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Sample records for wwii jew rescuers

  1. Rescuers of Jews during the Nazi Holocaust: A Study in Altruism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliner, Samuel P.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the Altruistic Personality Project, a study which is exploring the nature of people who risked their lives to save Jews during the Holocaust. In determining which factors motivated the rescuers, researchers have identified three main areas: values and attitudes, personality traits, and situational factors. Advocates cultivation of…

  2. The human chameleon: Hybrid Jews in cinema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vudka, A.

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the seditious potential of hybrid Jewish figures in cinema, based on certain thinkers of post WWII French philosophy, feminist and postcolonial theories, and traditional Jewish texts, which in different ways point to a reevaluation of the "chameleon Jew" in positive terms.

  3. Transnationalism and the Jews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt, Jakob Egholm

    and normativity.Transnationalism and the Jews directly relates ideas about transnationalism and cultural pluralism to Jewish historical experience. It shows how the Jews and ‘Jewishness’ has been a problematic issue for cultural thought since the Enlightenment, and how this problem produced the alternative ideas...... of culture and identity that are widely accepted today. It argues that Jewish experience and ‘Jewishness’ helped produced the modern concept of transnationalism and cultural pluralism...

  4. Jews enemies of Christianity?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    repressed, and anti-Jewish thinking emerged within the church. How does Tomson arrive at the above depiction of the (current) relationship between Christians and Jews? This is discussed in his 'longer answer' (chapters 2−8). As a starting point in unravelling this relationship, Tomson argues that a positive relationship ...

  5. Transnationalism and the Jews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt, Jakob Egholm

    The concept of transnationalism has been widely used for many years to describe mobility and cross-border relations in the modern, globalized world. Most uses of the concept of transnationalism neglect its historical trajectory and largely ignore the networks that constructed its meaning...... and normativity.Transnationalism and the Jews directly relates ideas about transnationalism and cultural pluralism to Jewish historical experience. It shows how the Jews and ‘Jewishness’ has been a problematic issue for cultural thought since the Enlightenment, and how this problem produced the alternative ideas...... of culture and identity that are widely accepted today. It argues that Jewish experience and ‘Jewishness’ helped produced the modern concept of transnationalism and cultural pluralism...

  6. Sombart and the Jews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Protti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay has the purpose of collecting and exposing in synthetic form the main issues which Sombart treats in his book Die Juden und das Wirtschaftsleben, 1911. Sombart defends the view that the Jews have founded modern capitalism, inventing financial practices (such as credit instruments and security interests, thus easing the movement of money and investments (financial intermediation. In this they have been supported by texts (the Bible and its interpretative commentaries and customary practices between people belonging to Jewish communities and strangers. The resulting form of capitalism is of a financial and commercial type, which Weber distinguishes from and opposes to the ‘modern’ form of capitalism, based on industry and rational production of goods, and determined by the typical character of Protestant ethics. The juxtaposition between Sombart and Weber sees the former arguing for a historical and conceptual articulation of capitalism that is more complex and articulated than the one posited by the latter. Weber believes that the ‘bloc’ formed by Jews, strangers and heretics (as opposed to Catholicism, that is, the Protestants has founded capitalism in its original version, the Jewish form of capitalism, later supported by the English translation of the Bible, urged and authorized by James I, whose influence has powerfully affected the ideological construction of a ‘historic’ object.

  7. Why Jews Quote

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Marmur

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Quotation is a feature of cultures throughout history and across continents. The purpose of this article is to present a phenomenology of quotation in Jewish culture, where it has had pride of place for millennia. Following a brief historical overview, six functions are discussed: quotation as 1 an engagement with tradition; 2 a means of resuscitating the quoted source; 3 legitimization of the quoter; 4 enrichment and embellishment of a text or oral performance; 5 an act of community-building; and 6 an incantatory act, a means of effecting change. In conclusion, the article suggests that quotation performs a rhapsodic function in the original sense of sewing together fragments in the creation of a thick fabric. Through quotation the Jew is in conversation with past, present, and future.

  8. Former WWII Fighter Pilot Finds New Home Near Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Former WWII Fighter Pilot Finds New Home Near Family Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table of Contents For ... moved to an assisted living facility located near family in Kalispell, Mont. Advice On a Move to ...

  9. A clinico-epidemiological study of rescuer burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basra, Baljeet Kumar; Suri, Manav P; Patil, Nilesh; Atha, Ravish; Patel, Natvar; Sachde, Jayesh P; Shaikh, M F

    2014-08-01

    Rescuer burn is a relatively newer terminology introduced to define the burns sustained by a person attempting to rescue a primary burn victim. Few studies have been published thus far on this peculiar type of burns. Due to the general neglect of the rescuer burns victim and discontinuation of treatment in most cases, once the primary victim dies, the rescuer often ends up in badly infected wounds and has a delayed return to work. A prospective study was conducted at the B J Medical College and Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad from January 2009 to December 2012 on the rescuer burns patients treated in its burns and plastic surgery department. 3074 patients of burns received treatment during the period of study. Of these, 48 patients gave the history of sustaining burns while trying to rescue a burns victim. Male to female ratio of rescuers was approximately 7:1. It was significantly higher as compared to the ratio of 1:0.8 of females to male burn victims observed at our centre (p≤0.01). Average age of the rescuers was higher in males as compared to females but the difference was not significant (p≥0.05). Of the 45 cases of female primary burns victims, male rescuer was husband of the primary victim in 41/45 cases (91.1%), mother was rescuer in three cases (6.6% cases) and sister was rescuer in one case. Though multiple people came to rescue a burns victim, in all cases, it was seen that it was the first rescuer who sustained burns himself or herself. None of the rescuers had any knowledge of the techniques and precautions to be taken while performing a rescue operation irrespective of their education status, indirectly pointing to the lack of any teaching on burns rescue in the school education curriculum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. Jews, Jesus, and Menstrual Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marienberg Evyatar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how concepts related to menstruation and menstrual blood were used by medieval Jews to insult the Christians’ God and his mother. One of the central concepts used in these exchanges was the claim that Jesus was conceived while Mary was menstruating. The article checks this and similar claims when they appear, among other places, in polemic works, such as the rather famous Toledot Yeshu (“The Genealogy of Jesus”, and in the Jewish chronicles about the massacres of Rhineland Jews during the first crusade of 1096.

  11. MISSION AMONG THE JEWS 1. INTRODUCTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The author discusses whether the issue of mission among the Jews deals with the basic question of mission or whether it is the core of the Christian faith. Although both Jews and Christians reject the idea and (more so) mission among the Jews, the author strongly argues for its need, for mission is not the expansion of ideas ...

  12. CSSC Fish Barrier Simulated Rescuer Touch Point Results, Operating Guidance, and Recommendations for Rescuer Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    contact with any PIW (in the electrified area) unless the rescuer is electrically isolated from the PIW. Any attempt at rescue in electrified water...heart such as a pacemaker wire and the spike hits on the “T” wave of the cardiac cycle. Active defibrillation is necessary to convert fibrillation...back to a physiological rhythm. Defibrillation generally takes larger voltages and currents. Defibrillation is an act of passing a strong-enough

  13. Money, Madoff, and the Jews

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wohlberg, Mitch

    2009-01-01

    ... of all of us this year: as Americans in terms of the economy, as Jews in terms of Bernard Madoff. This is the year when we saw things happen that we never thought possible--from the collapse of Bear Stearns and Lehman Brothers, to our pensions and net worth dipping lower, to General Motors going broke. And although he had nothing to do with the d...

  14. Creole Jews: Negotiating Community in Colonial Suriname

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. Vink (Wieke)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis study explores the ways in which a colonial domain affected identification processes among the Jews who had forged a Jewish community in Suriname since the mid seventeenth century. The history of the Surinamese Jews involves conflict, struggle and exclusion, but also cultural

  15. Health protection and risks for rescuers in cases of floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janev Holcer, Nataša; Jeličić, Pavle; Grba Bujević, Maja; Važanić, Damir

    2015-03-01

    Floods can pose a number of safety and health hazards for flood-affected populations and rescuers and bring risk of injuries, infections, and diseases due to exposure to pathogenic microorganisms and different biological and chemical contaminants. The risk factors and possible health consequences for the rescuers involved in evacuation and rescuing operations during the May 2014 flood crisis in Croatia are shown, as well as measures for the prevention of injuries and illnesses. In cases of extreme floods, divers play a particularly important role in rescuing and first-response activities. Rescuing in contaminated floodwaters means that the used equipment such as diving suits should be disinfected afterwards. The need for securing the implementation of minimal health and safety measures for involved rescuers is paramount. Data regarding injuries and disease occurrences among rescuers are relatively scarce, indicating the need for medical surveillance systems that would monitor and record all injuries and disease occurrences among rescuers in order to ensure sound epidemiological data. The harmful effects of flooding can be reduced by legislation, improvement of flood forecasting, establishing early warning systems, and appropriate planning and education.

  16. Jews and Greeks in Alexandria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemen Klun

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the history of contacts and cultural exchange between the Jews and the Greeks in early and late antiquity, especially relevant not only for historians and philologists, but also for those interested in Hellenistic philosophy and the origins of Christianity, having its roots into a very complex fusion of Jewish and Greek tradition. Metropolitan city of Alexandria in Ptolemaic Egypt provided a very fruitfull milieu for this kind of cultural contact just from the time the group of seventy-two translators arrived to the city to translate the Hebrew Scripture for the famous library in the time of Ptolemy II (285-247 BCE and his librarian Demetrius of Phalerum. For the genealogy of contacts between two nations that both contributed so much to the Western thought, we may, of course, go back to the history and relevant sources. The City of Jerusalem, for instance, is mentioned for the first time in the old Egyptian Tell el-Amarna correspondence (XIV. century BCE, while the Jews (though often named as the Syrians of Palestine are referred to by many Greek authors (poet Alcaius from Lesbos, Herodotus, Theophrastus, Hecataeus of Abdera, an Egyptian priest in Heliopolis Manetho, Polybius, Menander, and many others. The Hebrew Bible (Tanakh on the other hand, provides an interesting source of records of contacts between the old Israelites and the Greek speaking tribes (from the Ionian isles, Crete, Cyprus etc, back to the reign of king David and king Solomon (X. century BCE, which both allegedly enrolled Greek soldiers and officials in their armies (cf. 2 Samuel 20, 23; 1 Kings 1, 38. The Bible also reports about trade contacts between Palestine and Greek lsles (cf. Ezekiel 27, 7; Joel 4.6, and also about Greek settlers in the 'Holly land' (cf. Deuteronomy 2, 23; Jeremiah 47, 4; Zephaniah 2, 5. The period after Alexander the Great is also very important for relations between Greeks and Jews. When his diadochoi came to Palestine, they

  17. Coarse fraction of soils from building rubble (WWII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekiffer, Beate; Wessolek, Gerd; Scheytt, Traugott; Bussert, Robert; Nehls, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Soils, resulting from building rubble of WWII are wide spread in whole Europe. The parent material for pedogenesis originates from different kinds of buildings, which where destroyed of different ways. Also the kind of sorting and disposing was varying for this material. So the most important feature of soils, resulting from building rubble of WWII, is their heterogeneity. We investigated samples of soils developed from building rubble to answer the following questions: ­ What are the amounts of coarse fraction and what are their main components? ­ What are the chemical properties and what is the crystalline mineral composition of technogenic components? ­ What is the release of ions from coarse technogenic components? We sieved and hand sorted the materials, used the X-ray diffractometry and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and measured the ions released in 1:2-extract. In most cases, the soils have a high amount of coarse fraction (> 2mm) (median 25% w/w, N=52). Dominating components in the coarse fraction are in the order of decreasing abundance: bricks, mortar (incl. plaster and stucco), slag, ashes and unburned coals. The analyzed components show alkalescent to alkaline pH-values. 75% of the samples show low electrical conductivities of up to 141 µS/cm. Bricks mainly consist of Si oxides, followed by oxides of Al, Ca, Fe, Mg and K. X-Ray-diffractometry of bricks showed, that most common minerals are clay minerals (Kaolinit, Illit, Montmorillonit and Chlorit), Quarz, and Carbonates (Calcite and Dolomite, Siderite). Bricks contain Fe-Oxides (Hematite, Goethite), Sulphates and Sulfides (Gypsum, Pyrite, Markasite) in lower amounts. 5-20 % of the minerals are x-ray-amorphous. Mortar is characterized by a high amount of silicates (nearby 80%). The samples showed a lower percentage of Al- and Ca-compounds than bricks. Chemical composition of ashes and slag varies in wide ranges, depending on their genesis. We found mainly ashes from stove heating. They contained

  18. Multicultural Counseling and the Orthodox Jew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnall, Eliezer

    2006-01-01

    The cultural diversity literature largely ignores the effects of religion, and especially Judaism, on counseling and psychotherapy. The author reviews the meager and mostly anecdotal accounts relating to Orthodox Jews in the literature of several related disciplines, including counseling, social work, psychology, and psychiatry. The objective is…

  19. Jews in the Netherlands and their languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, A.C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Cultural contacts between majority and minority groups involve many different aspects, one of which is language. Jews have been living in the Netherlands since around the beginning of the sixteenth century. In the two centuries that followed, their language repertoire was very rich, consisting of at

  20. MISSION AMONG THE JEWS 1. INTRODUCTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sion to the Jews as most Christians were silent during the Holocaust. This is the first, most important objection against re-opening the dis- cussion since it was closed in the second century. Another objection must be considered. Is such mission not con- testable? In a pluralistic world we should not make proselytes, but strive.

  1. Autobiographical memories in testimonies of WWII Veterans with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tricia Olea Santos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study is a continuation of investigations of personal narratives of healthy older adults and those with aphasia. It focuses on autobiographical memories in testimonies of elderly WWII veterans with dementia, with particular emphasis on emotional events that occurred at the time of their memory peak. This study describes how declines in memory affect changes in language in narratives of memorable experiences at the time in old age when life review is typically experienced. Ten WWII veterans with dementia were selected from a larger study of healthy elderly veterans. Participants were between the ages of 86-91 years old, with the majority obtaining higher education. Based on the Arizona Battery for Communication Disorders of Dementia, participants demonstrated dementia of mild-to-moderate severity. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to elicit memorable war experiences. Modifications to the interview were made, such as the use of photos to set the topic and occasional closed-ended questions to facilitate responses. Information was recorded and analyzed in terms of the amount and specificity of linguistic information, overall coherence of narratives, and the evaluations of memorable war experiences. The participants were not able to produce complete narratives; they instead relayed short episodes of their war experiences. Difficulties with semantic and episodic memory were reflected in the reduced length of their stories. Anomia was inherent in these episodes, as evidenced by the absence of specific names, dates and places. Lack of specificity was exhibited in reduced details and the use of nonspecific referents, such as “thing,” “stuff,” “there.” Participants produced coherent short story episodes. Coherence in episodic structure was maintained by the ability to relate events in a temporal sequence. Repetition was a strategy that served essential functions of emphasizing a point and/or clarifying breakdowns in communication

  2. Population movement and redistribution among American Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, S

    1982-06-01

    Recently concern has been voiced in the American Jewish community about the distribution of the American Jewish population and its impact, especially at a time when American Jewish fertility has reached a low level and when intermarriage and assimilation appear to be threatening the demographic and socioreligious vitality of the community. This paper examines population movement and distribution among American Jews using data from the National Jewish Population Study (1970-71) sponsored by the Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds, which sampled the Jewish population, including marginal and unaffiliated Jews, in every geographic region of the U.S. Lifetime and recent migration patterns, origin/destination of recent migrants, and socioeconomic differentials are described and discussed. The author concludes that the patterns identified reflect wider residential dispersion and point to an increasing "Americanization" of the Jewish population. Jews are participating in the major currents of population redistribution characterizing the American population as a whole. Regardless of which migration stream becomes popular in the future, the net result is likely to be a more geographically dispersed Jewish population in the future, a trend further reinforced by the observed socioeconomic differentials. Population movement must thus be seen as a key variable in any assessment of the future strength of the American Jewish community, from both local and national perspectives.

  3. The Netherlands and World War II, Jews and suicide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ultee, W.C.; Luijkx, R.; van Tubergen, F.; Sher, L.; Vilens, A.

    2009-01-01

    World War II in the Netherlands lasted from May 1940 to May 1945. Suicide numbers peaked in these months, in the first case because of suicide by Jews, and in the second case because of suicide by collaborators with the German occupier. Suicide rates for Jews were higher in 1942 than in 1940 and

  4. Project-Based Learning in Post-WWII Japanese School Curriculum: An Analysis via Curriculum Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    In the 2000s, the new national curriculum, dubbed as the "yutori curriculum," introduced a new subject for project-based learning "Integrated Study" as its prominent feature. Comparing curriculum orientations in project-based learning in three historical periods after the WWII including Integrated Study, this paper aims to…

  5. Governance as glue: Urban governance and social cohesion in post-WWII neighbourhoods in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, K.K.

    2006-01-01

    At the time when the post-WWII neighbourhoods were built, they were much wanted housing environments. Today, however, they face many problems with safety, concentrations of poverty, and liveability. Much good is expected of social cohesion to restore the situation in these neighbourhoods.

  6. Safety of fully automatic external defibrillation by untrained lay rescuers in the presence of a bystander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosmans, Tony Ph; Maquoi, Isabelle; Vogels, Catherine; Courtois, Anne-Catherine; Micheels, Jean; Lamy, Maurice; Monsieurs, Koenraad G

    2008-05-01

    Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are becoming increasingly available in public places to be used by citizens in case of cardiac arrest. Most AEDs are semi-automatic (SAEDs), but some are fully automatic (FAEDs) and there is ongoing debate and concern that they may lead to inadvertent shocks to rescuers or bystanders because the timing of the shock is not controlled by the rescuer. We therefore compared the behaviour of untrained citizens using an FAED or an SAED in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario. One hundred and seventy-six laypeople were randomised to use an FAED or an SAED (Lifepak CR+, Medtronic, Redmond, USA) in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario on a manikin (Ambu, Denmark) where a bystander was touching the victim's upper arm. Each rescuer's performance was recorded on video and analysed afterwards using a modified Cardiff Score. The rescuer or the bystander was considered unsafe if either of them touched the victim during shock delivery. Eleven cases could not be analysed because of technical problems. Fifteen participants violated the protocol making further analysis impossible. Of the remaining 150 participants, 68 used the FAED and 82 used the SAED. The rescuers were safe in 97/150 (65%) cases, without a difference between FAED and SAED. The bystander was safe in 25/68 (37%) cases in the FAED group versus 19/82 (23%) in the SAED group (p=0.07). Combined safety of both rescuer and bystander was observed in 23/68 (34%) cases in the FAED group versus 15/82 (18%) in the SAED group (p=0.03). Safety was not compromised when untrained lay rescuers used an FAED compared with an SAED. The observation of overall safer behaviour by FAED users in the presence of bystanders may be related to the additional instructions provided by the FAED, and the reduced interaction of the rescuer with the bystander when using the SAED.

  7. Jews in the East End, Jews in the Polity, ‘The Jew’ in the Text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Feldman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers the relationship of the Jewish East End to liberalism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Liberalism is here understood both as a discourse and a set of practices concerned with governance. The idea that liberalism was intolerant of the Jews’ difference is an idea present in much recent writing by both historians and literary scholars. The essay subjects this idea to critical examination. Specifically, it considers the integration of Jews within practices of poor relief and education as well as the representation of Jews in the writing of social investigators such as Beatrice Potter. (Image: Interior of a tailoring workshop in Christian Street in London’s East End, c. 1913. The image is part of the Jewish Museum’s online exhibition Jewish Britain: A History in 50 Objects. Credit: © Jewish Museum London

  8. The Third Generation: Hungarian Jews on Screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Portuges

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The post-Cold War era, with its redrawn European topographies and renegotiated political and cultural alliances, has witnessed the return of Central European Jews to the screen in fiction features, documentary and experimental films, and new media. A younger generation of filmmakers devoted to speaking out on the Holocaust and its aftermath is opening vibrant new spaces of dialogue among historians, literary and scholars, as well as within the framework of families and audiences. By articulating unresolved questions of Jewish identity, memory and history, their work both extends and interrogates prior narratives and visual representations. My presentation compares recent films by several filmmakers with regard to the contested meanings of Jewish identity; issues of gender and the filmmaker’s voice and subject position; the contextualization of historical evidence; and innovative modes and genres of cinematic representation.

  9. Exploring How Lay Rescuers Overcome Barriers to Provide Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiesen, Wenche Torunn; Bjørshol, Conrad Arnfinn; Høyland, Sindre; Braut, Geir Sverre; Søreide, Eldar

    2017-02-01

    Survival rates after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) vary considerably among regions. The chance of survival is increased significantly by lay rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) before Emergency Medical Services (EMS) arrival. It is well known that for bystanders, reasons for not providing CPR when witnessing an OHCA incident may be fear and the feeling of being exposed to risk. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of why barriers to providing CPR are overcome. Using a semi-structured interview guide, 10 lay rescuers were interviewed after participating in eight OHCA incidents. Qualitative content analysis was used. The lay rescuers were questioned about their CPR-knowledge, expectations, and reactions to the EMS and from others involved in the OHCA incident. They also were questioned about attitudes towards providing CPR in an OHCA incident in different contexts. The lay rescuers reported that they were prepared to provide CPR to anybody, anywhere. Comprehending the severity in the OHCA incident, both trained and untrained lay rescuers provided CPR. They considered CPR provision to be the expected behavior of any community citizen and the EMS to act professionally and urgently. However, when asked to imagine an OHCA in an unclear setting, they revealed hesitation about providing CPR because of risk to their own safety. Mutual trust between community citizens and towards social institutions may be reasons for overcoming barriers in providing CPR by lay rescuers. A normative obligation to act, regardless of CPR training and, importantly, without facing any adverse legal reactions, also seems to be an important factor behind CPR provision. Mathiesen WT , Bjørshol CA , Høyland S , Braut GS , Søreide E . Exploring how lay rescuers overcome barriers to provide cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a qualitative study. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(1):27-32.

  10. Use of self-rescuers in hot and humid mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, B.; Brenkley, D.; Jozefowicz, R.R.; Whitaker, D.; Shotton, J.; Booth, A.P. [Mine Rescue Service Ltd. (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    The concept of self-rescue is premised on the assumption that underground mineworkers have the physical and mental capacities required for self-rescue and in-seam rescue. There is a recognised research 'gap' concerning the practical limitations, and ultimately personal endurance limits, associated with the extended wearing of mining industry respiratory protective devices particularly under high physiological stress conditions. This has important implications for emergency response strategies predicated on seeking to evacuate hot and humid mines. In response to these issues, a programme of research was defined, consisting of: a literature review; an audit of climatic conditions; laboratory investigations; and a programme of climatic chamber wearing trials. The wearing trial component of the programme, which involved volunteers being subject to controlled heat stress, was reviewed by and received the approval of HSE's Research Ethics Committee. This work has provided a wider base of fundamental knowledge on physiological response to the wearing of escape respiratory protective devices under hot and humid conditions, and contributes to available guidance on the selection and use of self-rescuers appropriate to prevailing deep mine environments in the UK.

  11. The Memory of North African Jews in the Diaspora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mechtild Gilzmer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the following contribution, I will approach in three steps the construction of memory by North-African Jews in the Diaspora. I will first trace the history and historiography of Jews in Arab countries and point out their characteristics. This will lead me to look more precisely at the concept of “Sephardic Jews,” its meaning and application as a key-notion in the memory building for Jews from Arab countries in the Diaspora nowadays. As literature and filmmaking hold a crucial role in the perception and transmission of memory, I will then present the works of two Jewish women artists, one living in France and the other living in Quebec, both with North African origins. I will try to show how they use the past for identity (de-construction and compare their approaches. I choose the two examples because they illustrate two extremely opposed positions concerning the role of cultural identity. Standing in the intersection of history and literary studies, my interdisciplinary work considers literary and film as memory archives and subjective representations of the past not as historical sources. In referring to Jews in Arab countries this means in my article more precisely to look at the North-African Jews.

  12. [Lay-rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)--controversies in emergency medicine: lay-rescuer CPR with or without mouth-to-mouth ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolcke, Benno

    2013-09-01

    An analysis of literature results reveals differences concerning the need for rescue breathing in lay-rescuer cardiopulmonary-resuscitation (CPR). Observational studies on large registries have shown improved survival rates with standard CPR (chest compressions and rescue breathing) compared to continuous chest compressions (CCC). This applies especially for cardiac arrests of non-cardiac origin or prolonged EMS-arrival times. In contrast a public program for lay-rescuers focusing on CCC lead to improved success rates of bystander-CPR, followed by improved survival rates. The 2010 ERC guidelines have resolved this controversy by integrating both aspects. CCC is recommended for everyone. Trained bystanders should use standard-CPR as method of choice. For dispatcher-assisted CPR the results are clear. Giving instructions for mouth-to-mouth ventilation is too complicated and time consuming, thus impairing survival rates. Therefore CCC is recommended for dispatcher-assisted CPR. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Major gene is responsible for anencephaly among Iranian Jews

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlotogora, J. [Hebrew Univ. Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel)

    1995-03-13

    Anencephaly is relatively frequent in Jews originating from Iran, in particular when its incidence is compared to that of open spina bifida in the same population (12 cases of anencephaly out of 14 cases of neural tube defects). The high incidence of this disorder in Iranian Jews, a relatively isolated community with a very high rate of consanguinity, suggests that anencephaly is caused by a major recessive gene. This possibility is supported by the sex ratio among these patients, which was significantly different from that observed for patients with anencephaly in other populations. 10 refs.

  14. Rescuer fatigue under the 2010 ERC guidelines, and its effect on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Catherine H; Heggie, James; Jones, Christopher M; Thorne, Christopher J; Hulme, Jonathan

    2013-08-01

    Updated life-support guidelines were published by the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) in 2010, increasing the required depth and rate of chest compression delivery. This study sought to determine the impact of these guidelines on rescuer fatigue and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performance. 62 Health science students performed 5 min of conventional CPR in accordance with the 2010 ERC guidelines. A SkillReporter manikin was used to objectively assess temporal change in determinants of CPR quality. Participants subjectively reported their end-fatigue levels, using a visual analogue scale, and the point at which they believed fatigue was affecting CPR delivery. 49 (79%) participants reported that fatigue affected their CPR performance, at an average of 167 s. End fatigue averaged 49.5/100 (range 0-95). The proportion of chest compressions delivered correctly decreased from 52% in min 1 to 39% in min 5, approaching significance (p=0.071). A significant decline in chest compressions reaching the recommended depth occurred between the first (53%) and fifth (38%) min (p=0.012). Almost half this decline (6%) was between the first and second minutes of CPR. Neither chest compression rate, nor rescue breath volume, were affected by rescuer fatigue. Fatigue affects chest compression delivery within the second minute of CPR under the 2010 ERC guidelines, and is poorly judged by rescuers. Rescuers should, therefore, be encouraged to interchange after 2 min of CPR delivery. Team leaders should be advised to not rely on rescuers to self-report fatigue, and should, instead, monitor for its effects.

  15. Recovery of rescuers from a 24-h shift and its association with aerobic fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katariina Lyytikäinen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Rescuers work in 24-h shifts and the demanding nature of the occupation requires adequate recovery between work shifts. The purpose of this study has been to find out what kind of changes in autonomic control may be seen during work shift and its recovery period in the case of rescuers. An additional interest has been to see if aerobic fitness is associated with recovery from work shifts. Material and Methods: Fourteen male rescuers (aged 34±9 years old volunteered to participate in the study. Heart rate variability (HRV was recorded for 96 h to study stress and recovery, from the beginning of a 24-h work shift to the beginning of the next shift. Aerobic fitness assessment included maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max estimation with a submaximal bicycle ergometer test. Salivary cortisol samples were collected 0 min, 15 min, and 30 min after awakening on the 3 resting days. Results: Some HRV parameters showed enhanced autonomic control after the work shift. Stress percentage decreased from the working day to the 2nd rest day (p 0.05. Cortisol awakening response was attenuated right after the work shift. Conclusions: The HRV findings show that recovery after a long work shift takes several days. Thus, rescuers should pay attention to sufficient recovery before the next work shift, and an integrated model of perceived and physiological measurements could be beneficial to assess cardiovascular strain among rescuers with long work shifts. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(3:433–444

  16. To Pay or Not to Pay’: WWI and WWII Reparations and their Impact on European (Dis)Integration

    OpenAIRE

    Paravantis, Spero

    2017-01-01

    Due to the separation between the historical and legal fields which have examined the issue of WWII reparations, no generally accepted definition of their current status exists either in the historical, legal or political spheres. This lack of clarity has greatly contributed to this issue remaining unresolved until the present. In his talk, Spero Paravantes looks at the way the issue was used by the Big Three in their dealings with each other after WWII. In light of the Greek government’s con...

  17. Jews and Cosmopolitanism: An Arc of European Thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marci Shore

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Isaac Deutscher, raised in his youth to be a Talmudic scholar, instead became a communist. In 1958, he addressed the World Jewish Congress on the topic of “The Non-Jewish Jew.” There was a Jewish tradition – Deutscher began, citing Spinoza and Marx, Freud and Luxemburg and Trotsky – of breaking with Jewish tradition. Jews had always been restless and rootless, always lived on the borders of various heritages, languages, and cultures, at once in and apart from society. Victimized by religious intolerance and nationalist sentiments, Jews longed for a universalist Weltanschauung. It is true that “non-Jewish Jews” played a disproportionate role in the history of European Marxism. Yet Jews’ contributions to Marxism might be understood in a larger context: namely, that “non-Jewish Jews” have played a disproportionate role in the intellectual history of modern Europe much more broadly. This essay is an attempt to place the relationship between Jews and Marxism in a larger context – less the larger sociological context than the larger intellectual context of European modernity.

  18. Fear of Crime among Elderly Jews in Boston and London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Yona

    1985-01-01

    Examines the impact of fear of crime on the daily behavior of elderly Jews in racially mixed, deteriorating neighborhoods in Boston and London. Results showed the Boston elderly retreated behind locked doors, while the London elderly continued their daily routine. (JAC)

  19. Results of Out-of-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest Cases with Intervention by Lay Rescuers and Emergency Health Workers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mehmet Murat Oktay; Behçet Al; Suat Zengin; Sener Cindoruk; Mustafa Sabak; Mustafa Bogan; Cuma Yildirim

    2016-01-01

    .... The time and location of the cardiac arrest, information regarding the lay rescuers and professional health workers, and the practices followed during transport and at the emergency service were examined...

  20. Results of Out-of-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest Cases with Intervention by Lay Rescuers and Emergency Health Workers: 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mehmet Murat Oktay; Behçet Al; Suat Zengin; Sener Cindoruk; Mustafa Sabak; Mustafa Bogan; Cuma Yildirim

    2016-01-01

    .... The time and location of the cardiac arrest, information regarding the lay rescuers and professional health workers, and the practices followed during transport and at the emergency service were examined...

  1. The Influence Paths of Emotion on the Occupational Safety of Rescuers Involved in Environmental Emergencies- Systematic Review Article

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Jintao; Yang, Naiding; Ye, Jinfu; Wu, Haoran

    2014-01-01

    ... of the rescuers involved in responding to them, by employing Pub Med, Science Direct, Web of Science, Google Scholar, CNKI and Scopus for required information with the several keywords "emergency rescue...

  2. Will medical examination gloves protect rescuers from defibrillation voltages during hands-on defibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Joseph L; Chapman, Fred W

    2012-12-01

    Continuing compressions during a defibrillation shock has been proposed as a method of reducing pauses in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) but the safety of this procedure is unproven. The medical examination gloves worn by rescuers play an important role in protecting the rescuer yet the electrical characteristics of these gloves are unknown. This study examined the response of medical examination gloves to defibrillation voltages. Part 1 of this study measured voltage-current curves for a small sample (8) of gloves. Part 2 tested more gloves (460) to determine the voltage required to produce a specific amount of current flow. Gloves were tested at two current levels: 0.1 mA and 10 mA. Testing included four glove materials (chloroprene, latex, nitrile, and vinyl) in a single layer and double-gloved. All gloves tested in part 1 allowed little current to flow (defibrillation voltage range. Also, 6 of 80 (7.5%) single gloves and 5 of 80 (6.2%) double gloves allowed over 10 mA. Few of the gloves tested limited the current to levels proven to be safe. A lack of sensation during hands-on defibrillation does not guarantee that a safety margin exists. As such, we encourage rescuers to minimize rather than eliminate the pause in compressions for defibrillation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Narrative Remembrance: Close Encounters Between Muslims and Jews in Morocco's Atlas Mountains

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Sarah Frances

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation examines twentieth-century Jewish-Muslim relations in Morocco’s Atlas Mountains through oral traditions (anecdotes, jokes, songs, poetry duels) as remembered by Muslims and Jews in the twenty-first century. Jews had lived in these predominantly Berber-speaking regions for over one thousand years; yet these rural Jewish communities had almost completely disappeared by the early 1960s, due to mass emigration, largely to Israel. Despite the totality of the rupture, Jews and Mus...

  4. Increased safety and tactical abilities of rescuers in liquidation of fires with high heat release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Тетяна Вікторівна Костенко

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Characteristic features of firefighters’ rescue work are risks for their lives because of possible explosions and collapses, danger of injuries, limited visual range or complete absence of visibility, high temperature and high humidity. Extinguishing fires in different weather conditions, the firefighters can be influenced by abrupt and repeated changes in ambient temperature. Close to the seat of fire the rescuer is exposed to powerful thermal radiation that makes it necessary to use personal individual thermal protection means. Fire units in Ukraine are equipped with heat-reflective and thermal protective suits, that have become outdated, with rather limited protective service life and don't ensure safety of firefighters during extinguishing fires and rescue operations under high temperature conditions. The drawbacks of these existing protective suits reduce the efficiency of the firefighters’ rescue work. That is why the improvement of individual thermal protection means will make it possible to increase the efficiency of work within the areas of high temperatures. The purpose of the work is to identify ways of upgrading the safety and tactical possibilities of emergency rescue operations under high temperature conditions. The article analyzes the working conditions of the rescuers, various types of thermal protection structural features and applying autonomic cooling elements, defines limiting values of heat flows and ambient air temperature. The surface layers of the protective clothing are of time and temperature limited utility. Analysis showed that the existing means of thermal protection are of limited usefulness and are too massive thus restraining the activities of firefighters. It has been concluded that it is possible to use water or foam forming composition from fire fighting systems for cooling the body and clothes of the rescuers. Following these recommendations may increase the tactical possibilities of rescue units in

  5. Offering Hospitality to Strangers: Hugo Grotius's Draft Regulations for the Jews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilde, M.

    2017-01-01

    In 1615, the States of Holland and West-Vriesland commissioned Hugo Grotius to draft a set of legal regulations for the Jews in their province. This article analyzes Grotius’s draft, entitled Remonstrance. It examines how Grotius understood and justified the rights of Jews and to what extent his

  6. Duration of ventilations during cardiopulmonary resuscitation by lay rescuers and first responders: relationship between delivering chest compressions and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beesems, Stefanie G.; Wijmans, Lizzy; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2013-01-01

    The 2010 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation allow 5 seconds to give 2 breaths to deliver sufficient chest compressions and to keep perfusion pressure high. This study aims to determine whether the recommended short interruption for ventilations by trained lay rescuers and first responders

  7. Russians, Jews, and Poles: Russification and Antisemitism 1881-1914

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodor R. Weeks

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Relations between Poles and Jews deteriorated significantly in the three decades leading up to World War I. Many reasons for this phenomenon can be given, for example: economic competition, a general atmosphere of acute nationalism, increased migration, perceived threats to traditional forms of life and religion. Exacerbating all of these factors, however, was the fact of Polish statelessness and the extreme sensitivity of Poles to perceived threats to their culture and nation. In particular within the Russian Empire, Poles perceived the very future of their nation at risk. In such circumstances the continued existence of Jewish cultural difference combined with the development of specifically Jewish forms of national awakening (e.g., the Bund and Zionism were understood by many in Polish society as ingratitude and collaboration with the Russian occupier

  8. Y chromosome evidence for a founder effect in Ashkenazi Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, Almut; Filon, Dvora; Faerman, Marina; Soodyall, Himla; Oppenheim, Ariella

    2005-03-01

    Recent genetic studies, based on Y chromosome polymorphic markers, showed that Ashkenazi Jews are more closely related to other Jewish and Middle Eastern groups than to their host populations in Europe. However, Ashkenazim have an elevated frequency of R-M17, the dominant Y chromosome haplogroup in Eastern Europeans, suggesting possible gene flow. In the present study of 495 Y chromosomes of Ashkenazim, 57 (11.5%) were found to belong to R-M17. Detailed analyses of haplotype structure, diversity and geographic distribution suggest a founder effect for this haplogroup, introduced at an early stage into the evolving Ashkenazi community in Europe. R-M17 chromosomes in Ashkenazim may represent vestiges of the mysterious Khazars.

  9. A Romanian Jew in Hollywood: Edward G. Robinson

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    Moldovan Raluca

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to investigate the contribution that actor Edward G. Robinson brought to the American film industry, beginning with his iconic role as gangster Little Caesar in Mervyn Le Roy’s 1931 production, and continuing with widely-acclaimed parts in classic film noirs such as Double Indemnity, The Woman in the Window and Scarlet Street. Edward G. Robinson was actually a Romanian Jew, born Emmanuel Goldenberg in Bucharest, in 1893, a relatively little known fact nowadays. By examining his biography, filmography and his best-known, most successful films (mentioned above, I show that Edward G. Robinson was one of classical Hollywood’s most influential actors; for instance, traits of his portrayal of Little Caesar (one of the very first American gangster films can be found in almost all subsequent cinematic gangster figures, from Scarface to Vito Corleone. In the same vein, the doomed noir characters he played in Fritz Lang’s The Woman in the Window and Scarlet Street are still considered by film critics today to be some of the finest, most nuanced examples of noir heroes. Therefore, the main body of my article will be dedicated to a more detailed analysis of these films, while the introductory section will trace his biography and discuss some of his better-known films, such as Confessions of a Nazi Spy and Key Largo. The present study highlights Edward G. Robinson’s merits and impact on the cinema industry, proving that this diminutive Romanian Jew of humble origins was indeed something of a giant during Hollywood’s classical era.

  10. Religion as culture: religious individualism and collectivism among american catholics, jews, and protestants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adam B; Hill, Peter C

    2007-08-01

    We propose the theory that religious cultures vary in individualistic and collectivistic aspects of religiousness and spirituality. Study 1 showed that religion for Jews is about community and biological descent but about personal beliefs for Protestants. Intrinsic and extrinsic religiosity were intercorrelated and endorsed differently by Jews, Catholics, and Protestants in a pattern that supports the theory that intrinsic religiosity relates to personal religion, whereas extrinsic religiosity stresses community and ritual (Studies 2 and 3). Important life experiences were likely to be social for Jews but focused on God for Protestants, with Catholics in between (Study 4). We conclude with three perspectives in understanding the complex relationships between religion and culture.

  11. Alyiah1 of Romanian Jews - socio-statistical facts (historical approach)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adina Babes

    2014-01-01

      This paper addresses the issue of alyiah of Romanian Jews to Israel, before and after its establishment It discusses the topic of emigration by analyzing the socio-political factors that determined...

  12. The Roman Catholic Church, the Holocaust, and the demonization of the Jews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertzer, David I.

    2015-01-01

    Following eleven years’ work, in 1998 a high-level Vatican commission instituted by Pope John Paul II offered what has become the official position of the Roman Catholic Church denying any responsibility for fomenting the kind of demonization of the Jews that made the Holocaust possible. In a 2001 book, The popes against the Jews, I demonstrated that in fact the church played a major role in leading Catholics throughout Europe to view Jews as an existential threat. Yet defenders of the church position continue to deny the historical evidence and to launch ferocious ad hominem attacks against scholars who have researched the subject. The anti-Semitism promulgated by the church can be seen as part of the long battle it waged against modernity, with which the Jews were identified. PMID:27011787

  13. GENETIC DIASPORA: Producing Knowledge of Genes and Jews in Rural South Africa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    TAMARKIN, NOAH

    2014-01-01

    After Lemba South Africans participated in genetic tests that aimed to demonstrate their ancient links to contemporary Jewish populations, American Jews began to visit the Lemba to connect with them...

  14. Rescuer-limited cardiopulmonary resuscitation as an alternative to 2-min switched CPR in the setting of inhospital cardiac arrest: a randomised cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Choong Hyun; Cho, Gyu Chong; Ahn, Jung Hwan; Park, Yoo Seok; Lee, Chang Hee

    2015-07-01

    The 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) recommend that chest compression be rotated every 2 min to prevent rescuer fatigue. However, the quality of chest compression using 2-min switched CPR tends to decrease rapidly due to rescuer fatigue. We aimed to compare the effectiveness of use of 2-min switched CPR and rescuer-limited CPR (the person performing compressions is allowed to switch with another rescuer prior to 2 min if feeling fatigued) in the setting of inhospital cardiac arrest. Using a randomised cross-over trial design, 90 medical students were grouped into pairs to perform four cycles of 2-min switched CPR and rescuer-limited CPR (495 s per technique). During each trial, the total number of compressions performed, mean depth of compression and proportion of effective compressions performed (compression depth >5 mm) were recorded for identification of significant differences and changes in pulse rate and RR were measured to determine the extent of exhaustion. Compared with 2-min switched CPR, the mean compression was deeper (51 vs 47 mm, pCPR. Subgroup analysis by 30-s unit showed more consistent compression quality during rescuer-limited CPR. No significant differences in change in pulse rate and RR were found between the two techniques. Rescuer-limited CPR yields a greater number of effective compressions and more consistent quality of CPR than 2-min switched CPR. Rescuer-limited CPR might be a suitable alternative for treating inhospital cardiac arrest. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Comparison of the quality of basic life support provided by rescuers trained using the 2005 or 2010 ERC guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Christopher M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Effective delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and prompt defibrillation following sudden cardiac arrest (SCA is vital. Updated guidelines for adult basic life support (BLS were published in 2010 by the European Resuscitation Council (ERC in an effort to improve survival following SCA. There has been little assessment of the ability of rescuers to meet the standards outlined within these new guidelines. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of the performance of first year healthcare students trained and assessed using either the new 2010 ERC guidelines or their 2005 predecessor, within the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom. All students were trained as lay rescuers during a standardised eight hour ERC-accredited adult BLS course. Results We analysed the examination records of 1091 students. Of these, 561 were trained and assessed using the old 2005 ERC guidelines and 530 using the new 2010 guidelines. A significantly greater proportion of candidates failed in the new guideline group (16.04% vs. 11.05%; p  Conclusions The new ERC guidelines lead to a greater proportion of lay rescuers performing chest compressions at an erroneously fast rate and may therefore worsen BLS efficacy. Additional study is required in order to define the clinical impact of compressions performed to a greater depth and at too fast a rate.

  16. WWII GI Bill and Its Effect on Low Education Levels: Did the World War II GI Bill Have an Effect on High School Completion, Poverty, and Employment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Megan D.

    2017-01-01

    Did the World War II (WWII) GI Bill increase the probability of completing high school and further affect the probability of poverty and employment for the cohorts for whom it benefited? This paper studies whether the GI Bill, one of the largest public financial aid policies for education, affected low education levels in addition to its…

  17. Historical Trends in Educational Decentralization in the United States and Developing Countries: A Periodization and Comparison in the Post-WWII Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D. Brent, Jr.; DeMatthews, Davis E.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we fill a gap in the writing on the decentralization of educational governance by periodizing and comparing trends that have fallen under this label in both the United States and developing countries in the post-WWII period (1945-present). The findings are informed by a review of 127 decentralization-related studies from seven…

  18. The Start of the Jews Rescue Campaign by the Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky in August 1942

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skira, Yu. R.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Start of the campaign for the rescue of the Jews by the Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky in August 1942 is studied in the article. The author begins with an analysis of the August campaign in 1942 as a massive Holocaust of Lvivʼs Jewish community. He focuses on the fact that a foreboding of imminent catastrophe felt by some Jews led them, in despair, to address the Head of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church. A visit of Rabbis Dawid Kahane and Kalman Chameides started the campaign for the rescue of Jewish children from Lviv Ghetto. Active rescue efforts regarding adult Jews were made during the August operation. Some sources allow us to assert that sheltering the Jews in cellars of St. Georgeʼs Cathedral architectural complex was not a one-time act of commitment but an ongoing rescue operation under conditions of growing genocide. Events that took place in August 1942 became the turning point for Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky and Lviv Jews and their relationship, since they started the process of rescuing people deprived of the right to live by the Nazis. This rescuing campaign developed during the following months of autumn 1942.

  19. Perceptions of dual identity and separate groups among secular and religious Israeli Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizman, A; Yinon, Y

    2000-10-01

    The authors examined the effects of perceptions of dual identity and separate groups on tendencies to handle intergroup conflict through problem solving and contention. Among secular Israeli Jews, regression analyses revealed a significant interaction between perceptions of dual identity and perceptions of separate groups: Only under high perception of dual identity was the perception of separate groups associated with contention. Among religious Israeli Jews, problem solving and contention were unrelated to either dual identity or to perceptions of separate groups. The results are discussed in terms of the common ingroup identity model (S. L. Gaertner, M. C. Rust, J. F. Dovidio, B. A. Bachman, & P. A. Anastasio, 1994) and in the context of the conflict between religious and secular Jews in Israel.

  20. Depression stigma and treatment preferences among Orthodox and non-Orthodox Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, David E; Kanter, Jonathan W; Pirutinsky, Steven; Murphy, Joseph; Rosmarin, David H; Rosmain, David H

    2014-07-01

    Anecdotal reports of increased stigma toward mental illness among Orthodox Jews seems to conflict with an existing literature describing less stigmatization toward depression among Jewish individuals. This online survey study investigated stigma toward depression and treatment preference among Orthodox and non-Orthodox Jews (N = 391). All participants were presented with a depression vignette to assess for stigma and then randomized to a vignette depicting a treatment modality (behaviorally oriented or insight oriented) to assess for treatment preference across several delivery options (individual, group, or Internet). Results indicated elevated depression stigma among Orthodox Jews as expressed by elevated levels of secrecy, treatment-seeking stigma, family/marriage stigma, and stigmatizing experiences, but not attitudinal social distancing. No group differences were found with respect to overall treatment preference, treatment modality, or manner of delivery. Overall, participants preferred individual therapy more than group and Internet therapy and preferred group therapy more than Internet therapy. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

  1. Victoria Khiterer. Jewish City or Inferno of Russian Israel? A History of the Jews in Kiev Before February 1917.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly St. Julian-Varnon

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Book review of Victoria Khiterer. Jewish City or Inferno of Russian Israel? A History of the Jews in Kiev Before February 1917. Academic Studies Press, 2016. Jews of Russia and Eastern Europe and Their Legacy, series editor, Maxim D. Shrayer. xx, 474 pp. Illustrations. Tables. Maps. Appendix. Bibliography. Index. $89.00, cloth.

  2. The algorithm of the formation and realization of the individually oriented physical preparedness of the future rescuers at the stages of studying at high military educational institution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonshovsky V.M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical and empiric facts for the projecting of the technology of the individualization of physical preparedness of the rescuers while studying at high military educational institution were studied. The algorithm of the formation and realization of the corresponding content was worked out. The facts concerning the principles of projecting of pedagogical technology, theory of adaptation, theory and methodology of physical education of students, specificity of professional activity of rescuers were used. The sequence and content of the projecting actions were set, realization of which will promote the formation of the effective physical preparedness in the solving tasks of the physical and military-professional preparedness of the future rescuers with different somatotypes at the stages of education.

  3. CPR PRO® device reduces rescuer fatigue during continuous chest compression cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomized crossover trial using a manikin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovic, Ivor; Lulic, Dinka; Lulic, Ileana

    2013-10-01

    The performance of high-quality chest compressions with minimal interruptions is one of the most important elements of the "Chain of Survival." To evaluate the impact of a novel CPR PRO(®) (CPRO) device for manual chest compression on rescuer fatigue, pain, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality. Randomized crossover trial of 24 health care professionals performing continuous chest compression CPR for 10 min with a CPRO device and conventional manual CPR (MCPR). Data about chest compressions were recorded using a manikin. Rescuers' physiologic signs were recorded before and after each session, and heart rate (HR) data were tracked continuously. Fatigue was assessed with ratings of perceived exertion, and pain questionnaire. All subjects completed 10 min of CPR with both methods. Significantly more rest breaks were taken during MCPR sessions (1.7 ± 2 vs. 0.21 ± 0.72). Subjects' perceived exertion was higher after MCPR, as well as the average (120.7 ± 16.8 vs. 110.8 ± 17.6) and maximal HR (134.3 ± 18.5 vs. 123.42 ± 16.5) during testing. Subjects reported more pain in the hands, especially the wrist, after performing MCPR. Average depth of compressions was higher with the CPRO device (4.6 ± 7.0 vs. 4.3 ± 7.9) and declined more slowly over time. Other CPR quality parameters, such as the correct position and complete release of pressure, were also better for CPRO CPR. CPRO device reduces rescuer fatigue and pain during continuous chest compression CPR, which results in a higher quality of CPR in a simulation setting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Extendiendo las capacidades del robot RESCUER en ROS : planificación, navegación y simulación.

    OpenAIRE

    León Pérez, Julio Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Treball Final de Màster Universitari en Sistemes Intel·ligents. Codi: SIE043. Curs: 2014/2015 RESCUER es un modelo de robot fabricado por la empresa Robotnik. La Universitat Jaume I cuenta con un modelo de este tipo. RESCUER está formado por una base móvil y un brazo articulado (ver Figura 1.1). La base está traccionada por cadenas, lo que habilita al robot para moverse por terrenos irregulares e incluso subir y bajar escaleras. El robot no tiene montado ningún manipulador ...

