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Sample records for wurtsmith afb michigan

  1. Environmental Impact Statement. Disposal and Reuse of Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    the state. In 1991, 178 acres at Wurtsmith AFB were sprayed utilizing approximately 1 quart of Bacillus thuringiensis (BT) per acre. Pesticides are...Force has bee dale- 1 recognisse the significant economic ampect that closure 2 gated the authority to act as the federal disposal egent 2 will have on...principal alternatives 8 agmet and the natural environment. hv utdeacribed. one other land use concept hes bee 9 In several of these resource areas, the

  2. Attenuated geophysical signatures associated with ongoing remediation efforts at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Oscoda, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che-Alota, V.; Atekwana, E. A.; Sauck, W. A.; Nolan, J. T.; Slater, L. D.

    2007-12-01

    Previous geophysical investigations (1996, 1997, 2003, and 2004) conducted at the decommissioned Wurtsmith Air Force Base former Fire Training Cell (FT-02) showed a clearly defined high conductivity anomaly associated with hydrocarbon contaminants in the vadose zone and ground water near the source area. The source of the geophysical anomalies was attributed to biogeochemical modifications of the contaminated zone resulting from intrinsic bioremediation. During these previous surveys, ground penetrating radar (GPR) data showed a zone of attenuated GPR reflections extending from the vadose zone to below the water table. Self potential data (SP) data defined a positive anomaly coincident with the hydrochemically defined plume, while electrical resistivity data showed anomalously high conductivity within the zone of impact. In 2007, another integrated geophysical study of the site was conducted. GPR, SP, electrical resistivity, and induced polarization surveys were conducted with expectations of achieving similar results as the past surveys. However, preliminary assessment of the data shows a marked decrease in electrical conductivity and SP response over the plume. GPR data still showed the attenuated signals, but the zone of attenuation was only observed below the water table. We attribute the attenuation of the observed geophysical anomalies to ongoing soil vapor extraction initiated in 2003. Significant removal of the contaminant mass by the vapor extraction system has altered the subsurface biogeochemical conditions and these changes were documented by the 2007 geophysical and geochemical data. The results of this study show that the attenuation of the contaminant plume is detectable with geophysical methods.

  3. Potential Impacts Related to the Proposed Strategic Air Command Realigments. Institutional Characteristics Transportation Civilian Community Utilities Land Use for Kincheloe AFB, Michigan. Wurtsmith AFB, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-17

    Total Public 428,071 42.1 Private 394,483 38.8 Corporation 195,175 19.2 Source: Eastern V.P. Regional Planning and Development Com- mission, P.O...facturing company, and Straits Aggregate and Equipment Corporation , an operator of ready mix concrete plants in Oscoda and Tawas City, would lose...significant as a result of loss of these companxes. During the past 12 months a total of 21 passengers moved via the local Greyhound Bus Line. A

  4. Disposal and Reuse of Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan. Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    Muskrat Ondatra zibethica, Deer mouse Peromyscus maniculatus White-footed mouse Peromyscus leucopus American woodcock Philophele minor Raccoon Proc...swine), parental behaviors (fowl, mink), milk letdown (dairy cattle, dairy goats, swine), and egg production. There is little literature on the effects...a startle response, a sequence of physiological and behavioral events that once helped animals avoid predators. There are good dose-response relations

  5. Dicty_cDB: AFB810 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFB810 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16377-1 AFB810P (Link to Original site) AFB...810F 563 AFB810Z 606 AFB810P 1169 - - Show AFB810 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFB...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFB8-A/AFB810Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFB...810P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFB810 (AFB810Q) /CSM/AF/AFB8-A/AFB...g significant alignments: (bits) Value AFB810 (AFB810Q) /CSM/AF/AFB8-A/AFB810Q.Seq.d/ 2165 0.0 AFJ644 (AFJ64

  6. Dicty_cDB: AFB353 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFB353 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15536-1 AFB353P (Link to Original site) AFB...353F 513 AFB353Z 588 AFB353P 1101 - - Show AFB353 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFB...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFB3-C/AFB353Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFB...353P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFB353 (AFB353Q) /CSM/AF/AFB3-C/AFB...ore E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value AFB353 (AFB353Q) /CSM/AF/AFB3-C/AFB

  7. Dicty_cDB: AFB894 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFB894 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15536-1 AFB894P (Link to Original site) AFB...894F 592 AFB894Z 685 AFB894P 1277 - - Show AFB894 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFB...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFB8-D/AFB894Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFB...894P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFB894 (AFB894Q) /CSM/AF/AFB8-D/AFB...VQISL*n*rnlstipk Homology vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value AFB894 (AFB894Q) /CSM/AF/AFB

  8. Dicty_cDB: AFB115 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFB115 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U09219-1 AFB115F (Link to Original site) AFB...115F 548 - - - - - - Show AFB115 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFB115 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFB1-A/AFB115Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFB11...5F (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFB115 (AFB115Q) /CSM/AF/AFB1-A/AFB115Q.Seq.d/ ATATT... producing significant alignments: (bits) Value AFB115 (AFB115Q) /CSM/AF/AFB1-A/AFB115Q.Seq.d/ 884 0.0 VFA87

  9. Dicty_cDB: AFB757 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFB757 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U10692-1 AFB757F (Link to Original site) AFB757...F 603 - - - - - - Show AFB757 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFB757 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFB7-C/AFB757Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFB757...F (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFB757 (AFB757Q) /CSM/AF/AFB7-C/AFB757Q.Seq.d/ AAAGC...DNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value AFB757 (AFB757Q) /CSM/AF/AFB7-C/AFB757Q

  10. Dicty_cDB: AFB357 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFB357 (Link to dictyBase) - G21515 DDB0218380 Contig-U14942-1 AFB...357E (Link to Original site) AFB357F 1038 AFB357Z 657 AFB357P 1685 AFB357E 1428 Show AFB357 Library AF (...Link to library) Clone ID AFB357 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID G21515 dictyBase ID DDB0218380 Link ...to Contig Contig-U14942-1 Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/AF/AFB3-C/AFB...357Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID AFB357E (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >AFB357 (AFB

  11. Griffiss AFB integrated resource assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force Air Combat Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk's primary federal facilities, Griffiss AFB, an Air Combat Command facility located near Rome, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Electric Resource Assessment. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Griffiss AFB by building type and electric energy end use. A complete electric energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major electric energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

  12. Environmental Assessment, Minuteman III and Peacekeeper Silo Elimination, Malmstrom AFB, Montana; F. E. Warren AFB, Wyoming; and Vandenberg AFB, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Gaviota tarplant Deinandra increscens ssp. villosa E E Beach spectaclepod Dithyrea maritima -- T E = endangered T = threatened Source: Vandenberg AFB... Political Science, Georgia State University, Atlanta M.Sc. Urban Planning, University of Arizona, Tucson Graduate Certificate, Geographic Information

  13. Bathymetry of Lake Michigan

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Michigan has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  14. Empirical yield tables for Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerold T. Hahn; Joan M. Stelman

    1984-01-01

    Describes the tables derived from the 1980 Forest Survey of Michigan and presents ways the tables can be used. These tables are broken down according to Michigan's four Forest Survey Units, 14 forest types, and 5 site-index classes.

  15. Potential Impacts Related to the Air Training Command Realignments. Institutional Characteristics, Transportation, Civilian Community Utilities, Land Use for Craig AFB, Alabama, Webb AFB, Texas, Columbus AFB, Mississippi, Laughlin AFB, Texas, Reese AFB, Texas, Vance AFB, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-30

    8217 adn _AERN 4.4.1.3) Automobile traffic in Big Spring is not noticeably affected by AFB operations. Base empioyees arrive at and depart from the base...67 TRANSPORTATION ( ARN 4.4.1) Off-Base CAFERN 4.4.1.2) The impact of the proposed expansion upon off-base trans- portetion systems is not expected to...The area has been planning for increased growth in both land use arn trans- portation for some time and the increased population due to the alter

  16. POTENTIAL OF CANOLA IN MICHIGAN

    OpenAIRE

    Adhikari, Bishwa B.

    1996-01-01

    This study consists of four different aspects of canola in Michigan with special emphasis on northern Michigan. The economic feasibility of canola as an alternative cash crop, potential canola growing area, feasibility of establishing canola processing plant(s) in northern Michigan and the canola marketing situation in Michigan were appraised. Secondary data, previous research results, key informant interviews, informal visits, expert opinions and survey data were used to study these aspects ...

  17. Dicty_cDB: AFB102 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value AFB102 (AFB102Q) /CSM/AF/AFB...2-A/VFL214Q.Seq.d/ 119 9e-27 own update 2001.11.24 Homology vs DNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value...Homology vs Protein Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value U36937_1( U36937 |pid:n

  18. Michigan: The Great Lakes State

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Sandra Lee; La Luzerne-Oi, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Although Michigan is often called the "Wolverine State," its more common nickname is the "Great Lakes State." This name comes from the fact that Michigan is the only state in the United States that borders four of the five Great Lakes. Also referred to as the "Water Wonderland," Michigan has 11,000 additional lakes,…

  19. Michigan forest statistics, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard K. Raile; W. Brad Smith

    1983-01-01

    The fourth inventory of the timber resource of Michigan shows a 7% decline in commercial forest area and a 27% gain in growing-stock volume between 1966 and 1980. Highlights and statistics are presented on area, volume, growth, mortality, removals, utilization, and biomass.

  20. Level II Ergonomic Analyses, Dover AFB, DE

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-02-01

    IERA-RS-BR-TR-1999-0002 UNITED STATES AIR FORCE IERA Level II Ergonomie Analyses, Dover AFB, DE Andrew Marcotte Marilyn Joyce The Joyce...Project (070401881, Washington, DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Level II Ergonomie Analyses, Dover...1.0 INTRODUCTION 1-1 1.1 Purpose Of The Level II Ergonomie Analyses : 1-1 1.2 Approach 1-1 1.2.1 Initial Shop Selection and Administration of the

  1. Hydrologic provinces of Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheaume, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Geological Survey Division, to describe the statewide hydrologic variations in Michigan's water resources. Twelve hydrologic provinces, which are based on similarities in aquifer lithology, yield, recharge, and ground-water- and surface-water-quality data, are described. The definition of statewide hydrologic characteristics and the delineation of hydrologic provinces improves the understanding of Michigan's water resources and provides a firm basis for realistic water-manangement decisions. The 12 provinces identified areas where bedrock aquifers provide most of the potable ground water (five provinces), where glacial-deposit aquifers provide most of the potable ground water (three provinces), and where problems with water quantity and (or) quality have limited the use of ground water as a water supply (four provinces). Subprovinces are defined on the basis of regional surface-water flow directions toward each of the Great Lakes.

  2. Michigan E85 Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Matthew M.

    2012-03-30

    This is the final report for a grant-funded project to financially assist and otherwise provide support to projects that increase E85 infrastructure in Michigan at retail fueling locations. Over the two-year project timeframe, nine E85 and/or flex-fuel pumps were installed around the State of Michigan at locations currently lacking E85 infrastructure. A total of five stations installed the nine pumps, all providing cost share toward the project. By using cost sharing by station partners, the $200,000 provided by the Department of Energy facilitated a total project worth $746,332.85. This project was completed over a two-year timetable (eight quarters). The first quarter of the project focused on project outreach to station owners about the incentive on the installation and/or conversion of E85 compatible fueling equipment including fueling pumps, tanks, and all necessary electrical and plumbing connections. Utilizing Clean Energy Coalition (CEC) extensive knowledge of gasoline/ethanol infrastructure throughout Michigan, CEC strategically placed these pumps in locations to strengthen the broad availability of E85 in Michigan. During the first and second quarters, CEC staff approved projects for funding and secured contracts with station owners; the second through eighth quarters were spent working with fueling station owners to complete projects; the third through eighth quarters included time spent promoting projects; and beginning in the second quarter and running for the duration of the project was spent performing project reporting and evaluation to the US DOE. A total of 9 pumps were installed (four in Elkton, two in Sebewaing, one in East Lansing, one in Howell, and one in Whitmore Lake). At these combined station locations, a total of 192,445 gallons of E85, 10,786 gallons of E50, and 19,159 gallons of E30 were sold in all reporting quarters for 2011. Overall, the project has successfully displaced 162,611 gallons (2,663 barrels) of petroleum, and reduced

  3. Transportation and Travel: Travel Overseas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-20

    FL FT STEWART GA BAKER NSC JACKSONVILLE FL FT STEWART BAY TYNDALL AFB FL FT RUCKER AL BRADFORD NSC JACKSONVILLE FL FT STEWART BREVARD PATRICK AFB FL...ANGB FORT McCOY BAY WURTSMITH AFB MI FORT McCOY BENZIE WURTSMITH AFB MI FORT McCOY BERRIEM USA TARCOM SELFRIDGE ANGB FORT McCOY BRANCH USA TARCOM...CANNON AFB NM FORT BLISS ATASCOSA SAN ANTONIO TX FORT SAM HOUSTON AUSTIN ELLINGTON AFB TX FORT SAM HOUSTON BAILEY CANNON AFB NM FORT BLISS BANDERA SAN

  4. Final Environmental Assessment: Replace Hanscom AFB Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    by Hanscom AFB on “reduce, reuse, recycle ”, it is expected that the new Middle School will operate more efficiently and use fewer resources than...Also, all hazardous materials used during construction would be handled and disposed of in accordance with Hanscom AFB policies and protocols and all...areas, specialist rooms, a music room, an art room, a learning impaired room, teacher work rooms, counseling areas, storage offices, administrative

  5. 75 FR 34932 - Safety Zone; Michigan City Super Boat Grand Prix, Lake Michigan, Michigan City, IN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Michigan City Super Boat Grand Prix, Lake... intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Lake Michigan due to a high speed boat racing event. This... associated with a high speed boat racing event. DATES: This regulation is effective from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m...

  6. 75 FR 22333 - Safety Zone; Michigan City Super Boat Grand Prix, Lake Michigan, Michigan City, IN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Michigan City Super Boat Grand Prix, Lake.... This zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Lake Michigan due to high speed power boat... associated with high speed power boat racing. DATES: Comments and related material must be received by the...

  7. Mishap Investigation Team (MIT) - Barksdale AFB, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepaniak, Philip

    2005-01-01

    The Shuttle Program is organized to support a Shuttle mishap using the resources of the MIT. The afternoon of Feb. 1, 2003, the MIT deployed to Barksdale AFB. This location became the investigative center and interim storage location for crewmembers received from the Lufkin Disaster Field Office (DFO). Working under the leadership of the MIT Lead, the medical team executed a short-term plan that included search, recovery, and identification including coordination with the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology Temporary operations was set up at Barksdale Air Force Base for two weeks. During this time, coordination with the DFO field recovery teams, AFIP personnel, and the crew surgeons was on going. In addition, the crewmember families and NASA management were updated daily. The medical team also dealt with public reports and questions concerning biological and chemical hazards, which were coordinated with SPACEHAB, Inc., Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Medical Operations and the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Space Medicine office. After operations at Barksdale were concluded the medical team transitioned back to Houston and a long-term search, recovery and identification plan was developed.

  8. New Michigan Tiny House Community Announced

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michael Chamernik

    2016-01-01

      A new tiny house community called Tiny House Estates has been announced and will be located at the northern end of Michigan's Lower Peninsula, at Traverse Bay Resort in Traverse City, near the shores of Lake Michigan...

  9. One - day 2 Sputum Samples AFB Microscopy Versus Standard Two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    day 3 sputum samples AFB microscopy in a Nigerian rural tuberculosis center. Method: A total of 752 suspected tuberculosis patients were studied between May and July, 2006. Two sputum samples collected “on the spot” and one hour later ...

  10. Prevalence of HIV/Sputum AFB positivity among patients attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: prevalence, TB, HIV, co-infection, Nigeria. LA PREVALENCE DE LA POSITIVITE DU VIH/EXPECTORATIONS AFB CHEZ LES PATIENTS QUI FREQUENT L'UNIVERSITE HOPITAL D'ENSEIGNEMENT DE BENIN (UBTH), BENIN CITY, NIGERIA. Le virus de l'immunodéficience humaine(VIH) et la tuberculose ...

  11. External quality assessment of AFB smear microscopy performances ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    External quality assessment of AFB smear microscopy performances and its associated factors in selected private health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. ... Data were captured, cleaned, and analyzed using SPSS version 16.0; χ2 tests, kappa statistics were used for comparison purpose. P value < 0.05 considered ...

  12. Segmenting Michigan tourists based on distance traveled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiamei Xu; Tsao-Fang Yuan; Edwin Gomez; Joseph D. Fridgen

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to segment Michigan travelers into short, medium and long distance traveler groups by distance that they traveled from home to a primary destination in Michigan, and to compare travel behavior, trip characteristics and sociodemographics among these segments. Significant differences were identified in past trip experiences in Michigan,...

  13. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-22

    Energy used by Michigan single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  14. Michigan School Privatization Survey 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohman, James M.; Fryzelka, Evan E.

    2014-01-01

    Many of Michigan's public school districts are under substantial fiscal pressures from a combination of declining enrollment and increasing costs, particularly related to employee benefits, but most districts are responding to these challenges. One of the ways that districts can stretch their resources further is through competitive contracting…

  15. Michigan School Privatization Survey 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohman, James M.; Kollmeyer, Josiah M.

    2013-01-01

    Michigan's School Aid fund increased once more this year, but many school administrators in the state continue to hunt for effective measures to reduce spending due to increased pension costs and phased-out stimulus money. Many options available for trimming costs, such as enacting pay-to-play for sports, are extremely unpopular for districts and…

  16. Michigan's Fourth Forest Inventory: Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John S. Jr. Spencer

    1983-01-01

    The fourth inventory of Michigan's forest resources found 17.5 million acres of commercial forest, down 7% from the 18.9 million found in 1966. This bulletin analyzes findings from the inventory and presents detailed tables of forest area.

  17. Michigan School Privatization Survey 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohman, James M.; Woodman, Zachary D.

    2014-01-01

    In 2003, when it came to contracting out for common public school services, only outsourcing food provision could be considered a rather common occurrence in Michigan. There was good reason for this: school districts are prohibited from making a profit from their cafeteria, but any deficits created in providing food for students must be covered by…

  18. Michigan lakes: An assessment of water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnerick, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Michigan has more than 11,000 inland lakes, that provide countless recreational opportunities and are an important resource that makes tourism and recreation a $15-billion-dollar per-year industry in the State (Stynes, 2002). Knowledge of the water-quality characteristics of inland lakes is essential for the current and future management of these resources.Historically the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) jointly have monitored water quality in Michigan's lakes and rivers. During the 1990's, however, funding for surface-water-quality monitoring was reduced greatly. In 1998, the citizens of Michigan passed the Clean Michigan Initiative to clean up, protect, and enhance Michigan's environmental infrastructure. Because of expanding water-quality-data needs, the MDEQ and the USGS jointly redesigned and implemented the Lake Water-Quality Assessment (LWQA) Monitoring Program (Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, 1997).

  19. Building Energy Audit Report, for Hickam AFB, HI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chvala, William D.; De La Rosa, Marcus I.; Brown, Daryl R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2010-09-30

    A building energy assessment was performed by a team of engineers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract to the Department of Energy/Federal Energy Management program (FEMP). The effort used the Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) model to determine how energy is consumed at Hickam AFB, identify the most cost-effective energy retrofit measures, and calculate the potential energy and cost savings. This documents reports the results of that assessment.

  20. Phased Array Warning System (PAVE PAWS), Otis AFB, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-02-01

    pounds per hour of sulphur dioxide , par- ticulates and nitrogen oxide respectively. A secondary effect of the PAVE PAWS project at Otis AFB will...shrubbery consisting of ferns, greenbriar, grape , bear berry, sheep laurel and low bush blueberry. The nature of this vegetation has been affected...will have to be relocated to the northern part of vhe station. The helicopter landing pad and sewage disposal plant are also close to the proposed

  1. KI Sawyer AFB, Gwinn, Michigan. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-26

    I SAVYFR AO MA4 -97; AG 1 { ’..WET BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTAL TOTA -20,-2l1 14 o241-25 ................ -32/-33...PAGE 2 0o00--900! MOLOS (L. $. ,. - T..p. WET BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) I TOTAL 1 TOTAL (F) 0 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 19-10 11- 12:13. 1415- 16117

  2. Griffiss AFB integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Electric baseline detail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force Air Combat Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, Griffiss AFB, an Air Combat Command facility located near Rome, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Electric Resource Assessment. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Griffiss AFB by building type and electric energy end use. A complete electric energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major electric energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

  3. Wastewater Characterization and Hazardous Waste Survey, Hickam AFB, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    compounds to be exceeded. Either a pretreatment system is needed, such as air stripping or powdered activated charcoal adsorption, or the waste should be...4 I. rh ;).Ij~t I t h I ink p . p. ~ I (.~efa.d%*.~# ~ RESULTS FOR pH, TEMPERATURE, AND CONDUCTIVITY FOR iICKAM AFB WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION...ttdt bLink) 70 I .1 *,~ Appendix H SUM ARY OF WASTE DISPOSAL PRACTICES 71 S "" -, *’ S p - S •~.~ 𔃾 .4 N S t S S Phi s ~ Ic! ! ~ 1 InK 1 V 4 4 4 ~e

  4. Final Shaw AFB Chaff and Flare Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    iron, copper, manganese , magnesium, zinc, vanadium, and titanium. Some of these individual components, in sufficient quantities, have toxic risks...maximum Copper Cu 0.05 maximum Manganese Mn 0.05 maximum Magnesium Mg 0.05 maximum Zinc Zn 0.05 maximum Vanadium V 0.05 maximum Titanium Ti 0.03...Co1nmand I- IQ ACC/CEV:P 129 Andrews Street, Suite 102 Langley AFB, VA 23665-2769 REF: Proposed Chaff and Flare Usage in Military Operations Areas Shaw

  5. Wood-fired AFB saves plant $1. 5M yearly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvin, C.

    1982-04-26

    An atmospheric fluidized-bed (AFB) boiler that burns waste wood instead of natural gas will save an Oregon plywood manufacturing plant $1.5 million in annual fuel costs and have a 3.5-year payback. The new boiler also saves maintenance costs for old equipment. The plant generates enough wood wastes (about 10 tons per hour) to fuel the Energy Products of Idaho (EPI) system and produce 50,000 pounds of steam per hour as well as hot gas for veneering. (DCK)

  6. Michigan Education in the 80's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkel, Phillip E.

    The social, economic, and political conditions that exist in Michigan are outlined in an attempt to predict what effect these conditions will have on the future of the state's public education system. Accompanying the depressed economic status of Michigan's automobile industry and the state's declining school enrollments, numerous cutbacks have…

  7. Economic impacts of wine tourism in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi-Kyung Kim; Seung Hyun Kim

    2003-01-01

    In Michigan, wine tourism is perceived as increasingly important concept because more and more tourists visit wineries and wine tasting rooms annually. However there have been few studies conducted concerning the economic impacts of wineries in Michigan even though the industry has been recognized as having significant economic impact potential. The primary purpose of...

  8. Environmental Assessment: Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) 2005 Mission Realignments to Vandenberg AFB

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    35 ppm, 1-hr avg. a) Aggravation of angina pectoris and other aspects of coronary heart disease; b) Decreased exercise tolerance in persons with...Planning, Vandenberg AFB Ryan, Dina, Environmental Planning, NEPA Compliance Specialist, Vandenberg AFB Vincent , Paul, Geo-integration Officer, GIS

  9. Environmental Assessment Wing Infrastructure Development Outlook (WINDO) for Cannon AFB, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    mutica) (DeBruin et al. 1995). Scattered shrubs, such as mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa), cacti and cholla ( Opuntia spp.) were also present. Much of...2003. Project Controller, Cannon AFB, New Mexico. Smith, Gene . 2004. Tanks Program Manager, 27 CES/CEV, Cannon AFB, New Mexico. Timmons, Denny

  10. Functionalised Au Coated Iron Oxide Nanocomposites Based Reusable Immunosensor for AFB1 Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchika Chauhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A reusable sandwiched electrochemical piezoelectric immunosensor has been developed for aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 detection using gold coated iron oxide core-shell (Au-Fe3O4 nanostructure. The monoclonal anti-aflatoxin antibody (aAFB1 was immobilized on self-assembled monolayer of 4-aminothiophenol on gold coated quartz crystal to fabricate immunoelectrode (BSA/aAFB1/4-ATP/Au. In addition, secondary rabbit-immunoglobulin antibodies (r-IgGs functionalized with Au-Fe3O4 NPs via cysteamine (r-IgG-Cys-Au-Fe3O4 were allowed to interact with AFB1. Both competitive and noncompetitive strategies were employed and a competition between coated AFB1 and free AFB1 was carried out. The competitive mode shows higher linear range (0.05 to 5 ng mL−1 than the noncompetitive one (0.5 to 5 ng mL−1, high sensitivity 335.7 µA ng−1 mL cm−2, and LOD 0.07 ng mL−1. The fabricated immunosensor has been tested using cereal samples spiked with different concentrations of AFB1. The developed competitive immunoelectrode displays good reproducibility, and storage stability and regenerated with negligible loss in activity through removal of the r-IgG-Cys-Au-Fe3O4 conjugate using a strong external magnet.

  11. AFB-NETT - business opportunities for European biomass industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higham, I. [ETSU, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The AFB-NETT is an ALTENER funded project lead by ETSU. The project was started in 1995 with 11 partner nations. The initial aim was to bring together the whole biomass supply and use chain, not just within countries but across the Europe. At present more than 280 people take part in the network. The four objectives of the project are: detection and promotion of business opportunities; transfer of knowledge and experience; promotion of collaboration and co-ordination; and implementation of National and European Strategies. The effort in 1997 split into four main activities, 2 of which based on market sectors and two on improving the market conditions. The activities for 1997 were (the leader in parentheses): Co-combustion and gasification (Finland); Small scale and district heat (Austria); Financial incentives (the Netherlands); Wood fuel and emission standards (UK)

  12. Michigan transportation facts & figures : public transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-08-16

    This on-line document is part of a series, Transportation Facts & Figures, by the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT). The Public Transit section of Transportation Facts & Figures cover such topics as intercity bus service, intercity rail se...

  13. Aerospace medicine at Brooks AFB, TX: hail and farewell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunneley, Sarah A; Webb, James T

    2011-05-01

    With the impending termination of USAF operations at Brooks Air Force Base (AFB) in San Antonio, TX, it is time to consider its historic role in Aerospace Medicine. The base was established in 1917 as a flight training center for the U.S. Army Air Service and in 1926 became home to its School of Aviation Medicine. The school moved to San Antonio's Randolph Field in 1931, but in 1959 it returned to Brooks where it occupied new facilities to support its role as a national center for U.S. Air Force aerospace medicine, including teaching, clinical medicine, and research. The mission was then expanded to encompass support of U.S. military and civilian space programs. With the abrupt termination of the military space program in 1969, research at Brooks focused on clinical aviation medicine and support of advanced military aircraft while continuing close cooperation with NASA in support of orbital spaceflight and the journey to the Moon. Reorganization in the 1990s assigned all research functions at Brooks to the Human Systems Division and its successors, leaving to USAFSAM the missions related to clinical work and teaching. In 2002 the USAF and the city of San Antonio implemented shared operation of Brooks as a "City-Base" in the hope of deflecting threatened closure. Nevertheless, under continuing pressure to consolidate military facilities in the United States, the 2005 Base Closure and Realignment Commission ordered Brooks closed by 2011, with its aerospace medicine functions relocated to new facilities at Wright-Patterson AFB in Dayton, OH.

  14. MICHIGAN FARM DATABASE NEW DIRECTIONS FOR 1995

    OpenAIRE

    Nott, Sherrill B.; Hepp, Ralph E.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide financial and production performance data for Michigan farms in 1995. Separate sections report on the farm types of Cash Grain, Dairy, Fruit, General Crop, General Livestock, and Swine. This data can be used as a comparative data base for individual farmers to conduct a financial analysis of their own farm to identify strengths and weaknesses. This report can also provide information to those interested in the financial well being of Michigan agricultur...

  15. Bioremediation of a Large Chlorinated Solvent Plume, Dover AFB, DE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, Aleisa C [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Bioremediation of a Large Chlorinated Solvent Plume, Dover AFB, DE Aleisa Bloom, (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA) Robert Lyon (bob.lyon@aecom.com), Laurie Stenberg, and Holly Brown (AECOM, Germantown, Maryland, USA) ABSTRACT: Past disposal practices at Dover Air Force Base (AFB), Delaware, created a large solvent plume called Area 6 (about 1 mile long, 2,000 feet wide, and 345 acres). The main contaminants are PCE, TCE, and their degradation products. The remedy is in-situ accelerated anaerobic bioremediation (AAB). AAB started in 2006 and is focusing on source areas and downgradient plume cores. Direct-push injections occurred in source areas where contamination is typically between 5 and 20 feet below ground surface. Lower concentration dissolved-phased contamination is present downgradient at 35 and 50 feet below ground surface. Here, permanent injection/extraction wells installed in transects perpendicular to the flow of groundwater are used to apply AAB. The AAB substrate is a mix of sodium lactate, emulsified vegetable oil, and nutrients. After eight years, dissolved contaminant mass within the main 80-acre treatment area has been reduced by over 98 percent. This successful application of AAB has stopped the flux of contaminants to the more distal portions of the plume. While more time is needed for effects to be seen in the distal plume, AAB injections will soon cease, and the remedy will transition to natural attenuation. INTRODUCTION Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Science Division (ORNL) and AECOM (formerly URS Corporation) have successfully implemented in situ accelerated anaerobic bioremediation (AAB) to remediate chlorinated solvent contamination in a large, multi-sourced groundwater plume at Dover Air Force Base (AFB). AAB has resulted in significant reductions of dissolved phase chlorinated solvent concentrations. This plume, called Area 6, was originally over 1 mile in length and over 2,000 feet wide (Figure 1

  16. Keesler AFB, Mississippi. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-11-01

    65.4 65.4 65 -. . 1 50001 59.7 63.1 64.4 66.4 61.5 66.9 66.9 6(.9 67.1 67.1 67.3 67.3 bT13 b;:5 61.3 .- 452r’l 60.9 64 51.b 67.6 67.7 68.1 68.1 b8.1...8S.3 85.3 85.3 85.3 bs.3 85.3 UEbOCl0 1.2 78.8 83.5 86.4 85.5 85.5 85.6 8 . o5.6 85.6 85.6 85.6 85.6 85.6 85.6 85.6 GE 50001 1.2 79.5 a4.5 P6.3 86.5...TICNNUMZER: 776t6 STATION NAME: KEESLER AFB MS PER-OD OF RECORD: 76-85 MONTH: DEC HOURSILSTI: O00O-0200 i L Iso VISIBILITY IN STATUTE MILES L I GE L

  17. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force's Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions will need to be carried out at each site. The island's drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. Geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities. This report, appendices B, C, and D contains information on the following: geophysical contour maps and profile plots; human health risk assessment; and ecological risk assessment.

  18. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force's Installation Restoration Program (IRP). As a part of the IRP program, field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions willneed to be carried out at each site. The island's drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites during the 1992 field investigation included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities.

  19. Market Barriers to Solar in Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, E.; Nobler, E.; Wolf, C.; Doris, E.

    2012-08-01

    The solar industry in the United States is at a turning point; the cost of PV hardware has declined substantially in recent years, placing new attention on reducing the balance of system (BOS) costs of solar that now contribute to a growing percentage of installation expenses. How states address these costs through the creation of a favorable policy and regulatory environment is proving to be a critical determinant of a thriving statewide solar market. This report addresses the permitting and tax issues that may stimulate the solar market growth in Michigan. By making PV installations easier to complete through reduced BOS costs, Michigan would become a more attractive location for manufacturers and installers. As PV module costs decline and BOS costs make up a greater share of the cost of solar, action taken today on these issues will prove beneficial in the long term, providing Michigan an opportunity to establish a leadership position in the solar industry.

  20. Collaborative feasibility study of a biphasic system (Roche Septi-Chek AFB) for rapid detection and isolation of mycobacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    ISENBERG, H.D.; D'Amato, R F; Heifets, L; Murray, P R; Scardamaglia, M; Jacobs, M C; Alperstein, P; Niles, A

    1991-01-01

    A study to delineate the feasibility of a biphasic-culture approach for detection and isolation of mycobacteria from clinical specimens except blood was conducted in four medical centers. The biphasic system (Septi-Chek AFB, Roche Diagnostic Systems, Nutley, N.J.) was compared with conventional mycobacterial isolation media and the BACTEC system. Septi-Chek AFB showed the highest degree of mycobacterial recovery. In addition, Septi-Chek AFB consistently shortened the time required for recover...

  1. Status of beech bark disease establishment and research in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Deborah G. McCullough; Toby R. Petrice; Nathan W. Siegert

    2003-01-01

    Beech bark disease was first discovered in Michigan in spring 2000 in Ludington State Park on the shore of Lake Michigan in the lower peninsula. Soon thereafter it was found in the upper peninsula of Michigan in the Bass Lake campground.

  2. 75 FR 41895 - Inteva Products, LLC Adrian, Michigan; Inteva Products, LLC Troy, Michigan; Amended Certification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... (automotive instruments and door panels) for automobiles. New findings show that worker separations occurred..., Michigan location provides human resources, administrative functions, engineering and financial services... supplier of component parts (automotive instruments and door panels) for automobiles to a TAA certified...

  3. Auxin signaling through SCFTIR1/AFBs mediates feedback regulation of IAA biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takato, Shin; Kakei, Yusuke; Mitsui, Marie; Ishida, Yosuke; Suzuki, Masashi; Yamazaki, Chiaki; Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Ishii, Takahiro; Nakamura, Ayako; Soeno, Kazuo; Shimada, Yukihisa

    2017-07-01

    We previously reported that exogenous application of auxin to Arabidopsis seedlings resulted in downregulation of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis genes in a feedback manner. In this study, we investigated the involvement of the SCFTIR1/AFB-mediated signaling pathway in feedback regulation of the indole-3-pyruvic acid-mediated auxin biosynthesis pathway in Arabidopsis. Application of PEO-IAA, an inhibitor of the IAA signal transduction pathway, to wild-type seedlings resulted in increased endogenous IAA levels in roots. Endogenous IAA levels in the auxin-signaling mutants axr2-1, axr3-3, and tir1-1afb1-1afb2-1afb3-1 also increased. Furthermore, YUCCA (YUC) gene expression was repressed in response to auxin treatment, and expression of YUC7 and YUC8 increased in response to PEO-IAA treatment. YUC genes were also induced in auxin-signaling mutants but repressed in TIR1-overexpression lines. These observations suggest that the endogenous IAA levels are regulated by auxin biosynthesis in a feedback manner, and the Aux/IAA and SCFTIR1/AFB-mediated auxin-signaling pathway regulates the expression of YUC genes.

  4. Highly sensitive electrochemical impedance spectroscopy immunosensor for the detection of AFB1 in olive oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lili; Zhang, Yang; Hu, Chenyi; Wu, Hui; Yang, Yayun; Huang, Chusen; Jia, Nengqin

    2015-06-01

    Aflatoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus are commonly found in olive and its derivatives. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a predominant toxin detected abundantly and has been implicated in the etiology of human hepatocellular carcinoma. This study proposes a sensitive and convenient electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method for determining AFB1 by MWCNTs/RTIL composite films-based immunosensor. The calibration curve for AFB1 was linear in the range of 0.1-10ngmL(-1) with the limit of detection (LOD) 0.03ngmL(-1). The presence of MWCNTs warrant fast electron transfer, and the ionic liquid provides a benign microenvironment for antibody. The experimental parameters, such as pH and incubating time, have been investigated and optimized. Furthermore, the detection of AFB1 is presented to test this method after extracted from olive oils. It can be anticipated that this method would be used for the detection of AFB1 in various agriculture products and vegetable oils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Demographic characteristics and motivations of Michigan agritourists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah Che; Ann Veeck; Gregory Veeck

    2007-01-01

    Michigan agricultural producers, faced with declining commodity prices, rising production costs, and increased global competition, have looked at agritourism as a way to save the farm as well as provide customers with personalized service; high-quality, fresh food; and farm, nature, and family experiences. While previous research on agritourism indicates that it taps...

  6. Operability and location of Michigan's timber resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark H. Hansen; Jerold T. Hahn

    1987-01-01

    Operability is the ease or difficulty of managing or harvesting timber because of physical conditions in the stand or on the site. Data collected during the 1980 Michigan statewide forest inventory were used to examine operability of the timber resource based on seven operability components.

  7. Michigan's forest statistics, 1987: an inventory update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Brad Smith; Jerold T. Hahn

    1986-01-01

    The Michigan 1987 inventory update, derived by using tree growth models, reports 17.3 million acres of timberland, a decline of less than 1% since 1980. Growing-stock removals have risen sharply since 1979, climbing from 275 million cubic feet annually to the current level of 398 cubic feet.

  8. Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Ann Arbor, Michigan, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  9. Putting Literacy To Work in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan Library, Lansing.

    This packet of materials was created to help literacy professionals, social agencies, volunteers, and media representatives promote literacy efforts in Michigan, especially during Literacy Action Month (September). The materials can be used to support literacy in the community, in democracy, in the family, and in economic development. Items…

  10. Educational Seismology in Michigan: The MIQuakes Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, K.; DeWolf, C. L.; Ruddock, J.; Svoboda, M. R.; Sinclair, J.; Schepke, C.; Waite, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    MIQuakes is a K-14 educational seismograph network currently consisting of 17 schools, mostly located in Michigan's lower peninsula. It is operated under the auspices of the Michigan Earth Science Teachers Association (MESTA) and is part of the IRIS Seismographs in Schools program. Although individual teachers in Michigan have had instruments as early as 1992, MESTA formed MIQuakes in 2010 to support the development of activities associated with classroom seismology appropriate for grades 6-12 and relevant to the Midwest, using locally recorded data. In addition, the deployment of the EarthScope transportable array in Michigan during 2011-2014 offered a tie in with a national-level research program. Michigan State University (MSU) and Michigan Tech provide content and technical support. In keeping with MESTA's philosophy of 'teachers helping teachers,' MIQuakes became, first and foremost, a group supported by teachers. Earthquake 'alerts' initially issued by MSU, were soon taken over by teachers who took the initiative in alerting each other to events, especially those that occurred during the school day. In-service teachers and university faculty have jointly organized workshops at MSU and at MESTA conferences - with teachers increasingly providing activities for sharing and relating the program to the new national standards. Workshops held to date have covered such topics as recognizing arrivals, filtering, focal mechanisms, and the Tohoku earthquake. As the group has grown, the degree of involvement and level of expertise have become broader, resulting in very different expectations from different teachers. How to keep the network cohesive, yet meet the needs of the individual members, will be one of the challenges of the next few years. Three levels of involvement by teachers are seen in the near term: those who operate their own classroom seismometer (currently either the short-period IRIS AS-1 or the broadband EAS-S102 seismometers); those who stream a nearby

  11. Increasing Farmers Market Patronage: A Michigan Survey

    OpenAIRE

    David S. Conner; Smalley, Susan B.; Colasanti, Kathryn J.A.; Ross, R. Brent

    2010-01-01

    Farmers markets can play an important role in enhancing farm profitability, particularly those farms choosing to differentiate their products by appealing to consumer preferences for “locally grown†food or gain a larger share of the food dollar by marketing directly to consumers rather than through wholesale markets. This paper reports results of a random state-wide telephone survey in Michigan which measured attitudes and behaviors surrounding farmers markets in order to better understan...

  12. Michigan ATLAS MDT Chamber Mass Production

    CERN Document Server

    Diehl, E; Levin, D; McKee, S; Neal, H; Schick, H; Tarle, G; Thun, R; Weaverdyck, C; Xu, Q; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the ATLAS MDT precision muon chamber construction at the University of Michigan. The chamber assembly facilities, the jigging set up, alignment procedures, and other measurements necessary for chamber assembly are described. The chamber quality assurance monitoring procedures and data for the first year mass production are presented. The chamber gas system assembly facilities, and the chamber leak test procedure together with data also reported. The chamber production database, which monitors chamber production, is also discussed.

  13. Relocation of the Air National Guard 176th Wing to Elmendorf AFB, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    widely (from a soft whisper to a jet engine) and is measured on a logarithmic scale to accommodate this wide range. The use of logarithms is a...abbreviated SEL or LAE ) combines both of these characteristics into a single metric. Relocation of the ANG 176th Wing to Elmendorf AFB Page D-4

  14. Finding No Significant Impact: Aircraft Weather Shelter at Laughlin AFB, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    surface water flow is southeast into the Ro Grande and down toward the Gulf of Mexico. Lake Amistad reservoir, located approximately 12 miles northwest...characterized Lake Amistad reservoir as having excellent water quality (USAF, 1997). Laughlin AFB contains a total of 19 acres of surface water

  15. Remedial Action Plan for Expanded Bioventing System at Site FC-2 Kelly AFB, Texas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    This remedial action plan presents the scope for an expanded bioventing system for in situ treatment of fuel-contaminated soils at a former fire control training area referred to as Site FC-2 at Kelly Air Force Base (AFB) Texas...

  16. Postdecommissioning Radiological Survey of Building 628, McClellan AFB, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    3 49100801 post decon cube 16 ɚ ɚ  49100802 breaker bar for ə ɚ  scrabble 21 McClellan AFB Bldg 628 Mondoid Room Cubicle #1 Gross Activity...49100801 post decon cube 16 ɚ ɚ  49100802 breaker bar for ə ɚ  scrabble 146 SAMPLE ANALYSIS RESULTS REPORTED ON 14-JUN-1991 ARMSTRCONG

  17. A Case Study: Environmental Impact of the Hamilton AFB, California Base Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-06-01

    SLGR, Wright- Patterson AFB, Ohio, 1976. 4. Beckham , Captain Kenneth Bo, USAF, and Major Larry W. Harris, USAF. "An Air Force Base Closure; The Phy...Washington, D. C., 1969. AD 859833. 15. McDowell, Captain Lance Ea, USAF, and Captain David A. Weber, USAF. "The Social Impact on a Community Resulting

  18. Studies on the biological functions of CPS1 in AFB1 induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chi; Fu, Rao; Zhuang, Zhenhong; Wang, Shihua

    2016-10-10

    Carbamyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) was down-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), as treated by aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a potent hepatocarcinogenesis mycotoxin. In this study, we firstly confirmed that AFB1 down-regulated the expression of CPS1 in a dose-dependent manner. At the meantime, both siRNA knock down of CPS1 and AFB1 treatment inhibited cell proliferation, and induced cell apoptosis. To further analysis the function of CPS1, the interacting proteins of CPS1 were searched by Co-IP, and three interacting proteins including type II cytoskeletal 1 (KRT1), albumin (ALB), and ubiquitin C (UBC) were found. Both KRT1 and ALB were new interacting proteins for CPS1. Our further study showed that CPS1 was regulating interacted and colocalized with KRT1 and ALB, and the intensity correlation was changed by AFB1. KRT1, ALB and CPS1 were all reported to play an important role in differentiation and tissue specialization. These results may offer an increasing understand that CPS1 might have a function in differentiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Edwards AFB Runway

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable workhorse, the B-52 mothership, rolls out on the Edwards AFB runway after a test flight in 1996. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket

  20. Fast-Food Consumption and Obesity Among Michigan Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Beth; Lyon-Callo, Sarah; Fussman, Christopher; Imes, Gwendoline; Rafferty, Ann P.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Consumption of meals eaten away from home, especially from fast-food restaurants, has increased in the United States since the 1970s. The main objective of this study was to examine the frequency and characteristics of fast-food consumption among adults in Michigan and obesity prevalence. Methods We analyzed data from 12 questions about fast-food consumption that were included on the 2005 Michigan Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, a population-based telephone survey of Michigan adul...

  1. Lake Michigan Offshore Wind Feasibility Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boezaart, Arnold [GVSU; Edmonson, James [GVSU; Standridge, Charles [GVSU; Pervez, Nahid [GVSU; Desai, Neel [University of Michigan; Williams, Bruce [University of Delaware; Clark, Aaron [GVSU; Zeitler, David [GVSU; Kendall, Scott [GVSU; Biddanda, Bopi [GVSU; Steinman, Alan [GVSU; Klatt, Brian [Michigan State University; Gehring, J. L. [Michigan State University; Walter, K. [Michigan State University; Nordman, Erik E. [GVSU

    2014-06-30

    The purpose of this project was to conduct the first comprehensive offshore wind assessment over Lake Michigan and to advance the body of knowledge needed to support future commercial wind energy development on the Great Lakes. The project involved evaluation and selection of emerging wind measurement technology and the permitting, installation and operation of the first mid-lake wind assessment meteorological (MET) facilities in Michigan’s Great Lakes. In addition, the project provided the first opportunity to deploy and field test floating LIDAR and Laser Wind Sensor (LWS) technology, and important research related equipment key to the sitting and permitting of future offshore wind energy development in accordance with public participation guidelines established by the Michigan Great Lakes Wind Council (GLOW). The project created opportunities for public dialogue and community education about offshore wind resource management and continued the dialogue to foster Great Lake wind resource utilization consistent with the focus of the GLOW Council. The technology proved to be effective, affordable, mobile, and the methods of data measurement accurate. The public benefited from a substantial increase in knowledge of the wind resources over Lake Michigan and gained insights about the potential environmental impacts of offshore wind turbine placements in the future. The unique first ever hub height wind resource assessment using LWS technology over water and development of related research data along with the permitting, sitting, and deployment of the WindSentinel MET buoy has captured public attention and has helped to increase awareness of the potential of future offshore wind energy development on the Great Lakes. Specifically, this project supported the acquisition and operation of a WindSentinel (WS) MET wind assessment buoy, and associated research for 549 days over multiple years at three locations on Lake Michigan. Four research objectives were defined for the

  2. Comparative analysis of discharges into Lake Michigan, Phase I - Southern Lake Michigan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.; Elcock, D.; Gasper, J. R.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-06-30

    BP Products North America Inc. (BP) owns and operates a petroleum refinery located on approximately 1,700 acres in Whiting, East Chicago, and Hammond, Indiana, near the southern tip of Lake Michigan. BP provided funding to Purdue University-Calumet Water Institute (Purdue) and Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to conduct studies related to wastewater treatment and discharges. Purdue and Argonne are working jointly to identify and characterize technologies that BP could use to meet the previous discharge permit limits for total suspended solids (TSS) and ammonia after refinery modernization. In addition to the technology characterization work, Argonne conducted a separate project task, which is the subject of this report. In Phase I of a two-part study, Argonne estimated the current levels of discharge to southern Lake Michigan from significant point and nonpoint sources in Illinois, Indiana, and portions of Michigan. The study does not consider all of the chemicals that are discharged. Rather, it is narrowly focused on a selected group of pollutants, referred to as the 'target pollutants'. These include: TSS, ammonia, total and hexavalent chromium, mercury, vanadium, and selenium. In Phase II of the study, Argonne will expand the analysis to cover the entire Lake Michigan drainage basin.

