WorldWideScience

Sample records for wstf-jpl carbon overwrapped

  1. Designing of a Fleet-Leader Program for Carbon Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L.N.; Phoenix, S. Leigh

    2009-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are often used for storing pressurant gases on board spacecraft when mass saving is a prime requirement. Substantial weight savings can be achieved compared to all metallic pressure vessels. For example, on the space shuttle, replacement of all metallic pressure vessels with Kevlar COPVs resulted in a weight savings of about 30 percent. Mass critical space applications such as the Ares and Orion vehicles are currently being planned to use as many COPVs as possible in place of all-metallic pressure vessels to minimize the overall mass of the vehicle. Due to the fact that overwraps are subjected to sustained loads during long periods of a mission, stress rupture failure is a major concern. It is, therefore, important to ascertain the reliability of these vessels by analysis, since it is practically impossible to show by experimental testing the reliability of flight quality vessels. Also, it is a common practice to set aside flight quality vessels as "fleet leaders" in a test program where these vessels are subjected to slightly accelerated operating conditions so that they lead the actual flight vessels both in time and load. The intention of fleet leaders is to provide advanced warning if there is a serious design flaw in the vessels so that a major disaster in the flight vessels can be averted with advance warning. On the other hand, the accelerating conditions must be not so severe as to be prone to false alarms. The primary focus of the present paper is to provide an analytical basis for designing a viable fleet leader program for carbon COPVs. The analysis is based on a stress rupture behavior model incorporating Weibull statistics and power-law sensitivity of life to fiber stress level.

  2. Evaluation of Carbon Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels Fabricated Using Ionic Liquid Epoxies Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The intent of the work proposed here is to ascertain the viability of ionic liquid (IL) epoxy based carbon fiber composites for use as storage tanks at cryogenic temperatures. This IL epoxy has been specifically developed to address composite cryogenic tank challenges associated with achieving NASA's in-space propulsion and exploration goals. Our initial work showed that an unadulterated ionic liquid (IL) carbon-fiber composite exhibited improved properties over an optimized commercial product at cryogenic temperatures. Subsequent investigative work has significantly improved the IL epoxy and our first carbon-fiber Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessel (COPV) was successfully fabricated. Here additional COPVs, using a further improved IL epoxy, will be fabricated and pressure tested at cryogenic temperatures with the results rigorously analyzed. Investigation of the IL composite for lower pressure liner-less cryogenic tank applications will also be initiated. It is expected that the current Technology Readiness Level (TRL) will be raised from about TRL 3 to TRL 5 where unambiguous predictions for subsequent development/testing can be made.

  3. In-Situ Nondestructive Evaluation of Kevlar(Registered Trademark)and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Micromechanics for Improved Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess; Saulsberry, Regor

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been faced with recertification and life extension issues for epoxy-impregnated Kevlar 49 (K/Ep) and carbon (C/Ep) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) used in various systems on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station, respectively. Each COPV has varying criticality, damage and repair histories, time at pressure, and pressure cycles. COPVs are of particular concern due to the insidious and catastrophic burst-before-leak failure mode caused by stress rupture (SR) of the composite overwrap. SR life has been defined [1] as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress level(s), time at stress level(s), and associated environment. SR has none of the features of predictability associated with metal pressure vessels, such as crack geometry, growth rate and size, or other features that lend themselves to nondestructive evaluation (NDE). In essence, the variability or surprise factor associated with SR cannot be eliminated. C/Ep COPVs are also susceptible to impact damage that can lead to reduced burst pressure even when the amount of damage to the COPV is below the visual detection threshold [2], thus necessitating implementation of a mechanical damage control plan [1]. Last, COPVs can also fail prematurely due to material or design noncompliance. In each case (SR, impact or noncompliance), out-of-family behavior is expected leading to a higher probability of failure at a given stress, hence, greater uncertainty in performance. For these reasons, NASA has been actively engaged in research to develop NDE methods that can be used during post-manufacture qualification, in-service inspection, and in-situ structural health monitoring. Acoustic emission (AE) is one of the more promising NDE techniques for detecting and monitoring, in real-time, the strain energy release and corresponding stress-wave propagation produced by actively growing flaws and defects in composite

  4. Reliability Considerations for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels on Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Phoenix, S. L.

    2007-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are used to store gases under high pressure onboard spacecraft. These are used for a variety of purposes such as propelling liquid fuel etc, Kevlar, glass, Carbon and other more recent fibers have all been in use to overwrap the vessels. COPVs usually have a thin metallic liner with the primary purpose of containing the gases and prevent any leakage. The liner is overwrapped with filament wound composite such as Kevlar, Carbon or Glass fiber. Although the liner is required to perform in the leak before break mode making the failure a relatively benign mode, the overwrap can fail catastrophically under sustained load due to stress rupture. It is this failure mode that is of major concern as the stored energy of such vessels is often great enough ta cause loss of crew and vehicle. The present paper addresses some of the reliability concerns associated specifically with Kevlar Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels. The primary focus of the paper is on how reliability of COPV's are established for the purpose of deciding in general their flight worthiness and continued use. Analytical models based on existing design data will be presented showing how to achieve the required reliability metric to the end of a specific period of performance. Uncertainties in the design parameters and how they affect reliability and confidence intervals will be addressed as well. Some trade studies showing how reliability changes with time during a program period will be presented.

  5. NDE and Stress Monitoring on Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Damage caused by composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) failure can be catastrophic. Thus, monitoring condition and stress in the composite overwrap,...

  6. Stress Rupture Life Reliability Measures for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Thesken, John C.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie

    2007-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are often used for storing pressurant gases onboard spacecraft. Kevlar (DuPont), glass, carbon and other more recent fibers have all been used as overwraps. Due to the fact that overwraps are subjected to sustained loads for an extended period during a mission, stress rupture failure is a major concern. It is therefore important to ascertain the reliability of these vessels by analysis, since the testing of each flight design cannot be completed on a practical time scale. The present paper examines specifically a Weibull statistics based stress rupture model and considers the various uncertainties associated with the model parameters. The paper also examines several reliability estimate measures that would be of use for the purpose of recertification and for qualifying flight worthiness of these vessels. Specifically, deterministic values for a point estimate, mean estimate and 90/95 percent confidence estimates of the reliability are all examined for a typical flight quality vessel under constant stress. The mean and the 90/95 percent confidence estimates are computed using Monte-Carlo simulation techniques by assuming distribution statistics of model parameters based also on simulation and on the available data, especially the sample sizes represented in the data. The data for the stress rupture model are obtained from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) stress rupture testing program, carried out for the past 35 years. Deterministic as well as probabilistic sensitivities are examined.

  7. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Materials Aging Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the issues concerning the aging of the materials in a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV). The basic composition of the COPV is a Boss, a composite overwrap, and a metallic liner. The lifetime of a COPV is affected by the age of the overwrap, the cyclic fatigue of the metallic liner, and stress rupture life, a sudden and catastrophic failure of the overwrap while holding at a stress level below the ultimate strength for an extended time. There is information about the coupon tests that were performed, and a test on a flight COPV.

  8. Composite Overwrap Fragmentation Observations, Concerns, and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangham, Mike; Hovater, Mary

    2017-01-01

    A series of test activities has raised some concerns about the generation of orbital debris caused by failures of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). These tests have indicated that a large number of composite fragments can be produced by either pressure burst failures or by high-speed impacts. A review of prior high-speed tests with COPV indicates that other tests have produced large numbers of composite fragments. As was the case with the test referenced here, the tests tended to produce a large number of small composite fragments with relatively low velocities induced by the impact and or gas expansion.

  9. Develop Critical Profilometers to Meet Current and Future Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Interior Inspection Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop laser profilometer technology that can efficiently inspect and map the inside of composite pressure vessels for flaws such as liner buckling, pitting, or other surface imperfections. The project will also provide profilometers that can directly support inspections of flight vessels during development and qualification programs and subsequently be implemented into manufacturing inspections to screen out vessels with "out of family" liner defects. An example interior scan of a carbon overwrapped bottle is shown in comparison to an external view of the same bottle (Fig. 1). The internal scan is primarily of the cylindrical portion, but extends about 0.15 in. into the end cap area.

  10. Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress Rupture Lifting Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress rupture failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle s Kevlar-49 (DuPont) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed nonconservative life predictions have been made where stress rupture data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23 percent lower than what had previously been used to predict stress rupture life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress rupture lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress rupture life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.

  11. Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress Rupture Lifing Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress rupture failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle's Kevlar-49 fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed non-conservative life predictions have been made where stress rupture data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic-plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23% lower than what had previously been used to predict stress rupture life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress rupture lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress rupture life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.

  12. Failure process investigation of overwrapping composite on the pipe by burst test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Cheng, Z. Q.; Barriere, T.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, B. S.

    2017-10-01

    Overwrapping structure of Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer(GFRP) is widely used for pipeline repair and is also a promising crack arrest method, so it is worthy of further research on its failure process. For investigating failure process, a bare pipe with specially designed defect of axial slot is used for hydrostatic test, burst pressure 25.6MPa is obtained. Then, the same defected pipe wrapped with 5 layers composite is used for hydrostatic test, overwrapping composite and pipe bust simultaneously at pressure 26.2MPa, failure process cannot be observed as sudden failure. Next, the same defected pipe wrapped with 12 layers composite is utilized for hydrostatic test, progressive failure process of overwrapping GFRP structure happens at pressure 28.6MPa, while the defected pipe remains well. After overwrapping composite is wholly broken axially, the damage interface area between composite structure and pipe is distinguished by proposed strain gauge method. Subsequent hydrostatic test shows that the remaining intact interface still has obvious enforcement effect, the burst happens at pressure 30.2MPa. It implies that interface's shear strength between overwrapping composite and pipe is essential to improve ultimate burst pressure.

  13. Shelf life of fresh foal meat under MAP, overwrap and vacuum packaging conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, José M; Gómez, María

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the physico-chemical properties, the microbial counts and the sensory properties' changes of foal steaks packed under various conditions. The experimental packaging systems were: (i) vacuum packaging (VP), (ii) overwrap packaging and (iii) two modified atmosphere packaging methods (MAP): high O₂ MAP (80% O₂+20% CO₂) and low O₂ MAP (30% O₂+70% CO₂). The meat was stored at 2 °C during 14 days and tested for pH, colour, lipid and protein oxidation, microbial counts and sensory assessment of odour, colour and appearance. Of the two MAP, overwrap and VP, both MAP were the most effective treatments for the inhibition of the total viable counts (TVC), Pseudomonas spp., psychrotrophic aerobic bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae as well as moulds and yeast. According to the sensory evaluation, foal steaks packed under overwrap and MAP treatments resulted unacceptable after 7 days of storage, whereas the vacuum-packed meat was still acceptable. Moreover, the redness value decreased significantly (Pfoal steaks from overwrap packaging and MAP conditions had a greater increase of TBAR'S values and carbonyl content during the storage time. High O₂ levels affected foal meat quality negatively, while anaerobic conditions extended the meat's shelf life up to 14 days. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Strain measurement during stress rupture of composite over-wrapped pressure vessel with fiber Bragg gratings sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Grant, Joseph; Russell, Sam; Arnett, Shawn

    2008-03-01

    Fiber optic Bragg gratings were used to measure strain fields during Stress Rupture (SSM) test of Kevlar Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs). The sensors were embedded under the over-wrapped attached to the liner released from the Kevlar and attached to the Kevlar released from the liner. Additional sensors (foil gages and fiber bragg gratings) were surface mounted on the COPV liner.

  15. The cryogenic bonding evaluation at the metallic-composite interface of a composite overwrapped pressure vessel with additional impact investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Eric A.

    A bonding evaluation that investigated the cryogenic tensile strength of several different adhesives/resins was performed. The test materials consisted of 606 aluminum test pieces adhered to a wet-wound graphite laminate in order to simulate the bond created at the liner-composite interface of an aluminum-lined composite overwrapped pressure vessel. It was found that for cryogenic applications, a flexible, low modulus resin system must be used. Additionally, the samples prepared with a thin layer of cured resin -- or prebond -- performed significantly better than those without. It was found that it is critical that the prebond surface must have sufficient surface roughness prior to the bonding application. Also, the aluminum test pieces that were prepared using a surface etchant slightly outperformed those that were prepared with a grit blast surface finish and performed significantly better than those that had been scored using sand paper to achieve the desired surface finish. An additional impact investigation studied the post impact tensile strength of composite rings in a cryogenic environment. The composite rings were filament wound with several combinations of graphite and aramid fibers and were prepared with different resin systems. The rings were subjected to varying levels of Charpy impact damage and then pulled to failure in tension. It was found that the addition of elastic aramid fibers with the carbon fibers mitigates the overall impact damage and drastically improves the post-impact strength of the structure in a cryogenic environment.

  16. Nondestructive Methods and Special Test Instrumentation Supporting NASA Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulsberry, Regor; Greene, Nathanael; Cameron, Ken; Madaras, Eric; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh; Murthy, Pappu; Revilock, Duane

    2007-01-01

    Many aging composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), being used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are currently under evaluation to better quantify their reliability and clarify their likelihood of failure due to stress rupture and age-dependent issues. As a result, some test and analysis programs have been successfully accomplished and other related programs are still in progress at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) and other NASA centers, with assistance from the commercial sector. To support this effort, a group of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) experts was assembled to provide NDE competence for pretest evaluation of test articles and for application of NDE technology to real-time testing. Techniques were required to provide assurance that the test article had adequate structural integrity and manufacturing consistency to be considered acceptable for testing and these techniques were successfully applied. Destructive testing is also being accomplished to better understand the physical and chemical property changes associated with progression toward "stress rupture" (SR) failure, and it is being associated with NDE response, so it can potentially be used to help with life prediction. Destructive work also includes the evaluation of residual stresses during dissection of the overwrap, laboratory evaluation of specimens extracted from the overwrap to evaluate physical property changes, and quantitative microscopy to inform the theoretical micromechanics.

  17. A Theoretical Investigation of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Mechanics Applied to NASA Full Scale Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.; Greene, N.; Palko, Joseph L.; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Sutter, James; Saulsberry, R.; Beeson, H.

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the factors controlling the stress rupture life of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) continues. Kevlar (DuPont) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of a load sharing liner, the manufacturing induced residual stresses and the complex mechanical response, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. This paper is a companion to a previously reported experimental investigation and develops a theoretical framework necessary to design full-scale pathfinder experiments and accurately interpret the experimentally observed deformation and failure mechanisms leading up to static burst in COPVs. The fundamental mechanical response of COPVs is described using linear elasticity and thin shell theory and discussed in comparison to existing experimental observations. These comparisons reveal discrepancies between physical data and the current analytical results and suggest that the vessel s residual stress state and the spatial stress distribution as a function of pressure may be completely different from predictions based upon existing linear elastic analyses. The 3D elasticity of transversely isotropic spherical shells demonstrates that an overly compliant transverse stiffness relative to membrane stiffness can account for some of this by shifting a thin shell problem well into the realm of thick shell response. The use of calibration procedures are demonstrated as calibrated thin shell model results and finite element results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The successes reported here have lead to continuing work with full scale testing of larger NASA COPV

  18. Health Monitoring of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) Using Meandering Winding Magnetometer ((MWM(Registered Trademark)) Eddy Current Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Rick; Grundy, David; Jablonski, David; Martin, Christopher; Washabaugh, Andrew; Goldfine, Neil

    2011-01-01

    There are 3 mechanisms that affect the life of a COPV are: a) The age life of the overwrap; b) Cyclic fatigue of the metallic liner; c) Stress Rupture life. The first two mechanisms are understood through test and analysis. A COPV Stress Rupture is a sudden and catastrophic failure of the overwrap while holding at a stress level below the ultimate strength for an extended time. Currently there is no simple, deterministic method of determining the stress rupture life of a COPV, nor a screening technique to determine if a particular COPV is close to the time of a stress rupture failure. Conclusions: Demonstrated a correlation between MWM response and pressure or strain. Demonstrated the ability to monitor stress in COPV at different orientations and depths. FA41 provides best correlation with bottle pressure or stress.

  19. Testing of Carbon Fiber Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Stress-Rupture Lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Beeson, Harold; Yoder, Tommy; Greene, Nathaniel

    2006-01-01

    This paper contains summaries of testing procedures and analysis of stress rupture life testing for two stress rupture test programs, one for Kevlar COPVs performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the other a joint study between NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. These will be discussed in detail including test setup and issues encountered during testing. Lessons learned from testing in these two programs will be discussed.

  20. Optical Sensing using Fiber Bragg Gratings for Monitoring Structural Damage in Composite Over-Wrapped Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Composite Over-Wrap Vessels are widely used in the aerospace community. They are made of thin-walled bottles that are over wrapped with high strength fibers embedded in a matrix material. There is a strong drive to reduce the weight of space borne vehicles and thus pushes designers to adopt COPVs that are over wrapped with graphite fibers embedded in its epoxy matrix. Unfortunately, this same fiber-matrix configuration is more susceptible to impact damage than others and to make matters worse; there is a regime where impacts that damage the over wrap leave no visible scar on the COPV surface. In this paper FBG sensors are presented as a means of monitoring and detecting these types of damage. The FBG sensors are surface mounted to the COPVs and optically interrogated to explore the structural properties of these composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in the composite matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around 4500 psi. A Fiber Optic Demodulation System built by Blue Road Research, is used for interrogation of the Bragg gratings.

  1. Development of a Numerical Model of Hypervelocity Impact into a Pressurized Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, M. A.; Davis, B. A.; Miller, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    As the outlook for space exploration becomes more ambitious and spacecraft travel deeper into space than ever before, it is increasingly important that propulsion systems perform reliably within the space environment. The increased reliability compels designers to increase design margin at the expense of system mass, which contrasts with the need to limit vehicle mass to maximize payload. Such are the factors that motivate the integration of high specific strength composite materials in the construction of pressure vessels commonly referred to as composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPV). The COPV consists of a metallic liner for the inner shell of the COPV that is stiff, negates fluid permeation and serves as the anchor for composite laminates or filaments, but the liner itself cannot contain the stresses from the pressurant it contains. The compo-site-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) is wound around the liner using a combination of hoop (circumferential) and helical orientations. Careful consideration of wrap orientation allows the composite to evenly bear structural loading and creates the COPV's characteristic high strength to weight ratio. As the CFRP overwrap carries most of the stresses induced by pressurization, damage to the overwrap can affect mission duration, mission success and potentially cause loss-of-vehicle/loss-of-crew. For this reason, it is critical to establish a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in the failure of a stressed composite such as that of the COPV. One of the greatest external threats to the integrity of a spacecraft's COPV is an impact from the meteoroid and orbital debris environments (MMOD). These impacts, even from submillimeter particles, generate extremely high stress states in the CFRP that can damage numerous fibers. As a result of this possibility, initial assumptions in survivability analysis for some human-rated NASA space-craft have assumed that any alteration of the vessel due to impact is

  2. Damage Control Plan for International Space Station Recharge Tank Assembly Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    As NASA has retired the Space Shuttle Program, a new method of transporting compressed gaseous nitrogen and oxygen needed to be created for delivery of these crucial life support resources to the International Space Station (ISS). One of the methods selected by NASA includes the use of highly pressurized, unprotected Recharge Tank Assemblies (RTAs) utilizing Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs). A COPV consists of a thin liner wrapped with a fiber composite and resin or epoxy. It is typically lighter weight than an all metal pressure vessel of similar volume and therefore provides a higher-efficiency means for gas storage. However COPVs are known to be susceptible to damage resulting from handling, tool drop impacts, or impacts from other objects. As a result, a comprehensive Damage Control Plan has been established to mitigate damage to the RTA COPV throughout its life cycle. The DCP is intended to evaluate and mitigate defined threats during manufacturing, shipping and handling, test, assembly level integration, shipment while pressurized, launch vehicle integration and mission operations by defining credible threats and methods for preventing potential damage while still maintaining the primary goal of resupplying ISS gas resources. A comprehensive threat assessment is performed to identify all threats posed to the COPV during the different phases of its lifecycle. The threat assessment is then used as the basis for creating a series of general inspection, surveillance and reporting requirements which apply across all phases of the COPV's life, targeted requirements only applicable to specific work phases and a series of training courses for both ground personnel and crew aboard the ISS. A particularly important area of emphasis deals with creating DCP requirements for a highly pressurized, large and unprotected RTA COPV for use during Inter Vehicular Activities (IVA) operations in the micro gravity environment while supplying pressurized gas to the

  3. Continued Development of Meandering Winding Magnetometer (MWM (Register Trademark)) Eddy Current Sensors for the Health Monitoring, Modeling and Damage Detection of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard; Wincheski, Russell; Jablonski, David; Washabaugh, Andy; Sheiretov, Yanko; Martin, Christopher; Goldfine, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are used in essentially all NASA spacecraft, launch. vehicles and payloads to contain high-pressure fluids for propulsion, life support systems and science experiments. Failure of any COPV either in flight or during ground processing would result in catastrophic damage to the spacecraft or payload, and could lead to loss of life. Therefore, NASA continues to investigate new methods to non-destructively inspect (NDE) COPVs for structural anomalies and to provide a means for in-situ structural health monitoring (SHM) during operational service. Partnering with JENTEK Sensors, engineers at NASA, Kennedy Space Center have successfully conducted a proof-of-concept study to develop Meandering Winding Magnetometer (MWM) eddy current sensors designed to make direct measurements of the stresses of the internal layers of a carbon fiber composite wrapped COPV. During this study three different MWM sensors were tested at three orientations to demonstrate the ability of the technology to measure stresses at various fiber orientations and depths. These results showed good correlation with actual surface strain gage measurements. MWM-Array technology for scanning COPVs can reliably be used to image and detect mechanical damage. To validate this conclusion, several COPVs were scanned to obtain a baseline, and then each COPV was impacted at varying energy levels and then rescanned. The baseline subtracted images were used to demonstrate damage detection. These scans were performed with two different MWM-Arrays. with different geometries for near-surface and deeper penetration imaging at multiple frequencies and in multiple orientations of the linear MWM drive. This presentation will include a review of micromechanical models that relate measured sensor responses to composite material constituent properties, validated by the proof of concept study, as the basis for SHM and NDE data analysis as well as potential improvements including

  4. Characterization of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer repair system for structurally deficient steel piping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeffrey M.

    This Dissertation investigates a carbon fiber reinforced polymer repair system for structurally deficient steel piping. Numerous techniques exist for the repair of high-pressure steel piping. One repair technology that is widely gaining acceptance is composite over-wraps. Thermal analytical evaluations of the epoxy matrix material produced glass transition temperature results, a cure kinetic model, and a workability chart. These results indicate a maximum glass transition temperature of 80°C (176°F) when cured in ambient conditions. Post-curing the epoxy, however, resulted in higher glass-transition temperatures. The accuracy of cure kinetic model presented is temperature dependent; its accuracy improves with increased cure temperatures. Cathodic disbondment evaluations of the composite over-wrap show the epoxy does not breakdown when subjected to a constant voltage of -1.5V and the epoxy does not allow corrosion to form under the wrap from permeation. Combustion analysis of the composite over-wrap system revealed the epoxy is flammable when in direct contact with fire. To prevent combustion, an intumescent coating was developed to be applied on the composite over-wrap. Results indicate that damaged pipes repaired with the carbon fiber composite over-wrap withstand substantially higher static pressures and exhibit better fatigue characteristics than pipes lacking repair. For loss up to 80 percent of the original pipe wall thickness, the composite over-wrap achieved failure pressures above the pipe's specified minimum yield stress during monotonic evaluations and reached the pipe's practical fatigue limit during cyclical pressure testing. Numerous repairs were made to circular, thru-wall defects and monotonic pressure tests revealed containment up to the pipe's specified minimum yield strength for small diameter defects. The energy release rate of the composite over-wrap/steel interface was obtained from these full-scale, leaking pipe evaluations and results

  5. Use of Raman Spectroscopy and Delta Volume Growth from Void Collapse to Assess Overwrap Stress Gradients Compromising the Reliability of Large Kevlar/Epoxy COPVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezirian, Michael T.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2009-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are frequently used for storing pressurized gases aboard spacecraft and aircraft when weight saving is desirable compared to all-metal versions. Failure mechanisms in fibrous COPVs and variability in lifetime can be very different from their metallic counterparts; in the former, catastrophic stress-rupture can occur with virtually no warning, whereas in latter, a leak before burst design philosophy can be implemented. Qualification and certification typically requires only one burst test on a production sample (possibly after several pressure cycles) and the vessel need only meet a design burst strength (the maximum operating pressure divided by a knockdown factor). Typically there is no requirement to assess variability in burst strength or lifetime, much less determine production and materials processing parameters important to control of such variability. Characterizing such variability and its source is crucial to models for calculating required reliability over a given lifetime (e.g. R = 0.9999 for 15 years). In this paper we present a case study of how lack of control of certain process parameters in COPV manufacturing can result in variations among vessels and between production runs that can greatly increase uncertainty and reduce reliability. The vessels considered are 40-inch ( NASA Glenn Research center, Cleveland, OH, 44135 29,500 in3 ) spherical COPVs with a 0.74 in. thick Kevlar49/epoxy overwrap and with a titanium liner of which 34 were originally produced. Two burst tests were eventually performed that unexpectedly differed by almost 5%, and were 10% lower than anticipated from burst tests on 26-inch sister vessels similar in every detail. A major observation from measurements made during proof testing (autofrettage) of the 40-inch vessels was that permanent volume growth from liner yielding varied by a factor of more than two (150 in3 to 360 in3 ), which suggests large differences in the residual

  6. Kevlar Overwrap Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Marshall and Dick Grove (RPL) and D. Gleich (Arde) 4. Telcon 5/7/85 D. Gleich (Arde) and Frank Davies (PI) 5. Letter, John Marshall (RPL) to D. Gleich...anc rrost oiozs iac 6 to 12 noise SoiKes. Durina the .’a±conc1ici-1 ors. :i ac-es Mac much netter than reasconable n.as e 41c’ors. .-ic nicase

  7. Smart Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel - Integrated Structural Health Monitoring System to Meet Space Exploration and International Space Station Mission Assurance Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulsberry, Regor; Nichols, Charles; Waller, Jess

    2012-01-01

    Currently there are no integrated NDE methods for baselining and monitoring defect levels in fleet for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) or related fracture critical composites, or for performing life-cycle maintenance inspections either in a traditional remove-and-inspect mode or in a more modern in situ inspection structural health monitoring (SHM) mode. Implicit in SHM and autonomous inspection is the existence of quantitative accept-reject criteria. To be effective, these criteria must correlate with levels of damage known to cause composite failure. Furthermore, implicit in SHM is the existence of effective remote sensing hardware and automated techniques and algorithms for interpretation of SHM data. SHM of facture critical composite structures, especially high pressure COPVs, is critical to the success of nearly every future NASA space exploration program as well as life extension of the International Space Station. It has been clearly stated that future NASA missions may not be successful without SHM [1]. Otherwise, crews will be busy addressing subsystem health issues and not focusing on the real NASA mission

  8. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochi, E. J.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Cano, R. J.; Wincheski, R. A.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Czabaj, M.

    2016-01-01

    Reported mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at the nanoscale suggest their potential to enable significantly lighter structures of interest for space applications. However, their utility depends on the retention of these properties in bulk material formats that permit practical fabrication of large structures. This presentation summarizes recent progress made to produce carbon nanotube composites with specific tensile properties that begin to rival those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. CNT content in these nanocomposites was greater than 70% by weight. Tested nanocomposite specimens were fabricated from kilometers or tens of square meters of CNT, depending on the starting material format. Processing methods to yield these results, and characterization and testing to evaluate the performance of these composites will be discussed. The final objective is the demonstration of a CNT composite overwrapped pressure vessel to be flight tested in the Fall of 2016.

  9. Effects of polyvinyl chloride overwrap film, high-oxygen modified atmosphere packaging, or ultra-low-oxygen modified atmosphere packaging on bone marrow discoloration in beef humerus, rib, thoracic vertebra, and scapula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobbel, J P; Dikeman, M E; Smith, J S; Kropf, D H; Milliken, G A

    2006-03-01

    Meat retailers have reported bone marrow discoloration to be a problem, especially in modified atmosphere packages (MAP). Therefore, it is important to determine the prevalence and cause(s) of bone marrow discoloration in different beef bones and packaging systems. Thirty-six beef humeri, ribs, scapulas, and thoracic vertebrae from USDA Select and Choice carcasses were obtained from a commercial abattoir, cut into 2.54-cm-thick sections at 4 d postmortem, and packaged into 1 of 3 systems: 1) polyvinyl chloride film (PVC) overwrap; 2) high-oxygen (80% O2, 20% CO2) MAP; and 3) ultra-low-oxygen (70% N2, 30% CO2) MAP. Instrumental reflectance and visual color scores were taken on d 0, 2, and 4, and on d 0 to 4 of display, respectively. Bone marrow was extracted from humeri, ribs, and thoracic vertebrae for analysis but not from scapulas. Ribs, scapulas, and thoracic vertebrae packaged in PVC and high-oxygen MAP developed undesirable gray or black discoloration. In ultra-low-oxygen MAP, mean visual color scores were acceptable throughout the entire display period. Discoloration (darkening) was more extensive for ribs, scapulas, and thoracic vertebrae than for humeri, especially for bones packaged in PVC and high-oxygen MAP. Humeri had lower (P packaged in ultra-low-oxygen MAP and for humeri in PVC and high-oxygen MAP. Humeri marrow had lower (P packaging systems. Myoglobin was undetectable in humeri marrow. The much larger amounts of Fe and hemoglobin in ribs and thoracic vertebrae likely contribute to marrow discoloration. Bone marrow discoloration was distinct in ribs, scapulas, and thoracic vertebrae packaged in PVC or high-oxygen MAP. Bones packaged in ultra-low-oxygen MAP had minimal discoloration.

  10. The Effect of Localized Damage on the Electrical Conductivity of Bare Carbon Fiber Tow and its Use as a Non-Destructive Evaluation Tool for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzel, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Composite materials are beneficial because of their high specific strength and low weight. Safety, Destructive testing and destructive testing, Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) and Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE). Problem: Neither NDT nor NDE can provide sufficient data to determine life expectancy or quantify the damage state of a composite material.

  11. Structural CNT Composites. Part I; Developing a Carbon Nanotube Filament Winder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauti, Godfrey; Kim, Jae-Woo; Wincheski, Russell A.; Antczak, Andrew; Campero, Jamie C.; Luong, Hoa H.; Shanahan, Michelle H.; Stelter, Christopher J.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) based materials promise advances in the production of high strength and multifunctional components for aerospace and other applications. Specifically, in tension dominated applications, the latest CNT based filaments are yielding composite properties comparable to or exceeding composites from more established fibers such as Kevlar and carbon fiber. However, for the properties of these materials to be fully realized at the component level, suitable manufacturing processes have to be developed. These materials handle differently from conventional fibers, with different wetting characteristics and behavior under load. The limited availability of bulk forms also requires that the equipment be scaled down accordingly to tailor the process development approach to material availability. Here, the development of hardware and software for filament winding of carbon nanotube based tapes and yarns is described. This hardware features precision guidance of the CNT material and control of the winding tension over a wide range in an open architecture that allows for effective process control and troubleshooting during winding. Use of the filament winder to develop CNT based Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) shall also be discussed.

  12. Use of Modal Acoustic Emission to Monitor Damage Progression in Carbon Fiber/Epoxy and Implications for Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, J. M.; Nichols, C. T.; Wentzel, D. J.; Saulsberry R. L.

    2010-01-01

    Broad-band modal acoustic emission (AE) data was used to characterize micromechanical damage progression in uniaxial IM7 and T1000 carbon fiber-epoxy tows and an IM7 composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) subjected to an intermittent load hold tensile stress profile known to activate the Felicity ratio (FR). Damage progression was followed by inspecting the Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs) associated with acoustic emission events. FFT analysis revealed the occurrence of cooperative micromechanical damage events in a frequency range between 100 kHz and 1 MHz. Evidence was found for the existence of a universal damage parameter, referred to here as the critical Felicity ratio, or Felicity ratio at rupture (FR*), which had a value close to 0.96 for the tows and the COPV tested. The implications of using FR* to predict failure in carbon/epoxy composite materials and related composite components such as COPVs are discussed. Trends in the FFT data are also discussed; namely, the difference between the low and high energy events, the difference between early and late-life events, comparison of IM7 and T1000 damage progression, and lastly, the similarity of events occurring at the onset of significant acoustic emission used to calculate the FR.

  13. Fiber Breakage Model for Carbon Composite Stress Rupture Phenomenon: Theoretical Development and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie

    2010-01-01

    Stress rupture failure of Carbon Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) is of serious concern to Science Mission and Constellation programs since there are a number of COPVs on board space vehicles with stored gases under high pressure for long durations of time. It has become customary to establish the reliability of these vessels using the so called classic models. The classical models are based on Weibull statistics fitted to observed stress rupture data. These stochastic models cannot account for any additional damage due to the complex pressure-time histories characteristic of COPVs being supplied for NASA missions. In particular, it is suspected that the effects of proof test could significantly reduce the stress rupture lifetime of COPVs. The focus of this paper is to present an analytical appraisal of a model that incorporates damage due to proof test. The model examined in the current paper is based on physical mechanisms such as micromechanics based load sharing concepts coupled with creep rupture and Weibull statistics. For example, the classic model cannot accommodate for damage due to proof testing which every flight vessel undergoes. The paper compares current model to the classic model with a number of examples. In addition, several applications of the model to current ISS and Constellation program issues are also examined.

  14. NDT and SHM of Carbon Fiber Composites using Linear Drive MWM-Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washabaugh, Andrew; Martin, Christopher; Lyons, Robert; Grundy, David; Goldfine, Neil; Russell, Richard; Wincheski, Russell

    2012-01-01

    Carbon fiber composites are used in a wide range of structural applications due to their excellent specific strength and stiffness. However, the anisotropic mechanical and electrical properties associated with the fibers within each composite layer present challenges, and opportunities, for Nondestructive Testing (NDT) methods used to characterize and assess the structure condition. This includes composite condition after manufacture (such as fiber orientation and density, porosity, delamination, and bond strength) and during usage (such as damage from impact, fiber breakage, thermal exposure or applied stress). Ultrasonic and thermographic methods can address some of these challenges, but eddy current methods provide an alternative method for composite structures that contain a conducting material, such as carbon fibers or a metallic liner. This presentation reviews recent advances in the development of eddy current sensors and arrays for carbon fiber composite NDT and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) applications. The focus is on eddy current sensor constructs with linear drive windings, such as MWM -Arrays, that induce currents primarily within the linear fibers of the composite. By combining this type of sensor construct with micromechanical models that relate composite constituent properties to measurable sensor responses, insight is obtained into the volumetric distribution of electrical properties within the composite and the associated manufacturing, damage, or strain conditions. With knowledge of the fiber layup, this MWM-Array technology is able to detect damage and strain/stress as a function of depth and fiber orientation. This work has been funded by NASA, NA V AIR and the Army for applications ranging from composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) to aircraft structures and rotorcraft blades. This presentation will specifically present background on the MWM-Array technology, results from the micromechanical modeling effort, and results from

  15. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  16. Use of Statistical Analysis of Acoustic Emission Data on Carbon-Epoxy COPV Materials-of-Construction for Enhanced Felicity Ratio Onset Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Arick Reed A.; Johnson, Kenneth L.; Nichols, Charles T.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Waller, Jess M.

    2012-01-01

    Broadband modal acoustic emission (AE) data were acquired during intermittent load hold tensile test profiles on Toray T1000G carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy (C/Ep) single tow specimens. A novel trend seeking statistical method to determine the onset of significant AE was developed, resulting in more linear decreases in the Felicity ratio (FR) with load, potentially leading to more accurate failure prediction. The method developed uses an exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control chart. Comparison of the EWMA with previously used FR onset methods, namely the discrete (n), mean (n (raised bar)), normalized (n%) and normalized mean (n(raised bar)%) methods, revealed the EWMA method yields more consistently linear FR versus load relationships between specimens. Other findings include a correlation between AE data richness and FR linearity based on the FR methods discussed in this paper, and evidence of premature failure at lower than expected loads. Application of the EWMA method should be extended to other composite materials and, eventually, composite components such as composite overwrapped pressure vessels. Furthermore, future experiments should attempt to uncover the factors responsible for infant mortality in C/Ep strands.

  17. Carbon-On-Carbon Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Gregory S. (Inventor); Buchanan, Larry (Inventor); Banzon, Jr., Jose T. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The presently disclosed technology relates to carbon-on-carbon (C/C) manufacturing techniques and the resulting C/C products. One aspect of the manufacturing techniques disclosed herein utilizes two distinct curing operations that occur at different times and/or using different temperatures. The resulting C/C products are substantially non-porous, even though the curing operation(s) substantially gasify a liquid carbon-entrained filler material that saturates a carbon fabric that makes up the C/C products.

  18. Porous carbons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carbon in dense as well as porous solid form is used in a variety of applications. Activated porous carbons are made through pyrolysis and activation of carbonaceous natural as well as synthetic precursors. Pyrolysed woods replicate the structure of original wood but as such possess very low surface areas and poor ...

  19. Carbon Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, the present state of knowledge of the carbon stars is discussed. Particular attention is given to issues of classification, evolution, variability, populations in our own and other galaxies, and circumstellar material.

  20. Developments in carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, Timothy D.

    1994-01-01

    The following carbon-based materials are reviewed and their applications discussed: fullerenes; graphite (synthetic and manufactured); activated carbon fibers; and carbon-carbon composites. Carbon R&D activities at ORNL are emphasized.

  1. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  2. Online Monitoring of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira; Figueiredo, Joana; Faria, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    -composite and composite-composite interfaces during their manufacturing processes. The idea is to allow the online strain monitoring during preliminary testing and service-life. The ability of these measuring systems to effectively assess the strain fields has been investigated. Simultaneously, a finite element analysis...... pressures are sought continuously, to get higher energy densities in such storage systems, and safety aspects become critical. Thus, reliable design and test procedures are required to reduce the risks of undesired and unpredicted failures. An in-service health monitoring system may contribute to a better...... product development, design and optimization, as well as to minimize the risks and improve the public acceptance. Within the scope of developing different COPV models for a wide range of operating pressures and applications, optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors were embedded in the liner...

  3. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Monitoring System Using Fiber Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) proposes, in this Phase 1 SBIR project, to demonstrate the feasibility of innovations based on an...

  4. Carbon classified?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar

    2012-01-01

    . Using an actor- network theory (ANT) framework, the aim is to investigate the actors who bring together the elements needed to classify their carbon emission sources and unpack the heterogeneous relations drawn on. Based on an ethnographic study of corporate agents of ecological modernisation over...... and corporations construing themselves as able and suitable to manage their emissions, and, additionally, given that the construction of carbon emissions has performative consequences, the underlying practices need to be declassified, i.e. opened for public scrutiny. Hence the paper concludes by arguing...