  5. Collective Memories of WWII Collaboration in Belgium and Attitudes About Amnesty in the Two Main Linguistic Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura De Guissmé

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Collaboration with the Nazi occupier during WWII has always been a topic of dissent between French-speakers (FS and Dutch-speakers (DS in Belgium. According to a popular myth coined after the war and often narrated in the media and literature, collaboration was widespread in Flanders, whereas Walloons bravely resisted, although historical reality is much more nuanced. These representations regularly resurface in political debates surrounding the Belgian linguistic conflict. Demands for amnesty addressed by nationalist Flemish parties are a case in point. A questionnaire survey (N = 521; 315 FS and 206 DS showed that collaboration was represented negatively and was morally condemned in both groups. However, DS expressed more Support for Amnesty (SA than FS. This effect of Linguistic Group (LG on SA was mediated by judgment of morality of collaboration, and this mediation was moderated by identification with the LG. Interestingly, SA was predicted by judgments of morality of DS, but not of FS, collaborators, in both groups, as if francophone collaboration was deemed irrelevant. Results suggest that differences between DS and FS in political position taking regarding the granting of amnesty are partly due to differences in representations of collaboration, and to different perspectives towards the same historical representation. The myth is both shared and disputed.

  6. In-situ corrosion measurements of WWII shipwrecks in Chuuk Lagoon, quantification of decay mechanisms and rates of deterioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Donald Macleod

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on a series of measurements taken on WWII historic shipwrecks that resulted from the effects of Operation Hailstone in February 1944 on the Japanese merchant fleet which was assembled in Chuuk lagoon, Federated States of Micronesia. More than 65 shipwrecks and 250 aircraft were sunk during two main bombing raids. The vessels lost covered a wide range of underwater orientation and water depths and so provided a perfect suite of corrosion experiments. Since the fuel on board the aircraft was either readily burnt at the time or was lost through volatilisation, the wrecked planes present no pollution problems today. However the bunker fuel kept inside on-board storage tanks does present a real conservation management crisis. In-situ measurements on many vessels have determined how water depth, the localised wreck topography, dissolved oxygen levels, temperature and salinity affects the corrosion rate of cast iron and mild steel. Thus corrosion rates can be calculated with confidence.

  7. Increased inequality in mortality from road crashes among Arabs and Jews in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magid, Avi; Leibovitch-Zur, Shalhevet; Baron-Epel, Orna

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in several countries have shown that the economically disadvantaged seem to have a greater risk of being involved in a car crash. The aim of the present study was to compare rates and trends in mortality and injury from road crashes by age among the Arab and Jewish populations in Israel. Data on road crashes with casualties (2003-2011) from the Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics were analyzed. Age-adjusted road crash injury rates and mortality rates for 2003 to 2011 were calculated and time trends for each age group and population group are presented. Time trend significance was evaluated by linear regression models. Arabs in Israel are at increased risk of injury and mortality from road crashes compared to Jews. Road crash injury rates have significantly decreased in both populations over the last decade, although the rates have been persistently higher among Arabs. Road crash mortality rates have also decreased significantly in the Jewish population but not in the Arab population. This implies an increase in the disparity in mortality between Jews and Arabs. The most prominent differences in road crash injury and mortality rates between Arabs and Jews can be observed in young adults and young children. The reduction in road crashes in the last decade is a positive achievement. However, the reductions are not equal among Arabs and Jews in Israel. Therefore, an increase in the disparities in mortality from road crashes is apparent. Public health efforts need to focus specifically on decreasing road crashes in the Arab community.

  8. Still Wandering: The Exclusion of Jews from Issues of Social Justice and Multicultural Thought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Dan Ian

    2013-01-01

    Anti-Semitism, prejudice, and discrimination against Jewish people are still largely absent from the study of social justice issues and multicultural education at the university level. Although often seen as being White, Jews are still discriminated against, with current reports showing that acts of anti-Semitism have been at their highest levels…

  9. The Poles, the Jews and the Holocaust: Reflections on an AME Trip to Auschwitz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    Two trips to Auschwitz (in 1989 and 2003) provide a context for reflection on fundamental issues in civic and moral education. Custodians of the Auschwitz historical site are currently aware of its responsibility to humanity to educate about the genocide against the Jews, as a morally distinct element in its presentation of Nazi crimes at…

  10. Consanguinity, intracommunity and intercommunity marriages in a population sample of Israeli Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, T; Vardi-Saliternik, R; Friedlander, Y

    2004-01-01

    Changes in the marriage patterns of Israeli Jews have been associated with the mass immigration of Jews from many countries over a relatively short period of time. This study seeks to document consanguineous, intracommunity and intercommunity marriage patterns, and to observe the changes that have occurred over time, and in relation to the level of education and religiousness. During 1990-1992, 4388 Jewish women were interviewed after delivery in maternity wards throughout Israel. Demographic information was received, with special emphasis on country of origin, community and consanguinity of the couples and their parents. The consanguinity rate among the couples was 2.3%, including 0.8% first cousin marriages, with the highest consanguinity rate among Eastern Jews (7.1%). The rate of intracommunity marriages was 64% (25% Ashkenazim, 22% Sephardim and 17% Eastern Jews). The rate of intercommunity marriages was lowest among Ashkenazim. It rose with the level of education and inversely to the degree of religiousness. Over the past decades there has been a decline in consanguineous and intracommunity marriage rates and an increase in intercommunity marriages. Immigrant and ultraorthodox women tended to marry within the community as opposed to Israeli-born women and those with higher educational level who tended to intermarry with other communities as well.

  11. Education and age affect skill acquisition and retention in lay rescuers after a European Resuscitation Council CPR/AED course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalexopoulou, Konstantina; Chalkias, Athanasios; Dontas, Ioannis; Pliatsika, Paraskevi; Giannakakos, Charalampos; Papapanagiotou, Panagiotis; Aggelina, Afroditi; Moumouris, Theodoros; Papadopoulos, Georgios; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    To examine whether education and age affect skill acquisition and retention in lay rescuers after a European Resuscitation Council (ERC) CPR/AED course. Because of the importance of bystander CPR/AED skills in the setting of cardiac arrest, acquisition and retention of resuscitation skills has gained a great amount of interest. The ERC CPR/AED course format for written and practical evaluation was used. Eighty lay people were trained and evaluated at the end of the course, as well as at one, three, and six months. Retention of CPR/AED skills improved over time, recording the lowest practical scores at one month after initial training and the lowest written scores at initial training. In practical evaluation scores, when examined longitudinally, age presented a significant adverse effect and higher background education presented a non-significant positive effect. Moreover, regarding written evaluation scores, when examined longitudinally, education presented a significant positive effect while age did not significantly correlate with written scores. Education and age affected retention of CPR/AED skills in lay rescuers. Also, our results suggest that the ERC CPR/AED course format may be poorly designed to discriminate between participants with different levels of practical and written resuscitation skills and merit a thorough investigation in future studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Soaring on the wings of the wind: Freud, Jews and Judaism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Robert

    2009-08-01

    This paper looks at Freud's Jewish identity in the context of the Jewish experience in Eastern and Central Europe after 1800, using his family history and significant figures in his life as illustration. Sigmund Freud's life as a Jew is deeply paradoxical, if not enigmatic. He mixed almost exclusively with Jews while living all his life in an anti-Semitic environment. Yet he eschewed Jewish ritual, referred to himself as a godless Jew and sought to make his movement acceptable to gentiles. At the end of his life, dismayed by the rising forces of nationalism, he accepted that he was in his heart a Jew "in spite of all efforts to be unprejudiced and impartial". The 18th century Haskalla (Jewish Enlightenment) was a form of rebellion against conformity and a means of escape from shtetl life. In this intense, entirely inward means of intellectual escape and revolt against authority, strongly tinged with sexual morality, we see the same tensions that were to manifest in the publication by a middle-aged Viennese neurologist of a truly revolutionary book to herald the new 20th century: The Interpretation of Dreams. Freud's life and work needs to be understood in the context of fin-de-siecle Vienna. Mitteleuropa, the cultural renaissance of Central Europe, resulted from the emancipation and urbanization of the burgeoning Jewish middle class, who adopted to the cosmopolitan environment more successfully than any other group. In this there is an extreme paradox: the Jewish success in Vienna was a tragedy of success. Freud, despite a deliberate attempt to play down his Jewish origins to deflect anti-Semitic attacks, is the most representative Jew of his time and his thinking and work represents the finest manifestation of the Litvak mentality.

  13. Local lay rescuers with AEDs, alerted by text messages, contribute to early defibrillation in a Dutch out-of-hospital cardiac arrest dispatch system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Jolande A.; Stieglis, Remy; Riedijk, Frank; Smeekes, Martin; van der Worp, Wim E.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2014-01-01

    Public access defibrillation rarely reaches out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients in residential areas. We developed a text message (TM) alert system, dispatching local lay rescuers (TM-responders). We analyzed the functioning of this system, focusing on response times and early

  14. Francesca Bregoli, Mediterranean Enlightenment. Livornese Jews, Tuscan Culture, and Eighteenth-Century Reform (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Tani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of the following book: Francesca Bregoli, Mediterranean Enlightenment. Livornese Jews, Tuscan Culture, and Eighteenth-Century Reform (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2014, ISBN 9780804791595

  15. Yiddish Language and Ashkenazic Jews: A Perspective from Culture, Language, and Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aptroot, Marion

    2016-07-02

    The typology of Yiddish and the name Ashkenaz cannot serve as arguments to support the theory put forward by Das et al. (2016) (Localizing Ashkenazic Jews to primeval villages in the ancient Iranian lands of Ashkenaz. Genome Biol Evol 8:1132-1149.) that the origin of Ashkenazic Jews can be located in ancient Iran. Yiddish is a Germanic, not a Slavic language. The history of the use of the term Ashkenaz from the Middle Ages onward is well documented. Ashkenazic Jewry is named for the Hebrew and Yiddish designation for Germany, originally a Biblical term. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. Uncovering the Italian Muscle Jew: from Zionist Gymnastics to Fascist Boxing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Levis Sullam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article I examine the presence and influence among Italian Jews of Max Nordau’s image of the “muscle Jew” and more broadly of a virile imaginary, intertwined with Zionist and Italian nationalist ideas. I first document the relevance of an early phase of Italian muscular Judaism at the beginning of the twentieth century, at the time of the rise of Zionism in Italy. I then study the development, in the 1920s and 1930s, of a virile imagery among the two trends of Italian revisionist Zionism and of what we may call Italian Jewish Fascism. I end by asking whether there were not inherent contradictions, or at least relevant tensions, in the ideal of the muscle Jew, between radical nationalism and Jewish forms of virility, as developed after the First world war and in connection with the rise and stabilization of Fascism.

  17. Portuguese crypto-Jews: the genetic heritage of a complex history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueiro, Inês; Teixeira, João C.; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor; Alvarez, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The first documents mentioning Jewish people in Iberia are from the Visigothic period. It was also in this period that the first documented anti-Judaic persecution took place. Other episodes of persecution would happen again and again during the long troubled history of the Jewish people in Iberia and culminated with the Decrees of Expulsion and the establishment of the Inquisition: some Jews converted to Catholicism while others resisted and were forcedly baptized, becoming the first Iberian Crypto-Jews. In the 18th century the official discrimination and persecution carried out by the Inquisition ended and several Jewish communities emerged in Portugal. From a populational genetics point of view, the worldwide Diaspora of contemporary Jewish communities has been intensely studied. Nevertheless, very little information is available concerning Sephardic and Iberian Crypto-Jewish descendants. Data from the Iberian Peninsula, the original geographic source of Sephardic Jews, is limited to two populations in Portugal, Belmonte, and Bragança district, and the Chueta community from Mallorca. Belmonte was the first Jewish community studied for uniparental markers. The construction of a reference model for the history of the Portuguese Jewish communities, in which the genetic and classical historical data interplay dynamically, is still ongoing. Recently an enlarged sample covering a wide region in the Northeast Portugal was undertaken, allowing the genetic profiling of male and female lineages. A Jewish specific shared female lineage (HV0b) was detected between the community of Belmonte and Bragança. In contrast to what was previously described as a hallmark of the Portuguese Jews, an unexpectedly high polymorphism of lineages was found in Bragança, showing a surprising resistance to the erosion of genetic diversity typical of small-sized isolate populations, as well as signs of admixture with the Portuguese host population. PMID:25699075

  18. PORTUGUESE CRYPTO-JEWS: THE GENETIC HERITAGE OF A COMPLEX HISTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Pires Nogueiro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The first documents mentioning Jewish people in Iberia are from the Visigothic period. It was also in this period that the first documented anti-Judaic persecution took place. Other episodes of persecution would happen again and again during the long troubled history of the Jewish people in Iberia and culminated with the Decrees of Expulsion and the establishment of the Inquisition: some Jews converted to Catholicism while others resisted and were forcedly baptized, becoming the first Iberian Crypto-Jews. In the 18th century the official discrimination and persecution carried out by the Inquisition ended and several Jewish communities emerged in Portugal. From a populational genetics point of view, the worldwide Diaspora of contemporary Jewish communities has been intensely studied. Nevertheless, very little information is available concerning Sephardic and Iberian Crypto-Jewish descendants. Data from the Iberian Peninsula, the original geographic source of Sephardic Jews, is limited to two populations in Portugal, Belmonte and Bragança district, and the Chueta community from Mallorca. Belmonte was the first Jewish community studied for uniparental markers. The construction of a reference model for the history of the Portuguese Jewish communities, in which the genetic and classical historical data interplay dynamically, is still ongoing. Recently an enlarged sample covering a wide region in the Northeast Portugal was undertaken, allowing the genetic profiling of male and female lineages. A Jewish specific shared female lineage (HV0b was detected between the community of Belmonte and Bragança. In contrast to what was previously described as a hallmark of the Portuguese Jews, an unexpectedly high polymorphism of lineages’ was found in Bragança, showing a surprising resistance to the erosion of genetic diversity typical of small-sized isolate populations, as well as signs of admixture with the Portuguese host population.

  19. Persistent high rates of smoking among Israeli Arab males with concomitant decrease among Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron-Epel, Orna; Keinan-Boker, Lital; Weinstein, Ruth; Shohat, Tamy

    2010-12-01

    During the last few decades much effort has been invested into lowering smoking rates due to its heavy burden on the population's health and on costs for the health care services. To compare trends in smoking rates between adult Arab men and Jewish men and women during 2000-2008. Six random telephone surveys were conducted by the Israel Center for Disease Control in 2000-2008 to investigate smoking rates. The number of respondents was 24,976 Jewish men and women and 2564 Arab men. The percent of respondents reporting being current smokers was calculated for each population group (Jews and Arabs) by age, gender and education, and were studied in relation to time. Among Jewish men aged 21-64 smoking declined during 2000-2008 by about 3.5%. In the 21-44 age group this decline occurred only among respondents with an academic education. Among Jewish women this decline also occurred at ages 21-64, and in the 45-64 age group this decline was due only to a decline in smoking among those with an academic education. Among Arab men aged 21-64 an increase in smoking rates of about 6.5% was observed among both educated and less educated respondents. Smoking prevalence is declining in Israel among Jews, but not among Arab men. The larger decrease in smoking rates among academics will, in the future, add to the inequalities in health between the lower and higher socioeconomic status groups and between Arabs and Jews. This calls for tailored interventions among the less educated Jews and all Arab men.

  20. The Threat from Within: American Jews, the State of Israel, and Intermarriage

    OpenAIRE

    Minkin, Sarah Anne

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates how dominant American Jewish organizations seek to construct a collective Jewish identity that focuses on and advocates for the state of Israel. While the state of Israel has long been at the center of Jewish collective identity, there has been increasing fragmentation among American Jews with regard to Israel over the last several years. It is within this shifting, unstable dynamic that the dominant Jewish organizations cultivate Jewish collectivity, explicitly constr...

  1. A comparison between over-the-head and lateral cardiopulmonary resuscitation with a single rescuer by bag-valve mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Ebrahim; Nasiri, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Context: mask fixation in the lateral position is difficult during CPR. Aim: the aim of this study is to compare the lateral CPR for the use of bag-valve mask by single paramedic rescuer as well as over-the-head CPR on the chest compression and ventilation on the manikin. Settings and Design: Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. The design of this study was a randomized cross-over trial. Methods: participants learned a standardized theoretical introduction CPR according to the 2010 guidelines. The total number of chest compressions per two minutes was measured. Total number of correct and wrong ventilation per two minutes was evaluated. Statistical Analysis: we used Wilcoxon signed-rank test to analyze the non-normally distributed data in dependence groups A. P-value of more than 0.05 was considered to show statistical significance. Results: there were 100 participants (45 women and 55 men) who participated in the study from September to March, 2011. The compression and ventilation rate in lateral CPR was lower than OTH CPR. Around 51% of participants had correct chest compression rate more than 90 beats per minute in lateral CPR and 65% of them had equal or more than ten correct ventilations per minute. Conclusions: in conclusion, this study confirmed that in a simulated CPR model over-the-head position CPR led to a better BLS than the lateral position CPR by a single paramedic student with a BVM device. We also concluded that by this new BVM fixation method on the face of the patients in the lateral position CPR can be a good alternative over-the-head mask fixation by a single trained rescuer. PMID:24665237

  2. A genetic contribution from the Far East into Ashkenazi Jews via the ancient Silk Road.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiao-Yang; Wang, Hua-Wei; Li, Yu-Chun; Zhang, Wen; Yao, Yong-Gang; van Straten, Jits; Richards, Martin B; Kong, Qing-Peng

    2015-02-11

    Contemporary Jews retain a genetic imprint from their Near Eastern ancestry, but obtained substantial genetic components from their neighboring populations during their history. Whether they received any genetic contribution from the Far East remains unknown, but frequent communication with the Chinese has been observed since the Silk Road period. To address this issue, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation from 55,595 Eurasians are analyzed. The existence of some eastern Eurasian haplotypes in eastern Ashkenazi Jews supports an East Asian genetic contribution, likely from Chinese. Further evidence indicates that this connection can be attributed to a gene flow event that occurred less than 1.4 kilo-years ago (kya), which falls within the time frame of the Silk Road scenario and fits well with historical records and archaeological discoveries. This observed genetic contribution from Chinese to Ashkenazi Jews demonstrates that the historical exchange between Ashkenazim and the Far East was not confined to the cultural sphere but also extended to an exchange of genes.

  3. Depression among Arabs and Jews in Israel: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Giora; Glasser, Saralee; Murad, Havi; Atamna, Ahmed; Alpert, Gershon; Goldbourt, Uri; Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra

    2010-10-01

    Depression is the second most common chronic disorder seen by primary care physicians. Risk factors associated with depression include medical and psychosocial factors. While in Israel, the rate and risk factors for depression are considered similar to those in other Western countries, population-based data are limited. The present study aims to estimate the prevalence of depression among Jews and Muslim Arabs, and to consider possible associations with demographic, socioeconomic, and health factors. The study group (N = 872) was equally divided according to ethnicity, gender, and age group. Depression was measured by the Harvard Department of Psychiatry National Depression Screening Day Scale (HANDS). The rate of depression scores in the likely/very likely range was 2.5 times higher among Arabs than among Jews (24.9 vs. 10.6%; P Arabs and Jews were maintained after controlling for confounding variables, except that when controlling for education, the difference between the ethnic groups was no longer significant. After adjusting for all variables in the analysis, no significant association remained between ethnicity and depression (OR = 0.80; 95% CI = 0.45-1.40).

  4. Three Jews in Günter Grass' novel The Tin Drum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zobenica Nikolina N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the novel The Tin Drum (Die Blechtrommel, 1959 Günter Grass depicts three periods of German history: pre-war time, World War II, and post-war time. In all the segments of the novel, there is a Jewish character: in the first part it is the toy dealer, Sigismund Markus; in the second, Mr Feingold; and in the third it is Ferdinand Schmuh. The aim of this paper is to determine similarities and differences among these characters, bearing in mind the changes in socio-political situation, as well as the status of Jews in the world of petite bourgeoisie. Sigismund Markus was in love with Oskar's mother, and he was loyal to her, even though she was cheating her husband with another man. He warned her of the changing circumstances and he himself decided to get baptised, in order to survive in the new society. However, he was attacked in Crystal Night then he killed himself in order to avoid the destiny which the Nazis have planned for him. The second Jew in the novel is a survivor, Mr Feingold. Although his entire family has been killed in the concentration camp Treblinka, he is eager to help and to protect Maria, Oskar and Kurt. He helps Oskar during the fever and eventually proposes to Maria, but Maria is now ready to leave Gdansk, so Mr Feingold was turned down, just like Markus few years back. Symbolically, the devoted love of the Jews for the Germans and for Gdansk has been refused, as well as hope for a fresh start for the Jews and Germans. While Markus and Feingold show love and respect for women and understanding for Oskar, Schmuh is embittered because Germans have not learnt to mourn and are incapable of crying. He is giving them an opportunity to learn it by serving them onions which makes them shed tears and open their hearts. However, this is only temporary; they do not really change; so Schmuh vents his negative feelings in cursing toilet women and regularly killing twelve sparrows in an afternoon. As he once exaggerated and killed one

  5. Memorialization, Graffiti and Artifact Movement: A Case Study of Cultural Impacts on WWII Underwater Cultural Heritage in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Jennifer F.

    2015-04-01

    Cultural tourism in the Pacific has always offered an underwater option for those who snorkel or are certified to dive. In addition to the coral reefs and marine life, World War II (WWII) shipwrecks, aircraft wrecks and other submerged vehicles draw hundreds of tourists to the Pacific each year. While it is encouraging that so many are interested in the cultural heritage of battlefields, these same visitors can cause considerable amounts of damage. This paper presents a case study of cultural impacts on submerged WWII sites in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) where diving heritage tourism is a growing industry. Cultural impacts in the CNMI include a diverse range of direct and indirect impacts including vandalism, the act of memorialization, looting and collecting souvenirs, anchor and mooring damage, and moving artifacts. What is often viewed as detrimental cultural impacts by archaeologists and managers can also be examined as behavior that reflects various stakeholders' values and attitudes towards heritage sites. As such, these behaviors can and should be examined and considered concurrently during research and management discussions.

  6. The determination of efficiency of a special obstacle course for training of cadets and rescuers of Public Service of Ukraine on emergency situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olexandr Baybak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine directions of the improvement of the educational and training process of cadets and retraining of rescuers of Public Service of Ukraine on emergency situations (PSES for carrying out the search-rescue works in highlands. Material & Methods: the contingent – cadets (25, rescuers (25 and officers (25 of Public Services of Ukraine on emergency situations took part in the research. The following methods are used for the solution of objectives: the theoretical analysis and generalization of scientific and methodical literature, pedagogical methods of research (poll and questioning. Results: the main requirements to a special obstacle course were defined on the basis of studying and analysis of biographical particulars with the purpose of the improvement of rescuers of PSES for carrying out the search-rescue works (SRW during the emergency situations (ES of a natural character. Conclusions: the need of modeling of weather conditions on a special obstacle course is defined for the purpose of the improvement of the level of preparedness of staff of the search-rescue groups in highlands.

  7. PTSD, burnout and well-being among rescue workers: Seeking to understand the impact of the European refugee crisis on rescuers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzea, Vasiliki-Eirini; Sifaki-Pistolla, Dimitra; Vlachaki, Sofia-Aikaterini; Melidoniotis, Evangelos; Pistolla, Georgia

    2017-09-12

    Individuals who perform rescue and recovery duties, as part of their daily work activities, confront diverse stressors that can affect their mental state and overall well-being. The study aimed to assess the prevalence and the factors associated with self-assessed PTSD, perceived well-being and burnout among rescue workers operating at Lesvos during the European refugees crisis. 217 rescuers participated in the study, while the PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C), the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and the Well-being Index (WHO-5) were utilized. The prevalence of self-assessed PTSD and perceived burnout syndrome was 17.1% and 57% respectively, while 72.8% of the rescuers reported low levels of perceived well-being. Self-assessed PTSD was positively correlated with perceived burnout and inversely correlated with perceived well-being. Perceived burnout was also inversely correlated with perceived well-being. A number of significant predictors were identified for self-assessed PTSD, perceived burnout and well-being, including: family status, age, duration of shifts, collection of dead adults or dead children bodies. The impact of the refugee crisis is visible on the rescue workers that offer rescue and first aid services. There is an urgent need for implementing effective interventions focusing on the identified determinants in order to enhance the occupational psychological burden of rescuers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Imaginary Jews and True Confessions: Ethnicity, Lyricism, and John Berryman's Dream Songs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Gross

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Berryman was fascinated with the figure of "the imaginary Jew." The phrase is the title of his first short story, it recurs in The Dream Songs, and it was to have been the topic of the final chapter of his autobiographical novel Recovery. Critics have not treated Berryman's "imaginary Jew" kindly. Early critics saw prosopopoeia as uncongenial to the confessional project. More recent critics see the figure as a misappropriation of Jewish identity. Berryman, however, did not want to pass himself off as Jewish; he invented the figure to expose the anti-Semitism of Eliot and Pound. His strategy of impersonating the stereotypical figure of "the Jew" was also in keeping with contemporary theories of prejudice and identity, which followed Sartre and psychoanalysis in understanding Jewishness as a product of morbid projection. My essay traces the critical reception—and rejection—of Berryman in order to expose what I see as the "identitarian" bias of American studies since the 1970s, most recently evident in debates over "the Americanization of the Holocaust." Berryman's transpersonal poetry, I argue, is also transnational, both in its personification of Nazi victims and in its comparison of domestic racism and the Vietnam War to genocide. Berryman's concern is not identity but the violence implicit in designating the other as Other. This violence not only plays a role in prejudice but also in progressive theories of "ethnic lyricism" that see the individual as an expression of her "culture" or "nation" and the poem as a personification of the individual.

  9. Imaginary Jews and True Confessions: Ethnicity, Lyricism, and John Berryman's Dream Songs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Gross

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Berryman was fascinated with the figure of "the imaginary Jew." The phrase is the title of his first short story, it recurs in The Dream Songs, and it was to have been the topic of the final chapter of his autobiographical novel Recovery. Critics have not treated Berryman's "imaginary Jew" kindly. Early critics saw prosopopoeia as uncongenial to the confessional project. More recent critics see the figure as a misappropriation of Jewish identity. Berryman, however, did not want to pass himself off as Jewish; he invented the figure to expose the anti-Semitism of Eliot and Pound. His strategy of impersonating the stereotypical figure of "the Jew" was also in keeping with contemporary theories of prejudice and identity, which followed Sartre and psychoanalysis in understanding Jewishness as a product of morbid projection. My essay traces the critical reception—and rejection—of Berryman in order to expose what I see as the "identitarian" bias of American studies since the 1970s, most recently evident in debates over "the Americanization of the Holocaust." Berryman's transpersonal poetry, I argue, is also transnational, both in its personification of Nazi victims and in its comparison of domestic racism and the Vietnam War to genocide. Berryman's concern is not identity but the violence implicit in designating the other as Other. This violence not only plays a role in prejudice but also in progressive theories of "ethnic lyricism" that see the individual as an expression of her "culture" or "nation" and the poem as a personification of the individual.

  10. A founder mutation causing a severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency in Bukharian Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shachar, Shay; Zvi, Tal; Rolfs, Arndt; Breda Klobus, Andrea; Yaron, Yuval; Bar-Shira, Anat; Orr-Urtreger, Avi

    2012-11-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. A novel homozygous MTHFR c.474A>T (p.G158G) mutation was detected in two unrelated children of Jewish Bukharian origin. This mutation generates an abnormal splicing and early termination codon. A carrier frequency of 1:39 (5/196) was determined among unrelated healthy Bukharian Jews. Given the disease severity and allele frequency, a population screening for individuals of this ancestry is warranted in order to allow prenatal, or preimplantation diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cementing the enemy category: arrest and imprisonment of German Jews in Nazi concentration camps, 1933-8/9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünschmann, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Understandably, research has focused overwhelmingly on Jews in the camps of the Holocaust. But the nazis had been detaining Jews in concentration camps ever since 1933, at times in large numbers. Who were these prisoners? This article analyzes nazi policies that brought Jews into the concentration camps. It ventures into the inner structure and dynamics of one of the most heterogeneous groups of concentration camp inmates. By contrasting the perpetrators' objectives with the victims' experiences, this article will illuminate the role of the concentration camp as the ultimate means of pressure in the fatal process of turning a minority group into an outsider group: that is, the act of defining and marking the enemy which was the critical stage before the destruction of European Jewry. Furthermore, it will examine Jewish reactions to SS terror inside the camps.

  12. Expectations training for miners using self-contained self-rescuers in escapes from underground coal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski-Trakofler, K.M.; Vaught, C.; Brnich, M.J. [NIOSH, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Research Laboratory

    2008-10-15

    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health researchers conducted a study to investigate the human response issues related to wearing a self-contained self-rescuer (SCSR). The goal was to develop training to educate miners on what they could expect from their units during an escape. Subjects included miners who had experience wearing SCSRs, manufacturers, and researchers. Results identified nine key areas of concern: (1) starting the unit, (2) unit heat, (3) induction of coughing, (4) unit taste, (5) difficulty in breathing while wearing the unit, (6) quality of the air supplied, (7) nose clips, (8) goggles (9) the behavior of the breathing bag. In addition, researchers reviewed the literature on human response under duress. This article describes the expectations training program, which comprises the findings of the SCSR study, and what is known about the normal human response in an emergency. The authors present background on SCSRs and the SCSR switchover procedure. mandated in the recent federal Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006, which provided the impetus for the expectations training.

  13. [The Black Death as a cause of the massacres of Jews: a myth of medical history?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzmann, I

    1998-01-01

    In the middle of the 14th century, most towns in German-speaking territories and beyond massacred their Jewish communities. Thousands of Jews were burnt, often connected with accusations of well-poisoning. Medical and socio-historical literature usually attributes these massacres to the anxiety created by the Black Death, which was sweeping over Europe during this period. This article argues that there is no direct link between the massacres and the plague. How other researchers showed before, far from acts of plague-terrified, frenzied mobs, the massacres were the carefully planned and executed work of the Christian local governments. In addition, the slaughtering of Jews began long before the Black Death broke out in Europe. No relation can be found between the intensity of the disease and the violence of the murderers, even though there were wide regional differences. Causes of the persecutions other than the effects of plague seem evident, mainly religious fears fueled by the Church, financial profit, and political interests. This article wants to draw the attention to a myth in the history of medicine, the myth of the plague as the main cause of the massacres in the 14th century. It also raises the question, whether the plague as a trigger for the massacres really was a basic requirement.

  14. Making technology familiar: orthodox Jews and infertility support, advice, and inspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Susan Martha

    2006-12-01

    This paper examines how orthodox Jews use traditional strategies and new media simultaneously to cope with infertility in the age of new reproductive technologies. Not only have they used the Internet to establish support, information, and educational networks, but also they have created frameworks for unique professional collaborations among rabbis, doctors, and clinic personnel in order to ensure that their fertility treatments are conducted with strict attention to Jewish legal concerns, particularly with regard to incest, adultery, and traditional practices regarding bodily emissions. Throughout these processes, they have innovated a hybrid language for describing and explaining infertility treatments that blends Hebrew prayers, Yiddish aphorisms, English slang, Gematria (numerology), and biomedical terminology. By using idiomatic language and folk practice, orthodox Jews construct a unique terrain that shapes and makes familiar their experience and understanding of fertility treatment. Biomedicine in this context is understood as a set of tools and strategies that can be readily appropriated and harnessed to a particular set of individual and collective goals.

  15. Jews, Muslims and the Ritual Male Circumcision Debate: Religious Diversity and Social Inclusion in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökçe Yurdakul

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available On 7 May 2012, the Cologne regional court ruled that circumcising young boys was a form of previous bodily harm (körperverletzung. Although both Muslims and Jews circumcise infant boys as a religious practice, the Cologne court found that the child’s “fundamental right to bodily integrity” was more important than the parents’ rights, leaving Muslim and Jewish parents under suspicion of causing bodily harm to their children. After heated public discussions and an expedited legal process, legal authorities permitted the ritual circumcision of male children under a new law. However, the German debates on religious diversity are not yet over. On the third anniversary of the Court decision in 2015, thirty-five civil society organisations organised a rally in Cologne for “genital autonomy”, calling for a ban on ritual male circumcision. In this article, I will focus on religious diversity, which is undergoing changes through minority and immigrant claims for religious accommodation. Analysing the ongoing controversies of ritual male circumcision in Germany, I argue that this change is best observed with Muslim and Jewish claims for practicing their religion. By using political debates, news reports and information provided by lawyers and medical doctors who were involved in the public debate, I show that religious diversity debates are a litmus test for social inclusion: Muslims and Jews, in this context, are both passive subjects of social inclusion policies and active participants in creating a religiously diverse society in Germany.

  16. Mutations in the sulonylurea receptor gene are associated with familial hyperinsulinism in Ashkenazi Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestorowicz, A; Wilson, B A; Schoor, K P; Inoue, H; Glaser, B; Landau, H; Stanley, C A; Thornton, P S; Clement, J P; Bryan, J; Aguilar-Bryan, L; Permutt, M A

    1996-11-01

    Familial hyperinsulinism (HI) is a disorder of pancreatic beta-cell function characterized by persistent hyperinsulinism despite severe hypoglycemia. To define the molecular genetic basis of HI in Ashkenazi Jews, 25 probands were screened for mutations in the sulfonylurea receptor (SUR1) gene by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of genomic DNA and subsequent nucleotide sequence analyses. Two common mutations were identified: (I) a novel in-frame deletion of three nucleotides (nt) in exon 34, resulting in deletion of the codon for F1388 (delta F1388) and (II) a previously described g-->a transition at position-9 of the 3' splice site of intron 32 (designated 3992-9g-->a). Together, these mutations are associated with 88% of the HI chromosomes of the patients studied. 86Rb+ efflux measurements of COSm6 cells co-expressing Kir6.2 and either wild-type or delta F1388 SUR1 revealed that the F1388 mutation abolished ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) activity in intact cells. Extended haplotype analyses indicated that the delta F1388 mutation was associated with a single specific haplotype whereas the 3992-9g-->a mutation was primarily associated with a single haplotype but also occurred in the context of several other different haplotypes. These data suggest that HI in Ashkenazi Jews is predominantly associated with mutations in the SUR1 gene and provide evidence for the existence of at least two founder HI chromosomes in this population.

  17. Cross-cultural ageism: ageism and attitudes toward aging among Jews and Arabs in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Yoav S; Bodner, Ehud; Cohen-Fridel, Sara

    2013-01-01

    While it is generally agreed that traditional societies are more favorable toward their elders, research findings have been inconsistent. Accordingly, this study presents a cultural comparison between Jews and Arabs in Israel in attitudes toward older adults and personal views regarding one's own aging. It was assumed that Arabs would rate their culture as more tolerant toward older adults, would report spending more time with them, and express lower ageism and aging anxieties. We examined 154 native Israeli citizens, 86 Jewish and 68 Muslim Arabs, who completed measures of ageism, aging anxieties, and cultural views of older adults. Arabs rated their culture as more tolerant toward their elders, perceived older adults as significantly more contributing to society, and reported engaging in less avoiding behaviors toward them. Arabs also exhibited less general fears of growing old and concerns over one's physical appearance in old age. But it was interesting to note that Arab women reported higher scores of aging anxieties and ageist attitudes in comparison to Arab men, whereas no such differences were found among Jews. Our findings point that the cultural importance of elders for the Arab cohort transcends beyond Westernization processes which affect the Arab society in Israel, and reflect the demanding role of Arab women as primary caregivers for the elders in the family. Limitations and implications of the study are discussed.

  18. Differences in food intake and disparity in obesity rates between adult Jews and Bedouins in southern Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Drora; Bilenko, Natalya; Vardy, Hillel; Abu-Saad, Kathleene; Shai, Iris; Abu-Shareb, Heijar; Shahar, Danit R

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare eating patterns of Jews and Muslim Bedouins and investigate possible dietary causes for discrepancy in obesity rates. We pooled two surveys that included data from 793 Jews and 169 Bedouins aged 35-64years recruited from 1998 through 2003 in southern Israel. For the Jewish sample, we used a proportional geographic cluster random sample of persons aged > or = 35 years. For the Bedouins, a convenience sample of 519 participants was used. Participants were interviewed at home, using modified 24-hour food questionnaires with additional questions regarding health and eating habits. The Jewish group was older and better educated than were the Bedouins. The Bedouins had a higher age-adjusted body mass index than did the Jews (P = .03), and the rate of obesity was higher among Bedouins than Jews (27.9% vs 20.0%, respectively). Compared to Jewish men, Bedouin men reported lower intake of fat, cholesterol, total saturated fat, and protein and fat as a percentage of total energy, but they reported higher intake of carbohydrates, fiber, and carbohydrates as a percentage of total energy. Bedouin women reported lower intake of total saturated fat, percentage of protein and fat, and higher intake of carbohydrates and fiber than did Jewish women. The Bedouin population is adapting Western eating patterns that appear to be associated with increased obesity. To address this problem, culturally sensitive intervention programs will have to be developed.

  19. Racism, Antisemitism, and the Schism between Blacks and Jews in the United States: A Pilot Intergroup Encounter Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Lewis Z.; Talleyrand, Regine M.; Lyons, Heather Z.; Baker, Lisa M.

    2007-01-01

    A schism now exists between Blacks and Jews in the United States, 2 groups that were strong allies during the civil rights movement. The authors describe the historical antecedents of and contributing factors to this schism and present information on and lessons learned from 2 Black-Jewish dialogues that were conducted.

  20. Soviet Jewish Community Strategies, Concerning Memory Perpetuation (Erection of Memorials to Jews-Fascism Victims Case Study

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    Alexandra Tcherkasski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article, case studying the memorials erection, shows the process of Jews, victims of Nazism memory perpetuation by the Jewish Community within the Soviet Republics in postwar, what difficulties the Jewish Communities and groups of initiators faced, trying to prove the Jewish identity of the graves and gain adoption of Jewish symbols on memorials and memorial signs to fascism victims.

  1. New Entrepreneurs in Israel: “Adventures” of the Integration of the Soviet Jews

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    William Berthomière

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Following the collapse of the Soviet block, more than 800,000 FSU Jews emigrated to Israel, the only true host country. This new migration constituted a real challenge of integration for Israel: how to provide employment for this massive wave of working population? The Israeli government faced two major obstacles. First, the FSU immigrants were composed, to a great extent, of very qualified people, even highly qualified than the structure of the Israeli labour market was unable to incorporate. The Israeli labour market was oriented to qualified workers (e.g. for the building sector whereas the migratory wave brought many engineers, teachers, doctors and high-level scientists. In a second point of view, these highly qualified migrants were all the more difficult to integrate that in addition to the structural obstacles existed a true inadequacy between the qualifications held by the immigrants and those needed by the Israeli employers. These difficulties of employment led the FSU Jews to accept non-qualified jobs, which generated a strong loss of social status for most of them. Faced with these problems and moved by the refusal to accept a non-qualified employment any longer, a growing number of ex-Soviets decided to create their own company. It is this “adventure” of the integration of the FSU Jews in Israel that we sought to clarify. The observations and analysis suggested in this article are the result of about thirty talks realized with several new Israeli entrepreneurs from the FSU. With these investigations we tried to outline the various motivations underlying these initiatives. Three great types of motivations, reflecting the different perceptions of the professional integration in the migrant group, were underlined: the company as a “last chance” of integration, the Soviet community as an entrepreneurial niche and the entrepreneurial activity as a way to personal achievement. With these three ways of analyses, this article tried

  2. Comparison of outcomes of two skills-teaching methods on lay-rescuers' acquisition of infant basic life support skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavit, Itai; Peled, Shuny; Steiner, Ivan P; Harley, Dwight D; Ross, Shelley; Tal-Or, Eran; Lemire, April

    2010-09-01

    The objective was to determine if lay-rescuers' acquisition of infant basic life support (BLS) skills would be better when skills teaching consisted of videotaping practice and providing feedback on performances, compared to conventional skills-teaching and feedback methods.   This pilot-exploratory, single-blind, prospective, controlled, randomized study was conducted on November 12, 2007, at the Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel. The population under study consisted of all first-year medical students enrolled in the 2007-2008 year. BLS training is part of their mandatory introductory course in emergency medicine. Twenty-three students with previous BLS training were excluded. The remaining 71 were randomized into four and then two groups, with final allocation to an intervention and control group of 18 and 16 students, respectively. All the students participated in infant BLS classroom teaching. Those in the intervention group practiced skills acquisition independently, and four were videotaped while practicing. Tapes were reviewed by the group and feedback was provided. Controls practiced using conventional teaching and feedback methods. After 3 hours, all subjects were videotaped performing an unassisted, lone-rescuer, infant BLS resuscitation scenario. A skills assessment tool was developed. It consisted of 25 checklist items, grouped into four sections: 6 points for "categories" (with specific actions in six categories), 14 points for "scoring" (of accuracy of performance of each action), 4 points for "sequence" (of actions within a category), and 1 point for "order" of resuscitation (complete and well-sequenced categories). Two blinded expert raters were given a workshop on the use of the scoring tool. They further refined it to increase scoring consistency. The main outcome of the study was defined as evidence of better skills acquisition in overall skills in the four sections and in the specific skills

  3. Could the survival and outcome benefit of adrenaline also be dependent upon the presence of gasping upon arrival of emergency rescuers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottenberg, Eric M

    2014-09-01

    A recent systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of adrenaline use during resuscitation of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest found no benefit of adrenaline in survival to discharge or neurological outcomes. It did, however, find an advantage of standard dose adrenaline (SDA) over placebo and high dose adrenaline over SDA in overall survival to admission and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), which was also consistent with previous reviews. As a result, the question that remains is "Why is there no difference in the rate of survival to discharge when there are increased rates of ROSC and survival to admission in patients who receive adrenaline?" It was suggested that the lack of efficacy and effectiveness of adrenaline may be confounded by the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during cardiac arrest, which has been demonstrated in animal models. CPR quality was not measured or reported in the included randomized controlled trials. However, the survival and outcome benefit of adrenaline may also depend upon the presence of witnessed gasping and/or gasping upon arrival of emergency rescuers, which is a critical factor not accounted for in the analyses of the cited animal studies that allowed gasping but showed the survival and neurological outcome benefits of adrenaline use. Moreover, without the aid of gasping, very few rescuers can provide high-quality CPR. Also, age and the absence of gasping observed by bystanders and/or upon arrival of emergency- rescuers may be important factors in the determination of whether vasopressin instead of adrenaline should be used first. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hands-on defibrillation has the potential to improve the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and is safe for rescuers-a preclinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Tobias; Gruenewald, Matthias; Lauenstein, Christoph; Drews, Tobias; Iden, Timo; Meybohm, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that rescuers could safely provide a low, static downward force in direct contact with patients during elective cardioversion. The purpose of our experimental study was to investigate whether shock delivery during uninterrupted chest compressions may have an impact on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality and can be safely performed in a realistic animal model of CPR. Twenty anesthetized swine were subjected to 7 minutes of ventricular fibrillation followed by CPR according to the 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines. Pregelled self-adhesive defibrillation electrodes were attached onto the torso in the ventrodorsal direction and connected to a biphasic defibrillator. Animals were randomized either to (1) hands-on defibrillation, where rescuers wore 2 pairs of polyethylene gloves and shocks were delivered during ongoing chest compressions, or (2) hands-off defibrillation, where hands were taken off during defibrillation. CPR was successful in 9 out of 10 animals in the hands-on group (versus 8 out of 10 animals in the hands-off group; not significant). In the hands-on group, chest compressions were interrupted for 0.8% [0.6%; 1.4%] of the total CPR time (versus 8.2% [4.2%; 9.0%]; P=0.0003), and coronary perfusion pressure was earlier restored to its pre-interruption level (P=0.0205). Also, rescuers neither sensed any kind of electric stimulus nor did Holter ECG reveal any serious cardiac arrhythmia. Hands-on defibrillation may improve CPR quality and could be safely performed during uninterrupted chest compressions in our standardized porcine model.

  5. Up-Down Hand Position Switch May Delay the Fatigue of Non-Dominant Hand Position Rescuers and Improve Chest Compression Quality during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Randomized Crossover Manikin Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bing; Wang, Huang-Lei; Xiong, Dan; Sheng, Li-Pin; Yang, Qi-Sheng; Jiang, Shan; Xu, Peng; Chen, Zhi-Qiao; Zhao, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown improved external chest compression (ECC) quality and delayed rescuer fatigue when the dominant hand (DH) was in contact with the sternum. However, many rescuers prefer placing the non-dominant hand (NH) in contact with the sternum during ECC. We aimed to investigate the effects of up-down hand position switch on the quality of ECC and the fatigue of rescuers during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). After completion of a review of the standard adult basic life support (BLS) course, every candidate performed 10 cycles of single adult CPR twice on an adult manikin with either a constant hand position (CH) or a switched hand position (SH) in random order at 7-day intervals. The rescuers’ general characteristics, hand positions, physiological signs, fatigue appearance and ECC qualities were recorded. Our results showed no significant differences in chest compression quality for the DH position rescuers between the CH and SH sessions (p>0.05, resp.). And also no significant differences were found for Borg score (p = 0.437) or cycle number (p = 0.127) of fatigue appearance after chest compressions between the two sessions. However, for NH position rescuers, the appearance of fatigue was delayed (p = 0.046), with a lower Borg score in the SH session (12.67 ± 2.03) compared to the CH session (13.33 ± 1.95) (p = 0.011). Moreover, the compression depth was significantly greater in the SH session (39.3 ± 7.2 mm) compared to the CH session (36.3 ± 8.1 mm) (p = 0.015). Our data suggest that the up-down hand position switch during CPR may delay the fatigue of non-dominant hand position rescuers and improve the quality of chest compressions. PMID:26267353

  6. Comparison of CPR quality and rescuer fatigue between standard 30:2 CPR and chest compression-only CPR: a randomized crossover manikin trial

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Jonghwan; Hwang, Seong Youn; Lee, Hui Jai; Park, Chang Je; Kim, Yong Joon; Son, Yeong Ju; Seo, Ji Seon; Kim, Jin Joo; Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, In Mo; Koh, Bong Yeun; Hong, Sung Gi

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to compare rescuer fatigue and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality between standard 30:2 CPR (ST-CPR) and chest compression only CPR (CO-CPR) performed for 8 minutes on a realistic manikin by following the 2010 CPR guidelines. Methods All 36 volunteers (laypersons; 18 men and 18 women) were randomized to ST-CPR or CO-CPR at first, and then each CPR technique was performed for 8 minutes with a 3-hour rest interval. We measured the mean blood pressure (MBP) of the vol...

  7. The effectiveness of the technology of individualization of the physical preparedness of the future rescuers at the stages of studying at high military educational institution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonshovsky V.М.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the individually oriented physical preparedness of the future rescuers on the physical and practical military-professional preparedness was studied. In experiment participated 20 student (experimental groups, and also 24 and 22 students (control groups thoracic and muscular somatotypes aged 21-22. The first group used the content worked out accordingly to the given technology, the second one - traditional. Large effectiveness of the worked out content was proved comparatively with traditional pattern in the proving of the physical and practical military-professional preparedness of students, namely the number of indexes which essentially were proved.

  8. Bishop Ramon Despont and the Jews of the Kingdom of Valencia

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    Meyerson, Mark D.

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available This article treats the intervention of Bishop Ramon Despont (1289-1312 in the affairs of the Jews of the kingdom of Valencia. It deals mainly with his efforts to put an end to Jewish usury and with the effects of his initiatives on Christian-Jewish relations.[fr] Cet article traite de l'intervention de l'évêque Ramon Despont (1289-1312 dans les affaires des juifs du royaume de Valence. Il s'occupe principalement des efforts de cet évêque pour mettre tin à l'usure juive et des conséquences de ses initiatives sur les relations entre chrétiens et juifs.

  9. No evidence from genome-wide data of a Khazar origin for the Ashkenazi Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Doron M; Metspalu, Mait; Baran, Yael; Kopelman, Naama M; Yunusbayev, Bayazit; Gladstein, Ariella; Tzur, Shay; Sahakyan, Hovhannes; Bahmanimehr, Ardeshir; Yepiskoposyan, Levon; Tambets, Kristina; Khusnutdinova, Elza K; Kushniarevich, Alena; Balanovsky, Oleg; Balanovsky, Elena; Kovacevic, Lejla; Marjanovic, Damir; Mihailov, Evelin; Kouvatsi, Anastasia; Triantaphyllidis, Costas; King, Roy J; Semino, Ornella; Torroni, Antonio; Hammer, Michael F; Metspalu, Ene; Skorecki, Karl; Rosset, Saharon; Halperin, Eran; Villems, Richard; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2013-12-01

    standard techniques for the analysis of population-genetic structure, we found that Ashkenazi Jews share the greatest genetic ancestry with other Jewish populations and, among non-Jewish populations, with groups from Europe and the Middle East. No particular similarity of Ashkenazi Jews to populations from the Caucasus is evident, particularly populations that most closely represent the Khazar region. Thus, analysis of Ashkenazi Jews together with a large sample from the region of the Khazar Khaganate corroborates the earlier results that Ashkenazi Jews derive their ancestry primarily from populations of the Middle East and Europe, that they possess considerable shared ancestry with other Jewish populations, and that there is no indication of a significant genetic contribution either from within or from north of the Caucasus region. Copyright © 2014 Wayne State University Press, Detroit, Michigan 48201-1309.

