosion behavior of a copper container in a compacted bentonite environment was reviewed in detail. Several previous studies on the copper corrosion in a bentonite environment were summarized and the applied methods were illustrated firstly. On the basis of the review, it is discussed how to execute long-term copper corrosion test as regarding korean disposal environment. The selection of bentonite medium and the composition of a medium such as bentonite-sand mixture or bentonite-sand double layer was mentioned in this report. The need for protection layer on copper surface was also discussed for reducing initial copper corrosion rate. As key aspects on the corrosion test, a measuring of corrosion rate, an observation of surface morphology, an analysis of corrosion product, and a measuring of corrosion potential were pointed out. For the purpose of a experimental consistency, the necessity of standard composition for a bentonite and a underground water might be confirmed before the test. Consequently, three experimental designs were derived for the corrosion test such as a corrosion testing design at creep condition, a simple corrosion design for the evaluation for other candidate materials, and lastly, a corrosion testing design in compacted bentonite. Through this survey and discussion for a copper corrosion in bentonite environment it would be very helpful for a high level radioactive waste disposal plan in the future.

  20. Remediation of distilleries wastewater using chitosan immobilized Bentonite and Bentonite based organoclays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Dib, F I; Tawfik, F M; Eshaq, Gh; Hefni, H H H; ElMetwally, A E

    2016-05-01

    Organic-inorganic nanocomposite, namely chitosan immobilized Bentonite (CIB) with chitosan content of 5% was synthesized in an acetic acid solution (2%). Organically modified CIB and Bentonite (mbent.) were prepared by intercalating cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a cationic surfactant at doses equivalent to 1.5 and 3 times the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of clay. The prepared samples were characterized using FTIR, XRD and SEM to explore the interlayer structure and morphology of the resultant nanocomposites. The remediation of distilleries (vinasse) wastewater process was carried out using different adsorbents including CIB, modified CIB (mCIB), Bentonite (bent.), modified Bentonite (mbent.) and chitosan at different contact time. The results showed that the packing density of surfactant used in the synthesis of organoclays strongly affects the sorption capacity of the clay mineral and also showed that (mCIB)3 was found to be the most effective sorbent in the purification of distilleries wastewater with 83% chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction and 78% color removal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Handling of Deuterium Pellets for Plasma Refuelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Andersen, Verner

    1982-01-01

    The use of a guide tube technique to inject pellets in pellet-plasma experiments is described. The effect of the guide tube on the mass and speed of a slowly moving pellet ( nu approximately 150 m s-1) is negligible. To improve the divergence in trajectories of the pellets on leaving the guide tube...

  2. Enhanced shear strength of sodium bentonite using frictional additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, K.E. [GeoSyntec Consultants, Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Bowders, J.J.; Gilbert, R.B. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Daniel, D.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    One of the most important obstacles to using geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) in landfill cover systems is the low shear strength provided by the bentonitic portion of the GCL. In this study, the authors propose that granular, frictional materials might be added to the bentonite to form an admixture that would have greater shear strength than the bentonite alone while still raining low hydraulic conductivity. Bentonite was mixed with two separate granular additives, expanded shale and recycled to form mixtures consisting of 20-70% bentonite by weight. In direct shear tests at normal stresses of 34.5-103.5 kPa, effective friction angles were measured as 45{degrees} for the expanded 36{degrees} for the recycled glass, and 7{degrees} for the hydrated granular bentonite. The strength of the expanded shale mixtures increased nearly linearly as the percentage shale in the mixture increased, to 44{degrees} for a bentonite mixture with 80% shale. The addition of recycled glass showed little effect on the shear strength of the mixtures of glass and bentonite. Hydraulic conductivity measurements for both types of mixtures indicated a linear increase with log(k) as the amount of granular additive increased. For applications involving geosynthetic clay liners for cover systems, a mixture of 40% expanded shale and 60% bentonite is recommended, although further testing must be done. The 40/60 mixture satisfies the hydraulic equivalency requirement, with k = 5.1X10{sup -9} cm/sec, while increasing the shear strength parameters of the bentonitic mixture to {phi}{prime} = 17{degrees} and c{prime} = 0.

  3. A general framework for ion equilibrium calculations in compacted bentonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgersson, Martin

    2017-03-01

    An approach for treating chemical equilibrium between compacted bentonite and aqueous solutions is presented. The treatment is based on conceptualizing bentonite as a homogeneous mixture of water and montmorillonite, and assumes Gibbs-Donnan membrane equilibrium across interfaces to external solutions. An equation for calculating the electrostatic potential difference between bentonite and external solution (Donnan potential) is derived and solved analytically for some simple systems. The solutions are furthermore analyzed in order to illuminate the general mechanisms of ion equilibrium and their relation to measurable quantities. A method is suggested for estimating interlayer activity coefficients based on the notion of an interlayer ionic strength. Using this method, several applications of the framework are presented, giving a set of quantitative predictions which may be relatively simply tested experimentally, e.g.: (1) the relative amount of anions entering the bentonite depends approximately on the square-root of the external concentration for a 1:2 salt (e.g. CaCl2). For a 1:1 salt (e.g. NaCl) the dependence is approximately linear, and for a 1:2 salt (e.g. Na2SO4) the dependence is approximately quadratic. (2) Bentonite contains substantially more nitrate as compared to chloride if equilibrated with the two salt solutions at equal external concentration. (3) Potassium bentonite generally contains more anions as compared to sodium bentonite if equilibrated at the same external concentration. (4) The anion concentration ratio in two bentonite samples of different cations (but with the same density and cation exchange capacity) resembles the ion exchange selectivity coefficient for that specific cation pair. The results show that an adequate treatment of chemical equilibrium between interlayers and bulk solutions are essential when modeling compacted bentonite, and that activity corrections generally are required for relevant ion equilibrium calculations. It

  4. Uranium sorption on bentonite modified by octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majdan, Marek, E-mail: marek@hermes.umcs.lublin.pl [Maria Curie Sklodowska University, Faculty of Chemistry, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Pikus, Stanislaw; Gajowiak, Agnieszka; Sternik, Dariusz [Maria Curie Sklodowska University, Faculty of Chemistry, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Zieba, Emil [Catholic University of Lublin, SEM Laboratory, 20-718 Lublin (Poland)

    2010-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The influence of pH on U(VI) sorption on ODTMA-bentonite. Research highlights: {yields}ODTMA-bentonite has high sorption affinity for U(VI) in a pH range: 6-10. {yields} Anionic complexes: (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(OH){sub 7}{sup -} sorption is the most probable. {yields} U(VI) sorption data can be evaluated by straight line dependence. - Abstract: The sorption of U(VI) on octadecyltrimethyl-bentonite was investigated at the pH values of the aqueous phase ranging from 3 to 10 and the concentrations of U(VI): 0.1-1 mmol/dm{sup 3}. The concentrations of alkylammonium cation in bentonite were increased from 21% to 150% of CEC (cation exchange capacity). It was determined that the sorption of U(VI) on modified bentonite, i.e. the distribution constant -K{sub d} decreases with the percent of mineral modification until it attains a minimum at 76% of CEC and then increases again. The effective sorption of U(VI) was found to be in the pH range: 6-10 for the modified bentonite and was explained as the consequence of U(VI) anionic hydroxy complexes sorption. Both FT-IR and XRD spectra of the modified bentonite were analyzed and provided arguments for the existence of surfactant cations in the form of monolayer and bilayer in the interlamellar space of bentonite. In turn the luminescence spectra of bentonite suspensions, i.e. their character at different values of pH, proved the existence of hydroxide-like planar polymeric U(VI) species in the bentonite phase at pH 9.

  5. Interaction processes at the concrete-bentonite interface after 13 years of FEBEX-Plug operation. Part II: Bentonite contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Raúl; Torres, Elena; Ruiz, Ana I.; Cuevas, Jaime; Alonso, María Cruz; García Calvo, José Luis; Rodríguez, Enrique; Turrero, María Jesús

    2017-06-01

    The in situ FEBEX experiment performed at the URL in Grimsel (Swizerland) was dismantled after 18 years of operation. Interface samples between bentonite and a shotcreted concrete plug that was constructed in a second operational phase have been studied after 13 years of interaction. Mineralogical and geochemical characterization of samples have been performed by XRD, SEM-EDX, TG and FTIR techniques in addition to determinations of major ions by chemical analysis of aqueous extracts, δ18O and δ13C stable isotopes both in concrete paste and bentonite, and exchangeable cations in bentonite. Low mineralogical alteration impact was observed in bentonite that is only affected by a few millimeters. A large accumulation of Mg was observed at the bentonite side of the interface precipitating as silicates in various forms. In addition, heterogeneous carbonation was observed at the interface, but mostly affecting the concrete side. Migration of aqueous species occurred, being the most relevant the diffusion of chloride and sulfate from bentonite to concrete, in agreement with Part I of this study. Chloride advanced more into the concrete, while sulfates reacted to form ettringite, which has an evident alteration impact at the very interface (concrete. The ionic mobility has also redistributed the exchangeable cations in bentonite, increasing the content in Ca2+ and Na+, compensated by a decrease in Mg2+. The results presented in this paper complement those presented in Part I, focusing on the alteration of concrete by the bentonite and the granite groundwater.

  6. Antifungal activity of streptomycetes isolated bentonite clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Shirobokov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the biological activity of streptomycetes, isolated from Ukrainian bentonite clay. Methods. For identification of the investigated microorganisms there were used generally accepted methods for study of morpho-cultural and biochemical properties and sequencing of 16Ѕ rRNA producer. Antagonistic activity of the strain was determined by agar diffusion and agar block method using gram-positive, gram-negative microorganisms and fungi. Results. Research of autochthonous flora from bentonite clay of Ukrainian various deposits proved the existence of stable politaxonomic prokaryotic-eukaryotic consortia there. It was particularly interesting that the isolated microorganisms had demonstrated clearly expressed antagonistic properties against fungi. During bacteriological investigation this bacterial culture was identified like representative of the genus Streptomyces. Bentonite streptomycetes, named as Streptomyces SVP-71, inagar mediums (agar block method inhibited the growth of fungi (yeast and mold; zones of growth retardation constituted of 11-36 mm, and did not affect the growth of bacteria. There were investigated the inhibitory effects of supernatant culture fluid, ethanol and butanol extracts of biomass streptomycetes on museum and clinical strains of fungi that are pathogenic for humans (Candida albicans, C. krusei, C. utilis, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. kefir, S. glabrata, C. lusitaniae, Aspergillus niger, Mucor pusillus, Fusarium sporotrichioides. It has been shown that research antifungal factor had 100% of inhibitory effect against all fungi used in experiments in vitro. In parallel, it was found that alcohol extracts hadn’t influence to the growth of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria absolutely. It was shown that the cultural fluid supernatant and alcoholic extracts of biomass had the same antagonistic effect, but with different manifestation. This evidenced about identity of antifungal substances

  7. Hydro-mechanical characterization of Barmer 1 bentonite from Rajasthan, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Sudhakar M., E-mail: msrao@civil.iisc.ernet.in; Ravi, K., E-mail: ravik@civil.iisc.ernet.in

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Hydro-mechanical characteristics of bentonite buffer from India are presented. • Bentonite from Barmer district in Rajasthan state is the identified buffer. • Properties of Barmer clay and bentonite buffers from literature are compared. • Equations to design hydro-mechanical properties of bentonite buffer are presented. - Abstract: The conceptual model for deep geological disposal of high level nuclear waste (HLW) is based on multiple barrier system consisting of natural and engineered barriers. Buffer/backfill material is regarded as the most important engineered barrier in HLW repositories. Due to large swelling ability, cation adsorption capacity, and low permeability bentonite is considered as suitable buffer material in HLW repositories. Japan has identified Kunigel VI bentonite, South Korea – Kyungju bentonite, China – GMZ bentonite, Belgium – FoCa clay, Sweden – MX-80 bentonite, Spain – FEBEX bentonite and Canada – Avonseal bentonite as candidate bentonite buffer for deep geological repository program. An earlier study on Indian bentonites by one of the authors suggested that bentonite from Barmer district of Rajasthan (termed Barmer 1 bentonite), India is suited for use as buffer material in deep geological repositories. However, the hydro-mechanical properties of the Barmer 1 bentonite are unavailable. This paper characterizes Barmer 1 bentonite for hydro-mechanical properties, such as, swell pressure, saturated permeability, soil water characteristic curve (SWCC) and unconfined compression strength at different dry densities. The properties of Barmer 1 bentonite were compared with bentonite buffers reported in literature and equations for designing swell pressure and saturated permeability coefficient of bentonite buffers were arrived at.

  8. Swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity of compacted GMZ01 bentonite under salinization-desalinization cycle conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yong-gui; Zhu, Chunming; YE, Wei-Min; Wang, Qiong; Cui, Yu-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Compacted bentonite has been used as buffer material in radioactive waste disposal. Once compacted bentonite is emplaced, the chemical composition of site water is changed due to the long-term interaction between the bentonite, surrounding rock and the concrete facility; therefore the hydraulic mechanical behavior of compacted bentonite should be evaluated for the disposal safety. In this study, the swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity of compacted GMZ01 bentonite were investigated un...

  9. Pore space modification in bentonites subjected to low hydrothermal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prikryl, Richard; Weishauptova, Zuzana; Svandova, Jana; Krizova, Vera

    2010-05-01

    Bentonites are chief candidates for engineering barriers in nuclear waste repositories. These smectite-rich rocks are generally considered to be of excellent sorption properties due to the large specific surface area. Extremely low permeability due to swelling after being hydrated is another favourable property. In our experiment, we focused on the effect of long term (1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 18 months) of hydration by using different types of "synthetic" ground water (enriched in potassium and/or magnesium) and real ground water. The experiments were conducted on two types of bentonites (Fe-montmorillonite rich bentonite from Rokle deposit and FEBEX bentonite from Spain) under normal laboratory and elevated (95°C) temperature. After the experiments, the detailed analyses of mineralogical changes and pore space were conducted. Although no mineralogical changes were recorded, the treated material exhibited substantial changes in pore space, respectively specific surface area. Each of the studied material shows distinct response: the Rokle bentonite experienced drop in the specific surface area of mesopores over 33 % (but the micropores remained unchanged), the FEBEX bentonite shows similar changes but namely for the micropores. These can be probably explained by presence of specific species of smectites in each of the studied bentonites.

  10. Catalytic Polymerization of Acrylonitrile by Khulays Bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matar M. Al-Esaimi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous polymerization of acrylonitrile (AN catalyzed with exchanged Khulays bentonite . The influence of various polymerization parameters ( e.g., concentrations of Potassium Persulfate (K2S2O8 and monomer , various of organic solvents, and different temperature has been investigated. It was found that the rate of polymerization of AN was found to be dependent on monomer concentration, initiator and temperature. The activation energy of polymerization was calculated .Thermal properties of the polymer were studied by TGA and DSC techniques. © 2007 CREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.Received: 5 February 2007; Received in revised: 19 April 2007; Accepted: 7 May 2007[How to Cite: M. M. Al-Esaimi. (2007. Catalytic Polymerization of Acrylonitrile by Khulays Bentonite. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 32-36.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.1.4.6-10][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.1.4.6-10 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/4] 

  11. Influencing of foundry bentonite mixtures by binder activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Beňo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although new moulding processes for manufacture of high quality castings have been developed and introduced into foundry practice in recent years, the green-sand moulding in bentonite mixture still remains the most widely used technology. Higher utility properties of bentonite binders are achieved through their activation. This contribution is aimed at finding a suitable activating agent. A number of sodium salts and MgO based agents has been chosen. In the framework of the experiment the swelling volume of chosen agents was tested and technological parameters of a bentonite mixture with a binder activated with the studied agents were determined.

  12. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-27

    Energy used by Wyoming single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  13. Banking Wyoming big sagebrush seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert P. Karrfalt; Nancy Shaw

    2013-01-01

    Five commercially produced seed lots of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. var. wyomingensis (Beetle & Young) S.L. Welsh [Asteraceae]) were stored under various conditions for 5 y. Purity, moisture content as measured by equilibrium relative humidity, and storage temperature were all important factors to successful seed storage. Our results indicate...

  14. corrosion of a carbon steel covered by treated bentonites in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    F. Arbaoui

    2017-09-01

    clay/aqueous solutions study. Two Algerian bentonites have been considered. The obtained results show that both clays are corrosive even in the absence of chloride ions. We show that this corrosiveness is related to the ...

  15. Defluoridation of drinking water by using Calcium loaded Bentonite

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr.M.Singanan

    loaded bentonite was found to be. 0.275mmol Ca2+/g of .... are available, but the processes are very expensive and not economically feasible. Further ... of calcium ions in aqueous phase by. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) techniques.

  16. A study on the thermal conductivity of compacted bentonites

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Anh-Minh; Le, Trung Tinh; 10.1016/j.clay.2007.11.001

    2008-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of compacted bentonite is one of the most important properties in the design of high-level radioactive waste repositories where this material is proposed for use as a buffer. In the work described here, a thermal probe based on the hot wire method was used to measure the thermal conductivity of compacted bentonite specimens. The experimental results were analyzed to observe the effects of various factors (i.e. dry density, water content, hysteresis, degree of saturation and volumetric fraction of soil constituents) on the thermal conductivity. A linear correlation was proposed to predict the thermal conductivity of compacted bentonite based on experimentally observed relationship between the volumetric fraction of air and the thermal conductivity. The relevance of this correlation was finally analyzed together with others existing methods using experimental data on several compacted bentonites.

  17. Bentonite Modification with Manganese Oxides and Its Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Dolinská, S.; Schütz, T; Znamenáčková, I.; Lovás, M.; Vaculíková, L. (Lenka)

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the preparation of new composite based on on relatively cheap natural materials from domestic deposits and synthetically prepared manganese oxides. The manganese oxides were precipitated on the surface of activated sodium bentonite particles.\

  18. Physical properties of peanut hull pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasina, O O

    2008-03-01

    Peanut hull (peanut pods and waste materials from processing of peanuts) was pelleted through a 3/16-in. (4.76 mm) diameter die. The effect of change in moisture content (4.2-21.2%, wet basis) of the pellets (due to exposure of the pellets to low or high humidity storage environments) on physical properties were measured. Pelleting increased the bulk density of the peanut hull from 151 kg/m(3) to more than 600 kg/m(3). Bulk density, particle density and durability of the pelleted peanut hull of pellets were significantly affected by moisture content attained by the pellets during exposure to the low or high humidity environment. Air relative humidity significantly influenced the rate at which the pellets exchange moisture with the environment while air temperature did not. The values of the constants of the GAB model were obtained from moisture sorption isotherm at 25 degrees C.

  19. Calculation of K diffusional rates in bentonite beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altaner, S.P. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

    1989-04-01

    Zoned K-bentonites with illite-rich contacts and smectite-rich interiors are interpreted as products of potassium (K) metasomatism during diagenesis. A mathematical model is developed to describe both K transport in pore water and K fixation in smectite clays (smectite illitization). Solution of these coupled equations is done using finite difference techniques. Best-fit modeling of mineralogical and K/Ar data from a 2.5 m thick zoned K-bentonite from western Montana suggests that diffusional exchange of K for Ca is the important transport mechanism in compacted bentonite beds. Diffusion coefficients (D) for K/Ca exchange of about 9 to 13 {center dot} 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2}/sec best model observed zonations in the 2.5 m bentonite as well as mineralogical zonations observed in bentonites thinner than 2.5 meters. This range in D seems to be reasonable when compared with calculated D values for K/Ca exchange in a highly tortuous medium. Although the precise burial history for these Montana rocks is not well known, geologically reasonable burial histories appear to be best modeled by using fifth- and sixth-order kinetic parameters for illitization. The model suggests that illitization occurred for 7 to 9 my at temperatures of about 80 to 90{degree}C. The model of chemical transport and illitization developed here should have applications in the analysis of the stability of bentonite as a backfill material in a nuclear waste repository.

  20. Adsorption of humic acid on acid-activated Greek bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulia, Danae; Leodopoulos, Ch; Gimouhopoulos, K; Rigas, F

    2009-12-15

    The adsorption of humic acid on bentonite from Milos Island (Greece) acid-treated with dilute H(2)SO(4) solutions over a concentration range between 0.25 and 13M has been studied. Bentonite activated with 3M sulfuric acid (AAS) showed a higher efficiency in removing humic acid from aqueous solutions and was selected for further investigation. The specific surface area of acid-activated bentonite was estimated using the methylene blue adsorption method. The morphology of untreated, activated, and HA-sorbed bentonite was studied under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The effects of contact time, adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dose, and temperature on the adsorption of humic acid onto bentonite activated with 3M H(2)SO(4) were studied using a batch adsorption technique. Acidic pH and high ionic strength proved to be favorable for the adsorption efficiency. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models were used to describe the kinetic data and the rate constants were evaluated. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin equations and the isotherm constants were determined. Thermodynamic parameters (DeltaH(o), DeltaS(o), and DeltaG(o)) of adsorption of humic acid onto acid-activated bentonite with 3M sulfuric acid were also evaluated.

  1. Impregnation of bentonite with cellulose as adsorbent of congo red

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Theresa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of bentonite impregnation with cellulose has been studied. Cellulose extracted from rubber wood and clay from natural bentonite was activated. The impregnation process is performed using thiourea as impregnant agent. The impregnation results were characterized by using FT-IR spectrophotometer then the material was used as congo red dye adsorbent. Factors affecting the adsorption process were studied by kinetic parameters and thermodynamic parameters. The FTIR results indicate the impregnation process was succesfully conducted the characterization by FTIR indicated resources of typical absorption of the hydroxyl (OH and vibrational (-CH vibration function groups as specific groups of cellulose Appearing at wave numbers 3464.15 cm-1 and 2368.59 cm-1 from impregnated material. Vibration Si-O-Si and Al-O-Si as bentonite-specific strands groups Appear at 1465.9 cm-1 and 609.51 cm-1 wavenumbers in the impregnated spectra. The adsorption thermodynamic study showed that the adsorption and adsorption capacity of the cellulose-impregnated bentonite adsorbent reached the optimum point at 50 ° C at 43.47 mol / g and energy of 11.62 kJ mol. The optimum enthalpy (ΔH of cellulose bentonite was 143.13 kJ/mol and the minimum entropy (ΔS at concentration of 40 mg/L was 0.207 kJ/mol. Keywords: Bentonite, cellulose, impregnation; adsorption; Congo red

  2. Geochemical investigation of iron transport into bentonite as steel corrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Fiona; Bate, Fiona; Heath, Tim; Hoch, Andrew [Serco Assurance, Harwe ll (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    In Sweden and Finland, it is proposed that spent nuclear fuel will be encapsulated in sealed cylindrical canisters, for disposal in a geologic repository, either in vertical boreholes (KBS-3V) or in long horizontal boreholes (KBS-3H). The canisters will consist of a thick cast iron insert and a copper outer container, and each canister will be surrounded by a compacted bentonite clay buffer. It is important to investigate the possible consequences if a failure of these physical barriers was to occur. For instance, if mechanical failure of the copper outer container were to occur then groundwater could enter the annulus and reach the cast iron insert. This would result in anaerobically corroded iron from the cast iron insert interacting with the bentonite surrounding the canisters. The presence of anaerobically corroded iron in groundwater raises the question of how the bentonite will be affected by this process. In the case of the KBS-3H concept, mechanical failure of the copper outer container could lead to interaction between anaerobically corroded iron and bentonite, as above. However, direct contact between anaerobically corroding carbon steel and bentonite is also likely because of the presence of perforated carbon steel support structures in the long horizontal boreholes. As part of the NF-PRO project, an extensive experimental programme has been carried out over several years to study the interactions between anaerobically corroding carbon steel or cast iron and bentonite. The purpose of this report is to describe the modelling work that has been carried out, and the conclusions that have been reached. The experimental programme has carried out a series of long term experiments looking at anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel or cast iron in compacted MX80 bentonite at 30 deg C or 50 deg C. In the bentonite the concentration of iron decreased with increasing distance away from the iron-bentonite interface, with local iron concentrations as high as 20 wt % in

  3. The oolitization rate determination of bentonite moulding mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Miksovsky

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite mixtures belong and will always belong among the most widespread sand mixtures for the “green sand” technology of castings production. This technology’s essential advantage is bentonite mixtures application reversibility in the closed circulation after composition modifications and circulation losses replenishment. After the casting of a mould, the surrounding sand mixture is strained by the solidifying casting heat and bentonite degradation occurs. In case of appropriate conditions the oolitization occurs. This phenomenon is specific only for bentonite-bonded mixtures. The oolitization of opening material silica grains brings a number of negative as well as positive features with it. It is not only a technological problem but economical and ecological as well because for minimization of mixture regeneration with a help of new sand it is necessary to know bentonite mixtures quality control tools even in term of the oolitization rate. This paper deals with the description of undemanding physical method of the oolitization rate evaluation with a help of powder density assessment and its examination with actual sand mixtures which were obtained from the Czech Republic foundry plants. There are foundry plants of heavier weight castings and in one case there was an operation where bentonite mixtures regeneration was applied. Moreover, the oolitization effect on metal penetration in test castings was verified.

  4. Performance Optimization of a Cassava Pelleting Machine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cassava pelleting in most developing countries are usually done manually. This process is very laborious, time consuming and unhygienic. A pelleting machine has been recommended because of its low cost, high capacity of providing pelleted cassava as well as relative ease of operation and maintenance. The machine ...

  5. Pellet fired appliances. Market survey. 7. rev. ed.; Pelletheizungen. Marktuebersicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-01-15

    The market survey under consideration reports on pellet central heating systems and pellet fired appliances. The main chapters of this market survey are concerned to: (1) Information on wood pellets and pellet fired appliances; (2) Information about the interpretation of the market survey; (3) Survey of all compared pellet fired appliances with respect to the nominal power; (4) Price lists of pellet fired appliances and pellet central heating systems; (5) Type sheets of the compared pellet fired appliances and pellet central heating systems. Finally, this brochure contains the addresses of the produces and distribution partners of pellet fired appliances and pellet central heating systems.

  6. Power from Pellets Technology and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Döring, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a practical description of the technology of pellet production on the basis of renewable sources as well as the utilization of pellets. The author explains what kinds of biomass are usable in addition to wood, how to produce pellets and how to use pellets to produce energy. Starting with the basics of combustion, gasification and the pelletizing process, several different technologies are described. The design, planning, construction and economic efficiency are discussed as well. The appendix gives useful advice about plant concepts, calculations, addresses, conversion tables and formulas.

  7. Wyoming DOE EPSCoR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gern, W.A.

    2004-01-15

    All of the research and human resource development projects were systemic in nature with real potential for becoming self sustaining. They concentrated on building permanent structure, such as faculty expertise, research equipment, the SEM Minority Center, and the School of Environment and Natural Resources. It was the intent of the DOE/EPSCoR project to permanently change the way Wyoming does business in energy-related research, human development for science and engineering careers, and in relationships between Wyoming industry, State Government and UW. While there is still much to be done, the DOE/EPSCoR implementation award has been successful in accomplishing that change and enhancing UW's competitiveness associated with coal utilization, electrical energy efficiency, and environmental remediation.

  8. Mechanisms and models for bentonite erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neretnieks, Ivars; Longcheng Liu; Moreno, Luis (Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Royal Inst. of Technology, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    There are concerns that the bentonite buffer surrounding the canisters with spent nuclear fuel may erode when non-saline groundwaters seep past the buffer. This is known to happen if the water content of ions is below the critical coagulation concentration CCC. Above the CCC the smectite forms a coherent gel, which does not release particles. One main effort in this study has been directed to assess under which conditions the pore water composition of the gel at the gel/water interface could be lower than the CCC. Another main effort has been directed to understanding the behaviour of expansive gel when the pore water is below the CCC. We have developed a Dynamic model for sodium gel expansion in fractures where the gel soaks up non-saline water as it expands. The model is based on a force balance between and on smectite particles, which move in the water. The Dynamic model of gel expansion showing the evolution in time and space of a gel was successfully tested against expansion experiments in test tubes. The expansion was measured with high resolution and in great detail over many months by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The model also predicted the gel expansion through filters with very narrow pores well. A gel viscosity model of dilute gels was derived, which accounts for ion concentration influence as well as the volume fraction of smectite in the gel. The model accounts for the presence of the DDL, which seemingly makes the particles larger so that they interact at lower particle densities. Simulations were performed for a case where the gel expands outward into the fracture that intersects the deposition hole. Fresh groundwater approaches and passes the gel/water interface. Smectite colloids move out into the water due to the repulsive forces between the particle and by Brownian motion (effect included in the Dynamic model). The dilute gel/sol is mobilised and flows downstream in a thin region where the viscosity is low enough to permit flow. Sodium diffuses

  9. Pelletizing properties of torrefied wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang; Nielsen, Niels Peter; Hansen, Hans Ove

    2013-01-01

    of wheat straw have been analyzed. Laboratory equipment has been used to investigate the pelletizing properties of wheat straw torrefied at temperatures between 150 and 300 °C. IR spectroscopy and chemical analyses have shown that high torrefaction temperatures change the chemical properties of the wheat......Combined torrefaction and pelletization are used to increase the fuel value of biomass by increasing its energy density and improving its handling and combustion properties. However, pelletization of torrefied biomass can be challenging and in this study the torrefaction and pelletizing properties...... straw significantly, and the pelletizing analyses have shown that these changes correlate to changes in the pelletizing properties. Torrefaction increase the friction in the press channel and pellet strength and density decrease with an increase in torrefaction temperature....

  10. Supervision and Evaluation: The Wyoming Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Range, Bret G.; Scherz, Susan; Holt, Carleton R.; Young, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    The intent of this study was to assess the perceptions and actions of Wyoming principals concerning their role in supervising and evaluating teachers. A survey was sent to all 286 principals in the state of Wyoming, of which, 143 returned surveys, a response rate of 50%. Findings suggested that principals utilized supervisory behaviors more often…

  11. Silurian K-bentonites of the Dnestr Basin, Podolia, Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, W.D.; Bergstrom, Stig M.; Kolata, Dennis R.

    2000-01-01

    The Dnestr Basin of Podolia, Ukraine, is an epicratonic basin consisting of neritic carbonate and calcareous mudstone facies including a nearly complete Silurian sequence ranging from late Llandovery to late Pridoli in age. The Silurian section has served as a standard for regional and interregional studies as a consequence of its well-documented macro- and microfaunal assemblages. Approximately 24 mid- to Late Silurian K-bentonites are present in this succession, and their lateral persistence has aided in establishing regional correlations. The K-bentonites range from 1 to 40 cm in thickness and occur in the Bagovitsa (late Wenlock), Malinovtsy (Ludlow) and Skala (Pridoli) Formations. Discrimination diagrams based on immobile trace elements together with rare earth element data suggest the K-bentonites had a volcanic origin in a collision margin setting related to subduction. Thickness and stratigraphic distribution considerations are consistent with a source area in the Rheic Ocean.

  12. Migration Behaviour of Strontium in Czech Bentonite Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Baborova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with sorption and diffusion behaviour of strontium in Czech bentonite B75. The study is a part of a research on reactive transport of radioactive contaminants in barrier materials of a deep geological repository of radioactive waste in the Czech Republic. Series of sorption and diffusion experiments with Sr and non-activated Ca bentonite B75 produced in the Czech Republic were performed in two background solutions (CaCl2 and NaCl. On the basis of sorption batch experiments the kinetics of strontium sorption on bentonite was assessed and the sorption isotherms for various experimental conditions were obtained. As a result of performed diffusion experiments the parameters of diffusion (i.e. effective diffusion coefficient De and apparent diffusion coefficient Da were determined. The observed discrepancies between sorption characteristics obtained from the sorption and diffusion experiments are discussed.

  13. Bentonite Clay as a Natural Remedy: A Brief Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background: From old times, the human kind has used clays, externally or internally, for maintaining body health or treating some diseases. Meanwhile there are few scientific articles reviewing the beneficial effects of clays on body function. Bentonite clay is one of the available clays in nature, used as traditional habits, and remedies in many cultures. Methods: These articles explored among 2500 scientific articles published in PubMed to sort the scientific works have been done on the effects of this clay on body function (it was about 100 articles). Results: Bentonite has a broad range of action on different parts of body. Conclusion: As traditional remedies seem to have a deep root in maintaining body health, it merits doing more research works on bentonite clay and its impacts on body function. PMID:29026782

  14. Independent developer plans Wyoming project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-25

    Little Horn Energy Wyoming, Inc. is proposing a project on the Dry Fork of the Little Big Horn River. The lower reservoir would be impounded by a roller-compacted concrete dam and an outlet tower on the upstream face of the dam would have multilevel intakes to allow selective temperature discharges into the Dry Fork. The asphalt-lined upper reservoir on an adjacent ridge would be contained by a 100 foot high rockfill embankment. Maximum planned daily drawdown is 45 ft. Preliminary plans call for water to drop through a 21 ft. diameter shaft to a manifold. Then ft. diameter penstocks would feed a four unit underground power house.

  15. Eutrophication management in surface waters using lanthanum modified bentonite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Copetti, Diego; Finsterle, Karin; Marziali, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the scientific knowledge on the use of a lanthanum modified bentonite (LMB) to manage eutrophication in surface water. The LMB has been applied in around 200 environments worldwide and it has undergone extensive testing at laboratory, mesocosm, and whole lake scales. The availa......This paper reviews the scientific knowledge on the use of a lanthanum modified bentonite (LMB) to manage eutrophication in surface water. The LMB has been applied in around 200 environments worldwide and it has undergone extensive testing at laboratory, mesocosm, and whole lake scales...

  16. Characterization of bentonite clay from “Greda” deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadežda Stanković

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on mineralogical and technological investigations of the deposit “Greda” important characteristics of bentonite clay were determined. Representative samples of the deposit were characterized with X-ray diffraction, low-temperature nitrogen adsorption, chemical analysis, differential thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy. It was determined that the main mineral is montmorillonite and in subordinate quantities kaolinite, quartz and pyrite. The chemical composition generally shows high silica and alumina contents in all samples and small quantities of Fe3+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations. Based on technological and mineralogical research, bentonite from this deposit is a high-quality raw material for use in the ceramic industry.

  17. SWELLING AND COMPRESSIBILITY CHARACTERISTICS OF SOIL - BENTONITE MIXTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Setyo Muntohar

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding characteristics of soil mixtures lead to increasing the confidence level before applying such materials in the field. The outcomes of this study can provide insight into the swelling and the compressibility behavior of soil – bentonite mixtures, between non-swelling materials and swelling materials. A simple swell and compression laboratory test has been conducted for the purposes of this study. The result of this study indicated that the existence of bentonite in the soil mixtures influence the swelling behavior, which follows a hyperbolic curve model. Amount and size of nonswelling fraction affected the swelling and compressibility.

  18. Comparison between uniaxially and isostatically compacted bentonite; Jaemfoerelser mellan enaxlig och isostatisk kompaktering av bentonit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalbantner, P.; Sjoeblom, R. [AaF-Energikonsult, Stockholm (Sweden); Boergesson, Lennart [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of the present report is to provide the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) with the knowledge base needed for their selection of reference method for manufacturing of bentonite blocks. The purpose is also to provide support for the direction of the further development work. Three types of blocks are compared in the present report: uniaxially compacted medium high blocks, isostatically compacted medium high blocks, isostatically compacted high blocks. The analyses is based on three process systems relating to the sequence of excavation of bentonite-transport-powder preparation-compaction-handling and emplacement of bentonite blocks. The need for further knowledge has been identified and documented in conjunction with these analyses. The comparison is primarily made with regard to the criteria safety/risk, quality/ technique and economy. It is carried out through identification of issues of significance and subsequent analysis and evaluation as well as more formally in a simplified AHP (AHP = Analytical Hierarchic Process). The result of the analyses is that the isostatic technique is applicable for the production of high as well as medium size blocks. The pressed blocks are assessed to fulfil the basic requirements with a very large margin. The result of the analyses is also that the uniaxial technique is applicable for the preparation of medium size blocks, which are assessed to fulfil the basic requirements with a large margin. The need for development and process control is assessed to be somewhat higher for the uniaxial technique. One example is the friction against the walls of the die during the compaction, including the significance of this friction for the development of stresses and discontinuities in the block. These results support a selection of the isostatic technique as the reference technique as it provides flexibility in the choice of block height. The uniaxial technique can form a second alternative if medium high

  19. Strength and Compaction Analysis of Sand-Bentonite-Coal Ash Mixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobti, Jaskiran; Singh, Sanjay Kumar

    2017-08-01

    This paper deals with the strength and compaction characteristics of sand-bentonite-coal ash mixes prepared by varying percentages of sand, bentonite and coal ash to be used in cutoff walls and as a liner or cover material in landfills. The maximum dry density (MDD) and optimum moisture content (OMC) of sand-bentonite mixes and sand-bentonite-coal ash mixes were determined by conducting the standard proctor test. Also, the strength and stiffness characteristics of soil mixes were furnished using unconfined compressive strength test. The results of the study reveal influence of varying percentages of coal ash and bentonite on the compaction characteristics of the sand-bentonite-coal ash mixes. Also, validation of a statistical analysis of the correlations between maximum dry density (MDD), optimum moisture content (OMC) and Specific Gravity (G) was done using the experimental results. The experimental results obtained for sand-bentonite, sand-bentonite-ash and coal ash-bentonite mixes very well satisfied the statistical relations between MDD, OMC and G with a maximum error in the estimate of MDD being within ±1 kN/m3. The coefficient of determination (R2) ranged from 0.95 to 0.967 in case of sand-bentonite-ash mixes. However, for sand-bentonite mixes, the R2 values are low and varied from 0.48 to 0.56.

  20. Caracterización de bentonitas y zeolitas sin tratamiento como refuerzo en materiales compuestos de matriz polimérica//Characterization of untreated zeolites and bentonites as reinforcement in polymer matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Jesús Mondelo‐García

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Las bentonitas con microestructuras compuestas de placas silicio aluminosas. Se logró el objetivo de caracterizar las bentonitas sódicas de Wyoming, USA, Patagonia de Argentina, nordeste de Brasil, así como las bentonitas policatiónicas de Brasil, la cálcica activada con sodio y zeolita de Cuba no organofilizadas para emplearlas como refuerzo en materiales compuestos de matriz polimérica. Estosmateriales se evaluaron usando técnicas físico-químicas como fluorescencia de rayos X, difracción de rayos X, microscopia electrónica de barrido, humedad, capacidad de intercambio catiónico, absorción e hinchabilidad en diluyente acuoso. Los resultados confirmaron rangos variables de intercambio catiónico,hinchamiento y absorciòn en agua entre las bentonitas analizadas, debido a su naturaleza química estructural en hidratación, logrando mayores valores las sódicas, luego la cálcica activada y con menor valor las policatiónicas, pero permiten usarlas como carga en polímeros.Palabras claves: bentonita, zeolita, matriz polimérica, organofilizada, materiales compuestos._____________________________________________________________________________AbstractBentonites with aluminous silicon microstructure composed of plates. The work accomplished to characterize the sodium bentonites in Wyoming USA, Patagonia Argentina, Northeast Brazil and the Brazilian polycationic bentonites, calcium-activated sodium zeolite from Cuba without organic modificationnot organophilized to employ as reinforcing in composite materials of polymer matrix. These materials were evaluated for physical and chemical assay techniques such as X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, moisture, cation exchange capacity, absorption and swelling aqueousdiluent. The results confirmed variables ranges of cationic exchange, swelling and water absorption from the bentonites tested, due to its chemical-structural hydration, achieving higher values nature

  1. Ocular injuries from paintball pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thach, A B; Ward, T P; Hollifield, R D; Dugel, P U; Sipperley, J O; Marx, J L; Abrams, D A; Wroblewski, K J; Sonkin, P L; Birdsong, R H; Dunlap, W A

    1999-03-01

    To evaluate the ocular effects of blunt trauma due to injury from a paintball pellet. Noncomparative case series. Thirteen patients who suffered ocular injury from paintballs are described. The patients presented to six different civilian and military emergency departments in tertiary care medical centers. Patients were treated for the ocular injury. Patients were evaluated for initial and final visual acuity. The reason for persistent loss of vision was delineated. There were 12 males and 1 female with an average age of 21 years (range, 12-33 years). Eleven of the 13 had no ocular protection at the time of the ocular injury. On initial examination, nine patients had a hyphema, nine had a vitreous hemorrhage, six had a retinal tear or detachment, three had corneal or corneal-scleral ruptures, and one had traumatic optic neuropathy. The final visual acuity was 20/40 or better in two patients, 20/50 to 20/150 in three patients, and 20/200 or worse in eight patients. Injuries due to paintball pellets can result in severe ocular damage and significant loss of vision. Eyecare professionals should be aware of the risks of this sport and must strongly advise participants to wear adequate protection when involved in this activity.

  2. The friction-free compressibility curve of bentonite block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tien, Y.M.; Wu, P.L. [National Central University, Dpt. of Civil Engineering, Taiwan (China); Chuang, W.S. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taiwan (China)

    2005-07-01

    The buffer material in nuclear waste disposal was made up with pure bentonite or sand-bentonite mixture. The excellent sealing and swelling properties of highly compacted bentonite or bentonite-sand mixture blocks have made them primary candidate for embedment of in geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The emplacement of bentonite buffer material surrounding canisters and overpack has long been a feature of disposal concepts adopted for high-level waste and spent fuel disposal programmes with a number of countries. For performance assessment of compacted bentonite based buffer material, there are many researchers devoted for the permeability swelling behaviors mechanics and diffusion of compacted bentonite block. Recently, Johoannesson and and his coworkers conducted a series of study on compaction characteristics and industrial technique production of large scale and different shapes bentonite blocks. Available techniques for compacting bentonite blocks are isostatic compaction and uniaxial compaction. The uniaxial compaction technique is widely used in buffer compaction because of time-saving and produce blocks with high precession in geometry. It is not necessary to reshape the geometry of block after compaction. The major disadvantage of uniaxial compaction is that the blocks may become inhomogeneous due to the friction between block and the die. The block-die wall friction plays a crucial role in compaction and causes non-uniform packing densities within the blocks. High wall-friction creates high stress gradients within the block, and hence causing significant density fluctuation. To reduce the wall friction effect the following precautions may be taken: (1) use low aspect ratio sample (ratio between the height and diameter of block, h/d), (2) use both an upper and a lower piston at compaction, (3) compact blocks to a high degree of saturation, (4) use lubricant on the die. However, it is impossible to eliminate the wall friction fully, even

  3. Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Natasha B.; Means, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of the Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment (REA) is to provide information that supports regional planning and analysis for the management of ecological resources. The REA provides an assessment of baseline ecological conditions, an evaluation of current risks from drivers of ecosystem change (including energy development, fire, and invasive species), and a predictive capacity for evaluating future risks (including climate change). Additionally, the REA may be used for identifying priority areas for conservation or restoration and for assessing cumulative effects of multiple land uses. The Wyoming Basin REA will address Management Questions developed by the Bureau of Land Management and other agency partners for 8 major biomes and 19 species or species assemblages. The maps developed for addressing Management Questions will be integrated into overall maps of landscape-level ecological values and risks. The maps can be used to address the goals of the REA at a number of levels: for individual species, species assemblages, aquatic and terrestrial systems, and for the entire ecoregion. This allows flexibility in how the products of the REA are compiled to inform planning and management actions across a broad range of spatial scales.

  4. Hydrogen Pellet-Rotating Plasma Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, Alfred Hegaard; Øster, Flemming

    1977-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements on the interaction between solid hydrogen pellets and rotating plasmas are reported. It was found that the light emitted is specific to the pellet material, and that the velocity of the ablated H-atoms is of the order of l0^4 m/s. The investigation was carried out...

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A CASSAVA PELLETING MACHINE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-03

    Nov 3, 2012 ... A cassava pelleter comprising of a feed hopper, screw conveyor, barrel, 4hp electric motor, ex- trusion plate and a pelleting knive was designed and developed using ... sorting and weighing the har- vested cassava tubers, washing and peeling with knife to remove the skin which contains hydrogen cyanide.

  6. Pengaruh Penambahan Zeolit pada Proses Pelletizing Limbah Penetasan Terhadap Kandungan Coliform dan Salmonella Produk Pellet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhtiar Ali Wardana

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK. Penelitian untuk mengkajipengaruh penambahan zeolit pada proses pelletizing limbah penetasan, terhadap total Coliform dan Salmonella,telah dilaksanakan di Laboratorium Teknologi Pakan, Fakultas Peternakan dan Pertanian, Universitas Diponegoro. Zeolit dilaporkan mampu mengikat berbagai senyawa kimia, termasuk senyawa beracun, serta mampu mempengaruhi aktivitas mikrobia. Penambahan zeolit dalam pelletizing limbah penetasan diharapkan mampu menurunkan total Coliform dan Salmonella dalam produk pellet, sehingga dapat meningkatkan keamanan produk pellet sebagai bahan pakan alternatif. Dosis penambahan zeolit pada pembuatan pellet yaitu: 0, 2, 4 dan 6%. Data dianalisis dengan analisis ragam dan dilanjutkan dengan uji jarak berganda Duncan. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan penambahan zeolit dalam proses Pelletizing limbah penetasan berpengaruh sangat nyata (P<0,01 terhadap penurunan total Coliform. Peningkatan dosis zeolite dapat menurunkan Total Coliform dan bakteri Salmonella tidak terdekteksi pada pellet limbah penetasan. Dapat disimpulkan bahwa pelletizing limbah penetasan dengan dosis zeolit hingga 6% terbuktimampu menurunkan kandungan Coliform dan Salmonella pada produk pellet.    (Effect administering zeolite in the pelletizing of hatchery waste to contents of coliform and salmonella of the pellet products  ABSTRACT. Experiment to study effect of administering zeolite in the pelletizing hatchery wastes on the total Coliform and Salmonella was done in the Laboratory of Feed Technology, Faculty of Animal Science and Agriculture, University of Diponegoro. Zeolite has been reported have binding capacity on wide range of chemicals, including toxic compounds, and interfere the activity of microbes. Administration zeolite in the pelletizing of hatchery wastes are expected to reduce the total Coliform and Salmonella in the pellet products, therefore improved the safety of the pellet products as an alternative feed ingredients. Doses of zeolite

  7. Surfactant-modified bentonite clays: preparation, characterization, and atrazine removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anirban; Singh, Neera

    2015-03-01

    Bentonite clay was modified using quaternary ammonium cations, viz. phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA), hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA), trioctylmethylammonium (TOMA) [100 % of cation exchange capacity of clay], and stearylkonium (SK) [100 % (SK-I) and 250 % (SK-II) of cation exchange capacity of clay]. The organoclays were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Atrazine adsorption on modified clays was studied using a batch method. Bentonite clay was a poor adsorbent of atrazine as 9.4 % adsorption was observed at 1 μg mL(-1) atrazine concentration. Modification of clay by PTMA cation did not improve atrazine adsorption capacity. However, atrazine adsorption in HDTMA-, TOMA-, and SK-bentonites varied between 49 and 72.4 % and data fitted well to the Freundlich adsorption isotherm (R > 0.96). Adsorption of atrazine in organoclays was nonlinear and slope (1/n) values were organoclays showed hysteresis and TOMA- and SK-I-bentonites were the best organoclays to retain the adsorbed atrazine. Organoclays showed better atrazine removal from wastewater than an aqueous solution. The synthesized organoclays may find application in soil and water decontamination and as a carrier for atrazine-controlled released formulations.

  8. Physico-chemistry of continental Bentonites and Kaolin for ceramic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growing demand for bentonite and kaolin applications in the ceramic industry motivated this study which aimed at physico-chemically characterizing some selected continental clayey materials from Botswana, Mozambique, Pakistan, Senegal, South Africa and the United States of America. The hydrogen ion concentration ...

  9. Identification and Purification of Montmorillonite Mineral of Ghaen Mine Bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mirhoseini Moosavi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Montmorillonite is the major mineral of Bentonite with many applications in industrial fields but some impurities decreases the quality of the bentonite. The main objective of this study was to investigate the suitable method for purification of Ghaen mine bentonite. A combination of methods was considered including wet sieving and sedimentation, centrifuge and ultrasound. The efficiency of purification methods was determined based on X-ray, particle size, cation exchange capacity (CEC and ratio peak of the Quartz/Montmorillonite analysis before and after experiments. The results showed that such methods were efficient for preparing of the materials having high quantity of montmorillonite with less than 2 microns particle sizes. Cristobalite was the only mineral remained in samples, however many of particles were exempted from the samples. Cristobalite was the main impurity remained with montmorillonite. Chemical treatment is the only way for its complete removal. The results of this study revealed that by using easy, cheap and fast methods, it is possible for acceptable purification of bentonite.

  10. The biological costs of not reclaiming bentonite mine spoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolyn Hull Sieg; Daniel W. Uresk; Richard M. Hansen

    1982-01-01

    Bentonite clay has been mined in the northern Great Plains for more than 80 years. Until the late 1960's, mine spoil materials were left in steep piles and no effort was made to restore biological productivity to these disturbed sites. As a result, unreclaimed spoils are barren and eroded. The biological costs of not reclaiming these spoils are examined in this...

  11. Performance evaluation of low-density bentonite and econolite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative study of the performance of low-density bentonite and econolite cement slurries was carried out. Parameters considered were thickening time, compressive strength, free fluid, and rheological properties among others. Results obtained indicated that while econolite slurries hydrated better in sea water, the ...

  12. characterization of geotechnical properties of lateritic soil-bentonite

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Abstract. The purpose of this study was to characterize lateritic soil bentonite mixtures intended for use as low-permeability barrier in municipal waste disposal landfill. Characterization of the soil mix- tures included measurement of Atterberg limits, compaction properties, hydraulic conductivity,.

  13. Effects of polyethyleneimine adsorption on rheology of bentonite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    pension, the pH values change between 8 and 8⋅4. In this range of pH, it is expected that both faces and edges of bentonite particles are negatively charged, whereas PEI has a net positive charge, so the driving force for adsorp- tion should be electrostatic. The zeta potential measurements of suspensions sup- port this ...

  14. Synthesis of MCM-41 nanomaterial from Algerian bentonite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mesoporous materials of the MCM-41 type were synthesized from Algerian bentonite as an aluminosilicate source without the addition of pure silica and aluminum reagents. The samples were synthesized under hydrothermal condition using cetyltrimithylammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant. The influence of initial ...

  15. Polypropylene–clay composite prepared from Indian bentonite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    creased attention, both in industry and academia. The most common ... automotive, aerospace and electronics industries (Kato et al. 1997; Usuki et ..... confined to clusters. 4. Conclusions. Cheap filler-like bentonite can be effectively used as a good reinforcement for PP matrix even without any modi- fication. Composite was ...

  16. Comparative Analysis on Chemical Composition of Bentonite Clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... Abdullahi and Audu. 35. Comparative Analysis on Chemical Composition of Bentonite Clays. Obtained from Ashaka and Tango Deposits in Gombe State, Nigeria. Abdullahi S.L1 and Audu A.A2. 1Kano State Polytechnic, Kano - Nigeria. 2Department of Pure and Industrial Chemistry, Bayero University Kano ...

