WorldWideScience

Sample records for written life history

  1. Life history written in blood: erythrocyte parameters in a small hibernator, the edible dormouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havenstein, Nadine; Langer, Franz; Fietz, Joanna

    2017-07-29

    The oxygen delivery system is one major determinant of the performance of vertebrates and responds sensitively to a variety of internal and environmental factors. To understand physiological mechanisms underlying variations of fitness, we investigated effects of demanding conditions associated with certain life-history events, food availability, and population density on the oxygen delivery system in free-ranging edible dormice (Glis glis). We sampled blood (n = 248) and urine (n = 319), performed an erythrocyte haemogram and visually determined the presence of haemoglobinuria. Reproduction leads to increased mortality in edible dormice and our study now reveals severe haematological impairments during reproduction that were associated with nutrient and energy deficits and stress. These effects were even more pronounced in subsequent reproductive years, indicating prolonged physiological impairment. Under limited food availability, the rate of erythrocyte generation was reduced. This seems to be part of an energy saving strategy instead of representing a poor body condition as survival probability in this species is high in years of low food availability. A high prevalence ratio of haemoglobinuria (up to 85%) at the end of the active season indicated amplified erythrocyte destruction through haemolysis. This may be the result of a preparative mechanism to avoid massive oxidative damage during the long hibernation period. Most ecophysiological studies so far focus on single erythrocyte parameters on a short time scale, which could be misleading. Our results clearly highlight that a wide-array RBC approach is a powerful tool for investigating mechanisms underlying physiological performance and fitness, also for other vertebrate taxa.

  2. The Present in Flemish Secondary History Education through the Lens of Written History Exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nieuwenhuyse, Karel; Wils, Kaat; Clarebout, Geraldine; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2015-01-01

    The present plays an important part in history education, in particular in efforts to make the study of the past relevant for today. This contribution examines how the relationship between past and present is dealt with in current Flemish secondary history education by analyzing 190 written history exams for the 11th and 12th grade. Ten percent of…

  3. Life History Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2015-01-01

    of the social and the psychic, both in the interpretation procedure and in some main theoretical understandings of language, body and mind. My article will present the reflections on the use of life history based methodology in learning and education research as a kind of learning story of research work.......The article presents a development of biographical research in education and learning research, in which psycho-societal interpretations play a key role. The horizon of the approach is the lifelong subjective engagement in intended as well as unintended learning, in formal education as well...... as in everyday life. Life histories represent lived lives past, present and anticipated future. As such they are interpretations of individuals’ experiences of the way in which societal dynamics take place in the individual body and mind, either by the individual him/herself or by another biographer. The Life...

  4. Life History and Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, William G.

    2013-01-01

    This article uses the life history method to chronicle the challenges of a low-income, first-generation student en route to college. The paper addresses three questions: how Manuel navigates college and related topics such as roommates, family, and money; how he creates social networks; and how he works with adults such as teachers and…

  5. Life-history interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

    2010-01-01

    My first encounter with life history research was during my Ph.D. research. This concerned a multi-method study of nomadic mobility in Senegal. One method stood out as yielding the most interesting and in-depth data: life story interviews using a time line. I made interviews with the head...... of the nomadic households and during these I came to understand the use of mobility in a complex context of continuity and change, identity and belonging in the Fulani community. Time line interviews became one of my favourite tool in the years to follow, a tool used both for my research in various settings...... of a time line for making life story interviews. I decided that the lack of authoritative literature should not omit me from teaching my students how to make a time line interview. After an introduction, they had to use the tool for making an interview each other concerning their learning journey to DPU...