  10. Death in the Aljama of Huesca: the Jews and Royal Taxation in Fourteenth-Century Aragon

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    Guerson, Alexandra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1385, Baruch Alentienz was beaten to death by fellow Jews while exercising his duties as treasurer of the Jewish community of Huesca. This article analyzes Baruch’s murder in the context of the growing fiscal pressures imposed on communities – whether Christian, Jewish, or Muslim – throughout the Mediterranean in the fourteenth century. With the third largest Jewish community of the kingdom of Aragon and being responsible for 18% of the total contributions expected by the Crown from the Jews of Aragon, Huesca provides us with an ideal case study of these larger patterns. The case of Baruch Alentienz gives us a unique opportunity to shed light on the fiscal and economic history of the kingdom of Aragon but perhaps more importantly, shows how this growing taxation led to growing conflict inside local communities.En 1385, el judío Baruch Alentienz fue asesinado por miembros de la aljama judía mientras ejercía la función de tesorero en la comunidad judía de Huesca. Este artículo analiza el asesinato de Baruch en el contexto del crecimiento de la presión tributaria sobre las comunidades mediterráneas –tanto cristianas, como judías y musulmanas– en el siglo XIV. Como tercera comunidad judía más grande del reino de Aragón, la aljama de Huesca era responsable del 18% del total de contribuciones tributarias demandadas por la Corona a los judíos aragoneses. El caso de Baruch Alentienz nos ofrece una oportunidad única para explorar la historia fiscal y económica del Reino de Aragón y demuestra cómo el desarrollo del sistema fiscal y el crecimiento tributario del estado derivó en muchos conflictos internos en las comunidades locales.

  11. Volk, Jew and Devil: Ironic Inversion in Günter Grass's Dog Years

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    Lyle H. Smith Jr.

    1978-08-01

    Full Text Available As Edward Diller pointed out in A Mythic Journey: Günter Grass's Tin Drum , the author of the Baltic Trilogy employs elements of myth and of the marvellous not only to give his stories local color, but also to establish patterns of symbolism. The present study maintains that Grass employs Baltic mythology and the language of mythopoesis throughout the whole of Dog Years as a means of parodying anti-Semitic myths embodied in Volkist race-ideology, thereby undercutting not only Nazism but also its cultural foundation. By identifying the novel's half-Jewish character, Eddi Amsel, with the gods of ancient Prussia, while simultaneously demonstrating his conformity with some of the standard traits claimed by Volkist anti-semitic propaganda to be uniquely and objectionably Jewish, Grass ironically inverts the traditional identification of land, Volk and life forces which formed the life and world view of most Germans from the early nineteenth century onward. The Jew, seen as «rootless» and alien by German anti-semites, becomes identified in Grass's novel with the values that Volkist ideologues held to be characteristic of the settled, rooted and «genuine» German. Simultaneously, Grass demonstrates in Amsel many of the characteristics advanced by the anti-semites as evidence of the Jew's inhuman and threatening character. The result--the eventual triumph of this arch-Germanic, arch-Jewish eiron in the midst of a hostile group of fascistic alazons --is a brilliant surprise. By appearing to substantiate anti-semitic doctrines in Eddi's case, Grass uncovers their absurdity by in fact examining that individual case very carefully, disclosing that Eddi is in closer and more intimate communion with his land and its cosmic creative forces--hence, more mystically and «genuinely» German-than are any of the book's major Gentile characters.

  12. Identification of population substructure among Jews using STR markers and dependence on reference populations included

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    Mutirangura Apiwat

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting population substructure is a critical issue for association studies of health behaviors and other traits. Whether inherent in the population or an artifact of marker choice, determining aspects of a population's genetic history as potential sources of substructure can aid in design of future genetic studies. Jewish populations, among which association studies are often conducted, have a known history of migrations. As a necessary step in understanding population structure to conduct valid association studies of health behaviors among Israeli Jews, we investigated genetic signatures of this history and quantified substructure to facilitate future investigations of these phenotypes in this population. Results Using 32 autosomal STR markers and the program STRUCTURE, we differentiated between Ashkenazi (AJ, N = 135 and non-Ashkenazi (NAJ, N = 226 Jewish populations in the form of Northern and Southern geographic genetic components (AJ north 73%, south 23%, NAJ north 33%, south 60%. The ability to detect substructure within these closely related populations using a small STR panel was contingent on including additional samples representing major continental populations in the analyses. Conclusions Although clustering programs such as STRUCTURE are designed to assign proportions of ancestry to individuals without reference population information, when Jewish samples were analyzed in the absence of proxy parental populations, substructure within Jews was not detected. Generally, for samples with a given grandparental country of birth, STRUCTURE assignment values to Northern, Southern, African and Asian clusters agreed with mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomal data from previous studies as well as historical records of migration and intermarriage.

  13. Assessment of Hg Pollution Released from a WWII Submarine Wreck (U-864) by Hg Isotopic Analysis of Sediments and Cancer pagurus Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rua-Ibarz, Ana; Bolea-Fernandez, Eduardo; Maage, Amund; Frantzen, Sylvia; Valdersnes, Stig; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-10-04

    Hg pollution released from the U-864 submarine sunk during WWII and potential introduction of that Hg into the marine food chain have been studied by a combination of quantitative Hg and MeHg determination and Hg isotopic analysis via cold vapor generation multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (CVG-MC-ICP-MS) in sediment and Cancer pagurus samples. The sediment pollution could be unequivocally linked with the metallic Hg present in the wreck. Crabs were collected at the wreck location and 4 nmi north and south, and their brown and claw meat were analyzed separately. For brown meat, the δ202Hg values of the individuals from the wreck location were shifted toward the isotopic signature of the sediment and, thus, the submarine Hg. Such differences were not found for claw meat. The isotope ratio results suggest direct ingestion of metallic Hg by C. pagurus but do not offer any proof for any other introduction of the submarine Hg into the marine food chain.

  14. Techniques for estimating genetic admixture and applications to the problem of the origin of the Icelanders and the Ashkenazi Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijsman, E M

    1984-01-01

    A method is introduced for simultaneously using multiple loci to estimate admixture and test goodness of fit of the model of admixture. Deviation of observed frequencies from expectation caused by sources of error such as sampling and/or drift is allowed for all loci in all populations. This allows investigation of the effects of different assumptions about sources of error on the estimates. Admixture is then investigated for Icelanders and Ashkenazi Jews. Results indicate that the Icelanders have a large Norse contribution, and that the Jews may have a small to moderate contribution from the European gene pool. There are some indications that AB0 and G6PD give abnormal estimates of admixture compared to other loci, and that the Jewish gene pool may be derived from additional populations in addition to the populations considered.

  15. Successful cultural change: the example of female circumcision among Israeli Bedouins and Israeli Jews from Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmaker, R H

    2012-01-01

    Female genital mutilation (FGM) is practiced in many areas of the world, including the Middle East, Africa and Australia. Although it is most common in Muslim populations it is not a dictate of Islam. In the 1980s this practice was reported among Bedouin tribes, originally nomadic, in the southern area of Israel. Almost all of the women interviewed in the first study intended to continue the practice by performing FGM on their daughters including educated women who were teachers, dental assistants or university students. A second study was therefore done based in the obstetrical clinic where only women from tribes reporting to undergo FGM were examined for signs of FGM by an experienced gynecologist, in the presence of an Arabic-speaking female nurse and translator, as part of a gynecologic examination that was indicated for other reasons. In no cases was clitoridectomy or any damage to the labia found. All women had a small scar from a 1cm. incision somewhere on the labia or prepuce of the clitoris. this study concluded that the importance of the ritual in this population was unrelated to its severity. the ritual had apparently become over time a small symbolic scar, even though this population continued to believe in its importance. By contrast, a group of Ethiopian Jews who had immigrated to Israel was interviewed by an Amharic translator, and examined during routine gynecological examination in the same manner as the Bedouin group above. In Ethiopia, FGM is universal among Christian, Muslim and Jewish groups. All women interviewed reported that FGM was universal in Ethiopia, but none intended to continue this practice with their daughters. All stated that this was a practice that would be left behind in their country of origin. On physical examination many of the women had amputation of the clitoris. The conclusion of this study was that the severity of the operation performed had no relation to the social and cultural adherence to the operation, since the

  16. Law, Imperial Bureaucracy and Russian Jews Beyond the Pale of Settlement in 19 – Beginning of the 20th Centuries

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    Vladimir N. Shaidurov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies into history of regional Jewish communities in the Russian Empire in the period between the 19th and early 20th century have so far been extremely erratic. There are topics that have rarely come into focus of Russian, Israeli and American Jewish studies. North Caucasus and Siberia were not included in the Pale of Settlement. The Jews who lived in Siberia as in North Caucasus had a specific legal status. Discrepancies in the national and regional laws adversely affected the lives and activities of local Jewish communities. Not only did the laws determine areas where Jews were permitted to reside, but also those sectors of the economy in which they could work. Law-making in the 19th and early 20th century regarding the Jewish population of Siberia and North Caucasus had no general trend and was subject to change from conservative to liberal character, depending on the state’s national policy. In this article, we will make use of specific examples and comparative analyse to look at the dynamics of the Russian laws on Jews of Siberia and North Caucasus in the 19th and early 20th century. This article is based on archival materials and acts of legislation.

  17. Constructing interethnic conflict and cooperation: why some people harmed Jews and others helped them during the Holocaust in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitru, Diana; Johnson, Carter

    2011-01-01

    The authors draw on a natural experiment to demonstrate that states can reconstruct conflictual interethnic relationships into cooperative relationships in relatively short periods of time. The article examines differences in how the gentile population in each of two neighboring territories in Romania treated its Jewish population during the Holocaust. These territories had been part of tsarist Russia and subject to state-sponsored anti-Semitism until 1917. During the interwar period one territory became part of Romania, which continued anti-Semitic policies, and the other became part of the Soviet Union, which pursued an inclusive nationality policy, fighting against inherited anti-Semitism and working to integrate its Jews. Both territories were then reunited under Romanian administration during World War II, when Romania began to destroy its Jewish population. The authors demonstrate that, despite a uniform Romanian state presence during the Holocaust that encouraged gentiles to victimize Jews, the civilian population in the area that had been part of the Soviet Union was less likely to harm and more likely to aid Jews as compared with the region that had been part of Romania. Their evidence suggests that the state construction of interethnic relationships can become internalized by civilians and outlive the life of the state itself.

  18. Inflammatory bowel disease: an emergent disease among Ethiopian Jews migrating to Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Gil Shitrit, Ariella; Koslowsky, Benjamin; Kori, Michal; Paz, Kalman; Adar, Tomer; Israeli, Eran; Ben-Horin, Shomron; Berdichevski, Tania; Coscas, Daniel; Gal, Eyal; Odes, Shmuel; Shaul, Ron; Ben-Ya'acov, Ami; Goldin, Eran

    2015-03-01

    The development and characteristics of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Ethiopian Jewish immigrants to Israel were investigated. A case-control study was conducted in 7 tertiary care hospitals in Israel. Patients of Ethiopian origin with IBD >6 months were included. Time of disease onset after immigration and age at diagnosis were recorded. Randomly chosen patients with IBD of Ashkenazi Jewish origin served as controls. Demographics and clinical parameters were compared between the 2 cohorts. Thirty-two Ethiopian patients with IBD were compared with 33 Ashkenazi Jewish patients with IBD. Crohn's disease (CD) was more prevalent than ulcerative colitis (UC) in the Ethiopian group compared with the Ashkenazi group (94% versus 73%, P = 0.02). No Ethiopian-origin patient had a positive family history of IBD compared with 42% of Ashkenazi-origin patients (P Israel with a mean of 13 ± 5 years, and 75% were born in Ethiopia. The shortest time between immigration and developing IBD was 8 years (range, 8-26; median 16 yrs). No Ethiopian patient was diagnosed before immigration. Ethiopian Jews migrating to Israel are at risk of developing IBD. Larger cohorts are needed to determine the relative importance of environmental and genetic factors that cause IBD in these patients.

  19. Serum protein polymorphism in Chuetas (Majorcan Jews)--GC, A2HS, ORM, ITI and HP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picornell, A; Castro, J A; Ramon, M M

    1994-08-01

    A sample of 140 Chuetas (descendants of Majorcan Jews) were typed for the GC, A2HS, ORM, ITI and HP serum proteins. Studies on ORM and ITI markers have not yet been reported in other Jewish populations. The allele frequencies obtained were: GC*1 = 0.610; A2HS*1 = 0.787; ORM*F1 = 0.339; ORM*S = 0.497; ITI*1 = 0.581; ITI*2 = 0.414; HP*2FS = 0.625; HP*1S = 0.230; HP*1F = 0.135. Some rare variants were found in polymorphic frequencies (ORM*S1 = 0.043; ORMS*S2 = 0.096; A2HS*10 = 0.015). These results have been compared with those found in other Jewish and non-Jewish European populations. The relatively high frequency of the HP*2FS allele and the presence of ORM*S1 and ORM*S2 variants in Chuetas show the Jewish origin of this population. The frequencies of GC and A2HS in Chuetas are similar to those found in other surrounding non-Jewish populations. ITI results are similar to those found in the two European populations studied. HP frequencies suggest a Spanish admixture.

  20. Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) in Moroccan Jews: Demonstration of a founder effect by extened haplotype analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksentijevich, I.; Pras, E.; Helling, S.; Prosen, L.; Kastner, D.L.; Gruberg, L.; Pras, M. (Heller Institute for Medical Research, Tel-Hashomer (Israel))

    1993-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease causing attacks of fever and serositis. The FMF gene (designated MEF') is on 16p, with the gene order 16 cen-D16S80-MEF-D16S94-D16S283-D16S291-16pter. Here the authors report the association of FMF susceptibility with alleles at D16S94, D16S283, and D16S291 among 31 non-Ashkenazi Jewish families 14 Moroccan families. For the non-Moroccans, only the allelic association at D16S94 approached statistical significance. Haplotype analysis showed that 18/25 Moroccan FMF chromosomes, versus 0/21 noncarrier chromosomes, bore a specific haplotype for D16S94-D16S283-D16S291. Among non-Moroccans this haplotype was present in 6/26 FMF chromosomes versus 1/28 controls. Both groups of families are largely descended from Jews who fled the Spanish Inquisition. The strong haplotype association seen among the Moroccans is most likely a founder effect, given the recent origin and genetic isolation of the Moroccan Jewish community. The lowest haplotype frequency among non-Moroccan carriers may reflect differences both in history and in population genetics. 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  1. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) in Moroccan Jews: demonstration of a founder effect by extended haplotype analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksentijevich, I; Pras, E; Gruberg, L; Shen, Y; Holman, K; Helling, S; Prosen, L; Sutherland, G R; Richards, R I; Dean, M

    1993-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease causing attacks of fever and serositis. The FMF gene (designated "MEF") is on 16p, with the gene order 16cen-D16S80-MEF-D16S94-D16S283-D16S291-++ +16pter. Here we report the association of FMF susceptibility with alleles as D16S94, D16S283, and D16S291 among 31 non-Ashkenazi Jewish families (14 Moroccan, 17 non-Moroccan). We observed highly significant associations at D16S283 and D16S291 among the Moroccan families. For the non-Moroccans, only the allelic association at D16S94 approached statistical significance. Haplotype analysis showed that 18/25 Moroccan FMF chromosomes, versus 0/21 noncarrier chromosomes, bore a specific haplotype for D16S94-D16S283-D16S291. Among non-Moroccans this haplotype was present in 6/26 FMF chromosomes versus 1/28 controls. Both groups of families are largely descended from Jews who fled the Spanish Inquisition. The strong haplotype association seen among the Moroccans is most likely a founder effect, given the recent origin and genetic isolation of the Moroccan Jewish community. The lower haplotype frequency among non-Moroccan carriers may reflect differences both in history and in population genetics.

  2. Pathologizing dissent: identity politics, Zionism and the 'self-hating Jew'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, W M L

    2005-06-01

    This article discusses problems with Kurt Lewin's notion of self-hatred among Jews (Lewin, 1941/1948), and illustrates the ways in which the concept is used in identity politics. It argues that the way the notion of self-hatred is often used makes it problematic as a psychological concept because it requires that we accept particular definitions of group identities and particular political positions as central to those identities. Often, however, such issues are disputed by group members. Examination of the literature illustrates that it is rarely a straightforward decision whether those behaviours or attitudes identified as manifestations of self-hatred are best explained in this way. The function of the self-hatred concept in current debate over Israeli policy is described as an example of how arguments over identity are part of political conflict. In the case of current Middle Eastern politics, the concept of self-hatred is used by rightwing Zionists to label those who criticize policies of the current Israeli government as disloyal and pathological.

  3. Media Images and Experiences of Being a Jew in the Swedish City of Malmö

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Wigerfelt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of high-profile incidents in and after 2008 placed Malmö in southern Sweden on the national and international map as a place that was unsafe for people identified as Jews. The primary aim of this article is to explore and exemplify what it is like to live with Jewish identity in Malmö within a framework of how the media reports anti-Semitism and how this group copes with being the potential target of anti-Semitic harassment and hate crime. Based on interviews with people with Jewish identity in Malmö, we analyze and discuss their experiences using different themes, such as violent and everyday anti-Semitism, the local impact of the Israel–Palestine conflict, how media images affect their lives, and how exposure and vulnerability are dealt with. The findings are important in terms of both possible long-term measures against anti-Semitism and as immediate support for those targeted.

  4. An investigation of the unexpectedly high fertility of secular, native-born Jews in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, Barbara S

    2016-07-01

    Secular, native-born Jews in Israel enjoy the socio-economic status of many affluent populations living in other democratic countries, but have above-replacement period and cohort fertility. This study revealed a constellation of interrelated factors which together characterize the socio-economic, cultural, and political environment of this fertility behaviour and set it apart from that of other advanced societies. The factors are: a combination of state and family support for childbearing; a dual emphasis on the social importance of women's employment and fertility; policies that support working mothers within a conservative welfare regime; a family system in which parents provide significant financial and caregiving aid to their adult children; relatively egalitarian gender-role attitudes and household behaviour; the continuing importance of familist ideology and of marriage as a social institution; the role of Jewish nationalism and collective behaviour in a religious society characterized by ethno-national conflict; and a discourse which defines women as the biological reproducers of the nation. Supplementary material for this article is available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00324728.2016.1195913.

  5. Registers of Violence. Removing of Jews from Czechowicz’s Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Jarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is a reaction to the second edtion of Józef Czechowicz’s Letters (2011, which the author compares to the first edition (1977. It turns out that the poet’s letters, when they went through censorship screening in the 1970s, were purged not only of politically charged passages, where he mentions Miłosz, Czuchnowski, Iwaniuk, and Łobodowski, as well as the critical passages about Marxism, but also his remarks about Jews, remarks that were mostly antisemitic and stereotypical. The analysis of these passages is confronted with Czechowicz’s photographs of the Jewish quarter in Lublin and with the “Jewish traces” in his poetry. Above all, however, the discussion focuses on the language of violence, exposed in the poem śmierć [death] in the volume called dzień jak co dzień. The poem has been interpreted polemically, in opposition to Jacek Leociak, who reads śmierć both figuratively and as a text about a slaughterhouse. In this way, unexpected dimensions of Czechowicz’s sensitivity are shown, as the poet understands the cruelty of modern “animal killing industry” (used by the designers of the Holocaust machine, while at the same time he uses a dangerous array of antisemitic stereotypes, which were previously unknown to his critics.

  6. Jew's mellow leaves (Corchorus olitorius) suppress elevation of postprandial blood glucose levels in rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innami, Satoshi; Ishida, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kahoru; Kondo, Mika; Tabata, Kimiko; Koguchi, Takashi; Shimizu, Jun; Furusho, Tadasu

    2005-01-01

    The study was performed to explore the suppressive effect of Jew's mellow leaves (JML) on postprandial blood glucose levels in rats and humans. A soluble dietary fiber (SDF) was extracted from the freeze-dried JML powder. An elevation of the postprandial blood glucose level in rats given 1% or 2% JML-SDF solution orally together with 20% glucose solution was significantly suppressed as compared with that observed in the control rats given only glucose solution. When seven healthy young male adults ingested 225 mL of JML mixed juice containing 15 g of freeze-dried powder with 75 g of glucose in the fasting state in the morning, the elevation of the postprandial blood glucose level was significantly suppressed as compared with the control subjects. The diffusion rate of glucose and the permeation rate of glucose in the cultured Caco-2 cells were both significantly reduced by the addition of appropriate amounts of JML-SDF when compared to the controls. These results indicate that the effective substance in JML for suppressing blood glucose elevation is a kind of mucilaginous SDF. The mechanism by which this suppression occurs may be largely attributable to the delayed absorption of glucose from the intestinal membrane in the upper digestive tract by viscous SDF.

  7. Children Without Childhood: The Emotionality of Orphaned Children and Images of Their Rescuers in Selected Works of English and Canadian Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Avsenik Nabergoj

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with literary depictions of social, political, cultural and religious circumstances in which children who have lost one or both parents at birth or at a later age have found themselves. The weakest members of society, the children looked at here are exposed to dangers, exploitation and violence, but are fortunate enough to be rescued by a relative or other sympathetic person acting out of benevolence. Recognizing that the relationship between the orphaned child, who is in mortal danger, and a rescuer, who most frequently appears unexpectedly in a relationship, has been portrayed in narratives throughout the ages and that we can therefore speak of it as being an archetypal one, the article focuses especially on three novels by Charles Dickens – Oliver Twist (1837–1839, David Copperfield (1849–1850 and Great Expectations (1860–1861 – and in Fugitive Pieces (1996 by Canadian writer Anne Michaels. Charles Dickens earned the reputation of a classic writer through his original literary figures of orphaned children in the context of the rough capitalism of the Victorian era of the 19th century. Such originality also distinguishes Anne Michaels, whose novel Fugitive Pieces portrays the utterly traumatic circumstances that a Jewish boy is exposed to after the Germans kill his parents during the Holocaust. All the central children’s lives in these extreme situations are saved by generous people, thus highlighting the central idea of both selected authors: that evil cannot overcome good. Rescuers experience their selfless resolve to save extremely powerless and unprotected child victims of violence from life-threatening situations as a self-evident moral imperative. Through their profound and deeply experienced descriptions of memories of traumas successfully overcome by central literary figures in a spirit of compassion and solidarity, Charles Dickens and Anne Michaels have left testaments of hope against hope for future

  8. Further development of a method for assessing mine rescuers` heat tolerance. Final report; Rev. ed.; Weiterentwicklung eines Verfahrens zur Ermittlung der Waermevertraeglichkeit von Grubenwehrmitgliedern. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bresser, G.; Kampmann, B.

    1997-08-01

    A test method was to be developed which permits reliable prediction of mine rescuers` heat tolerance. Apart from the anthropometric data like age, body weight and body size, further reference data were to be obtained from a standard test and a test of the rescuers` physical condition (Dynavit{sup R} test). These tests provide further parameters that may influence heat tolerance and which have been monitored both quantitatively and qualitatively for long years by the Central Mine Rescuing Authority. The description of stress incurred during the standard test and the heat test while wearing protective clothing will relate the criteria applied for the standard physical acceptance examination to the loads incurred during the tests. In order to take account of day-to-day variations of physical fitness, quarterly tests were carried out with four staff members, and performance variations were recorded. The results will serve as a basis for deciding on how rigid potential classification criteria should be applied. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Es sollte ein Testverfahren entwickelt werden, das eine zuverlaessige Prognose der Waermevertraeglichkeit eines Grubenwehrmitgliedes zulaesst. Als Bezugsrahmen sollte die Beanspruchung bei der Standarduebung und das Abschneiden bei einem Konditionstest (Dynavit{sup R}-Test) zusaetzlich erfasst werden. Damit stehen - neben den anthropometrischen Daten wie Alter, Koerpergewicht und Koerpergroesse - weitere moegliche Einflussgroessen zur Abschaetzung der Hitzetauglichkeit zur Verfuegung, ueber deren Groesse und Verteilung langjaehrige Erfahrungen im Bereich der Hauptstelle fuer das Grubenrettungswesen vorliegen. Durch die Beschreibung der Beanspruchung der Grubenwehrmitglieder bei der Standarduebung und bei der Klimabelastung unter Flammenschutzkleidung sollen die Kriterien der Grubenwehrtauglichkeitsuntersuchung in Bezug zur Beanspruchung bei Uebungen gesetzt werden. Um die Schwankungen der Tagesform, die bei den Untersuchungen vorliegt

  9. Kišinev or Linkuva? Rumors and threats against Jews in Lithuania in 1903

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Richter

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Over Easter 1903, a large-scale anti-Jewish riot in Kišinev, capital of the Russian governorate of Bessarabia, left dozens of Jews dead and hundreds injured, thus leading to a massive wave of emigration. A product of social discontent and anti-Semitic agitation, the riots of Kišinev became notoriously famous as the onset of a wave of pogroms of hitherto unprecedented brutality, which only subsided after the end of the Russian Revolution of 1905/06. This article analyzes the incidents by emphasizing cultural transfers between Kišinev and Lithuania, using the histoire croisée approach in order to provide for the different ethnic, social and political backgrounds and motivations of the actors. It also compares the disturbances in the rural north of Lithuania and in the Bessarabian industrial city of Kišinev in order to contextualize anti-Jewish violence in Lithuania on the larger scale of the Russian pogroms. When Lithuanian Jews were sometimes threatened to be killed “as in Kišinev” and at other times to be treated “as in Linkuva”, the significance of analyzing cultural transfer while keeping the regional context in mind becomes apparent.Rezumat:În perioada Paştelui anului 1903, o revoltă antievreiască la scară largă izbucnită la Chişinău, capitala guberniei ruseşti Basarabia, lăsa în urma sa zeci de evrei morţi şi sute de răniţi, ceea ce a condus la un val masiv de emigrare. Rezultat al nemulţumirilor sociale şi al agitaţiilor antisemite, revolta de la Chişinău a devenit foarte cunoscută ca marcând debutul unui val de pogromuri, de o brutalitate fără precedent până în acel moment, care s-a diminuat abia după încheierea Revoluţiei Ruse din 1905-1906. Articolul de faţă abordează incidentele prin studierea transferurilor culturale dintre Chişinău şi Lituania, utilizând metodele histoire croisée în scopul de a oferi explicaţii pentru diferenţele ce apar în ceea ce priveşte mediile

  10. Epidemiology of cleft lip and palate among Jews and Bedouins in the Negev.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Eldad; Silberstein, Tali; Elhanan, Emil; Bar-Droma, Eitan; Bogdanov-Berezovsky, Alexander; Rosenberg, Lior

    2012-06-01

    Clefts of the lip and palate are the most common significant congenital birth anomaly of the orofacial region. The condition may vary from a minor easily correctable cleft to a significant functional and cosmetic incapacitation. This is the first epidemiological study of orofacial clefts in the Negev region in Israel. To establish the frequency of cleft lip and palate in the population of the Negev, characterize the demographic features of affected individuals and find possible risk factors, compare the risk in two major population groups: Bedouin and Jewish in a well-defined geographic area, and determine whether there is a change overtime in the birth of babies with facial clefts. We conducted a retrospective survey of the Soroka Medical Center archives. The sample population comprised all 131,218 babies born at Soroka during the 11 year period 1 January 1996 to 31 December 2006. Statistical tests used Pearson's chi-square test, Student's t-test and Spearman's correlation coefficient test according to the type of parameter tested. During the study period 140 babies were born with orofacial cleft. The overall incidence of cleft lip and palate was 1.067/1000. The incidence of facial clefts was 1.54/1000 among Bedouins and 0.48/1000 among Jews (P Cleft palate was significantly more frequent in female than male babies (P = 0.002). Over the study years we found a significant decrease in the incidence of facial clefts in the Bedouin population, with Spearman's correlation coefficient rank -0.9 (P clefts among Bedouin. This change may be attributed to prenatal care in the Bedouin Negev population as part of social and health-related behavior changes. The reduction in rates of congenital malformations, however, does not mean a reduction in the number of cases in a growing population. Also, with a modern western lifestyle, the expectancy and demand for reconstructive facial surgery and comprehensive care for these children are on the rise.

  11. “A source of satisfaction to all Jews, wherever they may be living”. Louis Miller between New York and Tel Aviv, 1911

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehud Manor

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Although throughout the middle-ages Jews used to live in urban environment more than non-Jews, urbanization process in the 19th century was as critical to Jewish modern history as in other cases. Modernization, in all aspects, had a deep impact on Jewish demography, socio-economic life and self understanding. On the same time Jews were immigrating by the millions to the “new world” (mainly to the United States, a small current of Jews was heading to Palestine (Eretz Israel if to use their specific term. As opposed to a common understanding of Zionism, the future city and the neo-urbanization of the Jews – and not only the new villages (Moshavot, Kibbutzim, Moshavim – was a main Zionist goal. This article describes one of the first comprehensive observations of these issues, as seen from the eyes of Louis Miller, himself a Jewish immigrant that settled in the outmost city of the modern world: New York. In 1911 he paid a visit to the one-year-old Tel Aviv, and managed to see in this new modest garden-city the cradle of the Zionist revolution. Not less important: Miller understood as early as 1911, the crucial role Jewish settlements in Palestine would have in the crystallization of modern Jewish peoplehood. Tel Aviv took major part in this development. It still does.

  12. The Association of Exposure, Risk, and Resiliency Factors With PTSD Among Jews and Arabs Exposed to Repeated Acts of Terrorism in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobfoll, Stevan E.; Canetti-Nisim, Daphna; Johnson, Robert J.; Palmieri, Patrick A.; Varley, Joseph D.; Galea, Sandro

    2009-01-01

    Israel has faced ongoing terrorism since the beginning of the Al Aqsa Intifada in September 2000. The authors examined risk and resiliency factors associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among 1,117 Jews and 394 Arab adult citizens of Israel during August and September 2004 through telephone interviews. Probable PTSD was found among 6.6% of Jews and 18.0% of Arabs. Predictors of probable PTSD in a multivariate model for Jews were refusal to report income, being traditionally religious, economic and psychosocial resource loss, greater traumatic growth, and lower social support. For Arabs, predictors were low education and economic resource loss among those exposed to terrorism. Findings for only those directly exposed to terrorism were similar to those for the overall national sample. PMID:18302179

  13. The association of exposure, risk, and resiliency factors with PTSD among Jews and Arabs exposed to repeated acts of terrorism in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobfoll, Stevan E; Canetti-Nisim, Daphna; Johnson, Robert J; Palmieri, Patrick A; Varley, Joseph D; Galea, Sandro

    2008-02-01

    Israel has faced ongoing terrorism since the beginning of the Al Aqsa Intifada in September 2000. The authors examined risk and resiliency factors associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among 1,117 Jews and 394 Arab adult citizens of Israel during August and September 2004 through telephone interviews. Probable PTSD was found among 6.6% of Jews and 18.0% of Arabs. Predictors of probable PTSD in a multivariate model for Jews were refusal to report income, being traditionally religious, economic and psychosocial resource loss, greater traumatic growth, and lower social support. For Arabs, predictors were low education and economic resource loss among those exposed to terrorism. Findings for only those directly exposed to terrorism were similar to those for the overall national sample.

  14. UK Royal Navy WWII Logbooks

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006, the UK and NOAA's Climate Database Modernization Program (CDMP) funded the imaging of approximately 8,000 Royal Navy logbooks in the UK National Archives...

  15. Immunoglobulin E antibody reactivity to the major shrimp allergen, tropomyosin, in unexposed Orthodox Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, J; Reshef, A; Patton, L; Ayuso, R; Reese, G; Lehrer, S B

    2003-07-01

    Assessment of allergic (IgE antibody-mediated) reactions to foods may become complicated by cross-reactivity that can occur among certain food families and between foods and seemingly unrelated allergens. The allergenic properties of tropomyosin (muscle-derived protein) have been recently demonstrated in invertebrates such as cockroaches, dust mites, and shrimp. In view of a possible cross-reactivity between food allergens and related allergens from animal sources, we designed a study to assess IgE antibody reactivity to the major shrimp allergen, Pen a 1, in an unexposed population of Orthodox Jews, who observe Kosher dietary laws that prohibit eating shellfish. Nine subjects, who reacted positively by skin tests to shrimp (Penaeus setiferous), were selected for the study. Subjects (two females, seven males) ranged in age from 14 to 32 years (mean 20.4). All subjects were strictly observant of Jewish tradition and had no prior exposure to seafood (regarded as a non-Kosher food). Serum was obtained from all the subjects and tested for IgE antibody reactivity to shrimp and dust mite. All subjects reported symptoms of perennial allergic rhinitis, five had history of asthma, atopic dermatitis, and/or sinusitis. All had positive skin prick tests to shrimp and house dust mite (HDM) (Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus, or both); 2/7 subjects were positive to cockroach mix (Blattella germanica and Periplaneta americana). Sera of 4/9 subjects demonstrated specific IgE antibodies by RAST to shrimp (7.0-20.0%), 3/9 to Pen a 1 (6.3-24.1%), and 3/9 to shrimp or Pen a 1 by immunoblot. IgE binding to Pen a 1 was inhibited with either mite or cockroach extracts as demonstrated by RAST and/or immunoblot inhibition analysis. These studies indicate that IgE antibody reactivity to a major food allergen, shrimp, can occur in an unexposed population of individuals; some subjects allergic to HDM and/or cockroach show substantial IgE antibody reactivity to the major shrimp

  16. Pulsed electric field extraction enhanced anti-coagulant effect of fungal polysaccharide from Jew's ear (Auricularia auricula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changtian; Mao, Xinxin; Xu, Baojun

    2013-01-01

    As a Chinese herbal medicine, Jew's ear has been known for its anti-coagulant effects. Hence it is worthwhile developing an effective technique to extract active components. To find the optimal extraction condition and to identify the best strain to yield fungal polysaccharide with anti-coagulant activity. Three strains of Jew's ear from Jilin Province, named as 988, DY 18 and FS 02, and three extraction techniques, namely, high intensity pulsed electric fields (HIPEF), microwave-assisted extraction method (MAEM) and ultrasonic-assisted extraction method (UAEM), were applied to optimise the extraction conditions. The crude extracts and polysaccharides were further determined for anti-coagulant activities. All extracts prolonged blood clotting time as compared to reagent control. The HIPEF exhibited the most remarkable effect among the three extraction techniques. The anti-coagulant activities of extracts were enhanced with increasing electric field strength when the field strength reached 24 kV/cm. Current results suggest that the HIPEF technique will be an effective method in the manufacture of bioactive natural polysaccharide. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Israeli Arabs develop diverticulitis at a younger age and are more likely to require surgery than Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itai, Ghersin; Slijper, Nadav; Sroka, Gideon; Matter, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Only few studies have examined the impact of racial differences on the age of onset, course and outcomes of diverticulitis. To provide data about the epidemiology of diverticulitis in northern Israel, and to determine whether ethnicity is a predictor of age of onset, complications, and need for surgery. Was conducted a retrospective review of the charts of all patients diagnosed with a first episode of diverticulitis in our hospital between 2005 and 2012. Were found 638 patients with a first episode of acute diverticulitis in the eight year interval. Israeli Arabs developed a first episode of diverticulitis at a younger age compared to Jews (51.2 vs 63.8 years, pdiverticulitis at a younger age than Arabs living in urban centers (49.4 vs 54.5 years, P=0.03). Jewish and Arabic men developed diverticulitis at younger age compared to their female counterparts (59.9 vs 66.09, pdiverticulitis. Israeli Arabs tend to develop diverticulitis at a younger age and are more likely to require surgical treatment for diverticulitis compared to Jews. Arabs living in rural areas develop diverticulitis at a younger age than Arabs living in urban centers. These findings highlight a need to address the root cause for ethnic differences in onset, course and outcome of acute diverticulitis.

  18. The photoreceptor cell-specific nuclear receptor gene (PNR) accounts for retinitis pigmentosa in the Crypto-Jews from Portugal (Marranos), survivors from the Spanish Inquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, S; Rozet, J M; Takezawa, S I; dos Santos, L C; Lopes, L; Gribouval, O; Penet, C; Perrault, I; Ducroq, D; Souied, E; Jeanpierre, M; Romana, S; Frézal, J; Ferraz, F; Yu-Umesono, R; Munnich, A; Kaplan, J

    2000-09-01

    The last Crypto-Jews (Marranos) are the survivors of Spanish Jews who were persecuted in the late fifteenth century, escaped to Portugal and were forced to convert to save their lives. Isolated groups still exist in mountainous areas such as Belmonte in the Beira-Baixa province of Portugal. We report here the genetic study of a highly consanguineous endogamic population of Crypto-Jews of Belmonte affected with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP). A genome-wide search for homozygosity allowed us to localize the disease gene to chromosome 15q22-q24 (Zmax=2.95 at theta=0 at the D15S131 locus). Interestingly, the photoreceptor cell-specific nuclear receptor (PNR) gene, the expression of which is restricted to the outer nuclear layer of retinal photoreceptor cells, was found to map to the YAC contig encompassing the disease locus. A search for mutations allowed us to ascribe the RP of Crypto-Jews of Belmonte to a homozygous missense mutation in the PNR gene. Preliminary haplotype studies support the view that this mutation is relatively ancient but probably occurred after the population settled in Belmonte.

  19. Prevalence of non-syndromic orofacial clefts among Jews and Arabs, by type, site, gender and geography: a multi-center study in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Yehoshua; Haklai, Ziona; Blum, Itay; Shpack, Nir; Amitai, Yona

    2014-12-01

    Orofacial clefts are the most common craniofacial congenital malformations, with significant anatomic, ethnic, racial and gender differences. To investigate the prevalence, distribution and characteristic features of various types of non-syndromic clefts among Israeli Jews and Arabs. We conducted a retrospective multi-center survey in 13 major hospitals in Israel for the period 1993-2005. To obtain the true prevalence and detailed clinical characteristics, data on liveborn infants with non-syndromic clefts were obtained from the Ministry of Health's National Birth Defect Registry and completed by chart reviews in the 13 surveyed hospitals. Of 976,578 liveborn infants, 684 presented unilateral or bilateral clefts, with a prevalence of 7.00/10,000 live births; 479 were Jews and 205 were Arabs. The prevalence was higher among Arabs compared to Jews (11.12 and 6.22 per 10,000 live births in Arabs and Jews, respectively, P 0.00001). Males had higher cleft rates than females (7.69/10,000 and 6.17/10,000 live births, respectively, P = 0.05). Males had more cleft lips (P prevalence of non-syndromic clefts was 7.00/10,000 live births. The markedly higher rate in Arabs is related to the high rate of consanguinity. Both very young and old maternal age represents a higher risk of clefts in their offspring.

  20. Local lay rescuers with AEDs, alerted by text messages, contribute to early defibrillation in a Dutch out-of-hospital cardiac arrest dispatch system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlstra, Jolande A; Stieglis, Remy; Riedijk, Frank; Smeekes, Martin; van der Worp, Wim E; Koster, Rudolph W

    2014-11-01

    Public access defibrillation rarely reaches out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients in residential areas. We developed a text message (TM) alert system, dispatching local lay rescuers (TM-responders). We analyzed the functioning of this system, focusing on response times and early defibrillation in relation to other responders. In July 2013, 14112 TM-responders and 1550 automated external defibrillators (AEDs) were registered in a database residing with the dispatch center of two regions of the Netherlands. TM-responders living defibrillator was connected from February 2010 until July 2013. Electrocardiograms from all defibrillators were analyzed for connection and defibrillation time. Of all OHCAs, the dispatcher activated the TM-alert system 893 times (58.1%). In 850 cases ≥1 TM-responder received a TM-alert and in 738 cases ≥1 AED was available. A TM-responder AED was connected in 184 of all OHCAs (12.0%), corresponding with 23.1% of all connected AEDs. Of all used TM-responder AEDs, 87.5% were used in residential areas, compared to 71.6% of all other defibrillators. TM-responders with AEDs defibrillated mean 2:39 (min:sec) earlier compared to emergency medical services (median interval 8:00 [25-75th percentile, 6:35-9:49] vs. 10:39 [25-75th percentile, 8:18-13:23], Pdefibrillation in OHCA, particularly in residential areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dressing religious bodies in public spaces: gender, clothing and negotiations of stigma among Jews in Paris and muslims in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endelstein, Lucine; Ryan, Louise

    2013-06-01

    In recent years religious clothing has become prevalent across many European cities, making religious bodies more visible in public spaces. This paper brings together our separate research on Jews in Paris and Muslims in London. While recognising the clear differences between these two socio-political contexts and distinct religious groups, we suggest that a focus on clothing allows us to consider some points of similarity and difference in the presentation of gendered religious bodies, particularly in situations of heightened stigmatisation. We draw upon Goffman's notion of impression management, in contexts of risks and threats, to explore how individuals experience and negotiate self presentation as members of stigmatised religious groups. We use rich qualitative data based on indepth interviews to consider how, when faced with collective stigmatisation, actors make deliberate and measured choices to present themselves and attempt to impression manage.

  2. The Overview of Gifted Education in Israel in Terms of Rate of Receiving International Prizes Israelis and Jews Living Elsewhere?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna DAVID

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the indicators about countries’ quality of education is receiving the international prizes e.g. The Nobel Prize, The Fields Medal, The Turing Award, The IJCAI – Computers and Thought Award, and the Award for Research Excellence according to international criterions. In this study the comparison of prizes that Israelis and Jews living elsewhere Israel has been examined in terms of population of the country where they live, the number of prizes. It is clear that the numbers of prizes that Jewish living elsewhere has won are high in comparison to living in Israel. In this situation, enrichment programs for gifted children practiced for 40 years in Israel should be check out in terms of international criteria.

  3. Memory and Forgetting among Jews from the Arab-Muslim Countries. Contested Narratives of a Shared Past

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Trevisan Semi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this issue we examine themes which are linked to memory studies and which have witnessed significant development in recent decades due to the strengthening of multiculturalism in the 1980s. The former, demanding equal respect for the various cultures making up a society and pursuing the aim of promoting and preserving cultural diversity, has contributed to a challenging of mainstream historiography and to a re-evaluation of memories considered “minor.” This explains how new spaces have developed to allow a counter-memory to challenge the dominant narrative. In Israeli society this has meant re-appraising the Zionist master narrative and giving expression to the different histories that are a part of the collective memory of the Jews of Arab Islamic countries, those who arrived in Israel from the end of the 1940s, but also to the histories of Palestinian Israelis.

  4. Perceptions of complementary medicine integration in supportive cancer care of Arabs and Jews in Israel: a cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Schiff, Elad; Silbermann, Michael; Agbarya, Abed; Bar-Sela, Gil

    2015-05-01

    There is a dearth of studies on how cultural background influences patients' attitudes and choices regarding complementary and traditional medicine (CTM) integration. To explore Arab and Jewish patients' perspectives regarding CTM use and its possible integration within conventional cancer care. This was a cross-cultural study. We developed a 27-item questionnaire that evaluates patients' perceptions regarding CTM integration in supportive cancer care. The questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of patients receiving cancer care in community and hospital oncology centers. Of the 770 respondents (response rate 88%), 324 defined their religion as Muslim, Christian, or Druze (henceforth, regarded as Arabs) and 446 were Jews. Respondents in the two groups differed significantly in terms of age, gender, marital status, number of children, education, religiosity, and prevalence of cancer types (excluding breast cancer). Although Arab respondents reported less use of CTM for cancer-related outcomes (39.6% vs. 52.1%; P = 0.001), they expressed greater support than Jewish respondents for optional CTM consultation if provided within conventional oncology care (P < 0.0001). Respondents in both groups stated that their primary expectation from the oncologist concerning CTM was to participate in formulating a CTM treatment plan to be provided within the oncology department. Compared with Arab respondents, Jews expected CTM consultations to focus on improving daily functioning and coping, reducing chemotherapy side effects, and providing spiritual support. Although quality of life-related expectations are more pronounced among Jewish respondents, both groups share the expectation from their health care providers to be actively involved in construction of a tailored integrative CTM treatment plan. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Formal and informal Patronage among Jews in the Islamic East: evidence from the Cairo Geniza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustow, Marina

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the political culture of the Islamic East under Fatimid and Buwayhid rule (tenth-twelfth centuries via relationships between patrons, clients, protégés, and partners. The main body of evidence I utilize are letters and petitions from the Cairo Geniza that employ the same specialized vocabulary of patron-client relationships one finds in Arabic histories of the period: idioms referring to the exchange of benefit, reciprocal service, protection, oversight, patronage, and loyalty. The Geniza letters, written without regard for posterity, suggest that these idioms were used well beyond the courts and were understood and deployed by men and women, the literate and illiterate, the important and the inconsequential. Yet the use of certain terms in Judaeo-Arabic also differs from their use in Arabic: some reflect devaluation over time, while others hardened into formulaic phrases. These differences suggest that some forms of patronage did not thrive beyond the hothouse of the court; viewed from another perspective, they also suggest that even outside courtly literature, one can retrieve fossils of older forms of patronage in the terms used to describe relationships between leaders and their followers as well as among people more nearly equal in station. A society’s use of social metaphors reveals something of what its members value, what they choose to retain and perpetuate from the past, how they function in moments of crisis, and how successfully their rulers have managed to convince them of the legitimacy of the social and political order. Conversely, the vocabulary of patronage was a social technique that allowed Jews to conduct business, engage in politics and communal regulation, and to amass and retain followers in a variety of spheres, including that of the rabbinic academies who proffered the construction of Judaism that became hegemonic over the course of the Middle Ages.

    Este artículo aborda la cultura pol

  6. A new defibrillator mode to reduce chest compression interruptions for health care professionals and lay rescuers: a pilot study in manikins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barash, David M; Raymond, Richard P; Tan, Qing; Silver, Annemarie E

    2011-01-01

    Chest compression interruptions are detrimental during the resuscitation of cardiac arrest patients, especially immediately prior to shock delivery. To evaluate the effect of use of a new defibrillator technology, which filters compression-induced artifact and provides reliable rhythm analysis with automatic defibrillator charging during chest compressions, on preshock chest compression interruption. Thirty subjects (20 basic life support [BLS]; 10 advanced life support [ALS]) worked in pairs to perform two randomly ordered simulated cardiac resuscitations with the defibrillator operating in either standard mode (ALS = manual; BLS = automated external defibrillator [AED]) or the new Analysis and Charging during CPR (AC-CPR) mode. During each resuscitation simulation, rescuers switched roles as chest compressor and defibrillator operator every two segments of CPR (one segment = 2 minutes of chest compressions, rhythm analysis, and shock delivery, if appropriate), for eight total segments. The participants rested ≥30 minutes between trials and received brief AC-CPR training (BLS = 30 seconds; ALS = 5 minutes). Heart rate and perceived exertion were measured with pulse oximetry and the Borg scale, respectively. Mean (± standard deviation) preshock chest compression pause time was considerably shorter in each CPR segment with AC-CPR versus standard defibrillator operation (2.13 ± 0.99 sec vs. 10.93 ± 1.33, p defibrillator operation versus AC-CPR (p = 0.2-1.0). Preshock pause time is reduced by 80% utilizing a novel technology that employs automated analysis and charging during chest compression. Although chest compression pause time is reduced with the use of the new technology, participants do not excessively fatigue.

  7. Evaluación de ansiedad y estrategias de afrontamiento de estrés en socorristas de la Defensa Civil. Assessment of anxiety and stress coping strategies in the Civil Defense rescuers.

    OpenAIRE

    Amorocho – Lozano, Pablo Miguel; Uribe Rodríguez, Ana Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    Evaluación  de ansiedad y estrategias de afrontamiento de estrés en socorristas  de la Defensa Civil.  Assessment of anxiety and stress coping strategies in the Civil Defense rescuers. Resumen El artículo presenta resultados de un estudio cuyo objetivo fue dirigido a detectar el nivel de ansiedad de socorristas activos y evaluar su forma de afrontamiento del estrés,  condicionada a edad actual, entorno social y ambiental, dinámica familiar, desarrollo de actividad académica y laboral. La mues...

  8. King João II of Portugal “O Principe Perfeito” and the Jews (1481-1495

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyer, François

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available King João II (1481-1495 is chiefly remembered in Portuguese historiography as the first “modern” King of Portugal and a monarch who vigorously worked to restore the status of the Portuguese Crown, weakened during the reign of his father Afonso V (1438-1481. In Jewish historiography, however, João II has become infamous for his persecution of the Jews who came to Portugal after their expulsion from Castile in 1492 as well as his order to seize Jewish children from their parents so that they could be converted to Christianity and sent to colonize the Island of São Tomé. Using Hebrew, Spanish and Portuguese sources, this article examines in detail the nature of the relations that existed between João II and the Jews, both those who were natives of Portugal as well as the Jewish exiles from Castile.

    El rey João II es recordado en la historiografía portuguesa principalmente como el primer rey «moderno» de Portugal, y un monarca que trabajó enérgicamente para restaurar el estatus de la Corona, debilitada durante el reinado de su padre Afonso V (1438-1481. Sin embargo, la historiografía judía ha construido una imagen del rey como infame por su persecución de los judíos expulsos llegados de Castilla en 1492, así como por la orden de sustracción de niños judíos a sus progenitores para usarlos en la colonización de la isla de São Tomé. Mediante el uso de fuentes hebreas, hispánicas y portuguesas, este artículo examina de forma detallada la naturaleza de las relaciones existentes entre João II y los judíos, tanto de los que eran nativos de Portugal, como de los castellanos exiliados.

  9. Between Cultural Memory and Communicative Memory – the Dilemmas of Reconstruction of Annihilated Past of Polish Jews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Malicki

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This text presents briefly some of the elements of Polish discourse about collective memory of Holocaust during transformations. I refer to Assmann’s concept of communicative and cultural memories, which seems to help to explain the phenomenon of present memory, which can be observed. This text concentrates not on Polish memory of annihilation of Jews (so different from the memory of victims or perpetrators, not to mention different memory of other nations but on its internal divisions and dilemmas which it generates. Along with war generation passing away, the decisive role of creating Polish memory about Shoah will be taken over by specialised institutions and rituals commemorating the past. In the early post -war period the transfer of memory happened mainly by the witness. The role of specialised institutions was marginal. From the beginning of XX century along with last witnesses passing away, the memory of Shoah became the focus of institutions (scientific institutions gathering documents including witnesses’ reports and anniversaries. It is a very important moment to look again at the memory distributed from the roots and confront it with models and standards of commemorating the past, which will create the memory of the next generations.