  3. Creating Safe and Healthy Futures: Michigan Youth Violence Prevention Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrel-Samuels, Susan; Zimmerman, Marc A.; Reischl, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Youth are in the cross-fire of gun violence, and the highest rate in the nation is in Flint, Michigan. This article highlights six innovative strategies that prepare youth to solve problems at home and in their communities in peaceful ways. The Michigan Youth Violence Prevention Center (MI-YVPC) works with community groups to strengthen…

  4. Michigan Sex-Offender Law Has Educators in Uproar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses a new state law which has stirred up a fierce dispute over privacy rights, as innocent school employees in Michigan have begun learning that they have been misidentified as criminals. The Student Safety Initiative, a series of laws that took effect January 1, required Michigan school districts to obtain criminal-background…

  5. Lake Michigan lake trout PCB model forecast post audit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scenario forecasts for total PCBs in Lake Michigan (LM) lake trout were conducted using the linked LM2-Toxics and LM Food Chain models, supported by a suite of additional LM models. Efforts were conducted under the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study and the post audit represents th...

  6. Unemployment Insurance Fund Insolvency and Debt in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaustein, Saul J.

    Without changes in Michigan's unemployment insurance law, the state's unemployment insurance debt will probably reach $3.8 billion by the end of 1985. Currently, Michigan's employers pay unemployment insurance tax rates that vary from 1 to 9 percent, depending upon the amount of benefits charged against their accounts. Beginning with the federal…

  7. Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (FSEIS) for the Disposal and Reuse of the Airfield Property at Griffiss AFB, New York

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    .... This document supplements the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Disposal and Reuse of Griffiss Air Force Base, New York, which was prepared by the Air Force when the remainder of Griffiss AFB was closed in 1995...

  8. Final Environmental Assessment, Military Family Housing Privatization at Arnold AFB, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    grounds. The Base has 5,494 acres of cultivated pine forests and 23,053 acres of hardwood forests (Arnold AFB, 2007). Grasslands and early successional...lands (AEDC, 2004). These lands include cultivated pine forests totaling approximately 5,494 acres and hardwood forests totaling 23,492 acres...leucocephalus) Recently Delisted a Eggert’s sunflower (Helianthus eggertii) Recently Delisted b a 50 CFR 17; July 9, 2007 b Federal Register (FR) 70:159 pp

  9. Ellington AFB, Houston, Texas Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-14

    CHARI NATIONAL BUREAU Of STANDARDS qbi A t-1 PHOIEB ADES 1 I Camera Operator When Filming attachpd document use Bell & Howell ’am.ra ONLY.#" N LEVEL...AFETAC PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY AIR wEATHER SERVICE/MAC 11-1y6 ELLINGTON AFB TX 69-70,73-8: APR STATION STATION NAME YEARS MONTH PAGE I ALL NOIrS (L. S

  10. Final Environmental Impact Statement, Peacekeeper in Minuteman Silos, F.E. Warren AFB, Wyoming. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    the late Victorian era or evidencing other important stylistic features. F.E. Warren AFB itself contains a designated Historic District/Landmark...resident, 35.8 years in 1980, was considerably higher than the County’s median age of 28.1 years. In 1981, marriage and divorce rates for Laramie County...and the State of Wyoming were considerably higher than the national rates and, although no firm conclusions can be drawn, higher marriage and divorce

  11. Barksdale AFB, Shreveport, Louisiana. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-12

    maximum and minimum temperatures, extreme maximum and minimum temperatures, psychrometric swimnry of wet-bulb temperature depression versus dry-bulb...8 0 $1 *( a. * * *0 93 130161 1.; ( f W21 I PA 06 0-IS-5 IOLl) PuV,0U WTHSu OF THaS FOOD AM OROUi...1 GLCBAL CL!MATOLO(4 ARANC. ,AAFETAC PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY Alt *EATHER SERVICE/MAC 722485 aAPKSDALE AFB LA 70,73-81 JAN STAT Om STATION NAMEE

  12. Environmental Assessment All-Terrain Vehicle Training Area at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-17

    Urtica dioica ), beggars’ ticks (Bidens frondosa), and waterleaf (Hydrophyllum viginianum) are typical forbes. 30 One hundred and forty two total...promote the establishment of native plant species. Socioeconomic Resources - This action would have a minor positive effect on the local economy... effects of the associated construction activities along with other concurrent actions at Grand Forks AFB and the surrounding area. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16

  13. Environmental Assessment: Building Addition Building 233 at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-22

    Rosa woodsii) are common in the understory in this area. Wood nettle (Laportea 29 canadensis), stinging nettle ( Urtica dioica ), beggars’ ticks...soil erosion, and promote the establishment of native plant species. Socioeconomic Resources - This action would have a minor positive effect on...cumulative effects of the associated construction activities along with other concurrent actions at Grand Forks AFB and the surrounding area. 15

  14. Environmental Assessment for the Construction of Eielson AFB Youth Center Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Pleistocene and Holocene loess deposits. These deposits originated from the floodplain of the Tanana River and the foothills of the Alaska Range. The...concern include carbon monoxide, emitted primarily from motor vehicles, and particulates, which are the result of combustion of a variety of fossil ...EIELSON AFB YOUTH CENTER ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT SEPTEMBER 2010 16 3.2.3.2 There are 32 species of mammals found on

  15. RELATIVE ABUNDANCE OF TOTAL AND METHYL MERCURY IN 1994-5 LAKE MICHIGAN FORAGE FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Project, forage fish samples were collected in 1994-5 from three regions within Lake Michigan: Saugatuck, Michigan and Port Washington and Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin by the USGS Great Lakes Science Center in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Species of ...

  16. The Academic Study of Religion in Four State Universities in Michigan: Culture, Curriculum and Complexities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewel, Christine L.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the development of religion curricula at four state universities in Michigan: Grand Valley State University, Western Michigan University, Michigan State University and the University of Michigan. It analyzes the historical development of these curricula, illustrating that each institution has a unique religion curriculum…

  17. Environmental status of the Lake Michigan region. Volume 6. Zoobenthos of Lake Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozley, S.C.; Howmiller, R.P.

    1977-09-01

    This report summarizes Lake Michigan zoobenthic studies up to 1974, including reports of power-plant surveys. It describes ecologies of macroinvertebrate species and some microfauna, partly through use of data from other Great Lakes. The following are discussed: methodology of field surveys; zoobenthic indicators of pollution; zoobenthic effects on sediment-water exchanges; and numbers, biomass, and production of total macroinvertebrates. Prominent features of Lake Michigan zoobenthos include predominance of the amphipod Pontoporeia affinis, usefulness of tubificid oligochaetes in mapping environmental quality, and pronounced qualitative gradients in zoobenthos in relation to depth. Further research is needed on sampling methods, energy flow rates and pathways through benthic communities, factors limiting distribution of species near shore, and effects of macroinvertebrates on sediment chemistry and structure.

  18. Geographic Expansion of Lyme Disease in Michigan, 2000-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantos, Paul M; Tsao, Jean; Nigrovic, Lise E; Auwaerter, Paul G; Fowler, Vance G; Ruffin, Felicia; Foster, Erik; Hickling, Graham

    2017-01-01

    Most Lyme disease cases in the Midwestern United States are reported in Minnesota and Wisconsin. In recent years, however, a widening geographic extent of Lyme disease has been noted with evidence of expansion eastwards into Michigan and neighboring states with historically low incidence rates. We collected confirmed and probable cases of Lyme disease from 2000 through 2014 from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, entering them in a geographic information system. We performed spatial focal cluster analyses to characterize Lyme disease expansion. We compared the distribution of human cases with recent Ixodes scapularis tick distribution studies. Lyme disease cases in both the Upper and Lower Peninsulas of Michigan expanded more than 5-fold over the study period. Although increases were seen throughout the Upper Peninsula, the Lower Peninsula particularly expanded along the Indiana border north along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan. Human cases corresponded to a simultaneous expansion in established I scapularis tick populations. The geographic distribution of Lyme disease cases significantly expanded in Michigan between 2000 and 2014, particularly northward along the Lake Michigan shore. If such dynamic trends continue, Michigan-and possibly neighboring areas of Indiana, Ohio, and Ontario, Canada-can expect a continued increase in Lyme disease cases.

  19. Surficial geologic map of Berrien County, Michigan, and the adjacent offshore area of Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Byron D.; Kincare, Kevin A.; O'Leary, Dennis W.; Newell, Wayne L.; Taylor, Emily M.; Williams, Van S.; Lundstrom, Scott C.; Abraham, Jared E.; Powers, Michael H.

    2017-12-13

    The surficial geologic map of Berrien County, southwestern Michigan (sheet 1), shows the distribution of glacial and postglacial deposits at the land surface and in the adjacent offshore area of Lake Michigan. The geologic map differentiates surficial materials of Quaternary age on the basis of their lithologic characteristics, stratigraphic relationships, and age. Drill-hole information correlated in cross sections provides details of typical stratigraphic sequences that compose one or more penetrated geologic map units. A new bedrock geologic map (on sheet 2) includes contours of the altitude of the eroded top of bedrock and shows the distribution of middle Paleozoic shale and carbonate units in the subcrop. A sediment thickness map (also on sheet 2) portrays the extent of as much as 150 meters of surficial materials that overlie the bedrock surface.The major physical features of the county are related principally to deposits of the last Laurentide ice sheet that advanced and then retreated back through the region from about 19,000 to 14,000 radiocarbon years before present. Glacial and postglacial deposits underlie the entire county; shale bedrock crops out only in the adjacent offshore area on the bottom of Lake Michigan. All glacial deposits and glacial meltwater deposits in Berrien County are related to the late Wisconsinan glacial advances of the Lake Michigan ice lobe and its three regional recessional moraines, which cross the county as three north-northeast-trending belts.From east to west (oldest to youngest), the three moraine belts are known as the Kalamazoo, Valparaiso, and Lake Border morainic systems. The till-ridge morainic systems (Lake Border and local Valparaiso morainic systems) consist of multiple, elongate moraine ridges separated by till plains and lake-bottom plains. Tills in ground and end moraines in Berrien County are distinguished as informal units, and are correlated with three proposed regional till units in southwestern Michigan

  20. MIS Case Study: I-94 Rehabilitation Project - Detroit, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    ISTEA includes specific requirements for inclusion in studies of Major Investment Projects in Metropolitan Planning Areas. The State of Michigan initiated a Major Investment Study (MIS) in October 1994 for the redesign and reconstruction of a 7 mile ...

  1. Pavement subgrade MR design values for Michigan's seasonal changes : appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-22

    The resilient modulus (MR) of roadbed soil plays an integral role in the design of pavement systems. Currently, the various regions of the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) use different procedures to determine the MR values. Most of these...

  2. Best design practices for walking and bicycling in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) has undertaken : a research initiative to determine how to optimize pedestrian and : bicycle safety while minimizing impacts to vehicular mobility. The : best practices in this document provide guidanc...

  3. Fifteen year performance review of Michigan's European concrete pavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    In 1993, a special pavement demonstration project was constructed in Detroit on NB I-75 to evaluate the design features of some highly acclaimed European rigid pavements. The Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) and the Federal Highway Admini...

  4. Twenty year performance review of Michigan's European concrete pavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    In 1993, a special pavement demonstration project was constructed in Detroit on NB I-75 to evaluate the design features of some highly acclaimed European rigid pavements. The Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) and the Federal Highway Admini...

  5. Michigan 2008 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the MI coasts of Lake Superior, Lake Michigan and...

  6. The Michigan leadership model: developing a management infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Carrie; Aebersold, Michelle; Mamolen, Nancy; Goldberg, Janet; Frank, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    University of Michigan Health System underwent a number of reduction strategies in the early 1990s to address the rising costs of healthcare. By 2001, an analysis revealed that these strategies negatively impacted employee satisfaction and patient care. A team of nurse managers was charged with redesigning the current support structure for nurse managers. The team conducted an analysis of the current situation and designed a new model called the Michigan Leadership Model comprising both administrative and leadership support positions.

  7. Geographic Expansion of Lyme Disease in Michigan, 2000?2014

    OpenAIRE

    Lantos, Paul M.; Tsao, Jean; Nigrovic, Lise E.; Auwaerter, Paul G.; Fowler, Vance G.; Ruffin, Felicia; Foster, Erik; Hickling, Graham

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Most Lyme disease cases in the Midwestern United States are reported in Minnesota and Wisconsin. In recent years, however, a widening geographic extent of Lyme disease has been noted with evidence of expansion eastwards into Michigan and neighboring states with historically low incidence rates. Methods. We collected confirmed and probable cases of Lyme disease from 2000 through 2014 from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, entering them in a geographic i...

  8. Geographic Expansion of Lyme Disease in Michigan, 2000–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Jean; Nigrovic, Lise E.; Auwaerter, Paul G.; Fowler, Vance G.; Ruffin, Felicia; Foster, Erik; Hickling, Graham

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Most Lyme disease cases in the Midwestern United States are reported in Minnesota and Wisconsin. In recent years, however, a widening geographic extent of Lyme disease has been noted with evidence of expansion eastwards into Michigan and neighboring states with historically low incidence rates. Methods. We collected confirmed and probable cases of Lyme disease from 2000 through 2014 from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, entering them in a geographic information system. We performed spatial focal cluster analyses to characterize Lyme disease expansion. We compared the distribution of human cases with recent Ixodes scapularis tick distribution studies. Results. Lyme disease cases in both the Upper and Lower Peninsulas of Michigan expanded more than 5-fold over the study period. Although increases were seen throughout the Upper Peninsula, the Lower Peninsula particularly expanded along the Indiana border north along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan. Human cases corresponded to a simultaneous expansion in established I scapularis tick populations. Conclusions. The geographic distribution of Lyme disease cases significantly expanded in Michigan between 2000 and 2014, particularly northward along the Lake Michigan shore. If such dynamic trends continue, Michigan—and possibly neighboring areas of Indiana, Ohio, and Ontario, Canada—can expect a continued increase in Lyme disease cases. PMID:28480261

  9. The University of Michigan Dioxin Exposure Study: Predictors of Human Serum Dioxin Concentrations in Midland and Saginaw, Michigan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David H. Garabrant; Alfred Franzblau; James Lepkowski; Brenda W. Gillespie; Peter Adriaens; Avery Demond; Elizabeth Hedgeman; Kristine Knutson; Lynn Zwica; Kristen Olson; Timothy Towey; Qixuan Chen; Biling Hong; Chiung-Wen Chang; Shih-Yuan Lee; Barbara Ward; Kathy LaDronka; William Luksemburg; Martha Maier

    2009-01-01

    Background: We conducted a population-based human exposure study in response to concerns among the population of Midland and Saginaw counties, Michigan, that discharges by the Dow Chemical Company of dioxin-like...

  10. Group 13, 1990 ASCAN Sherlock at cockpit trainer during Vance AFB exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Group 13, 1990 Astronaut Candidate (ASCAN) Nancy J. Sherlock, wearing flight suit, parachute, and helmet with oxygen mask, approaches the aircraft cockpit training device at Vance Air Force Base (AFB) in Enid, Oklahoma. This portion of the survival training course is designed to familiarize the trainee with procedures to follow in preparation for ejection from a jet aircraft. Sherlock, along with 22 other ASCANs, began a year's training and evaluation in July. This session was conducted from 07-29-90 through 07-31-90.

  11. Installation Restoration Program for Richards-Gebaur AFB. Phase 2. Field Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    SCWINTY CL6ASSIVICATION or TwIs P04c ;Wism Doel Eaeat.4 UnclIqif ied SuCuRiTY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGIE(Wh?1 D4 EZmd) The Phase Il--Field Evaluation...IO In en - 040 3j C’ tn- 3. 0n fn 0 .-. I./ V k v V M. N, too 0n z-o 7-28 [RICH-GEB/AFB.2 ]HTB/3. 1 12/30/83 Table 3. EPA List cf 129 Priority

  12. Diversity and specificity: auxin perception and signaling through the TIR1/AFB pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Renhou; Estelle, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Auxin is a versatile plant hormone that plays an essential role in most aspects of plant growth and development. Auxin regulates various growth processes by modulating gene transcription through a SCFTIR1/AFB-Aux/IAA-ARF nuclear signaling module. Recent work has generated clues as to how multiple layers of regulation of the auxin signaling components may result in diverse and specific response outputs. In particular, interaction and structural studies of key auxin signaling proteins have produced novel insights into the molecular basis of auxin-regulated transcription and may lead to a refined auxin signaling model. PMID:25032902

  13. Environmental Assessment: Replace Sanitary Sewer from Building 801 to Lagoons at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    occasional moose and bear. Amphibian State Species of Concern include the Northern Leopard Frog. Mammal State Species of Concern include the bobcat...1808 15th Ave NE, Grand ’J:or11s, NO 58201 IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my. hand and seal this ~ day of July, 2010 Oan.l:llll/ss...Program 319 CES/CEV A 525 Tuskegee Airmen Blvd. Grand Forks AFB, ND 58205-6434 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SECTION Gold Seal Center, 918 E. Divide Ave

  14. Sewart AFB, Smyrna, Tennessee. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967-07-10

    DAILY OSSIAVATIOHS) ( 13827 SMYRNA TENNESSEE/SEWART AFB 42-47049-65 STATION STATION HAME ER ( 24 HOUR AMOUNTS IN INCHES _MO NTH ALL YEAR JAN. FEN. IMAR ...49-66 FEB S-*A-OC StATION -Aft .t fS M- CT . { ALL WEATHER 1200r1400 C LASS COGAS UL S TO) SPEED I I 1> MEAN (KNTS) 1.3 4-6 7-10 11.16 17.21 22-27 28...0 ............... NW..,. ’ . i . " T "- -T .* _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ V C LALM ,,_, iL - - Ct ASHEVILLE9 N .Co 28801 PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND

  15. Biofluid Mechanics Education at U Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotberg, James

    2007-11-01

    At the University of Michigan, biofluid mechanics is taught in the Department of Biomedical Engineering with cross-listing in Mechanical Engineering. The course has evolved over 25 years and serves advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The course description is as follows: BiomedE/MechE 476 Biofluid Mechanics. CATALOG DESCRIPTION: This is an intermediate level fluid mechanics course which uses examples from biotechnology processes and physiologic applications including cellular, cardiovascular, respiratory, ocular, renal, orthopedic, and gastrointestinal systems. COURSE TOPICS: 1. Dimensional analysis (gastrointestinal, renal) 2. Approximation methods, numerical methods (biotechnology, respiratory) 3. Particle kinematics in Eulerian and Lagrangian references frames (biotechnology, respiratory) 4. Conservation of mass and momentum 5. Constitutive equations (blood, mucus) 6. Kinematic and stress boundary conditions: rigid, flexible, porous (cardio-pulmonary, cellular) 7. Surface tension phenomena (pulmonary, ocular) 8. Flow and wave propagation in flexible tubes (cardio-pulmonary) 9. Oscillatory and pulsatile flows (cardio-pulmonary, orthopedic) 10. High Reynolds number flows (cardio-pulmonary) 11. Low Reynolds number flows (biotechnology, cellular, vascular) 12. Lubrication theory (vascular, orthopedic) 13. Flow in poroelastic media (orthopedic, pulmonary, ocular) 14. Video presentations of laboratory experiments.

  16. Environmental status of the Lake Michigan region. Volume 14. Birds of the Lake Michigan drainage basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, G.J.

    1977-07-01

    This report characterizes the bird life found in 100 counties of the four states peripheral to Lake Michigan. It discusses major habitats (the Lake Michigan shoreline, inland lakes, rivers and streams, marshes, fields and open spaces, and woodlots) and associates specific birds with habitats according to preferences for space and food. It also discusses the special attributes of state parks and lakeshores, refuges and sanctuaries, and other special areas which are attractive to avifauna. Patterns of historical occurrence and abundance, and the influence of pesticides and pollution, disease, and hunting pressure are explored to place present occurrence in a modern perspective. Migration patterns are discussed to explain increases and decreases which occur in nonresident avifauna of the Basin. The distribution and habits of birds that occur regularly in the Basin are described in an annotated list; a more complete list is presented in a table which encapsulates data for rapid and convenient reference. Separate sections deal with extinct, extirpated, and introduced species, and with endangered, threatened, and declining species.

  17. Environmental status of the Lake Michigan region. Volume 3. Chemistry of Lake Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrey, M S

    1976-05-01

    The report is a synoptic review of data collected over the past twenty years on the chemistry of Lake Michigan. Changes in water quality and sediment chemistry, attributable to cultural and natural influences, are considered in relation to interacting processes and factors controlling the distribution and concentration of chemical substances within the Lake. Temperature, light, and mixing processes are among the important natural influences that affect nutrient cycling, dispersal of pollutants, and fate of materials entering the Lake. Characterization of inshore-offshore and longitudinal differences in chemical concentrations and sediment chemistry for the main body of the Lake is supplemented by discussion of specific areas such as Green Bay and Grand Traverse Bay. Residues, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, major and trace nutrients, and contaminants are described in the following context: biological essentiality and/or toxicity, sources to the Lake, concentrations in the water column and sediments, chemical forms, seasonal variations and variation with depth. A summary of existing water quality standards, statutes, and criteria applicable to Lake Michigan is appended.

  18. SCFTIR1/AFB-Based Auxin Perception: Mechanism and Role in Plant Growth and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehin, Mohammad; Bagchi, Rammyani; Estelle, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Auxin regulates a vast array of growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle of plants. Auxin responses are highly context dependent and can involve changes in cell division, cell expansion, and cell fate. The complexity of the auxin response is illustrated by the recent finding that the auxin-responsive gene set differs significantly between different cell types in the root. Auxin regulation of transcription involves a core pathway consisting of the TIR1/AFB F-box proteins, the Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors, and the ARF transcription factors. Auxin is perceived by a transient coreceptor complex consisting of a TIR1/AFB protein and an Aux/IAA protein. Auxin binding to the coreceptor results in degradation of the Aux/IAAs and derepression of ARF-based transcription. Although the basic outlines of this pathway are now well established, it remains unclear how specificity of the pathway is conferred. However, recent results, focusing on the ways that these three families of proteins interact, are starting to provide important clues. PMID:25604443

  19. SCFTIR1/AFB-based auxin perception: mechanism and role in plant growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehin, Mohammad; Bagchi, Rammyani; Estelle, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Auxin regulates a vast array of growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle of plants. Auxin responses are highly context dependent and can involve changes in cell division, cell expansion, and cell fate. The complexity of the auxin response is illustrated by the recent finding that the auxin-responsive gene set differs significantly between different cell types in the root. Auxin regulation of transcription involves a core pathway consisting of the TIR1/AFB F-box proteins, the Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors, and the ARF transcription factors. Auxin is perceived by a transient coreceptor complex consisting of a TIR1/AFB protein and an Aux/IAA protein. Auxin binding to the coreceptor results in degradation of the Aux/IAAs and derepression of ARF-based transcription. Although the basic outlines of this pathway are now well established, it remains unclear how specificity of the pathway is conferred. However, recent results, focusing on the ways that these three families of proteins interact, are starting to provide important clues. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  20. SCFTIR1/AFB-auxin signalling regulates PIN vacuolar trafficking and auxin fluxes during root gravitropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baster, Paweł; Robert, Stéphanie; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen; Vanneste, Steffen; Kania, Urszula; Grunewald, Wim; De Rybel, Bert; Beeckman, Tom; Friml, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of the phytohormone auxin regulates many aspects of plant development including growth response to gravity. Gravitropic root curvature involves coordinated and asymmetric cell elongation between the lower and upper side of the root, mediated by differential cellular auxin levels. The asymmetry in the auxin distribution is established and maintained by a spatio-temporal regulation of the PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin transporter activity. We provide novel insights into the complex regulation of PIN abundance and activity during root gravitropism. We show that PIN2 turnover is differentially regulated on the upper and lower side of gravistimulated roots by distinct but partially overlapping auxin feedback mechanisms. In addition to regulating transcription and clathrin-mediated internalization, auxin also controls PIN abundance at the plasma membrane by promoting their vacuolar targeting and degradation. This effect of elevated auxin levels requires the activity of SKP-Cullin-F-boxTIR1/AFB (SCFTIR1/AFB)-dependent pathway. Importantly, also suboptimal auxin levels mediate PIN degradation utilizing the same signalling pathway. These feedback mechanisms are functionally important during gravitropic response and ensure fine-tuning of auxin fluxes for maintaining as well as terminating asymmetric growth. PMID:23211744

  1. Bioventing bioremediation -- 1500 Area JP-4 jet fuel spill site, Kelly AFB, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brownlow, D.T. [Earth Technology Corp., Alexandria, VA (United States); Escude, S.; Johanneson, O.H.

    1994-12-31

    The 1500 Area at Kelly Air Force Base (AFB) was the site of a subsurface release of approximately 1,000 gallons of JP-4 jet fuel. Preliminary studies found evidence of hydrocarbon contamination extending from 10 feet below ground surface (bgs) down to the shallow water table, at 20 to 25 feet bgs. In June of 1993, Kelly AFB authorized the installation and evaluation of a bioventing system at this site to aid in the cleanup of the hydrocarbon contaminated soils. The purpose of the bioventing system is to aerate subsurface soils within and immediately surrounding the release area, in order to stimulate in-situ biological activity and enhance the natural bioremediation capacity of the soil. Augmenting oxygen to the indigenous soil microorganisms promotes the aerobic metabolism of fuel hydrocarbons in the soil. In vadose zone soils exhibiting relatively good permeability, bioventing has proven to be a highly cost effective remediation technology for treating fuel contaminated soils. In November, 1993, a Start-Up Test program consisting of an In-Situ Respiration Test (ISRT) and an Air Permeability Test was performed at the 1500 Area Spill Site.

  2. Celebrating the International Year of Light in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Anca L.; Dreyer, Elizabeth F. C.; Aku-Leh, Cynthia; Jones, Timothy; Nees, John A.; Smith, Arlene

    2016-09-01

    The 2015 International Year of Light created a wonderful opportunity to bring light and optics events and activities to people of all ages and occupations in Michigan. A large spectrum of events took place; from events held in schools, colleges, and universities targeting various groups of students, to events associated with festivals attended by large crowds. The latter included the Ann Arbor Summer Festival held in June and the Flint Back-to-the-Bricks Festival in August. All events included interactive activities where participants learned hands-on about optics and photonics phenomena and applications. Original demonstrations and kits were developed by the Ann Arbor OSA Local Section and the Optics Society at the University of Michigan, the joint OSA/SPIE student chapter, for use during the events. The activities were funded through the student chapter's SPIE grant for IYL outreach events and corporate sponsorships. Under the name Michigan Light Project, these groups along with local technology enthusiasts and science clubs delivered several events across Michigan. Other events took place throughout the year in Mid-Michigan through the efforts of faculty and students in the Photonics and Laser Technology program at Baker College of Flint. The outreach events targeted students in K-12. Teachers, counselors, and parents also learned about the importance of optics and photonics in society. The activities developed will continue this year and in the future. The paper will provide details on the completed events and activities along with tips for implementing similar activities and outreach partnerships in other areas.

  3. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Michigan. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Michigan.

  4. 76 FR 28077 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate...

  5. 76 FR 28078 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in...

  6. 77 FR 45992 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Indiana; Michigan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ... regulations necessary to meet ambient air quality standards. Additionally, the Illinois Pollution Control...; Illinois; Indiana; Michigan; Minnesota; Ohio; Wisconsin; Infrastructure SIP Requirements for the 2006 PM 2... elements, of State Implementation Plan (SIP) submissions by Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio...

  7. Holocene vegetation history and Lake Michigan lake-level fluctuations on the southern shore of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petty, W.H. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1994-06-01

    A 250-cm sediment core with a base radiocarbon date of 7960 yrs BP was collected in June of 1993 from Elbow Lake, Mackinac Co., Michigan. Radiocarbon dates and fossil pollen preserved in lake sediments indicate that changes in vegetation are related to changes in climate and proximity to the Lake Michigan shoreline. Basal radiocarbon dates on sediment cores from a transect of ponds combined with tree-ring cores and GLO surveyor notes of a shipwreck reveal an average late-Holocene rate of regression of 3 feet per year. The pollen record, sediment stratigraphy, and sediment accumulation rates show that this general retreat of the shoreline was punctuated by periodic high stands. Radiocarbon dates of [approximately]6900 yrs BP indicate a high stand of Lake Michigan during the late-Chippewa state of Lake Michigan, prior to the classically recognized Nipissing-I high stand at [approximately]4500 yrs PB. Pollen percentages for Tsuga canadensis and Fagus grandifolia both reach > 1% by 5500 yrs BP, indicating that the northern shore of Lake Michigan provided suitable habitat for colonization by these species. Establishment of F. grandifolia at this time is associated with a rise in water table and is [approximately]2000 years prior to its expansion into the interior of the Upper Peninsula after 3500 yrs BP. A further increase in mesic hardwoods along with T. canadensis to their modern level by 2200 yrs BP is associated with an increase in sediment accumulation rate, indicative of a rising lake level and moister climate.

  8. Paternity acknowledgment in 2 million birth records from Michigan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Almond

    Full Text Available Out-of-wedlock childbearing is more common in the U.S. than in other countries and becoming more so. A growing share of such non-marital births identify the father, which can create a legal entitlement to child support. Relatively little is known about individual determinants of the decision to establish paternity, in part because of data limitations. In this paper, we evaluate all birth records in Michigan from 1993 to 2006, which have been merged to the paternity registry. In 2006, 30,231 Michigan children, almost one quarter of all Michigan births, were born to unmarried mothers and had paternity acknowledged. We find that births with paternity acknowledged have worse outcomes along various health and socio-economic dimensions relative to births to married parents, but better outcomes relative to births to unmarried parents without paternity acknowledgement. Furthermore, unmarried men who father sons are significantly more likely to acknowledge paternity than fathers of daughters.

  9. Fast-food consumption and obesity among Michigan adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Beth; Rafferty, Ann P; Lyon-Callo, Sarah; Fussman, Christopher; Imes, Gwendoline

    2011-07-01

    Consumption of meals eaten away from home, especially from fast-food restaurants, has increased in the United States since the 1970s. The main objective of this study was to examine the frequency and characteristics of fast-food consumption among adults in Michigan and obesity prevalence. We analyzed data from 12 questions about fast-food consumption that were included on the 2005 Michigan Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, a population-based telephone survey of Michigan adults, using univariate and bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression, and compared these data with data on Michigan obesity prevalence. Approximately 80% of Michigan adults went to fast-food restaurants at least once per month and 28% went regularly (≥2 times/wk). Regular fast-food consumption was higher among younger adults (mostly men) but was not significantly associated with household income, education, race, or urbanicity (in a multivariate framework). The prevalence of obesity increased consistently with frequenting fast-food restaurants, from 24% of those going less than once a week to 33% of those going 3 or more times per week. The predominant reason for choosing fast food was convenience. Although hypothetically 68% of adults who go to fast-food restaurants would choose healthier fast-food items when available, only 16% said they ever use nutritional information when ordering. The prevalence of fast-food consumption is high in Michigan across education, income, and racial groups and is strongly associated with obesity. Making nutritional information at fast-food restaurants more readily available and easier to use may help consumers to order more healthful or lower-calorie items.

  10. Standardization of compounded oral liquids for pediatric patients in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Melanie J; Ciarkowski, Scott L; Rood, Janis; Wang, Bryan; Wagenknecht, Larry D; Dickinson, Chris J; Stevenson, James G

    2016-07-01

    The development, dissemination, and adoption of standard concentrations for compounded oral liquids for pediatric patients in Michigan are described. A baseline assessment of current practices in Michigan revealed significant variations in the concentrations of commonly used oral liquid medicines for pediatric patients. A statewide collaborative initiative in Michigan was created to standardize the concentrations of compounded oral liquids for pediatric patients. Standard concentrations were proposed and adopted by key stakeholders. These standards were then disseminated across the state to prescribers and pharmacists, with encouragement to voluntarily adopt the standards as a patient safety measure. A follow-up survey was conducted to evaluate adoption of the standards. A total of 263 pharmacists responded to the survey. Standardization of the concentrations of compounded oral liquids in Michigan was welcomed by most pharmacies and is perceived to have reduced the risk for errors at transitions of care for children receiving compounded oral liquids. Awareness of the standardization initiative was acknowledged by 77% of survey respondents, and adoption of the standards was observed to some degree by 57% of survey respondents. In addition, 70% of survey respondents agreed or strongly agreed that adoption of the standards has improved patient safety in Michigan. Standard drug concentrations for compounded oral liquids were developed for pediatric patients in Michigan. A survey after dissemination of the recommended standards confirmed general awareness of the initiative and adoption of the standards by a substantial proportion of respondents. Most respondents indicated a belief that creation of the standards improved patient safety. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Chemical speciation and transformation of dissolved nitrogen in Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, L.; Guo, L.; Zhou, Z.; Cuhel, R. L.; Aguilar, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Great Lakes have experienced significant ecological and environmental changes due to increasing anthropogenic influences and the introduction of invasive species. However, changes in nutrient cycling pathways in Lake Michigan remain elusive. Water samples were collected between December 2012 and July 2013 along a transect from the Milwaukee River to open Lake Michigan for the measurements of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, including NO3, NO2, and NH4), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and colloidal organic nitrogen (CON). Concentrations of DIN in river waters decreased from winter to spring, while in Lake Michigan, DIN increased from spring/summer to winter, showing a general decrease from river to lake waters, but homogeneous or slightly increase from surface to deep water in Lake Michigan. Within the DIN pool, NO3 is the predominant species comprising >84%. Concentrations of DON also decreased from river to open lake waters, but less variable or slightly decreased from surface to deep waters in Lake Michigan. These variation trends highlighted the importance of terrestrial contribution of DIN and DON to the lake and possible production of DIN in bottom waters. While DIN predominated the total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) pool in both river and lake waters during winter, DON became dominant throughout the entire water column during spring/summer. The imbalance between DON production and DIN consumption during summer suggested that DON could also be derived from particulate nitrogen pool in the water column and other sources. Colloidal organic nitrogen contributed up to 22-56% of the DON pool or 12-32% of the TDN pool in river/coastal waters. Similar to DIN and DON, the abundance of CON also decreased from the Milwaukee River to Lake Michigan, indicating short turnover times of the colloidal N pool and increase the proportion of low-molecular-weight DON in lake waters.

  12. XPD codon 312 and 751 polymorphisms, and AFB1 exposure, and hepatocellular carcinoma risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may influence individual variation in DNA repair capacity, which may be associated with risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC related to the exposure of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1. In this study, we have focused on the polymorphisms of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD codon 312 and 751 (namely Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln, involved in nucleotide excision repair. Methods We conducted a case-control study including 618 HCC cases and 712 controls to evaluate the associations between these two polymorphisms and HCC risk for Guangxi population by means of TaqMan-PCR and PCR-RFLP analysis. Results We found that individuals featuring the XPD genotypes with codon 751 Gln alleles (namely XPD-LG or XPD-GG were related to an elevated risk of HCC compared to those with the homozygote of XPD codon 751 Lys alleles [namely XPD-LL, adjusted odds ratios (ORs were 1.75 and 2.47; 95% confidence interval (CIs were 1.30-2.37 and 1.62-3.76, respectively]. A gender-specific role was evident that showed an higher risk for women (adjusted OR was 8.58 for XPD-GG than for men (adjusted OR = 2.90 for XPD-GG. Interestingly, the interactive effects of this polymorphism and AFB1-exposure information showed the codon 751 Gln alleles increase the risk of HCC for individuals facing longer exposure years (Pinteraction = 0.011, OR = 0.85. For example, long-exposure-years (> 48 years individuals who carried XDP-GG had an adjusted OR of 470.25, whereas long-exposure-years people with XDP-LL were at lower risk (adjusted OR = 149.12. However, we did not find that XPD codon 312 polymorphism was significantly associated with HCC risk. Conclusion These findings suggest that XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism is an important modulator of AFB1 related-HCC development in Guangxi population.

  13. Distribution and change of microbial activity in combined UASB and AFB reactors for wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, J.; Chen, H.; Ji, M.; Yue, P.L. [Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology, Kowloon (Hong Kong). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2000-04-01

    A thermophilic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was combined with a mesophilic aerobic fluidized bed (AFB) reactor for treatment of a medium strength wastewater with 2,700 mg COD l{sup -1}. The COD removal efficiency reached 75% with a removal rate of 0.2 g COD l{sup -1} h{sup -1} at an overall hydraulic retention time 14 hours. The distribution of microbial activity and its change with hydraulic retention time in the two reactors were investigated by measuring ATP concentration in the reactors and specific ATP content of the biomass. In the UASB reactor, the difference in specific ATP was significant between the sludge bed and blanket solution (0.02 mg ATP g VS{sup -1} versus 0.85 mg ATP g VS{sup -1}) even though the ATP concentrations in these two zones were similar. A great pH gradient up to 4 was developed along the UASB reactor. Since a high ATP or biological activity in the blanket solution could only be maintained in a narrow pH range from 6.5 to 7.5, the sludge granules showed a high pH tolerance and buffering capacity up to pH 11. The suspended biomass in AFB reactor had a higher specific ATP than the biomass fixed in polyurethane carriers (1.6 mg ATP g VS{sup -1} versus 1.1 mg ATP g VS{sup -1}), which implies a starvation status of the immobilized cells due to mass transfer limitation. The aerobes had to work under starvation conditions in this polishing reactor. The anaerobic biomass brought into AFB reactor contributed to an increase in suspended solids, but not the COD removal because of its fast deactivation under aerobic conditions. A second order kinetic model was proposed for ATP decline of the anaerobes. The results on distribution of microbial activity in the two reactors as well as its change with hydraulic retention time lead to further performance improvement of the combined anaerobic/aerobic reactor system. (orig.)

  14. High Energy Theory Workshops and Visitors at the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics FY16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Aaron [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-09-08

    This award provided partial support for the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics to host the 5-day workshop "Emergent themes in String Theory" this winter, March 15 - 19, 2016. on the University of Michigan campus. In addition, this award provided limited support for the Young High Energy Theorist (YHET) visitor program at the University of Michigan.

  15. Michigan's agricultural heritage: using historical data to develop authentic heritage attractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig Wiles; Terry Shaffer; Gail Vander Stoep

    2003-01-01

    The Michigan Agricultural Heritage Project, a multi-disciplinary research effort at Michigan State University sponsored by the Michigan Department of Transportation, is currently completing a rural agricultural context document. While the main purpose of this project is to provide information, tools and resources for historic preservation consultants...

  16. 78 FR 65375 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Michigan has completed an... inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the University of Michigan...

  17. 33 CFR 165.910 - Security Zones; Captain of the Port Lake Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... beginning. (3) Donald C. Cook Nuclear Power Plant. All waters of Lake Michigan around the Donald C. Cook...) Palisades Nuclear Power Plant. All waters of Lake Michigan around the Palisades Nuclear Power Plant within a... Michigan. (2) Dresden Nuclear Power Plant. All waters of the Illinois River in the vicinity of Dresden...

  18. 76 FR 48834 - Michigan Consolidated Gas Company and Dawn Gateway Pipeline, LLC; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Michigan Consolidated Gas Company and Dawn Gateway Pipeline, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on July 26, 2011, Michigan Consolidated Gas Company (MichCon), and Dawn Gateway Pipeline, LLC (Dawn Gateway), whose offices are co-located at One Energy Plaza, Detroit, Michigan 48226...

  19. Michigan Health & Hospital Association Keystone Obstetrics: a statewide collaborative for perinatal patient safety in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kathleen Rice; Knox, G Eric; Martin, Morgan; George, Chris; Watson, Sam R

    2011-12-01

    Preventable harm to mothers and infants during labor and birth is a significant patient safety and professional liability issue. A Michigan Health & Hospital Association Keystone Center for Patient Safety & Quality Obstetric Collaborative Project involved perinatal teams from 15 Michigan hospitals during an 11-month period in 2009. The purpose of the project was to promote safe care practices during labor and birth using the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP). Consistent with the CUSP model, this project's components included assessing and promoting a culture of safety; interdisciplinary team building; case review; learning from defects through multiple methods of education; team and individual coaching and peer encouragement; administrative support for the establishment of a fundamental safety infrastructure; and ongoing evaluation of care processes and outcomes. Study measures included 32 components of a perinatal patient infrastructure, 6 care processes during labor and birth, and 4 neonatal outcomes. Significant improvements were found in the safety culture (Safety Attitudes Questionnaire), the perinatal patient safety infrastructure components, and all care processes. Although the project was successful, getting buy-in from all members of the clinical team in each hospital for all of the measures was challenging at times. There was initial resistance to some of the measures and their various expected aspects of care. For example, some of the clinicians were initially reluctant to adopt the recommended standardized oxytocin protocol. Peer encouragement and unit-based feedback on progress in minimizing early elective births proved useful in many hospitals. A CUSP in obstetrics can be beneficial in improving the care of mothers and infants during labor and birth.

  20. Auxin sensitivities of all Arabidopsis Aux/IAAs for degradation in the presence of every TIR1/AFB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu-Mitao, Yasushi; Kakimoto, Tatsuo

    2014-08-01

    Auxin plays a key role in regulation of almost all processes of plant growth and development. Different physiological processes are regulated by different ranges of auxin concentrations; however, the underlying mechanisms creating these differences are largely unknown. The first step of auxin signaling is auxin-dependent interaction of an auxin receptor with transcriptional co-repressors (Aux/IAA), which leads to Aux/IAA degradation. Arabidopsis has six homologous auxin receptors (TIR1 and five AFBs), 29 Aux/IAA proteins and two types of active auxins, IAA and phenylacetic acid (PAA). Therefore, a large number of possible combinations between these three factors may contribute to the creation of complex auxin responses. Using a yeast heterologous reconstitution system, we investigated auxin-dependent degradation of all Arabidopsis Aux/IAAs in combination with every TIR or AFB receptor component. We found that TIR1 and AFB2 were effective in mediating Aux/IAA degradation. We confirmed that the Aux/IAA domain II, which binds TIR1, is essential for degradation. IAA and other natural auxins, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid (4-Cl-IAA) and PAA, induced Aux/IAA degradation; and IAA and 4-Cl-IAA had higher activity than PAA. Effective auxin concentrations for Aux/IAA degradation depended on both Aux/IAAs and TIR1 or AFB2 receptors, which is consistent with the Aux/IAA-TIR1/AFB co-receptor concept. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Holloman AFB, New Mexico. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-12

    FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) ,’_,132 HOLLONAN AFB NN 68-70,75-81 04AY WarM . iIAMr Uhu m..?. ALL WIEATHER 1500-1T00...77 L~ __ . .. . . . _ _.. -.- -. - G BLOBAL CLINATOLOSY SRANCH USAFETAC CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY AIR WEATHER SERVICE/NAC (- 747320 HOLLOAN AF3 UN 68...OSUSIVATION) ciwm 1110110 ( WARM ON a’e 11. 1 s atI. I at 2 1 1s’ 19 1k-. Is i’ i" a t’$ i, a 3. 1* to " C~ *~ at s a o "tT*To T ts Is 1*. as M 10,usm

  2. Blytheville AFB, Arkansas. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    8217L 0LY 8A’CH L TAC WEATHER CONDITIONS AT Hrk SEP. VICL/AC -Z4 _L TEILLL AFB A 73--37 r S. ATIONYNAME EARS MONTH P. C:CNTAGL. FPE UFNCY cF OCCURRFNC OF...4 .6 7 . 10 I1 . 16 1/ 21 22 - 27 28 33 34 - 40 41 - 47 48 - 55 56 % N TD DiR SPEED 3.’ .I _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _i N 1 1.4 _ _ _ _ _1_ ENE 4 . 1...47.5 97.7 95.7_. - c .6_. 9 TOTAL NUMBER Of OBSIRVATIONS _ _-__ - ,SA F A 0- 4.’ 01 A tD ..c -s 1 36.0 -9L CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY PERCENTAGE

  3. Stack-emission testing for beryllium, Hill AFB, Utah. Final report, 13-17 July 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, M.

    1987-11-01

    At the request of HQ AFLC/SGB, personnel from the USAFOEHL conducted an air-emission survey of the exhaust from a C-5 brake reconditioning operation at Hill AFB UT from 13 July to 17 July 1987. These brakes contain beryllium disks and during the reconditioning process, beryllium particles are generated. The reconditioning operation consists of two processes which vent to individual stacks. The emissions for both stacks were well below the EPA standard for this kind of operation. The brake shop conducts a two part reconditioning operation on C-5 beryllium brake discs. This operation consists of an active wet grinding process and a wet dipping process. The reconditioning process is a cyclic operation for six hours per day and the shop operates only one shift per day. Each process is exhausted through its own stack and has no air pollution control equipment.

  4. Proceedings of the Annual Review Conference (13th) on Atmospheric Transmission Models Held in Hanscom AFB, Massachusetts on 5-6 June 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    TEAS Grp. 904-678- 2001 PO Box P135 Eglin AFB, FL 32542 Dr. Daryl E. Freeman Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 617-495-2783 60 Garden Street...617-377-3618 Hanscom AFB, MA 01731-5000 Mr. Paul W. Pellegrini RADC/ESE 617-377-3699 Hanscom AFB, MA 01731-5000 Dr. William A. Peterson U.S. Army...Schloss Kressback D-7400 Tubinger 1 Federal Republic of Germany Peter B. Ulrich W.J. Schafer Associates 703-558-7900 Arlington, VA 22209 Dr. George A

  5. Innovative Schools in Michigan. Connect: Making Learning Personal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Stephen F., Ed.