  17. Vitrification and neomineralisation of bentonitic and kaolinitic clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resultant fired mineral phases depicted mineral compositions of ceramic bodies, and the study suggested that these clays could be gainfully utilized in the making of ceramic wares, subject to selected beneficiation processes. Keywords: kaolin, bentonite, vitrification, neomineralization, ceramic, firing. Global Journal of ...

  18. Comparative Analysis on Chemical Composition of Bentonite Clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... ... Activation and Functionalization via the Acid Treatment. World Journal of Nano. Science and Engineering, 3; 161-168. Apugo-Nwosu, T.U., Mohammed-Dabo, I.A.,. Ahmed, A.S., Abubakar, G., Alkali, A.S. and Ayilara, S.I. (2011). Studies on the. Suitability of Ubakala Bentonitic Clay for. Oil Well Drilling Mud ...

  19. Comparative analysis on chemical composition of bentonite clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A combination of some analytical techniques such as X-ray Flourescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectral (IR) analysis and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to characterize bentonite samples from Ashaka and Tango (Gombe State, Nigeria). The results obtained for the two samples were ...

  20. Effects of polyethyleneimine adsorption on rheology of bentonite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The influence of the cationic polymer, polyethyleneimine polymer (PEI) on the flow behaviour of bentonite suspensions (2%, w/w), was studied. XRD, zeta potential and adsorption studies were done together with rheological measurements. The addition of PEI at concentration ranges of 10-5–4.5 g/l and their rheological ...

  1. Magnesium incorporated bentonite clay for defluoridation of drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakre, Dilip; Rayalu, Sadhana; Kawade, Raju [National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI-CSIR), Nagpur 440020 (India); Meshram, Siddharth [Department of Chemistry, Laxminarayan Institute of Technology (LIT), RTM Nagpur University, Nagpur (India); Subrt, J. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, ASC, Rez (Czech Republic); Labhsetwar, Nitin, E-mail: nk_labhsetwar@neeri.res.in [National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI-CSIR), Nagpur 440020 (India)

    2010-08-15

    Low cost bentonite clay was chemically modified using magnesium chloride in order to enhance its fluoride removal capacity. The magnesium incorporated bentonite (MB) was characterized by using XRD and SEM techniques. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to study and optimize various operational parameters such as adsorbent dose, contact time, pH, effect of co-ions and initial fluoride concentration. It was observed that the MB works effectively over wide range of pH and showed a maximum fluoride removal capacity of 2.26 mg g{sup -1} at an initial fluoride concentration of 5 mg L{sup -1}, which is much better than the unmodified bentonite. The experimental data fitted well into Langmuir adsorption isotherm and follows pseudo-first-order kinetics. Thermodynamic study suggests that fluoride adsorption on MB is reasonably spontaneous and an endothermic process. MB showed significantly high fluoride removal in synthetic water as compared to field water. Desorption study of MB suggest that almost all the loaded fluoride was desorbed ({approx}97%) using 1 M NaOH solution however maximum fluoride removal decreases from 95.47 to 73 (%) after regeneration. From the experimental results, it may be inferred that chemical modification enhances the fluoride removal efficiency of bentonite and it works as an effective adsorbent for defluoridation of water.

  2. Magnesium incorporated bentonite clay for defluoridation of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakre, Dilip; Rayalu, Sadhana; Kawade, Raju; Meshram, Siddharth; Subrt, J; Labhsetwar, Nitin

    2010-08-15

    Low cost bentonite clay was chemically modified using magnesium chloride in order to enhance its fluoride removal capacity. The magnesium incorporated bentonite (MB) was characterized by using XRD and SEM techniques. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to study and optimize various operational parameters such as adsorbent dose, contact time, pH, effect of co-ions and initial fluoride concentration. It was observed that the MB works effectively over wide range of pH and showed a maximum fluoride removal capacity of 2.26 mgg(-1) at an initial fluoride concentration of 5 mg L(-1), which is much better than the unmodified bentonite. The experimental data fitted well into Langmuir adsorption isotherm and follows pseudo-first-order kinetics. Thermodynamic study suggests that fluoride adsorption on MB is reasonably spontaneous and an endothermic process. MB showed significantly high fluoride removal in synthetic water as compared to field water. Desorption study of MB suggest that almost all the loaded fluoride was desorbed ( approximately 97%) using 1M NaOH solution however maximum fluoride removal decreases from 95.47 to 73 (%) after regeneration. From the experimental results, it may be inferred that chemical modification enhances the fluoride removal efficiency of bentonite and it works as an effective adsorbent for defluoridation of water. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. DEPOSITS AND MINING POTENTIAL OF BENTONITE IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Klanfar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite is one of the materials that is planed to be used for buffering and backfilling in spent nuclear fuel repositories, within deep crystalline rock. There are several locations in Croatia that bentonite deposits and occurrences are found on. Some were exploited in past, and others were more or less explored. This paper presents overview of bentonite deposits, basic properties and potential resources, and mining practices in Croatia. Largest exploited deposits are found in area of Poljanska luka, Gornja Jelenska and Bednja. Surface and underground methods (drift and fill, sublevel caving were used during exploitation. In the area of Svilaja and Lika are found potentially valuable deposits that were never exploited. Montmorilonite content ranges form 20-50% to 57-89%. Most deposits contain bentonite beds with thickness 0,4-1,6 m, and have plunge 10°-30°. Few exceptions are nearly horizontal and thick more than 5 m and even 12 m. One is declined at 70° and up to 40m thick. Proven reserves are about 2,3 Mt with some level of uncertainty. Average production per mine during exploitation period can be assumed to be several thousands t/y.

  4. (Mycosorb) and sodium bentonite on performance and antibody ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... The aim of this study was to determine the impact of aflatoxin (AF), yeast glucomannan (YG) and sodium bentonite (SB) on .... Vaccination and serology. Before chicks (one-day-old) were separated into groups, blood ..... accumulation, plasma estradiol and egg shell quality among laying hens. Poult. Sci.

  5. Response surface optimisation for activation of bentonite with microwave irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rožić Ljiljana S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the statistical design of the experimental method was applied on the acid activation process of bentonite with microwave irradiation. The influence of activation parameters (time, acid normality and microwave heating power on the selected process response of the activated bentonite samples was studied. The specific surface area was chosen for the process response, because the chemical, surface and structural properties of the activated clay determine and limit its potential applications. The relationship of various process parameters with the specific surface area of bentonite was examined. A mathematical model was developed using a second-order response surface model (RSM with a central composite design incorporating the above mentioned process parameters. The mathematical model developed helped in predicting the variation in specific surface area of activated bentonite with time (5-21 min, acid normality (2-7 N and microwave heating power (63-172 W. The calculated regression models were found to be statistically significant at the required range and presented little variability. Furthermore, high values of R2 (0.957 and R2 (adjusted (0.914 indicate a high dependence and correlation between the observed and the predicted values of the response. These high values also indicate that about 96% of the result of the total variation can be explained by this model. In addition, the model shows that increasing the time and acid normality improves the textural properties of bentonites, resulting in increased specific surface area. This model also can be useful for setting an optimum value of the activation parameters for achieving the maximum specific surface area. An optimum specific surface area of 142 m2g-1 was achieved with an acid normality of 5.2 N, activation time of 7.38 min and microwave power of 117 W. Acid activation of bentonite was found to occur faster with microwave irradiation than with conventional heating. Microwave

  6. Lab and Bench-Scale Pelletization of Torrefied Wood Chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shang, Lei; Nielsen, Niels Peter K.; Stelte, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Combined torrefaction and pelletization is used to increase the fuel value of biomass by increasing its energy density and improving its handling and combustion properties. In the present study, a single-pellet press tool was used to screen for the effects of pellet die temperature, moisture...... content, additive addition, and the degree of torrefaction on the pelletizing properties and pellet quality, i.e., density, static friction, and pellet strength. Results were compared with pellet production using a bench-scale pelletizer. The results indicate that friction is the key factor when scaling...... up from single-pellet press to bench-scale pelletizer. Tuning moisture content or increasing the die temperature did not ease the pellet production of torrefied wood chips significantly. The addition of rapeseed oil as a lubricant reduced the static friction by half and stabilized pellet production...

  7. [Controlled release of pseudoephedrine HCl from pellets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertommen, J

    1997-01-01

    This study describes the development work on a dosage form, which should release the drug pseudoephedrine HCl over twelve hours. Pellets were chosen as the dosage form. The pellets contained 20, respectively, 45 percent pseudoephedrine HCL and were produced using a high shear mixer-granulator. These pellets were coated in a fluidized bed and in a high shear mixer-granulator equipped with a microwave drying installation. The results of the experiments indicate that it is possible to produce pellets in a high shear mixer-granulator. Strong pellets with a narrow size distribution were obtained. A high shear mixer-granulator appears, therefore, to be a valuable alternative to the more commonly used pellet-forming technique of extrusion-sphere formation. The pellets could be coated as well in a fluidized bed as in a high shear mixer-granulator equipped with a microwave drying installation. A major advantage of the high shear mixer-granulator equipped with a microwave drying installation is the possibility to perform several unit operations such as mixing, pellet formation drying, and coating in one piece of equipment. With respect to the requirement of getting a release of pseudoephedrine HCl over twelve hours, the pellets containing 20 percent pseudoephedrine HCl fulfilled this requirement. For pellets containing 45 percent pseudoephedrine HCl it appears to be hard to obtain a sufficient delay in release using the commonly used coating formulations. This can be attributed to the very good solubility of pseudoephedrine HCl in water. Optimization of the coating formulation by changing the nature and concentration of the plasticizer may solve the problem.

  8. Conductive thermal modeling of Wyoming geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heasler, H.P.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01

    A summary of techniques used by the Wyoming Geothermal Resource Assessment Group in defining low-temperature hydrothermal resource areas is presented. Emphasis is placed on thermal modeling techniques appropriate to Wyoming's geologic setting. Thermal parameters discussed include oil-well bottom hole temperatures, heat flow, thermal conductivity, and measured temperature-depth profiles. Examples of the use of these techniques are from the regional study of the Bighorn Basin and two site specific studies within the Basin.

  9. Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite by plasma technique for U(VI) removal from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xinghao [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Intelligent Manufacturing Technology Research Institute, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230088 (China); Cheng, Cheng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Xiao, Chengjian, E-mail: xiaocj@caep.cn [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Shao, Dadong, E-mail: shaodadong@126.com [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Xu, Zimu, E-mail: xzm@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Intelligent Manufacturing Technology Research Institute, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230088 (China); Wang, Jiaquan; Hu, Shuheng [Intelligent Manufacturing Technology Research Institute, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230088 (China); Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Weijuan [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • PANI/bentonie can be synthesized by simple plasma technique. • PANI/bentonie has an excellent adsorption capacity for trace uranium in solution. • U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite is a spontaneous and endothermic process. - Abstract: Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite (PANI/bentonie) was synthesized by plasma induced polymerization of aniline on bentonite surface, and applied to uptake of uranium(VI) ions from aqueous solution. The as-synthesized PANI/bentonie was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Batch adsorption technique was utilized to investigate the adsorption of U(VI) on bentonite and PANI/bentonite. The adsorption of U(VI) (10 mg/L) on PANI/bentonite surface is fairly depend on solution pH, ionic strength, and temperature in solution. The modified PANI on PANI/bentonite surface significantly enhances its adsorption capability for U(VI). The presence of humic acid (HA) can sound enhance U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite at pH < 6.5 because of the strong complexation, and inhibits U(VI) adsorption at pH > 6.5. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the adsorption of U(VI) on PANI/bentonite surface is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The results highlight the application of PANI/bentonite composites as candidate material for the uptake of trace U(VI) from aqueous solution.

  10. Pelletization of fine coals. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastry, K.V.S.

    1995-12-31

    Coal is one of the most abundant energy resources in the US with nearly 800 million tons of it being mined annually. Process and environmental demands for low-ash, low-sulfur coals and economic constraints for high productivity are leading the coal industry to use such modern mining methods as longwall mining and such newer coal processing techniques as froth flotation, oil agglomeration, chemical cleaning and synthetic fuel production. All these processes are faced with one common problem area--fine coals. Dealing effectively with these fine coals during handling, storage, transportation, and/or processing continues to be a challenge facing the industry. Agglomeration by the unit operation of pelletization consists of tumbling moist fines in drums or discs. Past experimental work and limited commercial practice have shown that pelletization can alleviate the problems associated with fine coals. However, it was recognized that there exists a serious need for delineating the fundamental principles of fine coal pelletization. Accordingly, a research program has been carried involving four specific topics: (i) experimental investigation of coal pelletization kinetics, (ii) understanding the surface principles of coal pelletization, (iii) modeling of coal pelletization processes, and (iv) simulation of fine coal pelletization circuits. This report summarizes the major findings and provides relevant details of the research effort.

  11. A Review of Pellets from Different Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Teresa; Montero, Irene; Sepúlveda, Francisco José; Arranz, José Ignacio; Rojas, Carmen Victoria; Nogales, Sergio

    2015-03-27

    The rise in pellet consumption has resulted in a wider variety of materials for pellet manufacture. Thus, pellet industry has started looking for alternative products, such as wastes from agricultural activities, forestry and related industries, along with the combination thereof, obtaining a broad range of these products. In addition, the entry into force of EN ISO 17225 standard makes wood pellet market (among other types) possible for industry and household purposes. Therefore, wastes that are suitable for biomass use have recently increased. In this study, the main characteristics of ten kinds of laboratory-made pellets from different raw materials were analyzed. Thus, we have focused on the most limiting factors of quality standards that determine the suitability for biomass market, depending on the kind of pellet. The results showed considerable differences among the analyzed pellets, exceeding the limits established by the standard in almost all cases, especially concerning ash content and N and S composition. The requirements of the studied standard, very demanding for certain factors, disable the entry of these densified wastes in greater added value markets.

  12. A Review of Pellets from Different Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Miranda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The rise in pellet consumption has resulted in a wider variety of materials for pellet manufacture. Thus, pellet industry has started looking for alternative products, such as wastes from agricultural activities, forestry and related industries, along with the combination thereof, obtaining a broad range of these products. In addition, the entry into force of EN ISO 17225 standard makes wood pellet market (among other types possible for industry and household purposes. Therefore, wastes that are suitable for biomass use have recently increased. In this study, the main characteristics of ten kinds of laboratory-made pellets from different raw materials were analyzed. Thus, we have focused on the most limiting factors of quality standards that determine the suitability for biomass market, depending on the kind of pellet. The results showed considerable differences among the analyzed pellets, exceeding the limits established by the standard in almost all cases, especially concerning ash content and N and S composition. The requirements of the studied standard, very demanding for certain factors, disable the entry of these densified wastes in greater added value markets.

  13. Sorption of ions Pb2+ by cryogels on the basis of polyvinyl alcohol and bentonite clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. Seralin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cryogels on the basis of polyvinyl alcohol and bentonite clay were synthesized. Influences of factors of environment (pH, temperature on properties of composites and them sorption ability were considered. In given article it is resulted sorption kinetics of lead ions on bentonite clay, and also composite cryogel on the basis of polyvinyl alcohol and bentonite clay. It was established that composite cryogels shows much bigger sorption ability.

  14. The Behavior of Bentonite Binders for the Elevated and High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelínek P.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite binders rank among the most widespread applied systems for the production of molds. Their resistance to high temperatures (thermal stability is mainly defined by genesis of binders, chemical composition and the content of Montmorillonite. The aim of this contribution is to compare selected bentonite binders commonly used in the foundries of the Central European region, in different ways of the thermostability determination as a result of changes of the mechanical strengths of the bentonite bonded sand mixture.

  15. Study on GMZ bentonite-sand mixture by undrained triaxial tests

    OpenAIRE

    Sun Wen-jing; Chen Chao; Liu Shi-qing; Sun De-an; Liang Xue-hai; Tan Yun-Zhi; Fatahi Behzad

    2016-01-01

    It is particularly necessary to study the deformation, strength and the changes of pore water pressure of bentonite-based buffer/backfill materials under the undrained condition. A series of isotropic compression tests and triaxial shear tests under undrained conditions were conducted on the compacted saturated/unsaturated GMZ bentonite-sand mixtures with dry mass ratio of bentonite/sand of 30:70. During the tests, the images of the sample were collected by photographic equipment and subseque...

  16. SINTESIS KOMPOSIT ZnO-BENTONIT dan PENGGUNAANNYA DALAM PROSES DEGRADASI METHYL ORANGE

    OpenAIRE

    Olivia Carolyn Sitepu; Oka Ratnayani; Iryanti Eka Suprihatin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRAK: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menentukan kondisi optimum proses degradasi methyl orange dengan menggunakan komposit ZnO-bentonit. Komposit ZnO-bentonit telah disintesis melalui proses sonikasi menggunakan ultrasonic batch selama 3 jam. Komposit tersebut dikarakterisasi menggunakan FTIR, XRD dan SEM, dan kemudian diaplikasikan sebagai fotokatalis dalam proses degradasi methyl orange menggunakan iradiasi sinar UV. Kondisi optimumnya didapat pada pH 5, konsentrasi komposit ZnO-bentonit...

  17. Hydrogen Uptake of DPB Getter Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Herberg, J L; Saab, A P; Weigle, J; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S; McLean II, W

    2008-05-30

    The physical and chemical properties of 1,4-diphenylbutadiyne (DPB) blended with carbon-supported Pd (DPB-Pd/C) in the form of pellets during hydrogenation were investigated. A thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) was employed to measure the kinetics of the hydrogen uptake by the DPB getter pellets. The kinetics obtained were then used to develop a semi-empirical model, based on gas diffusion into solids, to predict the performance of the getter pellets under various conditions. The accuracy of the prediction model was established by comparing the prediction models with independent experimental data on hydrogen pressure buildup in sealed systems containing DPB getter pellets and subjected to known rates of hydrogen input. The volatility of the hydrogenated DPB products and its effects on the hydrogen uptake kinetics were also analyzed.

  18. Kinetic depletion model for pellet ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuteev, Boris V. [State Technical Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2001-11-01

    A kinetic model for depletion effect, which determines pellet ablation when the pellet passes a rational magnetic surface, is formulated. The model predicts a moderate decrease of the ablation rate compared with the earlier considered monoenergy versions [1, 2]. For typical T-10 conditions the ablation rate reduces by a reactor of 2.5 when the 1-mm pellet penetrates through the plasma center. A substantial deceleration of pellets -about 15% per centimeter of low shire rational q region; is predicted. Penetration for Low Field Side and High Field Side injections is considered taking into account modification of the electron distribution function by toroidal magnetic field. It is shown that Shafranov shift and toroidal effects yield the penetration length for HFS injection higher by a factor of 1.5. This fact should be taken into account when plasma-shielding effects on penetration are considered. (author)

  19. Comment on Li pellet Conditioning in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.V. Budny

    2011-05-23

    Li pellet conditioning in TFTR results in a reduction of the edge electron density which allows increased neutral beam penetration, central heating, and fueling. Consequently the temperature profiles became more peaked with higher central Ti, Te, and neutron emission rates.

  20. Investigations of the changes in the bentonite structure caused by the different treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojiljković S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The bentonite was treated in different ways and the changes in structure were monitored. Acid activation with sulphuric acid of investigated bentonite caused the increase in specific volume of micropore-mesopore. It was shown that activation by acid obtained at a constant temperature and constant period of time provides the possibility to obtain samples of bentonite of searched porosity only by changing the concentration of sulphuric and hydrochloric acid. By thermal activation of bentonite clay in the temperature range 100-1100 0C, samples of desired porosity were acquired. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 174007i br. TR 34020

  1. Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite by plasma technique for U(VI) removal from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinghao; Cheng, Cheng; Xiao, Chengjian; Shao, Dadong; Xu, Zimu; Wang, Jiaquan; Hu, Shuheng; Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Weijuan

    2017-07-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite (PANI/bentonie) was synthesized by plasma induced polymerization of aniline on bentonite surface, and applied to uptake of uranium(VI) ions from aqueous solution. The as-synthesized PANI/bentonie was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Batch adsorption technique was utilized to investigate the adsorption of U(VI) on bentonite and PANI/bentonite. The adsorption of U(VI) (10 mg/L) on PANI/bentonite surface is fairly depend on solution pH, ionic strength, and temperature in solution. The modified PANI on PANI/bentonite surface significantly enhances its adsorption capability for U(VI). The presence of humic acid (HA) can sound enhance U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite at pH 6.5. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the adsorption of U(VI) on PANI/bentonite surface is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The results highlight the application of PANI/bentonite composites as candidate material for the uptake of trace U(VI) from aqueous solution.

  2. LABORATORY TESTING OF BENTONITE CLAYS FOR LANDFILL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Kovačević Zelić

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Top and bottom liners are one of the key construction elements in every landfill. They are usually made as compacted clay liners (CCLs composed of several layers of compacted clay with strictly defined properties or by the use of alternative materials such as: GCL – geosynthetic clay liner, BES – bentonite enhanced soils or bentonite/polymer mixtures. Following the state of the art experiences in the world, GCLs are used in Croatian landfills for several years, as well. Depending upon the location and the obeying function, GCLs have to fulfill certain conditions. A legislated compatibility criterion has to be proven by various laboratory tests. In the paper are presented the results of direct shear and chemical compatibility tests of GCLs as well as the results of permeability measurement of kaolin clay (the paper is published in Croatian .

  3. A facile method to modify bentonite nanoclay with silane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeywardena, Sujani B. Y.; Perera, Srimala; Nalin de Silva, K. M.; Tissera, Nadeeka P.

    2017-07-01

    Immobilization of smectite clay onto a desirable surface has received much attention, since its nanospace can be utilized for many applications in material science. Here, we present an efficient method to functionalize surface of bentonite nanoclay (BNC) through the grafting of 3-aminotriethoxysilane (APTES). Infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis confirmed the presence of organic chains and amine groups in modified nanoclay. XRD analysis confirmed grafting of APTES on the surface of bentonite nanoclay without intercalation. The accomplishment of the surface modification was quantitatively proved by TGA analysis. Modified BNC can covalently couple with different material surfaces, allowing its nanospace to be utilized for intercalation of cations, bio-molecules, and polymeric materials, to be used in advanced military aerospace, pharmaceuticals, and many other commercial applications.

  4. Sedimentation Characteristics of Kaolin and Bentonite in Concentrated Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulah Obut

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The sedimentation characteristics of two clays, namely kaolinite and bentonite, were determinated at high clay (5 % wt/vol and electrolyte (1 N concentrations using various inorganic-organic compounds. It was observed that the settling behaviour of kaolinite (1:1 clay and montmorillonite (2:1 clay is quite different due to the structural differences between these minerals. Although, similar initial settling rates and final sediment volumes were obtained after 24 hours of settling time for kaolin suspensions, the corresponding rates and volumes for bentonite suspensions varied greatly with the used chemical compound. According to the experimental results, a further intensive theoretical and experimental investigation is needed to reveal the mechanism underlying the sedimentation characteristics of clay minerals at high clay and electrolyte concentrations.

  5. Development of advanced LWR fuel pellet technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kun Woo; Kang, K.W.; Kim, K. S.; Yang, J. H.; Kim, Y. M.; Kim, J. H.; Bang, J. B.; Kim, D. H.; Bae, S. O.; Jung, Y. H.; Lee, Y. S.; Kim, B. G.; Kim, S. H

    2000-03-01

    A UO{sub 2} pellet was designed to have a grain size of larger than 12 {mu}m, and a new duplex design that UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} is in the core and UO{sub 2}-Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the periphery was proposed. A master mixing method was developed to make a uniform mixture of UO{sub 2} and additives. The open porosity of UO{sub 2} pellet was reduced by only mixing AUC-UO{sub 2} powder with ADU-UO{sub 2} or milled powder. Duplex compaction tools (die and punch) were designed and fabricated, and duplex compacting procedures were developed to fabricate the duplex BA pellet. In UO{sub 2} sintering, the relations between sintering variables (additive, sintering gas, sintering temperature) and pellet properties (density, grain size, pore size) were experimentally found. The UO{sub 2}-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powder which is inherently not sinterable to high density could be sintered well with the aid of additives. U{sub 3}O{sub 8} single crystals were added to UO{sub 2} powder, and homogeneous powder mixture was pressed and sintered in a reducing atmosphere. This technology leads to a large-grained pellet of 12-20 {mu}m. In UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} sintering, the relations between sintering variables (additives, sintering gas) and pellet properties (density, grain size) were experimentally found. The developed technology of fabricating a large-grained UO{sub 2} pellet has been optimized in a lab scale. Pellet properties were investigated in the fields of (1) creep properties, (2) thermal properties, (3) O/M ratios and (4) unit cell lattice. (author)

  6. [Adsorption Properties of Fluorine onto Fulvic Acid-Bentonite Complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Dun; Tian, Hua-jing; Ye, Xin; He, Ci-li; Dan, You-meng; Wei, Shi-yong

    2016-03-15

    Fulvic Acid-Bentonite (FA-BENT) complex was prepared using coprecipitation method, and basic properties of the complex and sorption properties of fluorine at different environmental conditions were studied. XRD results showed that the d₀₀₁ spacing of FA- BENT complex had no obvious change compared with the raw bentonite, although the diffraction peak intensity of smectite in FA-BENT complex reduced, and indicated that FA mainly existed as a coating on the external surface of bentonite. Some functional groups (such as C==O, −OH, etc. ) of FA were observed in FA-BENT FTIR spectra, thus suggesting ligand exchange-surface complexation between FA and bentonite. Higher initial pH values of the reaction system were in favor of the adsorption of fluorine onto FA-BENT, while the equilibrium capacity decreased with the increase of pH at initial pH ≥ 4.50. The adsorption of fluorine onto FA-BENT was also affected by ionic strength, and the main reason might be the "polarity" effect. The adsorption of fluorine onto FA-BENT followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model and was controlled by chemical process ( R² = 0.999 2). Compared with the Freundlich model, Langmuir model was apparently of a higher goodness of fit (R² > 0.994 9) for absorption of fluorine onto FA-BENT. Thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption process of fluorine was an spontaneously endothermic reaction, and was an entropy-driven process (ΔH 32.57 kJ · mol⁻¹, ΔS 112.31 J · (mol · K)⁻¹, ΔG −0.65- −1.76 kJ · mol⁻¹).

  7. Biofilm formation of Pasteurella multocida on bentonite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Ramachandranpillai; Nair, Govindapillai Krishnan; Mini, Mangattumuruppel; Joseph, Leo; Saseendranath, Mapranath Raghavan; John, Koshy

    2013-06-01

    Biofilms are structural communities of bacterial cells enshrined in a self produced polymeric matrix. The studies on biofilm formation of Pasteurella multocida have become imperative since it is a respiratory pathogen and its biofilm mode could possibly be one of its virulence factors for survival inside a host. The present study describes a biofilm assay for P. multocida on inert hydrophilic material called bentonite clay. The potential of the organism to form in vitro biofilm was assessed by growing the organism under nutrient restriction along with the inert substrate bentonite clay, which will provide a surface for attachment. For quantification of biofilm, plate count by the spread plate method was employed. Capsule production of the attached bacteria was demonstrated by light microscopic examination following Maneval staining and capsular polysaccharide estimation was done using standard procedures. The biofilm formation peaked on the third day of incubation (1.54 ×10(6) cfu/g of bentonite clay) while the planktonic cells were found to be at a maximum on day one post inoculation (8.10 ×10(8) cfu/ml of the broth). Maneval staining of late logarithmic phase biofilm cultures revealed large aggregates of bacterial cells, bacteria appearing as chains or as a meshwork. The capsular polysaccharide estimation of biofilm cells revealed a 3.25 times increase over the planktonic bacteria. The biofilm cells cultured on solid media also produced some exclusive colony morphotypes.

  8. Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Natasha B.; Melcher, Cynthia P.

    2015-08-28

    The Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment was conducted in partnership with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The overall goals of the BLM Rapid Ecoregional Assessments (REAs) are to identify important ecosystems and wildlife habitats at broad spatial scales; identify where these resources are at risk from Change Agents, including development, wildfire, invasive species, disease and climate change; quantify cumulative effects of anthropogenic stressors; and assess current levels of risk to ecological resources across a range of spatial scales and jurisdictional boundaries by assessing all lands within an ecoregion. There are several components of the REAs. Management Questions, developed by the BLM and stakeholders for the ecoregion, identify the regionally significant information needed for addressing land-management responsibilities. Conservation Elements represent regionally significant species and ecological communities that are of management concern. Change Agents that currently affect or are likely to affect the condition of species and communities in the future are identified and assessed. REAs also identify areas that have high conservation potential that are referred to as “large intact areas.” At the ecoregion level, the ecological value of large intact areas is based on the assumption that because these areas have not been greatly altered by human activities (such as development), they are more likely to contain a variety of plant and animal communities and to be resilient and resistant to changes resulting from natural disturbances such as fire, insect outbreaks, and disease.

  9. Life zone investigations in Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Merritt

    1917-01-01

    Wyoming is among the foremost of our States in its wealth of natural scenery, culminating in the grandeur of Yellowstone National Park, one of the wonders of the world. In addition to this distinction it posseses vast open plains and lofty mountains whence flow the headwaters of mighty river systems emptying far away to the west into the Pacific Ocean, to the southeast into the Gulf of Mexico, and to the southwest into the Gulf of California. The various slope exposures of its mountain ranges, the fertility of its intervening valleys or basins, and the aridity of its desert spaces present a study of geographic and vertical distribution of wild life that is in many particulars unique.The study of geographic and vertical distribution of life with the governing factors and attendant problems is valuable as a matter of scientific research and in the attainment of practical knowledge. The Biological Survey has been making detailed investigations of the transcontinental life belts, or zones, of North America for some years, and this work has been carried on with special reference to their practical value. It has become increasingly evident that life zones furnish a fairly accurate index to average climatic conditions and, therefore, are useful as marking the limits of agricultural possibilities, so far as these are dependent upon climate. The knowledge thus gained has been published and made available as the investigations have progressed and the life zones have been mapped.1

  10. Adsorption of As, B, Cr, Mo and Se from coal fly ash leachate by Fe3 modified bentonite clay

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vhahangwele, M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available leachates on Fe3(sup +)-modified bentonite (Fe-Bent); such modification improved the physicochemical properties of bentonite clay. For optimization of adsorption of the five elements, the effects of time, adsorbent dosage, adsorbate concentration, and p...

  11. Quality of pellets from torrefied biomass and pellets torrefied at different temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shang, Lei; Dahl, Jonas; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper

    facility to do torrefaction before co-firing. In this study, both ways were utilized to produce torrefied pellets. The quality of these pellets have been characterized for higher heating value (HHV), energy consumption during grinding, mechanical durability and equilibrium moisture content (EMC) under...

  12. Map service: Oil and gas development for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI), southwestern Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map service was created to assemble oil and gas well information for a comprehensive inventory of energy data pertinent to the Wyoming Landscape Conservation...

  13. Map service: Historical oil and gas exploration for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI), southwestern Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map service was created to assemble oil and gas well information for a comprehensive inventory of energy data pertinent to the Wyoming Landscape Conservation...

  14. Oil and gas wells data for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI), southwestern Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This feature class was created to assemble oil and gas well information for a comprehensive inventory of energy data pertinent to the Wyoming Landscape Conservation...

  15. Map service: Oil and gas wells for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI), southwestern Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map service was created to assemble oil and gas well information for a comprehensive inventory of energy data pertinent to the Wyoming Landscape Conservation...

  16. Preparation and Mechanism of a New Enhanced Flocculant Based on Bentonite for Drinking Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-shan Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite is characterized by the large specific surface, good adsorption, ion exchange ability, and nontoxicity. An enhanced bentonite base composite flocculant (BTA can be prepared from treating the calcium base bentonite and compositing various functional additives. Bentonite was firstly treated by citric acid, then the talc and activated carbon turned to be acid part and simultaneously the part that was treated by sodium bicarbonate and calcium hydroxide turned to be alkaline part, and finally the acid bentonite part and alkaline bentonite part were mixed up with preground powder of polymeric chloride aluminium (PAC, cationic polyacrylamide (CPAM, ferrous sulfate, and aluminum sulfate, and after all of the processing flocculant BTA was obtained. The optimum preparation process of flocculant BTA has shown 29.5% acid bentonite part, 29.5% alkaline bentonite part, 15% PAC, 1% CPAM, 5% ferrous sulfate, and 20% aluminum sulfate. BTA was used to treat drinking water with high turbidity and metal ion in Karamay City, Xinjiang. The treated water was surely up to the drinking water standard of China in decolorization rate, deodorization rate, heavy metal ion removal rate, and so forth, and contents of residual aluminum ions and acrylamide monomer in drinking water were considerably decreased.

  17. Effects of bentonite on plasma urea and creatinine of wistar albino rats.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The in vivo effect of Nigerian calcium bentonite clay on wistar albino rat plasma urea and creatinine levels were investigated. The rats were fed for a period of four weeks with varying concentrations of the bentonite clay, and the urea and creatinine levels determined using spectrophotometric methods. Test results showed ...

  18. Characterization of Cr/Bentonite and HZSM-5 Zeolite as Catalysts for Ethanol Conversion to Biogasoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Ronal Widjaya

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research it has been done characterization on Cr/Bentonit and Zeolit HZSM-5 catalysts for ethanol catalytic process to biogasoline (equal to gasoline. Cr/Bentonit has high acidity and resistant to a lot of moisture, so in addition to being able to processing feed which a lot of moisture (>15% from ethanol-water mixture, also it is not easy deactivated. Cr/Bentonit which is then used as the catalyst material on the process of ethanol conversion to be biogasoline and the result was compared with catalyst HZSM-5 zeolite. Several characterization methods: X-ray diffraction, Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET, thermogravimetry analysis (TGA, and catalyst activity tests using catalytic Muffler instrument and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS for product analysis were performed on both catalysts. From acidity measurement, it is known that acidity level of Cr/Bentonit is the highest and also from XRD result, it is known there is shift for 2theta in Cr/Bentonit, which indicates that Cr-pillar in the Bentonite can have interaction. It is also supported by BET data that shows the addition of specific surface are in Cr/Bentonite compared with natural Bentonite before pillarization. Futhermore catalyst activity test produced the results, analyzed by GC-MS, identified as butanol and also possibly formed hexanol, decane, dodecane, undecane, which are all included in gasoline range (C4 until C12.

  19. Physico-chemical characterization of bentonite and its application for Mn2+ removal from water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranđelović Marjan S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite is mainly composed of clay minerals from smectite group, therefore it has a well developed and chemically active surface area and high cation exchange capacity. Moreover, an interlayer space of smectite has unusual hydration properties, which manifest as swelling of bentonite in water. These properties make bentonite as a commonly used raw material in chemistry and industry, and it is very important in environmental protection and water treatment as an effective sorbent of heavy metals. The results of X-ray diffraction, a cationic exchange capacity, specific surface area, acid-base properties of the surface and the swelling index showed that the bentonite sample contains mostly montmorillonite. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of bentonite in the removal of Mn2+ from aqueous systems. The experimental results of Mn2+ adsorption on the bentonite were interpreted by Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption isotherms. The adsorption isotherm studies indicate that the adsorption of Mn2+ follows Langmuir isotherm very well. Theoretical monolayer saturation capacity according to Langmuir model was 12.41 mg/g. The removal of Mn2+ is achieved by ion exchange mechanism with naturally occurring cations in bentonite, as well as by forming the inner- and outer-sphere complexes with bentonite surface.

  20. Effect of calcium bentonite on lipid parameters in Wistar albino rat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The in vivo effect of Nigerian calcium bentonite clay on rat plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels of Wistar albino rats was investigated. The rats were fed for a period of four weeks with varying concentrations of the bentonite clay, and the cholesterol and triglyceride levels determined using spectrophotometric methods.

  1. Geochemical modelling of hydrogen gas migration in an unsaturated bentonite buffer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M.; Thomas, H.R.; Al Masum, S.; Vardon, P.J.; Nicholson, D.; Chen, Q.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the transport and fate of hydrogen gas through compacted bentonite buffer. Various geochemical reactions that may occur in the multiphase and multicomponent system of the unsaturated bentonite buffer are considered. A reactive gas transport model, developed

  2. BENTONITE-QUARTZ SAND AS THE BACKFILL MATERIALS ON THE RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raharjo Raharjo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of the contribution of quartz sand in the bentonite mixture as the backfill materials on the shallow land burial of radioactive waste has been done. The experiment objective is to determine the effect of quartz sand in a bentonite mixture with bentonite particle sizes of -20+40, -40+60, and -60+80 mesh on the retardation factor and the uranium dispersion in the simulation of uranium migration in the backfill materials. The experiment was carried out by the fixed bed method in the column filled by the bentonite mixture with a bentonite-to-quartz sand weight percent ratio of 0/100, 25/75, 50/50, 75/25, and 100/0 on the water saturated condition flown by uranyl nitrate solution at concentration (Co of 500 ppm. The concentration of uranium in the effluents in interval 15 minutes represented as Ct was analyzed by spectrophotometer, then using Co and Ct, retardation factor (R and dispersivity ( were determined. The experiment data showed that the bentonite of -60+80 mesh and the quartz sand of -20+40 mesh on bentonite-to-quartz sand with weight percent ratio of 50/50 gave the highest retardation factor and dispersivity of 18.37 and 0.0363 cm, respectively.   Keywords: bentonite, quartz sand, backfill materials, radioactive waste

  3. Studies on preparation of aceclofenac pellets by centrifugal granulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zibin GAO

    Full Text Available To prepare aceclofenac pellets by centrifugal granulation. Using 90~100 g of starch pellets as the core pellets,100 g of aceclofenac mixed with 50 g of microcrystalline cellulose(MCC and 4 g talc, methyl cellulose (HPMC as binder,the aceclofenac pellets were prepared by centrifugal granulation .And evaluate the quality of the pellets. The aceclofenac pellets had high yield and less losses,the pellets had a partical size of 0.70~0.88 mm(18~24 mesh)and had uniform particle size .the moisture ,drug content and dissolution meet the requirement . Aceclofenac pellets were prepared by the process of centrifugal granulation .The preparation prescription and process parameters were optimized by single factor method .and the pellets meet the standard requirements.

  4. Preliminary Study on Benzoic Acid Adsorption from Crude Active Coals and Bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbes Boucheta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We studied the adsorption of pollutant benzoic acid by the modified bentonite of Maghnia (west of Algeria, and coal (Coal from the mines, southwest of Algeria, Bechar area under three forms, crude and activated. Kinetic data show that the balance of bentonite (as amended adsorbs organic acids better than activated and raw coal. Indeed, the intercalation of bentonite with benzoic acid causes an improvement in the texture of porous material, which allows its use in the adsorption of organic compounds. The adsorption isotherms (Langmuir and Freundlich indicate that the adsorption of benzoic acid by the coal and bentonite yielded results favorably. The results obtained showed the practical value of using the activated coal and bentonite (as amended in the field of remediation of water contaminated with organic pollutants

  5. Preparation, characterization and thermal stability of bentonite modified with bis-imidazolium salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhoukhi, B., E-mail: benamarmakh@yahoo.fr [Laboratory of Separation and Purification Technologies, Department of Chemistry, Tlemcen University, Box 119, Tlemcen (Algeria); Villemin, D. [Laboratoire de Chimie Moléculaire et Thio-organique, UMR CNRS 6507, INC3M, FR 3038, ENSICAEN and Université de Caen, 14050 Caen (France); Didi, M.A. [Laboratory of Separation and Purification Technologies, Department of Chemistry, Tlemcen University, Box 119, Tlemcen (Algeria)

    2013-02-15

    Sodium bentonite was modified with several organic bis-imidazolium salts. Organoclays with water soluble surfactants were prepared by the traditional cation exchange reaction. The bis-imidazolium-bentonites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), powder X-ray diffraction analysis (PXRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The effect of chemical composition and molecular weight of the salts on the thermal stability and basal spacing were evaluated. The bis-imidazolium-bentonites showed enhanced thermal stability (300–400 °C) and may be potentially useful materials for melt processing of polymer/layered silicates nanocomposites. - Highlights: ► Geometry and volume of the molecule influence on interlayer spacing of modified bentonites. ► The intercalation increases with molecule length. ► The modified bentonites have an appreciably higher thermal stability.

  6. Fusible pellet transport and storage of heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    A new concept for both transport and storage of heat at high temperatures and heat fluxes is introduced and the first steps in analysis of its feasibility is taken. The concept utilizes the high energy storage capability of materials undergoing change of phase. The phase change material, for example a salt, is encapsulated in corrosion resistant sealed pellets and transported in a carrier fluid to heat source and storage. Calculations for heat transport from a typical solar collector indicate that the pellet mass flow rates are relatively small and that the required pumping power is only a small fraction of the energy transport capability of the system. Salts and eutectic salt mixtures as candidate phase change materials are examined and discussed. Finally, the time periods for melting or solidification of sodium chloride pellets is investigated and reported.

  7. Microbiological survey of birds of prey pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipineto, Ludovico; Bossa, Luigi Maria De Luca; Pace, Antonino; Russo, Tamara Pasqualina; Gargiulo, Antonio; Ciccarelli, Francesca; Raia, Pasquale; Caputo, Vincenzo; Fioretti, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    A microbiological survey of 73 pellets collected from different birds of prey species housed at the Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Center of Napoli (southern Italy) was performed. Pellets were analyzed by culture and biochemical methods as well as by serotyping and polymerase chain reaction. We isolated a wide range of bacteria some of them also pathogens for humans (i.e. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, Campylobacter coli, Escherichia coli O serogroups). This study highlights the potential role of birds of prey as asymptomatic carriers of pathogenic bacteria which could be disseminated in the environment not only through the birds of prey feces but also through their pellets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 78 FR 10512 - Wyoming Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... error for grammatical correctness in subsection (c.) by changing the word ``creation'' to ``creating... Wyoming needs to correct a typographical error for grammatical correctness by changing the phrase ``where... proposed language warrants additional grammatical revisions for purposes of clarity and consistency within...

  9. Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships…

  10. 76 FR 34815 - Wyoming Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... augmented seeding, fertilizing, irrigation, or other work, excluding husbandry practices that are approved...)(iii)(E)(I)-(IV); Species of vegetation described in the reclamation plan and seeding rates (relocated... Regulations 1. Chapter 1, Section 2(j); Definition of ``Augmented Seeding'' Wyoming proposes to add a new...

  11. Considerations on the DEMO pellet fuelling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, P.T., E-mail: peter.lang@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Day, Ch. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Fable, E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Igitkhanov, Y. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Köchl, F. [Association EURATOM-Ö AW/ATI, Atominstitut, TU Wien, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Mooney, R. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Pegourie, B. [CEA, IRFM, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Ploeckl, B. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Wenninger, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); EFDA, Garching (Germany); Zohm, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Considerations are made for a core particle fuelling system covering all DEMO requirements. • Particle deposition beyond the pedestal top is needed to achieve efficient fuelling. • Conventional pellet technology enabling launching from the torus inboard side can be used. • Efforts have been taken for integrating a suitable pellet guiding system into the EU DEMO model. • In addition, further techniques bearing potential for advanced fuelling performance are considered. - Abstract: The Demonstration Fusion Power Reactor DEMO is the step foreseen to bridge the gap between ITER and the first commercial fusion power plant. One key element in the European work plan for DEMO is the elaboration of a conceptual design for a suitable core particle fuelling system. First considerations for such a system are presented in this contribution. Following the well-considered ITER solution, most analysis performed in this study assumes conventional pellet technology will be used for the fuelling system. However, taking advantage of the less compressed time frame for the DEMO project, several other techniques thought to bear potential for advanced fuelling performance are considered as well. In a first, basic analysis all actuation parameters at hand and their implications on the fuelling performance were considered. Tentative transport modeling of a reference scenario strongly indicates only particles deposited inside the plasma pedestal allow for efficient fuelling. Shallow edge fuelling results in an unbearable burden on the fuel cycle. Sufficiently deep particle deposition seems technically achievable, provided pellets are launched from the torus inboard at sufficient speed. All components required for a DEMO pellet system capable for high speed inboard pellet launch are already available or can be developed in due time with reasonable efforts. Furthermore, steps to integrate this solution into the EU DEMO model are taken.

  12. Fuel Pellets Production from Biodiesel Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawalin Chaiyaomporn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This research palm fiber and palm shell were used as raw materials to produce pelletised fuel, and waste glycerol were used as adhesive to reduce biodiesel production waste. The aim of this research is to find optimum ratio of raw material (ratio of palm fiber and palm shell, raw material size distribution, adhesive temperature, and ratio of ingredients (ratio of raw material, waste glycerol, and water. The optimum ratio of pelletized fuel made only by palm fiber was 50:10:40; palm fiber, water, and waste glycerol respectively. In the best practice condition; particle size was smaller than 2 mm, adhesive glycerol was heated. From the explained optimum ratio and ingredient, pelletizing ratio was 62.6%, specific density was 982.2 kg/m3, heating value was 22.5 MJ/kg, moisture content was 5.9194%, volatile matter was 88.2573%, fix carbon content was 1.5894%, and ash content was 4.2339% which was higher than the standard. Mixing palm shell into palm fiber raw material reduced ash content of the pellets. The optimum raw material ratio, which minimizes ash content, was 80 to 20 palm fiber and palm shell respectively. Adding palm shell reduced ash content to be 2.5247% which was higher than pelletized fuel standard but followed cubed fuel standard. At this raw material ratio, pelletizing ratio was 70.5%, specific density was 774.8 kg/m3, heating value was 19.71 MJ/kg, moisture content was 9.8137%, volatile matter was 86.2259%, fix carbon content was 1.4356%, and compressive force was 4.83 N. Pelletized fuel cost at optimum condition was 1.14 baht/kg.

  13. 76 FR 14057 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human... possession and control of the University of Wyoming Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository... of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, professional staff in consultation...

  14. International Trade of Wood Pellets (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-05-01

    The production of wood pellets has increased dramatically in recent years due in large part to aggressive emissions policy in the European Union; the main markets that currently supply the European market are North America and Russia. However, current market circumstances and trade dynamics could change depending on the development of emerging markets, foreign exchange rates, and the evolution of carbon policies. This fact sheet outlines the existing and potential participants in the wood pellets market, along with historical data on production, trade, and prices.

  15. Water Migration and Swelling in Bentonite Quantified using Neutron Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, A.; DiStefano, V. H.; Perfect, E.; Hale, R. E.; Anovitz, L. M.; McFarlane, J.

    2016-12-01

    Permanent disposal of radioactive waste remains a critical challenge for the nation's energy future. All disposal system concepts include interfaces between engineered systems and natural materials requiring extensive characterization. Bentonite is often used to buffer subsurface disposal systems from geologic media containing ground water. Bentonite characterization experiments were carried out using the CG-1D neutron imaging beam line at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dry bentonite was packed into vertically-oriented aluminum cylinders. Water was ponded on the top surface of each packed cylinder. Images were acquired at 2 min intervals using dynamic neutron radiography. The detector consisted of stacked neutron sensitive microchannel plates above a quad Timepix readout with a 28 x 28 mm2 field of view. The spatial resolution of the detector was 55 μm. Raw neutron radiographs were imported into ImageJ and normalized with respect to the initial completely dry state. The wetting process was 1-dimensional, and vertical intensity profiles were computed by averaging pixel rows. The vertical distance between the clay-water interface and the wetting front could then be determined as a function of time. Depth of water infiltration increased linearly with the square root of time, yielding a sorptivity value of 0.75 (± 0.070) mm/min0.5. Swelling occurred in the form of upward movement of clay particles into the ponded water over time. The resulting low density assemblage was discernable by normalizing the raw profiles with respect to the intensity profile immediately after ponding. The packed clay-water interface was clearly visible in the normalized profiles, and swelling was quantified as the height of the low density assemblage above the original interface. Swelling occurred as a linear function of time, at a rate of 0.054 (± 0.020) mm/min. Further experiments of this type are planned under variable temperature and pressure regimes applicable to subsurface

  16. High Temperature Thermal Properties of Bentonite Foundry Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krajewski P.K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of measuring thermal conductivity and heat capacity of bentonite foundry sand in temperature range ambient - 900­­°C. During the experiments a technical purity Cu plate was cast into the green-sand moulds. Basing on measurements of the mould temperature field during the solidification of the casting, the temperature relationships of the measured properties were evaluated. It was confirmed that water vaporization strongly influences thermal conductivity of the moulding sand in the first period of the mould heating by the poured casting.

  17. Decay rate of reindeer pellet-groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Skarin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Counting of animal faecal pellet groups to estimate habitat use and population densities is a well known method in wildlife research. Using pellet-group counts often require knowledge about the decay rate of the faeces. The decay rate of a faecal pellet group may be different depending on e.g. substrate, size of the pellet group and species. Pellet-group decay rates has been estimated for a number of wildlife species but never before for reindeer (Rangifer tarandus. During 2001 to 2005 a field experiment estimating the decay rate of reindeer pellet groups was performed in the Swedish mountains close to Ammarnäs. In total the decay rate of 382 pellet groups in three different habitat types (alpine heath, birch forest and spruce forest was estimated. The slowest decay rate was found in alpine heath and there the pellet groups persisted for at least four years. If decay was assumed to take place only during the bare ground season, the estimated exponential decay rate was -0.027 pellet groups/week in the same habitat. In the forest, the decay was faster and the pellet groups did not persist more than two years. Performing pellet group counts to estimate habitat use in dry habitats, such as alpine heath, I will recommend using the faecal standing crop method. Using this method makes it possible to catch the animals’ general habitat use over several years. Abstract in Swedish / Sammanfattning:Nedbrytningshastighet av renspillningInom viltforskningen har spillningsinventeringar använts under flera årtionden för att uppskatta habitatval och populationstäthet hos olika djurslag. För att kunna använda data från spillningsinventeringar krävs ofta att man vet hur lång tid det tar för spillningen att brytas ner. Nedbrytningshastigheten är olika beroende på marktyp och djurslag. Nedbrytningshastighet på spillning har studerats för bland annat olika typer av hjortdjur, men det har inte studerats på ren (Rangifer tarandus tidigare. I omr

  18. Plastic pellets on the Caranzalem beach sands, Goa, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.

    Postmonsoonal survey of Caranzalem beach, Goa, India indicated the presence of plastic pellets. These pellets varied in shape, size and number, and are considered to be contaminants of marine environment...

  19. [Preparation of tablets containing enteric-coated diclofenac sodium pellets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiao-Le; Zhu, Jia-Bi; Chen, Sheng-Jun

    2008-01-01

    Fluidized-bed manufactured enteric-coated diclofenac sodium pellets were compressed into tablets. The blend of two aqueous acrylic resins dispersion in different ratios, Eudragit NE30D and Eudragit L30D-55, were used to prepare enteric-coated diclofenac sodium pellets of different particle sizes and coating level. The cushioning pellets with different properties and these enteric-coated pellets were compressed into tablets in different proportions. The drug release of the tablets containing these pellets would be lower than 10% in 2 h in simulated gastric fluid, but reach (83 +/- 2.42)% in 1 h in simulated enteric fluid. The mixture of Eudragit NE30D and Eudragit L30D-55 could be used to prepare enteric pellets which are suitable for compression. The cushioning pellets which were composed of stearic acid/microcrystalline cellulose (4:1, w/w) could avoid rupture of the coating of pellets during the compression.