  10. Positioning oneself and being positioned in the 'community': an essay on Jewish ethnography as a 'Jew-ish' ethnographer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Kasstan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article offers a reflexive and anthropological contribution to the current volume of Scripta Instituti Donneriani Aboensis. It reflects on the experience of conducting anthropological work at home – or across homes – I considered this research to be an experience of ‘Jewish ethnog-raphy’ as a Jewish ethnographer. However, my own ‘Jew-ish’ background meant that I had become ‘neither- fish nor fowl’ within the field-site, which proved both to be an obstacle to, and an opportunity for, conducting the research. It utilises this experience to challenge the conceptual use of the term ‘community’, which encapsulates considerable diversity but obscures the nuanced differences that can pervade a social body. These reflections demonstrate how positionality can be used as a tool for postgraduate students to untangle the complexities of conducting ethnographic research at ‘home’ or in relation to religious minority groups, where significant intra-group differences of practice and worldviews exist, but may otherwise be concealed by the image of ‘community’.

  11. Prevalence and Correlates of Sleep Problems in Adult Israeli Jews Exposed to Actual or Threatened Terrorist or Rocket Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Patrick A.; Chipman, Katie J.; Canetti, Daphna; Johnson, Robert J.; Hobfoll, Stevan E.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of, and to identify correlates of clinically significant sleep problems in adult Israeli citizens exposed to chronic terrorism and war trauma or threat thereof. Methods: A population-based, cross-sectional study of 1001 adult Israeli citizens interviewed by phone between July 15 and August 26, 2008. The phone survey was conducted in Hebrew and assessed demographics, trauma/stressor exposure, probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), probable depression, and sleep problems. Probable PTSD and depression were assessed with the PTSD Symptom Scale (PSS) and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), respectively, following DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Sleep problems in the past month were assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), on which a global composite score ≥ 6 indicates a clinical-level sleep problem. Results: Prevalence of probable PTSD and depression was 5.5% and 5.8%, respectively. Prevalence of clinically significant sleep problems was 37.4% overall, but was significantly higher for probable PTSD (81.8%) and probable depression (79.3%) subgroups. Independent correlates of poor sleep included being female, older, less educated, experiencing major life stressors, and experiencing psychosocial resource loss. Psychosocial resource loss due to terrorist attacks emerged as the strongest potentially modifiable risk factor for sleep problems. Conclusions: Sleep problems are common among Israeli adults living under chronic traumatic threat and trauma exposure. Given the continuing threat of war, interventions that bolster psychosocial resources may play an important role in preventing or alleviating sleep problems in this population. Citation: Palmieri PA; Chipman KJ; Canetti D; Johnson RJ; Hobfoll SE. Prevalence and correlates of sleep problems in adult Israeli Jews exposed to actual or threatened terrorist or rocket attacks. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(6):557-564. PMID:21206544

  12. Efeito de herbicidas sobre quatro espécies de trapoeraba Effect of herbicides on four wandering-jew species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.C. Rocha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available O controle químico de espécies do gênero Commelina (trapoerabas é, muitas vezes, insatisfatório, apesar do uso intenso de herbicidas. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar o controle de quatro espécies daninhas de Commelina com o uso de diferentes herbicidas aplicados em pós-emergência. Foram avaliadas plantas de C. benghalensis, C. villosa, C. diffusa e C. erecta, em estádio com mais de quatro folhas e caules com cerca de 15 a 25 cm de comprimento, submetidas aos tratamentos com carfentrazone-ethyl (30 e 50 g ha-1, glyphosate (960 g ha-1, carfentrazone-ethyl + glyphosate (30 + 960 g ha-1 e sulfentrazone + glyphosate (150 + 960 g ha-1, além de uma testemunha sem aplicação. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado, com quatro repetições. Verificou-se que o controle químico de trapoerabas foi dependente da espécie, sendo C. benghalensis controlada mais eficientemente com os tratamentos testados, enquanto C. erecta apresentou o menor controle. A aplicação de glyphosate em mistura com carfentrazone-ethyl foi mais eficiente no controle das espécies de trapoeraba do que os demais tratamentos empregados.Chemical weed control of Commelina species (wandering-jew is sometimes unsatisfactory. This work was carried out to observe the effect of herbicides on Commelina species at post-emergence. C. benghalensis, C. villosa, C. diffusa and C. erecta were treated with carfentrazone-ethyl (30 g ha-1 and 50 g ha-1, glyphosate (960 g ha-1, carfentrazone-ethyl plus glyphosate (30 + 960 g ha-1, sulfentrazone plus glyphosate (150 + 960 g ha-1, and a control, when the plants displayed 15 to 25 cm long stems. The experimental design was completely randomized with four replications. Commelina chemical control was different among species. Best control was achieved with C. benghalensis and C. erecta had the worst level of control. The treatment with carfentrazone-ethyl plus glyphosate showed the best results on the control of

  13. Recent origin and spread of a common Lithuanian mutation, G197del LDLR, causing familial hypercholesterolemia: positive selection is not always necessary to account for disease incidence among Ashkenazi Jews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durst, R.; Colombo, R.; Shpitzen, S.; Avi, L. B.; Friedlander, Y.; Wexler, R.; Raal, F. J.; Marais, D. A.; Defesche, J. C.; Mandelshtam, M. Y.; Kotze, M. J.; Leitersdorf, E.; Meiner, V.

    2001-01-01

    G197del is the most prevalent LDL receptor (LDLR) mutation causing familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) in Ashkenazi Jew (AJ) individuals. The purpose of this study was to determine the origin, age, and population distribution of G197del, as well as to explore environmental and genetic effects on

  14. The attitude of Sunnī Islam toward Jews and Christians as reflected in some legal issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsafrir, Nurit

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available How have Muslim scholars viewed followers of other religions, mainly ahl al-kitāb (the People of the Book, i.e., Jews and Christians? Islamic laws in two areas - slaughter and marriage - reflect both an attempt to separate Muslims from non-monotheists (demonstrated by rules against consuming meat from animals slaughtered by non-monotheists and against marrying their women, and the permissibility of contact between Muslims and ahl al-kitāb. The extent of these contacts is dictated by two opposing motives: the desire to maintain ties with ahl al-kitāb, and a wish to avoid the danger to the Islamic framework posed by these ties. Consequently, Muslim jurists generally permit meat from slaughter by ahl al-kitāb - even when the obligation to mention the name of Allāh has not been fulfilled - but most jurists prohibit meat from an animal slaughtered by a Christian who recites the name of Jesus over the slaughter. Similarly, the marriage law, which allows certain kinds of marriage between Muslims and ahl al-kitāb, prohibits marriages that result in the inferiority of the Muslim to a kitābī spouse, for such inferiority carries with it the danger of assimilation.

    ¿Cómo veían los ulemas musulmanes a los seguidores de otras religiones, especialmente a los ahl al-kitāb (las gentes del Libro, es decir, los judíos y cristianos? Las leyes islámicas, en dos áreas concretas - el sacrificio ritual y el matrimonio -, reflejan al tiempo el intento por separar a los musulmanes de los no monoteístas (como muestran las regulaciones en contra de consumir la carne de animales sacrificados por los no monoteístas y en contra de casarse con sus mujeres y la permisibilidad del contacto entre los musulmanes y los ahl al-kitāb. Estos contactos respondían a dos motivos contradictorios: el deseo de mantener vínculos con los ahl al-kitāb, y el deseo de evitar el peligro que tales v

  15. Airpower in Three Wars (WWII, Korea, Vietnam)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Momyer, William

    2003-01-01

    When I received the request to update my 1978 foreword to this book, I thought it might be useful to give my perspective of some aspects on the employment of airpower in the Persian Gulf War, the Air War over Serbia...

  16. Frozen WWII battlefields in High Arctic Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog Jensen, Jens

    Projektet ’Kampen om Klimaet’ har til formål gennem tværfaglige historiske og arkæologiske undersøgelser at dokumentere Anden Verdens Krigs arkæologiske spor i Nordøstgrønland, samt at analysere disse i et tværfagligt perspektiv...

  17. Mitochondrial myopathy, sideroblastic anemia, and lactic acidosis: an autosomal recessive syndrome in Persian Jews caused by a mutation in the PUS1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeharia, Avraham; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Casas, Kari; Bykhocskaya, Yelena; Tamari, Hana; Lev, Dorit; Mimouni, Marc; Lerman-Sagie, Tally

    2005-05-01

    We report the seventh case of autosomal recessive inherited mitochondrial myopathy, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia The patient, a product of consanguineous Persian Jews, had the association of mental retardation, dysmorphic features, lactic acidosis, myopathy, and sideroblastic anemia. Muscle biopsy demonstrated low activity of complexes 1 and 4 of the respiratory chain. Electron microscopy revealed paracrystalline inclusions in most mitochondria. Southern blot of the mitochondrial DNA did not show any large-scale rearrangements. The patient was found to be homozygous for the 656C-->T mutation in the pseudouridine synthase 1 gene (PUS1). Mitochondrial myopathy, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia is an oxidative phosphorylation disorder causing sideroblastic anemia, myopathy, and, in some cases, mental retardation that is due to mutations in the nuclear-encoded PUS1 gene. This finding provides additional evidence that mitochondrial ribonucleic acid modification impacts the phenotypic expression of oxidative phosphorylation disorders.

  18. Molecular analysis of cystinuria in Libyan Jews: Exclusion of the SLC3A1 gene and mapping of a new locus on 19q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wartenfeld, R.; Pras, E.; Pras, M. [Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer (Israel)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Cystinuria is a hereditary disorder of amino acid transport and is manifested by the development of kidney stones. In some patients the disease is caused by mutations in the SLC3A1 gene, which is located on the short arm of chromosome 2 and encodes a renal/intestinal transporter for cystine and the dibasic amino acids. In Israel cystinuria is especially common among Jews of Libyan origin. After excluding SLC3A1 as the disease-causing gene in Libyan Jewish patients, we performed a genomewide search that shows that the Libyan Jewish cystinuria gene maps to the long arm of chromosome 19. Significant linkage was obtained for seven chromosome 19 markers. A maximal LOD score of 9.22 was obtained with the marker D19S882. Multipoint data and recombination analysis placed the gene in an 8-cM interval between the markers D19S409 and D19S208. Significant linkage disequilibrium was observed for alleles of four markers, and a specific haplotype comprising the markers D19S225, D19S208, D19S220, and D19S422 was found in 11 of 17 carrier chromosomes, versus 1 of 58 Libyan Jewish noncarrier chromosomes. 40 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Study of potential impacts of using sewage sludge in the amendment of desert reclaimed soil on wheat and jews mallow plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mazen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was conducted to study the impacts of using sewage sludge at different concentrations (0, 10, 25, 50, 75% in amendment of desert reclaimed soil properties and some physiological aspects in wheat and jews mallow plants. Generally adding sewage sludge to desert soil improved the soil texture, raised the organic matter contents, water holding capacity and lowered pH value. The contents of NPK gradually increased as the ratio of sewage sludge increased. The fresh and dry weights and biosyntheses of pigment contents of the variously treated test plants were increased by increasing the sewage sludge levels in the soil. Also, total carbohydrate and protein contents of sewage sludge-treated test plants were positively affected. With respect to the proline content and total free amino acids, in most cases, it decreased significantly, expect at 75% sewage sludge, which was higher than that of other concentrations. Also, the accumulation of metal was generally higher, especially in the root than that in the shoot system in the test plant tissues.

  20. Edmund Burke, the Atlantic American war and the ‘poor Jews at St. Eustatius’. Empire and the law of nations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Abbattista

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay is devoted to a relatively minor episode in Edmund Burke’s parliamentary career and political speculation involving the rights of war and international law in the final years of the American War of Independence. The starting point for Burke’s consideration of these questions was the affair of St. Eustatius, that is to say Britain’s conquest in 1781 of the Dutch West-Indian island early in the “fourth Anglo-Dutch War” of 1780-1784. The harsh treatment of the Dutch colony’s cosmopolitan community by the commanding officers of the British Navy and Army provoked a series of reactions in Britain and the colonies. The essay starts by outlining the identity of St. Eustatius with its economic, demographic and social features, its peculiar role in the eighteenth-century West Indies and its emblematic meaning in the historical literature of the Enlightenment as a symbol of the virtues of commerce and of economic liberty. It goes on to analyse the facts of the military conquest in 1781 and the ensuing occupation realized by Admiral George Rodney and Major-General John Vaughan, particularly as this affected the “poor Jews at St. Eustatius” (as Burke himself qualified them in his second speech on 4 December 1781, with the subsequent reactions of the Dutch and especially the British Atlantic world. We then examine Edmund Burke’s reasons for taking up this affair, including the political and ideological motives and the sources of arguments he used in the two parliamentary speeches he made on the topic during 1781, relating this to Burke’s ideas on international relations and imperial government during the 1770s and 1780s. We end by pointing to cultural links between Burke’s positions and a wider political, commercial and civic culture emerging in the British Atlantic world which reflected some of the most typical European Enlightenment values and ideological commitments.

  1. Did the naval wars in the North Atlantic and adjacent North and Baltic Sea during WWI and WWII played a significant role in the two climatic shifts of the 20th Century, the Arctic warming (1919 to 1939) and the global cooling (1940 to mid 1970)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaerts, Arnd

    2010-05-01

    A better understanding of the perfect time correlation between the two most devastating naval wars during the last century, and the most prominent climatic changes in the Northern Hemisphere, the first at the end of WWI, and the second immediately after WWII commencement, could highlight the role of the ocean and adjacent seas in climate change matters, and of anthropogenic activities in the marine environment. The study provides an overview of decisive links between naval activities and a change of air temperatures, showing that the Arctic warming (1919 to 1939) was based on a different mechanism as the cooling period (1940 to mid 1970), which needs to be subdivided in two distinct periods, and three main regions. From autumn 1939 to winter 1941/42 naval war was primarily fought in the North- and Baltic Sea and the most eastern part of the Northern North Atlantic. Only after the U.S.A. became a war party in December 1941, the naval war took place everywhere in the North Atlantic for more than two years, and with increasing intensity in the Western North Pacific from 1942 to August 1945. Particular attention is given to the role of the North and Baltic Sea concerning the three extreme cold winters in Europe 1939/40, 1940/41 and 1941/42 that marked the start of a three decade long global cooling, and had been the coldest for more than 100 years. The most affected locations lay close to those sea areas with the highest naval activities, e.g. the North Sea section from The Netherlands to Denmark, and in the Southern and Central Baltic Sea in winter 1939/40. Similar observations can be made for the two subsequent war winters. After the invasion of Norway in 1940 the Skagerrak region experienced a record cold winter. The next most severe winter conditions in 1941/42 can be attributed to the realm of the Eastern Baltic Sea where naval force had been active since Germany had attacked Russia in June 1941. A significant fact of the three extreme winters is their appearance

  2. Juifs et Arabes sur la scène israélienne Jews and Arabs on the Israeli Stage יהודים וערבים בתיאטרון הישראלי

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurit Yaari

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available La rencontre entre Juifs et Arabes par le théâtre israélien. Puisque le théâtre israélien joue un rôle important dans la formation et l'évolution de la société israélienne, il n'est pas étonnant que le conflit entre Juifs et Arabes, Israéliens et Palestiniens y joue également un rôle important depuis le début du XXe siècle. Cependant, le théâtre n'est pas seulement dramatique, c'est d'abord et avant tout une rencontre entre des personnes vivantes, des acteurs et spectateurs qui partagent le même espace pour la durée de l'événement théâtral. Cet article suit deux importants « moments » de l'histoire du théâtre israélien : l'émergence de la narration arabe sur la scène israélienne et l'entrée des acteurs arabes, afin de souligner la contribution spéciale du théâtre à la compréhension entre les deux peuples.Since Israeli theatre plays an important role in the formation and evolution of the Israeli society in Israel, It is not surprising, that the conflict between Jews and Arabs, Israelis and Palestinians plays an important part in Israeli drama since the beginning of the 20th century. However theatre is not only drama; it is first and foremost an encounter between living people, of actors and spectators sharing the same space for the duration of the theatrical event. This article follows two important "moments" in the history of the Israeli theatre: the emergence of the Arab narrative on the Israeli stage and the entrance of the Arab actors on the Israeli stage, in order to emphasize theatre's special contribution to the understanding between the two peoples.מאחר והתיאטרון הישראלי משקף את המציאות החברתית והפוליטית בארץ, אין זה מפתיע שהסכסוך הישראלי פלשתיני תופש בו מקום חשוב מראשית המאה ה-20. הת

  3. Marriage between Jews and Non-Jews: Counseling Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Sandra C.

    1994-01-01

    Considers the problems arising from cultural and religious differences in Jewish-non-Jewish marriage. Treatment requires dealing with family systems dynamics while educating the couple about the role of cultural difference in their relationship. Treatment should help couple view their differences flexibly as they blend their cultures. (RJM)

  4. From Ceylon to Constantinople: Andrés de Noronha’s Advertimiento, Felipe Botello’s Memorandum, and the Apocryphal Correspondence between the Jews of Spain and those of Constantinople

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Bravo López

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we throw new light on the Advertimiento that bishop Andrés de Noronha sent to Phillip II’s secretary, Mateo Vázquez, in 1584. This document has been presented by some historians as a very early evidence of the circulation of the famous apocryphal correspondence between the Jews of Spain and those of Constantinople. We analyse the Advertimiento by situating it in its context, thanks to the study of the correspondence that Noronha maintained with Vázquez. And finally, we analyse the document by comparing its content with that of the memorandum – unpublished until now – that the clergyman Felipe Botello handed to the inquisitor Martín de Salvatierra in 1569. Through that analysis we will demonstrate that almost all what Noronha said in his document was a forgery, a product of the misrepresentation of Botello’s memorandum.

  5. Exiliados judíos del Tercer Reich en el cine español: 1933-1936 / Jews in Exile from the 3rd Reich in the Spanish Cinema: 1933-1936

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando González García

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo pretende dar cuenta por extenso de la participación de judíos exiliados del Tercer Reich en el cine español entre 1933 y 1936, años en los que florece la industria cinematográfica española tras la crisis del sonoro. Se analizan aquí las estrategias de las empresas que estos exiliados forman o gestionan, y el papel de los técnicos y artistas en el conjunto de la cinematografía española, ofreciendo un listado pormenorizado de nombres y actividades, y su destino tras el inicio de la Guerra Civil en España.Palabras clave: capitales, empresarios, gestores, técnicos, artistas, productoras, películas, Tercer Reich, cine español, años treinta.AbstractThe aim of this paper is to fully inform the participation in the Spanish cinema between 1933and 1936 of Jews in exile from the Third Reich. It is in these years that the Spanish film industry flourishes after the ‘Sound Crisis’. Not only the strategies of the production companies that these exiled Jews created or managed will be analysed, but also the role of technicians and artists that participated in every aspect of the Spanish cinematography. Additionally, a detailed list of names and activities will be provided, with indication of their destiny after the beginning of the Spanish Civil War.Keywords: capital, businessmen, managers, technicians, artists, production companies, movies, Third Reich, Spanish cinema, Thirties.

  6. Freedom fighters appeal for help, evaluation of WWII events

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Teises Maailmasõjas Saksa vägede koosseisus võidelnud Eesti vabadusvõitlejad nõuavad parlamendilt ja valitsuselt poliitilise hinnangu andmist 1939-1944 aasta sündmustele ning riigi kaitset süüdistuste eest

  7. Publishing WWII aerial photographs in geographical and library information systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhelst, E.C.H.; Missel, L.; Vanmeulebrouk, B.; Rip, F.I.

    2012-01-01

    The Library of the Dutch Wageningen University and Research centre houses a collection of aerial photographs taken by the Allied Air Forces. The collection is part of a project that aims to publish these images in a user friendly way so that they are accessible to a wide audience. This paper

  8. HLA in Brazilian Ashkenazic Jews with chronic dermatophytosis caused by Trichophyton rubrum Antígenos Leucocitários Humanos (HLA em Judeus Ashkenazitas Brasileiros portadores de dermatofitose crônica causada por Trichophyton rubrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Sadahiro

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of HLA (Human Leucocyte Antigens was analyzed in 25 non-consanguineous Brazilian Ashkenazic Jews, resident in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, suffering from chronic dermatophytosis caused by T. rubrum, and in 25 non-infected individuals belonging to the same ethnic group. Statistically significant values (pA freqüência dos HLA foi analisada em 25 Judeus Ashkenazitas, não consangüíneos, residentes em São Paulo, Brasil, com dermatofitose crônica causada por T. rubrum e em 25 indivíduos sadios, pertencentes ao mesmo grupo étnico dos pacientes. Observou-se valor estatisticamente significante (p<0,05 para HLA-B14 associado a resistência à dermatofitose crônica enquanto HLA-DQB1*06 (p=0,05 possivelmente relacionado a susceptibilidade. Estes achados indicam que o desenvolvimento da dermatofitose crônica pode ser influenciado por genes localizados no cromossomo 6, na região do complexo principal de histocompatibilidade.

  9. Joseph ben Samuel Sarfati's «Tratado de Melibea y Calisto»: A Sephardic Jew's Reading of the Celestina in Light of the Medieval Judeo-Spanish Go-between Tradition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton, Michelle M.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The introductory poem that the sixteenth-century Italian Jew, Samuel Ṣarfati, included with his now lost Hebrew translation of Fernando de Rojas' Spanish masterpiece La Celestina, mentions several elements foreign to Rojas work as we know it today. These include the image of the war of lovers, the description of women as the Angels of Death and as the Devil (Azazel, and the identification of sexual desire and religious assimilation. In my opinion these elements show that Ṣarfati had in mind two earlier works from the Judeo-Spanish go-between tradition, Minḥat Yehuda by Judah Ibn Šabbatay and the «Maqāma of Marriage» by Judah al- Harīzī. In both of these Hebrew works we find images similar to those used by Ṣarfati, as well as some strikingly similar formal and linguistic characteristics, all of which suggests that these two works were part of the historical-literary background of Ṣarfati (and, perhaps, Rojas himself.El poema que, en el siglo XVI, escribió el judío italiano Samuel Ṣarfati para introducir su traducción al hebreo de La Celestina, de Fernando de Rojas, hace referencia a unos elementos que no corresponden a los de la obra de F. de Rojas. Éstos incluyen la imagen de la batalla amorosa, la identificación de la mujer con el Ángel de la muerte y con el Diablo (Azazel y la identificación de la asimilación religiosa con el deseo sexual, caracterizado por Ṣarfati como «el deseo gentil». En mi opinión, estos elementos encajan mejor con dos relatos de la tradición judeo-española de los siglos XIII-XIV, cuyo protagonista es una alcahueta, el Minḥat Yehuda de Judah Ibn Šabbatay y la «Maqāma del matrimonio» de Judah al-Harīzī. En ambas obras hebreas se encuentran semejanzas con el poema de Ṣarfati en términos de contenido y de forma. Estas semejanzas sugieren que estas obras eran parte del trasfondo histórico-literario en el que se situaba Ṣarfati (y quizás el mismo F. de Rojas.

  10. Recent Origin and Spread of a Common Lithuanian Mutation, G197del LDLR, Causing Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Positive Selection Is Not Always Necessary to Account for Disease Incidence among Ashkenazi Jews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durst, Ronen; Colombo, Roberto; Shpitzen, Shoshi; Avi, Liat Ben; Friedlander, Yechiel; Wexler, Roni; Raal, Frederick J.; Marais, David A.; Defesche, Joep C.; Mandelshtam, Michail Y.; Kotze, Maritha J.; Leitersdorf, Eran; Meiner, Vardiella

    2001-01-01

    G197del is the most prevalent LDL receptor (LDLR) mutation causing familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) in Ashkenazi Jew (AJ) individuals. The purpose of this study was to determine the origin, age, and population distribution of G197del, as well as to explore environmental and genetic effects on disease expression. Index cases from Israel (n=46), South Africa (n=24), Russia (n=7), The Netherlands (n=1), and the United States (n=1) were enlisted. All trace their ancestry to Lithuania. A highly conserved haplotype (D19S221:104-D19S865:208-D19S413:74) was identified in G197del chromosomes, suggesting the occurrence of a common founder. When two methods were used for analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between flanking polymorphic markers and the disease locus and for the study of the decay of LD over time, the estimated age of the deletion was found to be 20 ± 7 generations (the 95% confidence interval is 15–26 generations), so that the most recent common ancestor of the mutation-bearing chromosomes would date to the 14th century. This corresponds with the founding of the Jewish community of Lithuania (1338 a.d.), as well as with the great demographic expansion of AJ individuals in eastern Europe, which followed this settlement. The penetrance of mutation-linked severe hypercholesterolemia is high (94% of heterozygotes have a baseline concentration of LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) that is >160 mg/dl), and no significant differences in the mean baseline lipid level of G197del carriers from different countries were found. Polymorphisms of apolipoprotein E and of scavenger-receptor class B type I were observed to have minor effects on the plasma lipid profile. With respect to determinative genetic influences on the biochemical phenotype, there is no evidence that could support the possibility of a selective evolutionary metabolic advantage. Therefore, the founder effect in a rapidly expanding population from a limited number of families remains a simple, parsimonious

  11. Recent origin and spread of a common Lithuanian mutation, G197del LDLR, causing familial hypercholesterolemia: positive selection is not always necessary to account for disease incidence among Ashkenazi Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durst, R; Colombo, R; Shpitzen, S; Avi, L B; Friedlander, Y; Wexler, R; Raal, F J; Marais, D A; Defesche, J C; Mandelshtam, M Y; Kotze, M J; Leitersdorf, E; Meiner, V

    2001-05-01

    G197del is the most prevalent LDL receptor (LDLR) mutation causing familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) in Ashkenazi Jew (AJ) individuals. The purpose of this study was to determine the origin, age, and population distribution of G197del, as well as to explore environmental and genetic effects on disease expression. Index cases from Israel (n=46), South Africa (n=24), Russia (n=7), The Netherlands (n=1), and the United States (n=1) were enlisted. All trace their ancestry to Lithuania. A highly conserved haplotype (D19S221:104-D19S865:208-D19S413:74) was identified in G197del chromosomes, suggesting the occurrence of a common founder. When two methods were used for analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between flanking polymorphic markers and the disease locus and for the study of the decay of LD over time, the estimated age of the deletion was found to be 20 +/- 7 generations (the 95% confidence interval is 15-26 generations), so that the most recent common ancestor of the mutation-bearing chromosomes would date to the 14th century. This corresponds with the founding of the Jewish community of Lithuania (1338 a.d.), as well as with the great demographic expansion of AJ individuals in eastern Europe, which followed this settlement. The penetrance of mutation-linked severe hypercholesterolemia is high (94% of heterozygotes have a baseline concentration of LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) that is >160 mg/dl), and no significant differences in the mean baseline lipid level of G197del carriers from different countries were found. Polymorphisms of apolipoprotein E and of scavenger-receptor class B type I were observed to have minor effects on the plasma lipid profile. With respect to determinative genetic influences on the biochemical phenotype, there is no evidence that could support the possibility of a selective evolutionary metabolic advantage. Therefore, the founder effect in a rapidly expanding population from a limited number of families remains a simple, parsimonious

  12. Nietzsche, The Christians And The Jews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Ștefănescu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The present text is concerned with depicting an imagery of fundamental opposition between Friedrich Nietzsche on the one hand, and Judeo-Christianity, on the other. Since the vigorous and authentic society of the Ancients is falsely an unwarrantedly substituted by an ever-growing Christian paradigm, Nietzsche’s response will tend to identifying, as well as possibly curing the Judeo-Christian disease on a social and moral level. We therefore investigate his denouncement of a falsely-oriented cultural way of life and thought by addressing the two halves of his philosophical project: morals and religion. Moreover, in the final part of the current paper we will briefly concern ourselves with some political, as well as cultural implications stemming from his radical views.

  13. Vicarious Group Trauma among British Jews

    OpenAIRE

    Fuhr, Christina

    2016-01-01

    This is the final version of the article. It first appeared from Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11133-016-9337-4 Given that literature on the intra- and inter-generational transmission of traumas is mainly based on secondary literature and focuses on the transmission of trauma memory in terms of the historical knowledge of group trauma, this article develops the theory of vicarious group trauma and tests this theory by exploring vicarious traumatization in the everyday lives of Je...

  14. Some Notes on Jews and Turks

    OpenAIRE

    Shapira, Dan D. Y.

    2008-01-01

    For the Khazar royal house (and an unknown number of other Khazars and members of subject tribes), the conversion to Judaism was worked out on the model well known from the Sogdian-Eastern-Turkic encounter, with a significant difference: sandwiched between Byzantium and the Khalifate, the Khazars chose to be the third force and the earliest religion.

  15. Nuovi documenti su Emanuele di Bonaiuto da Camerino, banchiere e uomo di cultura ebreo tra le Marche e la Toscana del XV secolo / New documents about the Jew Emanuele di Bonaiuto da Camerino, banker and intellectual between Marche and Toscana regions in the 15th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafalda Toniazzi

    2014-06-01

    Between the Middle and Modern Ages, Marche and Tuscany, and especially Camerino and Florence, were involved in a constant dialogue (supported by commercial and political reasons and by the movement of people and goods that has not been confined to the economics, but has also interested the cultural sphere as well. This paper intends to focus particularly on the figure of the Jew Emanuel of Bonaiuto da Camerino, a famous banker and a talented businessman, one of the protagonists of this trend, who was also a keen scholar, able to gather around him great personalities of the coeval culture (like Jehuda Messer Leon, Yochanan Alemanno and Ovadiah of Jehuda from Bertinoro, to collate an important library and acting, therefore, as an intermediary between the two regions.

  16. The Effects of Nuclear Weapons on Post WWII US/USSR Confrontations intensity Peak Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-06

    Event» of 19li6 New York: Punk & Wagnalla Company, 19ii7, pp. 30Ö-309. * ’ 88 ■■■■■■ ■■■■■■ ■. US Government officials were more...34’ ’* ’ (e) October 1961 10th. $0,000 new Soviet and 10,000 Polish troops were re- ported to have moved into East Germany for maneuvers

  17. Application and Misapplication of the Czechoslovak STP Cipher During WWII – Report on an Unpublished Manuscript

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Porubský, Štefan

    accepted 2017 (2018) ISSN 1210-3195 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : STP cipher * Josef Růžek * Karol Cigáň * František Moravec * Czechoslovak military cryptography * Word War II Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  18. Fort Hood Building and Landscape Inventory with WWII and Cold War Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    openings covered with simple grilles. Metal louvered openings ventilated the water heater room.589 Bands of metal-sash, awning- and hopper-type...case of an explosion, they are designed to blow straight up into the air and then cave in on themselves to suffocate any fires inside. Stradley...to suffocate fires 6.3.2 Former Gray Air Force Base Barracks Six barracks buildings that once housed airmen near the Gray AFB airfield are

  19. The Forgotten Airman - Major General Oliver P. Echols and How He Won WWII

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    aircraft are in combat with the enemy in the Aleutians, New Caledonia, New Guinea, Australia, China, India, Egypt, England, and Iceland . In every...Paget’s disease , a chronic ailment that weakens bones. After his condition did not improve during his hospital stay, on 23 December 1946, an Army...Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC, 17 Nov 1960 , 168.7252-12 Oliver P. Echols Death 15 May 1954, Volume XI, IRIS No. 01082422, in Echols

  20. Military anesthesia trainees in WWII at the University of Wisconsin: their training, careers, and contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Colby L; Schroeder, Mark E

    2013-05-01

    The emerging medical specialty of anesthesiology experienced significant advances in the decade prior to World War II but had limited numbers of formally trained practitioners. With war looming, a subcommittee of the National Research Council, chaired by Ralph M. Waters, MD., was charged with ensuring sufficient numbers of anesthesiologists for military service. A 12-week course was developed to train military physicians at academic institutions across the country, including the Wisconsin General Hospital. A total of 17 officers were trained in Madison between September 1942 and December 1943. Notably, Virgil K. Stoelting, the future chair of anesthesiology at Indiana University, was a member of this group.A rigorous schedule of study and clinical work ensured the officers learned to administer anesthesia safely while using a variety of techniques. Their leadership and contributions in the military and after the war contributed significantly to the further growth of anesthesiology.

  1. An Application of Convergence Theory to Japan's Post-WWII Economic "Miracle."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Benigno

    2003-01-01

    Provides an explanation of the post-World War II economic phenomenon of Japan as a process of economic convergence within the framework of the neoclassical Solo-Swan model of economic growth. States that this interpretation helps students understand economic growth and development and Japan's modern economic history. (JEH)

  2. Characterization and Neutralization of Arsenical-Based WWII Era Chemical Munition Fills

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    permanganate solutions, with corrosion rates of 2 mpy or less. 63 Nylons, polyesters, acrylics, styrenes, furans, nitrile, natural rubber , SBR , and isoprene...EAI Corporation and GEO-CENTERS, which are now part of Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this work... Applications International Corporation) for helpful discussions throughout this project. The authors also wish to thank Andy J. Murphy (U.S. Army Garrison

  3. Between occupation and a hard place : WWII anniversary splits Russia and Estonia / Yelena Shesternina

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Shesternina, Yelena

    2007-01-01

    2007. a. märtsis allkirjastas president Toomas Hendrik Ilves pühade ja tähtpäevade seaduse muutmise seaduse, millega nimetati 22. september vastupanuvõitluse mälestuspäevaks. Tallinna vabastamise tähtpäeva eel peetud kõnes asetas president võrdusmärgi kommunistide ja natside vahele, öeldes et Punaarmee ja NKVD "vabastasid" Eestit täpselt niisama palju kui Wehrmacht ja Gestapo enne neid

  4. Discovering Jews in Southern Africa: A Critical Approach to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article addresses the usefulness of the comparative method. By introducing two case studies specific to southern Africa, the comparison of the Zulu and Lemba to the ancient Israelite practice of Judaism, the author is able to explore the dynamics of power relations, politics, identity and space. These dynamics are further ...

  5. Jakob Wassermann: A Jew in the Nationalist Avant-Garde?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haberich Max

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Of Jewish origin, Jakob Wassermann (1873-1934 has been labeled a nationalist and reactionary author, even a precursor of fascism. The opposite is the case. Nicole Plöger (2007 argues convincingly for Wassermann’s modernism by examining the literary style of his early novels. This article seeks to complement her approach by concentrating on two key aspects of Wassermann’s thought: First, there is his critical attitude to modern industrial and urban life, exemplified in his “Volksromane.” Second, Wassermann conceived of the “Orientale,” a charismatic leader figure of Jewish origin-heavily influenced by Nietzsche’s “Übermensch”-who would overcome anti-Semitism, and eventually, reconcile the German and Jewish cultures. These two elements of his early work, which may appear reactionary from the modern viewpoint, are in fact decisive evidence that Wassermann was at the height of his time.

  6. Of Milk and Blood: Innocent III and the Jews, revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Tolan, John

    2012-01-01

    The pontificate of Innocent III has often been presented as a turning point in the history of the rise of medieval anti-Judaism: through his virulent anti-Jewish rhetoric and his attempts to restrict Christian-Jewish contact, the pope ushered in an age of growing interreligious tension. This paper reexamines the anti-Jewish policies and rhetoric of Innocent III through a close analysis of three bulls sent to France between 1205 and 1208. Through these missives, the pope seeks to enforce the p...

  7. Religiosity, Meaning in Life and Suicidal Tendency Among Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilchek-Aviad, Yael; Malka, Michal

    2016-04-01

    The study examines the impact that meaning in life, or lack thereof, has on suicidal tendencies among youth, as well as the nexus between level of religiosity, meaning in life and suicidal tendencies. Subjects were 450 students from both Jewish religious and Jewish secular schools aged 15-18. a significant and negative correlation was found between a sense of meaning in life and suicidal tendencies, beyond gender or level of religiosity. In addition, no difference was found in level of suicidal tendency between Jewish religious and Jewish secular youth; however, among Jewish religious teens, a lower level of depression was reported in comparison with their secular peers. The study therefore concludes that meaning in life is the dominant variable in minimizing suicidal tendencies among youth. The results of this study may promote the establishment of prevention, intervention and therapy plans, especially in the age range that is crucial for suicide. Such programs should be based upon finding meaning in life.

  8. Assimilating jews in Dutch nation-building: the missing 'pillar'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippenberg, H.

    2002-01-01

    Until the Second World War the Netherlands housed a Jewish minority, which varied from 1.4% to 2.2% of the Dutch population in the 1800-1940 period. In this paper an analysis is made of their numerical development and geographical distribution based on census data, and of the consequences of the

  9. Archive: The Holocaust of Romanian Jews. A New Legal Document

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Florian

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available As of February to November, 2010, the “Elie Wiesel” National Institute for the Study of the Holocaust in Romania developed a historical and archeological research project aiming to confirm the existence of a possible common grave from the time of the Pogrom in Iaşi, in June 1941. An interdisciplinary research team made of specialists in recent history, archeology, communication, researchers, university teaching staff and PhD students, led by Mr. Adrian Cioflâncă, confronted the existing documents with the testimonies of the inhabitants of the Popricani commune.

  10. The Folk Literature of the Sephardic Jews Digital Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Rosenstock

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The essay describes the digital library containing audio files and transcriptions of Hispanic ballads and other oral literary genres sung by Sephardic Jewish informants and collected initially by the late Professors Samuel Armistead and Joseph Silverman, later joined by the ethnomusicologist Israel Katz. Beginning in 1957 their fieldwork was conducted over several decades in North America, North Africa, Israel, Greece, and the Balkans.

  11. [Personal resources and negative and positive effects of traumatic events in a group of medical rescuers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogińska-Bulik, Nina

    The purpose of the research was to investigate the role of personal resources, such as optimism and sense of selfefficacy in both negative (posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms) and positive (posttraumatic growth - PTG) effects of experienced trauma in a group of emergency service representatives. Data of 100 medical rescue workers, mostly men (59%) who have experienced traumatic events in their worksite were analyzed. The age of the participants ranged from 24 to 60 years (mean = 37.43; standard deviation = 8.73). Polish versions of the Impact of Event Scale - Revised and the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory were used to assess the negative and positive effects of experienced events. Optimism was assessed by the Life Orientation Test and sense of self-efficacy by the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale. The obtained results revealed that optimism is negatively associated with symptoms of PTSD in men, and sense of self-efficacy - positively with the severity of growth after trauma in women. The analyzed personal resources play a diverse role in the emergence of negative and positive effects of experienced traumatic events, depending on the gender of the respondents. Med Pr 2016;67(5):635-644.

  12. Personal resources and negative and positive effects of traumatic events in a group of medical rescuers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Ogińska-Bulik

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of the research was to investigate the role of personal resources, such as optimism and sense of selfefficacy in both negative (posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD symptoms and positive (posttraumatic growth – PTG effects of experienced trauma in a group of emergency service representatives. Material and Methods: Data of 100 medical rescue workers, mostly men (59% who have experienced traumatic events in their worksite were analyzed. The age of the participants ranged from 24 to 60 years (mean = 37.43; standard deviation = 8.73. Polish versions of the Impact of Event Scale – Revised and the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory were used to assess the negative and positive effects of experienced events. Optimism was assessed by the Life Orientation Test and sense of self-efficacy by the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale. Results: The obtained results revealed that optimism is negatively associated with symptoms of PTSD in men, and sense of self-efficacy – positively with the severity of growth after trauma in women. Conclusions: The analyzed personal resources play a diverse role in the emergence of negative and positive effects of experienced traumatic events, depending on the gender of the respondents. Med Pr 2016;67(5:635–644

  13. 30 CFR 57.18028 - Mine emergency and self-rescuer training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... going underground. (c) All instructional material, handouts, visual aids, and other such teaching....18028 Section 57.18028 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL...

  14. "Making better use of U.S. women" Psychology, sex roles, and womanpower in post-WWII America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Alexandra

    2017-07-01

    The relationship between American psychology and gender ideologies in the two decades following World War II was complicated and multivalent. Although many psy-professionals publicly contributed to the cult of domesticity that valorized women's roles as wives and mothers, other psychologists, many of them women, reimagined traditional sex roles to accommodate and deproblematize the increasing numbers of women at work, especially working mothers. In this article, I excavate and highlight the contributions of several of these psychologists, embedding their efforts in the context of the paradoxical expectations for women that colored the postwar and increasingly Cold War landscape of the United States. By arguing that conflict was inherent in the lives of both women and men, that role conflict (when it did occur) was a cultural, not intrapsychic, phenomenon, and that maternal employment itself was not damaging to children or families, these psychologists connected the work of their first-wave, first-generation forebears with that of the explicitly feminist psychologists who would come after them. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Voicing past and present uncertainties. The relocation of a Soviet WWII memorial and the politics of memory in Estonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melchior, I.L.J.; Visser, O.

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes the politics of memory around the Estonian government's decision to relocate Tallinn's World War II memorial of a Soviet soldier. It shows why and how legitimizing national discourses resonated with and influenced personal narratives among ordinary Estonians. It also discusses

  16. Carl Schmitt's attitude towards total war and total enemy on the eve of the outbreak of WWII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molnar Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Carl Schmitt is usually perceived as the theorist of total state, total war and total hostility. In the article, the author however tries to show that from 1937 to 1944, Schmitt was arguing that total war and total hostility were dangerous for Germany (as well as for the rest of Europe and warned against perpetuation of all efforts to totalize enemy that started in 1914. In his theoretical endeavors in this period there was place for the total state only - and especially for the total state strong enough to resist temptation of declaring total war on total enemy. The total state he recommended Hitler and his Nazi comrades was German Reich, as a part of Europe ordered and divided in the huge spaces (Grossraumordnung. Positioned in the centre of Europe, between the rest of the powers (France, Italy, USSR as well as the Scandinavian states, Germany should be careful enough to wage war only against its Eastern enemies (Poland and maybe USSR and only in order to achieve 'just' borders. Occupying in this way its huge space Germany should devote itself to the task of exploitation of various peoples such as Poles, Chechs and Slovaks, which were perceived as incapable of having their states and doomed to serve the master race - the Germans.

  17. Teaching Literacy behind Barbed Wire in WWII: Elementary Schools in Japanese-American Internment Camps in Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Millions of children around the world are out of school due to conflict, poverty, lack of education systems and infrastructure, and other issues. Educating children living in difficult contexts is the best way to empower them with the knowledge and competencies to rise to their full potential despite the challenges they face. Dedicated and…

  18. WWII (World War II) Era Building Demolition and Renovation Cost Estimator (ESTER) 1.0 User’s Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    8217 Idefine _XMTL 3X6 335.00 Ea LA. 3𔄀" x 6’ */ a casement , average quality, bldrs. model, wood *, % Idefine CS W-D 213 150.00 * EA. 2’ x 3’ high, standard...8217 x 3’ i, -define CS PL 2X4 205.00 a LA. 2’ x 4’ a/ -define CS PL 2X5 235.00 * EA. 2’ x 5"a/ -define CS PL 2X6 4𔃿.00 EA. 2’ x 6’ * * casement , lJeie

  19. Shared meanings for military nurse veterans: follow up survey of nurse veterans from WWII, Korea, Vietnam, and Operation Desert Storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton-Bandiero, M P

    1998-01-01

    This study is an extension of a qualitative study involving military nurses in World War II, Korea, Vietnam and Operation Desert Storm. Common themes and shared meanings identified in the previous qualitative study were investigated using a broad sample of military nurses who had served at various times and different branches of the service. The present investigation used a survey to gather data, and results tended to validate results of the earlier study that the experiences of military nurses in times of war tend to transcend many factors including time and branch of service.

  20. From WWII to Kingston, Ontario: The History of Queen's University School of Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Karen; Wyllie, Kenneth; Davidson, John

    2016-01-01

    To describe the origin and development of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the Queen's University School of Medicine (Kingston, Ontario). Resarch ethics board approval and privacy agreements from the Kingston General Hospital (KGH, Kingston, Ontario) medical archives were obtained. Primary and secondary data sources were identified. A systematic examination of newspaper archives, research literature, KGH medical advisory committee meeting minutes, and testimonies from Dr Kenneth Wyllie and Dr John Davidson were obtained. In 1949, Dr Albert Ross Tilley arrived at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. There, Tilley initiated the Burn Unit at the KGH and began monthly teaching during the academic semester. Ken Wyllie (Meds '55), Lloyd Carlson (Meds '57) and John Emery (Meds '57) were the notable progeny of his early initiatives. In 1963, Kenneth Wyllie founded the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery in Kingston, Ontario, having completed plastic surgery training in Toronto and Edinburgh with experiences in Stockholm (Sweden), Paris (France) and Baltimore (Maryland, USA). He was shortly joined by Pat Shoemaker (Meds '66). John Davidson (Meds '82) arrived in 1989, bringing an interest in microsurgery and critical inquiry to the division. Five notable surgeons, Cartotto (Meds '88), Watkins, Watters, Meathrel (Meds '03) and McKay, further enhanced the Division's clinical and academic mission. The collective activity of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Queen's School of Medicine in its 66-year history has encouraged more than 40 others to pursue distinguished careers in the specialty throughout North America, including three past presidents of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons.

  1. Legal aspects of the application of the lay rescuer automatic external defibrillator (AED) program in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyuna

    2008-04-01

    The American Heart Association has stated that the automatic external defibrillator (AED) is a promising method for achieving rapid defibrillation, and emphasized that AED training and use should be available in every community. The demonstrated safety and effectiveness of the AED make it ideally suited for the delivery of early defibrillation by trained laypersons, and the placement of AEDs in selected locations for immediate use by trained laypersons may enable critical intervention that can significantly increase survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The American Heart Association recommends the installation of AEDs in public locations such as airports, thus allowing laypersons to conduct defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation on the occasion of adverse cardiopulmonary events. In Korea, the Ministry of Health and Welfare officially prohibits the installation of AEDs in public locations on the grounds that cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation are understood as medical practices that can be conducted only by licensed medical practitioners. The purpose of this article is to discuss the necessity for AEDs and the appropriate process for their implementation in Korea, by examining the current pre-AED status of Korea and the relevant legal aspects.

  2. The Use of Developmental Rehabilitation Services. Comparison between Bedouins and Jews in the South of Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasia Lubetzky

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Some communities have peripheral zones inhabited by persons with a different culture than the majority of the general population, such as the Aboriginals in Australia, the Native Americans in the U.S. and Canada, the Eskimos in Lapland, and the Bedouins in Israel. These citizens are not receiving the same medical or rehabilitation services as the citizens of the metropolitan areas due to the fact that health and welfare programs are not adapted to their unique needs. At the Soroka University Medical Center in Beer-Sheva, Israel, the health and rehabilitation services have a very large and heterogeneous catch-up population serving most of the south of Israel. The purpose of this study was to look at the utilization and the number of appointments for child rehabilitation services by the Bedouin population compared to the general population in the south of Israel at the Zusman Child Development Center (CDC.The records of appointments to the CDC between the years 1995–1999 inclusive were studied and we randomly chose to limit the study to January, April, July, and October of each year, and randomly chose the daily records of nine therapists, three from each discipline (occuptional therapy [OT], physical therapy [PT], and speech and language therapy [SLT]. There were 8,504 appointments during these 4 months of the years 1995–1999, 2,255 of which were for Bedouin and 6,249 for Jewish children. Noncompliance with therapy appointments (NCTA for the same period for both the Bedouins (31% and Jewish children (26%, with a significant difference between the two populations, was noted. Of all the Jewish childrens’ appointments, the percentage of all three services was similar: 33% to PT, 38% to OT, and 29% to SLT, but for the Bedouin children, the percentage between the three services was significantly different: 62% to PT, 34% to OT, and 3% to SLT. These results seem to indicate that the Bedouin families prefer the PT and OT over the SLT. Our results enhanced the need for planning a model for supplying health services adapted to clients coming from different cultures. According to this model, we need to take into consideration the cultural differences, the accessibility to rehabilitation services, and the economical impact on the family; all in all, to give a better solution to the patient with special needs.

  3. Tay Sachs disease in Australia: reduced disease incidence despite stable carrier frequency in Australian Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Raelia M; Proos, Anne L; Burnett, Leslie; Delatycki, Martin; Bankier, Agnes; Fietz, Michael J

    2012-12-10

    To evaluate the outcomes of preconception screening of Jewish Australians for Tay Sachs disease (TSD) carrier status on Jewish TSD-affected births. Epidemiological observational study involving a complete retrospective audit of infantile and intermediate TSD cases diagnosed in Sydney and Melbourne between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2011 (Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne; Pacific Laboratory Medicine Services, Pathology North, NSW Health Pathology, Sydney; Victorian Clinical Genetics Services, Melbourne; and SA Pathology, Adelaide), and carrier frequency among Jewish high school students attending schools participating in TSD screening programs over the same period. Jewish TSD carrier frequency; and expected versus observed Jewish TSD-affected births. The 2006 Census indicated that most of the total 88,826 Jewish Australians live in Melbourne (46%) and Sydney (40%). The 7,756 Jewish high school students screened for TSD in Sydney and Melbourne during the study period had a carrier frequency of one in 31 (3.26%; 95% CI, 2.89%-3.68%).The estimated expected number of TSD-affected births in Melbourne and Sydney in 1995-2011 was 4.1 for Jewish births and 7.4 for other births (a ratio of Jewish to non-Jewish births of 1:2). The actual number was 12 (four in Sydney and eight in Melbourne), of which two were Jewish (a ratio of Jewish to non-Jewish births of 1:5). This finding of fewer than expected Jewish TSD cases coincided with a period during which screening programs were operating. There have been no Jewish TSD-affected children born to parents who were screened previously. Community education, appreciation of autosomal recessive inheritance and genetic carrier screening before pregnancy are the likely factors in our finding of fewer than expected Jewish babies with TSD. Ongoing outcome monitoring must continue.