  5. Carbon-carbon - An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, John D.

    1988-01-01

    In nonoxidizing high-temperature environments, carbon-carbon composites retain room temperature properties to more than 2225 C; in oxidizing environments, the variety of coatings thus far developed limits maximum operating temperatures to about 1600 C. The high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion of these composites renders them ideal for applications encountering thermal shocks. In addition, the variety of fibers, weave patterns, and layup procedures that can be used for the composites allows mechanical properties to be carefully tailored over a wide range to fit the application in question.

  6. Carbon Based Refractories

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    EWAIS, Emad Mohamed M

    2004-01-01

    .... They are classified into two groups; carbon/bricks/blocks and carbon containing materials. Carbon containing materials are further classified into carbon containing basic refractories and non-basic refractories...

  7. Carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    SLOBODAN N. MARINKOVIC

    2008-01-01

    Nanotubes, the last in the focus of scientists in a series of “all carbon” materials discovered over the last several decades are the most interesting and have the greatest potential. This review aims at presenting in a concise manner the considerable amount of knowledge accumulated since the discovery of this amazing form of solid carbon, particularly during the last 15 years. The topics include methods of synthesis, mathematical description, characterization by Raman spectroscopy, most impo...

  8. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  9. Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux is defined as the year-over-year change in Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock, or the net rate of carbon exchange between an ecosystem and the...

  10. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "Invisible ...

  11. Carbon-carbon grid for ion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Charles E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus of manufacturing a grid member for use in an ion discharge apparatus provides a woven carbon fiber in a matrix of carbon. The carbon fibers are orientated to provide a negatibe coefficient of thermal expansion for at least a portion of the grid member's operative range of use.

  12. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept

  13. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  14. Carbon Nanomembranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Polina; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2017-03-01

    This chapter describes the formation and properties of one nanometer thick carbon nanomembranes (CNMs), made by electron induced cross-linking of aromatic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The cross-linked SAMs are robust enough to be released from the surface and placed on solid support or over holes as free-standing membranes. Annealing at 1000K transforms CNMs into graphene accompanied by a change of mechanical stiffness and electrical resistance. The developed fabrication approach is scalable and provides molecular level control over thickness and homogeneity of the produced CNMs. The mechanisms of electron-induced cross-linking process are discussed in details. A variety of polyaromatic thiols: oligophenyls as well as small and extended condensed polycyclic hydrocarbons have been successfully employed, demonstrating that the structural and functional properties of the resulting nanomembranes are strongly determined by the structure of molecular monolayers. The mechanical properties of CNMs (Young's modulus, tensile strength and prestress) are characterized by bulge testing. The interpretation of the bulge test data relates the Young's modulus to the properties of single molecules and to the structure of the pristine SAMs. The gas transport through the CNM is measured onto polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) - thin film composite membrane. The established relationship of permeance and molecular size determines the molecular sieving mechanism of permeation through this ultrathin sheet.

  15. Mutagenicity of carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Håkan; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; White, Paul A; Gingerich, John; Møller, Peter; Loft, Steffen; Vogel, Ulla

    2011-02-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such carbon nanotubes, graphene and fullerenes are some the most promising nanomaterials. Although carbon nanomaterials have been reported to possess genotoxic potential, it is imperitive to analyse the data on the genotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials in vivo and in vitro and check the validity and predictability of different assays.

  16. Mutagenicity of carbon nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Håkan; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; White, Paul A

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such carbon nanotubes, graphene and fullerenes are some the most promising nanomaterials. Although carbon nanomaterials have been reported to possess genotoxic potential, it is imperitive to analyse the data on the genotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials in vivo and in vitro...

  17. Permafrost-carbon complexities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, J.E.; Gustafsson, Ö.

    2013-01-01

    The thawing and decomposition of carbon stored in permafrost generates greenhouse gases that could further intensify global warming. Currently, most of the thawed carbon is assumed to be converted to greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide and methane, and carbon decomposition is thought

  18. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  19. Carbon repression in Aspergilli.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, G.J.G.; Visser, J.

    1997-01-01

    Many microorganisms prefer easily metabolizable carbon sources over alternative, less readily metabolized carbon sources. One of the mechanisms to achieve this is repression of the synthesis of enzymes related to catabolism of the alternative carbon sources, i.e. carbon repression. It is now clear

  20. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  1. Carbon-based spintronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Zhang, GuangYu

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-based spintronics refers mainly to the spin injection and transport in carbon materials including carbon nanotubes, graphene, fullerene, and organic materials. In the last decade, extraordinary development has been achieved for carbon-based spintronics, and the spin transport has been studied in both local and nonlocal spin valve devices. A series of theoretical and experimental studies have been done to reveal the spin relaxation mechanisms and spin transport properties in carbon materials, mostly for graphene and carbon nanotubes. In this article, we provide a brief review on spin injection and transport in graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerene and organic thin films.

  2. Wood - a carbon depot

    OpenAIRE

    Lipušček, Igor; Tišler, Vesna

    2003-01-01

    The article examines the global movement of carbon dioxide, the most important greenhouse gas due to its large quantities. We studied the carbon cycle with possibilities of its extension, and analysed the mechanisms that remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and bind it into solid substances for a longer period of time. The focus was on carbon dioxide sink into biomass and carbon deposit in wood. On the basis of wood component data and chemical analysis of the components, we calculated th...

  3. Substantial global carbon uptake by cement carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Fengming; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Guan, Dabo; Pade, Claus; Shi, Tiemao; Syddall, Mark; Lv, Jie; Ji, Lanzhu; Bing, Longfei; Wang, Jiaoyue; Wei, Wei; Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Lagerblad, Björn; Galan, Isabel; Andrade, Carmen; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Zhu

    2016-12-01

    Calcination of carbonate rocks during the manufacture of cement produced 5% of global CO2 emissions from all industrial process and fossil-fuel combustion in 2013. Considerable attention has been paid to quantifying these industrial process emissions from cement production, but the natural reversal of the process--carbonation--has received little attention in carbon cycle studies. Here, we use new and existing data on cement materials during cement service life, demolition, and secondary use of concrete waste to estimate regional and global CO2 uptake between 1930 and 2013 using an analytical model describing carbonation chemistry. We find that carbonation of cement materials over their life cycle represents a large and growing net sink of CO2, increasing from 0.10 GtC yr-1 in 1998 to 0.25 GtC yr-1 in 2013. In total, we estimate that a cumulative amount of 4.5 GtC has been sequestered in carbonating cement materials from 1930 to 2013, offsetting 43% of the CO2 emissions from production of cement over the same period, not including emissions associated with fossil use during cement production. We conclude that carbonation of cement products represents a substantial carbon sink that is not currently considered in emissions inventories.

  4. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates OCTOBER 13, ... Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2011 Annual Estimates View All ...

  5. Trading forest carbon - OSU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issues associate with trading carbon sequestered in forests are discussed. Scientific uncertainties associated with carbon measurement are discussed with respect to proposed accounting procedures. Major issues include: (1) Establishing baselines. (2) Determining additivity from f...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "Invisible Killer" because it's a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas. ...

  7. Carbon Materials Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffman, Wesley P

    2005-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites have been used by the Air Force and others for over 25 years in a variety of thermostructural applications including rocket propulsion, re-entry, hypersonics and aircraft brakes...

  8. Preparing to Capture Carbon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daniel P. Schrag

    2007-01-01

    .... Scientific and economic challenges still exist, but none are serious enough to suggest that carbon capture and storage will not work at the scale required to offset trillions of tons of carbon...

  9. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  10. Biomass Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Biomass carbon includes carbon stored in above- and below-ground live plant components (such as leaf, branch, stem and root) as well as in standing and down dead...

  11. Soil Organic Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the carbon held within soil organic constituents (i.e., products produced as dead plants and animals decompose and the soil microbial...

  12. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  13. Carbon Goes To…

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasci, Funda

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this activity are to help middle school students understand the carbon cycle and realize how human activities affect the carbon cycle. This activity consists of two parts. The first part of the activity focuses on the carbon cycle, especially before the Industrial Revolution, while the second part of the activity focuses on how…

  14. TWIN CARBON ARC TORCH

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    its predominate applications in heating, brazing, and welding have been supplanted by the highly developed oxyacetylene torch. As seen in Fig. l, the twin carbon arc torch (henceforth referred to in this article as simply the carbon-arc torch) consists of a hand held apparatus made of two ('twin') carbon or graphite electrodes ...

  15. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small

  16. Protolytic carbon film technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renschler, C.L.; White, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the deposition of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) on virtually any surface allowing carbon film formation with only the caveat that the substrate must withstand carbonization temperatures of at least 600 degrees centigrade. The influence of processing conditions upon the structure and properties of the carbonized film is discussed. Electrical conductivity, microstructure, and morphology control are also described.

  17. Carbon/Carbon Pistons for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Carbon/carbon piston performs same function as aluminum pistons in reciprocating internal combustion engines while reducing weight and increasing mechanical and thermal efficiencies of engine. Carbon/carbon piston concept features low piston-to-cylinder wall clearance - so low piston rings and skirts unnecessary. Advantages possible by negligible coefficient of thermal expansion of carbon/carbon.

  18. Latest Permian carbonate carbon isotope variability traces heterogeneous organic carbon accumulation and authigenic carbonate formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schobben

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bulk-carbonate carbon isotope ratios are a widely applied proxy for investigating the ancient biogeochemical carbon cycle. Temporal carbon isotope trends serve as a prime stratigraphic tool, with the inherent assumption that bulk micritic carbonate rock is a faithful geochemical recorder of the isotopic composition of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon. However, bulk-carbonate rock is also prone to incorporate diagenetic signals. The aim of the present study is to disentangle primary trends from diagenetic signals in carbon isotope records which traverse the Permian–Triassic boundary in the marine carbonate-bearing sequences of Iran and South China. By pooling newly produced and published carbon isotope data, we confirm that a global first-order trend towards depleted values exists. However, a large amount of scatter is superimposed on this geochemical record. In addition, we observe a temporal trend in the amplitude of this residual δ13C variability, which is reproducible for the two studied regions. We suggest that (sub-sea-floor microbial communities and their control on calcite nucleation and ambient porewater dissolved inorganic carbon δ13C pose a viable mechanism to induce bulk-rock δ13C variability. Numerical model calculations highlight that early diagenetic carbonate rock stabilization and linked carbon isotope alteration can be controlled by organic matter supply and subsequent microbial remineralization. A major biotic decline among Late Permian bottom-dwelling organisms facilitated a spatial increase in heterogeneous organic carbon accumulation. Combined with low marine sulfate, this resulted in varying degrees of carbon isotope overprinting. A simulated time series suggests that a 50 % increase in the spatial scatter of organic carbon relative to the average, in addition to an imposed increase in the likelihood of sampling cements formed by microbial calcite nucleation to 1 out of 10 samples, is sufficient to induce the

  19. Latest Permian carbonate carbon isotope variability traces heterogeneous organic carbon accumulation and authigenic carbonate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schobben, Martin; van de Velde, Sebastiaan; Gliwa, Jana; Leda, Lucyna; Korn, Dieter; Struck, Ulrich; Vinzenz Ullmann, Clemens; Hairapetian, Vachik; Ghaderi, Abbas; Korte, Christoph; Newton, Robert J.; Poulton, Simon W.; Wignall, Paul B.

    2017-11-01

    Bulk-carbonate carbon isotope ratios are a widely applied proxy for investigating the ancient biogeochemical carbon cycle. Temporal carbon isotope trends serve as a prime stratigraphic tool, with the inherent assumption that bulk micritic carbonate rock is a faithful geochemical recorder of the isotopic composition of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon. However, bulk-carbonate rock is also prone to incorporate diagenetic signals. The aim of the present study is to disentangle primary trends from diagenetic signals in carbon isotope records which traverse the Permian-Triassic boundary in the marine carbonate-bearing sequences of Iran and South China. By pooling newly produced and published carbon isotope data, we confirm that a global first-order trend towards depleted values exists. However, a large amount of scatter is superimposed on this geochemical record. In addition, we observe a temporal trend in the amplitude of this residual δ13C variability, which is reproducible for the two studied regions. We suggest that (sub-)sea-floor microbial communities and their control on calcite nucleation and ambient porewater dissolved inorganic carbon δ13C pose a viable mechanism to induce bulk-rock δ13C variability. Numerical model calculations highlight that early diagenetic carbonate rock stabilization and linked carbon isotope alteration can be controlled by organic matter supply and subsequent microbial remineralization. A major biotic decline among Late Permian bottom-dwelling organisms facilitated a spatial increase in heterogeneous organic carbon accumulation. Combined with low marine sulfate, this resulted in varying degrees of carbon isotope overprinting. A simulated time series suggests that a 50 % increase in the spatial scatter of organic carbon relative to the average, in addition to an imposed increase in the likelihood of sampling cements formed by microbial calcite nucleation to 1 out of 10 samples, is sufficient to induce the observed signal of carbon

  20. Carbon/Carbon for satellite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, M.; Lee, S.; Irbah, A.; Ostergren, S.

    2011-06-01

    Carbon/Carbon has many attributes that make it an attractive material for satellite applications. It is low in density, is dimensionally stable under a wide variety of conditions, has very low thermal expansion, is relatively low in cost, and is a mature technology. Moreover, the material is flexible enough to enable the designer to select such variables as fiber type, fabric architecture, fiber volume, and high temperature processing and thus custom tailor the physical and mechanical properties to his specific requirements. A wide range of properties are available - densities from 1.5 to 1.9 g/cm3, room temperature Coefficients of Thermal Expansion (CTE) from -0.3x10-6to -1.3x10-6/K, room temperature thermal conductivities from 7 to 210 W/m.K, and modulus from 60 to 190 GPa. A new type of structure developed by CNRS on the space instrument SODISM uses Carbon/Carbon.

  1. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Gillikin, David Paul

    2008-10-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell δ13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants consumed. Shell δ13C is typically >10‰ heavier than diet, probably because respiratory gas exchange discards CO2, and retains the isotopically heavier HCO3 -. Respired CO2 contributes less to the shells of aquatic mollusks, because CO2/O2 ratios are usually higher in water than in air, leading to more replacement of respired CO2 by environmental CO2. Fluid exchange with the environment also brings additional dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into the calcification site. Shell δ13C is typically a few ‰ lower than ambient DIC, and often decreases with age. Shell δ13C retains clues about processes such as ecosystem metabolism and estuarine mixing. Ca2+ ATPase-based models of calcification physiology developed for corals and algae likely apply to mollusks, too, but lower pH and carbonic anhydrase at the calcification site probably suppress kinetic isotope effects. Carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonates are clearly complex, but cautious interpretation can provide a wealth of information, especially after vital effects are better understood.

  2. Carbon dioxide sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Prabir K [Worthington, OH; Lee, Inhee [Columbus, OH; Akbar, Sheikh A [Hilliard, OH

    2011-11-15

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  3. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Dolan, Michael C.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is a significant cause of illness and death. Its protean symptoms probably lead to a gross underestimation of its true incidence. Low levels of carbon monoxide aggravate chronic cardiopulmonary problems, and high levels are associated with cardiac arrhythmias and cerebral edema. Patients who survive acute poisoning are at risk of delayed neurologic sequelae. The measurement of carboxyhemoglobin levels does not reveal the tissue levels of carbon monoxide but is useful...

  4. Carbon nanotubes decorating methods

    OpenAIRE

    A.D. Dobrzańska-Danikiewicz; Łukowiec, D.; D. Cichock; W. Wolany

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The work is to present and characterise various methods of depositing carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles of precious metals, and also to present the results of own works concerning carbon nanotubes coated with platinum nanoparticles.Design/methodology/approach: Electron transmission and scanning microscopy has been used for imaging the structure and morphology of the nanocomposites obtained and the distribution of nanoparticles on the surface of carbon nanotubes.Findings: The studie...

  5. Carbon monoxide poisoning (acute)

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Kent; Smollin, Craig

    2008-01-01

    The main symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are non-specific in nature and relate to effects on the brain and heart. The symptoms correlate poorly with serum carboxyhaemoglobin levels. People with comorbidity, the elderly or very young, and pregnant women are most susceptible.Carbon monoxide is produced by the incomplete combustion of carbon fuels, including inadequately ventilated heaters and car exhausts, or from chemicals such as methylene chloride paint stripper.Poisoning is conside...

  6. Carbon monoxide poisoning (acute)

    OpenAIRE

    Smollin, Craig; Olson, Kent

    2010-01-01

    The main symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are non-specific in nature and relate to effects on the brain and heart. The symptoms correlate poorly with serum carboxyhaemoglobin levels. People with comorbidity, elderly or very young people, and pregnant women are most susceptible.Carbon monoxide is produced by the incomplete combustion of carbon fuels, including inadequately ventilated heaters and car exhausts, or from chemicals such as methylene chloride paint stripper.Poisoning is cons...

  7. Carbon emissions in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhu [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Sustainability Science Program

    2016-07-01

    This study analyzes the spatial-temporal pattern and processes of China's energy-related carbon emissions. Based on extensive quantitative analysis, it outlines the character and trajectory of China's energy-related carbon emissions during the period 1995-2010, examining the distribution pattern of China's carbon emissions from regional and sectoral perspectives and revealing the driving factors of China's soaring emission increase. Further, the book investigates the supply chain carbon emissions (the carbon footprints) of China's industrial sectors. Anthropogenic climate change is one of the most serious challenges currently facing humankind. China is the world's largest developing country, top primary energy consumer and carbon emitter. Achieving both economic growth and environmental conservation is the country's twofold challenge. Understanding the status, features and driving forces of China's energy-related carbon emissions is a critical aspect of attaining global sustainability. This work, for the first time, presents both key findings on and a systematic evaluation of China's carbon emissions from energy consumption. The results have important implications for global carbon budgets and burden-sharing with regard to climate change mitigation. The book will be of great interest to readers around the world, as it addresses a topic of truly global significance.

  8. Carbon Trading. Literature Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerste, M.; Weda, J.; Rosenboom, N.

    2010-12-15

    From Pigou and Coase to the Kyoto Protocol, carbon trading has resulted in pricing of the negative externalities emanating from pollution. This report highlights leading literature and empirical findings on carbon trading, amongst others addressing the relevant carbon and related markets, the (lack of) success of carbon trading so far and room for improvement as well as its impact on investments in emission reduction. This report is part of a set of SEO-reports on finance and sustainability. The other reports deal with: Financing the Transition to Sustainable Energy; Innovations in financing environmental and social sustainability; and Sustainable investment.

  9. Holocene carbon cycle dynamics: HOLOCENE CARBON CYCLE DYNAMICS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kleinen, Thomas; Brovkin, Victor; von Bloh, Werner; Archer, David; Munhoven, Guy

    2010-01-01

    .... Apart from the deep sea sediments, important carbon cycle processes considered are carbon uptake or release by the vegetation, carbon uptake by peatlands, and CO2 release due to shallow water sedimentation of CaCO3...

  10. Carbon Dioxide Fountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seong-Joo; Ryu, Eun-Hee

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the development of a carbon dioxide fountain. The advantages of the carbon dioxide fountain are that it is odorless and uses consumer chemicals. This experiment also is a nice visual experiment that allows students to see evidence of a gaseous reagent being consumed when a pressure sensor is available. (Contains 3 figures.)…

  11. Carbon dioxide recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether is seen to offer a substantial route to renewable and environmentally carbon neutral fuels. One of the authors has championed the “Methanol Economy" in articles and a book. By recycling ambient CO2, the authors argue ...

  12. Carbon for sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This book reveals why carbon is playing such an increasingly prominent role as a sensing material. The various steps that transform a raw material in a sensing device are thoroughly presented and critically discussed.  The authors deal with all aspects of carbon-based sensors, starting from the various hybridization and allotropes of carbon, with specific focus on micro and nanosized carbons (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene) and their growth processes. The discussion then moves to the role of functionalization and the different routes to achieve it. Finally, a number of sensing applications in various fields are presented, highlighting the connection with the basic properties of the various carbon allotropes.  Readers will benefit from this book’s bottom-up approach, which starts from the local bonding in carbon solids and ends with sensing applications, linking the local hybridization of carbon atoms and its modification by functionalization to specific device performance. This book is a must-have in th...

  13. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon ... All CO Safety Guides ")); jQuery(".node-type-safety-education-center ... Camping Equipment Home Heating Equipment On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More ...

  14. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main content Languages 简体中文 English Bahasa Indonesia 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase ... Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as ...

  15. Petroleum-derived carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacha, J.D.; Newman, J.W.; White, J.L. (eds.)

    1986-01-01

    The 25 typescript papers in this volume derive from an ACS symposium held at an undisclosed site and date. They are concerned with such subjects as coke, carbon composites, the carbonization process, surface area, etc., and are accompanied by a 12-page index.

  16. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Animals can also be poisoned by carbon monoxide. People who have pets at home may notice that their animals become ... or unresponsive from carbon monoxide exposure. Often the pets will ... these conditions. This can lead to a delay in getting help.

  17. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  18. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Quere, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R.M.; Canadell, J.G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J.I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G.P.; Andres, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Houghton, R.A.; House, J.I.; Keeling, R.F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D.C.E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L.P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Feely, R.A.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A.K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Goldewijk, K.K.; Koven, C.; Landschuetzer, P.; Lauvset, S.K.; Lefevre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I.D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D.R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J.E.M.S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Perez, F.F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Roedenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Seferian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B.D.; Sutton, A.J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I.T.; van der Werf, G.R.; van Heuven, S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we

  19. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quéré, Le C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R.M.; Canadell, J.G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J.I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G.P.; Andres, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Houghton, R.A.; House, J.I.; Keeling, R.F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D.C.E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L.P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Feely, R.A.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A.K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S.K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I.D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D.R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J.E.M.S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F.F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B.D.; Sutton, A.J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; Laan-Luijkx, Van Der I.T.; Werf, Van Der G.R.; Heuven, Van S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we

  20. Carbon Capture and Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benson, S.M.; Bennaceur, K.; Cook, P.; Davison, J.; Coninck, H. de; Farhat, K.; Ramirez, C.A.; Simbeck, D.; Surles, T.; Verma, P.; Wright, I.

    2012-01-01

    Emissions of carbon dioxide, the most important long-lived anthropogenic greenhouse gas, can be reduced by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). CCS involves the integration of four elements: CO 2 capture, compression of the CO2 from a gas to a liquid or a denser gas, transportation of pressurized CO 2

  1. Carbon nanotubes cement composites

    OpenAIRE

    Simone Musso; Jean-Marc Tulliani; Giuseppe Ferro

    2011-01-01

    The present paper reviews the current state of the art of carbon nanotubes cement-based composites and the possible applications. The influence of carbon nanotubes additions onto cement paste mechanical and electrical properties are discussed in detail. Though promising, several challenges have still to be solved before the introduction of these new materials into the public sphere through civil infrastructures.

  2. Seeing the Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Pamela; Welty, David J.; Repeta, Daniel; Engle-Belknap, Cheryl A.; Cramer, Catherine; Frashure, Kim; Chen, Robert

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a classroom experiment that was developed to introduce middle school learners to the carbon cycle. The experiment deals with transfer of CO[subscript 2] between liquid reservoirs and the effect CO[subscript 2] has on algae growth. It allows students to observe the influence of the carbon cycle on algae growth,…

  3. The carbon cycle revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolin, Bert; Fung, Inez

    1992-01-01

    Discussions during the Global Change Institute indicated a need to present, in some detail and as accurately as possible, our present knowledge about the carbon cycle, the uncertainties in this knowledge, and the reasons for these uncertainties. We discuss basic issues of internal consistency within the carbon cycle, and end by summarizing the key unknowns.

  4. (PSLW) Activated Carbon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2017-12-02

    Dec 2, 2017 ... ABSTRACT: Silver-impregnated carbon (SIC) and its precursor (un-impregnated) derived from an easily available low cost plant material Prosopis spicigera L. wood (PSLW) carbon was investigated for their ability to remove arsenic from aqueous solutions in batch and column experiments. Arsenic uptake ...

  5. Soil carbon: Depth of understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Bernhard; Reichstein, Markus

    2017-11-01

    Earth system models disagree on the fate of soil organic carbon under climate change. Reproducing spatial patterns of the climatological temperature sensitivity of soil carbon is a necessary condition for trustworthy simulations of the carbon-cycle-climate feedback.

  6. Resistivity of Carbon-Carbon Composites Halved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites have become the material of choice for applications requiring strength and stiffness at very high temperatures (above 2000 C). These composites comprise carbon or graphite fibers embedded in a carbonized or graphitized matrix. In some applications, such as shielding sensitive electronics in very high temperature environments, the performance of these materials would be improved by lowering their electrical resistivity. One method to lower the resistivity of the composites is to lower the resistivity of the graphite fibers, and a proven method to accomplish that is intercalation. Intercalation is the insertion of guest atoms or molecules into a host lattice. In this study the host fibers were highly graphitic pitch-based graphite fibers, or vapor-grown carbon fibers (VGCF), and the intercalate was bromine. Intercalation compounds of graphite are generally thought of as being only metastable, but it has been shown that the residual bromine graphite fiber intercalation compound is remarkably stable, resisting decomposition even at temperatures at least as high as 1000 C. The focus of this work was to fabricate composite preforms, determine whether the fibers they were made from were still intercalated with bromine after processing, and determine the effect on composite resistivity. It was not expected that the resistivity would be lowered as dramatically as with graphite polymer composites because the matrix itself would be much more conductive, but it was hoped that the gains would be substantial enough to warrant its use in high-performance applications. In a collaborative effort supporting a Space Act Agreement between the NASA Glenn Research Center and Applied Sciences, Inc. (Cedarville, OH), laminar preforms were fabricated with pristine and bromine-intercalated pitch-based fibers (P100 and P100-Br) and VGCF (Pyro I and Pyro I-Br). The green preforms were carbonized at 1000 C and then heat treated to 3000 C. To determine whether the

  7. Fiber-Matrix Interphase Development in Carbon/Carbon Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rellick, G

    1998-01-01

    In carbon/carbon (C/C) composites-i.e., a composite in which a carbon matrix is reinforced with carbon fiber when the matrix is derived from a thermosetting resin, we always observe a distinct, highly graphitizable, and well-oriented...

  8. Authigenic carbonate and the history of the global carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Daniel P; Higgins, John A; Macdonald, Francis A; Johnston, David T

    2013-02-01

    We present a framework for interpreting the carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary rocks, which in turn requires a fundamental reinterpretation of the carbon cycle and redox budgets over Earth's history. We propose that authigenic carbonate, produced in sediment pore fluids during early diagenesis, has played a major role in the carbon cycle in the past. This sink constitutes a minor component of the carbon isotope mass balance under the modern, high levels of atmospheric oxygen but was much larger in times of low atmospheric O(2) or widespread marine anoxia. Waxing and waning of a global authigenic carbonate sink helps to explain extreme carbon isotope variations in the Proterozoic, Paleozoic, and Triassic.

  9. Porous carbons prepared by direct carbonization of MOFs for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xinlong; Li, Xuejin; Yan, Zifeng; Komarneni, Sridhar

    2014-07-01

    Three porous carbons were prepared by direct carbonization of HKUST-1, MOF-5 and Al-PCP without additional carbon precursors. The carbon samples obtained by carbonization at 1073 K were characterized by XRD, TEM and N2 physisorption techniques followed by testing for electrochemical performance. The BET surface areas of the three carbons were in the range of 50-1103 m2/g. As electrode materials for supercapacitor, the MOF-5 and Al-PCP derived carbons displayed the ideal capacitor behavior, whereas the HKUST-1 derived carbon showed poor capacitive behavior at various sweep rates and current densities. Among those carbon samples, Al-PCP derived carbons exhibited highest specific capacitance (232.8 F/g) in 30% KOH solution at the current density of 100 mA/g.

  10. Carbon aerogels; Les aerogels de carbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthon-Fabry, S.; Achard, P

    2003-06-15

    The carbon aerogel is a nano-porous material at open porosity, electrical conductor. The aerogels morphology is variable in function of the different synthesis parameters. This characteristic offers to the aerogels a better adaptability to many applications: electrodes (super condensers, fuel cells). The author presents the materials elaboration and their applications. It provides also the research programs: fundamental research, realization of super-condenser electrodes, fuel cells electrodes, gas storage materials and opaque materials for thermal insulation. (A.L.B.)

  11. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ... the information it contains. You may wish to review the privacy policy of the external site as ...

  12. Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, S.; Xue, Yong-Qinag; Anantram, M. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discusses coupling between carbon nanotubes (CNT), simple metals (FEG) and a graphene sheet. The graphene sheet did not couple well with FEG, but the combination of a graphene strip and CNT did couple well with most simple metals.

  13. Hydropower's Biogenic Carbon Footprint

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scherer, Laura; Pfister, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    .... Little is known about the severity of their emissions at the global scale. Here we show that the carbon footprint of hydropower is far higher than previously assumed, with a global average of 173 kg CO2...

  14. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pan, Hui; Li, Jianyi; Feng, Yuanping

    2010-01-01

    .... The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor...

  15. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium carbonate is found in: Automatic dishwashing soaps Clinitest (diabetes testing) tablets Glass products Pulp and paper products Some bleaches Some bubble bath solutions Some steam iron cleaners Note: This list is not all-inclusive.

  16. Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Total ecosystem carbon includes above- and below-ground live plant components (such as leaf, branch, stem and root), dead biomass (such as standing dead wood, down...

  17. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Search CPSC Search Menu Home Recalls Recall List CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information ...

  18. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with Non-Fire ...

  19. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Import Surveillance International Recall Guidance Civil and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & ... 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 ...

  20. Carbon Monoxide Nonattainment Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer identifies areas in the U.S. where air pollution levels have not met the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Carbon Monoxide and have...

  1. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths ... 2011 Annual Estimates View All CO-Related Injury Statistics and Technical Reports Related Links Recalls Safety Education ...

  2. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unites States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  3. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C

    2015-01-01

    .... In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one...

  4. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vented fuel-burning appliances such as furnaces, stoves, water heaters and fireplaces. Watch This Video View CO Safety Tips Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest ...

  5. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business ... Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest Video View the blog Clues You Can ...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ... Related Links Recalls Safety Education Regulations, Laws & Standards Research & Statistics Business & Manufacturing Small Business Resources OnSafety Blogs ...

  7. Morphing Carbon Nanotube Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-20

    muscle inspired by spider dragline silk. Nat. Commun. 5, 3322 (2014). 13. Hart, A. J. & Slocum , A. H. Rapid Growth and Flow-Mediated Nucleation of...Phys. Lett. 87, 123110 (2005). 15. A. J. Hart, A. H. Slocum . Rapid growth and flow-mediated nucleation of millimeter-scale aligned carbon nanotube... Slocum , B. L. Wardle. High-yield growth and morphology control of aligned carbon nanotubes on ceramic fibers for multifunctional enhancement of

  8. Applications for alliform carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogotsi, Yury; Mochalin, Vadym; McDonough, IV, John Kenneth; Simon, Patrice; Taberna, Pierre Louis

    2017-02-21

    This invention relates to novel applications for alliform carbon, useful in conductors and energy storage devices, including electrical double layer capacitor devices and articles incorporating such conductors and devices. Said alliform carbon particles are in the range of 2 to about 20 percent by weight, relative to the weight of the entire electrode. Said novel applications include supercapacitors and associated electrode devices, batteries, bandages and wound healing, and thin-film devices, including display devices.

  9. Growing carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Ando, Yoshinori; Zhao, Xinluo; Sugai, Toshiki; Kumar, Mukul

    2004-01-01

    The discovery of ‘fullerenes’ added a new dimension to the knowledge of carbon science1; and the subsequent discovery of ‘carbon nanotubes’ (CNTs, the elongated fullerene) added a new dimension to the knowledge of technology2;. Today, ‘nanotechnology’ is a hot topic attracting scientists, industrialists, journalists, governments, and even the general public. Nanotechnology is the creation of functional materials, devices, and systems through control of matter on the nanometer scale and the ex...

  10. Carbon Nanotubes in Neuroscience

    OpenAIRE

    Malarkey, Erik B.; Parpura, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have electrical, mechanical and chemical properties that make them one of the most promising materials for applications in neuroscience. Single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes have been increasingly used as scaffolds for neuronal growth and more recently for neural stem cell growth and differentiation. They are also used in interfaces with neurons, where they can detect neuronal electrical activity and also deliver electrical stimulation to these cells. The emerging ...

  11. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  12. Carbon dioxide as chemical feedstock

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aresta, M

    2010-01-01

    ... Dioxide as an Inert Solvent for Chemical Syntheses 15 Alessandro Galia and Giuseppe Filardo Introduction 15 Dense Carbon Dioxide as Solvent Medium for Chemical Processes 15 Enzymatic Catalysis in Dense Carbon Dioxide 18 Other Reactions in Dense Carbon Dioxide 19 Polymer Synthesis in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide 20 Chain Polymerizations: Synt...

  13. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  14. Black carbon in marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Van Breugel, P.

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of black carbon were determined for a number of marine sediments. A comparison of black carbon based on thermal oxidation and hot concentrated nitric acid pretreatments revealed that the latter significantly overestimates combustion derived carbon phases. Black carbon accounts for

  15. Programmable high crystallinity carbon patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Hong; Gu, Yang; Fu, Wei; Zheng, Lu; Liu, Guowei; He, Yongmin; Long, Yi; Zhao, Wu; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Zheng

    2017-06-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotube and graphene are promising candidates for next-generation flexible electronics. However, the practical application of carbon electronics requires controlled fabrication of those materials with micro-patterned structures on flexible substrate at wafer-scale and low cost. Inspiring from the conventional photolithography process and pyrolysis of photoresist, herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of high-quality micro-patterned high crystallinity carbon. The method employed pre-patterned pyrolyzed photoresist as carbon precursors, in order to minimize the mobility of carbon during the high temperature growth, which results into high quality carbon patterns with a lateral resolution up to ~2 µm. The flexible carbon electronics are demonstrated by transferring the as-patterned high crystallinity carbon patterns to the flexible substrate, and showing asymmetric tensile-compressive response with high output resolution. These results will pave the way to the next-generation carbon-based flexible electronics and mechanical sensors.

  16. Nanoporous metal-carbon composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Satcher, Joe; Kucheyev, Sergei; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Colvin, Jeffrey; Felter, Thomas; Kim, Sangil; Merrill, Matthew; Orme, Christine

    2017-12-19

    Described here is a metal-carbon composite, comprising (a) a porous three-dimensional scaffold comprising one or more of carbon nanotubes, graphene and graphene oxide, and (b) metal nanoparticles disposed on said porous scaffold, wherein the metal-carbon composite has a density of 1 g/cm.sup.3 or less, and wherein the metal nanoparticles account for 1 wt. % or more of the metal-carbon composite. Also described are methods for making the metal-carbon composite.

  17. Stable prenucleation calcium carbonate clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Gebauer, Denis; Völkel, Antje; Cölfen, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Calcium carbonate forms scales, geological deposits, biominerals, and ocean sediments. Huge amounts of carbon dioxide are retained as carbonate ions, and calcium ions represent a major contribution to water hardness. Despite its relevance, little is known about the precipitation mechanism of calcium carbonate, and specified complex crystal structures challenge the classical view on nucleation considering the formation of metastable ion clusters. We demonstrate that dissolved calcium carbonate...

  18. Implications of carbon dust emission for terrestrail carbon cycling and carbon accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion preferentially removes the finest carbon- and nutrient-rich soil fractions, and consequently its role may be significant within terrestrial carbon (C) cycles. However, the impacts of wind erosion on soil organic carbon (SOC) redistribution are not considered in most carbon cycle models,...

  19. Global carbon inequality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubacek, Klaus [University of Maryland, Department of Geographical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States); Masaryk University, Department of Environmental Studies, Brno (Czech Republic); Baiocchi, Giovanni [University of Maryland, Department of Geographical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States); University of Maryland, Department of Economics, College Park, MD (United States); Feng, Kuishuang [University of Maryland, Department of Geographical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States); Munoz Castillo, Raul [University of Maryland, Department of Geographical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States); Interamerican Development Bank, Washington, DC (United States); Sun, Laixiang [University of Maryland, Department of Geographical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States); SOAS, University of London, London (United Kingdom); International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Laxenburg (Austria); Xue, Jinjun [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Economics, Nagoya (Japan); Hubei University of Economics, Wuhan (China)

    2017-12-01

    Global climate change and inequality are inescapably linked both in terms of who contributes climate change and who suffers the consequences. This fact is also partly reflected in two United Nations (UN) processes: on the one hand, the Paris Agreement of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change under which countries agreed to hold the increase in the global average temperature to below 2 C above pre-industrial levels and, on the other hand, the UN's Sustainable Development Goals aiming to end poverty. These agreements are seen as important foundation to put the world nations on a sustainable pathway. However, how these agreements can be achieved or whether they are even mutually compatible is less clear. We explore the global carbon inequality between and within countries and the carbon implications of poverty alleviation by combining detailed consumer expenditure surveys for different income categories for a wide range of countries with an environmentally extended multi-regional input-output approach to estimate carbon footprints of different household groups, globally, and assess the carbon implications of moving the poorest people out of poverty. Given the current context, increasing income leads to increasing carbon footprints and makes global targets for mitigating greenhouse gases more difficult to achieve given the pace of technological progress and current levels of fossil fuel dependence. We conclude that the huge level of carbon inequality requires a critical discussion of undifferentiated income growth. Current carbon-intensive lifestyles and consumption patterns need to enter the climate discourse to a larger extent. (orig.)

  20. Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2013-01-29

    Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

  1. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldocchi, Dennis; Ryu, Youngryel; Keenan, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    A growing literature is reporting on how the terrestrial carbon cycle is experiencing year-to-year variability because of climate anomalies and trends caused by global change. As CO 2 concentration records in the atmosphere exceed 50 years and as satellite records reach over 30 years in length, we are becoming better able to address carbon cycle variability and trends. Here we review how variable the carbon cycle is, how large the trends in its gross and net fluxes are, and how well the signal can be separated from noise. We explore mechanisms that explain year-to-year variability and trends by deconstructing the global carbon budget. The CO 2 concentration record is detecting a significant increase in the seasonal amplitude between 1958 and now. Inferential methods provide a variety of explanations for this result, but a conclusive attribution remains elusive. Scientists have reported that this trend is a consequence of the greening of the biosphere, stronger northern latitude photosynthesis, more photosynthesis by semi-arid ecosystems, agriculture and the green revolution, tropical temperature anomalies, or increased winter respiration. At the global scale, variability in the terrestrial carbon cycle can be due to changes in constituent fluxes, gross primary productivity, plant respiration and heterotrophic (microbial) respiration, and losses due to fire, land use change, soil erosion, or harvesting. It remains controversial whether or not there is a significant trend in global primary productivity (due to rising CO 2 , temperature, nitrogen deposition, changing land use, and preponderance of wet and dry regions). The degree to which year-to-year variability in temperature and precipitation anomalies affect global primary productivity also remains uncertain. For perspective, interannual variability in global gross primary productivity is relatively small (on the order of 2 Pg-C y -1 ) with respect to a large and uncertain background (123 +/- 4 Pg-C y -1 ), and

  2. Composition of carbonization residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupfer; Leonhardt

    1943-11-27

    This report compared the composition of samples from Wesseling and Leuna. In each case the sample was a residue from carbonization of the residues from hydrogenation of the brown coal processed at the plant. The composition was given in terms of volatile components, fixed carbon, ash, water, carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, volatile sulfur, and total sulfur. The result of carbonization was given in terms of (ash and) coke, tar, water, gas and losses, and bitumen. The composition of the ash was given in terms of silicon dioxide, ferric oxide, aluminum oxide, calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, potassium and sodium oxides, sulfur trioxide, phosphorus pentoxide, chlorine, and titanium oxide. The most important difference between the properties of the two samples was that the residue from Wesseling only contained 4% oil, whereas that from Leuna had about 26% oil. Taking into account the total amount of residue processed yearly, the report noted that better carbonization at Leuna could save 20,000 metric tons/year of oil. Some other comparisons of data included about 33% volatiles at Leuna vs. about 22% at Wesseling, about 5 1/2% sulfur at Leuna vs. about 6 1/2% at Leuna, but about 57% ash for both. Composition of the ash differed quite a bit between the two. 1 table.