  20. Co-gasification of pelletized wood residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos A. Alzate; Farid Chejne; Carlos F. Valdes; Arturo Berrio; Javier De La Cruz; Carlos A. Londono [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Antioquia (Colombia). Grupo de Termodinamica Aplicada y Energias Alternativas

    2009-03-15

    A pelletization process was designed which produces cylindrical pellets 8 mm in length and 4 mm in diameter. These ones were manufactured using a blend of Pinus Patula and Cypress sawdust and coal in proportions of 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, and 30% v/v of coal of rank sub-bituminous extracted from the Nech mine (Amaga-Antioquia). For this procedure, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) was used as binder at three different concentrations. The co-gasification experiments were carried out with two kinds of mixtures, the first one was composed of granular coal and pellets of 100% wood and the second one was composed of pulverized wood and granular coal pellets. All samples were co-gasified with steam by using an electrical heated fluidized-bed reactor, operating in batches, at 850{sup o}C. The main components of the gaseous product were H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} with approximate quantities of 59%, 6.0%, 20%, 5.0%, and 9.0% v/v, respectively, and the higher heating values ranged from between 7.1 and 9.5 MJ/Nm{sup 3}.

  1. Torrefaction of wood pellets: New solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaichenko, V. M.; Shterenberg, V. Ya.

    2017-10-01

    The current state of the market of conventional and torrefied wood pellets and the trends of its development have been analyzed. The advantages and disadvantages of pellets of both types have been compared with other alternative fuels. The consumer segment in which wood pellets are the most competitive has been determined. The original torrefaction technology using exhaust gas heat from a standard gas engine that was developed at the Joint Institute for High Technologies and the scheme of an experimental unit for the elaboration of the technology have been presented. The scheme of the combined operation of a torrefaction unit and a standard hot water boiler, which makes it possible to utilize the heat of exhaust steam-and-gas products of torrefaction with the simultaneous prevention of emissions of harmful substances into the environment, has been proposed. The required correlation between the capacity of the torrefaction unit and the heating boiler house has been estimated for optimal operation under the conditions of the isolated urban village in a region that is distant from the areas of extraction of traditional fuels and, at the same time, has quite sufficient resources of raw materials for the production of wood pellets.

  2. Development of D2 Pellet Injectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.; Andersen, S. A.; Nordskov Nielsen, A.

    1985-01-01

    A versatile extrusion-type pneumatic gun is described. The extrusion nozzle/gun barrel system can easily be exchanged to produce pellets in the diameter range 0.4—2.0 mm. Velocities in the range 0.1—1.35 km/s are obtained by adjusting the propeller gas pressure. It is proposed that this gun type ...

  3. Pelletized Asphalt for Airfield Damage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    14, 2008. Gulf Asphalt Contractor (GAC), Panama City, FL, provided all labor , material (with the exception of pelletized asphalt) and equipment for...produced. Benefits include: reduced transportation, traffic disruption, operating costs, and labor costs, while increased productivity and... Mercado , E. A., A. Epps Martin, E. S. Park, C. Spiegelman, and C. J. Glover, “Factors Affecting Binder Properties between Production and Construction

  4. Quality wood chips - an alternative to pellets; Alternative zu Pellets. Qualischnitzel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keel, A.

    2008-07-01

    This article takes a look at a new wood-chip product that features wood-chips that are dryer than traditional ones. The new 'quality chips' are also of a calibrated size and are supplied dust-free. Their low water content permits their use in the same areas as wood pellets, where, especially in summer, low water-content is important. The increasing use of pellets and the growing shortages of clean sawdust and shavings for their production is commented on, as is the use of forestry wastes in pellet production. The new wood-chip product is further discussed as being a direct alternative to pellets. The low 'grey energy' content for tree-felling, hacking, transport and the drying of the chips is quoted as being less than 5% of the energy in the chippings.

  5. Synthesis of Thiamine-Modified Bentonite for Pretreatment of Pharmaceutical Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of sodium bentonite and thiamine were used as raw materials to prepare a new adsorbent – thiamine- modified bentonite. The adsorbent was applied in the pretreatment of pharmaceutical wastewater. The optimum preparation conditions of thiamine-modified bentonite were studied. The experiments showed that the removals of COD (chemical oxygen demand reached 47.98 % under optimal condition. The FTIR results indicated that bentonite has been modified by thiamine. The X-ray diffraction result showed that the interplanar distance of modified bentonite was increased by intercalating thiamine. From the analyses of the SEM photographs, it can be clearly observed that the bentonite, after thiamine insertion reaction, loses its foliated structure and exhibits a rougher surface. Among several isotherm equations, Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were investigated. They were widely used to describe equilibrium data for water and wastewater treatment applications. Adsorption isotherms correlate well with the Langmuir isotherm model. Detailed isothermal and kinetic studies show that the modified bentonite removes organic pollutants from pharmaceutical wastewater by physical adsorption processes.

  6. Crude clove bud oil (CBO) quality improvement by bentonite adsorption process in flow system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubiyanto, Dwiarso; Diaty, Dita; Allwar

    2017-03-01

    Improvement of the quality of crude clove bud oil (crude CBO) by bentonite adsorption process in flow system had been done. This research aimed to improve the quality of crude CBO based on SNI 06-4267-1996 and SNI 06-2387-2006. The parameters were colours, densities, refractives index, eugenol and trans-caryophillene contents and also the additional analysis parameter which were the analysis of Fe using bentonite and measurement of pH using universal paper. Adsorption was carried out in the optimation of bentonite. The weight variations of bentonite was 5, 10, 15 and 20 grams. From the surface area analysis, it showed that bentonite had surface area about 30,512 m2/g which was activated chemically using 0,5 M HCl and calcinated using furnace in temperature of 400 0C. The results showed that the analysis of colours, densities, recfractives index and test of pH were not different significantly. Meanwhile the adsorption of Fe metal using 20 gram bentonite be able to adsorp until 94,20%. The highest percentage of eugenol found in the variation of 5 gram which was about 13,52% and decreased trans-caryophillene in 9,64% of 15 gram bentonite.

  7. Low-temperature pyrolysis of oily sludge: roles of Fe/Al-pillared bentonites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Hanzhong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis is potentially an effective treatment of oily sludge for oil recovery, and the addition of a catalyst is expected to affect its pyrolysis behavior. In the present study, Fe/Al-pillared bentonite with various Fe/Al ratios as pyrolysis catalyst is prepared and characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption, and NH3-TPD. The integration of Al and Fe in the bentonite interlayers to form pillared clay is evidenced by increase in the basal spacing. As a result, a critical ratio of Fe/Al exists in the Fe/Al-pillared bentonite catalytic pyrolysis for oil recovery from the sludge. The oil yield increases with respect to increase in Fe/Al ratio of catalysts, then decreases with further increasing of Fe/Al ratio. The optimum oil yield using 2.0 wt% of Fe/Al 0.5-pillared bentonite as catalyst attains to 52.46% compared to 29.23% without catalyst addition in the present study. In addition, the addition of Fe/Al-pillared bentonite catalyst also improves the quality of pyrolysis-produced oil and promotes the formation of CH4. Fe/Al-pillared bentonite provides acid center in the inner surface, which is beneficial to the cracking reaction of oil molecules in pyrolysis process. The present work implies that Fe/Al-pillared bentonite as addictive holds great potential in industrial pyrolysis of oily sludge.

  8. Consolidation undrainage three-axial compression test of calcium type bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Munehiro [K.K. Kobori Takuji Kenkyusho (Japan); Ito, Masaru; Mihara, Morihiro; Tanaka, Masuhiro

    1997-12-01

    On disposal of radioactive wastes, when using sodium type bentonite for buffer agent, it is presumed to convert from sodium type to calcium type for a long term at disposing environment owing to effects of calcite in bentonite and components in underground water. And, in the TRU waste disposal facility, cement material can be used for its structural frame body, filler and supporting material, where conversion to calcium type is thought to become remarkable. Therefore, when promoting disposal study of the TRU waste, it is necessary to know some features of calcium type bentonite. This report is summary on consolidation undrainage three-axial compression test of saturated compressed bentonite, for a part of investigation on disposal concept of the TRU waste. In this test, sodium and calcium type bentonite were prepared to specimens after compressing them to have 1.6 g/cc of dry density to saturate. The test was conducted by using a three-axial compression tester, where the saturated specimen were conducted their compression tests under undrainage condition after suffering 0.5 to 2.0 MPa of consolidation stress. As a result, the calcium type bentonite showed a little larger dynamic features than those of the sodium type, but its difference was so small that investigation on dynamic deformation behavior of the buffer agent was judged to be allowed to use dynamic features of the sodium type bentonite. (G.K.)

  9. A surface chemical model of the bentonite-water interface and its implications for modelling the near field chemistry in a repository for spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieland, E.; Wanner, H. [MBT Umwelttechnik AG, Zuerich, (Switzerland); Albinsson, Y. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wersin, P. [MBT Tecnologia Ambiental, Cerdanyola (Spain); Karnland, O. [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    1994-07-01

    Understanding the surface chemical properties of montmorillonite in near-neutral and alkaline media is essential for establishing a chemical model of the bentonite/water interaction applicable for repository conditions. A pretreated and well-characterised Wyoming MX-80 bentonite has been used for investigating the acid/base characteristics of Na-montmorillonite. The CEC of Na-montmorillonite was determined to 108 meq/100 g for pretreated bentonite and to 85 meq/100 g for the bulk material. The BET surface area was (31.53{+-}0.16)m{sup 2}/g. Potentiometric titrations of montmorillonite suspensions at ionic strengths I=0.005 M, 0.05 M and 0.5 M were conducted as batch-type experiments. Deprotonation of surface OH groups possibly exposed at the edge surface causes an overall negative charge on the surface of montmorillonite in the alkaline pH range. In this pH range, the protolysis degree of OH groups increases with increasing pH and ionic strength. The proton density on the surface of montmorillonite increases with decreasing pH in the acidic pH range (pH<7.5). In this pH range, two simultaneously occurring surface reactions account for the observed proton density on montmorillonite: Protonation of edge OH groups and ion exchange of the major cations for H{sup +} at the structural-charge sites. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of a two-site model with structural-charge surface sites (X layer sites) and variable-charge surface sites (edge OH groups) as the reactive surface functionalities. The total population of the surface sites are estimated to TOT-OH=2.84*10{sup -5} mol/g, TOT-X=2.22*10{sup -5} mol/g. The intrinsic acidity constants for the OH groups are determined to pK{sup int}{sub al}= (5.4{+-}0.1) and pK{sup int}{sub a2}=(6-7{+-}0.1), respectively, using th configuration of the diffuse double layer model (DDLM). 43 refs, 18 figs, 11 tabs.

  10. Adsorption behaviour of bivalent ions onto Febex bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Dpt. de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    The sorption and transport properties of radionuclides in the near and far field barriers of a deep geological radioactive waste repository are amongst the principal aspects to be evaluated for the performance assessment (PA) of such a kind of disposal. The study of the clayey materials is crucial because the backfill material is constituted by compacted clay in most countries design; in addition, argillaceous formations are particularly suitable as host rock formations. It is widely recognised that, to acquire predictive modelling capability, a theoretical effort is needed for a mechanistic understanding of sorption processes, as they greatly influence the transport of radionuclides in clay porous structures. In this work, an exhaustive experimental study of the Co(II), Sr (II) and Ca(II) sorption behaviour on a Spanish bentonite was carried out. The clay used for these experiments is the FEBEX bentonite, which is basically formed by smectite (93 {+-} 2%) with small percentages of quartz (2 {+-} 1 %), plagioclase (3 {+-} 1 %), cristobalite (2 {+-} 1 %) and traces of minerals such as K-feldspar and calcite. (authors)

  11. KARAKTER BENTONIT TERPILAR LOGAM ALUMINIUM PADA VARIASI SUHU KALSINASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toeti Koestiari

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mempelajari karakter bentonit terpilar logam aluminium pada berbagai suhu kalsinasi. Instrumen yang digunakan untuk melihat karakter fisiko-kimia adalah Spektrofotometer IR, X-ray Diffraction dan Gas Sorption Analyzer. Hasil yang diperoleh menunjukkan adanya persamaan dan perbedaan karakter dari B-Al yang dikalsinasi pada suhu 300, 400, dan 500 oC. Persamaan karakter ketiga B-Al terletak di daerah gugus fungsional pada bilangan gelombang 1636 cm-1 dan 3500-4000 cm-1, serta sesuai dengan hasil XRD untuk lapis SiO2 dan Al2O3 yang tidak mengalami perubahan pada harga d, maupun bentuk pori yang dihasilkan menggunakan GSA. Perbedaan suhu kalsinasi menyebabkan perbedaan bilangan gelombang di daerah sidik jari yaitu adanya pita tajam yang disebabkan oleh banyaknya ion Al3+ di antar lapis terutama pada suhu kalsinasi 500 oC. Jumlah ion Al3+ karena masuknya pemilar menyebabkan perbedaan luas permukaan ditunjukkan juga oleh GSA dengan harga radius pori dan luas permukaan tertinggi terletak pada B-Al/400oC. Dengan demikian bentonit terpilar Al pada suhu kalsinasi 400 oC merupakan hasil yang terbaik ditinjau dari karakter fisiko-kimia.

  12. [Effect of SDS on the adsorption of Cd2+ onto amphoteric modified bentonites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Tao; Meng, Zhao-Fu; Yang, Ya-Ti; Yang, Shu-Ying; Li, Bin; Xu, Shao-e

    2014-07-01

    Under different modified ratios, temperatures, pH and ionic strengths, the effect of sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) on the adsorption of Cd2+ onto bentonites which modified with amphoteric modifier dodecyl dimethyl betaine (BS-12) was studied by batch experiments, and the adsorption mechanism was also discussed. Results showed that the adsorption of Cd2+ on amphoteric bentonites can be enhanced significantly by SDS combined modification, Cd2+ adsorption decreases in the order: BS + 150SDS (BS-12 + 150% SDS) > BS + 100SDS (BS-12 + 100% SDS) > BS +50SDS(BS-12 + 50% SDS) > BS + 25SDS (BS-12 + 25% SDS) > BS (BS-12) > CK (unmodified soil). The adsorption isotherm can be described by the Langmuir equation. The change of temperature effect from positive on CK and amphoteric bentonites to negative on BS + 150SDS bentonites is observed with an increase of SDS modified ratio. The pH has little influence on Cd2+ adsorption on bentonites. The adsorption of Cd2+ on bentonites decreases with ionic strength rise, but the effect of ionic strength can be reduced with an increase of SDS modified ratio also. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that the adsorption of Cd2+ on modified bentonites was spontaneously controlled by entropy increment. When the SDS modified ratio is lower than 100% CEC, the adsorption of Cd2+ on modified bentonites is a process with characteristics of both enthalpy increment and entropy increment, while the SDS modified ratio is equal to or higher than 100% CEC, the adsorption of Cd2+ on modified bentonites becomes a process of enthalpy decrement and entropy increment.

  13. Controlled flocculation of coarse suspensions by colloidally dispersed solids I: Interaction of bismuth subnitrate with bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, H

    1976-06-01

    Deflocculated suspensions of coarse powders tend to cake as the individual particles settle out and form compact, cohesive sediments. Limited flocculation results in looser sediments because the settled-out flocs incorporate large amounts of the liquid suspending medium. Controlled flocculation of bismuth subnitrate suspensions was achieved by the addition of small amounts of bentonite. The interaction of the coarse, positively charge bismuth subnitrate particles in aqueous suspension with negatively charged, colloidally dispersed bentonite was investigated by measuring electrophoretic mobility, sedimentation volume, and viscosity. Gradual addition of bentonite dispersion to bismuth subnitrate suspensions first reduced the zeta-potential of the bismuth subnitrate particles from +28 mv to zero, then inverted it, and finally caused it to level off at -20 mv for bismuth subnitrate-bentonite weight ratios below 200. Owing to the much greater specific surface area of bentonite, the surface of the bismuth subnitrate lath-shaped crystals was completely covered by 0.5% of its weight in clay platelets. Adhesion was promoted by electrovalences between surface bismuthyl ions and cation-exchange sites of the clay and by secondary valences. The charge neutralization of bismuth subnitrate by bentonite was a heterocoagulation process: the addition of small amounts of the clay flocculated the bismuth subnitrate suspensions and eliminated caking. While the zeta-potential of the bismuth subnitrate particles leveled off when their surface was saturated with bentonite platelets, sedimentation volume and viscosity continued to increase when the clay concentration was increased further while maintaining the bismuth subnitrate concentration constant. The excess, nonadsorbed bentonite formed the characteristic house-of-cards structure, incorporating the bentonite-coated bismuth subnitrate particles as cornerstones.

  14. Review of Suction Water Content Relationship of Bentonite-Sand Mixtures Considering Temperature Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Abhishek; Zhi Lang, Lin; Baille, Wiebke

    2015-04-01

    Bentonite-sand mixture is one of the candidate sealing/ buffer material for landfills, hazardous and high level radioactive waste repository. The long term satisfactory performance of bentonite sand mixture in terms of load bearing function, sealing function and buffer function is governed by hydro-mechanical response of material under elevated temperature conditions. The suction-water content relationship is one of the key parameter, which govern the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of compacted bentonite-sand mixture. This paper presents brief review of suction water content relationships of bentonite-sand mixture considering temperature effects. Numerous parametric models or equations have been developed for representing the soil water characteristics curve i.e. SWCC for isothermal conditions. The most frequently used equations for representing the SWCC are the van Genuchten (1980) and Fredlund and Xing (1994) SWCC equations. Various researchers (Romero et al. 2000; Villar and Lloret, 2004; Tang and Cui, 2005; Agus, 2005; Arifin, 2008) have reported the temperature effect on the water retention behavior of compacted bentonite-sand mixtures. The testing program, results and major conclusions made by above mentioned researchers were discussed in this paper. The changes in hydro-mechanical behavior due to elevated temperature are also discussed based on the suction components of soil which are influenced by temperature. As a general conclusion, total suction of the bentonite-sand mixtures is a function of mixture water content and mixture bentonite content or collectively a function of bentonite water content both at room temperature and at elevated temperature. At a constant temperature, different techniques for measuring suction results in different values of suction depending on accuracy of the sensor and calibration technique used as founded earlier by Agus (2005). The change in total suction due to change in temperature lower than 100 degree C is reversible

  15. Characterization of organo-modified bentonite sorbents: The effect of modification conditions on adsorption performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parolo, María E., E-mail: maria.parolo@fain.uncoma.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ingeniería de Procesos, Biotecnología y Energías Alternativas (PROBIEN), Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Neuquén 8300 (Argentina); Pettinari, Gisela R. [Instituto de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ingeniería de Procesos, Biotecnología y Energías Alternativas (PROBIEN), Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Neuquén 8300 (Argentina); Musso, Telma B. [Instituto de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ingeniería de Procesos, Biotecnología y Energías Alternativas (PROBIEN), Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Neuquén 8300 (Argentina); CONICET, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sánchez-Izquierdo, María P.; Fernández, Laura G. [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Neuquén 8300 (Argentina)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Modification of clay was evaluated by two methods for removing an organic substance. • Surfactant cations and organosilanes were intercalated into the interlayer space. • The hydrophobic surface of adsorbents increased the retention of organic substances. • Clay grafted with vinyltrimethoxysilane showed the highest adsorption for aniline. - Abstract: The organic modification of a natural bentonite was evaluated using two methods: exchanging the interlayer cations by hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) and grafting with vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMS) and γ-methacryloyloxy propyl trimethoxysilane (TMSPMA) on montmorillonite surface. The physicochemical characterization of all materials was made by X-ray diffraction (XRD), IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area techniques. HDTMA cations and organosilanes were intercalated into the interlayer space of montmorillonite, as deduced from the increase of the basal spacing. IR spectroscopy, TGA and BET area give evidence of successful organic modification. The studies show a decrease in the IR absorption band intensity at 3465 cm{sup −1} with surfactant modification, and also a decrease of mass loss due to adsorbed water observed in two samples: the organoclay and functionalized bentonites, which are evidences of a lower interlayer hydrophilicity. The efficiency of aniline removal onto natural bentonite, organobentonite and functionalized bentonites from aqueous solutions was evaluated. Aniline sorption on natural bentonite was studied using batch experiments, XRD and IR spectroscopy. The hydrophobic surface of organobentonite and functionalized bentonites increased the retention capacity for nonionic organic substances such as aniline on bentonites. The sorption properties of modified bentonite, through different modification methods, enhanced the potential industrial applications of bentonites in water decontamination.

  16. Effects of carbonization conditions on properties of bamboo pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijia Liu; Zehui Jiang; Zhiyong Cai; Benhua Fei; Yan Yu; Xing' e Liu

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo is a biomass material and has great potential as a bio-energy resource of the future in China. Bamboo pellets were successfully manufactured using a laboratory pellet mill in preliminary work. This study was therefore carried out to investigate the effect of carbonization conditions (temperature and time) on properties of bamboo pellets and to evaluate product...

  17. Global Wood Pellet Industry and Trade Study 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thrän, D.; Peetz, D.; Schaubach, K.; Mai-Moulin, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412461021; Junginger, H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/202130703; Lamers, P.; Visser, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413534839

    2017-01-01

    The report Global Wood Pellet Industry Market published in 2011 has always been the most downloaded document of IEA Bioenergy Task 40. We have decided to update the report and bring new insights on market trends and trade of the global wood pellets. The global wood pellet market has increased

  18. Transonic ablation flow regimes of high-Z pellets

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Hyoungkeun; Parks, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In this letter, we report results of numerical studies of the ablation of argon and neon pellets in tokamaks and compare them with theoretical predictions and studies of deuterium pellets. Results demonstrate the influence of atomic physics processes on the pellet ablation process.

  19. Effect of torrefaction on oil palm empty fruit bunch pelletization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focuses on the properties of raw and torrified pellet from EFB by varying different parameters including energy consumption, moisture adsorption, Meyer hardness test and pellet density. To save storage space and transport costs, it can be compressed into fuel pellets of high physical and energetic density.

  20. Na-smectite s in the Cala de Tomate bentonite deposit (Spain): a natural analogue of the salinity effect on the bentonite barrier of a rad waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez del Villar, L.; Pelayo, M.; Fernandez, A.M.; Cozar, J.S. [CIEMAT - Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT/DIRE/CEAGP), Madrid (Spain); Delgado, A.; Reyes, E. [Ciencias de la Tierra y Quimica Ambiental Estacion Experimental del Zaidin Dpt., Granada (Spain); Fernandez-Soler, J.M. [Granada Univ., Dpt. de Mineralogia y Petrologia (Spain); Tsige, M. [Facultad de Ciencias Geologicas, Dpt. de Geodinamica, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Within the framework of the ENRESA programme for the assessment of the long-term behaviour of the bentonite-engineered barrier for a deep radwaste geological repository, analogue studies on several bentonite deposits are conducted at CIEMAT. Among these analogue studies, the thermal effect induced by volcanic intrusions on bentonite deposits is highlighted. In the Cabo de Gata volcanic region, there are several analogue scenarios where these studies have been performed, such as the Cala de Tomate bentonite deposit that was intruded by a pyroxene andesite volcanic dome. However, geological, mineralogical, physicochemical, geochemical and stable isotopic data obtained from the smectites do not allow to establish any analogy with the thermal effect expected on the bentonite-engineered barrier of a deep geological repository after burial. Thus, the bentonitisation processes took place after the intrusion of the dome, as a result of meteoric diagenesis intensively developed on faulting zone affecting the parent pyroclastic acid tuffs. This faulting process occurred after the dome intrusion. However, the physicochemical characteristics of these smectites, specially the exchangeable cations, allow to consider this bentonite deposit as a natural analogue of the saline effect on the clayey barrier. This analogy has been established because Na-smectites are present in this deposit and, up to our present knowledge, it is the first time that these smectites occur naturally in the Cabo de Gata-La Serrata de Nijar volcanic region. As a consequence, the main objectives of this work are: i) to characterise these smectites; ii) to establish their genesis and processes affecting them after their formation and iii) to identify the effects on the bentonite-engineered barrier should it were affected by a Na-rich saline waterfront. (authors)

  1. Confined wetting of FoCa clay powder/pellet mixtures: Experimentation and numerical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maugis, P. [Commissariat Energie Atom, DMT, MTMS, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Imbert, C. [Commissariat Energie Atom, DPC, SCCME, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2007-07-01

    Potential geological nuclear waste disposals must be properly sealed to prevent contamination of the biosphere by radionuclides. In the framework of the RESEAL project, the performance of a bentonite shaft seal is currently studied at Mol (Belgium). This paper focuses on the hydro-mechanical physical behavior of centimetric, unsaturated samples of the backfilling material - a mixture of FoCa-clay powder and pellets - during odometer tests. The hydro-mechanical response of the samples is observed experimentally, and then compared to numerical simulations performed by our Cast3M Finite Element code. The generalized Darcy's law and the Barcelona Basic Model mechanical model formed the physical basis of the numerical model and the interpretation. They are widely used in engineered barriers modeling. Vertical swelling pressure and water intake were measured throughout the test. Although water income presents a monotonous increase, the swelling pressure evolution is marked by a peak, and then a local minimum before increasing again to an asymptotic value. This unexpected behavior is explained by yielding rather than by heterogeneity. It is satisfactorily reproduced by the model after parameter calibration. Several samples with different heights ranging from 5 to 12 cm show the same hydro-mechanical response, apart from a dilatation of the time scale. The interest of the characterization of centimetric samples to predicting the efficiency of a metric sealing is discussed. (authors)

  2. BENTONITE-QUARTZ SAND AS THE BACKFILL MATERIALS ON THE RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORY

    OpenAIRE

    Raharjo Raharjo

    2010-01-01

    An investigation of the contribution of quartz sand in the bentonite mixture as the backfill materials on the shallow land burial of radioactive waste has been done. The experiment objective is to determine the effect of quartz sand in a bentonite mixture with bentonite particle sizes of -20+40, -40+60, and -60+80 mesh on the retardation factor and the uranium dispersion in the simulation of uranium migration in the backfill materials. The experiment was carried out by the fixed bed metho...

  3. Chemical Activation of Bentonite Clay and Its Adsorption Properties of Methylene Blue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susilawati Susilawati

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Study on adsorbent properties of bentonite such as optimum activation condition, concentration concentration effect of sulphuric acid, activation temperature and activation time on decolorization of methylene blue have been investigated in this paper. The study was started by activation of bentonite with sulfuric acid. The data was analysis by statistical method via Least Significant Difference (LSD test. The optimum condition of adsortion showed that the concentration of activating agent (sulphuric acid was 20%, activation temperature at 110 ºC and activation time was 30 minutes. At this optimum condition, methylene blue was absorbed by bentonite with 93.30% yield.

  4. Concrete/Febex Bentonite Interaction: Results On Short-Term Column Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escribano, A.; Turrero, M.J.; Torres, E.; Martin, P.L. [CIEMAT, Environmental Department, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    Interaction between the alkaline pore fluids from the concrete engineered barriers and the bentonite at the repository conditions may generate products that can diffuse through the porous structure of the bentonite affecting their properties. A comprehensive study based on series of short term experiments is being performed to provide experimental evidences on the physical, chemical and mineralogical changes during the concrete-compacted bentonite interaction. Samples were analyzed by XRD, SEM-EDS and FTIR. Measurements of swelling capacity, specific surface area and chemical analysis for cation exchange capacity and soluble salts analyses were also performed. (authors)

  5. A new age model for the Late Ordovician bentonites in Oslo, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk Ballo, Eirik; Eivind Augland, Lars; Hammer, Øyvind; Svensen, Henrik

    2017-04-01

    During the Late Ordovician, explosive volcanic eruptions led to the deposition of worldwide bentonites. Some of the largest of these eruptions took place in the Sandbian and produced the Milbrig and Deicke K-bentonites of North America and the Kinnekulle K-bentonite of Scandinavia. We have studied the classic locality of Hagemann and Spjeldnæs (1955) - one of the most complete sections of Ordovician bentonites in Europe. The bentonites are present in the Arnestad Formation comprising dark shale with carbonate nodule beds grading into an increasingly more carbonate rich environment. Through a 50-meter interval we have identified 33 bentonites of which 10 have not previously been reported from this locality. The bentonites have an average thickness of 4.9 cm with a few exceptions such as the Kinnekulle K-bentonite (35 cm) and the Grimstorp B (13 cm). We have measured magnetic susceptibility of two 2-3 meter intervals with a sampling distance of 5 cm, using a handheld magnetic susceptibility meter in the field. These data show significant periodicity peaks that correlate well with Milankovitch cycles and are suggested to represent astronomically forced changes in sediment supply. This study further presents high-precision U-Pb zircon ages of five bentonites from the section, including the Kinnekulle K-bentonite and Grimstorp B. These two beds were previously dated by Svensen et al. (2015) from a locality south of Oslo. Our new data improves the precision of the ages of these two key beds, and constrain the duration of the entire interval and thus the onset and termination of the late Ordovician volcanic system that deposited these tephras. We conclude that the Oslo section provides a high-resolution age model to understand one of the most intense volcanic periods of the Paleozoic by combining radiometric and cyclostratigraphic data. BIBLIOGRAPHY Hagemann, F. and Spjeldnæs, N. (1955). "The Middle Ordovician of the Oslo region, Norway. 6. Notes on bentonites (K-bentonites

  6. Study of Interaction between Fly Ash-cement and Bentonite Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daněk Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the important factors characterizing the quality of sealing mixtures is strength, durability, compatibility and permeability. Experimental work was therefore conducted to assess the use of cement, fly ash, gravel and bentonite in the form of artificial self-hardening sealing mixture. The results of the work show a good compatibility between the bentonite and cement during its fly ash replacement. Compactness of the structure was confirmed by studying of permeability and SEM microscopy, which in the system of ash-cement-bentonite matrix allowed assessing successive microstructure development of hydrating gel.

  7. Modeling Dynamic Fracture of Cryogenic Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, Paul [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This work is part of an investigation with the long-range objective of predicting the size distribution function and velocity dispersion of shattered pellet fragments after a large cryogenic pellet impacts a solid surface at high velocity. The study is vitally important for the shattered pellet injection (SPI) technique, one of the leading technologies being implemented at ORNL for the mitigation of disruption damage on current tokamaks and ITER. The report contains three parts that are somewhat interwoven. In Part I we formulated a self-similar model for the expansion dynamics and velocity dispersion of the debris cloud following pellet impact against a thick (rigid) target plate. Also presented in Part I is an analytical fracture model that predicts the nominal or mean size of the fragments in the debris cloud and agrees well with known SPI data. The aim of Part II is to gain an understanding of the pellet fracturing process when a pellet is shattered inside a miter tube with a sharp bend. Because miter tubes have a thin stainless steel (SS) wall a permanent deformation (dishing) of the wall is produced at the site of the impact. A review of the literature indicates that most projectile impact on thin plates are those for which the target is deformed and the projectile is perfectly rigid. Such impacts result in “projectile embedding” where the projectile speed is reduced to zero during the interaction so that all the kinetic energy (KE) of the projectile goes into the energy stored in plastic deformation. Much of the literature deals with perforation of the target. The problem here is quite different; the softer pellet easily undergoes complete material failure causing only a small transfer of KE to stored energy of wall deformation. For the real miter tube, we derived a strain energy function for the wall deflection using a non-linear (plastic) stress-strain relation for 304 SS. Using a dishing profile identical to the linear Kirchkoff-Love profile (for lack

  8. Sintesis Komposit TiO2-Bentonit dan Aplikasinya untuk Penurunan BOD dan COD Air Embung UNNES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navela Rahma Aji

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Telah disintesis komposit TiO2-bentonit untuk penurunan BOD dan COD. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui proses pembentukan komposit TiO2-Bentonit serta mengetahui katalis terbaik dalam proses fotodegradasi air embung. Penelitian diawali dengan preparasi TiO2-Bentonit. Hasil pembentukan komposit dikarakterisasi dengan menggunakan X-Ray Diffraction (XRD, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR dan Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Katalis yang diuji adalah TiO2, bentonit, TiO2-bentonit yang diaplikasikan ke air embung dengan waktu penyinaran selama 30 menit.Terbentuknya komposit TiO2-Bentonit ditunjukkan dengan refleksi TiO2 pada 2 25. Hasil analisis menggunakan FTIR yakni Ti-O antara range 400-700 cm -1 dalam hal ini ditunjukkan dalam peak 478.35 dan 594.08. Puncak serapan-serapan utama pada bentonit beradi di bilangan gelombang 3626.17 cm-1, 3448.72 cm-1 dan 1635.64 cm-1. Spektra TiO2-Bentonit tidak menunjukkan adanya pergeseran serapan pada bilangan gelombang 3448.72 cm-1 yang belum  menunjukkan ikatan O-H yang semakin lemah karena adanya TiO2 di dalam antar lapis bentonit.Penurunan nilai BOD dan COD terbesar diperoleh dengan menggunakan TiO2-Bentonit yakni untuk BOD 18.40 ppm dan COD 10.05ppm. Kemampuan komposit TiO2-Bentonit lebih besar dibandingkan katalis TiO2 dan bentonit.   Kata kunci: air embung, fotodegradasi, TiO2-bentonit Abstract   Have done synthesized composite TiO2-bentonite to decrease BOD and COD. This study aims to determine the process of form he composite TiO2-bentonite and determine the best catalyst in the process of photodegradation water reservoir. The study begins with the preparation of TiO2-bentonite. Results composite formation characterized using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The catalyst is tested TiO2, bentonite, TiO2-bentonite which is applied to the water reservoir with the exposure time for 30 menit.Terbentuknya composite TiO2

  9. Fuel Pellets from Wheat Straw: The Effect of Lignin Glass Transition and Surface Waxes on Pelletizing Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang Stelte; Craig Clemons; Jens K. Holm; Jesper Ahrenfeldt; Ulrik B. Henriksen; Anand R. Sanadi

    2012-01-01

    The utilization of wheat straw as a renewable energy resource is limited due to its low bulk density. Pelletizing wheat straw into fuel pellets of high density increases its handling properties but is more challenging compared to pelletizing wood biomass. Straw has a lower lignin content and a high concentration of hydrophobic waxes on its outer surface that may limit...

  10. 46 CFR 148.04-9 - Fishmeal or scrap, ground or pelletized; fishmeal or scrap, ground and pelletized (mixture).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fishmeal or scrap, ground or pelletized; fishmeal or scrap, ground and pelletized (mixture). 148.04-9 Section 148.04-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Additional Requirements for Certain Material § 148.04-9 Fishmeal or scrap, ground or pelletized; fishmeal or...

  11. Development and in vitro evaluation of mesalamine delayed release pellets and tableted reservoir-type pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendas, Ehab R; Christensen, J Mark; Ayres, James W

    2010-04-01

    The basic objective of this study was to develop a novel technique that aids in compaction of coated pellets into tablets and obtain a release pattern from compressed pellets resembling the same pattern before compression. Multi-unit dosage forms of mesalamine targeted to the colon were formulated by extrusion-spheronization, and then coated with Eudragit S (30%). These pellets were filled into gelatin capsules or further formulated and compressed into tablets. Tablets for colonic delivery of mesalamine were prepared by mixing the coated beads with cushioning agents like stearic acid and Explotab, or by applying an additional coat of gelatin (4% weight gain) onto the Eudragit S coated pellets, and then compressing into tablets (tableted reservoir-type pellets). Then additional coating of the tablets prepared by the coating technique was applied utilizing Eudragit L 100-55 (5% weight gain). This technique provides additive protection for the coated beads to withstand the compression force during tableting. Excellent in vitro dissolution results were obtained, which were comparable to the results of the release of mesalamine from uncompressed beads filled in capsules. Mesalamine release from the capsules was 0.3% after 2 hours in gastric pH, 0.37% was released after an additional 1 hour in pH 6, and 89% was released after 1.5 hours in colonic pH 7.2. Various formulation and process parameters have to be optimized in order to obtain tableted reservoir-type pellets having the same release properties as the uncompressed pellets. The coating technique delays the release of mesalamine until the beads reach the terminal ileum and colon. Once released in the colon, mesalamine is minimally absorbed and can act locally to treat ulcerative colitis.

  12. An advanced cold moderator using solid methane pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, C.A. [Cryogenic Applications F, Inc., Clinton, TN (United States); Carpenter, J.M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (United States)

    2001-03-01

    This paper reports developments of the pellet formation and transport technologies required for producing a liquid helium or hydrogen cooled methane pellet moderator. The Phase I US DOE SBIR project, already completed, demonstrated the production of 3 mm transparent pellets of frozen methane and ammonia and transport of the pellets into a 40 cc observation cell cooled with liquid helium. The methane pellets, formed at 72 K, stuck together during the loading of the cell. Ammonia pellets did not stick and fell readily under vibration into a packed bed with a 60% fill fraction. A 60% fill fraction should produce a very significant increase in long-wavelength neutron production and advantages in shorter pulse widths as compared to a liquid hydrogen moderator. The work also demonstrated a method of rapidly changing the pellets in the moderator cell. The Phase II project, just now underway, will develop a full-scale pellet source and transport system with a 1.5 L 'moderator' cell. The Phase II effort will also produce an apparatus to sub-cool the methane pellets to below 20 K, which should prevent the methane pellets from sticking together. In addition to results of the phase I experiments, the presentation includes a short video of the pellets, and a description of plans for the Phase II project. (author)

  13. Quality properties of fuel pellets from forest biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtikangas, P.

    1999-07-01

    Nine pellet assortments, made of fresh and stored sawdust, bark and logging residues (a mixture of Norway spruce and Scots pine) were tested directly after production and after 5 months of storage in large bags (volume about 1 m{sup 3} loose pellets) for moisture content, heating value and ash content. Dimensions, bulk density, density of individual pellets and durability were also determined. Moreover, sintering risk and contents of sulphur, chlorine, and lignin of fresh pellets were determined. It is concluded that bark and logging residues are suitable raw materials for pellets production, especially regarding durability and if the ash content is controlled. Pellets density had no effect on its durability, unlike lignin content which was positively correlated. The pellets had higher ash content and lower calorific heating value than the raw materials, probably due to loss of volatiles during drying. In general, the quality changes during storage were not large, but notable. The results showed that storage led to negative effects on durability, especially on pellets made of fresh materials. The average length of pellets was decreased due to breakage during storage. Microbial growth was noticed in some of the pellet assortments. Pellets made out of fresh logging residues were found to be weakest after storage. The tendency to reach the equilibrium with the ambient moisture content should be taken into consideration during production due to the risk of decreasing durability.

  14. Reprint of: Pelletizing properties of torrefied wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang; Nielsen, Niels Peter K.; Hansen, Hans Ove

    2013-01-01

    of wheat straw have been analyzed. Laboratory equipment has been used to investigate the pelletizing properties of wheat straw torrefied at temperatures between 150 and 300 °C. IR spectroscopy and chemical analyses have shown that high torrefaction temperatures change the chemical properties of the wheat......Combined torrefaction and pelletization are used to increase the fuel value of biomass by increasing its energy density and improving its handling and combustion properties. However, pelletization of torrefied biomass can be challenging and in this study the torrefaction and pelletizing properties...... straw significantly, and the pelletizing analyses have shown that these changes correlate to changes in the pelletizing properties. Torrefaction increase the friction in the press channel and pellet strength and density decrease with an increase in torrefaction temperature....

  15. High-rate behaviour of iron ore pellet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Gustaf; Häggblad, Hans-Åke; Jonsén, Pär; Nishida, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    Iron ore pellets are sintered, centimetre-sized spheres of ore with high iron content. Together with carbonized coal, iron ore pellets are used in the production of steel. In the transportation from the pelletizing plants to the customers, the iron ore pellets are exposed to different loading situations, resulting in degradation of strength and in some cases fragmentation. For future reliable numerical simulations of the handling and transportation of iron ore pellets, knowledge about their mechanical properties is needed. This paper describes the experimental work to investigate the dynamic mechanical properties of blast furnace iron ore pellets. To study the dynamic fracture of iron ore pellets a number of split Hopkinson pressure bar tests are carried out and analysed.

  16. Ecological pellets from brown coal and biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Sedláček

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available One way of renewable energy sources applications in the Czech republic is a cultivation of biomass plants. After the biomass reformation, it is possible to add it to palletizing mixes with coal and delulfurisative additives. Possibilities of brown coal of palletizing with biomass adds were tested recently. The product represents a new coal-biomass combustible wich can be used in some types of boilers with a low pollutant production level (specially SO2.In the past brown-coal pellets weremade with an addition of melted wood mass (wood fibres, wood wastes and mustard straw. Practical tests have shown of an extension the waste field of coal-pellets utilization.

  17. Ecological pellets from brown coal and biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Sedláček; Nikolas Mucha; Iva Pečtová; Peter Fečko

    2007-01-01

    One way of renewable energy sources applications in the Czech republic is a cultivation of biomass plants. After the biomass reformation, it is possible to add it to palletizing mixes with coal and delulfurisative additives. Possibilities of brown coal of palletizing with biomass adds were tested recently. The product represents a new coal-biomass combustible wich can be used in some types of boilers with a low pollutant production level (specially SO2).In the past brown-coal pellets weremade...

  18. Experimental studies of the interactions between anaerobically corroding iron and bentonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Liisa; Karnland, Ola; Oversby, Virginia M.; Rance, Andy P.; Smart, Nick R.; Snellman, Margit; Vähänen, Marjut; Werme, Lars O.

    In the horizontal emplacement concept (KBS-3H) for the disposal of radioactive waste, which is being developed in Sweden and Finland, copper canisters will be surrounded by bentonite buffer and placed in perforated steel containers in long horizontal boreholes in the crystalline bedrock, at a depth of ≈500 m. Under the chemical conditions in a deep repository, it is possible that the release of iron from the steel containers could influence the physico-chemical properties of the bentonite, for example, by exchange of the interlayer ions. In order to gain further insights into this process, an experimental study was undertaken, to investigate the mode of iron uptake into bentonite and the extent of changes induced in the basic physico-chemical properties of bentonite. The samples were taken from long-term anaerobic corrosion tests of carbon steel or cast iron in compacted bentonite (Na/Ca-bentonite: Volclay MX-80, ∼4% Fe 2O 3) in contact with a simple artificial groundwater at 30 °C or 50 °C. A range of analytical techniques was applied to samples of corrosion product on carbon steel and cast iron and to the bentonite surrounding the corroding specimens. Corrosion products and bentonite samples were analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis (EPMA), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer transmission spectroscopy. In addition, the bentonite samples were analysed using Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), exchangeable cation analysis and cation exchange capacity (CEC) measurements. Hydraulic conductivity and swelling pressure were also measured. From visual observation, the corrosion product formed on the carbon steel in bentonite was less voluminous than that formed on steel in artificial porewaters with no bentonite, although previous work showed that the corrosion

  19. Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissociation in the Presence of Silica Sand and Bentonite Clay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kumar Saw, V; Udayabhanu, G; Mandal, A; Laik, S

    2015-01-01

      The formation and dissociation of methane hydrates in a porous media containing silica sand of different sizes and bentonite clay were studied in the presence of synthetic seawater with 3.55 wt% salinity...

  20. Textural properties of poly(glycidyl methacrylate) : acid-modified bentonite nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zunic, M.; Milutinovic-Nikolic, A.; Nastasovic, A.; Vukovic, Z.; Loncarevic, D.; Vukovic, I.; Loos, K.; ten Brinke, G.; Jovanovic, D.; Sharma, Bhaskar; Ubaghs, Luc; Keul, Helmut; Höcker, Hartwig; Loontjens, Ton; Benthem, Rolf van; Žunić, M.; Milutinović-Nikolić, A.; Nastasović, A.; Vuković, Z.; Lončarević, D.; Vuković, I.; Jovanović, D.

    The aim of this study was to obtain enhanced textural properties of macroporous crosslinked copolymer poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) by synthesizing nanocomposites with acid-modified bentonite. Nanocomposites were obtained by introducing various amounts of

  1. Efficiency of ball milled South African bentonite clay for remediation of acid mine drainage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masindi, Vhahangwele

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of using vibratory ball milled South African bentonite clay for neutralization and attenuation of inorganic contaminants from acidic and metalliferous mine effluents has been evaluated. Treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD...

  2. Effect of anionic polyelectrolytes on the flow of activated sodium bentonite drilling mud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalah Kaci

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite is often used in water-based drilling fluids. The xanthan gum is widely used as to increase the viscosity of the bentonite suspension. For the stabilization of the drilled layers, we use filtrate reducers: sodium carboxymethylcellulose low viscosity and cellulose polyanionic low viscosity. The objective of this work is to explain the effect of the polymers on the rheological behavior of the 5% bentonite suspensions. These results will provide practical recommendations for the rational use of different types of additives in water-based drilling muds. Our work is based on rheological trials on a viscometer. The results obtained on the bentonite 5%-xanthane suspension show a rheofluidifying behavior with yield stress conform to the Herschel-bulckly modal. While increasing the concentration of filtrate reducer decreases the yield stress and reduces the viscosity. The effect of CMC LV is more pronounced than PAC L.

  3. Suspected bentonite toxicosis in a cat from ingestion of clay cat litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornfeldt, C S; Westfall, M L

    1996-10-01

    A 2 1/2-y-old spayed female cat was presented for lethargy and weakness. The cat was hypokalemic (3.1 m Eq K/L) and severely anemic (60% PVC, 1.3 g hemoglobin/dL). The cat was known to ingest bentonite-containing cat litter. It recovered with treatment of i.v. fluids, electrolytes and whole blood transfusion and was discharged. Two months later the cat was presented again with signs similar to those seen previously. This occurred 1 mo after the owner resumed the use of bentonite-containing cat litter. The signs were remarkably similar to those reported in humans from the chronic ingestion of bentonite clays. Bentonite toxicosis is suggested by the coexistence of hypokalemia hypochromic anemia in cats presented with lethargy and muscle weakness.

  4. Biochar, Bentonite and Zeolite Supplemented Feeding of Layer Chickens Alters Intestinal Microbiota and Reduces Campylobacter Load

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prasai, Tanka P; Walsh, Kerry B; Bhattarai, Surya P; Midmore, David J; Van, Thi T H; Moore, Robert J; Stanley, Dragana

    2016-01-01

    .... Alternative methods are needed to suppress pathogen loads and maintain productivity. As an alternative to antibiotics use, we investigated the ability of biochar, bentonite and zeolite as separate 4...

  5. Temperature effects on geotechnical and hydraulic properties of bentonite hydrated with inorganic salt solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rashid, H. M. A.; Kawamoto, K.; Saito, T.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015, International Journal of GEOMATE. This study investigated the combined effect of temperature and single-species salt solutions on geotechnical properties (swell index and liquid limit) and hydraulic conductivity of bentonite applying different cation types, concentrations, and temperatures...

  6. Surface properties of beached plastic pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotopoulou, Kalliopi N; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K

    2012-10-01

    The presence of pollutants on plastic debris is an emerging environmental hot topic. Understanding the surface alteration of plastics while in the marine environment increases our understanding of the pollutant-plastic debris interaction. Plastic pellets are widely distributed throughout the world oceans. Eroded and virgin polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) pellets were studied for their surface properties to better understand the interaction between plastic and compounds in marine environment. Surface properties such as point of zero charge, surface area and pore volume, surface topography, functional groups and acid-base behavior are important factors which affect sorption. Virgin plastic pellets had homogeneous smooth surfaces that do not have any acid-base behavior. Eroded PE demonstrates an altered surface that at seawater pH acquires a negative charge due to ketone groups. The uneven surface and possible functional groups could have been formed from the erosion processes while floating at the sea surface and might explain the interaction of eroded plastics with microbes and metals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hydraulic permeability of bentonite-polymer composites for application in landfill technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehn, Hanna; Haase, Hanna; Schanz, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Bentonites are often used as barrier materials in landfill technology to prevent infiltration of leachates to the natural environment. Since decades, geoenvironmental engineering aims at improving the hydro-mechanical performance of landfill liners. Various studies on the permeability performance of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) show effects of non-standard liquids on behaviour of Na+-bentonite regarding its sealing capacity. With increasing concentration of chemical aggressive solutions the sealing capacity decreases (Shackelford et al. 2000). An opportunity to improve the hydraulic permeability of the bentonites is the addition of polymers. The changes in hydraulic permeability performance of polymer treated and untreated bentonites while adding chemical aggressive solutions were studied by several authors. Results obtained by Scalia et al. (2014) illustrate that an increase in permeability can be prevented by adding polymer to Na+-bentonite. On the other hand, Ashmawy et al. (2002) presented results on the incapability of several commercial bentonite-polymer-products. The objective of this study is to characterize the influence of polymer addition on hydraulic performance of Na+-bentonite systematically. Therefore, the influence of 1% polymer addition of cationic and anionic polyacrylamide on the swelling pressure and hydraulic permeability of MX 80 bentonite was investigated. Preparation of bentonite-polymer composites was conducted (1) in dry conditions and (2) using solution-intercalation method. Experiments on hydraulic permeability were carried out using distilled water as well as CaCl2-solution. References Ashmawy, A. K., El-Hajji, D., Sotelo, N. & Muhammad, N. (2002), `Hydraulic Performance of Untreated and Polymer-treated Bentonite in Inorganic Landfill Leachates', Clays and Clay Minerals 50(5), 546-552. Scalia, J., Benson, C., Bohnhoff, G., Edil, T. & Shackelford, C. (2014), 'Long-Term Hydraulic Conductivity of a Bentonite-Polymer Composite Permeated

  8. Effect of fungicides on Wyoming big sagebrush seed germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert D. Cox; Lance H. Kosberg; Nancy L. Shaw; Stuart P. Hardegree

    2011-01-01

    Germination tests of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young [Asteraceae]) seeds often exhibit fungal contamination, but the use of fungicides should be avoided because fungicides may artificially inhibit germination. We tested the effect of seed-applied fungicides on germination of Wyoming big sagebrush at 2 different...

  9. Geothermal resources of the Washakie and Great Divide basins, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heasler, H. P.; Buelow, K. L.

    1985-05-01

    The geothermal resources of the Great Divide and Washakie Basins of southern Wyoming are described. Oil well bottomhole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data were interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. It was concluded large areas in Wyoming are underlain by water hotter than 120 F. Isolated areas with high temperature gradients exist within each basin.

  10. Comparison of postfire seeding practices for Wyoming big sagebrush

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey E. Ott; Robert D. Cox; Nancy L. Shaw

    2017-01-01

    Wildfires in the Great Basin have resulted in widespread loss of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young), an ecologically important shrub that has proven difficult to establish from seed.We sought to identify optimal seeding practices forWyoming big sagebrush in the context of postfire seeding operations involving...