  4. The Growing Disconnect Between What American Jews Believe and Jewish Organizations Promote

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brownfeld, Allan C

    2001-01-01

    The two major crusades upon which American Jewish organizations have now embarked are a circling of the wagons in support of Ariel Sharon's government in Israel and a campaign for Jewish "continuity...

  5. Explaining the frequency of alcohol consumption in a conflict zone: Jews and Palestinians in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Zohar; Chartier, Karen G; Stebbins, Mary B; Canetti, Daphna; Hobfoll, Stevan E; Hall, Brian J; Shuval, Kerem

    2015-07-01

    Experiencing stress and exposure to terrorism may have an adverse effect on health risk behaviors. Few studies have examined alcohol use among adults living in Israel under chronic, stressful terrorism-related conditions. In this study, we examined the relationships of demographics, past stressful events, and terrorism exposure to the frequency of alcohol use and the mediating roles of depressive and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. We used three waves of data from a 2007-2008 nationally representative sample of Jewish and Palestinian adults in Israel. We assessed past stressful events, in addition to direct and indirect exposures to terrorism. Results indicated that past stressful events and exposure to terrorism were not directly associated with alcohol use, but were indirectly associated and mediated by depressive and PTSD symptomology. Mental health symptoms were differentially associated with alcohol use. More frequent drinking was mediated by higher levels of depression, including for women and Palestinians; however, PTSD symptom severity was related to less frequent drinking. Mental health may play a prominent role in the frequency of alcohol use among adults exposed to terrorism in Israel. Alcohol use, as a coping mechanism, may differ by demographic characteristics (gender and ethnicity) and psychological symptomology for adults living in a conflict zone in Israel. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Ashkenazi Jews of Curaçao, a trading minority

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Abraham-Van der Mark

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available First describes the early Sephardi presence in Curaçao, the arrival of the Ashkenazi in the 20th c., and the relations between these 2 groups. Author goes on to discuss the Ashkenazis' economic success and the exodus of the 1980s. She asks whether the success and the exodus can be attributed to the characteristics of the group itself or whether conditions and developments in Curaçao account for economic fortune and the departure of the Ashkenazi.

  7. The history of African gene flow into Southern Europeans, Levantines, and Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorjani, Priya; Patterson, Nick; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Keinan, Alon; Hao, Li; Atzmon, Gil; Burns, Edward; Ostrer, Harry; Price, Alkes L; Reich, David

    2011-04-01

    Previous genetic studies have suggested a history of sub-Saharan African gene flow into some West Eurasian populations after the initial dispersal out of Africa that occurred at least 45,000 years ago. However, there has been no accurate characterization of the proportion of mixture, or of its date. We analyze genome-wide polymorphism data from about 40 West Eurasian groups to show that almost all Southern Europeans have inherited 1%-3% African ancestry with an average mixture date of around 55 generations ago, consistent with North African gene flow at the end of the Roman Empire and subsequent Arab migrations. Levantine groups harbor 4%-15% African ancestry with an average mixture date of about 32 generations ago, consistent with close political, economic, and cultural links with Egypt in the late middle ages. We also detect 3%-5% sub-Saharan African ancestry in all eight of the diverse Jewish populations that we analyzed. For the Jewish admixture, we obtain an average estimated date of about 72 generations. This may reflect descent of these groups from a common ancestral population that already had some African ancestry prior to the Jewish Diasporas.

  8. The history of African gene flow into Southern Europeans, Levantines, and Jews.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Moorjani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous genetic studies have suggested a history of sub-Saharan African gene flow into some West Eurasian populations after the initial dispersal out of Africa that occurred at least 45,000 years ago. However, there has been no accurate characterization of the proportion of mixture, or of its date. We analyze genome-wide polymorphism data from about 40 West Eurasian groups to show that almost all Southern Europeans have inherited 1%-3% African ancestry with an average mixture date of around 55 generations ago, consistent with North African gene flow at the end of the Roman Empire and subsequent Arab migrations. Levantine groups harbor 4%-15% African ancestry with an average mixture date of about 32 generations ago, consistent with close political, economic, and cultural links with Egypt in the late middle ages. We also detect 3%-5% sub-Saharan African ancestry in all eight of the diverse Jewish populations that we analyzed. For the Jewish admixture, we obtain an average estimated date of about 72 generations. This may reflect descent of these groups from a common ancestral population that already had some African ancestry prior to the Jewish Diasporas.

  9. Educational stratification among Arabs and Jews in Israel: historical disadvantage, discrimination, and opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, Barbara S; Friedlander, Dov

    2005-07-01

    Arabs in Israel are a heterogeneous but largely underprivileged minority with a history of disadvantage in several domains, including education and employment. In this paper, we document changes in their attainment of various educational levels across cohorts born from the mid-1920s to the 1970s. We make comparisons among different Arab religious groups, between men and women, and between Arabs and the majority Jewish populations in Israel. We find that over consecutive birth cohorts, substantial ethnic differences in educational attainment have narrowed at the lower levels of schooling, but have increased at higher levels. Moreover, the results indicate that the disadvantage of Muslim Arabs in terms of entry into and completion of high school can be accounted for only partially by differences in the social status of their parents and characteristics of their neighbourhoods. The findings suggest that long-term historical differences among groups and discriminatory practices towards Arabs are important factors in explanations of disparities in educational attainment.

  10. The Nation behind the Diary: Anne Frank and the Holocaust of the Dutch Jews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foray, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Since its first appearance in 1947, "The Diary of Anne Frank" has been translated into sixty-five different languages, including Welsh, Esperanto, and Faroese. Millions and perhaps even billions of readers, scattered throughout the globe and now spanning multiple generations, are familiar with the life and work of this young Jewish…

  11. Ilonggos, Igorrottes, Merchants, and Jews: Shakespeare and American Colonial Education in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Celine Ick

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available I begin with a story of bewilderment. Shortly after my return to the Philippines from graduate school in 1994, I found myself an accidental speaker on things Shakespearean at a small, very exclusive Opus Dei-run high school in a converted Lopez mansion in the outskirts of Iloilo. The speaking engagement was unplanned and rather spontaneous. The school authorities, though, did a splendid job of putting a program together for the occasion. Aside from my talk, the impromptu program also featured performances by two of the winners of a recently concluded declamation contest. Quite fortuitously (or would that be unsurprisingly?, the winning declaimers both did pieces from Shakespeare.

  12. Between Grief and Grievance: Memories of Jews in France and the Klaus Barbie Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Levine

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Working between the Amos Gitai film One Day You’ll Understand (2008 and the 1987 Klaus Barbie trial against which it is set, the article explores how the trial marked a decisive turning point in France’s relationship to its wartime past. Of Barbie’s hundreds of crimes, including murder, torture, rape, and deportation, only those of the gravest nature, 41 separate counts of crimes against humanity, were pursued in the French court in Lyon. Not only did the trial raise crucial juridical questions involving the status of victims and the definition of crimes against humanity but, extending into the private sphere, it became the occasion for citizens to address heretofore silenced aspects of their own family histories and conduct trials of a more personal nature. Whereas the law in general seeks to contain historical trauma and to translate it into legal-conscious terminology, it is often the trauma that takes over, transforming the trial into “another scene” (Freud in which an unmastered past is unwittingly repeated and unconsciously acted out. Such failures of translation, far from being simply legal shortcomings, open a space between grief and grievance, one through which it is possible to explore both how family secrets are disowned from one generation to the next, and how deeply flawed legal proceedings such as the Barbie trial may “release accumulated social toxins” (Kaplan and thereby expose unaddressed dimensions of French postwar (and -colonial history.

  13. Insight into ethnic flux: marriage patterns among Jews of mixed ancestry in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, Barbara S

    2004-02-01

    Increases in ethnic and racial intermarriage in immigrant countries have led to growing proportions of persons of mixed ancestry and backgrounds. The marriage patterns of these persons both reflect and affect the salience and meaning of current forms of ethnicity and race in these societies. This article analyzes the marriage behavior of children of ethnically mixed unions in the Jewish population of Israel. Among persons of mixed ancestry, educational attainment plays a large role in whether they marry Ashkenazim or less economically advantaged Mizrahim. Such patterns suggest that intermarriage in Israel does not necessarily reduce ethnic differences in socioeconomic status or the salience of ethnicity among disadvantaged groups.

  14. Perceptions of sense of control, relative deprivation, and expectations of young Jews and Palestinians in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Dahlia

    2003-08-01

    The author focused on the impact of personal deprivation, sense of control, and social context on the future expectations of advantaged and discriminated groups. Analysis of 6,430 Jewish and Palestinian high school students in Israel showed that Palestinian students had lower expectations and stronger feelings of deprivation than Jewish students. Also those who felt deprived had lower expectations regarding the prospects of marriage and the probability of owning a home and a car and of holding a permanent job. However, sense of control influenced these expectations more than did feelings of deprivation. The findings indicated that the processes by which future expectations are formed might be different for Jewish and Palestinian students and that these differences are--at least in part--related to long-term discrimination against Palestinians in Israel.

  15. On the Jews of the bishopric of Malaga (1485-1492)

    OpenAIRE

    López de Coca Castañer, José Enrique

    2013-01-01

    La política seguida con las comunidades judías de Málaga y su territorio varió según las circunstancias de la conquista. Hubo judíos en las ciudades de Málaga y Vélez Málaga, y en algunas aldeas dispersas por los montes. Un judío castellano, el intérprete Israel, recaudó los impuestos que debían pagar los campesinos musulmanes y los repobladores cristianos. La expulsión de los judíos en 1492. Algunos volvieron más tarde y se bautizaron; entre ellos, el intérprete Israel, que pasaría a llamars...

  16. Jews and British Sport: integration, ethnicity and anti-semitism, c1880-c1960

    OpenAIRE

    Dee, David Gareth

    2011-01-01

    Between the 1890s and the 1960s, sport had a distinctive and varied impact on the social, cultural, political and economic life of the British Jewish community. During this period, Anglo-Jewry developed a clear sporting tradition, in both a direct and indirect sense, and their participation in the world of British sport had a significant impact on processes and discourses surrounding integration, ethnicity and anti-Semitism. Through a broad analysis of archival materials, newspaper source...

  17. The Wandering Jew in Novels of Jane Austen: The Pursuit of an Organic Whole in Romanticism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Kenseh Madaki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Austen’s fictions may or may not set out to express the framework of imagery that projects the division of beings into four levels as enumerated by Northrop Frye in his Essay “The drunken boat: the revolutionary element in Romanticism”, her works, like the Romanticism poets are greatly influenced by this framework. This framework is found in the imagery of pre- Romanticism poetry and is the basis for the conflict between the Romanticism and the pre-Romanticism one despite their affiliation and similarities. Frye expounds the influence of this framework in the poetic garden of imagery in Romanticism, this work attempts to expand the influence in the prose garden of Austen’s symbolic expressions. Austen uses symbolism to interpret the structure of beings and their station, the concept of alienation, the journey, and the quest and finally the formation of an organic whole; the superb inter-change of the masculine and feminine domain in metaphoric representation excels Austen’s works within Romanticism expressions.

  18. Survival of Jews during the Holocaust: the importance of different types of social resources

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tammes, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Background Of the Jewish inhabitants of Amsterdam 25.9% survived the Holocaust. However, different cultural and socio-economic groups within the Jewish community may have had different social resources and different chances of survival...

  19. Europe and its Jews: a Cosmopolitan Journey with Jürgen Habermas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Fine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available After the Holocaust European antisemitism did not simply vanish into thin air and critical theorists drew attention to the new or secondary forms of antisemitism that arose in the postwar period. Among them Jürgen Habermas, a leading figure in the younger generation of critical theorists, is remarkable for confronting the legacy of European antisemitism in his his vision of a new Europe. His approach to the postnational constellation emphasised the importance of ongoing engagement with the history of European antisemitism and of reconstructing political community in ways that should make antisemitism less feasible in the future. While this paper endorses much of Habermas’ analysis, it is critical of cracks in the edifice of his reconstruction which allow back in a certain form of European chauvinism and which make it possible to reach the premature judgement that the problem of antisemitism has been solved in Europe. The last part of the paper addresses the actual ways in which the cracks in the postnational edifice have provided footholds for the unwelcome return of the ‘Jewish question’ to Europe and have made it difficult for critical theory to understand new forms of antisemitism emerging on the European landscape. The signs of an inversion of the cosmopolitan project - from critical engagement with the legacy of European antisemitism to an idealized image of European success in overcoming antisemitism - points to a misappropriation of cosmopolitanism that needs to be challenged.

  20. Space of Transit, Place of Memory: Ma’abarah and Literary Landscapes of Arab Jews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Rossetto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Sifrut ha-ma’abarah (transit camp literature represents a narrative space where contemporary Israeli authors of Middle Eastern origin tell the stories forgotten, considered insignificant, and often repressed of the “oriental Jews” (Mizraḥim, who emigrated to Israel from North Africa and the Middle East during the 1950’s and the 1960’s.After a brief historical introduction on the ma’abarot (transit camps, I aim to unravel the experience of the ma’abarah as a “place of memory” and a “narrative place.” My reflections are based on the concept of “space/place” as conveyed from a human geography perspective. In this framework, I suggest different “literary declensions” through which ma’abarah might be interpreted, and in particular as a narrative place of defiance, resistance, and exile.

  1. The History of African Gene Flow into Southern Europeans, Levantines, and Jews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorjani, Priya; Patterson, Nick; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Keinan, Alon; Hao, Li; Atzmon, Gil; Burns, Edward; Ostrer, Harry; Price, Alkes L.; Reich, David

    2011-01-01

    Previous genetic studies have suggested a history of sub-Saharan African gene flow into some West Eurasian populations after the initial dispersal out of Africa that occurred at least 45,000 years ago. However, there has been no accurate characterization of the proportion of mixture, or of its date. We analyze genome-wide polymorphism data from about 40 West Eurasian groups to show that almost all Southern Europeans have inherited 1%–3% African ancestry with an average mixture date of around 55 generations ago, consistent with North African gene flow at the end of the Roman Empire and subsequent Arab migrations. Levantine groups harbor 4%–15% African ancestry with an average mixture date of about 32 generations ago, consistent with close political, economic, and cultural links with Egypt in the late middle ages. We also detect 3%–5% sub-Saharan African ancestry in all eight of the diverse Jewish populations that we analyzed. For the Jewish admixture, we obtain an average estimated date of about 72 generations. This may reflect descent of these groups from a common ancestral population that already had some African ancestry prior to the Jewish Diasporas. PMID:21533020

  2. Sexual Orientation and Behavior of Adult Jews in Israel and the Association With Risk Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Zohar; Davidovich, Udi

    2016-08-01

    Estimating the size of key risk groups susceptible to HIV/sexually transmitted diseases (STI) is necessary for establishment of interventions and budget allocation. This study aimed to identify various dimensions of sexual orientation and practices in Israel, and correlate the findings with sexual risk behavior (SRB). It used a random representative sample of the Jewish population aged 18-44 years who completed online questionnaires regarding their self-identified sexual orientation, attraction and practices, and SRB. Concordant heterosexuals were those who self-reported heterosexual identity, were attracted and had sex only with the opposite gender. National estimates regarding prevalence of gay, lesbian, and bisexual men and women were based on the civil census. The sample included 997 men and 1005 women, of whom 11.3 and 15.2 % were attracted to the same-gender, 10.2 and 8.7 % reported lifetime same-gender encounters, while 8.2 and 4.8 % self-identified as gay or bisexual men and lesbian or bisexual women, respectively. The estimated population of self-identified Jewish gay or bisexual men and lesbian or bisexual women aged 18-44 in Israel was 94,176, and 57,671, respectively. SRB was more common among self-identified gays or bisexual men and among discordant heterosexual men and women. Those who reported same-gender sexual practices reported greater SRB than those who only had opposite-gender encounters. Interestingly, SRB among discordant heterosexuals was associated with same-sex behavior rather than attraction. Health practitioners should increase their awareness of sexual diversity among their clientele, and should recognize that risk for HIV/STI may exist among self-identified heterosexuals, who may not disclose their actual sexual attraction or practices.

  3. The Battle for Jewish Sympathy: The House of Orange, the Dutch Jews, and Postwar Morality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallet, B.T.; Wertheim, David

    2017-01-01

    In 1965, Queen Juliana of the Netherlands announced the engagement of Princess Beatrix to the German Claus von Amsberg. In the context of a rearticulation of Dutch public morality in terms of the Second World War, and especially the Holocaust, this engagement provoked intense public debate. Each of

  4. The experience of stuttering among Ultra-Orthodox and Secular/Traditional Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, Debora; Ezrati-Vinacour, Ruth; Katz-Bernstein, Nitza; Fostick, Leah

    2017-12-01

    This groundbreaking research compares the experience of stuttering among adult male People Who Stutter (PWS) from the ultra-Orthodox (UO) Jewish community in Israel to those from Secular/Traditional (ST) backgrounds. Participants were 32 UO and 31 ST PWS, aged 18-67 years. Self-report questionnaires utilized: Perceived Stuttering Severity (PSS); Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience of Stuttering (OASES-A); Students' Life Satisfaction Scale (SLSS); Situation Avoidance Behavior Checklist (SABC). Demographic, religious, and stuttering information was collected. Groups were compared on scales, and correlations between scales and the PSS. Subjective stuttering severity ratings were significantly higher among the UO. A significant group effect was found for the OASES-A quality of life subscale, but not other subscales. Significant positive correlations were found between: 1) PSS and OASES-A Total Impact; 2) PSS and 3 OASES subscales; and 3) PSS and SABC (indicating increased avoidance with increased stuttering severity rating). A significant negative correlation was found between the PSS and SLSS, indicating lower life satisfaction with higher rates of stuttering severity among the ST. Interestingly, when tested by group, significant correlations between the PSS and all other study measures were observed only among the ST. UO participants showed higher subjective stuttering severity ratings, yet less impact on quality of life, and no correlation between subjective stuttering and other measures of stuttering experience. These novel findings may result from the combined protective effect of religiosity and socio-cultural characteristics on UO PWS' well-being, despite heightened concern about social consequences of stuttering within UO society. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Attitudes of Major Soviet Nationalities. Volume V. Other Nationalities. The Jews, The Tatars, Moldavia, Comparative Tables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-06-01

    Semander nn the Caspian, lying along the routes from the East into Byzantium. In the eighth or ninth century the royal house of Khazar and large portions... Khazar kingdom was defeated by ,.iatoslav, Grand Duke of Kiev. IThis section is based on the following sources: Sachar, 1972; Halpern, 1968; Dubnow...1916-1920; Ettinger, 1970; Schwartz, 1951 and 1966. 2According to some sources the royal house of Khazar came to its decision to accept Judaism only

  6. THE RIGHT TO MISSION IN HUMAN RIGHTS LAW, "MISSION TO AMISH PEOPLE" AND "JEWS FOR JESUS"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maria Grazia Martino

    2015-01-01

    ... and Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief and the American Convention of Human Rights, it investigates the extent to which such activities fall within the scope of the right to free speech and to freedom...

  7. Weight-of-evidence environmental risk assessment of dumped chemical weapons after WWII along the Nord-Stream gas pipeline in the Bornholm Deep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Hans; Fauser, Patrik; Thomsen, Marianne; Larsen, Jørn Bo

    2012-05-15

    In connection with installation of two natural gas pipelines through the Baltic Sea between Russia and Germany, there has been concern regarding potential re-suspension of historically dumped chemical warfare agents (CWA) in a nearby dump site and the potential environmental risks associated. 192 sediment and 11 porewater samples were analyzed for CWA residues, both parent and metabolites in 2008 and 2010 along the pipeline corridor next to the dump site. Macrozoobenthos and background variables were also collected and compared to the observed CWA levels and predicted potential risks. Detection frequencies and levels of intact CWA found were low, whereas CWA metabolites were more frequently found. Re-suspension of CWA residue-containing sediment from installation of the pipelines contributes marginally to the overall background CWA residue exposure and risk along the pipeline route. The multivariate weight-of-evidence analysis showed that physical and background parameters of the sediment were of higher importance for the biota than observed CWA levels. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Participation, social cohesion and the challenges of the governance process : An analysis of a post-WWII neighbourhood in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, K.; Kempen, R. van

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the past 5 years, several scientific articles have been written on the theme of social cohesion in urban neighbourhoods. In most cases this literature focuses on the loss of social cohesion in these areas. In addition, many problems, such as a declining quality of life, physical

  9. From WWII to Kingston, Ontario: The History of Queen’s University School of Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Karen; Wyllie, Kenneth; Davidson, John

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the origin and development of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the Queen’s University School of Medicine (Kingston, Ontario). METHODS Resarch ethics board approval and privacy agreements from the Kingston General Hospital (KGH, Kingston, Ontario) medical archives were obtained. Primary and secondary data sources were identified. A systematic examination of newspaper archives, research literature, KGH medical advisory committee meeting minutes, and testimonies from Dr Kenneth Wyllie and Dr John Davidson were obtained. RESULTS In 1949, Dr Albert Ross Tilley arrived at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. There, Tilley initiated the Burn Unit at the KGH and began monthly teaching during the academic semester. Ken Wyllie (Meds ’55), Lloyd Carlson (Meds ’57) and John Emery (Meds ’57) were the notable progeny of his early initiatives. In 1963, Kenneth Wyllie founded the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery in Kingston, Ontario, having completed plastic surgery training in Toronto and Edinburgh with experiences in Stockholm (Sweden), Paris (France) and Baltimore (Maryland, USA). He was shortly joined by Pat Shoemaker (Meds ’66). John Davidson (Meds ’82) arrived in 1989, bringing an interest in microsurgery and critical inquiry to the division. Five notable surgeons, Cartotto (Meds ’88), Watkins, Watters, Meathrel (Meds ’03) and McKay, further enhanced the Division’s clinical and academic mission. CONCLUSIONS The collective activity of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Queen’s School of Medicine in its 66-year history has encouraged more than 40 others to pursue distinguished careers in the specialty throughout North America, including three past presidents of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons. PMID:28439504

  10. What can we learn from the dark chapters in our history? Education about the Holocaust in Poland in a comparative perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Ambrosewicz-Jacobs

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates what research tells us about the dynamics of educational practice in both formal and informal education about the Holocaust. It poses questions such as whether it is possible to identify good practices on a political and/or educational level, whether there are links between education about the Holocaust and human rights education, and how education about the Holocaust relates to attitudes toward Jews. Examples of both international studies (such as those by the Fundamental Rights Agency of the EU and the American Jewish Committee and some national surveys on education about the Holocaust are discussed, followed by an analysis of empirical studies from Poland based on focus group interviews and individual interviews with educators. The choice of case study was based on the historical fact that occupied Poland was the site of the murder of almost 5 million Jews, including 3 million Polish Jews.In many cases a strong association with a Polish sense of victimhood based on the memory of the terror and the murder of almost 2 million ethnic Poles during WWII creates conflicting approaches and generates obstacles to providing education about Jewish victims. Nevertheless, following the fall of communism, the number of educational initiatives designed to teach and learn about the Shoah is steadily increasing. The article presents tips for successful programmes of education about the Holocaust which can be generalised for any type of quality education, but are primarily significant for education about tolerance and education aimed at reducing prejudice, counteracting negative stereotypes and preventing discrimination.

  11. Distribution of pre-course BLS/AED manuals does not influence skill acquisition and retention in lay rescuers: a randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Lila; Xanthos, Theodoros; Bassiakou, Eleni; Stroumpoulis, Kostantinos; Barouxis, Dimitrios; Iacovidou, Nicolleta

    2010-03-01

    The present study aims to investigate whether the distribution of the Basic Life Support and Automated External Defibrillation (BLS/AED) manual, 4 weeks prior to the course, has an effect on skill acquisition, theoretical knowledge and skill retention, compared with courses where manuals were not distributed. A total of 303 laypeople were included in the present study. The courses were randomised with sealed envelopes in 12 courses, where manuals were distributed to participants (group A) and in 12 courses, where manuals were not distributed to participants (group B). The participants were formally evaluated at the end of the course, and at 1, 3 and 6 months after each course. The evaluation procedure was the same at all time intervals and consisted of two distinct parts: a written test and a simulated cardiac arrest scenario. No significant difference was observed between the two groups in skill acquisition at the time of initial training. Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the groups in performing BLS/AED skills at 1, 3 and 6 months after initial training. Theoretical knowledge in either group at the specified time intervals did not exhibit any significant difference. Significant deterioration of skills was observed in both groups between initial training and at 1 month after the course, as well as between the first and third month after the course. The present study shows that distribution of BLS/AED manuals 1 month prior to the course has no effect on theoretical knowledge, skill acquisition and skill retention in laypeople. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. No One Expects a Transgender Jew: Religious, Sexual and Gendered Intersections in the Evaluation of Religious and Nonreligious Others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Cragun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While a large body of research has established that there is substantial prejudice against atheists and nonreligious individuals, both in the US and in other countries where nonreligious people are minorities, to date very little research has looked beyond attitudes toward solitary identities (e.g., “atheists” vs. “gay atheists”. Given the growing recognition of the importance of intersectionality in understanding the experiences of minorities, in this article we examined attitudes toward intersected identities, combining five (nonreligious identities (i.e., Christian, Jewish, Muslim, atheist, and nonreligious with four sexual/gender identities (i.e., heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual, and transgender using a 100-point thermometer scale (N = 618. We found that sexual/gender identities were more influential in ordering the results than were religious identities, with heterosexual individuals being rated most positively, followed for the most part by: homosexual, bisexual, and then transgender individuals. However, within the sexual/gender identities, (nonreligion ordered the results; Christians and Jewish individuals rated most highly among heterosexuals while nonreligious and atheist individuals rated most highly among transgender individuals. We suggest these results indicate that people believe minority sexual/gender identities “taint” or “pollute” religious identities, unless those religious identities are already perceived as tainted, as is the case for atheists and the nonreligious.

  13. Pseudo Alopecia Areata Caused by Skull-caps with Metal Pin Fasteners used by Orthodox Jews in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaim Yosefy

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alopecia Areata (AA is a disease characterized by hair loss that is widely believed to be autoimmune in origin. Thus treatment is generally aimed in this direction using immune inhibitors such as steroids and PUVA.

  14. Methodological issues in studying an insular, traditional population: a women's health survey among Israeli haredi (ultra-Orthodox) Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rier, David A; Schwartzbaum, Avraham; Heller, Chaya

    2008-01-01

    This article describes obstacles encountered and strategies devised in planning and conducting a national telephone health survey (n = 459) of an insular, deeply traditional religious population, haredi (ultra-Orthodox Jewish) Israeli women. The paper discusses how special characteristics of this population influenced study design, sampling, data collection, and interpretation. Sampling employed polling data to identify haredi concentrations. Despite haredim's reputation for low survey participation, we achieved a 71-74% response rate (depending on the unknown eligibility of 24 phones never answered) in interviews conducted in 2003-2004. We describe our systematic attention to special aspects of haredi culture such as: modesty and speech codes; the need for rabbinic endorsement; and the importance of female, haredi interviewers. This research was initiated and managed by a community-based women's health non-governmental organization, in partnership with trained researchers. Our experiences can guide others surveying insular communities, such as traditional Muslim and Christian societies.

  15. The mental health impact of terrorism in Israel: a repeat cross-sectional study of Arabs and Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelkopf, M; Solomon, Z; Berger, R; Bleich, A

    2008-05-01

    Since September 2000 Israeli society has been subjected to numerous deadly terror attacks. Few studies have studied the comparative mental health vulnerability of minorities and majorities to continuous terror attacks. Two telephone surveys (N = 512 and 501) on two distinct representative samples of the Israeli population after 19 months and after 44 months of terror. The Arab minority and Jewish majority were compared on measures of exposure to terrorism, posttraumatic stress symptomatology, feeling depressed, coping, sense of safety, future orientation, and previous traumatic experiences. After 19 months of terrorist attacks Arab Israelis and Jewish Israelis reacted roughly similarly to the situation, however after 44 months of terror, posttraumatic symptom disorder in the Arab population increased three-fold, posttraumatic symptomatology doubled and resiliency almost disappeared. We suggest that certain conditions inherent to political conflict situations may potentially put minorities at risk and may only be observable as terrorism-related stressors become chronic.

  16. Perception of the Image of Scientist by Israeli Student Teachers from Two Distinct Communities in Israel: Arabs and Jews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Pazit; Bar, Varda

    2009-01-01

    This is a comparative study of the image of the scientist held by Israeli Jewish and Arabic student teachers from various backgrounds. The image of female scientists among these groups was also investigated. Five groups of female students (N = 500) from four colleges were studied. Traditional tools (DAST) were combined with more informative…

  17. A missense mutation in DHDDS, encoding dehydrodolichyl diphosphate synthase, is associated with autosomal-recessive retinitis pigmentosa in Ashkenazi Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelinger, Lina; Banin, Eyal; Obolensky, Alexey; Mizrahi-Meissonnier, Liliana; Beryozkin, Avigail; Bandah-Rozenfeld, Dikla; Frenkel, Shahar; Ben-Yosef, Tamar; Merin, Saul; Schwartz, Sharon B; Cideciyan, Artur V; Jacobson, Samuel G; Sharon, Dror

    2011-02-11

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal degenerations caused by mutations in at least 50 genes. Using homozygosity mapping in Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) patients with autosomal-recessive RP (arRP), we identified a shared 1.7 Mb homozygous region on chromosome 1p36.11. Sequence analysis revealed a founder homozygous missense mutation, c.124A>G (p.Lys42Glu), in the dehydrodolichyl diphosphate synthase gene (DHDDS) in 20 AJ patients with RP of 15 unrelated families. The mutation was not identified in an additional set of 109 AJ patients with RP, in 20 AJ patients with other inherited retinal diseases, or in 70 patients with retinal degeneration of other ethnic origins. The mutation was found heterozygously in 1 out of 322 ethnically matched normal control individuals. RT-PCR analysis in 21 human tissues revealed ubiquitous expression of DHDDS. Immunohistochemical analysis of the human retina with anti-DHDDS antibodies revealed intense labeling of the cone and rod photoreceptor inner segments. Clinical manifestations of patients who are homozygous for the c.124A>G mutation were within the spectrum associated with arRP. Most patients had symptoms of night and peripheral vision loss, nondetectable electroretinographic responses, constriction of visual fields, and funduscopic hallmarks of retinal degeneration. DHDDS is a key enzyme in the pathway of dolichol, which plays an important role in N-glycosylation of many glycoproteins, including rhodopsin. Our results support a pivotal role of DHDDS in retinal function and may allow for new therapeutic interventions for RP. Copyright © 2011 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. German Jews and the Great War: Gustav Landauer’s and Fritz Mauthner’s Friendship during Times of War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Schapkow

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper examines the friendship of Fritz Mauthner (1849-1923 and Gustav Landauer (1870-1919 at the time of World War I. Mauthner’s and Landauer’s correspondence in wartime stimulated debate about the war, on the one hand, and German and Jewish identity, on the other. Most significantly, both intellectuals perceived in Germany, as a place of culture, a profound transformation. This was particularly the case when they found themselves compelled to consider what Germany should look like after the defeat in 1918. The debate between Landauer and Mauthner had a deep impact on their sense of general Jewish questions and their approach to the fate of Eastern European Jewry during the war.

  19. Why not the best? Social anxiety symptoms and perfectionism among Israeli Jews and Arabs: a comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iancu, I; Bodner, E; Joubran, S; Ben Zion, I; Ram, E

    2015-05-01

    Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) has been repeatedly shown to be very prevalent in the Western society and is characterized by low self-esteem, pessimism, procrastination and also perfectionism. Very few studies on SAD have been done in the Middle East or in Arab countries, and no study tackled the relationship between social anxiety symptoms and perfectionism in non-Western samples. We examined social anxiety symptoms and perfectionism in a group of 132 Israeli Jewish (IJ) and Israeli Arab (IA) students. Subjects completed the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (MPS), the Negative Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ-N), the Positive Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ-P) and a socio-demographic questionnaire. The rate of SAD in our sample according to a LSAS score of 60 or more was 17.2% (IJ=13.8%, IA=19%, ns). The correlation between perfectionism and the LSAS was high in both groups, and in particular in the IJ group. The IA group had higher scores of social avoidance, of ATQ-P and of two of the MPS subscales: parental expectations and parental criticism. Concern over mistakes and negative automatic thoughts positively predicted social fear in the IJ group, whereas in the IA group being female, religious and less educated positively predicted social fear. Negative automatic thoughts and age positively predicted social avoidance in the IJ group. In general, the IJ and IA subjects showed higher social anxiety, higher ATQ-N scores and lower parental expectations as compared with non-clinical US samples. Social anxiety symptoms and perfectionism are prevalent in Arab and Jewish students in Israel and seem to be closely related. Further studies among non-western minority groups may detect cultural influences on social anxiety and might add to the growing body of knowledge on this intriguing condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ethnic Heritage in America, Teacher's Manual: Curriculum Materials in Elementary School Social Studies on Greeks, Jews, Lithuanians, and Ukrainians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicago Consortium for Inter-Ethnic Curriculum Development, IL.

    The teacher's manual accompanies the Ethnic Heritage in America curriculum materials for elementary-level social studies. First, the manual presents a background discussion of the materials. The materials resulted from an ethnic education project based on a course for teachers on Community Policies in Ethnic Education at the University of Illinois…

  1. The speech of Agrippa during the War against Jews in Flavius Josephus: notes for a stylistic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Rodríguez Horrillo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Agrippa’s speech of Josephus’ Jewish war is examined from a stylistic perspective. The speech is an example of literary μελετή in which the historian uses stylistic resources and reminiscences in order to create cultural connections between the Classical Greece and the present.

  2. Elderly Bedouins and Jews in Israel: the effects of visual impairment on perceived functional and health status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iecovich, Esther; Isralowitz, Richard E

    2003-01-01

    Age-related vision impairment is a major cause of functional limitations in mobility and independent living. Research findings suggest that vision impairment in later life affects social, emotional, mental as well as physical well-being, and daily functioning. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between ethnicity and visual problems, i.e., whether Bedouin and Jewish elderly persons differed in terms of visual impairment prevalence and the extent to which visual impairment affected their ability to perform activities of everyday life. This study sampled 88 Bedouin and 111 Jewish elderly persons aged 60 and older in the southern region of Israel. The findings show that the majority of the respondents reported visual problems. Bedouin elderly tended to have more problems with distance sight as a result of living conditions than Jewish elderly. In terms of ability to perform ADL and IADL functions, elderly Bedouins reported more problems. The study findings are discussed in terms of policy and service provision. In addition, recommendations for additional research are presented. Copyright 2003 The Haworth Press, Inc.

  3. The Effect of the Immigration of Soviet Jews to Israel on Israel’s Economy and Human Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Evered (408) 656-2646 ]AS/Ev DD FORM 1473,84 MAR 83 APR edition may be used until exhausted security clasification of this page All other editions ar...families, who typically are adults 0 arriving in the early prime of their working lives with relatively few children. The case of the Soviet immigrants is

  4. THE DEFENSIVE NATURE OF BENEFIT FINDING DURING ONGOING TERRORISM: AN EXAMINATION OF A NATIONAL SAMPLE OF ISRAELI JEWS

    Science.gov (United States)

    HALL, BRIAN J.; HOBFOLL, STEVAN E.; CANETTI, DAPHNA; JOHNSON, ROBERT J.; GALEA, SANDRO

    2011-01-01

    A study examining the effects of terrorism on a national sample of 1,136 Jewish adults was conducted in Israel via telephone surveys, during the Second Intifada. The relationship between reports of positive changes occurring subsequent to terrorism exposure (i.e., Benefit finding), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity, and negative outgroup attitudes toward Palestinian citizens of Israel (PCI) was examined. Benefit finding was related to greater PTSD symptom severity. Further, Benefit finding was related to greater threat perception of PCI and ethnic exclusionism of PCI. Findings were consistent with hypotheses derived from theories of outgroup bias and support the anxiety buffering role of social affiliation posited by terror management theory. This study suggests that benefit finding may be a defensive coping strategy when expressed under the conditions of ongoing terrorism and external threat. PMID:22058603

  5. It Is Just a Game (of Jews vs. Nazi Beer Pong): A Case Study on Law, Ethics, and Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monseau, Susanna; Lasher, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accreditation standards on learning and teaching, adopted in 2013, require students to "engage in experiential and active learning designed to improve skills and the application of knowledge in practice." The discussion of the facts of real life case studies is a great way…

  6. Islam, Jews and Eastern Christianity in late medieval pilgrims’ guidebooks: some examples from the Franciscan Convent of Mount Sion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campopiano, M.

    2012-01-01

    The Holy Land was described, not just in the accounts of the pilgrims who visited the most sacred land of Christianity, but also in several compilations and collections of texts conceived as guidebooks for clerics and pilgrims. From the fourteenth century onwards, many of these collections are

  7. Mostre e musei nei cinegiornali dell’Archivio Luce tra le due guerre / Exhibitions and museums in the newsreels of the Institute Luce Archive between the WWI and the WWII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Casini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Il patrimonio cinematografi co dell’Istituto Nazionale Luce raccoglie alcune centinaia di ore di fi lmati che riguardano la storia delle mostre e dei musei del ‘900 in Italia e non solo. Sin dalla sua nascita, nel 1925, il LUCE (L’Unione Cinematografi ca Educativa inviò i suoi operatori a documentare musei, gallerie e mostre, specialmente in occasione di visite ufficiali dei sovrani e di esponenti del regime fascista. Cinegiornali e documentari didattici sono visibili on-line sul sito dell’Archivio, e parzialmente anche sul canale dedicato di YouTube. Il contributo traccia una prima ricognizione di un vasto panorama di materiali documentari e informativi, dando conto dell’uso del mezzo fi lmico per documentare le esposizioni temporanee e i musei. L’importanza del materiale del LUCE, che a partire dal 1931 diventa anche sonoro, offre uno spaccato ancora poco conosciuto di questa forma di documentazione in relazione al coevo dibattito sui musei, tra propaganda e uso pedagogico dell’immagine. Vengono esaminate modalità e strategie di presentazione visive e testuali distinguendo tra gli i musei di archeologia, arte antica, arte moderna e contemporanea, considerando alcuni casi specifi ci di esposizioni temporanee come la Biennale di Venezia e la Quadriennale di Roma. La conclusione è dedicata ad una rifl essione sui viaggi di Adolf Hitler in Italia in rapporto al patrimonio artistico e architettonico. The film heritage of the National Institute Luce collects several hundred hours of footage covering the history of the exhibitions and museums of the ‘900 in Italy and beyond. Since its inception in 1925, the LUCE (The Union Educational Film sent his workers to document museums, galleries and exhibitions, especially on the occasion of offi cial visits of kings and members of the fascist regime. Newsreels and educational documentaries and that for some years on-line are also visible on the Archive audiovisual database, and partly also on the dedicated YouTube channel. The paper draws a fi rst reconnaissance of a vast landscape of documentary materials and informative, giving regard to the use of the medium of fi lm to document the temporary exhibitions and museums. The importance of the LUCE’s material, which in 1931 also becomes sound, offers a glimpse still little known of this form of documentation in relation to the contemporary debate on museums, including propaganda and pedagogical use of the image. Ways visual and textual presentation strategies are examined distinguishing among the museums of archeology, ancient art, modern and contemporary art, considering some specifi c cases of temporary exhibitions like the Venice Biennale and the Rome Quadrenniale. The conclusion is dedicated to a refl ection on Adolf Hitler travels in Italy in relation to the artistic and architectural heritage.

  8. Introduction to "Standing together in Troubled Times"

    CERN Document Server

    Shifman, M

    2016-01-01

    This Introduction opens the book {\\sl Standing Together in Troubled Times} which presents a story of friendship between Wolfgang Pauli, one of the greatest theoretical physicists of the 20th century, and Charlotte Houtermans. They met at the very onset of the quantum era, in the late 1920s in Germany where Charlotte was a physics student at G\\"ottingen University. At that time G\\"ottingen was right at the heart of groundbreaking developments in physics. Both Pauli and Houtermans personally knew major participants in the quantum revolution. Caught between two evils -- German National Socialism and Soviet Communism -- Charlotte Houtermans would have likely perished if it were not for the brotherhood of physicists: Niels Bohr, Wolfgang Pauli, Albert Einstein, James Franck, Max Born, Robert Oppenheimer and many other noted scientists who tried to save friends and colleagues (either leftist sympathizers or Jews) who were in mortal danger of becoming entrapped in a simmering pre-WWII Europe. This book is based on n...

  9. Standing together in troubled times unpublished letters by Pauli, Einstein, Franck and others

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This captivating book is a story of the friendship between a genius physicist Wolfgang Pauli and Charlotte Houtermans whose career in physics was not as glamorous. They met in the late 1920s in Germany, at the very onset of the quantum era and personally knew all the major players in the emergent quantum world that was very much part of central Europe: Germany, Austria, Hungary, Denmark and Switzerland. And Charlotte was a student at Göttingen that was right at the heart.Caught between two evils — Soviet Communism and German National Socialism — she would have probably perished if it were not for the brotherhood of physicists: Niels Bohr, Wolfgang Pauli, Albert Einstein, James Franck, Max Born, Robert Oppenheimer and many other noted scientists who tried to save friends and colleagues (either leftist sympathizers or Jews) who were in mortal danger of being entrapped in a simmering pre-WWII Europe.Using newly discovered documents from the Houtermans family archive: twenty three Pauli's letters to Charlott...

  10. POLES IN THE SNOW OF THE NORTH. POLISH MIGRATION TO NORWAY IN THE PAST TWO CENTURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Sokół-Rudowska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Migration of Polish citizens in recent times is a very current issue. In my article I want to explain this highly sophisticated phenomenon on the example of Polish migration to Norway. The scope of my research includes the last two hundred years, during which it has been possible to observe a few different, in the genesis, waves of migration – the nineteenth century (the Polish insurgents and the Polish Jews, WWII (soldiers and forced laborers, and both the political from 1980’s and the largest, economic migration after the Polish accession to the European Union in 2004. The main issue the article focuses on is the style and quality of life of the Poles, who voluntarily or forced by the circumstances, settled in Norway. The article also focuses on cultural confrontation, which automatically followed that migration, often accompanied by acculturation, contrculturation, transculturation or cultural integration. Among other subjects raised in the article there are also the reasons causing the present high migratory activity of the Poles, the largest group of foreigners living in Norway today.

  11. World War II-related post-traumatic stress disorder and breast cancer risk among Israeli women: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Dekel, Rachel; Barchana, Micha; Linn, Shai; Keinan-Boker, Lital

    2014-03-01

    Several studies have suggested that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is related to adverse health outcomes. There are limited data on PTSD and cancer, which has a long latency period. We investigated the association between World War II (WWII)-related PTSD and subsequent breast cancer (BC) risk among Jewish WWII survivors and examined whether this association was modified by exposure to hunger during WWII. We compared 65 BC patients diagnosed in 2005 through 2010 to 200 population-based controls who were members of various organizations for Jewish WWII survivors in Israel. All participants were born in Europe, lived at least six months under Nazi rule during WWII, and immigrated to Israel after the war. We estimated PTSD using the PTSD Inventory and applied logistic regression models to estimate the association between WWII-related PTSD and BC, adjusting for potential confounders. We observed a linear association between WWII-related PTSD and BC risk. This association remained significant following adjustment for potential confounders, including obesity, alcohol consumption, smoking, age during WWII, hunger exposure during WWII, and total number of traumatic life events (OR = 2.89, 95% CI = 1.14-7.31). However, the level of hunger exposure during WWII modified this effect significantly. These findings suggest an independent association between WWII-related PTSD and subsequent BC risk in Jewish WWII survivors that is modified by hunger, a novel finding. Future research is needed to further explore these findings.

  12. The Ninth Circuit Court's treatment of the history of suicide by Ancient Jews and Christians in Compassion in Dying v. State of Washington: historical naivete or special pleading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, D W

    1998-01-01

    In this article, Prof. Darrel Amundsen critiques Judge Reinhardt's comments regarding "Historical Attitudes Toward Suicide" in his Compassion in Dying opinion. Amundsen demonstrates that the court's characterization of ancient Jewish and Christian practices is inaccurate and misleading because it fails to acknowledge the complexities of the moral issue of suicide. Amundsen discusses martyrdom, suicide in general, suicide by the ill, and euthanasia in ancient Judaism. In contrast to the court's commentary, Amundsen demonstrates that regard for human life is a central feature of Jewish ethical monotheism. Furthermore, the author challenges the court's conclusions about early Christianity, and explains why its treatment of the issue of suicide in early Christianity is misleading and inaccurate. Amundsen's discussion of early Christianity includes suicide, martyrdom, and especially the Augustinian teaching on suicide. He concludes that the court's treatment of the issue of suicide in early Christianity is so historically and conceptually muddled as to be fundamentally inaccurate.

  13. Don’t Drink the Chocolate; Domestic Slavery and the Exigencies of Fasting for Crypto-Jews in Seventeenth-Century Mexico

    OpenAIRE

      , Robert J. Ferry

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines some of the elements of the identity of people who secretly practiced certain Judaic rituals in seventeenth-century Mexico.  It is drawn from research on an extensive project that is based on a close reading of the testimonial records of more than a hundred individuals who were accused of and prosecuted for Jewish heresy by the Mexican Holy Office of the Inquisition in the 1640s. The second quarter of the seventeenth century was a time of troubles and transformations in ...

  14. Reflections on the Cultural Encounter between the Jews and the Greeks and Romans in Jewish Coin Iconography of the Hellenistic-Roman Period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Contrary to the written and archaeological sources, the numismatic material from the Persian, Hellenistic, and particularly the Roman Imperial periods in Palestine constitutes an almost uninterrupted material source from which detailed knowledge can be drawn concerning the political, cultural and...

  15. Differences in the prevalence of asthma and current wheeze between Jews and Arabs: results from a national survey of schoolchildren in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohat, Tamy; Green, Manfred S; Davidson, Yael; Livne, Irit; Tamir, Rami; Garty, Ben-Zion

    2002-10-01

    There is evidence that the prevalence of asthma is higher in Jewish schoolchildren than in Arab schoolchildren. It is not clear to what extent other risk factors explain these differences. To evaluate whether the population group differences in the prevalence of asthma and current wheeze remain after adjustment for several potential risk factors. A national survey of 10,057 13- to 14-year-old schoolchildren was carried out in Israel in 1997. There were 7,436 Jewish children and 2,621 Arab children. Differences in the two population groups were examined while controlling for demographic and environmental factors such as: sex, parental education, parental smoking and asthma, crowding, and presence of older siblings. The prevalence of asthma and current wheeze was significantly higher in Jewish children compared with Arab children. The asthma prevalence was 7.8% for Jewish children and 4.9% for Arab children (P = 0.001), and prevalence of current wheeze was 20.7 and 10.1%, respectively (P = 0.001). After adjustment for demographic and environmental factors, the prevalence of asthma and current wheeze was still increased in the Jewish population (odds ratios: 1.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06 to 2.15; 2.15 95% CI = 1.70 to 2.73, respectively). History of asthma in parents and residence in a rural area were significant risk factors for asthma and current wheeze. In addition, the presence of less than three older siblings was a significant risk factor for asthma, and female sex, ever having pets, and maternal smoking were significantly associated with current wheeze. The differences between Jewish and Arab children were not explained by the studied factors. Genetic factors, different environmental exposure, and nutritional habits should be studied to further explain the differences between these populations.

  16. The psychological impact of the Israel-Hezbollah War on Jews and Arabs in Israel: the impact of risk and resilience factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Patrick A; Canetti-Nisim, Daphna; Galea, Sandro; Johnson, Robert J; Hobfoll, Stevan E

    2008-10-01

    Although there is abundant evidence that mass traumas are associated with adverse mental health consequences, few studies have used nationally representative samples to examine the impact of war on civilians, and none have examined the impact of the Israel-Hezbollah War, which involved unprecedented levels of civilian trauma exposure from July 12 to August 14, 2006. The aims of this study were to document probable post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), determined by the PTSD Symptom Scale and self-reported functional impairment, in Jewish and Arab residents of Israel immediately after the Israel-Hezbollah War and to assess potential risk and resilience factors. A telephone survey was conducted August 15-October 5, 2006, following the cessation of rocket attacks. Stratified random sampling methods yielded a nationally representative population sample of 1200 adult Israeli residents. The rate of probable PTSD was 7.2%. Higher risk of probable PTSD was associated with being a woman, recent trauma exposure, economic loss, and higher psychosocial resource loss. Lower risk of probable PTSD was associated with higher education. The results suggest that economic and psychosocial resource loss, in addition to trauma exposure, have an impact on post-trauma functioning. Thus, interventions that bolster these resources might prove effective in alleviating civilian psychopathology during war.

  17. Sens et enjeux d’un interdit alimentaire dans le judaïsme Food taboos in Judaism: the example of Ashkenazi Jews in London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Faure

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cet article porte sur la manière dont la prohibition de mêler nourritures lactées et carnées dans le judaïsme se matérialise par les objets de la cuisine et leurs usages quotidiens, à partir d’une recherche réalisée à Londres auprès de couples juifs ashkénazes qui se définissent presque tous comme orthodoxes (modern orthodox et dont la scolarisation dans des écoles juives a parfois pu contribuer à revivifier les pratiques religieuses. Par delà la diversité des habitudes culinaires et de leurs formes (ex : végétarisme, par delà les éventuelles variations individuelles de l’observance religieuse au cours du cycle de vie, l’interdit alimentaire de mêler lait et viande est respecté par l’ensemble des personnes rencontrées. Il s’agit alors d’en comprendre le sens et la portée. Les conséquences matérielles de cet interdit alimentaire permettent de saisir l’importance de la religion dans le logement et les activités de tous les jours. Elles conduisent à articuler le plan matériel et le plan symbolique en suggérant une interprétation anthropologique de cette prohibition, en lien avec les écrits bibliques et les analyses déjà menées sur le sujet.This article is based upon research on Ashkenazi Jewish families living in London. It deals with the way, in Judaïsm, the prohibition of eating meat and dairy foods together is materialised through the use of kitchen utensils on a day to day basis. Material consequences of this dietary law allow us to understand the importance of religion in the Jewish home and in everyday life. Consequences which lead to the linking of material uses and their symbolic significance by suggesting an anthropological interpretation of this dietary law in accordance with Biblical writings.