    2015-01-01

    This second issue of "Connect" highlights innovative teaching as practiced by teachers and administrators in Michigan schools as they seek to provide greater personalization for every student's learning. Nicholas Provenzano and Ben Gilpin give field reports from their schools, which have implemented a version of 20-Time--a concept…

  6. Evaluation of Michigan's Foster Care Case Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kristen; Wagner, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    Objective: In 1997, Michigan's Family Independence Agency piloted case management procedures designed to expedite permanency and improve services to children in foster care. Method: A 3-year evaluation examined outcomes in nine pilot and nine comparison counties to determine if children in the pilot counties achieved permanency, either returned…

  7. 30 CFR 922.700 - Michigan Federal program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of Federal, State, or local government-financed highway or other construction. (2) Michigan Farmland and Open Space Preservation Act, MCL section 554.701, pertaining to land use restrictions including... extraction of coal is an incidental part of Federal, State, or local government-financed highway or other...

  8. Timber resource of Michigan's Southern Lower Peninsula Unit, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerold T. Hahn

    1982-01-01

    The fourth inventory of the timber resource of Michigan's Southern Lower Peninsula Survey Unit shows a 12% decline in commercial forest area and a 26% gain in growing-stock volume between 1966 and 1980. Presented are highlights and statistics on area, volume, growth, mortality, removals, utilization, and biomass.

  9. Importance-performance analysis: an application to Michigan's natural resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria Sanders; Erin White; Lori Pennington-Gray

    2001-01-01

    In the state of Michigan, the nature-based tourist is becoming an increasingly important target market for providers of natural resources. To meet the demands of this growing market segment, evaluation strategies for nature-based sites are needed to maintain and improve customer satisfaction and loyalty. Evaluation strategies that incorporate consumer input can help to...

  10. Understanding public opinion regarding transit in southeast Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This report presents findings from a study on public opinion regarding transit in Southeast Michigan. The overall goals of this : study were to assess the nature of public opinion regarding regional transit and to understand its relation to socio-dem...

  11. 78 FR 73793 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Evart and Ludington, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Evart and Ludington, Michigan AGENCY: Federal... filing procedures for comments, see 47 CFR 1.415 and 1.420. List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa Sawez, Assistant Chief, Audio Division...

  12. Spiritual and Religious Considerations of Michigan Counseling Association Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeland, Jennifer M.; Anderson, Mary L.; Bischof, Gary H.; Will, Bradley

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated Michigan Counseling Association members' perceptions of spirituality and religion in the therapeutic process. Specifically, this study sought to find out if spirituality and religion were important in the lives of counselors; how they define these concepts; if they have received training in working with these issues in…

  13. Social Studies and Grade Level Content Expectations in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeChano-Cook, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    In 2007 the Michigan Department of Education (MDOE) unveiled Social Studies Grade Level Content Expectations (GLCEs) that went into implementation during the 2008-2009 academic year. The purpose of this research was to examine social studies teaching in grades K-8 and what effects, if any, the GLCEs had on the curriculum in these grades.…

  14. Availability of Library Service to Osteopathic Physicians in Southeastern Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Joyce E.; Pings, Vern M.

    This report covers the availability of library service to osteopathic physicians of Detroit and the surrounding area. The appointments of 813 osteopathic physicians were identified from the staff lists of 16 hospitals in southeastern Michigan. A staff physician was identified as having library service if the hospital in which he has an appointment…

  15. Research in Second Language Studies at Michigan State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inceoglu, Solene; Spino, Le Anne

    2013-01-01

    Since its inception seven years ago, Michigan State University's vibrant Second Language Studies (SLS) Program has grown quickly under the direction of Dr. Susan Gass. Thus far, twelve students have graduated from the program and now hold academic positions in various universities in the United States and elsewhere. In 2011, the department…

  16. Timber resources of Michigan's Eastern Upper Peninsula, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Brad Smith

    1982-01-01

    The fourth inventory of the timber resource of Michigan's Eastern Upper Peninsula Survey Unit shows a 9% decline in commercial forest area and a 19% gain in growing-stock volume between 1966 and 1980. Presented are highlights and statistics on area, volume, growth, mortality, removals, utilization, and biomass.

  17. User evaluation of campgrounds on two Michigan National Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert C. Lucas

    1970-01-01

    Campground use on the Huron and Manistee National Forests in Michigan was studied in relation to resource characteristics, location, facilities provided, and visitor attitudes about the environment. Four factors in combination accounted for 69% of a variation in campground use per unit. Resource quality ratings made earlier as part of a nationwide Forest Service...

  18. Research: Clinical electives at the University of Michigan from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research: Clinical electives at the University of Michigan from the perspective of Ghanaian medical students: A qualitative study. ... This preliminary study suggests that international bilateral exchange programmes have lasting value for participants from low-income nations. Further research is needed to determine if the ...

  19. Grip and Pinch Strength Norms for Michigan Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel M. Phillips M.S., OTRL

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to create a norm reference of current grip and pinch strength norms for working-age Michigan adults. This normative study included a convenience sample of 179 volunteers who were employees at car plants in South East Michigan or hospital sites in West Michigan. Participants’ ages ranged from between 20 and 62 years of age with a mean age of 49.15 years. There were 78 females (44% and 101 males (56%. Subjects were classified by gender and in the age categories of ages 20 to 49 years and ages 50-62 years. Grip and pinch strength norms were collected following the American Society of Hand Therapy protocol. The norms from these working adults were calculated with descriptive statistics for males and females in two age classifications: ages 20 to 49 and ages 50 to 62 years. Standard Errors (SE are better than the 1985 norms for both males and females ages 20 to 49 years. SEs are higher than the ages 20 to 49 years’ norms for the ages 50 to 62 years age categories in both males and females. These norms offer a point of comparison for clinicians to use for clients in Michigan who are ages 20 to 62 years and who have a goal to improve their grip strength. Clients’ grip and pinch strength could be compared to their age level or gender norms using the comparison for one standard deviation above, below, or at the means.

  20. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Iron River Quadrangle, Michigan and Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frishman, D

    1982-09-01

    No area within the Iron River 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Michigan and Wisconsin, appears to be favorable for the existence of a minimum of 100 tons of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ at a grade of 0.01 percent or better.

  1. Reconnaissance Report for Hydropower Redevelopment at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Chairman Sugarman regarding the feasibility study on hydropower redevelopment at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan The Commission would appreciate being...United States Government in a timely fashion. Sincerely, David A. LaRoche Secretary United States Section cc: Wingate Lloyd, Department of State F-II-8

  2. Teachers' Perspectives on Citizenship Education in Islamic Schools in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saada, Najwan L.

    2013-01-01

    This multiple case study examines how 4 social studies teachers in 2 private Islamic schools in Michigan understand the concept of citizenship education and the dilemmas they face in teaching for unity and diversity and in helping their students negotiate their civics identities within the American sociopolitical context. Data were collected…

  3. Child restraint device use and misuse in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    In 1994, nearly 87,000 children under the age of five were injured or killed in traffic crashes across the nation, with 2,336 of these injuries and fatalities occurring in Michigan. The use of child restraint devices (CRDs, also called child safety s...

  4. Natural enemies of emerald ash borer in southeastern Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Houping Liu; Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice; Deborah L. Miller

    2004-01-01

    Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), the emerald ash borer (EAB), is native to China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Russian Far East, and Taiwan. In 2002, EAB was identified as the causative agent of extensive ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in southeastern Michigan and nearby southwestern Ontario. EAB was inadvertently...

  5. Michigan ATLAS Monitored Drift Chamber Production Database 012

    CERN Document Server

    Neal, Homer Alfred; Han Chun Hui

    2000-01-01

    We describe herein the design philosophy and the implementation details of the University of MichiganATLAS MDT Production Database. Details are given that would be useful to other institutes wishing toestablish a similar facility. We present also a comparison between relational and object oriented databaseswith regard to their utility for managing production information and analysis.

  6. 75 FR 28296 - Denso Manufacturing of Michigan Including On-Site Leased Workers From Adecco Employment Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... Employment and Training Administration Denso Manufacturing of Michigan Including On-Site Leased Workers From..., 2009, applicable to workers of Denso Manufacturing of Michigan, including leased workers from Adecco... Group were employed on-site at the Battle Creek, Michigan location of Denso Manufacturing of Michigan...

  7. Educational Assessment and District Enrollment in Michigan. The Seventh Report of the 1970-71 Michigan Educational Assessment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Arthur; And Others

    The seventh report of the Michigan Educational Assessment Program provides data comparing scores on the program variables of groups of State school districts classified on the basis of enrollment size. The 628 districts were divided into 14 groups, which were compared on: (1) human resources--such as pupil/teacher ratio and percent of teachers…

  8. Fish communities of fixed sites in the Western Lake Michigan Drainages, Wisconsin and Michigan, 1993-95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    Fish communities were surveyed at 20 wadable stream sites during 1993-95 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Water- Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program's assessment of the Western Lake Michigan Drainages. Part of the NAWQA design is to incorporate ecological data into an overall environmental assessment. Collection of fish-community data was part of this ecological assessment.

  9. Monoclonal antibody anti-AFB1: scale-up in vitro for biotools development Anticorpo monoclonal antiAFB1: produção in vitro visando desenvolvimento de bioferramentas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiko Nakagawa Itano

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 is a mycotoxin classified as group 1 (human carcinogen by International Agency for Research on Cancer - IARC, causing hazardous contamination in a wide variety of food and feed, where the monitoring depends on precision and accuracy of analytical method. The culture of AFB1 specific monoclonal antibody (mAb secreting hybridoma was performed for further development of immunochemical methods. The growth of hybridoma AF2 was carried out in RPMI medium + 15 % fetal bovine serum (FBS, as well as the same medium gradually amended with H-SFM medium (25, 50, 75 and 100 % H-SFM. The protein concentration in the culture supernatant ranged from 1.80 to 10.88 mg/mL. The culture amended with FBS-free synthetic H-SFM medium reached production of reagent with higher degree of purity and lower risk, in addition to lower protein content (2.29 mg/mL reached with 100 % H-SFM, which approaches the real content of pure mAb. The indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ic-ELISA and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE showed anti-AFB1 activity and IgG corresponding bands, respectively, indicating feasible application of mAb produced in 100, 75 and 50 % H-SFM for further use in the development of AFB1 detecting biotools. This mAb production can be an initial step that can supply the self-sufficient immune-reagent in the rapid diagnosis at national condition, which is essential in the food quality and safety.Aflatoxina B1 (AFB1 é uma micotoxina classificada pela International Agency for Research on Cancer - IARC no Grupo 1 (carcinógeno ao humano, responsável pelo perigo de contaminação em ampla variedade de alimento e ração, cujo monitoramento depende de metodologia analítica precisa e exata. O trabalho visou cultivo do hibridoma secretor de anticorpo monoclonal (AcM específico para AFB1 visando desenvolvimento de métodos imunoquímicos. Hibridoma AF2 foi cultivado em meio RPMI + 15 % de soro fetal bovino (SFB

  10. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT FOR FORESTRY BIOFUEL STATEWIDE COLLABORATION CENTER (MICHIGAN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaCourt, Donna M.; Miller, Raymond O.; Shonnard, David R.

    2012-04-24

    A team composed of scientists from Michigan State University (MSU) and Michigan Technological University (MTU) assembled to better understand, document, and improve systems for using forest-based biomass feedstocks in the production of energy products within Michigan. Work was funded by a grant (DE-EE-0000280) from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and was administered by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC). The goal of the project was to improve the forest feedstock supply infrastructure to sustainably provide woody biomass for biofuel production in Michigan over the long-term. Work was divided into four broad areas with associated objectives: • TASK A: Develop a Forest-Based Biomass Assessment for Michigan – Define forest-based feedstock inventory, availability, and the potential of forest-based feedstock to support state and federal renewable energy goals while maintaining current uses. • TASK B: Improve Harvesting, Processing and Transportation Systems – Identify and develop cost, energy, and carbon efficient harvesting, processing and transportation systems. • TASK C: Improve Forest Feedstock Productivity and Sustainability – Identify and develop sustainable feedstock production systems through the establishment and monitoring of a statewide network of field trials in forests and energy plantations. • TASK D: Engage Stakeholders – Increase understanding of forest biomass production systems for biofuels by a broad range of stakeholders. The goal and objectives of this research and development project were fulfilled with key model deliverables including: 1) The Forest Biomass Inventory System (Sub-task A1) of feedstock inventory and availability and, 2) The Supply Chain Model (Sub-task B2). Both models are vital to Michigan’s forest biomass industry and support forecasting delivered cost, as well as carbon and energy balance. All of these elements are important to facilitate investor, operational and policy decisions. All

  11. Pope AFB, Fayetteville, North Carolina Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (P) ITOTAL TOTAL ___ (F) * 1 .2 3.4 9.6 7-L 9.10 11.121* 1 3-1 I5 171,,IV.2021.2223.,42S.2627.209.2S 831 .S..SDyBb hWet b.Ib...WEATHIER SERVICE/MAC 723030 POPE AFB MC STINNM74-83 vm * PAGE I wnEDnn. T.... ____ ___ WET SUL& TEMPERATURE DEPRESION (F) TOTAL ___TOTAL *(F) 0 1.2

  12. Response of Intestinal Bacterial Flora to the Long-term Feeding of Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiai; Liu, Liangliang; Chen, Jing; Xiao, Aiping

    2017-10-12

    In order to investigate the influence of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) on intestinal bacterial flora, 24 Kunming mice (KM mice) were randomly placed into four groups, which were labeled as control, low-dose, medium-dose, and high-dose groups. They were fed intragastrically with 0.4 mL of 0 mg/L, 2.5 mg/L, 4 mg/L, or 10 mg/L of AFB1 solutions, twice a day for 2 months. The hypervariable region V3 + V4 on 16S rDNA of intestinal bacterial flora was sequenced by the use of a high-flux sequencing system on a Miseq Illumina platform; then, the obtained sequences were analyzed. The results showed that, when compared with the control group, both genera and phyla of intestinal bacteria in the three treatment groups decreased. About one third of the total genera and one half of the total phyla remained in the high-dose group. The dominant flora were Lactobacillus and Bacteroides in all groups. There were significant differences in the relative abundance of intestinal bacterial flora among groups. Most bacteria decreased as a whole from the control to the high-dose groups, but several beneficial and pathogenic bacterial species increased significantly with increasing dose of AFB1. Thus, the conclusion was that intragastric feeding with 2.5~10 mg/mL AFB1 for 2 months could decrease the majority of intestinal bacterial flora and induce the proliferation of some intestinal bacteria flora.

  13. The Scholarly Communication Process within the University Research Corridor (Michigan State University, the University of Michigan, and Wayne State University): A Case Study in Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utter, Timothy; Holley, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    The growth of open access publishing, the development of institutional repositories, and the availability of millions of digitized monographs and journals are rapidly changing scholarly communication. This case study looks at the current and possible uses of these tools by Michigan's three largest universities: Michigan State University, the…

  14. A Low-Cost Label-Free AFB1 Impedimetric Immunosensor Based on Functionalized CD-Trodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Vinicius Foguel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the investigation of a label-free immunosensor for the detection of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1. CD-trodes (electrodes obtained from recordable compact disks were used as low-cost and disposable transducers after modification with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM of lipoic acid. The anti-aflatoxin B1 antibody was immobilized via EDC/NHS activation, followed by blocking with bovine serum albumin and immunoassays with AFB1. The optimization of analytical parameters and the detection were carried out using electrochemical impedance measurements. Using chemometric tools, the best conditions for the immunosensor development were defined as: anti-AFB1 antibody at 1:2000 dilution and surface blocking with 0.5% bovine serum albumin, both incubated for 1 h, and antibody–antigen immunoreaction for 30 min. The impedimetric immunosensor showed a linear range from 5 × 10−9 to 1 × 10−7 mol·L−1 (1.56–31.2 ng·mL−1, limit of detection and limit of quantification, respectively, 3.6 × 10−10 and 1.1 × 10−9mol·L−1 (0.11 and 0.34 ng·mL−1. The proposed immunosensor was applied to analyze peanut samples.

  15. CHARA Michigan phase-tracker (CHAMP): design and fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, David H.; Monnier, John D.; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Muirhead, Philip; Pedretti, Ettore; Thureau, Nathalie

    2006-06-01

    We present the design for a near-infrared (JHK) fringe tracker to be used at the CHARA Array, a long baseline optical interferometer located at Mount Wilson Observatory. The CHARA Michigan Phase-tracker (CHAMP) is being fabricated and tested at the University of Michigan and will be transported to the CHARA Array for general use. CHAMP is separate from the science combiners and can therefore be optimized for fringe tracking. It will modulate around fringe center by 1-2λ at up to 500 Hz and calculate phase offsets in real-time using a modified 'ABCD' method . Six pair-wise Mach-Zehnder combiners will phase the entire Array. We give an overview of the optical layout and discuss our design strategy. Components such as the path-length modulators, low-OH fiber transport system, 1024x1024 HAWAII-1 detector, and control computer are discussed.

  16. Family members' reports of abuse in Michigan nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffore, Robert J; Barboza, Gia E; Mastin, Teresa; Oehmke, James; Schiamberg, Lawrence B; Post, Lori Ann

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this article is to describe abuse and neglect of adults age 65 and older in Michigan nursing homes, as reported by members of their families. Using list-assisted random-digit dialing, data on abuse and neglect for a 12-month period were collected from individuals who had a relative age 65 or older in a Michigan nursing home. Of the nursing home residents represented in this analysis, the majority were female, Caucasian, and widowed. Neglect and caretaking mistreatment were the most frequent types of abuse reported. Comparison of these data with data from the National Ombudsman Reporting System suggests that family members constitute a sensitive source of data on abuse in nursing homes.

  17. Colorectal cancer: Quality of surgical care in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanters, Arielle; Mullard, Andrew J; Arambula, Jennifer; Fasbinder, Laurie; Krapohl, Greta; Wong, Sandra L; Campbell, Darrell A; Hendren, Samantha

    2017-03-01

    Surgery remains the cornerstone therapy for colorectal cancer (CRC). This study assesses CRC quality measures for surgical cases in Michigan. In this retrospective cohort study, processes of care and outcomes for CRC resection cases were abstracted in 30 hospitals in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative (2014-2015). Measures were case-mix and reliability adjusted, using logistic regression models. For 871 cases (640 colon cancer, 231 rectal cancer), adjusted morbidity (27.4%) and mortality rates (1.5%) were low. Adjusted process measures showed gaps in quality of care. Mesorectal excision was documented in 59.4% of rectal cancer (RC) cases, 65% of RC cases had sphincter preserving surgery, 18.7% of cases had quality of care measures for CRC, suggesting opportunity for regional quality improvement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Rock dumping secures twin pipelines across Michigan straits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hairston, D.E. (Willbros Butler Engineers Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States)); Seng, J.E.; Jaskowiec, L.J. (Great Lakes Gas Transmission Co., Detroit, MI (United States))

    1994-04-25

    Great Lakes Gas Transmission Co., Detroit, in 1993 successfully stabilized its two 24-in. natural-gas pipelines crossing the Straits of Mackinac in northern Michigan. Placing approximately 152,000 tons of limestone rock around and under the lines supported and stabilized them and prevented further erosion of the lake bottom under them. The paper describes the discovery of the erosion problem in 1992, the surveys done to plan repair, concrete repair, and the rock placement program.

  19. Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Group - The University of Michigan Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Consortium; The Cancer Institute of New Jersey/University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ; Robert Wood Johnson Medical School...University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer...cilengitide in children with refractory brain tumors: pediatric brain tumor consortium study PBTC-012. J Clin Oncol 26:919–924 29. Moreno J, DeBono

  20. Digital land use mapping in Oakland County, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattinger, I. J.; Dillman, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    ERTS-1 data for a portion of Oakland County, Michigan was computer processed to produce a map of water, urban areas, wooded areas, and other vegetation. Comparison with RB-57 photography of the area shows a good correspondence of the two sources of data. Preliminary evaluation indicates that this type of four-category map derived from ERTS data will be useful for conceptual studies of large geographic areas in recreational planning.

  1. Spatial Distribution of Black Bear Incident Reports in Michigan

    OpenAIRE

    McFadden-Hiller, Jamie E.; Beyer, Dean E.; Belant, Jerrold L.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between humans and carnivores have existed for centuries due to competition for food and space. American black bears are increasing in abundance and populations are expanding geographically in many portions of its range, including areas that are also increasing in human density, often resulting in associated increases in human-bear conflict (hereafter, bear incidents). We used public reports of bear incidents in Michigan, USA, from 2003-2011 to assess the relative contributions o...

  2. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report. Volume 1: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force`s Installation Restoration Program (IRP). As a part of the IRP program, field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions willneed to be carried out at each site. The island`s drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites during the 1992 field investigation included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities.

  3. Vadose zone monitoring system installation report for McClellan AFB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawislanski, P.; Faybishenko, B.; James, A.; Freifeld, B.; Salve, R.

    1996-10-31

    Two vadose zone monitoring systems (VZMS) have been installed at Site S-7, in Investigation Cluster 34 (IC 34), in Operable Unit A (OU A) of McClellan AFB. The two boreholes, VZMS-A and VZMS-B were instrumented at depths ranging from approximately 6 ft to 113 ft. Instruments were installed in clusters using a custom-made stainless steel cage with a spring-loaded mechanism allowing instruments to be in contact with the well bore wall once in place. Each cluster contains a tensiometer, suction lysimeter, soil gas probe and thermistor for measuring hydraulic potential, liquid- and gas-phase pressure, temperature of the formation and for collecting samples for chemical analyses in both the liquid and gas phases. Neutron probe logging is performed in two separate, smaller borings, VZMS-NP-1 and VZMS-NP-2, to obtain soil moisture content data. Preliminary details of soil gas analyses, laboratory field testing of soil samples, particle size analyses and neutron probe data are presented.

  4. Uncertainty analysis of wind-wave predictions in Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouee, Navid; Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad; Hamidi, Sajad Ahmad

    2016-10-01

    With all the improvement in wave and hydrodynamics numerical models, the question rises in our mind that how the accuracy of the forcing functions and their input can affect the results. In this paper, a commonly used numerical third-generation wave model, SWAN is applied to predict waves in Lake Michigan. Wind data are analyzed to determine wind variation frequency over Lake Michigan. Wave predictions uncertainty due to wind local effects are compared during a period where wind has a fairly constant speed and direction over the northern and southern basins. The study shows that despite model calibration in Lake Michigan area, the model deficiency arises from ignoring wind effects in small scales. Wave prediction also emphasizes that small scale turbulence in meteorological forces can increase prediction errors by 38%. Wave frequency and coherence analysis show that both models can predict the wave variation time scale with the same accuracy. Insufficient number of meteorological stations can result in neglecting local wind effects and discrepancies in current predictions. The uncertainty of wave numerical models due to input uncertainties and model principals should be taken into account for design risk factors.

  5. Maturity schedules of lake trout in Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenjian, Charles P.; DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Stedman, Ralph M.

    1998-01-01

    We determined maturity schedules of male and female lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Michigan from nearshore populations and from an offshore population on Sheboygan Reef, which is located in midlake. Gill nets and bottom trawls were used to catch lake trout in fall 1994 and 1995 from two nearshore sites and Sheboygan Reef. Each lake trout was judged immature or mature, based on visual examination of gonads. Probit analysis, coupled with relative potency testing, revealed that age-at-maturity and length-at-maturity were similar at the two nearshore sites, but that lake trout from the nearshore sites matured at a significantly earlier age than lake trout from Sheboygan Reef. However, length at maturity for the nearshore populations was nearly identical to that for the offshore population, suggesting that rate of lake trout maturation in Lake Michigan was governed by growth rather than age. Half of the lake trout males reached maturity at a total length of 580 mm, whereas half of the females were mature at a length of 640 mm. Over half of nearshore males were mature by age 5, and over half the nearshore females matured by age 6. Due to a slower growth rate, maturity was delayed by 2 years on Sheboygan Reef compared with the nearshore populations. Documentation of this delay in maturation may be useful in deciding stocking allocations for lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Michigan.

  6. Environmental status of the Lake Michigan region. Volume 16. Amphibians and reptiles of the Lake Michigan drainage basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentecost, E.D.; Vogt, R.C.

    1976-07-01

    The focus of this report is on regional distribution of the herpetofauna of the Lake Michigan Drainage Basin. The introduction includes a brief discussion of plant communities and their associated herpetofauna, and the importance of hibernacula and migration routes. Some aspects of the status, distribution, habitat, and life history of the amphibians and reptiles of the Basin are described in an annotated checklist. Special attention is given to uncommon and endangered species. Species range is shown on distribution maps.

  7. Ground-water contamination and legal controls in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Morris

    1963-01-01

    The great importance of the fresh ground-water resources of Michigan is evident because 90 percent of the rural and about 70 percent of the total population of the State exclusive of the Detroit metropolitan area are supplied from underground sources. The water-supply and public-health problems that have been caused by some cases of ground-water contamination in the State illustrate the necessity of protecting this vital resource.Manmade and natural contaminants, including many types of chemical and organic matter, have entered many of the numerous aquifers of the State. Aquifers have been contaminated by waste-laden liquids percolating from the surface or from the zone of aeration and by direct injection to the aquifer itself. Industrial and domestic wastes, septic tanks, leaking sewers, flood waters or other poor quality surface waters, mine waters, solids stored or spread at the surface, and even airborne wastes all have been sources of ground-water contamination in Michigan. In addition, naturally occurring saline waters have been induced into other aquifers by overpumping or unrestricted flow from artesian wells, possibly by dewatering operations, and by the deepening of surface stream channels. Vertical migration of saline waters through open holes from formations underlying various important aquifers also has spoiled some of the fresh ground waters in the State. In spite of the contamination that has occurred, however, the total amount of ground water that has been spoiled is only a small part of the total resource. Neither is the contamination so widespread as that of the surface streams of Michigan.Overall legal authority to control most types of ground-water contamination in the State has been assigned by the Michigan Legislature to the Water Resources Commission, although the Department of Conservation and the Health Department also exercise important water-pollution control functions. The Michigan Supreme Court, in an important case upholding the power

  8. Lake Michigan Wind Assessment Analysis, 2012 and 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles R Standridge

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to address the wind energy potential over Lake Michigan to support a commercial wind farm.  Lake Michigan is an inland sea in the upper mid-western United States.  A laser wind sensor mounted on a floating platform was located at the mid-lake plateau in 2012 and about 10.5 kilometers from the eastern shoreline near Muskegon Michigan in 2013.  Range gate heights for the laser wind sensor were centered at 75, 90, 105, 125, 150, and 175 meters.  Wind speed and direction were measured once each second and aggregated into 10 minute averages.  The two sample t-test and the paired-t method were used to perform the analysis.  Average wind speed stopped increasing between 105 m and 150 m depending on location.  Thus, the collected data is inconsistent with the idea that average wind speed increases with height. This result implies that measuring wind speed at wind turbine hub height is essential as opposed to using the wind energy power law to project the wind speed from lower heights.  Average speed at the mid-lake plateau is no more that 10% greater than at the location near Muskegon.  Thus, it may be possible to harvest much of the available wind energy at a lower height and closer to the shoreline than previously thought.  At both locations, the predominate wind direction is from the south-southwest.  The ability of the laser wind sensor to measure wind speed appears to be affected by a lack of particulate matter at greater heights.   Keywords: wind assessment, Lake Michigan, LIDAR wind sensor, statistical analysis. Article History: Received June 15th 2016; Received in revised form January 16th 2017; Accepted February 2nd 2017 Available online How to Cite This Article: Standridge, C., Zeitler, D., Clark, A., Spoelma, T., Nordman, E., Boezaart, T.A., Edmonson, J.,  Howe, G., Meadows, G., Cotel, A. and Marsik, F. (2017 Lake Michigan Wind Assessment Analysis, 2012 and 2013. Int. Journal of Renewable Energy Development

  9. Transformación de la aflatoxina B1 de alimentos, en el cancerígeno humano, aducto AFB1-ADN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Carvajal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Las aflatoxinas (AF son metabolitos secundarios tóxicos principalmente de los hongos Aspergillus flavus y A. parasiticus, son potentes mutágenos y cancerígenos de alimentos y la exposición del hombre a ellas es continuo. Las AF se ligan al ADN, ARN y proteínas formando aductos AFB1-ADN que se acumulan por años y dañan desde los virus hasta el hombre. Es importante identificar y cuantificar estos aductos como biomarcadores de largo tiempo de riesgo de enfermedad, ya que originan mutaciones y cáncer, y están validados en animales y humanos. Las AF se activan en presencia del citocromo P450 como una molécula inestable 8,9 epóxido AFB1, que se liga al N7 de la guanina, y se transforma en los cancerígenos activos o aductos AFB1-Gua y, finalmente, en los aductos AFB1-FAPY y son una medida objetiva de la exposición humana a cancerígenos ambientales. Los aductos representan la exposición, absorción, distribución, metabolismo, reparación del ADN y cambio celular. Los temas tratados aquí son la formación de aductos AFB1-ADN, estudios in vitro e in vivo, exposición a una dieta con AFB1, efectos, desarrollo de cáncer y mutaciones en el gen supresor p53, rutas de exposición, vitaminas, tipos de aducto AFB1-ADN, metodología y su control.

  10. Estimated bankfull discharge for selected Michigan rivers and regional hydraulic geometry curves for estimating bankfull characteristics in southern Michigan rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachol, Cynthia M.; Boley-Morse, Kristine

    2009-01-01

    Regional hydraulic geometry curves are power-function equations that relate riffle dimensions and bankfull discharge to drainage-basin size. They are defined by data collected through surveys conducted at stable stream reaches and can be used to aid watershed managers, design engineers, and others involved in determination of the best course of action for an unstable stream. Hydraulic geometry curves provide a mechanism through which comparisons can be made between riffle dimensions collected at an unstable stream to those collected at stable streams within the same region. In 2005, a study was initiated to delineate regional hydraulic geometry curves for Michigan. After in-office review of 343 U.S. Geological Survey streamgaging stations and an extensive field reconnaissance effort, 44 stable reaches were selected for this study. Detailed surveys that included cross-sectional and longitudinal profiles and pebble counts were conducted at selected streamgages, which were distributed throughout Michigan. By use of survey data from riffle cross sections and water-surface slope, bankfull discharge was estimated and compared to flood-recurrence intervals using regional flood equations. This comparison shows that bankfull discharges in Michigan recur more frequently than every 2 years. Regional hydraulic geometry curves were developed rather than statewide curves owing to large differences in factors that control channel geometry across the State. However, after the data were subdivided according to ecoregions, it was determined that there were enough data to delineate regional hydraulic geometry curves only for the Southern Lower Michigan Ecoregion. For this ecoregion, geometry curve equations and their coefficients of determination are: Width = 8.19 x DA0.44; R2 = 0.69, Depth = 0.67 x DA0.27; R2 = 0.28, Area = 4.38 x DA0.74; R2 = 0.59, where DA is the drainage area and R2 is the coefficient of determination. By use of discharge estimates for the Southern Lower Michigan

  11. 78 FR 20454 - Safety Zones; Annual Events Requiring Safety Zones in the Captain of the Port Lake Michigan Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    .... (2) Michigan Aerospace Challenge Sport Rocket Launch; Muskegon, MI--(i) Location. All waters of...) Harborfest Music and Family Festival; Racine, WI--(i) Location. All waters of Lake Michigan and Racine Harbor...

  12. 76 FR 41065 - Safety Zones; Annual Events Requiring Safety Zones in the Captain of the Port Lake Michigan Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... Saturday of March; 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. (b) Michigan Aerospace Challenge Sport Rocket Launch; Muskegon, MI....m. (i) Harborfest Music and Family Festival; Racine, WI. (1) Location. All waters of Lake Michigan...

  13. Scoping Summary Report, Los Angeles AFB, California. Air Force Base Closure and Realignment Environmental Impact Analysis Process Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    24560 Nandina Avenue, Suite 7 1434 W. Fern Moreno Valley, CA 92388 Redlands, CA 92373 i* Tom Laurin Terence Moffitt 424 W. 5th Street 2632 S. Palm...Albuquerque, New Mexico 87109 3 48 FQR OFFICIAL USE ONLY 3 3 FOR OFFICIAI USF 0Ný-ý 3 KIRTLAND AFB Harry E. Kinney Edward L. Lujan Former Mayor of Albuquerque...RIVERSIDE. HAS HE ARRIVED YET? OKAY. i 25 NEXT, MR. TERENCE MOFFITT , REPRESENTING 26 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON. 3 GILLESPIE REPORTING SERVICES FOR-OFFICIAL

  14. Cannon AFB, Clovis, New Mexico. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO), Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-16

    FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 23onA tANNGN AFB NFW MEXIC (I/CLEIV!S 41;..46,52,72 FF STATION STATION MAUI TARAS i01TO ( ALL WFATHER ALL CLAN NOUNS (L*S.T...K ~~ -_______ _______ ___ 2.8 TOTAL NUMBER OF OBSERVATIONS 28 - USFETA 08 (CU)’IS’~’us ~h~os-OD1145 DOM M OM0CNT A~’ USA ~ft; e ~ ~ ~ _ _ _ __Z n...raivious IioIos of Imis toOm Am ohiomfI ii- 11 Z C DATA PROCESSING BRANCH 2 ETAC/ USA SURFACE WINDS AIR WEATOER SERVICE/MAC PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND

  15. Inventors Center of Michigan Technical Assessment Program. Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    The Technical Assessment Program at the Inventors Center of Michigan is designed to provide independent inventors with a reliable assessment of the technical merits of their proposed inventions. Using faculty from within Ferris State University`s College of Technology an assessment process examines the inventor`s assumptions, documentation, and prototypes, as well as, reviewing patent search results and technical literature to provide the inventor with a written report on the technical aspects of the proposed invention. The forms for applying for a technical assessment of an invention are included.

  16. Improving Nitrogen Efficiency: Lessons from Malawi and Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieglinde Snapp

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Two case studies are presented here of nitrogen (N dynamics in potato/maize systems. Contrasting systems were investigated from (1 the highland tropics of Dedza, Malawi in southern Africa and (2 the northern temperate Great Lakes region of Michigan. Formal surveys were conducted to document grower perceptions and N management strategies. Survey data were linked with N budgets conducted by reviewing on-farm data from representative farms in the targeted agroecosystems and simulation modeling to estimate N losses. Potential N-loss junctures were identified. Interventions that farmers might accept are discussed. The Malawi system uses targeted application of very small amounts of fertilizer (average 18 kg N ha-1 to growing plants. This low rate is on the steep part of plant response to N curve and should serve to enhance efficiency; plant growth, however, is generally stunted in Malawi due to degraded soils and weed competition. Very limited crop yields reduce N efficiency from a simulated 60 kg grain per kg N to an actual of ~20 kg grain per kg N (at 40 kg N ha-1 applied. Legume-intensified systems could improve growth potential and restore N use efficiency through amelioration of soil quality and transfer functions and from biological fixation N inputs. In the Michigan system, N efficiency is enhanced currently through multiple, split applications of N fertilizer tailored to plant growth rate and demand. Fertilizer N rates used by growers, however, averaged 32% higher than recommended rates and 40% higher than N removed in crop product. Application of 50 kg N ha-1 to cover crops in the fall may contribute to the apparent high potential for N leaching losses. Careful consideration of N credits from legumes and residual soil N would improve N efficiency. Overall, N budgets indicated 0 to 20 kg N ha-1 loss potential from the Malawi systems and tenfold higher loss potential from current practice in Michigan maize/potato rotations. Best management

  17. Total and Methyl Mercury in 1994-5 Lake Michigan Lake Trout and Forage Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total and methyl mercury were analyzed in Lake Michigan fish collected in 1994 and 1995 as part of the Lake Michigan Mass Balance project (LMMB). One predator fish species and five forage fish species were analyzed to determine the bioaccumulative nature of mercury. These data ...

  18. "Teachers Should Be Like Us!" Bridging Migrant Communities to Rural Michigan Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrez, J. Estrella

    2014-01-01

    A brief sketch, as provided by the 2010 Michigan Migrant Head Start Community Assessment, describes Michigan migrant students in the following terms: (1) approximately 17.5% are high school graduates; (2) 92.46% live in homes where Spanish is the preferred language; and (3) 93.3% live below the poverty line. These circumstances create a…

  19. 77 FR 51071 - Indiana Michigan Power Company, Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant, Unit 2, Environmental Assessment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ... COMMISSION Indiana Michigan Power Company, Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant, Unit 2, Environmental Assessment and... Indiana Michigan Power Company (the licensee), for operation of Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant, Unit 2 (CNP... exemption, these proposed actions do not result in changes to land use or water use, or result in changes to...

  20. Municipal Sludge Application in Forests of Northern Michigan: a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.G. Brockway; P.V. Nguyen

    1986-01-01

    A large-scale operational demonstration and research project was cooperatively established by the US. Environmental Protection Agency, Michigan Department of Natural Resources, and Michigan State University to evaluate the practice of forest land application as an option for sludge utilization. Project objectives included completing (1) a logistic and economic...

  1. Lake Michigan lake trout PCB model forecast post audit (oral presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scenario forecasts for total PCBs in Lake Michigan (LM) lake trout were conducted using the linked LM2-Toxics and LM Food Chain models, supported by a suite of additional LM models. Efforts were conducted under the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study and the post audit represents an...

  2. 76 FR 56428 - City of Holland, Michigan Board of Public Works; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission City of Holland, Michigan Board of Public Works; Notice of Filing Take... Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) \\2\\ the City of Holland, Michigan Board of Public Works (Holland... Compliance Committee denying Holland BPW's appeal of the decision of ReliabilityFirst Corporation to register...

  3. Dispersal of emerald ash borer: a case study at Tipton, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Therese Poland; David Cappaert

    2003-01-01

    We had a unique opportunity to assess the dispersal of one generation of emerald ash borer adults for spread pattern in a rural area near Tipton, Lenawee County, Michigan. A Michigan Department of Agriculture inspector discovered adult beetles ovipositing on small ash trees in 2002 in this area, well beyond the core infestation area. Discussions with the property owner...

  4. 78 FR 11638 - Michigan Consolidated Gas Company, DTE Gas Company, DTE Gas Company; Notice of Petition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Michigan Consolidated Gas Company, DTE Gas Company, DTE Gas Company; Notice... Docket Nos. PR13-29-000, and PR13-30-000 (not consolidated), Michigan Consolidated Gas Company (MichCon) and DTE Gas Company (DTE Gas) filed to institute a name change to both itself from MichCon to DTE Gas...

  5. 76 FR 52356 - Indiana Michigan Power Company, Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant, Unit 1; Environmental Assessment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ... COMMISSION Indiana Michigan Power Company, Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant, Unit 1; Environmental Assessment and... to Indiana Michigan Power Company (the licensee), for operation of Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant, Unit... Statement for Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant, Unit 1, or the Generic Environmental Impact Statement for...

  6. 76 FR 11454 - Kasugamycin; Receipt of Application for Emergency Exemption for Use on Apples in Michigan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... present that favor a fire blight disease epidemic, it is likely that Michigan's apple growers could suffer... AGENCY Kasugamycin; Receipt of Application for Emergency Exemption for Use on Apples in Michigan... kasugamycin (CAS No. 6980-18-3) to treat up to 10,000 acres of apples to control fire blight. The applicant...

  7. High Energy Theory Workshops and Visitors at the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics FY16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Aaron [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-08-04

    This award provided partial support for the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics to host two workshops "Beyond the Standard Model 2016" in October 2016, and the "5th MCTP Symposium: Foundations of String Cosmology" in April 2017 on the University of Michigan campus.

  8. Incidence of bark- and wood-boring insects in firewood: a survey at Michigan's Mackinac Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice; Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2010-01-01

    Firewood is a major pathway for the inadvertent movement of bark- and wood-infesting insects. After discovery of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in southeastern Michigan in 2002, quarantines were enacted including prohibition of transporting firewood across the Mackinac Bridge between Michigan's Lower and Upper peninsulas...

  9. 78 FR 59958 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The Michigan State University Museum, East Lansing, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: The Michigan State University Museum, East Lansing, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Michigan State University Museum (MSUM) has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian...

  10. 78 FR 65360 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Michigan has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian...

  11. Job-Embedded Professional Development Policy in Michigan: Can It Be Successful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Michael A.; Pogodzinski, Ben; Hill, William E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates Michigan's recently implemented job-embedded professional development policy using criteria of relevance, focus, goal orientation and social scope. The authors assert that while Michigan's policy does address all four criteria detailing effective professional development, there are limitations in the policy that may impact the…

  12. The forests of Michigan-from ice to axe to growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larry A. Leefers

    2010-01-01

    Michigan’s forests have evolved considerably during the past 4500 years. Post-glacial expansion of forests provided extensive, versatile resources for indigenous peoples. Eventually, these resources were exploited by immigrants to Michigan from Europe and the eastern US. Today, the forests are recovering and growing via natural regeneration and tree plantings, with...

  13. 78 FR 59966 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Michigan State Police, Jackson Post, Jackson, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... human remains was made by the Michigan State University Anthropology Department on behalf of the... and transferred them to the Michigan State University, Anthropology Department, for analysis. The... remains described in this notice are Native American based on forensic inspection of the remains by the...

  14. Michigan timber industry: An assessment of timber product output and use, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    David E. Haugen; Anthony K. Weatherspoon

    2010-01-01

    Reports forest-industry trends, production and receipts of industrial roundwood, and production of saw logs, veneer logs, excelsior/shavings, and other products for Michigan's timber industry in 2004. Also reports logging residue generated from timber harvest operations in Michigan as well as the generation and disposition of wood and bark residue generated by...

  15. Michigan and Ohio K-12 Educational Financing Systems: Equality and Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlin, Michael; Thompson, Paul N.

    2014-01-01

    We consider issues of equality and efficiency in two different school funding systems--a state-level system in Michigan and a foundation system in Ohio. Unlike Ohio, the Michigan system restricts districts from generating property or income tax revenue to fund operating expenditures. In both states, districts fund capital expenditures with local…

  16. 78 FR 34129 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Michigan, Museum of... determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has... County, MI. In 1924, these items were sold to the University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology, by Rev...

  17. 77 FR 55139 - Safety Zone; Chicago Red Bull Flugtag, Lake Michigan, Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Chicago Red Bull Flugtag, Lake Michigan... restrict vessels from a portion of Lake Michigan for the Red Bull Flugtag event. This temporary safety zone... September 8, 2012 Red Bull North America will sponsor their Red Bull Flugtag event on the waters of Lake...

  18. Seasonal homes and natural resources: patterns of use and impact in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Stynes; JiaJia Zheng; Susan I. Stewart

    1997-01-01

    Describes patterns of seasonal home ownerships and use in northern lower Michigan, including recreational use of nearby public and private lands and potential use of the seasonal home as a retirement home. Estimates economic impacts associated with seasonal home related spending in the 33 counties of northern lower Michigan.

  19. School Spending and Student Achievement in Michigan: What's the Relationship? A Mackinac Center Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGrow, Ben; Hoang, Ed

    2016-01-01

    What is the relationship between school spending and student achievement in Michigan? That is the question this paper attempts to answer. The bulk of the research on this question has typically shown that there is little correlation between spending and achievement, but it is possible that Michigan's public schools are an exception to this…

  20. 78 FR 65367 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... objects was made by the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology professional staff in consultation... associated funerary objects from the site were donated to the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology... lot of unidentified fibers, 1 lot of animal hide (with copper inclusions adhering to material), 1 lot...

  1. Installation-restoration program (IRP) Stage 7, remedial investigation/feasibility study comprehensive CERCLA work plan for McClellan AFB/EM, McClellan AFB, California. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    In 1979, officials at McClellan Air Force Base (AFB) in California began to suspect that past waste disposal practices may be contaminating the ground water in the area. At least four areas of potential ground water contamination needing further investigation. A comprehensive program was developed to maintain drinking water quality and to remediate the contamination. Through the operation and maintenance of aircraft, McClellan AFB has been engaged in operations that involve the use, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials including: industrial solvents, caustic cleaners, electroplating chemicals, heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), low-level radioactive wastes, and a variety of fuel oils and lubricants. Hazardous substances have percolated into aquifers. Ground water testing identified the presence of volatile organic compounds in on- and off-base wells. Surface water drainage includes several creeks within the area watersheds. These creeks receive contaminants and toxic hazards from on base drainage and then in turn merge with several tributaries, and exit to the west.