  11. Wyoming's forest products industry and timber harvest, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelsea P. McIver; Colin B. Sorenson; Charles E. Keegan; Todd A. Morgan; Mike T. Thompson

    2014-01-01

    This report traces the flow of Wyoming’s 2010 timber harvest through the primary wood-using industries; provides a description of the structure, capacity, and condition of Wyoming’s primary forest products industry, and quantifies volumes and uses of wood fiber. Historical wood products industry changes are discussed, as well as changes in harvest, production,...

  12. Wyoming's forest products industry and timber harvest, 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd A. Morgan; Timothy P. Spoelma; Charles E. Keegan; Alfred L. Chase; Mike T. Thompson

    2005-01-01

    This report traces the flow of Wyoming's 2000 timber harvest through the primary wood-using industries; provides a description of the structure, capacity, and condition of Wyoming's primary forest products industry; and quantifies volumes and uses of wood fiber. Historical wood products industry changes are discussed, as well as changes in harvest, production...

  13. 30 CFR 950.35 - Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land... STATE WYOMING § 950.35 Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. (a) Wyoming certification of completing all known coal-related impacts is accepted, effective May 25, 1984. (b) The...

  14. Photophysical and adsorption properties of pyronin B in natural bentonite clay dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostami, Mohammad Reza [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Atatürk University, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey); Kaya, Mehmet [Recep Tayyip Erdoğan University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, 53100 Rize (Turkey); Gür, Bahri; Onganer, Yavuz [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Atatürk University, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey); Meral, Kadem, E-mail: kademm@atauni.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Atatürk University, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: The molecular aggregation of PyB in bentonite aqueous dispersion is observed by using molecular absorption spectrum. - Highlights: • Molecular behavior of PyB adsorbed on bentonite was spectroscopically followed. • H-aggregates of PyB in bentonite aqueous dispersion were formed. • The adsorption characteristics of PyB on bentonite particles were determined. - Abstract: The present study focused on the adsorption and photophysical properties of pyronin B (PyB) in bentonite aqueous dispersion. The photophysical properties of PyB in the aqueous dispersion were studied by using UV–vis absorption, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. In this concept, the interaction of the dye with bentonite particles in the aqueous dispersion was spectroscopically followed depending on certain parameters such as interaction time, pH and the dye concentration. Obtained spectral data revealed that the aggregate structures (H-type) of PyB in the aqueous dispersion were formed in the dye concentration range studied. The non-fluorescence nature of H-aggregates and the clay minerals governed the fluorescence property of PyB. The mentioned non-radiative processes caused the fluorescence lifetime of the dye to decrease compared to that in water. The adsorption process of PyB on bentonite was examined depending on contact time and initial adsorbate concentration. An adsorption isotherm was good-fitted by the Freundlich model with a linear regression correlation value of 0.999. The adsorption of PyB on bentonite particles was in agreement with pseudo second-order kinetics.

  15. Further insight into the microstructure of compacted bentonite-sand mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Saba, Simona; Delage, Pierre; Lenoir, Nicolas; Cui, Yu-Jun; TANG, Anh Minh; Barnichon, Jean-Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Compacted bricks of bentonite/sand mixture are planned to be used as sealing plugs in deep radioactive waste disposal repositories because of their low permeability, high swelling capacity and favourable properties with respect to radionuclide retention. The isolating capacity of compacted bentonite/sand mixture is closely related to microstructure features that have been often investigated, in particular by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM or ESEM) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (M...

  16. Infiltration of Pb(II) solution in compacted bentonite/sand mixture under unconfined conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yong-Gui; JIA, Ling-Yan; Ye, Wei-min; Wang, Qiong; Chen, Bao; Cui, Yu-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Compacted mixture of bentonite and sand has been proposed for using as buffer/backfill material in the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in many countries. The hydraulic behaviors and deformation properties of this material can be influenced by the chemical composition of groundwater. In the present work, the infiltration test of Pb(II) solution was conducted on compacted Gaomiaozi (GMZ) bentonite/sand mixture under unconfined conditions. The moisture migration characteristics and swel...

  17. Thermodynamic modeling and sensitivity analysis of porewater chemistry in compacted bentonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, Michael; Lothenbach, Barbara; Shibata, Masahiro; Yui, Mikazu

    Compacted bentonite is typically foreseen as the main component of the engineered barrier system of high-level radioactive waste repositories. To derive Kd values and diffusion coefficients of radionuclides for performance assessment, it is critical to be able to describe the chemistry of the pore solution and to understand how it is influenced by different factors. The present paper presents a sensitivity analysis on the influence of important parameters on porewater chemistry in compacted bentonite. The principal parameters varied were the fractions of calcite, gypsum, and NaCl dissolving from bentonite, and pCO 2: Model calculations were done with the help of a surface chemical thermodynamic model that simultaneously treats solution/mineral equilibria as well as surface complexation and ion exchange reactions at the edge and siloxane surfaces of clay minerals. Some calculations were extended to take into account electric double layer effects in the porespace. The model results show that two powerful pH buffer systems are operative in compacted bentonite: Amphoteric edge SOH sites and the carbonate buffer system. If pCO 2 is imposed externally, the resulting porewater pH is mainly controlled by the carbonate buffer. If bentonite is treated as a closed system, the buffering action of the SOH sites becomes more important. In both cases, the dissolution of calcite and gypsum from the bentonite is important. The dissolution of impurities and the ion exchange reactions have an important influence in compacted bentonite, and porewater composition is relatively independent of groundwater composition. If the development of an electric double layer in the bentonite pores is considered, our results indicate that at higher dry densities (⩾1200 kg/m 3) the entire porespace may be occupied with (truncated) diffuse layers, leaving no space for free porewater.

  18. Evaluation on elution feature of bentonite buffer materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Hirohisa; Kanno, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro

    1997-09-01

    In order to evaluate long term physical stability of artificial barrier in land disposal of high level radioactive wastes, it is necessary to know quantitatively elution behavior of buffering materials from disposal road (or cavity) to circumferential rock crack. When elution of the buffer material occurs on large scale, amount of bentonite in the disposal road (or cavity) reduces and reduction of various functions expected to the buffer materials is presumed. According to specification examples of road transverse arrangement and disposal vertical arrangement systems, evaluation on elution amount of the buffer materials at disposal environment was conducted. Opening width of rock crack in the disposal environment was supposed to be 0.5 mm. As a result, obtained mass elution ratios of the buffer materials due to extrusion phenomenon were 0.04 to 0.2% after 10,000 year and 2 to 12% after 1,000,000 years. (G.K.)

  19. Methylation of Eugenol Using Dimethyl Carbonate and Bentonite as Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Asnawati

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Eugenol is a compound with a variety of reactive functional groups such as allyl, hydroxy and methoxy. The presence of the functional groups brings eugenol possible to undertake the transformation into various derivative compounds with diverse activities. One of the simple and possible transformations is methylation or alkylation. Commonly, methyl halides and dimethyl sulphate are used as methylation agent. However, those kinds of methylation agents are toxic and carcinogenic. In this research dimethyl carbonate, an alternative methylation agent is used, because of its low toxicity, green, and economic. The synthesis has been carried out by using a catalyst. Bentonite was activated by heating to a temperature using 300 °C. Methylation was shown by the formation of a light yellow liquid (25.71% yield. The structures of products were characterized by GC-MS and obtained a compound, namely bis eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenoxy methane (2.37% yield.

  20. Sodium bentonite and monensin under chronic aflatoxicosis in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnoli, A P; Texeira, M; Rosa, C A R; Miazzo, R D; Cavaglieri, L R; Magnoli, C E; Dalcero, A M; Chiacchiera, S M

    2011-02-01

    Clay feed additives have been increasingly incorporated into animal diets to prevent aflatoxicosis. Due to the nonselective nature of the binding interaction, many important components of the diets could also be made unavailable because of these feed additives. The anticoccidial monensin (MON) could also be sequestered by these clays. The use of sodium bentonite (Na-B) from a mine in the province of Mendoza, Argentina, was investigated as a sequestering agent to prevent the effects of 100 µg/kg of dietary aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)). In vitro studies demonstrated that the above Na-B was a good candidate to prevent aflatoxicosis. They also showed that MON competes with AFB(1) for the adsorption sites on the clay surface and effectively displaces the toxin when it is in low concentration. Even though the levels of MON in diets, approximately 55 mg/kg, are high enough to not be significantly changed as a consequence of the adsorption, they can further affect the ability of the clays to bind low levels of AFB(1). An in vivo experiment carried out with poultry showed that 100 µg/kg of AFB(1) does not significantly change productive or biochemical parameters. However, liver histopathology not only confirmed the ability of this particular Na-B to prevent aflatoxicosis but also the decrease of this capacity in the presence of 55 mg/kg of MON. This is the first report stressing this fact and further research should be performed to check if this behavior is a characteristic of the assayed Na-B or of this type of clay. On the other hand, the presence of MON should also be taken into account when assaying the potential AFB(1) binding ability of a given bentonite.

  1. Producing bio-pellets from sunflower oil cake for use as an energy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Yuichi; Kato, Hitoshi; Kanai, Genta; Togashi, Tatsushi [National Agricultural Research Center (Japan)], E-mail: kobay@affrc.go.jp

    2008-07-01

    Pellet fuels were produced from ground sunflower oil cake using a pelletizer. The length, hardness, and powder characteristics of dried pellets depend on the initial water content of the oil cake. The appropriate values of water contents were 19.9 - 21.0% w.b. Oil cake pellets were found to contain 6.07% ash and 20.99 MJ/kg caloric value, which are within the standard range of wood pellets. Combustion experiments using a commercial pellet stove demonstrate that oil cake pellets burn as well as wood pellets. Oil cake pellets are useful as a fuel alternative to wood pellets. (author)

  2. Chitosan/bentonite bionanocomposites: morphology and mechanical behavior; Bionanocompositos quitosana/bentonita: morfologia e comportamento mecanico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, C.R.C.; Melo, F.M.A. de [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais; Vitorino, I.F. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais; Fook, M.V.L.; Silva, S.M.L., E-mail: suedina@dema.ufcg.edu.b [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais

    2010-07-01

    This study chitosan/bentonite bionanocomposite films were prepared by solution intercalation process, seeking to investigate the effect of the chitosan/bentonite ratio (5/1 e 10/1) on the morphology and mechanical behavior of the bionanocomposites. It was used as nanophase, Argel sodium bentonite (AN), was provided by Bentonit Uniao Nordeste-BUN (Campina Grande, Brazil) and as biopolymer matrix the chitosan of low molecular weight and degree of deacetylation of 86,7% was supplied by Polymar (Fortaleza, Brazil). The bionanocomposites was investigated by X-ray diffraction and tensile properties. According to the results, the morphology and the mechanical behavior of the bionanocomposite was affected by the ratio of chitosan/bentonite. The chitosan/bentonite ratio (5/1 and 10/1) indicated the formation of an intercalated nanostructure and of the predominantly exfoliated nanostructure, respectively. And the considerable increases in the resistance to the traction were observed mainly for the bionanocomposite with predominantly exfoliated morphology. (author)

  3. Surface modification of a low cost bentonite for post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chao [Department of Chemical Engineering, Inha University, Incheon, 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xinyang Normal University, Henan province, 464000 (China); Park, Dong-Wha [Department of Chemical Engineering, Inha University, Incheon, 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Wha-Seung, E-mail: whasahn@inha.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Inha University, Incheon, 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    A low cost bentonite was modified with PEI (polyethylenimine) through a physical impregnation method. Bentonite in its natural state and after amine modification were characterized by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms, and investigated for CO{sub 2} capture using a thermogravimetric analysis unit connected to a flow panel. The effect of adsorption temperature, PEI loading and CO{sub 2} partial pressure on the CO{sub 2} capture performance of the PEI-modified bentonite was examined. A cyclic CO{sub 2} adsorption–desorption test was also carried out to assess the stability of PEI-modified bentonite as a CO{sub 2} adsorbent. Bentonite in its natural state showed negligible CO{sub 2} uptake. After amine modification, the CO{sub 2} uptake increased significantly due to CO{sub 2} capture by amine species introduced via chemisorption. The PEI-modified bentonites showed high CO{sub 2} capture selectivity over N{sub 2}, and exhibited excellent stability in cyclic CO{sub 2} adsorption–desorption runs.

  4. Investigation on hydraulic properties of compacted GMZ bentonite used as buffer/backfill material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye W. M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past decades, GMZ bentonite has been widely investigated for its use as buffer/backfill materials in China. Based on a comprehensive review of the former studies, achievements on experimental and theoretic works on the hydraulic aspects of compacted GMZ bentonite with consideration of temperature effects are presented in this paper. Water retention property of compacted GMZ bentonite depends on constraint conditions. Temperature effects on water-retention depend on constraint conditions and suction. The hysteresis behaviour is not obvious. Based on the test results, a revised water retention model was developed for considering the temperature effect. The saturated hydraulic conductivity of the densely compacted GMZ bentonite increases as dry density and temperature increases. A revised model, which considers temperature influence on water viscosity and the effective flow cross-sectional area of porous channels, for prediction of saturated hydraulic conductivity have been developed and verified. The unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of confined densely compacted GMZ bentonite samples decreases first and then increases with suction decrease from an initial value of 80 MPa to zero. With consideration of temperature effects and microstructure changes, a revised model for prediction of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of compacted GMZ01 bentonite was proposed.

  5. Stabilization of heavy metals in soil using two organo-bentonites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Xu, Jian; Jiang, Xiaohong; Liu, Cun; McCall, Wesley; Lu, Jinlong

    2017-10-01

    Stabilization of Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg, Cr and As in soil using tetramethylammonium (TMA) and dodecyltrimethylammonium (DTMA) modified bentonites (T-Bents and D-Bents) as amendments was investigated. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was used to quantify the metal mobility after soil treatment. The structural parameters of modified bentonites, including the BET surface area, basal spacing and zeta potential were obtained as a function of the TMA and DTMA loading at 40, 80, 120, 160 and 200% of the bentonite's cation exchange capacity, respectively. The results indicated that the characteristics of the organo-bentonites fundamentally varied depending on the species and concentration of modifiers loaded on bentonite. T-Bents and D-Bents manifested distinct immobilization effectiveness towards various metals. In association with the organo-bentonite characteristics, the main interactive mechanisms for Cu, Zn and Cd proceeded via cation exchange, Hg proceeded via physical adsorption and partitioning, Cr and As proceeded via specific adsorption and electrostatic attraction, respectively. This study provided operational and mechanistic basis for optimizing the organic clay synthesis and selecting as the appropriate amendment for remediation of heavy metal contaminated soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Numerical simulation of reactive processes in an experiment with partially saturated bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingliang; Bauer, Sebastian; Kolditz, Olaf; Nowak, Thomas; Shao, Hua

    2006-02-01

    Bentonites are preferred materials for use as engineered barriers for high-level nuclear waste repositories. Simulation of geochemical processes in bentonite is therefore important for long-term safety assessment of those repositories. In this work, the porewater chemistry of a bentonite sample subject to simultaneous heating and hydration, as studied by Cuevas et al. [Cuevas, J., Villar, M., Fernández, A., Gómez, P., Martín, P., 1997. Porewaters extracted from compacted bentonite subjected to simultaneous heating and hydration. Applied Geochemistry 12, 473-481.], was assessed with a non-isothermal reactive transport model by coupling the geochemical software PHREEQC2 with the object-oriented FEM simulator GeoSys/RockFlow. Reactive transport modelling includes heat transport, two-phase flow, multicomponent transport and geochemical reactions in the liquid phase, i.e. ion exchange, mineral dissolution/precipitation and equilibrium reactions. Simulations show that the easily soluble minerals in bentonite determine the porewater chemistry. Temperature affects both two-phase flow and geochemical reactions. Porosity change due to dissolution/precipitation is low during the experiment. However, changes of the effective porosity caused by bentonite swelling can be very large. The simulated results agree well with the experimental data.

  7. γ-radiation induced corrosion of copper in bentonite-water systems under anaerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin Norrfors, K.; Björkbacka, Åsa; Kessler, Amanda; Wold, Susanna; Jonsson, Mats

    2018-03-01

    In this work we have experimentally studied the impact of bentonite clay on the process of radiation-induced copper corrosion in anoxic water. The motivation for this is to further develop our understanding of radiation-driven processes occurring in deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel where copper canisters containing the spent nuclear fuel will be embedded in compacted bentonite. Experiments on radiation-induced corrosion in the presence and absence of bentonite were performed along with experiments elucidating the impact irradiation on the Cu2+ adsorption capacity of bentonite. The experiments presented in this work show that the presence of bentonite clay has no or very little effect on the magnitude of radiation-induced corrosion of copper in anoxic aqueous systems. The absence of a protective effect similar to that observed for radiation-induced dissolution of UO2 is attributed to differences in the corrosion mechanism. This provides further support for the previously proposed mechanism where the hydroxyl radical is the key radiolytic oxidant responsible for the corrosion of copper. The radiation effect on the bentonite sorption capacity of Cu2+ (reduced capacity) is in line with what has previously been reported for other cations. The reduced cation sorption capacity is partly attributed to a loss of Al-OH sites upon irradiation.

  8. Numerical simulation of reactive processes in an experiment with partially saturated bentonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingliang; Bauer, Sebastian; Kolditz, Olaf; Nowak, Thomas; Shao, Hua

    2006-02-01

    Bentonites are preferred materials for use as engineered barriers for high-level nuclear waste repositories. Simulation of geochemical processes in bentonite is therefore important for long-term safety assessment of those repositories. In this work, the porewater chemistry of a bentonite sample subject to simultaneous heating and hydration, as studied by Cuevas et al. [Cuevas, J., Villar, M., Fernández, A., Gómez, P., Martín, P., 1997. Porewaters extracted from compacted bentonite subjected to simultaneous heating and hydration. Applied Geochemistry 12, 473-481.], was assessed with a non-isothermal reactive transport model by coupling the geochemical software PHREEQC2 with the object-oriented FEM simulator GeoSys/RockFlow. Reactive transport modelling includes heat transport, two-phase flow, multicomponent transport and geochemical reactions in the liquid phase, i.e. ion exchange, mineral dissolution/precipitation and equilibrium reactions. Simulations show that the easily soluble minerals in bentonite determine the porewater chemistry. Temperature affects both two-phase flow and geochemical reactions. Porosity change due to dissolution/precipitation is low during the experiment. However, changes of the effective porosity caused by bentonite swelling can be very large. The simulated results agree well with the experimental data.

  9. The influence of the addition of polymers on the physico-chemical properties of bentonite suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojiljkovic S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite clays have many applications in industries ranging from construction to cosmetics. Addition of polymers can profoundly influence the properties of bentonite suspensions and we now describe the influence of a range of different polymers. Whereas polyvinyl pyrolidone and soy isolate only slightly influenced the pH and the electrical conductivity of bentonite polymers in suspension, Carbopol solution caused decreases in both pH and electrical conductivity. As expected, strong electrolytes like sodium chloride caused big changes in the electrical conductivity of the suspensions. When the temperature of the bentonite suspensions was increased, the pH was almost unchanged, but the electrical conductivity increased. Bentonite treated with polymer suspensions can be used in purifying polluted water; for example, our results suggest that high pH caused by phosphorous salts can be addressed using bentonite modified with Carbopol. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije: Stanisa Stojiljkovic, Vojkan Miljkovic, Goran Nikolic, Ivana Savic and Ivan Savic, TR 34020, Danijela Kostic 172047 and Biljana Arsic 174007

  10. Kapasitas Adsorpsi Bentonit terhadap Sulfur dan Merkuri secara Simultan pada Pembakaran Batubara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhamidi Yusran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pemanfaatan batubara sebagai sumber energi melalui pembakaran langsung akan menghasilkan emisi gas, partikulat trace metal (logam berat dan abu (terutama abu terbang yang akan mencemari udara. Penanganan terhadap pencemaran tersebut merupakan hal yang sangat mendesak. Dalam studi ini ditawarkan penyelesaian secara simultan terhadap emisi SOx dan partikulat logam berat merkuri pada pembakaran batubara peringkat rendah yang ada di Aceh melalui penyerapan menggunakan bentonit alam yang juga terdapat di Aceh (juga di daerah lain di Indonesia. Penggunaan bentonit dapat mengurangi emisi gas SO2 dan partikulat trace metal Hg dalam gas buang dan abu terbang. Bentonit dapat meningkatkan afinitas atau gaya tarik menarik antara Hg dan mineral-mineral dalam bentonit dan sekaligus menurunkan afinitas Hg terhadap S atau SO2. Konsentrasi bentonit dalam kajian ini, tanpa kalsinasi dan langsung dicampur dalam batubara, adalah 0 – 16% dan temperatur pembakaran adalah 700 – 900oC. Hasil yang didapat menunjukkan bahwa kondisi maksimum penyerapan sulfur dan/atau SO2 serta merkuri terjadi pada kandungan bentonit 6% dan temperatur 700oC.

  11. Effect on physical properties of laterite soil with difference percentage of sodium bentonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasim, Nur Aisyah; Azmi, Nor Azizah Che; Mukri, Mazidah; Noor, Siti Nur Aishah Mohd

    2017-08-01

    This research was carried out in an attempt to know the physical properties of laterite soil with the appearance of difference percentage of sodium bentonite. Lateritic soils usually develop in tropical and other regions with similar hot and humid climate, where heavy rainfall, warm temperature and well drainage lead to the formation of thick horizons of reddish lateritic soil profiles rich in iron and aluminium. When sodium predominates, a large amount of water can be absorbed in the interlayer, resulting in the remarkable swelling properties observed with hydrating sodium bentonite. There are some basic physical properties test conducted in this research which are Specific Gravity Test, pH Test, Sieve Analysis, Hydrometer Test, Shrinkage Limit and Atterberg Limit. The test will be conducted with 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% of sodium bentonite. Each test will be repeated three times for the accuracy of the result. From the physical properties test the soil properties characteristic react with the sodium bentonite can be determine. Therefore the best percentage of sodium bentonite admixture can be determined for laterite soil. The outcomes of this study give positive results due to the potential of sodium bentonite to improve the laterite soil particle.

  12. Unexpected difference in phenol sorption on PTMA- and BTMA-bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdan, Marek; Bujacka, Monika; Sabah, Eyup; Gładysz-Płaska, Agnieszka; Pikus, Stanisław; Sternik, Dariusz; Komosa, Zofia; Padewski, Aleksander

    2009-10-01

    The comparison of phenol sorption on phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA)- and benzyltrimethylammonium (BTMA)-bentonite shows a clear difference as far as phenol sorption isotherms are concerned. For PTMA-bentonite the sorption isotherm is of a straight-line character which results from simple partitioning of phenol between the aqueous and organic phases sorbed on the bentonite surface. For BTMA-bentonite the isotherm has a convex shape, characteristic of physicochemical sorption. For the first time a three-parametric model, including the dissociation constant of phenol pK(a), distribution constant of phenol Kd(phen) and phenolate anion Kd(phen)(-) between the aqueous phase and the bentonite phases is used for the evaluation of phenol sorption on organoclays with pH change. The model shows that the values of Kd(phen) are higher than those of Kd(phen)(-) for all investigated initial phenol concentrations. The inspection of the FTIR spectrum of BTMA-bentonite loaded with phenol in the regions 1300-1600 and 1620-1680 cm(-1) shows the features of pi-pi electron interaction between the benzene rings of phenol and the BTMA cation together with the phenol-water hydrogen bond strengthened by this interaction.

  13. Pelletizing using forest fuels and Salix as raw materials. A study of the pelletizing properties; Pelletering med skogsbraensle och Salix som raavara. En undersoekning av pelleterbarheten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinsson, Lars; Oesterberg, Stefan [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2004-08-01

    Three common forest fuels: light thinning material, cull tree and logging residues as well as energy forest fuel (Salix) has been used as fuel pellet materials. Logging residues and Salix were stacked for approximately 6 and 10 months respectively. Parameters varied for each raw material have been the moisture content and the press length of the die. These parameters have been changed to obtain best possible quality, mainly concerning mechanical durability. Pellets were also produced from bark free shavings in order to use as a reference in this study. Physical as well as chemical properties have been compared. It was comparatively easy to press logging residues and Salix into durable pellets and, even with larger press length, the production of pellets was higher than it was for the other raw materials. The density was equal for all pellets while the mechanical durability was better for all tested raw materials compared with the reference material. The fact that all raw materials besides the reference material contains bark which has an improving effect on the degree of hardness. The quality properties were mainly about the same or better for pellets made of light thinning material and cull tree respectively, compared with the reference pellets. However, the ash content was approximately twice as high compared with the reference pellets. The pellets made of logging residues and Salix respectively were of very good quality concerning duration and density but the ash content was approximately 10 times higher than in the reference pellets. Additionally, the nitrogen content was 6-9 times higher compared with the reference pellets.

  14. Effects of pellet characteristics on L-lactic acid fermentation by R. oryzae: pellet morphology, diameter, density, and interior structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yong-Qian; Yin, Long-Fei; Zhu, Hua-Yue; Jiang, Ru; Li, Shuang; Xu, Qing

    2014-11-01

    The effects of pellet morphology, diameter, density, and interior structure on L-lactic acid fermentation by Rhizopus oryzae were characterized for different inoculum sizes and concentrations of peptone and CaCO3. Inoculum size was the most important factor determining pellet formation and diameter. The diameter decreased with increasing inoculum size, and larger pellets were observed for lower inoculum sizes. Peptone concentration had the greatest effect on pellet density, which increased with increasing peptone concentration. L-lactic acid production depended heavily on pellet density but not on pellet diameter. Low-density pellets formed easily under conditions of low peptone concentration and often had a relatively hollow structure, with a thin condensed layer surrounding the pellet and an extraordinarily loose biomass or hollow center. As expected, this structure greatly decreased production. The production of L-lactic acid increased until the density reached a certain level (50-60 kg/m(3)), in which the compact part was distributed homogeneously in the thick outer layer of the pellet and loose in the central layer. Homogeneously structured, denser pellets had limited mass transfer, causing a lower overall turnover rate. However, the interior structure remained nearly constant throughout all fermentation phases for pellets with the same density. CaCO3 concentration only had a slight influence on pellet diameter and density, probably because it increases spore germination and filamentous hypha extension. This work also provides a new analysis method to quantify the interior structure of pellets, thus giving insight into pellet structure and its relationship with productivity.

  15. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources in the Wyoming Thrust Belt Province, Wyoming, Idaho, and Utah, 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Woodall, Cheryl A.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Le, Phuong A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Finn, Thomas M.; Marra, Kristen R.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.

    2018-02-16

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean undiscovered, technically recoverable resources of 26 million barrels of oil and 700 billion cubic feet of gas in the Wyoming Thrust Belt Province, Wyoming, Idaho, and Utah.

  16. Experimental assessment of non-treated bentonite as the buffer material of a radioactive waste repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J; Kang, C H; Whang, J

    2001-05-01

    The bentonite-based material being evaluated in several countries as potential barriers and seals for a nuclear waste disposal system is of mostly sodium type, whereas most bentonite available in Korea is known to be of calcium type. In order to investigate whether local Korean bentonite could be useful as a buffer or sealing material in an HLW repository system, raw bentonites sampled from the south-east area of Korea were examined in terms of their physicochemical properties such as surface area, CEC, swelling rate, and distribution coefficient. The diffusion behavior of some radionuclides of interest in compacted bentonite was also investigated. Considering that HLW generates decay heat over a long time, the thermal effect on the physicochemical properties of bentonite was also included. Four local samples were identified as Ca-bentonite through XRD and chemical analysis. Of the measured values of surface area, CEC and swelling rate of the local samples, Sample-A was found to have the greatest properties as the most likely candidate barrier material. The distribution coefficients of Cs-137, Sr-85, Co-60 and Am-241 for Sample-A sample were measured by the batch method. Sorption equilibrium was reached in around 8 to 10 days, but that of Sr was found to be reached earlier. Comparing the results of this study with the reference data, domestic bentonite was found to have a relatively high sorption ability. For the effect of varying concentration on sorption, the values of Kd peaked at 10(-9)-10(-7) mol/l of radionuclide concentration. In XRD analysis, the (001) peak of Sample-A was fully collapsed above 200 degrees C. The shoulder appearing at about 150 degrees C in the DSC curve was found to be evidence that Sample-A is predominated by Ca-montmorillonite. The loss of swelling capacity and CEC of Sample-A started at about 100 degrees C. The swelling data and the (001) peak intensity of the heat-treated sample showed that they were linearly interrelated. The measured

  17. Cellular uptake and cytotoxic potential of respirable bentonite particles with different quartz contents and chemical modifications in human lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geh, Stefan; Rettenmeier, Albert W.; Dopp, Elke [University Hospital, Institute of Hygiene and Occupational Medicine, Essen (Germany); Yuecel, Raif [University Hospital, Institute of Cell Biology (Cancer Research), Essen (Germany); Duffin, Rodger [Institute of Environmental Health Research (IUF), Duesseldorf (Germany); University of Edinburgh, ELEGI COLT Lab, Scotland (United Kingdom); Albrecht, Catrin; Borm, Paul J.A. [Institute of Environmental Health Research (IUF), Duesseldorf (Germany); Armbruster, Lorenz [Verein fuer Technische Sicherheit und Umweltschutz e.V., Gotha (Germany); Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Bruening, Thomas [Research Institute for Occupational Medicine of the Institutions for Statutory Accident Insurance and Prevention (BGFA), Bochum (Germany); Hoffmann, Eik [University of Rostock, Institute of Biology, Department of Cell Biology and Biosystems Technology, Rostock (Germany)

    2006-02-01

    Considering the biological reactivity of pure quartz in lung cells, there is a strong interest to clarify the cellular effects of respirable siliceous dusts, like bentonites. In the present study, we investigated the cellular uptake and the cytotoxic potential of bentonite particles (Oe< 10 {mu}m) with an {alpha}-quartz content of up to 6% and different chemical modifications (activation: alkaline, acidic, organic) in human lung fibroblasts (IMR90). Additionally, the ability of the particles to induce apoptosis in IMR90-cells and the hemolytic activity was tested. All bentonite samples were tested for endotoxins with the in vitro-Pyrogen test and were found to be negative. Cellular uptake of particles by IMR90-cells was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cytotoxicity was analyzed in IMR90-cells by determination of viable cells using flow cytometry and by measuring of the cell respiratory activity. Induced apoptotic cells were detected by AnnexinV/Propidiumiodide-staining and gel electrophoresis. Our results demonstrate that activated bentonite particles are better taken up by IMR90-cells than untreated (native) bentonite particles. Also, activated bentonite particles with a quartz content of 5-6% were more cytotoxic than untreated bentonites or bentonites with a quartz content lower than 4%. The bentonite samples induced necrotic as well as apoptotic cell death. In general, bentonites showed a high membrane-damaging potential shown as hemolytic activity in human erythrocytes. We conclude that cellular effects of bentonite particles in human lung cells are enhanced after chemical treatment of the particles. The cytotoxic potential of the different bentonites is primarily characterized by a strong lysis of the cell membrane. (orig.)

  18. Mycelial pellet formation by edible ascomycete filamentous fungi, Neurospora intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Ramkumar B; Lennartsson, Patrik R; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2016-12-01

    Pellet formation of filamentous fungi in submerged culture is an imperative topic of fermentation research. In this study, we report for the first time the growth of filamentous ascomycete fungus, Neurospora intermedia in its mycelial pellet form. In submerged culture, the growth morphology of the fungus was successfully manipulated into growing as pellets by modifying various cultivation conditions. Factors such as pH (2.0-10.0), agitation rate (100-150 rpm), carbon source (glucose, arabinose, sucrose, and galactose), the presence of additive agents (glycerol and calcium chloride) and trace metals were investigated for their effect on the pellet formation. Of the various factors screened, uniform pellets were formed only at pH range 3.0-4.0, signifying it as the most influential factor for N. intermedia pellet formation. The average pellet size ranged from 2.38 ± 0.12 to 2.86 ± 0.38 mm. The pellet formation remained unaffected by the inoculum type used and its size showed an inverse correlation with the agitation rate of the culture. Efficient glucose utilization was observed with fungal pellets, as opposed to the freely suspended mycelium, proving its viability for fast-fermentation processes. Scale up of the pelletization process was also carried out in bench-scale airlift and bubble column reactors (4.5 L).

  19. Influence of burner form and pellet type on domestic pellet boiler performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastvorov, D. V.; Osintsev, K. V.; Toropov, E. V.

    2017-10-01

    The study presents combustion and emission results obtained using two serial pellet boilers of the same heating capacity 40 kW. These boilers have been designed by producers for domestic conditions of exploitation. The principal difference between boilers was the type of the burner. The study concerns the efficiency and ecological performance difference between burners of circular and rectangular forms. The features of the combustion process in both types of burners were studied when boiler operated with different sorts of pellets. The results suggest that the burner of circular form excels the rectangular form burner. However, there is some difference of NOx emission between circular and rectangular burners.

  20. Evaluation of Chlorophyll Fluorescence and Biochemical Traits of Lettuce under Drought Stress and Super Absorbent or Bentonite Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Valizadeh Ghale Beig

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of two superabsorbents (natural-bentonite and (synthetic-A 200 on the chlorophyll fluorescence index, proline accumulation, phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity and total carbohydrate in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. was evaluated. For this purpose, a factorial experiment using completely randomized design with superabsorbents at 3 levels (0, 0.15, 0.30 w/w%, drought stress at 2 levels (60 and 100% of field capacity and 4 replicates was conducted. Results showed that photosystem photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm II under drought stress (60% FC as well as lower levels of bentonite superabsorbent polymer reduced. The minimum and maximum proline content were obtained in 0.3% bentonite, 100% FC and 0 benetonite, 60% FC, respectively. The lowest and highest phenolic compounds was corresponded to the highest levels in both super absorbents and control respectively, so that the super absorbent and bentonite, reduced phenolic compounds by 62.65 and 66.21% compared to control. 0 and 0.15 wt % bentonite in high drought stress (60% FC showed the highest and 0.3 wt % bentonite and 100% FC attained the lowest level of antioxidant activity. Control bentonite treatment beds at 60% FC and beds containing 0.3 wt. % bentonite in 100% FC, showed the lowest and the highest total carbohydrate content respectively. Results of this study indicate that bentonite can reduce the negative effects of drought stress similar to artificial super absorbent.

  1. Hydrothermal commercialization baseline for state of Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanny, J.A.; Lunis, B.C. [eds.

    1979-06-01

    Wyoming does have numerous hot springs; but there has been little development effort in geothermal energy, since the state's primary interests are in coal, gas and oil. The hot springs of Thermopolis are among the largest in the world. Recent data from the central portion of the state indicate the potential for electric power generation from geothermal energy. Oil and gas wells (about 70,000) have been drilled in the state and some have geothermal waters that can be utilized for direct applications. The Madison Aquifer extends into the northeastern quadrant of the state and offers considerable potential for geothermal energy. Leasing activity is very limited. Geothermal legislation is basically non-existent, but the State Engineer has the responsibility for protecting the thermal springs. This handbook provides a synopsis of various aspects of the geothermal program in Wyoming. The section on Basic State Data (Section 2) lists government personnel (both legislative and executive branches) who are most directly involved with geothermal development. Some basic demographic data are also included. The various hydrothermal resources and the pertinent geology are summarized in Section 3. Activities (ranging from leases to operational systems) that lead to commercialization are described in Section 4. Plans for various developments are summarized in Section 5, while government assistance to Wyoming projects is list4ed in Section 6. The section on energy use patterns (Section 7) summarizes existing energy use and identifies counties and industries likely to be impacted most by geothermal energy. The section on leasing and permitting policies (Section 8) deals with legal and institutional considerations and includes a time table of institutional procedures for a typical resource to show the interrelationships among various organizations involved in development and regulation of the resource.

  2. Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nealon, Teresa

    2014-06-30

    This report outlines the accomplishments of the Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Technology Institute (WCTI), including creating a website and online course catalog, sponsoring technology transfer workshops, reaching out to interested parties via news briefs and engaging in marketing activities, i.e., advertising and participating in tradeshows. We conclude that the success of WCTI was hampered by the lack of a market. Because there were no supporting financial incentives to store carbon, the private sector had no reason to incur the extra expense of training their staff to implement carbon storage. ii

  3. LARAMIE PEAK WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerstrom, Kenneth; Weisner, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey, most of the Laramie Peak Wilderness study area in Wyoming was concluded to have little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Only three small areas in the northern part, one extending outside the study area to Esterbrook, were found to have probable mineral-resource potential for copper and lead. The geologic setting precludes the presence of fossil-fuel resources in the study area. There are no surface indications that geothermal energy could be developed within or near the study area.

  4. Fuel Pellets from Biomass. Processing, Bonding, Raw Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang

    and paper industry are not sufficient to meet future needs. Therefore, new types and sources of biomass will be used more commonly in the future. Although wood pellet production has been an established process for more than 100 years, little research has been conducted about pellet production; it has mainly...... surface at an elevated temperature played an important role. The second study presented a method of how key processing parameters can be estimated, based on a pellet model and a small number of fast and simple laboratory trials using a single pellet press. The third study investigated the bonding...... mechanisms within a biomass pellet, which indicate that different mechanisms are involved depending on biomass type and pelletizing conditions. Interpenetration of polymer chains and close intermolecular distance resulting in better secondary bonding were assumed to be the key factors for high mechanical...

  5. Microstability analysis of pellet fuelled discharges in MAST

    CERN Document Server

    Garzotti, L; Roach, C M; Valovic, M; Dickinson, D; Naylor, G; Romanelli, M; Scannell, R; Szepesi, G

    2014-01-01

    Reactor grade plasmas are likely to be fuelled by pellet injection. This technique transiently perturbs the profiles, driving the density profile hollow and flattening the edge temperature profile. After the pellet perturbation, the density and temperature profiles relax towards their quasi-steady-state shape. Microinstabilities influence plasma confinement and will play a role in determining the evolution of the profiles in pellet fuelled plasmas. In this paper we present the microstability analysis of pellet fuelled H-mode MAST plasmas. Taking advantage of the unique capabilities of the MAST Thomson scattering system and the possibility of synchronizing the eight lasers with the pellet injection, we were able to measure the evolution of the post-pellet electron density and temperature profiles with high temporal and spatial resolution. These profiles, together with ion temperature profiles measured using a charge exchange diagnostic, were used to produce equilibria suitable for microstability analysis of th...

  6. Pellet-plasma interactions in tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C.T.

    1991-01-01

    confinement time, offset by the accumulation of impurities at the plasma core is brought into focus. A possible remedy is suggested to diminish the effect of the impurities. Plausible arguments are presented to explain the apparent controversial observations on the propagation of a fast cooling front ahead...... of the plasma. The appearance of striations and the curving of the pellet trajectory are discussed in detail. The possibility is described for using these observations to study the plasma current-density distribution as well as the existence of suprathermal electrons....

  7. Decontamination of cesium, strontium, and cobalt from aqueous solutions by bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, M.A. [Univ. of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan); Khan, S.A. [Government F.C. College, Lahore (Pakistan)

    1996-12-31

    Sorption studies of cesium, strontium, and cobalt (Cs, Sr, and Co) on bentonite under various experimental conditions, such as contact time, pH, sorbent and sorbate concentration, and temperature, have been performed. The sorption data for all these metals have been interpreted in terms of Freundlich, Langmuir, and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations. Thermodynamics parameters, such as heat of sorption {Delta}H{degrees}, free energy change {Delta}G{degrees}, and entropy change {Delta}S{degrees}, for the sorption of these metals on bentonite have been calculated. The value of {Delta}H{degrees} shows that the sorption of Cs was exothermic, while the sorption of Sr and Co on bentonite were endothermic in nature. The value of {Delta}G{degrees} for their sorption was negative, showing the spontaneity of the process. The maximum loading capacity of Cs, Sr, and Co were 75.5, 22, and 27.5 meq, respectively, for 100 g of bentonite. The mean free energy E of Cs, Sr, and Co sorption on bentonite was 14.5, 9, and 7.7 kJ/mol, respectively. The value of E indicates that ion exchange may be the predominant mode of sorption for these radionuclides. The desorption studies with 0.01 M CaCl{sub 2} and groundwater at low-metal loading on bentonite showed that about 95% of Cs, 85-90% of Sr, and 97% of Co were irreversibly sorbed. Bentonite could be effectively used for the decontamination of wastewater effluent containing low concentrations of radioactive nuclides of Cs, Sr, and Co. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Sorption of Uranium(VI and Thorium(IV by Jordanian Bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawwaz I. Khalili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purification of raw bentonite was done to remove quartz. This includes mixing the raw bentonite with water and then centrifuge it at 750 rpm; this process is repeated until white purified bentonite is obtained. XRD, XRF, FTIR, and SEM techniques will be used for the characterization of purified bentonite. The sorption behavior of purified Jordanian bentonite towards and Th4+ metal ions in aqueous solutions was studied by batch experiment as a function of pH, contact time, temperature, and column techniques at 25.0∘C and . The highest rate of metal ions uptake was observed after 18 h of shaking, and the uptake has increased with increasing pH and reached a maximum at . Bentonite has shown high metal ion uptake capacity toward uranium(VI than thorium(IV. Sorption data were evaluated according to the pseudo- second-order reaction kinetic. Sorption isotherms were studied at temperatures 25.0∘C, 35.0∘C, and 45.0∘C. The Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R sorption models equations were applied and the proper constants were derived. It was found that the sorption process is enthalpy driven for uranium(VI and thorium(IV. Recovery of uranium(VI and thorium(IV ions after sorption was carried out by treatment of the loaded bentonite with different concentrations of HNO3 1.0 M, 0.5 M, 0.1 M, and 0.01 M. The best percent recovery for uranium(VI and thorium(IV was obtained when 1.0 M HNO3 was used.

  9. Prolonged release matrix pellets prepared by melt pelletization. I. Process variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, L.J.; Schaefer, T.; Sonnergaard, Jørn

    1993-01-01

    A melt pelletization process was investigated in an 8 litre laboratory scale high shear mixer using a formulation with paracetamol, glyceryl monostearate 40-50, and microcrystalline wax. The effects of jacket temperature, product temperature during massing, product load, massing time and impeller...... to be important process variables. Remarkably low in vitro drug release rates were observed in USP-dissolution tests....

  10. New Pellet Injection Schemes on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, P.M.; Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Foust, C.R.; Jernigan, T.C.; Robinson, J.I.

    1999-11-13

    The pellet fueling system on DIII-D has been modified for injection of deuterium pellets from two vertical ports and two inner wall locations on the magnetic high-field side (HFS) of the tokamak. The HFS pellet injection technique was first employed on ASDEX-Upgrade with significant improvements reported in both pellet penetration and fueling efficiency. The new pellet injection schemes on DIII-D required the installation of new guide tubes. These lines are {approx_equal}12.5 m in total length and are made up of complex bends and turns (''roller coaster'' like) to route pellets from the injector to the plasma, including sections inside the torus. The pellet speed at which intact pellets can survive through the curved guide tubes is limited ({approx_equal}200-300 m/s for HFS injection schemes). Thus, one of the three gas guns on the injector was modified to provide pellets in a lower speed regime than the original guns (normal speed range {approx_equal}500 to 1000 m/s). The guide tube installations and gun modifications are described along with the injector operating parameters, and the latest test results are highlighted.

  11. Germinação de sementes de cenoura osmoticamente condicionadas e peletizadas com diversos ingredientes Germination of carrot seed primed and pelleted with several ingredients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warley M Nascimento

    2009-03-01

    seeders is generally very difficult. Seed pelleting has been used to improve sowing and consequently the stand establishment. Pelleted seeds generally present lower germination rate than raw seeds from the same seed lot. Seed priming has been used to increase germination rate of several species. Various binder materials for seed pelleting were evaluated and the relation between the osmoconditioning and germination of pellet seeds verified, using 'Alvorada' carrot cultivar. The pellet was obtained through a mixture of equal parts of microcelulose and sand as filling materials; five binder materials were also evaluated: bentonite, methocel, opadry, rhoximat and arabic gum. Part of the pelleted seeds received an external coat treatment (iriodin. Raw seeds were included as control. In another study, seeds were primed in an aerated solution of polyethylene glycol, dried and then pelleted. Rhoximat and opadry showed better characteristics as binder materials presenting pellets with smooth surface, uniform and excellent external appearance. In general, seed pellets showed a slight decrease of the germination rate and total germination compared to raw seeds, with greather differences for pellets finished with iriodin. Priming enhanced the germination rate of pelleted carrot seeds.

  12. Review of the properties and uses of bentonite as a buffer and backfill material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, D.; Lind, A. [QuantiSci Ltd., Melton Mowbray (United Kingdom); Arthur, R.C. [QuantiSci lnc., Denver, CO (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Research carried out by SKB on the use and behaviour of bentonite as a buffer and backfill material in a radioactive waste repository has been reviewed. The following research areas have been evaluated: mechanical properties; hydraulic and other transport properties; geochemical properties; thermal properties and resaturation; gas migration; manufacturing and emplacement procedures. This review has shown that SKB has carried out much pioneering and world-leading research on bentonite, particularly with regard to analogue studies, microtextural work and practical manufacturing and emplacement procedures. However, there are a number of subject areas which appear less well addressed than others which require further attention: The extrapolation of experimental results of the mechanical properties of bentonite to repository timescales and repository conditions should be investigated further. There is a need for detailed microstructural analysis of materials as part of experimental programmes. This would enable SKB to build confidence in the interpretations of results and reveal whether the mechanical processes occurring during experimentation truly reflect expectations of the performance of the repository. The large amount of experimental, theoretical, empirical datasets and computer models of the mechanical properties of bentonite need to be collated to form a database which is assessable and relevant to those involved in performance assessment calculations. At present, the valuable results of many excellent research projects on mechanical properties of bentonite buffer are not readily available. There seems to be a relatively poor understanding of the mechanisms of radionuclide diffusion through compacted bentonite. Other international work suggests that diffusion coefficients are much lower than those applied by SKB in its PA work. The importance of surface diffusion to describe diffusion in bentonite for certain chemical species ascribed by SKB is not reflected in

  13. Fuel pellets from biomass - Processing, bonding, raw materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelte, W.

    2011-12-15

    The present study investigates several important aspects of biomass pelletization. Seven individual studies have been conducted and linked together, in order to push forward the research frontier of biomass pelletization processes. The first study was to investigate influence of the different processing parameters on the pressure built up in the press channel of a pellet mill. It showed that the major factor was the press channel length as well as temperature, moisture content, particle size and extractive content. Furthermore, extractive migration to the pellet surface at an elevated temperature played an important role. The second study presented a method of how key processing parameters can be estimated, based on a pellet model and a small number of fast and simple laboratory trials using a single pellet press. The third study investigated the bonding mechanisms within a biomass pellet, which indicate that different mechanisms are involved depending on biomass type and pelletizing conditions. Interpenetration of polymer chains and close intermolecular distance resulting in better secondary bonding were assumed to be the key factors for high mechanical properties of the formed pellets. The outcome of this study resulted in study four and five investigating the role of lignin glass transition for biomass pelletization. It was demonstrated that the softening temperature of lignin was dependent on species and moisture content. In typical processing conditions and at 8% (wt) moisture content, transitions were identified to be at approximately 53-63 deg. C for wheat straw and about 91 deg. C for spruce lignin. Furthermore, the effects of wheat straw extractives on the pelletizing properties and pellet stability were investigated. The sixth and seventh study applied the developed methodology to test the pelletizing properties of thermally pre-treated (torrefied) biomass from spruce and wheat straw. The results indicated that high torrefaction temperatures above 275 deg

  14. On the hydro-mechanical behaviour of MX80 bentonite-based materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jun Cui

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite-based materials have been considered in many countries as engineered barrier/backfilling materials in deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. During the long period of waste storage, these materials will play an essential role in ensuring the integrity of the storage system that consists of the waste canisters, the engineered barrier/backfill, the retaining structures as well as the geological barrier. Thus, it is essential to well understand the hydro-mechanical behaviours of these bentonite-based materials. This review paper presents the recent advances of knowledge on MX80 bentonite-based materials, in terms of water retention properties, hydraulic behaviour and mechanical behaviour. Emphasis is put on the effect of technological voids and the role of the dry density of bentonite. The swelling anisotropy is also discussed based on the results from swelling tests with measurements of both axial and radial swelling pressures on a sand-bentonite mixture compacted at different densities. Microstructure observation was used to help the interpretation of macroscopic hydro-mechanical behaviour. Also, the evolution of soil microstructure thus the soil density over time is discussed based on the results from mock-up tests. This evolution is essential for understanding the long-term hydro-mechanical behaviour of the engineered barrier/backfill.

  15. FRACTAL ANALYSIS OF PHYSICAL ADSORPTION ON SURFACES OF ACID ACTIVATED BENTONITES FROM SERBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Rožić

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Solid surfaces are neither ideally regular, that is, morphological and energeticcally homogeneous, nor are they fully irregular or fractal. Instead, real solid surfaces exhibit a limited degree of organization quantified by the fractal dimension, D. Fractal analysis was applied to investigate the effect of concentrations of HCl solutions on the structural and textural properties of chemically activated bentonite from southern Serbia. Acid treatment of bentonites is applied in order to remove impurities and various exchangeable cations from bentonite clay. Important physical changes in acid-activated smectite are the increase of the specific surface area and of the average pore volume, depending on acid strength, time and temperature of a treatment. On the basis of the sorption-structure analysis, the fractal dimension of the bentonite surfaces was determined by Mahnke and Mögel method. The fractal dimension evaluated by this method was 2.11 for the AB3 and 1.94 for the AB4.5 sample. The estimation of the values of the fractal dimension of activated bentonites was performed in the region of small pores, 0.5 nm < rp < 2 nm.

  16. THE IMPACT OF LABORATORY AIR TEMPERATURE AND RELATIVE HUMIDITY ON BENTONITE WATER ABSORPTION CAPACITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Strgar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite, which is a mineral component of geosynthetic clay liners, has important physical and chemical properties that ensure very small hydraulic permeability. The main component of bentonite is a clay mineral called sodium montmorillonite whose very low permeability is due to its ability to swell. The deposits of bentonite are spread all over the world, however, only a very small number of those deposits satisfies all the quality and durability demands that must be met if the bentonite is to be used in the sealing barriers. Depending on the location of installation and their purpose, geosynthetic clay liners must meet certain requirements. Their compatibility with the prescribed criterion is confirmed through various laboratory procedures. Amongst them are tests examining the index indicators (free swell index, fluid loss index, and water absorption capacity. This paper presents results regarding the impact of laboratory air temperature and relative humidity of the testing area on the water absorption capacity. This is one of the criteria that bentonite must satisfy during the quality and durability control of the mineral component of geosynthetic clay liner (the paper is published in Croatian.