  3. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  4. Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Scott; Alvizo, Oscar

    2013-01-15

    The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

  5. Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novick, Scott J; Alvizo, Oscar

    2013-10-29

    The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

  6. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage. PMID:20672061

  7. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  8. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui; Li, Jianyi; Feng, Yuanping

    2010-01-05

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  9. The Carbon Trading Game

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouquet, Roger [Environmental Policy and Management Group, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom)

    2003-12-01

    In response to the Kyoto Protocol, an international market for carbon dioxide tradable permits is likely to be created. Two of the key issues involved are explaining the concepts of tradable permits to industrialists, policy-makers and the man on the street, and anticipating how the market will evolve. A simple game of the market for carbon dioxide tradable permits has been developed and used that can help deal with both issues. As a pedagogical tool, this game benefits from simplicity (just a few pieces of paper are needed) and enables students to grasp the concepts and remember them through the intensity and fun of a trading 'pit'. The experiences also provide substantial insights into the evolution of the carbon dioxide permit market, particularly related to the evolution of trade volume, permit prices and country strategies.

  10. Flexible Carbon Aerogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Schwan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon aerogels are highly porous materials with a large inner surface area. Due to their high electrical conductivity they are excellent electrode materials in supercapacitors. Their brittleness, however, imposes certain limitations in terms of applicability. In that context, novel carbon aerogels with varying degree of flexibility have been developed. These highly porous, light aerogels are characterized by a high surface area and possess pore structures in the micrometer range, allowing for a reversible deformation of the aerogel network. A high ratio of pore size to particle size was found to be crucial for high flexibility. For dynamic microstructural analysis, compression tests were performed in-situ within a scanning electron microscope allowing us to directly visualize the microstructural flexibility of an aerogel. The flexible carbon aerogels were found to withstand between 15% and 30% of uniaxial compression in a reversible fashion. These findings might stimulate further research and new application fields directed towards flexible supercapacitors and batteries.

  11. Purification of carbon nanotubes via selective heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, John A.; Wilson, William L.; Jin, Sung Hun; Dunham, Simon N.; Xie, Xu; Islam, Ahmad; Du, Frank; Huang, Yonggang; Song, Jizhou

    2017-11-21

    The present invention provides methods for purifying a layer of carbon nanotubes comprising providing a precursor layer of substantially aligned carbon nanotubes supported by a substrate, wherein the precursor layer comprises a mixture of first carbon nanotubes and second carbon nanotubes; selectively heating the first carbon nanotubes; and separating the first carbon nanotubes from the second carbon nanotubes, thereby generating a purified layer of carbon nanotubes. Devices benefiting from enhanced electrical properties enabled by the purified layer of carbon nanotubes are also described.

  12. Carbon Capture and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, S

    2007-10-03

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several

  13. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.

    2000-01-27

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5--10%. The authors report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approximately} 15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure.

  14. Lithium in LMC carbon stars

    OpenAIRE

    Hatzidimitriou, D.; Morgan, D. H.; Cannon, R. D.; Croke, B. F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Nineteen carbon stars that show lithium enrichment in their atmospheres have been discovered among a sample of 674 carbon stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Six of the Li-rich carbon stars are of J-type, i.e. with strong 13C isotopic features. No super-Li-rich carbon stars were found. The incidence of lithium enrichment among carbon stars in the LMC is much rarer than in the Galaxy, and about five times more frequent among J-type than among N-type carbon stars. The bolometric magnitudes of ...

  15. Authigenic carbonate and the history of the global carbon cycle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schrag, Daniel P; Higgins, John A; Macdonald, Francis A; Johnston, David T

    2013-01-01

    We present a framework for interpreting the carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary rocks, which in turn requires a fundamental reinterpretation of the carbon cycle and redox budgets over Earth's history...

  16. CarbonSat Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Tobehn, Carsten; Ernst, Robert; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John P.; Notholt, John

    1 Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) are the most important manmade greenhouse gases (GHGs) which are driving global climate change. Currently, the CO2 measurements from the ground observing network are still the main sources of information but due to the limited number of measurement stations the coverage is limited. In addition, CO2 monitoring and trading is often based mainly on bottom-up calculations and an independent top down verification is limited due to the lack of global measurement data with local resolution. The first CO2 and CH4 mapping from SCIAMACHY on ENVISAT shows that satellites add important missing global information. Current GHG measurement satellites (GOSAT)are limited either in spatial or temporal resolution and coverage. These systems have to collect data over a year or even longer to produce global regional fluxes products. Conse-quently global, timely, higher spatial resolution and high accuracy measurement are required for: 1. A good understanding of the CO2 and CH4 sources and sinks for reliable climate predic-tion; and 2. Independent and transparent verification of accountable sources and sinks in supporting Kyoto and upcoming protocols The CarbonSat constellation idea comes out the trade off of resolution and swath width during CarbonSat mission definition studies. In response to the urgent need to support the Kyoto and upcoming protocols, a feasibility study has been carried out. The proposed solution is a constellation of five CarbonSat satellites in 614km LTAN 13:00, which is able to provide global, daily CO2 and CH4 measurement everywhere on the Earth with high spatial resolution 2 × 2 km and low uncertainty lt;2ppm (CO2) and lt;8ppb (CH4). The unique global daily measurement capability significantly increases the number of cloud free measurements, which enables more reliable services associated with reduced uncertainty, e.g. to 0.15ppm (CO2) per month in 10km and even more timely products. The CarbonSat Constellation in

  17. Method for production of carbon nanofiber mat or carbon paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-08-04

    Method for the preparation of a non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers, the method comprising carbonizing a non-woven mat or paper preform (precursor) comprised of a plurality of bonded sulfonated polyolefin fibers to produce said non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers. The preforms and resulting non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fiber, as well as articles and devices containing them, and methods for their use, are also described.

  18. The Kane Experimental Forest carbon inventory: Carbon reporting with FVS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coeli Hoover; Stephanie Rebain

    2008-01-01

    As the number of state and regional climate change agreements grows, so does the need to assess the carbon implications of planned forest management actions. At the operational level, producing detailed stock estimates for the primary carbon pools becomes time-consuming and cumbersome. Carbon reporting functionality has been fully integrated within the Forest...

  19. Fixation of carbon dioxide into dimethyl carbonate over ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A titanium-based zeolitic thiophene-benzimidazolate framework has been designed for the direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) from methanol and carbon dioxide. The developed catalyst activates carbon dioxide and delivers over 16% yield of DMC without the use of any dehydrating agent or requirement for azeotropic distillation. Prepared for submission to Nature Scientific reports.

  20. Soil carbon in the Artic and the permafrost carbon feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Huissteden, J.; Dolman, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Estimates of the Arctic soil carbon pool have more than doubled in size recently. However, it remains very uncertain how much of this carbon will enter the atmosphere as a result of future global warming. We review in this paper recent estimates of the Arctic soil carbon pool, and experimental and

  1. Electron irradiation of carbon dioxide-carbon disulphide ice analog ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Upon electron irradiation the chemical composition was found to have altered and the new products from irradiation were found to be carbonyl sulphide (OCS), sulphur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3), carbon trioxide (CO3), sulphur trioxide (SO3), carbon subsulphide (C3S2) and carbon monoxide (CO). Results obtained confirm ...

  2. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 2014 JANUARY 08, 2015 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2011 Annual Estimates View All CO-Related Injury Statistics and Technical Reports Related Links Recalls Safety Education Regulations, Laws & Standards Research & Statistics Business & Manufacturing Small ...

  3. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Klinger

    Full Text Available We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  4. Many Phases of Carbon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 12. Many Phases of Carbon. B Gopalakrishnan S V Subramanyam. General Article Volume 7 Issue 12 December 2002 pp 10-19. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/12/0010-0019 ...

  5. City Carbon Footprint Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangwu Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Progressive cities worldwide have demonstrated political leadership by initiating meaningful strategies and actions to tackle climate change. However, the lack of knowledge concerning embodied greenhouse gas (GHG emissions of cities has hampered effective mitigation. We analyse trans-boundary GHG emission transfers between five Australian cities and their trading partners, with embodied emission flows broken down into major economic sectors. We examine intercity carbon footprint (CF networks and disclose a hierarchy of responsibility for emissions between cities and regions. Allocations of emissions to households, businesses and government and the carbon efficiency of expenditure have been analysed to inform mitigation policies. Our findings indicate that final demand in the five largest cities in Australia accounts for more than half of the nation’s CF. City households are responsible for about two thirds of the cities’ CFs; the rest can be attributed to government and business consumption and investment. The city network flows highlight that over half of emissions embodied in imports (EEI to the five cities occur overseas. However, a hierarchy of GHG emissions reveals that overseas regions also outsource emissions to Australian cities such as Perth. We finally discuss the implications of our findings on carbon neutrality, low-carbon city concepts and strategies and allocation of subnational GHG responsibility.

  6. Rapamycin carbonate esters

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodes, A; Sandhu, S S; Onis, J. E; McKendrick, John

    2009-01-01

    Certain embodiments include carbonate esters of rapamycin at position 42 that are synthesized by a lipase catalyzed regio-specific process. These compounds or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof are useful in the treatment of organ and tissue transplant rejection, autoimmune disease, proliferative disorder, restenosis, cancer, or microbial infection.

  7. Closing carbon cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, Martin

    1999-01-01

    Fossil fuels are used as raw materials for the manufacture of synthetic organic materials, e.g. plastics, fibres, synthetic rubber, paints, solvents, fertilisers, surfactants, lubricants and bitumen. Since fossil carbon is embodied in these products they may be particularly relevant to climate

  8. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ... Website Feedback Connect with Us: Facebook Instagram YouTube Twitter Blog SlideShare GooglePlus Flickr Report an Unsafe Product ...

  9. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips Recalls and News Questions and Answers Charcoal Portable Heaters & Camping Equipment Home Heating Equipment On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ...

  10. Many Phases of Carbon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    carbo' meaning charcoal. Carbon is known as the king of elements owing to its versatility and diversity in all fields, which is unquestionable. It is widely distributed in N a- ture, from molecules of life to matter in outer cosmos. It holds the sixth place ...

  11. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Investigations Associated with Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide from Engine-Driven Generators and Other Engine-Driven Tools, 2004–2014 JANUARY 08, 2015 Non- ... outside of the Federal Government. CPSC does not control this external site or its privacy policy and ...

  12. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths ... left anytime CPSC.gov is the U.S. government's official web portal. Message can be left anytime Website ...

  13. Balancing atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goreau, T.J. (Discovery Bay Marine Laboratory, Univ. of the West Indies (JM))

    1990-01-01

    Rising carbon dioxide and global temperatures are causing increasing worldwide concern, and pressure towards an international law of the atmosphere is rapidly escalating, yet widespread misconceptions about the greenhouse effect's inevitability, time scale, and causes have inhibited effective consensus and action. Observations from Antarctic ice cores, Amazonian rain forests, and Carribean coral reefs suggest that the biological effects of climate change may be more severe than climate models predict. Efforts to limit emissions from fossil-fuel combustion alone are incapable of stabilizing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Stabilizing atmospheric carbon dioxide requires coupled measures to balance sources and sinks of the gas, and will only be viable with large-scale investments in increased sustainable productivity on degraded tropical soils, and in long-term research on renewable energy and biomass product development in the developing countries. A mechanism is outlined which directly links fossil-fuel combustion sources of carbon dioxide to removal via increasing biotic productivity and storage. A preliminary cost-benefit analysis suggests that such measures are very affordable, costing far less than inaction. (With 88 refs.).

  14. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with ... Other Engine-Driven Tools, 2004–2014 JANUARY 08, 2015 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the ...

  15. Carbon nanotube macroelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialu

    In this dissertation, I discuss the application of carbon nanotubes in macroelectronis. Due to the extraordinary electrical properties such as high intrinsic carrier mobility and current-carrying capacity, single wall carbon nanotubes are very desirable for thin-film transistor (TFT) applications such as flat panel display, transparent electronics, as well as flexible and stretchable electronics. Compared with other popular channel material for TFTs, namely amorphous silicon, polycrystalline silicon and organic materials, nanotube thin-films have the advantages of low-temperature processing compatibility, transparency, and flexibility, as well as high device performance. In order to demonstrate scalable, practical carbon nanotube macroelectroncis, I have developed a platform to fabricate high-density, uniform separated nanotube based thin-film transistors. In addition, many other essential analysis as well as technology components, such as nanotube film density control, purity and diameter dependent semiconducting nanotube electrical performance study, air-stable n-type transistor fabrication, and CMOS integration platform have also been demonstrated. On the basis of the above achievement, I have further demonstrated various kinds of applications including AMOLED display electronics, PMOS and CMOS logic circuits, flexible and transparent electronics. The dissertation is structured as follows. First, chapter 1 gives a brief introduction to the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes, which serves as the background knowledge for the following chapters. In chapter 2, I will present our approach of fabricating wafer-scale uniform semiconducting carbon nanotube thin-film transistors and demonstrate their application in display electronics and logic circuits. Following that, more detailed information about carbon nanotube thin-film transistor based active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays is discussed in chapter 3. And in chapter 4, a technology to

  16. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-19

    Carbon capture and sequestration (or storage)known as CCShas attracted interest as a : measure for mitigating global climate change because large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) : emitted from fossil fuel use in the United States are potentiall...

  17. Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... tornadoes), using alternative sources of power can cause carbon monoxide (CO) to build up in a home and ...

  18. Dewatering Peat With Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Proposed process produces enough gas and carbon to sustain itself. In proposed process peat slurry is dewatered to approximately 40 percent moisture content by mixing slurry with activated carbon and filtering with solid/liquid separation techniques.

  19. Carbon emission flow in networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kang, Chongqing; Zhou, Tianrui; Chen, Qixin; Xu, Qianyao; Xia, Qing; Ji, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    As the human population increases and production expands, energy demand and anthropogenic carbon emission rates have been growing rapidly, and the need to decrease carbon emission levels has drawn increasing attention...

  20. ROE Carbon Storage - Percent Change

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This polygon dataset depicts the percentage change in the amount of carbon stored in forests in counties across the United States, based on the difference in carbon...

  1. Where is mantle's carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganov, A. R.; Ono, S.; Ma, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Due to the strongly reducing conditions (the presence of metallic iron was suggested both by experiments [1] and theory [2]), diamond was believed to be the main host of carbon through most of the lower mantle [3]. We showed [4] that cementite Fe3C is another good candidate to be the main host of "reduced" carbon in the mantle, reinforcing an earlier hypothesis [5]. The fate of "oxidised" carbon (in subducted slabs) is of particular importance - if carbonates decompose producing fluid CO2, this would have important implications for the chemistry and rheology of the mantle. Knowledge of crystal structures and phase diagrams of carbonates is crucial here. The high-pressure structures of CaCO3 were predicted [6] and subsequently verified by experiments. For MgCO3, Isshiki et al. [7] found a new phase above 110 GPa, and several attempts were made to solve it [8,9]. Here [4], using an evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction [10], we show that there are two post-magnesite phases at mantle-relevant pressure range, one stable at 82-138 GPa, and the other from 138 GPa to ~160 GPa. Both are based on threefold rings of CO4-tetrahedra and are more favourable than all previously proposed structures. We show that through most of the P-T conditions of the mantle, MgCO3 is the major host of oxidized carbon in the Earth. We predict the possibility of CO2 release at the very bottom of the mantle (in SiO2-rich basaltic part of subducted slabs), which could enhance partial melting of rocks and be related to the geodynamical differences between the Earth and Venus. 1.Frost D.J., Liebske C., Langenhorst F., McCammon C.A., Tronnes R.G., Rubie D.C. (2004). Experimental evidence for the existence of iron-rich metal in the Earth's lower mantle. Nature 428, 409-412. 2.Zhang F., Oganov A.R. (2006). Valence and spin states of iron impurities in mantle-forming silicates. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 249, 436-443. 3.Luth R.W. (1999). Carbon and carbonates in the mantle. In: Mantle

  2. Carbon. Examples of Property Realization

    OpenAIRE

    I.A. Kossko; A.A. Onoprienko; T.G. Kossko

    2013-01-01

    Examples of realization of carbon properties in formation of section near-surface boundaries defining the mechanism of oxidizing (normal) wear are presented. Synthesis of strengt hening diamond- lonsdaleite -carbene «frame» and graphite with function of solid lubricant on a friction surface in high-desperse carbon environment is reviewed. Prospects of carbon ap placation in implementation of the concept of electronics on one element, and also use of thin-film structures of amorphous carbon – ...

  3. Plasma Processing for Carbon Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Tanoue, Hideto

    Plasma is a useful tool to synthesize carbon nano-materials including diamond, fullerene, nanotube and graphene. This review introduces the overview of these carbon nano-materials produced by thermal or non-thermal plasmas and also the authors' work related to plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes and its correlation with numerical simulation of CH4/H2 feedstock gas plasmas. The amount of carbon atoms in the CNTs grown and that calculated from simulation showed good agreement.

  4. Advancing Climate and Carbon Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, S

    2004-12-14

    We use a recently developed integrated climate/carbon model to perform breakthrough studies of the climate. Two major studies are carried out--namely the effects of CO{sub 2}-fertilized vegetation on global climate and carbon dynamics, and the effect of climate sensitivity on carbon cycle feedback. We have also begun development of a next-generation climate/carbon modeling capability.

  5. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  6. Designing carbon markets, Part 2. Carbon markets in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fankhauser, Samuel [Grantham Research Institute and Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy, London School of Economics, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE (United Kingdom); Hepburn, Cameron [Grantham Research Institute, London School of Economics, and Smith School for Enterprise and the Environment, Oxford University, 75 George Street, Oxford OX1 2BQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    This paper analyses the design of carbon markets in space (i.e., geographically). It is part of a twin set of papers that, starting from first principles, ask what an optimal global carbon market would look like by around 2030. Our focus is on firm-level cap-and-trade systems, although much of what we say would also apply to government-level trading and carbon offset schemes. We examine the first principles of spatial design to maximise flexibility and to minimise costs, including key design issues in linking national and regional carbon markets together to create a global carbon market. (author)

  7. Designing carbon markets, Part II: Carbon markets in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fankhauser, Samuel, E-mail: s.fankhauser@lse.ac.u [Grantham Research Institute and Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy, London School of Economics, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE (United Kingdom); Hepburn, Cameron, E-mail: cameron.hepburn@economics.ox.ac.u [Grantham Research Institute, London School of Economics, and Smith School for Enterprise and the Environment, Oxford University, 75 George Street, Oxford OX1 2BQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    This paper analyses the design of carbon markets in space (i.e., geographically). It is part of a twin set of papers that, starting from first principles, ask what an optimal global carbon market would look like by around 2030. Our focus is on firm-level cap-and-trade systems, although much of what we say would also apply to government-level trading and carbon offset schemes. We examine the 'first principles' of spatial design to maximise flexibility and to minimise costs, including key design issues in linking national and regional carbon markets together to create a global carbon market.

  8. The Structures & Properties of Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellini, Olivia M.; Lisensky, George C.; Ehrlich, Jennifer; Zenner, Greta M.; Crone, Wendy C.

    2006-01-01

    The four main forms of carbon--diamond, graphite, buckyballs, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs)--are an excellent vehicle for teaching fundamental principles of chemical bonding, material structure, and properties. Carbon atoms form a variety of structures that are intrinsically connected to the properties they exhibit. Educators can take advantage of…

  9. Low Carbon Development of Hainan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Feng; Kun, Zhang

    With the construction of Hainan international tourism island rising to a national strategy level, the green growth pattern based on low carbon objectives will become a significant part in the development of Hainan's economy. In this paper, low carbon electric power system and differentiation service will be discussed, and some opinions were brought up to have a good impact on Hainan's low carbon development.

  10. Carbon Fiber Risk Analysis. [conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The scope and status of the effort to assess the risks associated with the accidental release of carbon/graphite fibers from civil aircraft is presented. Vulnerability of electrical and electronic equipment to carbon fibers, dispersal of carbon fibers, effectiveness of filtering systems, impact of fiber induced failures, and risk methodology are among the topics covered.

  11. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or

  12. Carbon dioxide as a carbon source in organic transformation: carbon-carbon bond forming reactions by transition-metal catalysts.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuji, Yasushi; Fujihara, Tetsuaki

    2012-01-01

    Recent carbon-carbon bond forming reactions of carbon dioxide with alkenes, alkynes, dienes, aryl zinc compounds, aryl boronic esters, aryl halides, and arenes having acidic C-H bonds are reviewed in which transition-metal catalysts play an important role.

  13. Photonic Sensor for Nondestructive Testing of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research proposes to develop a photonic sensor instrumentation, capable of monitoring distributed load and acoustic emission (AE) for rapid inspection of...

  14. Photonic Sensor for Nondestructive Testing of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research proposes to develop a new automated health monitoring sensor system capable of monitoring distributed load and acoustic emission (AE) for rapid...

  15. Erosion of soil organic carbon: implications for carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oost, Kristof; Van Hemelryck, Hendrik; Harden, Jennifer W.; McPherson, B.J.; Sundquist, E.T.

    2009-01-01

    Agricultural activities have substantially increased rates of soil erosion and deposition, and these processes have a significant impact on carbon (C) mineralization and burial. Here, we present a synthesis of erosion effects on carbon dynamics and discuss the implications of soil erosion for carbon sequestration strategies. We demonstrate that for a range of data-based parameters from the literature, soil erosion results in increased C storage onto land, an effect that is heterogeneous on the landscape and is variable on various timescales. We argue that the magnitude of the erosion term and soil carbon residence time, both strongly influenced by soil management, largely control the strength of the erosion-induced sink. In order to evaluate fully the effects of soil management strategies that promote carbon sequestration, a full carbon account must be made that considers the impact of erosion-enhanced disequilibrium between carbon inputs and decomposition, including effects on net primary productivity and decomposition rates.

  16. Carbon composites composites with carbon fibers, nanofibers, and nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Deborah D L

    2017-01-01

    Carbon Composites: Composites with Carbon Fibers, Nanofibers, and Nanotubes, Second Edition, provides the reader with information on a wide range of carbon fiber composites, including polymer-matrix, metal-matrix, carbon-matrix, ceramic-matrix and cement-matrix composites. In contrast to other books on composites, this work emphasizes materials rather than mechanics. This emphasis reflects the key role of materials science and engineering in the development of composite materials. The applications focus of the book covers both the developing range of structural applications for carbon fiber composites, including military and civil aircraft, automobiles and construction, and non-structural applications, including electromagnetic shielding, sensing/monitoring, vibration damping, energy storage, energy generation, and deicing. In addition to these new application areas, new material in this updated edition includes coverage of cement-matrix composites, carbon nanofibers, carbon matrix precursors, fiber surface ...

  17. Carbon dioxide dangers demonstration model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venezky, Dina; Wessells, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is a dangerous volcanic gas. When carbon dioxide seeps from the ground, it normally mixes with the air and dissipates rapidly. However, because carbon dioxide gas is heavier than air, it can collect in snowbanks, depressions, and poorly ventilated enclosures posing a potential danger to people and other living things. In this experiment we show how carbon dioxide gas displaces oxygen as it collects in low-lying areas. When carbon dioxide, created by mixing vinegar and baking soda, is added to a bowl with candles of different heights, the flames are extinguished as if by magic.

  18. Elastic Moduli of Carbon Nanohorns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube is a special case of carbon nanohorns or carbon nanocones with zero apex angle. Research into carbon nanohorns started almost at the same time as the discovery of nanotubes in 1991. Most researchers focused on the investigation of nanotubes, and the exploration of nanohorns attracted little attention. To model the carbon nanohorns, we make use of a more reliable second-generation reactive empirical bond-order potential by Brenner and coworkers. We investigate the elastic moduli and conclude that these nanohorns are equally strong and require in-depth investigation. The values of Young's and Shear moduli decrease with apex angle.

  19. Designing rigid carbon foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sora; Ahn, Jeung Sun; Kwon, Young-Kyun; Tomanek, David [Department of Physics and Research Institute for Basic Sciences, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kittimanapun, Kritsada, E-mail: ykkwon@khu.ac.k, E-mail: tomanek@pa.msu.ed [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-2320 (United States)

    2010-08-25

    We use ab initio density functional calculations to study the stability, elastic properties and electronic structure of sp{sup 2} carbon minimal surfaces with negative Gaussian curvature, called schwarzites. We focus on two systems with cubic unit cells containing 152 and 200 carbon atoms, which are metallic and very rigid. The porous schwarzite structure allows for efficient and reversible doping by electron donors and acceptors, making it a promising candidate for the next generation of alkali ion batteries. We identify schwarzite structures that act as arrays of interconnected spin quantum dots or become magnetic when doped. We introduce two interpenetrating schwarzite structures that may find their use as the ultimate super-capacitor.

  20. Properties of amorphous carbon

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Amorphous carbon has a wide range of properties that are primarily controlled by the different bond hydridisations possible in such materials. This allows for the growth of an extensive range of thin films that can be tailored for specific applications. Films can range from those with high transparency and are hard diamond-like, through to those which are opaque, soft and graphitic-like. Films with a high degree of sp3 bonding giving the diamond-like properties are used widely by industry for hard coatings. Application areas including field emission cathodes, MEMS, electronic devices, medical and optical coatings are now close to market. Experts in amorphous carbon have been drawn together to produce this comprehensive commentary on the current state and future prospects of this highly functional material.

  1. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  2. Carbon Lorenz Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groot, L. [Utrecht University, Utrecht School of Economics, Janskerkhof 12, 3512 BL Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it exhibits that standard tools in the measurement of income inequality, such as the Lorenz curve and the Gini-index, can successfully be applied to the issues of inequality measurement of carbon emissions and the equity of abatement policies across countries. These tools allow policy-makers and the general public to grasp at a single glance the impact of conventional distribution rules such as equal caps or grandfathering, or more sophisticated ones, on the distribution of greenhouse gas emissions. Second, using the Samuelson rule for the optimal provision of a public good, the Pareto-optimal distribution of carbon emissions is compared with the distribution that follows if countries follow Nash-Cournot abatement strategies. It is shown that the Pareto-optimal distribution under the Samuelson rule can be approximated by the equal cap division, represented by the diagonal in the Lorenz curve diagram.

  3. Carbon Lorenz curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groot, Loek [Utrecht University School of Economics (USE), Faculty of Law, Economics and Governance, Janskerkhof 12, 3512 BL Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-01-15

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it exhibits that standard tools in the measurement of income inequality, such as the Lorenz curve and the Gini-index, can successfully be applied to the issues of inequality measurement of carbon emissions and the equity of abatement policies across countries. These tools allow policy-makers and the general public to grasp at a single glance the impact of conventional distribution rules such as equal caps or grandfathering, or more sophisticated ones, on the distribution of greenhouse gas emissions. Second, using the Samuelson rule for the optimal provision of a public good, the Pareto-optimal distribution of carbon emissions is compared with the distribution that follows if countries follow Nash-Cournot abatement strategies. It is shown that the Pareto-optimal distribution under the Samuelson rule can be approximated by the equal cap division, represented by the diagonal in the Lorenz curve diagram. (author)

  4. Carbon Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    HyComp(R), Inc. development a line of high temperature carbon fiber composite products to solve wear problems in the harsh environment of steel and aluminum mills. WearComp(R), self-lubricating composite wear liners and bushings, combines carbon graphite fibers with a polyimide binder. The binder, in conjunction with the fibers, provides the slippery surface, one that demands no lubrication, yet wears at a very slow rate. WearComp(R) typically lasts six to ten times longer than aluminum bronze. Unlike bronze, WearComp polishes the same surface and imparts a self-lube film for years of service. It is designed for continuous operation at temperatures of 550 degrees Fahrenheit and can operate under high compressive loads.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  6. Carbon cycle makeover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene; Kump, Lee R.

    2013-01-01

    In 1845, the French chemist and mining engineer Jacques-Joseph Ebelman figured out why Earth's atmosphere contains oxygen (1). Oxygen is produced by plants during photosynthesis, but almost all of this oxygen is used again in respiration. Ebelman reasoned that small amounts of organic matter rema...... geochemical cycle. But Earth is an old planet, and oxygen levels have changed through time (2). On page 540 of this issue, Schrag et al. (3) challenge the most commonly used geochemical approach to assess long-term changes in the coupled oxygen and carbon cycles....... remaining in sediments after respiration leave a residual of oxygen in the atmosphere. The source of oxygen to the atmosphere represented by organic matter burial is balanced by oxygen sinks associated with rock weathering and chemical reaction with volcanic gases. This is the long-term carbon and oxygen...

  7. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  8. Magnetism in carbon nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Magnetism in carbon nanostructures is a rapidly expanding field of current materials science. Its progress is driven by the wide range of applications for magnetic carbon nanosystems, including transmission elements in spintronics, building blocks of cutting-edge nanobiotechnology, and qubits in quantum computing. These systems also provide novel paradigms for basic phenomena of quantum physics, and are thus of great interest for fundamental research. This comprehensive survey emphasizes both the fundamental nature of the field, and its groundbreaking nanotechnological applications, providing a one-stop reference for both the principles and the practice of this emerging area. With equal relevance to physics, chemistry, engineering and materials science, senior undergraduate and graduate students in any of these subjects, as well as all those interested in novel nanomaterials, will gain an in-depth understanding of the field from this concise and self-contained volume.

  9. Low carbon development. Key issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Frauke; Nordensvaard, Johan (eds.)

    2013-03-07

    This comprehensive textbook addresses the interface between international development and climate change in a carbon constrained world. It discusses the key conceptual, empirical and policy-related issues of low carbon development and takes an international and interdisciplinary approach to the subject by drawing on insights from across the natural sciences and social sciences whilst embedding the discussion in a global context. The first part explores the concept of low carbon development and explains the need for low carbon development in a carbon constrained world. The book then discusses the key issues of socio-economic, political and technological nature for low carbon development, exploring topics such as the political economy, social justice, financing and carbon markets, and technologies and innovation for low carbon development. This is followed by key issues for low carbon development in policy and practice, which is presented based on cross-cutting issues such as low carbon energy, forestry, agriculture and transportation. Afterwards, practical case studies are discussed from low carbon development in low income countries in Africa, middle income countries in Asia and Latin America and high income countries in Europe and North America.

  10. Carbon Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    wt% polyvinyl alcohol (Airvol 2005 PVA,Air Products andChemicals,Allentown, PA). The mixture was uniaxially pressed into bars (11 mm long × 9.9 mm...process. First, carbon fibers, which carry the mechanical load, are woven, braided, felted, or filament wound into a preform which has the shape of the... filaments , injection of brake preforms, and in fab- rication of anode materials for lithium ion batteries. The principle behind the impregnation with in

  11. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    OpenAIRE

    Li Jianyi; Pan Hui; Feng YuanPing

    2010-01-01

    Abstract As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disad...

  12. Brominated graphitized carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Low cost, high break elongation graphitized carbon fibers having low degree of graphitization are inert to bromine at room or higher temperatures, but are brominated at -7 to 20 C, and then debrominated at ambient. Repetition of this bromination-debromination process can bring the bromine content to 18 percent. Electrical conductivity of the brominated fibers is three times of the before-bromination value.

  13. 148. Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Hedmer, Maria; Kåredal, Monica; Gustavsson, Per; Rissler, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be seen as graphene sheets rolled to form cylinders. CNTs may be categorised as single- (SWCNT) or multi-walled (MWCNT). Due to the small size, the number of particles as well as the surface area per mass unit is extremely high. CNTs are highly diverse, differing with respect to e.g., diameter, length, chiral angles, chemical functionalisation, purity, stiffness and bulk density. Today, CNTs are utilised primarily for the reinforcement of composite polymers, but th...

  14. Interfaces of Propylene Carbonate

    OpenAIRE

    You, Xinli; Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; Pratt, Lawrence R.; Pesika, Noshir; Aritakula, Kalika M.; Rick, Steven W.

    2012-01-01

    Propylene carbonate (PC) wets graphite with a contact angle of 31 deg at ambient conditions. Molecular dynamics simulations agree with this contact angle after 40% reduction of the strength of graphite-C atom Lennard-Jones interactions with the solvent, relative to the models used initially. A simulated nano-scale PC droplet on graphite displays a pronounced layering tendency and an Aztex pyramid structure for the droplet. Extrapolation of the computed tensions of PC liquid-vapor interface es...

  15. Carbon Structure Hazard Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Tommy; Greene, Ben; Porter, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Carbon composite structures are widely used in virtually all advanced technology industries for a multitude of applications. The high strength-to-weight ratio and resistance to aggressive service environments make them highly desirable. Automotive, aerospace, and petroleum industries extensively use, and will continue to use, this enabling technology. As a result of this broad range of use, field and test personnel are increasingly exposed to hazards associated with these structures. No single published document exists to address the hazards and make recommendations for the hazard controls required for the different exposure possibilities from damaged structures including airborne fibers, fly, and dust. The potential for personnel exposure varies depending on the application or manipulation of the structure. The effect of exposure to carbon hazards is not limited to personnel, protection of electronics and mechanical equipment must be considered as well. The various exposure opportunities defined in this document include pre-manufacturing fly and dust, the cured structure, manufacturing/machining, post-event cleanup, and post-event test and/or evaluation. Hazard control is defined as it is applicable or applied for the specific exposure opportunity. The carbon exposure hazard includes fly, dust, fiber (cured/uncured), and matrix vapor/thermal decomposition products. By using the recommendations in this document, a high level of confidence can be assured for the protection of personnel and equipment.

  16. Spectroelectrochemistry of carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, Lothar

    2007-05-14

    This review is focused on charge-transfer reactions at carbon nanotubes and fullerenes. The spectroelectrochemistry of fullerenes deals with the spin states of fullerenes, the role of mono-anions and the reactivity of higher charged states in C60. The optical (Vis-NIR) spectroelectrochemistry of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) follows changes in the allowed optical transitions among the Van Hove singularities. The Raman spectroelectrochemistry of SWNT benefits from strong resonance enhancement of the Raman scattering. Here, both semiconducting and metallic SWNTs are analyzed using the radial breathing mode (RBM) and G-modes as well as the second order (D, G') and intermediate frequency modes. Raman spectroelectrochemistry of SWNT allows the addressing of index-identified tubes and even single isolated nanotubes. Optical and Raman spectroelectrochemistry of fullerene peapods, C60@SWNT and C70@SWNT indicates effective shielding of the intratubular fullerene (peas). The most striking effect in the spectroelectrochemistry of peapods is the so-called "anodic Raman enhancement" of intratubular C60. Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) give a specific spectroscopic response in Vis-NIR spectroelectrochemistry for the inner and the outer tube. They are better distinguishable by Raman spectroelectrochemistry which allows a precise tracing of the specific doping response of outer/inner tubes.

  17. Securing tropical forest carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scharlemann, Jörn P. W.; Kapos, Valerie; Campbell, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Forest loss and degradation in the tropics contribute 6-17% of all greenhouse gas emissions. Protected areas cover 217.2 million ha (19.6%) of the world's humid tropical forests and contain c. 70.3 petagrams of carbon (Pg C) in biomass and soil to 1 m depth. Between 2000 and 2005, we estimate...... that 1.75 million ha of forest were lost from protected areas in humid tropical forests, causing the emission of 0.25-0.33 Pg C. Protected areas lost about half as much carbon as the same area of unprotected forest. We estimate that the reduction of these carbon emissions from ongoing deforestation...... in protected sites in humid tropical forests could be valued at USD 6,200-7,400 million depending on the land use after clearance. This is >1.5 times the estimated spending on protected area management in these regions. Improving management of protected areas to retain forest cover better may be an important...

  18. Hydropower's Biogenic Carbon Footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Laura; Pfister, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is accelerating and the world urgently needs a shift to clean and renewable energy. Hydropower is currently the largest renewable source of electricity, but its contribution to climate change mitigation is not yet fully understood. Hydroelectric reservoirs are a source of biogenic greenhouse gases and in individual cases can reach the same emission rates as thermal power plants. Little is known about the severity of their emissions at the global scale. Here we show that the carbon footprint of hydropower is far higher than previously assumed, with a global average of 173 kg CO2 and 2.95 kg CH4 emitted per MWh of electricity produced. This results in a combined average carbon footprint of 273 kg CO2e/MWh when using the global warming potential over a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100). Nonetheless, this is still below that of fossil energy sources without the use of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. We identified the dams most promising for capturing methane for use as alternative energy source. The spread among the ~1500 hydropower plants analysed in this study is large and highlights the importance of case-by-case examinations.

  19. Hydropower's Biogenic Carbon Footprint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Scherer

    Full Text Available Global warming is accelerating and the world urgently needs a shift to clean and renewable energy. Hydropower is currently the largest renewable source of electricity, but its contribution to climate change mitigation is not yet fully understood. Hydroelectric reservoirs are a source of biogenic greenhouse gases and in individual cases can reach the same emission rates as thermal power plants. Little is known about the severity of their emissions at the global scale. Here we show that the carbon footprint of hydropower is far higher than previously assumed, with a global average of 173 kg CO2 and 2.95 kg CH4 emitted per MWh of electricity produced. This results in a combined average carbon footprint of 273 kg CO2e/MWh when using the global warming potential over a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100. Nonetheless, this is still below that of fossil energy sources without the use of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. We identified the dams most promising for capturing methane for use as alternative energy source. The spread among the ~1500 hydropower plants analysed in this study is large and highlights the importance of case-by-case examinations.

  20. Composition of carbonization residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupfer; Leonhardt

    1943-11-30

    This report gave a record of the composition of several samples of residues from carbonization of various hydrogenation residue from processing some type of coal or tar in the Bergius process. These included Silesian bituminous coal processed at 600 atm. with iron catalyst, in one case to produce gasoline and middle oil and in another case to produce heavy oil excess, Scholven coal processed at 250 atm. with tin oxalate and chlorine catalyst, Bruex tar processed in a 10-liter oven using iron catalyst, and a pitch mixture from Welheim processed in a 10-liter over using iron catalyst. The values gathered were compared with a few corresponding values estimated for Boehlen tar and Gelsenberg coal based on several assumptions outlined in the report. The data recorded included percentage of ash in the dry residue and percentage of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, total sulfur, and volatile sulfur. The percentage of ash varied from 21.43% in the case of Bruex tar to 53.15% in the case of one of the Silesian coals. Percentage of carbon varied from 44.0% in the case of Scholven coal to 78.03% in the case of Bruex tar. Percentage of total sulfur varied from 2.28% for Bruex tar to a recorded 5.65% for one of the Silesian coals and an estimated 6% for Boehlen tar. 1 table.