  6. Reflections on the Life Histories of Today's LGBQ Postsecondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, James L.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative multiple-case study utilized a life history methodology in which written and oral narratives were obtained from six postsecondary students who self-identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and/or queer (LGBQ). Through the construction of life histories, the researcher endeavored to understand how past experiences and behaviors shaped…

  7. Human Life History Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine J. Chua

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Human life history (LH strategies are theoretically regulated by developmental exposure to environmental cues that ancestrally predicted LH-relevant world states (e.g., risk of morbidity–mortality. Recent modeling work has raised the question of whether the association of childhood family factors with adult LH variation arises via (i direct sampling of external environmental cues during development and/or (ii calibration of LH strategies to internal somatic condition (i.e., health, which itself reflects exposure to variably favorable environments. The present research tested between these possibilities through three online surveys involving a total of over 26,000 participants. Participants completed questionnaires assessing components of self-reported environmental harshness (i.e., socioeconomic status, family neglect, and neighborhood crime, health status, and various LH-related psychological and behavioral phenotypes (e.g., mating strategies, paranoia, and anxiety, modeled as a unidimensional latent variable. Structural equation models suggested that exposure to harsh ecologies had direct effects on latent LH strategy as well as indirect effects on latent LH strategy mediated via health status. These findings suggest that human LH strategies may be calibrated to both external and internal cues and that such calibrational effects manifest in a wide range of psychological and behavioral phenotypes.

  8. The evolution of life histories

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stearns, S. C

    1992-01-01

    .... It will interest all biologists wishing to understand the evolution of the life cycle and the causes of phenotypic variation in fitness, and it contains the seeds of applications of life history...

  9. Early History of Written Oromo Language up to 1900 | Tolessa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this paper is to make known historical development of written Afaan Oromo to 1900. The study draws upon primary and secondary sources. The primary data are drawn from oral and archival sources. Books and articles in Afaan Oromo and in other languages about Afaan Oromo were consulted. Many of ...

  10. Life history types and strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boel, Mikkel

    strategies and types in migratory freshwater fish, using brown trout and alewife as study organisms. Firstly, we investigated underlying mechanisms of resident and migratory life history strategies of salmonids, using indicators for nutritional status, stress, tissue damage and smoltification. Secondly......, avian predation pressure on the groups with different life history strategies was explored in their respective habitats. Thirdly, we demonstrated that the life history type of alewives, through regulation of zooplankton availability, influence the ontogeny of concurrent largemouth bass. Finally, a field...... study approach was used to evaluate the effect of PIT tagging on body condition of brown trout. Within a salmonid population several life history strategies can be found, each of which involves variations in migration and residency. Migratory life history strategies are often viewed as an adaptive...

  11. Computer-assisted versus oral-and-written dietary history taking for diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Igor; Pappas, Yannis; Car, Josip; Sheikh, Aziz; Majeed, Azeem

    2011-12-07

    Diabetes is a chronic illness characterised by insulin resistance or deficiency, resulting in elevated glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Diet and adherence to dietary advice is associated with lower HbA1c levels and control of disease. Dietary history may be an effective clinical tool for diabetes management and has traditionally been taken by oral-and-written methods, although it can also be collected using computer-assisted history taking systems (CAHTS). Although CAHTS were first described in the 1960s, there remains uncertainty about the impact of these methods on dietary history collection, clinical care and patient outcomes such as quality of life.  To assess the effects of computer-assisted versus oral-and-written dietary history taking on patient outcomes for diabetes mellitus. We searched The Cochrane Library (issue 6, 2011), MEDLINE (January 1985 to June 2011), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2011) and CINAHL (January 1981 to June 2011). Reference lists of obtained articles were also pursued further and no limits were imposed on languages and publication status. Randomised controlled trials of computer-assisted versus oral-and-written history taking in patients with diabetes mellitus. Two authors independently scanned the title and abstract of retrieved articles. Potentially relevant articles were investigated as full text. Studies that met the inclusion criteria were abstracted for relevant population and intervention characteristics with any disagreements resolved by discussion, or by a third party. Risk of bias was similarly assessed independently. Of the 2991 studies retrieved, only one study with 38 study participants compared the two methods of history taking over a total of eight weeks. The authors found that as patients became increasingly familiar with using CAHTS, the correlation between patients' food records and computer assessments improved. Reported fat intake decreased in the control group and increased when queried by the computer

  12. Life History Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Owen

    2016-01-01

    of these patterns and highlights the need to consider senescence from a broad taxonomic scope to truly understand the evolution of aging. Keywords: Aging; Demography; Evolution; Fertility; Gompertz; Life span; Mortality; Ontogenescence; Reproduction; Reproductive senescence; Senescence; Survivorship...