  2. Evaluation of Xpert MTB/RIF Versus AFB Smear and Culture to Identify Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Patients With Suspected Tuberculosis From Low and Higher Prevalence Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Firnhaber, Cynthia; Kendall, Michelle A; Wu, Xingye; Mazurek, Gerald H; Benator, Debra A; Arduino, Roberto; Fernandez, Michel; Guy, Elizabeth; Johnson, Pamela; Metchock, Beverly; Sattler, Fred; Telzak, Edward; Wang, Yun F; Weiner, Marc; Swindells, Susan; Sanne, Ian M; Havlir, Diane V; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Alland, David

    2016-05-01

    The Xpert MTB/RIF (Xpert) assay is a rapid nucleic acid amplification test widely used in settings of high tuberculosis prevalence to detect tuberculosis as well asrpoBmutations associated with rifampin resistance. Data are needed on the diagnostic performance of Xpert in lower-prevalence settings to inform appropriate use for both tuberculosis detection and the need for respiratory isolation. Xpert was compared to 2 sputum samples, each evaluated with acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear and mycobacterial culture using liquid and solid culture media, from participants with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis from the United States, Brazil, and South Africa. Of 992 participants enrolled with evaluable results, 22% had culture-confirmed tuberculosis. In 638 (64%) US participants, 1 Xpert result demonstrated sensitivity of 85.2% (96.7% in participants with AFB smear-positive [AFB(+)] sputum, 59.3% with AFB smear-negative [AFB(-)] sputum), specificity of 99.2%, negative predictive value (NPV) of 97.6%, and positive predictive value of 94.9%. Results did not differ between higher- and low-prevalence settings. A second Xpert assay increased overall sensitivity to 91.1% (100% if AFB(+), 71.4% if AFB(-)), with specificity of 98.9%. In US participants, a single negative Xpert result predicted the absence of AFB(+)/culture-positive tuberculosis with an NPV of 99.7%; NPV of 2 Xpert assays was 100%, suggesting a role in removing patients from airborne infection isolation. Xpert detected tuberculosis DNA and mutations associated with rifampin resistance in 5 of 7 participants with rifampin-resistant, culture-positive tuberculosis. Specificity for rifampin resistance was 99.5% and NPV was 98.9%. In the United States, Xpert testing performed comparably to 2 higher-tuberculosis-prevalence settings. These data support the use of Xpert in the initial evaluation of tuberculosis suspects and in algorithms assessing need for respiratory isolation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford

  3. Changes in stable isotope composition in Lake Michigan trout ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have frequently sought to use environmental archives of sediment, peat and glacial ice to try and assess historical trends in atmospheric mercury (Hg) deposition to aquatic ecosystems. While this information is valuable in the context of identifying temporal source trends, these types of assessments cannot account for likely changes in bioavailability of Hg sources that are tied to the formation of methylmercury (MeHg) and accumulation in fish tissues. For this study we propose the use of long-term fish archives and Hg stable isotope determination as an improved means to relate temporal changes in fish Hg levels to varying Hg sources in the Great Lakes. For this study we acquired 180 archived fish composites from Lake Michigan over a 40-year time period (1975 to 2014) from the Great Lakes Fish Monitoring and Surveillance Program, which were analyzed for their total Hg content and Hg isotope abundances. The results reveal that Hg sources to Lake Michigan trout (Salvelinus namaycush) have encountered considerable changes as well as a large shift in the food web trophic position as a result of the introduction of several invasive species, especially the recent invasion of dreissenid mussels. Total Hg concentrations span a large range (1,600 to 150 ng g-1) and exhibit large variations from 1975 to 1985. Ä199Hg signatures similarly exhibit large variation (3.2 to 6.9‰) until 1985, followed by less variation through the end of the data record in 2014.

  4. A combinatorial TIR1/AFB-Aux/IAA co-receptor system for differential sensing of auxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Luz Irina A. Calderón; Lee, Sarah; De Oliveira, Cesar; Ivetac, Anthony; Brandt, Wolfgang; Armitage, Lynne; Sheard, Laura B.; Tan, Xu; Parry, Geraint; Mao, Haibin; Zheng, Ning; Napier, Richard; Kepinski, Stefan; Estelle, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin regulates virtually every aspect of plant growth and development. Auxin acts by binding to the F-box protein TIR1 and promotes the degradation of the Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors. Here, we show that efficient auxin binding requires assembly of an auxin co-receptor complex consisting of TIR1 and an Aux/IAA protein. Heterologous experiments in yeast and quantitative IAA binding assays using purified proteins showed that different combinations of TIR1 and Aux/IAA proteins form co-receptor complexes with a wide range of auxin-binding affinities. Auxin affinity appears to be largely determined by the Aux/IAA. As there are 6 TIR1/AFBs and 29 Aux/IAA proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana, combinatorial interactions may result in many co-receptors with distinct auxin sensing properties. We also demonstrate that the AFB5-Aux/IAA co-receptor selectively binds the auxinic herbicide picloram. This co-receptor system broadens the effective concentration range of the hormone and may contribute to the complexity of auxin response. PMID:22466420

  5. Radiation inactivation of Paenibacillus larvae and sterilization of American Foul Brood (AFB) infected hives using Co-60 gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guzman, Zenaida M; Cervancia, Cleofas R; Dimasuay, Kris Genelyn B; Tolentino, Mitos M; Abrera, Gina B; Cobar, Ma Lucia C; Fajardo, Alejandro C; Sabino, Noel G; Manila-Fajardo, Analinda C; Feliciano, Chitho P

    2011-10-01

    The effectiveness of gamma radiation in inactivating the Philippine isolate of Paenibacillus larvae was investigated. Spores of P. larvae were irradiated at incremental doses (0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 kGy) of gamma radiation emitted by a ⁶⁰Co source. Surviving spores were counted and used to estimate the decimal reduction (D₁₀) value. A dose of 0.2 kGy was sufficient to inactivate 90% of the total recoverable spores from an initial count of 10⁵- 9 × 10³ spores per glass plate. The sterilizing effect of high doses of gamma radiation on the spores of P. larvae in infected hives was determined. In this study, a minimum dose (D(min)) of 15 kGy was tested. Beehives with sub-clinical infections of AFB were irradiated and examined for sterility. All the materials were found to be free of P. larvae indicating its susceptibility to γ-rays. After irradiation, there were no visible changes in the physical appearance of the hives' body, wax and frames. Thus, a dose of 15 kGy is effective enough for sterilization of AFB-infected materials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Stream habitat characteristics of fixed sites in the western Lake Michigan drainages, Wisconsin and Michigan, 1993-95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, F.A.; Giddings, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    Habitat characteristics of 11 fixed sites in the Western Lake Michigan Drainages were examined by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1993 through 1995 as part of the ecological assessment of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Evaluation of habitat consisted of more than 75 measurements at three spatial levels: drainage basin, stream segment between major tributaries (length from 1 to 14 kilometers), and stream reach (approximately 150 meters). The 11 fixed sites consisted of 8 "indicator" sites with drainage basins that differ in bedrock type, surficial deposits, and land use; and 3 "integrator" sites with drainage basins that contain a mixture of bedrock type, surficial deposits, and land use. Spatial and temporal variations in habitat characteristics are described and compared. Comparisons are limited to indicator sites except for comparisons amongbasin characteristics, which include all fixed sites. Two habitat classification schemes used in Wisconsin and Michigan were used to rank the quality of habitat in indicator streams. Reach-level data were collected at two additional reaches at three of the indicator sites to assess the representativeness of the reach for overall stream conditions.

  7. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of late Holocene raised strandplain sequences adjacent to Lakes Michigan and Superior, Upper Peninsula, Michigan, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyilan, Erin P.; Forman, Steven L.; Johnston, John W.; Wilcox, Douglas A.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of optically stimulated luminescence to date well-preserved strandline sequences at Manistique/Thompson bay (Lake Michigan), and Tahquamenon and Grand Traverse Bays (Lake Superior) that span the past ∼4500 yr. The single aliquot regeneration (SAR) method is applied to produce absolute ages for littoral and eolian sediments. SAR ages are compared against AMS and conventional 14C ages on swale organics. Modern littoral and eolian sediments yield SAR ages 14C ages on swale organics. Significant variability in 14C ages >2000 cal yr B.P. complicates comparison to SAR ages at all sites. However, a SAR age of 4280 ± 390 yr (UIC913) on ridge77 at Tahquamenon Bay is consistent with regional regression from the high lake level of the Nipissing II phase ca. 4500 cal yr B.P. SAR ages indicate a decrease in ridge formation rate after ∼1500 yr ago, likely reflecting separation of Lake Superior from lakes Huron and Michigan. This study shows that SAR is a credible alternative to 14C methods for dating littoral and eolian landforms in Great Lakes and other coastal strandplains where 14C methods prove problematic.

  8. Evaluating Michigan's community hospital access: spatial methods for decision support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varnakovida Pariwate

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community hospital placement is dictated by a diverse set of geographical factors and historical contingency. In the summer of 2004, a multi-organizational committee headed by the State of Michigan's Department of Community Health approached the authors of this paper with questions about how spatial analyses might be employed to develop a revised community hospital approval procedure. Three objectives were set. First, the committee needed visualizations of both the spatial pattern of Michigan's population and its 139 community hospitals. Second, the committee required a clear, defensible assessment methodology to quantify access to existing hospitals statewide, taking into account factors such as distance to nearest hospital and road network density to estimate travel time. Third, the committee wanted to contrast the spatial distribution of existing community hospitals with a theoretical configuration that best met statewide demand. This paper presents our efforts to first describe the distribution of Michigan's current community hospital pattern and its people, and second, develop two models, access-based and demand-based, to identify areas with inadequate access to existing hospitals. Results Using the product from the access-based model and contiguity and population criteria, two areas were identified as being "under-served." The lower area, located north/northeast of Detroit, contained the greater total land area and population of the two areas. The upper area was centered north of Grand Rapids. A demand-based model was applied to evaluate the existing facility arrangement by allocating daily bed demand in each ZIP code to the closest facility. We found 1,887 beds per day were demanded by ZIP centroids more than 16.1 kilometers from the nearest existing hospital. This represented 12.7% of the average statewide daily bed demand. If a 32.3 kilometer radius was employed, unmet demand dropped to 160 beds per day (1

  9. Environmental Assessment Addressing FTFA07-1174, Repair Approach Lighting System at the North End of Runway 01/19 at Eglin AFB, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    provides maintenance of regional biodiversity (Eglin AFB 2010). Typical species occurring within the Sandhills Matrix are shown in Table 3-2. Some...Goals (MCLGs), and Best Available Technology (BAT) treatment techniques for organic, inorganic, radioactive, and microbial contaminants; and...provide maintenance of regional biodiversity . Additionally, the sandhills, due to their wide coverage on Eglin, are the matrix across which fire

  10. IRP Stage 2 Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study, Appendices A through K and M through R, for BOMARC Missile Site, McGuire AFB, New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-26

    This plan was submitted on February 23, 1989 to Joseph Nycz -at the U. S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration in Marlton, New Jersey and to the...for theSBOMARC Missile Site, McGuire AFB, New Jersey. This plan was submitted on February 23, 1989 to Joseph Nycz at the U. S. Occupational Safety and

  11. Pure neuritic leprosy: Resolving diagnostic issues in acid fast bacilli (AFB)-negative nerve biopsies: A single centre experience from South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Monalisa; Uppin, Megha S; Challa, Sundaram; Meena, A K; Kaul, Subhash

    2015-01-01

    Demonstration of lepra bacilli is essential for definite or unequivocal diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy (PNL) on nerve biopsy. However, nerves always do not show bacilli owing to the changes of previous therapy or due to low bacillary load in tuberculoid forms. In absence of granuloma or lepra bacilli, other morphologic changes in endoneurium and perineurium can be of help in making a probable diagnosis of PNL and treating the patient with multidrug therapy. Forty-six biopsies of PNL were retrospectively reviewed and histologic findings were compared with 25 biopsies of non leprosy neuropathies (NLN) including vasculitic neuropathy and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). The distribution of endoneurial infiltrate and fibrosis, perineurial thickening, and myelin abnormalities were compared between PNL and NLN biopsies and analyzed by Chi-square test. Out of 46 PNL casses, 24 (52.17 %) biopsies were negative for acid fast bacilli (AFB). In these cases, the features which favor a diagnosis of AFB-negative PNL were endoneurial infiltrate (51.1%), endoneurial fibrosis (54.2%), perineurial thickening (70.8%), and reduced number of myelinated nerve fibers (75%). Nerve biopsy is an efficient tool to diagnose PNL and differentiate it from other causes of NLN. In absence of AFB, the diagnosis of PNL is challenging. In this article, we have satisfactorily evaluated the various hisopthological features and found that endoneurial inflammation, dense fibrosis, and reduction in the number of myelinated nerve fibers are strong supportive indicators of PNL regardless of AFB positivity.

  12. U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

    1998-02-01

    The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Michigan.

  13. The validity of the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, H; Nielsen, S D; Gluud, C

    1994-01-01

    This review examines the validity of the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST) as a screening instrument for alcohol problems. Studies that compare the MAST-questionnaire with other defined diagnostic criteria of alcohol problems were retrieved through MEDLINE and a cross-bibliographic check....... A total of 20 validity studies were included. The studies varied considerably regarding the prevalence of alcohol problems, the diagnostic criteria, and the examined patient categories. The MAST compared with other diagnostic criteria of alcohol problems gave validity measures with the following span...... and the specificities show substantial variations. The variables that seem to have the largest influence on the PVpos seem to be the prevalence of alcohol problems, the diagnostic method against which the MAST-questionnaire is validated, and the populations on which the MAST is applied. The MAST should in the future...

  14. Neglect of older adults in Michigan nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenmei; Schiamberg, Lawrence B; Oehmke, James; Barboza, Gia E; Griffore, Robert J; Post, Lori A; Weatherill, Robin P; Mastin, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Although research on domestic elder abuse and neglect has grown over the past 20 years, there is limited research on elder neglect in nursing homes. The purpose of this study is to estimate the incidence of elder neglect in nursing homes and identify the individual and contextual risks associated with elder neglect. Data came from a 2005 random digit dial survey of individuals in Michigan who had relatives in long term care. Our analytic sample included 414 family members who had a relative aged 65 or older in nursing homes. Results showed that about 21% of nursing home residents were neglected on one or more occasion in the last 12 months. Two nursing home residents' characteristics reported by family members appear to significantly increase the odds of neglect: functional impairments in activities of daily living and previous resident-to-resident victimization. Behavior problems also are associated with higher odds of neglect (p = 0.078). Policy implications of these results are discussed.

  15. How Choice Changes the Education System: A Michigan Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, David; Sykes, Gary

    1999-11-01

    In countries around the world policy makers propose that parents should exercise more control over the choice of schools that their children attend. This paper considers the ways in which the introduction of new opportunities for school choice changes the education system. It argues that choice affects the education system as a whole by introducing new actors into the system, by changing the terms of relationships among existing actors, and by creating new pressures within the system that require new responses. The nature, magnitude, and consequences of these effects cannot be predicted in advance, as they depend on a number of factors including the social and economic context. The empirical basis for this paper derives from a case study of the implementation of choice policies in the state of Michigan in the US, but the conceptual issues raised have important implications for the study of school choice wherever such policies are adopted.

  16. Rebuilding astronomy at Michigan: from Hussey to Goldberg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Rudi Paul

    2003-12-01

    The University of Michigan astronomy programme, in research and teaching, was in terrible shape when W.J. Hussey returned to revive it in 1905. With support from the administration and an old friend, Hussey built a new, astrophysical observatory and planned a southern station to pursue his double star campaign. His successor, Ralph Hamilton Curtiss, developed a school of astronomical spectroscopy and saw the southern station, the Lamont-Hussey Observatory, in full operation. After Ralph Curtiss' early death, Heber Curtis continued, nurtured the McMath-Hulbert Observatory and wedded it to the Unoversity, and obtained the pyrex disk for a 2.49-m (98-inch) reflector. The Great Depression deprived the Ann Arbor programme of its momentum, but after World War II a new Director, Leo Goldberg, made the Department a formidable presence in American astronomical research and training.

  17. Spatial Distribution of Black Bear Incident Reports in Michigan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie E McFadden-Hiller

    Full Text Available Interactions between humans and carnivores have existed for centuries due to competition for food and space. American black bears are increasing in abundance and populations are expanding geographically in many portions of its range, including areas that are also increasing in human density, often resulting in associated increases in human-bear conflict (hereafter, bear incidents. We used public reports of bear incidents in Michigan, USA, from 2003-2011 to assess the relative contributions of ecological and anthropogenic variables in explaining the spatial distribution of bear incidents and estimated the potential risk of bear incidents. We used weighted Normalized Difference Vegetation Index mean as an index of primary productivity, region (i.e., Upper Peninsula or Lower Peninsula, primary and secondary road densities, and percentage land cover type within 6.5-km2 circular buffers around bear incidents and random points. We developed 22 a priori models and used generalized linear models and Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC to rank models. The global model was the best compromise between model complexity and model fit (w = 0.99, with a ΔAIC 8.99 units from the second best performing model. We found that as deciduous forest cover increased, the probability of bear incident occurrence increased. Among the measured anthropogenic variables, cultivated crops and primary roads were the most important in our AIC-best model and were both positively related to the probability of bear incident occurrence. The spatial distribution of relative bear incident risk varied markedly throughout Michigan. Forest cover fragmented with agriculture and other anthropogenic activities presents an environment that likely facilitates bear incidents. Our map can help wildlife managers identify areas of bear incident occurrence, which in turn can be used to help develop strategies aimed at reducing incidents. Researchers and wildlife managers can use similar mapping

  18. Spatial Distribution of Black Bear Incident Reports in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden-Hiller, Jamie E; Beyer, Dean E; Belant, Jerrold L

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between humans and carnivores have existed for centuries due to competition for food and space. American black bears are increasing in abundance and populations are expanding geographically in many portions of its range, including areas that are also increasing in human density, often resulting in associated increases in human-bear conflict (hereafter, bear incidents). We used public reports of bear incidents in Michigan, USA, from 2003-2011 to assess the relative contributions of ecological and anthropogenic variables in explaining the spatial distribution of bear incidents and estimated the potential risk of bear incidents. We used weighted Normalized Difference Vegetation Index mean as an index of primary productivity, region (i.e., Upper Peninsula or Lower Peninsula), primary and secondary road densities, and percentage land cover type within 6.5-km2 circular buffers around bear incidents and random points. We developed 22 a priori models and used generalized linear models and Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) to rank models. The global model was the best compromise between model complexity and model fit (w = 0.99), with a ΔAIC 8.99 units from the second best performing model. We found that as deciduous forest cover increased, the probability of bear incident occurrence increased. Among the measured anthropogenic variables, cultivated crops and primary roads were the most important in our AIC-best model and were both positively related to the probability of bear incident occurrence. The spatial distribution of relative bear incident risk varied markedly throughout Michigan. Forest cover fragmented with agriculture and other anthropogenic activities presents an environment that likely facilitates bear incidents. Our map can help wildlife managers identify areas of bear incident occurrence, which in turn can be used to help develop strategies aimed at reducing incidents. Researchers and wildlife managers can use similar mapping techniques to

  19. McConnell AFB, Witchita, Kansas. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-14

    3 .1 _.6 S_.," EMIL 2.4* 1 2-,2 1.5 1 .2 1 0.2 5,1 1 - 1.8 .3-4 1.3 &.6 4,.7 in 2.A 2,Q _1.8 .1 .1 b.9 4.9 SE 1 . - 2.7 7Z ,i . SSE qR 4-3 kl. .9 .427...99.9 OoO TOTAL NUMBER OF OBSERVATIONS 93 USAF TAC . 0-16-5 (OL A) ...... lS ..... .. P A. .. • m Im mmmmm m Jm ~llm i l~jlllm Emil (- .. O GL’EAL...SERVICE/MAC 3923 MCCONNELL AFB KS 69-70,73-80 NOld STATION STATION NAMI 1IOD MON N CUMULATIVE PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE (FROM HOURLY OSSERVATIONS

  20. Radiation inactivation of Paenibacillus larvae and sterilization of American Foul Brood (AFB) infected hives using Co-60 gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Guzman, Zenaida M. [Microbiological Research and Service Laboratory, Atomic Research Division, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines); Cervancia, Cleofas R. [Institute of Biological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, University of the Philippines, Los Banos, Laguna (Philippines); Dimasuay, Kris Genelyn B.; Tolentino, Mitos M.; Abrera, Gina B.; Cobar, Ma. Lucia C. [Microbiological Research and Service Laboratory, Atomic Research Division, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines); Fajardo, Alejandro C.; Sabino, Noel G.; Manila-Fajardo, Analinda C. [Institute of Biological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, University of the Philippines, Los Banos, Laguna (Philippines); Feliciano, Chitho P., E-mail: cpfeliciano@pnri.dost.gov.ph [Microbiological Research and Service Laboratory, Atomic Research Division, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines); Institute of Biology, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines)

    2011-10-15

    The effectiveness of gamma radiation in inactivating the Philippine isolate of Paenibacillus larvae was investigated. Spores of P. larvae were irradiated at incremental doses (0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 kGy) of gamma radiation emitted by a {sup 60}Co source. Surviving spores were counted and used to estimate the decimal reduction (D{sub 10}) value. A dose of 0.2 kGy was sufficient to inactivate 90% of the total recoverable spores from an initial count of 10{sup 5}-9x10{sup 3} spores per glass plate. The sterilizing effect of high doses of gamma radiation on the spores of P. larvae in infected hives was determined. In this study, a minimum dose (D{sub min}) of 15 kGy was tested. Beehives with sub-clinical infections of AFB were irradiated and examined for sterility. All the materials were found to be free of P. larvae indicating its susceptibility to {gamma}-rays. After irradiation, there were no visible changes in the physical appearance of the hives' body, wax and frames. Thus, a dose of 15 kGy is effective enough for sterilization of AFB-infected materials. - Highlights: > We characterized Paenibacillus larvae and determined its radiation sensitivity. > We investigated the effectiveness of gamma rays in inactivating P. larvae. > Gamma radiation inactivates P. larvae. > 15 kGy is effective for the sterilization of P. larvae-infected hives. > Irradiation produces no visible changes in the hives' body, waxes and frames.

  1. NACP Peatland Land Cover Map of Upper Peninsula, Michigan, 2007-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset provides a land cover map focused on peatland ecosystems in the upper peninsula of Michigan. The map was produced at 12.5-m resolution using a...

  2. Effect of thermal discharges on the mass energy balance of Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asbury, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    Effects of electric utility generating stations and steel mills on physical quality of Lake Michigan are considered. Study is based on extension of heat exchange model developed by Edinger and Geyer for small lakes and cooling ponds.

  3. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Michigan based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Michigan census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  4. Improving mobility and transportation options for Michigan's rural seniors : research spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Mobility challenges faced by older adults in : rural Michigan include long travel distances to obtain basic services or medical : care, and the limited availability of public, : private or volunteer transportation providers. Because of these challeng...

  5. 75 FR 48939 - National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory of Michigan State University; Notice of Decision on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory of Michigan State University...., NW., Washington, DC. Docket Number: 10-043. Applicant: National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory...

  6. Preventing industrial pollution at its source: the final report of the Michigan source reduction initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1999-09-01

    This report describes a collaborative effort between NRDC, Dow Chemical, and Michigan Environmental Groups. The effort resulted in the identification and implementation of 17 pollution prevention projects that reduced substantial quantities of wastes and emissions and saved Dow considerable money.

  7. Pavement subgrade MR design values for Michigan's seasonal changes : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-22

    The resilient modulus (MR) of roadbed soil plays an integral role in the design of pavement systems. Currently, the : various regions of the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) use different procedures to determine the : MR values. Most of t...

  8. Pavement subgrade MR design values for Michigan's seasonal changes : table E5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    The resilient modulus (MR) of roadbed soil plays an integral role in the design of pavement systems. Currently, the various regions of the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) use different procedures to determine the MR values. Most of these...

  9. Pavement subgrade MR design values for Michigan's seasonal changes : table E4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-22

    The resilient modulus (MR) of roadbed soil plays an integral role in the design of pavement systems. Currently, the various regions of the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) use different procedures to determine the MR values. Most of these...

  10. Forest tree improvement at Michigan State University: Past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Bloese

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Forestry at Michigan State University has engaged in forest tree improvement for more than 50 years. This paper presents a brief historical perspective on past research, the status of current projects, and outlines plans for the future.

  11. Total and methyl mercury, moisture, and porosity in Lake Michigan surficial sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Total and methyl mercury, moisture content (%), and porosity were measured in Lake Michigan sediment by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/Office of Research...

  12. Effects of contaminants of reproduction of bald eagles on Green Bay, Lake Michigan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nesting on Green Bay, Lake Michigan, have extremely low reproductive rates, in comparison to eagles nesting in inland...

  13. Michigan Islands National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Michigan Islands Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  14. Cisco (Coregonus artedii) mortalities in a southern Michigan lake, July 1968

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Peter J.; Brooke, Larry T.

    1969-01-01

    Cisco die-offs are common in the summer in certain lakes of northern Indiana and southern Michigan, along the southern boundary of the national distribution of coregonine fishes. Although numerous cisco die-offs have been reported, few, if any, have been accompanied by environmental information at the time of the die-off. On 31 July and 1 August 1968, we investigated a cisco die-off on Halfmoon Lake, on the border of Washtenaw and Livingston Counties, Michigan.

  15. Advanced Characterization of Fractured Reservoirs in Carbonate Rocks: The Michigan Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, James R.; Harrison, William B.

    2002-12-02

    The purpose of the study was to collect and analyze existing data on the Michigan Basin for fracture patterns on scales ranging form thin section to basin. The data acquisition phase has been successfully concluded with the compilation of several large digital databases containing nearly all the existing information on formation tops, lithology and hydrocarbon production over the entire Michigan Basin. These databases represent the cumulative result of over 80 years of drilling and exploration.

  16. Establishing MICHCARB, a geological carbon sequestration research and education center for Michigan, implemented through the Michigan Geological Repository for Research and Education, part of the Department of Geosciences at Western Michigan University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, David A. [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo MI (United States); Harrison, William B. [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo MI (United States)

    2014-01-28

    The Michigan Geological Repository for Research and Education (MGRRE), part of the Department of Geosciences at Western Michigan University (WMU) at Kalamazoo, Michigan, established MichCarb—a geological carbon sequestration resource center by: • Archiving and maintaining a current reference collection of carbon sequestration published literature • Developing statewide and site-specific digital research databases for Michigan’s deep geological formations relevant to CO2 storage, containment and potential for enhanced oil recovery • Producing maps and tables of physical properties as components of these databases • Compiling all information into a digital atlas • Conducting geologic and fluid flow modeling to address specific predictive uses of CO2 storage and enhanced oil recovery, including compiling data for geological and fluid flow models, formulating models, integrating data, and running the models; applying models to specific predictive uses of CO2 storage and enhanced oil recovery • Conducting technical research on CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery through basic and applied research of characterizing Michigan oil and gas and saline reservoirs for CO2 storage potential volume, injectivity and containment. Based on our research, we have concluded that the Michigan Basin has excellent saline aquifer (residual entrapment) and CO2/Enhanced oil recovery related (CO2/EOR; buoyant entrapment) geological carbon sequestration potential with substantial, associated incremental oil production potential. These storage reservoirs possess at least satisfactory injectivity and reliable, permanent containment resulting from associated, thick, low permeability confining layers. Saline aquifer storage resource estimates in the two major residual entrapment, reservoir target zones (Lower Paleozoic Sandstone and Middle Paleozoic carbonate and sandstone reservoirs) are in excess of 70-80 Gmt (at an overall 10% storage efficiency factor; an approximately

  17. Effects of repealing the motorcycle helmet law in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hothem, Zachary; Simon, Robert; Barnes, Wesley; Mohammad, Azmath; Sevak, Shruti; Ziegler, Kathryn; Iacco, Anthony; Janczyk, Randy

    2017-09-01

    In 2012, Michigan repealed its universal helmet law. Our study assessed the clinical impact of this repeal. Our trauma database was queried retrospectively for 2 motorcycle riding seasons before and 3 seasons after repeal. On-scene death data was obtained from the Medical Examiner. Helmet use in hospitalized patients decreased after the helmet law repeal. Non-helmeted patients had a significant increased rate of head injury. Non-helmeted patients were more likely to die during hospitalization. While, helmet use and drugs/alcohol status significantly affected the risk for head injury, only drug/alcohol had a significant effect on overall mortality. Following helmet law repeal, helmet use has decreased. Helmet status and drug/alcohol use was found to significantly increase risk of head injury. Although overall mortality was only affected by drug/alcohol use, non-helmeted patients did have a higher inpatient mortality. These findings deserve furthermore study and may provide a basis for reinstating the universal helmet law. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Body burdens of heavy metals in Lake Michigan wetland turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dayna L; Cooper, Matthew J; Kosiara, Jessica M; Lamberti, Gary A

    2016-02-01

    Tissue heavy metal concentrations in painted (Chrysemys picta) and snapping (Chelydra serpentina) turtles from Lake Michigan coastal wetlands were analyzed to determine (1) whether turtles accumulated heavy metals, (2) if tissue metal concentrations were related to environmental metal concentrations, and (3) the potential for non-lethal sampling techniques to be used for monitoring heavy metal body burdens in freshwater turtles. Muscle, liver, shell, and claw samples were collected from painted and snapping turtles and analyzed for cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, magnesium, manganese, and zinc. Turtle tissues had measurable quantities of all eight metals analyzed. Statistically significant correlations between tissue metal concentrations and sediment metal concentrations were found for a subset of metals. Metals were generally found in higher concentrations in the larger snapping turtles than in painted turtles. In addition, non-lethal samples of shell and claw were found to be possible alternatives to lethal liver and muscle samples for some metals. Human consumption of snapping turtles presents potential health risks if turtles are harvested from contaminated areas. Overall, our results suggest that turtles could be a valuable component of contaminant monitoring programs for wetland ecosystems.

  19. Observations of cocooned Hydrobaenus (Diptera: Chironomidae) larvae in Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Taaja R.; Hudson, Patrick L.; Riley, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Larvae of the family Chironomidae have developed a variety of ways to tolerate environmental stress, including the formation of cocoons, which allows larvae to avoid unfavorable temperature conditions, drought, or competition with other chironomids. Summer cocoon formation by younger instars of the genus Hydrobaenus Fries allows persistence through increased temperatures and/or intermittent dry periods in arid regions or temporary habitats, but this behavior was not observed in the Great Lakes until the current study. Cocoon-aestivating Hydrobaenus sp. larvae were found in benthic grab samples collected in 2010–2013 near Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore in northern Lake Michigan with densities up to 7329/m2. The aestivating species was identified as Hydrobaenus johannseni (Sublette, 1967), and the associated chironomid community was typical for an oligotrophic nearshore system. Hydrobaenus cocoon formation in the Great Lakes was likely previously unnoticed due to the discrepancies between the genus' life history and typical benthos sampling procedures which has consequences for describing chironomid communities where Hydrobaenus is present.

  20. Surveillance of coyotes to detect bovine tuberculosis, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VerCauteren, Kurt C; Atwood, Todd C; DeLiberto, Thomas J; Smith, Holly J; Stevenson, Justin S; Thomsen, Bruce V; Gidlewski, Thomas; Payeur, Janet

    2008-12-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (TB) is endemic in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in the northeastern portion of Michigan's Lower Peninsula. Bovine TB in deer and cattle has created immense financial consequences for the livestock industry and hunting public. Surveillance identified coyotes (Canis latrans) as potential bio-accumulators of Mycobacterium bovis, a finding that generated interest in their potential to serve as sentinels for monitoring disease risk. We sampled 175 coyotes in the bovine TB-endemic area. Fifty-eight tested positive, and infection prevalence by county ranged from 19% to 52% (statistical mean 33%, SE 0.07). By contrast, prevalence in deer (n = 3,817) was lower (i.e., 1.49%; Mann-Whitney U4,4 = 14, pcoyotes rather than deer, we sampled 97% fewer individuals and increased the likelihood of detecting M. bovis by 40%. As a result of reduced sampling intensity, sentinel coyote surveys have the potential to be practical indicators of M. bovis presence in wildlife and livestock.

  1. Eastern gas shales subprogram. [Appalachia, Illinois and Michigan Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-02-01

    The goal of the Eastern Gas Shales Subprogram (EGSS) is to develop scientific and engineering knowledge and to enable the recovery of natural gas from shale formations that underlie the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins. To pursue this goal, the geology and chemistry of gas-bearing Devonian shales was characterized early during the subprogram. As information was gathered and knowledge of the shales increased, studies of well completion and stimulation methods were conducted in the laboratory as well as in the field. Recently, the synthesis of geologic and geochemical data marked the conclusion of the resource characterization effort. Upon the completion of the resource characterization, project emphasis was directed toward understanding the fractured shale reservoir and its gas storage and production characteristics. The Meigs County, Ohio, offset well test established the directional aspects of shale gas production, providing new insight into field development. In addition, a methodology for characterizing gas flow behavior allows for the development and application of novel extraction methods to increase the otherwise poor recovery efficiency of current extraction methods.

  2. Surveillance for Silicosis - Michigan and New Jersey, 2003-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleiff, Patricia L; Mazurek, Jacek M; Reilly, Mary Jo; Rosenman, Kenneth D; Yoder, Martha B; Lumia, Margaret E; Worthington, Karen

    2016-10-14

    CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), state health departments, and other state entities maintain a state-based surveillance program of confirmed silicosis cases. Data on confirmed cases are collected and compiled by state entities and submitted to CDC. This report summarizes information for cases of silicosis that were reported to CDC for 2003-2011 by Michigan and New Jersey, the only states that continue to provide data voluntarily to NIOSH. The data for this report were final as of January 8, 2015. Data are presented in tabular form on the number and distribution of cases of silicosis by year (Table 1), duration of employment in occupations with potential exposure to dust containing respirable crystalline silica (Table 2), industry (Table 3), and occupation (Table 4). The number of cases by year is presented graphically (Figure). This report is a part of the Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks - United States, which encompasses various surveillance years but is being published in 2016 (1). The Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks appears in the same volume of MMWR as the annual Summary of Notifiable Infectious Diseases (2).

  3. The Michigan State University Twin Registry (MSUTR): an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, S Alexandra; Klump, Kelly L

    2013-02-01

    The primary aim of the Michigan State University Twin Registry (MSUTR) is on understanding developmental changes in genetic, environmental, and neurobiological influences on internalizing and externalizing disorders, with antisocial behavior and disordered eating representing our particular areas of interest. The MSUTR has two broad components: a large-scale, population-based registry of child, adolescent, and adult twins and their families (current N ~20,000) and a series of more focused and in-depth studies drawn from the registry (current N ~4,000). Participants in the population-based registry complete a family health and demographic questionnaire via mail. Families are then recruited for one or more of the intensive, in-person studies from the population-based registry based on their answers to relevant items in the registry questionnaire. These in-person assessments target a variety of biological, genetic, and environmental phenotypes, including multi-informant measures of psychiatric and behavioral phenotypes, census and neighborhood informant reports of twin neighborhood characteristics, buccal swab and salivary DNA samples, assays of adolescent and adult steroid hormone levels, and/or videotaped interactions of child twin families. This article provides an overview of the MSUTR and describes current and future research directions.

  4. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Michigan Hand Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Bryan T; Morris, Steven F

    2015-02-01

    When the Michigan Hand Questionnaire (MHQ) was originally developed, an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was used to reduce the originally large number of generated items to the 63 items currently present on the questionnaire. Confirmation of the implied factor model of the existing MHQ has never been performed. The objective of this study was to confirm the factor model used to create the existing MHQ, and to possibly shorten the existing MHQ using factor analysis. Patients attending the Plastic Surgery Clinic at the QEII Health Sciences Centre with a hand complaint were asked to complete the MHQ. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to explore the implied factor structure of the original EFA and to examine the interplay between the MHQ subscales. Further item-reduction was performed using clinically guided decisions as well as factor analysis-guided statistics. Initial confirmatory factor analysis showed that original EFA model does not optimally explain the relationships between items in the existing MHQ and their corresponding factors. Our abbreviated model of the MHQ consists of 23 items, and performed more favorably in all goodness-of-fit parameters than the original 63-item questionnaire. The factor model of the existing MHQ does not fully take advantage of the relationship between items in the MHQ and the proposed factors. This study proposes a shortened version of the MHQ that more accurately reflects hand health as well as a factor-based interpretation of the subscales that takes interdependent relationships into account.

  5. Geoheritage and Possible Geopark in Michigan's Copper Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, W. I.; Klawiter, M. F.; Vye, E. C.; Gochis, E. E.

    2013-12-01

    Famous for native copper and the first metal mining in North America, Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula is also the center of mid-continent rift exposures of continental flood basalts, a great thrust fault and extensive redbed sediments that fill the mid-Proterozoic Rodinian rift and was used widely as building stone all over the eastern US. The Keweenaw also has spectacular glacial and post glacial geology. It is the site of two national parks and numerous state and local parks and heritage partners. It is a mineral collectors paradise, and the site of mining-driven US immigration and labor history. A grassroots effort at communication of geoheritage has developed to build local awareness. Middle school earth science teachers have done significant parts of the interpretive work, which has expanded far beyond the park boundaries and enriched the math and science partnerships bridging the university with schools sponsored by NSF. The local population has embraced the geo-outreach. We anticipate that the effort may lead to a proposal for a Geopark which will encompass the Keweenaw and Isle Royale.

  6. Best Practices: The Neuroscience Program at Central Michigan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Gary L.

    2015-01-01

    The original design of our program at Central Michigan University (CMU) and its evolving curriculum were directly influenced by Faculty for Undergraduate (FUN) workshops at Davidson College, Oberlin College, Trinity College, and Macalester College. The course content, laboratory exercises, and pedagogy used were informed by excellent articles in the Journal of Undergraduate Neuroscience Education (JUNE) and presentations at these FUN workshops and meetings over the years. Like the program at Baldwin-Wallace College, which was a previous winner of the Undergraduate Neuroscience Program of the Year Award, as selected by the Committee on Neuroscience Departments and Programs (CNDP) of the Society for Neuroscience (SfN, our program stresses the importance of inquiry-based, hands-on research experience for our undergraduates and utilizes a peer-mentoring system. A distinct advantage that is employed at CMU is the use of graduate student mentors, which allows us to expand our peer-mentorship to distinct research teams that are focused on a specific research project. Developing our program was not easy. The present manuscript reviews the long and arduous journey (including ways in which we navigated some difficult internal political issues) we made to build a strong program. Hopefully, this description may prove helpful for other evolving programs, in terms of avoiding certain pitfalls and overcoming obstacles, as well as selecting practices that have proven to be successful at our institution. PMID:26240523

  7. M2FS: the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Mario; Bailey, John I.; Crane, Jeffrey; Shectman, Stephen; Thompson, Ian; Roederer, Ian; Bigelow, Bruce; Gunnels, Steve

    2012-09-01

    We describe the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS) under construction for use on the Magellan/Clay telescope. M2FS consists of four primary components including: (1) A fiber-fed double spectrograph (MSPec) in which each spectrograph is fed by 128 fibers (for a total multiplexing factor of 256) and each is optimized in to operate from 370- 950 nm; (2) A fiber mounting system (MFib) that supports the fibers and fiber plug plates at the telescope f/11 Nasmyth focal surface and organizes the fibers into `shoes' that are used to place the fibers at the image surface of the MSpec spectrographs;, (3) A new wide-field corrector (WFC) that produces high-quality images over a 30 arcmin diameter field; (4) A unit (MCal) mounted near the telescope secondary that provides wavelength and continuum calibration and that supports a key component in a novel automated fiber identification system. We describe the opto-mechanical properties of M2FS, its modes of operation, and its anticipated performance, as well as potential upgrades including the development of a robotic fiber positioner and an atmospheric dispersion corrector. We describe how the M2FS design could serve as the basis of a powerful wide-field, massively multiplexed spectroscopic survey facility.

  8. Complicating Counterspaces: Intersectionality and the Michigan Womyn's Music Festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Elizabeth A; Todd, Nathan R; Odahl-Ruan, Charlynn; Shattell, Mona

    2016-06-01

    The counterspaces framework articulated by Case and Hunter (2012), follows from community psychology's long-standing interest in the potential for settings to promote well-being and liberatory responses to oppression. This framework proposes that certain settings (i.e., "counterspaces") facilitate a specific set of processes that promote the well-being of marginalized groups. We argue that an intersectional analysis is crucial to understand whether and how counterspaces achieve these goals. We draw from literature on safe spaces and present a case study of the Michigan Womyn's Music Festival (Michfest) to illustrate the value of an intersectional analysis and explore how these processes operate. Based on 20 in-person interviews, 23 responses to an online survey, and ethnographic field notes, we show how Michfest was characterized by a particular intersection of identities at the setting level, and intersectional diversity complicated experiences at the individual level. Moreover, intersectional identities provided opportunities for dialogue and change at the setting level, including the creation of counterspaces within counterspaces. Overall, we demonstrate the need to attend to intersectionality in counterspaces, and more broadly in how we conceptualize settings in community psychology. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  9. Notable decomposition products of senescing Lake Michigan Cladophora glomerata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peller, Julie R.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Shively, Dawn A.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Chun, Chan Lan; Whitman, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Massive accumulations of Cladophora, a ubiquitous, filamentous green alga, have been increasingly reported along Great Lakes shorelines, negatively affecting beach aesthetics, recreational activities, public health and beachfront property values. Previously, the decomposition byproducts of decaying algae have not been thoroughly examined. To better understand the negative consequences and potential merit of the stranded Cladophora, a three month mesocosm study of the dynamic chemical environment of the alga was conducted using fresh samples collected from southern Lake Michigan beaches. Typical fermentation products, such as organic acids, sulfide compounds, and alcohols were detected in the oxygen–deprived algae. Short chain carboxylic acids peaked on day seven, in correspondence with the lowest pH value. Most low molecular mass carbon compounds were eventually consumed, but 4-methylphenol, indole, and 3-methylindole were detected throughout the incubation period. Natural oils were detected in fresh and decomposing algae, indicating the stable nature of these compounds. The mesocosm experiment was validated by directly sampling the fluid within decomposing Cladophora mats in the field; many of the same compounds were found. This study suggests that the problematic Cladophora accumulations may be harvested for useful byproducts, thereby reducing the odiferous and potentially harmful mats stranded along the shorelines.

  10. A Study of Multitype Library Cooperatives: Including Developments in the Southwest Michigan Library Network, Michigan, California and Texas, with References to New York State and Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faibisoff, Sylvia G.

    This report reviews the activities, structure, and organization of the Southwest Michigan Library Network (SMLN) and provides a review of multitype networking in several other states, sources of funding, and issues in national networking. The SMLN is a cooperative group of 56 libraries located within the five counties of Allegan, Berrien, Cass,…

  11. Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Manual Control (10th) held at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio on 9-11 April 1974

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-04-01

    system as observed e.g. with Parkinson tremors [19 ] . Our simulation tests of the model illustrated in figure 6c showed that the oscillation...exposures can lead to physiological accommodation or deterioration as in some occupational diseases . The direct biomechanical interference of...Currently assigned to the 6585 Test Group, Holloman AFB, New Mexico . -705- i ■ ■ ■* - ■* ■ » i end landing (VTOL) type aircraft. Lateral

  12. Pure neuritic leprosy: Resolving diagnostic issues in acid fast bacilli (AFB-negative nerve biopsies: A single centre experience from South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monalisa Hui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Demonstration of lepra bacilli is essential for definite or unequivocal diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy (PNL on nerve biopsy. However, nerves always do not show bacilli owing to the changes of previous therapy or due to low bacillary load in tuberculoid forms. In absence of granuloma or lepra bacilli, other morphologic changes in endoneurium and perineurium can be of help in making a probable diagnosis of PNL and treating the patient with multidrug therapy. Materials and Methods: Forty-six biopsies of PNL were retrospectively reviewed and histologic findings were compared with 25 biopsies of non leprosy neuropathies (NLN including vasculitic neuropathy and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP. The distribution of endoneurial infiltrate and fibrosis, perineurial thickening, and myelin abnormalities were compared between PNL and NLN biopsies and analyzed by Chi-square test. Results: Out of 46 PNL casses, 24 (52.17 % biopsies were negative for acid fast bacilli (AFB. In these cases, the features which favor a diagnosis of AFB-negative PNL were endoneurial infiltrate (51.1%, endoneurial fibrosis (54.2%, perineurial thickening (70.8%, and reduced number of myelinated nerve fibers (75%. Interpretation and Conclusion: Nerve biopsy is an efficient tool to diagnose PNL and differentiate it from other causes of NLN. In absence of AFB, the diagnosis of PNL is challenging. In this article, we have satisfactorily evaluated the various hisopthological features and found that endoneurial inflammation, dense fibrosis, and reduction in the number of myelinated nerve fibers are strong supportive indicators of PNL regardless of AFB positivity.

  13. Reliability and internal validity of the michigan hand questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Bryan T; Morris, Steven F

    2014-10-01

    The Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ) remains one of very few to be based on validated and systematic methods in its creation. However, test-retest reliability and internal validity have not been appropriately investigated in any other English-speaking population outside the original development sample. The objective of this study is to examine the reliability and internal validity of the MHQ in a Canadian population. All patients with a clinical hand problem but no hand immobilization who attended our Plastic Surgery Clinic were invited to participate in this study. Patients were asked to complete the MHQ, and then contacted to arrange for completion of the MHQ a second time. Internal validity was estimated using Cronbach alpha. Reliability was estimated using the method of Bland and Altman, and intraclass correlation coefficients. Correlation analysis between score differences and time between tests was performed. Full versions of the MHQ were completed by 116 participants on their initial visit, while only 77 participants completed a second MHQ. Cronbach alpha ranged from 0.84 to 0.95 for the MHQ subscales. Intraclass-correlation coefficients ranged from 0.71 to 0.84 for the subscales. The magnitude of the limits of agreement for the subscales ranged from 13.8 to 26.2. The difference in scores between the first and second tests was not related to the time between tests. The high values of Cronbach alpha indicate high internal validity, but that there may be redundancy between items in the MHQ, which could be eliminated without losing information. Reliability of the MHQ is considered moderate. The limits of agreement are considered wide, indicating potential issues with respect to interpretation of a change in score between 2 administrations of the MHQ.

  14. Status of the deepwater cisco population of Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stanford H.

    1964-01-01

    The species and size composition and the abundance of the cisco (Leucichthys spp.) population of Lake Michigan have undergone drastic changes since the sea lamprey became established in the 1940's. The changes were measured by the catches of gill nets of identical specifications fished at the same seasons, depths, and locations in 1930-32, 1954-55, and 1960-61. The two largest ciscoes (johannae and nigripinnis), exploited heavily in a highly selective fishery from the midnineteenth century to the early 1900's, were only sparsely represented in the catch in the 1930's and were absent from catches of the comparison surveys in 1954-55 and 1960-61. The species of intermediate size (alpenae, artedi, kiyi, reighardi, and zenithicus) constituted about two-thirds of the cisco stocks of the deepwater zone in the 1930's but declined to 23.9 and 6.4 percent in the 1950's and 1960's, respectively. Major causes of change were the increased fishing pressure and sea lamprey predation that accompanied the disappearance of the lake trout. The small, slow-growing cisco (hoyi) - the primary food of lake trout - which was not fished intensively, and was too small to suffer greatly from sea lamprey predation, increased from 31.0 percent of the catch in the 1930's to 76.1 percent in the 1950's and 93.6 percent in the 1960's. Consequences of the extreme imbalance of the cisco population have been a reduction in mean size of all species, extension of the range of the very abundant hoyi (formerly most abundant in moderately shallow areas) to almost all depths and sections of the lake, and possibly introgressive hybridization among the various species. The primary change in the fishery has been a shift from gill nets to more extensive use of trawls which can take the now abundant smaller fish.