  1. Interfaces of propylene carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xinli; Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; Pratt, Lawrence R.; Pesika, Noshir; Aritakula, Kalika M.; Rick, Steven W.

    2013-03-01

    Propylene carbonate (PC) wets graphite with a contact angle of 31° at ambient conditions. Molecular dynamics simulations agree with this contact angle after 40% reduction of the strength of graphite-C atom Lennard-Jones interactions with the solvent, relative to the models used initially. A simulated nano-scale PC droplet on graphite displays a pronounced layering tendency and an Aztex pyramid structure for the droplet. Extrapolation of the computed tensions of PC liquid-vapor interface estimates the critical temperature of PC accurately to about 3%. PC molecules lie flat on the PC liquid-vapor surface and tend to project the propyl carbon toward the vapor phase. For close PC neighbors in liquid PC, an important packing motif stacks carbonate planes with the outer oxygen of one molecule snuggled into the positively charged propyl end of another molecule so that neighboring molecule dipole moments are approximately antiparallel. The calculated thermal expansion coefficient and the dielectric constants for liquid PC agree well with experiment. The distribution of PC molecule binding energies is closely Gaussian. Evaluation of the density of the coexisting vapor then permits estimation of the packing contribution to the PC chemical potential and that contribution is about two thirds of the magnitude of the contributions due to attractive interactions, with opposite sign.

  2. Imaging of Carbon Translocation to Fruit Using Carbon-11-Labeled Carbon Dioxide and Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawachi, Naoki; Kikuchi, Kaori; Suzui, Nobuo; Ishii, Satomi; Fujimaki, Shu; Ishioka, Noriko S.; Watabe, Hiroshi

    2011-04-01

    Carbon kinetics into the fruit is an agricultural issue on the growth and development of the sink organs to be harvested. Particularly, photoassimilate translocation and distribution are important topics for understanding the mechanism. In the present work, carbon-11 (11C) labeled photoassimilate translocation into fruits of tomato has been imaged using carbon-11-labeled carbon dioxide and the positron emission tomography (PET). Dynamice PET data of gradual increasing of 11C activity and its distribution is acquired quantitatively in intact plant body. This indicates that the 3-D photoassimilate translocation into the fruits is imaged successfully and carbon kinetics is analyzable to understand the plant physiology and nutrition.

  3. Limits on carbon sequestration in arid blue carbon ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schile, Lisa M; Kauffman, J Boone; Crooks, Stephen; Fourqurean, James W; Glavan, Jane; Megonigal, J Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Coastal ecosystems produce and sequester significant amounts of carbon ("blue carbon"), which has been well documented in humid and semi-humid regions of temperate and tropical climates but less so in arid regions where mangroves, marshes, and seagrasses exist near the limit of their tolerance for extreme temperature and salinity. To better understand these unique systems, we measured whole-ecosystem carbon stocks in 58 sites across the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in natural and planted mangroves, salt marshes, seagrass beds, microbial mats, and coastal sabkha (inter- and supratidal unvegetated salt flats). Natural mangroves held significantly more carbon in above- and belowground biomass than other vegetated ecosystems. Planted mangrove carbon stocks increased with age, but there were large differences for sites of similar age. Soil carbon varied widely across sites (2-367 Mg C/ha), with ecosystem averages that ranged from 49 to 156 Mg C/ha. For the first time, microbial mats were documented to contain soil carbon pools comparable to vascular plant-dominated ecosystems, and could arguably be recognized as a unique blue carbon ecosystem. Total ecosystem carbon stocks ranged widely from 2 to 515 Mg C/ha (seagrass bed and mangrove, respectively). Seagrass beds had the lowest carbon stock per unit area, but the largest stock per total area due to their large spatial coverage. Compared to similar ecosystems globally, mangroves and marshes in the UAE have lower plant and soil carbon stocks; however, the difference in soil stocks is far larger than with plant stocks. This incongruent difference between stocks is likely due to poor carbon preservation under conditions of weakly reduced soils (200-350 mV), coarse-grained sediments, and active shoreline migration. This work represents the first attempt to produce a country-wide coastal ecosystem carbon accounting using a uniform sampling protocol, and was motivated by specific policy goals identified by the Abu Dhabi Global

  4. Magneto-carbonization method for production of carbon fiber, and high performance carbon fibers made thereby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K.; Ozcan, Soydan; Eberle, Claude C.; Abdallah, Mohamed Gabr; Mackiewicz, Ludtka Gail; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Paulauskas, Felix Leonard; Rivard, John Daniel Kennedy

    2017-08-08

    Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from fiber precursor, wherein the fiber precursor is subjected to a magnetic field of at least 3 Tesla during a carbonization process. The carbonization process is generally conducted at a temperature of at least 400.degree. C. and less than 2200.degree. C., wherein, in particular embodiments, the carbonization process includes a low temperature carbonization step conducted at a temperature of at least or above 400.degree. C. or 500.degree. C. and less than or up to 1000.degree. C., 1100.degree. C., or 1200.degree. C., followed by a high temperature carbonization step conducted at a temperature of at least or above 1200.degree. C. In particular embodiments, particularly in the case of a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber precursor, the resulting carbon fiber may possess a minimum tensile strength of at least 600 ksi, a tensile modulus of at least 30 Msi, and an ultimate elongation of at least 1.5%.

  5. [Forest carbon cycle model: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping

    2009-06-01

    Forest carbon cycle is one of the important items in the research of terrestrial carbon cycle, while carbon cycle model is an important means in studying the carbon cycle mechanisms of forest ecosystem and in estimating carbon fluxes. Based on the sum-up of main carbon cycle models, this paper classified the forest carbon cycle models into two categories, i.e., patch scale forest carbon cycle models and regional scale terrestrial carbon cycle models, with their features commented. The future development trend in the research of forest carbon cycle models in China was discussed.

  6. Natural Carbonation of Peridotite and Applications for Carbon Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, E.; Kelemen, P.; Matter, J.

    2009-05-01

    Natural carbonation of peridotite in the Samail Ophiolite of Oman is surprisingly rapid and could be further enhanced to provide a safe, permanent method of CO2 storage through in situ formation of carbonate minerals. Carbonate veins form by low-temperature reaction between peridotite and groundwater in a shallow weathering horizon. Reaction with peridotite drives up the pH of the water, and extensive travertine terraces form where this groundwater emerges at the surface in alkaline springs. The potential sink for CO2 in peridotite is enormous: adding 1wt% CO2 to the peridotite in Oman could consume 1/4 of all atmospheric carbon, and several peridotite bodies of comparable size exist throughout the world. Thus carbonation rate and cost, not reservoir size, are the limiting factors on the usefulness of in situ mineral carbonation of peridotite for carbon storage. The carbonate veins in Oman are much younger than previously believed, yielding average 14C ages of 28,000 years. Age data plus estimated volumes of carbonate veins and terraces suggest 10,000 to 100,000 tons per year of CO2 are consumed by these peridotite weathering reactions in Oman. This rate can be enhanced by drilling, hydraulic fracture, injecting CO2-rich fluid, and increasing reaction temperature. Drilling and hydraulic fracture can increase volume of peridotite available for reaction. Additional fracture may occur due to the solid volume increase of the carbonation reaction, and field observations suggest that such reaction-assisted fracture may be responsible for hierarchical carbonate vein networks in peridotite. Natural carbonation of peridotite in Oman occurs at low pCO2, resulting in partial carbonation of peridotite, forming magnesite and serpentine. Raising pCO2 increases carbonation efficiency, forming of magnesite + talc, or at complete carbonation, magnesite + quartz, allowing ˜30wt% CO2 to be added to the peridotite. Increasing the temperature to 185°C can improve the reaction rate by

  7. Sensitivity of carbon sequestration costs to soil carbon rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antle, J; Capalbo, S; Mooney, S; Elliott, E T; Paustian, K H

    2002-01-01

    Modifying current agricultural management practices as a means of sequestering carbon has been shown to be a relatively low cost way to offset greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper we examine the sensitivity of the estimates of the amount of soil carbon sequestered and the implied costs of sequestering a tonne of carbon to changes in the rates of soil carbon sequestered for alternative production practices. An application is made to the dryland grain production systems of the US Northern Plains where the marginal costs of soil C range from $20 to $100 per MT. We show that the resulting changes in the marginal costs quantities of C sequestered are not a monotonic transformation of the changes in the soil carbon rates. These results underscore the importance of using a linked economic and biophysical simulation model to assess the economic potential for sequestering carbon in agricultural soils.

  8. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  9. Designing carbon markets. Part I: Carbon markets in time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fankhauser, Samuel, E-mail: s.fankhauser@lse.ac.u [Grantham Research Institute and Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy, London School of Economics, Houghton St, London WC2A 2AE (United Kingdom); Hepburn, Cameron, E-mail: cameron.hepburn@economics.ox.ac.u [Grantham Research Institute, London School of Economics, and Smith School for Enterprise and the Environment, Oxford University, 75 George Street, Oxford OX1 2BQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    This paper analyses the design of carbon markets in time (i.e., intertemporally). It is part of a twin set of papers that ask, starting from first principles, what an optimal global carbon market would look like by around 2030. Our focus is on firm-level cap-and-trade systems, although much of what we say would also apply to government-level trading and carbon offset schemes. We examine the 'first principles' of temporal design that would help to maximise flexibility and to minimise costs, including banking and borrowing and other mechanisms to provide greater carbon price predictability and credibility over time.

  10. Designing carbon markets. Part 1. Carbon markets in time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fankhauser, Samuel [Grantham Research Institute and Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy, London School of Economics, Houghton St, London WC2A 2AE (United Kingdom); Hepburn, Cameron [Grantham Research Institute, London School of Economics, and Smith School for Enterprise and the Environment, Oxford University, 75 George Street, Oxford OX1 2BQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    This paper analyses the design of carbon markets in time (i.e., intertemporally). It is part of a twin set of papers that ask, starting from first principles, what an optimal global carbon market would look like by around 2030. Our focus is on firm-level cap-and-trade systems, although much of what we say would also apply to government-level trading and carbon offset schemes. We examine the first principles of temporal design that would help to maximise flexibility and to minimise costs, including banking and borrowing and other mechanisms to provide greater carbon price predictability and credibility over time. (author)

  11. Multiporous carbon allotropes transformed from symmetry-matched carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxiang Cai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs with homogeneous diameters have been proven to transform into new carbon allotropes under pressure but no studies on the compression of inhomogeneous CNTs have been reported. In this study, we propose to build new carbon allotropes from the bottom-up by applying pressure on symmetry-matched inhomogeneous CNTs. We find that the (3,0 CNT with point group C3v and the (6,0 CNT with point group C6v form an all sp3 hybridized hexagonal 3060-Carbon crystal, but the (4,0 CNT with point group D4h and the (8,0 CNT with point group D8h polymerize into a sp2+sp3 hybridized tetragonal 4080-Carbon structure. Their thermodynamic, mechanical and dynamic stabilities show that they are potential carbon allotropes to be experimentally synthesized. The multiporous structures, excellently mechanical properties and special electronic structures (semiconductive 3060-Carbon and semimetallic 4080-Carbon imply their many potential applications, such as gases purification, hydrogen storage and lightweight semiconductor devices. In addition, we simulate their feature XRD patterns which are helpful for identifying the two carbon crystals in future experimental studies.

  12. Carbon Micronymphaea: Graphene on Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Won Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the morphology of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotube (CNT, graphene, and their hybrid structure under various operating conditions during a one-step synthesis via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD. We focus on the synthetic aspects of carbon hybrid material composed of heteroepitaxially grown graphene on top of a vertical array of carbon nanotubes, called carbon micronymphaea. We characterize the structural features of this unique nanocomposite by uses of electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. We observe carbon nanofibers, poorly aligned and well-aligned vertical arrays of CNT sequentially as the growth temperature increases, while we always discover the carbon hybrids, called carbon micronymphaea, at specific cooling rate of 15°C/s, which is optimal for the carbon precipitation from the Ni nanoparticles in this study. We expect one-pot synthesized graphene-on-nanotube hybrid structure poses great potential for applications that demand ultrahigh surface-to-volume ratios with intact graphitic nature and directional electronic and thermal transports.

  13. Multiporous carbon allotropes transformed from symmetry-matched carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yingxiang, E-mail: yingxiangcai@ncu.edu.cn; Wang, Hao; Xu, Shengliang; Hu, Yujie; Liu, Ning; Xu, Xuechun [Department of Physics, NanChang University, Jiangxi, Nanchang 330031 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with homogeneous diameters have been proven to transform into new carbon allotropes under pressure but no studies on the compression of inhomogeneous CNTs have been reported. In this study, we propose to build new carbon allotropes from the bottom-up by applying pressure on symmetry-matched inhomogeneous CNTs. We find that the (3,0) CNT with point group C{sub 3v} and the (6,0) CNT with point group C{sub 6v} form an all sp{sup 3} hybridized hexagonal 3060-Carbon crystal, but the (4,0) CNT with point group D{sub 4h} and the (8,0) CNT with point group D{sub 8h} polymerize into a sp{sup 2}+sp{sup 3} hybridized tetragonal 4080-Carbon structure. Their thermodynamic, mechanical and dynamic stabilities show that they are potential carbon allotropes to be experimentally synthesized. The multiporous structures, excellently mechanical properties and special electronic structures (semiconductive 3060-Carbon and semimetallic 4080-Carbon) imply their many potential applications, such as gases purification, hydrogen storage and lightweight semiconductor devices. In addition, we simulate their feature XRD patterns which are helpful for identifying the two carbon crystals in future experimental studies.

  14. Carbon Nanotube-Enhanced Carbon-Phenenolic Ablator Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikolaev, P.; Stackpoole, M.; Fan, W.; Cruden, B. A.; Waid, M.; Moloney, P.; Arepalli, S.; Arnold, J.; Partridge, H.; Yowell, L.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of PICA (phenolic impregnated carbon ablator) as the selected material for heat shielding for future earth return vehicles. It briefly reviews the manufacturing of PICA and the advantages for the use of heat shielding, and then explains the reason for using Carbon Nanotubes to improve strength of phenolic resin that binds carbon fibers together. It reviews the work being done to create a carbon nanotube enhanced PICA. Also shown are various micrographic images of the various PICA materials.

  15. Evaluation of carbon-carbon for space engine nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhoza, J. P.; Cawood, G. W.; Cawood, G. W.; Cawood, G. W.; Cawood, G. W.; Cawood, G. W.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation is underway to determine the suitability of carbon-carbon composite materials for lightweight nozzle extensions on the Orbit Transfer Vehicle (OTV). The best combinations of fiber precursor, matrix material, and oxidation protection coatings are being evaluated in a series of hot-fire tests in an O sub 2/H sub 2 rocket nozzle environment. Evaluation criteria include life expectancy (recession), strength to weight, producibility, maturity, and cost. A data base of carbon-carbon performance in the OTV nozzle environment will be established which may be used in designing a full-scale OTV nozzle extension.

  16. A better carbon footprint label

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John; Nielsen, Kristian S.

    2016-01-01

    Based on insights from behavioral economics, it is suggested to extend carbon footprint labeling with information about relative performance, using the well-known “traffic light” color scheme to communicate relative performance. To test this proposition, the impact of a carbon footprint label......, participants saw the original Carbon Trust label and in the other condition they saw the same label, but with traffic light colors added to communicate the product’s relative performance in terms of carbon footprint. All included attributes were found to have a significant impact on consumer choices....... As expected, price and carbon footprint were negatively related to choice. Further, participants preferred organic to non-organic coffee and certification by a public authority. The effect of the carbon label is significantly stronger the more environmentally concerned the consumer is. Using colors...

  17. Fragmentation in Carbon Therapy Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Charara, Y M

    2010-01-01

    The state of the art Monte Carlo code HETC-HEDS was used to simulate spallation products, secondary neutron, and secondary proton production in A-150 Tissue Equivalent Plastic phantoms to investigate fragmentation of carbon therapy beams. For a 356 MeV/Nucleon carbon ion beam, production of charged particles heavier than protons was 0.24 spallation products per incident carbon ion with atomic numbers ranging from 1 through 5 (hydrogen to boron). In addition, there were 4.73 neutrons and 2.95 protons produced per incident carbon ion. Furthermore, as the incident energy increases, the neutron production rate increases at a rate of 20% per 10 MeV/nucleon. Secondary protons were created at a rate between 2.62-2.87 per carbon ion, while spallation products were created at a rate between 0.20-0.24 per carbon ion.

  18. Carbon Nanomaterials as Antibacterial Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Maas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials like graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes and the various forms of diamond have attracted great attention for their vast potential regarding applications in electrical engineering and as biomaterials. The study of the antibacterial properties of carbon nanomaterials provides fundamental information on the possible toxicity and environmental impact of these materials. Furthermore, as a result of the increasing prevalence of resistant bacteria strains, the development of novel antibacterial materials is of great importance. This article reviews current research efforts on characterizing the antibacterial activity of carbon nanomaterials from the perspective of colloid and interface science. Building on these fundamental findings, recent functionalization strategies for enhancing the antibacterial effect of carbon nanomaterials are described. The review concludes with a comprehensive outlook that summarizes the most important discoveries and trends regarding antibacterial carbon nanomaterials.

  19. Stable prenucleation calcium carbonate clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Denis; Völkel, Antje; Cölfen, Helmut

    2008-12-19

    Calcium carbonate forms scales, geological deposits, biominerals, and ocean sediments. Huge amounts of carbon dioxide are retained as carbonate ions, and calcium ions represent a major contribution to water hardness. Despite its relevance, little is known about the precipitation mechanism of calcium carbonate, and specified complex crystal structures challenge the classical view on nucleation considering the formation of metastable ion clusters. We demonstrate that dissolved calcium carbonate in fact contains stable prenucleation ion clusters forming even in undersaturated solution. The cluster formation can be characterized by means of equilibrium thermodynamics, applying a multiple-binding model, which allows for structural preformation. Stable clusters are the relevant species in calcium carbonate nucleation. Such mechanisms may also be important for the crystallization of other minerals.

  20. Carbon Ion Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Herrmann, Rochus

    On the importance of choice of target size for selective boosting of hypoxic tumor subvolumina in carbon ion therapy Purpose: Functional imaging methods in radiotherapy are maturing and can to some extent uncover radio resistant structures found within a tumour entity. Selective boost of identified...... hypoxic subvolumina with high-LET radiation may in principle lead to increased tumour control due to LET-dependence of the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER). Here, we demonstrate the importance of minimizing field sizes in order not to dilute the dose average LET by quantifying the OER as a function of PTV...

  1. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Canadell, J. G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J. I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Boden, T. A.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Keeling, R. F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L. P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Feely, R. A.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A. K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S. K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D. R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J. E. M. S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F. F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; van Heuven, S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and a methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates as well as consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover-change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models forced by observed climate, CO2, and land-cover change (some including nitrogen-carbon interactions). We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from three atmospheric inverse methods for three broad latitude bands. All uncertainties are reported as ±1σ, reflecting the current capacity to characterise the annual estimates of each component of the global

  2. Global Carbon Budget 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quéré, Corinne; Andrew, Robbie M.; Canadell, Josep G.; Sitch, Stephen; Korsbakken, Jan Ivar; Peters, Glen P.; Manning, Andrew C.; Boden, Thomas A.; Tans, Pieter P.; Houghton, Richard A.; Keeling, Ralph F.; Alin, Simone; Andrews, Oliver D.; Anthoni, Peter; Barbero, Leticia; Bopp, Laurent; Chevallier, Frédéric; Chini, Louise P.; Ciais, Philippe; Currie, Kim; Delire, Christine; Doney, Scott C.; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Gkritzalis, Thanos; Harris, Ian; Hauck, Judith; Haverd, Vanessa; Hoppema, Mario; Klein Goldewijk, Kees; Jain, Atul K.; Kato, Etsushi; Körtzinger, Arne; Landschützer, Peter; Lefèvre, Nathalie; Lenton, Andrew; Lienert, Sebastian; Lombardozzi, Danica; Melton, Joe R.; Metzl, Nicolas; Millero, Frank; Monteiro, Pedro M. S.; Munro, David R.; Nabel, Julia E. M. S.; Nakaoka, Shin-ichiro; O'Brien, Kevin; Olsen, Are; Omar, Abdirahman M.; Ono, Tsuneo; Pierrot, Denis; Poulter, Benjamin; Rödenbeck, Christian; Salisbury, Joe; Schuster, Ute; Schwinger, Jörg; Séférian, Roland; Skjelvan, Ingunn; Stocker, Benjamin D.; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Takahashi, Taro; Tian, Hanqin; Tilbrook, Bronte; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T.; van der Werf, Guido R.; Viovy, Nicolas; Walker, Anthony P.; Wiltshire, Andrew J.; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-11-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere - the "global carbon budget" - is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates and consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, respectively, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models. We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from three atmospheric inverse methods for three broad latitude bands. All uncertainties are reported as ±1σ, reflecting the current capacity to characterise the annual estimates of each component of the global carbon budget. For the last decade available (2006-2015), EFF was 9

  3. 40-in. OMS Kevlar(Registered Trademark) COPV S/N 007 Stress Rupture Test NDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulsberry, Regor; Greene, Nate; Forth, Scott; Leifeste, Mark; Gallus, Tim; Yoder, Tommy; Keddy, Chris; Mandaras, Eric; Wincheski, Buzz; Williams, Philip; hide

    2010-01-01

    The presentation examines pretest nondestructive evaluation (NDE), including external/internal visual inspection, raman spectroscopy, laser shearography, and laser profilometry; real-time NDE including eddy current, acoustic emission (AE), and real-time portable raman spectroscopy; and AE application to carbon/epoxy composite overwrapped pressure vessels.

  4. Carbon Dioxide Fixation by Microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Victoria H.; Calvin, Melvin

    1951-07-24

    Resting cells of eleven microorganisms were exposed to radioactive carbon dioxide for 40 minutes. The radioactive compounds formed during this time were separated and identified by paper chromatography. Resting cells of Lactobacillus casei fixed no carbon dioxide and growing cells fixed carbon dioxide primarily in malic and aspartic acids. All of the radioactive compounds formed could have become radioactive by reversal of known decarboxylation reactions.

  5. Carbon. Examples of Property Realization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Kossko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Examples of realization of carbon properties in formation of section near-surface boundaries defining the mechanism of oxidizing (normal wear are presented. Synthesis of strengt hening diamond- lonsdaleite -carbene «frame» and graphite with function of solid lubricant on a friction surface in high-desperse carbon environment is reviewed. Prospects of carbon ap placation in implementation of the concept of electronics on one element, and also use of thin-film structures of amorphous carbon – metal for data recording are discussed.

  6. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  7. Carbon dioxide and climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-01

    Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

  8. Carbon nanotube computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulaker, Max M; Hills, Gage; Patil, Nishant; Wei, Hai; Chen, Hong-Yu; Wong, H-S Philip; Mitra, Subhasish

    2013-09-26

    The miniaturization of electronic devices has been the principal driving force behind the semiconductor industry, and has brought about major improvements in computational power and energy efficiency. Although advances with silicon-based electronics continue to be made, alternative technologies are being explored. Digital circuits based on transistors fabricated from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential to outperform silicon by improving the energy-delay product, a metric of energy efficiency, by more than an order of magnitude. Hence, CNTs are an exciting complement to existing semiconductor technologies. Owing to substantial fundamental imperfections inherent in CNTs, however, only very basic circuit blocks have been demonstrated. Here we show how these imperfections can be overcome, and demonstrate the first computer built entirely using CNT-based transistors. The CNT computer runs an operating system that is capable of multitasking: as a demonstration, we perform counting and integer-sorting simultaneously. In addition, we implement 20 different instructions from the commercial MIPS instruction set to demonstrate the generality of our CNT computer. This experimental demonstration is the most complex carbon-based electronic system yet realized. It is a considerable advance because CNTs are prominent among a variety of emerging technologies that are being considered for the next generation of highly energy-efficient electronic systems.

  9. Advanced carbon nanotubes functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setaro, A.

    2017-10-01

    Similar to graphene, carbon nanotubes are materials made of pure carbon in its sp2 form. Their extended conjugated π-network provides them with remarkable quantum optoelectronic properties. Frustratingly, it also brings drawbacks. The π-π stacking interaction makes as-produced tubes bundle together, blurring all their quantum properties. Functionalization aims at modifying and protecting the tubes while hindering π-π stacking. Several functionalization strategies have been developed to circumvent this limitation in order for nanotubes applications to thrive. In this review, we summarize the different approaches established so far, emphasizing the balance between functionalization efficacy and the preservation of the tubes’ properties. Much attention will be given to a functionalization strategy overcoming the covalent-noncovalent dichotomy and to the implementation of two advanced functionalization schemes: (a) conjugation with molecular switches, to yield hybrid nanosystems with chemo-physical properties that can be tuned in a controlled and reversible way, and; (b) plasmonic nanosystems, whose ability to concentrate and enhance the electromagnetic fields can be taken advantage of to enhance the optical response of the tubes.

  10. Global Carbon Budget 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéré, Corinne Le; Andrew, Robbie M.; Canadell, Josep G.; Sitch, Stephen; Korsbakken, Jan Ivar; Peters, Glen P.; Manning, Andrew C.; Boden, Thomas A.; Tans, Pieter P.; Houghton, Richard A.; hide 12px; height:12px; display:none; " src="images/arrow-down.gif" width="12" height="12" border="0" alt="hide" id="author_20170008485_hide">

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere the global carbon budget is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates and consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, respectively, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models. We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from three atmospheric inverse methods for three broad latitude bands. All uncertainties are reported as +/- 1(sigma), reflecting the current capacity to characterize the annual estimates of each component of the global carbon budget. For the last decade available (2006-2015), EFF was 9

  11. Condensation of carbon in radioactive supernova gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, D D; Liu, W; Dalgarno, A

    1999-02-26

    Chemistry resulting in the formation of large carbon-bearing molecules and dust in the interior of an expanding supernova was explored, and the equations governing their abundances were solved numerically. Carbon dust condenses from initially gaseous carbon and oxygen atoms because energetic electrons produced by radioactivity in the supernova cause dissociation of the carbon monoxide molecules, which would otherwise form and limit the supply of carbon atoms. The resulting free carbon atoms enable carbon dust to grow faster by carbon association than the rate at which the dust can be destroyed by oxidation. The origin of presolar micrometer-sized carbon solids that are found in meteorites is thereby altered.

  12. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of the carbonate facies in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Vindhyan sedimentary succession in central India spans a wide time bracket from the Paleopro- terozoic to the Neoproterozoic period.Chronostratigraphic significance of stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of the carbonate phase in Vindhyan sediments has been discussed in some recent studies.However,the ...

  13. Studies of activated carbon and carbon black for supercapacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richner, R.; Mueller, S.; Koetz, R.; Wokaun, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Carbon Black and activated carbon materials providing high surface areas and a distinct pore distribution are prime materials for supercapacitor applications at frequencies < 0.5 Hz. A number of these materials were tested for their specific capacitance, surface and pore size distribution. High capacitance electrodes were manufactured on the laboratory scale with attention to ease of processability. (author) 1 fig., 1 ref.

  14. Electron irradiation of carbon dioxide-carbon disulphide ice analog ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon disulphide (CS2) molecular ice mixture was prepared under low temperature (85 K) astrochemical conditions. The icy mixture irradiated with keV electrons simulates the irradiation environment experienced by icy satellites and Interstellar Icy Mantles (IIM). Upon electron irradi-.

  15. High-Melt Carbon-Carbon Coating for Nozzle Extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-Carbon Advanced Technologies, Inc. (C-CAT), has developed a high-melt coating for use in nozzle extensions in next-generation spacecraft. The coating is composed primarily of carbon-carbon, a carbon-fiber and carbon-matrix composite material that has gained a spaceworthy reputation due to its ability to withstand ultrahigh temperatures. C-CAT's high-melt coating embeds hafnium carbide (HfC) and zirconium diboride (ZrB2) within the outer layers of a carbon-carbon structure. The coating demonstrated enhanced high-temperature durability and suffered no erosion during a test in NASA's Arc Jet Complex. (Test parameters: stagnation heat flux=198 BTD/sq ft-sec; pressure=.265 atm; temperature=3,100 F; four cycles totaling 28 minutes) In Phase I of the project, C-CAT successfully demonstrated large-scale manufacturability with a 40-inch cylinder representing the end of a nozzle extension and a 16-inch flanged cylinder representing the attach flange of a nozzle extension. These demonstrators were manufactured without spalling or delaminations. In Phase II, C-CAT worked with engine designers to develop a nozzle extension stub skirt interfaced with an Aerojet Rocketdyne RL10 engine. All objectives for Phase II were successfully met. Additional nonengine applications for the coating include thermal protection systems (TPS) for next-generation spacecraft and hypersonic aircraft.

  16. Thermal carbonization of nanoporous silicon: Formation of carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An interesting phenomenon is observed while carrying out thermal carbonization of porous silicon (PS) with an aim to arrest the natural surface degradation, and it is a burning issue for PS-based device applications. A tubular carbon structure has been observed on the PS surface. Raman, Fourier transform infrared ...

  17. Carbon-Carbon High Melt Coating for Nozzle Extensions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Melt Coating system is applied to a carbon-carbon structure and embeds HfC, ZrB2 in the outer layers. ACC High Melt builds on the time tested base material...

  18. Carbon storage and carbon emission offset potential in an African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical deforestation contributes to atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, linked to global climate change. In response, emerging markets for carbon emission offsets offer developing nations added incentives for rehabilitation and reforestation that increase terrestrial carbon storage. The Lower Tana River ...

  19. Reducibility of platinum supported on nanostructured carbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, A.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837598; Schubert, T.; Storr, U.; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X; Bitter, J.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/160581435

    2009-01-01

    The nanostructure of graphite like carbon, i.e. carbon nanofibers (CNF), carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanoplatelets (CNP), displayed a significant influence on the reducibility of platinum deposited on these carbons. The onset temperature for reduction increased from 461 K for Pt/CNF to 466 K

  20. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium carbonate. 184.1191 Section 184.1191 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Calcium carbonate (CaCO3, CAS Reg... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation...

  1. Carbon-Carbon High Melt Coating for Nozzle and Nozzle Extensions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — C-CAT, which has proven carbon-carbon fabrication capabilities, will investigate use of ACC-6 High Melt oxidation protective system on carbon-carbon for use on the...

  2. Cryogenic Adsorption of Nitrogen and Carbon Dioxide in Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fuzhi; Liu, Huiming; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Hengcheng; Lu, Junfeng; Li, Laifeng

    2017-09-01

    Activated carbon have been used for a long time at low temperature for cryogenic applications. The knowledge of adsorption characteristics of activated carbon at cryogenic temperature is essential for some specific applications. However, such experimental data are very scare in the literature. In order to measure the adsorption characteristics of activated carbon under variable cryogenic temperatures, an adsorption measurement device was presented. The experiment system is based on the commercially available PCT-pro adsorption analyzer coupled to a two-stage Gifford McMahon refrigerator, which allows the sample to be cooled to 4.2K. Cryogenic environment can be maintained steadily without the cryogenic liquid through the cryocooler and temperature can be controlled precisely between 5K and 300K by the temperature controller. Adsorption measurements were performed in activated carbon for carbon dioxide and nitrogen and the adsorption isotherm were obtained.

  3. The Vibration of a Linear Carbon Chain in Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Ding

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An explicit solution for the vibration of a carbon chain inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs was obtained using continuum modeling of the van der Waals (vdW interactions between them. The effect of the initial tensile force and the amplitude of the carbon chain as well as the radii of the CNTs on the vibration frequency were analyzed in detail, respectively. Our analytical results show that the vibration frequency of the carbon chain in a (5,5 CNT could be around two orders of magnitude higher than that of an independent carbon chain without initial tensile force. For a given CNT radius, the vibration frequency nonlinearly increases with increasing amplitude and initial tensile force. The obtained analytical cohesive energy and vibration frequency are reasonable by comparison of present molecular dynamics (MD simulations. These findings will be a great help towards understanding the vibration property of a nanowire in nanotubes, and designing nanoelectromechanical devices.

  4. Finding Paleoclimates Using Pedogenic Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garapaty, C.; Bella Pratt, K.; Blisniuk, K.

    2016-12-01

    Carbonate rinds naturally form on the undersides of clasts in desert soil. These carbonate rinds can be used to determine past climates in these environments because they contain certain radioactive isotopes and stable isotopes. Radioactive isotopes can provide the age of soil formation because carbonate rinds only form after the soil. When the carbonates are forming on the rock, in desert soil, they trap miniscule amounts of uranium which will radioactively decay into thorium. Therefore, the uranium to thorium ratio found when the carbonates are analyzed can accurately give you the date of the sample. On the other hand stable isotopes help determine the average temperature at the time the carbonate was formed. The oxygen in the CO3- (carbonate) are usually 16O and 18O. The ratio of 16O to 18O can give you the temperature of the environment when the carbonates formed. This ratio depends on temperature because water with 16O evaporates first since it is lighter and 18O precipitates more easily because it is heavier. Evaporation, precipitation, and temperature change, easily alters the concentration of the ratio of 16O to 18O so it is easy to calculate the temperature, in that area and at that time, from it. The samples I worked on are from the Sonoran Desert in Southern California. I used a microscope, tweezers and a small pick to remove the carbonate from the clast and remove the biotite and other contamination from the carbonate. Later, we wash the samples by hand and by using an ultrasonic machine to make them even cleaner by washing away any loose material. We had to remove the biotite and wash away the loose material because the carbonates need to be clean in order for us to analyze it accurately.

  5. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA) to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration.

  6. Activated Carbon, Carbon Nanofiber and Carbon Nanotube Supported Molybdenum Carbide Catalysts for the Hydrodeoxygenation of Guaiacol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Santillan-Jimenez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum carbide was supported on three types of carbon support—activated carbon; multi-walled carbon nanotubes; and carbon nanofibers—using ammonium molybdate and molybdic acid as Mo precursors. The use of activated carbon as support afforded an X-ray amorphous Mo phase, whereas crystalline molybdenum carbide phases were obtained on carbon nanofibers and, in some cases, on carbon nanotubes. When the resulting catalysts were tested in the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO of guaiacol in dodecane, catechol and phenol were obtained as the main products, although in some instances significant amounts of cyclohexane were produced. The observation of catechol in all reaction mixtures suggests that guaiacol was converted into phenol via sequential demethylation and HDO, although the simultaneous occurrence of a direct demethoxylation pathway cannot be discounted. Catalysts based on carbon nanofibers generally afforded the highest yields of phenol; notably, the only crystalline phase detected in these samples was Mo2C or Mo2C-ζ, suggesting that crystalline Mo2C is particularly selective to phenol. At 350 °C, carbon nanofiber supported Mo2C afforded near quantitative guaiacol conversion, the selectivity to phenol approaching 50%. When guaiacol HDO was performed in the presence of acetic acid and furfural, guaiacol conversion decreased, although the selectivity to both catechol and phenol was increased.

  7. Carbon recycling in ophiolite-hosted carbonates, Oman-UAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, A.; Jenkin, G. R.; Smith, D. J.; Styles, M. T.; Naden, J.; Boyce, A. J.; Bryant, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale surface and subsurface freshwater carbonate deposits of probable Quaternary age have formed on the Oman-UAE ophiolite. Here, serpentinisation reactions in ultramafic rocks have produced calcite and magnesite. These carbonates are frequently cited as examples of natural atmospheric CO2 sequestration, but the possibility of carbon recycling has not been addressed. The aim of this study is to assess the degree of atmospheric CO2 being incorporated into carbonates versus that which has been recycled from alternative sources such as soil CO2, or limestones that underlie the ophiolite. This has been determined through δ13C/δ18O, 87Sr/86Sr and 14C analysis of all major carbonate lithofacies identified. Our analyses of modern carbonate crusts forming on the surface of stagnant hyperalkaline (pH >11) waters show highly depleted δ13C and δ18O values (-25.5‰ ×0.5 PDB and -16.8‰ ×0.5 PDB respectively). This depletion has been attributed to a kinetic isotope effect occurring during atmospheric CO2 exchange with Ca(OH)2 hyperalkaline waters [1]. By comparison, inactive travertine deposits show a large range in δ13C (-10.5 to -21.8‰ PDB) which lies on a trajectory from the composition of modern crusts towards bicarbonate fluids in equilibrium with soil CO2. We interpret this trend as being produced by the mixing of different carbon sources, either at the time of formation or during later alteration. Modern carbonates and inactive travertines also have 87Sr/86Sr ratios and Sr concentrations similar to Cretaceous and Tertiary limestones which surround the ophiolite, whilst subsurface veins also display 87Sr/86Sr ratios similar to these Cretaceous limestones. Carbon recycling can also be determined with 14C. Modern atmospheric CO2 has a global average of 105-106% modern 14C (pMC), therefore freshwater carbonates forming solely from atmospheric CO2 would be expected to contain >100 pMC. However, modern carbonates display varied results from 94.5-101.4 p

  8. Methods of analyzing carbon nanostructures, methods of preparation of analytes from carbon nanostructures, and systems for analyzing carbon nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Da Costa, Pedro Miquel Ferreira Joaquim

    2016-09-09

    Provided herein is a method determining the concentration of impurities in a carbon material, comprising: mixing a flux and a carbon material to form a mixture, wherein the carbon material is selected from the group consisting of graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerene, carbon onions, graphite, carbon fibers, and a combination thereof; heating the mixture using microwave energy to form fused materials; dissolution of the fused materials in an acid mixture; and measuring the concentration of one or more impurities.

  9. The Carbon City Index (CCI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Britta; Straatman, Bas; Mangalagiu, Diana

    This paper presents a consumption-based Carbon City Index for CO2 emissions in a city. The index is derived from regional consumption and not from regional production. It includes imports and exports of emissions, factual emission developments, green investments as well as low carbon city...

  10. corrosion inhibitor for carbon steels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    potentiodynamic polarisation techniques. It was found that. CNSL reduces the extent of the electrochemical processes taking place on carbon steel undergoing corrosion. The corrosion rate of the carbon steel was reduced by over 92 % when only 300 ppm of CNSL was applied. This indicates that. CNSL is a potential ...

  11. Psychological effectiveness of carbon labelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Geoffrey

    2012-04-01

    Despite the decision by supermarket-giant Tesco to delay its plan to add carbon-footprint information onto all of its 70,000 products, carbon labelling, if carefully designed, could yet change consumer behaviour. However, it requires a new type of thinking about consumers and much additional work.

  12. Breaking Carbon Lock-in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Driscoll, Patrick Arthur

    2014-01-01

    This central focus of this paper is to highlight the ways in which path dependencies and increasing returns (network effects) serve to reinforce carbon lock-in in large-scale road transportation infrastructure projects. Breaking carbon lock-in requires drastic changes in the way we plan future...