  13. New Directions in the History of Written Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyons, Martyn

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews some new directions in the history of writing practices, concentrating on Western Europe and the Americas in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. I identify some major intellectual influences on the field, deriving from historiography, anthropology and literary studies. I indicate some important archives specialising in popular writings which sustain the study of the writings of ordinary and semi-literate people. A few selected topics in which the history of writing practices makes a contribution are then briefly reviewed. These are, firstly, the history of correspondence and letter-writing instruction manuals, which introduces two important concepts: the ‘epistolary pact’ and ‘epistolary literacy’. Secondly, I introduce three new works on the development of postal services, stressing their role in forging national cohesion. Thirdly, I indicate how the study of emigrants’ writings has contributed to a shift of focus in the study of emigration in general. I conclude that the history of scribal culture can make a significant contribution to socio-cultural history, provided that writing is analysed in its material form, and as a text, not simply as a source of information. Writing practices deserve serious study as a social and cultural phenomenon in their own right.

    Este artículo revisa algunas tendencias nuevas en la historiografía a propósito de las prácticas de escritura, concentrándose en Europa occidental y las Américas durante en el siglo XIX y principios del XX. Señalo en él algunas de las mayores influencias intelectuales que han incidido en este campo, provenientes de la historiografía, la antropología y los estudios literarios. Indico algunos importantes archivos especializados en escritura popular en los que se basa el estudio de los escritos de la gente corriente y semi-alfabetizada. Después reviso brevemente unos cuantos temas escogidos a los que ha hecho su aportación la

  14. Dynamic heterogeneity in life histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Steiner, Uli; Orzack, Steven Hecht

    2009-01-01

    generate dynamic heterogeneity: life-history differences produced by stochastic stratum dynamics. We characterize dynamic heterogeneity in a range of species across taxa by properties of the Markov chain: the entropy, which describes the extent of heterogeneity, and the subdominant eigenvalue, which...... distributions of lifetime reproductive success. Dynamic heterogeneity contrasts with fixed heterogeneity: unobserved differences that generate variation between life histories. We show by an example that observed distributions of lifetime reproductive success are often consistent with the claim that little...... or no fixed heterogeneity influences this trait. We propose that dynamic heterogeneity provides a 'neutral' model for assessing the possible role of unobserved 'quality' differences between individuals. We discuss fitness for dynamic life histories, and the implications of dynamic heterogeneity...

  15. Tradeoffs in bacteriophage life histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Eric C

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities on the planet, yet most classical principles of evolutionary biology and ecology were not developed with viruses in mind. Here, the concept of biological tradeoffs, a fundamental tenet of life history theory, is examined in the context of bacteriophage biology. Specifically, several important parameters of phage life histories-replication, persistence, host range, and adsorption-are evaluated for tradeoffs. Available data indicate that replication rate is strongly negatively correlated with both persistence and host range, suggesting that the well-documented tradeoff in macroorganisms between offspring production and offspring quality also applies to phages. The biological tradeoffs that appear to characterize viruses' life histories have potential importance for viral evolution, ecology, and pathogenesis.