  17. Adsorption behavior of a textile dye of Reactive Blue 19 from aqueous solutions onto modified bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goek, Ozer; Ozcan, A. Safa [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Anadolu University, Yunusemre Campus, 26470 Eskisehir (Turkey); Ozcan, Adnan, E-mail: aozcan@anadolu.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Anadolu University, Yunusemre Campus, 26470 Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2010-06-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate adsorption kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamic parameters of Reactive Blue 19 (RB19) onto modified bentonite from aqueous solutions. The effects of pH, contact time, initial dye concentration and temperature were investigated in the experimentally. Natural bentonite was modified by using 1,6-diamino hexane (DAH) as a modifying agent. The characterization of modified bentonite (DAH-bentonite) was accomplished by using FTIR, TGA, BET and elemental analysis techniques. The optimum pH value for the adsorption experiments was found to be 1.5 and all the experiments were carried out at this pH value. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model agrees very well with the experimental results. Equilibrium data were also fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm model in the studied concentration range of RB19 at 20 deg. C. The results indicate that DAH-modified bentonite is a suitable adsorbent for the adsorption of textile dyes.

  18. Kinetics of metribuzin release from bentonite-polymer composites in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sonalika; Manjaiah, K M; Datta, S C; Ahmed Shabeer, T P; Kumar, Jitendra

    2014-01-01

    A series of bentonite polymer-composites (BPCs) loaded with metribuzin were studied for their controlled release in aqueous medium. The release of active ingredient from BPCs was significantly lower as compared to commercial metribuzin formulation. The results revealed that the cumulative metribuzin release was highest (81%) from the BPCs containing 8% clay (commercial bentonite) and 2% metribuzin which correspond to the lowest (14 days) half-life values i.e., time required for 50% release of active ingredient (t1/2). The metribuzin release from the BPCs decreased with increased concentration of clays in polymer matrix and the release was further decreased with BPCs prepared with pure nano-bentonite. BPCs containing 12% clay and 2% metribuzin showed maximum t1/2 values i.e., 25 and 51 days for commercial bentonite and pure nano-bentonite as clay sources, respectively. The differential behaviour in the metribuzin release rates from BPCs was ascribed due to variations in crosslinking of metribuzin in the composites. As metribuzin release was found to be slower in BPCs compared to commercial formulation, it could be used for control of weeds tailored to different crops.

  19. Photodegradation of Methylene Blue by TiO2-Fe3O4-Bentonite Magnetic Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fe3O4-bentonite nanoparticles have been prepared by a coprecipitation technique under a nitrogen atmosphere. An aqueous suspension of bentonite was first modified with FeCl2 and FeCl3. TiO2 was then loaded onto the surface of the Fe3O4-bentonite by a sol-gel method. After sufficient drying, the colloidal solution was placed in a muffle furnace at 773 K to obtain the TiO2-Fe3O4-bentonite composite. The material has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM. Morphological observation showed that Fe3O4 and TiO2 nanoparticles had been adsorbed on the surface of bentonite nanoneedles. The material was then applied for the photodegradation of the azo dye methylene blue (MB. It was found that the removal efficiency of MB exceeded 90% under UV illumination, and that only a 20% mass loss was incurred after six cycles. The composite material thus showed good photocatalytic performance and recycling properties.

  20. Polypropylene Fiber Amendments to Alleviate Initiation and Evolution of Desiccation Cracks in Bentonite Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuller, M.; Gebrenegus, T. B.

    2009-12-01

    Sodium saturated bentonite is a major constituent of compacted and geosynthetic liners and covers for hydraulic isolation of hazardous waste, playing a crucial role in protecting groundwater and other environmental resources from harmful landfill leachates. Due to favorable hydraulic properties (i.e., low permeability), large surface area and associated adsorption capacity for particular contaminants, and relative abundance and low cost, bentonite is the material of choice in many modern waste containment systems. However, long-term interactions between bentonite and waste leachate and exposure of bentonite to desiccative conditions may significantly deteriorate liner or cover performance and ultimately lead to failure of containment systems. In the presented study, the potential usefulness of polypropylene fiber amendments for preventing initiation and evolution of desiccation cracks, while maintaining acceptably low permeability under saturated conditions was investigated. Well-controlled desiccation experiments were conducted using initially saturated bentonite-sand mixtures that contained varying amounts of polypropylene fibers. Initiation and evolution of surface cracks were observed by means of X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT). Advanced image analysis techniques were employed to characterize and quantify 2-D and 3-D features of the evolving crack networks. Potential negative effects of employed additives on saturated hydraulic conductivity were determined with fully-automated Flexible Wall Permeametry (FWP).

  1. Improving the quality of biopolymer (poly lactic acid) with the addition of bentonite as filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryani; Agusnar, Harry; Wirjosentono, Basuki; Rihayat, Teuku; Nurhanifa

    2017-07-01

    PLA (Poly Lactid Acid) - Bentonite polymer nanocomposite which is a combination of natural and nanometer-scale inorganic substances created through three processes, mixing using a melt blending, molding with a hot press using specimens Standard ASTM D 638 Type IV and drying. In this study, PLA combined with two types of natural bentonite obtained from different areas to find differences in the quality of the results of characterization. To optimize the performance of filler, before mixing, bentonite have to furificate first with (NaPO3)6 and also open the interlayer space with CTAB. D-spacing of bentonite imterlayer were analyze by X-Ray difraction (XRD). Characterization bionanocomposite resulting morphologic structure was tested using a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). Mechanical analysis of PLA-bentonite nanocomposite in the form of tensile strength was tested using a tensile test specimens of standard American Standard for Testing Materials (ASTM) D 638 Type 4, and thermal resistance using Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA).

  2. Microbial incidence on copper and titanium embedded in compacted bentonite clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Joergen; Lydmark, Sara; Edlund, Johanna; Paeaejaervi, Anna; Pedersen, Karsten (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden))

    2011-10-15

    The incidence of bacteria on metal surfaces was examined in an experimental setting simulating conditions of the proposed Swedish concept for disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Titanium and copper rods were embedded in compacted bentonite clay saturated with groundwater collected at a depth of 450 m. Bentonite blocks were exposed to an external flux of groundwater with or without added lactate or H{sub 2} for up to 203 days. Bacterial accumulation on metal rods and in the surrounding bentonite was analyzed using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), with genetic markers for overall bacterial presence (16S rDNA) as well as specific for sulfate-reducing bacteria (apsA). Clay species composition was analyzed by cloning and sequencing 16S rDNA extracted from the clay. Results suggest limited bacterial accumulation on metal surfaces, amounting to a maximum of approximately 106 apsA copies cm-2, corresponding to a 3.7% coverage of metal surfaces. Bacterial species composition appeared to be a mix of species originating from the bentonite clay and from the added groundwater, including an apparently high proportion of sulfate-reducing bacteria. While titanium surfaces exhibited higher bacterial presence than did copper surfaces, neither the degree of bentonite compaction nor the addition of lactate or H{sub 2} appeared to have any effect on the bacterial incidence on metal surfaces

  3. Evaluation of impact strength of polyamide 6/bentonite clay nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz, Rene Anisio; Araujo, Edcleide Maria; Tomas Jeferson Alves; Amanda Damiao; Medeiros, Vanessa da Nobrega [Federal University of Campina Grande (CCT/UFCG), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Pessan, Luiz Antonio [Federal University of Sao Carlos (DEMa/UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Materials Engineering Department

    2012-07-15

    Nanocomposites of polymer/clay have had much attention in recent years, particularly those developed with layered silicates due to the need of engineering materials more efficient than pure polymers for certain applications. The level of exfoliation of layered silicates in crystalline structure of polymer matrices has been studied and has been observed that it affects the crystalline behavior and the physical and mechanical properties. In this study, nanocomposites of polyamide 6 were obtained by the melt intercalation method, using a Brazilian bentonite modified with a quaternary ammonium salt. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) results showed the incorporation of salt among the layers of clay, making it organophilic and that the nanocomposites presented exfoliated and/or partially exfoliated structures and confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By thermogravimetry (TG), the results indicated that the presence of clay increased the thermal stability of polyamide 6. The impact properties of the nanocomposites showed inferior values in relation to the pure polyamide, in other words, decrease the toughness. (author)

  4. Evaluation of impact strength of polyamide 6/bentonite clay nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Anisio Paz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites of polymer/clay have had much attention in recent years, particularly those developed with layered silicates due to the need of engineering materials more efficient than pure polymers for certain applications. The level of exfoliation of layered silicates in crystalline structure of polymer matrices has been studied and has been observed that it affects the crystalline behavior and the physical and mechanical properties. In this study, nanocomposites of polyamide 6 were obtained by the melt intercalation method, using a Brazilian bentonite modified with a quaternary ammonium salt. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD results showed the incorporation of salt among the layers of clay, making it organophilic and that the nanocomposites presented exfoliated and/or partially exfoliated structures and confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. By thermogravimetry (TG, the results indicated that the presence of clay increased the thermal stability of polyamide 6. The impact properties of the nanocomposites showed inferior values in relation to the pure polyamide, in other words, decrease the toughness.

  5. Sorption and desorption of silver ions by bentonite clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Leonel Vinicius; Quirino, Juliana Nunes; Monteiro, Alessandra Maffei; Abrão, Taufik; Parreira, Paulo Sérgio; Urbano, Alexandre; Santos, Maria Josefa

    2017-04-01

    Anthropogenic activities have increased the concentration of metal species in the environment. The toxicity of silver ions to aquatic and terrestrial organisms has required monitoring by analytical methods, besides actions to promote its control as pollutant. Sorption and desorption processes are directly related to the mobility and availability of metal ions in the environment. In this context, clay minerals can be used for pre-concentration, removal and recovery of silver ions from aqueous solution. Herein, two bentonite clays (BaVC-1 and SWy-2) were characterised and applied to investigate the sorption and desorption of silver ions. Isotherms were fitted to the dual-mode Langmuir-Freundlich model to qualify and quantify sorption sites and evaluate the mobilisation process. The maximum sorption capacity was 743 and 849 meq kg -1 for BaVC-1 and SWy-2, respectively. Hysteresis index (HI) and mobilisation factor (MF) suggest that the desorption of silver ions in BaVC-1 is about four times more conducive compared to that in SWy-2, although both materials have demonstrated a great potential for Ag + pre-concentration from aqueous solutions.

  6. Transport of heavy metals and chemical compatibility of hydraulic conductivity of a compacted sand-bentonite mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanthanit Charoenthaisong

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Clayey soils are usually used as barrier material in landfill liners because of its low hydraulic conductivity and high sorption capacity. Bentonite, which consists mainly of montmorillonite, has a high cation exchange capacity resulting in a high retention capacity of heavy metals. Sand is a permeable material but its hydraulic conductivity decreases significantly when mixed with bentonite. However, using a sand-bentonite mixture as landfill liners is questionable, because the hydraulic conductivity of the sand-bentonite mixture may increase when permeated with heavy metal solutions, which are normally found in landfill leachates. In this paper, transport of heavy metals through a compacted sand-bentonite mixture and its chemical compatibility were studied through the batch adsorption test, the column test, and the hydraulic conductivity test.Experimental results indicate that the sorption capacity of the bentonite, ranked in descending order, was Cr3+, Pb2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, and Ni2+, respectively. The diffusion coefficients of the sand-bentonite mixture were in the order of 10-5 cm2/s and the retardation factors were 130, 115, 111, and 90 for Pb2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+, respectively. The hydraulic conductivity of thesand-bentonite mixture was only compatible with a chromium solution having a concentration not greater than 0.001 M.

  7. Report on Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Laboratory Tests Performed by CIEMAT on Febex Bentonite 2004-2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Gomez-Espina, R.

    2009-11-25

    The results of the laboratory studies performed by CIEMAT with the FEBEX bentonite in the context of WP3.2 of the NF-PRO Project and of the Agreement ENRESA-CIEMAT Anexo V are presented and analysed in this report. They refer to the effect of the hydraulic gradient on the permeability of bentonite, the effect of the thermal gradient on the hydration kinetics of bentonite, and the repercussion of temperature on the hydro-mechanical properties of bentonite (swelling, permeability and water retention capacity). In all the cases the bentonite has been used compacted to densities expected in the engineered barrier of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The existence of threshold and critical hydraulic gradients has been observed, both of them dependent on bentonite density and water pressures. After more than seven years of hydration, the 40-cm high bentonite columns are far from full saturation, the thermal gradient additionally delaying the process, which is very slow. Temperatures below 100 degree centigrade slightly decrease the swelling and the water retention capacity of the bentonite and increase its permeability. The information obtained improves the knowledge on the behaviour of expansive clay and will help the development of constitutive models and the interpretation of the results obtained in the mock-up and the in situ tests. (Author) 35 refs.

  8. Dielectric characterization of Bentonite clay at various moisture contents and with mixtures of biomass in the microwave spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study assesses the potential for using bentonite as a microwave absorber for microwave-assisted biomass pyrolysis based on the dielectric properties. Dielectric properties of bentonite at different moisture contents were measured using a coaxial line dielectric probe and vector network analyzer...

  9. A coupled THC model of the FEBEX in situ test with bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.

    2011-04-01

    The performance assessment of a geological repository for radioactive waste requires quantifying the geochemical evolution of the bentonite engineered barrier. This barrier will be exposed to coupled thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes. This paper presents a coupled THC model of the FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) in situ test which accounts for bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis. Model results attest the relevance of thermal osmosis and bentonite swelling for the geochemical evolution of the bentonite barrier while chemical osmosis is found to be almost irrelevant. The model has been tested with data collected after the dismantling of heater 1 of the in situ test. The model reproduces reasonably well the measured temperature, relative humidity, water content and inferred geochemical data. However, it fails to mimic the solute concentrations at the heater-bentonite and bentonite-granite interfaces because the model does not account for the volume change of bentonite, the CO{sub 2}(g) degassing and the transport of vapor from the bentonite into the granite. The inferred HCO{sub 3}{sup -} and pH data cannot be explained solely by solute transport, calcite dissolution and protonation/deprotonation by surface complexation, suggesting that such data may be affected also by other reactions.

  10. NPDES Permit for Shoshone Utility Organization in Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit WY-0044580, the Shoshone Utility Organization is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility located in Fremont County, Wyoming to an unnamed irrigation drainage ditch tributary to the South Fork of the Little Wind R.

  11. Oil field produced water discharges into wetlands in Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Approximately 600 oil field produced water discharges are permitted in Wyoming by the State’s Department of Environmental Quality's (WDEQ) National Pollutant...

  12. Rare behaviour of a catalyst pellet catalyst dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.; Loonen, R.A.; Martens, A.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature overshoots and undershoots were found for a Pd on alumina catalyst pellet in its course towards a new steady state after a change in concentration of one of the reactants ethylene or hydrogen. When cooling the pellet, after heat-up by reaction, with pure hydrogen a sudden temperature

  13. Ablation of Hydrogen Pellets in Hydrogen and Helium Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L W; Sillesen, Alfred Hegaard; Øster, Flemming

    1975-01-01

    Measurements on the interaction between solid hydrogen pellets and rotating plasmas are reported. The investigations were carried out because of the possibility of refuelling fusion reactors by the injection of pellets. The ablation rate found is higher than expected on the basis of a theory...

  14. Wood pellet market and trade: A global perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goh, C.S.; Cocchi, M.; Junginger, H.M.; Marchal, D.; Thrän, D.; Hennig, C.; Heinimo, J.; Nikolaisen, L.; Schouwenberg, P.P.; Bradley, D.; Hess, R.F.; Jacobson, J.; Ovard, L.; Deutmeyer, M.

    2013-01-01

    This perspective provides an overview of wood pellet markets in a number of countries of high signifi cance, together with an inventory of market factors and relevant past or existing policies. In 2010, the estimated global wood pellet production and consumption were close to 14.3 Mt (million

  15. Automatic control system for uniformly paving iron ore pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bowen; Qian, Xiaolong

    2014-05-01

    In iron and steelmaking industry, iron ore pellet qualities are crucial to end-product properties, manufacturing costs and waste emissions. Uniform pellet pavements on the grate machine are a fundamental prerequisite to ensure even heat-transfer and pellet induration successively influences performance of the following metallurgical processes. This article presents an automatic control system for uniformly paving green pellets on the grate, via a mechanism mainly constituted of a mechanical linkage, a swinging belt, a conveyance belt and a grate. Mechanism analysis illustrates that uniform pellet pavements demand the frontend of the swinging belt oscillate at a constant angular velocity. Subsequently, kinetic models are formulated to relate oscillatory movements of the swinging belt's frontend to rotations of a crank link driven by a motor. On basis of kinetic analysis of the pellet feeding mechanism, a cubic B-spline model is built for numerically computing discrete frequencies to be modulated during a motor rotation. Subsequently, the pellet feeding control system is presented in terms of compositional hardware and software components, and their functional relationships. Finally, pellet feeding experiments are carried out to demonstrate that the control system is effective, reliable and superior to conventional methods.

  16. Biosorption of copper (II) from aqueous solution by mycelial pellets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study, mycelial pellets of Rhizopus oryzae (MPRO) were investigated as a potential biosorbent for the removal of copper (II) from aqueous solution. The effects of the pellet diameter, solution pH, contact time, initial copper (II) concentration and temperature were studied. The optimum diameter and pH for ...

  17. Colpoda secrete viable Listeria monocytogenes within faecal pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghu Nadhanan, Rethish; Thomas, Connor J

    2014-02-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was used to demonstrate that co-cultures of the ciliate Colpoda RR (an environmental isolate) and Colpoda MLS-5 (a food processing environment isolate) with the pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes DRDC8 resulted in secretion of faecal pellets containing intact DRDC8 cells. A green fluorescent protein expressing variant of DRDC8 was used in co-cultures to confirm that the pellet-associated bacterial cells were L. monocytogenes. Viability was confirmed by plate counts, and assay of microbial respiratory activity-proved DRDC8 cells present within faecal pellets was metabolically active. Following treatment of faecal pellets secreted by Colpoda RR and MLS-5 with gentamycin and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), no loss of viability of the pellet-located DRDC8 cells was observed, indicating that faecal pellet encapsulated DRDC8 cells are resistant to biocidal agents. This work suggests that Colpoda-derived faecal pellets may provide a mechanism for transmission of L. monocytogenes and other pathogenic bacteria. Furthermore, bacteria encapsulated by faecal pellets may be resistant to disinfectants and cleaning agents used in food manufacturing and preparation facilities. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Microgasification cookstoves and pellet fuels from waste biomass: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lotter;Msola Hunter;Straub

    relative efficiency and cost of the major urban cooking fuels - charcoal and liquefied natural gas (LNG) .... stoves designed for low-density biomass such as ..... Solid fuels. Pellets were placed in the fuel chamber and ignited with approximately 30 ml of kerosene. The initial amount of pellets was 1 kg except the Philips, whose ...

  19. Uranium assessment for the Precambrian pebble conglomerates in southeastern Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgman, L.E.; Sever, C.; Quimby, W.F.; Andrew, M.E.; Karlstrom, K.E.; Houston, R.S.

    1981-03-01

    This volume is a geostatistical resource estimate of uranium and thorium in quartz-pebble conglomerates, and is a companion to Volume 1: The Geology and Uranium Potential to Precambrian Conglomerates in the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming; and to Volume 2: Drill-Hole Data, Drill-Site Geology, and Geochemical Data from the Study of Precambrian Uraniferous Conglomerates of the Medicine Bow Mountains and the Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming.

  20. MX-80 Bentonite. thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Characterisation Performed at CIEMAT in the Context of the Prototype Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.

    2005-07-01

    This document details the results of the thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) characterisation of the commercial MX-80 bentonite performed by CIEMAT from 2001 to 2004 in the context of a project carried out at the AEspoe Hard Rock Laboratory (Sweden), the Prototype Repository. The swelling pressure and the permeability of the bentonite compacted to different dry densities has been determined, as well as the influence of the permeant salinity on hydraulic conductivity. The influence of salinity on the retention capacity of the compacted bentonite has been studied. For that, a new methodology has been designed. Water retention curves have been determined at temperatures of 20 and 60oC. Suction controlled odometer tests have been performed at 20oC. Finally, the behaviour of the MX-80 bentonite has been compared to that of the Spanish FEBEX bentonite. (Author) 13 refs.

  1. Paraformaldehyde pellet not necessary in vacuum-pumped maple sap system

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Clay Smith; Carter B. Gibbs

    1970-01-01

    In a study of sugar maple sap collection through a vacuum-pumped plastic tubing system, yields were compared between tapholes in which paraformaldehyde pellets were used and tapholes without pellets, Use of the pellets did not increase yield.

  2. Ocular trauma from paintball-pellet war games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, John O; Feist, Richard M; White, Milton F

    2002-02-01

    We studied ocular injuries and visual outcome after blunt trauma from paintball pellets. We retrospectively reviewed cases of ocular injury from paintball pellets occurring over 32 months. Ten cases of ocular injury from paintball pellets were recorded. Most patients (9) were injured at home or at a friend's home; only 1 was injured at a war game facility. Six patients had surgery. Final visual acuity was 20/25 or better in 6 patients, 20/30 to 20/50 in 2 patients, 20/60 to 20/100 in 2 patients, and 20/200 in 1 patient. Traumatic maculopathy and epiretinal membrane formation were determinants of worse final visual acuity. Paintball pellet ocular injuries occur more frequently at home than at war game facilities. Advanced surgical techniques offer decreased ocular morbidity and improved visual acuity. Decreasing visual morbidity from paintball pellets requires public education, proper product labeling, and packaging of eye protection with all paintball-related products.

  3. The Self-Reducing Pellet Production from Organic Household Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Alberto; Takano, Cyro; Mourão, Marcelo; Pillihuaman, Adolfo

    The organic household waste has a growing disposal problem, requiring costly disposal systems. It is necessary to find new applications for these materials; one could be the steelmaking raw material production. In this paper is studied the development of self-reducing pellets from the organic waste pyrolysis, where is generated carbon and condensable and non-condensable volatiles. Non-condensable volatiles were burned and condensable volatiles were recovered. The resulting tar was mixed with iron ore, coal powder and flux (CaO), to then be pelletized together. Compression, falls and tumbler tests were conducted to characterize the pellets before and after heat treatment and reduction processes. The reduction curve and their physical and morphological characterization were measured. The results were as was expected, the fluidized coal create sufficient adhesion that pellets earned resistance with an equivalent resistance of common pellets, showing a good feasibility of this process.

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF BENTONITE FOR ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEMS IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL SITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubravko Domitrović

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Engineered barrier systems are used in radioactive waste disposal sites in order to provide better protection of humans and the environment from the potential hazards associated with the radioactive waste disposal. The engineered barrier systems usually contain cement or clay (bentonite because of their isolation properties and long term performance. Quality control tests of clays are the same for all engineering barrier systems. Differences may arise in the required criteria to be met due for different application. Prescribed clay properties depend also on the type of host rocks. This article presents radioactive waste management based on best international practice. Standard quality control procedures for bentonite used as a sealing barrier in radioactive waste disposal sites are described as some personal experiences and results of the index tests (free swelling index, water adsorption capacity, plasticity limits and hydraulic permeability of bentonite (the paper is published in Croatian.

  5. Physico-chemical characteristics of nano-organo bentonite prepared using different organo-modifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Motawie

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Different types of nano-organo bentonite (NOB were prepared from the Egyptian Bentonite (EB. EB was characterized by energy dispersive X-ray EDX. It was purified from different impurities using a conventional method via the treatment with HCl and distilled water. The modification of the clay was carried out using different types of organo-modifiers namely; hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (HTAB, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (Silane, octadecylamine (ODA, and dodecylamine (DDA. The cation exchange capacity (CEC was measured for pristine bentonite after and before modification. The NB was characterized by FTIR, XRD, TEM, and TGA techniques. The obtained results indicated that variation of the interlayer space gallery was effected by the type of the penetrator used.

  6. Water retention behaviour of compacted bentonites: experimental observations and constitutive model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieudonne Anne-Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite-based materials are studied as potential barriers for the geological disposal of radioactive waste. In this context, the hydro-mechanical behaviour of the engineered barrier is first characterized by free swelling conditions followed by constant volume conditions. This paper presents an experimental study conducted in order to characterize the water retention behaviour of a compacted MX-80 bentonite/sand mixture. Then, based on observations of the material double structure and the water retention mechanisms in compacted bentonites, a new water retention model is proposed. The model considers adsorbed water in the microstructure and capillary water in the aggregate-porosity. The model is calibrated and validated against the experimental data. It is used for better understanding competing effects between volume change and water uptake observed during hydration under free swelling conditions.

  7. Kajian Kinerja Organoclay Bentonit Terinterkalasi Poli-DADMAC sebagai Flokulasn Limbah Cair Tahu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhayati Rohmah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Telah dilakukan kajian kinerja organoclay bentonit terinterkalasi polyi-DADMAC  sebagai flokulan limbah cair tahu. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk menguji efektifitas organoclay bentonit terinterkalasi poly-DADMAC sebagai flokulan limbah cair tahu. Organoclay bentonit terinterkalasi poly-DADMAC  disintesis dengan mereaksikan 10 g bentonit dengan 100 mL poly-DADMAC 4%.  Pergeseran yang terjadi pada spektra hasil analisis XRD dan FTIR menunjukan keberhasilan proses interkalasi bentonit dengan poly-DADMAC. Koagulasi flokulasi dilakukan dengan metode jar test pada kecepatan pengadukan cepat 120 rpm selama 1 menit dan pengadukan lambat 20 rpm. Kajian kinerja flokulan organoclay meliputi variasi jenis flokulan, massa flokulan, lama waktu kontak flokulasi dan variasi jenis pengenceran. Nilai efektifitas penurunan COD maksimum pada   35.7 %  terjadi pada penambahan jenis flokulan organoclay dengan massa 0.05 g dan waktu kontak flokulasi 40 menit. Proses koagulasi-flokulasi limbah cair tahu menggunakan flokulan organoclay mampu menghasilkan penurunan nilai COD limbah dari 1145.76 mg/L menjadi 833.28 mg/L. Akan tetapi., koagulasi-flokulasi limbah cair tahu pada penelitian ini tidak menurunkan pH limbah secara ekstrim, rentang penurunan pH adalah dari 3.836 menjadi 3.448.   Kata kunci : Flokulan, organoclay, bentonit-polyDADMAC, limbah cair tahu Abstract Studies of Bentonite intercalated organoclay performance polyi-DADMAC as flocculants wastewater of tahu has been done. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of Bentonite intercalated organoclay poly-DADMAC as flocculants wastewater of Tahu. Bentonite intercalated organoclay poly-DADMAC are synthesized by reacting 10 g of bentonite with 100 mL of poly-DADMAC 4%. The shift in spectral analysis of XRD and FTIR results showed the success of the process of intercalation of bentonite with poly-DADMAC. Coagulation-flocculation using Jar test with the rapid stirring

  8. Influence of ionic strength on the viscosities and water loss of bentonite suspensions containing polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Viana Amorim

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A study was made of the influence of ionic strength (S on the apparent (AV and plastic (PV viscosities and water loss (WL of sodium bentonite suspension with polymers. Na-bentonite was dispersed in water (4.86% w/w of different ionic strengths (S = 0.0, 0.015, 0.030 and 0.045 M followed by the addition of polymer. Three polymer samples were studied, i.e., low viscosity carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC BV, polyanionic cellulose (PAC, and partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM. The results indicated that the presence of salts and increased salinity greatly influence the apparent and plastic viscosities and water loss of bentonite suspensions with polymer.

  9. Mechanical properties and mophology natural rubber blend with bentonit and carbon black

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginting, E. M.; Bukit, N.; Muliani; Frida, E.

    2017-07-01

    Purpose of this study was to determine the mechanical properties and morphology of composite natural rubber and natural bentonite with addition of Na-bentonite filler and carbon black to natural rubber. The method is carried material mixed with filler composition variations (0,10,20,30) phr using open mill for 6 min. Results of the open mill is vulcanized at a temperature of 170°C. Further testing mechanical properties and morphology. Results showed that the addition of Na-bentonite filler and carbon black influence on the mechanical properties of tensile strength, elongation at break, modulus of elasticity, hardness, and strong tear. Morphological results showed cavities in the rubber compound and the occurrence agglomeration.

  10. U.S. Pellet Industry Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corrie I. Nichol; Jacob J. Jacobsen; Richard D. Boardman

    2011-06-01

    This report is a survey of the U.S. Pellet Industry, its current capacity, economic drivers, and projected demand for biomass pellets to meet future energy consumption needs. Energy consumption in the US is projected to require an ever increasing portion of renewable energy sources including biofuels, among which are wood, and agrictulrual biomass. Goals set by federal agencies will drive an ever increasing demand for biomass. The EIA projections estimate that renewable energy produced by 2035 will be roughly 10% of all US energy consumption. Further analysis of the biofuels consumption in the US shows that of the renewable energy sources excluding biofuels, nearly 30% are wood or biomass waste. This equates to roughly 2% of the total energy consumption in the US coming from biomass in 2009, and the projections for 2035 show a strong increase in this amount. As of 2009, biomass energy production equates to roughly 2-2.5 quadrillion Btu. The EIA projections also show coal as providing 21% of energy consumed. If biomass is blended at 20% to co-fire coal plants, this will result in an additional 4 quadrillion Btu of biomass consumption. The EISA goals aim to produce 16 billion gal/year of cellulosic biofuels, and the US military has set goals for biofuels production. The Air Force has proposed to replace 50% of its domestic fuel requirements with alternative fuels from renewable sources by 2016. The Navy has likewise set a goal to provide 50% of its energy requirements from alternative sources. The Department of Energy has set similarly ambitious goals. The DOE goal is to replace 40% of 2004 gasoline use with biofuels. This equates to roughly 60 billion gal/year, of which, 45 billion gal/year would be produced from lignocellulosic resources. This would require 530 million dry tons of herbaceous and woody lignocellulosic biomass per year.

  11. ADSORPTION OF Am-241, Cs-137 AND Sr-90 RADIONUCLIDES WITH BENTONITE-HUMIC ACID IMMOBILIZED YIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Tri Basuki

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of Am-241, Cs-137 and Sr-90 radionuclides to bentonite-humic acid immobilized yield have been done. The aims of this study are (1 making of adsorbent materials from resulted immobilization humic acid into bentonite mineral, and it's characterization with spectroscopy infrared and X-ray diffractometer and (2 adsorption of Am-241, Cs-137 and Sr-90 radionuclides into bentonite mineral as adsorbent at various pH. Experiments showed that result of immobilization of bentonite-humic acid were optimum at 100 g bentonite, 60 g humic acid, 0.1 M NaNO3 ionic strength, and 2.5 pH. At the optimum condition bentonite could be bonded by the functional COOH from humic acid maximum equal to 75.2%. Base on infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometer showed that humic acid can immobilized into bentonite to form of bentonite-humic acid alloy. Application of adsorbent bentonite-humic acid immobilized yield to adsorb radionuclides of Am-241, Cs-137 and of Sr-90, showed that can adsorb at the range of pH 3 until 10. The phenomenon adsorption as species radionuclides was predicted by ";;Visual minteq";; software. By each the feeds of radionuclide 0.001 mMol/L, 0.1 M NaNO3 ionic strength and pH 5 showed that bentonite-humic acid can adsorb radionuclides 98.50-99.1% of Am-241, Cs-137, and Sr-90.   Keywords: immobilisation, adsorption, infra red spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometer

  12. Expansion and Enhacement of the Wyoming Coalbed Methane Clearinghouse Website to the Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulme, Diana [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Hamerlinck, Jeffrey [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Bergman, Harold [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Oakleaf, Jim [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2010-03-25

    Energy development is expanding across the United States, particularly in western states like Wyoming. Federal and state land management agencies, local governments, industry and non-governmental organizations have realized the need to access spatially-referenced data and other non-spatial information to determine the geographical extent and cumulative impacts of expanding energy development. The Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse (WERIC) is a web-based portal which centralizes access to news, data, maps, reports and other information related to the development, management and conservation of Wyoming's diverse energy resources. WERIC was established in 2006 by the University of Wyoming's Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR) and the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center (WyGISC) with funding from the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The WERIC web portal originated in concept from a more specifically focused website, the Coalbed Methane (CBM) Clearinghouse. The CBM Clearinghouse effort focused only on coalbed methane production within the Powder River Basin of northeast Wyoming. The CBM Clearinghouse demonstrated a need to expand the effort statewide with a comprehensive energy focus, including fossil fuels and renewable and alternative energy resources produced and/or developed in Wyoming. WERIC serves spatial data to the greater Wyoming geospatial community through the Wyoming GeoLibrary, the WyGISC Data Server and the Wyoming Energy Map. These applications are critical components that support the Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse (WERIC). The Wyoming GeoLibrary is a tool for searching and browsing a central repository for metadata. It provides the ability to publish and maintain metadata and geospatial data in a distributed environment. The WyGISC Data Server is an internet mapping application that provides traditional GIS mapping and analysis

  13. Newcastle folio, Wyoming-South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darton, N. H.

    1904-01-01

    The Newcastle quadrangle embraces the quarter of a square degree which lies between parallels 43° 30' and 44° north latitude and meridians 104° and 104° 30' west longitude.  It measures approximately 34 1/2 miles from north to south and 25 1/8 from east to west, and its area is 863 4/5 square miles.  It lies mainly in the eastern portion of Weston County, Wyo., but includes also a narrow area of western Custer and Pennington counties, S. Dak.  The northeastern portion of the quadrangle lies on the slopes of the Black Hills, but the larger part of it belongs to the Great Plains, although these plains are lower here than in the greater part of adjoining portions of Nebraska and Wyoming.  The district is drained by branches of the South Branch of Cheyenne River.

  14. Overview of Energy Development Opportunities for Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01

    An important opportunity exists for the energy future of Wyoming that will • Maintain its coal industry • Add substantive value to its indigenous coal and natural gas resources • Improve dramatically the environmental impact of its energy production capability • Increase its Gross Domestic Product These can be achieved through development of a carbon conversion industry that transforms coal and natural gas to synthetic transportation fuels, chemical feedstocks, and chemicals that are the building blocks for the chemical industry. Over the longer term, environmentally clean nuclear energy can provide the substantial energy needs of a carbon conversion industry and be part of the mix of replacement technologies for the current fleet of aging coal-fired electric power generating stations.

  15. Measuring microbial metabolism in atypical environments: Bentonite in used nuclear fuel storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Wendy; Kroukamp, Otini; Moes, Ana; McKelvie, Jennifer; Korber, Darren R; Wolfaardt, Gideon M

    2016-01-01

    Genomics enjoys overwhelming popularity in the study of microbial ecology. However, extreme or atypical environments often limit the use of such well-established tools and consequently demand a novel approach. The bentonite clay matrix proposed for use in Deep Geological Repositories for the long-term storage of used nuclear fuel is one such challenging microbial habitat. Simple, accessible tools were developed for the study of microbial ecology and metabolic processes that occur within this habitat, since the understanding of the microbiota-niche interaction is fundamental to describing microbial impacts on engineered systems such as compacted bentonite barriers. Even when genomic tools are useful for the study of community composition, techniques to describe such microbial impacts and niche interactions should complement these. Tools optimised for assessing localised microbial activity within bentonite included: (a) the qualitative use of the resazurin-resorufin indicator system for redox localisation, (b) the use of a CaCl2 buffer for the localisation of pH, and (c) fluorometry for the localisation of precipitated sulphide. The use of the Carbon Dioxide Evolution Monitoring System was also validated for measuring microbial activity in desiccated and saturated bentonite. Finally, the buffering of highly-basic bentonite at neutral pH improved the success of isolation of microbial populations, but not DNA, from the bentonite matrix. Thus, accessible techniques were optimised for exploring microbial metabolism in the atypical environments of clay matrices and desiccated conditions. These tools have application to the applied field of used nuclear fuel management, as well as for examining the fundamental biogeochemical cycles active in sedimentary and deep geological environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Coupled behaviour of bentonite buffer results of PUSKURI project; Bentoniittipuskurin kytketty kaeyttaeytyminen PUSKURI-hankkeen tuloksia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olin, M.; Rasilainen, K.; Itaelae, A. [and others

    2011-08-15

    In the report main results form a KYT2010 programme's project Coupled behaviour of bentonite buffer (PUSKURI) are presented. In THC modelling, Aku Itaelae made and published his Master of Science Thesis. Itaelae was able to successfully model the LOT-experiment. Additionally, he also listed problems and development proposals for THC-modelling of bentonite buffer. VTT and Numerola created in collaboration a model coupling saturation, diffusion and cation exchange; the model was implemented and tested in Numerrin, COMSOL and TOUGHREACT. Petri Jussila's PhD THM-model was implemented into COMSOL to facilitate further development. At GTK, the mineralogical characterisation of bentonite was planned. The previous THM model (Jussila's model) including only small deformations was successfully generalized to finite deformations in way at least formally preserving the original formalism. It appears that the theory allows also a possibility to include finite plastic deformations in the theory. In order to measure the relevant mechanical properties of compacted bentonite, two different experiments, namely hydrostatic compression experiment and one-dimensional compression experiment were designed. In the hydrostatic compression experiment, a cylindrical sample of compacted bentonite covered with liquid rubber coating is placed in the sample chamber equipped with a piston. The same device was also used in one-dimensional compression experiment. X-ray microtomographic techniques were used in order to study the basic mechanisms of water transport in bentonite. The preliminary results indicate that in the present experimental set-up, water transport is dominated by a dispersive mechanism such as diffusion of vapour in gas phase or diffusion of water in solid phase. (orig.)

  17. Experimental and modeling studies on sorption and diffusion of radium in bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachi, Y; Shibutani, T; Sato, H; Yui, M

    2001-02-01

    The sorption and desorption behavior of radium on bentonite and purified smectite was investigated as a function of pH, ionic strength and liquid to solid ratio by batch experiments. The distribution coefficients (Kd) were in the range of 10(2) to > 10(4) ml g-1 and depended on ionic strength and pH. Most of sorbed Ra was desorbed by 1 M KCl. The results for purified smectite indicated that Ra sorption is dominated by ion exchange at layer sites of smectite, and surface complexation at edge sites may increase Ra sorption at higher pH region. Reaction parameters between Ra and smectite were determined based on an interaction model between smectite and groundwater. The reaction parameters were then used to explain the results of bentonite by considering dissolution and precipitation of minerals and soluble impurities. The dependencies of experimental Kd values on pH, ionic strength and liquid to solid ratio were qualitatively explained by the model. The modeling result for bentonite indicated that sorption of Ra on bentonite is dominated by ion exchange with smectite. The observed pH dependency was caused by changes of Ca concentration arising from dissolution and precipitation of calcite. Diffusion behavior of Ra in bentonite was also investigated as a function of dry density and ionic strength. The apparent diffusion coefficients (Da) obtained in compacted bentonite were in the range of 1.1 x 10(-11) to 2.2 x 10(-12) m2 s-1 and decreased with increasing in dry density and ionic strength. The Kd values obtained by measured effective diffusion coefficient (De) and modeled De were consistent with those by the sorption model in a deviation within one order of magnitude.

  18. Circular economy in drinking water treatment: reuse of ground pellets as seeding material in the pellet softening process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schetters, M J A; van der Hoek, J P; Kramer, O J I; Kors, L J; Palmen, L J; Hofs, B; Koppers, H

    2015-01-01

    Calcium carbonate pellets are produced as a by-product in the pellet softening process. In the Netherlands, these pellets are applied as a raw material in several industrial and agricultural processes. The sand grain inside the pellet hinders the application in some high-potential market segments such as paper and glass. Substitution of the sand grain with a calcite grain (100% calcium carbonate) is in principle possible, and could significantly improve the pellet quality. In this study, the grinding and sieving of pellets, and the subsequent reuse as seeding material in pellet softening were tested with two pilot reactors in parallel. In one reactor, garnet sand was used as seeding material, in the other ground calcite. Garnet sand and ground calcite performed equally well. An economic comparison and a life-cycle assessment were made as well. The results show that the reuse of ground calcite as seeding material in pellet softening is technologically possible, reduces the operational costs by €38,000 (1%) and reduces the environmental impact by 5%. Therefore, at the drinking water facility, Weesperkarspel of Waternet, the transition from garnet sand to ground calcite will be made at full scale, based on this pilot plant research.

  19. Comparison of film-coated retarded release pellets manufactured by layering technique or by bed rotor pelletization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priese, Florian; Frisch, Toni; Wolf, Bertram

    2015-06-01

    In order to investigate the influence of coatings for controlled active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) release, two types of pellets were used. Microcrystalline pellets were coated with a model API using the Wurster fluidized bed technique in laboratory scale (layered Cellets). Another type of pellets consisting of microcrystalline cellulose and model API was manufactured by fluidized bed rotor pelletization (matrix pellets (MP)). Both kinds of pellets were coated in a Wurster fluidized bed process with a polymer mixture of ethylcellulose to achieve retarded API release. With layered Cellets and an increased thickness of the ethylcellulose layer, the lag-time was increased and the release rate was decreased. In the case of MP, retardation was less pronounced probable due to inhomogeneous polymer film formation as a result of the porous particle surface. To reduce the surface roughness, the MP were coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as an intermediate smoothing layer, in a first trial step by step. In a second trial, pelletization and the coating steps were performed in an uninterrupted process. Intermediate PVP coating improved the ethylcellulose film formation and led to a more pronounced retardation of API release. The uninterrupted process of matrix pellet manufacturing and coating results in a product with only low retarded release.

  20. Performance of an Argentinian acid-activated bentonite in the bleaching of soybean oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foletto E.L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a bentonite clay from Mendoza, Argentina was activated with H2SO4 (4 and 8 N at 90ºC for 2 and 3.5 hours. Under these conditions several cations were removed from the octahedral sheet (Mg, Al, and Fe and the DTA-TGA curves of the solids obtained after treatment were modified. Treatment time and acid concentration increased the degree of destruction of the bentonite structure. Activated samples were tested in order to verify their capacity to bleach soybean oil and were compared to a standard commercial bleaching clay. Treated samples are more efficient in bleaching than the standard.

  1. Preparation and characterization of bentonite organo clay; Preparacao de caracterizacao de argilas bentonitas organofilicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolli, C.; Almeida Neto, A.F. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Quimica. Lab. de Engenharia Ambiental; Silva, M.G.C., E-mail: meuris@feq.unicamp.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Quimica

    2009-07-01

    Bentonite clays organically modified have great potential use for environmental remediation, especially in the separation of organic compounds from the water. The aim of this work was the preparation of organophilic clays from 'Verde-Lodo' bentonite clay with the quaternary ammonium salts cetyl-pyridinium chloride and benzalkonium chloride. The materials obtained were characterized by XRD, thermogravimetric analyses, Helium picnometry, SEM and energy dispersive X-ray techniques. The results show consistently successful synthesis of the organoclay through the increase in the basal spacing, as well as salt elimination picks and presence of carbon and chlorine in the modified clays; they are inexistent elements in the natural clay. (author)

  2. Bentonite and Gelatine Impact on the Young Red Wine Coloured Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Slobodan Jović; Jelena Živković; Snežana Stanković

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the impact of two fining agents (bentonite and gelatine) on the coloured matters of young red wines Vranac, Pinot Noir and Gamay Noir. Both agents caused decrease in these substances. The effect is more intensive with the dose of bentonite of 1 g/L, but the variability depends on variety. Higher decrease was found in the colour intensity, coloured anthocyanins and polymers (up to 44 %), but lower in the colourless anthocyanins (up to 20 %). The intensity of red and blue ...

  3. The Effect of Sand on Strength of Mixtures of Bentonite-Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakbaz, Mohammad C.; Khayat, Navid

    The main purpose of this research is to evaluate the effect of sand on strength of compacted samples of bentonite sand mixtures. Samples of bentonite with 10,30,50,70, and 80 percent by weight of sand at standard proctor optimum water content were compacted and tested to measure confined and unconfined strength. Unconfined strength of mixtures increased with percentage of sand until 50 percent and then it decreased thereafter. On the other hand, the confined strength of mixtures tested in triaxial UU increased with percentage of sand.

  4. Efficiency of additives of the polysaccharide type on physical properties of bentonite mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Beňo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The addition of polysaccharide additives generally aims at improving some important physical properties of bentonite mixt ures, above allthe stability of moulds against the water loss and prevention of surface defects of castings. Polysaccharide products of inland and foreign production were checked in mixtures of two bentonites of the Czech provenance with the same montmorillonite content. The attention was paid in particular to the abrasion resistance of mixtures during storing them under constant climatic conditions.Conclusions have shownthe substantial influence of: the amount of the added additive, the kind and structural composition of the additive (pH of the water extract, electric conductance.

  5. Recent advances in fueling magnetically confined plasmas with pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Fisher, P.W.; Gouge, M.J.; Jernigan, T.C.

    2000-07-01

    Pellet injection has been used for many years in a number of magnetic confinement fusion experiments to provide plasma fueling and density profile control. A pellet fueling system for a reactor-sized device will need to supply hydrogenic fuel as deeply into the plasma as possible to replace the deuterium-tritium ions consumed and to provide a density gradient for plasma particle (especially helium ash) flow to the edge. Development of injection systems that can provide deep fueling with sufficient throughput to provide these features remains a high priority in the fusion technology program. Several tokamak devices, including DIII-D, ASDEX-Upgrade, and JET, have recently employed pellet injection from the high magnetic field side (inner wall). Injection from the high field side (HFS) yields improved fuel penetration and fueling efficiency over the usual simpler method of low-field-side injection from the outside midplane. There is a resulting improvement in fueling efficiency and fuel deposition. The improvement is believed to be due to a {del}B drift and curvature-induced drift of the pellet ablatant in the major radius direction. Curved guide tubes must be employed to inject from the inner wall in all current devices requiring slow to moderate pellet speeds to obtain intact pellets. Alternative injection schemes that take advantage of the HFS injection while allowing for high-speed pellet injection are possible using a vertical injection geometry. The technology to produce cryogenic pellets of hydrogenic isotopes has matured to the level of reliable pellet injection devices that produce and accelerate intact pellets at high repetition rates. New technology enhancements to pneumatic guns have been developed for the production of slower-speed pellets that can survive the curved guide tubes required for HFS injection. Centrifugal accelerators have also been operated at the low velocities required for HFS fueling. The understanding of pellet mechanical properties

  6. Erosion of sodium bentonite by flow and colloid diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Luis; Liu, Longcheng; Neretnieks, Ivars

    Smectite gel formed at the outer part of a bentonite buffer in granitic rock could expand into rock fractures with seeping water. Such a gel can release colloids into low ionic strength waters. In addition the gel/sol can itself slowly flow downstream when it has reached a low particle concentration sufficient to decrease the viscosity to allow flow. The erosion due to the combined effects of particle diffusion and gel/sol flow is modelled for a thin fracture into which the gel expands influenced by various forces between and on particles. Some of the forces such as the electrical double layer force and viscous force are strongly influenced by the ionic strength of the pore water. Changes in the ionic strength due to diffusion and dilution of ions in the expanding clay are modelled simultaneously with the gel expansion, flow of gel and colloid release to the seeping water. The model includes description of flow of the seeping fluid, which gradually turns from pure water to sol to more dense gel as the smectite source is approached. The model also describes expansion of the gel/sol and colloid release and flow and diffusion of ions in the system. The coupled models are solved using a numerical code. The results show that the gel will flow with a non-negligible flowrate when its volume fraction is below 1%, but that the erosion and loss of smectite is not much influenced by the concentration of sodium in the clay or in the approaching seeping water, if they are kept below the Critical Coagulation Concentration, CCC.

  7. Spatial and temporal characteristics of moose highway crossings in the Buffalo Fork Valley, Wyoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide the Wyoming Department of Transportation (WYDOT) and the Wyoming Game and Fish : Department (WGFD) with information that could be used to assess the importance of habitat, landscape, and anthropogenic features...

  8. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Wyoming. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Wyoming.

  9. Geodatabase of Wyoming statewide oil and gas drilling activity to 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Wyoming statewide oil and gas wells feature class was developed to provide a historical perspective of drilling activity for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation...

  10. 76 FR 14058 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human... University of Wyoming Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, Laramie, WY. The human remains were..., Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, professional staff in consultation with representatives of...

  11. Mule Deer (Odocoileus hemionus) Movement and Habitat Use Patterns in Relation to Roadways in Northwest Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide the Wyoming Department of Transportation and Wyoming Game and Fish Department with useful information about the patterns of mule deer seasonal habitat use, migration, road crossings, and wildlife-vehicle colli...

  12. Consolidated waste forms: glass marbles and ceramic pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treat, R.L.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    Glass marbles and ceramic pellets have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the multibarrier concept for immobilizing high-level radioactive waste. These consolidated waste forms served as substrates for the application of various inert coatings and as ideal-sized particles for encapsulation in protective matrices. Marble and pellet formulations were based on existing defense wastes at Savannah River Plant and proposed commercial wastes. To produce marbles, glass is poured from a melter in a continuous stream into a marble-making device. Marbles were produced at PNL on a vibratory marble machine at rates as high as 60 kg/h. Other marble-making concepts were also investigated. The marble process, including a lead-encapsulation step, was judged as one of the more feasible processes for immobilizing high-level wastes. To produce ceramic pellets, a series of processing steps are required, which include: spray calcining - to dry liquid wastes to a powder; disc pelletizing - to convert waste powders to spherical pellets; sintering - to densify pellets and cause desired crystal formation. These processing steps are quite complex, and thereby render the ceramic pellet process as one of the least feasible processes for immobilizing high-level wastes.

  13. Pellet injection in the RFP (Reversed Field Pinch)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurden, G. A.; Weber, P. G.; Munson, C. P.; Cayton, T. E.; Bunting, C. A.; Carolan, P. G.

    Observation of pellets injected into the ZT-40M Reversed Field Pinch has allowed a new twist on the usual tokamak ablation physics modeling. The RFP provides a strong ohmic heating regime with relatively high electron drift parameter (xi sub drift approx. 0.2), in the presence of a highly sheared magnetic field geometry. In situ photos of the pellet ablation cloud using a grated-intensified CCD camera, as well as two-view integrated photos of the pellet trajectory show substantial modification of the original pellet trajectory, in both direction and speed. Depending on the launch geometry, increases in the initial 500 m/s pellet speed by 50 percent were observed, and a ski jump deflector plate in the launch port has been used to counteract strong poloidal curvature. In contrast to the tokamak, the D sub alpha light signature is strongest near the edge, and weaker in the plasma center. Additional information on ion temperature response to pellet injection with 20 microsec time resolution has been obtained using a 5-channel neutral particle analyzer (NPA). The energy confinement is transiently degraded while the beta is largely unchanged. This may be indicative of pellet injection into a high-beta plasma operating at fixed beta.

  14. Pellet production from sawmill residue : a Saskatchewan perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karwandy, J. [Forintek Canada Corp., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2007-03-31

    This paper reported on the results of a project that evaluated the viability of producing pellets in Saskatchewan in order to capture some of this rapid market growth. The objective was to define the supply potential for wood pellets. The production process was described along with technical barriers to producing wood pellets in Saskatchewan. It was shown that Saskatchewan's forest sector generates about 1,188,050 oven dried tonnes of residual material annually. However, not all the residuals are preferred by pellet manufacturers. It is unlikely that the entire amount of raw material would be used at one facility since the cost of transporting the raw materials is very prohibitive. It was concluded that the limits on the type and volume of raw material available in Saskatchewan are significant barriers to the commercial scale production of wood pellets. There is not enough sawdust and shavings to support a world class pelleting facility in the province. It was cautioned that although it is feasible to produce pellets in Saskatchewan, the scale of production would be significantly limited by feedstock availability. 24 refs., 8 tabs., 12 figs., 2 appendices.