  18. Exploring the association between posttraumatic growth and PTSD: a national study of Jews and Arabs following the 2006 Israeli-Hezbollah war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brian J; Hobfoll, Stevan E; Canetti, Daphna; Johnson, Robert J; Palmieri, Patrick A; Galea, Sandro

    2010-03-01

    Posttraumatic growth (PTG)-deriving benefits following potentially traumatic events-has become a topic of increasing interest. We examined factors that were related to self-reported PTG, and the relationship between PTG and symptoms of post-traumatic stress (PTS) following the 2006 Israel-Hezbollah. Drawing from a national random sample of Israel, data from 806 terrorism-exposed Israeli adults were analyzed. PTG was associated with being female, lower education, greater recent terrorism exposure, greater loss of psychosocial resources, greater social support, and greater self-efficacy. PTG was a consistent predictor of PTS across hierarchical linear regression models that tested whether demographic, stress, or personal resources moderated the relationship between PTG and PTS. PTG did not relate to PTS differently for people who differed by age, sex, ethnicity, education, religiosity, degree of terrorism exposure, self-efficacy, nonterrorism stressful life events, and loss of psychosocial and economic resources. PTG was not related to well-being for any of these subgroups.

  19. NAJI ATTALLAH’S CREW: STEREOTYPES OF JEWS, ARABS, AND AMERICANS IN EGYPT’S MOST-­‐WATCHED RAMADAN 2012 SOAP OPERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaya Martin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In addition to its strict fasting regiments, observed by practicing Muslims, the month of Ramadan has become known for its high viewership of serialized television programs throughout the Arabic-speaking world.  During Ramadan - a month during which millions partake of festive fast breaking (Iftaar gatherings after sundown - competition among television stations pull all the stops to attract the largest audiences possible, often by offering compelling seasonal soap operas featuring major local and pan-Arab actors.

  20. Examples of Best Practice 3. Holocaust Education and Sexual Diversity: A Positive Link between Teaching about the Persecution of Jews and Sexual Minorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Lutz

    2010-01-01

    Holocaust education has been most successful in creating empathy, historical understanding and present responsibility against racism/antisemitism and towards human rights by telling true stories of children, women and men who were victims of these crimes during the Nazi period, while also raising awareness of the consequences for the present. The…

  1. Plasma cholesterol, triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels in 17-year-old Jerusalem offspring of Jews from 19 countries of birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, S T; Eisenberg, S; Baras, M; Davies, A M; Halperin, G; Stein, Y

    1982-11-01

    The distribution of plasma cholesterol, triglyceride (TG) and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) was examined in 6,654 17-yr-old young men and women who attended an army medical examination. There were highly significant differences among the four main groups, classified according to their father's place of birth: Israel, the Asian Near East, North Africa and Europe (including the Americas, Oceania and Southern Africa). Mean levels of plasma cholesterol in each group varied in males from 126.9 to 137.4 mg/dl, TG from 72.1 to 77.8 mg/dl and HDL-C from 41.3 to 44.4 mg/dl. In females, the cholesterol levels ranged from 144.6 to 154.8 mg/dl, TG from 72.7 to 76.3 and HDL-C from 47.3 to 50.5 mg/dl. In the various groups, subjects of North African origin consistently had the lowest lipid values, and subjects whose fathers were born in Europe or Israel, the highest. When the subjects were classified according to their fathers' specific country of origin, mean cholesterol values ranged from a low of 126.2 mg/dl in Moroccan males to a high of 143.0 in Austrian and Swiss males, and from 137.6 mg/dl in Tunisian females to 161.6 in those whose fathers had emigrated from North American countries. HDL-C ranged in males from 40.0 mg/dl in the Egyptian group to 47.0 in the Austrian-Swiss-Lichtenstein group; in females, the values ranged from 46.0 mg/dl in the Algerian group to 53.4 in the Austrian-Swiss-Lichtenstein group. These findings are discussed in light of published reports of lipid and lipoprotein levels in individuals living in different countries.

  2. Am I "That Jew"? North African Jewish Experiences in the Toronto Jewish Day School System and the Establishment of or Haemet Sephardic School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Train, Kelly Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the North African Jewish community's establishment of Or Haemet Sephardic School as a response to the forced "Ashkenazification" of Sephardic students in the Orthodox Jewish day school system. The establishment of the school signifies the North African Jewish community's refusal and resistance to an essentialist…

  3. Levi's eerste kerstfeest. Jeugdverhalen over jodenbekering, 1792-2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, E.

    2017-01-01

    The Christians must respect the Jews, for they are God’s chosen people, and Jesus himself was a Jew. However, the Jews must be converted: They must recognize Jesus as the Messiah. Thus the essence of many children’s books on missionary work among the Jews. In this study, Ewoud Sanders investigates

  4. Auch eine Theorie der Moderne Another Theory of Modernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Rohlf

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Hahn zeichnet die Wege schreibender Frauen durch 200 Jahre deutsch-jüdische Kulturgeschichte nach. Ausgehend von Paul Celans vieldeutiger Jüdin Pallas Athene, werden dabei stereotype Bilder der „Jüdin“, der „Intellektuellen“ und die scharfe Trennlinie zwischen humanistisch christlicher und jüdischer Tradition zur Diskussion gestellt. Mit Celans Figur schreibt sich gleichzeitig die theoretische Herausforderung in diese Studie ein, nach Ambivalenzen und Dialogen zu fragen, deren Voraussetzungen mit beispielloser Gewalt zerstört wurden. Gestützt auf Archivmaterial und veröffentlichte Texte der von ihr vorgestellten Frauen, spannt Hahn den Bogen von frühen Strategien der Assimilierung bis in die Jahre nach 1945. Das Buch ist keine Überblicksdarstellung, sondern präsentiert einzelne, einander auch überschneidende Konstellationen – intellektuelle Netzwerke, Briefwechsel, intertextuellen Transfer.Hahn traces the paths of women writers through two hundred years of German-Jewish cultural history. Using Celan’s plurivalent “Pallas Athene” as a starting point, Hahn discusses stereotypical images of “the Jew,” “the Intellectual,” and the sharp division between the humanistic Christian and the Jewish tradition. The character created by Celan functions as a theoretical challenge in this text, asking about feelings of ambivalence and dialogues which could not take place as their premises were destroyed with an unprecedented violence. Based on archival material and biographical texts about the women she uses, Hahn completes the circle between early strategies and assimilation until the post-WWII years. This book does not offer a general overview, but offers individual, overlapping constellations-intellectual networks, letters, and intertextual transfers.

  5. Monsters and Clowns Incorporated: the Representations of Adolf Hitler in British and American WWII Propaganda Posters Monstres, clowns et compagnie : les représentations d’Hitler dans les affiches de propagande britanniques et américaines pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Vallée

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Dans les affiches de propagande britanniques et américaines de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, les représentations d’Adolf Hitler font de lui soit un monstre effrayant, sanguinaire et diabolique, soit un clown grotesque, un pantin ridicule et risible, une cible qu’il faut frapper, écraser, ou détruire d’une façon ou d’une autre. S’adressant au sens de l’humour du spectateur, à ses peurs ou à son aversion, les artistes de propagande des deux côtés de l’Atlantique utilisent des leviers émotionnels et des tons très variés pour faire du dictateur nazi un des ressorts principaux de la participation à l’effort de guerre. Ces caricatures d’Hitler, dont l’objectif final était d’encourager la production et les économies ou de lutter contre les bavardages intempestifs, révèlent une condamnation morale ou politique et font partie de la propagande de soutien au moral, qui vise à galvaniser les Troupes de l’Intérieur en présentant la victoire comme quelque chose de vital ou d’inéluctable. Qu’il soit monstre ou clown, on fait tomber le dictateur déshumanisé de son piédestal, un piédestal si soigneusement construit pour lui par la propagande nazie.

  6. The Integration of Science, Higher Education and Economy as a Factor of Recovery and Modernization of Soviet National Economy During the First Post-WWII Decades (Case Study of the Activity of the Siberian Physical-Technical Institute (1945-1954

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Sorokin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article traces the development of the research activity of the largest scientific institute of the Eastern part of Russia – Siberian Physical-Technical Institute in the period between 1945 and 1954. The author analyzes the main currents of integration of science, education and production, characterize SPhTI’s area of researches. Particular importance is given to the meaning of the integration of science, education and industry as a factor of recovery and modernization of Soviet national economy. This article is meant for all interested in history of Soviet higher education and on the whole in the Soviet period of Russian history.

  7. 78 FR 17890 - Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for Automated External Defibrillator System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    ... to rescuers or bystanders. There is the potential risk of delivering an electrical shock during defibrillation of a patient to a rescuer or bystander if there is physical contact between them and the patient... action is of a type that does not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human...

  8. Keep pushing! Limiting interruptions to CPR; bag-valve mask versus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This has led to first responders and paramedics performing single rescuer CPR using a bag-valve-mask (BVM) device as opposed to the historical practice of intubating and ventilating via an endotracheal tube. Bag-valve-mask ventilations, especially during single rescuer CPR, are however associated with complications ...

  9. Electrical exposure risk associated with hands-on defibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemkin, Daniel L; Witting, Michael D; Allison, Michael G; Farzad, Ali; Bond, Michael C; Lemkin, Mark A

    2014-10-01

    The use of hands-on defibrillation (HOD) to reduce interruption of chest compression after cardiac arrest has been suggested as a means of improving resuscitation outcomes. The potential dangers of this strategy in regard to exposing rescuers to electrical energy are still being debated. This study seeks to determine the plausible worst-case energy-transfer scenario that rescuers might encounter while performing routine resuscitative measures. Six cadavers were acquired and prepared for defibrillation. A custom instrumentation-amplifier circuit was built to measure differential voltages at various points on the bodies. Several skin preparations were used to determine the effects of contact resistance on our voltage measurements. Resistance and exposure voltage data were acquired for a representative number of anatomic landmarks and were used to map rescuers' voltage exposure. A formula for rescuer-received dose (RRD) was derived to represent the proportion of energy the rescuer could receive from a shock delivered to a patient. We used cadaver measurements to estimate a range of RRD. Defibrillation resulted in rescuer exposure voltages ranging from 827V to ∼200V, depending on cadaver and anatomic location. The RRD under the test scenarios ranged from 1 to 8J, which is in excess of accepted energy exposure levels. HOD using currently available personal protective equipment and resuscitative procedures poses a risk to rescuers. The process should be considered potentially dangerous until equipment and techniques that will protect rescuers are developed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hitler's Death Camps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Presents a high school lesson on Hitler's death camps and the widespread policy of brutality and oppression against European Jews. Includes student objectives, instructional procedures, and a chart listing the value of used clothing taken from the Jews. (CFR)

  11. Mormon and Jewish views of the afterlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David; Portner, Jodi; Sierra, Duvan

    2004-12-01

    In their responses to a questionnaire, undergraduates, 60 Mormons, viewed the afterlife as less pleasant than did the 37 Jews, while the Jews were more concerned with sin and judgment and more often believed in reincarnation.

  12. Containment: Relevant or Relic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    Policy Formation History and Truman Doctrine The ―Grand Alliance‖ countries responsible for defeating Nazism during WWII was doomed to unravel due to...is the business of killing, sometimes it still is the moral (therefore just) response to a situation. Walzer cites Nazism in WWII as a justifiable

  13. Multiple Stages 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, John

    Multiple stages 2: theatrical futures, set design, community plays, cultural capitals, democracy & drama, WWII dramas, performance on adoption, promenade about emigration, qualities in political theatre, performance analysis, dramaturgical education, Toulmin Variations......Multiple stages 2: theatrical futures, set design, community plays, cultural capitals, democracy & drama, WWII dramas, performance on adoption, promenade about emigration, qualities in political theatre, performance analysis, dramaturgical education, Toulmin Variations...

  14. Mobile and Portable Dental Services Catering to the Basic Oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    /pla/files/2011_ISDB(2).pdf. [Last cited 2013 Sept 12]. 21. Dental equipment and supply [Internet Source]. Office of Medical History, US Army Medical. Department. Available from: http://history.amedd. army.mil/corps/dental/wwii/chapterv_wwii.

  15. Recombinant mapping of the familial hyperinsulinism gene to an 0.8 cM region on chromosome 11p15.1 and demonstration of a founder effect in Ashkenazi Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, B; Chiu, K C; Liu, L; Anker, R; Nestorowicz, A; Cox, N J; Landau, H; Kaiser, N; Thornton, P S; Stanley, C A

    1995-05-01

    A gene for autosomal recessive familial hyperinsulinism (HI) (OMIM: 256450), a neonatal metabolic disease characterized by inappropriate insulin secretion in the presence of severe hypoglycemia, was recently mapped to a 6.6 cM interval between the markers D11S926 and D11S928 on chromosome 11p in 15 families (1). In the current study we evaluated six additional families and five new markers, and further localized the gene between D11S419 and D11S1310. Using genotype data from CEPH Version 7 and data generated from this study, this region was estimated to be 0.8 cM in length. Significant linkage disequilibrium between markers and the HI gene was observed over a region of 10.3 cM (11 pter-D11S926-D11S1308-11pcen) for Ashkenazi Jewish chromosomes. Haplotype analysis showed that 12 of 36 HI chromosomes, versus one of 36 non-HI chromosomes, bore a specific haplotype for D11S419-D11S902-D11S921 (p < 0.0007), strongly suggesting a founder effect in this ethnic group.

  16. Teamwork and Leadership in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hunziker, Sabina; Johansson, Anna C; Tschan, Franziska; Semmer, Norbert K; Rock, Laura; Howell, Michael D; Marsch, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    .... Resuscitation teams often deviate from algorithms of CPR. Emerging evidence suggests that in addition to technical skills of individual rescuers, human factors such as teamwork and leadership affect adherence to algorithms and hence the outcome of CPR...

  17. Basal genoplivning af voksne og automatisk ekstern defibrillering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berlac, Peter Anthony; Torp-Pedersen, Christian T; Lippert, Freddy K

    2008-01-01

    The new ERC guidelines on resuscitation emphasize the importance of quality CPR. BLS should be started as early as possible. Lay rescuers should not check for a pulse, they should call for help and start chest compressions immediately. Compression depth should be 4-5 cm at a rate of 100 compressi......The new ERC guidelines on resuscitation emphasize the importance of quality CPR. BLS should be started as early as possible. Lay rescuers should not check for a pulse, they should call for help and start chest compressions immediately. Compression depth should be 4-5 cm at a rate of 100...... compressions per minute. Chest compressions and ventilation should be performed in a ratio of 30:2. Lay rescuers should continue until professional help arrives. Lay rescuers may use the same procedure for children as recommended for adults. Professionals should, however, initiate CPR in children with 5...

  18. In-hospital airway management training for non-anesthesiologist EMS physicians: a descriptive quality control study

    OpenAIRE

    Trimmel, Helmut; Beywinkler, Christoph; Hornung, Sonja; Kreutziger, Janett; Voelckel, Wolfgang G

    2017-01-01

    Background Pre-hospital airway management is a major challenge for emergency medical service (EMS) personnel. Despite convincing evidence that the rescuer?s qualifications determine efficacy of tracheal intubation, in-hospital airway management training is not mandatory in Austria, and often neglected. Thus we sought to prove that airway management competence of EMS physicians can be established and maintained by a tailored training program. Methods In this descriptive quality control study w...

  19. Comparative performance assessment of commercially available automatic external defibrillators: A simulation and real-life measurement study of hands-off time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savastano, Simone; Vanni, Vincenzo; Burkart, Roman; Raimondi, Maurizio; Canevari, Fabrizio; Molinari, Simone; Baldi, Enrico; Danza, Aurora I; Caputo, Maria Luce; Mauri, Romano; Regoli, Francois; Conte, Giulio; Benvenuti, Claudio; Auricchio, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Early and good quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) improve cardiac arrest patients' survival. However, AED peri- and post-shock/analysis pauses may reduce CPR effectiveness. The time performance of 12 different commercially available AEDs was tested in a manikin based scenario; then the AEDs recordings from the same tested models following the clinical use both in Pavia and Ticino were analyzed to evaluate the post-shock and post-analysis time. None of the AEDs was able to complete the analysis and to charge the capacitors in less than 10s and the mean post-shock pause was 6.7±2.4s. For non-shockable rhythms, the mean analysis time was 10.3±2s and the mean post-analysis time was 6.2±2.2s. We analyzed 154 AED records [104 by Emergency Medical Service (EMS) rescuers; 50 by lay rescuers]. EMS rescuers were faster in resuming CPR than lay rescuers [5.3s (95%CI 5-5.7) vs 8.6s (95%CI 7.3-10). AEDs showed different performances that may reduce CPR quality mostly for those rescuers following AED instructions. Both technological improvements and better lay rescuers training might be needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Is there any room for shortening hands-off time further when using an AED?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Joong Eui; Kim, Taeyun; Kim, Kyuseok; Choi, Saewon

    2009-02-01

    Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) play a very important role in out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The mandatory hands-off time imposed by current AEDs is not short enough to bring about the full benefits of rapid defibrillation with an AED into light. The aim of this study is to examine whether a change in the process of charging the capacity and removing explanations from the prompts of the AEDs shortens hands-off time. The operating steps and the voice prompts of the current AEDs were reviewed and the time intervals between the steps and the voice prompts were measured. We modified an AED to fully precharge the capacitor and to contain more concise voice prompts. We had 42 expert rescuers and 50 lay-person rescuers perform 2-rescuer CPR with the modified AED and the old AED, respectively. Using the modified AED significantly reduced hands-off times by 9.95 s (95% CI: 9.67-10.23) in 2-rescuer CPR and by 10.68 s (95% CI: 9.75-11.61) in 1-rescuer CPR (pAEDs can shorten the hands-off time in both 1 and 2-rescuer CPR.

  1. Achieving safe hands-on defibrillation using electrical safety gloves--a clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Charles D; Thomsen, Jakob E; Løfgren, Bo; Petley, Graham W

    2015-05-01

    Safe hands-on defibrillation (HOD) will allow uninterrupted chest compression during defibrillation and may improve resuscitation success. We tested the ability of electrical insulating gloves to protect the rescuer during HOD using a 'worst case' electrical scenario. Leakage current flowing from the patient to the 'rescuer' during antero-lateral defibrillation of patients undergoing elective cardioversion was measured. The 'rescuer' maintained firm (20 kgf) contact with the patient during defibrillation, wearing Class 1 electrical insulating gloves while simulating an inadvertent contact with the patient, through an additional wired contact between 'rescuer' and patient. Data from 61 shocks from 43 different patients were recorded. The median leakage current from all defibrillations was 20.0 μA, (range: 2.0-38.5). In total, 18 of the shocks were delivered at 360 J and had a median leakage current of 27.0 μA (range: 14.3-38.5). When using Class 1 electrical insulating gloves for hands-on defibrillation, rescuer leakage current is significantly below the 1 mA safe threshold, allowing safe hands-on defibrillation if the rescuer makes only one other point of contact with the patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Uut moodi Teine maailmasõda / Kaisa Karu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karu, Kaisa

    2009-01-01

    Teise maailmasõja 70. aastapäevaks valminud kuueosalise doksarja "Apokalüpsis: WWII", (National Geographic, režissöör Isabelle Clarke, stsenaristid Henri de Turenne ja Daniel Costelle) filmimispaikades

  3. Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization: Anomaly or Future Roadmap

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sadowski, Robert W

    2008-01-01

    .... JIEDDO itself has been compared to a 'Manhattan-style' project This paper provides historical perspective through case studies while exploring other analogs such as the North Atlantic shipping tragedy in WWII...

  4. Why the 'World's Policeman' Cannot Retire in Southeast Asia: A Critical Assessment of the 'East Timor Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clark, Ian

    2002-01-01

    ... -- since assuming the position from the British after WWII. In 1999, Australia led a peacekeeping force into East Timor, ostensibly fulfilling a long held desire by the United States to reduce its worldwide commitments...

  5. How Anticommonism 'Cemented' the American Conservative Movement in a Liberal Age of Conformity, 1945-64

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee Haddigan

    2010-01-01

      With the publication in 1976 of George H. Nash's The Conservative Intellectual Movement in America Since 1945, interest in post-WWII opposition to the dominant liberal consensus of the time has steadily grown...

  6. The strokes that killed Churchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ali, Rohaid; Connolly, Ian D; Li, Amy; Choudhri, Omar A; Pendharkar, Arjun V; Steinberg, Gary K

    2016-01-01

    From February 4 to 11, 1945, President Franklin D. Roosevelt of the United States, Soviet Union Premier Joseph Stalin, and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill met near Yalta in Crimea to discuss how post-World War II (WWII...

  7. Toward the anthropology of white nationalist postracialism: Comments inspired by Hall, Goldstein, and Ingram’s “The hands of Donald Trump”

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeff Maskovsky

    2017-01-01

    ...–WWII industrial economy, his use of hand gestures, and his public speaking about race work together to telegraph a white nationalist message to his followers without making them feel that he is...

  8. Molecular Studies of HTLV-1 in a Newly Recognized High Risk Population (AIDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-16

    per year. Hodgkin’s disease may provide another case in point. The bimodal age distribution, the age prevalence , anectodal description of geographic... Prevalence of HTLV-I infection Patients HTLV-I & western blot # tested # Positive (%) Iranian Jews 480 5.20% (25)- Mashadi Jews 210 12 X (25...community continued to marry close relatives for over the next 150 years. Markers of consanguinity are high among Mashadi Jews - for example, over 20% have

  9. Military Training Lands Historic Context: Miscellaneous Training Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    NARA College Park, RG 111-SC WWII, Box 42, Photo SC131444) 43 66 Aluminum balk pontoon bridge construction on Smith Lake at Fort Bragg, NC, 1951...field. Examples of Engineer training sites are shown below. Pontoon bridge construction Figure 64. A 75 mm howitzer crossing an engineer pontoon... bridge construction on Smith Lake at Fort Bragg, NC, 1951 (NARA College Park, RG 111-SC WWII, Box 207, Photo SC370521). ERDC/CERL TR-10-9 44

  10. The Further Integration of the Intelligence and Surface Warfare Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    professionals into a position to influence the outcome of the war. However, this demand for quality intelligence products came at a price , and in WWII...that price was manpower. The Intelligence center in Hawaii grew from just 126 personnel at the beginning of WWII to 1,767 at war’s end. 14...use intelligence as filler to establish the scene setter for the next evaluated evolution. Conclusions and Recommendations Command and control

  11. Die onkunde van die Jode en hulle verwerping van die evangelie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. van Zyl

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available The ignorance of the Jews and their rejection of salvation The aim of this paper is to answer the question on just how much the Jews could rely on their ignorance in rejecting Jesus Christ and his message of salvation. This could not be answered without viewing Luke's attitude towards the Jews. The paper argues further that the predestination of God played a significant role. In the end the whole question is concerned with the conversion of the Jews after their 'previous state of ignorance'.

  12. Time Trends in the Incidence and Mortality of Ovarian Cancer in Ireland, Northern Ireland, and Israel, 1994-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinan-Boker, Lital; Silverman, Barbara G; Walsh, Paul M; Gavin, Anna T; Hayes, Catherine

    2017-10-01

    The aims of this study were to compare time trends in ovarian cancer incidence and mortality in populations with (1) similar genetics but different health care systems (Ireland and Northern Ireland [NI]) and (2)different genetics but similar health care system (Israeli Jews and Arabs) and to interpret the results. Age-standardized rates of ovarian cancer incidence and mortality for 1994-2013 in the 3 countries were obtained from national cancer registries and national statistics. Time trends in incidence, mortality, and incidence-to-mortality ratio were assessed by linear regression models applied to each country and between populations (Ireland-NI, Ireland-Israeli Jews, Israeli Jews-Arabs). Joinpoint analysis was used to calculate the annual percentage change (APC). Ovarian cancer incidence and mortality rates in 1994 were similar in the countries studied. Thereafter a reduction in incidence and mortality was observed in Ireland (incidence APC1994-2013 = -0.75%, P Ireland and Israeli Jews (P = 0.009) and between Israeli Jews and Arabs (P = 0.004) were observed. The only significant trend difference for mortality was between Israeli Jews and Arabs (P = 0.038). Incidence-to-mortality ratios showed stable trends in all groups except for Israeli Jews (APC1994-2013 = -1.0%, P Ireland, NI, and Israeli Jews, following global trends, with a more prominent incidence decline in Israeli Jews. Decreasing mortality trends are driven by falling incidence in the countries studied rather than improved survival.

  13. In Search of the jüdische Typus: A Proposed Benchmark to Test the Genetic Basis of Jewishness Challenges Notions of "Jewish Biomarkers".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhaik, Eran

    2016-01-01

    The debate as to whether Jewishness is a biological trait inherent from an "authentic" "Jewish type" (jüdische Typus) ancestor or a system of beliefs has been raging for over two centuries. While the accumulated biological and anthropological evidence support the latter argument, recent genetic findings, bolstered by the direct-to-consumer genetic industry, purport to identify Jews or quantify one's Jewishness from genomic data. To test the merit of claims that Jews and non-Jews are genetically distinguishable, we propose a benchmark where genomic data of Jews and non-Jews are hybridized over two generations and the observed and predicted Jewishness of the terminal offspring according to either the Orthodox religious law (Halacha) or the Israeli Law of Return are compared. Members of academia, the public, and 23andMe were invited to use the benchmark to test claims that Jews are genetically distinct from non-Jews. Here, we report the findings from these trials. We also compare the genomic similarity of ∼300 individuals from nearly thirty Afro-Eurasian Jewish communities to a simulated jüdische Typus population. The results are discussed in light of modern trends in the genetics of Jews and related fields and provide a tentative answer to the ageless question "who is a Jew?"

  14. In search of the jüdische Typus: a proposed benchmark to test the genetic basis of Jewishness challenges notions of “Jewish biomarkers”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eran Elhaik

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The debate as to whether Jewishness is a biological trait inherent from an authentic Jewish type (jüdische Typus ancestor or a system of beliefs has been raging for over two centuries. While the accumulated biological and anthropological evidence support the latter argument, recent genetic findings, bolstered by the direct-to-consumer genetic industry, purport to identify Jews or quantify one’s Jewishness from genomic data. To test the merit of claims that Jews and non-Jews are genetically distinguishable, we propose a benchmark where genomic data of Jews and non-Jews are hybridized over few generations and the observed and predicted Jewishness of the terminal offspring according to either the Orthodox religious law (Halacha or the Israeli Lafw of Return are compared. Members of academia, the public, and 23andMe were invited to use the benchmark to test claims that Jews are genetically distinct from non-Jews. Here, we report the findings from these trials. We also compare the genomic similarity of ~300 individuals from nearly thirty Afro-Eurasian Jewish communities to a simulated jüdische Typus population. The results are discussed in light of modern trends in the genetics of Jews and related fields and provide a tentative answer to the ageless question who is a Jew?

  15. Delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, M. R.; Billica, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    The microgravity environment presents several challenges for delivering effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Chest compressions must be driven by muscular force rather than by the weight of the rescuer's upper torso. Airway stabilization is influenced by the neutral body posture. Rescuers will consist of crew members of varying sizes and degrees of physical deconditioning from space flight. Several methods of CPR designed to accommodate these factors were tested in the one G environment, in parabolic flight, and on a recent shuttle flight. Methods: Utilizing study participants of varying sizes, different techniques of CPR delivery were evaluated using a recording CPR manikin to assess adequacy of compressive force and frequency. Under conditions of parabolic flight, methods tested included conventional positioning of rescuer and victim, free floating 'Heimlich type' compressions, straddling the patient with active and passive restraints, and utilizing a mechanical cardiac compression assist device (CCAD). Multiple restrain systems and ventilation methods were also assessed. Results: Delivery of effective CPR was possible in all configurations tested. Reliance on muscular force alone was quickly fatiguing to the rescuer. Effectiveness of CPR was dependent on technique, adequate restraint of the rescuer and patient, and rescuer size and preference. Free floating CPR was adequate but rapidly fatiguing. The CCAD was able to provide adequate compressive force but positioning was problematic. Conclusions: Delivery of effective CPR in microgravity will be dependent on adequate resuer and patient restraint, technique, and rescuer size and preference. Free floating CPR may be employed as a stop gap method until patient restraint is available. Development of an adequate CCAD would be desirable to compensate for the effects of deconditioning.

  16. Jewish -- Zionist Terrorism and the Establishment of Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-01

    Revisionists seceded from the World Zionist Organization and formed the New Zionist Organizacion . 5 Through- out the disturbances of the 1930s, the...terror which the Jews always skill- fully maintained.蕵 The Jews used Deir Yassin extensively in their psychological warfare campaigns designed to

  17. A Spatial Expansion of a Pocket Size Homeland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Cecilie Speggers Schrøder

    2016-01-01

    references of the kind that made traditional Jewish life accessible to assimilated Jews and non-Jews alike. Heine took his readers into Jewish spaces such as a Jewish home, synagogue, and street. He gave the Jewish readers a sense of togetherness, of belonging to a Jewish space that was available through...

  18. "Feeling Jewish" and "Knowing Jewish": The Cognitive Dimension of Informal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamoran, Adam

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Joseph Reimer's article titled, "Beyond More Jews Doing Jewish: Clarifying the Goals of Informal Jewish Education." Reimer's essay on the goals of informal education is a welcome contribution to discussions about whether and how Jewish education may contribute to the continuity of Jews and Judaism…

  19. Dutch Jewry during the Emancipation Period (1787 - 1815)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michman, Jozeph

    1995-01-01

    By the end of the eighteenth century, the Dutch Jews enjoyed complete freedom of religion, but economic discrimination left the majority of them penniless. Moreover, a bitter conflict broke out between the enlightened and the orthodox Jews, leading to a fierce controversy and the foundation of a

  20. The Utopian Dilemma: American Judaism and Public Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Murray

    Since the turn of the century, American Jews have been closely associated with reform movements that seek to improve social conditions, to help the disadvantaged, and to achieve international peace. Jewish religious traditions and social circumstances have disposed many Jews to view politics and power idealistically. However, traditional…

  1. JEWISH-­ARAB RELATIONS THROUGH THE LENSE OF ISRAELI CINEMA; THEN AND NOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shmuel Shepkaru

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Israeli cinema has presented different aspects of the relationship between Israeli Jews and Arabs.  These aspects encompass topics such as personal friendships and conflicts, homosexual and heterosexual affairs, gender issues, politics and wars, and questions of identity.  This article focuses on the presentations of the relationships between Jews and Arabs and their desire for normalization and peace.

  2. Obraz Židů v českém kazatelství přelomu 17. a 18. století: předběžné poznámky

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 1 (2016), s. 72-106 ISSN 1213-2144 Institutional support: RVO:68378068 Keywords : Preaching and the Image of Jews * Catholic Sermons * Early Modern Homiletics * Representation of Jews in Literature * Anti-Jewish Rhetoric Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision

  3. Living Together: The Impact of the Intifada and the Peace Negotiations on Attitudes toward Coexistence of Arab and Jewish Pupils in Ethnically Segregated and Mixed Schools in Jaffa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuzovsky, Ruth

    1997-01-01

    Changes in the willingness of Jews and Arabs to coexist were studied in 1989 with 217 12-year-olds and in 1994 with 194 in Jaffa (Israel), where both Jews and Arabs live. Separatist attitudes increased and faith in coexistence decreased, but mixed schools seemed to improve attitudes toward coexistence. (SLD)

  4. Satisfaction and Stressors in a Religious Minority: A National Study of Orthodox Jewish Marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnall, Eliezer; Pelcovitz, David; Fox, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    The paucity of mental health studies with Orthodox Jews makes culturally competent counseling care unlikely. In this large-scale investigation of marriage among Orthodox Jews, most respondents reported satisfaction with marriage and spouse, although satisfaction was highest among recently married couples. The most significant stressors were…

  5. "By the Rivers of Babylon": Deterritorialization and the Jewish Rhetorical Stance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard-Donals, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The position of the excluded other, it seems to the author, is the position that has characterized Jews since antiquity: exiled from the nation and dispersed to other nations, Jewish participation in civic life has been defined, even in modernity, by its marginalization and precariousness. The Jew, in other words, provides a salient example of the…

  6. 3 CFR 8379 - Proclamation 8379 of May 12, 2009. Jewish American Heritage Month, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... tradition. Since Jews arrived in New Amsterdam in 1654, Jewish Americans have maintained a unique identity... come to mean “good deed,” and many Jews have adopted these practices to serve their communities. Other mitzvot include observing holidays, such as Passover, which marks the exodus from Egypt; and Yom Kippur, a...

  7. Reframing Paul's sibling language in light of Jewish epistolary forms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-17

    Jun 17, 2015 ... Yet, whereas sociological explorations of Paul's sibling language in the context of the Greco-Roman background are ..... the carpenter.' In the Griechische Papyri der Staats- und. Universitätsbibliothek Hamburg (P.Hamb.) 60, Pascheis (a. Jew), a letter writer, addresses Justos (non-Jew) as 'strategos.

  8. "My Heart Is in the East and I Am in the West": Enduring Questions of Israel Education in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakai, Sivan

    2014-01-01

    By examining writing about Israel education since the founding of the State, this paper highlights three questions that have surfaced repeatedly in Jewish educational discourse: What is the purpose of teaching American Jews about Israel? Who is best equipped to teach American Jews about Israel? How can Israel education foster positive…

  9. Discursive investigation into John's internalised spirit identity and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-31

    May 31, 2016 ... (John 8:44–46). In the verses, Jesus castigated the Jews and naturalised their identity. For the Johannine Jesus, the. Jews – the outsiders, are ..... kingdom. Clinging to her mundane identity of being a. Samaritan, she exuded ignorance by asking invalid questions. The Johannine Jesus perceived her ...

  10. Haplotype structure in Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Im, Kate M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Wang, Xianshu

    2011-01-01

    Three founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute to the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Ashkenazi Jews (AJ). They are observed at increased frequency in the AJ compared to other BRCA mutations in Caucasian non-Jews (CNJ). Several authors have proposed that elevated allele fre...

  11. Models of Common Schooling and Interethnic Relations: A Comparative Analysis of Policies and Practices in the USA, Israel, and Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrew, Marie; Lemire, Francine

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes four specific attempts at integrated schooling: Blacks and Whites in the United States; Ashkenazim and Sephardic Jews, and Arabs and Jews in Israel; and Catholics and Protestants in Ireland. Maintains that mere interethnic contact is not sufficient to change negative ethnic attitudes. Outlines other necessary conditions and approaches.…

  12. The Argument for Genocide in Nazi Propaganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bytwerk, Randall L.

    2005-01-01

    The Nazis justified their attempt to exterminate the Jews by claiming that they were only defending themselves against Jewish plans to destroy Germany and its population. I show how the Nazis used the same words to discuss both claims, and how they argued that just as the Jews were serious about exterminating Germany, they were equally serious…

  13. Racial Trade Barriers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jacob Halvas

    Aryanization is associated with Nazi Germany's policies to exclude Jews in the Germany from the economy in the pre-war years, but I will show it was a global policy from 1937. The utopian goal of international Aryanization was the total removal of Jews who traded with Germany anywhere in the world...

  14. Theology of religions in Martin Luther

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    Luther does mention Jews and Muslims together in his works (Miller 2013:427), but he had different ... advises Christians to ban Jews from society, and advises them to go and live amongst the. Turks (Kaufmann ... good prophet, convinced Luther that Muslims were heretics and followers of the false religion (WA 53, 280, 7).

  15. Multicultural Education in the Zionist State--The Mizrahi Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Gal; Dahan, Yossi

    2000-01-01

    Reports that the educational experience of Israeli Jews from Islamic countries (Mizrahi Jews) demonstrates the struggle between egalitarian rhetoric (a critical multiculturalism with a social-democratic character) on one hand and a practice of segregation (an autonomist multiculturalism with fundamentalist features) on the other. (Contains 78 end…

  16. De-colonising Exile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabih, Joshua

    . My paper shall focus on the representation of the Moroccan Jew in both Moroccan and “Jewish” cinemas in the last two decades in order to show how transnational Moroccan cinema and post-Zionist Mizrahi films actually engage Moroccans – Jews and Muslims – to tell their confiscated memories...

  17. [The organization of Jewish dentists in pre-Israel Palestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren-Kratz, M

    2016-04-01

    The first modern dental institutes were established in Europe and in the USA during the 1840s. At that period there wasn't a single qualified doctor in Palestine, not to mention a professional dentist. A couple of decades later, as the number of Christian pilgrims grew, some modern hospitals were established and a few non-Jewish dentists opened their clinics in Jerusalem, which was then and in the following decades, the region's largest city. In Europe, dentistry became a popular profession among Jews in general and among Jewish women in particular. The first Jewish dentist settled in Jerusalem in the mid-1880s. Other dentists were slow to arrive and their number began to grow only after the turn of the 20th century. Their professional education varied from those who were trained as apprentices by other dentists to those which studied a couple of years in an academic dental school. The devastation caused by WWI prompted American-Zionist organizations to send a special medical unit to Palestine in 1918. Along medical supplies it also brought a small group of doctors and dentists. The two American dentists that decided to remain in Palestine took upon themselves to spread their medical and scientific knowledge. They also organized the dentists, whose number grew considerably during the 1920s, and called the authorities to regulate the dental profession. In 1926 the British authorities issued a decree regulating all medical professions. It demanded that dental practitioners will be licensed after proving their previous studies and professional knowledge. In 1931, local dentists' organizations decided to establish the Palestine Dental Association. Five years later it was accepted as a member by the International Dental Federation (FDI) and was recognized by the local authorities. Since the 1930s, prominent Jewish dentists from abroad were invited to come to Palestine to lecture, and local dentists participated in international conferences. This prompted the first

  18. Imagen fotográfica y memorial cultural. El caso de los judíos en la prensa gráfica de la primera mitad del siglo XX/Photographic Image and cultural memory. The case of the Jews in the graphic press of the first half of the twentieth century

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Antonio B Espinosa-Ramírez; Antonio A Ruíz-Rodríguez

    2015-01-01

    ... de las fotografías publicadas en la prensa gráfica se analizan los mecanismos de connotación de las imágenes para que estas puedan ser interpretadas por los lectores en claves de memoria cultural aplicada a un grupo humano concreto: lo judíos...

  19. Tay-Sachs disease preconception screening in Australia: self-knowledge of being an Ashkenazi Jew predicts carrier state better than does ancestral origin, although there is an increased risk for c.1421 + 1G > C mutation in individuals with South African heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Raelia; Burnett, Leslie; Proos, Anné

    2011-12-01

    The Australasian Community Genetics Program provided a preconception screening for Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) to 4,105 Jewish high school students in Sydney and Melbourne over the 12-year period 1995-2007. By correlating the frequencies of mutant HEXA, MIM *606869 (gene map locus 15q23-q24) alleles with subjects' nominated ethnicity (Ashkenazi/Sephardi/Mixed) and grandparental birthplaces, we established that Ashkenazi ethnicity is a better predictor of TSD carrier status than grandparental ancestral origins. Screening self-identified Ashkenazi subjects detected 95% of TSD carriers (carrier frequency 1:25). Having mixed Ashkenazi and non-Ashkenazi heritage reduced the carrier frequency (1:97). South African heritage conveyed a fourfold risk of c.1421 + 1G > C mutation compared with other AJ subjects (odds ratio (OR), 4.19; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.83-9.62, p = 0.001), but this was the only specific case of ancestral origin improving diagnostic sensitivity over that based on determining Ashkenazi ethnicity. Carriers of c.1278insTATC mutations were more likely to have heritage from Western Europe (OR, 1.65 (95% CI, 1.04-2.60), p = 0.032) and South Eastern Europe (OR, 1.77 (95% CI, 1.14-2.73), p = 0.010). However, heritage from specific European countries investigated did not significantly alter the overall odds of TSD carrier status.

  20. [Basic resuscitation of adults and automatic external defibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlac, Peter Anthony; Torp-Pedersen, Christian T; Lippert, Freddy K

    2008-11-17

    The new ERC guidelines on resuscitation emphasize the importance of quality CPR. BLS should be started as early as possible. Lay rescuers should not check for a pulse, they should call for help and start chest compressions immediately. Compression depth should be 4-5 cm at a rate of 100 compressions per minute. Chest compressions and ventilation should be performed in a ratio of 30:2. Lay rescuers should continue until professional help arrives. Lay rescuers may use the same procedure for children as recommended for adults. Professionals should, however, initiate CPR in children with 5 ventilations followed by a compression-ventilation ratio of 15:2. Automatic External Defibrillation should be used as early as possible.

  1. A world of change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, B.

    2007-01-15

    The paper explains why the time has come for the coal industry to look at advancing mine escape and rescue strategies. Many recent coal mining incidents required the intervention of mine rescue teams equipped with breathing apparatus. Self rescuers have only been widely used since the late 1960s in the form of filter rescuers. Now most US coal miners carry the 1 hour person-wearable SCSR, an oxygen producing unit rather than a filter. NIOSH has reported incidences of failures of SCSRs during detailed inspection - the author comments that it is high time the manufacturers produced 100% reliable products. Historically, a filter self-rescuer is simpler to design, easier to use and more reliable than an SCSR. At the Sago explosion miners may have fared better with this. Thermal imaging cameras would help mine rescue teams but these are expensive and not approved as intrinsically safe. 4 photos.

  2. Basal genoplivning af voksne og automatisk ekstern defibrillering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berlac, P.A.; Lippert, F.K.; Torp-Pedersen, Christian Tobias

    2008-01-01

    The new ERC guidelines on resuscitation emphasize the importance of quality CPR. BLS should be started as early as possible. Lay rescuers should not check for a pulse, they should call for help and start chest compressions immediately. Compression depth should be 4-5 cm at a rate of 100 compressi......The new ERC guidelines on resuscitation emphasize the importance of quality CPR. BLS should be started as early as possible. Lay rescuers should not check for a pulse, they should call for help and start chest compressions immediately. Compression depth should be 4-5 cm at a rate of 100...

  3. Heterogeneity in the long term health effects of warfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut-Yuksel, Mevlude; Yuksel, Mutlu

    2017-11-01

    This paper estimates the long-term heterogeneous legacies of exposures to war in utero and during early childhood on height in adulthood. Using a novel dataset on the regional WWII destruction in Germany, combined with the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP), we find that individuals who experienced warfare in utero and during childhood are an average of 2cm shorter as adults, suggesting that the negative scarring effect of WWII dominated the positive effect coming from a selection. Among war survivors, children from less privileged families who resided in highly destroyed regions, particularly girls, suffered the greatest health consequences of warfare. Our analyses also show that wartime children who lost their parents during the war years are an average of 1.3cm shorter as adults. However, the father's conscription during WWII had no long-term effect on adult height. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Relative bioavailability and toxicity of fuel oils leaking from World War II shipwrecks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faksness, Liv-Guri; Daling, Per; Altin, Dag; Dolva, Hilde; Fosbæk, Bjørn; Bergstrøm, Rune

    2015-05-15

    The Norwegian Authorities have classified 30 WWII shipwrecks to have a considerable potential for pollution to the environment, based on the location and condition of the wreck and the types and amount of fuel. Oil thus far has been removed from eight of these shipwrecks. The water accommodated fractions of oils from two British wrecks and two German wrecks have been studied with special emphasis on chemistry and biological effects (algae growth (Skeletonema costatum) and copepod mortality (Calanus finmarchicus)). Chemical analyses were also performed on three additional German wreck oils. The results from these studies show that the coal based oils from German WWII shipwrecks have higher toxicity to marine organisms than the mineral oils from the British shipwrecks. The potential for higher impact on the marine environment of coal based oils has resulted in an altering of the priority list for oil recovery from WWII wrecks by the authorities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Crossroads. Life Changing Stories from the Second World War: A (Transmedia Storytelling Approach to World War II Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licia Calvi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Crossroads is the name of the concept that narratively connects several WWII-related cultural institutions in Brabant. We were initially looking for ways to connect 4 otherwise very diverse World War II-related institutions (in fact, 3 museums and a commemoration centre and we found it in this overarching paradigm. Crossroads does not require museums to share their collection items. It offers them instead a tool to build and offer visitors a cohesive experience related to WWII heritage.  This experience is characterized by the specific focus into their WWII stories using storytelling that they can adopt. This paper will highlight the creative process that brought to the development of this concept and will discuss examples of the resulting transmedia narratives.

  6. Judíos de Belchite en el denominado «Libro de la escribanía de don Federico de Aragón, conde de Luna» (1422-1425)

    OpenAIRE

    Aparici Martí, Joaquín

    2011-01-01

    The lack of documentary local sources has hindered until here our knowledge of the Jews of the Aragonese town of Belchite, belonging to the count of Luna. By using a manuscript notarial notebook –that had been inaccurately ascribed to a “seigniorial notary’s office of Federico de Aragon”– preserved in the City Archives of Segorbe, the author identifies several Jews living in the town in the 1420s and provides mention of their activities. Some of these Jews are featured in the Hebrew poems by ...

  7. Antisemitismo nella stampa diocesana negli anni Trenta del Novecento / Anti-Semitism in the Diocesan Press in 1930s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perin Raffaella

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The essay analyzes the Catholic Church's attitude toward the Jews during the Thirties, examining the diocesan press of the North-East of Italy. Going through the Catholic weekly newspapers it was first possible to establish their position with respect to the spread of racist and anti-semitic ideologies, and then to outline which were the images of Jews theorized and propagandized by the Catholic press. The old teaching of the Catholic doctrine and theology concerning the Jews influenced the construction of the collective imaginary and the creation of anti-semitic stereotypes from the second half of the XIX century.

  8. Nuremberg Laws in Ion Antonescu Regime. Compulsory Community Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Florian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In December 1940, the Law-Decree no. 3 984 set out the military status of Jews. Practically, all Jews in Romania were excluded from the military service. The meaning of this political measure was extremely powerful for the destiny of the Jewish community. As the Law text provisioned, it was a political and legislative decision continuing that regarding the racial definition of Jews. The direct consequence was the socio-political marginalization, on ethnic criteria, of a group of men.

  9. Sacrilegios y crímenes rituales: el judío como encarnación de la infamia en los romances de ciego españoles (1700-1850

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine Pédeflous

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the literary presentation of the figure of the Jew in a corpus of chapbooks from early eighteenth century to mid-nineteenth century. The analysis of repetitive motives and characterizations will reveal the existence of a typical Jew, intrinsically bad and sacrilegious. We will compare this figure to similar but Christian characters and put it into perspective with a brief study of the literary sources and of the sociohistorical context, in order to understand why the Jew chapbooks flourish in that period. The exemplar mechanisms and the use of the marvellous will also be analysed in this work.

  10. Applying posttraumatic stress disorder MMPI subscale to World War II POW veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Query, W T; Megran, J; McDonald, G

    1986-03-01

    In order to determine whether the MMPI-PTSD subscale has application for assessing DSM-III diagnosed PTSD among populations other than Vietnam veterans, a group of WWII POWs (N = 69) were given the subscale. Results indicated that the use of the PTSD subscale can be generalized to older veterans; in a small sample of Pacific POWs, PTSD is more common among those from the Pacific theater than those from Europe. However, the subscale fails to distinguish between Pacific and European POW veterans. Difficulties in sampling and confounding stressors are discussed, as well as implications for treatment of WWII veterans.

  11. Major General Malcolm C. Grow, M.D. (1887-1960) Soldier, Surgeon, Airman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Tyler R; Cowan, Scott W; Yeo, Charles J; Beekley, Alec C

    2017-11-01

    World War I (WWI) and World War II (WWII) both presented physicians with challenges unseen before in history. New inventions such as the machine gun and poisonous gas in WWI and the massive aircraft battles in WWII required physicians and surgeons to adapt and innovate to provide the best care and preventative measures for service members. One physician, Malcolm Cummings Grow, distinguished himself as an innovator, a researcher, and a leader. His contributions to the field of military medicine, flight surgery, and medical administration led to countless lives being saved during the two World Wars and laid the groundwork for many different combat protective equipment still in use today.

  12. It's All Happening at the Zoo: Children's Environmental Learning after School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jason A.; Katz, Cindi

    2009-01-01

    Pairing dynamic out-of-school-time (OST) programs with zoos can encourage young people's relationships with and sense of responsibility for animals and the environment. The project presented in this article, Animal Rescuers, gave the authors the opportunity to examine how such a pairing can work. OST programs enable learning in settings that are…

  13. Health and safety of underground workforce of paramount importance to the SA mining industry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schreiber, WL

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Underground mines are divided into ventilating districts. This means that two or more workings use the same ventalation air to cool and provide workers with breathable air. Every year, a substantial number of Self-Contained Self-Rescuers (SCSRs...

  14. Les barrières à la demande de service de vaccination chez les populations nomades de Danamadji, Tchad

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seli, D.

    2017-01-01

    Some interesting themes emerged especially at the end of the individual interviews, focus group discussions as well as after observing the behavior of the nomads during this study. Firstly, among the themes identified is the mistrust towards the vaccinating agents by most simple rescuers or young

  15. Rescue behaviour in a social bird : removal of sticky 'bird-catcher tree' seeds by group members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammers, Martijn; Brouwer, Lyanne

    2017-01-01

    Rescue behaviour is a special form of cooperation in which a rescuer exhibits behaviours directed towards averting a threat to an endangered individual, thereby potentially putting itself at risk. Although rescue behaviour has been well-documented in experimental studies on rats and ants, published

  16. Delaying a shock after takeover from the automated external defibrillator by paramedics is associated with decreased survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berdowski, Jocelyn; Schulten, Ron J.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; van Alem, Anouk P.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the takeover by Advanced Life Support [ALS] trained ambulance paramedics from rescuers using an automated external defibrillator [AED] delays shocks and if this delay is associated with decreased survival after out-of-hospital

  17. Heavy-Duty Rescue Straps For Coveralls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Henry M.

    1988-01-01

    New type of strap on coveralls helps rescuers lift victims of industrial accidents. Made of heavy twill. New material, 1 in. wide and has breaking strength of 600 lb, sewn to coveralls with polyester thread in box "X" stitching. Reinforcing nylon webbing, 1 3/4 in. wide sewn with strap at attachment points.