  15. Visceral Malperfusion in Aortic Dissection: The Michigan Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamman, Arnoud V; Yang, Bo; Kim, Karen M; Williams, David M; Michael Deeb, George; Patel, Himanshu J

    2017-01-01

    One of the most dreaded complications of acute aortic dissection is end-organ malperfusion. We summarize current evidence and describe our treatment paradigm in the setting of malperfusion in aortic dissection. Given the difficulty with identifying isolated visceral malperfusion in aortic dissection, both in the literature as well as in our practice, we have broadened the discussion to include data examining the presentation complex of malperfusion, particularly if mesenteric ischemia is identified. The approach to treating malperfusion syndrome is different depending on whether the patient presents with type A dissection vs type B dissection with malperfusion. Although thoracic endovascular aortic repair has emerged as the dominant strategy for resolving malperfusion for complicated type B dissection, fenestration may still have a role in its treatment. In contrast, for type A aortic dissection presenting with visceral malperfusion, the concept of operative repair after restoration of end-organ perfusion has been proposed with increasing frequency in recent reports. At the University of Michigan, we apply a patient-specific algorithm, based on the presence of malperfusion with end-organ dysfunction. In those patients presenting with visceral malperfusion, we prefer to first fenestrate, await resolution of the malperfusion syndrome and then perform central aortic repair. We recognize that other groups have implemented similar algorithms to reduce the dismal results of operative procedures in this cohort. However, the most appropriate period of delay remains unknown and there is a persistent risk of rupture before repair is performed. Future studies should be performed to determine whether these various treatment paradigms have merit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Updated polychlorinated biphenyl mass budget for Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiehong; Romanak, Kevin; Westenbroek, Stephen M.; Li, An; Kreis, Russell; Hites, Ronald A.; Venier, Marta

    2017-01-01

    This study revisits and updates the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Project (LMMBP) for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) that was conducted in 1994–1995. This work uses recent concentrations of PCBs in tributary and open lake water, air, and sediment to calculate an updated mass budget. Five of the 11 LMMBP tributaries were revisited in 2015. In these five tributaries, the geometric mean concentrations of ∑PCBs (sum of 85 congeners) ranged from 1.52 to 22.4 ng L–1. The highest concentrations of PCBs were generally found in the Lower Fox River and in the Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal. The input flows of ∑PCBs from wet deposition, dry deposition, tributary loading, and air to water exchange, and the output flows due to sediment burial, volatilization from water to air, and transport to Lake Huron and through the Chicago Diversion were calculated, as well as flows related to the internal processes of settling, resuspension, and sediment–water diffusion. The net transfer of ∑PCBs is 1240 ± 531 kg yr–1 out of the lake. This net transfer is 46% lower than that estimated in 1994–1995. PCB concentrations in most matrices in the lake are decreasing, which drove the decline of all the individual input and output flows. Atmospheric deposition has become negligible, while volatilization from the water surface is still a major route of loss, releasing PCBs from the lake into the air. Large masses of PCBs remain in the water column and surface sediments and are likely to contribute to the future efflux of PCBs from the lake to the air.

  17. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report. Volume 3, Appendixes B, C, and D: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force`s Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions will need to be carried out at each site. The island`s drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. Geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities. This report, appendices B, C, and D contains information on the following: geophysical contour maps and profile plots; human health risk assessment; and ecological risk assessment.

  18. Spatio-temporal pattern of viral meningitis in Michigan, 1993-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Sharon K.; Schmidt, Mark A.; Stobierski, Mary Grace; Wilson, Mark L.

    2005-05-01

    To characterize Michigan's high viral meningitis incidence rates, 8,803 cases from 1993-2001 were analyzed for standard epidemiological indices, geographic distribution, and spatio-temporal clusters. Blacks and infants were found to be high-risk groups. Annual seasonality and interannual variability in epidemic magnitude were apparent. Cases were concentrated in southern Michigan, and cumulative incidence was correlated with population density at the county level (r=0.45, p<0.001). Kulldorff's Scan test identified the occurrence of spatio-temporal clusters in Lower Michigan during July-October 1998 and 2001 (p=0.01). More extensive data on cases, laboratory isolates, sociodemographics, and environmental exposures should improve detection and enhance the effectiveness of a Space-Time Information System aimed at prevention.

  19. Descriptive Epidemiology of Bovine Tuberculosis in Michigan (1975–2010: Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika C. Okafor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite ongoing eradication efforts, bovine tuberculosis (BTB remains a challenge in Michigan livestock and wildlife. The objectives of this study were to (1 review the epidemiology of BTB in Michigan cattle, privately owned cervids, and wildlife between 1975 and 2010 and (2 identify important lessons learned from the review and eradication strategies. BTB information was accessed from the Michigan BTB Eradication Project agencies. Cattle herds (49, privately owned deer herds (4, and wild white-tailed deer (668 were found infected with BTB during the review period. BTB has occurred primarily in counties located at the northern portion of the state's Lower Peninsula. Currently used BTB eradication strategies have successfully controlled BTB spread. However additional changes in BTB surveillance, prevention, and eradication strategies could improve eradication efforts.

  20. Tapping the Source: A Listing of Groundwater Education Materials Available through the Groundwater Education in Michigan (GEM) Program. Updated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Inst. of Water Research.

    Established in 1988 through the cooperative efforts of the Institute of Water Research at Michigan State University and the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, the Groundwater Education in Michigan (GEM) program helps people understand the relationship between their actions and the quality of their environment, particularly groundwater. The program has a…

  1. Overview on the pest status and research plans on beech bark disease: A new exotic in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Deborah G. McCullough; Toby R. Petrice; Nathan W. Siegert

    2001-01-01

    Beech bark disease was first discovered in Michigan in spring 2000 in Ludington State Park and soon thereafter it was found in the upper peninsula in the bass Lake campground. since then, surveyshave found it in six counties in Michigan. Beech bark disease involves two exotic organisms: the beech bark scale (Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind.; Eriococcidae...

  2. Predicting the ability to produce emerald ash borer: a comparison of riparian and upland ash forests in southern lower Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Crocker; Deborah G. McCullough; Nathan W. Siegert

    2009-01-01

    Concern for the future of ash trees in the United States has risen since the 2002 discovery of emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) in southeastern Michigan. The ability of ash forests in the Southern Lower Peninsula of Michigan to produce EAB was compared by physiographic class and stand size. Results showed that EAB production...

  3. Michigan forest ecosystem vulnerability assessment and synthesis: a report from the Northwoods Climate Change Response Framework project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen Handler; Matthew J. Duveneck; Louis Iverson; Emily Peters; Robert M. Scheller; Kirk R. Wythers; Leslie Brandt; Patricia Butler; Maria Janowiak; P. Danielle Shannon; Chris Swanston; Amy Clark Eagle; Joshua G. Cohen; Rich Corner; Peter B. Reich; Tim Baker; Sophan Chhin; Eric Clark; David Fehringer; Jon Fosgitt; James Gries; Christine Hall; Kimberly R. Hall; Robert Heyd; Christopher L. Hoving; Ines Ibáñez; Don Kuhr; Stephen Matthews; Jennifer Muladore; Knute Nadelhoffer; David Neumann; Matthew Peters; Anantha Prasad; Matt Sands; Randy Swaty; Leiloni Wonch; Jad Daley; Mae Davenport; Marla R. Emery; Gary Johnson; Lucinda Johnson; David Neitzel; Adena Rissman; Chadwick Rittenhouse; Robert. Ziel

    2014-01-01

    Forests in northern Michigan will be affected directly and indirectly by a changing climate during the next 100 years. This assessment evaluates the vulnerability of forest ecosystems in Michigan's eastern Upper Peninsula and northern Lower Peninsula to a range of future climates. Information on current forest conditions, observed climate trends, projected climate...

  4. Migrant and Seasonal Workers in Michigan's Agriculture: A Study of Their Contributions, Characteristics, Needs, and Services. Research Report No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochin, Refugio I.; Santiago, Anne M.; Dickey, Karla S.

    This study examines the characteristics and needs of Michigan's migrant and seasonal farmworkers. The study was based on census data, state agency records, and a statewide survey of service providers. Results indicate that neither mechanization nor other structural changes in Michigan's agricultural economy have diminished the industry's…

  5. The High School "Space Race": Implications of a School-Choice Market Environment for a Michigan Metropolitan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militello, Matthew; Metzger, Scott Alan; Bowers, Alex J.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the implications of competition between school districts in a mid-Michigan metropolitan area. Over the 10-year period after Michigan's major school-funding reform in 1994, many urban and suburban districts found themselves competing for per-pupil state funding. Suburban districts need extra students to make up budgetary…

  6. The University of Michigan Dioxin Exposure Study: predictors of human serum dioxin concentrations in Midland and Saginaw, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabrant, David H; Franzblau, Alfred; Lepkowski, James; Gillespie, Brenda W; Adriaens, Peter; Demond, Avery; Hedgeman, Elizabeth; Knutson, Kristine; Zwica, Lynn; Olson, Kristen; Towey, Timothy; Chen, Qixuan; Hong, Biling; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Lee, Shih-Yuan; Ward, Barbara; Ladronka, Kathy; Luksemburg, William; Maier, Martha

    2009-05-01

    We conducted a population-based human exposure study in response to concerns among the population of Midland and Saginaw counties, Michigan, that discharges by the Dow Chemical Company of dioxin-like compounds into the nearby river and air had led to an increase in residents' body burdens of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), here collectively referred to as "dioxins." We sought to identify factors that explained variation in serum dioxin concentrations among the residents of Midland and Saginaw counties. Exposures to dioxins in soil, river sediments, household dust, historic emissions, and contaminated fish and game were of primary interest. We studied 946 people in four populations in the contaminated area and in a referent population, by interview and by collection of serum, household dust, and residential soil. Linear regression was used to identify factors associated with serum dioxins. Demographic factors explained a large proportion of variation in serum dioxin concentrations. Historic exposures before 1980, including living in the Midland/Saginaw area, hunting and fishing in the contaminated areas, and working at Dow, contributed to serum dioxin levels. Exposures since 1980 in Midland and Saginaw counties contributed little to serum dioxins. This study provides valuable insights into the relationships between serum dioxins and environmental factors, age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and breast-feeding. These factors together explain a substantial proportion of the variation in serum dioxin concentrations in the general population. Historic exposures to environmental contamination appeared to be of greater importance than recent exposures for dioxins.

  7. The University of Michigan Dioxin Exposure Study: Predictors of Human Serum Dioxin Concentrations in Midland and Saginaw, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabrant, David H.; Franzblau, Alfred; Lepkowski, James; Gillespie, Brenda W.; Adriaens, Peter; Demond, Avery; Hedgeman, Elizabeth; Knutson, Kristine; Zwica, Lynn; Olson, Kristen; Towey, Timothy; Chen, Qixuan; Hong, Biling; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Lee, Shih-Yuan; Ward, Barbara; LaDronka, Kathy; Luksemburg, William; Maier, Martha

    2009-01-01

    Background We conducted a population-based human exposure study in response to concerns among the population of Midland and Saginaw counties, Michigan, that discharges by the Dow Chemical Company of dioxin-like compounds into the nearby river and air had led to an increase in residents’ body burdens of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), here collectively referred to as “dioxins.” Objectives We sought to identify factors that explained variation in serum dioxin concentrations among the residents of Midland and Saginaw counties. Exposures to dioxins in soil, river sediments, household dust, historic emissions, and contaminated fish and game were of primary interest. Methods We studied 946 people in four populations in the contaminated area and in a referent population, by interview and by collection of serum, household dust, and residential soil. Linear regression was used to identify factors associated with serum dioxins. Results Demographic factors explained a large proportion of variation in serum dioxin concentrations. Historic exposures before 1980, including living in the Midland/Saginaw area, hunting and fishing in the contaminated areas, and working at Dow, contributed to serum dioxin levels. Exposures since 1980 in Midland and Saginaw counties contributed little to serum dioxins. Conclusions This study provides valuable insights into the relationships between serum dioxins and environmental factors, age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and breast-feeding. These factors together explain a substantial proportion of the variation in serum dioxin concentrations in the general population. Historic exposures to environmental contamination appeared to be of greater importance than recent exposures for dioxins. PMID:19479027

  8. Normative Values of the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire for Patients with and without Hand Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Michael T; Shauver, Melissa J; Chung, Kevin C

    2017-09-01

    The Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire has been widely used for nearly 20 years to assess patients with a variety of hand and upper extremity conditions. However, normative data have not previously been collected, limiting interpretation. The Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire was administered to 579 participants recruited from the general population. In addition, participants were asked to identify any problem affecting their hand(s), including trauma, hand disease/condition, systemic illness, or nonspecific symptoms. Comorbidities and demographic data were also collected. Total Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire score for healthy individuals was indicative of generally good hand function (95.2; 95 percent CI, 94.3 to 96.1). Individuals with unilateral trauma scored for their affected hand (90.3; 95 percent CI, 87.9 to 92.6) lower than their healthy hand (mean difference, 5.7; 95 percent CI, 3.2 to 8.3). For individuals with and without hand trauma, total Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire score decreased with increasing number of comorbidities. Many of the differences in Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire score between the problem hand and unaffected hand were smaller than the minimal clinically important difference of 3.0 to 23.0 for known abnormalities of the hand and upper extremity. These normative data provide appropriate baseline information for individuals with and without underlying hand conditions. Most notably, these findings suggest that individuals with a unilateral problem establish new subnormative values for both their affected and unaffected hands. These data will encourage an appropriate understanding of the results of future studies using the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire.

  9. Examining Lake Michigan Spring Euphotic Depth (Zeu) Anomalies: Utilizing 10 Years of MODIS-Aqua Data at 4 Kilometer Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, James G.

    2013-01-01

    Examination of ten years of euphotic depth anomalies in Lake Michigan during the months of March-June indicates the following: The well-known and frequently observed occurrence of a turbidity feature in the southern part of Lake Michigan during the spring season has become less common during the period 2003-2012. Overall, the clarity of Lake Michigan water in the southern end of the lake appears to have increased spring season over the period 2003-2012. Euphotic depth can be used as a primary indicator of changes in Lake Michigan lacustrine optics, and for other large lakes. Unique events, such as the heavy rains in June 2008, can have a distinct signature in the euphotic depth anomaly distribution in Lake Michigan.

  10. Legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric potential in Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    The legal and institutional obstacles to the development of small-scale hydroelectric energy at the state level is described. The Federal government also exercises extensive regulatory authority in the area. The first obstacle which any developer must confront in Michigan is obtaining the authority to utilize the river bed, banks, and flowing water at a proposed dam site. This involves a determination of ownership of the stream banks and bed, and the manner of obtaining either their title or use; and existing constraints with regard to the use of the water. Michigan follows the riparian theory of water law. The direct regulation; indirect regulation; public utilities regulation; financing; and taxation are discussed.

  11. Ground-water quality in the western part of the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer in the Western Lake Michigan Drainages, Wisconsin and Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water samples were collected during the summer of 1995 from 29 wells in the western part of the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer in the Western Lake Michigan Drainages study unit of the National-Water Quality Assessment Program. Analyses of ground-water samples from these wells were used to provide an indication of waterquality conditions in this heavily used part of the aquifer.

  12. Virtual Training for Virtual Success: Michigan State University Extension's Virtual Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Lela; Reese, Luke

    2011-01-01

    Michigan State University Extension conducted its first virtual conference, attended by more than 600 staff, with a weeklong menu of over 100 online meetings and learning sessions. Providing multiple types of pre-conference hands-on training to small groups using Adobe Connect Pro was an important key to success. Other success factors were pre and…

  13. Guided Educational Tourism as Informal Physical Geography Education on St. Helena Island, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Joseph M.; Stoltman, Joseph P.

    2017-01-01

    Guided educational tours are a major activity within informal education. This article examines the potential for tour guides of a largely historical tour of St. Helena Island, Michigan, to include physical geography within the tour. Using field data and interview methods, the researchers identified the physical features of the island that could be…

  14. Introduction and establishment of Entomophaga maimaiga, a fungal pathogen of gypsy moth (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. R. Smitley; L. S. Bauer; A. E. Hajek; F. J. Sapio; R. A. Humber

    1995-01-01

    In 1991, late instars of gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), were sampled and diagnosed for infections of the pathogenic fungus Entomophaga maimaiga Humber, Shimazu & Soper and for gypsy moth nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV) at 50 sites in Michigan. Approximately 1,500 larvae were collected and reared from these sites, and no...

  15. Dynamics of nitrogen oxides and ozone above and within a mixed hardwood forest in Northern Michigan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seok, B.; Helmig, D.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Williams, W.; vogel, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO2) and ozone (O3) above and within the canopy at the University of Michigan Biological Station AmeriFlux (UMBS Flux) site was investigated by continuous multi-height vertical gradient measurements during the summer and the fall of 2008. A daily

  16. 78 FR 23327 - Issuance of a Presidential Permit Authorizing the State of Michigan to Construct, Connect...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Josh Rubin, Canada Border Affairs Officer, via email at [email protected] bridge (the New International Trade Crossing) between Detroit, Michigan, and Windsor, Ontario, Canada.... Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and other U.S. Federal Inspection Agencies on the provision of...

  17. Who Are the Homeless? Student Mobility and Achievement in Michigan 2010-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Joshua M.

    2017-01-01

    This article provides provide a new, systematic profile of more than 18,000 homeless students in Michigan, utilizing rich administrative data from all test-taking students in Grades 3-9 during three academic years. These data are part of a larger study of school choice and student mobility in that state. Homelessness is a condition found…

  18. Three-year progression of emerald ash borer-induced decline and mortality in southeastern Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal J.K. Gandhi; Annemarie Smith; Robert P. Long; Robin A.J. Taylor; Daniel A. Herms

    2008-01-01

    We monitored the progression of ash (Fraxinus spp.) decline and mortality due to emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, in 38 forest stands in the upper Huron River watershed region of southeastern Michigan from 2004-2007. Black ash (F. nigra), green ash (F. pennsylvanica), and white ash...

  19. 78 FR 34124 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Michigan Department of Transportation, Van Wagoner Building...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... Community, Michigan; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand... stone flakes, 2 edge-damaged flake tools, 1 bipolar chipped stone tool, 1 bifacial chipped stone tool, 1..., Oklahoma; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Forest County Potawatomi Community...

  20. 75 FR 36673 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Public Museum of West Michigan, Grand Rapids, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ..., Michigan; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand... grinding stone, 1 stone dish, 3 fired clay balls, 5 pottery shards, 1 boatstone, 1 drilled bear tooth, 2... fragments, 3 grinding stones, 4 animal bones, 1 conch shell, 1 celt, 1 drilled bear canine effigy, 1 lot of...

  1. Eastern Michigan University's Automated Storage and Retrieval System: 10 Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, Rita; Wrosch, Jackie

    2009-01-01

    Automated storage/retrieval systems (ASRSs) are playing an integral part in today's library operations and collections management. Eastern Michigan University installed an ASRS as part of the new Halle Library, which opened in May 1998, to provide "storage" for up to 800,000 items. Over the past 10 years our policies and procedures have…

  2. Identifying the origin of waterbird carcasses in Lake Michigan using a neural network source tracking model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenow, Kevin P.; Ge, Zhongfu; Fara, Luke J.; Houdek, Steven C.; Lubinski, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Avian botulism type E is responsible for extensive waterbird mortality on the Great Lakes, yet the actual site of toxin exposure remains unclear. Beached carcasses are often used to describe the spatial aspects of botulism mortality outbreaks, but lack specificity of offshore toxin source locations. We detail methodology for developing a neural network model used for predicting waterbird carcass motions in response to wind, wave, and current forcing, in lieu of a complex analytical relationship. This empirically trained model uses current velocity, wind velocity, significant wave height, and wave peak period in Lake Michigan simulated by the Great Lakes Coastal Forecasting System. A detailed procedure is further developed to use the model for back-tracing waterbird carcasses found on beaches in various parts of Lake Michigan, which was validated using drift data for radiomarked common loon (Gavia immer) carcasses deployed at a variety of locations in northern Lake Michigan during September and October of 2013. The back-tracing model was further used on 22 non-radiomarked common loon carcasses found along the shoreline of northern Lake Michigan in October and November of 2012. The model-estimated origins of those cases pointed to some common source locations offshore that coincide with concentrations of common loons observed during aerial surveys. The neural network source tracking model provides a promising approach for identifying locations of botulinum neurotoxin type E intoxication and, in turn, contributes to developing an understanding of the dynamics of toxin production and possible trophic transfer pathways.

  3. 75 FR 45658 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Central Michigan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ..., have long called this area home. Officials of the Museum of Cultural and Natural History have... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Central... funerary objects in the possession of the Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Central Michigan...

  4. 75 FR 16175 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Central Michigan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ..., have long called this area home. Officials of the Museum of Cultural and Natural History have... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Central... possession of the Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI. The...

  5. Association of District Principal Evaluation with Learning-Centered Leadership Practice: Evidence from Michigan and Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Youngs, Peter; Yang, Haiyan; Chu, Hongqi; Zhao, Qian

    2012-01-01

    Principal evaluation has become a key component of national policy debates on developing effective leaders. To contribute to these debates, this study draws on survey data to explore how principals in Michigan and metropolitan Beijing behaved differently in enacting leadership related to teaching and learning, and how they were evaluated…

  6. 75 FR 14352 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Michigan; PSD Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... Reviews I. Background Michigan Air Pollution Control Rules, Part 18, Rules R 336.2801 except for (j) and.... Specifically, the rules revised are R 336.2801(r)(ii) (definition of ``emission unit'') and R 336.2801(hh) (definition of ``potential to emit''). After consideration, EPA concludes that the submitted revisions to the...

  7. 78 FR 65366 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY... inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian...

  8. 78 FR 65369 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY... inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian...

  9. 78 FR 65382 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY... inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian...

  10. Field responses of Prunus serotina and Asclepias syriaca to ozone around southern Lake Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, J.P. [U.S. Geological Survey and Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)]. E-mail: jpbennet@wisc.edu; Jepsen, E.A. [Bureau of Air Management, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison, WI 53707 (United States); Roth, J.A. [Bureau of Air Management, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison, WI 53707 (United States)

    2006-07-15

    Higher ozone concentrations east of southern Lake Michigan compared to west of the lake were used to test hypotheses about injury and growth effects on two plant species. We measured approximately 1000 black cherry trees and over 3000 milkweed stems from 1999 to 2001 for this purpose. Black cherry branch elongation and milkweed growth and pod formation were significantly higher west of Lake Michigan while ozone injury was greater east of Lake Michigan. Using classification and regression tree (CART) analyses we determined that departures from normal precipitation, soil nitrogen and ozone exposure/peak hourly concentrations were the most important variables affecting cherry branch elongation, and milkweed stem height and pod formation. The effects of ozone were not consistently comparable with the effects of soil nutrients, weather, insect or disease injury, and depended on species. Ozone SUM06 exposures greater than 13 ppm-h decreased cherry branch elongation 18%; peak 1-h exposures greater than 93 ppb reduced milkweed stem height 13%; and peak 1-h concentrations greater than 98 ppb reduced pod formation 11% in milkweed. - Decreased cherry branch elongation, milkweed stem height and pod production, and foliar injury on both species occurred at sites around southern Lake Michigan at ozone exposures of 13 SUM06 ppm-h and 93-98 ppb peak hourly.

  11. The 2014 Michigan Public High School Context and Performance Report Card

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 Michigan Public High School Context and Performance Report Card is the Mackinac Center's second effort to measure high school performance. The first high school assessment was published in 2012, followed by the Center's 2013 elementary and middle school report card, which used a similar methodology to evaluate school performance. The…

  12. Population increase in Kirtland's warbler and summer range expansion to Wisconsin and Michigan's Upper Peninsula, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Probst; Deahn M. Donner; Carol I. Bocetti; Steve Sjogren

    2003-01-01

    The threatened Kirtland's warbler Dendroica kirtlandii breeds in stands of young jack pine Pinus banksiana growing on well-drained soils in Michigan, USA. We summarize information documenting the range expansion of Kirtland's warbler due to increased habitat management in the core breeding range in the Lower Peninsula of...

  13. Michigan's fourth forest inventory: timber volumes and projections of timber supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John S. Jr. Spencer; Jerold T. Hahn

    1984-01-01

    The fourth inventory of the timber resource of Michigan shows growing-stock volume increased 27% between 1966 and 1980, from 15.1 to 19.1 billion cubic feet. Presented are highlights and statistics on volume, growth, mortality, removals, biomass, and projections.

  14. The supply and energy potential of forest resources in northern Wisconsin and Michigan's Upper Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis P. Bradley; Eugene M. Carpenter; James A. Mattson; Jerold T. Hahn; Sharon A. Winsauer

    1980-01-01

    Analyzes the economic potential of achieving energy independence by 10 pulp and paper mills in northern Wisconsin and Upper Michigan. Independence would require the annual harvest of 5.79 million green tons for both fuel and fiber needs, compared to a recommended harvest level of 31 million green tons. Delivered wood cost projections seem well within affordable...

  15. The Coping Strategies of Nontraditional Female Students in Southwest Michigan and Northern Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Desiree

    2017-01-01

    Problem: The purpose of this research study was to examine the coping strategies of nontraditional female students in a private university in Southwest Michigan, and a public university in Northern Indiana. According to Carney-Compton & Tan (2002), nontraditional female students characterize the leading emergent set of students beginning…

  16. Putting Michigan in the Driver's Seat for the Race to the Top

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Kathryn; Walsh, Kate; Jacobs, Sandi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the authors lay out a number of features of "Race to the Top" funding and what states like Michigan should expect from the upcoming competition. They then provide a description of the kind of strategies--including next steps broken down by key actors and back-of-the-envelope cost calculations for implementing such…

  17. Profile of winery visitors of Michigan wineries based on behavioral segmentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzu-Ching Chang; Mi-Kyung Kim; Seung Hyun Kim

    2003-01-01

    Since 1995, the number of wineries and sales of Michigan wine continued to increase. In addition to wine production, the vineyards have been designed for agriculture tourism including the development of tasting rooms and winery tours. Commercial winery is more than simply grape production and has an important relationship with visitors or customers. However, little...

  18. A Quantitative Study of Michigan High School Students' Perception of Parents' Role in Their Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Veryl

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between parental involvement in academic success as determined by grade point average and Michigan high school students' perception of parent involvement with school, participation in homework, recognition of academic success, knowledge of school policies, and support of participation in…

  19. Whole Language: A Survey of Language Arts Approaches in Cass County Michigan Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Ada M.

    A study investigated whether whole language principles had "seeped" into secondary language arts teaching in Cass County, Michigan by surveying teachers' attitudes. A total of 14 of the 15 language arts teachers in the four secondary schools in the county returned completed surveys. Results indicated that the language arts teachers (1)…

  20. Planning an On-Premise Telecommunication System: The University of Michigan Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwick, Leslie B.

    1988-01-01

    The first of two articles describing the University of Michigan's experiences in installing an on-premise telecommunications system covers: (1) the physical, historical, and cultural context; (2) planning for the new system; (3) voice and data strategies of the system; (4) switching equipment and transmission media; and (5) financing and rates.…

  1. Structural Disturbances in Rural Communities: Some Repercussions of the Migration Turnaround in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Daniel C.; Price, Michael L.

    The recent, widespread trend toward rural migration can create disturbances in the organization of the host community by overloading community services and by creating conflict between oldtimers and newcomers. To obtain information about community disturbances and migration in Michigan, questionnaires were sent to a random sample of 21,792…

  2. Western Michigan University: Quasi-Revolving Fund. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Western Michigan University has designed an innovative "Quasi-Revolving Fund" model that demonstrates the institution's full commitment to incorporating sustainability into campus operations. The Quasi-Revolving Fund recaptures money from cost-savings, similar to a typical green revolving fund, but it also sources capital from the…

  3. 77 FR 34991 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann....S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the University of... minimum number of individuals in the Notice of Inventory Completion published in the Federal Register (74...

  4. Administration of the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST) at a Student Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Thomas J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This study evaluated the usefulness of the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST) in the medical assessment of college students. The MAST was administered randomly to 200 students at a student health center and was found to be useful as part of individual health assessments. (Author/MT)

  5. Screening for Drug Abuse Among College Students: Modification of the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannell, M. Barry; Favazza, Armando R.

    1978-01-01

    Modified version of the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test was anonymously given to 245 college students on two Midwestern university campuses. Cutoff score for suspected drug abuse was set at five points. The percent of students scoring five or more points was 25 and 22 from campuses A and B respectively. (Author)

  6. 75 FR 19307 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Air and Water Show, Milwaukee, Lake Michigan, Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ...: The Coast Guard proposes to establish a temporary safety zone on Lake Michigan near Bradford Beach in... the following methods: ] (1) Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov . (2) Fax: 202-493.... The telephone number is 202-366-9329. To avoid duplication, please use only one of these four methods...

  7. 75 FR 32664 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Air and Water Show, Lake Michigan, Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... establishing a safety zone on Lake Michigan near Bradford Beach in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. This zone is intended..., design, or operation; test methods; sampling procedures; and related management systems practices) that... to Bradford Beach in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The safety zone will encompass all U.S. waters of Lake...

  8. 75 FR 68604 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 70; Detroit, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-08

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 70; Detroit, Michigan Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as amended (19 U.S.C. 81a-81u), the Foreign-Trade Zones Board (the Board) adopts the following Order: Whereas, the Greater Detroit Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc...

  9. 75 FR 11514 - Foreign-Trade Zone 70 - Detroit, Michigan, Application for Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 70 - Detroit, Michigan, Application for Expansion An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones Board (the Board) by the Greater Detroit Foreign... application was submitted pursuant to the provisions of the Foreign-Trade Zones Act, as amended (19 U.S.C. 81a...

  10. Diagnosis and management of new and re-emerging diseases of highbush blueberries in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueberries are an important commodity in Michigan and disease management is crucial for production of high-quality fruit. Over the past 6 years, a number of new and re-emerging diseases have been diagnosed in the state. In 2009, Blueberry scorch virus (BlScV) and Blueberry shock virus (BlShV) were ...

  11. Beyond Rural Idylls: Imperfect Lesbian Utopias at Michigan Womyn's Music Festival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Kath

    2011-01-01

    Whilst rural idylls have dominated some discussions of rural social difference, little attention has been paid to rural utopias. Imagined, material and discursive experiences of utopian rural ideals are critically examined in this paper. It takes as its focus the Michigan Womyn's Music Festival--an annual US womyn-only festival--in order to…

  12. Mitigation of Shore Damage Attributed to the Federal Navigation Structures at Ludington Harbor, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-12-01

    Resources Commission, Michigan Department of Natural Resources, 1974. Shelford, V.E., The Ecology of North America, 610 pp., U. Illinois Press, Urbana ...FORESmT SERVICE NORTHEASTERN AREA. STATE AND PRIVATE FORESTRY 6868 MARIKET STrEET. UPPER DAPBY. PA I OB2 492-_ 215--597--3770 S400 May 28, 1975 P

  13. 77 FR 47282 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Air and Water Show, Lake Michigan, Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... acrobatic maneuvers proximate to a gathering of watercraft and personnel pose a significant risk to public..., and click ``Search.'' You may visit the Docket Management Facility, Department of Transportation, West... questions on this temporary rule, call or email CWO Jon Grob, U.S. Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan...

  14. Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus Daniel Richardson named Central Michigan game Hokie Hero

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus Capt. Daniel Richardson, U.S. Air Force, who earned a degree in industrial and systems engineering from the College of Engineering and a minor in leadership studies from the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets Rice Center for Leader Development in 2004 has been selected as the Hokie Hero for the Virginia Tech versus Central Michigan University game.

  15. An Examination of Alcohol and Other Drug Usage by Central Michigan University Undergraduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, Ross J.

    This study was undertaken to obtain information on the alcohol consumption patterns of Central Michigan University undergraduates from the perspectives of the students themselves, residence hall staff, and academic faculty. Data were collected from 836 undergraduates, 113 residence hall staff members, and 96 faculty members. The student sample…

  16. A Statistical Analysis of a Convective Boundary Layer Over Lake Michigan on 10 January 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    Automated Niesonet (PAM 11) and special rawinsonde stations manned by both the Chicago and Purdue research groups. Data were collected over Lake Michigan...Les tourbillons cellulaires dlans tine nappe liquids transportant de la chaleur par convection en regime permanent. Ann. Chim. Phv_. 23. 62- 144

  17. Urban and community forests of the North Central East region: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Eric J. Greenfield

    2010-01-01

    This report details how land cover and urbanization vary within the states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin by community (incorporated and census designated places), county subdivision, and county. Specifically this report provides critical urban and community forestry information for each state including human population characteristics and trends,...

  18. Michigan timber industry: an assessment of timber product output and use, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald J. Piva; Anthony K. Weatherspoon

    2010-01-01

    Presents recent Michigan forest industry trends; production and receipts of industrial roundwood; and production of saw logs, veneer logs, pulpwood, and other products in 2006. Logging residue generated from timber harvest operations is reported, as well as wood and bark residue generated at primary wood-using mills and disposition of mill residues.

  19. INVESTIGATION OF VERTICAL DISTRIUBTION AND MORPHO- LOGY OF INDIGENOUS ORGANIC MATTER AT SLEEPING BEAR SITE, MICHIGAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluates the nature and origin of particulate organic carbon and organic coatings on aquifer sands upgradient from a fuel spill site near the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore in Michigan. The distribution of carbon was found to be highly complex due to the occur...

  20. Survey of Current Practices in Field Experience Education. Michigan State University 1977-1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duley, John S.

    During the 1978 winter term, the Learning and Evaluation Service of Michigan State University initiated, in collaboration with the Council for the Advancement of Experiential Learning (CAEL), an institutional development program in field experience education. Purposes of the study were to describe the nature and extent of field experience…

  1. Change Agent Strategies: A Study of the Michigan-Ohio Regional Educational Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Peggy Lynne

    This dissertation reports on a study of the planning and development activities of the Michigan-Ohio Regional Educational Laboratory (MOREL). The study attempted to assess (1) whether MOREL has accepted a change agent role, and (2) whether it has taken action that indicates recognition of what is known through the literature and research about…

  2. Michigan Wetlands: Yours To Protect. A Citizen's Guide to Local Involvement in Wetland Protection. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikiel, Wilfred

    This guidebook is designed to assist concerned Michigan citizens, local governments, conservation organizations, landowners, and others in their efforts to initiate wetlands protection activities. Chapter 1 focuses on wetland functions, values, losses, and the urgent need to protect wetland resources. Chapter 2 discusses wetland identification and…

  3. 76 FR 36149 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... Anthropology, Kalamazoo, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, and has determined that there is no cultural...

  4. 76 FR 36145 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... Anthropology, Kalamazoo, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, and has determined that there is no cultural...

  5. 76 FR 36151 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Anthropology... Indian tribe, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and a...

  6. Modeling spring-summer phytoplankton bloom in Lake Michigan with and without riverine nutrient loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lin; Wang, Jia; Hunter, Timothy; Wang, Dongxiao; Vanderploeg, Henry A.

    2017-11-01

    There were two phytoplankton blooms captured by remote sensing in Lake Michigan in 1998, one from March to May, and one during June. In this paper, those phytoplankton blooms were simulated by a coupled physical-biological model, driven by observed meteorological forcing in 1998. The model reasonably reproduced the lake currents. The biological model results, with and without riverine nutrient loading, were compared with the remote sensing data. A 3-month-long donut-like phytoplankton bloom that appeared in southern Lake Michigan was reasonably well simulated only when riverine input was included, indicating the importance of riverine nutrient input for supporting the growth of phytoplankton in Lake Michigan. The model with riverine input also captured a second event-driven phytoplankton bloom during June with weaker magnitude that occurred in mid-south Lake Michigan, which lasted for about 20 days. The major reason for the weaker bloom in June was that vertical mixing in the hydrodynamic model was too weak (leading to a mixed-layer depth of 20 m) to bring the bottom nutrient-rich water up to the epilimnion. High chlorophyll concentration that persisted in Green Bay for almost a year was simulated with less intensity.

  7. Green above-stump weights for red oak, red maple and white birch in northern Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmuth M. Steinhilb; Edwin S. Miyata; Thomas R. Crow

    1983-01-01

    Presents the green weights of the above-stump portion of trees, boles, and residue for red oak, red maple, and white birch in northern Michigan. Estimating equations and green weight tables are included for the tree components of each species.

  8. 76 FR 69673 - Tart Cherries Grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... grower diversion certificates from the definition of handle. 2. Amendment 2 would revise the ``marketing...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 930 Tart Cherries Grown in Michigan, New... File Written Exceptions to Proposed Amendment of Marketing Order No. 930 AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing...

  9. 77 FR 13015 - Tart Cherries Grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    ...: Section 930.10, the definition of ``Handle''; Section 930.50, ``Marketing Policy'' and Section 930.58... from definition of handle. 2. Amendment 2 would revise the ``marketing policy'' provisions in section... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 930 Tart Cherries Grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon...

  10. Making Michigan Right-to-Work: Implementation Problems in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines how public school districts responded to Michigan's 2012 "right-to-work" law. It describes the key findings from reviews of more than 500 teacher collective bargaining agreements. It also raises several questions about the legality of some union contracts with regard to this new law. Approximately 75 percent of…

  11. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning. Volume 13, Number 1, Fall 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jeffrey, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    The "Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning" ("MJCSL") is a national, peer-reviewed journal consisting of articles written by faculty and service-learning educators on research, theory, pedagogy, and issues pertinent to the service-learning community. The "MJCSL" aims to: (1) widen the community of…

  12. 76 FR 41075 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Indiana; Michigan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... and `automatic stay' provisions that are applicable to Illinois Pollution Control Board hearings... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Indiana.... SUMMARY: EPA is taking final action to approve elements of submissions by Illinois, Indiana, Michigan...

  13. 75 FR 81561 - Huron-Manistee National Forests, Michigan, Land and Resource Management Plan Supplemental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... Forest Service Huron-Manistee National Forests, Michigan, Land and Resource Management Plan Supplemental... Environmental Impact Statement prepared for the Huron-Manistee Land and Resource Management Plan Revision of... Management'', then ``Forest Land and Resource Management Plan''. Individuals who use telecommunication...

  14. 76 FR 28068 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Anthropology, University of... intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Museum of Anthropology, University of... variety of archeological materials was purchased by the University of Michigan from Rev. L.P. Rowland of...

  15. Age and growth of round gobies in Lake Michigan, with preliminary mortality estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Bin; Madenjian, Charles P.; Xie, Cong X.; Zhao, Yingming; O'Brien, Timothy P.; Czesny, Sergiusz J.

    2015-01-01

    The round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) is a prevalent invasive species throughout Lake Michigan, as well as other Laurentian Great Lakes, yet little information is available on spatial variation in round goby growth within one body of water. Age and growth of round goby at three areas of Lake Michigan were studied by otolith analysis from a sample of 659 specimens collected from 2008 to 2012. Total length (TL) ranged from 48 to 131 mm for Sturgeon Bay, from 50 to 125 mm for Waukegan, and from 54 to 129 mm for Sleeping Bear Dunes. Ages ranged from 2 to 7 years for Sturgeon Bay, from 2 to 5 years for Waukegan, and from 2 to 6 years for Sleeping Bear Dunes. Area-specific and sex-specific body–otolith relationships were used to back-calculate estimates of total length at age, which were fitted to von Bertalanffy models to estimate growth rates. For both sexes, round gobies at Sleeping Bear Dunes and Waukegan grew significantly faster than those at Sturgeon Bay. However, round goby growth did not significantly differ between Sleeping Bear Dunes and Waukegan for either sex. At all three areas of Lake Michigan, males grew significantly faster than females. Based on catch curve analysis, estimates of annual mortality rates ranged from 0.79 to 0.84. These relatively high mortality rates suggested that round gobies may be under predatory control in Lake Michigan.

  16. Proposed Expansion of German Air Force Operations at Holloman AFB, New Mexico, Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2: Public Hearing Transcripts and Responses to Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    n -- n- ’U~ ~~~~~~~~~~ E2ni!..-nq *n nwv-ý- J v~.C n’ cC-. ~5-S. ~fiU C~;S. E u ; ~ ~’cl fi 13 zm’C; :ýA= -Z; 0 R ’_E Fq vf’C no S-a - o SOn o M0.v...Public Affairs Office are: 490 First Street, #2800 A a gooo - neig , Holloman AFB, NM 88330-8287 (505) 475-5406 co e wh atI "* We work with the Federal

  17. IRP stage 2 remedial investigation/feasibility study, Appendix L, for Bomarc Missile Site, McGuire AFB, New Jersey. Final report, November 1989-May 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, P.; Collins, D.

    1992-05-26

    This document is an appendix of the final RI/FS report for the BOMARC Missile Site, McGuire AFB, New Jersey. The BOMARC site became contaminated in 1960 as the result of a fire which partially consumed a nuclear warhead-equipped BOMARC missile. The purpose of the RI/FS report is to document the extent and magnitude of environmental contamination at the site, to assess risks to human health and the environment, to determine the need for site remediation, and to evaluate feasible remedial alternatives. Appendix L contains tables of analytical data.

  18. Transformación de la aflatoxina B1 de alimentos, en el cancerígeno humano, aducto AFB1-ADN

    OpenAIRE

    Carvajal, Magda

    2013-01-01

    Las aflatoxinas (AF) son metabolitos secundarios tóxicos principalmente de los hongos Aspergillus flavus y A. parasiticus, son potentes mutágenos y cancerígenos de alimentos y la exposición del hombre a ellas es continuo. Las AF se ligan al ADN, ARN y proteínas formando aductos AFB1-ADN que se acumulan por años y dañan desde los virus hasta el hombre. Es importante identificar y cuantificar estos aductos como biomarcadores de largo tiempo de riesgo de enfermedad, ya que originan mutaciones y ...

  19. Evaluating the economic and noneconomic impacts of the veterinary medical profession in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, J W; Dartt, B A

    2000-01-01

    This study reaffirms the diversity and breadth of the veterinary profession. As it turns out, some of the furthest-reaching impacts of the veterinary medical profession were largely non-quantifiable. The veterinary medical profession had a substantial direct economic impact in Michigan during 1995. The total economic contribution of the veterinary medical profession to Michigan during 1995 that was attributable to expenditures on salaries, supplies, services, and their multiplier effect was approximately $500 million. In addition, the profession was associated with nearly 8,500 jobs (combined professional and lay positions). The veterinary medical profession was also considered to have an impact on the prosperity of the live-stock, equine, and pet food industries in Michigan, even though the economic contribution in these areas could not be directly quantified. Economic well-being of the individual businesses in these industries is directly related to the health and productivity of the associated animals, and improvements in output or productivity that accompany improved animal health likely carry substantial economic benefits in these sectors. In addition, progressive animal health management provides a crucial method of managing risk in the animal industries. Similarly, although the economic contribution could not be quantified, the veterinary medical profession enhances the safety and quality of human food through research, regulation, and quality assurance programs in livestock production, minimizing the risk of drug residues and microbial contamination. During 1995, approximately 5.3 million Michigan residents benefitted from the physical, psychological, and emotional well-being that accompanies companion animal ownership. By preserving the health and longevity of companion animals, veterinarians sustain and enhance these aspects of the human-animal bond. As Michigan enters a new century, it is likely that the state's veterinary medical profession will

  20. Hydrology and land use in Van Buren County, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, T.R.; Twenter, F.R.; Holtschlag, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    This report gives the results of an investigation to determine the chemical and physical characteristics of ground and surface water in Van Buren County and to relate these characteristics to the agricultural use of land. Chemical inputs to the hydrologic system, including those from precipitation, animal wastes, septic tanks, and fertilizers, are assessed. Land-use, geologic setting, and hydrologic conditions are given as a necessary framework for interpretations. The land surface in Van Buren county in southwestern Michigan is flat to rolling, and ranges in altitude from 580 to 1,050 feet. About 30,000 acres or 7.4 percent of land is irrigated. Annual precipitation ranges from 34 to 36 inches. Two rivers--the Paw Paw and South Branch Black--drain most of the county. During this study, the maximum discharge of the Paw Paw River was 2,500 cubic feet per second; the minimum discharge was 202 cubic feet per second. The average discharge of the South Branch Black River during a 17- year period of record has been 106 cubic feet per second. Glacial deposits are the principal source of ground-water supplies. These deposits range in thickness from 100 to 600 feet and consist of till, outwash, and materials of lacustrine and eolian origin. In places the deposits fill buried valleys that are as much as 400 feet deep. The Coldwater Shale of Mississippian age, which underlies the glacial deposits, is mostly shale and usually yields only small amounts of salty water. Of the glacial deposits, outwash is the most productive aquifer. Most domestic wells obtain water from outwash at depths ranging from 15 to 160 feet. Irrigation wells capable of yielding 1,000 gallons per minute generally are about 200 feet deep. In places in the western part of the county, glacial deposits, which are several hundred feet thick, are mostly clay and yield little or no water. Areal variations in the chemical and physical characteristics of ground and surface water are related to land use and

  1. A GIS-Enabled, Michigan-Specific, Hierarchical Groundwater Modeling and Visualization System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q.; Li, S.; Mandle, R.; Simard, A.; Fisher, B.; Brown, E.; Ross, S.