  15. Data analysis on physical and mechanical properties of cassava pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguntunde, Pelumi E; Adejumo, Oluyemisi A; Odetunmibi, Oluwole A; Okagbue, Hilary I; Adejumo, Adebowale O

    2018-02-01

    In this data article, laboratory experimental investigation results carried out at National Centre for Agricultural Mechanization (NCAM) on moisture content, machine speed, die diameter of the rig, and the outputs (hardness, durability, bulk density, and unit density of the pellets) at different levels of cassava pellets were observed. Analysis of variance using randomized complete block design with factorial was used to perform analysis for each of the outputs: hardness, durability, bulk density, and unit density of the pellets. A clear description on each of these outputs was considered separately using tables and figures. It was observed that for all the output with the exception of unit density, their main factor effects as well as two and three ways interactions is significant at 5% level. This means that the hardness, bulk density and durability of cassava pellets respectively depend on the moisture content of the cassava dough, the machine speed, the die diameter of the extrusion rig and the combinations of these factors in pairs as well as the three altogether. Higher machine speeds produced more quality pellets at lower die diameters while lower machine speed is recommended for higher die diameter. Also the unit density depends on die diameter and the three-way interaction only. Unit density of cassava pellets is neither affected by machine parameters nor moisture content of the cassava dough. Moisture content of cassava dough, speed of the machine and die diameter of the extrusion rig are significant factors to be considered in pelletizing cassava to produce pellets. Increase in moisture content of cassava dough increase the quality of cassava pellets.

  16. Data analysis on physical and mechanical properties of cassava pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelumi E. Oguntunde

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this data article, laboratory experimental investigation results carried out at National Centre for Agricultural Mechanization (NCAM on moisture content, machine speed, die diameter of the rig, and the outputs (hardness, durability, bulk density, and unit density of the pellets at different levels of cassava pellets were observed. Analysis of variance using randomized complete block design with factorial was used to perform analysis for each of the outputs: hardness, durability, bulk density, and unit density of the pellets. A clear description on each of these outputs was considered separately using tables and figures. It was observed that for all the output with the exception of unit density, their main factor effects as well as two and three ways interactions is significant at 5% level. This means that the hardness, bulk density and durability of cassava pellets respectively depend on the moisture content of the cassava dough, the machine speed, the die diameter of the extrusion rig and the combinations of these factors in pairs as well as the three altogether. Higher machine speeds produced more quality pellets at lower die diameters while lower machine speed is recommended for higher die diameter. Also the unit density depends on die diameter and the three-way interaction only. Unit density of cassava pellets is neither affected by machine parameters nor moisture content of the cassava dough. Moisture content of cassava dough, speed of the machine and die diameter of the extrusion rig are significant factors to be considered in pelletizing cassava to produce pellets. Increase in moisture content of cassava dough increase the quality of cassava pellets.

  17. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S K; Baylor, L R; Foust, C R; Lyttle, M S; Meitner, S J; Rasmussen, D A

    2014-11-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  18. ECCENTRIC ROLLING OF POWDER AND BONDING AGENT INTO SPHERICAL PELLETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, G. Jr.; Zirinsky, S.

    1961-06-01

    A machine is described for pelletizing powder and bonding agent into spherical pellets of high density and uniform size. In this device, the material to be compacted is added to a flat circular pan which is moved in a circular orbit in a horizontal plane about an axis displaced from that of the pan's central axis without rotating the pan about its central axis. This movement causes the material contained therein to roll around the outside wall of the container and build up pellets of uniform shape, size, and density.

  19. Multibarrel repetitive injector with a porous pellet formation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viniar, I. [Saint-Petersburg State Technical Univ., Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Sudo, S.

    1997-07-01

    New repetitive multibarrel pellet injector for steady-state fueling and diagnostics purposes in large fusion devices has been designed. The injector is intended to apply in the Large Helical Device at the National Institute for Fusion Science in Japan. The steady-state operation is provided by ten pipe-guns with unique porous units forming solid hydrogen pellets for 5 - 9 s in every barrel. Over one thousand hydrogen pellets have been formed and accelerated to 1.2 km/s at the different repetitive rates. The injector design and experimental results are presented. (author)

  20. Preparation and characterization Al3+-bentonite Turen Malang for esterification fatty acid (palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulloh, Abdulloh; Aminah, Nanik Siti; Triyono, Mudasir, Trisunaryanti, Wega

    2016-03-01

    Catalyst preparation and characterization of Al3+-bentonite for esterification of palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid has been done. Al3+-bentonite catalyst was prepared from natural bentonite of Turen Malang through cation exchange reaction using AlCl3 solution. The catalysts obtained were characterized by XRD, XRF, pyridine-FTIR and surface area analyser using the BET method. Catalyst activity test of Al3+-bentonite for esterification reaction was done at 65°C using molar ratio of metanol-fatty acid of 30:1 and 0.25 g of Al3+-bentonite catalyst for the period of ½, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 hours. Based on the characterization results, the Al3+-bentonite Turen Malang catalyst has a d-spacing of 15.63 Ǻ, acid sites of Brönsted and Lewis respectively of 230.79 µmol/g and 99.39 µmol/g, surface area of 507.3 m2/g and the average of radius pore of 20.09 Å. GC-MS analysis results of the oil phase after esterification reaction showed the formation of biodiesel (FAME: Fatty acid methyl ester), namely methyl palmitate, methyl oleate and methyl linoleate. The number of conversions resulted in esterification reaction using Al3+-bentonite Turen Malang catalyst was 74.61%, 37.75%, and 20, 93% for the esterification of palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid respectively.

  1. Influence of soil humic acid and fulvic acid on sorption of thorium(IV) on MX-80 bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, D.; Wang, X.K.; Chen, C.L.; Zhou, X.; Tan, X.L. [Inst. of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China)

    2006-07-01

    Th(IV) is considered herein as a chemical analogue of other actinides (IV). Effect of pH, ionic strength and humic acid/fulvic acid concentrations on the sorption of thorium(IV) to MX-80 bentonite was studied by batch technique. The sorption isotherms were acquired by varying pH in the range of 0.5-12 and FA/HA concentration in the range of 2-20 mg/L. The results indicate that soil fulvic acid has higher carboxylic content than humic acid, and has stronger positive influence on the sorption of Th(IV) on bentonite at low pH values than humic acid. The increase of FA/HA concentration results in a slight increase of Th(IV) sorption on FA/HA coated bentonite. The results of no drastic effect of different addition sequences of FA/HA and Th(IV) to bentonite suspension on Th(IV) sorption in the ternary system HA/FA-Th(IV)-bentonite indicate that both the Th(IV)-HA/FA complexation and HA/FA-bentonite sorption do not affect the sorption of Th(IV) on HA/FA coated bentonite obviously. The samples were also measured by SEM method and the results show that the surface properties of different samples are different. (orig.)

  2. 30 CFR 950.30 - Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Department of Environmental Quality, Abandoned Mine Lands Division, Herschler Building, Third Floor West, 122... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land... § 950.30 Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Wyoming Abandoned Mine Land...

  3. Bio-accumulation of lanthanum from lanthanum modified bentonite treatments in lake restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waajen, G.; Van Oosterhout, F.; Lürling, M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lanthanum (La) modified bentonite (LMB) is one of the available mitigating agents used for the reduction of the phosphorus (P) recycling in eutrophic lakes. The potential toxicity of the La from LMB to aquatic organisms is a matter of concern. In this study the accumulation of La was

  4. Eutrophication management in surface waters using lanthanum modified bentonite: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copetti, D.; Finsterle, K.; Marziali, L.; Stefani, F.; Tartari, G.; Douglas, G.C.; Reitzel, K.; Spears, B.M.; Winfield, I.J.; Crosa, G.; Yasseri, S.; Lurling, M.F.L.L.W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the scientific knowledge on the use of a lanthanum modified bentonite (LMB) to manage eutrophication in surface water. The LMB has been applied in around 200 environments worldwide and it has undergone extensive testing at laboratory, mesocosm, and whole lake scales. The available

  5. Effects of combined flocculant – Lanthanum modified bentonite treatment on aquatic macroinvertebrate fauna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waajen, G.; Pauwels, M.; Lürling, M.

    2017-01-01

    A low dose flocculant (FeCl3), combined with lanthanum modified bentonite (LMB) as phosphate-binding agent, has been applied for eutrophication management in Lake De Kuil (The Netherlands). After the treatment, the state of the lake shifted from hypertrophic to mesotrophic. Although

  6. Bio-accumulation of lanthanum from lanthanum modified bentonite treatments in lake restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waajen, G.; Oosterhout, van F.; Lürling, M.

    2017-01-01

    Lanthanum (La) modified bentonite (LMB) is one of the available mitigating agents used for the reduction of the phosphorus (P) recycling in eutrophic lakes. The potential toxicity of the La from LMB to aquatic organisms is a matter of concern. In this study the accumulation of La was investigated in

  7. Preparation of immobilized glucose oxidase wafer enzyme on calcium-bentonite modified by surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widi, R. K.; Trisulo, D. C.; Budhyantoro, A.; Chrisnasari, R.

    2017-07-01

    Wafer glucose oxidase (GOx) enzymes was produced by addition of PAH (Poly-Allyamine Hydrochloride) polymer into immobilized GOx enzyme on modified-Tetramethylammonium Hydroxide (TMAH) 5%-calsium-bentonite. The use of surfactant molecul (TMAH) is to modify the surface properties and pore size distribution of the Ca-bentonite. These properties are very important to ensure GOx molecules can be bound on the Ca-bentonit surface to be immobilized. The addition of the polymer (PAH) is expected to lead the substrates to be adsorbed onto the enzyme. In this study, wafer enzymes were made in various concentration ratio (Ca-bentonite : PAH) which are 1:0, 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3. The effect of PAH (Poly-Allyamine Hydrochloride) polymer added with various ratios of concentrations can be shown from the capacitance value on LCR meter and enzyme activity using DNS method. The addition of the polymer (PAH) showed effect on the activity of GOx, it can be shown from the decreasing of capacitance value by increasing of PAH concentration.

  8. Use of Bentonite Clay for the Reduction of Cyanide Poisoning after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: The in vivo study of the effect of bentonite on cyanide poisoning and its effect on plasma urea was investigated. A total of ... Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were given a daily dose of 0.4ml of cassava waste water containing a sub-lethal amount of cyanide (2.16 x ..... acute cyanide poisoning. The enzyme responsible (β-.

  9. Effects of radiation and temperature on iodide sorption by surfactant-modified bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choung, Sungwook; Kim, Minkyung; Yang, Jung-Seok; Kim, Min-Gyu; Um, Wooyong

    2014-08-19

    Bentonite, which is used as an engineered barrier in geological repositories, is ineffective for sorbing anionic radionuclides because of its negatively charged surface. This study modified raw bentonite using a cationic surfactant (i.e., hexadecyltrimethylammonium [HDTMA]-Br) to improve its sorption capability for radioactive iodide. The effects of temperature and radiation on the iodide sorption of surfactant-modified bentonite (SMB) were also evaluated under alkaline pH condition similar to that found in repository environments. Different amounts of surfactant, equivalent to the 50, 100, and 200% cation-exchange capacity of the bentonite, were used to produce the HDTMA-SMB for iodide sorption. The sorption reaction of the SMB with iodide reached equilibrium rapidly within 10 min regardless of temperature and radiation conditions. The rate of iodide sorption increased as the amount of the added surfactant was increased and nonlinear sorption behavior was exhibited. However, high temperature and γ-irradiation ((60)Co) resulted in significantly (∼2-10 times) lower iodide Kd values for the SMB. The results of FTIR, NMR, and XANES spectroscopy analysis suggested that the decrease in iodide sorption may be caused by weakened physical electrostatic force between the HDTMA and iodide, and by the surfactant becoming detached from the SMB during the heating and irradiation processes.

  10. Effects of lipids on thermophilic anaerobic digestion and reduction of lipid inhibition upon addition of bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelidaki, I; Petersen, S P; Ahring, B K

    1990-07-01

    The effect of bentonite-bound oil on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of cattle manure was investigated. In digestor experiments, addition of oil was found to be inhibitory during start-up and the inhibitory effect was less pronounced when the oil was added in the form of bentonite-bound oil compared to when the oil was added alone. After adaptation of the digestors, very rapid degradation of oil was observed and more than 80% of the oil was degraded within a few hours after daily feeding. In batch experiments, glyceride trioleate was found to be inhibitory to thermophilic anaerobic digestion when the concentrations were higher than 2.0 g/l. However, addition of bentonite (a clay mineral) at concentrations of 0.15% and 0.45% was found to partly overcome this inhibition. Addition of calcium chloride in concentration of 3 mM (0.033% w/v) showed a similar positive effect on the utilization of oil, but the effect was lower than with bentonite.

  11. Adsorption of p-chlorophenol from aqueous solutions on bentonite and perlite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumanova, Bogdana; Peeva-Antova, P

    2002-03-29

    The adsorption of p-chlorophenol (p-CP) from aqueous solutions on bentonite and perlite was studied. These materials are available in large quantities in Bulgaria. Model solutions of various concentrations (1-50 mgdm(-3)) were shaken with certain amounts of adsorbent to determine the adsorption capacity of p-CP on bentonite and perlite as well. The influence of several individual variables (initial adsorbate concentration, adsorbent mass) on the rate of uptake of the studied compound on the adsorbent was determined by carrying out experiments at different contact times using the batch adsorber vessel designed according to the standard tank configuration. Rapid adsorption was observed 20-30 min after the beginning for every experiment. After that, the concentration of p-CP in the liquid phase remained constant. The adsorption equilibrium of p-CP on bentonite and perlite was described by the Langmuir and the Freundlich models. A higher adsorption capacity was observed for bentonite (10.63 mgg(-1)) compared to that for perlite (5.84 mgg(-1)).

  12. Hydraulic properties of dune sand–bentonite mixtures of insulation barriers for hazardous waste facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. Gueddouda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the valorization of local materials such as desert dune sand obtained from Laghouat region in the South Algeria and mine bentonite intended for the realization of liner base layers in the conception of insulation barriers for hazardous waste facilities. In practice, an economical mixture satisfying the hydraulic requirements is generally concerned. First, in order to get an adequate dune sand–bentonite mixture compacted to the optimum Proctor condition, an investigation on saturated hydraulic behavior is carried out in this study for different mixtures. Using oedometer test (indirect measurement, the adequate mixture of 85% dune sand and 15% bentonite satisfies the conditions of saturated hydraulic conductivity (k  3 MPa. This technique is conducted based on the exploitation of the water retention curve in order to establish the relationships between hydraulic conductivity, degree of saturation, and suction. It shows that the hydraulic conductivity increases with the degree of saturation and decreases with the suction. However, the hydraulic conductivity has a constant value for suctions larger than 20 MPa. The selected dune sand–bentonite mixture satisfies the regulation requirements and hence constitutes a good local and economical material for the conception of barrier base liners.

  13. Bentonite diminishes DON-induced changes in bone development in mink dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaszewska Ewa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of deoxynivalenol (DON, given alone or with bentonite (which eliminates mycotoxicity in the diet of mink dams throughout mating, pregnancy, and lactation period to pelt harvesting, on the mechanical properties and geometry of their long bones.

  14. Adsorptive Removal of Reactive Black 5 from Wastewater Using Bentonite Clay: Isotherms, Kinetics and Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tahir Amin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The studies of the kinetics and isotherms adsorption of the Reactive Black 5 (RB5 onto bentonite clay were explored in a batch study in a laboratory. The maximum RB5 adsorption conditions of bentonite clay were optimized such as shaking speed (100 rpm, temperature (323 K, pH (10, contact time (40 min, initial dye concentration (170 mg·L−1, and particle size (177 µm. The adsorbent surface was characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy spectroscopy. The mechanisms and characteristic parameters of the adsorption process were analyzed using two parameter isotherm models which revealed the following order (based on the coefficient of determination: Harkin-Jura (0.9989 > Freundlich (0.9986 and Halsey (0.9986 > Langmuir (0.9915 > Temkin (0.9818 > Dubinin–Radushkevich (0.9678. This result suggests the heterogeneous nature of bentonite clay. Moreover, the adsorption process was chemisorption in nature because it follows the pseudo-second order reaction model with R2 value of 0.9998, 0.9933 and 0.9891 at 25, 75 and 100 mg·L−1 RB5 dye in the solution, respectively. Moreover, based on the values of standard enthalpy, Gibbs free energy change, and entropy, bentonite clay showed dual nature of exothermic and endothermic, spontaneous and non-spontaneous as well as increased and decreased randomness at solid–liquid interface at 303–313 K and 313–323 K temperature, respectively.

  15. Biochar, Bentonite and Zeolite Supplemented Feeding of Layer Chickens Alters Intestinal Microbiota and Reduces Campylobacter Load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanka P Prasai

    Full Text Available A range of feed supplements, including antibiotics, have been commonly used in poultry production to improve health and productivity. Alternative methods are needed to suppress pathogen loads and maintain productivity. As an alternative to antibiotics use, we investigated the ability of biochar, bentonite and zeolite as separate 4% feed additives, to selectively remove pathogens without reducing microbial richness and diversity in the gut. Neither biochar, bentonite nor zeolite made any significant alterations to the overall richness and diversity of intestinal bacterial community. However, reduction of some bacterial species, including some potential pathogens was detected. The microbiota of bentonite fed animals were lacking all members of the order Campylobacterales. Specifically, the following operational taxonomic units (OTUs were absent: an OTU 100% identical to Campylobacter jejuni; an OTU 99% identical to Helicobacter pullorum; multiple Gallibacterium anatis (>97% related OTUs; Bacteroides dorei (99% and Clostridium aldenense (95% related OTUs. Biochar and zeolite treatments had similar but milder effects compared to bentonite. Zeolite amended feed was also associated with significant reduction in the phylum Proteobacteria. All three additives showed potential for the control of major poultry zoonotic pathogens.

  16. Strength characteristics of lightly solidified dredged marine clay admixed with bentonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariffin, Syazwana Tajul; Chan, Chee-Ming

    2017-11-01

    Strength characteristic is a significant parameter in measuring the effect of soil improvement and effective composition of solidification. In this study, the dredged marine sediment (DMS) collected from Kuala Perlis (Malaysia) was examined to determine its strength characteristics under light cement solidification with bentonite. Dredged marine clay generally has the low shear strength and high void ratio, and consists mainly of soil particles of the fine-grained type. As a discarded geo-waste, it can be potentially treated to for reuse as a backfill material instead of being disposed of, hence reducing the negative impact on the environment. Physico-chemical parameters of the dredged sample were first determined, then solidification was carried out to improve the engineering properties by admixing ordinary Portland cement (OPC) as the binder and bentonite as a volume enhancer to the soil. The DMS was treated with the addition of 3 % and 6 % cement and bentonite within the range of 0-30 %. The specimens were cured at room temperature for 3, 7 and 14 days. The strength gain was measured by unconfined compression test and vane shear test. The laboratory test results were analyzed to establish the relationship between strength properties and solidification specifications. In summary, the strength of specimens increased with the increase of the quantity of bentonite and cement to get the effective composition of the specimen.

  17. Defluoridation of drinking water using Al3+-modified bentonite clay: Optimization of fluoride adsorption conditions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vhahangwele, M

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available (sup3+) concentration. Physicochemical characterization of raw and modified bentonite clay was done by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry attached to scanning electron microscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis...

  18. Use of Ca-bentonite to ameliorate moisture and nutrient limitations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    the potential for Ca-bentonite (2:1 clay mineral) as an amendment for increased moisture retention ... 2.5 t ha-1; DAP at 0, 62.5 and 125 kg ha-1; urea at 0 and 60 kg ha-1; and farmyard manure (FYM) at ... reasonable amount of organic matter.

  19. In situ reactive compatibilization of natural rubber/acrylic-bentonite composites via peroxide-induced vulcanization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Lihua; Lei, Zhiwen [Guangxi Key Laboratory of Petrochemical Resource Processing and Process Intensification Technology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Xu, Chuanhui, E-mail: xuhuiyee@gxu.edu.cn [Guangxi Key Laboratory of Petrochemical Resource Processing and Process Intensification Technology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Chen, Yukun, E-mail: cyk@scut.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Polymer Processing Engineering, Ministry of Education, China(South China University of Technology), Guangzhou, 510640 (China)

    2016-02-15

    To achieve good interfacial interaction between fillers and rubber matrix is always a hot topic in rubber reinforcing industry. In this paper, acid activated bentonite (Bt) was alkalified to be alkaline calcium-bentonite (ACBt), then acrylic acid (AA) was employed to modify ACBt to obtain acrylic-bentonite (ABt). The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) illustrated that acrylate groups were chemically boned onto the surface of Bt and the layer spacing of Bt was increased. During peroxide-induced vulcanization, in situ compatibilization of ABt was realized via the reaction between the unsaturated bonds of acrylate groups on the surface of Bt and the natural rubber (NR) chains. This resulted in an enhanced cross-linked network which contributed to the improved mechanical properties of NR/ABt composites. - Highlights: • Acrylate groups were chemically boned onto the surface of bentonite. • In situ compatibilization was realized via the reaction of acrylate group and NR. • ABt particles participated in forming the NR crosslink network. • A potential reinforcing material options for “white” rubber products.

  20. Biochar, Bentonite and Zeolite Supplemented Feeding of Layer Chickens Alters Intestinal Microbiota and Reduces Campylobacter Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Tanka P.; Walsh, Kerry B.; Bhattarai, Surya P.; Midmore, David J.; Van, Thi T. H.; Moore, Robert J.; Stanley, Dragana

    2016-01-01

    A range of feed supplements, including antibiotics, have been commonly used in poultry production to improve health and productivity. Alternative methods are needed to suppress pathogen loads and maintain productivity. As an alternative to antibiotics use, we investigated the ability of biochar, bentonite and zeolite as separate 4% feed additives, to selectively remove pathogens without reducing microbial richness and diversity in the gut. Neither biochar, bentonite nor zeolite made any significant alterations to the overall richness and diversity of intestinal bacterial community. However, reduction of some bacterial species, including some potential pathogens was detected. The microbiota of bentonite fed animals were lacking all members of the order Campylobacterales. Specifically, the following operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were absent: an OTU 100% identical to Campylobacter jejuni; an OTU 99% identical to Helicobacter pullorum; multiple Gallibacterium anatis (>97%) related OTUs; Bacteroides dorei (99%) and Clostridium aldenense (95%) related OTUs. Biochar and zeolite treatments had similar but milder effects compared to bentonite. Zeolite amended feed was also associated with significant reduction in the phylum Proteobacteria. All three additives showed potential for the control of major poultry zoonotic pathogens. PMID:27116607

  1. Characteristics of cesium ion sorption from aqueous solution on bentonite- and carbon nanotube-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shubin; Han, Cho; Wang, Xiangke; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2014-06-15

    The technology development of Cs(+) capture from aqueous solution is crucial for the disposal of nuclear waste and still remains a significant challenge. Previous researches have been proven that ion exchanges with the cations and hydroxyl exchange are the main sorption mechanisms for Cs(+). Therefore, how important are the cation exchange and the hydroxyl exchange mechanisms to Cs(+) sorption? And whether can we improve the sorption capacity of the material by increasing the amount of hydroxyl groups? With these in mind, we herein designed the chitosan-grafted carbon nanotubes (CS-g-CNTs) and the chitosan-grafted bentonite (CS-g-bentonite) by plasma-induced grafting method. The interactions of Cs(+) with CNTs, bentonite, CS-g-CNTs and CS-g-bentonite composites were investigated. The sorption of Cs(+) is mainly dominated by strong cation exchange in monovalent Group I and divalent Group II. And the cation-exchange mechanism is much more effective than the hydroxyl group exchange. The effect of hydroxyl groups is dependent on the property of the matrix. We cannot improve the Cs adsorption capacity of material for Cs(+) only by increasing the amount of hydroxyl groups in any case. The spatial structure and the cation-exchange capacity of the material are important factors for choosing the sorbent for Cs(+) removal from radioactive waste water. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Study on GMZ bentonite-sand mixture by undrained triaxial tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wen-jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is particularly necessary to study the deformation, strength and the changes of pore water pressure of bentonite-based buffer/backfill materials under the undrained condition. A series of isotropic compression tests and triaxial shear tests under undrained conditions were conducted on the compacted saturated/unsaturated GMZ bentonite-sand mixtures with dry mass ratio of bentonite/sand of 30:70. During the tests, the images of the sample were collected by photographic equipment and subsequently were cropped, binarized and centroids marked by image processing technique. Based on identification of the variation of the position of marked centroids, the deformation of the sample can be determined automatically in real-time. Finally, the hydro-mechanical behaviour of saturated and unsaturated bentonite-sand mixtures under the undrained condition can be obtained. From results of triaxial shear tests on unsaturated samples under constant water content, inflated volumetric deformation transforms to contractive volumetric deformation due to the increase of the confining pressure and lateral expansion deformation are observed due to the increase in the shearing stress. Moreover, the net mean stress affects the initial stiffness, undrained shear strength and deformation of the sample during the undrained shear tests.

  3. Retention of heavy metal ions in bentonites from Grau Region (Northern Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, J.; Vega, J. L.; Alvarez, R.; Loredo, J.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental studies on the retention of metals (Cu, Co, Ni, and Zn) in bentonite samples from the Grau Region (Northern Peru) have been accomplished using monometallic, bimetallic, trimetallic, and tetrametallic solutions. Parameters such as pH and concentration of dissolved metals and organic compounds have been evaluated by means of batch adsorption experiments. Adsorption rates indicate the suitability of these bentonites in the environmental industry for heavy metals retention purposes. In addition to its quality as physical barrier to avoid the dispersion through the environment of polluted leachates, bentonite, due to its high cation exchange capacity, can act also as a chemical barrier, protecting the quality of surface and groundwater systems, while limiting the migration of heavy metals in solid residues or sludge stocked in security landfills. Adsorption rates of tested bentonites were proved to decrease when concentrations of both metal and organic compounds, as well as the number of ionic species, increase in solution; additionally, lower metal removal rates from solution were obtained when extremely acidic conditions were achieved.

  4. Methane rich gasification of wood pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joka Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the work there are shown the results of experimental studies on methane rich gasification of pinewood pellets in Bio-CONOx technology. The experiment was carried out on a laboratory scale gasifier (5 kW, which design features allow producing a high quality gas with a high methane content. In the results there was identified the impact of the quantity of Bio-CONOx on the amount of flammable gas compounds (methane, hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the synthesis gas and the gas calorific value. The additive was added in 10,20,30 and 50% concentrations to the gasifier chamber. It has been shown that increasing the amount of the additive has a positive effect on the calorific value of the synthesis gas (Fig.1,2. Gas with a high content of methane (and high calorific value was obtained from gasification of biomass with a 50% addition of Bio-CONOx. There was also examined the proportion of blowing air (gasifying medium for which the properties of obtained syngas were the best.

  5. Physical and chemical clay binder characteristics from various locality and their influence on some technological properties of bentonite mouling mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Vasková

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explore the complex physical – chemical characteristics of bentonite of slovak provenance and to compare with non-slovak, which is considered as European highest quality standard in foundry and to compare from the point of foundry application. These characteristics of raw material have direct relationship with technological properties of bentonite sand mixtures and mainly with the quality of castings poured into these mixtures. To compare technological properties of bentonite forming mixtures with use of various clay types point of view application in foundry industry.

  6. ACETAL OBTAINED FROM ETHANOL AND ACID-ACTIVATED BENTONITE AS A CATALYST: AN ALTERNATIVE FOR THE SUGAR-ALCOHOL AGROINDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Yecid Buitrago Suescún

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the results of characterizing and activating a bentonite from the Valle del Cauca region. The betonite is used as a catalyst in the reaction to obtain 1,1-Diethoxyethane from ethanol, which can be extracted from sugar cane. Important factors are analyzed such as: the activation of the bentonite; the percentage of bentonite; the reaction temperature; and the ethanol/acetaldehyde feed ratio. In addition, comparison tests are performed against the CaCl2 catalyst which is commonly used in previous literature. Physical and spectrometric constants are measured for the obtained product confirming that it is 1,1-Diethoxyethane.

  7. Response of Compacted Bentonites to Thermal and Thermo-Hydraulic Loadings at High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehasis Tripathy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The final disposal of high-level nuclear waste in many countries is preferred to be in deep geological repositories. Compacted bentonites are proposed for use as the buffer surrounding the waste canisters which may be subjected to both thermal and hydraulic loadings. A significant increase in the temperature is anticipated within the buffer, particularly during the early phase of the repository lifetime. In this study, several non-isothermal and non-isothermal hydraulic tests were carried on compacted MX80 bentonite. Compacted bentonite specimens (water content = 15.2%, dry density = 1.65 Mg/m3 were subjected to a temperature of either 85 or 150 °C at one end, whereas the temperature at the opposite end was maintained at 25 °C. During the non-isothermal hydraulic tests, water was supplied from the opposite end of the heat source. The temperature and relative humidity were monitored along predetermined depths of the specimens. The profiles of water content, dry density, and degree of saturation were established after termination of the tests. The test results showed that thermal gradients caused redistribution of the water content, whereas thermo-hydraulic gradients caused both redistribution and an increase in the water content within compacted bentonites, both leading to development of axial stress of various magnitudes. The applied water injection pressures (5 and 600 kPa and temperature gradients appeared to have very minimal impact on the magnitude of axial stress developed. The thickness of thermal insulation layer surrounding the testing devices was found to influence the temperature and relative humidity profiles thereby impacting the redistribution of water content within compacted bentonites. Under the influence of both the applied thermal and thermo-hydraulic gradients, the dry density of the bentonite specimens increased near the heat source, whereas it decreased at the opposite end. The test results emphasized the influence of

  8. Study on the Surface-Physicochemical-Property Changing of Bentonite by Adapting a New Soil Stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Xiang, Wei; Lang, Linzhi; Cui, Deshan

    2015-04-01

    Surface-physicochemical-property of clays has been proved to have direct influence on its mechanic behavior. Specific surface area (SSA) is one of the most important factors for surface-physicochemical-property assessment. The smaller SSA tends higher strength (shear strength, unconfined compressive strength and tensile strength) under different water contents of soil. In this paper, a new soil stabilizer (Tung oil-based sulfonated) is developed and applied to improve the properties of Ca-bentonite. The differences of specific surface area, fractal dimension and micro geometric morphology between raw Ca-bentonite samples and modified ones are investigated based on the data acquired from water vapor, nitrogen adsorption experiments and SEM experiments. Results show that the SSA including external SSA and total SSA of treated samples decrease largely and apparently when compared to that of the raw samples. Furthermore, the higher volume ratio between soil stabilizer and water, the more decrease in SSA. Compared to the ones of raw Ca-bentonite, the external SSA and total SSA of the modified Ca-bentonite samples decrease by 48.5% and 25.2%, respectively, when the volume ratio was 1:50. This result implies that the connection of montmorillonite particles becomes more tightly after the treatment by the soil stabilizer. In addition, an obvious decreasing trend is found in fractal dimension by analysis of water vapor adsorption isotherms. This finding indicates that the pore surface tends to be smoother by the chemical action among particles bonds, more condensable in aggregates and shorter space between the interlayer of montmorillonite. SEM results display that the new soil stabilizer developed a quantity of lamellar aggregates but did not change the structure of montmorillonite. Based on all mentioned above, the results of fractal dimension analysis are verified. Consequently, this study shows that the new soil stabilizer (Tung oil-based sulfonated) has obvious effects

  9. Analysis of the porewater chemical composition of a Spanish compacted bentonite used in an engineered barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, A. M. a.; Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.; Rivas, P.

    Compacted bentonites are being considered in many countries as a backfill material in high-level radioactive waste disposal concepts. A knowledge of the porewater chemistry in the clay barrier is essential since the porewater composition influences the release and transport of the radionuclides. However, quantification of the water chemistry in compacted bentonite under repository conditions is difficult. The methodology followed to obtain the porewater composition of the FEBEX bentonite is described in this paper. It is based on the characterisation of the solid phase, determination of the physico-chemical properties of the montmorillonite component and geochemical modelling. The FEBEX bentonite has a high cation exchange capacity (∼1 eq/kg), high surface area (∼725 m 2/g total surface area and 62 m 2/g external surface area) and accessory minerals such as carbonates, sulphates, pyrite, etc.; and organic matter. The chloride inventory in the FEBEX bentonite is ∼22 mmol/kg. The montmorillonite, together with the other mineral phases present, will determine the composition of the porewater. However, in order to calculate a unique aqueous chemistry, two further quantities are required, the chloride concentration and the pH. Water vapour adsoption/desorption isotherms, together with c-lattice spacing determinations, were used to identify the different states and location of water. Most of the water in the as received bentonite resides in the interlayer space. However, the measurements indicate that about 0.053 l/kg may be regarded as free water, implying a chloride concentration of 0.42 M. The pH of the system is fixed by equilibrium with the atmosphere ( PCO 2=10 -3.5 bar) and saturation with the carbonate phases present. The porewater calculated to be in equilibrium with the as received FEBEX bentonite powder is a Na-Ca-Mg chloride type with a high ionic strength, 0.66 M, and a pH of ∼7.4. Likewise, in order to calculate the porewater composition of

  10. Evaluation of an enteric-coated naproxen pellet formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, J G; Lamont, G L; Evans, D F; Haga, A K; Gamst, O N

    1991-02-01

    An enteric-coated, pellet formulation of naproxen has been evaluated in eight healthy subjects. Each volunteer was dosed with 153Sm-labelled, enteric-coated pellets on two occasions, once whilst fasted and once after breakfast. Gastrointestinal transit was followed using gamma scintigraphy and drug absorption compared with that from uncoated naproxen pellets dosed on a separate occasion. The pH in the stomach and intestines was monitored using radiotelemetry capsules. Gastric emptying was delayed by dosing after breakfast, but small intestinal transit of the enteric-coated formulation was the same on both occasions. The highest pH recorded from the stomach was 4.0 and in all subjects the pH rose to at least 7.3 in the small intestine. The onset of drug absorption was fastest from the uncoated formulation and slowest from the coated pellets taken after breakfast. The total amount of drug absorbed was the same on all three occasions.

  11. A coupled THMC model of a heating and hydration laboratory experiment in unsaturated compacted FEBEX bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Fernandez, A.M.

    2010-05-01

    Unsaturated compacted bentonite is foreseen by several countries as a backfill and sealing material in high-level radioactive waste repositories. The strong interplays between thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration stage of a repository call for fully coupled THMC models. Validation of such THMC models is prevented by the lack of comprehensive THMC experiments and the difficulties of experimental methods to measure accurately the chemical composition of bentonite porewater. We present here a non-isothermal multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive solute transport model for a deformable medium of a heating and hydration experiment performed on a sample of compacted FEBEX bentonite. Besides standard solute transport and geochemical processes, the model accounts for solute cross diffusion and thermal and chemical osmosis. Bentonite swelling is solved with a state-surface approach. The THM model is calibrated with transient temperature, water content and porosity data measured at the end of the experiment. The reactive transport model is calibrated with porewater chemical data derived from aqueous extract data. Model results confirm that thermal osmosis is relevant for the hydration of FEBEX bentonite while chemical osmosis can be safely neglected. Dilution and evaporation are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species. Dissolved cations are mostly affected by calcite dissolution-precipitation and cation exchange reactions. Dissolved sulphate is controlled by gypsum/anhydrite dissolution-precipitation. pH is mostly buffered by protonation/deprotonation via surface complexation. Computed concentrations agree well with inferred aqueous extract data at all sections except near the hydration boundary where cation data are affected by a sampling artifact. The fit of Cl{sup -} data is excellent except for the data near the heater. The largest deviations of the model from inferred aqueous

  12. Geochemical and Mineralogical Changes in Compacted MX-80 Bentonite Submitted to Heat and Water Gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Espina, R.; Villar, M. V.

    2010-05-01

    A 20-cm high column of MX80 bentonite compacted at dry density 1.70 g/cm{sup 3} with an initial water content of 16 percent was submitted to heating and hydration by opposite ends for 496 days (TH test). The temperature at the bottom of the column was set at 140 degree centigrade and on top at 30 degree centigrade, and deionised water was injected on top at a pressure of 0.01 MPa. Upon dismantling water content, dry density, mineralogy, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, content of exchangeable cations, and concentration of soluble salts and pH of aqueous extracts were determined in different positions along the bentonite column. The pore water composition was modelled with a geochemical software. The test tried to simulate the conditions of an engineered barrier in a deep geological repository for high-level radioactive waste. The water intake and distribution of water content and dry density along the bentonite were conditioned by the thermal gradient. Liquid water did not penetrate into the column beyond the area in which the temperature was higher than 100 degree centigrade. A convection cell was formed above this area, and liquid water loaded with ions evaporated towards cooler bentonite as it reached the area where the temperature was too high. In this area precipitation of mineral phases took place, Advection, interlayer exchange and dissolution/precipitation processes conditioned the composition of the pore water along the column. In most of the column the pore water was Na-SO{sub 4} {sup 2}- type, and changed to Na-Cl near the heater. TH treatment did not cause significant changes in the smectite content or the other mineral phases of the bentonite. (Author) 41 refs.

  13. Purification of industrial phosphoric acid (54 %) using Fe-pillared bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Wiem; Chtara, Chaker; Benzina, Mourad

    2016-08-01

    The current problem of excess impurities in industrial phosphoric acid (IPA) 54 % P2O5 makes phosphates industries look toward low-cost but efficient adsorbents. In the present study, iron-oxide-modified bentonite (Fe-PILB) was prepared and investigated as a possible adsorbent for the removal of organic matter (OM) like humic acid (HA), chromium (Cr(III)), and zinc (Zn(II)) from IPA aqueous solutions. These adsorbents were characterized using XRD, TEM, and BET. The adsorption of impurities is well described by the pseudo-second-order model. The results indicate that Fe-PILB has a good ability to resist co-existing anions and the low-pH condition of IPA and owns a relatively high-removal capacity of 80.42 and 25 % for OM, Cr(III), and Zn(II). The mechanism of adsorption may be described by the ligand and ion exchange that happened on the active sites. The selected order of adsorption OM > Cr(3+) > Zn(2+) showed the importance of the competitive phenomenon onto bentonite materials' pore adsorption. For the adsorption of OM at the low pH of IPA, H-bond complexation was the dominant mechanism. From the adsorption of heavy metals and OM complex compounds contained in IPA 54 % on Fe-PILB, the bridging of humic acid between bentonite and heavy metals (Zn(II) or Cr(III)) is proposed as the dominant adsorption mechanism (bentonite-HA-Me). Overall, the results obtained in this study indicate Fe-pillared bentonite possesses a potential for the practical application of impurity (OM, Zn(II), and Cr(III)) removal from IPA aqueous solutions.

  14. Manure from biochar, bentonite and zeolite feed supplemented poultry: Moisture retention and granulation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Tanka P; Walsh, Kerry B; Midmore, David J; Jones, Ben E H; Bhattarai, Surya P

    2017-08-31

    Feeding treatments were imposed in two feeding trials involving Cobb broiler and Bond Brown layer birds. Three feed additives (biochar, bentonite and zeolite) were supplied at four rates (0, 1, 2 and 4% w/w) in feed, as previously considered in the context of animal production, was considered in the context of Excreta chemical and water retention properties and granulation characteristics of decomposed excreta (manure) were characterised. At field capacity (- 0.01 MPa), manure produced from control and 4% bentonite diets contained significantly (p = 0.001) more water (at 1.93 and 2.44% v/v water, respectively) than zeolite and biochar treatments. Manure mesoporosity was significantly (p = 0.015) higher in 2 and 4% bentonite treatments than other feed additives. Fresh excreta from layer birds on the control diet contained 6% w/dw N and 35% C, which was decreased to 2.6% N and 28% C after decomposition, with C:N ratio changing from 5.9 to 12.1. Ammonia loss was higher from biochar and zeolite manures than control or bentonite, associated with higher pH in the biochar and zeolite manures. More N was unaccounted from bentonite manure than other treatments, presumably lost as N2O or N2, a result linked to its higher moisture content and its enhanced rate of denitrification. The highest proportion of granules in the size class desired for fertilizer spreading was achieved using decomposed manure from the 1 and 2% w/w biochar treatments of the broiler trial, and 1 and 2% zeolite and 4% biochar treatments of the layer trial. Thus the feed amendments improved poultry manure in specific ways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Adsorption kinetics and isotherm of anionic dyes onto organo-bentonite from single and multisolute systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dazhong; Fan, Jianxin; Zhou, Weizhi; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Kang, Qi

    2009-12-15

    The performances of polydiallydimethylammonium modified bentonite (PDADMA-bentonite) as an adsorbent to remove anionic dyes, namely Acid Scarlet GR (AS-GR), Acid Turquoise Blue 2G (ATB-2G) and Indigo Carmine (IC), were investigated in single, binary and ternary dye systems. In adsorption from single dye solutions with initial concentration of 100 micromol/L, the dosage of PDADMA-bentonite needed to remove 95% dye was 0.42, 0.68 and 0.75 g/L for AS-GR, ATB-2G and IC, respectively. The adsorption isotherms of the three dyes obeyed the Langmuir isotherm model with the equilibrium constants of 0.372, 0.629 and 4.31 L/micromol, the saturation adsorption amount of 176.3, 149.2 and 228.7 micromol/g for ATB-2G, IC and AS-GR, respectively. In adsorption from mixed dye solutions, the isotherm of each individual dye followed an expanded Langmuir isotherm model and the relationship between the total amount of dyes adsorbed and the total equilibrium dye concentration was interpreted well by Langmuir isotherm model. In the region of insufficient dosage of PDADMA-bentonite, the dye with a larger affinity was preferentially removed by adsorption. Desorption was observed in the kinetic curve of the dye with lower affinity on PDADMA-bentonite surface by the competitive adsorption. The kinetics in single dye solution and the total adsorption of dyes in binary and ternary dye systems nicely followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  16. Investigations on uranium sorption on bentonite and montmorillonite, respectively, and uranium in environmental samples; Untersuchungen zur Uransorption an Bentonit bzw. Montmorillonit sowie von Uran in Umweltproben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azeroual, Mohamed

    2010-09-22

    The geotechnical barrier is an important component of a geological repository and consists of compacted bentonite surrounding radioactive waste containers. Its most important functions are, to retard the radionuclide migration into the biosphere and to prevent groundwater contact with containers. lt is therefore of central importance to investigate the bentonite material on its capacity to sorb radionuclides under near-natural chemical and physical conditions. The purpose of this work was to study the adsorption of uranium(VI) on bentonit and on montmorillonite-standards at high uranium concentrations. Thereby, a special account was given to the calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexation, which leads to the formation of very stable and mobile uncharged Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} complex. Results of batch experiments showed that the dicalcium-uranyl-tricarbonate complexation lowers the uranium(VI) sorption on natural clay (bentonite) by a factor of up to 3. After 21 days of contact time, about 40 % and 20 % of the initial uranium(VI)concentration were sorbed on Na-bentonite and ea-bentonite, respectively, from a solution with Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} dominating the uranium(VI) speciation. On the contrary, about 55 % of the initial uranium(VI)-concentration were sorbed on thes clays from the solution, in which (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(OH){sub 3}{sup -} complex dominated the uranium(VI) speciation. Thus uranium(VI) sorption is more strongly influenced by the solution composition than by bentonite type. Na-bentonite should be used instead of ea-bentonite as a geotechnical barrier, since calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexation may be a realistic scenario. Further SEM-EDX and HREM-EDX studies showed that uranium(VI) sorption occurred predominantly on montmorillonite, which is the main component of bentonite. Uranium(VI) sorption on bentonite's accessory Minerals (pyrite, calcite, mica, and feldspar) was not observed. Investigation of uranium

  17. Are owl pellets good estimators of prey abundance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analia Andrade

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Some ecologists have been skeptics about the use of owl pellets to estimate small mammal’s fauna. This is due to the assumptions required by this method: (a that owls hunt at random, and (b that pellets represent a random sample from the environment. We performed statistical analysis to test these assumptions and to assess the effectiveness of Barn owl pellets as a useful estimator of field abundances of its preys. We used samples collected in the arid Extra-Andean Patagonia along an altitudinal environmental gradient from lower Monte ecoregion to upper Patagonian steppe ecoregion, with a mid-elevation ecotone. To test if owls hunt at random, we estimated expected pellet frequency by creating a distribution of random pellets, which we compared with data using a simulated chi-square. To test if pellets represent a random sample from the environment, differences between ecoregions were evaluated by PERMANOVAs with Bray–Curtis dissimilarities. We did not find evidence that owls foraged non-randomly. Therefore, we can assume that the proportions of the small mammal’s species in the diet are representative of the proportions of the species in their communities. Only Monte is different from other ecoregions. The ecotone samples are grouped with those of Patagonian steppes. There are no real differences between localities in the small mammal’s abundances in each of these ecoregions and/or Barn owl pellets cannot detect patterns at a smaller spatial scale. Therefore, we have no evidence to invalidate the use of owl pellets at an ecoregional scale.

  18. Digestibility of pelleted rations containing diverse potato flour and urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Martinele

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate ruminal in situ degradability and in vitro digestibility of dry matter (DM in concentrate supplements containing diverse potato flour pelletized with urea (0%, 4%, 8%, and 12% DM. Samples of feeds were incubated for 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48h in the rumen of four fistulated sheep. Level of urea added had no significant effect (P>;0.05 on the soluble fraction (a or potentially degradable fraction (b of the pellets and ranged from 2.1% to 12.2% and 72.9% to 87.5%, respectively. Quadratic effects (P=0.03 of the rate of degradation of fraction "b" ranged from 4.75% h-1to 7.39% h-1; the estimated maximum value at 7.4% h-1was obtained when 5.9% urea was added to the pellet. Quadratic effects (P≤0.02 of the level of urea added to the pellets on the effective degradability (ED of DM were evaluated after considering rumen passage rates of 2.5% h-1and 8% h-1; the maximum values of ED calculated under these rumen passage rates were estimated at 6.3% to 7.3% urea in the pellets. The in vitro digestibility of DM of the pellets showed a quadratic effect (P=0.02 at different levels of urea, with a maximum value of 96.9% achieved when 7.9% urea was added to the pellets. Our results suggest that the addition of 6-8% urea to pelleted feed promotes an increase in the in vitro digestibility and ED of DM.

  19. Effect of pH and fulvic acid on sorption and complexation of cobalt onto bare and FA bound MX-80 bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, D.; Shao, D.D.; Chen, C.L.; Ren, A.P.; Wang, X.K. [Inst. of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China)

    2006-07-01

    Bentonite has attracted great interest in nuclear waste management because of its outstanding properties. Herein, the sorption and complexation of cobalt on bare bentonite and fulvic acid (FA) coated bentonite are studied, respectively, under ambient conditions. The experiments are carried out at T = 25 {+-} 2 C in 0.01 M KNO{sub 3} solutions. Effect of pH, bentonite concentration, fulvic acid and cobalt solution concentration on cobalt sorption to bentonite is also investigated. The results show that cobalt sorption is strongly pH dependent and weakly bentonite content dependent. The presence of fulvic acid enhances Co{sup 2+} sorption at low pH values and reduces the sorption of Co{sup 2+} at high pH values. Effect of addition sequences of Co{sup 2+} and FA to bentonite suspension on cobalt sorption to FA-bentonite colloids is also studied and the results indicate that the sorption of cobalt on FA coated bentonite is dependent on the addition sequences. The mechanism is discussed by the relative strength between both complexes of Co(II) with sorbed and soluble FA and with bentonite. (orig.)

  20. Carbon Monoxide Off-Gassing From Bags of Wood Pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Arifur; Rossner, Alan; Hopke, Philip K

    2017-12-25

    Wood pellets are increasingly used for space heating in the United States and globally. Prior work has shown that stored bulk wood pellets produce sufficient carbon monoxide (CO) to represent a health concern and exceed regulatory standards for occupational exposures. However, most of the pellets used for residential heating are sold in 40-pound (18.1 kg) plastic bags. This study measured CO emission factors from fresh, bagged-wood pellets as a function of temperature and relative humidity. CO concentrations increased with increasing temperature and moisture in the container. CO measurements in a pellet mill warehouse with stored pallets of bagged pellets had 8-h average CO concentrations up to 100 ppm exceeding occupational standards for worker exposure. Thus, manufacturers, distributors, and home owners should be aware of the potential for CO in storage areas and design facilities with appropriate ventilation and CO sensors. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  1. Long-term alteration of bentonite in the presence of metallic iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumpulainen, Sirpa; Kiviranta, Leena (BandTech Oy (Finland)); Carlsson, Torbjoern; Muurinen, Arto (VTT (Finland)); Svensson, Daniel (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (Sweden)); Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Yui, Mikatzu (JAEA (Japan)); Wersin, Paul; Rosch, Dominic (Gruner Ltd (Switzerland))

    2010-05-15

    According to the KBS-3H concept, each copper canister containing spent nuclear fuel will be surrounded by a bentonite buffer and a perforated steel cylinder. Since steel is unstable in wet bentonite, it will corrode and the corrosion products will interact with the surrounding bentonite in ways that are not fully understood. Such interaction may seriously impair the bentonite's functioning as a buffer material, e.g. by lowering its CEC or decreasing its swelling capacity. This report presents results from two iron-bentonite experiments carried out under quite different conditions at VTT (Finland) and JAEA (Japan). Both studies focused on long-term iron-bentonite interactions under anaerobic conditions. The study at VTT comprised eight years long experiments focused on diffusive based interactions between solid cast-iron and compacted MX-80 bentonite (dry density 1.5-1.6 g/cm3) in contact with an aqueous 0.5 M NaCl solution. The study at JAEA comprised ten years long batch experiments, each involving a mixture of metallic iron powder (25 g), an industrially refined Na bentonite, Kunipia F, which contains more than 99% montmorillonite (25 g), and an aqueous solution (250 mL). Samples were sent to B+Tech in airtight steel vessels filled with N{sub 2} and subsequently analyzed at various laboratories in Finland and Sweden. The JAEA samples differed with regard to the initial solution chemistry, which was either distilled water, 0.3 M NaCl, 0.6 M NaCl, 0.1 M NaHCO{sub 3}, or 0.05 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The analyses of the MX-80 bentonite samples were carried out on samples containing a cast iron cylinder and also on corresponding background samples with no cast iron. In addition, the external solution and gas phase in contact with the bentonite were analyzed. Briefly, the gas contained H{sub 2}, most possibly caused by corrosion of the cast iron, and CO{sub 2}, mainly as a result of carbonate dissolution. The eight years old external solution exhibited, inter alia

  2. Human Rabies - Wyoming and Utah, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrist, Alexia; Styczynski, Ashley; Wynn, DonRaphael; Ansari, Safdar; Hopkin, Justin; Rosado-Santos, Harry; Baker, JoDee; Nakashima, Allyn; Atkinson, Annette; Spencer, Melanie; Dean, Debbie; Teachout, Leslie; Mayer, Jeanmarie; Condori, Rene E; Orciari, Lillian; Wadhwa, Ashutosh; Ellison, James; Niezgoda, Michael; Petersen, Brett; Wallace, Ryan; Musgrave, Karl

    2016-06-03

    In September 2015, a Wyoming woman was admitted to a local hospital with a 5-day history of progressive weakness, ataxia, dysarthria, and dysphagia. Because of respiratory failure, she was transferred to a referral hospital in Utah, where she developed progressive encephalitis. On day 8 of hospitalization, the patient's family told clinicians they recalled that, 1 month before admission, the woman had found a bat on her neck upon waking, but had not sought medical care. The patient's husband subsequently had contacted county invasive species authorities about the incident, but he was not advised to seek health care for evaluation of his wife's risk for rabies. On October 2, CDC confirmed the patient was infected with a rabies virus variant that was enzootic to the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The patient died on October 3. Public understanding of rabies risk from bat contact needs to be improved; cooperation among public health and other agencies can aid in referring persons with possible bat exposure for assessment of rabies risk.