  16. Dynamic heterogeneity in life histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Steiner, Ulrich K; Orzack, Steven Hecht

    2009-01-01

    Longitudinal data on natural populations have been analysed using multistage models in which survival depends on reproductive stage, and individuals change stages according to a Markov chain. These models are special cases of stage-structured population models. We show that stage-structured models generate dynamic heterogeneity: life-history differences produced by stochastic stratum dynamics. We characterize dynamic heterogeneity in a range of species across taxa by properties of the Markov chain: the entropy, which describes the extent of heterogeneity, and the subdominant eigenvalue, which describes the persistence of reproductive success during the life of an individual. Trajectories of reproductive stage determine survivorship, and we analyse the variance in lifespan within and between trajectories of reproductive stage. We show how stage-structured models can be used to predict realized distributions of lifetime reproductive success. Dynamic heterogeneity contrasts with fixed heterogeneity: unobserved differences that generate variation between life histories. We show by an example that observed distributions of lifetime reproductive success are often consistent with the claim that little or no fixed heterogeneity influences this trait. We propose that dynamic heterogeneity provides a 'neutral' model for assessing the possible role of unobserved 'quality' differences between individuals. We discuss fitness for dynamic life histories, and the implications of dynamic heterogeneity for the evolution of life histories and senescence.

  17. Life History Trade-offs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smallegange, I.M.; Kliman, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Trade-offs play a central role in life history theory. This article explains why they exist, how they arise, how they can be measured, and briefly discusses their evolution. Three important trade-offs are discussed in detail: the trade-off between current reproduction and survival, between current

  18. DYNAMIC HETEROGENEITY IN LIFE HISTORIES

    OpenAIRE

    Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Steiner, Ulrich K.; Orzack, Steven Hecht

    2008-01-01

    Longitudinal data on natural populations have been analyzed using multi-stage models in which survival depends on reproductive stage, and individuals change stages according to a Markov chain. These models are special cases of stage-structured population models. We show that stage-structured models generate dynamic heterogeneity: life history differences produced by stochastic stratum dynamics. We characterize dynamic heterogeneity in a range of species across taxa by properties of the Markov...

  19. Life history tradeoffs in cancer evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddy, Amy M.; Gatenby, Robert A.; Brown, Joel S.; Maley, Carlo C.

    2014-01-01

    Somatic evolution during cancer progression and therapy results in tumor cells that exhibit a wide range of phenotypes including rapid proliferation and quiescence. Evolutionary life history theory may help us understand the diversity of these phenotypes. Fast life history organisms reproduce rapidly while those with slow life histories show less fecundity and invest more resources in survival. Life history theory also provides an evolutionary framework for phenotypic plasticity with potential implications for understanding ‘cancer stem cells’. Life history theory suggests that different therapy dosing schedules could select for fast or slow life history cell phenotypes, with important clinical consequences. PMID:24213474

  20. Life History Adaptations to Seasonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varpe, Øystein

    2017-11-01

    Seasonality creates a template for many natural processes and evolutionary adaptations. Organisms are often faced with an annual cycle consisting of a productive (favorable) and unproductive period. This yearly cycle along with other seasonal variations in abiotic factors and associated biotic interactions form strong selection pressures shaping the scheduling of annual activities and the developmental stages and modes of life through the year. Annual decisions impact trade-offs that involve both current and future reproductive value (RV), and life history theory provides the foundation to understand these linkages between phenology and an organism's full life. Annual routine models further allow for multiple annual decisions to be optimized and predicted with respect to lifetime consequences. Studies of life history adaptations to seasonality are concerned with questions such as: within the productive season, should growth come first, followed by reproduction, or the other way around? What is the best time to diapause or migrate, and how will this timing impact other life history traits? Should energy reserves be built, to transfer resources from 1 year to the next, and allow for the spatial and temporal freedom of capital breeding? If offspring value is low during parts of the productive season, what is then the best alternative to reproduction: accumulate stores, grow, or wait in safety? To help answer these and other questions, I provide an overview of key theoretical concepts and some of the main life schedules, annual routines, and trade-offs involved. Adaptations to the unproductive period include diapause (dormancy), embryonic resting stages (eggs, seeds), energy reserves, and seasonal migrations. Adaptations to the productive window include rapid growth, high reproductive effort, capital breeding, and reproduction entrained to the annual cycle and with precise timing. Distinct annual routines, large body size, energy storage capacities, and parental care