  13. Carbon accumulation in European forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciais, P.; Schelhaas, M.J.; Zaehle, S.; Piao, S.L.; Cescatti, A.; Liski, J.; Luyssaert, S.; Le-Maire, G.; Schulze, E.D.; Bouriaud, O.; Freibauer, A.; Valentini, R.; Nabuurs, G.J.

    2008-01-01

    European forests are intensively exploited for wood products, yet they also form a sink for carbon. European forest inventories, available for the past 50 years, can be combined with timber harvest statistics to assess changes in this carbon sink. Analysis of these data sets between 1950 and 2000

  14. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  15. Radiation Effects in Carbon Nanoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory D. Cress

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally investigate the effects of Co-60 irradiation on the electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene field-effect transistors. We observe significant differences in the radiation response of devices depending on their irradiation environment, and confirm that, under controlled conditions, standard dielectric hardening approaches are applicable to carbon nanoelectronics devices.

  16. Carbon Storage in US Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background/Question/Methods Wetland soils contain some of the highest stores of soil carbon in the biosphere. However, there is little understanding of the quantity and distribution of carbon stored in US wetlands or of the potential effects of human disturbance on these stocks. ...

  17. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarillo-Herrero, P.D.

    2005-01-01

    Electronic transport through nanostructures can be very different from trans- port in macroscopic conductors, especially at low temperatures. Carbon na- notubes are tiny cylinders made of carbon atoms. Their remarkable electronic and mechanical properties, together with their small size (a few nm in

  18. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirscher, M; Becher, M

    2003-01-01

    The article gives a comprehensive overview of hydrogen storage in carbon nanostructures, including experimental results and theoretical calculations. Soon after the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, different research groups succeeded in filling carbon nanotubes with some elements, and, therefore, the question arose of filling carbon nanotubes with hydrogen by possibly using new effects such as nano-capillarity. Subsequently, very promising experiments claiming high hydrogen storage capacities in different carbon nanostructures initiated enormous research activity. Hydrogen storage capacities have been reported that exceed the benchmark for automotive application of 6.5 wt% set by the U.S. Department of Energy. However, the experimental data obtained with different methods for various carbon nanostructures show an extreme scatter. Classical calculations based on physisorption of hydrogen molecules could not explain the high storage capacities measured at ambient temperature, and, assuming chemisorption of hydrogen atoms, hydrogen release requires temperatures too high for technical applications. Up to now, only a few calculations and experiments indicate the possibility of an intermediate binding energy. Recently, serious doubt has arisen in relation to several key experiments, causing considerable controversy. Furthermore, high hydrogen storage capacities measured for carbon nanofibers did not survive cross-checking in different laboratories. Therefore, in light of today's knowledge, it is becoming less likely that at moderate pressures around room temperature carbon nanostructures can store the amount of hydrogen required for automotive applications.

  19. Assimilation of Unusual Carbon Compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelhoven, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Yeast taxa traditionally are distinguished by growth tests on several sugars and organic acids. During the last decades it became apparent that many yeast species assimilate a much greater variety of naturally occurring carbon compounds as sole source of carbon and energy. These abilities are

  20. 40 CFR 86.316-79 - Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide analyzer specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide... Test Procedures § 86.316-79 Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide analyzer specifications. (a) Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide measurements are to be made with nondispersive infrared (NDIR) an analyzers. (b...

  1. Allyl 4-hydroxyphenyl carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Hugo Flores Ahuactzin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The title molecule, C10H10O4, is a functionalized carbonate used in the synthetic route to organic glasses. The central CH fragment of the allyl group is disordered over two positions, with occupancies in a 0.758 (10:0.242 (10ratio. This disorder reflects the torsional flexibility of the oxygen–allyl group, although both disordered parts present the expected anticlinal conformation, with O—CH2—CH=CH2 torsion angles of −111 (2 and 119.1 (4°. The crystal structure is based on chains parallel to [010], formed by O...H—O hydrogen bonds involving hydroxyl and carbonyl groups as donors and acceptors, respectively. The molecular packing is further stabilized by two weak C—H...π contacts from the benzene ring of the asymmetric unit with two benzene rings of neighboring molecules.

  2. Forecasting carbon dioxide emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaobing; Du, Ding

    2015-09-01

    This study extends the literature on forecasting carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by applying the reduced-form econometrics approach of Schmalensee et al. (1998) to a more recent sample period, the post-1997 period. Using the post-1997 period is motivated by the observation that the strengthening pace of global climate policy may have been accelerated since 1997. Based on our parameter estimates, we project 25% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2050 according to an economic and population growth scenario that is more consistent with recent global trends. Our forecasts are conservative due to that we do not have sufficient data to fully take into account recent developments in the global economy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  4. Nonstructural carbon in woody plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Michael C; Sala, Anna; Carbone, Mariah S; Czimczik, Claudia I; Mantooth, Joshua A; Richardson, Andrew D; Vargas, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Nonstructural carbon (NSC) provides the carbon and energy for plant growth and survival. In woody plants, fundamental questions about NSC remain unresolved: Is NSC storage an active or passive process? Do older NSC reserves remain accessible to the plant? How is NSC depletion related to mortality risk? Herein we review conceptual and mathematical models of NSC dynamics, recent observations and experiments at the organismal scale, and advances in plant physiology that have provided a better understanding of the dynamics of woody plant NSC. Plants preferentially use new carbon but can access decade-old carbon when the plant is stressed or physically damaged. In addition to serving as a carbon and energy source, NSC plays important roles in phloem transport, osmoregulation, and cold tolerance, but how plants regulate these competing roles and NSC depletion remains elusive. Moving forward requires greater synthesis of models and data and integration across scales from -omics to ecology.

  5. Natural materials for carbon capture.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M. (National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA); Romanov, Vyacheslav N. (National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA); Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2010-11-01

    Naturally occurring clay minerals provide a distinctive material for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. Swelling clay minerals, such as the smectite variety, possess an aluminosilicate structure that is controlled by low-charge layers that readily expand to accommodate water molecules and, potentially, carbon dioxide. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intercalating carbon dioxide in the interlayer of layered clays but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the process and the extent of carbon capture as a function of clay charge and structure. A series of molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational analyses have been completed to assess the molecular interactions associated with incorporation of CO2 in the interlayer of montmorillonite clay and to help validate the models with experimental observation.

  6. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  7. Carbon nanotubes: engineering biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Burgos, Juan C; Yu, Jiamei; Balbuena, Perla B

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are cylinder-shaped allotropic forms of carbon, most widely produced under chemical vapor deposition. They possess astounding chemical, electronic, mechanical, and optical properties. Being among the most promising materials in nanotechnology, they are also likely to revolutionize medicine. Among other biomedical applications, after proper functionalization carbon nanotubes can be transformed into sophisticated biosensing and biocompatible drug-delivery systems, for specific targeting and elimination of tumor cells. This chapter provides an introduction to the chemical and electronic structure and properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a description of the main synthesis and post-synthesis methods. These sections allow the reader to become familiar with the specific characteristics of these materials and the manner in which these properties may be dependent on the specific synthesis and post-synthesis processes. The chapter ends with a review of the current biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes, highlighting successes and challenges. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    retain an isotopically light Cr signature. Cr(VI) enriched in heavy Cr isotopes is then transported via river waters to the oceans and sequestered into marine sediments. Marine chemical sediments such asbanded iron formations and modern marine carbonates have proven useful in recording the Cr isotope...... with calcium carbonate in order to test the reliability of the Cr carbonate compositions. Several experimental approaches have been employed to elucidate the fractionation behavior of Cr isotopes when Cr(VI) is incorporated into calcium carbonate phases. These results indicate that at lower Cr concentrations......Chromium (Cr) is a redox sensitive element potentially capable of tracing fine-scale fluctuations of the oxygenation of Earth’s early surface environments and seawater. The Cr isotope composition of carbonates could perhaps be used as paleo-redox proxy to elucidate changes in the geological past...

  9. Carbon Nanostructures Containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potsi, Georgia; Rossos, Andreas; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Antoniou, Myrsini K.; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Karakassides, Michael A.; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2015-01-01

    This mini review describes the synthesis and properties of carbon nanostructures containing organic-inorganic cage-like polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The physical and chemical functionalization of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes

  10. Carbon sequestration in the agroecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Středa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Reduction of amount CO2 is possible by carbon sequestration to the soil. Fixation potential of EU–15 agricultural land is c. 16–19 mil t C . year−1. Amount and composition of post–harvest residues is essential for carbon soil sequestration. Long–term yield series of the most planted crops (winter wheat – Triticum aestivum, spring barley – Hordeum vulgare, corn and silage maize – Zea mays, winter rape – Brassica napus, potatoes – Solanum tuberosum, sugar beet – Beta vulgaris, alfalfa – Medicago sativa, red clover – Trifolium pratense, white mustard – Sinapis alba and fiddleneck – Phacelia tanacetifolia in various agroecological conditions and growing technologies were used for carbon balance calculation. The carbon balances were calculated for main crop rotations of maize, sugar beet, cereal and potato production regions (24 crop rotations. The calculations were realized for following planting varieties: traditional, commercial, ecological and with higher rate of winter rape. All chosen crop rotations (except seven have positive carbon balance in the tillage system. Amount of fixed carbon might be increases about 30% by the use of no–tillage system. Least amount of carbon is fixed by potatoes, high amount by cereals, alfalfa and sugar beet. For a short time (months the crops sequestration of carbon is relatively high (to 4.4 t . ha−1 . year−1 or to 5.7 t . ha−1 . year−1 for no–tillage system. From the long time viewpoint (tens of years the data of humified carbon in arable soil (max 400 kg C . ha−1 . year−1 are important. Maximal carbon deficit of chosen crop rotation is 725 kg C . year−1.

  11. Carbon Nanotubes and Modern Nanoagriculture

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.

    2015-01-27

    Since their discovery, carbon nanotubes have been prominent members of the nanomaterial family. Owing to their extraordinary physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been proven to be a useful tool in the field of plant science. They were frequently perceived to bring about valuable biotechnological and agricultural applications that still remain beyond experimental realization. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated the ability of carbon nanotubes to traverse different plant cell barriers. These studies, also, assessed the toxicity and environmental impacts of these nanomaterials. The knowledge provided by these studies is of practical and fundamental importance for diverse applications including intracellular labeling and imaging, genetic transformation, and for enhancing our knowledge of plant cell biology. Although different types of nanoparticles have been found to activate physiological processes in plants, carbon nanotubes received particular interest. Following addition to germination medium, carbon nanotubes enhanced root growth and elongation of some plants such as onion, cucumber and rye-grass. They, also, modulated the expression of some genes that are essential for cell division and plant development. In addition, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were evidenced to penetrate thick seed coats, stimulate germination, and to enhance growth of young tomato seedlings. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes can penetrate deeply into the root system and further distribute into the leaves and the fruits. In recent studies, carbon nanotubes were reported to be chemically entrapped into the structure of plant tracheary elements. This should activate studies in the fields of plant defense and wood engineering. Although, all of these effects on plant physiology and plant developmental biology have not been fully understood, the valuable findings promises more research activity in the near future toward complete scientific understanding of

  12. Optimal decisions of countries with carbon tax and carbon tariff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Hou

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Reducing carbon emission has been the core problem of controlling global warming and climate deterioration recently. This paper focuses on the optimal carbon taxation policy levied by countries and the impact on firms’ optimal production decisions. Design/methodology/approach: This paper uses a two-stage game theory model to analyze the impact of carbon tariff and tax. Numerical simulation is used to supplement the theoretical analysis. Findings: Results derived from the paper indicate that the demand in an unstable market is significantly affected by environmental damage level. Carbon tariff is a policy-oriented tax while the carbon tax is a market-oriented one. Comprehensive carbon taxation policy benefit developed countries and basic policy is more suitable for developing countries. Research limitations/implications: In this research, we do not consider random demand and asymmetric information, which may not well suited the reality. Originality/value: This work provides a different perspective in analyzing the impact of carbon tax and tariff. It is the first study to consider two consuming market and the strategic game between two countries. Different international status of countries considered in the paper is also a unique point.

  13. Nanophase Carbonates on Mars: Implications for Carbonate Formation and Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, P. Douglas, Jr.; Lauer, H. Vern; Ming, Douglas W.; Niles, Paul B.; Morris, Richard V.; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Sutter, Brad

    2014-01-01

    Despite having an atmosphere composed primarily of CO2 and evidence for abundant water in the past, carbonate minerals have only been discovered in small amounts in martian dust [1], in outcrops of very limited extent [2, 3], in soils in the Northern Plains (the landing site of the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Mission) [4] and may have recently been detected in aeolian material and drilled and powdered sedimentary rock in Gale Crater (the Mars Science Laboratory [MSL] landing site) [5]. Thermal analysis of martian soils by instruments on Phoenix and MSL has demonstrated a release of CO2 at temperatures as low as 250-300 degC, much lower than the traditional decomposition temperatures of calcium or magnesium carbonates. Thermal decomposition temperature can depend on a number of factors such as instrument pressure and ramp rate, and sample particle size [6]. However, if the CO2 released at low temperatures is from carbonates, small particle size is the only effect that could have such a large impact on decomposition temperature, implying the presence of extremely fine-grained (i.e., "nanophase" or clay-sized) carbonates. We hypothesize that this lower temperature release is the signature of small particle-sized (clay-sized) carbonates formed by the weathering of primary minerals in dust or soils through interactions with atmospheric water and carbon dioxide and that this process may persist under current martian conditions. Preliminary work has shown that clay-sized carbonate grains can decompose at much lower temperatures than previously thought. The first work took carbonate, decomposed it to CaO, then flowed CO2 over these samples held at temperatures >100 degC to reform carbonates. Thermal analysis confirmed that carbonates were indeed formed and transmission electron microsopy was used to determine crystal sized were on the order of 10 nm. The next step used minerals such as diopside and wollastonite that were sealed in a glass tube with a CO2 and H2O source. After

  14. Uncovering the Neoproterozoic carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, D T; Macdonald, F A; Gill, B C; Hoffman, P F; Schrag, D P

    2012-02-29

    Interpretations of major climatic and biological events in Earth history are, in large part, derived from the stable carbon isotope records of carbonate rocks and sedimentary organic matter. Neoproterozoic carbonate records contain unusual and large negative isotopic anomalies within long periods (10-100 million years) characterized by δ(13)C in carbonate (δ(13)C(carb)) enriched to more than +5 per mil. Classically, δ(13)C(carb) is interpreted as a metric of the relative fraction of carbon buried as organic matter in marine sediments, which can be linked to oxygen accumulation through the stoichiometry of primary production. If a change in the isotopic composition of marine dissolved inorganic carbon is responsible for these excursions, it is expected that records of δ(13)C(carb) and δ(13)C in organic carbon (δ(13)C(org)) will covary, offset by the fractionation imparted by primary production. The documentation of several Neoproterozoic δ(13)C(carb) excursions that are decoupled from δ(13)C(org), however, indicates that other mechanisms may account for these excursions. Here we present δ(13)C data from Mongolia, northwest Canada and Namibia that capture multiple large-amplitude (over 10 per mil) negative carbon isotope anomalies, and use these data in a new quantitative mixing model to examine the behaviour of the Neoproterozoic carbon cycle. We find that carbonate and organic carbon isotope data from Mongolia and Canada are tightly coupled through multiple δ(13)C(carb) excursions, quantitatively ruling out previously suggested alternative explanations, such as diagenesis or the presence and terminal oxidation of a large marine dissolved organic carbon reservoir. Our data from Namibia, which do not record isotopic covariance, can be explained by simple mixing with a detrital flux of organic matter. We thus interpret δ(13)C(carb) anomalies as recording a primary perturbation to the surface carbon cycle. This interpretation requires the revisiting of

  15. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA CARBON FOOTPRINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, R. C.; Nugent, P. [Computational Cosmology Center, Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 50B-4206, Berkeley, CA 94611 (United States); Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Childress, M.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Loken, S. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universite Paris Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Baltay, C. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M.; Paech, K. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); and others

    2011-12-10

    We present convincing evidence of unburned carbon at photospheric velocities in new observations of five Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained by the Nearby Supernova Factory. These SNe are identified by examining 346 spectra from 124 SNe obtained before +2.5 days relative to maximum. Detections are based on the presence of relatively strong C II {lambda}6580 absorption 'notches' in multiple spectra of each SN, aided by automated fitting with the SYNAPPS code. Four of the five SNe in question are otherwise spectroscopically unremarkable, with ions and ejection velocities typical of SNe Ia, but spectra of the fifth exhibit high-velocity (v > 20, 000 km s{sup -1}) Si II and Ca II features. On the other hand, the light curve properties are preferentially grouped, strongly suggesting a connection between carbon-positivity and broadband light curve/color behavior: three of the five have relatively narrow light curves but also blue colors and a fourth may be a dust-reddened member of this family. Accounting for signal to noise and phase, we estimate that 22{sup +10}{sub -6%} of SNe Ia exhibit spectroscopic C II signatures as late as -5 days with respect to maximum. We place these new objects in the context of previously recognized carbon-positive SNe Ia and consider reasonable scenarios seeking to explain a physical connection between light curve properties and the presence of photospheric carbon. We also examine the detailed evolution of the detected carbon signatures and the surrounding wavelength regions to shed light on the distribution of carbon in the ejecta. Our ability to reconstruct the C II {lambda}6580 feature in detail under the assumption of purely spherical symmetry casts doubt on a 'carbon blobs' hypothesis, but does not rule out all asymmetric models. A low volume filling factor for carbon, combined with line-of-sight effects, seems unlikely to explain the scarcity of detected carbon in SNe Ia by itself.

  16. The NASA Carbon Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtt, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Greenhouse gas emission inventories, forest carbon sequestration programs (e.g., Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD and REDD+), cap-and-trade systems, self-reporting programs, and their associated monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) frameworks depend upon data that are accurate, systematic, practical, and transparent. A sustained, observationally-driven carbon monitoring system using remote sensing data has the potential to significantly improve the relevant carbon cycle information base for the U.S. and world. Initiated in 2010, NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) project is prototyping and conducting pilot studies to evaluate technological approaches and methodologies to meet carbon monitoring and reporting requirements for multiple users and over multiple scales of interest. NASA's approach emphasizes exploitation of the satellite remote sensing resources, computational capabilities, scientific knowledge, airborne science capabilities, and end-to-end system expertise that are major strengths of the NASA Earth Science program. Through user engagement activities, the NASA CMS project is taking specific actions to be responsive to the needs of stakeholders working to improve carbon MRV frameworks. The first phase of NASA CMS projects focused on developing products for U.S. biomass/carbon stocks and global carbon fluxes, and on scoping studies to identify stakeholders and explore other potential carbon products. The second phase built upon these initial efforts, with a large expansion in prototyping activities across a diversity of systems, scales, and regions, including research focused on prototype MRV systems and utilization of COTS technologies. Priorities for the future include: 1) utilizing future satellite sensors, 2) prototyping with commercial off-the-shelf technology, 3) expanding the range of prototyping activities, 4) rigorous evaluation, uncertainty quantification, and error characterization, 5) stakeholder

  17. Atmospheric carbon dioxide and the global carbon cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabalka, J R [ed.

    1985-12-01

    This state-of-the-art volume presents discussions on the global cycle of carbon, the dynamic balance among global atmospheric CO2 sources and sinks. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (ACR)

  18. Studies on Enhancing Transverse Thermal Conductivity Carbon/Carbon Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manocha, Lalit M; Manocha, Satish M; Roy, Ajit

    2007-01-01

    The structure derived potential properties of Graphite such as high stiffness coupled with high thermal conductivity and low coefficient of thermal expansion have been better achieved in Carbon fibers...

  19. Carbon budgets and carbon sequestration potential of Indian forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaul, M.

    2010-01-01

    Keywords: Carbon uptake, Forest biomass, Bioenergy, Land use change, Indian forests, Deforestation, Afforestation, Rotation length, Trees outside forests. Global climate change is a widespread and growing concern that has led to extensive international discussions and negotiations. Responses to

  20. Method for carbon dioxide splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James E.; Diver, Jr., Richard B.; Siegel, Nathan P.

    2017-02-28

    A method for splitting carbon dioxide via a two-step metal oxide thermochemical cycle by heating a metal oxide compound selected from an iron oxide material of the general formula A.sub.xFe.sub.3-xO.sub.4, where 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1 and A is a metal selected from Mg, Cu, Zn, Ni, Co, and Mn, or a ceria oxide compound of the general formula M.sub.aCe.sub.bO.sub.c, where 0gas mixture, adding carbon dioxide, and heating to a temperature less than approximately 1400 C, thereby producing carbon monoxide gas and the original metal oxide compound.

  1. From PAHs to Solid Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, C.; Mutschke, H.; Henning, T.; Huisken, F.

    2011-03-01

    Carbonaceous grains represent a major component of cosmic dust. The review will summarize new results in laboratory investigations of carbonaceous dust components. The nanometer-sized carbon particles are supposed to represent a blend of differently structured carbon including graphitic, diamond-like, fullerene-like and chain-like components on a subnanometer or nanometer scale. Recent models used to explain the structure of gas-phase condensed carbon nano-particles are discussed. Possible formation pathways of carbonaceous grains from molecular components and clusters and the role of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and fullerenes are disclosed.

  2. Capacitor with a composite carbon foam electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1999-04-27

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  3. Oxidation resistant carbon-carbon composite for Space Shuttle application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, D. C.; Seeger, J. W.; Shuford, D. M.

    1973-01-01

    An oxidation resistant carbon-carbon composite has been developed for use on the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter Vehicle which can function on the high temperature surfaces to satisfy the 100 mission reuse capability requirement. This paper describes the design requirements, materials and processes developed, and the successful testing of simulated full-scale prototype hardware. Materials considerations are illustrated, including strength and oxidation testing, along with physical property determinations, characterizing the material over the predicted temperature range of use.

  4. Carbon-carbon turbopump concept for Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholt, David M.

    1993-06-01

    The U.S. Air Force Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program is placing high priority on maximizing specific impulse (ISP) and thrust-to-weight ratio in the development of a practical high-performance nuclear rocket. The turbopump design is driven by these goals. The liquid hydrogen propellant is pressurized and pumped to the reactor inlet by the turbopump assembly (TPA). Rocket propulsion is from rapid heating of the propellant from 180 R to thousands of degrees in the particle bed reactor (PBR). The exhausted propellant is then expanded through a high-temperature nozzle. A high-performance approach is to use an uncooled carbon-carbon nozzle and duct turbine inlet. Carbon-carbon components are used throughout the TPA hot section to obtain the high-temperature capability. Several carbon-carbon components are in development including structural parts, turbine nozzles/stators, and turbine rotors. The technology spinoff is applicable to conventional liquid propulsion engines and many other turbomachinery applications.

  5. Carbon isotopes in biological carbonates: Respiration and photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Burdett, Jim; Whelan, Joseph F.; Paull, Charles K.

    1997-02-01

    Respired carbon dioxide is an important constituent in the carbonates of most air breathing animals but is much less important in the carbonates of most aquatic animals. This difference is illustrated using carbon isotope data from freshwater and terrestrial snails, ahermatypic corals, and chemoautotrophic and methanotrophic pelecypods. Literature data from fish otoliths and bird and mammal shell and bone carbonates are also considered. Environmental CO 2/O 2 ratios appear to be the major controlling variable. Atmospheric CO 2/O 2 ratios are about thirty times lower than in most natural waters, hence air breathing animals absorb less environmental CO 2 in the course of obtaining 0 2. Tissue CO 2 therefore, does not isotopically equilibrate with environmental CO 2 as thoroughly in air breathers as in aquatic animals, and this is reflected in skeletal carbonates. Animals having efficient oxygen transport systems, such as vertebrates, also accumulate more respired CO 2 in their tissues. Photosynthetic corals calcify mainly during the daytime when photosynthetic CO 2 uptake is several times faster than respiratory CO 2 release. Photosynthesis, therefore, affects skeletal δ13C more strongly than does respiration. Corals also illustrate how "metabolic" effects on skeletal isotopic composition can be estimated, despite the presence of much larger "kinetic" isotope effects.

  6. Universally dispersible carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevoteau, Alexandre; Soulié-Ziakovic, Corinne; Leibler, Ludwik

    2012-12-12

    We show that supramolecular chemistry provides a convenient tool to prepare carbone nanotubes (CNTs) that can be dispersed in solvents of any chemical nature, easily recovered and redispersed. Thymine-modified CNTs (CNT-Thy) can be dispersed in solution in the presence of diaminotriazine (DAT) end-functionalized polymers, through supramolecular Thy/DAT association. DAT-polymer chains are selected according to the solvent chemical nature: polystyrene (PS) for hydrophobic/low polarity solvents and a propylene oxide/ethylene oxide copolymer (predominantly propylene oxide based, PPO/PEO) for polar solvents or water. Long-term stable supramolecular CNT dispersions are reversibly aggregated by adding a few droplets of a selective dissociating agent of the Thy/DAT association (DMSO). CNT-Thy, simply recycled by centrifugation or filtration, can be redispersed in another solvent in presence of a suitable soluble DAT-polymer. Dispersion and aggregation can also be switched on and off by choosing a polymer for which a given solvent is close to Θ-conditions, e.g., PS in cyclohexane or PPO/PEO in water.

  7. Carbon flows, carbon markets, and low-carbon lifestyles: reflecting on the role of markets in climate governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaargaren, G.; Mol, A.P.J.

    2013-01-01

    The role of carbon markets in governing global carbon flows triggers substantial debates among policymakers, social movements and social scientists. The present debate on carbon markets is different from the earlier debate on market-based instruments in environmental politics. Carbon markets

  8. Hypervelocity impact resistance of reinforced carbon carbon/carbon foam thermal protection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Pandurangan, B.; Zhao, C. L.; Biggers, S. B.; Morgan, D. R.

    2006-05-01

    Common aero vehicles (CAVs) are aerodynamically designed, (from orbit) re-entry, un-powered military vehicles planned to be used for deployment of the desired munitions with increased accuracy and range. In one of the currently considered designs of the CAVs, their outer skin is planned to be constructed from two-ply panels. The outer play is made of a carbon-carbon composite while the inner ply is constructed from a carbon-based foam. In the present work a transient non-linear-dynamics-based analysis is carried out in order to predict the extent of damage and the probability for failure of the carbon-carbon/carbon-foam CAV panels during potential hypervelocity impact of space debris with the outer surface of the CAVs. The results obtained show that the extent of damage scales with the normal component of the momentum associated with the debris particles just before the impact. In addition, it is found that despite its relatively low strength, the carbon-foam can provide a major increase in the resistance of the CAV panels towards penetration of the hypervelocity debris particles. This finding has been linked with an attendant consolidation of the foam, the process that is capable of absorbing a substantial amount of kinetic energy carried by the debris particles.

  9. Method for making carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M.X.

    1999-07-29

    A method for treating an organic polymer material, preferably a vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride copolymer (Saran) to produce a flat sheet of carbon film material having a high surface area ([approx equal]1000 m[sup 2] /g) suitable as an electrode material for super capacitor applications. The method comprises heating a vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride copolymer film disposed between two spaced apart graphite or ceramic plates to a first temperature of about 160 C for about 14 hours to form a stabilized vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride polymer film, thereafter heating the stabilized film to a second temperature of about 750 C in an inert atmosphere for about one hour to form a carbon film; and finally activating the carbon film to increase the surface area by heating the carbon film in an oxidizing atmosphere to a temperature of at least 750--850 C for between 1--6 hours. 2 figs.

  10. ROE Carbon Storage - Forest Biomass

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This polygon dataset depicts the density of forest biomass in counties across the United States, in terms of metric tons of carbon per square mile of land area....

  11. Enhanced Carbon Nanotube Ultracapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation utilizes carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with pseudo-capacitive MnO2 material as nano-composite electrode and ionic electrolyte for the...

  12. Mirador - Carbon Cycle and Ecosystems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Earth Science data access made simple. This Focus Area deals with the cycling of carbon in reservoirs and ecosystems as it changes naturally, is changed by humans,...

  13. Assimilation of Unusual Carbon Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelhoven, Wouter J.

    Yeast taxa traditionally are distinguished by growth tests on several sugars and organic acids. During the last decades it became apparent that many yeast species assimilate a much greater variety of naturally occurring carbon compounds as sole source of carbon and energy. These abilities are indicative of a greater role of yeasts in the carbon cycle than previously assumed. Especially in acidic soils and other habitats, yeasts may play a role in the degradation of carbon compounds. Such compounds include purines like uric acid and adenine, aliphatic amines, diamines and hydroxyamines, phenolics and other benzene compounds and polysaccharides. Assimilation of purines and amines is a feature of many ascomycetes and basidiomycetes. However, benzene compounds are degraded by only a few ascomycetous yeasts (e.g. the Stephanoascus/ Blastobotrys clade and black yeastlike fungi) but by many basidiomycetes, e.g. Filobasidiales, Trichosporonales, red yeasts producing ballistoconidia and related species, but not by Tremellales. Assimilation of polysaccharides is wide-spread among basidiomycetes

  14. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Functionally within the MDF, ORNL operates DOE’s unique Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF)—a 42,000 ft2 innovative technology facility and works with leading...

  15. The process of carbon creation

    CERN Multimedia

    El-Eid, M F

    2005-01-01

    In the Universe, the element carbon is created only in stars, in a remarkable reaction called the triple-α process. Fresh insights into the reaction now come from the latest experiments carried out on Earth

  16. Magnesite disposal of carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, K.S.; Butt, D.P.; Wendt, C.H.

    1997-08-01

    In this paper we report our progress on developing a method for carbon dioxide disposal whose purpose it is to maintain coal energy competitive even is environmental and political pressures will require a drastic reduction in carbon dioxide emissions. In contrast to most other methods, our approach is not aiming at a partial solution of the problem, or at buying time for phasing out fossil energy. Instead, its purpose is to obtain a complete and economic solution of the problem, and thus maintain access to the vast fossil energy reservoir. A successful development of this technology would guarantee energy availability for many centuries even if world economic growth the most optimistic estimates that have been put forward. Our approach differs from all others in that we are developing an industrial process which chemically binds the carbon dioxide in an exothermic reaction into a mineral carbonate that is thermodynamically stable and environmentally benign.

  17. Transparent, Conductive Carbon Nanotube Films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhuangchun Wu; Zhihong Chen; Xu Du; Jonathan M. Logan; Jennifer Sippel; Maria Nikolou; Katalin Kamaras; John R. Reynolds; David B. Tanner; Arthur F. Hebard; Andrew G. Rinzler

    2004-01-01

    We describe a simple process for the fabrication of ultrathin, transparent, optically homogeneous, electrically conducting films of pure single-walled carbon nanotubes and the transfer of those films...

  18. High capacity carbon dioxide sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, Steven Dean; Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan

    2015-09-01

    The present invention provides a sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a CO.sub.2 capacity of at least 9 weight percent when measured at 22.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; an H.sub.2O capacity of at most 15 weight percent when measured at 25.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; and an isosteric heat of adsorption of from 5 to 8.5 kilocalories per mole of CO.sub.2. The invention also provides a carbon sorbent in a powder, a granular or a pellet form for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a carbon content of at least 90 weight percent; a nitrogen content of at least 1 weight percent; an oxygen content of at most 3 weight percent; a BET surface area from 50 to 2600 m.sup.2/g; and a DFT micropore volume from 0.04 to 0.8 cc/g.

  19. Reducing carbon dioxide to products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Emily Barton; Sivasankar, Narayanappa; Parajuli, Rishi; Keets, Kate A

    2014-09-30

    A method reducing carbon dioxide to one or more products may include steps (A) to (C). Step (A) may bubble said carbon dioxide into a solution of an electrolyte and a catalyst in a divided electrochemical cell. The divided electrochemical cell may include an anode in a first cell compartment and a cathode in a second cell compartment. The cathode may reduce said carbon dioxide into said products. Step (B) may adjust one or more of (a) a cathode material, (b) a surface morphology of said cathode, (c) said electrolyte, (d) a manner in which said carbon dioxide is bubbled, (e), a pH level of said solution, and (f) an electrical potential of said divided electrochemical cell, to vary at least one of (i) which of said products is produced and (ii) a faradaic yield of said products. Step (C) may separate said products from said solution.

  20. Stable carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotopes in non-carbonate fractions of cold-seep carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dong; Peng, Yongbo; Peckmann, Jörn; Roberts, Harry; Chen, Duofu

    2017-04-01

    Sulfate-driven anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) supports chemosynthesis-based communities and limits the release of methane from marine sediments. This process promotes the formation of carbonates close to the seafloor along continental margins. The geochemical characteristics of the carbonate minerals of these rocks are increasingly understood, questions remain about the geochemical characteristics of the non-carbonate fractions. Here, we report stable carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotope patterns in non-carbonate fractions of seep carbonates. The authigenic carbonates were collected from three modern seep provinces (Black Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and South China Sea) and three ancient seep deposits (Marmorito, northern Italy, Miocene; SR4 deposit of the Lincoln Creek Formation and Whiskey Creek, western Washington, USA, Eocene to Oligocene). The δ13C values of non-carbonate fractions range from ˜-25‰ to -80‰ VPDB. These values indicate that fossil methane mixed with varying amounts of pelagic organic matter is the dominant source of carbon in these fractions. The relatively small offset between the δ34S signatures of the non-carbonate fractions and the respective sulfide minerals suggests that locally produced hydrogen sulfide is the main source of sulfur in seep environments. The δ15N values of the non-carbonate fractions are generally lower than the corresponding values of deep-sea sediments, suggesting that organic nitrogen is mostly of a local origin. This study reveals the potential of using δ13C, δ15N, δ34S values to discern seep and non-seep deposits. In cases where δ13Ccarbonate values are only moderately low due to mixing processes and lipid biomarkers have been erased in the course of burial, it is difficult to trace back AOM owing to the lack of other records. This problem is even more pronounced when authigenic carbonate is not available in ancient seep environments. Acknowledgments: The authors thank BOEM and NOAA for their years' support

  1. New way to trap carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news story “How to efficiently capture carbon dioxide out of thin air” (16 April, http://ow.ly/LHvpz; see also p4), which described a novel synthetic resin that can capture carbon dioxide (CO2) and remove it from the atmosphere much faster than trees can. The article noted that the resin absorbs CO2 in dry air and releases it again in humid air.

  2. Carbon Nanotubes and Related Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kingsuk Mukhopadhyay; Kanik Ram; K.U. Bhasker Rao

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists world wide. The small dimensions,strength, and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review, the structural aspects, the advantages and disadvantages of different for their procedures synthesis, the qualitative and quantitative estimation of carbon nanotubes by different analytical techniques, the present status on their applications a...

  3. Carbon nanotubes for coherent spintronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Churchill, H O H; Herring, P K

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes bridge the molecular and crystalline quantum worlds, and their extraordinary electronic, mechanical and optical properties have attracted enormous attention from a broad scientific community. We review the basic principles of fabricating spin-electronic devices based on individual......, electrically-gated carbon nanotubes, and present experimental efforts to understand their electronic and nuclear spin degrees of freedom, which in the future may enable quantum applications....

  4. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  5. Electrolytic formation of carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, W. K.; Terrones, M.; Hare, J. P.; Terrones, H.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    1996-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes (with and without encapsulated material) as well as nanoparticles and onion-like structures have been generated by electrolysis in molten alkali halide salts using carbon electrodes under an argon atmosphere. The nature of the products depends upon several factors including the electrolysis voltage and current, depth of electrode immersion in the electrolyte, the length of time the current is maintained and the electrolyte.

  6. Toward transformational carbon capture systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh PA (United States); Litynski, John T. [Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington DC (United States); Brickett, Lynn A. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh PA (United States); Morreale, Bryan D. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh PA (United States)

    2015-10-28

    This paper will briefly review the history and current state of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) research and development and describe the technical barriers to carbon capture. it will argue forcefully for a new approach to R&D, which leverages both simulation and physical systems at the laboratory and pilot scales to more rapidly move the best technoogies forward, prune less advantageous approaches, and simultaneously develop materials and processes.

  7. Lithographically defined microporous carbon structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckel, David Bruce; Washburn, Cody M.; Polsky, Ronen; Brozik, Susan M.; Wheeler, David R.

    2013-01-08

    A lithographic method is used to fabricate porous carbon structures that can provide electrochemical electrodes having high surface area with uniform and controllable dimensions, providing enormous flexibility to tailor the electrodes toward specific applications. Metal nanoparticles deposited on the surface of the porous carbon electrodes exhibit ultra small dimensions with uniform size distribution. The resulting electrodes are rugged, electrically conductive and show excellent electrochemical behavior.

  8. Recuperative supercritical carbon dioxide cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Sprouse, Kenneth M; Subbaraman, Ganesan; O'Connor, George M; Johnson, Gregory A

    2014-11-18

    A power plant includes a closed loop, supercritical carbon dioxide system (CLS-CO.sub.2 system). The CLS-CO.sub.2 system includes a turbine-generator and a high temperature recuperator (HTR) that is arranged to receive expanded carbon dioxide from the turbine-generator. The HTR includes a plurality of heat exchangers that define respective heat exchange areas. At least two of the heat exchangers have different heat exchange areas.

  9. Method for carbon dioxide sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yifeng; Bryan, Charles R.; Dewers, Thomas; Heath, Jason E.

    2017-12-05

    A method for geo-sequestration of a carbon dioxide includes selection of a target water-laden geological formation with low-permeability interbeds, providing an injection well into the formation and injecting supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO.sub.2) and water or bine into the injection well under conditions of temperature, pressure and density selected to cause the fluid to enter the formation and splinter and/or form immobilized ganglia within the formation.

  10. A Pentagon Based Carbon Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Zhang, Shunhong; Zhou, Jian; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Jena, Puru; A international Team Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    A new two-dimensional (2D) meta-stable carbon allotrope, penta-graphene, composed entirely of carbon pentagons and resembling the Cairo pentagonal tiling, is proposed. State-of-the-art theoretical calculations confirm that the new carbon polymorph is not only dynamically and mechanically stable, but also can withstand temperatures as high as 1000 K. Due to its unique atomic configuration penta-graphene has an unusual negative Poisson's ratio (NPR) and ultra-high ideal strength that can even outperform graphene. Furthermore, unlike graphene that needs to be functionalized for opening a band gap, penta-graphene possesses an intrinsic quasi-direct band gap as large as 3.25 eV - close to that of ZnO and GaN. Equally important, when rolled up, penta-graphene can form a pentagon-based nanotube. The resulting penta-carbon nanotubes are semiconducting regardless of their chirality. When stacked in different patterns, dynamically and thermally stable 3D twin structures of T12-carbon are generated with band gaps even larger than that of T12-carbon. The versatility of penta-graphene and its derivatives are expected to have broad applications in nanoelectronics and nanomechanics. Peking University.