  3. Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment: Work Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Natasha B.; Garman, Steven L.; Walters, Annika; Ray, Andrea; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Wesner, Jeff S.; O’Donnell, Michael S.; Sherrill, Kirk R.; Babel, Nils C.; Bowen, Zachary H.

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of the Rapid Ecoregional Assessments (REAs) being conducted for the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is to provide information that supports regional planning and analysis for the management of ecological resources. The REA provides an assessment of baseline ecological conditions, an evaluation of current risks from drivers of ecosystem change, and a predictive capacity for evaluating future risks. The REA also may be used for identifying priority areas for conservation or restoration and for assessing the cumulative effects of a variety of land uses. There are several components of the REAs. Management Questions, developed by the BLM and partners for the ecoregion, identify the information needed for addressing land-management responsibilities. Conservation Elements represent regionally significant aquatic and terrestrial species and communities that are to be conserved and (or) restored. The REA also will evaluate major drivers of ecosystem change (Change Agents) currently affecting or likely to affect the status of Conservation Elements. We selected 8 major biomes and 19 species or species assemblages to be included as Conservation Elements. We will address the four primary Change Agents—development, fire, invasive species, and climate change—required for the REA. The purpose of the work plan for the Wyoming Basin REA is to document the selection process for, and final list of, Management Questions, Conservation Elements, and Change Agents. The work plan also presents the overall assessment framework that will be used to assess the status of Conservation Elements and answer Management Questions.

  4. Case studies on direct liquefaction of low rank Wyoming coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, P.; Kramer, S.J.; Poddar, S.K. [Bechtel Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Previous Studies have developed process designs, costs, and economics for the direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 and Wyoming Black Thunder coals at mine-mouth plants. This investigation concerns two case studies related to the liquefaction of Wyoming Black Thunder coal. The first study showed that reducing the coal liquefaction reactor design pressure from 3300 to 1000 psig could reduce the crude oil equivalent price by 2.1 $/bbl provided equivalent performing catalysts can be developed. The second one showed that incentives may exist for locating a facility that liquifies Wyoming coal on the Gulf Coast because of lower construction costs and higher labor productivity. These incentives are dependent upon the relative values of the cost of shipping the coal to the Gulf Coast and the increased product revenues that may be obtained by distributing the liquid products among several nearby refineries.

  5. Development of a Tritium Extruder for ITER Pellet Injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.J. Gouge; P.W. Fisher

    1998-09-01

    As part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) plasma fueling development program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has fabricated a pellet injection system to test the mechanical and thermal properties of extruded tritium. Hydrogenic pellets will be used in ITER to sustain the fusion power in the plasma core and may be crucial in reducing first-wall tritium inventories by a process of "isotopic fueling" in which tritium-rich pellets fuel the burning plasma core and deuterium gas fuels the edge. This repeating single-stage pneumatic pellet injector, called the Tritium-Proof-of-Principle Phase II (TPOP-II) Pellet Injector, has a piston-driven mechanical extruder and is designed to extrude and accelerate hydrogenic pellets sized for the ITER device. The TPOP-II program has the following development goals: evaluate the feasibility of extruding tritium and deuterium-tritium (D-T) mixtures for use in future pellet injection systems; determine the mechanical and thermal properties of tritium and D-T extrusions; integrate, test, and evaluate the extruder in a repeating, single-stage light gas gun that is sized for the ITER application (pellet diameter -7 to 8 mm); evaluate options for recycling propellant and extruder exhaust gas; and evaluate operability and reliability of ITER prototypical fueling systems in an environment of significant tritium inventory that requires secondary and room containment systems. In tests with deuterium feed at ORNL, up to 13 pellets per extrusion have been extruded at rates up to 1 Hz and accelerated to speeds of 1.0 to 1.1 km/s, using hydrogen propellant gas at a supply pressure of 65 bar. Initially, deuterium pellets 7.5 mm in diameter and 11 mm in length were produced-the largest cryogenic pellets produced by the fusion program to date. These pellets represent about a 10% density perturbation to ITER. Subsequently, the extruder nozzle was modified to produce pellets that are almost 7.5-mm right circular

  6. An evaluation of the Wyoming gauge system for snowfall measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D.; Kane, D.L.; Hinzman, L.D.; Goodison, B.E.; Metcalfe, J.R.; Louie, P.Y.T.; Leavesley, G.H.; Emerson, D.G.; Hanson, C.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Wyoming snow fence (shield) has been widely used with precipitation gauges for snowfall measurement at more than 25 locations in Alaska since the late 1970s. This gauge's measurements have been taken as the reference for correcting wind-induced gauge undercatch of snowfall in Alaska. Recently, this fence (shield) was tested in the World Meteorological Organization Solid Precipitation Measurement Intercomparison Project at four locations in the United States of America and Canada for six winter seasons. At the Intercomparison sites an octagonal vertical Double Fence with a Russian Tretyakov gauge or a Universal Belfort recording gauge was installed and used as the Intercomparison Reference (DFIR) to provide true snowfall amounts for this intercomparison experiment. The intercomparison data collected were compiled at the four sites that represent a variety of climate, terrain, and exposure. On the basis of these data sets the performance of the Wyoming gauge system for snowfall observations was carefully evaluated against the DFIR and snow cover data. The results show that (1) the mean snow catch efficiency of the Wyoming gauge compared with the DFIR is about 80-90%, (2) there exists a close linear relation between the measurements of the two gauge systems and this relation may serve as a transfer function to adjust the Wyoming gauge records to obtain an estimate of the true snowfall amount, (3) catch efficiency of the Wyoming gauge does not change with wind speed and temperature, and (4) Wyoming gauge measurements are generally compatible to the snowpack water equivalent at selected locations in northern Alaska. These results are important to our effort of determining true snowfall amounts in the high latitudes, and they are also useful for regional hydrologic and climatic analyses.

  7. Spatial mapping and attribution of Wyoming wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Michael S.; Fancher, Tammy S.

    2010-01-01

    This Wyoming wind-turbine data set represents locations of wind turbines found within Wyoming as of August 1, 2009. Each wind turbine is assigned to a wind farm. For each turbine, this report contains information about the following: potential megawatt output, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, land ownership, county, wind farm power capacity, the number of units currently associated with its wind farm, the wind turbine manufacturer and model, the wind farm developer, the owner of the wind farm, the current purchaser of power from the wind farm, the year the wind farm went online, and the status of its operation. Some attributes are estimates based on information that was obtained through the American Wind Energy Association and miscellaneous online reports. The locations are derived from August 2009 true-color aerial photographs made by the National Agriculture Imagery Program; the photographs have a positional accuracy of approximately ?5 meters. The location of wind turbines under construction during the development of this data set will likely be less accurate than the location of turbines already completed. The original purpose for developing the data presented here was to evaluate the effect of wind energy development on seasonal habitat used by greater sage-grouse. Additionally, these data will provide a planning tool for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative Science Team and for other wildlife- and habitat-related projects underway at the U.S. Geological Survey's Fort Collins Science Center. Specifically, these data will be used to quantify disturbance of the landscape related to wind energy as well as quantifying indirect disturbances to flora and fauna. This data set was developed for the 2010 project 'Seasonal predictive habitat models for greater sage-grouse in Wyoming.' This project's spatially explicit seasonal distribution models of sage-grouse in Wyoming will provide resource managers with tools for conservation planning. These

  8. Application of cryptocrystalline magnesite-bentonite clay hybrid for defluoridation of underground water resources: implication for point of use treatment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masindi, Vhahangwele

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A new synthesis method was established to fabricate a nanocomposite material comprising of cryptocrystalline magnesite and bentonite clay that has high adsorption capacity for ionic pollutants. To synthesize the composite at 1:1 weight (g): weight...

  9. Synthesis of nanocomposite of cryptocrystalline magnesite-bentonite clay and its application for phosphate removal from municipal effluents

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masindi, Vhahangwele

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, nanocomposite of cryptocrystalline magnesite-bentonite clay was used as a novel technology for removal of phosphates from municipal effluents. Vibratory ball miller was used for fabrication of the composite. Removal...

  10. Surface complexation modeling of U(VI) sorption on GMZ bentonite in the presence of fulvic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jie [Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry Laboratory; Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Guangzhou (China). The 5th Electronics Research Inst.; Luo, Daojun [Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Guangzhou (China). The 5th Electronics Research Inst.; Qiao, Yahua; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Chunming [Ministry of Environmental Protection, Beijing (China). Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center; Wu, Wangsuo [Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry Laboratory; Ye, Yuanlv [Ministry of Environmental Protection, Beijing (China). Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center; Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry Laboratory

    2017-03-01

    In this work, experiments and modeling for the interactions between uranyl ion and GMZ bentonite in the presence of fulvic acid are presented. The results demonstrated that FA is strongly bound to GMZ bentonite, and these molecules have a very large effect on the U(VI) sorption. The results also demonstrated that U(VI) sorption to GMZ bentonite in the presence and absence of sorbed FA can be well predicted by combining SHM and DLM. According to the model calculations, the nature of the interactions between FA with U(VI) at GMZ bentonite surface is mainly surface complex. The first attempt to simulate clay interaction with humus by the SHM model.

  11. Electrochemistry Study on PVC-LiClO4 Polymer Electrolyte Supported by Bengkulu Natural Bentonite for Lithium Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghufira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research bentonite was used as filler to produce polymer electrolyte (PVCLiClO4. Some weight variation of bentonite have been made by addition, such as 0% wt/wt; 5% wt/wt ; 10% wt/wt ; 15% wt/wt ; 20% wt/wt ; and 25% wt/wt of bentonite to the mixture of 0,5 gramof PVC and 0,125 gram of LiClO4. Ionic conductivity of polymer electrolyte was tested using impedance spectroscopy. The result of the research was showed that a mixture of PVCBentonite(10% wt/wt-LiClO4 gives the highest ionic conductivity (4,86 x 10-3 S.Cm-1. This result indicated that the presence of natural bentonite can be used as a filler in the current composite polymer electrolyte and can increase the ionic conductivity of the polymer electrolyte.

  12. Lifetime of Bentonites study: hydrothermal stability of saponites; Estudio de longevidad en bentonitas: estabilidad hidrotermal de saponitas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leguey, S.; Cuevas, J.; Garralon, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Quimica Agricola, Geologia y Geoquimica, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-10-01

    The report studies the lifetime of bentonite and the hydrothermal stability of saponites. The testing comprised determination of physical and chemical properties of clays, the stability of the mineral porosity, lifetime and the wall of clay.

  13. Application of magnesite–bentonite clay composite as an alternative technology for removal of arsenic from industrial effluents

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masindi, Vhahangwele

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the feasibility of integrating amorphous magnesite and bentonite clay (composite) as an alternative technology for removing arsenic from industrial effluents. The removal of arsenic from industrial effluents by using magnesite...

  14. Time evolution of the general characteristics and Cu retention capacity in an acid soil amended with a bentonite winery waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Calviño, David; Rodríguez-Salgado, Isabel; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The effect of bentonite waste added to a "poor" soil on its general characteristic and copper adsorption capacity was assessed. The soil was amended with different bentonite waste concentrations (0, 10, 20, 40 and 80Mgha-1) in laboratory pots, and different times of incubation of samples were...... tested (one day and one, four and eight months). The addition of bentonite waste increased the pH, organic matter content and phosphorus and potassium concentrations in the soil, being stable for P and K, whereas the organic matter decreased with time. Additionally, the copper sorption capacity...... of the soil and the energy of the Cu bonds increased with bentonite waste additions. However, the use of this type of waste in soil presented important drawbacks for waste dosages higher than 20Mgha-1, such as an excessive increase of the soil pH and an increase of copper in the soil solution....

  15. SORPTION AND DISPERSION OF STRONTIUM RADIONUCLIDE IN THE BENTONITE-QUARTZ-CLAY AS BACKFILL MATERIAL CANDIDATE ON RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herry Poernomo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment of sorption and dispersion characteristics of strontium in the mixture of bentonite-quartz, clay-quartz, bentonite-clay-quartz as candidate of raw material for backfill material in the radioactive waste repository has been performed. The objective of this research is to know the grain size effect of bentonite, clay, and quartz on the weight percent ratio of bentonite to quartz, clay to quartz, bentonite to clay to-quartz can be gives physical characteristics of best such as bulk density (rb, effective porosity (e, permeability (K, best sorption characteristic such as distribution coefficient (Kd, and best dispersion characteristics such as dispersivity (a and effective dispersion coefficient (De of strontium in the backfill material candidate. The experiment was carried out in the column filled by the mixture of bentonite-quartz, clay-quartz, bentonite-clay-quartz with the weight percent ratio of bentonite to quartz, clay to quartz, bentonite to clay to quartz of 100/0, 80/20, 60/40, 40/60, 20/80, 0/100 respectively at saturated condition of water, then flowed 0.1 N Sr(NO32 as buffer solution with tracer of 0.05 Ci/cm3 90Sr as strontium radionuclide simulation was leached from immobilized radioactive waste in the radioactive waste repository. The concentration of 90Sr in the effluents represented as Ct were analyzed by Ortec b counter every 30 min, then by using profile concentration of Co and Ct, values of Kd, a and De of 90Sr in the backfill material was determined. The experiment data showed that the best results were -80+120 mesh grain size of bentonite, clay, quartz respectively on the weight percent ratio of bentonite to clay to quartz of 70/10/20 with physical characteristics of rb = 0.658 g/cm3, e = 0.666 cm3/cm3, and K = 1.680x10-2 cm/sec, sorption characteristic of Kd = 46.108 cm3/g, dispersion characteristics of a = 5.443 cm, and De = 1.808x10-03 cm2/sec can be proposed as candidate of raw material of backfill material

  16. Isostatic compaction of beaker shaped bentonite blocks on the scale 1:4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Nord, Sven [Ifoe Ceramics AB, Bromoella (Sweden ); Pusch, Roland [Geodevelopment AB, Lund (Sweden); Sjoeblom, Rolf [AaF-Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of the present work is to test, on a scale of 1:4, the feasibility of manufacturing bentonite blocks by isostatic compaction for application as a buffer material in a repository for spent nuclear fuel. In order for the tests to be sensitive to any weaknesses of the method, the blocks were shaped as beakers. The scope included the following: 1. Preparation of powder: a. mixing of the bentonite and addition of water in predetermined amounts, b. sieving to remove any lumps generated; 2. Isostatic compaction: a. establishment of a separate laboratory for the handling of bentonite powder (weighing, mixing, filling, sampling and machining), b. development and design of equipment and procedures for compaction of bentonite to beaker-shaped specimens, c. compaction process operation, d. visual inspection; 3. Sampling and characterisation: a. extraction of samples from the blocks made, b. determination of water content, c. determination of density, d. determination of strain at maximum stress by means of bending tests, e. determination of tensile strength by means of bending tests, f. determination of geometries of the blocks prepared; 4. Post-treatment by means of machining: a. machining of blocks made, b. visual inspection; 5. Evaluation. The work went very smoothly. No significant obstacles or unexpected events were encountered. The conclusions are as follows: The conclusions drawn in this report from work on the (linear)scale of one to four are very relevant to the full scale. Mixing of bentonite powder as well as moistening can be carried out on a pilot scale with a good homogeneity and with maintained good quality of the press powder. The compaction of bentonite can be carried out in a similar manner to the present operation at Ifoe Ceramics AB. This implies a very efficient handling as well as a very efficient use of the time in the press which may account for a large proportion of the total cost. The blocks could readily be produced to reproducible

  17. Analysis of the effect of vibrations on the bentonite buffer in the canister hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Martin (AaF- Berg och Maetteknik, Stockholm (Sweden)); Hakami, Hossein; Ekneligoda, Thushan (Itasca Geomekanik AB, Solna (Sweden))

    2009-09-15

    During the construction of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in crystalline rock, blasting activities in certain deposition tunnels will occur at the same time as the deposition of canisters containing the waste is going on in another adjacent access tunnel. In fact, the deposition consists of several stages after the drilling of the deposition hole. The most vulnerable stage from a vibration point of view is when the bentonite buffer is placed in the deposition hole but the canister has not been placed yet. During this stage, a hollow column of bentonite blocks remains free to vibrate inside the deposition hole. The goal of this study was to investigate the displacement of the bentonite blocks when exposed to the highest vibration level that can be expected during the drill and blast operations. In order to investigate this, a three dimensional model in 3DEC, capable of capturing the dynamic behaviour of the bentonite buffer was set up. To define the vibration levels, which serve as input data for the 3DEC model, an extensive analysis of the recorded vibrations from the TASQ - tunnel was carried out. For this purpose, an upper expected vibration limit was defined. This was done outgoing from the fact that the planned charging for the construction of the geological repository will lie in the interval 2 to 4 kg. Furthermore, at the first stage for this study, it was decided that the vibration should be conservatively evaluated for 30 m distance. Using these data, it was concluded that the maximum vibration level that can be expected will be approximately 60 mm/s. After simplifying the vibration signal, a sinusoidal wave with the amplitude 60 mm/s was applied at the bottom of the column and it was assumed that the vibrations only affect the bentonite buffer in one direction (horizontal direction). From this simulation, it was concluded that hardly any displacements occurred. However, when applying the same sinusoidal wave both in the horizontal and the

  18. Long-term alteration of bentonite in the presence of metallic iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumpulainen, S.; Kiviranta, L. [B and Tech Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Carlsson, T.; Muurinen, A. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Svensson, D. [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (SKB), Stockholm (Sweden); Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Yui, Mikatzu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) (Japan); Wersin, P.; Rosch, D. [Gruner Ltd, Basel (Switzerland)

    2011-12-15

    According to the KBS-3H concept, each copper canister containing spent nuclear fuel will be surrounded by a bentonite buffer and a perforated steel cylinder. Since steel is unstable in wet bentonite, it will corrode and the corrosion products will interact with the surrounding bentonite in ways that are not fully understood. Such interaction may seriously impair the bentonite's functioning as a buffer material, e.g. by lowering its CEC or decreasing its swelling capacity. This report presents results from two ironbentonite experiments carried out under quite different conditions at VTT (Finland) and JAEA (Japan). Both studies focused on long-term iron-bentonite interactions under anaerobic conditions. The study at VTT comprised eight years long experiments focused on diffusive based interactions between solid cast-iron and compacted MX-80 bentonite (dry density 1.5- 1.6 g/cm{sup 3}) in contact with an aqueous 0.5 M NaCl solution. The study at JAEA comprised ten years long batch experiments, each involving a mixture of metallic iron powder (25 g), an industrially refined Na bentonite, Kunipia F, which contains more than 99% montmorillonite (25 g), and an aqueous solution (250 mL). Samples were sent to B and Tech in airtight steel vessels filled with N{sub 2} and subsequently analyzed at various laboratories in Finland and Sweden. The JAEA samples differed with regard to the initial solution chemistry, which was either distilled water, 0.3 M NaCl, 0.6 M NaCl, 0.1 M NaHCO{sub 3}, or 0.05 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The analyses of the MX-80 bentonite samples were carried out on samples containing a cast iron cylinder and also on corresponding background samples with no cast iron. In addition, the external solution and gas phase in contact with the bentonite were analyzed. Briefly, the gas contained H{sub 2}, most possibly caused by corrosion of the cast iron, and CO{sub 2}, mainly as a result of carbonate dissolution. The eight years old external solution exhibited

  19. Wood pellets and work environment; Traepiller og arbejdsmiljoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skov, S.

    2012-07-01

    The project aim was to evaluate the working environment in the production, transport and use of wood pellets. Furthermore, obtained knowledge and guidelines should be disseminated to relevant audiences. The first aim was achieved by making dust measurements at various relevant locations and analyze the results. Several technical problems regarding the measurements occurred during the project. In general, the manual handling of pellets often is a short-term task, which limits the amount of dust that can be collected on the sampling filter. The solution to this problem could be the use of in situ monitoring equipment, however, this technic did not work well for wood dust. Dissemination is mainly done by publishing the findings and guidelines on the webpage www.fyrmedpiller.dk. The result shows that there are widespread dust problems associated with the use and handling of pellets. The result may have been expected in the wood pellet industry, which has been reluctant to support this project. Legislation on the working environment has set a threshold limit for the dust concentration in the air on max 1 mg of dust per cubic meters of air over a working day and in over shorter periods this limit may be doubled. These threshold values were exceeded in many cases. Brief overview: The production of pellets takes place in a very dusty working environment, but the specific pelletizing and bagging processes only produce limited amounts of dust. The dust problems are major in the large warehouses where the handling of the raw material for the pellets increases the dust concentration in the air to levels that by far exceeds the legal threshold values. The work is mainly carried out from the cabin of different machines e.g. loaders and bobcats. It turns out that the average dust concentration in these cabins with filters also exceeds the threshold values. The transports of wood pellets include loading, unloading and delivery of loose pellets, all situations that are critical

  20. Interaction processes at the concrete-bentonite interface after 13 years of FEBEX-Plug operation. Part I: Concrete alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, María Cruz; García Calvo, José Luis; Cuevas, Jaime; Turrero, María Jesús; Fernández, Raúl; Torres, Elena; Ruiz, Ana I.

    2017-06-01

    This paper evaluates the modifications created in the concrete of the FEBEX shotcreted concrete plug after 13 years in the Grimsel Test Site conditions. During this time the concrete interacted with granite groundwater and also with bentonite porewater at the concrete/bentonite contact. Three long cores and 6 small cores from different parts of the concrete plug were evaluated. Mechanical performance was not modified during this time but hydraulic conductivity increased. The main transport mechanisms involved in the alteration of the concrete were groundwater flow from the host rock to the concrete and diffusion at the concrete/bentonite interface. Leaching occurred in the concrete parts near the host rock due to the action of granite water with further portlandite dissolution. The joint action of granite groundwater and bentonite porewater has caused many changes to the concrete matrix which was located at a depth lower than 5 cm from the bentonite-concrete interface. In the first centimetre C-S-H was significantly altered, incorporating elements like Al, S and Mg which change the initial microstructure by loss of compactness. The ettringite content was very high along the length of the concrete plug due to the shotcreting technique which made use of accelerator additives that caused the formation of ettringite. An increase in the ettringite content is also shown near the bentonite barrier. Therefore, sulphate diffused from the bentonite into the concrete, causing the massive formation of new ettringite. Chloride also diffused from the bentonite barrier deeper into the concrete by up to 4-5 cm from where the formation of Friedel's salt was detected.

  1. Characterization of Various Kinds, Thickness and Bentonite Sand Ratio as Hardplain Materials: a Basic Concept for Coastal Sandy Land Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saparso

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Coastal sandy land development faces the sand characteristics, the lower holding water capacity and the larger nutrient leaching due to heavier rainfall in the tropics, soil porosity and without soil layering so it need alternative technology for more efficient harvesting water resources in supporting the crop growing. The laboratory research studied the characteristic of various kind, thickness and ratio of hardplain material was carried out at Laboratory of Agronomy of UNSOED, Soil Mechanic of GMU. the SEM and X-RD of Lemigas Jakarta. Permeability determination by Falling Head which is appropriate measurment was not significantly different with ELE28-290 permeameter. Permeability of Kokap clay soil and Nanggulan bentonite were larger than the rainfall intensity in coastal sandy land. The Sentolo Vertisol content 68% calcium smectite had permeability 3,7 mm.day-1. Bentonite permeability were not significantly different due to more than 80% clay mineral composition. Therefore the permeability of natrium bentonite like as BPIB and BLUB namely 1.4 x 10-2 and 10-2 mm day-1 were lower than the calcium bentonite like as RMBL and BLBK permeability namely 4.3 x 10-2 and 2.43 x 10-2 mm day-1. Permeability of 0.5 cm thickness bentonite was not significantly different than 1.0 dan 1.5 cm thickness and those had very low permeability. Bentonite sand mixture 15 and 20 percent produced bentonite sand agregate that had mesopores by which allowing the drainage and available soil water so that those had water permeability 13.7 dan 10.3 mm day-1 respectively. The mixture 30-100% had not significantly different permeability namely 7.3 x 10-2 up to 1.4 10-2 mm day-1. The combination of tickness and the low ratio of bentonite sand mixutre need to be determined to produce favourable environment in supporting the plant growth.

  2. The effects of technological voids on the hydro-mechanical behaviour of compacted bentonite-sand mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qiong; Minh Tang, Anh; Cui, Yu-Jun; Delage, Pierre; Barnichon, Jean-Dominique; Ye, Wei-min

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Compacted bentonite-based materials are often used as buffer materials in radioactive waste disposal. A good understanding of their hydro-mechanical behaviour is essential to ensure the disposal safety. In this study, a mixture of MX80 bentonite and sand was characterized in the laboratory in terms of water retention property, swelling pressure, compressibility and hydraulic conductivity. The effects of the technological voids or the voids inside the soil were investig...

  3. Experimental investigations on thermo-hydro-mechanical properties of compacted GMZ01 bentonite-sand mixture using as buffer materials

    OpenAIRE

    XU, L.; Ye, Wei-min; Chen, Bao; Chen, Yong-Gui; Cui, Yu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bentonite-sand mixture has been proposed as engineered barriers for high-level waste disposal in many countries. For investigation of the thermo-hydro-mechanical properties of compacted GMZ01 bentonite-sand mixture, swelling pressure, hydraulic thermal conductivity tests were conducted in this paper. Results show that addition of sand will increase the thermal conductivity of the mixture. However, depending on the dry density water content of the specimen, the increasing rate of thermal condu...

  4. Method to Produce Durable Pellets at Lower Energy Consumption Using High Moisture Corn Stover and a Corn Starch Binder in a Flat Die Pellet Mill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Conner, Craig C; Hoover, Amber N

    2016-06-15

    A major challenge in the production of pellets is the high cost associated with drying biomass from 30 to 10% (w.b.) moisture content. At Idaho National Laboratory, a high-moisture pelleting process was developed to reduce the drying cost. In this process the biomass pellets are produced at higher feedstock moisture contents than conventional methods, and the high moisture pellets produced are further dried in energy efficient dryers. This process helps to reduce the feedstock moisture content by about 5-10% during pelleting, which is mainly due to frictional heat developed in the die. The objective of this research was to explore how binder addition influences the pellet quality and energy consumption of the high-moisture pelleting process in a flat die pellet mill. In the present study, raw corn stover was pelleted at moistures of 33, 36, and 39% (w.b.) by addition of 0, 2, and 4% pure corn starch. The partially dried pellets produced were further dried in a laboratory oven at 70 °C for 3-4 hr to lower the pellet moisture to less than 9% (w.b.). The high moisture and dried pellets were evaluated for their physical properties, such as bulk density and durability. The results indicated that increasing the binder percentage to 4% improved pellet durability and reduced the specific energy consumption by 20-40% compared to pellets with no binder. At higher binder addition (4%), the reduction in feedstock moisture during pelleting was binder. With 4% binder and 33% (w.b.) feedstock moisture content, the bulk density and durability values observed of the dried pellets were >510 kg/m(3) and >98%, respectively, and the percent fine particles generated was reduced to <3%.

  5. Physical and chemical stability of the bentonite buffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinsong Liu; Neretnieks, Ivars [Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal I nstitute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-12-15

    A literature study was made on previous work on clay erosion and on the fundamental processes that govern the stability of clay gels. Mechanical erosion has been studied earlier and models devised to estimate the tendency to erode. We have used a different approach that we deem is fundamentally more correct. Chemical erosion processes have not been found to be studied previously and we have approached the problem by applying simple but fundamental mass balances and transport processes to the problem. The physical and chemical processes that govern the repulsive and cohesive forces in clay are well understood in principle but cannot yet be applied quantitatively to predict the gel/sol behaviour of the bentonite clay. It was necessary to rely directly on laboratory measurements for information on swelling and gel/sol properties. The backfill bentonite clay acts as a Bingham fluid over a wide range of clay density. To mobilise the clay a shear stress larger than the Bingham yield stress must be applied to the gel. The Bingham yield stress has been measured to be larger than 1 Pa (N/m{sup 2}) although it cannot be ruled out that lower values can be found under different experimental conditions than those reported. Shear stresses exerted by the water flowing in the fractures that intersect the deposition holes with the clay backfill have been estimated for a wide range of fracture transmissivities, apertures and hydraulic gradients that could exist under repository conditions. This includes the extremely high gradients that could exist during some periods during an ice age. For fracture transmissivities ranging from 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s, fracture apertures from 0.1 to 2 mm and the hydraulic gradients from 0.01 to 1 mH{sub 2}O/m, the largest local shear stress found in this range was about 0.1 Pa. To investigate a 'what if' situation where the shear stress exceeds the yield stress simple models were devised. They were used to assess the rate of

  6. A survey of the pellets sector. 'Interpellets', window of the international pellets industry; Uebersicht rund um Pellets. Interpellets als Schaufenster der internationalen Pelletsbranche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutter, Joerg [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Sonnenenergie e.V. (DGS) (Germany). Bereich PV-Projektierung und PV-Anlagenbetrieb

    2009-01-15

    In late October 2008, the 'Interpellets' fair was held at Stuttgart. Parallel to this, Solar Promotion GmbH hosted the expert conference 'Industrieforum Pellets'. At 5,300, public attendance was higher by 14 percent than in the year before, and the congress was attended by 480 experts. (orig.)

  7. Summary of a GAMBIT Club Workshop on Gas Migration in Bentonite. A Report produced for the GAMBIT Club

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodwell, W.R. [Serco Assurance, Risley (GB)] (ed.)

    2005-11-15

    In order to review the status of understanding of gas migration in bentonite, and particularly the experimental data that provides the basis for such understanding as exists, the GAMBIT Club organised a workshop of invited participants that was held in Madrid during 29-30 October 2003. (The GAMBIT Club is a consortium of radioactive waste management agencies: SKB, ANDRA, Enresa, JNC, Nagra, and Posiva.) The motivation for the workshop was the difficulty found in developing models of gas migration in bentonite because of lack of detailed characterisation of its mechanism and controlling parameters. This report provides a summary of the presentations made at the workshop and of the discussions that took place. Copies of the slides presented are provided in the appendix. The titles of the presentations are: Overview of Current Status of Experimental Knowledge and Understanding of Gas migration in Bentonite (William Rodwell); Summary of GAMBIT Club Modelling of Gas Migration in Compacted Bentonite (William Rodwell); A Capillarity/advection Model for Gas Break-through Pressures (Marolo Alfaro, Jim Graham); Recent Experiments by JNC on Gas Migration in Bentonite (Kenji Tanai, Mikihiko Yamamoto); Gas Flow in Clays: Experimental Data Leading to Two-phase and Preferential-path Modelling (Eduardo Alonso); Gas Movement in MX80 Bentonite under Constant Volume Conditions (Jon Harrington, Steve Horseman); Some Practical Observations on Gas Flow in Clays and Clay-rich Rocks (Steve Horseman, Jon Harrington); Early Large-scale Experiments on Gas Break-through Pressures in Clay based Materials (Harald Hoekmark)

  8. Effect of pH, ionic strength and fulvic acid on the sorption and desorption of cobalt to bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Sh.M. [School of Chemical Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, 230009, Hefei, Anhui (China); Ren, A.P. [School of Chemical Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, 230009, Hefei, Anhui (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O.Box 1126, 230031, Hefei (China); Chen, Ch.L. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O.Box 1126, 230031, Hefei (China); Chen, Y.X. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O.Box 1126, 230031, Hefei (China); Wang, X. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O.Box 1126, 230031, Hefei (China)]. E-mail: xkwang@ipp.ac.cn

    2006-04-15

    Humic substances and bentonite have attracted great interest in radioactive waste management. Here the sorption of cobalt on bentonite in the presence and absence of fulvic acid (FA) under ambient conditions was studied. The effects of pH, ionic strength, FA and solution concentrations on cobalt sorption to bentonite were also investigated using batch techniques. The results indicate that the sorption of cobalt is strongly dependent on pH and is independent of ionic strength under our experimental conditions. Surface complexation is considered the main mechanism of cobalt sorption to bentonite. In the presence of FA, little effect of FA on cobalt sorption was found at pH<6; a positive effect of FA on cobalt sorption was found for pH 6-8; and a negative effect of FA on cobalt sorption was found at pH>8. The addition sequences of FA/Co{sup 2+} to the bentonite suspension on the sorption of cobalt to FA-coated bentonite were also studied. The results indicated that the sorption is not influenced by the addition sequences. Some possible mechanisms are discussed.

  9. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater-bentonite-fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. The colloidal suspension (100 mg L(-1)) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10(-10) M (241)Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (k(f)) of 0.01-0.02 h(-1). Am recoveries in each column were 55-60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h(-1) in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. Our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill material system is unlikely to result in transport over long distance scales because

  10. Control of Montmorillonite Surface Coatings on Quartz Grains in Bentonite by Precursor Volcanic Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendlandt, R. F.; Harrison, W. J.

    2008-12-01

    The pathogenic tendencies of respirable-sized quartz grains may be dependent on inherent characteristics of the quartz as well as external factors. Surface coatings on quartz are of particular interest as they modify both physical and chemical properties of quartz grain surfaces and sequester the grain from contact with reactive lung fluids. Wendlandt et al. (Appl. Geochem. 22, 2007) investigated the surface properties of respirable-sized quartz grains in bentonites and recognized pervasive montmorillonite surface coatings on the quartz that resisted removal by repeated vigorous washings and reaction with HCl. To understand the persistence of montmorillonite coatings on quartz grains of igneous origin, volcanic ash deposits of varying age and degree of alteration to montmorillonite were sampled in Utah, including the distal Lava Creek (c. 0.64 Ma) and Bishop Tuffs (c. 0.74 Ma), and SW Colorado (Conejos Fm, San Juan Volcanic Field) for comparison with commercial grade Cretaceous-age "western" and "southern" bentonites. Quartz grains, hand-picked from these samples, were analyzed using FE-SEM and HRTEM. Continuous coatings of volcanic glass occur on quartz grains from the distal volcanic ash samples. As glass alteration to montmorillonite becomes more extensive, quartz grain surfaces start to display patches of montmorillonite. These patches become continuous in extent on quartz grains from the bentonites. Late precipitation of opal- CT lepispheres is consistent with the alteration reaction for volcanic glass: Volcanic glass + H2O = montmorillonite + SiO2(am) + ions(aq). HRTEM of quartz grains reveals an amorphous surface layer, consistent with a volcanic glass coating. Our results indicate that persistent montmorillonite coatings on quartz grains in bentonites are related to precursor volcanic glass coatings on these grains. The absence of glass coatings on other mineral grains in bentonite (feldspar, biotite) may be a consequence of the presence of strong cleavage

  11. Attenuation of elastic waves in bentonite and monitoring of radioactive waste repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biryukov, A.; Tisato, N.; Grasselli, G.

    2016-04-01

    Deep geological repositories, isolated from the geosphere by an engineered bentonite barrier, are currently considered the safest solution for high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) disposal. As the physical conditions and properties of the bentonite barrier are anticipated to change with time, seismic tomography was suggested as a viable technique to monitor the physical state and integrity of the barrier and to timely detect any unforeseen failure. To do so, the seismic monitoring system needs to be optimized, and this can be achieved by conducting numerical simulations of wave propagation in the repository geometry. Previous studies treated bentonite as an elastic medium, whereas recent experimental investigations indicate its pronounced viscoelastic behaviour. The aims of this contribution are (i) to numerically estimate the effective attenuation of bentonite as a function of temperature T and water content Wc, so that synthetic data can accurately reproduce experimental traces and (ii) assess the feasibility and limitation of the HLRW repository monitoring by simulating the propagation of sonic waves in a realistic repository geometry. A finite difference method was utilized to simulate the wave propagation in experimental and repository setups. First, the input of the viscoelastic model was varied to achieve a match between experimental and numerical traces. The routine was repeated for several values of Wc and T, so that quality factors Qp(Wc, T) and Qs(Wc, T) were obtained. Then, the full-scale monitoring procedure was simulated for six scenarios, representing the evolution of bentonite's physical state. The estimated Qp and Qs exhibited a minimum at Wc = 20 per cent and higher sensitivity to Wc, rather than T, suggesting that pronounced inelasticity of the clay has to be taken into account in geophysical modelling and analysis. The repository-model traces confirm that active seismic monitoring is, in principle, capable of depicting physical changes in the

  12. 40Ar/39Ar Dates from Cretaceous Bentonites in a Foreland Basin Setting, North Slope, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimer, G.; Benowitz, J.; Layer, P. W.; Sliwinski, M. G.; McCarthy, P.; Hanks, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    Bentonite beds occur in marine and non-marine Cretaceous sedimentary rocks of the Colville foreland basin of Alaska's North Slope. Thirteen new 40Ar/39Ar ages of bentonite mineral separates recovered from cores and a single outcrop location in the Nanushuk, Seabee, and Tuluvak formations confirm that volcanic ash deposition began as early as the late Albian and was persistent throughout the Cenomanian-Turonian. The 40Ar/39Ar results provide more precise age control than established biostratigraphic boundaries, and are useful for the interpretation of the foreland basin sediments in the context of increasing temperatures and global sea levels during the mid to Late Cretaceous. 40Ar/39Ar age spectra from six samples (biotite, sanidine, and glass phases) show limited argon loss and are used to calculate plateau ages. A biotite age of of 102.6 × 1.5 Ma from the deltaic deposits of the upper Nanushuk Formation is one of only a few radioisotopic dates for that formation, and supports the biostratigraphic determination based on ammonite and bivalve fossils. The Nanushuk Formation date, combined with a biotite age of 98.2 × 0.8 Ma from the base of the overlying marine Seabee Formation, roughly brackets a major transgressive event on the central North Slope to just after the Albian-Cenomanian boundary (~100.5 Ma). The 98.2 × 0.8 Ma age for the base of the Seabee Formation is older than expected, as are three ages for the Tuluvak Formation (94.4 × 0.9; 96.2 × 2.0; 96.6 × 1.4 Ma). The major and trace element geochemistry of a sub-sample of six bentonites from exploration wells at Umiat, Alaska show a range in composition from andesitic to rhyolitic, with a continental arc source. The bentonites become more felsic from the late Albian (~102 Ma) to late Cenomanian (~94 Ma). A likely source for the bentonites is the Okhotsk-Chukotka Volcanic Belt (OCVB) of eastern Siberia, a continental arc which became active in the Albian and experienced episodes of effusivity throughout

  13. The corrosion rate of copper in a bentonite test package measured with electric resistance sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, Bo [Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Kosec, Tadeja; Kranjc, Andrej; Kuhar, Viljem; Legat, Andraz [Slovenian National Building and Civil Engineering Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-12-15

    LOT1 test parcel A2 was exposed for six years in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, which offers a realistic environment for the conditions that will prevail in a deep repository for high-level radioactive waste disposal in Sweden. The test parcel contained copper electrodes for real-time corrosion monitoring in bentonite ring 36, where the temperature was 24 deg C, and copper coupons in bentonite rings 22 and 30, where the temperature was higher. After retrieval of the test parcel in January 2006, a bentonite test package consisting of bentonite rings 35 - 37 was placed in a container and sealed with a thick layer of paraffin. Later the same year new copper electrodes were installed in the test package. In January 2007 electric resistance (ER) sensors of pure copper with a thickness of 35 {mu}m were also installed in the test package mainly to facilitate the interpretation of the results from the real-time corrosion monitoring with electrochemical techniques. The ER measurements have shown that the corrosion rate of pure copper exposed in an oxic bentonite/ saline groundwater environment at room temperate decreases slowly with time to low but measurable values. The corrosion rates estimated from the regularly performed EIS measurements replicate the ER data. Thus, for this oxic environment in which copper acquires corrosion potentials of the order of 200 mV (SHE) or higher, electrochemical measurements provide believable data. Comparing the recorded ER data with an estimate of the average corrosion rate based on comparing cross-sections from exposed and protected sensor elements, it is obvious that the former overestimates the actual corrosion rate, which is understandable. It seems as if electrochemical measurements can provide a better estimate of the corrosion rate; however, this is quite dependent on the use of proper measuring frequencies and evaluation methods. In this respect ER measurements are more reliable. It has been shown that real-time corrosion

  14. Water resources of Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Jon P.; Miller, Kirk A.

    2004-01-01

    Sweetwater County is located in the southwestern part of Wyoming and is the largest county in the State. A study to quantify the availability and describe the chemical quality of surface-water and ground-water resources in Sweetwater County was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Wyoming State Engineers Office. Most of the county has an arid climate. For this reason a large amount of the flow in perennial streams within the county is derived from outside the county. Likewise, much of the ground-water recharge to aquifers within the county is from flows into the county, and occurs slowly. Surface-water data were not collected as part of the study. Evaluations of streamflow and stream-water quality were limited to analyses of historical data and descriptions of previous investigations. Forty-six new ground-water-quality samples were collected as part of the study and the results from an additional 782 historical ground-water-quality samples were reviewed. Available hydrogeologic characteristics for various aquifers throughout the county also are described. Flow characteristics of streams in Sweetwater County vary substantially depending on regional and local basin characteristics and anthropogenic factors. Because precipitation amounts in the county are small, most streams in the county are ephemeral, flowing only as a result of regional or local rainfall or snowmelt runoff. Flows in perennial streams in the county generally are a result of snowmelt runoff in the mountainous headwater areas to the north, west, and south of the county. Flow characteristics of most perennial streams are altered substantially by diversions and regulation. Water-quality characteristics of selected streams in and near Sweetwater County during water years 1974 through 1983 were variable. Concentrations of dissolved constituents, suspended sediment, and bacteria generally were smallest at sites on the Green River because of resistant geologic units, increased

  15. Modeling of Coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical Processes for Bentonite in a Clay-rock Repository for Heat-generating Nuclear Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Rutqvist, J.; Zheng, L.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2016-12-01

    Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) that include a bentonite-based buffer are designed to isolate the high-level radioactive waste emplaced in tunnels in deep geological formations. The heat emanated from the waste can drive the moisture flow transport and induce strongly coupled Thermal (T), Hydrological (H), Mechanical (M) and Chemical (C) processes within the bentonite buffer and may also impact the evolution of the excavation disturbed zone and the sealing between the buffer and walls of an emplacement tunnel The flow and contaminant transport potential along the disturbed zone can be minimized by backfilling the tunnels with bentonite, if it provides enough swelling stress when hydrated by the host rock. The swelling capability of clay minerals within the bentonite is important for sealing gaps between bentonite block, and between the EBS and the surrounding host rock. However, a high temperature could result in chemical alteration of bentonite-based buffer and backfill materials through illitization, which may compromise the function of these EBS components by reducing their plasticity and capability to swell under wetting. Therefore, an adequate THMC coupling scheme is required to understand and to predict the changes of bentonite for identifying whether EBS bentonite can sustain higher temperatures. More comprehensive links between chemistry and mechanics, taking advantage of the framework provided by a dual-structure model, named Barcelona Expansive Model (BExM), was implemented in TOUGHREACT-FLAC3D and is used to simulate the response of EBS bentonite in in clay formation for a generic case. The current work is to evaluate the chemical changes in EBS bentonite and the effects on the bentonite swelling stress under high temperature. This work sheds light on the interaction between THMC processes, evaluates the potential deterioration of EBS bentonite and supports the decision making in the design of a nuclear waste repository in light of the maximum allowance

  16. Biopellets - Quality assurance - prestudy; Kvalitetssaekring av pellets - inledande studie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiklund, S.E.; Cronholm, L.Aa. [AaF Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this summary is to specify the quality demands imposed by pellet users on the manufacturers of pellets, the testing methods that are used for manufacturing inspection at factories, and the type of acceptance inspection that is conducted at district heating plants and combined heat and power plants. A further task of the study has been to provide advice and guidelines to pellet users on how to carry out their acceptance inspection. During the course of the study, we have contacted and interviewed 8 Swedish users and 7 Swedish producers of pellets and asked them what type of quality control they employ at their heating plants and factories. The study shows that the users impose relatively stringent demands on pellet producers with regard to pellet quality. The parameters checked include energy content, moisture content, ash content, grain size, grain size distribution, the origin of the raw materials, resistance, weight, chemical bonding, sulphur content, chlorine content and analysis of metal content. Most of the above parameters are checked at various intervals, some every other hour or on each delivery and others several times every year. In the case of those users who only have one fuel supplier, we recommend limited acceptance inspection on the assumption that the supplier conducts the inspection that he has undertaken to perform under the terms of his agreement with the users. Users should, however, check the information and at some time during the year visit the pellet producer to make sure that the agreed procedures are being followed. In the case of those users with many different fuel suppliers, we recommend fairly extensive acceptance inspection. Those parameters that should be checked, but at different intervals, are energy content, moisture content, ash content, grain size, grain size distribution, the origin of raw materials, resistance, weight, chemical bonding, sulphur content, chlorine content and analysis of metal content. As a

  17. Studies on implementation of pellet tracking in hadron physics experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyszniak A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A system for optical tracking of frozen hydrogen microsphere targets (pellets has been designed. It is intended for the upcoming hadron physics experiment PANDA at FAIR, Darmstadt, Germany. With such a tracking system one can reconstruct the positions of the individual pellets at the time of a hadronic interaction in the offline event analysis. This gives information on the position of the primary interaction vertex with an accuracy of a few 100 µm, which is very useful e.g. for reconstruction of charged particle tracks and secondary vertices and for background suppression. A study has been done at the WASA detector setup (Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany to check the possibility of classification of hadronic events as originating in pellets or in background. The study has been done based on the instantaneous rate a Long Range TDC which was used to determine if a pellet was present in the accelerator beam region. It was clearly shown that it is possible to distinguish the two event classes. Also, an experience was gained with operation of two synchronized systems operating in different time scales, as it will also be the case with the optical pellet tracking.

  18. The prevalence and retention of lead pellets in Japanese quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K; Hayashi, M; Yoshimura, M; Hayashi, H; Hiratsuka, A; Isii, Y

    1993-05-01

    Thirty-six Japanese quail (18 control birds, 18 lead-dosed birds) were used. The 18 quail were dosed with #4 lead weight that were orally inserted into the proventriculus. Delta-aminolevulunic acid dehydrase (ALAD) activity in erythrocytes in the dosed quail decreased 90% (p ALAD activity in erythrocytes indicates lead exposure. Radiographics were obtained at 0, 1, 4, 9, 22, and 32 days. The lead pellets remained in the gizzard and became smaller in 4 days. At day 22, after the lead treatment, in 8 quail of the treated quail 12, the lead pellets disappeared. At day 32, all lead pellets disappeared. These findings indicate that the ingested lead pellets are absorbed gradually in the intestine. The lead concentrations in the blood, liver, kidney, and femur of the lead-dosed quail were significantly higher than in the undosed quail until the 6th week. At week 2, the lead concentration of the proventriculus, gizzard, gizzard contents, duodenum, small intestine, and cecum in the dosed quail was significantly higher. Lead concentration of feces was significantly higher at weeks 2 and 4 (p < 0.01). Throughout this study, no lead pellets were found in the feces.

  19. Fertilizing value of broiler litter: effects of drying and pelletizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Mosquera, M E; Cabaleiro, F; Sainz, M J; López-Fabal, A; Carral, E

    2008-09-01

    The effects of drying and pelletizing on the properties of broiler chicken litter, obtained from a farm in northwest Spain, were investigated. The drying and pelletizing process reduced among-batch variability in dry matter content, electrical conductivity, urea N, and K, S, Na, Fe, Cu and Cd contents, but increased among-batch variability in total N, ammonium N, nitrate N, total P and pH. N form contents in the pelletized product could be estimated with reasonable accuracy on the basis of dry matter content. Cr, Cu and Cd contents were all significantly lower in the dried pelletized product than in fresh litter, whereas Pb content was significantly higher. The dried pelletized product is of course clearly preferable to the fresh product as regards storage and handling, however, our results suggest a need to optimize the production process with the aim of reducing possible contamination during manufacture, and of minimizing variability in N form contents, P content and pH.

  20. Comparative analysis of thermal behavior in hollow nuclear fuel pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Beatriz M. dos; Alvim, Antonio C.M., E-mail: bmachado@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: aalvim@gmail.com [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-11-01

    The increase in energy demand in Brazil and in the world is a real problem and several solutions are being considered to mitigate it. Maximization of energy generation, within the safety standards of fuel resources already known, is one of them. In this respect, nuclear energy is a crucial technology to sustain energy demand on several countries. Performances of a solid cylindrical and an annular rod have been verified and compared; where it has been proven that the annular rod can reach a higher nominal power in relation to the solid one. In this paper, the temperature profiles of two distinct nuclear fuel pellets, one of them annular and the other in the shape of a hollow biconcave disc (like the cross section of a red blood cell), were compared to analyze the efficiency and safety of both. The finite differences method allowed the evaluation of the thermal behavior of these pellets, where one specific physical condition was analyzed, regarding convection and conduction at the lateral edges. The results show that the temperature profile of the hollow biconcave disc pellet is lower, about 70 deg C below, when compared to the temperature profile of the annular pellet, considering the same simulation parameters for both pellets. (author)

  1. The filamentous fungal pellet and forces driving its formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Zhang, Jining

    2016-12-01

    Filamentous fungi play an important role not only in the bio-manufacturing of value-added products, but also in bioenergy and environmental research. The bioprocess manipulation of filamentous fungi is more difficult than that of other microbial species because of their different pellet morphologies and the presence of tangled mycelia under different cultivation conditions. Fungal pellets, which have the advantages of harvest ease, low fermentation broth viscosity and high yield of some proteins, have been used for a long time. Many attempts have been made to establish the relationship between pellet and product yield using quantitative approaches. Fungal pellet formation is attributed to the combination of electrostatic interactions, hydrophobicity and specific interactions from spore wall components. Electrostatic interactions result from van der Waals forces and negative charge repulsion from carboxyl groups in the spore wall structure. Electrostatic interactions are also affected by counter-ions (cations) and the physiologic conditions of spores that modify the carboxyl groups. Fungal aggregates are promoted by the hydrophobicity generated by hydrophobins, which form a hydrophobic coat that covers the spore. The specific interactions of spore wall components contribute to spore aggregation through salt bridging. A model of spore aggregation was proposed based on these forces. Additionally, some challenges were addressed, including the limitations of research techniques, the quantitative determination of forces and the complex information of biological systems, to clarify the mechanism of fungal pellet formation.