    2005-12-01

    Efficient management of groundwater resources relies on a comprehensive database that represents the characteristics of the natural groundwater system as well as analysis and modeling tools to describe the impacts of decision alternatives. Many agencies in Michigan have spent several years compiling expensive and comprehensive surface water and groundwater inventories and other related spatial data that describe their respective areas of responsibility. However, most often this wealth of descriptive data has only been utilized for basic mapping purposes. The benefits from analyzing these data, using GIS analysis functions or externally developed analysis models or programs, has yet to be systematically realized. In this talk, we present a comprehensive software environment that allows Michigan groundwater resources managers and frontline professionals to make more effective use of the available data and improve their ability to manage and protect groundwater resources, address potential conflicts, design cleanup schemes, and prioritize investigation activities. In particular, we take advantage of the Interactive Ground Water (IGW) modeling system and convert it to a customized software environment specifically for analyzing, modeling, and visualizing the Michigan statewide groundwater database. The resulting Michigan IGW modeling system (IGW-M) is completely window-based, fully interactive, and seamlessly integrated with a GIS mapping engine. The system operates in real-time (on the fly) providing dynamic, hierarchical mapping, modeling, spatial analysis, and visualization. Specifically, IGW-M allows water resources and environmental professionals in Michigan to: * Access and utilize the extensive data from the statewide groundwater database, interactively manipulate GIS objects, and display and query the associated data and attributes; * Analyze and model the statewide groundwater database, interactively convert GIS objects into numerical model features

  2. Geodatabase of the datasets used to represent the two subunits of the Pennsylvanian aquifer in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase includes spatial datasets that represent the Pennsylvanian aquifers in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan. Included are: (1) polygon extents; datasets...

  3. Wildlife risks associated with passage of contaminated, anadromous fish at Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Licensed Dams in Michigan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this paper is to assess the issue of anadromous fish passage at Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) licensed hydropower dams in Michigan and...

  4. 78 FR 9640 - Safety Zones; Annual Events Requiring Safety Zones in the Captain of the Port Lake Michigan Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ....m. (2) Michigan Aerospace Challenge Sport Rocket Launch; Muskegon, MI. (i) Location. All waters of... second Friday of June; 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. (8) Harborfest Music and Family Festival; Racine, WI. (i...

  5. 75 FR 20982 - University of Michigan, et al., Notice of Consolidated Decision on Applications for Duty-Free...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    ... Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 49109-2122. Instrument: Tester for TFT Imager. Manufacturer: Siemens AG, Corporate... to image side walls with an exposed tip glass AFM probe and the ability to image in both NSOM and AFM...

  6. Towards a Symbiotic Relationship Between Academic Libraries and Disciplinary Data Repositories: A Dryad and University of Michigan Case Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katherine G. Akers; Jennifer A. Green

    2014-01-01

    ... into external disciplinary data repositories. In this paper, we focus on the University of Michigan Library and Dryad, a repository for scientific and medical data, as a case study to explore possible forms of partnership between academic...

  7. 2008 US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) National Coastal Mapping Program (NCMP) Topobathy Lidar - Illinois (Lake Michigan shoreline)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data contained in these files contain hydrographic and topographic data collected by the CHARTS system along the Lake Michigan coast of Illinois from September...

  8. Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Optimization, Clare Water Supply Superfund Site, Permeable Reactive Barrier and Soil Remedy Areas, Clare, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report contains a review of the long-term groundwater monitoring network for the Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) and Soil Remedy Areas at the Clare Water Supply Superfund Site in Clare, Michigan.

  9. Michigan Department of Transportation state planning and research part II program : research and implementation manual [revised June 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The Research and Implementation Manual describes the administrative processes used by : Research Administration to develop and implement the Michigan Department of Transportation : (MDOT) research program. Contents of this manual include a discussion...

  10. 2008 US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) National Coastal Mapping Program (NCMP) Topobathy Lidar - Indiana (Lake Michigan shoreline)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data contained in these files contain topographic data collected by the CHARTS system along Lake Michigan, Indiana. The data are broken into boxes. The box...

  11. Evaluating the financial cost and impact on long-term pavement performance of expediting Michigan's road construction work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) has been using monetary incentive payments for many : years to accelerate highway construction work, resulting in reduced delays to the traveling public. It was : envisioned that incentive/disincentive...

  12. The University of Michigan Dioxin Exposure Study: Population Survey Results and Serum Concentrations for Polychlorinated Dioxins, Furans, and Biphenyls

    OpenAIRE

    Hedgeman, Elizabeth; Chen, Qixuan; Hong, Biling; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Olson, Kristen; LaDronka, Kathleen; Ward, Barbara; Adriaens, Peter; Demond, Avery; Gillespie, Brenda W.; Lepkowski, James; Franzblau, Alfred; Garabrant, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Background The University of Michigan Dioxin Exposure Study was undertaken to address concerns that the discharge of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzo furans (PCDFs) from the Dow Chemical Company in the Midland, Michigan, area had resulted in contamination of soils in the Tittabawassee River floodplain and the city of Midland, leading to an increase in residents? body burdens of these compounds. Objective In this article we present descriptive statistics fr...

  13. RETENTION AND EXPANSION ISSUES AND CONCERNS OF RURAL BUSINESSES: SOME FINDINGS FROM SURVEYS IN THE WESTERN UPPER PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN

    OpenAIRE

    Abate-Kassa, Getachew; Moser, Colletta H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper is part of a series of reports of the activities conducted under a grant from the Fund for Rural America, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Funds for the grant entitled "Enhancing Rural Economies Through Comprehensive Extension, Research & Partnering Approaches Using Multi-County Clusters in Michigan With Application to National Rural Settings" were received by Michigan State University's Department of Agricultural Economics in March, 1998. The major goal of the grant is to increase ...

  14. Digital Surface and Terrain Models (DSM,DTM), Nearshore topographic and bathymetric survey along the Lake Michigan coast immediately north and south of St. Joseph River outlet in the City of St. Joseph, Michigan, Published in 2017, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Michigan Coastal Zone Management Program.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Digital Surface and Terrain Models (DSM,DTM) dataset current as of 2017. Nearshore topographic and bathymetric survey along the Lake Michigan coast immediately north...

  15. The Polish version of the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire: Cross-cultural adaptation, reliability, construct validity, and measurement error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziej, Mateusz; Trybus, Marek; Mydłowska, Anna; Sałapa, Kinga; Gniadek, Maksymilian; Banach, Marta; Brudnicki, Jarosław

    2018-02-01

    The aims of this study were to translate the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire into the Polish language and to test the measurement properties of its quality criteria. A total of 120 patients with hand complaints completed the Polish Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire on the first assessment, along with the grip test, pinch test, and pain sore assessed using a visual analogue scale during activity. After 7 days, 76 patients completed the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire the second time. The Cronbach alpha of the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire subscales ranged from 0.79 to 0.96. The intraclass correlation coefficient varied from 0.82-0.97, and the Bland-Altman method indicated the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire total score limit of agreement was -13.2-12.3 and -9.18-9.62 for the right and left hand, respectively. The construct validity revealed a moderate to strong correlation between every subscale of the Polish Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand, but they only correlated with the grip test and the visual analogue scale, and neither correlated with the pinch test. The study demonstrated properties similar to the original version, validating the belief that the use of this questionnaire in medical practice in Poland is justified.

  16. Ground-water supplies of the Ypsilanti area, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Charles L.; Poindexter, O.F.; Otton, E.G.

    1949-01-01

    As of the date of this report (August 1945), the major water users in the Ypsilanti area are: (1) the city of Ypsilanti, (2) the Willow Run bomber plant, built by the Federal Government and operated by the Ford Motor Co., and (3) the war housing project of the Federal Public Housing Authority, designated in this report the Willow Run Townsite. The city, bomber plant, and townsite have required large quantities of water for domestic and industrial uses, and the necessary water supplies have been developed from wells. The Federal Works Agency had the responsibility of deciding whether the existing water facilities were adequate to meet the expected demands and determining the character of any additional public water-supply facilities that might be constructed with Federal assistance. In order to appraise the ground-water resources of the area the Federal Works Agency requested the Geological Survey to investigate the adequacy of the existing supplies and the availability of additional water. The present report is the result of the investigation, which was made in cooperation with the Michigan Geological Survey Division.The water supplies of the three major users are obtained from wells penetrating glacial and associated sands and gravels. Supplies for the city of Ypsilanti and the Willow Run bomber plant are obtained from wells in the valley of the Huron River; the supply for the Willow Run Townsite is obtained from wells penetrating glacial gravels underlying the upland northeast of the valley. The bedrock formations of the area either yield little water to wells or yield water that is too highly mineralized for most uses.The water supply for the bomber plant is obtained from three closely spaced, highly productive wells at the northern edge of the Huron River, a little more than 3 miles southeast of Ypsilanti. The water receives complete treatment in a modern treatment plant. River water also can be treated and has been used occasionally in the winter and spring

  17. Beam position and phase measurements of microampere beams at the Michigan State University REA3 facility

    CERN Document Server

    Crisp, J; Durickovic, B; Kiupel, G; Krause, S; Leitner, D; Nash, S; Rodriguez, J A; Russo, T; Webber, R; Wittmer, W; Eddy, N; Briegel, C; Fellenz, B; Slimmer, D; Wendt, M

    2013-01-01

    A high power CW, heavy ion linac will be the driver accelerator for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) being designed at Michigan State University (MSU). The linac requires a Beam Position Monitoring (BPM) system with better than 100 micron resolution at 100 microamperes beam current. A low beam current test of the candidate technology, button pick-ups and direct digital down-conversion signal processing, was conducted in the ReA3 re-accelerated beam facility at Michigan State University. The test is described. Beam position and phase measurement results, demonstrating ~250 micron and ~1.5 degree resolution in a 45 kHz bandwidth for a 1.0 microampere beam current, are reported.

  18. Michigan Senate Bill 826: Replace Common Core with pre-2011 Massachusetts Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Stotsky

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Interested in academic standards and assessments proven to raise student achievement? You won’t get that from the Common Core Standards and their associated consortium tests, PARCC and SBAC. Despite the boisterous hype of higher, deeper, richer, more rigorous, and so on, there exists no valid evidence to support their claims of higher quality, achievement, or college readiness. There is a set of state standards and assessments, however, proven through actual experience to have raised academic achievement for students at all levels and in all curricular pathways: those used in Massachusetts from 2000 to 2011. So, why not use them? Such a proposal was recently proposed, and passed, by the Michigan Senate Education Policy Committee. Here, we provide links to Sandra Stotsky’s testimony before that committee, along with other relevant links. - See more at: http://nonpartisaneducation.org/Review/Resources/MichiganBill.htm

  19. Application study of wind power technology to the city of Hart, Michigan, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmussen, J.; Krauss, O.; Park, G. L; Linvill, D. E

    1978-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of wind-electric systems, six generation expansion alternatives were examined for Hart, Michigan--a city of 2,500 located near Lake Michigan where the average coastal wind velocities range from 5 to 7 m/s. Five of the alternatives included combinations of 500 and 1500 kW wind turbines (1975 GE parameters) and a 1 MW hydro plant while the last was a 3600 kW diesel generator. Wind velocity was estimated using data from U.S. Coast Guard stations along the shore and verified by a two-year measurement program. The Hart electrical system was represented by an hourly production cost program and the total cost calculations followed the ERDA/EPRI standard for solar energy evaluation.

  20. NCCN Guidelines implementation in the multidisciplinary Merkel Cell Carcinoma Program at the University of Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jennifer L; Wong, Sandra L; McLean, Scott A; Hayman, James A; Lao, Christopher D; Kozlow, Jeffrey H; Malloy, Kelly M; Bradford, Carol R; Frohm, Marcus L; Fullen, Douglas R; Lowe, Lori; Bichakjian, Christopher K

    2014-03-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare malignancy of the skin, and prospective randomized clinical studies on management and treatment are very limited. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for MCC provide up-to-date, best evidence-based, and consensus-driven management pathways with the purpose of providing best care and outcomes. Multidisciplinary management with consensus treatment recommendations to individualize patient care within the framework of these guidelines is optimal. The University of Michigan multidisciplinary MCC program uses NCCN Guidelines in the management and treatment of its patients. This article discusses 4 patient presentations to highlight the implementation of the NCCN Guidelines for MCC at the University of Michigan.

  1. Building Surface Science Capacity to Serve the Automobile Industry in Southeastern Michigan, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Weidian

    2013-09-27

    This project, “Building Surface Science Capacity to Serve the Automobile Industry in Southeastern Michigan” was carried out in two phases: (1) the 2009 – 2012 renovation of space in the new EMU Science Complex, which included the Surface Science Laboratory (SSL), a very vigorous research lab at EMU that carries on a variety of research projects to serve the auto and other industries in Michigan; and (2) the 2013 purchase of several pieces of equipment to further enhance the research capability of the SSL. The funding granted by the DoE was proposed to “renovate the space in the Science Complex to include SSL and purchase equipment for tribological and electrochemical impedance measurements in the lab, thus SSL will serve the auto and other industries in Michigan better.” We believe we have fully accomplished the mission.

  2. Antibiotic, Pharmaceutical, and Wastewater-Compound Data for Michigan, 1998-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Sheridan Kidd

    2010-01-01

    Beginning in the late 1990's, the U.S. Geological Survey began to develop analytical methods to detect, at concentrations less than 1 microgram per liter (ug/L), emerging water contaminants such as pharmaceuticals, personal-care chemicals, and a variety of other chemicals associated with various human and animal sources. During 1998-2005, the U.S. Geological Survey analyzed the following Michigan water samples: 41 samples for antibiotic compounds, 28 samples for pharmaceutical compounds, 46 unfiltered samples for wastewater compounds (dissolved and suspended compounds), and 113 filtered samples for wastewater compounds (dissolved constituents only). The purpose of this report is to summarize the status of emerging contaminants in Michigan waters based on data from several different project-specific sample-collection efforts in Michigan during an 8-year period. During the course of the 8-year sampling effort, antibiotics were determined at 20 surface-water sites and 2 groundwater sites, pharmaceuticals were determined at 11 surface-water sites, wastewater compounds in unfiltered water were determined at 31 surface-water sites, and wastewater compounds in filtered water were determined at 40 surface-water and 4 groundwater sites. Some sites were visited only once, but others were visited multiple times. A variety of quality-assurance samples also were collected. This report describes the analytical methods used, describes the variations in analytical methods and reporting levels during the 8-year period, and summarizes all data using current (2009) reporting criteria. Very few chemicals were detected at concentrations greater than current laboratory reporting levels, which currently vary from a low of 0.005 ug/L for some antibiotics to 5 ug/L for some wastewater compounds. Nevertheless, 10 of 51 chemicals in the antibiotics analysis, 9 of 14 chemicals in the pharmaceuticals analysis, 34 of 67 chemicals in the unfiltered-wastewater analysis, and 56 of 62 chemicals in

  3. Nearshore energy subsidies support Lake Michigan fishes and invertebrates following major changes in food web structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turschak, Benjamin A; Bunnell, David B.; Czesny, Sergiusz J.; Höök, Tomas O.; Janssen, John; Warner, David M.; Bootsma, Harvey A

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic food webs that incorporate multiple energy channels (e.g. nearshore benthic or pelagic) with varying productivity and turnover rates convey stability to biological communities by providing multiple independent energy sources. Within the Lake Michigan food web, invasive dreissenid mussels have caused rapid changes to food web structure and potentially altered the channels through which consumers acquire energy. We used stable C and N isotopes to determine how Lake Michigan food web structure has changed in the past decade, coincident with the expansion of dreissenid mussels, decreased pelagic phytoplankton production and increased nearshore benthic algal production. Fish and invertebrate samples collected from sites around Lake Michigan were analyzed to determine taxa-specific 13C:12C (delta 13C) and 15N:14N (delta 15N) ratios. Sampling took place during two distinct periods, 2002-2003 and 2010-2012, that spanned the period of dreissenid expansion, and included nearshore, pelagic and profundal fish and invertebrate taxa. Magnitude and direction of the 13C shift indicated significantly greater reliance upon nearshore benthic energy sources among nearly all fish taxa as well as profundal invertebrates. Although the mechanisms underlying this 13C shift likely varied among species, possible causes include the transport of benthic algal production to offshore waters and an increased reliance on nearshore prey items. Delta 15N shifts were more variable and of smaller magnitude across taxa although declines in delta 15N among some pelagic fishes may indicate a shift to alternative prey resources. Lake Michigan fishes and invertebrates appear to have responded to dreissenid induced changes in nutrient and energy pathways by switching from pelagic to alternative nearshore energy subsidies. Although large shifts in energy allocation (i.e. pelagic to nearshore benthic) resulting from invasive species appear to have affected total production at upper trophic

  4. Lesser scaup forage on zebra mussels at Cook nuclear plant, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C.A.; Carlson, J.

    1993-01-01

    Nineteen of 21 Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis) entrained while foraging at the water intake structures of Cook Nuclear Plant, Bridgman, Michigan had consumed zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha). The average number of zebra mussels in the upper gastrointestinal tract was 260; maximum number was 987. Migrating Lesser Scaup found this new food source during the first winter following settlement of zebra mussels on the water intake structures of the power plant.

  5. Exploratory energy research program at the University of Michigan. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, W.

    1980-12-08

    A DOE grant to the University of Michigan for an Exploratory Energy Research Program is being used by the U-M Office of Energy Research (OER) to support faculty research and grad student research assistantships. Progress on activity during the first six months of the program is described and brief status reports on 20 energy-related faculty research projects in the physical, engineering, biological, and behavioral sciences are presented.

  6. Moth and carabid beetle species associated with two ecological phases in northern Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy T. Work; Deborah G. McCullough; William J. Mattson

    1998-01-01

    More than 12,300 moths and 2,500 carabid beetles were trapped during 3 years (1993 through 1995) in two different ecological land type phases (ELTP's) in the Huron-Manistee National Forest in Michigan. One ELTP (no. 20) was dominated by oaks, and the other (no. 45) was dominated by sugar maple; each had distinctive kinds of insects, in spite of the fact that many...

  7. [Michigan Technological University Pre-Service Teacher Enhancement Program]. [Includes a copy of the Student Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.S.; Yarroch, W.L.

    1993-04-27

    The Michigan Technological University Teacher Education Program received funding from the US Department of Energy for the purpose of providing capable and suitably inclined, MTU Engineering and Science students a chance to explore high school level science and mathematics teaching as a career option. Ten undergraduate students were selected from nominations and were paired with mentor teachers for the study. This report covers the experience of the first ten nominees and their participation in the program.

  8. [Michigan Technological University Pre-Service Teacher Enhancement Program]. Progress performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.S.; Yarroch, W.L.

    1993-04-27

    The Michigan Technological University Teacher Education Program received funding from the US Department of Energy for the purpose of providing capable and suitably inclined, MTU Engineering and Science students a chance to explore high school level science and mathematics teaching as a career option. Ten undergraduate students were selected from nominations and were paired with mentor teachers for the study. This report covers the experience of the first ten nominees and their participation in the program.

  9. Seasonal stability of Cladophora-associated Salmonella in Lake Michigan watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byappanahalli, M.N.; Sawdey, R.; Ishii, S.; Shively, D.A.; Ferguson, J.A.; Whitman, R.L.; Sadowsky, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    The bacterial pathogens Shigella, Salmonella, Campylobacter, and shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) were recently found to be associated with Cladophora growing in southern Lake Michigan. Preliminary results indicated that the Salmonella strains associated with Cladophora were genetically identical to each other. However, because of the small sample size (n = 37 isolates) and a lack of information on spatial-temporal relationships, the nature of the association between Cladophora and Salmonella remained speculative. In this study, we investigated the population structure and genetic relatedness of a large number of Cladophora-borne Salmonella isolates from Lake Michigan (n = 133), as well as those isolated from stream and lake water (n = 31), aquatic plants (n = 8), and beach sands and sediments (n = 8) from adjacent watersheds. Salmonella isolates were collected during 2005-2007 between May and August from Lake Michigan beachsheds in Wisconsin, Illinois, and Indiana. The genetic relatedness of Salmonella isolates was examined by using the horizontal, fluorophore-enhanced rep-PCR (HFERP) DNA fingerprinting technique. While the Salmonella isolates associated with Cladophora exhibited a high degree of genetic relatedness (???92% similarity), the isolates were not all genetically identical. Spatial and temporal relationships were evident in the populations examined, with tight clustering of the isolates both by year and location. These findings suggest that the relationship between Salmonella and Cladophora is likely casual and is related to input sources (e.g. wastewater, runoff, birds) and the predominant Salmonella genotype surviving in the environment during a given season. Our studies indicate that Cladophora is likely an important reservoir for Salmonella and other enteric bacterial pathogens in Lake Michigan beachsheds, which in turn may influence nearshore water quality. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Who Are the Homeless? Student Mobility and Achievement in Michigan 2010-2013. Working Paper #53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    I provide a new, systematic profile of more than 18,000 homeless students in Michigan, utilizing rich administrative data from all test-taking students in grades 3-9 during the 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13 school years. These data are part of a larger study of school choice and student mobility in that state. Homelessness is a condition found…

  11. Spawning habitat unsuitability: an impediment to cisco rehabilitation in Lake Michigan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Rutherford, Edward S.; Blouin, Marc A.; Sederberg, Bryan J.; Elliott, Jeff R.

    2011-01-01

    The cisco Coregonus artedi was one of the most important native prey fishes in Lake Michigan and in the other four Laurentian Great Lakes. Most of the cisco spawning in Lake Michigan was believed to have occurred in Green Bay. The cisco population in Lake Michigan collapsed during the 1950s, and the collapse was attributed in part to habitat degradation within Green Bay. Winter water quality surveys of lower Green Bay during the 1950s and 1960s indicated that the bottom dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration was less than 2 mg/L throughout much of the lower bay, and most cisco eggs would not successfully hatch at such low DO concentrations. To determine present-day spawning habitat suitability in lower Green Bay, we compared cisco egg survival in lower Green Bay with survival at a reference site (St. Marys River, Michigan–Ontario) during 2009. We also conducted winter water quality surveys in lower Green Bay and the St. Marys River during 2009 and 2010. Cisco egg survival in lower Green Bay averaged 65.3%, which was remarkably similar to and not significantly different from the mean at the St. Marys River site (64.0%). Moreover, the lowest bottom DO concentrations recorded during the winter surveys were 11.2 mg/L in lower Green Bay and 12.7 mg/L in the St. Marys River. These relatively high DO concentrations would not be expected to have any negative effect on cisco egg survival. We conclude that winter water quality conditions in lower Green Bay were suitable for successful hatching of cisco eggs and that water quality during the egg incubation period did not represent an impediment to cisco rehabilitation in Lake Michigan. Our approach to determining spawning habitat suitability for coregonids would be applicable to other aquatic systems.

  12. Movements of yellow perch marked in southern Green Bay, Lake Michigan, in 1950

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mraz, Donald

    1952-01-01

    To obtain information on the post-spawning movements of yellow perch that spawn in southern Green Bay, Lake Michigan, 4,172 fish caught in drop nets were marked by tagging with monel-metal strap tags attached to the right operculum and 24,799 were marked by clipping off the second or membranous dorsal fin. Marking was done during the period from May 3 to 17, 1950, at six main stations, all located in the southern end of Green Bay.

  13. Spread of the Emerging Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus Strain, Genotype IVb, in Michigan, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Mohamed; Shavalier, Megan; Kim, Robert K.; Millard, Elena V.; Gunn, Michelle R.; Winters, Andrew D.; Schulz, Carolyn A.; Eissa, Alaa; Thomas, Michael V.; Wolgamood, Martha; Whelan, Gary E.; Winton, James

    2012-01-01

    In 2003, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) emerged in the Laurentian Great Lakes causing serious losses in a number of ecologically and recreationally important fish species. Within six years, despite concerted managerial preventive measures, the virus spread into the five Great Lakes and to a number of inland waterbodies. In response to this emerging threat, cooperative efforts between the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MI DNR), the Michigan State University Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory (MSU-AAHL), and the United States Department of Agriculture-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (USDA-APHIS) were focused on performing a series of general and VHSV-targeted surveillances to determine the extent of virus trafficking in the State of Michigan. Herein we describe six years (2005–2010) of testing, covering hundreds of sites throughout Michigan’s Upper and Lower Peninsulas. A total of 96,228 fish representing 73 species were checked for lesions suggestive of VHSV and their internal organs tested for the presence of VHSV using susceptible cell lines. Of the 1,823 cases tested, 30 cases from 19 fish species tested positive for VHSV by tissue culture and were confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Gene sequence analyses of all VHSV isolates retrieved in Michigan demonstrated that they belong to the emerging sublineage “b” of the North American VHSV genotype IV. These findings underscore the complexity of VHSV ecology in the Great Lakes basin and the critical need for rigorous legislation and regulatory guidelines in order to reduce the virus spread within and outside of the Laurentian Great Lakes watershed. PMID:22754647

  14. Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages and Liquor Consumption by Michigan High School Students, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Katherine R; Largo, Thomas W; Miller, Corinne; Kanny, Dafna; Brewer, Robert D

    2015-11-12

    Excessive alcohol consumption was responsible for approximately 4,300 annual deaths in the United States among people younger than 21 from 2006 through 2010. Underage drinking cost the United States $24.6 billion in 2006. Previous studies have shown that liquor is the most common type of alcohol consumed by high school students. However, little is known about the types of liquor consumed by youth or about the mixing of alcohol with energy drinks. The 2011 Michigan Youth Tobacco Survey was used to assess usual alcohol beverage consumption and liquor consumption and the mixing of alcohol with energy drinks by Michigan high school students. Beverage preferences were analyzed by demographic characteristics and drinking patterns. Overall, 34.2% of Michigan high school students consumed alcohol in the past month, and 20.8% reported binge drinking. Among current drinkers, liquor was the most common type of alcohol consumed (51.2%), and vodka was the most prevalent type of liquor consumed by those who drank liquor (53.0%). The prevalence of liquor consumption was similar among binge drinkers and nonbinge drinkers, but binge drinkers who drank liquor were significantly more likely than nonbinge drinkers to consume vodka and to mix alcohol with energy drinks (49.0% vs 18.2%, respectively). Liquor is the most common type of alcoholic beverage consumed by Michigan high school students; vodka is the most common type of liquor consumed. Mixing alcohol and energy drinks is common, particularly among binge drinkers. Community Guide strategies for reducing excessive drinking (eg, increasing alcohol taxes) can reduce underage drinking.

  15. Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages and Liquor Consumption by Michigan High School Students, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzales, Katherine R.; Largo, Thomas W.; Miller, Corinne; Kanny, Dafna; Brewer, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Excessive alcohol consumption was responsible for approximately 4,300 annual deaths in the United States among people younger than 21 from 2006 through 2010. Underage drinking cost the United States $24.6 billion in 2006. Previous studies have shown that liquor is the most common type of alcohol consumed by high school students. However, little is known about the types of liquor consumed by youth or about the mixing of alcohol with energy drinks. Methods The 2011 Michigan Youth T...

  16. Nearshore energy subsidies support Lake Michigan fishes and invertebrates following major changes in food web structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turschak, Benjamin A; Bunnell, David; Czesny, Sergiusz; Höök, Tomas O; Janssen, John; Warner, David; Bootsma, Harvey A

    2014-05-01

    Aquatic food webs that incorporate multiple energy channels (e.g., nearshore benthic and pelagic) with varying productivity and turnover rates convey stability to biological communities by providing independent energy sources. Within the Lake Michigan food web, invasive dreissenid mussels have caused rapid changes to food web structure and potentially altered the channels through which consumers acquire energy. We used stable C and N isotopes to determine how Lake Michigan food web structure has changed in the past decade, coincident with the expansion of dreissenid mussels, decreased pelagic phytoplankton production, and increased nearshore benthic algal production. Fish and invertebrate samples collected from sites around Lake Michigan were analyzed to determine taxa-specific 13C:12C (delta13C) and 15N:14N (delta15N) ratios. Sampling took place during two distinct periods, 2002-2003 and 2010-2012, that spanned the period of dreissenid expansion, and included nearshore, pelagic and profundal fish and invertebrate taxa. The magnitude and direction of the delta13C shift indicated significantly greater reliance upon nearshore benthic energy sources among nearly all fish taxa as well as profundal invertebrates following dreissenid expansion. Although the mechanisms underlying this delta13C shift likely varied among species, possible causes include the transport of benthic algal production to offshore waters and increased feeding on nearshore prey items by pelagic and profundal species. delta15N shifts were more variable and of smaller magnitude across taxa, although declines in delta15N among some pelagic fishes suggest a shift to alternative prey resources. Lake Michigan fishes and invertebrates appear to have responded to dreissenid-induced changes in nutrient and energy pathways by switching from pelagic to alternative nearshore energy subsidies. Although large shifts in energy allocation (i.e., pelagic to nearshore benthic) resulting from invasive species appear

  17. Sediment Budget on the Indiana Shore at Burns Harbor, Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-15

    1960s, and the USACE was well aware of potential littoral disruptions. Burns Waterway Harbor is located within a longshore littoral drift system with...formation of the Indiana Dunes 146 20/03/2015 16 pp 3 National Lakeshore (Engel 1983, Franklin and Schaeffer 1983, Higgs 1995). The Harbor is a...shores of Lake Michigan,” University of Illinois Press, Urbana, IL, 278 p. Higgs , S. (1995). “Eternal Vigilance: Nine Tales of Environmental

  18. Spread of the Emerging Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus Strain, Genotype IVb, in Michigan, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Winton

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2003, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV emerged in the Laurentian Great Lakes causing serious losses in a number of ecologically and recreationally important fish species. Within six years, despite concerted managerial preventive measures, the virus spread into the five Great Lakes and to a number of inland waterbodies. In response to this emerging threat, cooperative efforts between the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MI DNR, the Michigan State University Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory (MSU-AAHL, and the United States Department of Agriculture-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (USDA-APHIS were focused on performing a series of general and VHSV-targeted surveillances to determine the extent of virus trafficking in the State of Michigan. Herein we describe six years (2005–2010 of testing, covering hundreds of sites throughout Michigan’s Upper and Lower Peninsulas. A total of 96,228 fish representing 73 species were checked for lesions suggestive of VHSV and their internal organs tested for the presence of VHSV using susceptible cell lines. Of the 1,823 cases tested, 30 cases from 19 fish species tested positive for VHSV by tissue culture and were confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Gene sequence analyses of all VHSV isolates retrieved in Michigan demonstrated that they belong to the emerging sublineage “b” of the North American VHSV genotype IV. These findings underscore the complexity of VHSV ecology in the Great Lakes basin and the critical need for rigorous legislation and regulatory guidelines in order to reduce the virus spread within and outside of the Laurentian Great Lakes watershed.

  19. Factors Affecting Seasonal Walkability in a Cold Climate Community: A Case Study of East Lansing, Michigan, in Collaboration with Michigan State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne M. WESTPHAL

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available At its most basic level, community involvement has as its primary goal the betterment of the community. In this study, we investigated how community involvement (a form of social capital interrelates with seasonal walkability, cycling, and running in a cold climate community like East Lansing, Michigan. A head of household survey (of 505 individuals in three different neighborhoods was conducted that asked residents about their weekly exercise patterns, and their personal service involvement with others in their neighborhoods. Poor walkability in a community is thought to be an important limiting factor to human health and a contributing factor to obesity due to an increased dependency on the automobile. Previous studies show strong correlations between physical characteristics of the built environment and the incidence of obesity in a community. In this study, we integrated dimensions of seasonal weather phenomena, socio-demographic characteristics of neighborhoods (including current levels of physical activity, and expressions of social capital into a social-environmental model of the built environment and human health. Results of this communityuniversity partnership suggest ways to enhance the city’s ability to mobilize community resources, and prioritize its own resources, in creating a more pedestrian- and cyclist-friendly environment for its citizens. It also provides insight into how, when and why citizens engage in community life, and what public officials can do to improve long-term citizen involvement in issues affecting health and quality of life in East Lansing, Michigan, USA.

  20. Comparative recruitment dynamics of Alewife and Bloater in Lakes Michigan and Huron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collingsworth, Paris D.; Bunnell, David B.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Riley, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    The predictive power of recruitment models often relies on the identification and quantification of external variables, in addition to stock size. In theory, the identification of climatic, biotic, or demographic influences on reproductive success assists fisheries management by identifying factors that have a direct and reproducible influence on the population dynamics of a target species. More often, models are constructed as one-time studies of a single population whose results are not revisited when further data become available. Here, we present results from stock recruitment models for Alewife Alosa pseudoharengus and Bloater Coregonus hoyi in Lakes Michigan and Huron. The factors that explain variation in Bloater recruitment were remarkably consistent across populations and with previous studies that found Bloater recruitment to be linked to population demographic patterns in Lake Michigan. Conversely, our models were poor predictors of Alewife recruitment in Lake Huron but did show some agreement with previously published models from Lake Michigan. Overall, our results suggest that external predictors of fish recruitment are difficult to discern using traditional fisheries models, and reproducing the results from previous studies may be difficult particularly at low population sizes.

  1. Diet of lake trout and burbot in northern Lake Michigan during spring: Evidence of ecological interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Gregory R.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Bunnell, David B.; Holuszko, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    We used analyses of burbot (Lota lota) and lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) diets taken during spring gill-net surveys in northern Lake Michigan in 2006-2008 to investigate the potential for competition and predator-prey interactions between these two species. We also compared our results to historical data from 1932. During 2006-2008, lake trout diet consisted mainly of alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), whereas burbot utilized a much wider prey base including round goby (Neogobius melanostomus), rainbow smelt, alewives, and sculpins. Using the Schoener's diet overlap index, we found a higher potential for interspecific competition in 1932 than in 2006-2008, though diet overlap was not significant in either time period. No evidence of cannibalism by lake trout or lake trout predation on burbot was found in either time period. In 2006-2008, however, lake trout composed 5.4% (by weight) of burbot diet. To determine whether this predation could be having an impact on lake trout rehabilitation efforts in northern Lake Michigan, we developed a bioenergetic-based consumption estimate for burbot on Boulder Reef (a representative reef within the Northern Refuge) and found that burbot alone can consume a considerable proportion of the yearling lake trout stocked annually, depending on burbot density. Overall, we conclude that predation, rather than competition, is the more important ecological interaction between burbot and lake trout, and burbot predation may be contributing to the failed lake trout rehabilitation efforts in Lake Michigan.

  2. Genetic diversity of lake whitefish in lakes Michigan and Huron: sampling, standardization, and research priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Wendylee; VanDeHey, Justin A.; Sloss, Brian L.

    2010-01-01

    We combined data from two laboratories to increase the spatial extent of a genetic data set for lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis from lakes Huron and Michigan and saw that genetic diversity was greatest between lakes, but that there was also structuring within lakes. Low diversity among stocks may be a reflection of relatively recent colonization of the Great Lakes, but other factors such as recent population fluctuation and localized stresses such as lamprey predation or heavy exploitation may also have a homogenizing effect. Our data suggested that there is asymmetrical movement of lake whitefish between Lake Huron and Lake Michigan; more genotypes associated with Lake Michigan were observed in Lake Huron. Adding additional collections to the calibrated set will allow further examination of diversity in other Great Lakes, answer questions regarding movement among lakes, and estimate contributions of stocks to commercial yields. As the picture of genetic diversity and population structure of lake whitefish in the Great Lakes region emerges, we need to develop methods to combine data types to help identify important areas for biodiversity and thus conservation. Adding genetic data to existing models will increase the precision of predictions of the impacts of new stresses and changes in existing pressures on an ecologically and commercially important species.

  3. Compliance with physical activity recommendations by walking for exercise--Michigan, 1996 and 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-30

    Physical inactivity is an important modifiable risk factor for many diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and osteoporosis. The 1996 Surgeon General's report (1) recommended that persons of all ages obtain "a minimum of 30 minutes of physical activity of moderate intensity (e.g., brisk walking) on most, if not all, days of the week." Walking is encouraged as one of the most accessible ways to be physically active (2), is the most commonly reported leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) in the United States, and is relatively common among groups that are typically inactive (e.g., the elderly and low-income groups) (3). To determine whether exercise characteristics (i.e., duration, frequency, and speed of walking) of Michigan adults met the Surgeon General's recommendations, the Michigan Department of Community Health analyzed data from the 1996 and 1998 Michigan Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for those who reported walking as their only LTPA. This report summarizes the results of this analysis, which indicate that most walkers need to increase the frequency and perhaps the speed of their walking to comply with recommendations.

  4. Mixed stock analysis of Lake Michigan's Lake Whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis commercial fishery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andvik, Ryan; Sloss, Brian L.; VanDeHey, Justin A.; Claramunt, Randall M.; Hansen, Scott P.; Isermann, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) support the primary commercial fishery in Lake Michigan. Discrete genetic stocks of lake whitefish have been identified and tagging data suggest stocks are mixed throughout much of the year. Our objectives were to determine if (1) differential stock harvest occurs in the commercial catch, (2) spatial differences in genetic composition of harvested fish were present, and (3) seasonal differences were present in the harvest by commercial fisheries that operate in management zones WI-2 and WFM-01 (Green Bay, Lake Michigan). Mixed stock analysis was conducted on 17 commercial harvest samples (n = 78–145/sample) collected from various ports lake-wide during 2009–2010. Results showed significant mixing with variability in stock composition across most samples. Samples consisted of two to four genetic stocks each accounting for ≥ 10% the catch. In 10 of 17 samples, the stock contributing the largest proportion made up Big Bay de Noc (Michigan) stock as opposed to the geographically proximate, North–Moonlight Bay (Wisconsin) stock. These findings have implications for management and allocation of fish to various quotas. Specifically, geographic location of harvest, the current means of allocating harvest quotas, is not the best predictor of genetic stock harvest.

  5. Distribution and phenology of Dasineura oxycoccana (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) in Michigan blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Noel G; Isaacs, Rufus

    2012-06-01

    The blueberry gall midge, Dasineura oxycoccana Johnson, is a serious pest of rabbiteye blueberries in Florida, Georgia, and Mississippi, and a potential pest of southern and northern highbush blueberries. Its damage has been observed with increasing frequency in highbush blueberry plantings in the Great Lakes region, including in Wisconsin and in Michigan. Unlike in rabbiteye blueberry plantings, where blueberry gall midge primarily damages flowering buds, it is found to damage only the vegetative shoots of northern highbush blueberry. In this study, farms throughout Michigan were surveyed for the presence of blueberry gall midge and it was found in 43 of 46 sampled farms in 11 counties. From 2009-2011, several monitoring techniques, including yellow sticky traps, emergence traps, observational sampling, and vegetative shoot dissections were used to determine the ecology of this species in blueberry fields in southwest Michigan. Emergence traps were most useful in early detection of blueberry gall midge in April, and observational sampling for damage symptoms and vegetative shoot dissections revealed multiple population peaks throughout July and August. Infestation was detected in vegetative shoot tips in all parts of the bushes, with initial infestation greatest at the base of bushes. Degree day accumulations until first midge detection and peak infestation suggest some potential for predicting key events in the pest's phenology. This information about the distribution and timing of infestation will be useful in developing management strategies for blueberry gall midge infestation.

  6. Factors associated with the deposition of Cladophora on Lake Michigan beaches in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Stephen C.; Tucker, Taaja R.; Adams, Jean V.; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Lafrancois, Brenda Moraska

    2015-01-01

    Deposition of the macroalgae Cladophora spp. was monitored on 18 beaches around Lake Michigan during 2012 at a high temporal frequency. We observed a high degree of spatial variability in Cladophora deposition among beaches on Lake Michigan, even within local regions, with no clear regional pattern in the intensity of Cladophora deposition. A strong seasonal pattern in Cladophora deposition was observed, with the heaviest deposition occurring during mid-summer. Several beaches exhibited high temporal variability in Cladophora deposition over short time scales, suggesting that drifting algal mats may be extremely dynamic in nearshore environments of the Great Lakes. Cladophora deposition on Lake Michigan beaches was primarily related to the presence of nearshore structures, local population density, and nearshore bathymetry. There was relatively little evidence that waves, winds, or currents were associated with Cladophora deposition on beaches, but this may be due to the relatively poor resolution of existing nearshore hydrodynamic data. Developing a predictive understanding of beach-cast Cladophora dynamics in Great Lakes environments may require both intensive Cladophora monitoring and fine-scale local hydrodynamic modeling efforts.

  7. Inter-annual Variability of Snowfall in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, L.

    2016-12-01

    Winter snowfall, particularly lake-effect snowfall, impacts all aspects of Michigan life in the wintertime, from motorsports and tourism to impacting the day-to-day lives of residents. Understanding the inter-annual variability of winter snowfall will provide sound basis for local community safety management and improve weather forecasting. This study attempts to understand the trend in winter snowfall and the influencing factors of winter snowfall variability in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan (LPM) using station snowfall measurements and statistical analysis. Our study demonstrates that snowfall has significantly increased from 1932 to 2015. Correlation analysis suggests that regionally average air temperatures have a strong negative relationship with snowfall in LPM. On average, approximately 27% of inter-annual variability in snowfall can be explained by regionally average air temperatures. ENSO events are also negatively related to snowfall in LPM and can explain 8% of inter-annual variability. North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) does not have strong influence on snowfall. Composite analysis demonstrates that on annual basis, more winter snowfall occurs during the years with higher maximum ice cover (MIC) than during the years with lower MIC in Lake Michigan. Higher MIC is often associated with lower air temperatures which are negatively related to winter snowfall. This study could provide insight on future snow related climate model improvement and weather forecasting.

  8. The presence and near-shore transport of human fecal pollution in Lake Michigan beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, S.L.; Liu, L.B.; Phanikumar, M.S.; Jenkins, T.M.; Wong, M.V.; Rose, J.B.; Whitman, R.L.; Shively, D.A.; Nevers, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    The Great Lakes are a source of water for municipal, agricultural and industrial use, and support significant recreation, commercial and sport fishing industries. Every year millions of people visit the 500 plus recreational beaches in the Great Lakes. An increasing public health risk has been suggested with increased evidence of fecal contamination at the shoreline. To investigate the transport and fate of fecal pollution at Great Lakes beaches and the health risk associated with swimming at these beaches, the near-shore waters of Mt Baldy Beach, Lake Michigan and Trail Creek, a tributary discharging into the lake were examined for fecal pollution indicators. A model of surf zone hydrodynamics coupled with a transport model with first-order inactivation of pollutant was used to understand the relative importance of different processes operating in the surf zone (e.g. physical versus biological processes). The Enterococcus human fecal pollution marker, which targets a putative virulence factor, the enterococcal surface protein (esp) in Enterococcus faecium, was detected in 2/28 samples (7%) from the tributaries draining into Lake Michigan and in 6/30 samples (20%) from Lake Michigan beaches. Preliminary analysis suggests that the majority of fecal indicator bactateria variation and water quality changes at the beaches can be explained by inputs from the influential stream and hydrometeorological conditions. Using modeling methods to predict impaired water quality may help reduce potential health threats to recreational visitors.

  9. A comparison of hydrologic and functional trait domains from floodplain landscapes in Michigan and Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Appledorn, M.; Baker, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    Riparian forest ecosystems are ecologically important areas strongly influenced by hydrologic processes. Although studies from different regions suggest that variation in flood dynamics structures plant communities within and among watersheds, we still lack the ability to predict biotic responses to different flow regimes. Functional traits have the potential to yield insight into community structuring mechanisms not apparent without controlled experimentation, and may lead to region-specific improvement of conservation and restoration practices. The objectives of this study are to 1) quantify patterns of flood dynamics and functional trait distributions for riparian forests across two disparate regions (Maryland and Michigan's lower peninsula), and 2) compare trait-environment domains to evaluate the transferability of inter-regional riparian studies. Flood frequency, intensity and duration were characterized using long-term USGS gauge data for over 200 Maryland and Michigan rivers. Species lists were obtained from riparian inventories throughout Maryland and Michigan's lower peninsula and were related to functional traits representing growth, competition, regenerative processes, and adaptive strategies for disturbance resistance and resilience. We found that floods in Maryland tend to be less frequent and more energetically intense than in Michigan, where high baseflow yields lead to longer duration floods and less tractive power. In contrast with the hydrologic domains, functional trait distributions had a high degree of overlap between Maryland and Michigan. Species from both regions comprised each of the 9 functional groups represented by the combined sample, and both regions had similar measures of functional diversity (FDis MD = 0.143, FDis MI = 0.161). Trait distributions suggest that the states have comparable trait pools despite distinct species composition and environmental settings. This study demonstrates that regional shifts in environmental domains

  10. Combined-sewer overflow data and methods of sample collection for selected sites, Detroit, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweat, M.J.; Wolf, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    The discharge of untreated sewage is illegal in Michigan unless permitted under Act 245 due to public health concerns. In October, 1992, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR, now the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality) issued a discharge permit to Detroit authorizing discharge from the City's 78 combined-sewer overflows (CSOs), and requiring that a long-term control plan be developed to achieve mandated waterquality standards in receiving waters. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) issued a national CSO policy in April, 1994, which requires (1) operational improvements of existing systems to minimize discharges and prevent their occurrence in dry weather; (2) publicly operated treatment works (POTW) to characterize the frequency and volume of discharges; and (3) construction of CSO discharge control projects where necessary.In 1993, the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments (SEMCOG) requested assistance from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Detroit Water and Sewerage Department (DWSD) and MDNR, Surface Water Quality Division, to address part of the technical data requirements for requirement 2. The USGS scope of services for this interdisciplinary, multiagency investigation consisted of collection, compilation, and interpretation of the necessary hydrologic data, and documentation of results. In addition to USGS personnel, personnel from DWSD assisted with the field collection of samples and in alerting USGS personnel to CSO effluent discharges.From October 1, 1994 through December 31, 1995, four CSOs discharging to the Detroit River in Detroit, Michigan (figure 1) were monitored to characterize storm-related water quantity and quality. Water velocity, stage, and precipitation were measured continuously and recorded at 5-minute intervals. Water-quality samples were collected at discrete times during storms and analyzed for inorganic and organic pollutants. Discharges were sampled between 30 and 78 times

  11. Distribution of radioactivity from AFB{sub 1} {sup 3}H in Wistar rats fed with diets contained active yeast strain Y904

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Antonio S.; Abdalla, Adibe L.; Brigide, Priscila; Castilho, Lecio A.; Walder, Julio M.M. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: asbaptis@cena.usp.br; abdalla@cena.usp.br; brigide@cena.usp.br; lcastil@cena.usp.br; jwalder@cena.usp.br; Aguiar, Claudio Lima de [Universidade do Norte do Parana (Unopar), Londrina, PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: claguiar@yahoo.com.br; Baptista, Ana Angelita Sampaio [Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: angelita_sampaio@yahoo.com.br; Micheluchi, David; Gloria, Eduardo M.; Calori-Domingues, Maria A; Horii, Jorge [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: dmiquell@esalq.usp.br; emgloria@carpa.ciagri.usp.br; macdomin@esalq.usp.br; jhorri@esalq.usp.br; Cabral Filho, Sergio L.S. [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Instituto Central de Ciencias Ala Sul]. E-mail: slcabral@unb.br; Vizioli, Mario R. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia]. E-mail: vizioli@fop.unicamp.br

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this research was to study the action way of the yeast strain Y904 on the AFB{sub 1} 3{sup H} and it effects on the aflatoxicosis. With this purpose were conducted two assays. The first was a radioassay, which 18 animals were separated into two groups of nine each; these ones received diets free yeast (T1) and with yeast (T2). Besides, both groups, received from AFB{sub 1} 3{sup H} a dose of 12580 Becquerel. The radioactivity was monitored during 72 h. In another assay, twelve animals were divided in groups with four each and they were submitted, during 28 days, to the following treatments: negative control (group A), positive control (group B) and diets supplemented with the yeast strain Y904 (group C). In this study, the livers tissues were analyzed. There was verified in the animals submitted to the T1 and T2 eliminated approximately 80 % of the radioactive molecules in 72 h, the radioactivity content in livers were near of 0.5 % in both treatment and the concentration in the carcasses were 10.5 and 15 %, T1 and T2, respectively. The histopathological study revealed hepatotoxicity in the animals that received the positive control diet and the animals that received diets supplemented with yeast they did not showed cytotoxic signs. In conclusion, the absorption, distribution and excretion of aflatoxin B{sub 1}, in Wistar rats fed with diets contained the yeast strain Y904 or without this yeast are similar and, the yeast strain Y904 is able to reduce the hepatotoxicity promoted by aflatoxin ingestion. (author)

  12. Interaction of mammary bovine ABCG2 with AFB1 and its metabolites and regulation by PCB 126 in a MDCKII in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzini, L; Halwachs, S; Girolami, F; Badino, P; Honscha, W; Nebbia, C

    2017-12-01

    The ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter ABCG2 plays a key role in the mammary excretion of drugs and toxins in humans and animals. Aflatoxins (AF) are worldwide contaminants of food and feed commodities, while PCB 126 is a dioxin-like PCB which may contaminate milk and dairy products. Both compounds are known human carcinogens. The interactions between AF and bovine ABCG2 (bABCG2) as well as the effects of PCB 126 on its efflux activity have been investigated by means of the Hoechst H33342 transport assay in MDCKII cells stably expressing mammary bABCG2. Both AFB1 and its main milk metabolite AFM1 showed interaction with bABCG2 even at concentrations approaching the legal limits in feed and food commodities. Moreover, PCB 126 significantly enhanced bABCG2 functional activity. Specific inhibitors of either AhR (CH233191) or ABCG2 (Ko143) were able to reverse the PCB 126-induced increase in bABCG2 transport activity, showing the specific upregulation of the efflux protein by the AhR pathway. The incubation of PCB 126-pretreated cells with AFM1 was able to substantially reverse such effect, with still unknown mechanism(s). Overall, results from this study point to AFB1 and AFM1 as likely bABCG2 substrates. The PCB 126-dependent increased activity of the transporter could enhance the ABCG2-mediated excretion into dairy milk of chemicals (i.e., drugs and toxins) potentially harmful to neonates and consumers. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Effect of lake-wide planktivory by the pelagic prey fish community in Lakes Michigan and Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Peter S.; Stewart, Donald J.; Lantry, Brian F.; Rudstam, Lars G.; Johannsson, Ora E.; Goyke, Andrew P.; Brandt, Stephen B.; O'Gorman, Robert; Eck, Gary W.