  18. The Impact of a Natural Disaster: Under- and Postgraduate Nursing Education Following the Canterbury, New Zealand, Earthquake Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, S. K.; Richardson, A.; Trip, H.; Tabakakis, K.; Josland, H.; Maskill, V.; Dolan, B.; Hickmott, B.; Houston, G.; Cowan, L.; McKay, L.

    2015-01-01

    While natural disasters have been reported internationally in relation to the injury burden, role of rescuers and responders, there is little known about the impact on education in adult professional populations. A 7.1 magnitude earthquake affected the Canterbury region of New Zealand on 4 September 2010 followed by more than 13,000 aftershocks in…

  19. Teaching Holocaust Rescue: A Problematic Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Determining how to teach about rescue during the Holocaust presents many dilemmas to teachers as they plan Holocaust curricula. Rescue is often overemphasized, and faulty perspectives about rescuers and their actions may cause students to develop distorted views about this aspect of Holocaust history. This article explores several factors that…

  20. Political Christianity in Renaissance Drama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Joulan, Nayef Ali

    2017-01-01

    Examining the following selected Renaissance dramas: Marlowe's "The Jew of Malta" (1585), Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice" (1596), Massinger's "The Renegado" (1624), Daborne's "A Christian Turn'd Turk" (1612), and Goffe's "The Raging Turk" (1656), this research investigates Renaissance…

  1. Youth in the midst of escalated political violence: sense of coherence and hope among Jewish and Bedouin Arab adolescents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarah Abu-Kaf; Orna Braun-Lewensohn; Tehila Kalagy

    2017-01-01

    .... This study aimed to compare coping resources and stress reactions among adolescents from two ethnic groups in southern Israel-Jews and Bedouin Arabs-during a period of escalated political violence (November 2012...

  2. "Likes" for Peace: Can Facebook Promote Dialogue in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yifat Mor; Yiftach Ron; Ifat Maoz

    2016-01-01

      This study examines the ways in which social media is used to promote intergroup dialogue and reconciliation in the context of the protracted, ethnopolitical conflict between Israeli-Jews and Palestinians...

  3. "Likes" for peace: can Facebook promote dialogue in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mor, Yifat; Ron, Yiftach; Maoz, Ifat

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the ways in which social media is used to promote intergroup dialogue and reconciliation in the context of the protracted, ethnopolitical conflict between Israeli-Jews and Palestinians...

  4. The True Crime of Palestinian Professor Sari Nusseibeh

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Killgore, Andrew I

    1991-01-01

    [Sari Nusseibeh] may face an ordeal as grim at that survived by [Alfred Dreyfus]. As a Palestinian, Nusseibeh is subject to Israel's Basic Law, under which a particular group, Jews, rule supreme over any other group...

  5. Eating disorders in South African schools: a public health crisis that ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Weiner R. South African Jewish history and information. Wikepedia [homepage on the. Internet]. Available from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jews. 10. Szabo CP, Hollands C. Abnormal eating attitudes in secondary schoolgirls in South Africa:.

  6. Introduction: Why Teach about the Holocaust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Theodore

    1978-01-01

    Presents a rationale for teaching about the Nazi era in social studies courses. Major objectives are to eliminate prejudice against Jews by rendering it intellectually indefensible and to help students deal with blind obedience to authority. (Author/DB)

  7. Nazi Negation at Nuremberg: The Racial Laws of 1935 and German Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickman, William

    1985-01-01

    The Nuremberg Laws represented a consistent ideological policy that provided the legal basis for persecution and discrimination against the Jews. These laws permeated the content of every level of learning and instruction. (RM)

  8. Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... same country or region, who share language or culture. Spina bifida and other NTDs are more common in Caucasians and Hispanics and less common among Ashkenazi Jews, most Asian groups and African- Americans. Folic acid. Folic acid ...

  9. a re-reading of john 8:1–11 from a pastoral liberative perspective on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-08-06

    Aug 6, 2010 ... South Africa, South Africa. Correspondence to: Elijah Baloyi email: ..... This was an intended misreading and misinterpretation of the Bible by the. Jews to ...... Groothuis, R.M., Women caught in the conflict: The cultural war.

  10. Groepshaat en individuele identiteit: Bernstein en Baschwitz: twee verschillende visies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers, M.

    2009-01-01

    Peretz Bernstein had verrassend hedendaagse inzichten over groepsdenken, blijkt uit de recente heruitgave van 'The Social Roots of Discrimination: the case of the Jews'. Zijn tijdgenoot en tegenpool Siegfried Kurt Baschwitz vult aan.

  11. A ground moving target emergency tracking method for catastrophe rescue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Li, D.; Li, G.

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, great disasters happen now and then. Disaster management test the emergency operation ability of the government and society all over the world. Immediately after the occurrence of a great disaster (e.g., earthquake), a massive nationwide rescue and relief operation need to be kicked off instantly. In order to improve the organizations efficiency of the emergency rescue, the organizers need to take charge of the information of the rescuer teams, including the real time location, the equipment with the team, the technical skills of the rescuers, and so on. One of the key factors for the success of emergency operations is the real time location of the rescuers dynamically. Real time tracking methods are used to track the professional rescuer teams now. But volunteers' participation play more and more important roles in great disasters. However, real time tracking of the volunteers will cause many problems, e.g., privacy leakage, expensive data consumption, etc. These problems may reduce the enthusiasm of volunteers' participation for catastrophe rescue. In fact, the great disaster is just small probability event, it is not necessary to track the volunteers (even rescuer teams) every time every day. In order to solve this problem, a ground moving target emergency tracking method for catastrophe rescue is presented in this paper. In this method, the handheld devices using GPS technology to provide the location of the users, e.g., smart phone, is used as the positioning equipment; an emergency tracking information database including the ID of the ground moving target (including the rescuer teams and volunteers), the communication number of the handheld devices with the moving target, and the usually living region, etc., is built in advance by registration; when catastrophe happens, the ground moving targets that living close to the disaster area will be filtered by the usually living region; then the activation short message will be sent to the selected

  12. A COMPARISON OF YOUNG CHILDREN'S ENVIRONMENTS AND PARENTAL EXPECTATIONS IN JAPAN AND ISRAEL

    OpenAIRE

    石恒, 恵美子; 聖和大学

    1986-01-01

    The environment of young children is one of the most important factors in their growth. It is known that human charactor is formed in early years. From 1982-83 in Israel, I conducted research concerning the educational environment of pre-school children, taking cultual and religious aspects into consideration. The subjects of the investigation were Jews in Kibbutzim, ordinary Jews and Arabs inclding Bedin. The investigation was carried out using both questionnaires and interviews, covering th...

  13. Holy Jerusalem: The Key to Lasting Peace in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    retained through World War II. 37 British sympathies were with the Jewish settlers. During World War I, the Balfour declaration gave Jews renewed hope...Jews had been promised a state of their own in the Balfour declaration while the Arabs felt that one thousand years of uninterrupted rule in the city...Israeli War With the UN Resolution partitioning Palestine into two nations, one Jewish and one Arab, Israel immediately accepted and declared

  14. Constructions of Sex and Gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleicher, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Responding to the ethical and performative call of Judith Butler not to propagate the sex- and gender-related violence of the imbedded discourse that we study, this article inquires into the discursive strategies of Jewish scripture by analysing how it orchestrates certain norms of sex and gender...... Jews and non-Jews are able to influence their own representations of sex and gender and thus liberate themselves from the normativity implied by scriptural discourse....

  15. Israel and US National Interests in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    State operates the railroads and tele- communications industries, it manages public works projects in irrigation, afforestation and community...areas. However, as a general pattern, after a few years the Western Jews would migrate to urban areas, while the Oriental Jews generally lacking in...different social and economic backgrounds. In many cases, this is the first time Sephardim and Ashkazim, rural and urban , and local born and immigrant youth

  16. Rembrandt’s Jewish Physician—Dr Ephraim Bueno (1599–1665: A Brief Medical History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George M. Weisz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Medicine in the Middle Ages was, and ever since remained, one of the main preoccupations of the professionally restricted Jews. One of the medical dynasties on the Iberian Peninsula was the Bueno (Bonus family. Following the expulsion of the Jews from Spain and their spread in Europe, these Iberian physicians became successful everywhere—just as the Buenos were in the Netherlands.

  17. "Please. Don't. Die.": A Grounded Theory Study of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mausz, Justin; Snobelen, Paul; Tavares, Walter

    2018-02-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an important determinant of survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), yet rates of bystander CPR are highly variable. In an effort to promote bystander CPR, the procedure has been streamlined, and ultrashort teaching modalities have been introduced. CPR has been increasingly reconceptualized as simple, safe, and easy to perform; however, current methods of CPR instruction may not adequately prepare lay rescuers for the various logistical, conceptual, and emotional challenges of resuscitating a victim of cardiac arrest. We adopted a constructivist grounded theory methodology to qualitatively explore bystander CPR and invited lay rescuers who had recently (ie, within 1 week) intervened in an OHCA to participate in semistructured interviews and focus groups. We used constant comparative analysis until theoretical saturation to derive a midrange explanatory theory of bystander CPR. We constructed a 3-stage theoretical model describing a common experiential process for lay rescuer intervention in OHCA: Being called to act is disturbing, causing panic, shock, and disbelief that must ultimately be overcome. Taking action to save the victim is complicated by several misconceptions about cardiac arrest, where victims are mistakenly believed to be choking, and agonal respirations are misinterpreted to mean the victim is alive. Making sense of the experience is challenging, at least in the short term, where lay rescuers have to contend with self-doubt, unanswered questions, and uncomfortable emotional reactions to a traumatic event. Our study suggests that current CPR training programs may not adequately prepare lay rescuers for the reality of an OHCA and identifies several key knowledge gaps that should be addressed. The long-term psychological consequences of bystander intervention in OHCA remain poorly understood and warrant further study. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation during prolonged basic life support in military medical university students: A manikin study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Zhuo, Chao-nan; Zhang, Lei; Gong, Yu-shun; Yin, Chang-lin; Li, Yong-qin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The quality of chest compressions can be significantly improved after training of rescuers according to the latest national guidelines of China. However, rescuers may be unable to maintain adequate compression or ventilation throughout a response of average emergency medical services because of increased rescuer fatigue. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in training of military medical university students during a prolonged basic life support (BLS). METHODS: A 3-hour BLS training was given to 120 military medical university students. Six months after the training, 115 students performed single rescuer BLS on a manikin for 8 minutes. The qualities of chest compressions as well as ventilations were assessed. RESULTS: The average compression depth and rate were 53.7±5.3 mm and 135.1±15.7 compressions per minute respectively. The proportion of chest compressions with appropriate depth was 71.7%±28.4%. The average ventilation volume was 847.2±260.4 mL and the proportion of students with adequate ventilation was 63.5%. Compared with male students, significantly lower compression depth (46.7±4.8 vs. 54.6±4.8 mm, P<0.001) and adequate compression rate (35.5%±26.5% vs. 76.1%±25.1%, P<0.001) were observed in female students. CONCLUSIONS: CPR was found to be related to gender, body weight, and body mass index of students in this study. The quality of chest compressions was well maintained in male students during 8 minutes of conventional CPR but declined rapidly in female students after 2 minutes according to the latest national guidelines. Physical fitness and rescuer fatigue did not affect the quality of ventilation. PMID:26401177

  19. British Discourses on ‘the Jew’ and ‘the Nation’ 1899-1919

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Terwey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In Britain, modern antisemitism, that is, the perception of Jews as a ‘race’ as well as the employment of pictures of the Jew in social and political debates, developed around the same time as did its French and German counterparts, in the second half of the 19th century. Concentrating on the years between the South African War and the conclusion of the Great War, this essay explores the functional character of antisemitism and the discursive context of negative images of the Jew. In Britain, too, Jews were identified as a negative ferment within the nation, and they figured largely as an agent of representative government. In addition, Jews were continuously used as a negative foil for the definition of what was ‘English’ or ‘British’. However, unlike their continental counterparts, British anti-Semites did not question Jewish emancipation and even distanced themselves from ‘antisemitism’ at a time when elsewhere in Europe, being an ‘antisemite’ was a positive social and political stance. Both elements reflected the political culture, within which British antisemitic narratives evolved: while allowing for various forms of manifest and latent antisemitism, late 19th century Liberalism secured the status of the Jews as a religious minority, and contained specific forms of antisemitism that emerged on the Continent during the same period.

  20. Military Vaccines in Today’s Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    the result of infectious diseases was much higher than admissions due to wounds or other injuries incurred in WWII or the wars in Korea, Vietnam or...Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fevers or Venezuelan, eastern or western equine encephalitis. Further, genetically engineered novel threats are now a

  1. Fear, Honor, Intervention: Why Did the U.S. Not Stop Known Genocide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    priorities of both the United Nations and the modern human rights movement, aimed at the eradication of racism and xenophobia.”34 The Convention’s...Ethnic Conflict and International Intervention, 20. 62 stigma over failing to act more decisively to stop genocide in WWII, led some to conclude

  2. 77 FR 30238 - Living History Flight Experience (LHFE)-Exemptions for Passenger Carrying Operations Conducted...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ...-engine, World War II bomber aircraft to conduct limited passenger carrying flights, for compensation, as... nostalgia flight exemption to World War II (WWII) or earlier vintage airplanes (i.e., manufactured before... increased level of complexity to the maintenance of these aircraft. iii. The FAA must consider the higher...

  3. Crossing at the Speed of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    Moselle, and the final natural protective barrier for Germany, the Rhine River. Slowly, almost to the point of suicidal stubbornness, the Germans...1998. XX Corps. The Ghost Corps thru hell and high water. WWII Operational Documents– CARL Digital Library, Combined Arms Research Library, Ft

  4. The Strategic Bombing of German Cities during World War II and its Impact for Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brakman, S.; Garretsen, H; Schramm, M.

    2003-01-01

    We construct a unique data set in order to analyze whether or not a large temporary shock has an impact on city growth. Following recent work by Davis and Weinstein (2002) on Japan, we take the strategic bombing of German cities during WWII as an example of such a shock, and analyze its impact on

  5. The strategic bombing of German cities during WWI and its impact on city growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brakman, Steven; Garretsen, H.; Schramm, M.

    2004-01-01

    We construct a unique data set in order to analyze whether or not a large temporary shock has an impact on city growth. Following recent work by Davis and Weinstein (2002) on Japan, we take the strategic bombing of German cities during WWII as an example of such a shock, and analyze its impact on

  6. The Philippines, the East Asian "Developmental States" and Education: A Comparative Analysis of Why the Philippines Failed to Develop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maca, Mark; Morris, Paul

    2012-01-01

    After WWII, the economic prospects of the Philippines, then the second-largest economy in Asia, were viewed positively, but by the mid-1970s it had become Asia's developmental puzzle for its failure to sustain economic growth. In contrast during the same period, regional neighbours, Hong Kong, Taiwan, South Korea and Singapore, achieved previously…

  7. Who’s their Daddy? The Marine Corps Unmanned Community Lacks a Dedicated Senior Organizational Advocate Who can Best Shape a Long Term Vision to Support the Future MAGTF

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    inverse of the WWII statistic (See Appendix C). Weaponized UAS, capable of provi 1 ding a majority of the ISR flight hours and a portion of the...experience as a FAC(A), TAC(A), previous Forward Aii ’ Controlle!’ (FAC). 2 In the Marine Corps each infantry battalion has three winged aviators assigned

  8. The building paradigm shift and its effect on Western European housing stocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, A.

    2011-01-01

    The 20th century saw an enormous worldwide growth of the housing stock. In particular the building boom after WW-II, during which the housing stock in most countries was multifolded, focussed the attention of the housing sector primarily to the planning and realisation of new construction; the

  9. Paradigm shift or choke? The future of the Western European housing stock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, A.F.

    2010-01-01

    The 20th century saw an enormous worldwide growth of the housing stock. In particular the building boom after WW-II, during which the housing stock in most countries was multifolded, focussed the attention of the housing sector primarily to the planning and realisation of new construction; the

  10. An Overview of Somatics (Body-Mind) Approaches in Dance Therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The field of dance therapy has been expanding and around WWII, the work of psychoanalytic pioneers such as Freud and Jung made their mark on it. Afterward, Mary Starks Whitehouse, who would become a Jungian analyst, developed a process called “movement-in-depth” based on her knowledge of dance, movement ...

  11. Comfort Women in Human Rights Discourse: Fetishized Testimonies, Small Museums, and the Politics of Thin Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Hee-Jung Serenity

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, the issue of comfort women--the women and girls who were forced into sex slavery for the Japanese army before and during WWII--has risen to global attention. Tens of thousands of comfort women (the average estimate is anywhere between 80,000 and 200,000) were confined at comfort stations managed by the Japanese Imperial…

  12. Hazardous Waste Minimization Assessment: Fort Campbell, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    during WWII and served as a prisoner of war (POW) detention center for 4,000 German soldiers between mid-1943 and April 1946. In June 1948, the...DNT) pp Nitroglycerin (NG) PP Nitroguanidine (NQ) PP Dibutyl phthalate PP Diethyl phthalate PP Diphenylamine PP Benzene EX Toluene EX Sodium Nitrate Py

  13. Sina English and American Dictionaries — A New Partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Oliphant

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Robert Oliphant’s best known book is A Piano for Mrs. Cimino, the film version of which won a Golden Nymph Award at Monte Carlo for Bette Davis. He is a WWII air corps veteran, and his eBooks are available from the Nonpartisan Education Review.

  14. For-Profit Colleges and American Salesmanship — A Unique Opportunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Oliphant

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Robert Oliphant’s best known book is A Piano for Mrs. Cimino, the film version of which won a Golden Nymph Award at Monte Carlo for Bette Davis. He is a WWII air corps veteran, and his eBooks are available from the Nonpartisan Education Review.

  15. Where is Merlin When I Need Him? The Barriers to Higher Education are Still in Place: Recent Re-Entry Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Benie B.

    2013-01-01

    While the GI bill after WWII encouraged education for the older students, the combination of baby boomers and the rise of feminism have prompted a new wave of returning students to academia. The nontraditional student since the 1970s has often been an older female returning for a graduate degree. Making the decision to return has not been easy,…

  16. Examining U.S. Irregular Warfare Doctrine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    other or in stalemate (JP 1, 2007:I-6). This type of war characterizes what the American military has excelled in during WWI, WWII, Korea, Panama ...superiority has forced its enemies for the foreseeable future to fight it unconventionally, mixing modern technolo occurred among military historia u tial

  17. Combining individual memory & collective memory? : Classics Illustrated’s representation of World War II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribbens, Kees

    WWII is widely remembered and represented. Keeping the memories of this international conflict alive, both within academic and popular history writing, occurred largely within various national frameworks. On the one hand, in the immediate post-war world many stories appeared about the great events

  18. Preliminary Modeling of Acoustic Detection Capability for the Drifting Arctic Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    based on the values given by Urick [5, p.318], based on WWII-era electric submarines operating at the surface at a speed of 4 kts (originally found in...2015-R021 [24] Engen , Øyvind, Gjengedal, Jakob Andreas, Faleide, Jan Inge, Kristoffersen, Yngve, and Eldholm, Olav (2009), Seismic stratigraphy and

  19. Summary of: New Patterns of Collaboration and Rivalry in the US and European Defense and Aerospace Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-22

    Managing the Service Supply Chain Measuring Uncertainty in Earned Value Organizational Modeling and Simulation Public-Private Partnership...TRADING WITH ENEMY ACT (TWTE) ALSO APPLIED IN WWII • REVIEW COMMITTEE (CFIUS) ESTABLISHED 1975 • TWTE AMENDED IN 1977 • SUBSTANTIAL TWO-WAY FDI

  20. With Raised Hands: Film as fantasy within a photograph

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, Edvin

    2011-01-01

    About the manner in which this short film provides a poetic, audiovisuel interpretation and an adaptation of the famous WWII photograph from the Warshaw Ghetto. How are the dynamic elements of cinematic style used to create the viewer's experience of fantasy and provide a paradoxical sense of hope?...

  1. Propaganda: Can a Word Decide a War?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    appointing Dr. Joseph Goebbels as minister. World War II: Propaganda and Misinformation When the United States entered WWII its public information efforts...Information Service under Sherwood. Donovan was impressed with the effectiveness of Goebbels ’ propaganda efforts in Germany and believed that propaganda

  2. Pizza: Teaching US History through Food and Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Michael P.; Crocco, Margaret S.

    2015-01-01

    Pizza serves as a powerful example of historical themes such as immigration, cultural exchange and urbanization. In the post-WWII United States, Trenton, NJ, and other cities were gradually being transformed by suburbanization, the rise of fast food, and changes in family living related to women's entry in large numbers into the paid workforce.…

  3. Move On!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Boris Brorman

    2012-01-01

    Iceland gained its independence during WWII and many people in Greenland see Iceland as a role model for their future. How is the situation in Greenland seen from Iceland? Danish Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson has agreed to share his thoughts about Greenland’s cultural state of affairs....

  4. The Anatomy of Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Onofrio, Mauro; Rampazzo, Roberto; Zaggia, Simone; Longair, Malcolm S.; Ferrarese, Laura; Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; van der Kruit, Pieter C.; Laurikainen, Eija; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Combes, Françoise; Bertin, Giuseppe; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Calzetti, Daniela; Moss, David L.; Matteucci, Francesca; Djorgovski, Stanislav George; Fraix-Burnet, Didier; Graham, Alister W. McK; Tully, Brent R.

    2016-01-01

    Just after WWII Astronomy started to live its "Golden Age", not differently to many other sciences and human activities, especially in the west side countries. The improved resolution of telescopes and the appearance of new efficient light detectors (e.g. CCDs in the middle eighty) greatly impacted

  5. Crossroads. Life Changing Stories from the Second World War: A (Transmedia) Storytelling Approach to World War II Heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calvi, Licia; Hover, Moniek

    2016-01-01

    textabstractCrossroads is the name of the concept that narratively connects several WWII-related cultural institutions in Brabant. We were initially looking for ways to connect 4 otherwise very diverse World War II-related institutions (in fact, 3 museums and a commemoration centre) and we found it

  6. [Traumatic experiences in elderly Germans. Importance for mental and physical health at a population level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaesmer, H

    2014-04-01

    World War II (WWII) is probably the most distressing and fatal historical event in Europe's recent past. Research on mental and physical health sequelae of these traumatic experiences from WWII has only started recently. An overview on the findings from several population-based studies investigating the mental and physical health outcomes of traumatic experiences in the German elderly (born prior to 1946), especially from WWII, is given. The results presented here are based on several population-based representative studies regarding several aspects of mental and physical health in the elderly. About 40-50 % of the elderly German population report at least one traumatic event, mostly from WWII. Traumatic experiences are related to higher rates of depressive and somatoform disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder, and physical morbidity, which are associated with increased health care utilization. The findings underline that the negative effects on health are long-term, manifold, and serious. Some of the elderly need psychotherapeutic interventions. Thus, a specific internet-based psychotherapeutic approach (ITT) is briefly presented. However, the majority of the elderly generally use other kinds of medical care, such as primary care, inpatient care, and geriatric care. It seems useful and necessary to pay more attention to the historical and biographical backgrounds of the patients to see and understand the current symptoms from this aspect.

  7. Soviet Muslim Emigres in the Republic of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    Arif (Retired Colonel). iLk Dunya Harbinde Kafkas Cephesi [Caucasian Front in WWII Istanbul: Vakit Matbaast, 1946. 143 pp. Eyewitness account, reportedly...life and activity of Dr. Riza Nur in a special issue etc. Unavailable in the US. HOR TORKISTAN I(]N [Hfl-For a Free Turkistan, 1975-19781 Twelve

  8. Independent and additive association of prenatal famine exposure and intermediary life conditions with adult mortality between age 18-63 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekamper, P.; van Poppel, F.W.A.; Stein, A.D.; Lumey, L.H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To quantify the relation between prenatal famine exposure and adult mortality, taking into account mediating effects of intermediary life conditions. Design Historical follow-up study. Setting The Dutch famine (Hunger Winter) of 1944–1945 which occurred towards the end of WWII in occupied

  9. Ein(ver)nehmen : Sexualität und Alltag von Wehrmachtsoldaten in den besetzten Niederlanden 1940-1945

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fahnenbruck, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This study adds to research on sex in the context of the German Wehrmacht during WWII. Regarding the occupation of the Netherlands, historians and the public have hitherto only discussed female sexuality and the women who had sex with German soldiers. In terms of the sex of soldiers this is

  10. The Impact of Institutional and Peer Support on Faculty Research Productivity: A Comparative Analysis of Research vs. Non-Research Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Ming

    2010-01-01

    Across the landscape of American higher education, research has gradually established its dominant role in faculty work since the end of WWII--a paradigm shift yet to be fully studied and understood. Situated on their traditional locales on the spectrum stretching from pure teaching to heavy research, contemporary institutions all attempt to be…

  11. Defense Industrial Base (DIB): Munitions Realignment for 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ammunition continued until WWII. Technological improvements in weapons and ammunition design , doctrinal changes, and growing supplies of obsolete...munitions DIB by companies like Coca Cola , Quaker Oats, and Eastman Kodak. As industrial mobilization quickly increased, the requirements decreased...between 2014 and 2020 should enable planners to predict future demands while measuring the effects of growing transportation costs. The increased

  12. Migrating for a Profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2015-01-01

    a strong sense of agency and self-empowerment. In the post-WWII period, numerous Caribbean women trained in nursing at British hospitals that have been described as marred by race and gender related inequality and associated forms of exploitation. Yet, the nurses interviewed about this training emphasised...... in which it enabled these Caribbean women to stake out a new life for themselves....

  13. The Lived Experiences of GED (RTM) Students: What Do Their Experiences Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Susan Lynn

    2010-01-01

    The General Educational Development (GED[R]) Tests, established in 1945, helped determine soldiers' high school qualifications for the workforce, as they returned home from WWII. Because many soldiers dropped out of school to join the military, achieving a certain score on the test was a way for them to demonstrate that they had attained high…

  14. A paradigm shift or choke? The future of Western European housing stocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, A.

    2011-01-01

    The 20th century saw an enormous worldwide growth of the housing stock. In particular the building boom after WW-II, during which the housing stock in most countries was multifolded, focussed the attention of the housing sector primarily to the planning and realisation of new construction; the

  15. Making the Spoon: Analyzing and Employing Stability Power in Counterinsurgency Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-11

    Japanese society in 1946 is 99% Shinto or extremely homogenous / monopolistic with an HHI equaling 9802.256 Within the confines of religion and ethnic...sects there is little chance of internal sectarian violence in post WWII Japan (minus a Shinto reformation).257 An example of a distributed, very

  16. History of forest survey sampling designs in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. E. Frayer; George M. Furnival

    2000-01-01

    Extensive forest inventories of forested lands in the United States were begun in the early part of the 20th century, but widespread, frequent use was not common until after WWII. Throughout the development of inventory techniques and their application to assess the status of the nation's forests, most of the work has been done by the USDA Forest Service through...

  17. Measuring Human “Progress” in the New Millennium: The Jewish Question Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lempert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available

    This is an article in two parts. Part i offers a new way of looking at progressivism and progressive politics by defining different typologies of progressivism and by looking for these approaches in the cultural strategies of specific ethnic groups. The study offers a theory of how these progressive cultural strategies are maintained and distinguishes these strategies from apparent “progress” that may simply be a phenomenon of temporary accommodation of different ethnic groups in more complex systems. Part ii examines the ideology of “progress” as part of the cultural strategy of Jews and whether this strategy, which appears stronger when Jews are minorities in the Diaspora, is consistent with Jewish culture once Jews have a territorial boundary where they are a “majority.” This article touches upon the political choices that Jewish “political progressives” and Jews, overall, have made recently in the U.S.; modifying their support for “progress” in return for political representation, with parallels to the historical situations of other minorities. While “identity based” political choice that slows the overall “progress” of civilization appears to have protected Jewish interests in the short term, historical comparisons suggest that this choice will endanger Jews if the U.S. economy and U.S. global influence collapse, in a direct historical parallel to the European Holocaust; offering an opportunity to test theories on how (and whether “progress” occurs. In short, this study examines the choice that Jews made in the 20th century to define themselves as “European” rather than “Middle Eastern” (or “Eastern” and how a rethinking of this choice could be fundamental to protecting Jews in Israel and to restarting a global impetus for both social and political “progress.”

  18. Ethnical disparities in temporal trends of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) throughout a decade in Israel. Soroka acute myocardial infarction (SAMI-II) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakht, Ygal; Gilutz, Harel; Shiyovich, Arthur

    2016-07-01

    Ethnical disparities in presentation and outcomes following AMI were reported. We evaluated the temporal-trends of AMI hospitalizations and mortality of Bedouins (Muslims) and Jews in Israel. Retrospective analysis of 15,352 AMI admissions (10,652 patients; 11.3% Bedouins, 88.7% Jews) throughout 2002-2012. The trends in admission rates (AR) were compared using direct age-sex adjustment. The trends of in-hospital mortality (IHM) and 1-year post-discharge mortality (PDM) were adjusted for the patients' characteristics. Bedouins were younger (61.7±14.3 vs. 68.8±13.7years, p<0.001), a higher rate of males. Different prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors was found. STEMI presentation, 3-vessel disease and PCI intervention were more frequently in Bedouins than Jews. Adjusted AR was lower among Jews (4.80/1000 and 3.24/1000 in 2002 and 2012 respectively) than in Bedouins (9.63/1000 and 5.13/1000). A significant decrease of adjusted AR was found in both ethnicities (p-for-trend<0.001 both), greater in Bedouins (p-for-disparity=0.017). The overall rate of IHM was higher for Jews (8.7% vs. 5.6%; p=0.001). The decline of IHM was found in both groups: an increase of one-year resulted in AdjOR=0.877; (p-for-trend<0.001) and 0.910 (p-for-trend=0.052) in Jews and Bedouins respectively (p-for-interaction=0.793). The rates of PDM were higher for Jews (13.6% vs. 9.9%; p=0.001). The risk for PDM increased in both groups: AdjOR=1.118; (p-for-trend<0.001) and 1.093; (p-for-trend=0.012) for one-year increase, for Jews and Bedouins respectively (p-for-interaction=0.927). Throughout 2002-2012 Bedouin AMI patients differed from Jews. Adjusted incidence of AMI declined, greater in Bedouins. IHM declined and PDM increased in both groups. A culturally sensitive prevention program is warranted. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. Augustinus en de Joden: een inleidend overzicht

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. van Oort

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The article explores how Augustine of Hippo (354-430 deals with the Jews and Judaism. First it investigates the occurrence and meaning of the word �Iudaeus� in Augustine�s works. It turns out that Augustine, unlike many a predecessor, does not make a sharp distinction between �Hebrew�, �Israelite�, and �Jew�. Mainly on the basis of The City of God the role of the Jews in history is discussed. According to Augustine, all true believers (even those living before the time of Jesus are �Christ believers� and are considered to belong to Christ�s body, the Church. The diaspora of the Jews is evaluated both negatively and positively: negatively as a consequence of �their putting Christ to death�; positively since through the dispersion of the Jews their Scriptures have been dispersed as well and so provide �testimony to the truth taught by the Church�. The so-called �mark of Cain� can not be interpreted as a predominantly positive sign: it provides protection indeed, but this divine protection is, once again, �for the benefit of the Church�. Contrary to some current opinion, it is stressed that Augustine knew contemporary Jews in Roman North Africa quite well.

  20. The Making of Antisemitism as a Political Movement. Political History as Cultural History (1879-1914

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Bergmann

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The new dimension of antisemitism in contrast to the traditional religious animosity towards Jews, was in first instance not so much its racist orientation but the fact that this hostility assumed the form of a political or social movement. The reason for its emergence must be seen in the larger transformations taking place in 19th century Europe, in the social conflicts, economic upheavals, cultural dislocations and social-moral crises. Antisemitism, therefore, was not caused by religious conflicts; on the contrary this new kind of hatred against Jews originated from the “great transformation,” the upheaval of the whole way of living in the formation of the industrial world. This transformation led to a ‘clash of economic mentalities,” and parts of the middle classes and of the peasant population adhered to the “moral economy” of the traditional world.5 Unable to grasp the new capitalist mentality, they accused the Jews of being responsible for this transformation. The religious tradition of animosity towards Jews in this context served as legitimacy for the new antisemitic rage. Moreover Catholic, Protestant as well as Orthodox clergyman, fearing the cultural upheaval, accused the Jews of being responsible for the social and political conflicts of the 19th Century. Paradoxically, in this way, the Christian Churches played an important part in the making of the new non religious and secular political movement of antisemitism

  1. Extreme and acquiescence bias in a bi-ethnic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron-Epel, Orna; Kaplan, Giora; Weinstein, Ruth; Green, Manfred S

    2010-10-01

    Extreme and acquiescence biases are the tendency to give a positive or extreme answer regardless of the 'true' answer. These biases may compromise comparisons of attitudes regarding health between population groups. The aim of the study was to measure the extent of extreme and acquiescence biases and identify factors associated with them in two ethnic groups: Jews and Arabs in Israel. A random telephone survey was conducted during 2006, interviewing 2322 Jews and 809 Arabs. Three attitude questions were presented twice with opposite wording to measure extreme and acquiescence biases in these two groups. Extreme bias ranged from 2 to 14% among Jews and from 6 to 29% among Arabs, depending on the question. Acquiescence bias ranged from 2 to 10% among Jews and 5-19% among Arabs. The less educated respondents gave more extreme biased responses for all items. The older respondents gave more extreme answers for two out of the three questions tested. After adjusting for age and education the odds ratio (OR) of giving more extreme biased answers was higher among Arabs compared with Jews for all three questions [OR = 2.49, confidence interval (CI) = 1.87, 3.31; OR = 2.33, CI = 1.75, 3.10; and OR = 2.94, CI = 1.83-4.71, respectively, for each question]. Levels of response biases are higher in the Arab minority population compared with the majority Jewish population and depended on the subject, age and education.

  2. Parental decisions to abort or continue a pregnancy with an abnormal finding after an invasive prenatal test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotogora, Joël

    2002-12-01

    To determine the importance of various factors on the decisions whether to terminate or continue a pregnancy after an abnormal result. The decisions of 1467 women who had an abnormal result after an invasive prenatal test were examined according to their religion, the time of diagnosis and the severity of the disorder. When the examinations were performed by chorionic villus sampling (CVS) among both Jews and non-Jews most of the women opted to terminate the affected pregnancy. After amniocentesis the rate of termination of pregnancy was still very high among cases in which Down syndrome or other significant chromosomal aberrations were diagnosed among Jews. For all the other diagnostic groups either among Jews or non-Jews there was a significant proportion of the cases in which the women decided to continue the pregnancy. A significant exception about the decisions of the couples was in the case of hemoglobinopathy-affected pregnancies among Arabs since both after CVS and amniocentesis many women often decided to continue the pregnancy. The main factor in the decision to terminate or continue the pregnancy is the severity of the disorder diagnosed. However, among Arabs other factors are important, in particular the time at which the diagnosis is made. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Self-Assertion in the Public Sphere: The Jewish Press on the Eve of Legal Emancipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter J. Hecht

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jews like Adolf Fischhof and Ludwig August Frankl were prominent participants in the revolution of 1848. Their speeches, poems, and portraits circulated in Vienna and throughout the Empire. With the suppression of the revolution, most of these prominent Jews had to either leave Vienna or retreat to the private sphere. Only in the late 1850s did Jews regain their public presence, starting with the opening of the Leopoldstaedter Tempel in 1858 and the building of the Ringstrasse from 1860 onwards. Many Jews hoped that the new liberal era would grant them civil rights and legal emancipation. Jewish intellectuals and journalists supported this struggle from within and outside the growing Jewish community. An important weapon in their struggle were Jewish newspapers. These newspapers not only provided information, but also served as mouthpieces for different Jewish movements. They featured biographies with portraits (in words and images of distinguished Jewish leaders (mostly men and a few women, which were supposed to present the social achievements of a certain group within Jewish society to a broader audience. In fact, these portraits served as a form of self-assertion for the publisher as well as for the audience. It projected the message that Jews not only merited emancipation, but also struggled for it on various levels. The paper therefore addresses questions of biography and the (Jewish identity these portraits at once reflected and shaped.

  4. Realitas Sejarah dan Dinamika Identitas Yahudi Nusantara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Chrysostomos Epafras

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The history of Jewish Nusantara in Indonesia is unclear whether Jewish came to Indonesia or otherwise. The fact that in Indonesia regulation, Judaism is not part of religions officially recognized by the state, add more suspicions that Judaism is not well accepted in Indonesia. In addition, Indonesia people, objectively, factually and historically speaking, have no much information about Judaism either in terms of religion, social, cultural and politics. In terms of academic studies, Historical and scientific record are not yet capable to explore much information about them. On one hand, the history of Judaism in Indonesia (Yahudi Nusantara is academically and culturally limited. On the other hand, public discussion and debate relating to this topic—which tend to describe Jews historically and stereotypically—are rising and growing. This article aims to narrow the gap between both of two mentioned realities to explore historical existence of Jews in Indonesia. It will elucidate specific moments when Jews reality has been transforming and challenging in the context of Indonesian culture. Using this paradigm, the article perceives Jews as a dynamic and moving survival, like other realities. Therefore, this article intends to build good understanding of Judaism, in general, and Indonesian Jews in particular.

  5. Attitudes toward domestic violence: a cultural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallach, Helene S; Weingram, Ziv; Avitan, Orli

    2010-07-01

    This study examines the effect of acculturation on the attitudes held by Ethiopian Jews in Israel toward domestic violence (DV). The study findings revealed the following: Ethiopians who immigrated to Israel (n = 31) held more lenient attitudes toward DV than Israeli born Jews (n = 62), which supported the hypothesis that culture influences attitudes toward DV; in addition, Ethiopians born in Israel (n = 29) held attitudes closer to those of Israeli-born Jews who were not from Ethiopian origin, thus supporting the hypothesis that integration into the host country results in changes in DV attitudes. These are important findings due to the extremely high number of DV episodes among immigrant populations in general and Ethiopian Jews living in Israel in particular. This study may provide optimism in that it is probable that the younger generation will prove to be less violent than the first-generation immigrants. Perhaps one conclusion that can be drawn is the importance of expediting the integration process of the second-generation Ethiopian Jews in Israel.

  6. MEDPREPARATY, PRIMENIMYYe PRI OSTROM OTRAVLENII UGARNYM GAZOM V SHAKHTAKH. ZAMENITELI PLAZMY KROVI. GOLUBAYA KROV' [MEDICATIONS WHICH CAN BE USED IN CASE OF CARBON MONOXIDE ACUTE POISONING IN THE MINES. BLOOD PLASMA SUBSTITUTES. BLUE BLOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khromov A.V.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fires in the operational underground mine openings, as a rule, are catastrophic and lead to numerous victims. Due to the transfer of combustion products by the ventilation stream of the mine ventilation, they can be spread over long distances from the fire site and mortally injure miners along the course of the air stream. Essential assistance to miners in such emergency situations is provided by means of individual protection of miners, which are breathing apparatus of various types - so-called self-rescuers. There are cases anyway when they cannot protect from poisonous combustion products action. Then in the arsenal of mine rescuers there must be medical preparations capable of restoring the respiratory functions of the miners the fire victims. The purpose of this article is to familiarize mining specialists and VGSCh workers with the current state of medical preparations for carbon monoxide effect neutralization.

  7. Biosensing and environmental sensing for emergency and protection e-Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenes, G; Curone, D; Secco, E L; Bonfiglio, A

    2011-01-01

    The ProeTEX project introduced for the first time a complete set of smart garments integrating sensors for the physiological and environmental monitoring of emergency operators. These "smart" garments have been deeply tested in emergency-like contexts by professional rescuers, in order to assess real-time acquisition, processing and transmission of data from moving subjects while operating in harsh conditions. Here we report an overview of the main results obtained during field trials performed in 2010 by Italian and French professional firefighters, in specialized training centers, while dressing the ProeTEX prototypes. Results clearly demonstrate the benefit and step forward of such a system in order to monitor and coordinate rescuers even during intervention far away from the emergency headquarter.

  8. Osobnostní charakteristiky u záchranářů

    OpenAIRE

    DAVIDOVÁ, Klára

    2009-01-01

    The profession of rescuers is very stressful and requires high level of resistance against stress, connected to pro-social tendencies, which are altruism and empathy. The theoretical part is divided into five topics related to the research. These topics are: helping professions, competence of helping professions, pro-social behaviour, integrated emergency system in the Czech Republic and the last theoretical part concerns personality. The objective of this research was to identify some person...

  9. Basal genoplivning af voksne og automatisk ekstern defibrillering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berlac, Peter Anthony; Torp-Pedersen, Christian T; Lippert, Freddy K

    2008-01-01

    The new ERC guidelines on resuscitation emphasize the importance of quality CPR. BLS should be started as early as possible. Lay rescuers should not check for a pulse, they should call for help and start chest compressions immediately. Compression depth should be 4-5 cm at a rate of 100 compressi...... ventilations followed by a compression-ventilation ratio of 15:2. Automatic External Defibrillation should be used as early as possible....

  10. The 2015 emergency care reform in Poland: Some improvements, some unmet demands and some looming conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Anna; Kowalska-Bobko, Iwona; Mokrzycka, Anna

    2016-11-01

    Between 2006 and 2015, the Act on the State Emergency Medical System was the key act governing the organization, financing and provision of emergency care in Poland. From the moment it entered into force, it had been heavily criticized. The critique focused, among others, on the lack of provisions allowing for emergency medical services (EMS) to be performed outside the EMS units, the lack of a separate Act regulating the profession of a medical rescuer and the lack of a separate professional organization representing medical rescuers. As early as 2008 a team of specialists was set up to work on amending the Act and these works resulted in the draft Act on the State Emergency Medical System that was submitted to public consultations on 19 August, 2014. This draft was further reworked in 2015 and was signed by the President on 25 September of the same year. The Act addressed some of the shortcomings of the EMS legislation that was previously in place. However, the new Act did not meet the key demands of medical rescuers; namely, it did not introduce a separate legal act regulating this profession nor established a professional organisation representing their interests. An analysis of the vested interests of various groups of medical professionals indicates that these interests are likely to have influenced the final legislative outcome. The Act, as well as its implementing executive regulation from April 2016, may reduce support of certain medical professional groups during the Act's implementation as well as create tensions between these groups, especially between medical rescuers and nurses. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Psychology of Safety and Resistance to Terrorism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail V. Potapov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article main parameters of any emergency situation that influence the psychological stress intensity are described. The most frequent consequences of emergency situations are discussed. The characteristic of psychological and psychosomatic reactions of the rescuers and secret service agents is provided. Professional and personal training of emergency service workers involved in work with victims of terrorist attacks and emergency situations is described. Attention is drawn to the the problem of interaction between emergency service workers and victims.

  12. The spatial metaphor of Utopia in Russian culture and in analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivinsky, Vladimir

    2014-02-01

    The spatial metaphor of Utopia is considered from a Jungian perspective along with its role in Russian culture and in analysis. Such post-Jungian concepts as the cultural complex and the archetypal story pattern of a victim are used in considering the desperate longing for a rescuer in patients' narratives and in Russian society. A clinical vignette is provided to illustrate these ideas. © 2014, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  13. Physical qualification of school-leavers with different level of professional readiness and somatotypes at the stages of studying in the military institution of higher education of the forces of civil defence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonshovsky V.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of indexes of physical preparedness of rescuers is considered with the different levels of professional readiness and somatotypes. Probed 79 students. Formed battery from 14 tests. Professional readiness of graduating students was determined on results state examinations. Considerable divergences are exposed between excellent student and students with the lower levels of professional readiness. The necessity of account of these excellent student is rotined at forming of optimum maintenance of physical preparation.

  14. Důvody předčasného odchodu příslušníků Hasičského záchranného sboru ČR ze služebního poměru

    OpenAIRE

    ŽIŽKA, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT The thesis titled Reasons of Early Retirement of Members of Fire Rescue Service of the Czech Republic introduces Fire Rescue Service unit in the South Bohemia region, its role, its basic units, and operations. Further, I focused my attention on the personality of the fireman {--} rescuer and its features, as they are necessary for good performance when rescuing. Next part of the thesis describes history, major goals, and methods of work in Psychological service of Fire Rescue Service...

  15. Manual for best practice for emergency response procedures, part 2: the management of inrushes, fires, explosions and other emergencies.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Spencer, KC

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES PART 2 THE MANAGEMENT OF INRUSHES, FIRES, EXPLOSIONS AND OTHER EMERGENCIES Authors: K C Spencer, D M Walters, T P T Page and A G du Plessis. Research Agency: Turgis Technology (Pty) Ltd. Project No. COL 605 Date...-planning .................................................................................................................2 2.2 Awareness of the emergency situation..........................................................................2 2.3 Self contained self rescuers (SCSRs) ...........................................................................3 2...

  16. Keep pushing! Limiting interruptions to CPR; bag-valve mask versus i-gel® airway ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Vincent-Lambert

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: The use of the i-gel® airway resulted in a considerable decrease in the amount of time spent on ventilations and in more compressions being performed. The overall reduction in HOT was, however, offset by the time it took to secure the device. Further investigation into the use and securing of the i-gel® airway in single rescuer CPR is recommended.

  17. Security framework and training of lifeguards and water taking into account the topography of the sea of Аzov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Володимир Миколайович Зюзь

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the state policy of Ukraine realization in the field of health and life protection, use of the natural environment and providing safe living conditions, recreation, life protection upon the water, accidents prevention, search and rescue of people in distress on the water. The modern concept of safety and water rescuing takes into account the conclusions of the Commission on ecology, natural resources and recreation. Safety upon the water is achieved through correct information of the coastal outline and the natural phenomena around, correct choice of bathing-beaches and equipment, proper visual aids, well organized bathing, systematic explanatory work as to the rules of conduct on the water and precautionary measures, swimming training. Work in the rescuing service demands that the rescuer should be conscious, responsible, willing to help, being able to rescue the drowning. The rescue service task is to protect people from the dangers which they may be subjected to during bathing or swimming. To prevent people losing their life a series of preventive measures should be taken. These include: monitoring on beaches, oral and written instruction to swimmers as to proper behavior on the water, use of proper posters, training of swimmers, lifeguards. The profession of a rescuer on the water is always associated with risk. Therefore, always, before executing their duties, the future rescuers must undergo special training and prove they have the necessary knowledge, skills and qualifications. Otherwise, erroneous actions of a rescuer may lead to injury and death of both the victims of an accident and the members of his team. The reasons for possible accidents on the waters of the Azov sea have been analyzed in the article. Improved methodological basis for the training of lifeguards, including: knowledge of the coastline and beaches, types of sea shores, waves and currents as well as the first aid have been described

  18. SALVEREMO, an automatic system for the search and rescue in the wilderness and mountain areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, Roberto; Allasia, Walter; Bianchi, Luca; Licata, Enrico; Duranti, Pierluigi; Molino, Andrea; Bagalini, Enea; Sagliocco, Sergio; Scarafia, Simone; Prinetto, Paolo; Airofarulla, Giuseppe; Carelli, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    SALVEREMO project aims at designing and prototyping an innovative system for searching and rescuing individuals (especially hikers and mountaineers) who got lost or in peril in wilderness or mountain areas. It makes use of Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) equipped with a sensor suite specifically selected according to the requirements identified involving alpine rescuers and government officials. The peculiarity of the proposed solution is the exploitation and integration of the special skill and expertise coming from different competence fields. It will dramatically decrease the searching time in the wilderness and remote areas off the beaten tracks, providing rescuers and operators with a decision support system increasing successful results and reducing rescue missions costs. The system benefits from the adoption of a scaled-down Base Transceiver Station (BTS) embarked in the payload sensor suite of a small RPAS that can be carried in a back pack of rescuers. A Software Defined Radio (SDR) board implementing the BTS protocol stack has been integrated in a complex sensor suite made up of open processing boards and camera devices. Moreover computer vision (CV) algorithms for real time pattern detection and image enhancements have been investigated for assisting the rescuers during the searching operations. An easy-to-use ground station application has been developed for speeding up the overall mission accomplishment. Aknowledgement SALVEREMO project is a research project co-funded by Regione Piemonte according to the call for proposal POR F.E.S.R. 2007/2013, "Linea di attività I.1.3-Innovazione e PMI - Polo della Meccatronica e dei Sistemi Avanzati di Produzione". The authors want to thank "Il Soccorso Alpino Italiano" for the invaluable support for establishing operative requirements.

  19. Basal genoplivning af voksne og automatisk ekstern defibrillering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berlac, P.A.; Lippert, F.K.; Torp-Pedersen, Christian Tobias

    2008-01-01

    The new ERC guidelines on resuscitation emphasize the importance of quality CPR. BLS should be started as early as possible. Lay rescuers should not check for a pulse, they should call for help and start chest compressions immediately. Compression depth should be 4-5 cm at a rate of 100 compressi...... ventilations followed by a compression-ventilation ratio of 15:2. Automatic External Defibrillation should be used as early as possible Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11/17...