  11. Carbon-enhanced VRLA batteries.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enos, David George; Hund, Thomas D.; Shane, Rod (East Penn Manufacturing, Lyon Station, PA)

    2010-10-01

    The addition of certain forms of carbon to the negative plate in valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) batteries has been demonstrated to increase the cycle life of such batteries by an order of magnitude or more under high-rate, partial-state-of-charge operation. Such performance will provide a significant impact, and in some cases it will be an enabling feature for applications including hybrid electric vehicles, utility ancillary regulation services, wind farm energy smoothing, and solar photovoltaic energy smoothing. There is a critical need to understnd how the carbon interacts with the negative plate and achieves the aforementioned benefits at a fundamental level. Such an understanding will not only enable the performance of such batteries to be optimzied, but also to explore the feasibility of applying this technology to other battery chemistries. In partnership with the East Penn Manufacturing, Sandia will investigate the electrochemical function of the carbon and possibly identify improvements to its anti-sulfation properties. Shiomi, et al. (1997) discovered that the addition of carbon to the negative active material (NAM) substantially reduced PbSO{sub 4} accumulation in high rate, partial state of charge (HRPSoC) cycling applications. This improved performance with a minimal cost. Cycling applications that were uneconomical for traditional VRLA batteries are viable for the carbon enhanced VRLA. The overall goal of this work is to quantitatively define the role that carbon plays in the electrochemistry of a VRLA battery.

  12. Carbon monoxide: Anticoagulant or procoagulant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Vance G; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2014-03-01

    Within the past decade there have been several investigations attempting to define the impact of exogenous and endogenous carbon monoxide exposure on hemostasis. Critically, two bodies of literature have emerged, with carbon monoxide mediated platelet inhibition cited as a cause of in vitro human and in vitro/in vivo rodent anticoagulation. In contrast, interaction with heme groups associated with fibrinogen, α₂-antiplasmin and plasmin by carbon monoxide has resulted in enhanced coagulation and decreased fibrinolysis in vitro in human and other species, and in vivo in rabbits. Of interest, the ultrastructure of platelet rich plasma thrombi demonstrates an abnormal increase in fine fiber formation and matting that are obtained from humans exposed to carbon monoxide. Further, thrombi obtained from humans and rabbits have very similar ultrastructures, whereas mice and rats have more fine fibers and matting present. In sum, there may be species specific differences with regard to hemostatic response to carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide may be a Janus-faced molecule, with potential to attenuate or exacerbate thrombophilic disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sequestration of Soil Carbon as Secondary Carbonates (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, R.

    2013-12-01

    Rattan Lal Carbon Management and Sequestration Center The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210 USA Abstract World soils, the major carbon (C) reservoir among the terrestrial pools, contain soil organic C (SOC) and soil inorganic C (SIC). The SIC pool is predominant in soils of arid and semi-arid regions. These regions cover a land area of about 4.9x109 ha. The SIC pool in soils containing calcic and petrocalcic horizons is estimated at about 695-748 Pg (Pg = 1015 g = 1 gigaton) to 1-m depth. There are two types of carbonates. Lithogenic or primary carbonates are formed from weathering of carbonaceous rocks. Pedogenic or secondary carbonates are formed by dissolution of CO2 in the soil air to form carbonic acid and precipitation as carbonates of Ca+2 or Mg+2. It is the availability of Ca+2 or Mg+2 from outside the ecosystem that is essential to sequester atmospheric CO2. Common among outside sources of Ca+2 or Mg+2 are irrigation water, aerial deposition, sea breeze, fertilizers, manure and other amendments. The decomposition of SOC and root respiration may increase the partial pressure of CO2 in the soil air and lead to the formation of HCO_3^- upon dissolution in H20. Precipitation of secondary carbonates may result from decreased partial pressure of CO2 in the sub-soil, increased concentration of Ca+2, Mg+2 and HCO_3^- in soil solution, and decreased soil moisture content by evapotranspiration. Transport of bicarbonates in irrigated soils and subsequent precipitation above the ground water (calcrete), activity of termites and other soil fauna, and management of urban soils lead to formation of secondary carbonates. On a geologic time scale, weathering of silicate minerals and transport of the by-products into the ocean is a geological process of sequestration of atmospheric CO2. Factors affecting formation of secondary carbonates include land use, and soil and crop management including application of biosolids, irrigation and the quality of irrigation water

  14. Hydrogen adsorption in carbon nanostructures compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schimmel, H.G.; Nijkamp, M.G.; Kearley, G.J.; Rivera, A.; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X; Mulder, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports continue to suggest high hydrogen storage capacities for some carbon nanostructures due to a stronger interaction between hydrogen and carbon. Here the interaction of hydrogen with activated charcoal, carbon nanofibers, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), and electron beam ‘opened’

  15. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... precipitated calcium carbonate (CaCO3). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with calcium carbonate... precipitated calcium carbonate in the United States Pharmacopeia XX (1980). (c) Uses and restrictions. Calcium... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food...

  16. 29 CFR 1917.24 - Carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon monoxide. 1917.24 Section 1917.24 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.24 Carbon monoxide. (a) Exposure limits. The carbon... employees shall be removed from the enclosed space if the carbon monoxide concentration exceeds a ceiling of...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... a solution of magnesium sulfate or by carbonation of a slurry of magnesium hydroxide followed by... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium carbonate. 184.1425 Section 184.1425 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Magnesium carbonate (molecular...

  18. Carbon Fiber from Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milbrandt, Anelia [Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center, Godlen, CO (United States); Booth, Samuel [Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center, Godlen, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Carbon fiber (CF), known also as graphite fiber, is a lightweight, strong, and flexible material used in both structural (load-bearing) and non-structural applications (e.g., thermal insulation). The high cost of precursors (the starting material used to make CF, which comes predominately from fossil sources) and manufacturing have kept CF a niche market with applications limited mostly to high-performance structural materials (e.g., aerospace). Alternative precursors to reduce CF cost and dependence on fossil sources have been investigated over the years, including biomass-derived precursors such as rayon, lignin, glycerol, and lignocellulosic sugars. The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive overview of CF precursors from biomass and their market potential. We examine the potential CF production from these precursors, the state of technology and applications, and the production cost (when data are available). We discuss their advantages and limitations. We also discuss the physical properties of biomass-based CF, and we compare them to those of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based CF. We also discuss manufacturing and end-product considerations for bio-based CF, as well as considerations for plant siting and biomass feedstock logistics, feedstock competition, and risk mitigation strategies. The main contribution of this study is that it provides detailed technical and market information about each bio-based CF precursor in one document while other studies focus on one precursor at a time or a particular topic (e.g., processing). Thus, this publication allows for a comprehensive view of the CF potential from all biomass sources and serves as a reference for both novice and experienced professionals interested in CF production from alternative sources.

  19. Scale-up of Carbon/Carbon Bipolar Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David P. Haack

    2009-04-08

    This project was focused upon developing a unique material technology for use in PEM fuel cell bipolar plates. The carbon/carbon composite material developed in this program is uniquely suited for use in fuel cell systems, as it is lightweight, highly conductive and corrosion resistant. The project further focused upon developing the manufacturing methodology to cost-effectively produce this material for use in commercial fuel cell systems. United Technology Fuel Cells Corp., a leading fuel cell developer was a subcontractor to the project was interested in the performance and low-cost potential of the material. The accomplishments of the program included the development and testing of a low-cost, fully molded, net-shape carbon-carbon bipolar plate. The process to cost-effectively manufacture these carbon-carbon bipolar plates was focused on extensively in this program. Key areas for cost-reduction that received attention in this program was net-shape molding of the detailed flow structures according to end-user design. Correlations between feature detail and process parameters were formed so that mold tooling could be accurately designed to meet a variety of flow field dimensions. A cost model was developed that predicted the cost of manufacture for the product in near-term volumes and long-term volumes (10+ million units per year). Because the roduct uses lowcost raw materials in quantities that are less than competitive tech, it was found that the cost of the product in high volume can be less than with other plate echnologies, and can meet the DOE goal of $4/kW for transportation applications. The excellent performance of the all-carbon plate in net shape was verified in fuel cell testing. Performance equivalent to much higher cost, fully machined graphite plates was found.

  20. Ureilite Carbon and mg Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudon, P.; Romanek, C.; Paddock, L.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2004-05-01

    Ureilites are carbon-bearing ultramafic achondrites composed primarily of olivine and pyroxene with intergranular fine-grained metal, sulfides, and silicates. Carbon (up to 6.5 wt%) is either amorphous or present as graphite, lonsdaleite, and/or diamond. It has been shown that carbon-silicate redox (i.e. "smelting") reactions are responsible for the positive correlation between modal percent pigeonite and mg# and for the negative FeO-MnO trend seen in the mineral and bulk compositions of ureilites. Carbon redox reactions are strongly exothermic and pressure dependent; so ureilites with the largest mg# are the most reduced, experienced the highest temperatures, and formed at the lowest pressures, i.e. near the surface of the ureilite parent body. Ureilites with the largest mg# have the smallest δ 18O and the largest Δ 17O. To further investigate possible relationships, we performed carbon isotope and electron probe measurements on a suite of 27 ureilites in order to see the type of correlation that exists between mg# and carbon. Mg#s of olivine cores, carbon contents, and δ 13C data were taken from this study and the literature, and averaged. Polymict ureilites were not considered. A well-defined negative correlation is observed between the mg# of olivine cores and Δ 17O. A less well-defined negative correlation may exist between mg# of olivine cores and δ 13C, but there is substantial scatter in the data. However, a well-defined negative correlation exists between mg# of olivine rims and δ 13C. At first glance, this trend is unexpected: if ureilites with the largest mg# experienced the greatest amount of reduction, they should have the largest δ 13C and the correlation between mg# and δ 13C should be positive. A plot of carbon content versus δ 13C seems to show a general trend: the smaller the carbon content, the heavier is the carbon. This general trend is exactly what one would expect if smelting has affected the ureilite parent body: the more C is

  1. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valve for internal combustion engines and the like formed of continuous carbon fibers throughout the valve's stem and head is disclosed. The valve includes braided carbon fiber material over axially aligned unidirectional carbon fibers forming a valve stem; the braided and unidirectional carbon fibers being broomed out at one end of the valve stem forming the shape of the valve head; the valve-shaped structure being densified and rigidized with a matrix of carbon containing discontinuous carbon fibers: and the finished valve being treated to resist oxidation. Also disclosed is a carbon matrix plug containing continuous and discontinuous carbon fibers and forming a net-shape valve head acting as a mandrel over which the unidirectional and braided carbon fibers are formed according to textile processes. Also disclosed are various preform valves and processes for making finished and preform carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valves.

  2. Directed graph based carbon flow tracing for demand side carbon obligation allocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Tao; Feng, Donghan; Ding, Teng

    2016-01-01

    method for tracing carbon flow is proposed. In a lossy network, matrices such as carbon losses, net carbon intensity (NCI) and footprint carbon intensity (FCI) are obtained with the proposed method and used to allocate carbon obligation at demand side. Case studies based on realistic distribution......In order to achieve carbon emission abatement, some researchers and policy makers have cast their focus on demand side carbon abatement potentials. This paper addresses the problem of carbon flow calculation in power systems and carbon obligation allocation at demand side. A directed graph based...

  3. Dynamics of the Neoproterozoic carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Daniel H; Hayes, John M; Summons, Roger E

    2003-07-08

    The existence of unusually large fluctuations in the Neoproterozoic (1,000-543 million years ago) carbon-isotopic record implies strong perturbations to the Earth's carbon cycle. To analyze these fluctuations, we examine records of both the isotopic content of carbonate carbon and the fractionation between carbonate and marine organic carbon. Together, these are inconsistent with conventional, steady-state models of the carbon cycle. The records can be well understood, however, as deriving from the nonsteady dynamics of two reactive pools of carbon. The lack of a steady state is traced to an unusually large oceanic reservoir of organic carbon. We suggest that the most significant of the Neoproterozoic negative carbon-isotopic excursions resulted from increased remineralization of this reservoir. The terminal event, at the Proterozoic-Cambrian boundary, signals the final diminution of the reservoir, a process that was likely initiated by evolutionary innovations that increased export of organic matter to the deep sea.

  4. Method for manufacturing high quality carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Jeanette M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A non-catalytic process for the production of carbon nanotubes includes supplying an electric current to a carbon anode and a carbon cathode which have been securely positioned in the open atmosphere with a gap between them. The electric current creates an electric arc between the carbon anode and the carbon cathode, which causes carbon to be vaporized from the carbon anode and a carbonaceous residue to be deposited on the carbon cathode. Inert gas is pumped into the gap to flush out oxygen, thereby preventing interference with the vaporization of carbon from the anode and preventing oxidation of the carbonaceous residue being deposited on the cathode. The anode and cathode are cooled while electric current is being supplied thereto. When the supply of electric current is terminated, the carbonaceous residue is removed from the cathode and is purified to yield carbon nanotubes.

  5. Structural survey of carbonate-containing antacids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, C J; White, J L; Hem, S L

    1978-03-01

    A series of carbonate-containing antacids was examined by IR and X-ray analysis to establish the role of carbonate and to compare the structure of the antacids to naturally occurring carbonate minerals. Based on IR analysis, the relative degree of perturbation of carbonate increases in the order calcium carbonate, carbonate-containing aluminum hydroxide gel, and dihydroxyaluminum sodium carbonate. The crystalline carbonate-containing antacids were poorly organized forms of the minerals calcite, CaCO3; dawsonite, NaAl(OH)2CO3; and hydrotalcite, Mg6Al2CO3(OH)16-4H2O. Amorphous carbonate-containing aluminum hydroxide gel can be classified mineralogically as amorphous aluminum hydroxycarbonate. IR and X-ray evidence indicates that magaldrate has a hydrotalcite-like structure with sulfate as the major interlayer anion and carbonate also present in the interlayer space.

  6. Agricultural Carbon Sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwath, W. R.; Lal, R.

    2016-12-01

    Agriculture is a source or sink of greenhouse gases depending on land use and management. Diverse activities of agroecosystems include croplands, grazing lands, forestlands, integration among these three land use systems (e.g., agroforestry, agro-pastoral, silvo-pastoral, and agro-silvo-pastoral systems), and urban and degraded lands. Conversion of natural to agroecosystems leads to decline in soil organic carbon (SOC) pool because of reduction in input of biomass-C (C­i) and increase in losses (Cl) by mineralization, erosion and leaching (Cil) through changes in micro-climate, components of the hydrologic cycle and energy budgets, and alterations in biogeochemical cycles. Historic loss from soils of agroecosystems may range from 25 to 50% in temperate regions and 50 to 75% in the tropics. The magnitude of SOC depletion is aggravated by soil degradation caused by erosion, salinization, etc. Thus, there exists a soil/ecosystem C sink which can be refilled through best management practices which create a positive C budget (Ci>Cl) and lead to recarbonization. The average rate of SOC sequestration is 0-250 kg C/ha•yr for warm and dry regions vs. 250-500 kgC/ha•yr for cool and moist climates. The potential of C sequestration is estimated at 0.4-1.2 Pg C/yr for cropland; 0.3-0.5 PgC/yr savanna and grasslands; 1.2-1.4 PgC/yr for afforestation, agroforestry, forest succession and peatlands; 0.2-0.5 PgC/yr for forest plantations; 0.3-0.7 PgC/yr for restoration of salt affected soils, and 0.2-0.7 PgC/yr for erosion and desertification control. There is an emission-avoidance by enhancing eco-efficiency of farm operations (e.g., plowing, irrigation, and input of herbicides and pesticides). These strategies are in accord with the implementation of "4 per Thousand" initiative proposed at the COP21 and COP22 Summits in Paris and Marrakech, respectively. Payments to land managers for ecosystem services, based on societal value of soil C, can promote adoption of BMPs, advance

  7. Novel method for carbon nanofilament growth on carbon fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Johathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luhrs, Claudia [UNM MECH.ENG.; Terani, Mehran [UNM MECH.ENG.; Al - Haik, Marwan [UNM MECH.ENG.; Garcia, Daniel [UNM MECH.ENG.; Taha, Mahmoud R [UNM MECH.ENG.

    2009-01-01

    Fiber reinforced structural composites such as fiber reinforced polymers (FRPs) have proven to be key materials for blast mitigation due to their enhanced mechanical performance. However, there is a need to further increase total energy absorption of the composites in order to retain structural integrity in high energy environments, for example, blast events. Research has shown that composite failure in high energy environments can be traced to their relatively low shear strength attributed to the limited bond strength between the matrix and the fibers. One area of focus for improving the strength of composite materials has been to create 'multi-scale' composites. The most common approach to date is to introduce carbon nanotubes into a more traditional composite consisting of epoxy with embedded micron scale fibers. The inclusion of carbon nanotubes (CNT) clearly toughens different matrices. Depositing CNT in brittle matrix increases stiffness by orders of magnitude. Currently, this approach to create multiscale composites is limited due to the difficulty of dispersing significant amounts of nanotubes. It has repeatedly been reported that phase separation occurs above relatively low weight percent loading (ca. 3%) due to the strong van der Waals forces between CNTs compared with that between CNT and polymer. Hence, the nanotubes tend to segregate and form inclusions. One means to prevent nanotube or nanofilament agglomeration is to anchor one end of the nanostructure, thereby creating a stable multi-phase structure. This is most easily done by literally growing the CNTs directly on micron scale fibers. Recently, CNT were grown on carbon fibers, both polyacrylonitrile- (PAN-) and pitch-based, by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) using H2 and CH4 as precursors. Nickel clusters were electrodeposited on the fiber surfaces to catalyze the growth and uniform CNT coatings were obtained on both the PAN- and pitch-based carbon fibers. Multiwalled CNTs

  8. Carbonate Looping for De-Carbonization of Cement Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Andersen, Maria Friberg; Lin, Weigang

    2011-01-01

    Cement industry is one of the largest emitter of CO2 other than power generation plants, which includes the emissions from combustion of fuel and also from calcination of limestone for clinker production. In order to reduce CO2 emissions from the cement industry an effective an economically...... feasible technology is to be developed. The carbonate looping process is a promising technology, which is particularly suitable for the cement industry as limestone could be used for capture and release of CO2. Integration of carbonate looping process into cement pyroprocess has two advantages: 1...... integrated into cement pyro-process. The energy required for regeneration in the calciner increases with increase in average conversion of calcined limestone and energy that can be extracted from carbonator decreases with increasing average conversion. Further the influence of type of limestone...

  9. Yeast-based microporous carbon materials for carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wenzhong; He, Yue; Zhang, Shouchun; Li, Junfen; Fan, Weibin

    2012-07-01

    A hierarchical microporous carbon material with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of 1348 m(2) g(-1) and a pore volume of 0.67 cm(3) g(-1) was prepared from yeast through chemical activation with potassium hydroxide. This type of material contains large numbers of nitrogen-containing groups (nitrogen content >5.3 wt%), and, consequently, basic sites. As a result, this material shows a faster adsorption rate and a higher adsorption capacity of CO(2) than the material obtained by directly carbonizing yeast under the same conditions. The difference is more pronounced in the presence of N(2) or H(2)O, showing that chemical activation of discarded yeast with potassium hydroxide could afford high-performance microporous carbon materials for the capture of CO(2). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Detection of Carbon Monoxide Using Polymer-Carbon Composite Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Margie L.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Lara, Liana M.

    2011-01-01

    A carbon monoxide (CO) sensor was developed that can be incorporated into an existing sensing array architecture. The CO sensor is a low-power chemiresistor that operates at room temperature, and the sensor fabrication techniques are compatible with ceramic substrates. Sensors made from four different polymers were tested: poly (4-vinylpryridine), ethylene-propylene-diene-terpolymer, polyepichlorohydrin, and polyethylene oxide (PEO). The carbon black used for the composite films was Black Pearls 2000, a furnace black made by the Cabot Corporation. Polymers and carbon black were used as received. In fact, only two of these sensors showed a good response to CO. The poly (4-vinylpryridine) sensor is noisy, but it does respond to the CO above 200 ppm. The polyepichlorohydrin sensor is less noisy and shows good response down to 100 ppm.

  11. Carbonate buffering and metabolic controls on carbon dioxide in rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stets, Edward G.; Butman, David; McDonald, Cory P.; Stackpoole, Sarah M.; DeGrandpre, Michael D.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2017-04-01

    Multiple processes support the significant efflux of carbon dioxide (CO2) from rivers and streams. Attribution of CO2 oversaturation will lead to better quantification of the freshwater carbon cycle and provide insights into the net cycling of nutrients and pollutants. CO2 production is closely related to O2 consumption because of the metabolic linkage of these gases. However, this relationship can be weakened due to dissolved inorganic carbon inputs from groundwater, carbonate buffering, calcification, and anaerobic metabolism. CO2 and O2 concentrations and other water quality parameters were analyzed in two data sets: a synoptic field study and nationwide water quality monitoring data. CO2 and O2 concentrations were strongly negatively correlated in both data sets (ρ = -0.67 and ρ = -0.63, respectively), although the correlations were weaker in high-alkalinity environments. In nearly all samples, the molar oversaturation of CO2 was a larger magnitude than molar O2 undersaturation. We used a dynamically coupled O2CO2 model to show that lags in CO2 air-water equilibration are a likely cause of this phenomenon. Lags in CO2 equilibration also impart landscape-scale differences in the behavior of CO2 between high- and low-alkalinity watersheds. Although the concept of carbonate buffering and how it creates lags in CO2 equilibration with the atmosphere is well understood, it has not been sufficiently integrated into our understanding of CO2 dynamics in freshwaters. We argue that the consideration of carbonate equilibria and its effects on CO2 dynamics are primary steps in understanding the sources and magnitude of CO2 oversaturation in rivers and streams.

  12. Carbonate buffering and metabolic controls on carbon dioxide in rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stets, Edward; Butman, David; McDonald, Cory P.; Stackpoole, Sarah M.; DeGrandpre, Michael D.; Striegl, Rob

    2017-01-01

    Multiple processes support the significant efflux of carbon dioxide (CO2) from rivers and streams. Attribution of CO2 oversaturation will lead to better quantification of the freshwater carbon cycle and provide insights into the net cycling of nutrients and pollutants. CO2 production is closely related to O2consumption because of the metabolic linkage of these gases. However, this relationship can be weakened due to dissolved inorganic carbon inputs from groundwater, carbonate buffering, calcification, and anaerobic metabolism. CO2and O2 concentrations and other water quality parameters were analyzed in two data sets: a synoptic field study and nationwide water quality monitoring data. CO2 and O2 concentrations were strongly negatively correlated in both data sets (ρ = −0.67 and ρ = −0.63, respectively), although the correlations were weaker in high-alkalinity environments. In nearly all samples, the molar oversaturation of CO2 was a larger magnitude than molar O2 undersaturation. We used a dynamically coupled O2CO2 model to show that lags in CO2 air-water equilibration are a likely cause of this phenomenon. Lags in CO2 equilibration also impart landscape-scale differences in the behavior of CO2 between high- and low-alkalinity watersheds. Although the concept of carbonate buffering and how it creates lags in CO2 equilibration with the atmosphere is well understood, it has not been sufficiently integrated into our understanding of CO2 dynamics in freshwaters. We argue that the consideration of carbonate equilibria and its effects on CO2 dynamics are primary steps in understanding the sources and magnitude of CO2 oversaturation in rivers and streams.

  13. INCCA: Integrated Climate and Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, S L

    2001-03-13

    The INCCA (Integrated Climate and Carbon) initiative will develop and apply the ability to simulate the fate and climate impact of fossil fuel-derived carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and aerosols on a global scale. Coupled climate and carbon cycle modeling like that proposed for INCCA is required to understand and predict the future environmental impacts of fossil fuel burning. At present, atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations are prescribed, not simulated, in large climate models. Credible simulations of the entire climate system, however, need to predict time-evolving atmospheric greenhouse forcing using anthropogenic emissions as the fundamental input. Predicting atmospheric COS concentrations represents a substantial scientific advance because there are large natural sources and sinks of carbon that are likely to change as a result of climate change. Both terrestrial (e.g., vegetation on land) and oceanic components of the carbon cycle are known to be sensitive to climate change. Estimates of the amount of man-made CO{sub 2} that will accumulate in the atmosphere depend on understanding the carbon cycle. For this reason, models that use CO{sub 2} emissions, not prescribed atmospheric concentrations, as fundamental inputs are required to directly address greenhouse-related questions of interest to policymakers. INCCA is uniquely positioned to make rapid progress in this high-priority area of global change modeling and prediction because we can leverage previous and ongoing LLNL developments, and use existing component models that are well-developed and published. The need for a vastly improved carbon dioxide prediction capability is appreciated by the DOE. As the US Accelerated Climate Prediction Initiative (ACPI) progresses, we expect the DOE will emphasize the carbon cycle as the next major department-level earth science focus. INCCA will position LLNL for substantial additional funding as this new focus is realized. In the limited time since our LDRD funding was

  14. Studies on Enhancing Transverse Thermal Conductivity in Carbon/Carbon Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manocha, Lalit M

    2008-01-01

    ...) on a large scale in the form of aligned carbon nanotubes as arrays. Arrays of these carbon nanotubes were densified, like in carbon felt densification process by filling the space within the nanotube...

  15. The chemistry of dimethyl carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tundo, Pietro; Selva, Maurizio

    2002-09-01

    Dimethyl carbonate (DMC) is a versatile compound that represents an attractive eco-friendly alternative to both methyl halides (or dimethyl sulfate) and phosgene for methylation and carbonylation processes, respectively. In fact, the reactivity of DMC is tunable: at T = 90 degrees C, methoxycarbonylations take place, whereas at higher reaction temperatures, methylation reactions are observed with a variety of nucleophiles. In the particular case of substrates susceptible to multiple alkylations (e.g., CH(2)-active compounds and primary amines), DMC allows unprecedented selectivity toward mono-C- and mono-N-methylation reactions. Nowadays produced by a clean process, DMC possesses properties of nontoxicity and biodegradability which makes it a true green reagent to use in syntheses that prevent pollution at the source. Moreover, DMC-mediated methylations are catalytic reactions that use safe solids (alkaline carbonates or zeolites), thereby avoiding the formation of undesirable inorganic salts as byproducts. The reactivity of other carbonates is reported as well: higher homologues of DMC (i.e., diethyl and dibenzyl carbonate), are excellent mono-C- and mono-N-alkylating agents, whereas asymmetrical methyl alkyl carbonates (ROCO(2)Me with R > or = C(3)) undergo methylation processes with a chemoselectivity up to 99%.

  16. History of ultrahigh carbon steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadsworth, J.; Sherby, O.D.

    1997-06-20

    The history and development of ultrahigh carbon steels (i.e., steels containing between 1 and 2.l percent C and now known as UHCS) are described. The early use of steel compositions containing carbon contents above the eutectoid level is found in ancient weapons from around the world. For example, both Damascus and Japanese sword steels are hypereutectoid steels. Their manufacture and processing is of interest in understanding the role of carbon content in the development of modern steels. Although sporadic examples of UHCS compositions are found in steels examined in the early part of this century, it was not until the mid-1970s that the modern study began. This study had its origin in the development of superplastic behavior in steels and the recognition that increasing the carbon content was of importance in developing that property. The compositions that were optimal for superplasticity involved the development of steels that contained higher carbon contents than conventional modern steels. It was discovered, however, that the room temperature properties of these compositions were of interest in their own right. Following this discovery, a period of intense work began on understanding their manufacture, processing, and properties for both superplastic forming and room temperature applications. The development of superplastic cast irons and iron carbides, as well as those of laminated composites containing UHCS, was an important part of this history.

  17. Carbon-carbon contacts for robust nanoelectromechanical switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Owen; Wei, Xiaoding; Sullivan, John; Ocola, Leonidas E; Divan, Ralu; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2012-05-08

    Nanoelectromechanical devices exhibiting dramatically improved robustness through novel material selection are demonstrated. A unique combination of carbon nanotube active elements and conductive diamond-like carbon contact electrodes results in reliable switching performance not found in devices with ubiquitously-used metal thin film electrodes. This in turn represents a viable means to improve the reliability of a diverse, and widely-pursued class of nanoscale devices ranging from single-nanostructure switches to massively parallel arrays. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. The formation mechanism of chiral carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Liren; Lu, Junzhe; Zhu, Hengjiang

    2018-02-01

    The nuclei and the formation mechanism of chiral carbon nanotubes, namely, single-, double-, and triple-walled carbon nanotubes are simulated by the first principle density functional theory. The formation mechanism from nuclei to corresponding infinitely long carbon nanotubes occurs spirally and via absorbing carbon atoms layer by layer. Carbon atoms at the open end are metastable state compared with ones in the tube wall or the closed end, which indicate the growth point of chiral carbon nanotubes is located at the open end. Growth of outer layer tubular clusters takes precedence over the inner layer in the process of forming multi-walled nuclear structures. Because of the ratio of carbon atoms at the open end to all carbon atoms decreases, the stability of the tubular clusters increases with their length. The infinitely long carbon nanotubes are obtained by executing periodic boundary conditions depend on corresponding nuclear structures.

  19. Processing and Structure of Carbon Nanofiber Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongfu Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A unique concept of making nanocomposites from carbon nanofiber paper was explored in this study. The essential element of this method was to design and manufacture carbon nanofiber paper with well-controlled and optimized network structure of carbon nanofibers. In this study, carbon nanofiber paper was prepared under various processing conditions, including different types of carbon nanofibers, solvents, dispersants, and acid treatment. The morphologies of carbon nanofibers within the nanofiber paper were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM. In addition, the bulk densities of carbon nanofiber papers were measured. It was found that the densities and network structures of carbon nanofiber paper correlated to the dispersion quality of carbon nanofibers within the paper, which was significantly affected by papermaking process conditions.

  20. Carbon fiber manufacturing via plasma technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulauskas, Felix L.; Yarborough, Kenneth D.; Meek, Thomas T.

    2002-01-01

    The disclosed invention introduces a novel method of manufacturing carbon and/or graphite fibers that avoids the high costs associated with conventional carbonization processes. The method of the present invention avoids these costs by utilizing plasma technology in connection with electromagnetic radiation to produce carbon and/or graphite fibers from fully or partially stabilized carbon fiber precursors. In general, the stabilized or partially stabilized carbon fiber precursors are placed under slight tension, in an oxygen-free atmosphere, and carbonized using a plasma and electromagnetic radiation having a power input which is increased as the fibers become more carbonized and progress towards a final carbon or graphite product. In an additional step, the final carbon or graphite product may be surface treated with an oxygen-plasma treatment to enhance adhesion to matrix materials.

  1. Pulsed Laser Annealing of Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Joseph P.

    This dissertation investigates laser heating of carbon materials. The carbon industry has been annealing carbon via traditional furnace heating since at least 1800, when Sir Humphry Davy produced an electric arc with carbon electrodes made from carbonized wood. Much knowledge has been accumulated about carbon since then and carbon materials have become instrumental both scientifically and technologically. However, to this day the kinetics of annealing are not known due to the slow heating and cooling rates of furnaces. Additionally, consensus has yet to be reached on the cause of nongraphitizability. Annealing trajectories with respect to time at temperature are observed from a commercial carbon black (R250), model graphitizable carbon (anthracene coke) and a model nongraphitizable carbon (sucrose char) via rapid laser heating. Materials were heated with 1064 nm and 10.6 im laser radiation from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and a continuous wave CO2 laser, respectively. A pulse generator was used reduce the CO2 laser pulse width and provide high temporal control. Time-temperature-histories with nanosecond temporal resolution and temperature reproducibility within tens of degrees Celsius were determined by spectrally resolving the laser induced incandescence signal and applying multiwavelength pyrometry. The Nd:YAG laser fluences include: 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, and 550 mJ/cm2. The maximum observed temperature ranged from 2,400 °C to the C2 sublimation temperature of 4,180 °C. The CO2 laser was used to collect a series of isothermal (1,200 and 2,600 °C) heat treatments versus time (100 milliseconds to 30 seconds). Laser heated samples are compared to furnace annealing at 1,200 and 2,600 °C for 1 hour. The material transformation trajectory of Nd:YAG laser heated carbon is different than traditional furnace heating. The traditional furnace annealing pathway is followed for CO2 laser heating as based upon equivalent end structures. The nanostructure of sucrose char

  2. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau, P Umek, K Hernadi, P Marcoux, B Lukic, Cs Mikó, M Milas, R Gaál and L Forró Transitional behaviour in the transformation from active end

  3. Method for carbon dioxide splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, James E.; Diver, Jr., Richard B.; Siegel, Nathan P.

    2017-02-28

    A method for splitting carbon dioxide via a two-step metal oxide thermochemical cycle by heating a metal oxide compound selected from an iron oxide material of the general formula A.sub.xFe.sub.3-xO.sub.4, where 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1 and A is a metal selected from Mg, Cu, Zn, Ni, Co, and Mn, or a ceria oxide compound of the general formula M.sub.aCe.sub.bO.sub.c, where 0carbon dioxide, and heating to a temperature less than approximately 1400 C, thereby producing carbon monoxide gas and the original metal oxide compound.

  4. Smart Waterflooding in Carbonate Reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahid, Adeel

    in porous media. The main conclusion of most previous studies was that it is the rock wettability alteration towards more water wetting condition that helps improving the oil recovery. In the first step of this project, we focused on verifying this conclusion. Coreflooding experiments were carried out using...... imbibition rather than forced flooding. The objective of the third step of this project was to investigate the potential of high salinity waterflooding process by carrying out experiments with reservoir chalk samples. We carried out waterflooding instead of spontaneous imbibition using core plugs...... reservoirs by injecting brine of low salinity. However, this effect has not been thoroughly investigated for carbonates. At the final stage of this project, we have experimentally investigated the oil recovery potential of low salinity water flooding in the carbonate rocks. We used both reservoir carbonate...

  5. Advanced Thermal Protection Systems (ATPS), Aerospace Grade Carbon Bonded Carbon Fiber Material Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Carbon bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulating material is the basis for several highly successful NASA developed thermal protection systems (TPS). Included among...

  6. Advanced Thermal Protection Systems (ATPS), Aerospace Grade Carbon Bonded Carbon Fiber Material Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Carbon bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulating material is the basis for several highly successful NASA developed thermal protection systems (TPS). Among the...

  7. Carbon sequestration research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichle, Dave; Houghton, John; Kane, Bob; Ekmann, Jim; and others

    1999-12-31

    Predictions of global energy use in the next century suggest a continued increase in carbon emissions and rising concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the atmosphere unless major changes are made in the way we produce and use energy--in particular, how we manage carbon. For example, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts in its 1995 ''business as usual'' energy scenario that future global emissions of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere will increase from 7.4 billion tonnes of carbon (GtC) per year in 1997 to approximately 26 GtC/year by 2100. IPCC also projects a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration by the middle of next century and growing rates of increase beyond. Although the effects of increased CO{sub 2} levels on global climate are uncertain, many scientists agree that a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations could have a variety of serious environmental consequences. The goal of this report is to identify key areas for research and development (R&D) that could lead to an understanding of the potential for future use of carbon sequestration as a major tool for managing carbon emissions. Under the leadership of DOE, researchers from universities, industry, other government agencies, and DOE national laboratories were brought together to develop the technical basis for conceiving a science and technology road map. That effort has resulted in this report, which develops much of the information needed for the road map.

  8. CARBON DIOXIDE AS A FEEDSTOCK.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CREUTZ,C.; FUJITA,E.

    2000-12-09

    This report is an overview on the subject of carbon dioxide as a starting material for organic syntheses of potential commercial interest and the utilization of carbon dioxide as a substrate for fuel production. It draws extensively on literature sources, particularly on the report of a 1999 Workshop on the subject of catalysis in carbon dioxide utilization, but with emphasis on systems of most interest to us. Atmospheric carbon dioxide is an abundant (750 billion tons in atmosphere), but dilute source of carbon (only 0.036 % by volume), so technologies for utilization at the production source are crucial for both sequestration and utilization. Sequestration--such as pumping CO{sub 2} into sea or the earth--is beyond the scope of this report, except where it overlaps utilization, for example in converting CO{sub 2} to polymers. But sequestration dominates current thinking on short term solutions to global warming, as should be clear from reports from this and other workshops. The 3500 million tons estimated to be added to the atmosphere annually at present can be compared to the 110 million tons used to produce chemicals, chiefly urea (75 million tons), salicylic acid, cyclic carbonates and polycarbonates. Increased utilization of CO{sub 2} as a starting material is, however, highly desirable, because it is an inexpensive, non-toxic starting material. There are ongoing efforts to replace phosgene as a starting material. Creation of new materials and markets for them will increase this utilization, producing an increasingly positive, albeit small impact on global CO{sub 2} levels. The other uses of interest are utilization as a solvent and for fuel production and these will be discussed in turn.

  9. Rapid carbon-carbon bond formation and cleavage revealed by carbon isotope exchange between the carboxyl carbon and inorganic carbon in hydrothermal fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glein, C. R.; Cody, G. D.

    2013-12-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of organic compounds in water-rock systems (e.g., hydrothermal vents, sedimentary basins, and carbonaceous meteorites) is generally interpreted in terms of the isotopic composition of the sources of such molecules, and the kinetic isotope effects of metabolic or abiotic reactions that generate or transform such molecules. This hinges on the expectation that the carbon isotopic composition of many organic compounds is conserved under geochemical conditions. This expectation is reasonable in light of the strength of carbon-carbon bonds (ca. 81 kcal/mol); in general, environmental conditions conducive to carbon-carbon bond cleavage typically lead to transformations of organic molecules (decarboxylation is a notable example). Geochemically relevant reactions that involve isotopic exchange between carbon atoms in organic molecules and inorganic forms of carbon with no change in molecular structure appear to be rare. Notwithstanding such rarity, there have been preliminary reports of relatively rapid carbon isotope exchange between the carboxyl group in carboxylic acids and carbon dioxide in hot water [1,2]. We have performed laboratory hydrothermal experiments to gain insights into the mechanism of this surprising reaction, using phenylacetate as a model structure. By mass spectrometry, we confirm that the carboxyl carbon undergoes facile isotopic exchange with 13C-labeled bicarbonate at moderate temperatures (i.e., 230 C). Detailed kinetic analysis reveals that the reaction rate is proportional to the concentrations of both reactants. Further experiments demonstrate that the exchange reaction only occurs if the carbon atom adjacent to the carboxyl carbon is bonded to a hydrogen atom. As an example, no carbon isotope exchange was observed for benzoate in experiments lasting up to one month. The requirement of an alpha C-H bond suggests that enolization (i.e., deprotonation of the H) is a critical step in the mechanism of the exchange

  10. Fullerenes: from carbon to nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Pooja; Chawla, Viney; Maheshwari, Radhika; Saraf, Shubhini A; Saraf, Shailendra K

    2010-07-01

    Fullerenes, the third carbon allotrope, have emerged as agents which could revolutionize the treatment of many diseases. Fullerenes possess different biological applications like neuroprotective agents, antioxidants, anti-HIV activity, enzyme inhibition, antiapoptotic activity and the list is ever increasing. Moreover, they are being utilized as drug carrier systems and also for many non-biological applications like superconductors, catalysis and so on. Their size has made them promising agents for nanotechnology. This article aims at outlining the chemistry, properties and non-biological applications of fullerenes and their evolution to biological applications, thereby traversing their evolution from simple carbon allotropes to present day nano-medicinal agents.