    1995-01-01

    We compared predatory demand by pelagic planktivorous prey fish with invertebrate production in Lake Michigan during 1987 and in Lake Ontario during 1990. Predation by the planktivores in Lake Ontario was nearly fourfold higher than in Lake Michigan (approx. 87 g wet weight∙m−2∙year−1). Predation rates on Mysis were comparable in Lakes Michigan and Ontario (approx. 21 g∙m−2∙year−1), while predation on Diporeia was markedly higher in Lake Michigan than in Lake Ontario (21.3 vs. 8.5 g wet weight∙m−2∙year−1). In Lake Ontario, predatory demand on zooplankton exceeded our best estimate of production by a factor of 1.7. Similarly, predation estimates on Mysis in Lake Ontario were 1.2–2.0 times the estimated rate of production, depending on the production model used. Lake Michigan planktivores consumed approximately 55% of available zooplankton production in 1987, indicating that competition for prey resources, if operating, was not as intense as that in Lake Ontario in 1990. It is unclear how to resolve the paradox that predation could markedly exceed available prey production in some cases. There could be sources of error in the estimates of both the supply and demand sides of these trophic relationships.

  14. Mortality of smelt, Osmerus mordax (Mitchill), in Lakes Huron and Michigan during the fall and winter of 1942-1943

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oosten, John

    1947-01-01

    The mortality that nearly exterminated the huge stocks of smelt in Lakes Huron and Michigan during the fall and winter of 1942–1943 appears to have originated in central Lake Huron in the Saginaw Bay area in late September or early October 1942. The mortality spread rapidly northward reaching the Drummond Island area about the latter part of October and the St. Ignace region of the Straits of Mackinac near the end of the month. In the latter part of October smelt died also in the Canadian waters of Lake Huron including North Channel and Georgian Bay but exact details as to time and course are lacking. There is some evidence that the epidemic had not reached the Ontario shore of central Lake Huron by late May 1943. Spreading through northern Lake Michigan the mortality had penetrated as far south as Grand Traverse Bay by November 19 and as far west as Point Aux Barques, Michigan, by November 26, 1942. Smelt were reported to be dying in Lake Charlevoix, Michigan, in early February 1943, and in Green Bay toward the middle of that month. The mortality did not reach Crystal Lake where in contrast to Lake Charlevoix a dam barred the passage of fish from Lake Michigan. At the time of the 1943 spring spawning run (April) only a few scattered survivors remained from the vast populations.

  15. An integrated assessment for wind energy in Lake Michigan coastal counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordman, Erik; VanderMolen, Jon; Gajewski, Betty; Isely, Paul; Fan, Yue; Koches, John; Damm, Sara; Ferguson, Aaron; Schoolmaster, Claire

    2015-04-01

    The benefits and challenges of onshore and offshore wind energy development were assessed for a 4-county area of coastal Michigan. Economic, social, environmental, and spatial dimensions were considered. The coastal counties have suitable wind resources for energy development, which could contribute toward Michigan's 10% renewable energy standard. Wind energy is cost-effective with contract prices less than the benchmark energy price of a new coal-fired power plant. Constructing a 100 MW wind farm could have a $54.7 million economic impact. A patchwork of township-level zoning ordinances regulates wind energy siting. Voluntary collaborations among adjacent townships standardizing the ordinances could reduce regulatory complexity. A Delphi Inquiry on offshore wind energy in Lake Michigan elicited considerable agreement on its challenges, but little agreement on the benefits to coastal communities. Offshore turbines could be acceptable to the participants if they reduced pollution, benefited coastal communities, involved substantial public participation, and had minimal impact on property values and tourism. The US Coast Guard will take a risk-based approach to evaluating individual offshore developments and has no plans to issue blanket restrictions around the wind farms. Models showed that using wind energy to reach the remainder of the 10% renewable energy standard could reduce SO2 , NOx , and CO2 pollution by 4% to 7%. Turbines are highly likely to impact the area's navigational and defense radar systems but planning and technological upgrades can reduce the impact. The integrated assessment shows that responsible wind energy development can enhance the quality of life by reducing air pollution and associated health problems and enhancing economic development. Policies could reduce the negative impacts to local communities while preserving the benefits to the broader region. © 2015 SETAC.

  16. Active use of coyotes (Canis latrans) to detect Bovine Tuberculosis in northeastern Michigan, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, A R; Dunbar, M R; Johnson, S R; Robbe-Austerman, S; Martinez, L; Jones, R L

    2011-07-05

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is endemic in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in northeastern Michigan, USA, and research suggests transmission to cattle. Prevalence of the disease in deer is estimated at 1.8%, but as prevalence decreases the difficulty of detection increases. Research suggests coyotes (Canis latrans) have a higher prevalence of bTB in Michigan than deer and sampling coyotes may be a more efficient surveillance tool to detect presence or spread of the disease. Coyotes possess suitable ecological characteristics to serve as a sentinel species, assuming transmission between coyotes is not significant. The question of whether free-ranging coyotes shed Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bTB, has not been previously addressed. We actively used coyotes as a sentinel to detect bTB in infected and uninfected counties in Michigan's Northeastern Lower Peninsula. We determined whether bTB infection was present through bacteriologic culture of lymph nodes and tissues containing lesions and cultured oral/nasal swabs and feces to establish shedding. Seventeen of 171 coyotes were M. bovis culture positive, one of which was from a previously uninfected county. All oral, nasal secretions and feces were culture negative suggesting minimal, if any, shedding of M. bovis. Thus, infection of coyotes is likely to occur through ingestion of infected deer carcasses and not from interaction with conspecifics. These findings support previous research suggesting that coyotes are useful sentinels for bTB. The use of coyotes as a sentinel, may allow wildlife managers to detect the spread of bTB into naïve counties. With earlier detection managers may be able to take proactive surveillance measures to detect the disease in deer and reduce the potential risk to domestic livestock and captive deer herds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The role of natural enemy foraging guilds in controlling cereal aphids in Michigan wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarzoda, Shahlo; Bahlai, Christine A; Fox, Aaron F; Landis, Douglas A

    2014-01-01

    Insect natural enemies (predators and parasitoids) provide important ecosystem services by suppressing populations of insect pests in many agricultural crops. However, the role of natural enemies against cereal aphids in Michigan winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is largely unknown. The objectives of this research were to characterize the natural enemy community in wheat fields and evaluate the role of different natural enemy foraging guilds (foliar-foraging versus ground-dwelling predators) in regulating cereal aphid population growth. We investigated these objectives during the spring and summer of 2012 and 2013 in four winter wheat fields on the Michigan State University campus farm in East Lansing, Michigan. We monitored and measured the impact of natural enemies by experimentally excluding or allowing their access to wheat plants infested with Rhopalosiphum padi (L.) and Sitobion avenae (F.) (Hemiptera: Aphidae). Our results indicate that the natural enemy community in the wheat fields consisted mostly of foliar-foraging and ground-dwelling predators with relatively few parasitoids. In combination, these natural enemy groups were very effective at reducing cereal aphid populations. We also investigated the role of each natural enemy foraging guild (foliar-foraging versus ground-dwelling predators) independently. Overall, our results suggest that, in combination, natural enemies can almost completely halt early-season aphid population increase. Independently, ground-dwelling predators were more effective at suppressing cereal aphid populations than foliar-foraging predators under the conditions we studied. Our results differ from studies in Europe and the US Great Plains where foliar foraging predators and parasitoids are frequently more important cereal aphid natural enemies.

  18. Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Flavobacterium psychrophilum Isolates from the Great Lakes Basin, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vliet, Danielle; Loch, Thomas P; Smith, Peter; Faisal, Mohamed

    2017-09-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is a serious pathogen of salmonids worldwide, a matter that is compounded by the lack of effective vaccine preparations. As a result, biosecurity measures and antimicrobial agents remain the only available methods to control diseases caused by F. psychrophilum. It is feared that antimicrobial use may have led to the development of F. psychrophilum strains with reduced susceptibility. Therefore, the primary objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of 50 F. psychrophilum isolates from Michigan in response to 10 antimicrobial compounds. As recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute and the World Organization of Animal Health, a standardized microdilution broth assay was employed to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for ampicillin (AMP), gentamicin (GEN), enrofloxacin (ENRO), oxolinic acid (OXO), flumequine (FLUQ), trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (SXT), ormetoprim-sulphadimethoxine (PRI), erythromycin (ERY), florfenicol (FFN), and oxytetracycline (OXY). Epidemiological cutoff values were calculated using the normalized resistance interpretation (CONRI) and the ECOFFinder analysis methods (COECOFF). The MIC distributions in response to OXY exhibited bimodality, indicating the presence of isolates with reduced susceptibility in addition to the wild-type isolates. The OXY epidemiological cutoff values (COECOFF <0.06 μg/ml; CONRI <0.12 μg/ml) demonstrated that 24% of Michigan isolates exhibited reduced susceptibility to this commonly used drug. No other antimicrobial exhibited a bimodal distribution of MICs. This study represents the first antimicrobial susceptibility assessment of F. psychrophilum strains recovered from Michigan and contributes valuable data to the worldwide validation efforts to determine universal epidemiological cutoff values of this deadly fish pathogen.

  19. Vulnerability to extreme-heat-associated hospitalization in three counties in Michigan, USA, 2000-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbomo, Adesuwa S.; Gronlund, Carina J.; O'Neill, Marie S.; Konen, Tess; Cameron, Lorraine; Wahl, Robert

    2017-05-01

    With climate change, extreme heat (EH) events are increasing, so it is important to understand who is vulnerable to heat-associated morbidity. We determined the association between EH and hospitalizations for all natural causes; cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal diseases; diabetes mellitus; and acute myocardial infarction in Michigan, USA, at different intensities and durations. We assessed confounding by ozone and how individual characteristics and health insurance payer (a proxy for income) modified these associations. We obtained Michigan Inpatient Database, National Climatic Data Center, and US Environmental Protection Agency ozone data for May-September, 2000-2009 for three Michigan counties. We employed a case-crossover design and modeled EH as an indicator for temperature above the 95th, 97th, or 99th percentile thresholds for 1, 2, 3, or 4 days. We examined effect modification by patient age, race, sex, and health insurance payer and pooled the county results. Among non-whites, the pooled odds ratio for hospitalization on EH (97th percentile threshold) vs. non-EH days for renal diseases was 1.37 (95 % CI = 1.13-1.66), which increased with increasing EH intensity, but was null among whites (OR = 1.00, 95 % CI = 0.81, 1.25). We observed a null association between EH and cardiovascular hospitalization. EH (99th percentile threshold) was associated with myocardial infarction hospitalizations. Confounding by ozone was minimal. EH was associated with hospitalizations for renal disease among non-whites. This information on vulnerability to heat-associated morbidity helps characterize the public health burden of EH and target interventions including patient education.

  20. Completeness of reporting of chronic hepatitis B and C virus infections--Michigan, 1995-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are leading causes of death from cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in the United States. Because underreporting has complicated the understanding of disease burden, in 2010 the Institute of Medicine requested that CDC perform a comprehensive evaluation of national viral hepatitis surveillance. Hepatitis surveillance data rely on local and state estimates, and a better understanding of reporting at these levels can inform strategies to improve national data quality. As an initial assessment, CDC partnered with the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) and an urban health-care system in southeastern Michigan to evaluate the completeness of reporting (including case status, demographic, and risk factor information) of cases of chronic HBV and HCV infection among persons who were enrolled in a multicenter chronic hepatitis cohort study to the MDCH viral hepatitis registry. This report summarizes the results of that assessment. Among clinically confirmed chronic hepatitis infections, 82% of HBV infections and 65% of HCV infections were reported. Completeness of reporting of chronic HBV and HCV infections was significantly improved for those with more recent clinical diagnoses, but reporting still remained incomplete. The completeness of reporting varied significantly by demographic characteristics of patients with HCV infection. Few reports of either HBV or HCV infection included risk factors. Improving surveillance of chronic hepatitis in Michigan will require exploration of more efficient methods for the transfer of laboratory and clinical data and evaluation of the most appropriate sources for risk factor information to aid in the prevention of viral hepatitis transmission. Similar collaborations with health-care institutions that use electronic International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes and laboratory data can provide local and state health

  1. Local bladder cancer clusters in southeastern Michigan accounting for risk factors, covariates and residential mobility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey M Jacquez

    Full Text Available In case control studies disease risk not explained by the significant risk factors is the unexplained risk. Considering unexplained risk for specific populations, places and times can reveal the signature of unidentified risk factors and risk factors not fully accounted for in the case-control study. This potentially can lead to new hypotheses regarding disease causation.Global, local and focused Q-statistics are applied to data from a population-based case-control study of 11 southeast Michigan counties. Analyses were conducted using both year- and age-based measures of time. The analyses were adjusted for arsenic exposure, education, smoking, family history of bladder cancer, occupational exposure to bladder cancer carcinogens, age, gender, and race.Significant global clustering of cases was not found. Such a finding would indicate large-scale clustering of cases relative to controls through time. However, highly significant local clusters were found in Ingham County near Lansing, in Oakland County, and in the City of Jackson, Michigan. The Jackson City cluster was observed in working-ages and is thus consistent with occupational causes. The Ingham County cluster persists over time, suggesting a broad-based geographically defined exposure. Focused clusters were found for 20 industrial sites engaged in manufacturing activities associated with known or suspected bladder cancer carcinogens. Set-based tests that adjusted for multiple testing were not significant, although local clusters persisted through time and temporal trends in probability of local tests were observed.Q analyses provide a powerful tool for unpacking unexplained disease risk from case-control studies. This is particularly useful when the effect of risk factors varies spatially, through time, or through both space and time. For bladder cancer in Michigan, the next step is to investigate causal hypotheses that may explain the excess bladder cancer risk localized to areas of

  2. Management of bovine tuberculosis in Michigan wildlife: current status and near term prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Daniel J; Schmitt, Stephen M; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Berry, Dale E

    2011-07-05

    Surveillance and control activities for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in free-ranging Michigan white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) have now been underway for over a decade. Significant progress has been made, lowering apparent prevalence in deer in the core area by >60%, primarily via reduction of deer densities through hunting, and restrictions on public feeding and baiting of deer. These broad strategies of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR), implemented with the cooperation of Michigan deer hunters, halved the deer population in the bTB endemic area. However, as hunters see fewer deer, their willingness to sustain aggressive harvests has waned, and public resentment of control measures has grown. During the past four years, apparent prevalence in core area deer has held approximately steady just below 2%. After bottoming out in 2004 at an estimated 10-12 deer/km(2), deer numbers have since rebounded by ∼ 30%. Public compliance with baiting and feeding restrictions has been variable. In general, hunters in the core area do not perceive bTB as a problem, in spite of 13 years of MDNR outreach. To date, MDNR has expended more than US$23 million on TB-related activities. Of late, a substantial portion of that funding has been diverted to support other programs which have suffered from budget shortfalls. Livestock herd breakdowns continue to occur sporadically, averaging 3-4 per year 2005 to present. In total, 46 cattle and 4 captive deer herds have been diagnosed bTB positive statewide, the majority yielding only 1 positive animal. Five cattle herds were twice infected, one thrice. Michigan Department of Agriculture (MDA) policy emphasis has shifted towards obtaining producer support for wildlife risk mitigation and farm biosecurity. Funding has proven a limiting factor, with the majority of the US$63 million spent to date devoted to whole herd testing. Nevertheless, some initiatives justify cautious optimism. Promising research to support

  3. How are nursing homes cleaned? Results of a survey of 6 nursing homes in Southeast Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeb, Aya; Mody, Lona; Gibson, Kristen

    2017-11-01

    This brief report details 2 surveys that were conducted to better understand current cleaning practices in 6 nursing home facilities in Southeast Michigan. Each facility's environmental services supervisor answered questions regarding cleaning policy and procedures, roles and responsibilities of the staff, and frequency of education and training; one environmental services employee from each facility answered questions addressing education and training, employer evaluation and feedback, and workload. We identify gaps in knowledge and behaviors and note substantial variations in cleaning practices. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Investigation of earth's albedo using Skylab data. [White Sands, New Mexico and Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Specific test sites in the White Sands, New Mexico and Lake Michigan areas were chosen because of their stability and known reflectances. Skylab S192 multispectral data and ERIM aircraft multispectral data were collected for these sites and were compared with results of atmospheric radiative transfer calculations in order to determine the aerosol content of the atmosphere. The spectral shape of the Skylab data compared quite favorably with the nearly simultaneous spectral character of the aircraft data. Although there were difficulties in the calibration of the S192 instrument which remain unresolved, interesting mathematical and physical relationships were discovered.

  5. Advanced Characterization of Fractured Reservoirs in Carbonate Rocks: The Michigan Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, James R.; Harrison, William B.

    2000-10-24

    The main objective of this project is for a university-industry consortium to develop a comprehensive model for fracture carbonate reservoirs based on the ''data cube'' concept using the Michigan Basin as a prototype. This project combined traditional historical data with 2D and 3D seismic data as well as data from modern logging tools in a novel way to produce a new methodology for characterizing fractured reservoirs in carbonate rocks. Advanced visualization software was used to fuse the data and to image it on a variety of scales, ranging from basin-scale to well-scales.

  6. Bathymetry and selected perspective views of 6 reef and coastal areas in Northern Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Peter; Fleisher, Guy; Gardner, James V.; Lee, Kristen

    2003-01-01

    We apply state of the art laser technology and derivative imagery to map the detailed morphology and of principal lake trout spawning sites on reefs in Northern Lake Michigan and to provide a geologic interpretation. We sought to identify the presence of ideal spawning substrate: shallow, "clean" gravel/cobble substrate, adjacent to deeper water. This study is a pilot collaborative effort with the US Army Corps of Engineers SHOALS (Scanning Hydrographic Operational Airborne Lidar Survey) program. The high-definition maps are integrated with known and developing data on fisheries, as well as limited substrate sedimentologic information and underlying Paleozoic carbonate rocks.

  7. Hybrid Wall Evaluation for Ten New Construction Homes in Wyandotte, Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukachco, A.; Grin, A.; Bergey, D.

    2013-01-01

    The Wyandotte NSP2 project aims to build 20 new houses and retrofit 20 existing houses in Wyandotte, MI. This report will detail the design and construction of 10 new houses in the program. Wyandotte is part of a Michigan State Housing Development Authority-led consortium that is funded by HUD under the NSP2 program. The City of Wyandotte has also been awarded DOE EE&CBG funds that are being used to develop a district GSHP system to service the project. This draft report examines the energy efficiency recommendations for new construction at these homes.

  8. Hybrid Wall Evaluation for Ten New Construction Homes in Wyandotte, Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukachko, A. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Grin, A. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Bergey, D. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The Wyandotte NSP2 project aims to build 20 new houses and retrofit 20 existing houses in Wyandotte, MI. This report details the design and construction of 10 new houses in the program. Wyandotte is part of a Michigan State Housing Development Authority-lead consortium that is funded by HUD under the NSP2 program. The City of Wyandotte has also been awarded DOE EE&CBG funds that are being used to develop a district GSHP system to service the project. This draft report examines the energy efficiency recommendations for new construction at these homes.

  9. Geographic analysis of low birthweight and infant mortality in Michigan using automated zoning methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enander Helen

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infant mortality is a major public health problem in the State of Michigan and the United States. The primary adverse reproductive outcome underlying infant mortality is low birthweight. Visualizing and exploring the spatial patterns of low birthweight and infant mortality rates and standardized incidence and mortality ratios is important for generating mechanistic hypotheses, targeting high-risk neighborhoods for monitoring and implementing maternal and child health intervention and prevention programs and evaluating the need for health care services. This study investigates the spatial patterns of low birthweight and infant mortality in the State of Michigan using automated zone matching (AZM methodology and minimum case and population threshold recommendations provided by the National Center for Health Statistics and the US Census Bureau to calculate stable rates and standardized incidence and mortality ratios at the Zip Code (n = 896 level. The results from this analysis are validated using SaTScan. Vital statistics birth (n = 370,587 and linked infant death (n = 2,972 records obtained from the Michigan Department of Community Health and aggregated for the years 2004 to 2006 are utilized. Results For a majority of Zip Codes the relative standard errors (RSEs of rates calculated prior to AZM were greater than 20%. Spurious results were the result of too few case and birth counts. Applying AZM with a target population of 25 cases and minimum threshold of 20 cases resulted in the reconstruction of zones with at least 50 births and RSEs of rates 20–22% and below respectively, demonstrating the stability reliability of these new estimates. Other AZM parameters included homogeneity constraints on maternal race and maximum shape compactness of zones to minimize potential confounding. AZM identified areas with elevated low birthweight and infant mortality rates and standardized incidence and mortality ratios. Most but not all

  10. Public-Private Partnerships in Michigan During the Financial Crisis: The University's Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger E. HAMLIN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The following paper is the result of research conducted by the authors as a part of the Michigan State University, Institute for Public Policy and Social Research, Applied Public Policy Program. Specifically many findings were the result of a survey of economic development professionals conducted in 2009 in the middle of the economic/ financial crisis of that year. The first section describes the changing paradigm of public-private partnerships. The second section discusses publicprivate partnerships and the financial crisis. Part three describes the methodology of the study and the fourth part gives results of the survey. The last section provides a summary and conclusion.

  11. Examining Ecological and Ecosystem Level Impacts of Aquatic Invasive Species in Lake Michigan Using An Ecosystem Productivity Model, LM-Eco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecological and ecosystem-level impacts of aquatic invasive species in Lake Michigan were examined using the Lake Michigan Ecosystem Model (LM-Eco). The LM-Eco model includes a detailed description of trophic levels and their interactions within the lower food web of Lake Michiga...

  12. Reconnaissance of the Manistee River, a cold-water river in the northwestern part of Michigan's Southern Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, G.E.; Doonan, C.J.

    1972-01-01

    The cold-water streams of the northern states provide unique recreational values to the American people (wilderness or semi-wilderness atmosphere, fast-water canoeing, trout fishing), but expanding recreational needs must be balanced against the growing demand of water for public and industrial supplies, irrigation, and dilution of sewage and other wastes. In order to make intelligent decisions regarding use and management of water resources for recreation and other demands, an analysis of hydrologic factors related to recreation is essential.The Manistee River is one of Michigan's well-known trout streams-a stream having numerous public access sites and campgrounds. Upstream from Cameron Bridge (see location map) the Manistee is rated as a first-class trout stream but below Cameron Bridge the river is rated only as a fair trout stream by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. As a Michigan canoe trail it is second only to the Au Sable River in popularity. Esthetically, the Manistee is one of Michigan's most attractive rivers, its waters flowing cool and clean, and around each bend a pleasant wilderness scene. This report deals with that part of the river upstream from State Highway M-66 at Smithville. Several hard-surface roads give access to the upper river as shown on the location map. Numerous dirt roads and trails give access to the river at intermediate points. The recreational values of the Manistee depend on its characteristics of streamflow, water quality, and bed and banks. This atlas describes these characteristics and shows how they relate to recreational use.Much of the information presented here was obtained from basic records of the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Division. Additional information was obtained from field reconnaissance surveys in 1968 and 1969. The study was made in cooperation with the Michigan Geological Survey, Gerald E. Eddy, Chief. Assistance was also obtained from other sections of the Michigan Department of

  13. Basin-scale simulation of current and potential climate changed hydrologic conditions in the Lake Michigan Basin, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Daniel E.; Walker, John F.; Hunt, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) is the largest public investment in the Great Lakes in two decades. A task force of 11 Federal agencies developed an action plan to implement the initiative. The U.S. Department of the Interior was one of the 11 agencies that entered into an interagency agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as part of the GLRI to complete scientific projects throughout the Great Lakes basin. The U.S. Geological Survey, a bureau within the Department of the Interior, is involved in the GLRI to provide scientific support to management decisions as well as measure progress of the Great Lakes basin restoration efforts. This report presents basin-scale simulated current and forecast climatic and hydrologic conditions in the Lake Michigan Basin. The forecasts were obtained by constructing and calibrating a Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) model of the Lake Michigan Basin; the PRMS model was calibrated using the parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis (PEST) software suite. The calibrated model was used to evaluate potential responses to climate change by using four simulated carbon emission scenarios from eight general circulation models released by the World Climate Research Programme’s Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3. Statistically downscaled datasets of these scenarios were used to project hydrologic response for the Lake Michigan Basin. In general, most of the observation sites in the Lake Michigan Basin indicated slight increases in annual streamflow in response to future climate change scenarios. Monthly streamflows indicated a general shift from the current (2014) winter-storage/snowmelt-pulse system to a system with a more equally distributed hydrograph throughout the year. Simulated soil moisture within the basin illustrates that conditions within the basin are also expected to change on a monthly timescale. One effect of increasing air temperature as a result of the changing

  14. Case-control study of disease determinants for non-typhoidal Salmonella infections among Michigan children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Herbert D

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections with Salmonella serotypes continue to be a significant global public health problem. In addition to contaminated foods, several other sources contribute to infections with Salmonella serotypes. We have assessed the role of socioeconomic factors, exposure to food, and environmental sources in the etiology of non-typhoidal Salmonella infections in Michigan children. Findings A case-control study among Michigan children aged ≤ 10 years was conducted. A total of 123 cases of children with laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections and 139 control children, who had not experienced symptoms of gastrointestinal illness during the month prior to the interviews, were enrolled. The cases and controls were matched on age-category (Salmonella infections were significantly associated with attendance of a daycare center (adjusted matched odds ratio = 5.00, 95% CI: 1.51 - 16.58, contact with cats (MOR = 2.53, 95% CI: 1.14 - 5.88, and contact with reptiles (MOR = 7.90, 95% CI: 1.52 - 41.01, during the 3 days prior to the onset of child's illness. Conclusions Study results suggest that exposure to environmental sources may play an important role in sporadic infections with Salmonella serotypes in children. Additional efforts are needed to educate parents and caretakers about the risk of Salmonella transmission to children from these sources.

  15. Water-quality characteristics of Michigan's inland lakes, 2001-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, L.M.; Taricska, C.K.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) jointly monitored for selected water-quality constituents and properties of inland lakes during 2001–10 as part of Michigan's Lake Water-Quality Assessment program. During 2001–10, 866 lake basins from 729 inland lakes greater than 25 acres were monitored for baseline water-quality conditions and trophic status. This report summarizes the water-quality characteristics and trophic conditions of the monitored lakes throughout the State; the data include vertical-profile measurements, nutrient measurements at three discrete depths, Secchi-disk transparency (SDT) measurements, and chlorophyll a measurements for the spring and summer, with major ions and other chemical indicators measured during the spring at mid-depth and color during the summer from near-surface samples. In about 75 percent of inland lake deep basins (index stations), trophic characteristics were associated with oligotrophic or mesotrophic conditions; 5 percent or less were categorized as hypereutrophic, and 80 percent of hypereutrophic lakes had a maximum depth of 30 feet or less. Comparison of spring and summer measurements shows that water clarity based on SDT measurements were clearer in the spring than in the summer for 63 percent of lakes. For near-surface measurements made in spring, 97 percent of lakes can be considered phosphorus limited and less than half a percent nitrogen limited; for summer measurements, 96 percent of lakes can be considered phosphorus limited and less than half a percent nitrogen limited. Spatial patterns of major ions, alkalinity, and hardness measured in the spring at mid-depth all showed lower values in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and a southward increase toward the southern areas of the Lower Peninsula, though the location of increase varied by constituent. A spatial analysis of the data based on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Level III Ecoregions separated potassium

  16. Translation and cultural adaptation of the Brief Michigan Hand Questionnaire to Brazilian Portuguese language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Carlos Henrique; Neto, Jorge Raduan; Meirelles, Lia Miyamoto; Pereira, Carina Nascimento Mastrocinque; Dos Santos, João Baptista Gomes; Faloppa, Flavio

    2014-09-01

    The use of patient-reported outcome questionnaires is recommended in orthopedic studies. However, validated tools are necessary to ensure the comparability of results across different studies, centers, and countries. The Brief Michigan Hand Questionnaire (BMHQ) can be used for outcome measures in self-evaluation after carpal tunnel release. This study aimed to translate the BMHQ to Portuguese to permit cross-cultural adaptation to Brazilians patients. We translated the Brief Michigan Hand Questionnaire from the original version (English) to Brazilian Portuguese. The translation and cultural adaptation of the content of this tool consisted of six stages, according to the methodology proposed by medical literature: (1) initial translation of the questionnaire by two independent translators; (2) synthesis of translations and reconciliation; (3) back-translation to English of the reconciled version; (4) verification of the cultural equivalence process by an expert committee; (5) pre-testing in a sample of patients to verify understanding of the items; and (6) development of a final version of the BMHQ. The pre-final version of the tool was applied to 43 patients to verify its understanding. Pre-testing showed that the questions and options were satisfactorily understood. The number of items from the original English version was maintained in the Brazilian Portuguese version of BMHQ. The Brazilian Portuguese version of the BMHQ is easily understood by patients and will be useful to clinicians and researchers.

  17. Seasonal population characteristics of the opossum shrimp, Mysis relicta, in southeastern Lake Michigan, 1970-71

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, James B.; DeGraeve, G.M.

    1972-01-01

    This study of depth distribution, abundance, growth, reproduction and standing crop of the opossum shrimp, Mysis relicta, in southeastern Lake Michigan was based on monthly samples collected from August 1970 through July 1971 (except February and March). Population density was usually low at 10-20 fathoms, moderate at 25-30 fathoms and relatively high at 35 fathoms and deeper. Abundance was highest in midsummer and lowest in December. Free-living mysids were 3-25 mm long. Average growth rate was 1 mm per month. At maximum lengths, females were longer than males. Weight increased as approximately the cube of the length. The population consisted mostly of juveniles during summer and autumn and subadults and adults in winter and spring. Sizable numbers of adults apparently moved to relatively shallow water (10-35 fathoms) in winter, where they bred and released their young. In deeper water (40 fathoms or more), some reproduction occurred throughout the year. Most recruitment was in April and May. Standing crop ranged as high as 50 kg per hectare. Mysis apparently has a one-year life cycle in southeastern Lake Michigan.

  18. Evidence of Lake Trout reproduction at Lake Michigan's mid-lake reef complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, J.; Jude, D.J.; Edsall, T.A.; Paddock, R.W.; Wattrus, N.; Toneys, M.; McKee, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Mid-Lake Reef Complex (MLRC), a large area of deep (> 40 m) reefs, was a major site where indigenous lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Michigan aggregated during spawning. As part of an effort to restore Lake Michigan's lake trout, which were extirpated in the 1950s, yearling lake trout have been released over the MLRC since the mid-1980s and fall gill net censuses began to show large numbers of lake trout in spawning condition beginning about 1999. We report the first evidence of viable egg deposition and successful lake trout fry production at these deep reefs. Because the area's existing bathymetry and habitat were too poorly known for a priori selection of sampling sites, we used hydroacoustics to locate concentrations of large fish in the fall; fish were congregating around slopes and ridges. Subsequent observations via unmanned submersible confirmed the large fish to be lake trout. Our technological objectives were driven by biological objectives of locating where lake trout spawn, where lake trout fry were produced, and what fishes ate lake trout eggs and fry. The unmanned submersibles were equipped with a suction sampler and electroshocker to sample eggs deposited on the reef, draw out and occasionally catch emergent fry, and collect egg predators (slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus). We observed slimy sculpin to eat unusually high numbers of lake trout eggs. Our qualitative approaches are a first step toward quantitative assessments of the importance of lake trout spawning on the MLRC.

  19. Native Michigan plants stimulate soil microbial species changes and PAH remediation at a legacy steel mill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John C; Cable, Edward; Dabkowski, Robert T; Gargala, Stephanie; McCall, Daniel; Pangrazzi, Garett; Pierson, Adam; Ripper, Mark; Russell, Donald K; Rugh, Clayton L

    2013-01-01

    A 1.3-acre phytoremediation site was constructed to mitigate polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination from a former steel mill in Michigan. Soil was amended with 10% (v/v) compost and 5% (v/v) poultry litter. The site was divided into twelve 11.89 m X 27.13 m plots, planted with approximately 35,000 native Michigan perennials, and soils sampled for three seasons. Soil microbial density generally increased in subplots of Eupatorium perfoliatum (boneset), Aster novae-angliae (New England aster), Andropogon gerardii (big bluestem), and Scirpus atrovirens (green bulrush) versus unplanted subplots. Using enumeration assays with root exudates, PAH degrading bacteria were greatest in soils beneath plants. Initially predominant, Arthrobacter were found capable of degrading a PAH cocktail in vitro, especially upon the addition of root exudate. Growth of some Arthrobacter isolates was stimulated by root exudate. The frequency of Arthrobacter declined in planted subplots with a concurrent increase in other species, including secondary PAH degraders Bacillus and Nocardioides. In subplots supporting only weeds, an increase in Pseudomonas density and little PAH removal were observed. This study supports the notion that a dynamic interplay between the soil, bacteria, and native plant root secretions likely contributes to in situ PAH phytoremediation.

  20. 'Born in Michigan? You're in the biobank': engaging population biobank participants through Facebook advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, J E; Platt, T; Thiel, D; Kardia, S L R

    2013-01-01

    Despite a broad call for biobanks to use social media, data is lacking regarding the capacity of social media tools, especially advertising, to engage large populations on this topic. We used Facebook advertising to engage Michigan residents about the BioTrust for Health. We conducted a low-budget (Facebook advertisements and analyzed their performance in terms of reach and cost across 3 engagement types: passive, active and interactive. We compared engagement before, during and after the campaign. The Facebook page was viewed 1,249 times during the month of the advertising campaign, versus once in the month prior. 779,004 Michigan residents saw ads an average of 25.8 times; 4,275 clicked ads; the average click-through-ratio was 0.021%. Interactions included 516 'likes' and 30 photo contest entries. Cost per outcome ranged from advertisements have the capacity to scale-up engagement on biobanking while keeping costs manageable. Facebook advertisements provide necessary access points for unaware participants, with implications for public trust. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Theme Semester at the University of Michigan: The Universe - Yours to Discover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Shannon

    2008-09-01

    The Theme Semester program in the College of Literature Science and the Arts (LSA) at the University of Michigan brings the resources of a major University to the students and wider community. The winter 2009 theme semester was chosen to match the IYA: The Universe, Yours to Discover. This poster will present the programs and activities planned and sponsored by LSA, the Department of Astronomy, the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, the Student Astronomical Society, the Department of Physics, the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, the Residential College, University Libraries, local libraries, and other university divisions and local organizations. Among the major events is a distinguished lecture series on Friday evenings followed by free public planetarium shows and public observing. The Special Collections Library will hold a special exhibition of their collection, which includes a copy of Principia and some of Galileo's first notes on the moons of Jupiter. Several new courses are planned, including the first offering of "Life in the Universe", an introductory astronomy class with a focus on astrobiology. Cultural programs include a production of Bertolt Brecht's "Galileo” and an astronomy theme to the Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra's youth concerts. Most of the programming is offered free to students and free or low admission to the general public. A website is planned as a clearinghouse for information and resources.

  2. Physical and chemical data for ground water in the Michigan basin, 1986-89

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannemiller, G.T.; Baltusis, Matthew A.

    1990-01-01

    Ground-water samples were collected from 459 wells located in the Michigan basin as part of a Regional Aquifer-System Analysis. Data on the physical and chemical characteristics of 476 ground-water samples from these wells represent ground-water characteristics in the Berea Sandstone, Coldwater Shale, Marshall Sandstone, Michigan Formation, Bayport Limestone, Saginaw Formation, Grand River Formation, and glacial deposits. Ground-water samples were measured in the Geld for specific conductance, temperature, and alkalinity. Analyses of ground water for concentrations of dissolved oxygen, ferrous iron, total iron, and sulfide were also done in the field. Additional laboratory analysis provided data on eight major and 18 minor inorganic constituents. Twenty-one samples were analyzed for tritium, 140 samples were analyzed for carbon-13, and 19 samples were analyzed for carbon-14. The stable-isotope ratio of deuterium to hydrogen was determined for 408 samples; the ratio of oxygen-18 to oxygen-16 was determined for 433 samples; and the ratio of sulfur-34 to sulfur-32 was determined for 20 samples. Sixteen samples were analyzed for the unstable isotopes of uranium; 13 samples were analyzed for radium-226; and the ratio of radium-228 to radium-226 was determined for 13 samples.

  3. Current-use flame retardants in the water of Lake Michigan tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiehong; Romanak, Kevin; Westenbroek, Stephen M.; Hites, Ronald A.; Venier, Marta

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we measured the concentrations of 65 flame retardants in water samples from five Lake Michigan tributaries. These flame retardants included organophosphate esters (OPEs), brominated flame retardants (BFRs), and Dechlorane-related compounds. A total of 59 samples, including both the particulate and the dissolved phases, were collected from the Grand, Kalamazoo, Saint Joseph, and Lower Fox rivers and from the Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal (IHSC) in 2015. OPEs were the most abundant among the targeted compounds with geometric mean concentrations ranging from 20 to 54 ng/L; OPE concentrations were comparable among the five tributaries. BFR concentrations were about 1 ng/L, and the most-abundant compounds were bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate, 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate, and decabromodiphenyl ether. The highest BFR concentrations were measured in either the IHSC or the Saint Joseph River. The dechlorane-related compounds were detected at low concentrations (<1 pg/L). The fraction of target compounds in the particulate phase relative to the dissolved phase varied by chemical and tended to increase with their octanol–water partition coefficient. The chemical loading from all the five tributaries into Lake Michigan were <10 kg/year for the BFRs and about 500 kg/year for the OPEs.

  4. Soil Contamination as a Legacy of the U.S. Auto Industry, Southwest Detroit, Michigan USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, K.; Peterman, C.

    2012-04-01

    The Delray community of southwest Detroit is one of the most depressed areas in southeast Michigan. Historically, Delray was a working class, racially diverse community that depended heavily on industrial jobs provided by nearby factories. However, decades of industrial waste discharges have left Delray with extensive air and soil pollution. Although high unemployment and poverty are major challenges confronting residents in Delray today, the threat to public health from Pb, Hg, As and Cr [VI] in the soil may become an even bigger issue and a significant source of concern. Newspaper headlines cite crime, substance abuse, high school and labor force dropout, as being prevalent in Delray, but recent research suggest that soil contamination, which has resulted in elevated blood Pb levels may be an underlying factor. Recent interest in this area as a potential site for a new bridge to Canada, has offered new hope to the residents by potentially opening the door for redevelopment. The initial step in this process is an environmental assessment of the Delray community. This investigation is being conducted by the University of Michigan-Dearborn in consortium with local community groups and the Detroit Public School. Although preliminary, an analysis of soil samples from over 400 residences has indicated that significant levels of As, and Pb are present in the upper 0.1 meter of soil throughout the Delray area. The high levels of metals present in the soil suggest that further investigation and possible remedial action will be necessary prior to redevelopment.

  5. Influenza B-associated Reye's syndrome: incidence in Michigan and potential for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, L; Rubin, R J; Thompson, T R; Noble, G R; Cassidy, E; Hattwick, M A; Gregg, M B; Eddins, D

    1977-03-01

    Prospective surveillance for Reye's syndrome in Michigan revealed the occurrence of 46 cases between December 15, 1973 and June 1, 1974. In an attempt to determine the incidence of influenza B-associated Reye's syndrome, a randomized point-prevalence survey of 1,041 schoolchildren was done in a county in Michigan where there had been simultaneous outbreaks of influenza B and Reye's syndrome. Of the children tested, 20% had titers of hemagglutination-inhibiting antibody to influenza virus B/Hong Kong/5/72 of greater than or equal 1:20. Based upon this countywide survey, the incidence of Reye's syndrome following influenza B was estimated as between 30.8 and 57.8 cases of Reye's syndrome per 100,000 cases of influenza B. A detailed epidemiologic investigation of the patients who developed Reye's syndrome indicated that the syndrome occurred four times more frequently in children living in rural areas than in children in the urban areas of the state. These studies indicate that, in addition to antecedent viral infections such as influenza B, factor(s) that are most likely extrinsic or environmental also play a role in the pathogenesis of Reye's syndrome.

  6. Modeled sensitivity of Lake Michigan productivity and zooplankton to changing nutrient concentrations and quagga mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, Darren J.; McKinley, Galen A.; Kralj, James; Bootsma, Harvey A.; Reavie, Euan D.

    2017-08-01

    The recent decline in Lake Michigan productivity is often attributed to filter feeding by invasive quagga mussels, but some studies also implicate reductions in lakewide nutrient concentrations. We use a 3-D coupled hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model to evaluate the effect of changing nutrient concentrations and quagga mussel filtering on phytoplankton production and phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass. Sensitivity experiments are used to assess the net effect of each change separately and in unison. Quagga mussels are found to have the greatest impact during periods of isothermal mixing, while nutrients have the greatest impact during thermal stratification. Quagga mussels also act to enhance spatial heterogeneity, particularly between nearshore-offshore regions. This effect produces a reversal in the gradient of nearshore-offshore productivity: from relatively greater nearshore productivity in the prequagga lake to relatively lesser nearshore productivity after quaggas. The combined impact of both processes drives substantial reductions in phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass, as well as significant modifications to the seasonality of surface water pCO2, particularly in nearshore regions where mussel grazing continues year-round. These results support growing concern that considerable losses of phytoplankton and zooplankton will yield concurrent losses at higher trophic levels. Comparisons to observed productivity suggest that both quagga mussel filtration and lower lakewide total phosphorus are necessary to accurately simulate recent changes in primary productivity in Lake Michigan.

  7. Investigation of primary production and ecosystem metabolism in a Lake Michigan dune pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barko, J.W.; Murphy, P.G.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1977-11-01

    Annual estimates of the net primary productivity of phytoplankton, epipelic algae, and macrophytes of a small shallow pond located in the Michigan sand dunes of Lake Michigan were made using in situ /sup 14/C fixation and harvest techniques for the algae and macrophytes, respectively. Concurrent estimates of gross assimilation and ecosystem respiration were based on in situ determinations of CO/sub 2/ exchange. Total net primary productivity (TNPP) was 348 mg C m/sup -2/ day/sup -1/. Productivity of macrophytes (61% TNPP) was greater than that of epipelic algae (26% TNPP) and that of phytoplankton (13% TNPP). Gross assimilation (547 mg C m/sup -2/ day/sup -1/) exceeded ecosystem respiration (377 mg C m/sup -2/ day/sup -1/). The P/R ratio was estimated at 1.45, indicative of a potential accrual of organic carbon at the rate of 169 mg C m/sup -2/ day/sup -1/, net ecosystem production. Annual efficiencies of assimilation and growth in the pond were estimated at 0.42% and 64.0%, respectively. Laboratory determinations of photosynthesis of Juncus balticus, the dominant macrophyte, were used to interpret seasonal photosynthetic patterns observed in situ. The seasonal distribution and productivity of the algae are discussed. Macrophyte productivity and ecosystem metabolism estimates are critically examined. In conclusion, the productivity of the dune pond is compared to that of other aquatic ecosystems.