  20. [Resuscitation - Basic Life Support in adults and application of automatic external defibrillators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Andreas; Seewald, Stephan; Wnent, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Witnesses of a sudden cardiac arrest play a key-role in resuscitation. Lay-persons should therefore be trained to recognize that a collapsed person who is not breathing at all or breathing normally might suffer from cardiac arrest. Information of professional emergency medical staff by lay-persons and their initiation of cardio-pulmonary-resuscitation-measures are of great importance for cardiac-arrest victims. Ambulance-dispatchers have to support lay-rescuers via telephone. This support includes the localisation of the nearest Automatic External Defibrillator (AED). Presentation of agonal breathing or convulsions due to brain-hypoxia need to be recognized as potential early signs of cardiac arrest. In any case of cardiac arrest chest-compressions need to be started. There is insufficiant data to recommend "chest-compression-only"-CPR as being equally sufficient as cardio-pulmonary-resuscitation including ventilation. Rescuers trained in ventilation should therefore combine compressions and ventilations at a 30:2-ratio. Movement of the chest is being used as a sign of sufficient ventilation. High-quality chest-compressions of at least 5 cm of depth, not exceeding 6 cm, are recommended at a ratio of 100-120 chest conpressions/min. Interruption of chest-compression should be avoided. At busy public places AED should be available to enable lay-rescuers to apply early defibrillation. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Division of labor regulates precision rescue behavior in sand-dwelling Cataglyphis cursor ants: to give is to receive.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Nowbahari

    Full Text Available Division of labor, an adaptation in which individuals specialize in performing tasks necessary to the colony, such as nest defense and foraging, is believed key to eusocial insects' remarkable ecological success. Here we report, for the first time, a completely novel specialization in a eusocial insect, namely the ability of Cataglyphis cursor ants to rescue a trapped nestmate using precisely targeted behavior. Labeled "precision rescue", this behavior involves the ability of rescuers not only to detect what, exactly, holds the victim in place, but also to direct specific actions to this obstacle. Individual ants, sampled from each of C. cursor's three castes, namely foragers, nurses and inactives, were experimentally ensnared (the "victim" and exposed to a caste-specific group of potential "rescuers." The data reveal that foragers were able to administer, and obtain, the most help while members of the youngest, inactive caste not only failed to respond to victims, but also received virtually no help from potential rescuers, regardless of caste. Nurses performed intermediate levels of aid, mirroring their intermediate caste status. Our results demonstrate that division of labor, which controls foraging, defense and brood care in C. cursor, also regulates a newly discovered behavior in this species, namely a sophisticated form of rescue, a highly adaptive specialization that is finely tuned to a caste member's probability of becoming, or encountering, a victim in need of rescue.

  2. Do clinical examination gloves provide adequate electrical insulation for safe hands-on defibrillation? II: Material integrity following exposure to defibrillation waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petley, Graham W; Deakin, Charles D

    2013-07-01

    Maintaining contact with the patient during defibrillator discharge has been proposed as a method for reducing no flow time but carries an associated risk of electrocution of the rescuer. This study describes an investigation to determine if typical clinical examination gloves possess the dielectric strength needed to prevent breakdown at defibrillation voltages; a factor essential to protect the rescuer. Four types of examination glove typically used in a clinical environment were tested with two types of defibrillation waveform commonly used. For each type of glove, 10 samples were tested initially using a monophasic defibrillation waveform and then, using a fresh sample of gloves, with a Biphasic waveform. For each glove the number of shocks required before electrical breakdown occurred was recorded. Kimberly Clark KC300 (nitrile), Kimberly Clark KC500 purple (nitrile), PH Medisavers GN90 (nitrile) and Bodyguards GL6622 (Vinyl) were tested using a monophasic defibrillation waveform and broke down after a median of 1, 4.5, 1 and 1 shocks respectively. The equivalent values for Biphasic defibrillator were 2, >10, 2.5 and 1 shocks. Typical clinical examination gloves do not possess the dielectric strength required to protect a rescuer from defibrillation voltages during hands-on chest compressions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Geweld in 'n evangelie van liefde: Die Evangelie van Johannes se perspektief op geweld teen Jesus en sy dissipels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan van der Watt

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Violence in a gospel of love: The perspective of the Gospel of John on violence against Jesus and his disciples This article is the first of two articles in which violence in the Gospel of John is discussed. In these articles strong techniques of vilification in the Gospel are pointed out, according to which the status of the opposing group is radically discredited by the Jews on the one hand, and the followers of Jesus on the other hand. In the first article violence and vilification by the Jews, or disciples of Moses against the followers and disciples of Jesus are investigated. It is argued that the central issue of the conflict revolves around the question: Where is God's presence to be found? Among the Jews or among the followers of Jesus? The conflict and violence in John could be understood against the backdrop of this important question.

  4. Typology and the Holocaust: Erich Auerbach and Judeo-Christian Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malachi Haim Hacohen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In response to Nazi exclusion of the Jews from German society on racial grounds, Erich Auerbach (1892–1957, a secular Jewish intellectual inspired by cultural Protestantism and Catholicism, formed a vision of a cosmopolitan Judeo-Christian civilization that reintegrated the Jews as biblical founders and cultural mediators. But the integration expunged any mark of traditional Jewishness. Focusing on Christian figurative thinking (typology, Auerbach viewed the binding of Isaac through the crucifixion, and contemporary Jews as civilization’s (unwilling and undeserving martyrs. In the aftermath of the Holocaust, his cosmopolitanism reached a crisis, reflected in his postwar vision of Western decline. The progressive mandarin who had begun his intellectual life elevating Dante’s care for everyday life and sympathizing with French realist social critique ended endorsing Hugh of St. Victor’s alienation from reality and Pascal’s acquiescence in totalitarian rule.

  5. “¿Qué se te perdió en Cuba?” La doppia diaspora della comunità ebreo-cubana nelle pagine di Ruth Behar e Achy Obejas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Bajini

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is dedicated to the double diaspora of Jews of Cuba and its current literary representation. Cubans of Jewish heritage, have lived on the island of Cuba for centuries. Some Cubans trace Jewish ancestry to Marranos who fled the Spanish Inquisition, though few of these practice Judaism today. There was significant Jewish immigration to Cuba in the first half of the 20th century. Like others, many Jews left Cuba for the United States after the coming of Fidel Castro, and today there is a large community in South Florida. Ruth Behar and Achy Obejas lives in USA since they were children, but they wanted to recreate their double identity - which resembles that of many other cuban Jews in their peculiar american diaspora - the first with the anthropological researche, the second thanks to the novel or the short story.

  6. War during childhood: The long run effects of warfare on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut-Yuksel, Mevlude

    2017-05-01

    This paper estimates the causal long-term consequences of an exposure to war in utero and during childhood on the risk of obesity and the probability of having a chronic health condition in adulthood. Using the plausibly exogenous city-by-cohort variation in the intensity of WWII destruction as a unique quasi-experiment, I find that individuals who were exposed to WWII destruction during the prenatal and early postnatal periods have higher BMIs and are more likely to be obese as adults. I also find an elevated incidence of chronic health conditions such as stroke, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disorder in adulthood among these wartime children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pre-Linnaean herbaria viva of Helwing in the collections of the National Library of Poland and the University of Warsaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Spalik

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Georg Andreas Helwing (1666–1748 was the author of two important early accounts on the flora of former East Prussia: “Flora qusimodogenita” and “Supplementum florae prussicae”. Along with his son-in-law Matthias Ernst Boretius, he prepared several herbaria viva. Four of these herbaria survived until WWII; however, their whereabouts since WWII have been generally unknown. In this paper, two of these herbaria are described: one preserved in the collections of the National Library of Poland and another in the herbarium of the Faculty of Biology of the University of Warsaw. Both were formerly in the possession of the Königsberg city library. These herbaria document not only Helwing’s studies on the native flora of Prussia but also his experiments with acclimation of exotic species in his garden in Stullichen (Stulichy, Poland. They are also an important source of vernacular Polish and German names of plants.

  8. Mobilisering af barnets potentiale for en bedre fremtid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øland, Trine

    2014-01-01

    Children’s books were one of the scenes where ‘progressive’ professionals - mostly teachers, psychologists and artists - around WWII fought the battle to change society through changed educational thinking. Especially after WWII it was acknowledged that children’s books could contribute...... to the forming and education of the child, mobilising the child’s potential to secure the future and promote peace and international understanding. This article examines so far unexamined sources, i.e., 89 assessments of children’s book manuscripts from the private archives of Torben Gregersen (1911...... development and national culture, and literary and aesthetic-artistic elements to a lesser extent. Thus, the article shows that the emergence of ‘progressive’ elements which in research on children’s literature normally are dated to the late 1960s, are not only present in the 1940s and 1950s...

  9. The contribution of the Georges Heights Experimental Radar Antenna to Australian radio astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchiston, Wayne; Wendt, Harry

    2017-12-01

    During the late 1940s and throughout the1950s Australia was one of the world’s foremost astronomical nations owing primarily to the dynamic Radio Astronomy Group within the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Organisation’s Division of Radiophysics based in Sydney. The earliest celestial observations were made with former WWII radar antennas and simple Yagi aerials attached to recycled radar receivers, before more sophisticated purpose-built radio telescopes of various types were designed and developed. One of the recycled WWII antennas that was used extensively for pioneering radio astronomical research was an experimental radar antenna that initially was located at the Division’s short-lived Georges Heights Field Station but in 1948 was relocated to the new Potts Hill Field Station in suburban Sydney. In this paper we describe this unique antenna, and discuss the wide-ranging solar, galactic and extragalactic research programs that it was used for.

  10. Abraham's children in the genome era: major Jewish diaspora populations comprise distinct genetic clusters with shared Middle Eastern Ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzmon, Gil; Hao, Li; Pe'er, Itsik; Velez, Christopher; Pearlman, Alexander; Palamara, Pier Francesco; Morrow, Bernice; Friedman, Eitan; Oddoux, Carole; Burns, Edward; Ostrer, Harry

    2010-06-11

    For more than a century, Jews and non-Jews alike have tried to define the relatedness of contemporary Jewish people. Previous genetic studies of blood group and serum markers suggested that Jewish groups had Middle Eastern origin with greater genetic similarity between paired Jewish populations. However, these and successor studies of monoallelic Y chromosomal and mitochondrial genetic markers did not resolve the issues of within and between-group Jewish genetic identity. Here, genome-wide analysis of seven Jewish groups (Iranian, Iraqi, Syrian, Italian, Turkish, Greek, and Ashkenazi) and comparison with non-Jewish groups demonstrated distinctive Jewish population clusters, each with shared Middle Eastern ancestry, proximity to contemporary Middle Eastern populations, and variable degrees of European and North African admixture. Two major groups were identified by principal component, phylogenetic, and identity by descent (IBD) analysis: Middle Eastern Jews and European/Syrian Jews. The IBD segment sharing and the proximity of European Jews to each other and to southern European populations suggested similar origins for European Jewry and refuted large-scale genetic contributions of Central and Eastern European and Slavic populations to the formation of Ashkenazi Jewry. Rapid decay of IBD in Ashkenazi Jewish genomes was consistent with a severe bottleneck followed by large expansion, such as occurred with the so-called demographic miracle of population expansion from 50,000 people at the beginning of the 15th century to 5,000,000 people at the beginning of the 19th century. Thus, this study demonstrates that European/Syrian and Middle Eastern Jews represent a series of geographical isolates or clusters woven together by shared IBD genetic threads.

  11. Constructivism as the Framework for International Orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    this is specifically apparent in the disparity between the Treaty of Versailles in 1919 and the post-WWII settlements of 1945-1951. The Treaty of... Versailles only lasted until 1939 and Europe was again on the path to World War. The Treaty of Versailles failed because while the identity of...the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648, the failure of the resulting international order to prevent the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, and the

  12. Německo-španělské bilaterální vztahy 1939-1940

    OpenAIRE

    Jindra, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In my thesis "German-Hispanic Bilateral Relations 1939-1940 I deal with the evolution of high level cooperation between Nazi Germany and Francoist Spain. The primary point of these two dictatorships' relations was determined by the results of Spanish Civil War that directed Franco into the orbit of the Axis Powers. After the outbreak of WWII Spain decided to exercise so-called benevolent neutrality very tilted towards Germany. Under the impression of overwhelming German expansion this neutral...

  13. Aghas, Sheiks, and Daesh In Iraq: Kurdish Robust Action In Turmoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    because they are able to mobilize support through the legend of their personality. The only exception would be the potential for former royalty to...pressures.56 B. WWI THROUGH WWII With the end of WWI, the Kurds gained their first real opportunity for independence. With the League of Nations...the League of Nations and the British. However, the British proved disingenuous and were unwilling to risk their significant oil interests in northern

  14. Marine ground intelligence reform: how to redesign ground intelligence for the threats of the 21st century

    OpenAIRE

    Cukor, Drew E

    1997-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Present-day Marine ground intelligence is configured for attrition warfighting and the predictable conventional adversaries of the past. Designed during WWII, it has undergone little change; what has changed is the threat environment. Modern-day threats are less centralized and regimented. They think on their own and they adapt quickly. This thesis analyzes the current configuration of Marine ground intelligence and compares it with tw...

  15. Československo-španělské vztahy 1945-1975

    OpenAIRE

    Vurm, Filip

    2007-01-01

    This study deals with the history of spanish - czechoslovak relations in 1945 - 1975. In this period both countries were on the others sides of Iron curtain which separes two ideological blocks created after WWII. Czechoslovakia, where the soviet influence was strong since 1945, became a communist state after coup in February 1948. Franco's regime in Spain was legitimased with the victory in the civil war over the coalition of republicans, which was dominated by the Communist party of Spain (...

  16. US Army And The Emergence Of Unmanned Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    UAS carrying a warhead and proper navigation equipment could perform a land attack role. The technological barriers to developing land attack cruise...Bridge gave the US Army an opportunity to cross the last major barrier to Germany and deny the Wehrmacht the opportunity to mount a defense along the river...Bridge (South Yorkshire, UK: Pen & Sword Books, 2004), 55-116. 66 Paul Semmens, “The Hammer of Hell : The Coming of Age of Antiaircraft Artillery in WWII

  17. Cyber-Enabled Unconventional Warfare: The Convergence of Cyberspace, Social Mobilization, and Special Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    cyber warfare, cyber terrorism, DDoS attacks, department of defense, hackers, hacktivists, hybrid warfare, information warfare, insurgency...INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK xv LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS CBI China, Burma, and India (theater in WWII) CIA Central Intelligence Agency DDoS ...as a distributed denial of service ( DDoS ) attack. By pushing too much data to a computer, site, or server, these types of attacks effectively

  18. RPAs: Revolution or Retrogression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    However, the results were not at all commensurate with the effort invested.6 Nikola Tesla immigrated to the United States and patented many things in...combat.suite101.com/article.cfm/Japanese _balloon_bombs_of_wwii (accessed 14 October 2009). 7. “ Nikola Tesla ,” http://www.crhystalinks.com/tesla.html...accessed 14 October 2009); Nikola Tesla , “The Transmission of Electrical Energy without Wires as a Means for Furthering Peace,” Electrical World

  19. Long-term effects of conflict-related sexual violence compared with non-sexual war trauma in female World War II survivors: a matched pairs study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwert, Philipp; Glaesmer, Heide; Eichhorn, Svenja; Grundke, Elena; Pietrzak, Robert H; Freyberger, Harald J; Klauer, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the long-term effects of conflict-related sexual violence experienced at the end of World War II (WWII) with non-sexual WWII trauma (e.g., being exposed to shell shock or physical violence). A total of 27 elderly wartime rape survivors were compared to age- and gender-matched control subjects who were drawn from a larger sample of subjects over 70 years of age who had experienced WWII-related trauma. A modified version of the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale was used to assess trauma characteristics and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 was used to assess current psychopathology. Additionally, measures of posttraumatic growth (Posttraumatic Growth Inventory) and social acknowledgement as a trauma survivor (Social Acknowledgement Questionnaire) were used to assess two mediating variables in post-trauma conditions of rape victims. Women exposed to conflict-related sexual violence reported greater severity of PTSD-related avoidance and hyperarousal symptoms, as well as anxiety, compared with female long-term survivors of non-sexual WWII trauma. The vast majority (80.9 %) of these women also reported severe sexual problems during their lifetimes relative to 19.0 % of women who experienced non-sexual war trauma. Women exposed to conflict-related sexual violence also reported greater posttraumatic growth, but less social acknowledgement as trauma survivors, compared to survivors of non-sexual war trauma. The results were consistent with emerging neurobiological research, which suggests that different traumas may be differentially associated with long-term posttraumatic sequelae in sexual assault survivors than in other survivor groups and highlights the need to treat (or better prevent) deleterious effects of conflict-related sexual violence in current worldwide crisis zones.

  20. Notas sobre las transformaciones psíquicas de la adolescencia en la historia del psicoanálisis

    OpenAIRE

    Mauricio Fernández Arcila

    2014-01-01

    The determinism of childhood captured the attention of psychoanalytic thought and overshadowed the crucial role of adolescence, which Freud himself recognized. New approaches to the specificity and importance of adolescence begin to crop up in the mid-twentieth century, supported in clinical practice with adolescents developed after WWII. Finally the integration of the concept of "afterwards" {Nachträglichkeit} in these theories best validates the thesis that adolescent psychic transformation...

  1. Ludwig Franz Benedikt Biermann: the doyen of German post-war astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielebinski, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Ludwig Biermann was a major figure in theoretical astrophysics in Germany in the twentieth century. His work on stellar interiors, comets and magnetic fields advanced our knowledge. He also predicted the existence and the nature of the solar wind. His predictions were vindicated by space probes. Ludwig Biermann also was an important figure behind the scenes working on the revival of German astronomy after the demise of WWII. For his work he earned important national and international honors.

  2. Optimizing Search Patterns for Multiple Searchers Prosecuting a Single Contact In the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    and classify submarines in the area. 1.1 History SDT originated in World War II (WWII) and represented the birth of operations analysis...search and rescue operations [3]. The following research focuses on the aspects of stochastic processes, use and interpretation of sweep widths, and...limited only by the imagination of the analyst utilizing it. While it is exercised in the form of a naval problem for this research, many research papers

  3. Interoperability, Integration, and Interdependence Between the United States and Canadian Forces: Recreating the Devil’s Brigade

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    integrated force during WWII named the FSSF.28 The Canadian Army was pivotal in contributing high quality forces to the FSSF—precursor to today’s...an aggressive power. However, since the Soviets lacked atomic weapons, a long-range air force, and a blue water navy, the JCS anticipated the Soviets...War of Patrols; Canadian Army Operations in Korea, (Vancouver: University of British Colombia Press, 2003), xv. 19

  4. United States 1st Armored Division and Mission Command at the Battle of Faid Pass

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-13

    to inculcate an opportunistic mindset in the inexperienced leaders of the US Army. In Chapters Three: Leadership , it states that, “Every individual...doctrinal diction and some of its aligned theories did not exist during WWII, the philosophy as whole did. Chapters Three: Leadership and Four: The...many essential skills , it did not adequately prepare them for operations in Tunisia. The Army had to overcome significant obstacles to field

  5. RecitationWhiz® A Structural Method for Memorizing Poems and Other Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Oliphant

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Robert Oliphant’s bestseller, A Piano for Mrs. Cimino (Reader’s Digest USA, Canada, and Australia was also (same title a prize-winning film (Monte Carlo that starred Bette Davis and is still being shown worldwide. A WWII air corps veteran, he studied English philology under Herbert Dean Meritt at Stanford, is an emeritus Professor of English at California State University, Northridge, and currently writes a column for EducationNews.org.

  6. Money supply and Greek history monetary statistics: definition, construction, sources and data

    OpenAIRE

    Sophia Lazaretou

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to provide, for the first time, a survey of the construction of estimates of the quantity of money in Greece since the inception of the National Bank of Greece in 1842 until the eve of WWII. Specifically, we describe in detail the methods of construction and the sources of data used in building these aggregates. We discuss the data collection procedure and publication practices. The end product is presented in a data appendix.

  7. Building the Second Mind: 1956 and the Origins of Artificial Intelligence Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Skinner, Rebecca Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Building the Second Mind: 1956 and the Origins of Artificial Intelligence Computing tells the history of the origins of AI. As the field that seeks to do things that would be considered intelligent if a human being did them, AI is a constant of human thought. Yet it was impossible until the digital computer was invented during WWII, and the field itself was not declared until 1956.

  8. Who cares about the democratic mandate of education? A text analysis of the Swedish secondary education reform of 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Adman, Per

    2014-01-01

    For several decades after WWII, Swedish education reforms were justified extensively based on democratic and equality arguments. The Social Democrats, the party in governing power during this era, considered a uniform education system crucial to their endeavors towards a greater democracy and greater equality. According to current research, arguments of this kind are being used increasingly rarely to justify general reforms to public primary and secondary education. It is however unknown whet...

  9. Treating marriage as "the sick entity": Gender, emotional life, and the psychology of marriage improvement in postwar Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chettiar, Teri

    2015-08-01

    This essay examines how marriage relationships came to be constituted as therapeutic objects after WWII and the impact that this had on British postwar understandings of the meaning of marriage. In contrast to prevailing concerns during the interwar decades about sexual dissatisfaction as the chief impediment to marital stability, post-WWII marriage counselors and therapists framed marital harmony as dependent upon spouses' psychological maturity. An inability to sustain a stable marriage was interpreted as a sign of arrested development, most often stemming from a dysfunctional relationship with one or both parents in childhood. This essay reveals that the equal-but-different gender roles that were the cornerstone of the modern "companionate" marriage were crucial to marital counselors and therapists' psychological understanding of marriage as an interpersonal relationship during the decades following WWII. Practitioners gauged therapeutic success not only in accordance with whether or not couples stayed married, but also in terms of the extent to which spouses enthusiastically accepted the adult masculine and feminine spousal roles that the male-breadwinning nuclear family required. Moreover, therapists' valuing of the emotional dimensions of marriage made "natural" feminine attributes-such as a presumed ease in establishing loving relationships-a centrally valued aspect of therapeutic work and intimate life more broadly. Far from having a potentially disruptive impact on the presumed naturalness of gender difference (which had been a focus of criticism of psychoanalysis during the interwar decades), the psychoanalytic techniques that were developed to treat marriage problems after WWII were profoundly normalizing. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Space Technology and the Soviet/US Strategic Competition: A Perspective and Forecast Using Twelve-Year Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    revived from their four-year geopolitical autism following WWII, the answer to the reluctantly shouldered challenge was obvious: air power and the bomb...prior, and it, too, now sported improved missiles. Plus, the Strategic Air Command still had 505 operational B-52s. 2 Although the supersonic B-58 was...was 16 meters long, just over 4 meters in diameter, and sported four large solar panels for power.2 3 The largest of its three sections, the central

  11. Desert Environmental Handbook. First Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-11-01

    21 3 Alix I SECTION 4. DESERT OPERATIONS Par’e 4.1 Heat Stress . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... ...... . .. . . 4.2...0F)Surface Temperatures Floor Board : ¾-ton Truck 60^5 0 C 1410F 8-ton Goer 65 C 149OF Inside Cab: 8-ton Goer 57.20C 1350F Accelerator Pedal: ¾-ton...Experience in WWII, MS#P-129. 135 *)! Desert Effects (continued) Desert Convoy--Report of Environmental Operation, US Army Trans- portation Board

  12. Paradigm shift: Can TQM save DOD's procurement process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Ross V.

    1992-11-01

    The Department of Defense's (DOD) ambitious introduction of total quality management (TQM) will fail, unless they change their paradigm and reengineer how they do business. TQM implementation in the defense department and possibilities for reengineering DOD's management structure were investigated. This paper uses a case study to investigate DOD's procurement efficiency and effectiveness with information technology. The findings show DOD is faced with its greatest challenge since WWII in meeting the rapidly evolving environment of the 1990s and the 21st century.

  13. Empirical Evaluation of Advanced Electromagnetic Induction Systems - Factors Affecting Classification Effectiveness in Challenging Geologic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Geologic Environments February 2017 This document has been cleared for public release; Distribution Statement A REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Standard...Affecting Classification Effectiveness in Challenging Geologic Environments Tamir Klaff CH2M HILL CH2M HILL 2411 Dulles Corner Park, Suite 500...associated with the WWII- and Cold War- era use of the location by the U.S. military (ca. 1942-1956). The contributing properties include a wide range of

  14. Two for the Price of One: Integration of NEPA and NHPA Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    properties to maintain their cultural, education- al, aesthetic , and economic benefits. The NHPA established the National Register of Historic Places...Artillery Regiment, 203rd Personnel Services Battalion, Medical Activity-Alaska, and Dental Activity- Alaska. During WWII, Ladd Field served as a hub for...significance. The appearance ofbe1ow-deck features is not of concern from a historical aesthetic per- spective and may have a contemporary appearance

  15. Friendship in War: Camaraderie and Prevention of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevarez, Michael D; Yee, Hannah M; Waldinger, Robert J

    2017-10-01

    Aspects of social support during combat deployment, such as unit cohesion, have been shown to affect later posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) development among veterans. We utilized a longitudinal database to assess how relationship quality with fellow soldiers in World War II (WWII) might be linked with postwar PTSD symptoms. Data were available on 101 men who experienced combat exposure in WWII, documented through postwar assessment. Upon study entry (1939 to 1942), data were collected on the quality of participants' early childhood relationships and their emotional adjustment during college. Data on WWII experiences were collected in 1946. Relationship quality with fellow soldiers in WWII was examined as a moderator of the link between combat exposure and postwar PTSD symptoms. Prewar emotional adjustment was examined as a mediator between quality of childhood relationships and subsequent quality of relationships quality with fellow soldiers during war. Better quality relationships with fellow soldiers attenuated (i.e., moderated) the link between combat exposure severity and PTSD symptom count, explaining a significant percent of the variance, R2 = .19, p < .001. There was also a significant indirect mediation effect of childhood relationship quality on relationships with soldiers through prewar emotional adjustment, ab = 0.02, 95% BCa CI [0.01, 0.05]. Results suggest that better peer relationship quality during deployment may reduce the likelihood of subsequent PTSD symptom development, and that the quality of early relationships may set the stage for better relationships during stressful contexts such as war. These findings have implications for PTSD risk factor screening prior to deployment, and underscore the importance of interpersonal support among soldiers during deployment. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  16. Contemporary Jus Ad Bellum on Use of Force in Self-Defense by States Against Non-State Terrorist Groups -- Limitations, Evolutions and Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    and Dar es Salaam . The previous chapter described the facts of 66 this case. Iran, Iraq, Libya, Pakistan, Russia and Yemen condemned the response...2008, ch. 4). With the Congress of Vienna in 1815, and subsequent Concert of Europe, the concept of balance of power was restored in European...WWI) and World War II (WWII) generations became all too familiar. Advancing on the principles established by the Congress of Vienna of 1815, and

  17. "A Clear And Present Danger": Why DoD Active Duty Forces Must Assist in the Security of the U.S. Southern Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    including, if applicable, actions taken in anticipatory self -defense to preempt an attack before it takes place) with applicable support from its...this in Article 1, Section 8 where it grants the Congress the power to ―provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States;‖ 1...A brief look at U.S. history shows that the period following the major conflicts (WWI, WWII, Korea , 24 Vietnam, the Cold War and Operation DESERT

  18. Ethnic concentration and language fluency of immigrants : quasi-experimental evidence from the guest-worker placement in Germany (Ethnische Konzentration und Sprachkompetenz von Einwanderern : quasi-experimentelle Befunde aus der Gastarbeiteranwerbung in Deutschland)

    OpenAIRE

    Danzer, Alexander M.; Yaman, Firat

    2010-01-01

    "The paper analyses the impact of regional own-ethnic concentration on the language proficiency of immigrants. It solves the endogeneity of immigrants' location choices by exploiting the fact that guest-workers in Germany after WWII were initially placed by firms and labor agencies. We find a robust negative effect of ethnic concentration on immigrants' language ability. Simulation results of a simultaneous location and learning choice model confirm the presence of the effect and show how imm...

  19. Competence as a Professional Imperative: Does the Army Promote Competence in its Officers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    requirements, he arrived a full day late to the second course. He was counseled in writing and given make-up work for what he missed. At this point, his...of professional armies starting with Sparta in the seventh century B.C. and ending with personal experiences in WWII. These lectures were published...than once, it was said that if the rater waited until the OER to discuss development with his subordinate it was too late for appropriate development

  20. Improved Defense through Equipment Upgrades: The U.S. and Its Security Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    Security Assistance Agency Daniel Ruskin Vice President-Government Requirements Missiles, Space, and Electronics Systems Group _ , , - Lockheed Corporation...Equipment-class planning is well-within the state-of-the- art . How- S . S . ever, unless the equipment class happens to represent almost the only means...other) * 90/20 WWII destroyers * 100/140 minesweepers " * 150/900 patrol craft * 30/150 submarines -. . ... . - . ... Appendix A STUDY TERMS OF

  1. Defense Acquisition Research Journal. Volume 19, Number 4, Issue 64, October 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Graphic Designer Lisa Drobek Editing, Design, and Layout Schatz Publishing Group A Publication of the Defense Acquisition University October 2012 Vol...the Army, which prior to WWII had been directed to purchase commercial off-the-shelf trucks almost exclusively ( Thomson & Mayo, 1960). As the...the lowest bidder ( Thomson & Mayo, 1960). Out of 135 companies invited to bid on the vehicle contract, only two submitted proposals: American Bantam

  2. Policy Rules, Regime Switches, and Trend Inflation: An Empirical Investigation for the U.S.

    OpenAIRE

    Castelnuovo, Efrem; Greco, Luciano; Raggi, Davide

    2010-01-01

    This paper estimates Taylor rules featuring instabilities in policy parameters, switches in policy shocks' volatility, and time-varying trend inflation using post-WWII U.S. data. The model embedding the stochastic target performs better in terms of data-fit and identification of the changes in the FOMC's chairmanships. Policy breaks are found not to be synchronized with variations in policy shocks' volatilities. Finally, we detect a negative correlation between systematic monetary policy aggr...

  3. Jødiske indvandrere på den politiske dagsorden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian Arly

    2007-01-01

    archives which express the political elite’s views on Jews and Judaism. The paper will also include a theoretical discussion on how to analyse articulations on “otherness” as well as a description of the Jewish community during this period.    Debates on Jews and Jewish immigrants in the Danish Parliaments...... is important debates which reflects a general articulation and construction of otherness in a particular society, but at the same time is these articulations condensed in sources such as written oral debates, Bills, Proposal for Parliamentary Resolution, Accounts, Committees work etc. found...

  4. O abate de frangos pelo método Kosher: definições, conjuntura de mercado e perspectivas de estudo

    OpenAIRE

    Izidoro, Thiago Braga [UNESP; Pereira, Juliano Gonçalves [UNESP; Soares, Vanessa Mendonça [UNESP; Spina, Thiago Luiz Belém; Pinto, José Paes de Almeida Nogueira [UNESP

    2012-01-01

    Kosher food is understood as being the appropriate one for a Jew, ensuring this way their physical and spiritual health. It follows a series of food standards contained in the Halakha, which is a set of laws governing the proper moral conduct of the Jewish culture. Currently the market for Kosher food moves about 200 billion dollars in the USA, with consumers not only among Jews, but also among Muslims, vegetarians and people who associate such products with a more rigorous quality control. T...

  5. Die joodse volk en die kerk: nog 'n beskouing van die Probleem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Henry Keane

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available The Jewish nation and church: Another view of the problem. This article takes a look at the "Jewish problem" using Roman 9-11 as the point of departure . The apostle Paul is convinced that God has not rejected Israel. The Jews s till have a decisive role to p la y in the divine action in history . The problem o f the Jewish -Christian relationship is as old as Christianity itself. On this article the writer does not attempt to offer solutions b u t reminds the church that the people o f God will be incomplete until Jews and Christian s alike are united .

  6. Il Processo a Gesù di Diego Fabbri e i commenti della stampa cattolica italiana / The trial of Jesus by Diego Fabbri: the comments of the Italian Catholic Press

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazzini, Elena

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to examine Diego Fabbri's play, 'The Trial of Jesus', and its reception by the Italian Catholic press in the mid Fifties. The play and the comments generated by the press demonstrated how the circulation of Anti-Semitic prejudices is reflected through the mise en scène of Jesus' death provoked, according to theological catholic stereotype, by the Jews. The guilt felt by the Jewish people for having killed the Messiah -the deicide's guilt- had a leading role both in the play and in the Catholic press that have linked this supposed Jewish culpability to the massacres suffered by the Jews over the centuries.

  7. Il Processo a Gesu' di Diego Fabbri e i commenti della stampa cattolica italiana. Fra deicidio e persecuzioni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Mazzini

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to examine Diego Fabbri's play, 'The Trial of Jesus', and its reception by the Italian Catholic press in the mid Fifties. The play and the comments generated by the press demonstrated how the circulation of Anti-Semitic prejudices is reflected through the mise en scène of Jesus' death provoked, according to theological catholic stereotype, by the Jews. The guilt felt by the Jewish people for having killed the Messiah -the deicide's guilt- had a leading role both in the play and in the Catholic press that have linked this supposed Jewish culpability to the massacres suffered by the Jews over the centuries.

  8. Practices of Cultural Nationalism. Alfonso Pacifici and the Jewish Renaissance in Italy (1910-1916

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Airoldi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay focuses on Alfonso Pacifici, leader at the forefront of the Jewish cultural revival movement in Italy in the first decades of the XX century. His figure and his philosophy represent a privileged focus through which it is possible to identify and follow the evolution of various intertwined aspects of the Jewish experience in post-emancipated Italy, such as: the elaboration of the Kulturdebatte within Italian Zionism; the development of a form of Jewish nationalism, as well as the dilemmas and the complicated dynamics that shaped the national identity of Italian Jews, torn between their allegiance as Jews and as Italians

  9. A Spatial Expansion of a Pocket Size Homeland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Cecilie Speggers Schrøder

    2016-01-01

    was established in Heine’s texts and how this space intellectually and emotionally came to signify home for modern Jewish readers. It presents a new perspective on the spaces of Heine’s early works by focusing on what was particularly Jewish about these spaces. Heine’s establishment of a Jewish cultural space...... references of the kind that made traditional Jewish life accessible to assimilated Jews and non-Jews alike. Heine took his readers into Jewish spaces such as a Jewish home, synagogue, and street. He gave the Jewish readers a sense of togetherness, of belonging to a Jewish space that was available through...

  10. Entrenchment of the Status Quo in the Arab-Israeli Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Hebraic tribe leaves Babylo- nia to wander in the land of Canaan. Joseph takes the Jews to Egypt . Pharaohs enslave them. 1200-1100: Moses leads the Jews...sovereignty in ancient Israel. What makes the Zionist move- ment unique from other national movements is its basis in divine promise (Genesis 15:18...34Unto thy seed have I given this land, from the river of Egypt unto the great river, the river Euphrates." However, the Bible failed to specify where land

  11. The faith of the fathers, the future of the youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibeke Kieding Banik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to analyse the various descriptions of crises among Norwegian Jewry as they were expressed in Jewish magazines and organizations in the interwar period. By analysing social, organizational and religious work I ask how Jews emigrating from Eastern Europe handled the transition from the Jewish shtetl life to the homogeneity of the Scandinavian societies. Further, I discuss the various solutions to these crises. I suggest that by utilizing fixed ideas of Jewishness, such as ‘traditions’ and ‘Zionism’, the Norwegian Jews in fact created a versatile Jewishness that they labelled ‘national work’. This paved the way to becoming ‘Jewish Norwegians’.

  12. Jewish laws, customs, and practice in labor, delivery, and postpartum care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Anita; Rom, Miriam; Newsome-Wicks, Mona; Engelhardt, Kay; Woloski-Wruble, Anna

    2009-07-01

    Many communities throughout the world, especially in the United States and Israel, contain large populations of religiously observant Jews. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive, descriptive guide to specific laws, customs, and practices of traditionally, religious observant Jews for the culturally sensitive management of labor, delivery, and postpartum. Discussion includes intimacy issues between husband and wife, dietary laws, Sabbath observance, as well as practices concerning prayer, communication trends, modesty issues, and labor and birth customs. Health care professionals can tailor their practice by integrating their knowledge of specific cultures into their management plan.

  13. National Bank of Romania and the Ministry of Finance during the Holocaust in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Florian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ion Antonescu inspired, coordinated and organized the tragedy of Jews in Romania, Bessarabia, Bukovina and Transylvania in the 1940s. However, he was not alone. He had an entire team and an institutional system that worked for making anti-Semitism a state policy and practice. The beginning of WW II from the East meant for the Jews the acceleration of the destructive phase of their destiny. During the meeting of the Council of Ministers of September 6, 1941, Ion Antonescu stated the purpose of the war against the USSR and the drastic measures against the Jewish population.

  14. ILLEGAL JEWISH-IMMIGRATION POLICY IN PALESTINE (PERIODS OF 1st and 2nd CONSTITUTIONAL MONARCHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Şakir BATMAZ

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, illegal Jewish Migration to Palestine and the Manner of the Ottoman Empire towards this migration throughout the second half of the 19th century will be shed into light. The migration movement to the Palestinian lands for Zionist purposes covers a period for the Jewish people full of patience, seriousness and sacrifices. Especially the rich Jews living in Europe and America supplied the money flow through the companies they set up and the Jews who were the idea-father of the Zionism made great efforts to get the Jewish people all over the world to migrate to the holy lands.

  15. La signification changeante des souvenirs matériels chez les immigrés juifs polonais d’après-guerre en Israël

    OpenAIRE

    Dabrowska, Kamila

    2012-01-01

    The article is based on research made among Polish Jews who lived after the war in Lower Silesia region and in 1950s or in 1960s emigrated to Israel. I will show the two waves of emigration, concentrating on how they differentiate in constructing the image of Poland – both the past one and the contemporary one. My interviewees were mainly children of people who survived the Second World War in the Soviet Union. Their parents were convinced that Poland is not only hosting country Jews lived fo...

  16. Khazars and Karaites, Again

    OpenAIRE

    Shapira, Dan D. Y.

    2007-01-01

    Many authors who wrote on the subject of the minim Jews met by R. Petahiah there, identified them bluntly as Karaites, as they knew no Talmud, etc., while my own impression is that we encounter here a non-Karaite (and probably, non-Rabbanite) Jewish grouping, similar in its religious character to the early 19th century Mountaineer Jews, who by then had been uncertain about the status of the Talmud. Traditional Karaism cannot exist but in a Rabbanite environment and the differences between bot...

  17. Increased risk of attempted suicide among aging holocaust survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Yoram; Aizenberg, Dov; Szor, Henry; Swartz, Marnina; Maor, Rachel; Knobler, Haim Y

    2005-08-01

    Suicide rates are higher in elderly persons than in those at other phase of the life-cycle. The majority of World War II (WWII) veterans and Holocaust survivors still define their war experiences as being the "most significant stressor" of their lives. Aging of survivors is frequently associated with depression, reactivation of traumatic syndromes, physical disorders, loss, and psychological distress, possibly increasing the risk of suicide. The aim of the present study was to investigate, among a large cohort of elderly Holocaust survivors, whether their WWII experiences confer an increased risk of suicidal behavior. All medical records of elderly patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital in Israel during a 5-year period were retrospectively evaluated. Suicidal patients were compared with patients who had not attempted suicide. Of 921 eligible patients, 374 were Holocaust survivors; 135 (14.6%) had attempted suicide in the month before admission. Ninety Holocaust survivors (24%) had attempted suicide, versus 45 of the 502 patients (8.2%) with no WWII experience. The risk of attempted suicide among Holocaust survivors was significantly increased. Although these findings are from a highly selected sample, we suggest that aging Holocaust survivors are at increased risk of attempting suicide. The growth of the elderly population, of whom many had had traumatic life experiences, emphasizes the need to implement preventive strategies so that suicidal risk may be contained.

  18. PTSD prevalence among Polish World War II survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis-Turlejska, Maja; Łuszczyńska, Aleksandra; Szumiał, Szymon

    2016-10-31

    Over the past decade research has been published in several Western European countries on the prevalence of PTSD among World War II survivors, mostly civilians. Prevalence rates ranged from 1.9% to 10.8 %. The aim of the study was to measure the frequency of PTSD occurrence among Polish WWII survivors. Data from 96 persons: 59 women and 37 men, aged 70-96 were analyzed. All participants were born before 1945. They completed Polish adaptations of: Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PDS), Impact of Events Scale (IES), Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) and WWII trauma related questionnaire. Prevalence rate of potential PTSD was 32,3% Mean values of both number and severity of symptoms of PTSD were significantly higher for respondents with at least one war related trauma comparing to the participants who did note relate any such trauma. Comparing to other studies on WWII related PTSD the prevalence rate of possible PTSD was very high. Looking for possible explanation of such results seems to be an important challenge.

  19. The war against bacteria: how were sulphonamide drugs used by Britain during World War II?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Diana

    2012-06-01

    Penicillin is often considered one of the greatest discoveries of 20th century medicine. However, the revolution in therapeutics brought about by sulphonamides also had a profound effect on British medicine, particularly during World War II (WWII). Sulphonamides were used to successfully treat many infections which later yielded to penicillin and so their role deserves wider acknowledgement. The sulphonamides, a pre-war German discovery, were widely used clinically. However, the revolution brought about by the drugs has been either neglected or obscured by penicillin, resulting in less research on their use in Britain during WWII. By examining Medical Research Council records, particularly war memorandums, as well as medical journals, archives and newspaper reports, this paper hopes to highlight the importance of the sulphonamides and demonstrate their critical role in the medical war effort and their importance in both the public and more particularly, the medical, sectors. It will present evidence to show that sulphonamides gained importance due to the increased prevalence of infection which compromised the health of servicemen during WWII. The frequency of these infections led to an increase in demand and production. However, the sulphonamides were soon surpassed by penicillin, which had fewer side-effects and could treat syphilis and sulphonamide-resistant infections. Nevertheless, despite these limitations, the sulphonamides drugs were arguably more important in revolutionising medicine than penicillin, as they achieved the first real success in the war against bacteria.

  20. Ultrasound and computed tomography: spin-offs of the world wars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tiggelen, R; Pouders, E

    2003-01-01

    Important losses to the ships of the allied troops by the attacks of the German submarines during World War I led researchers to find specific detecting devices as a means of defence. In 1880 Pierre Curie and his brother, discovered the production of ultrasound waves. Langevin, their student, applied this invention to the localisation of boats. At the end of WWI, research and results ended up being forgotten, but gained attention again with the sonar when WWII loomed on the horizon. At the end of the war, a former military medical doctor, G. Ludwig (US Navy), tried to localize gallstones with a left-over sonar apparatus. This definitely led to firm conclusions. Other researchers in several countries contributed to refining this new imaging technique which is nowadays widely applied. During WWII, the American and British army developed considerable research in the field of the calculator (computer) to speed up deciphering the secret codes. Coupling the principles of tomography discovered during WWI with the computing capability of the calculators developed during WWII, computerized axial tomography could be obtained. This new technology, which is used daily, probably is one of the greatest acquisitions of the 20th century in the field of medical imaging.

  1. Vrijheid van meningsuiting en godsdienst versus het non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With reference to the relevant legal sources, the manner in which the law dealt with insult (especially of Jews and Roman Catholics) in the first half of the twentieth century is described, followed by a description of the reaction of some countries to the Convention on the Eradication of All Forms of Racial Discrimination ...

  2. The early reception of Aristotle through Averroes in medieval Jewish philosophy: the case of the Midrash ha-Hokhmah

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontaine, R.

    2012-01-01

    The Midrash ha-hokhmah ('The exposition of science') is a thirteenth-century Hebrew encyclopedic text that aims to divu lge contemporary science and philosophy among Jews. Its author is the rather unknown Judah ben Solomon ha-Kohen of Toledo. Originally drafted in Arabic in Toledo, the Hebrew

  3. Family Environment, Educational Aspirations, and Academic Achievement in Two Cultural Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seginer, Rachel; Vermulst, Ad

    2002-01-01

    Tested a four-step model involving family background parental support and demandingness, educational aspirations, and academic achievement. Data came from Israeli eighth graders within two cultural settings: transition to modernity (Arabs) and Western (Jews). Family background directly and indirectly affected academic achievement among Arabs but…

  4. Philosophies and Space and Place connected - A piece of Jewellery and a War Monument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Elias Melvin; Fisker, Anna Marie

    2015-01-01

    Amidst the pulsating heart of Berlin, the blooming capital of economics and culture, we find ourselves suddenly in a vacuum of Space and Place. We walk into architect Peter Eisenman's “Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe”, an overwhelming field of grey; a field of algorithmically undulating...

  5. Letters of Stone. From Nazi Germany to South Africa. Steven Robins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    social ostracisation experienced by Jews merely hint at the gruesome reality in Nazi Germany. With the hindsight granted to present-day readers, we know the fate that awaited these men and women as an elongated and agonising social death reached its culmination in systematic mass murder. In describing his journeys to ...

  6. Marine Corps Center for Lessons Learned Newsletter. Volume 9, Issue 01, January 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    a priority, including the employment of checklists and commander-to- commander outbriefs during battalion turnovers. RETURN TO TABLE OF CONTENTS...and driven man,” Mr. Coram writes, “possessed of a psyche fi lled with spiders and snakes.” LtGen Krulak’s parents were Russian Jews. He lied

  7. Role Problems for Trainers in an Arab-Jewish Conflict-Management Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargal, David; Bar, Haviva

    1990-01-01

    Describes and analyzes role problems of trainers who conduct conflict-management workshops between Arabs and Jews in Israel. Uses role theory to focus on problems of role ambiguity and role conflict, citing examples of each. Concludes with discussion of consequences of role problems on trainers' performance. (Author/TE)

  8. The Comedy of Terrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    While much recent scholarship asserts that the dark humor of Christopher Marlowe’s The Jew of Malta (1589-91) has a critical function, the political meaning of the comic elements of Doctor Faustus (1588-1593) has been largely ignored. This article aims to explore the critical function of comedy i...

  9. A clash of gods – Conceptualising space in Daniel 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-02-25

    Feb 25, 2014 ... of the narrative without interpreting the narrative as a whole within ..... The battle of the banquet is, however, only a preparation for a much tougher ... The book of Daniel was written to guide the Jews who lived under the rule of ...

  10. Polarity: The theology of anti-Judaism in Ephrem the Syrian's hymns ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the polarity Jews Christians in the hymns on ... theological tradition which sought to set opoi, boundaries, by way of theological definitions .... in the wedding of the 'peoples' with Christ (De Resurrectione III 4 and 5, De. Azymis II ...

  11. Gifted Immigrants and Refugees in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemarin, Shoshana

    2011-01-01

    Since its establishment in 1948, the state of Israel has acquired a lot of experience in absorbing Jews who migrated from different parts of the globe. Two very different groups have immigrated into Israel during the last two decades--Ethiopians (100.000) and Russians (700.000). Due to the basic differences between those groups and cultures, the…

  12. Ethnic trajectories in Israel : comparing the "Bené Israel" and "Beta Israel" communities, 1950-2000

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    In this article a comparative study is presented of the Indian and the Ethiopian Jews in Israel, immigrant communities that went through similar experiences of integration and accommodation in Israel, despite the time lag in their arrival. Elements of their history and sociocultural background in

  13. Boekbesprekings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vermes has fostered insight into. Jesus' Jewish origins, identity, and milieu. Now, twenty years after his pioneering word on Jesus the Jew, the leading Jewish scholar of the New. Testament and the Dead Sea Scrolls trains his attention on Jesus' own reli gious life - his teaching, preaching, and practise - as it can be gleaned.

  14. Abraham at Qumran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Søren

    2005-01-01

    The Dead Sea Scrolls, including the Book of Jubilees copiously attested at Qumran, depict Abraham as a Jew living by the Mosaic rules long before they were first given. This is an early example of coopting the patriarch in order to guarantee the primacy of one's own religious tradition...

  15. The U.S. Recognition of the State of Israel. Teaching with Documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC.

    In 1917, Chaim Weizmann persuaded the British government to issue a statement (later called the Balfour Declaration) favoring the establishment of a Jewish national home in Palestine. Because of the arrival of many Jews in Palestine in the 1930s and Arab fears about Palestine's future, guerrilla fighting broke out between the two groups. When U.S.…

  16. Epidemiology of prothrombin G20210A polymorphism in the Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohadeseh Arabnejad

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Results of the present study might be important in understanding the distribution of PTH G20210A polymorphism in the Southern Iran. Minor allele frequency in this population is higher than in the Iranian and European population but similar to the prevalence in the Western Iran, Iranian Jews, American, Irish, Tunisian and Bahraini population.

  17. Stopping Mass Killings in Africa: Genocide, Airpower and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    policies. Next, Jews found themselves the targets of expropriation, as Jewish firms were seized, as special taxes and levies were passed, and as family... Gerson , Secretary Dan Glickman, Secretary Jack Kemp, Judge Gabrielle Kirk McDonald, Amb Tom Pickering, Ms. Julia Taft, Mr. Vin Weber, and Gen Anthony

  18. De joodse gemeenschap in de stad Groningen, 1689-1796

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, Engbert

    1995-01-01

    Summary ‘A remark made by an anonymous commentator, found in a radical newspaper published in the city of Groningen in 1796, triggered the start of a research programm into the settlement of Jews in this city. This gentleman wrote ‘that the policy of the municipal authorities during the ancien

  19. Better Than You: Social Discrimination Against Minorities in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Terry

    This book focuses on the following areas of human relations: "The backgrounds of ethnic snobbery," including the shocks of mass immigration, the blacks and the orientals, master races and noble ancestors, and fencing out the Jews; "Discrimination at resorts"; "Prep school and campus"; "Discrimination in housing," including the fight for quality…

  20. 76 FR 25697 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-05

    ... extend market coverage for companies and may also be available for licensing. ADDRESSES: Licensing... rare disease affecting 1 in 40,000 babies born. Ashkenazi Jews of eastern European descent (about 1 in... of the aspects of the invention have been demonstrated. Market: Although there are currently many...