  11. [Carbon monoxide intoxications in Portugal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Márcia Christel; Rodrigues, Rui Paulo; Moura, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of carbon monoxide intoxication in the World shows that this is a common situation. In Portugal, there are no concrete data available in literature and its incidence remains unknown. Currently, the use of hyperbaric oxygen is a valid therapeutic for carbon monoxide poisoning management. However, its effectiveness and its proper handling are still controversial. The first aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of carbon monoxide intoxication in Portugal and to analyze its demographic characteristics. The second objective of this work was to evaluate the possible change in the type of treatment applied in areas near de hyperbaric chamber of Unidade Local de Saúde de Matosinhos, since its opening in June 2006. To achieve these objectives, we conducted a survey on admissions data for carbon monoxide intoxication occured between January first, 2000 and December 31, 2007. These data was collected in seven hospitals and in the Administração Central do Sistema de Saúde, I.P. Nationally, 621 hospitalizations were recorded, which represents an incidence of 5,86/100000 in 8 years. In the seven hospitals, there were 93 hospitalizations due to carbon monoxide intoxication during the same period of time. There was a peak of incidence during winter, between November and March and there was a similar distribution in men (47,3%) and women (52,7%). Since June 2006, date of opening of the hyperbaric chamber, the Unidade Local de Saúde de Matosinhos, E.P.E. recorded a sharp increase in the number of hospitalization for carbon monoxide intoxication. The number of admissions in the 19 months after the chamber opening was double the number of all cases occurred in that institution in the 65 months prior. We concluded that, in Portugal, carbon monoxide intoxication is an uncommon situation but it´s still an important cause of hospitalization. The referral of cases to the Unidade Local de Saúde de Matosinhos, E.P.E. since the opening of hyperbaric chamber

  12. Electron configuration of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojkovic, S.M.; Setrajcic, J.P. [Novi Sad Univ. (Yugoslavia). Inst. of Physics; Vragovic, I.D. [Technical Faculty M. Pupin, Zrenjanin (Yugoslavia)

    2000-07-01

    In the paper the analysis of electron band structure of infinite carbon nanotubes was performed using Green's function method. The electron dispersion law was found in harmonic and nearest neighbor approximation. One can see that carbon nanotubes of infinite length can be divided into two classes: metallic and semiconducting. Additional spatial confinement of the system along the nanotube axes leads to the opening of the forbidden gap even in nanotubes that are metallic for infinite length. The value of the forbidden gap decreases by increasing the tube length. The dependence of the forbidden gap on the tube length is not monotonic; it has oscillatory character for short tubes. (orig.)

  13. Materials for carbon dioxide separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingqing

    2014-10-01

    The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at room temperature have been investigated by comparing carbon nanotubes, fullerene, graphenes, graphite and granular activated carbons. It turned out that the amount of the micropore surface area was dominating the CO{sub 2} adsorption ability. Another promising class of materials for CO{sub 2} capture and separation are CaO derived from the eggshells. Two aspects were studied in present work: a new hybrid materials synthesized by doping the CaTiO{sub 3} and the relationship between physisorption and chemisorption properties of CaO-based materials.

  14. Carbon nanomaterials for gas adsorption

    CERN Document Server

    Terranova, Maria Letizia

    2012-01-01

    Research in adsorption of gases by carbon nanomaterials has experienced considerable growth in recent years, with increasing interest for practical applications. Many research groups are now producing or using such materials for gas adsorption, storage, purification, and sensing. This book provides a selected overview of some of the most interesting scientific results regarding the outstanding properties of carbon nanomaterials for gas adsorption and of interest both for basic research and technological applications. Topics receiving special attention in this book include storage of H, purific

  15. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  16. Simple ocean carbon cycle models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldeira, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffert, M.I. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Earth System Sciences; Siegenthaler, U. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

    1994-02-01

    Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

  17. Carbon Dioxide Information Center thesaurus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millemann, R.E.; Cushman, R.M.

    1986-04-01

    This thesaurus lists the keywords (including narrower, broader, and related terms, as well as forbidden terms) used by the Carbon Dioxide Information Center for the input and retrieval of records for its Bibliographic Information System (BIS), BIS is a specialized bibliographic data base on carbon dioxide and climate. It is being merged into the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base (EDB). The keywords used in the BIS Thesaurus are also used in the much larger EDB thesaurus so EDB may be searched for CO2 references using either thesaurus.

  18. Climate, Carbon, Conservation and Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaugn, Kit; Brickell, Emily [WWF-UK (United Kingdom); Roe, Dilys; Reid, Hannah; Elliot, Jo

    2007-07-01

    The growing market for carbon offers great opportunities for linking greenhouse gas mitigation with conservation of forests and biodiversity, and the generation of local livelihoods. For these combined objectives to be achieved, strong governance is needed along with institutions that ensure poor people win, rather than lose out, from the new challenges posed by climate change. This briefing paper explores the opportunities from and limitations to carbon-based funds for conservation and development. It highlights mechanisms that may help secure benefits for climate, conservation and communities.

  19. Carbon Dioxide Absorption Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A carbon dioxide absorption heat pump cycle is disclosed using a high pressure stage and a super-critical cooling stage to provide a non-toxic system. Using carbon dioxide gas as the working fluid in the system, the present invention desorbs the CO2 from an absorbent and cools the gas in the super-critical state to deliver heat thereby. The cooled CO2 gas is then expanded thereby providing cooling and is returned to an absorber for further cycling. Strategic use of heat exchangers can increase the efficiency and performance of the system.

  20. Surface Seal for Carbon Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuford, D. M.; Spruiell, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    Surface pores in parts made of graphite or reinforced-carbon/ carbon materials are sealed by a silicon carbide-based coating. Coating inhibits subsurface oxidation and lengthens part life. Starting material for coating is graphite felt, which is converted to silicon carbide felt by processing it according to a prescribed time/temperature schedule. Converted felt is pulverized in a ball mill and resulting powder is mixed with an equal weight of black silicon carbide powder. Powder mixture is combined with an equal weight of adhesive to form a paste.

  1. Reproductive toxicity of carbon nanomaterials: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasyukova, I.; Gusev, A.; Tkachev, A.

    2015-11-01

    In the current review, we assembled the experimental evidences of an association between carbon nanomaterials including carbon black, graphite nanoplatelets, graphene, single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and fullerene exposure and adverse reproductive and developmental effects, in vitro and in vivo studies. It is shown that carbon nanomaterials reveal toxic effect on reproductive system and offspring development of the animals of various system groups to a certain degree depending on carbon crystal structure. Although this paper provides initial information about the potential male and female reproductive toxicity of carbon nanomaterials, further studies, using characterized nanoparticles, relevant routes of administration, and doses closely reflecting all the expected levels of exposure are needed.

  2. Interactions between Carbon Nanomaterials and Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Li, Shanghao; Peng, Zhili; Al-Yuobi, Abdulrahman Obaid; Omar Bashammakh, Abdulaziz Saleh; El-Shahawi, M S; Leblanc, Roger M

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between carbon nanomaterials, including carbon dots, fullerene, carbon nanotube, graphene, and graphene oxide, and biomolecules play an important role in the field of nanobiotechnology. Due to the unique properties of carbon nanomaterials and the magnificent features of their colloids, it shows high potential in fibrillation inhibition, high sensitivity sensor fabrication, bioimaging, drug delivery, and other areas. Hereby, we will go over different families of carbon nanomaterials regarding to the interaction between carbon nanomaterials and biomolecules at the interface, and their applications will be reviewed as well.

  3. Apparatus for extracting and sequestering carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Gregory H [Castro Valley, CA; Caldeira, Kenneth G [Livermore, CA

    2010-02-02

    An apparatus and method associated therewith to extract and sequester carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) from a stream or volume of gas wherein said apparatus hydrates CO.sub.2 and reacts the resulting carbonic acid with carbonate. Suitable carbonates include, but are not limited to, carbonates of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, preferably carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Waste products are metal cations and bicarbonate in solution or dehydrated metal salts, which when disposed of in a large body of water provide an effective way of sequestering CO.sub.2 from a gaseous environment.

  4. Novel low Wigner energy amorphous carbon-carbon composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Kinshuk; Prakash, Jyoti; Tripathi, B. M.

    2014-02-01

    A novel amorphous carbon-carbon composite has been developed using carbon black dispersed in carbonized phenolic resin matrix in order to avoid Wigner energy problem associated with graphite. The as prepared sample showed a density of 1320 kg m-3. This has been further densified by resin impregnation and chemical vapour infiltration. The effect of processing parameters on final density (1517 kg m-3) has been investigated. This composite possesses the compressive strength of 65 Mpa, coefficient of thermal expansion of 3 × 10-6 K-1 and the specific heat of 1.2 J g-1 K-1. This novel composite was subjected to 145 MeV Ne+6 heavy ion irradiation at different doses. The highest dose was kept at 3 × 10-4 dpa. The stored energy in the composite was found to be 212 J g-1 at the highest dose of irradiation, which is much below than that of graphite. The composite remained amorphous after irradiation as confirmed by X-ray diffraction.

  5. Carbon nanotubes and methods of making carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2017-04-27

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for methods that can be used to produce carbon nanotubes (hereinafter CNT) having an inner diameter about 5-55 nm, methods of tuning the inner diameter of CNTs (e.g., by adjusting reaction pressure), CNTs having an inner diameter of greater than 20 nm or more, and the like.

  6. Thermal carbonization of nanoporous silicon: Formation of carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of carbon nanofibres without a metal catalyst. GUNJAN AGGARWAL, PRABHASH MISHRA, BIPIN JOSHI and S S ISLAM. ∗. Nano-Sensor Research Laboratory, Department of Applied Sciences and Humanities, F/O of. Engineering and Technology, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110 025,. India. ∗.

  7. Carbonate hydroxyapatite and silicon-substituted carbonate hydroxyapatite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, L T; Long, B D; Othman, R

    2014-01-01

    transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) techniques were used to characterize the formation of CO3Ap and Si-CO3Ap. The results revealed that the silicate (SiO4(4-)) and carbonate (CO3(2-)) ions competed to occupy the phosphate (PO4...

  8. Carbon paste electrode incorporating multi-walled carbon nanotube ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The preparation and electrochemical performance of the carbon nanotube paste electrode modified with ferrocene (FCMCNPE) was investigated for electrocatalytic behaviour toward oxidation of -acetyl--cysteine (NAC) in the presence of tryptophan (Trp) using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry ...

  9. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  10. Carbon budget and carbon chemistry in Photon Dominated Regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teyssier, D; Fosse, D; Gerin, M; Pety, J; Abergel, A; Roueff, E

    We present a study of small carbon chains and rings in Photon Dominated Regions (PDRs) performed at millimetre wavelengths. Our sample consists of the Horsehead nebula (B33), the rho Oph L1688 cloud interface, and the cometary-shaped cloud IC 63. Using the IRAM 30-m telescope, the SEST and the

  11. Carbon dioxide adsorption in chemically activated carbon from sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrés, Juan Manuel; Orjales, Luis; Narros, Adolfo; de la Fuente, María del Mar; Encarnación Rodríguez, María

    2013-05-01

    In this work, sewage sludge was used as precursor in the production of activated carbon by means of chemical activation with KOH and NaOH. The sludge-based activated carbons were investigated for their gaseous adsorption characteristics using CO2 as adsorbate. Although both chemicals were effective in the development of the adsorption capacity, the best results were obtained with solid NaOH (SBA(T16)). Adsorption results were modeled according to the Langmuir and Freundlich models, with resulting CO2 adsorption capacities about 56 mg/g. The SBA(T16) was characterized for its surface and pore characteristics using continuous volumetric nitrogen gas adsorption and mercury porosimetry. The results informed about the mesoporous character of the SBA(T16) (average pore diameter of 56.5 angstroms). The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of the SBA(T16) was low (179 m2/g) in comparison with a commercial activated carbon (Airpel 10; 1020 m2/g) and was mainly composed of mesopores and macropores. On the other hand, the SBA(T16) adsorption capacity was higher than that of Airpel 10, which can be explained by the formation of basic surface sites in the SBA(T16) where CO2 experienced chemisorption. According to these results, it can be concluded that the use of sewage-sludge-based activated carbons is a promising option for the capture of CO2. Adsorption methods are one of the current ways to reduce CO2 emissions. Taking this into account, sewage-sludge-based activated carbons were produced to study their CO2 adsorption capacity. Specifically, chemical activation with KOH and NaOH of previously pyrolyzed sewage sludge was carried out. The results obtained show that even with a low BET surface area, the adsorption capacity of these materials was comparable to that of a commercial activated carbon. As a consequence, the use of sewage-sludge-based activated carbons is a promising option for the capture of CO2 and an interesting application for this waste.

  12. Impact of a Regional Drought on Terrestrial Carbon Fluxes and Atmospheric Carbon: Results from a Coupled Carbon Cycle Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunjee; Koster, Randal D.; Ott, Lesley E.; Weir, Brad; Mahanama, Sarith; Chang, Yehui; Zeng, Fan-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the underlying processes that control the carbon cycle is key to predicting future global change. Much of the uncertainty in the magnitude and variability of the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) stems from uncertainty in terrestrial carbon fluxes, and the relative impacts of temperature and moisture variations on regional and global scales are poorly understood. Here we investigate the impact of a regional drought on terrestrial carbon fluxes and CO2 mixing ratios over North America using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Model. Results show a sequence of changes in carbon fluxes and atmospheric CO2, induced by the drought. The relative contributions of meteorological changes to the neighboring carbon dynamics are also presented. The coupled modeling approach allows a direct quantification of the impact of the regional drought on local and proximate carbon exchange at the land surface via the carbon-water feedback processes.

  13. Fabrication and testing of carbon-carbon grids for ion optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Charles E.; Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Ion optics measuring 16.5 cm in diameter and 1.0 mm in thickness were fabricated from carbon-carbon composites that were woven from a high-tensile-modulus carbon fiber. Plate flatness varied by less than 0.05 mm. Several methods were investigated for forming ion-extraction apertures in the carbon-carbon plates, including laser machining, mechanical drilling, and conventional electric discharge machining. Tests conducted using a quartz dilatometer indicated that the coefficient of thermal expansion of the carbon-carbon plates varied between -0.51 to -1.8 x 10 exp -6/degree C at plate temperatures between 173-773 K. Sputter-erosion experiments indicate that carbon-carbon erodes at a rate approximately 25 percent below molybdenum under the same conditions. These material properties indicate that carbon-carbon may be superior to molybdenum for use as ion optics electrodes for ion engines.

  14. Anthropogenic Forcing of Carbonate and Organic Carbon Preservation in Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Carbon preservation in marine sediments, supplemented by that in large lakes, is the primary mechanism that moves carbon from the active surficial carbon cycle to the slower geologic carbon cycle. Preservation rates are low relative to the rates at which carbon moves between surface pools, which has led to the preservation term largely being ignored when evaluating anthropogenic forcing of the global carbon cycle. However, a variety of anthropogenic drivers—including ocean warming, deoxygenation, and acidification, as well as human-induced changes in sediment delivery to the ocean and mixing and irrigation of continental margin sediments—all work to decrease the already small carbon preservation term. These drivers affect the cycling of both carbonate and organic carbon in the ocean. The overall effect of anthropogenic forcing in the modern ocean is to decrease delivery of carbon to sediments, increase sedimentary dissolution and remineralization, and subsequently decrease overall carbon preservation.

  15. Carbon emission disclosure: does it matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudibyo, Y. A.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research were to test empirically the relationship of Volume of Carbon emission, Carbon Management Practice disclosure and Carbon disclosure emission with firm value, especially in Indonesia as developing Country. This research using data from Indonesian sustainability Award in 2013-2015. The instrument of this research was adapted from CDP Questionnaires to score the disclosure of Carbon Management Practice. While the carbon emission disclosure instrument was dummy variable. For volume of carbon emission, this research used the quantity or volume of carbon reported in sustainability reporting. We find that Volume of carbon emission was not related to Firm value. Also Carbon disclosure Emission does not have relationship with Firm value. Both hypotheses were not consistent with [8] which was doing their research in Developed Country. While Carbon Management Practice Disclosure, using CDP Questionnaires, has positive relationship with Firm value. The conclusion is developing country as resource constraint need to be motivated to report and disclose carbon emission from voluntary reporting to mandatory by regulation from government, not just only for high sensitive industry but also low sensitive industry. Then developing country which has resource constraint need to have more proactive strategy to prevent carbon emission instead of reducing carbon emission.

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL PROFILE FOR PROPYLENE CARBONATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The overall goal of this research is to document the life cycle environmental impacts of propylene carbonate (PC) to assist DoD in assessing the life cycle environmental implications of PC and PC-based formulations as viable alternative materials, products, and techniques to pain...

  17. Open air carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumbelic, M I

    1998-01-01

    An unusual manner of carbon monoxide poisoning claimed the lives of two adults in two separate incidents. In the first case, a young man was four wheeling in a swampy area when his jeep became stuck in the mud as he continued to floor the accelerator. Carbon monoxide fumes entered the vehicle through the rusted floorboards, killing the driver. In the second case, two teens were skinny dipping behind a motor boat when they became affected by the boat exhaust. One of the youths was overcome and submerged into the lake. Both incidents were initially attributed to incorrect causes--a car accident and a drowning--because of the false notion that carbon monoxide is not a hazard in a ventilated area. The carboxyhemoglobin levels in these victims were 78 and 62% respectively. It was only through laboratory testing that carbon monoxide poisoning was identified as the cause of their demise. Physicians as well as the public need to be aware of the potential for this life threatening hazard to occur so that there can be proper emergency treatment and the prevention of fatalities.

  18. Carbon monoxide and the embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robkin, M A

    1997-04-01

    Mammals are homeotherms and expend considerable energy maintaining their body temperatures. The temperature of a mammalian embryo on the other hand is maintained by the mother and the embryo can devote its metabolic energy to growth and development. The mammalian embryo is acting as a poikilotherm and its energy needs are thus considerably less than if it were a comparably sized homeotherm. The energy requirements of the preimplantation rat embryo are generated by anaerobic metabolism. As it grows, aerobic metabolism develops. In culture, the addition of carbon monoxide to the perfusing gas for early rat embryos has a much smaller effect than decreasing the oxygen concentration. Carbon monoxide appears to be a relatively mild toxicant until the embryo is much larger, is depending much more on transport of oxygen by red blood cells, and the fraction of required metabolic energy produced by anaerobic metabolism has become quite small. The effect from smoking during gestation may be either by the concomitant reduction in food intake or a more direct toxic effect from some components in the smoke. Carbon monoxide does not seem to be the culprit. The possible mitigating effect of a compensatory increase in fetal hematocrit in response to any hypoxia must also be considered. Humans have no yolk sac placenta as rodents do, but if the switch from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism is correlated with the stage of development, then carbon monoxide exposure should not represent any significant risk to the human embryo until later in gestation.

  19. What Is My Carbon Footprint?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzo, Benjamin J.; McGivney-Burelle, Jean; Wagstrom, Rikki B.

    2016-01-01

    Human beings are having a profound impact on the environment. The opportunity to investigate this timely issue during one or two class periods gives algebra and precalculus students insight into a sustainability topic of great international concern--carbon footprints. Students use mathematical thinking in matters that are pertinent to their…

  20. The Cape Town Carbon Observatory

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nickless, A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available at the scale of the whole planet, but this does not give any national or local detail – the scales at which greenhouse gas management occurs. The Carbon Observatory project is testing whether the inverse modelling method can be applied at the scale of a large...

  1. Luminescent Surface Quaternized Carbon Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Bourlinos, Athanasios B.

    2012-01-10

    Thermal oxidation of a salt precursor made from the acid base combination of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and betaine hydrochloride results in light-emitting surface quaternized carbon dots that are water-dispersible, display anion exchange properties, and exhibit uniform size/surface charge. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  2. Desalination with carbon aerogel electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J.C.; Richardson, J.H.; Fix, D.V.

    1996-10-21

    An electrically regenerated electrosorption process known as carbon aerogel CDI was developed for continuously removing ionic impurities from aqueous streams. A salt solution flows in a channel formed by pairs of parallel carbon aerogel electrodes. Each electrode has a very high BET surface area and very low resistivity. After polarization, anions and cations are removed from electrolyte by the electric field and electrosorbed onto the carbon aerogel. The solution is thus separated into two streams, brine and water. Based on this, carbon aerogel CDI appears to be an energy-efficient alternative to evaporation, electrodialysis, and reverse osmosis. The energy required by this process is about QV/2, plus losses. Estimated energy requirement for sea water desalination is 18-27 Wh gal{sup -1}, depending on cell voltage and flow rate. The requirement for brackish water desalination is less, 1.2-2.5 Wh gal{sup -1} at 1600 ppM. This is assuming that stored electrical energy is reclaimed during regeneration.

  3. Carbon leakage and green growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altaghlibi, M.

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation consists of four chapters. A general introduction to the problem of carbon leakage and the necessity of sustainable development is furnished in the first chapter. In chapter 2, we investigate the conditions under which a donor country is motivated to give unconditional mitigation

  4. GEOLOGICAL STORAGE OF CARBON DIOXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Kolenković

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide geological storage represents a key segment of the carbon capture and storage system (CCS expected to significantly contribute to the reduction of its emissions, primarily in the developed countries and in those that are currently being industrialised. This approach to make use of the subsurface is entirely new meaning that several aspects are still in research phase. The paper gives a summary of the most important recent results with a short overview the possibilities in the Republic of Croatia. One option is to construct underground carbon dioxide storage facilities in deep coal seams or salt caverns. Another would be to use the CO2 in enhanced oil and gas recovery projects relying on the retention of the carbon dioxide in the deep reservoir because a portion of the injected gas is not going be produced together with hydrocarbons. Finally, the greatest potential estimated lies in depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs with significantly reduced reservoir pressure, as well as in the large regional units - layers of deep saline aquifers that extend through almost all sedimentary basins (the paper is published in Croatian.

  5. Photoconductivity of Activated Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity.

  6. Carbon Stars T. Lloyd Evans

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. Lloyd Evans. SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews,. Fife KY16 9SS, UK. ...... magnitude of the parent galaxy. The carbon stars are of two types, the ..... individual stars by different techniques and disagreements continued into more recent times. Lambert et al. (1986) ...

  7. Single carbon nanotube photovoltaic device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barkelid, K.M.; Zwiller, V.G.

    2013-01-01

    Here we present photocurrent measurements on a single suspended carbon nanotube p-n junction. The p-n junction was induced by electrostatic doping by local gates, and the E11 and E22 resonances in the nanotube could be probed using photocurrent spectroscopy. Current-voltage characteristics were

  8. Carbon pricing in the EU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, Corjan; Vollebergh, Herman R.J.; Werf, van der Edwin

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies various options to support allowance prices in the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS), such as adjusting the cap, an auction reserve price, and fixed and variable carbon taxes in addition to the EU ETS. We use a dynamic computable general equilibrium model that explicitly allows

  9. Modelling Sublimation of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Brian

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author reports results in their efforts to model sublimation of carbon dioxide and the associated kinetics order and parameter estimation issues in their model. They have offered the reader two sets of data and several approaches to determine the rate of sublimation of a piece of solid dry ice. They presented several models…

  10. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laird, E.A.; Kuemmeth, F.; Steele, G.A.; Grove-Rasmussen, K.; Nygard, J.; Flensberg, K.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This

  11. Predicting new phases of carbon, carbonates, and carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganov, A. R.; Zhu, Q.; Lyakhov, A. O.; Zeng, Q.

    2012-12-01

    We will discuss latest developments and applications of the USPEX code [1] to carbon-based materials: -We predicted structures of two high-pressure phases of CaCO3 [2] and two complex new high-pressure structures of MgCO3 [3], and our predictions have just been confirmed by experiment. We find that in the top part of the Earth's mantle diamond and MgCO3 magnesite will be the main host of C, but most of the lower mantle will contain carbon in the form of Fe3C cementite, diamond and MgCO3 phases (magnesite and post-magnesite phase). In the D" layer, CaCO3 with a pyroxene-like structure will be stable. -For the Fe-C system at pressures of the Earth's inner core, contrary to conventional wisdom, Fe3C and Fe7C3 are not thermodynamically stable compounds at relevant pressures - the only stable iron carbide is the orthorhombic (Pnma) phase of Fe2C [4]. The upper bound for the carbon content in the inner core is 11-15 mol.% (2.6-3.7 wt.%), and we conclude that carbon is a likely important light alloying element in the core. -We studied possible decomposition of methane. We confirm [5] that methane on compression initially polymerizes into ethane and butane, and it still higher pressures diamond is formed. Thus, it is confirmed that heat can be is produced in Neptune's interior by sinking large amounts of diamond. -Now it is possible to perform optimization of physical properties, e,g, the density and hardness [6,7], which allowed the predicted the densest possible structures of carbon [6]. These are up to 3.2% denser than diamond and possess interesting optical and electronic properties and their strong similarities with known phases of silica, quartz and keatite. It was also proven [7] that diamond is the hardest possible allotrope of carbon. -The evolutionary metadynamics technique [8] allowed us to predict the full set of candidate structures that could be formed upon low-temperature compression of graphite [9]. This includes our earlier proposed [1,10] monoclinic (M-carbon

  12. The Australian terrestrial carbon budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Haverd

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a study of the full carbon (C-CO2 budget of the Australian continent, focussing on 1990–2011 in the context of estimates over two centuries. The work is a contribution to the RECCAP (REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes project, as one of numerous regional studies. In constructing the budget, we estimate the following component carbon fluxes: net primary production (NPP; net ecosystem production (NEP; fire; land use change (LUC; riverine export; dust export; harvest (wood, crop and livestock and fossil fuel emissions (both territorial and non-territorial. Major biospheric fluxes were derived using BIOS2 (Haverd et al., 2012, a fine-spatial-resolution (0.05° offline modelling environment in which predictions of CABLE (Wang et al., 2011, a sophisticated land surface model with carbon cycle, are constrained by multiple observation types. The mean NEP reveals that climate variability and rising CO2 contributed 12 ± 24 (1σ error on mean and 68 ± 15 TgC yr−1, respectively. However these gains were partially offset by fire and LUC (along with other minor fluxes, which caused net losses of 26 ± 4 TgC yr−1 and 18 ± 7 TgC yr−1, respectively. The resultant net biome production (NBP is 36 ± 29 TgC yr−1, in which the largest contributions to uncertainty are NEP, fire and LUC. This NBP offset fossil fuel emissions (95 ± 6 TgC yr−1 by 38 ± 30%. The interannual variability (IAV in the Australian carbon budget exceeds Australia's total carbon emissions by fossil fuel combustion and is dominated by IAV in NEP. Territorial fossil fuel emissions are significantly smaller than the rapidly growing fossil fuel exports: in 2009–2010, Australia exported 2.5 times more carbon in fossil fuels than it emitted by burning fossil fuels.

  13. Chapter 4: Geological Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, J; Herzog, H

    2006-06-14

    Carbon sequestration is the long term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. The largest potential reservoirs for storing carbon are the deep oceans and geological reservoirs in the earth's upper crust. This chapter focuses on geological sequestration because it appears to be the most promising large-scale approach for the 2050 timeframe. It does not discuss ocean or terrestrial sequestration. In order to achieve substantial GHG reductions, geological storage needs to be deployed at a large scale. For example, 1 Gt C/yr (3.6 Gt CO{sub 2}/yr) abatement, requires carbon capture and storage (CCS) from 600 large pulverized coal plants ({approx}1000 MW each) or 3600 injection projects at the scale of Statoil's Sleipner project. At present, global carbon emissions from coal approximate 2.5 Gt C. However, given reasonable economic and demand growth projections in a business-as-usual context, global coal emissions could account for 9 Gt C. These volumes highlight the need to develop rapidly an understanding of typical crustal response to such large projects, and the magnitude of the effort prompts certain concerns regarding implementation, efficiency, and risk of the enterprise. The key questions of subsurface engineering and surface safety associated with carbon sequestration are: (1) Subsurface issues: (a) Is there enough capacity to store CO{sub 2} where needed? (b) Do we understand storage mechanisms well enough? (c) Could we establish a process to certify injection sites with our current level of understanding? (d) Once injected, can we monitor and verify the movement of subsurface CO{sub 2}? (2) Near surface issues: (a) How might the siting of new coal plants be influenced by the distribution of storage sites? (b) What is the probability of CO{sub 2} escaping from injection sites? What are the attendant risks? Can we detect leakage if it occurs? (3) Will surface leakage negate or

  14. Fragmentation of small carbon clusters, a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beroff, K. [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud, batiment 351, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)], E-mail: karine.beroff@u-psud.fr; Chabot, M. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS-IN2P3 and Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Mezdari, F. [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud, batiment 351, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Martinet, G.; Tuna, T. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS-IN2P3 and Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Desesquelles, P. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et Spectrometrie de Masse, Universite Paris-Sud and CNRS-IN2P3, batiment 104, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); LePadellec, A. [Institut de Recherche sur les Systemes Atomiques et Moleculaires Complexes, Universite Paul Sabatier and CNRS, batiment 3R1B4, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Barat, M. [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud, batiment 351, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2009-03-15

    An overview of the works devoted to fragmentation of small carbon clusters is given in a first part. Fragmentation of swift neutral and (multi) charged carbon clusters studied with the AGAT spectrometer is presented and discussed in a second part.

  15. Fragmentation of small carbon clusters, a review

    OpenAIRE

    Béroff, K.; Chabot, M.; Mezdari, F.; Martinet, G.; Tuna, T.; Désesquelles, P.; Le Padellec, Arnaud; Barat, M.

    2008-01-01

    An overview of the works devoted to fragmentation of small carbon clusters is given in a first part. Fragmentation of swift neutral and (multi) charged carbon clusters studied with the AGAT spectrometer is presented and discussed in a second part.

  16. Seawater carbonate chemistry, Kahekili, west Maui

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Time-series of seawater carbonate chemistry variables, including salinity, dissolved inorganic nutrients, pH, total alkalinity, and dissolved inorganic carbon from...

  17. Carbon nanomaterials for high-performance supercapacitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Tao; Dai, Liming

    2013-01-01

    .... Recently, carbon nanomaterials (especially, carbon nanotubes and graphene) have been widely investigated as effective electrodes in supercapacitors due to their high specific surface area, excellent electrical and mechanical properties...

  18. Carbon Nanomaterials as Reinforcements for Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials including fellerenes, nanotubes (CNT) and nanofibers have been proposed for many applications. One of applications is to use the carbon nanomaterials as reinforcements for composites, especially for polymer matrices. Carbon nanotubes is a good reinforcement for lightweight composite applications due to its low mass density and high Young's modulus. Two obscures need to overcome for carbon nanotubes as reinforcements in composites, which are large quantity production and functioning the nanotubes. This presentation will discuss the carbon nanotube growth by chemical vapor deposition. In order to reduce the cost of producing carbon nanotubes as well as preventing the sliding problems, carbon nanotubes were also synthesized on carbon fibers. The synthesis process and characterization results of nanotubes and nanotubes/fibers will be discussed in the presentation.

  19. One-carbon metabolism in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Alice C; Maddocks, Oliver D K

    2017-06-06

    Cells require one-carbon units for nucleotide synthesis, methylation and reductive metabolism, and these pathways support the high proliferative rate of cancer cells. As such, anti-folates, drugs that target one-carbon metabolism, have long been used in the treatment of cancer. Amino acids, such as serine are a major one-carbon source, and cancer cells are particularly susceptible to deprivation of one-carbon units by serine restriction or inhibition of de novo serine synthesis. Recent work has also begun to decipher the specific pathways and sub-cellular compartments that are important for one-carbon metabolism in cancer cells. In this review we summarise the historical understanding of one-carbon metabolism in cancer, describe the recent findings regarding the generation and usage of one-carbon units and explore possible future therapeutics that could exploit the dependency of cancer cells on one-carbon metabolism.

  20. Carbon Footprint Calculator | Climate Change | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-12

    An interactive calculator to estimate your household's carbon footprint. This tool will estimate carbon pollution emissions from your daily activities and show how to reduce your emissions and save money through simple steps.

  1. Epoxy-based carbon nanotubes reinforced composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kesavan Pillai, Sreejarani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available developed strategy offering promising results is to reinforce epoxy matrices with nano-sized organic and inorganic particles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanofibres (CNFs), nanoclays, metal oxide nanoparticles, etc. and make new materials...

  2. (Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

  3. Carbon balance of the Alaskan boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Yarie; Tim Hammond

    1996-01-01

    Determination of the carbon balance in a broad forest region like the Alaskan boreal forest requires the development of a number of important environmental (state factors) classes to allow for the development of carbon balance estimates.

  4. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  5. Benthic carbonate factories of the Phanerozoic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlager, W.

    2003-01-01

    Marine carbonate precipitation occurs in three basic modes: abiotic (or quasi-abiotic), biotically induced, and biotically controlled. On a geologic scale, these precipitation modes combine to form three carbonate production systems, or "factories" in the benthic environment: (1) tropical

  6. Moderate Temperature Synthesis of Mesoporous Carbon

    KAUST Repository

    Dua, Rubal

    2013-01-03

    Methods and composition for preparation of mesoporous carbon material are provided. For example, in certain aspects methods for carbonization and activation at selected temperature ranges are described. Furthermore, the invention provides products prepared therefrom.

  7. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2004-12-21

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  8. Robust optical carbon dioxide isotope analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Isotopic analysis of carbon dioxide is an important tool for characterization of the exchange and transformation of carbon between the biosphere and the atmosphere....

  9. Carbon Dioxide Embolism during Laparoscopic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Young; Kwon, Ja-Young

    2012-01-01

    Clinically significant carbon dioxide embolism is a rare but potentially fatal complication of anesthesia administered during laparoscopic surgery. Its most common cause is inadvertent injection of carbon dioxide into a large vein, artery or solid organ. This error usually occurs during or shortly after insufflation of carbon dioxide into the body cavity, but may result from direct intravascular insufflation of carbon dioxide during surgery. Clinical presentation of carbon dioxide embolism ranges from asymptomatic to neurologic injury, cardiovascular collapse or even death, which is dependent on the rate and volume of carbon dioxide entrapment and the patient's condition. We reviewed extensive literature regarding carbon dioxide embolism in detail and set out to describe the complication from background to treatment. We hope that the present work will improve our understanding of carbon dioxide embolism during laparoscopic surgery. PMID:22476987

  10. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is an innovative method that for the first time uses the strong reductant carbon monoxide to both reduce iron...

  11. Coating Carbon Fibers With Platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Michael R.; Duncan, Peter; Coupland, Duncan; Rigali, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    A process for coating carbon fibers with platinum has been developed. The process may also be adaptable to coating carbon fibers with other noble and refractory metals, including rhenium and iridium. The coated carbon fibers would be used as ingredients of matrix/fiber composite materials that would resist oxidation at high temperatures. The metal coats would contribute to oxidation resistance by keeping atmospheric oxygen away from fibers when cracks form in the matrices. Other processes that have been used to coat carbon fibers with metals have significant disadvantages: Metal-vapor deposition processes yield coats that are nonuniform along both the lengths and the circumferences of the fibers. The electrical resistivities of carbon fibers are too high to be compatible with electrolytic processes. Metal/organic vapor deposition entails the use of expensive starting materials, it may be necessary to use a furnace, and the starting materials and/or materials generated in the process may be hazardous. The present process does not have these disadvantages. It yields uniform, nonporous coats and is relatively inexpensive. The process can be summarized as one of pretreatment followed by electroless deposition. The process consists of the following steps: The surfaces of the fiber are activated by deposition of palladium crystallites from a solution. The surface-activated fibers are immersed in a solution that contains platinum. A reducing agent is used to supply electrons to effect a chemical reduction in situ. The chemical reduction displaces the platinum from the solution. The displaced platinum becomes deposited on the fibers. Each platinum atom that has been deposited acts as a catalytic site for the deposition of another platinum atom. Hence, the deposition process can also be characterized as autocatalytic. The thickness of the deposited metal can be tailored via the duration of immersion and the chemical activity of the solution.

  12. Carbon Sequestration via Wood Burial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, N.

    2007-12-01

    To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which forest dead wood or old trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. It was estimated that the carbon sequestration potential of forest wood harvest and burial is 10GtC y-1 with an uncertainty range of 5-15 GtC y-1. Based on data from North American logging industry, the cost was crudely estimated at $50/tC, significantly lower than the cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage, a carbon sequestration technique currently under most serious consideration. The low cost is largely because the CO2 capture is achieved at little cost by the natural process of photosynthesis. The technique is low tech, distributed, safe and can be stopped or reversed at any time. The relatively low cost may soon be competitive enough for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon trading market. In tropical regions with ongoing deforestation, wood burial instead of burning will immediately reduce that portion of the anthropogenic CO2 emission.

  13. Carbon Nanomaterials for Road Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaporotskova Irina Vladimirovna

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The requirement of developing and modernizing the roads in Russia and in the Volgograd region in particular, is based on need of expanding the directions of scientific research on road and transport complexes. They have to be aimed at the development of the theory of transport streams, traffic safety increase, and, first of all, at the application of original methods of road development and modernization, introduction of modern technologies and road-building materials.On the basis of the analysis of the plans for transportation sphere development in the Volgograd region assuming the need to apply the new technologies allowing to create qualitative paving, the authors propose the technology of creating a heavy-duty paving with the use of carbon nanomaterial. The knowledge on strengthening the characteristics of carbon nanotubes is a unique material for nanotechnology development which allowed to assume the analysis of general information about asphalt concrete. The analysis showed that carbon nanotubes can be used for improvement of operational characteristics of asphalt concrete, and it is possible to carry out additives of nanotubes in hot as well as in cold bitumen. The article contains the basic principles of creation of the new road material received by means of bitumen reinforcing by carbon nanotubes. The structures received by the offered technique binding on the basis of the bitumens modified by carbon nanomaterial can be used for coverings and bases on highways of all categories in all road and climatic zones of Russia. The technical result consists in increasing the durability and elasticity of the received asphalt covering, and also the increase of water resistance, heat resistance and frost resistance, the expansion of temperature range of its laying in the field of negative temperatures.

  14. Issues behind Competitiveness and Carbon Leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This report explores the vulnerability of heavy industry to carbon leakage and competitiveness loss. It reviews the existing literature on competitiveness and carbon leakage under uneven climate policies. It also suggests a statistical method to track carbon leakage, and applies this methodology to Phase I of the EU emissions trading scheme, for various industrial activities: iron and steel, cement, aluminium and refineries. Finally, it reviews measures to mitigate carbon leakage, as discussed in Australia, Canada, Europe, New Zealand and the US.

  15. Enabling food security by verifying agricultural carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahiluoto, H; Smith, P; Moran, D

    2014-01-01

    Rewarding smallholders for sequestering carbon in agricultural land can improve food security while mitigating climate change. Verification of carbon offsets in food-insecure regions is possible and achievable through rigorously controlled monitoring......Rewarding smallholders for sequestering carbon in agricultural land can improve food security while mitigating climate change. Verification of carbon offsets in food-insecure regions is possible and achievable through rigorously controlled monitoring...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1240 - Carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Carbon dioxide. 184.1240 Section 184.1240 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1240 Carbon dioxide. (a) Carbon dioxide (empirical formula CO2, CAS Reg. No.... The solid form, dry ice, sublimes under atmospheric pressure at a temperature of −78.5 °C. Carbon...