  8. Investigation of primary production and ecosystem metabolism in a Lake Michigan dune pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barko, J.W.; Murphy, P.G.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1977-11-01

    Annual estimates of the net primary productivity of phytoplankton, epipelic algae, and macrophytes of a small shallow pond located in the Michigan sand dunes of Lake Michigan were made using in situ /sup 14/C fixation and harvest techniques for the algae and macrophytes, respectively. Concurrent estimates of gross assimilation and ecosystem respiration were based on in situ determinations of CO/sub 2/ exchange. Total net primary productivity (TNPP) was 348 mg C m/sup -2/ day/sup -1/. Productivity of macrophytes (61% TNPP) was greater than that of epipelic algae (26% TNPP) and that of phytoplankton (13% TNPP). Gross assimilation (547 mg C m/sup -2/ day/sup -1/) exceeded ecosystem respiration (377 mg C m/sup -2/ day/sup -1/). The P/R ratio was estimated at 1.45, indicative of a potential accrual of organic carbon at the rate of 169 mg C m/sup -2/ day /sup -1/, net ecosystem production. Annual efficiencies of assmilation and growth in the pond were estimated at 0.42% and 64.0%, respectively. Laboratory determinations of photosynthesis of Juncus balticus, the dominant macrophyte, were used to interpret seasonal photosynthetic patterns observed in situ. The seasonal distribution and productivity of the algae are discussed. Macrophyte productivity and ecosystem metabolism estimates are critically examined. In conclusion, the productivity of the dune pond is compared to that of other aquatic ecosystems.

  9. Bird mortality during nocturnal migration over Lake Michigan: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Robert H.; Bates, John M.; Willard, David E.; Gnoske, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    Millions of birds die each year during migration. Most of this mortality goes unobserved and conditions surrounding the actual events are often not thoroughly documented. We present a case study of substantial migrant casualties along the shores of southwestern Lake Michigan during May 1996 when we found 2,981 dead birds of 114 species, mostly migrant passerines. An unusual sequence of events allowed us to document the circumstances surrounding this migratory bird kill. Bird carcasses appeared on the southwestern shores of Lake Michigan in the days following storm systems that produced high rain and in one case, hail. Encounters between birds and precipitation over open water were recorded by weather radar, and were followed by winds that drifted dead birds toward highly populated shorelines where the kill was observed and documented. Climatologically, May 1996 was exceptional for producing weather conditions that both killed birds en masse and allowed the mortality to be documented. As a result, this is one of the more thoroughly documented instances of a weather-related mass mortality event during migration.

  10. Lake Michigan offshore ecosystem structure and food web changes from 1987 to 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Mark W.; Bunnell, David B.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Warner, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystems undergo dynamic changes owing to species invasions, fisheries management decisions, landscape modifications, and nutrient inputs. At Lake Michigan, new invaders (e.g., dreissenid mussels (Dreissena spp.), spiny water flea (Bythotrephes longimanus), round goby (Neogobius melanostomus)) have proliferated and altered energy transfer pathways, while nutrient concentrations and stocking rates to support fisheries have changed. We developed an ecosystem model to describe food web structure in 1987 and ran simulations through 2008 to evaluate changes in biomass of functional groups, predator consumption, and effects of recently invading species. Keystone functional groups from 1987 were identified as Mysis, burbot (Lota lota), phytoplankton, alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), nonpredatory cladocerans, and Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Simulations predicted biomass reductions across all trophic levels and predicted biomasses fit observed trends for most functional groups. The effects of invasive species (e.g., dreissenid grazing) increased across simulation years, but were difficult to disentangle from other changes (e.g., declining offshore nutrient concentrations). In total, our model effectively represented recent changes to the Lake Michigan ecosystem and provides an ecosystem-based tool for exploring future resource management scenarios.

  11. Divergent life histories of invasive round gobies (Neogobius melanostomus) in Lake Michigan and its tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornis, Matthew; Weidel, Brian C.; Vander Zanden, M. Jake

    2017-01-01

    Round gobies (Neogobius melanostomus) have invaded benthic habitats of the Laurentian Great Lakes and connected tributary streams. Although connected, these two systems generally differ in temperature (Great Lakes are typically colder), food availability (Dreissenid mussels are more prevalent in Great Lakes), and system size and openness. Here, we compare round goby life histories from inshore Lake Michigan and adjacent tributary systems—an uncommon case study of life-history differences between connected systems. Tributary round gobies grew much faster (average length-at-age of 122.3 vs. 65.7 mm for Age 2 +  round gobies), appeared to have shorter life spans (maximum observed age of 2 vs. 5) and had lower age-at-50% maturity (1.6 vs. 2.4 years; females only) compared to gobies from Lake Michigan. In addition, tributary gobies had greater fecundity at Ages 1–2 than lake gobies, but had fewer eggs for a given body size prior to the first spawning event of the summer. We were not able to determine the cause of the observed life-history differences. Nonetheless, the observed differences in growth, maturation and longevity were consistent with known effects of water temperature, as well as predictions of life-history theory for animals at invasion fronts exposed to novel environmental conditions. The high degree of phenotypic plasticity in connected populations of this invasive species has implications for our understanding of invasive species impacts in different habitats.

  12. Parasites of Bloater Coregonus hoyi (Salmonidae) from Lake Michigan, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Muzzall, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    In total, 158 bloaters Coregonus hoyi collected in September and October 2011 from 4 Lake Michigan, U.S.A., ports were examined for parasites. The ports included Waukegan (WK), Illinois; Port Washington (PW) and Sturgeon Bay (SB), Wisconsin; and Saugatuck (SG), Michigan. Parasites found in bloaters by port were cestodes Cyathocephalus truncatus (WK, PW, and SB) and Eubothrium salvelini (WK, PW, SB, and SG); the nematode Cystidicola farionis (WK, PW, SB, and SG); acanthocephalans Acanthocephalus dirus (WK and PW), Echinorhynchus salmonis (WK, PW, and SB), and Neoechinorhynchus tumidus (SB); and the copepod Salmincola corpulentus (WK and PW). Gravid individuals of all parasite species were found except for E. salvelini and A. dirus. Cystidicola farionis had the highest prevalence at each port, and the highest mean intensity and mean abundance at PW. The numbers of C. farionis at PW were significantly higher than those at WK and SB. Echinorhynchus salvelini had the highest mean intensities and mean abundances at WK, SB, and SG. The values for parasite species richness in bloaters were similar among ports. The total numbers of parasites were similar between WK and PW, but they were higher at these ports than at SB. The parasite faunas of bloaters were characterized by autogenic helminth species.

  13. Smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis and AFB examination practices according to the standard checklist of WHO's tuberculosis laboratory assessment tool in three governmental hospitals, Eastern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Abiyu

    2014-05-13

    Using the Directly Observed Treatment-Short course (DOTS) program the World Health Organization's global target was to detect 70% of new sputum-smear positive PTB cases. Smear positive PTB cases are more infectious than the smear negative cases. The TB case detection rate remains very low in Ethiopia, but there are increases in smear-negative PTB diagnosis which could be attributed to several factors including poor quality of sputum smear-microscopy. A five years retrospective record review of data between September, 2007 and August, 2012 and an in-depth assessment of AFB staining practices of sputum smear using a standard checklist were made. The proportion of smear positive cases relative to overall Acid Fast Bacilli (AFB) screened was determined over a five year period to indicate the overall prevalence and the trend. Odds ratio with 95 percent confidence interval was calculated for categorical variables using multivariate Logistic Regression model to assess the strength of association. A total of 1266 individuals' data were reviewed. The majority of the study participants were male, 704 (55.6%), and rural residents, 690 (54.5%). The overall prevalence rate of smear positive PTB was 21.6%. Age categories between 15-24 and 25-34 years were independent predictors of smear positive PTB with adjusted odds ratio of 2.246 [95% CI (1.098-4.597)] and 2.267 [95% CI (1.107-4.642)], respectively. More males were affected by PTB than females with an adjusted odds ratio of 1.426 [95% CI (1.083-1.879)]. An in-depth interview with the respective laboratory chiefs showed that quality control measures for sputum smear microscopy were used at different levels of the testing activities; however, equipment function verification as a quality control measure was not accomplished regularly in all of the study hospital laboratories. The smear positive PTB case detection rate indicated in this study is significantly lower than the countries which met the 70% target of the World Health

  14. Use of a molecular diagnostic test in AFB smear positive tuberculosis suspects greatly reduces time to detection of multidrug resistant tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestani Tukvadze

    Full Text Available The WHO has recommended the implementation of rapid diagnostic tests to detect and help combat M/XDR tuberculosis (TB. There are limited data on the performance and impact of these tests in field settings.The performance of the commercially available Genotype MTBDRplus molecular assay was compared to conventional methods including AFB smear, culture and drug susceptibility testing (DST using both an absolute concentration method on Löwenstein-Jensen media and broth-based method using the MGIT 960 system. Sputum specimens were obtained from TB suspects in the country of Georgia who received care through the National TB Program.Among 500 AFB smear-positive sputum specimens, 458 (91.6% had both a positive sputum culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and a valid MTBDRplus assay result. The MTBDRplus assay detected isoniazid (INH resistance directly from the sputum specimen in 159 (89.8% of 177 specimens and MDR-TB in 109 (95.6% of 114 specimens compared to conventional methods. There was high agreement between the MTBDRplus assay and conventional DST results in detecting MDR-TB (kappa = 0.95, p<0.01. The most prevalent INH resistance mutation was S315T (78% in the katG codon and the most common rifampicin resistance mutation was S531L (68% in the rpoB codon. Among 13 specimens from TB suspects with negative sputum cultures, 7 had a positive MTBDRplus assay (3 with MDR-TB. The time to detection of MDR-TB was significantly less using the MTBDRplus assay (4.2 days compared to the use of standard phenotypic tests (67.3 days with solid media and 21.6 days with broth-based media.Compared to conventional methods, the MTBDRplus assay had high accuracy and significantly reduced time to detection of MDR-TB in an area with high MDR-TB prevalence. The use of rapid molecular diagnostic tests for TB and drug resistance should increase the proportion of patients promptly placed on appropriate therapy.

  15. Biology of the European oak borer in Michigan, United States of America, with comparisons to the native twolined chestnut borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toby R. Petrice; Robert A. Haack

    2014-01-01

    In 2010-2011, we studied the European oak borer (EOB), Agrilus sulcicollis Lacordaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in Michigan, United States of America, and made comparisons with the native twolined chestnut borer (TLCB), Agrilus bilineatus (Weber). EOB adult flight began and peaked before TLCB. More EOB females were captured on...

  16. Teaching and Understanding the Concept of Critical Thinking Skills within Michigan Accredited Associate Degree Dental Hygiene Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beistle, Kimberly S.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores dental hygiene faculty's perceptions regarding the issues surrounding the concept of critical thinking skills integration within Michigan accredited associate degree dental hygiene programs. The primary research goals are to determine faculty understanding of the concept of critical thinking, identify personal and departmental…

  17. Hepatitis B prevalence among Asian Americans in Michigan: an assessment to guide future education and intervention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Janilla; Lok, Anna S; Chen, Judy

    2010-10-01

    Free HBV (hepatitis B virus) screening was offered at 8 health fairs to Asian Americans in Southeast and West Michigan for two and a half years as a community service to study the prevalence of hepatitis B among Asian Americans in Michigan as a first step in reducing the incidence of hepatitis B. The screening included a 4 ml blood sample and a questionnaire assessing demographics and family history of hepatitis B; tests included the HBV surface antigen and antibody. 567 people participated in the study. About 6% of the participants had chronic hepatitis B (HBV carriers), 54% had the antibody (either had the disease before or were vaccinated) and 40% had no antibody or antigen (never infected by HBV and should be vaccinated to get protection). More than 95% of the participants were immigrants. Participants indicated in the family history that 10% had relatives with hepatitis B, 5% with liver cirrhosis, and 3% with liver cancer. Results of our screening supported our hypothesis that prevalence of hepatitis B among Asian Americans in Michigan would be similar to that in Asian Americans on the East and West coasts. We need to develop a strategy in Michigan to address this disease. In conducting this study, it was noticed that there was still resistance by Asian Americans to participate in clinical studies. An education intervention that is delivered in native Asian languages and in a culturally sensitive manner is needed to effectively raise awareness of hepatitis B among Asian Americans.

  18. 77 FR 36115 - Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, et al.; Final Free and Restricted Percentages for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ... service firms have been defined by the Small Business Administration (SBA) as those having annual receipts... the sales to primary markets, they play an important role for the industry. The areas of new products... representatives of Michigan State University). In addition, absent volume control, the industry could start to...

  19. 77 FR 11426 - Safety Zones; Annual Events Requiring Safety Zones in the Captain of the Port Lake Michigan Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... date and time. The third Saturday of March; 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. (2) Michigan Aerospace Challenge Sport... p.m. to 11 p.m. (9) Harborfest Music and Family Festival; Racine, WI. (i) Location. All waters of...

  20. 33 CFR 334.820 - Lake Michigan; naval restricted area, U.S. Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, Ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... area, U.S. Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, Ill. 334.820 Section 334.820 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.820 Lake Michigan; naval restricted area, U.S. Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, Ill. (a) The area. An area extending in a north and south direction from the Great Lakes, Illinois, south...

  1. Michigan State Code Adoption Analysis: Cost-Effectiveness of Lighting Requirements - ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richman, Eric E.

    2006-09-29

    This report documents PNNL's analysis of the potential energy effect and cost-effectiveness of the lighting requirements in ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004 if this energy code is adopted in the state of Michigan, instead of the current standard.

  2. Local Understanding of Fish Consumption Advisory Risks in Michigan's Upper Peninsula: The Role of Structure, Culture, and Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habron, Geoffrey; Barbier, Melanie; Kinnunen, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Fish consumption advisories fail to adequately help communities address the benefits and risks of eating potentially contaminated fish. We engaged community members and relevant institutions in identifying and implementing more effective risk communication in Michigan's rural Upper Peninsula. In 2004-2005, we collected data in four Michigan…

  3. Perceptions and status of Michigan as a heritage tourism state: results of an eleven-month telephone survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gail A. Vander Stoep

    1998-01-01

    Cultural and heritage tourism have gained increasing attention as a type of tourism in recent years. Through a telephone survey of Midwest residents (six states and one Canadian province), respondents were asked about their image of Michigan as a destination for heritage and cultural tourism experiences, about their visits to museums, halls of fame, historic and other...

  4. The Human Dimension of Energy Conservation and Sustainability: A Case Study of the University of Michigan's Energy Conservation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marans, Robert W.; Edelstein, Jack Y.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine the behaviors, attitudes, and levels of understanding among faculty, staff, and students in efforts to design programs aimed at reducing energy use in University of Michigan (UM) buildings. Design/methodology/approach: A multi-method approach is used in five diverse pilot buildings including focus…

  5. 75 FR 33736 - Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 930 Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, New York... Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Withdrawal of a proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Agricultural Marketing Service...

  6. 75 FR 57161 - Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, et al.; Increased Assessment Rate for the 2010...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ... has been reviewed under Executive Order 12988, Civil Justice Reform. Under the marketing order... Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 930 Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, et al.; Increased Assessment Rate for the 2010-2011 Crop Year for Tart Cherries AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION...

  7. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC): Development, Evolution, and Direction

    OpenAIRE

    Zucker, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    A historical summary is provided of the evolution of the University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC) since its origins in 1988. Begun as an NIH research center within a Department of Psychiatry and focused solely on alcohol and aging, early work emphasized treatment efficacy, differential outcome studies, and characterization of the neurophysiological and behavioral manifestations of chronic alcoholism.

  8. 75 FR 1724 - Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 930 Tart Cherries Grown in the States of... grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin, and provides growers... recommendation will include an analysis of the pertinent factors and issues, including the impact of a proposed...

  9. To Reinstate or to Not Reinstate? An Exploratory Study of Student Perspectives on the Death Penalty in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinkrah, Mensah; Clemens, William M

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. state of Michigan abolished the death penalty in 1846. Since then, several abortive efforts have been made by state legislators to re-establish the death sentence to deal with convicted murderers. Concurrently, some support exists among Michigan residents for the restoration of capital punishment in the state. This article presents the results of the analysis of an attitudinal survey of 116 college students enrolled in three criminal justice courses in a Michigan public university concerning the reinstatement of the death sentence in the state. The data from this exploratory study show that a slight majority (52.6%) of respondents favored reinstatement whereas 45.7% opposed restoration. Advocates and opponents of re-establishment of the death penalty in Michigan provided similar religious, moral and economic arguments proffered by others in previous surveys on capital punishment available in the death penalty literature. The current study makes a contribution to the scant extant literature on attitudes toward the death penalty in abolitionist jurisdictions. As this body of literature grows, it can provide baseline data or information with which to compare attitudes in retentionist states.

  10. 77 FR 40914 - In the Matter of Indiana Michigan Power Company, D. C. Cook Nuclear Power Plant; Confirmatory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... individual, who was offsite when selected for Fitness-for-Duty (FFD) testing, was tested at the earliest...-2060-SFI-411, ``Fitness-for-Duty (FFD) Random Selection and Notification Process,'' to include a... and time constraints. Indiana Michigan Power Company will make this presentation at an industry FFD...

  11. Ingestion of a newly described North American mushroom species from Michigan resulting in chronic renal failure: Cortinarius orellanosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Bryan S; Ammirati, Joseph F; Lincoff, Gary H; Trestrail, John H; Matheny, P Brandon

    2010-07-01

    Some mushrooms in the genus Cortinarius are well known to cause acute and chronic renal failure. Until now, there have been no confirmed cases of renal failure due to the ingestion of a Cortinarius mushroom in North America. We describe a case of a woman who ingested mushrooms found under an oak tree in western Michigan and developed chronic renal failure. Phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear-encoded ribosomal RNA was performed between an unconsumed sample of the Michigan specimens, a control sample of Cortinarius orellanus (JFA9859) from Europe, and other closely related ITS sequences of Cortinarius retrieved from GenBank. An additional gene region, rpb2, was also sequenced for comparison. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the Michigan material to be closely related to, but distinct from, other ITS sequences of the Orellani clade in Cortinarius. Divergence is less at the rpb2 locus. No historical taxa from North America are known to match the identification of the Michigan material. The mushrooms ingested by the patient were confirmed to be a new species of Cortinarius closely related to C. orellanus. We introduce a newly described North American species, Cortinarius orellanosus, capable of causing renal failure after ingestion.

  12. Racial disparities in knowledge of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs among Michigan adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussman, Chris; Rafferty, Ann P; Reeves, Mathew J; Zackery, Shannon; Lyon-Callo, Sarah; Anderson, Beth

    2009-01-01

    To describe the level of knowledge regarding risk factors and warning signs for stroke and heart attack among White and African American adults in Michigan and to quantify racial disparities. Knowledge of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs was assessed by using data from the 2004 Michigan Behavioral Risk Factor Survey. Prevalence estimates of knowledge were generated, and statistical differences in knowledge between Whites and African Americans were assessed. Adequate knowledge was defined as knowing 3 correct warning signs or risk factors. Logistic regression models were used to quantify the racial disparity in knowledge while controlling for potential confounding. Whites had substantially higher levels of adequate knowledge of risk factors (stroke: 31.6% vs 13.8%; heart attack: 52.6% vs 24.3%) and warning signs (stroke: 30.0% vs 17.2%; heart attack: 29.3% vs 13.8%) compared with African Americans (all observed differences were significant at P heart attack: AOR 3.4) and warning signs (stroke: AOR 2.0; heart attack: AOR 2.4) were significantly higher for Whites than for African Americans. A strong racial disparity in the knowledge of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs exists among Michigan adults. Communitywide public education programs in conjunction with targeted interventions for at-risk populations are necessary to produce meaningful improvements in the awareness of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs among Michigan adults.

  13. Profiles of Pre-Service Teacher Education: An Investigation into the Nature of Selected Exemplary Programs in Jamaica and Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Sherwood, Heather

    2018-01-01

    This qualitative multi-case study investigated three exemplary pre-service teacher education programs in Jamaica and Michigan in order to provide an account of how they are structured in different contexts of tertiary institutions and, to identify how they ensure that their graduates are prepared to function effectively in today's schools. Five…

  14. Modeling the transport and inactivation of E. coli and enterococci in the near-shore region of Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Phanikumar, M.S.; Molloy, S.L.; Whitman, R.L.; Shively, D.A.; Nevers, M.B.; Schwab, D.J.; Rose, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the transport and fate of fecal pollution at Great Lakes beaches and the health risks associated with swimming, the near-shore waters of Lake Michigan and two tributaries discharging into it were examined for bacterial indicators of human fecal pollution. The enterococcus human fecal pollution marker, which targets a putative virulence factorthe enterococcal surface protein (esp) in Enterococcus faecium, was detected in 2/28 samples (7%) in the tributaries draining into Lake Michigan and in 6/30 samples (20%) in Lake Michigan beaches. This was indicative of human fecal pollution being transported in the tributaries and occurrence at Lake Michigan beaches. To understand the relative importance of different processes influencing pollution transport and inactivation, a finite-element model of surf-zone hydrodynamics (coupled with models for temperature, E. coli and enterococci) was used. Enterococci appear to survive longer than E. coli, which was described using an overall first-order inactivation coefficient in the range 0.5−2.0 per day. Our analysis suggests that the majority of fecal indicator bacteria variation can be explained based on loadings from the tributaries. Sunlight is a major contributor to inactivation in the surf-zone and the formulation based on sunlight, temperature and sedimentation is preferred over the first-order inactivation formulation.

  15. Influence of landscape geomorphology on large wood jams and salmonids in an old-growth river of Upper Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur E. L. Morris; P. Charles Goebel; Lance R. Williams; Brian J. Palik

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the structure of large wood jams (LWJ) and their use by brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis Mitchill) and other fish in four geomorphically-distinct sections of the Little Carp River, a small river flowing through an uncut, old-growth, northern hardwood-conifer forest along the south shore of Lake Superior, Upper Michigan. We...

  16. 77 FR 33303 - Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ...: the definition of ``Handle''; and regulations concerning ``Marketing Policy'' and ``Grower Diversion... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 930 Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin; Order Amending Marketing Order No. 930 AGENCY...

  17. 75 FR 25309 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Expanded Intermodal Freight Terminal in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... Acquisition Policies of 1970, as amended . 7. Wetlands and Water Resources: Clean Water Act [33 U.S.C. 1251... Michigan (NS, CSX, CP, and CN); make roadway and yard entry gate changes; and provide enhancements to the...: Clean Air Act, as amended . 3. Land: Section 4(f) of the Department of Transportation Act of 1966...

  18. 77 FR 30315 - Notice of Intent To Amend the 1985 Michigan Resource Management Plan and Associated Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Intent To Amend the 1985 Michigan Resource Management Plan and Associated Environmental Assessment, Marquette County, MI AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION... Management (BLM) Northeastern States Field Office, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, intends to prepare a Resource...

  19. Regulating Dental Assistants: Revisions of the Michigan Dental Practice Act. Health Manpower Policy Discussion Paper Series No.: C2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldstein, Paul J.; And Others

    This document investigates the regulation of dental assistants in Michigan. Emphasis is placed on increased dental productivity from increased use of auxiliaries, utilization of dental auxiliaries, and educational and training requirements for certification and licensure. Results of the investigation indicate: (1) support should be given for the…

  20. Contemporary use of initial active surveillance among men in Michigan with low-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womble, Paul R; Montie, James E; Ye, Zaojun; Linsell, Susan M; Lane, Brian R; Miller, David C

    2015-01-01

    Active surveillance (AS) has been proposed as an effective strategy to reduce overtreatment among men with lower risk prostate cancers. However, historical rates of initial surveillance are low (4-20%), and little is known about its application among community-based urology practices. To describe contemporary utilization of AS among a population-based sample of men with low-risk prostate cancer. We performed a prospective cohort study of men with low-risk prostate cancer managed by urologists participating in the Michigan Urological Surgery Improvement Collaborative (MUSIC). The principal outcome was receipt of AS as initial management for low-risk prostate cancer including the frequency of follow-up prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, prostate biopsy, and local therapy. We examined variation in the use of surveillance according to patient characteristics and across MUSIC practices. Finally, we used claims data to validate treatment classification in the MUSIC registry. We identified 682 low-risk patients from 17 MUSIC practices. Overall, 49% of men underwent initial AS. Use of initial surveillance varied widely across practices (27-80%; p=0.005), even after accounting for differences in patient characteristics. Among men undergoing initial surveillance with at least 12 mo of follow-up, PSA testing was common (85%), whereas repeat biopsy was performed in only one-third of patients. There was excellent agreement between treatment assignments in the MUSIC registry and claims data (κ=0.93). Limitations include unknown treatment for 8% of men with low-risk cancer. Half of men in Michigan with low-risk prostate cancer receive initial AS. Because this proportion is much higher than reported previously, our findings suggest growing acceptance of this strategy for reducing overtreatment. We examined the use of initial active surveillance for the management of men with low-risk prostate cancer across the state of Michigan. We found that initial surveillance is used

  1. The Sudbury impact layer in the paleoproterozoiciron ranges of northern Michigan, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, W.F.; Schulz, K.J.; Horton, J. Wright; King, David A.

    2010-01-01

    A layer of breccia that contains fragments of impact ejecta has been found at 10 sites in the Paleoproterozoic iron ranges of northern Michigan, in the Lake Superior region of the United States. Radiometric age constraints from events predating and postdating deposition of the breccia are ca. 1875 Ma and 1830 Ma. The major bolide impact that occurred at 1850 Ma at Sudbury, Ontario, 500–700 km east of these sites, is the likely causative event. The Michigan sites described here, along with previously described sites in Minnesota and Ontario, define an extensive ejecta-bearing deposit throughout the Paleoproterozoic iron ranges of the Lake Superior region that we refer to as the Sudbury impact layer. The layer at the sites in Michigan exhibits a range of thicknesses, lithologic characters, and sedimentary settings. The diversity of rock types and internal stratigraphic details of the layer imply that several different processes of transport and deposition are represented, but the detailed investigations needed to document them are incomplete. Many of the sites had been described and interpreted previously as products of common terrestrial processes, but the presence of relict shock-induced planar deformation features in quartz indicates that the breccia layer is in fact the product of an extraterrestrial impact. At most localities, this layer also contains relict fragments of altered devitrified glass and/or accretionary lapilli. One immediate use of the impact layer is as an ultraprecise time line that ties together the well-known stratigraphic sequences of the various geographically separated iron ranges, the correlation of which has remained controversial for many decades. The Sudbury impact layer most commonly lies at a horizon that records a significant change in the character of sediments across the region. The impact layer marks the end of a major period of banded iron formation deposition that was succeeded by deposition of fine clastic rocks, commonly

  2. Deglaciation, lake levels, and meltwater discharge in the Lake Michigan basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Steven M.; Clark, J.A.; Clayton, L.; Hansel, A.K.; Larsen, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    The deglacial history of the Lake Michigan basin, including discharge and routing of meltwater, is complex because of the interaction among (1) glacial retreats and re-advances in the basin (2) the timing of occupation and the isostatic adjustment of lake outlets and (3) the depositional and erosional processes that left evidence of past lake levels. In the southern part of the basin, a restricted area little affected by differential isostasy, new studies of onshore and offshore areas allow refinement of a lake-level history that has evolved over 100 years. Important new data include the recognition of two periods of influx of meltwater from Lake Agassiz into the basin and details of the highstands gleaned from sedimentological evidence. Major disagreements still persist concerning the exact timing and lake-level changes associated with the Algonquin phase, approximately 11,000 BP. A wide variety of independent data suggests that the Lake Michigan Lobe was thin, unstable, and subject to rapid advances and retreats. Consequently, lake-level changes were commonly abrupt and stable shorelines were short-lived. The long-held beliefs that the southern part of the basin was stable and separated from deformed northern areas by a hinge-line discontinuity are becoming difficult to maintain. Numerical modeling of the ice-earth system and empirical modeling of shoreline deformation are both consistent with observed shoreline tilting in the north and with the amount and pattern of modern deformation shown by lake-level gauges. New studies of subaerial lacustrine features suggest the presence of deformed shorelines higher than those originally ascribed to the supposed horizontal Glenwood level. Finally, the Lake Michigan region as a whole appears to behave in a similar manner to other areas, both local (other Great Lakes) and regional (U.S. east coast), that have experienced major isostatic changes. Detailed sedimentological and dating studies of field sites and additional

  3. Occurrence of Escherichia coli and enterococci in Cladophora (Chlorophyta) in nearshore water and beach sand of Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Richard L.; Shively, Dawn A.; Pawlik, Heather; Nevers, Meredith; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.

    2003-01-01

    Each summer, the nuisance green alga Cladophora (mostly Cladophora glomerata) amasses along Lake Michigan beaches, creating nearshore anoxia and unsightly, malodorous mats that can attract problem animals and detract from visitor enjoyment. Traditionally, elevated counts of Escherichia coli are presumed to indicate the presence of sewage, mostly derived from nearby point sources. The relationship between fecal indicator bacteria and Cladophora remains essentially unstudied. This investigation describes the local and regional density ofEscherichia coli and enterococci in Cladophora mats along beaches in the four states (Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan) bordering Lake Michigan. Samples of Cladophora strands collected from 10 beaches (n = 41) were assayed for concentrations of E. coli and enterococci during the summer of 2002. Both E. coli and enterococci were ubiquitous (up to 97% occurrence), with overall log mean densities (± standard errors) of 5.3 (± 4.8) and 4.8 (± 4.5) per g (dry weight). E. coli and enterococci were strongly correlated in southern Lake Michigan beaches (P< 0.001, R2 = 0.73, n = 17) but not in northern beaches (P = 0.892, n = 16). BothE. coli and enterococci survived for over 6 months in sun-dried Cladophora mats stored at 4°C; the residual bacteria in the dried alga readily grew upon rehydration. These findings suggest that Cladophora amassing along the beaches of Lake Michigan may be an important environmental source of indicator bacteria and call into question the reliability of E. coli and enterococci as indicators of water quality for freshwater recreational beaches.

  4. Validation and Reliability of the Portuguese Version of the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Margarida; Saavedra, Ana; Severo, Milton; Maier, Christoph; Carvalho, Davide

    2017-04-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is very common in the diabetic population. Early screening for foot pathology is of the utmost importance. The Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI) is an easy, brief, and noninvasive screening tool. The aim of this study was to validate the semantics and characteristics of both sections of the Portuguese translation of the MNSI for Portuguese diabetic patients. A cross-sectional study was performed on 87 type 1 and 2 diabetic patients at our outpatient endocrinology department. The final sample was composed of 76 patients. Nerve conduction studies were requested, but only a subsample of 42 patients agreed to participate in them. The scale was internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha > 0.70 in section A, or a clinical history questionnaire and a physical examination [section B]), and the scores of both sections were positively correlated (r = 0.70; P Portuguese MNSI is a reliable and valid tool for screening diabetic neuropathy. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  5. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Twenty-four. Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description of the laws and programs of the State of Michigan governing the regulation of public energy facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  6. Evaluating the negative effect of benthic egg predators on bloater recruitment in northern Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, David B.; Mychek-Londer, Justin G.; Diana, James S.; Stott, Wendylee; Madenjian, Charles P.

    2012-01-01

    As the only extant deepwater cisco in Lake Michigan, bloater is currently at record low levels of abundance.  Several mechanisms to regulate their recruitment have been proposed, including skewed sex ratios, predation on their larvae by adult alewife, and climatic factors during early life history stages, but none has unequivocal support.  In this research, we evaluated an alternative mechanism of egg predation that was supported by an inverse relationship between bloater recruitment and biomass of slimy sculpin, which are known to be effective egg predators.  To that end, we used a combination of field sampling, laboratory experiments, and modeling to estimate the proportion of bloater eggs consumed by sculpins each year between 1973 and 2008.  Monthly field sampling between January through May 2009-2010 (when bloater eggs were incubating) offshore of Frankfort (Michigan), Sturgeon Bay (Wisconsin), Two Rivers (Wisconsin), and Muskegon (Michigan) provided benthivore diets for subsequent laboratory processing.  Identification and enumeration of stomach contents and subsequent genetic analyses of eggs revealed that the mean proportion of bloater eggs in slimy sculpin diets (N = 1016) equaled 0.04.  Bloater eggs also were consumed by deepwater sculpins (N = 699) at a slightly lower mean proportion (0.02), and only one round goby diet among 552 enumerated revealed a bloater egg.  Based on the diet results, we developed daily ration models to estimate consumption for both deepwater and slimy sculpins.  We conducted feeding experiments to estimate gastric evacuation (GEVAC) for water temperatures ranging 2-5 °C, similar to those observed during egg incubation.  GEVAC rates equaled 0.0115/ h for slimy sculpin and 0.0147/h for deepwater sculpin, and did not vary between 2.7 and 5.1 °C for either species or between prey types (Mysis relicta and fish eggs) for slimy sculpin.  Index of fullness [(g prey/g fish weight)100%] was estimated from sculpins sampled in

  7. Quantitative Literacy at Michigan State University, 3: Designing General Education Mathematics Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel L. Tunstall

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the process at Michigan State University whereby we have created two courses, Math 101 and 102, designed to foster numeracy and alleviate mathematics anxiety. The courses--which are not sequential--provide a means of satisfying the University's general education requirement without taking college algebra or calculus, among other options. They are context-driven and broken into modules such as "The World and Its People" and "Health and Risk." They have been highly successful thus far, with students providing positive feedback on their interest in the material and the utility they see of it in their daily lives. We include background on the courses' history, their current status, and present and future challenges, ending with suggestions for others as they attempt to implement quantitative literacy courses at their own institution.

  8. Water resources in a rapidly growing region-Oakland County, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichele, Stephen S.

    2005-01-01

    Oakland County is a suburban county in southeast Michigan. Population and demand for water grew steadily in the county over the 20th century, and these trends are expected to continue in coming decades. Roughly 75 percent of current water demand is met by imported water from the Detroit Water and Sewerage Division (DWSD), but water use from ground-water sources within the county still exceeds 43 million gallons per day. Because much of the population growth is in areas beyond the DWSD system, an additional 20-25 million gallons per day of supply may be necessary to meet future demands. Managing the wastewater produced while also protecting human and ecosystem health also may present challenges.

  9. Working at Getting to Work: Negotiating Transportation and Low-Wage Work in Rural Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Brooke Kelly

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the efforts that low-income mothers go through to get to work in two rural Michigan county contexts. The author relies on qualitative, in-depth interview data with one group of Latina mothers, who worked in agricultural labor often migrating with their families, and another group of white settled mothers in a county dominated by service jobs. Their accounts reveal the backstage labor needed to get to low-wage jobs in rural areas. Commuting, moving, and/or migrating necessitate much effort and planning. Without public transportation, mothers often "scramble" with unreliable, and often unsafe, vehicles. They also rely on friends and family members, negotiate with employers, coordinate their journey to work with the schedules of family members, and take risks to get to work. Programs and policies that provide assistance with reliable transportation, child care, and work and family balance should reduce the work of getting to work.

  10. Nutrient enrichment and eutrophication of Lake Michigan. Progress report, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelske, C.L.; Davis, C.O.

    1976-01-01

    Studies were conducted on relationships between phytoplankton and major nutrients. Data were collected on species composition and abundance of phytoplankton and on chlorophyll a, primary productivity, phosphorus silica, nitrate, ammonia, pH, chloride, specific conductance, water temperature, and transparency. Open lake studies confirmed a predicted shift in species composition from diatoms to blue-green algae in the epilimnetic waters and offered evidence that silica limitation is the major factor restricting diatom abundance. Studies on tributaries showed great differences in chemical parameters and phytoplankton composition in the three rivers, Grand, Kalamazoo, and St. Joseph. Cruises were conducted to study the Grand River and the Grand River plume in Lake Michigan; it was found that nutrient levels were high during high flow conditions regardless of the time of year. Chemostat studies are being conducted with diatoms. (HLW)

  11. Water quality of coal deposits and abandoned mines, Saginaw County, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, A.H.

    1982-01-01

    Surface water arid;ground water from an area underlain by coal- bearing rocks in the vicinity of St. Charles Michigan, were analyzed to determine the quality characteristics of these water resources and to assess the relation between the two. Data for 15 constituents, including boron, phenol, lithium, strontium and manganese, were in such high concentrations that they could be used to differentiate between water from wells drilled into coal-bearing beds and water from streams not directly associated with coal deposits. Ground water from abandoned mines and undisturbed coal-bearing beds is highly mineralized, and contains higher concentrations of trace metals than surface water. Water from the undistrubed coal- bearing beds and abandoned mines is not suitable for domestic, public supply, or agricultural uses. Large amounts of this highly mineralized ground water reaching local streams would have a deleterious effect on surface-water quality.

  12. Remote sensing in Michigan for land resource management: Highway impact assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    An existing section of M-14 freeway constructed in 1964 and a potential extension from Ann Arbor to Plymouth, Michigan provided an opportunity for investigating the potential uses of remote sensing techniques in providing projective information needed for assessing the impact of highway construction. Remote sensing data included multispectral scanner imagery and aerial photography. Only minor effects on vegetation, soils, and land use were found to have occurred in the existing corridor. Adverse changes expected to take place in the corridor proposed for extension of the freeway can be minimized by proper design of drainage ditches and attention to good construction practices. Remote sensing can be used to collect and present many types of data useful for highway impact assessment on land use, vegetation categories and species, soil properties and hydrologic characteristics.

  13. Excretion is Faster Than Diagenesis for Nutrient Recycling in Lake Michigan Benthos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, C.; Cuhel, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Regeneration of phytoplankton growth nutrients including ammonium (NH4+) and phosphate (HPO4=) occurs in aquatic systems worldwide through biogeochemical processes of diagenesis. Organic matter falling to the bottom accumulates in sediments, and bacterial decomposition removes oxygen from the sub-surface. Anaerobic metabolism is energetically inefficient, and bacteria a few cm below the surface respire or ferment organic matter into carbon dioxide or organic acids, excreting nitrogen (NH4+) or phosphorus inorganic 'waste'. Subsurface production of bacterial metabolic products often leads to sharp gradients in porewater concentrations of NH4+ and HPO4=, which drive diffusive flux out of the sediments into overlying water. Aquatic systems with totally aerobic water overlying anoxic sediment (e.g., Lake Michigan) have muted efflux of certain inorganic nutrients arising from organic matter decomposition. For example, NH4+ is oxidized to nitrate in the upper few mm of surficial sediments by nitrifying bacteria. Strong subsurface porewater gradients, especially of redox- or geochemically-reactive compounds, often decline to low values well below the sediment-water interface, indicating transformation by sediment bacterial populations, or by purely geochemical processes such as calcium hydroxyphosphate (apatite) precipitation. For these, little flux to the water column occurs. In Lake Michigan, neither NH4+ nor HPO4= escapes substantially from the biogeochemical barriers between their diagenetic sources and overlying waters, either before or after ecosystem alteration by invasive quagga mussels (QM). Silicate and total CO2 evade unimpeded in the same cores. The organic matter deposited from the water column is also the nutrition of benthic bivalve filter feeders such as QM in Lake Michigan, or the Asian Clam in San Francisco Bay. In animal metabolism for energy production, only the carbon component is oxidized through respiration, with NH4+ (from protein) and HPO4= (from

  14. Institutional profile of pharmacogenetics within University of Michigan College of Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Daniel L; Luzum, Jasmine A; Pasternak, Amy L; Ward, Kristen M; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Rae, James M; Ellingrod, Vicki L

    2017-07-26

    The University of Michigan College of Pharmacy has made substantial investment in the area of pharmacogenomics to further bolster its activity in pharmacogenomics research, implementation and education. Four tenure-track faculty members have active research programs that focus primarily on the discovery of functional polymorphisms (HJ Zhu), and genetic associations with treatment outcomes in patients with cancer (DL Hertz), cardiovascular disease (JA Luzum) and psychiatric conditions (VL Ellingrod). Recent investments from the University and the College have accelerated the implementation of pharmacogenetics broadly across the institution and in targeted therapeutic areas. Students within the PharmD and other health science professions receive substantial instruction in pharmacogenomics, in preparation for careers in biomedical health in which they can contribute to the generation, dissemination and utilization of pharmacogenomics knowledge to improve patient care.

  15. Sustained Benefit Over Four-Year Follow-Up of Michigan's Project Healthy Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corriveau, Nicole; Eagle, Taylor; Jiang, Qingmei; Rogers, Robert; Gurm, Roopa; Aaronson, Susan; Mitchell, Lindsey; DuRussel-Weston, Jean; Kline-Rogers, Eva; Eagle, Kim A; Jackson, Elizabeth A

    2015-12-01

    We determined the sustainability of effects of a school-based intervention to improve health behaviors and cardiovascular risk factors among middle school children. We administered a questionnaire and health screenings to 5 schools in Ann Arbor and 2 schools in Ypsilanti, Michigan. We assessed demographics, physiological factors, diet, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors from 1126 students who received a health curriculum (Project Healthy Schools) in the fall of sixth grade in 2005, 2006, and 2007. We administered the questionnaire and screening again in the spring and each subsequent spring through ninth grade to all available, consenting students. In the 4 years following the school-based intervention, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides improved, and for most years systolic and diastolic blood pressure improved. Serum glucose and body mass index did not change. Physical activity increased and sedentary behaviors diminished. Project Healthy Schools is associated with sustainable improvements in both cardiovascular parameters and healthy behaviors.

  16. Methanogenic biodegradation of charcoal production wastes in groundwater at Kingsford, Michigan, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Godsy E.; Warren, E.; Westjohn, D.B.

    2001-01-01

    A house exploded in the City of Kingsford, Michigan USA. The explosion was caused by CH4 that leaked into the basement from the surrounding soil. Evidence suggests that biodegradation of products from the distillation and spillage at or near a former wood carbonization plant site was the major source of CH4 and CO2 in the groundwater system. The plant area is directly upgradient from deep groundwater, samples of which are green-yellow in colour, have a very strong odour of burnt wood, contain high concentrations of mononuclear aromatic and phenolic compounds, and extremely high concentrations of volatile fatty acids. The majority of the dissolved compounds in these groundwater samples have been shown, using laboratory microcosms, to be anaerobically biodegradable to CH4 and CO2. The biodegradable compounds, and the amounts of CH4 and CO2 produced in the microcosms, are consistent with observations from field samples.

  17. Application of airborne infrared technology to monitor building heat loss. [Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanis, F. J.; Sampson, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    The application of airborne infrared technology to the requirements for energy conservation in buildings was studied. Quantitative airborne data of the City of Ypsilanti, Michigan, were collected and processed to identify roof temperatures. A thermal scanner was flown at an altitude of 1,200 feet with two thermal bands 8.2-9.3 micrometers and 10.4-12.5 micrometers recorded by an analog system. Calibration was achieved by standard hot and cold plates. Using a thermal model to interpret ceiling insulation status, environmental factors were found to influence the relation between roof temperature and insulation. These include interior and sky temperatures, roofing materials, and the pitch and orientation of the roof. A follow-up mail survey established the ability to identify insulated and uninsulated houses from the airborne infrared data.

  18. Multi-pathogen waterborne disease outbreak associated with a dinner cruise on Lake Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdarevic, F; Jones, R C; Weaver, K N; Black, S R; Ritger, K A; Guichard, F; Dombroski, P; Emanuel, B P; Miller, L; Gerber, S I

    2012-04-01

    We report an outbreak associated with a dinner cruise on Lake Michigan. This took place on the same day as heavy rainfall, which resulted in 42·4 billion liters of rainwater and storm runoff containing highly diluted sewage being released into the lake. Of 72 cruise participants, 41 (57%) reported gastroenteritis. Stool specimens were positive for Shigella sonnei (n=3), Giardia (n=3), and Cryptosporidium (n=2). Ice consumption was associated with illness (risk ratio 2·2, P=0·011). S. sonnei was isolated from a swab obtained from the one of the boat's ice bins. Environmental inspection revealed conditions and equipment that could have contributed to lake water contaminating the hose used to load potable water onto the boat. Knowledge of water holding and distribution systems on boats, and of potential risks associated with flooding and the release of diluted sewage into large bodies of water, is crucial for public health guidance regarding recreational cruises.

  19. Occurrence of acanthocephalans in largemouth bass and smallmouth bass (Centrarchidae) from Gull Lake, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzall, Patrick M; Gillilland, Merritt G

    2004-06-01

    A total of 65 largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, and 27 smallmouth bass, M. dolomieu, collected in April-September 2000 and April-July 2001 from Gull Lake, Michigan, were examined for acanthocephalans. Leptorhynchoides thecatus and Neoechinorhynchus cylindratus infected all the bass examined. Leptorhynchoides thecatus had the highest mean intensity (258.2 +/- 185.4 in 2000 and 145.0 +/- 61.0 in 2001) of the species infecting smallmouth bass. Although N. cylindratus had higher mean intensities (42.1 +/- 37.9 in 2000 and 68.9 +/- 70.5 in 2001) than did L. thecatus in largemouth bass, the values were not significantly different between bass species. The prevalence, mean intensity, and mean abundance of Pomphorhynchus bulbocolli in the bass species were below the values for the other acanthocephalan species. Leptorhynchoides thecatus and N. cylindratus are the most abundant intestinal helminths in bass from Gull Lake.

  20. The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test: false positives in a college student sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, C S; Liepman, M R; Young, C M

    1990-12-01

    The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST), designed and validated by Selzer (1971), is widely used to screen for persons with alcohol problems. The most recent version of the MAST includes the question "Have you ever attended a meeting of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)?" This question may contribute to false positive identifications, as it does not specify whether attendance is for the subject's own problem drinking. In the current research, 114 college students completed the MAST along with an additional question: "Have you ever attended a meeting of Alcoholics Anonymous because of your own problem drinking?" The results indicated that seven of 114 subjects (6.1%) attained inflated MAST scores because they had attended an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, but not for their own problem drinking. It is suggested that the wording to the Alcoholics Anonymous question on the MAST be changed to reduce the number of false positive identifications produced by this instrument.