  1. Hominin life history: reconstruction and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Shannen L; Wood, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    In this review we attempt to reconstruct the evolutionary history of hominin life history from extant and fossil evidence. We utilize demographic life history theory and distinguish life history variables, traits such as weaning, age at sexual maturity, and life span, from life history-related variables such as body mass, brain growth, and dental development. The latter are either linked with, or can be used to make inferences about, life history, thus providing an opportunity for estimating life history parameters in fossil taxa. We compare the life history variables of modern great apes and identify traits that are likely to be shared by the last common ancestor of Pan-Homo and those likely to be derived in hominins. All great apes exhibit slow life histories and we infer this to be true of the last common ancestor of Pan-Homo and the stem hominin. Modern human life histories are even slower, exhibiting distinctively long post-menopausal life spans and later ages at maturity, pointing to a reduction in adult mortality since the Pan-Homo split. We suggest that lower adult mortality, distinctively short interbirth intervals, and early weaning characteristic of modern humans are derived features resulting from cooperative breeding. We evaluate the fidelity of three life history-related variables, body mass, brain growth and dental development, with the life history parameters of living great apes. We found that body mass is the best predictor of great ape life history events. Brain growth trajectories and dental development and eruption are weakly related proxies and inferences from them should be made with caution. We evaluate the evidence of life history-related variables available for extinct species and find that prior to the transitional hominins there is no evidence of any hominin taxon possessing a body size, brain size or aspects of dental development much different from what we assume to be the primitive life history pattern for the Pan-Homo clade. Data for

  2. Personal Narratives in Life History Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germeten, Sidsel

    2013-01-01

    In this article I discuss how to create personal narratives in life history research methodology. People tell stories of their lives, and the researchers make these stories into life histories. Based on theoretical perspectives on "discourse" inspired by Michel Foucault, narratives are seen as ways of positioning oneself as a…

  3. Developing Validity Evidence for the Written Pediatric History and Physical Exam Evaluation Rubric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Marta A; Phillipi, Carrie A; Buchanan, Paula M; Lewin, Linda O

    The written history and physical examination (H&P) is an underutilized source of medical trainee assessment. The authors describe development and validity evidence for the Pediatric History and Physical Exam Evaluation (P-HAPEE) rubric: a novel tool for evaluating written H&Ps. Using an iterative process, the authors drafted, revised, and implemented the 10-item rubric at 3 academic institutions in 2014. Eighteen attending physicians and 5 senior residents each scored 10 third-year medical student H&Ps. Inter-rater reliability (IRR) was determined using intraclass correlation coefficients. Cronbach α was used to report consistency and Spearman rank-order correlations to determine relationships between rubric items. Raters provided a global assessment, recorded time to review and score each H&P, and completed a rubric utility survey. Overall intraclass correlation was 0.85, indicating adequate IRR. Global assessment IRR was 0.89. IRR for low- and high-quality H&Ps was significantly greater than for medium-quality ones but did not differ on the basis of rater category (attending physician vs. senior resident), note format (electronic health record vs nonelectronic), or student diagnostic accuracy. Cronbach α was 0.93. The highest correlation between an individual item and total score was for assessments was 0.84; the highest interitem correlation was between assessment and differential diagnosis (0.78). Mean time to review and score an H&P was 16.3 minutes; residents took significantly longer than attending physicians. All raters described rubric utility as "good" or "very good" and endorsed continued use. The P-HAPEE rubric offers a novel, practical, reliable, and valid method for supervising physicians to assess pediatric written H&Ps. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. 'What is not written does not exist': the importance of proper documentation of medication use history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Carina Carvalho; Santos, Lincoln Marques Cavalcante; de Oliveira-Filho, Alfredo Dias; de Lyra, Divaldo Pereira