  17. 75 FR 29534 - Inorganic Nitrates-Nitrite, Carbon and Carbon Dioxide, and Sulfur Registration Review; Draft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-26

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2010-12591] ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [EPA-HQ-OPP-2010-0434; FRL-8826-6] Inorganic... ecological risk assessment for the registration review of inorganic nitrates - nitrites, carbon and carbon... inorganic nitrates- nitrites, carbon and carbon dioxide uses, as well as gas cartridge uses of sulfur. The...

  18. N-heterocyclic carbene catalyzed synthesis of dimethyl carbonate via transesterification of ethylene carbonate with methanol

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Guang-Fen; Guo, Hao; Wang, Ying; Li, Wen-Juan; Shi, Wei-Jie; Dai, Bin

    2015-01-01

    An organocatalytic protocol for the synthesis of dimethyl carbonate has been developed. Under the catalysis of 5 mol% N-heterocyclic carbenes, ethylene carbonate undergoes transesterification reaction with methanol under very mild reaction conditions, producing dimethyl carbonate with high efficiency. Furthermore, this N-heterocyclic carbene promoted transesterification can be scaled-up easily without lose of the conversion of dimethyl carbonate.

  19. Page 1 Use of coal tar pitch for carbon-carbon composites 97 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fitzer E, Huttner W and Manocha L. M. 198Ob Carbon 1829. Kippling JJ, Sherwood JN, Shooter P V and Thomson N R 1963-64 Carbon 1315. Kippling JJ, Shooter P W and Young R N 1966 Carbon 4 341. Lowry H H 1968 Chemistry of coal utilization (New York: John Wiley). Mantall CL 1968 Carbon and graphite handbook ...

  20. Dissolved carbon leaching from soil is a crucial component of the net ecosystem carbon balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kindler, R.; Siemens, J.; Kaiser, K.; Moors, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Estimates of carbon leaching losses from different land use systems are few and their contribution to the net ecosystem carbon balance is uncertain. We investigated leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and dissolved methane (CH4), at forests, grasslands, and

  1. Preparation of flat carbon support films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, RI; Oostergetel, GT; Brisson, A

    Wrinkling of carbon support films is known to limit the resolution of electron microscopy images of protein two-dimensional crystals. The origin of carbon wrinkling during preparation of the support films was investigated by reflected light microscopy. We observed that carbon films go through

  2. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/carbondioxideco2inblood.html Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Blood To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. What is a Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Blood Test? Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an odorless, ...

  3. Silicon Whisker and Carbon Nanofiber Composite Anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junqing (Inventor); Newman, Aron (Inventor); Lennhoff, John (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A carbon nanofiber can have a surface and include at least one crystalline whisker extending from the surface of the carbon nanofiber. A battery anode composition can be formed from a plurality of carbon nanofibers each including a plurality of crystalline whiskers.

  4. Dual Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to Hemminga & Mateo. (1996), values of carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios vary considerably between seagrass species. It might also be expected that the remaining seagrass species could have some influence on the shrimp carbon signal. Isotopic evidence for mangroves being a carbon source for shrimps ...

  5. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  6. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.1191 Section 582.1191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Supplements 1 § 582.5191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.5191 Section 582.5191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL...

  8. Optimization of nutritional constituents for carbonic anhydrase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-08

    Aug 8, 2011 ... composition of the media could achieve better results in contrast to the conventional method. Key words: Bacillus mucilaginosus, carbonic anhydrase, specific production rate, kinetic analysis, orthogonal design. INTRODUCTION. Carbonic anhydrase (CA), which catalyzes the hydration of carbon dioxide ...

  9. A rechargeable carbon-oxygen battery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention relates to a rechargeable battery and a method to operate a rechargeable battery having high efficiency and high energy density for storing energy. The battery stores electrical energy in the bonds of carbon and oxygen atoms by converting carbon dioxide into solid carbon and oxygen....

  10. Carbon dioxide capture process with regenerable sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennline, Henry W.; Hoffman, James S.

    2002-05-14

    A process to remove carbon dioxide from a gas stream using a cross-flow, or a moving-bed reactor. In the reactor the gas contacts an active material that is an alkali-metal compound, such as an alkali-metal carbonate, alkali-metal oxide, or alkali-metal hydroxide; or in the alternative, an alkaline-earth metal compound, such as an alkaline-earth metal carbonate, alkaline-earth metal oxide, or alkaline-earth metal hydroxide. The active material can be used by itself or supported on a substrate of carbon, alumina, silica, titania or aluminosilicate. When the active material is an alkali-metal compound, the carbon-dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate bicarbonate. When the active material is an alkaline-earth metal, the carbon dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate carbonate. Spent sorbent containing the bicarbonate or carbonate is moved to a second reactor where it is heated or treated with a reducing agent such as, natural gas, methane, carbon monoxide hydrogen, or a synthesis gas comprising of a combination of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The heat or reducing agent releases carbon dioxide gas and regenerates the active material for use as the sorbent material in the first reactor. New sorbent may be added to the regenerated sorbent prior to subsequent passes in the carbon dioxide removal reactor.

  11. Organic carbon content of tropical zooplankton

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, V.R.

    In the Zuari and Mandovi estuaries variations in organic carbon of zooplankton are 26.4-38.8 and 24-39.9% of dry weight respectively. Maximum carbon content of estuarine zooplankton is observed in November. Organic carbon in nearshore and oceanic...

  12. Carbon prices for the next hundred years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerlagh, Reyer; Liski, M.

    This paper examines the socially optimal pricing of carbon emissions over time when climate-change impacts are unknown, potentially high-consequence events. The carbon price tends to increase with income. But learning about impacts, or their absence, decouples the carbon price from income growth.

  13. Optimal abatement of carbon emission flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withagen, C.A.A.M.; Moreaux, M.

    2015-01-01

    We study optimal carbon capture and storage (CCS) from point sources, taking into account damages incurred from the accumulation of carbon in the atmosphere and exhaustibility of fossil fuel reserves. High carbon concentrations call for full CCS, meaning zero net emissions. We identify conditions

  14. Filling of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reece D. Gately

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The reliable production of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is a relatively new development, and due to their unique structure, there has been much interest in filling their hollow interiors. In this review, we provide an overview of the most common approaches for filling these carbon nanostructures. We highlight that filled carbon nanostructures are an emerging material for biomedical applications.

  15. Lithographically defined microporous carbon-composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckel, David Bruce; Washburn, Cody M.; Lambert, Timothy N.; Finnegan, Patrick Sean; Wheeler, David R.

    2016-12-06

    A microporous carbon scaffold is produced by lithographically patterning a carbon-containing photoresist, followed by pyrolysis of the developed resist structure. Prior to exposure, the photoresist is loaded with a nanoparticulate material. After pyrolysis, the nanonparticulate material is dispersed in, and intimately mixed with, the carbonaceous material of the scaffold, thereby yielding a carbon composite structure.

  16. Carbon sp chains in graphene nanoholes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castelli, Ivano Eligio; Ferri, Nicola; Onida, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays sp carbon chains terminated by graphene or graphitic-like carbon are synthesized routinely in several nanotech labs. We propose an ab initio study of such carbon-only materials, by computing their structure and stability, as well as their electronic, vibrational and magnetic properties. We...

  17. Mexican forest inventory expands continental carbon monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto Sandoval Uribe; Sean. P. Healey; Gretchen G. Moisen; Rigoberto Palafox Rivas; Enrique Gonzalez Aguilar; Carmen Lourdes Meneses Tovar; Ernesto S. Diaz Ponce Davalos; Vanessa Silva Mascorro

    2008-01-01

    The terrestrial ecosystems of the North American continent represent a large reservoir of carbon and a potential sink within the global carbon cycle. The recent State of the Carbon Cycle Report [U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP), 2007] identified the critical role these systems may play in mitigating effects of greenhouse gases emitted from fossil fuel...

  18. Composite supercapacitor electrodes made of activated carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 36; Issue 4. Composite supercapacitor electrodes made of activated carbon/PEDOT:PSS and activated carbon/doped PEDOT. T S Sonia P A ... Carbon materials; composite materials; electrodeposition; energy storage and conversion; thin films; conducting polymers.

  19. Carbon prices for the next hundred years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerlagh, Reyer; Liski, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the socially optimal pricing of carbon emissions over time when climate-change impacts are unknown, potentially high-consequence events. The carbon price tends to increase with income. But learning about impacts, or their absence, decouples the carbon price from income growth.

  20. The Synthesis of Carbon Nanomaterials using Chlorinated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICOLAAS

    Nanotechnology is a topic that is attracting the interest of scientists in academia, research institutions and industry as well as government officials and journalists. Carbon nanotubes. (CNTs) and carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) in general are key components in the progress of nanotechnology. Polyhedral carbon clusters ...

  1. The organic carbon pump in the Atlantic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omta, A.W.; Bruggeman, J.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.; Dijkstra, H.A.

    2009-01-01

    The growth, sinking and remineralisation of phytoplankton constitute the soft-tissue carbon pump. Here we derive the expression for the strength of this carbon pump in terms of the nutrient utilisation and the carbon:nutrient ratio of plankton. Furthermore, we aim to determine how the physical

  2. dielectric constants of irradiated and carbonated polymers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1985-09-01

    Sep 1, 1985 ... irradiated and carbonated polymers as a function of carbon concentration are investigated. Both low and high density polymers are used. Results predict a quadratic increase in the dielectric constant of specimen as the percentage concentration of carbon is increased. This may be due to the formation of ...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1240 - Carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide. 582.1240 Section 582.1240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1240 Carbon dioxide. (a) Product. Carbon dioxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  4. Carbon dioxide-assisted fabrication of highly uniform submicron-sized colloidal carbon spheres via hydrothermal carbonization using soft drink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Gun-Hee; Shin, Yongsoon; Arey, Bruce W.; Wang, Chong M.; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Choi, Wonyong; Liu, Jun

    2012-10-01

    An eco-friendly and economical method for the formation of uniform-sized carbon spheres by hydrothermal dehydration/condensation of a commercial carbonated beverage at 200 oC is reported. CO2 dissolved in the beverage accelerates the dehydration kinetics of the dissolved sugar molecules leading to production of homogeneous carbon spheres having a diameter less than 850 nm. In the presence of CO2, the rough surface of these carbon spheres likely results from continuous Ostwald ripening of constituent microscopic carbon-containing spheres that are formed by subsequent polymerization of intermediate HMF molecules.

  5. Increased graphitization in electrospun single suspended carbon nanowires integrated with carbon-MEMS and carbon-NEMS platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati; Sharma, Ashutosh; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Madou, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Single suspended carbon nanowires (CNWs) integrated on carbon-MEMS (CMEMS) structures are fabricated by electrospinning of SU-8 photoresist followed by pyrolysis. These monolithic CNW-CMEMS structures enable fabrication of very high aspect ratio CNWs of predefined length. The CNWs thus fabricated display core-shell structures having a graphitic shell with a glassy carbon core. The electrical conductivity of these CNWs is increased by about 100% compared to glassy carbon as a result of enhanced graphitization. We suggest some tunable fabrication and pyrolysis parameters that may improve graphitization in the resulting CNWs, making them a good replacement for several carbon nanostructure-based devices. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  6. production and characterization of activated carbon from leather ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    ABSTRACT. Powdered activated carbon (PAC) was prepared from leather buffing waste, sawdust and lignite by carbonization ... Key words: Activated carbon, carbonization, Steam activation, Adsorption efficiency, Leather buffing waste. INTRODUCTION ..... Distribution Measurement” Separation Science and Technology 28 ...

  7. High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

    2014-01-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

  8. Quantification of carbon nanomaterials in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifang; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Cao, Aoneng; Liu, Yuanfang

    2013-03-19

    A diverse array of carbon nanomaterials (NMs), including fullerene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene, nanodiamonds, and carbon nanoparticles, have been discovered and widely applied in a variety of industries. Carbon NMs have been detected in the environment and have a strong possibility of entering the human body. The safety of carbon NMs has thus become a serious concern in academia and society. To achieve strict biosafety assessments, researchers need to fully understand the effects and fates of NMs in the human body, including information about absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADME/T). To acquire the ADME data, researchers must quantify NMs, but carbon NMs are very difficult to quantify in vivo. The carbon background in a typical biological system is high, particularly compared with the much lower concentration of carbon NMs. Moreover, carbon NMs lack a specific detection signal. Therefore, isotopic labeling, with its high sensitivity and specificity, is the first choice to quantify carbon NMs in vivo. Previously, researchers have used many isotopes, including ¹³C, ¹⁴C, ¹²⁵I, ¹³¹I, ³H, ⁶⁴Cu, ¹¹¹In, ⁸⁶Y, 99mTc, and ⁶⁷Ga, to label carbon NMs. We used these isotopic labeling methods to study the ADME of carbon NMs via different exposure pathways in animal models. Except for the metabolism of carbon NMs, which has seldom been investigated, significant amounts of data have been reported on the in vivo absorption, distribution, excretion, and toxicity of carbon NMs, which have revealed characteristic behaviors of carbon NMs, such as reticuloendothelial system (RES) capture. However, the complexity of the biological systems and diverse preparation and functionalization of the same carbon NMs have led to inconsistent results across different studies. Therefore, the data obtained so far have not provided a compatible and systematic profile of biosafety. Further efforts are needed to address these problems. In

  9. Optimization of process parameters during carbonization for improved carbon fibre strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, T.; Pursche, F.; Burscheidt, P.; Seide, G.; Gries, T.

    2017-10-01

    Based on their extraordinary properties, carbon fibres nowadays play a significant role in modern industries. In the last years carbon fibres are increasingly used for lightweight constructions in the energy or the transportation industry. However, a bigger market penetration of carbon fibres is still hindered by high prices (~ 22 /kg) [3]. One crucial step in carbon fibre production is the process of carbonization of stabilized fibres. However, the cause effect relationships of carbonization are nowadays not fully understood. Therefore, the main goal of this research work is the quantification of the cause-effect relationships of process parameters like temperature and residence time on carbon fibre strength.

  10. Poly(urethane–carbonate)s from Carbon Dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zuliang

    2017-03-09

    A one-pot, two-step protocol for the direct synthesis of polyurethanes containing few carbonate linkages through polycondensation of diamines, dihalides, and CO2 in the presence of Cs2CO3 and tetrabutylammonium bromide is described. The conditions were optimized by studying the polycondensation of CO2 with 1,6-hexanediamine and 1,4-dibromobutane as model monomers. Then, various diamines and dihalides were tested under optimal conditions. Miscellaneous samples of such carbonate-containing polyurethanes exhibiting molar masses from 6000 to 22 000 g/mol (GPC) and yields higher than 85% were obtained. The thermal properties of such polyurethanes were unveiled by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA): they were found very similar to those of traditional polyurethanes obtained by diisocyanates + diols polycondensation.

  11. Probabilistic fracture mechanics of 2D carbon-carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moet, A.; Mostafa, I.; Chudnovsky, A.; Kunin, B.

    1992-05-01

    The fracture toughness of two types of carbon-fabric-reinforced carbon composite (KKARB, Types A and C) is evaluated, the mechanisms of crack propagation resistance are identified, and both are related to microstructural differences. The two composites have the same constituents (i.e., fibers, yarns, fabric weaving and matrix precursor). However, different processing cycles result in apparent differences in microstructure (e.g., different number and length distribution of microcracks, crimp angle) and toughness. The crack diffusion model (CDM) is invoked to parameterize the fluctuating strength field of the composite in terms of an average fracture energy gamma a minimum fracture energy gamma(min) and a shape parameter alpha. The values of gamma(min) are in direct correlation with the average size of microcracks in each composite, and alpha is found to correlate with the scatter in fracture toughness.

  12. Synthesis of dimethyl carbonate in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ballivet-Tkatchenko

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The reactivity of carbon dioxide with methanol to form dimethyl carbonate was studied in the presence of the n-butylmethoxytin compounds n-Bu3SnOCH3, n-Bu2Sn(OCH32 , and [n-Bu2(CH3OSn]2 O. The reaction occurred under solventless conditions at 423 K and was produced by an increase in CO2 pressure. This beneficial effect is primarily attributed to phase behavior. The mass transfer under liquid-vapor biphasic conditions was not limiting when the system reached the supercritical state for a CO2 pressure higher than 16 MPa. Under these conditions, CO2 acted as a reactant and a solvent.

  13. Coaxial carbon plasma gun deposition of amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sater, D. M.; Gulino, D. A.; Rutledge, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    A unique plasma gun employing coaxial carbon electrodes was used in an attempt to deposit thin films of amorphous diamond-like carbon. A number of different structural, compositional, and electrical characterization techniques were used to characterize these films. These included scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X ray diffraction and absorption, spectrographic analysis, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Optical absorption and electrical resistivity measurements were also performed. The films were determined to be primarily amorphous, with poor adhesion to fused silica substrates. Many inclusions of particulates were found to be present as well. Analysis of these particulates revealed the presence of trace impurities, such as Fe and Cu, which were also found in the graphite electrode material. The electrodes were the source of these impurities. No evidence of diamond-like crystallite structure was found in any of the film samples. Details of the apparatus, experimental procedure, and film characteristics are presented.

  14. FABRICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF CARBON COMPOSITE FROM COCONUT SHELL CARBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meytij Jeanne Rampe

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Structure and chemical composition of coconut shell carbon with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA as the stimulant through the observation of TG-DTA, SEM-EDS and FTIR has been studied. The process was carried out by calcining coconut shell charcoal at the temperature of 873 and 1023 K under Nitrogen flow, then mixed with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA under composition of 2.5 to 7.5% (wt in water solvent. The growing of carbon composite structure was observed by heating the samples in Argon gas of 1673 K, the rate of temperature was 10 K/min in 3 h. The products were then analyzed by TG-DTA, SEM-EDS, FTIR and XRD. The result showed that the products were in uniform particle sizes of micrometer dimensions and spherical particles shape, with average content of C element was 97.44% (wt, aromatic character and semi-crystalline structure.

  15. Fracture of Carbon Nanotube - Amorphous Carbon Composites: Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates for use as reinforcements in next generation structural composite materials because of their extremely high specific stiffness and strength. They cannot, however, be viewed as simple replacements for carbon fibers because there are key differences between these materials in areas such as handling, processing, and matrix design. It is impossible to know for certain that CNT composites will represent a significant advance over carbon fiber composites before these various factors have been optimized, which is an extremely costly and time intensive process. This work attempts to place an upper bound on CNT composite mechanical properties by performing molecular dynamics simulations on idealized model systems with a reactive forcefield that permits modeling of both elastic deformations and fracture. Amorphous carbon (AC) was chosen for the matrix material in this work because of its structural simplicity and physical compatibility with the CNT fillers. It is also much stiffer and stronger than typical engineering polymer matrices. Three different arrangements of CNTs in the simulation cell have been investigated: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. The SWNT and MWNT array systems are clearly idealizations, but the SWNT bundle system is a step closer to real systems in which individual tubes aggregate into large assemblies. The effect of chemical crosslinking on composite properties is modeled by adding bonds between the CNTs and AC. The balance between weakening the CNTs and improving fiber-matrix load transfer is explored by systematically varying the extent of crosslinking. It is, of course, impossible to capture the full range of deformation and fracture processes that occur in real materials with even the largest atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. With this limitation in mind, the simulation results reported here provide a plausible upper limit on

  16. Nanomodified Carbon/Carbon Composites for Intermediate Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-31

    Several types of nanoparticles were used in this Phase II study. They are listed as follows: " Surface treated montmorillonite nanoclays (MMT nanoclays... surface treated clay, carbon nanofibers, POSS®, or n-SiC are introduced into cyanate ester resin and n-SiC into the AR mesophase pitch monomer resin. Four...unit will be discussed in more detail in the Discussion of Results section). Montmorillonite Nanoclays - The Cloisite® 30B is an organic surface

  17. Water-carbon Links in a Tropical Forest: How Interbasin Groundwater Flow Affects Carbon Fluxes and Ecosystem Carbon Budgets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genereux, David [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Osburn, Christopher [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Oberbauer, Steven [Florida Intl Univ., Miami, FL (United States); Oviedo Vargas, Diana [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Dierick, Diego [Florida Intl Univ., Miami, FL (United States)

    2017-03-27

    This report covers the outcomes from a quantitative, interdisciplinary field investigation of how carbon fluxes and budgets in a lowland tropical rainforest are affected by the discharge of old regional groundwater into streams, springs, and wetlands in the forest. The work was carried out in a lowland rainforest of Costa Rica, at La Selva Biological Station. The research shows that discharge of regional groundwater high in dissolved carbon dioxide represents a significant input of carbon to the rainforest "from below", an input that is on average larger than the carbon input "from above" from the atmosphere. A stream receiving discharge of regional groundwater had greatly elevated emissions of carbon dioxide (but not methane) to the overlying air, and elevated downstream export of carbon from its watershed with stream flow. The emission of deep geological carbon dioxide from stream water elevates the carbon dioxide concentrations in air above the streams. Carbon-14 tracing revealed the presence of geological carbon in the leaves and stems of some riparian plants near streams that receive inputs of regional groundwater. Also, discharge of regional groundwater is responsible for input of dissolved organic matter with distinctive chemistry to rainforest streams and wetlands. The discharge of regional groundwater in lowland surface waters has a major impact on the carbon cycle in this and likely other tropical and non-tropical forests.

  18. Multifunctional Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Cano, Roberto J.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Luong, Hoa; Grimsley, Brian W.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    For aircraft primary structures, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages over conventional aluminum alloys due to their light weight, higher strengthand stiffness-to-weight ratio, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low electrical and thermal conductivities of CFRP composites fail to provide structural safety in certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. Despite several attempts to solve these issues with the addition of carbon nanotubes (CNT) into polymer matrices, and/or by interleaving CNT sheets between conventional carbon fiber (CF) composite layers, there are still interfacial problems that exist between CNTs (or CF) and the resin. In this study, hybrid CNT/CF polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel® IM7/8852 prepreg. Resin concentrations from 1 wt% to 50 wt% were used to infuse the CNT sheets prior to composite fabrication. The interlaminar properties of the resulting hybrid composites were characterized by mode I and II fracture toughness testing (double cantilever beam and end-notched flexure test). Fractographical analysis was performed to study the effect of resin concentration. In addition, multi-directional physical properties like thermal conductivity of the orthotropic hybrid polymer composite were evaluated. Interleaving CNT sheets significantly improved the in-plane (axial and perpendicular direction of CF alignment) thermal conductivity of the hybrid composite laminates by 50 - 400%.

  19. Thermal Properties of Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Cano, Roberto J.; Luong, Hoa; Ratcliffe, James G.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages for aircraft structures over conventional aluminum alloys: light weight, higher strength- and stiffness-to-weight ratio, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low thermal and electrical conductivities of CFRP composites are deficient in providing structural safety under certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. One possible solution to these issues is to interleave carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets between conventional carbon fiber (CF) composite layers. However, the thermal and electrical properties of the orthotropic hybrid CNT/CF composites have not been fully understood. In this study, hybrid CNT/CF polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel (Registered Trademark) IM7/8852 prepreg. The CNT sheets were infused with a 5% solution of a compatible epoxy resin prior to composite fabrication. Orthotropic thermal and electrical conductivities of the hybrid polymer composites were evaluated. The interleaved CNT sheets improved the in-plane thermal conductivity of the hybrid composite laminates by about 400% and the electrical conductivity by about 3 orders of magnitude.

  20. Stabilization of carbon dioxide and chromium slag via carbonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xingxing; Yu, Binbin; Xu, Wei; Fan, Zheng; Wu, Zucheng; Zhang, Huimin

    2017-08-01

    As the main greenhouse gas, CO2 is considered as a threat in the context of global warming. Many available technologies to reduce CO2 emission was about CO2 separation from coal combustion and geological sequestration. However, how to deal with the cost-effective storage of CO2 has become a new challenge. Moreover, chromium pollution, the treatment of which requires huge energy consumption, has attracted people's widespread attention. This study is aimed to develop the sequestration of CO2 via chromium slag. A dynamic leaching experiment of chromium slag was designed to testify the ability of CO2 adsorption onto chromium slag and to release Cr(VI) for stabilization. The results showed that the accumulative amounts of Cr(VI) were ca. 2.6 mg/g released from the chromium slag after 24 h of leaching. In addition, ca. 89 mg/g CO2 was adsorbed by using pure CO2 in the experiment at 12 h. Calcite is the only carbonate species in the post-carbonated slag analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis. The approach provides the feasibility of the utilization of chromium slag and sequestration of the carbon dioxide at the same time at ordinary temperatures and pressures.

  1. CO2 Capture by Carbon Aerogel–Potassium Carbonate Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, various composites for reducing CO2 emissions have been extensively studied. Because of their high sorption capacity and low cost, alkali metal carbonates are recognized as a potential candidate to capture CO2 from flue gas under moist conditions. However, undesirable effects and characteristics such as high regeneration temperatures or the formation of byproducts lead to high energy costs associated with the desorption process and impede the application of these materials. In this study, we focused on the regeneration temperature of carbon aerogel–potassium carbonate (CA–KC nanocomposites, where KC nanocrystals were formed in the mesopores of the CAs. We observed that the nanopore size of the original CA plays an important role in decreasing the regeneration temperature and in enhancing the CO2 capture capacity. In particular, 7CA–KC, which was prepared from a CA with 7 nm pores, exhibited excellent performance, reducing the desorption temperature to 380 K and exhibiting a high CO2 capture capacity of 13.0 mmol/g-K2CO3, which is higher than the theoretical value for K2CO3 under moist conditions.

  2. Carbon sequestration via wood burial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Ning

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. It is estimated that a sustainable long-term carbon sequestration potential for wood burial is 10 ± 5 GtC y-1, and currently about 65 GtC is on the world's forest floors in the form of coarse woody debris suitable for burial. The potential is largest in tropical forests (4.2 GtC y-1, followed by temperate (3.7 GtC y-1 and boreal forests (2.1 GtC y-1. Burying wood has other benefits including minimizing CO2 source from deforestation, extending the lifetime of reforestation carbon sink, and reducing fire danger. There are possible environmental impacts such as nutrient lock-up which nevertheless appears manageable, but other concerns and factors will likely set a limit so that only part of the full potential can be realized. Based on data from North American logging industry, the cost for wood burial is estimated to be $14/tCO2($50/tC, lower than the typical cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage. The cost for carbon sequestration with wood burial is low because CO2 is removed from the atmosphere by the natural process of photosynthesis at little cost. The technique is low tech, distributed, easy to monitor, safe, and reversible, thus an attractive option for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon market.

  3. Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, and carbon fibers made thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Amit Kumar; Hunt, Marcus Andrew; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-08-04

    Methods for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, wherein the polyolefin fiber precursor is partially sulfonated and then carbonized to produce carbon fiber. Methods for producing hollow carbon fibers, wherein the hollow core is circular- or complex-shaped, are also described. Methods for producing carbon fibers possessing a circular- or complex-shaped outer surface, which may be solid or hollow, are also described.

  4. Preparation of PtRu/carbon hybrids by hydrothermal carbonization process

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Marques Tusi; Michele Brandalise; Olandir Vercino Correa; Almir Oliveira Neto; Marcelo Linardi; Estevam Vitorio Spinacé

    2007-01-01

    PtRu/Carbon hybrids were prepared by hydrothermal carbonization process using glucose or starch as carbon sources and reducing agents and platinum and ruthenium salts as catalysts of carbonization process and metals source. The obtained PtRu/Carbon materials were characterized by SEM/EDX, TGA, XRD and cyclic voltammetry. The electro-oxidation of methanol was studied by cyclic voltammetry using the thin porous coating technique aiming fuel cell application. The catalytic activity was dependent...

  5. Morphological Investigation of Calcium Carbonate during Ammonification-Carbonization Process of Low Concentration Calcium Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Huaigang Cheng; Xiaoxi Zhang; Huiping Song

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafine calcium carbonate is a widely used cheap additive. The research is conducted in low degree supersaturation solution in order to study the polymorphic phases’ change and its factors of the calcium carbonate precipitate in the ammonification-carbonization process of the solution with calcium. Fine particles of calcium carbonate are made in the solution containing 0.015 mol/L of Ca2+. Over 98% of the calcium carbonate precipitate without ammonification resembles the morphology of calci...

  6. Liberating energy from carbon introduction to decarbonization

    CERN Document Server

    Muradov, Nazim

    2014-01-01

    Liberating Energy from Carbon analyzes energy options in a carbon-constrained world. Major strategies and pathways to decarbonizing the carbon-intensive economy are laid out with a special emphasis on the prospects of achieving low-risk atmospheric CO2 levels. The opportunities and challenges in developing and bringing to market novel low and zero-carbon technologies are highlighted from technical, economic and environmental viewpoints. This book takes a unique approach by treating carbon in a holistic manner?tracking its complete transformation chain from fossil fuel sources to the unique pro

  7. Perspectives in the use of carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aresta Michele

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitigation of carbon dioxide is one of the scientific and technological challenges of the 2000s. Among the technologies that are under assessment, the recovery of carbon dioxide from power plants or industrial flue gases plays a strategic role. Recovered carbon dioxide can be either disposed in natural fields or used. The availability of large amounts of carbon dioxide may open new routes to its utilisation in biological, chemical and innovative technological processes. In this paper, the potential of carbon dioxide utilisation in the short-, medium-term is reviewed.

  8. Carbon nanotubes: synthesis, structure, functionalization, and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamolo, Valeria Anna; Vazquez, Ester; Prato, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have generated great expectations in the scientific arena, mainly due to their spectacular properties, which include a high aspect ratio, high strain resistance, and high strength, along with high conductivities. Nowadays, carbon nanotubes are produced by a variety of methods, each of them with advantages and disadvantages. Once produced, carbon nanotubes can be chemically modified, using a wide range of chemical reactions. Functionalization makes these long wires much easier to manipulate and dispersible in several solvents. In addition, the properties of carbon nanotubes can be combined with those of organic appendages. Finally, carbon nanotubes need to be carefully characterized, either as pristine or modified materials.

  9. Ternary carbon composite films for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Minh-Hai; Jeong, Hae Kyung

    2017-09-01

    A simple, binder-free, method of making supercapacitor electrodes is introduced, based on modification of activated carbon with graphite oxide and carbon nanotubes. The three carbon precursors of different morphologies support each other to provide outstanding electrochemical performance, such as high capacitance and high energy density. The ternary carbon composite shows six times higher specific capacitance compared to that of activated carbon itself with high retention. The excellent electrochemical properties of the ternary composite attribute to the high surface area of 1933 m2 g-1 and low equivalent series resistance of 2 Ω, demonstrating that it improve the electrochemical performance for supercapacitor applications.

  10. Biomedical applications of carbon-nanotube composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Jay Russell; Jin, Chunming; Narayan, Roger J; Aggarwal, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    The unique physical, chemical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes make them attractive for a variety of biomedical applications. Carbon nanotubes have been used to modify conventional biomedical materials to enhance mechanical properties, biocompatibility, or to impart other functionalities. New multifunctional composite materials using carbon nanotubes have been developed by combining them with inorganic, polymeric or biological materials. The biomedical applications for which novel carbon nanotube composites have been investigated include antimicrobial coatings, neural implants, tissue engineering scaffolds and electrochemical biosensors. In this paper, research on development and application of carbon nanotube composites for biomedical applications has been reviewed.

  11. Surface-functionalized mesoporous carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Sheng; Gorka, Joanna; Mayes, Richard T.

    2016-02-02

    A functionalized mesoporous carbon composition comprising a mesoporous carbon scaffold having mesopores in which polyvinyl polymer grafts are covalently attached, wherein said mesopores have a size of at least 2 nm and up to 50 nm. Also described is a method for producing the functionalized mesoporous composition, wherein a reaction medium comprising a precursor mesoporous carbon, vinyl monomer, initiator, and solvent is subjected to sonication of sufficient power to result in grafting and polymerization of the vinyl monomer into mesopores of the precursor mesoporous carbon. Also described are methods for using the functionalized mesoporous carbon, particularly in extracting metal ions from metal-containing solutions.

  12. Urban warming reduces aboveground carbon storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meineke, Emily; Youngsteadt, Elsa; Dunn, Robert Roberdeau

    2016-01-01

    sequestration (carbon stored per year) of mature trees. Urban warming increased herbivorous arthropod abundance on trees, but these herbivores had negligible effects on tree carbon sequestration. Instead, urban warming was associated with an estimated 12% loss of carbon sequestration, in part because...... photosynthesis was reduced at hotter sites. Ecosystem service assessments that do not consider urban conditions may overestimate urban tree carbon storage. Because urban and global warming are becoming more intense, our results suggest that urban trees will sequester even less carbon in the future....

  13. Carbon nanotube coatings as chemical absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Andresen, Brian D.; Alcaraz, Armando

    2004-06-15

    Airborne or aqueous organic compound collection using carbon nanotubes. Exposure of carbon nanotube-coated disks to controlled atmospheres of chemical warefare (CW)-related compounds provide superior extraction and retention efficiencies compared to commercially available airborne organic compound collectors. For example, the carbon nanotube-coated collectors were four (4) times more efficient toward concentrating dimethylmethyl-phosphonate (DMMP), a CW surrogate, than Carboxen, the optimized carbonized polymer for CW-related vapor collections. In addition to DMMP, the carbon nanotube-coated material possesses high collection efficiencies for the CW-related compounds diisopropylaminoethanol (DIEA), and diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP).

  14. Carbon Sequestration by Urban Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fares, Silvano; Paoletti, Elena; Calfapietra, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most prominent component of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, resulting mainly from fuel combustion in the built environment – for activities such as heating of buildings, urban mobility and cooking. The concentration of near-surface CO2 in cities is affected...... by a range of factors, including traffic density and atmospheric stability. Plants have the capacity to sequester CO2 through photosynthesis, and can therefore store carbon in plant biomass and in the soil. Green areas in the city may significantly affect local concentrations of atmospheric CO2, as observed...... in urban-to-rural comparisons showing lower CO2 concentration in the presence of vegetation. CO2 sequestration over the ‘urban forest’ displays diurnal variation during the growing period, with uptake during daytime when plants are photosynthetically active, and nocturnal emissions in response...

  15. Ferrocene-functionalized carbon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Kang, Xiongwu; Zuckerman, Nathaniel B.; Phebus, Bruce; Konopelski, Joseph P.; Chen, Shaowei

    2011-05-01

    Carbon nanoparticles were synthesized from natural gas soot and functionalized with ferrocenyl moieties by using 4-ferrocenylphenyldiazonium as the reactive precursor. The incorporation of the ferrocenyl units onto the carbon nanoparticle surface was confirmed by varied spectroscopic measurements. For instance, in FTIR measurements the characteristic vibrational bands of the ferrocenyl and phenyl moieties could be clearly identified. XPS measurements showed that there were approximately 31.9 ferrocenyl units per nanoparticle. UV-vis spectroscopic measurements displayed an absorption band at ca. 465 nm which was consistent with the optical characteristics of ferrocenyl derivatives. Furthermore, with surface functionalization by the ferrocenyl moieties, the photoluminescence of the carbon nanoparticles was found to diminish in intensity and red-shift in energy with the addition of NOBF4. This was accounted for by the formation of varied electron-accepting moieties on the particle surface, such as positively charged ferrocenium, quinone-like derivatives, and nitrosation of the aromatic rings of the graphitic cores. Interestingly, in electrochemical studies the nanoparticle-bound ferrocenyl moieties were found to exhibit two pairs of voltammetric waves with a difference of their formal potentials at about 78 mV, suggesting nanoparticle-mediated intraparticle charge delocalization at mixed valence as a result of the strong core-ligand covalent bonds and the conductive sp2 carbon matrix of the graphitic cores. Consistent behaviors were observed in near-infrared measurements, indicating that the particles behaved analogously to a Class I/II mixed-valence compound.Carbon nanoparticles were synthesized from natural gas soot and functionalized with ferrocenyl moieties by using 4-ferrocenylphenyldiazonium as the reactive precursor. The incorporation of the ferrocenyl units onto the carbon nanoparticle surface was confirmed by varied spectroscopic measurements. For instance

  16. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  17. Green Logistics: the Carbon Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the next few decades European companies will come under intense pressure to cut their greenhouse gas (GHG emissions in an effort to achieve very ambitious carbon reduction targets at national, EU and global levels by 2050. This paper presents a framework for the decarbonisation of their logistical activities based on five key freight transport parameters: freight transport intensity, modal split, vehicle utilization, energy efficiency and the carbon intensity of the energy used in logistics. It examines the potential to cut GHG emissions by altering each of these parameters. Consideration is also given to the decarbonisation of warehousing operations. It is concluded that many of the GHG-reduction measures will also yield financial benefit. The decarbonisation of other sectors of the economy may, however, generate greater demand for logistics services.

  18. Glassy carbon based supercapacitor stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baertsch, M.; Braun, A.; Koetz, R.; Haas, O. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Considerable effort is being made to develop electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLC) that store relatively large quantities of electrical energy and possess at the same time a high power density. Our previous work has shown that glassy carbon is suitable as a material for capacitor electrodes concerning low resistance and high capacity requirements. We present the development of bipolar electrochemical glassy carbon capacitor stacks of up to 3 V. Bipolar stacks are an efficient way to meet the high voltage and high power density requirements for traction applications. Impedance and cyclic voltammogram measurements are reported here and show the frequency response of a 1, 2, and 3 V stack. (author) 3 figs., 1 ref..

  19. Peculiarities of carbon fiber drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslan Yu. Melentiev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available At polymeric composite materials (PCM machining we face a number of specific features. The research refers to PCMs classification, exposing an overview of known specific features described in the latest advances and techniques to improve the quality and efficiency in PCM processing. To study the carbon fiber drilling a preliminary experiment has been conducted, which essential parameters and issues have been described with respective data Tables and numerous images. The holes surface quality and edges dimensional accuracy have been compared for samples obtained using a blade and a diamond tool; established is the instrument blade material impact on the edges’ precision parameters. Confirmed are the typical and revealed some new types of imperfections and their occurrence conditions. The problem of rapid clogging and related diamond tool clogging problem are identified. Some promising ways of processing of carbon fiber are offered.

  20. Synthesizing carbon nanothreads from benzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badding, John V.; Crespi, Vincent H.

    2015-01-26

    Carbon nanomaterials—e.g., fullerenes, nanotubes, and graphene, with dimensionalities of 0, 1, and 2, respectively—possess beautiful chemical bonding arrangements and extraordinary physical and chemical properties:1–3 see Figure 1(a). As is the case with graphite, their carbon atoms are bonded to three neighbors. Diamondoid molecules and graphane (the fully hydrogenated form of graphene) have fourfold tetrahedral bonding (like diamond) and dimensionalities of 0 and 2, respectively: see Figure 1(b). The diamondoid molecule adamantane, which is capped by hydrogen atoms, comprises the smallest unit cage structure of the diamond crystal lattice. Similarly, graphane represents the thinnest possible sheet of diamond. In this context, queries arise regarding what form the thinnest possible 1D diamond thread would take.