  2. Particle transport in pellet fueled JET (Jet European Torus) plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baylor, L.R.

    1990-01-01

    Pellet fueling experiments have been carried out on the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak with a multi-pellet injector. The pellets are injected at speeds approaching 1400 m/s and penetrate deep into the JET plasma. Highly peaked electron density profiles are achieved when penetration of the pellets approaches or goes beyond the magnetic axis, and these peaked profiles persist for more than two seconds in ohmic discharges and over one second in ICRF heated discharges. In this dissertation, analysis of electron particle transport in multi-pellet fueled JET limiter plasmas under a variety of heating conditions is described. The analysis is carried out with a one and one-half dimensional radial particle transport code to model the experimental density evolution with various particle transport coefficients. These analyses are carried out in plasmas with ohmic heating, ICRF heating, and neural beam heating, in limiter configurations. Peaked density profile cases are generally characterized by diffusion coefficients with a central (r/a < 0.5) diffusivity {approximately}0.1 m{sup 2}/s that increases rapidly to {approximately}0.3 m{sup 2}/s at r/a = 0.6 and then increases out to the plasma edge as (r/a){sup 2}. These discharges can be satisfactorily modeled without any anomalous convective (pinch) flux. 79 refs., 60 figs.

  3. Gyrokinetic simulations of particle transport in pellet fuelled JET discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegnered, D.; Oberparleiter, M.; Nordman, H.; Strand, P.; Garzotti, L.; Lupelli, I.; Roach, C. M.; Romanelli, M.; Valovič, M.; Contributors, JET

    2017-10-01

    Pellet injection is a likely fuelling method of reactor grade plasmas. When the pellet ablates, it will transiently perturb the density and temperature profiles of the plasma. This will in turn change dimensionless parameters such as a/{L}n,a/{L}T and plasma β. The microstability properties of the plasma then changes which influences the transport of heat and particles. In this paper, gyrokinetic simulations of a JET L-mode pellet fuelled discharge are performed. The ion temperature gradient/trapped electron mode turbulence is compared at the time point when the effect from the pellet is the most pronounced with a hollow density profile and when the profiles have relaxed again. Linear and nonlinear simulations are performed using the gyrokinetic code GENE including electromagnetic effects and collisions in a realistic geometry in local mode. Furthermore, global nonlinear simulations are performed in order to assess any nonlocal effects. It is found that the positive density gradient has a stabilizing effect that is partly counteracted by the increased temperature gradient in the this region. The effective diffusion coefficients are reduced in the positive density region region compared to the intra pellet time point. No major effect on the turbulent transport due to nonlocal effects are observed.

  4. Bioprospecting for podophyllotoxin in the Big Horn Mountains, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate variations in podophyllotoxin concentrations in Juniperus species found in the Big Horn Mountains in Wyoming. It was found that Juniperus species in the Big Horn Mountains included three species; J. communis L. (common juniper), J. horizontalis Moench. (c...

  5. Improving sustainable seed yield in Wyoming big sagebrush

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremiah C. Armstrong

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Great Basin Restoration Initiative, the effects of browsing, competition removal, pruning, fertilization and seed collection methods on increasing seed production in Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. spp wyomingensis Beetle & Young) were studied. Study sites were located in Idaho, Nevada, and Utah. A split-plot...

  6. Ethology of Omniablautus nigronotum (Wilcox) (Diptera: Asilidae) in Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    In southwest Wyoming, Omniablautus nigronotum (Wilcox), hunted primarily from the surface of the sandy substrate in a greasewood community. Prey, captured in flight, represented four insect orders with Diptera and Hymenoptera predominating. Courtship consisted of the male approaching the female from...

  7. Investigating the Multicultural Competency of a Sample of Wyoming Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Stacey L.

    2016-01-01

    The literature on disproportionality indicates a generally held belief that disproportionality endures, in part, because of the lack of multicultural competency in today's educators. Yet, there is a dearth of empirical evidence to support this belief. This study examined the multicultural competency of a sample of Wyoming educators in order to…

  8. The Earthworms (Oligochaeta: Lumbricidae)of Wyoming, USA, Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This survey of the earthworms from 22 of the 23 counties of Wyoming recorded 13 species of terrestrial Oligochaeta, all members of the family Lumbricidae. One of these species, Aporrectodea limicola, is reported for the first time from the state. Current nomenclature is applied to historical records...

  9. Study of the Properties of Bentonites for their use in Clay Geo synthetic Barriers; Estudio de la propiedades de las bentonitas para su utilizacion en barreras geosinteticas arcillosas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiro Lopez, A.; Mateo Sanz, B.; Garcia Cidoncha, H.; Blanco Fernandez, M.

    2014-02-01

    Bentonites used for the production of clay geo synthetic barriers need to meet some properties so that they can be a waterproofing system. among the bentonites used in industry, sodium bentonite has the lowest permeability due to its high water absorption capacity in the inter-laminar space, causing it to swell and form a barrier to water flow. this paper provides the study of the properties of four bentonite to evaluate their quality the study of the properties of four bentonite to evaluate their quality. For this study, the main properties have been tested: water absorption, swelling index, fluid loss, cation exchange capacity and montmorillonite content. In order to optimize the procedure for the characterization of bentonites, correlations between different tests have been done, to identify the most suitable ones. Finally, a compatibility test has been carried out to study the performance of bentonites in water containing a high amount of sales, because in this case, an ion exchange between the interlayer sodium ions of bentonite and cations dissolved in the water can take, resulting in a decrease swell of the bentonite. (Author)

  10. Drug release, preclinical and clinical pharmacokinetics relationships of alginate pellets prepared by melt technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Anirbandeep; Harjoh, Nurulaini; Pal, Tapan Kumar; Dan, Shubhasis; Wong, Tin Wui

    2016-01-01

    Alginate pellets prepared by the aqueous agglomeration technique experience fast drug dissolution due to the porous pre-formed calcium alginate microstructure. This study investigated in vitro drug release, preclinical and clinical pharmacokinetics relationships of intestinal-specific calcium acetate-alginate pellets against calcium-free and calcium carbonate-alginate pellets. Alginate pellets were prepared by solvent-free melt pelletization instead of aqueous agglomeration technique using chlorpheniramine maleate as model drug. A fast in situ calcium acetate dissolution in pellets resulted in rapid pellet breakup, soluble Ca(2+) crosslinking of alginate fragments and drug dissolution retardation at pH 1.2, which were not found in other pellet types. The preclinical drug absorption rate was lower with calcium acetate loaded than calcium-free alginate pellets. In human subjects, however, the extent and the rate of drug absorption were higher from calcium acetate-loaded pellets than calcium-free alginate pellets. The fine, dispersible and weakly gastric mucoadhesive calcium alginate pellets underwent fast human gastrointestinal transit. They released the drug at a greater rate than calcium-free pellets in the intestine, thereby promoting drug bioavailability. Calcium acetate was required as a disintegrant more than as a crosslinking agent clinically to promote pellet fragmentation, fast gastrointestinal transit and drug release in intestinal medium, and intestinal-specific drug bioavailability.

  11. Monitoring and data acquisition of the high speed hydrogen pellet in SPINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Samiran Shanti, E-mail: samiran@ipr.res.in; Mishra, Jyotishankar; Gangradey, Ranjana; Dutta, Pramit; Rastogi, Naveen; Panchal, Paresh; Nayak, Pratik; Agarwal, Jyoti; Bairagi, Pawan; Patel, Haresh; Sharma, Hardik

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Pellet INjector System with monitoring and data acquisition is described. • A high speed camera was used to view pellet size, and its flight trajectory. • PXI based high speed control system is used data acquisition. • Pellets of length 2–4.8 mm and speed 250–750 m/s were obtained. - Abstract: Injection of solid hydrogen pellets is an efficient way of replenishing the spent fuel in high temperature plasmas. Aiming that, a Single Pellet INjector System (SPINS) is developed at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India, to initiate pellet injection related research in SST-1. The pellet injector is controlled by a PXI system based data acquisition and control (DAC) system for pellet formation, precise firing control, data collection and diagnostics. The velocity of high speed moving pellets is estimated by using two sets of light gate diagnostic. Apart from light gate, a fast framing camera is used to measure the pellet size and its speed. The pellet images are captured at a frame rate of ∼200,000 frames per second at (128 × 64) pixel resolution with an exposure time of 1 μs. Using these diagnostic, various cylindrical pellets of length ranging from 2 to 4.8 mm and speed 250–750 m/s were successfully obtained. This paper describes the control and data acquisition system of SPINS, the techniques for measurement of pellet velocity and capturing images of high speed moving pellet.

  12. Comparative study of laterite and bentonite based organoclays: implications of hydrophobic compounds remediation from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafees, Muhammad; Waseem, Amir; Khan, Abdur Rehman

    2013-01-01

    Four cost effective organoclays were synthesized, characterized, and studied for the sorption of hydrophobic compounds (edible oil/grease and hydrocarbon oil) from aqueous solutions. Organoclays were prepared by cation exchange reaction of lattice ions (present onto the surface of laterite and bentonite clay minerals) with two surfactants, hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (HDTMA-Cl) and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (TDTMA-Br). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used for the characterization of synthesized organoclays. It was found that the amount of surfactant loading and the nature of the surfactant molecules used in the syntheses of organoclay strongly affect the sorption capacity of the clay mineral. Further, it was found that both the laterite and bentonite based organoclays efficiently removed the edible and hydrocarbon oil content from lab prepared emulsions; however, the adsorption capacity of clay mineral was greatly influenced by the nature of hydrophobic compounds as well.

  13. Comparative Study of Laterite and Bentonite Based Organoclays: Implications of Hydrophobic Compounds Remediation from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nafees

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Four cost effective organoclays were synthesized, characterized, and studied for the sorption of hydrophobic compounds (edible oil/grease and hydrocarbon oil from aqueous solutions. Organoclays were prepared by cation exchange reaction of lattice ions (present onto the surface of laterite and bentonite clay minerals with two surfactants, hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (HDTMA-Cl and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (TDTMA-Br. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used for the characterization of synthesized organoclays. It was found that the amount of surfactant loading and the nature of the surfactant molecules used in the syntheses of organoclay strongly affect the sorption capacity of the clay mineral. Further, it was found that both the laterite and bentonite based organoclays efficiently removed the edible and hydrocarbon oil content from lab prepared emulsions; however, the adsorption capacity of clay mineral was greatly influenced by the nature of hydrophobic compounds as well.

  14. Uranium(VI) retention by Ca-bentonite under (hyper)alkaline conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, Thimo; Schmeide, Katja [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes

    2017-06-01

    The sorption behavior of U(VI) on Ca-bentonite was studied in saline, (hyper)alkaline solution via batch experiments. At pH 8.5-9.5 sorption is low in the presence of CO{sub 2} due to the formation of weakly sorbing uranyl carbonate species, which have been observed to dominate speciation up to pH 10 by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). In the pH region 10-12, U(VI) retention is almost complete. The retention can either be attributed to strongly sorbing uranyl hydroxo complexes or to a partial precipitation of uranium due to an altered solubility of U(VI) induced by ions leached out of the bentonite.

  15. Activated charcoal is as effective as fuller's earth or bentonite in paraquat poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonek, S; Setyadharma, H; Borchert, A; Krienke, E G

    1982-02-15

    In vitro investigations have shown that the adsorption capacity of activated charcoal ('Kohle-Compretten', 'Ultracarbon', E. Merck, Darmstadt, FRG) is just as high as that of 'Fuller's earth' (Surrey powder, Laporte Industries Ltd., Luton, GB) or 'Bentonite BP W.B. (Steetley Minerals Ltd., Milton Keynes, GB). Fuller's earth ('Fullererde') from another manufacturer has had very poor adsorption properties and is thus not suitable for the treatment of paraquat poisoning. Animal experiments have shown that the curative effect of activated charcoal given 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 h after ingestion of 200 and 300 mg paraquat/kg body weight is equally as good or even better than that of 'Fuller's earth' or 'Bentonite BP W.B' Activated charcoal is a substitute of equal value to these mineral soils.

  16. Gas permeability of bentonite barriers: development, construction and testing of a measurement system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heraldo Nunes Pitanga

    Full Text Available Abstract This article proposes a testing device to quickly and reliably estimate the gas permeability of bentonite-based clay barriers used in landfill cover systems. The testing methodology is based on a transient gas flow regime that passes through the barrier, therefore not requiring the use of sophisticated equipment that aim to maintain constant differential pressure and measure the gas flow, common requirements for testing methods under a permanent flow regime. To confirm the feasibility of the proposed technique, tests were performed on a pure hydrated bentonite layer, which subsequently encompassed samples of geosynthetic clay liner (GCL at different moisture contents. Geosynthetic clay liners are often selected as a part of the barrier layer for cover systems in solid waste landfills to prevent infiltration of rainfall and migration of biogas into the atmosphere. The results confirmed the equipment reliability and differentiate the different responses of the gas flow barriers studied, considering their different compositions and different moistures.

  17. The effects of the fine grinding on the physicochemical properties and thermal behavior of bentonite clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STANKA ERIC-ANTONI

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the results obtained by the mechanical treatment of bentonite clay Zavidinci, Serbia in a laboratory vibration mill with rings for different periods of time are presented. The successive structural changes of the minerals were studied by X-ray diffraction analysis, DTA analysis, IR spectroscopy and particle size distribution. The reactivity changes were controlled by CEC. The starting material and the material mechanically treated for 30 min were sintered at several temperature and for different time periods examined by X-ray diffraction. Mechanical treatment by fine grinding of bentonite clay produces structural changes of the powdered material and influences its behavior in further processing steps in particular after thermal treatment.

  18. The effects of apple pomace, bentonite and calcium superphosphate on swine manure aerobic composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jishao; Huang, Yimei; Liu, Xueling; Huang, Hua

    2014-09-01

    The effects of additives such as apple pomace, bentonite and calcium superphosphate on swine manure composting were investigated in a self-built aerated static box (90 L) by assessing their influences on the transformation of nitrogen, carbon, phosphorous and compost maturity. The results showed that additives all prolonged the thermophilic stage in composting compared to control. Nitrogen losses amounted to 34-58% of the initial nitrogen, in which ammonia volatilization accounted for 0.3-4.6%. Calcium superphosphate was helpful in facilitating composting process as it significantly reduced the ammonia volatilization during thermophilic stage and increased the contents of total nitrogen and phosphorous in compost, but bentonite increased the ammonia volatilization and reduced the total nitrogen concentration. It suggested that calcium superphosphate is an effective additive for keeping nitrogen during swine manure composting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Changes in the microstructure of compacted bentonite caused by heating and hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villar M.V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two twin 40-cm long columns of compacted FEBEX bentonite were tested in Teflon cells; water was supplied through the top surface of the columns and in one of them a heater was placed at the base and set to 100°C. The purpose of these tests was to simulate the behaviour of an engineered barrier in a radioactive waste repository and investigate the effect of the thermal gradient on saturation. In particular, changes in the pore size distribution and interlayer size have been investigated in this work. The thermal gradient had a strong influence on the water intake and distribution. Water content and dry density gradients persisted in the two columns after 12 years of testing. These changes gave place to the modification of the bentonite microstructure, overall increasing the microstructural void ratio and the proportion of adsorbed, interlayer water.

  20. Characterization of Brazilian Bentonite Organoclays as sorbents of petroleum-derived fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Bertagnolli

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This work focused on preparing and characterizing Brazilian bentonite clay through the use of quaternary ammonium salt so as to apply it as a sorbent for petroleum-derived fuels. Bentonite clay was organophilizated by the intercalation of quaternary ammonium salts such as cetyl-pyridinium chloride and benzalkonium chloride. The resulting materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, N2 physisorption and infrared spectroscopy techniques. The clay similarity with petroleum-derived fuels, gasoline and diesel oil were defined by sorption and swelling tests. The increase in basal spacing and the appearance of absorption bands related to the CH2 and CH3 groups confirm the efficiency of Brazilian organoclays. Removal percentages between 50 and 60 for benzene, toluene and xylene indicate the potential of organoclay in the remediation of areas contaminated by petroleum-derived fuels.

  1. Bentonite electrical conductivity: a model based on series–parallel transport

    KAUST Repository

    Lima, Ana T.

    2010-01-30

    Bentonite has significant applications nowadays, among them as landfill liners, in concrete industry as a repairing material, and as drilling mud in oil well construction. The application of an electric field to such perimeters is under wide discussion, and subject of many studies. However, to understand the behaviour of such an expansive and plastic material under the influence of an electric field, the perception of its electrical properties is essential. This work serves to compare existing data of such electrical behaviour with new laboratorial results. Electrical conductivity is a pertinent parameter since it indicates how much a material is prone to conduct electricity. In the current study, total conductivity of a compacted porous medium was established to be dependent upon density of the bentonite plug. Therefore, surface conductivity was addressed and a series-parallel transport model used to quantify/predict the total conductivity of the system. © The Author(s) 2010.

  2. Alkali-activated fly ash-based geopolymers with zeolite or bentonite as additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingyu Hu; Xiaomin Zhu; Fumei Long [Nanchang University, Nanchang (China). College of Civil Engineering

    2009-11-15

    Geopolymers were synthesized by using fly ash as the main starting material, zeolite or bentonite as supplementary materials, and NaOH and CaO together as activator. An orthogonal array testing protocol was used to analyze the influence of the mix proportion on the properties of the geopolymers. The results indicate that the concentration of NaOH solution and the CaO content play an important role on the strength of the materials. Especially, with zeolite as additive, the fly ash-based geopolymer shows the highest strength and the best sulfate resistance. Infrared spectroscopy, X-ray, and SEM-EDX demonstrate that supplementary zeolite may involve the process of geopolymerization to form a stable zeolitic structure and improve the properties of the geopolymer. Bentonite simply acts as a filler to make the geopolymer more compact, but shows no improvement on the compositions and the microstructures of the geopolymer.

  3. Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissociation in the Presence of Silica Sand and Bentonite Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Saw V.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation and dissociation of methane hydrates in a porous media containing silica sand of different sizes and bentonite clay were studied in the presence of synthetic seawater with 3.55 wt% salinity. The phase equilibrium of methane hydrate under different experimental conditions was investigated. The effects of the particle size of silica sand as well as a mixture of bentonite clay and silica sand on methane hydrate formation and its dissociation were studied. The kinetics of hydrate formation was studied under different subcooling conditions to observe its effects on the induction time of hydrate formation. The amount of methane gas encapsulated in hydrate was computed using a real gas equation. The Clausius-Clapeyron equation is used to estimate the enthalpy of hydrate dissociation with measured phase equilibrium data.

  4. Effect of the Degree of Ionization on the Insertion of Polyvinylpyridinium Salts into Bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Amine Zenasni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports the effect of the degree of α ionization of poly(4-vinylpyridinium salts (P4VPS on the insertion of these polymer salts into bentonite. Nanocomposite materials made of a Na-montmorillonite mineral with poly(4-vinylpyridinium salts (P4VPS have been synthesised and characterised. The modified samples were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The basic spacing of unmodified montmorillonite, determined by XRD, was measured to be 1.38 nm; it was found to increase after modification up to 1.50 nm. The insertion capacity of P4VPS into bentonite increased with the increasing degree of quaternisated nitrogen sites in the polymer.

  5. Modelling of erosion of bentonite gel by gel/sol flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Luis; Neretnieks, Ivars; Longcheng Liu (Chemical Engineering and Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    Bentonite intrusion into a fracture intersecting the canister deposition hole is modelled. The model describes the expansion of the bentonite within the fracture. It accounts for the repulsive electrostatic double-layer forces, the attractive van der Waals forces and friction forces between the particles and the water. The model also takes into account the diffusion of the colloid particles in the smectite sol. Diffusion of a counterion, sodium, is accounted for as this strongly influences the double layer force and the viscosity of the gel/sol. The gel/sol is considered to be a fluid with a varying viscosity that is strongly dependent on the bentonite volume fraction in the gel and the sodium concentration in the water. Two different geometries were modelled; a rectangular and a cylindrical. The rectangular geometry was used to gain experience with the processes and mechanisms and how they interact since the cylindrical geometry was somewhat less stable numerically and more time consuming. In the rectangular geometry a fracture 1 metre long in the flow direction was modelled. In both geometries the fracture size was selected sufficiently large to ensure that the water velocity, near the distant border was nearly the same as the approaching water velocity and that the smectite concentration there was vanishingly small. It was found that the velocity of the fluid drops considerably where the bentonite volume fraction is larger than 1-2%. This is due to the strong increase in viscosity with increasing bentonite volume fraction. The loss of smectite by the slowly flowing fluid was found to be proportional to the square root of the seeping water velocity for the rectangular geometry. For the cylindrical geometry, the dependence is somewhat lower (exponent about 0.4) since the length of the gel/water interface decreases with increasing water flow rate. The penetration depth of the gel/water interface decreases with increasing water flow rate. For water velocity of the

  6. APPLICATION OF ZEOLITE AND BENTONITE FOR STABILIZING LEAD IN A CONTAMINATED SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Andrzejewska

    2017-08-01

    The study evaluated the properties of zeolite and bentonite for stabilizing lead (Pb in a contaminated soil. Sorbents were applied at different rates 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0% to the contaminated soil and incubated for four months. Soil reaction (pH was measured as well as the electrical conductivity (EC. The total content of Pb was determined in the soil samples as did the reactive forms (extracted by 0.11 mol CH3HCOOH dm-3. The evaluation of the efficiency of the stabilization of Pb was performed on the basis of the fractions of the reactive lead. It was found, that the addition of both zeolite and bentonite resulted in a decrease in the concentrations of the active forms of lead in soils. Thus, the two sorbents exerted a good stability and can be used for efficiently immobilizing lead in soil contaminated anthropogenically.

  7. Optimization of a multi-parameter model for biomass pelletization to investigate temperature dependence and to facilitate fast testing of pelletization behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jens Kai; Stelte, Wolfgang; Posselt, Dorthe

    2011-01-01

    Pelletization of biomass residues increases the energy density, reduces storage and transportation costs and results in a homogeneous product with well-defined physical properties. However, raw materials for fuel pellet production consist of ligno-cellulosic biomass from various resources...... and error” experiments and personal experience. However in recent years the utilization of single pellet press units for testing the biomass pelletizing properties has attracted more attention. The present study outlines an approach where single pellet press testing is combined with modeling to mimic...

  8. Comparative Study of Laterite and Bentonite Based Organoclays: Implications of Hydrophobic Compounds Remediation from Aqueous Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Nafees; Amir Waseem; Abdur Rehman Khan

    2013-01-01

    Four cost effective organoclays were synthesized, characterized, and studied for the sorption of hydrophobic compounds (edible oil/grease and hydrocarbon oil) from aqueous solutions. Organoclays were prepared by cation exchange reaction of lattice ions (present onto the surface of laterite and bentonite clay minerals) with two surfactants, hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (HDTMA-Cl) and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (TDTMA-Br). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning...

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF BENTONITE FOR ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEMS IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL SITES

    OpenAIRE

    Dubravko Domitrović; Helena Vučenović; Biljana Kovačević Zelić

    2012-01-01

    Engineered barrier systems are used in radioactive waste disposal sites in order to provide better protection of humans and the environment from the potential hazards associated with the radioactive waste disposal. The engineered barrier systems usually contain cement or clay (bentonite) because of their isolation properties and long term performance. Quality control tests of clays are the same for all engineering barrier systems. Differences may arise in the required criteria to be met due f...

  10. MnFe 2 O 4 /bentonite nano composite as a novel magnetic material ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is also found that the presence of bentonite in the magnetic composite has not made any changes in the spinel structure of MnFe2O4. SEM images of the sorbent shows nanocomposite with a uniform structure and nanochannels from 0.3 to 0.8 mμ in diameter having a surface area of 130 m2 g-1. The results also revealed ...

  11. Environmental Remediation and Sorption of Metal Cations Using Aluminum Pillared Nano-Bentonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifai, Rifai; Abou El Safa, Magda

    2015-04-01

    The release of heavy metal cations into the environment is a potential threat to water and soil quality. Some clay minerals play an important role, as physical and chemical barriers, for the isolation of metal-rich wastes and to adsorb heavy metals as well as to avoid their environmental dispersion. In the present study, the bentonitic clay (southeast El-Hammam City, Egypt) was subjected to pillaring using hydroxyl-aluminum solution. The XRD patterns of the Aluminum Pillared Nano-Bentonite (APNB) showed severe alteration of the crystal structure after pillaring. Poly metal solutions with different metal concentrations of Cu, Co, Ni, Zn, Cd and Pb (0.001, 0.005 and 0.01 moles), and pH (1, 2.5, 5 and 6) were subjected to treatment by the APNB. The removal process is very rapid and spontaneous and the contact time may be short (several minutes) for most adsorption to occur. The criterion for environmental remediation of APNB is less stringent and a short contact time is sufficient. The rate of Cu2+, Zn2+, Co2+, Cd2+, Ni2+ and Pb2+sorption remained higher or equal to the CEC. The sorption of metal ions by APNB are complex and probably involve several mechanisms. In general, APNB can be used to immobilize Cu2+, Zn2+, Co2+, Cd2+, Ni2+ and Pb2+ to any extent. For each metal ion, the most effective immobilization occurs over a particular pH around 5. According to the experimental data obtained, the uptake amount of the studied cations by APNB increased with increasing solution pH, sorbent dose and contact time. The preference of the APNB adsorption for heavy metal ions that are through the cation exchange processes decreases in the order: Cu2+>Zn2+>Co2+>Cd2+ >Ni2+ >Pb2+. Keywords: Bentonitic clay, Egypt, Aluminum Pillared Nano-Bentonite, heavy metal, environmental remediation

  12. Development of Composite Adsorbent Coating Based Acrylic Polymer/Bentonite for Methylene Blue Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Azha, Syahida Farhan; Abd Hamid, Shazlina; Ismail, Suzylawati

    2017-01-01

    The development of composite adsorbent coating based acrylic polymer solution (APS) mixed with bentonite (ben) was investigated. The composite adsorbent coating was prepared and coated to a high surface area substrate, cotton cellulosic fiber (CCF). The APS/ben-CCF was used for a single cationic methylene blue (MB) dye adsorption system. Characterization of composition and structure of materials and coating was carried out by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and U...

  13. Swelling compositions based polycarboxylic acids and bentonite clays in solutions of salts of metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sarshesheva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to the synthesis of chemical cross-linked composite materials made of natural inorganic polymer bentonite clay of Manrak deposit, and polyacrylic and polymethacrylic acids. The swelling ability of the composition in solutions of salts of heavy metals (Ni2+ and Pb2+, influence of solution of concentration, pH and temperature on the swelling ability is investigated.

  14. The influence of heat pre-treatment on the sorption of water vapour on bentonite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mokrejš, P.; Zikánová, Arlette; Hradil, David; Štulík, K.; Pacáková, V.; Kočiřík, Milan; Eić, M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2005), s. 57-63 ISSN 0929-5607 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/02/1464; GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A028 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : adsorption * bentonite * montmorillonite * water vapour Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.323, year: 2005

  15. Assessment of environmental influence of bentonite and lustrous carbon carrier - in an aspect of gases emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bobrowski

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The emission results of the selected gases from a bentonite-carbon mixture and from dusts originated from dry de-dusting of thegreen sand processing plant (at high temperatures are presented in the paper. In order to check and compare samples of dusts andbentonite-carbon mixtures in respect of emission of gases the Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA was performed by means of the massspectrometry method. This method allows to determine emission conditions of the selected chemical compounds.

  16. Influence of dust addition from cast iron production on bentonite sand mixture properties

    OpenAIRE

    P. Gengeľ; A. Pribulová

    2010-01-01

    In cast iron foundry operations like melting, casting, feetling, casts cleaning and grinding of a high amount of dusts are produced. Threekinds of dusts from different parts of cast iron foundry were analysed; chemical analyses, granulometric analyses and microscopic analyseswere carried out. The bentonite sand mixtures with different portion of dusts were prepared. Technological properties of prepared sandmixtures (compression strength, shearing strength and permeability) were measured.

  17. Influence of dust addition from cast iron production on bentonite sand mixture properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Gengeľ

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In cast iron foundry operations like melting, casting, feetling, casts cleaning and grinding of a high amount of dusts are produced. Threekinds of dusts from different parts of cast iron foundry were analysed; chemical analyses, granulometric analyses and microscopic analyseswere carried out. The bentonite sand mixtures with different portion of dusts were prepared. Technological properties of prepared sandmixtures (compression strength, shearing strength and permeability were measured.

  18. Exergetic Evaluation of a Pellet Stove in Different Configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granada, E.; Alvarez, H.; Moran, J.C.; Porteiro, J.; Miguez, J.L. [Univ. de Vigo (Spain). E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales

    2006-07-15

    To find best configuration for small co-generation system based in pellet combustion process, exergetic analysis was applied to a small pellet stove. Evaluation is focused in the exergetic balance of a stove, which supply hot water for heating, and in the smoke exergetic content for power generation purpose. Preheated air, secondary air, smoke recirculation and basis configurations were studied. Global exergetic simulation was developed in Matlab at these configurations based on energy and emissions experimental correlations. Influence of pellet feeding rate, excess of air, secondary air and smoke flow were studied. Discussion of results at any configuration was developed and best configuration is presented. Results show that emissions have high influence in smoke exergetic content although if emissions are removed only a slight global exergetic efficiency increase is expected.

  19. Standard specification for sintered (Uranium-Plutonium) dioxide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This specification covers finished sintered and ground (uranium-plutonium) dioxide pellets for use in thermal reactors. It applies to uranium-plutonium dioxide pellets containing plutonium additions up to 15 % weight. This specification may not completely cover the requirements for pellets fabricated from weapons-derived plutonium. 1.2 This specification does not include (1) provisions for preventing criticality accidents or (2) requirements for health and safety. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of the obligation to be aware of and conform to all applicable international, federal, state, and local regulations pertaining to possessing, processing, shipping, or using source or special nuclear material. Examples of U.S. government documents are Code of Federal Regulations Title 10, Part 50Domestic Licensing of Production and Utilization Facilities; Code of Federal Regulations Title 10, Part 71Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material; and Code of Federal Regulations Tit...

  20. Physicochemical and Photocatalytic Properties of Fe-Pillared Bentonite at Various Fe Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Is Fatimah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Iron-pillared bentonites (Fe/Bents were successfully prepared using a ferric chloride precursor. The prepared samples were characterized using XRD, BET and SEM-EDX. The results show that the pillared bentonite physicochemical character is affected by the iron content in a precursor solution. By Fe content variation it is found that Fe content in Fe/Bents is not linearly correlated with the specific surface area and the increased in d001 in which both the maximum specific surface are and d001 reach maximum at the Fe content of 20 mmol/g. Due to the kinetics of photocatalytic activity in phenol removal, it is concluded that in photo-Fenton-like processes. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 29th March 2016; Revised: 30th August 2016; Accepted: 1st September 2016 How to Cite: Fatimah, I., Nurkholifah, Y.Y. (2016. Physicochemical and Photocatalytic Properties of Fe-Pillared Bentonite at Various Fe Content. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (3: 398-405 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.3.456.398-405 Permalink/DOI: http://doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.3.456.398-405

  1. Bentonite and Gelatine Impact on the Young Red Wine Coloured Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Jović

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the impact of two fining agents (bentonite and gelatine on the coloured matters of young red wines Vranac, Pinot Noir and Gamay Noir. Both agents caused decrease in these substances. The effect is more intensive with the dose of bentonite of 1 g/L, but the variability depends on variety. Higher decrease was found in the colour intensity, coloured anthocyanins and polymers (up to 44 %, but lower in the colourless anthocyanins (up to 20 %. The intensity of red and blue colours decreases, while that of yellow colour increases. The use of bentonite in dosages higher than those recommended may cause the wine to obtain more pronounced »brick red« colour (the colour tint increases while the value of the spectrum form decreases. Fewer changes occurred in the coloured matters after treating the wine with gelatine. The colour intensity, colourless and coloured anthocyanins showed a decrease of up to 10 % and polymers of up to 16 %. The intensity of yellow colour decreases, while that of red increases as well as the ΔA/% value.

  2. Hydrothermal alterations of Bentonites in Almeria (Spain); Alteracion hidrotermal de las bentonitas de Almeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares Gonzalez, J.; Barahona Fernandez, E.; Huertas Garcia, F.; Caballero Mesa, E.; Cuadros Ojeda, J.

    1996-12-01

    The use of bentonite as backfilling and sealing material in the high level radioactive waste disposals has been treated in previous studies accomplished by different authors. However, the use of this clayey barrier needs the resolution of different problems so that its efficiency will be enhanced. between those could be cited the study of the actual capacity of sealing the space around the canister and the accommodation to the pressure of the rocky environment; the possible variations in plasticity; the diffusion and reaction processes that can be produced through the barrier by groundwater, the capacity of radionuclides adsorption, etc. These studies, show that the bentonites with high content in smectite fulfill satisfactorily with the physical and chemical conditions to be used as sealing material, but it is known that the smectite can be unstable in diagenetic conditions similar to those are given in a deep repository of radioactive wastes, being transformed into illite. A conclusion of immediate interest is deduced from this last study. The bentonites used as sealing material in radioactive waste repositories must no contain Na as interlayer cation since it is very easily exchangeable by K. It is better to select those smectites with Ca and Mg that detain the entry of K in the interlayer and as a consequence the transformation process of smectite into illite is made more difficult. (Author)

  3. Effect of Heating/Hydratation on Compacted Bentonite: Tests in 60-cm Long Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Fernandez, A. M.; Martin, P. L.; Barcala, J. M.; Gomez-Espina, R.; Rivas, P.

    2008-07-01

    The conditions of the bentonite in an engineered barrier for high-level radioactive waste disposal have been simulated in a series of tests. Cylindrical cells with an inner length of 60 cm and a diameter of 7 cm were constructed. Inside the cells, blocks of compacted FEBEX bentonite were put one on top of the other. the bottom surface of the material was heated at 100 degree centigree and the top surface was injected with granitic water. the duration of the tests was 0.5, 1,2 and 7,6 years. The temperatures and water intake were measured during the tests and, at the end, the cells were dismounted and the dry density, water content, mineralogy, geochemistry and some hydro-mechanical properties of the clay (permeability, swelling) were measured at different positions. the values obtained are compared among them and to those of the untreated FEBEX bentonite. The study has run over for 10 years in the context of the projects FEBEX I and II and NF-PRO. (Author) 50 refs.

  4. Admixing dredged marine clay with cement-bentonite for reduction of compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahilman, Nur Nazihah Nur; Chan, Chee-Ming

    2017-11-01

    Cement-based solidification/stabilization is a method that is widely used for the treatment of dredged marine clay. The key objective for solidification/stabilization is to improve the engineering properties of the originally soft, weak material. Dredged materials are normally low in shear strength and bearing capacity while high incompressibility. In order to improve the material's properties for possible reuse, a study on the one-dimensional compressibility of lightly solidified dredged marine clay admixed with bentonite was conducted. On the other hand, due to the viscous nature, particularly the swelling property, bentonite is a popular volumising agent for backfills. In the present study, standard oedometer test was carried out to examine the compressibility of the treated sample. Complementary strength measurements were also conducted with laboratory vane shear setup on both the untreated and treated dredged marine clay. The results showed that at the same binder content, the addition of bentonite contributed significantly to the reduction of compressibility and rise in undrained shear strength. These improved properties made the otherwise discarded dredged marine soils potentially reusable for reclamation works, for instance.

  5. A rapid automatic analyzer and its methodology for effective bentonite content based on image recognition technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Long

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fast and accurate determination of effective bentonite content in used clay bonded sand is very important for selecting the correct mixing ratio and mixing process to obtain high-performance molding sand. Currently, the effective bentonite content is determined by testing the ethylene blue absorbed in used clay bonded sand, which is usually a manual operation with some disadvantages including complicated process, long testing time and low accuracy. A rapid automatic analyzer of the effective bentonite content in used clay bonded sand was developed based on image recognition technology. The instrument consists of auto stirring, auto liquid removal, auto titration, step-rotation and image acquisition components, and processor. The principle of the image recognition method is first to decompose the color images into three-channel gray images based on the photosensitive degree difference of the light blue and dark blue in the three channels of red, green and blue, then to make the gray values subtraction calculation and gray level transformation of the gray images, and finally, to extract the outer circle light blue halo and the inner circle blue spot and calculate their area ratio. The titration process can be judged to reach the end-point while the area ratio is higher than the setting value.

  6. Synthesis of polycationic bentonite-ionene complexes and their benzene adsorption capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valquíria Campos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to structurally modify clays in order to incorporate water-insoluble molecules, such as petroleum hydrocarbons. The potential for ion exchange of quaternary ammonium salts was studied, which revealed their ability to interact with anions on the cationic surface, for environmental applications of the material. Ionenes, also known as polycations, have many potential uses in environmental applications. In this work, cationic aliphatic ammonium polyionenes, specifically 3,6-ionene and 3,6-dodecylionene, were prepared for incorporation into clay to form bentonite-ionene complexes. The intercalation of bentonite with ionene polymers resulted in an increase in the basal spacing of 3,6-dodecylionene from 1.5-3.5 nm. The higher d001 spacing of 3,6-dodecylionene samples than that of 3,6-ionene samples may be attributed to their longer tail length. The behavior of the TG/DTG curves and the activation energy values suggest that 3,6-dodecylionene (E = 174.85 kJ mol–1 is thermally more stable than 3,6 ionene (E = 115.52 kJ mol–1 complexes. The adsorption of benzene by 3,6-ionene and 3,6-dodecylionene was also investigated. The increase in benzene concentrations resulted in increased benzene adsorption by the sorbents tested in this work. The sorption capacity of benzene on ionene-modified bentonite was in the order of 3,6-dodecylionene > 3,6-ionene.

  7. An assessment of strontium sorption onto bentonite buffer material in waste repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Pankaj

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, changes occurring in sorption characteristics of a representative bentonite (WIn-BT) exposed to SrCl 2 (0.001-0.1 M) under the pH range of 1-13 were investigated. Such interaction revealed a significant variation in surface charge density and binding energy of ions with respect to bentonite, and alteration in their physicochemical properties viz., specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, thermal and mechanical behaviour were observed. The distribution coefficients (k d ) calculated for sorption onto virgin (UCBT) and contaminated bentonite (CBT) indicated a greater influence of mineralogical changes occurred with variance of pH and strontium concentration. Notably, the sorption mechanism clearly elucidates the effect of structural negative charge and existence of anionic metal species onto CBT, and depicted the reason behind significant k d values at highly acidic and alkaline pH. The maximum k d of UCBT and CBT (0.001M SrCl2) were 8.99 and 2.92 L/kg, respectively, at the soil pH 8.5; whereas it was 2.37 and 1.23 L/kg at pH 1 for the CBT (0.1M SrCl2) and CBT (0.01M SrCl2) , respectively. The findings of this study can be useful to identify the physicochemical parameters of candidate buffer material and sorption reversibility in waste repository.

  8. Adsorption of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons from aqueous solution: Agrowaste-modified kaolinite vs surfactant modified bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Unuabonah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption efficiency of a new hybrid clay adsorbent for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs is compared with known modified clay adsorbents. The new hybrid clay adsorbent (HYCA showed far higher adsorption capacities for the adsorption of various PAH molecules compared with sodium dodecyl sulfate modified and humic acid modified Bentonite clay adsorbents. With the new hybrid clay adsorbent (HYCA, the adsorption of some of the larger PAH molecules was complete in the first 1 h as compared with ≈ 62% and ≈ 76% observed for both humic acid modified and sodium dodecyl sulfate modified Bentonite clay adsorbents respectively. In 24 h adsorption of the PAHs was complete for all adsorbents with HYCA adsorbent showing better efficiency in the removal of the PAH molecules from aqueous solutions. No significant change was observed with increase in time up to 48 h. The adsorption was observed to be more spontaneous with HYCA adsorbent than with either modified Bentonite adsorbents. The enthalpy of adsorption did not follow any specific order and were not consistent for all PAH molecules considered.

  9. Characterisation of bentonites from Kutch, India and Milos, Greece - some candidate tunnel back-fill materials?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Siv; Karnland, Ola (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    During the past decades comprehensive investigations have been made on bentonite clays in order to find optimal components of the multi-barrier system of repositories for radioactive waste. The present study gives a mineralogical characterisation of some selected bentonites, in order to supply some of the necessary background data on the bentonites for evaluating their potential as tunnel back-fill materials. Two bentonites from the island of Milos, Greece (Milos BF 04 and BF 08), and two bentonites from Kutch, India (Kutch BF 04 and BF 08) were analysed for their grain size distribution, cation exchange properties and chemical composition. The mineralogical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis and evaluated quantitatively by use of the Siroquant software. Both the bulk bentonite and the <1mum fraction were analyzed when relevant. Prior to the chemical analyses the <1 mum fractions were converted to homo-ionic clays and purified by dialysis. The chemical data were used for calculating the structural formula of the smectites. Milos BF 04 contains ca. 10% particles >63 mum. The bentonite is distinguished by a high content of dolomite and calcite, which make up almost 25% of the bulk sample. The major accessory minerals are K-feldspars and plagioclase, whereas the content of sulphur-bearing minerals is very low (0.06% total S). Smectite makes up around 60% of the bulk sample, which has a CEC value of 73 meq/100 g. The pool of interlayer cations has a composition Mg>Ca>>Na>>K. The X-ray diffraction characteristics and the high potassium content (1.03% K{sub 2}O) of the <1 mum fraction suggest that the smectite is interstratified with ca. 10% illitic layers. Based on the charge distribution the smectite should be classified as montmorillonite and according to the structural formula, Mg predominates over Fe in the octahedral sheet. However, remnants of Mg-carbonates, if present, may be a source of error in the formula calculation. Milos BF 08 has a

  10. 77 FR 24176 - Bridger-Teton National Forest; Wyoming; Long Term Special Use Authorization for Wyoming Game and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-23

    ... Game and Fish Commission To Use National Forest System Land for Their Winter Elk Management Programs.... SUMMARY: The Bridger-Teton National Forest received a request from the Wyoming Game and Fish Commission... 1888, Jackson, WY 83001. Individuals who use telecommunication devices for the deaf (TDD) may call the...

  11. Development of wood pellets market in South East Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glavonjić Branko D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of researching wood pellets market in nine countries in South East Europe and Slovakia. Objective of the research was to observe the actual situation regarding the number of producers, size of installed capacities, production volume, foreign trade flows and existing problems and obstacles which significantly limit the sustainable development of wood pellets market in the selected countries. Selection of such an objective results from the fact that according to the stated elements there are no sufficiently reliable data, wherefore this region is a huge gap in numerous reports of international and national organizations and institutions. Results of the conducted research show that in the middle of 2014, 245 producers were engaged in wood pellets production in South East Europe and Slovakia, 116 of which were located in Bulgaria and Serbia. Most of the producers of wood pellets has installed capacities of 1,000-5,000 tons annually, while only 18 factories in the entire region have the installed capacity over 30,000 tons/year. Observed collectively in all stated countries, the total installed capacities for wood pellets production were 2.2 million tons in 2013 and the realized production was 1.36 million tons. The largest part of the produced amounts of wood pellets in this region is exported. 1.06 million tons were exported from the region in 2013, which is 77.9% of the realized production. Such high export is the result of the underdevelopment of the local market (Slovenia is the only exception and the problems which exist and limit its faster development in most countries.

  12. Pellet production from agricultural raw materials - A systems study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Daniel; Bernesson, Sven; Hansson, Per-Anders [Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7032, SE-75007 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-01-15

    The demand for biofuel pellets has increased considerably in recent years, causing shortage of the traditional raw materials sawdust and wood shavings. In this study, the costs and energy requirements for the production of pellets from agricultural raw materials were analysed. The materials studied were Salix, reed canary grass, hemp, straw, screenings, rape-seed meal, rape cake and distiller's waste. Four production scales were analysed, having an annual output of 80,000, 8000, 800 and 80 tonnes of pellets per year. It was concluded that the raw materials of greatest interest were Salix and reed canary grass. They had competitive raw material costs and acceptable fuel properties and could be mixed with sawdust in existing large-scale pelleting factories. Straw had low production costs but can cause serious ash-related problems and should, as also is the case for screenings, be avoided in small-scale burners. Hemp had high raw material costs and is of less commercial interest, while distiller's waste, rape-seed meal and rape cake had higher alternative values when used as protein feed. The scale of production had a crucial influence on production costs. The machinery was used much more efficiently in large-scale plants, resulting in clear cost savings. Small-scale pelleting, both static and mobile, required cheap raw materials, low labour costs and long utilisation times to be profitable. In most cases, briquetting would be more commercially viable. The energy use in manufacturing pellets from air-dried crops was generally no higher than when moist sawdust was used as the raw material. (author)

  13. Market review. Pellet wood gasification boiler / combination boiler. 8. ed.; Marktuebersicht. Scheitholzvergaser-/Kombikessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uth, Joern

    2012-01-15

    In the market review under consideration on pellet wood gasification boilers and combination boilers, the Federal Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Consumer Protection (Bonn, Federal Republic of Germany) reports on planning and installation of wood-fired heating systems, recommendations regarding to the technical assessment of boiler systems, buffers/combination boilers, prices of pellet wood gasification boilers, data sheets of the compared pellet wood gasification boilers, pellet wood combination boilers, prices of pellet wood combination boilers, data sheets of the compared pellet wood gasification boilers, list of providers.

  14. Pellet wood gasification boiler / Combination boiler. Market review. 7. ed.; Scheitholzvergaser-/Kombikessel. Marktuebersicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uth, Joern

    2010-08-15

    In the market review under consideration on pellet wood gasification boilers and combination boilers, the Federal Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Consumer Protection (Bonn, Federal Republic of Germany) report on planning and installation of wood-fired heating systems, recommendations regarding to the technical assessment of boiler systems, buffers/combination boilers, prices of pellet wood gasification boilers, data sheets of the compared pellet wood gasification boilers, pellet wood combination boilers, prices of pellet wood combination boilers, data sheets of the compared pellet wood gasification boilers, list of providers.

  15. Investigation for the quality factors on the tablets containing medicated pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueying Tan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sustained and controlled pellets are considered as one of the ideal dosage forms. Due to the large coverage area of pellets, loaded drugs can be absorbed completely in the body and bioavailability is improved correspondingly. Coated pellets-containing tablet is a special oral formulation consisting of various pellets with different release rate. Desired rate of drug release rate can be achieved by adjusting the proportion of pellets. However, this formulation faces strict requirements in the process of preparation. Several factors will influence release behavior of tablets, including pellet cores, coating, and tabletting. Therefore, these factors will be investigated sufficiently in this review to provide valuable information for manufacturing process.

  16. Investigation for the quality factors on the tablets containing medicated pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xueying; Hu, Jingbo

    2016-09-01

    Sustained and controlled pellets are considered as one of the ideal dosage forms. Due to the large coverage area of pellets, loaded drugs can be absorbed completely in the body and bioavailability is improved correspondingly. Coated pellets-containing tablet is a special oral formulation consisting of various pellets with different release rate. Desired rate of drug release rate can be achieved by adjusting the proportion of pellets. However, this formulation faces strict requirements in the process of preparation. Several factors will influence release behavior of tablets, including pellet cores, coating, and tabletting. Therefore, these factors will be investigated sufficiently in this review to provide valuable information for manufacturing process.

  17. Pellets for fusion reactor refueling. Annual progress report, January 1, 1976--December 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnbull, R. J.; Kim, K.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to test the feasibility of refueling fusion reactors using solid pellets composed of fuel elements. A solid hydrogen pellet generator has been constructed and experiments have been done to inject the pellets into the ORMAK Tokamak. A theory has been developed to describe the pellet ablation in the plasma, and an excellent agreement has been found between the theory and the experiment. Techniques for charging the pellets have been developed in order to accelerate and control them. Other works currently under way include the development of techniques for accelerating the pellets for refueling purpose. Evaluation of electrostatic acceleration has also been performed.

  18. Quality effects caused by torrefaction of pellets made from Scots pine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shang, Lei; Nielsen, Niels Peter K.; Dahl, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of torrefaction on the quality of Scots pine pellets. Pellet samples were torrefied at 230, 250 and 270°C for 1h in nitrogen atmosphere. Higher heating value (HHV) was increased from 18.37MJkg−1 to 24.34MJkg−1. The energy to crush a pellet...... the pellet samples in a bench scale disc mill. Particle size distribution measurements after grinding indicated a significant increase of small particles (diameterca. 2mm). To further analyze the effect on strength, the mechanical durability of pellets was tested according to wood pellet standards, EN 15210...

  19. Heat-resistant bacterial phytase in broiler pelleted diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TC de F Carlos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of a heat-resistant bacterial phytase added to pelleted diets on mineral digestibility, live performance, carcass traits, and bone quality of broilers. Three treatments were evaluated: Positive control; negative control, with 0.10 points reduction in calcium level and 0.15 points reduction in available phosphorus level; and negative control + phytase at 500 FTU/kg. Mineral digestibility and bone quality results demonstrated that the evaluated phytase resisted pelleting as it increased the utilization of the minerals present in the diet.

  20. Physicochemical and Geotechnical Alterations to MX-80 Bentonite at the Waste Canister Interface in an Engineered Barrier System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W. Davies

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the basic geomechanical and mineralogical evolution of the bentonite barrier under various experimental boundary conditions which replicated the near-field Thermo-Hydro-Chemico (THC conditions in a repository. The relationships between the physicochemical alterations and changes in the geotechnical properties have seldom been studied, especially on a consistent dataset. This paper attempts to link the physicochemical properties of Na-bentonite (MX-80 to the macro-scale engineering functionality of the bentonite post THC exposure. Experiments investigated the impact of THC variables on the engineering and physicochemical functionality of the bentonite with respect to its application within a High-Level Waste (HLW engineered barrier system. Intrinsic alterations to the MX-80 bentonite under relatively short-term exposure to hydrothermal and chemical conditions were measured. Additionally, two long-term tests were conducted under ambient conditions to consider the impact of exposure duration. The intrinsic measurements were then related to the overall performance of the bentonite as a candidate barrier material for application in a UK geological disposal facility. Findings indicate that exposure to thermo-saline-corrosion conditions (i.e., corrosion products derived from structural grade 275 carbon steel inhibits the free swell capacity and plasticity of the bentonite. However, the measured values remained above the design limits set out for the Swedish multi-barrier concept, from which the UK concept may take a lead. Corrosion alone does not appear to significantly affect the geotechnical measurements compared with the influence of thermal loading and high saline pore water after relatively short-term exposure. Thermal and corrosion exposure displayed no impact on the intrinsic swelling of the smectite component, indicating that no significant structural alteration had occurred. However, when exploring more complex saline