    2017-10-01

    Medications are perceived as health risk factors, because they might cause damage if used improperly. In this context, an adequate assessment of medication use history should be encouraged, especially in transitions of care to avoid unintended medication discrepancies (UMDs). In a case-controlled study, we investigated potential risk factors for UMDs at hospital admission and found that 150 (42%) of the 358 patients evaluated had one or more UMDs. We were surprised to find that there was no record of a patient and/or relative interview on previous use of medication in 117 medical charts of adult patients (44.8%). Similarly, in the medical charts of 52 (53.6%) paediatric patients, there was no record of parents and/or relatives interviews about prior use of medications. One hundred thirty-seven medical charts of adult patients (52.4%) and seventy-two medical charts of paediatric patients (74.2%) had no record about medication allergies and intolerances. In other words, there was a lack of basic documentation regarding the patient's medication use history. As patients move between settings in care, there is insufficient tracking of verbal and written information related to medication changes, which results in a progressive and cumulative loss of information, as evidenced by problems associated with clinical transfers and medication orders. Proper documentation of medication information during transfer is a key step in the procedure; hence, it should be rightly performed. It remains unclear whether interviews, and other investigations about medication use history have been performed but have not been recorded as health-care data. Therefore, it is crucial to the improvement of medication use safety that documentation of all drug-related information-even if not directly related to the actual event-become routine practice in health-care organizations, since 'what is not written does not exist'.

  5. Globalization and Life History Research: Fragments of a Life Foretold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, William G.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to understand, by way of a life history of one low-income working-class youth, how globalization impacts the working class in a developing nation. The concept of globalization and the method of life history seem diametrically opposed. Globalization is an idea about large social forces that impact the economic and material…

  6. Evolutionary biology and life histories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown, C. R.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The demographic processes that drive the spread of populations through environments and in turn determine the abundance of organisms are the same demographic processes that drive the spread of genes through populations and in turn determine gene frequencies and fitness. Conceptually, marked similarities exist in the dynamic processes underlying population ecology and those underlying evolutionary biology. Central to an understanding of both disciplines is life history and its component demographic rates, such as survival, fecundity, and age of first breeding, and biologists from both fields have a vested interest in good analytical machinery for the estimation and analysis of these demographic rates. In the EURING conferences, we have been striving since the mid 1980s to promote a quantitative understanding of demographic rates through interdisciplinary collaboration between ecologists and statisticians. From the ecological side, the principal impetus has come from population biology, and in particular from wildlife biology, but the importance of good quantitative insights into demographic processes has long been recognized by a number of evolutionary biologists (e.g., Nichols & Kendall, 1995; Clobert, 1995; Cooch et al., 2002. In organizing this session, we have aimed to create a forum for those committed to gaining the best possible understanding of evolutionary processes through the application of modern quantitative methods for the collection and interpretation of data on marked animal populations. Here we present a short overview of the material presented in the session on evolutionary biology and life histories. In a plenary talk, Brown & Brown (2004 explored how mark–recapture methods have allowed a better understanding of the evolution of group–living and alternative reproductive tactics in colonial cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota. By estimating the number of transient birds passing through colonies of different sizes, they

  7. Bluefin Tuna Life History (1972-1979)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Catch and size data for animals from which a collection of fish parts were done for life history studies. These samples will be used in comparison studies with more...

  8. The Early History of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, E. G.; Fowler, C. M. R.

    2003-12-01

    The youth of the Earth is strange to us. Many of the most fundamental constraints on life may have been different, especially the oxidation state of the surface. Should we suddenly land on its Hadean or early Archean surface by some sci-fi accident, we would not recognize our home. Above, the sky may have been green or some other unworldly color, and above that the weak young Sun might have been unrecognizable to someone trying to identify it from its spectrum. Below, seismology would show a hot, comparatively low-viscosity interior, possibly with a magma ocean in the deeper part of the upper mantle (Drake and Righter, 2002; Nisbet and Walker, 1982), and a core that, though present, was perhaps rather smaller than today. The continents may have been small islands in an icy sea, mostly frozen with some leads of open water, ( Sleep et al., 2001). Into these icy oceans, huge protruding Hawaii-like volcanoes would have poured out vast far-spreading floods of komatiite lavas in immense eruptions that may have created sudden local hypercane storms to disrupt the nearby icebergs. And meteorites would rain down.Or perhaps it was not so strange, nor so violent. The child is father to the man; young Earth was mother to Old Earth. Earth had hydrogen, silicate rock below and on the surface abundant carbon, which her ancient self retains today. Moreover, Earth was oxygen-rich, as today. Today, a tiny part of the oxygen is free, as air; then the oxygen would have been in the mantle while the surface oxygen was used to handcuff the hydrogen as dihydrogen monoxide. Oxygen dihydride is dense, unlikely to fly off to space, and at the poles, rock-forming. Of all the geochemical features that make Earth unique, the initial degassing (Genesis 2 : b) and then the sustained presence of liquid water is the defining oddity of this planet. Early Earth probably also kept much of its carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur as oxide or hydride. And, after the most cataclysmic events had passed, ˜4.5 Ga

  9. Dynamic heterogeneity and life histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Steiner, Uli

    2010-01-01

    of the variation among individual characteristics that is generated by dynamic heterogeneity. We conclude by discussing our ongoing and planned work on animals and humans. We also discuss the connections between our work and recent work on human mortality, disability and health, and life course theory....

  10. Multistate analysis of life histories with R

    CERN Document Server

    Willekens, Frans

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to multistate event history analysis. It is an extension of survival analysis, in which a single terminal event (endpoint) is considered and the time-to-event is studied. Multistate models focus on life histories or trajectories, conceptualized as sequences of states and sequences of transitions between states. Life histories are modeled as realizations of continuous-time Markov processes. The model parameters, transition rates, are estimated from data on event counts and populations at risk, using the statistical theory of counting processes. The Comprehensive R Network Archive (CRAN) includes several packages for multistate modeling. This book is about Biograph. The package is designed to (a) enhance exploratory analysis of life histories and (b) make multistate modeling accessible. The package incorporates utilities that connect to several packages for multistate modeling, including survival, eha, Epi, mvna, etm, mstate, msm, and TraMineR for sequence analysis. The book ...

  11. Dynamic heterogeneity and life histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Steiner, Ulrich K

    2010-08-01

    Biodemography is increasingly focused on the large and persistent differences between individuals within populations in fitness components (age at death, reproductive success) and fitness-related components (health, biomarkers) in humans and other species. To study such variation we propose the use of dynamic models of observable phenotypes of individuals. Phenotypic change in turn determines variation among individuals in their fitness components over the life course. We refer to this dynamic accumulation of fitness differences as dynamic heterogeneity and illustrate it for an animal population in which longitudinal data are studied using multistate capture-mark-recapture models. Although our approach can be applied to any characteristic, for our empirical example we use reproduction as the phenotypic character to define stages. We indicate how our stage-structured model describes the nature of the variation among individual characteristics that is generated by dynamic heterogeneity. We conclude by discussing our ongoing and planned work on animals and humans. We also discuss the connections between our work and recent work on human mortality, disability and health, and life course theory.

  12. Lemur Biorhythms and Life History Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Russell T; Godfrey, Laurie R; Schwartz, Gary T; Dirks, Wendy; Bromage, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal histology supports the hypothesis that primate life histories are regulated by a neuroendocrine rhythm, the Havers-Halberg Oscillation (HHO). Interestingly, subfossil lemurs are outliers in HHO scaling relationships that have been discovered for haplorhine primates and other mammals. We present new data to determine whether these species represent the general lemur or strepsirrhine condition and to inform models about neuroendocrine-mediated life history evolution. We gathered the largest sample to date of HHO data from histological sections of primate teeth (including the subfossil lemurs) to assess the relationship of these chronobiological measures with life history-related variables including body mass, brain size, age at first female reproduction, and activity level. For anthropoids, these variables show strong correlations with HHO conforming to predictions, though body mass and endocranial volume are strongly correlated with HHO periodicity in this group. However, lemurs (possibly excepting Daubentonia) do not follow this pattern and show markedly less variability in HHO periodicity and lower correlation coefficients and slopes. Moreover, body mass is uncorrelated, and brain size and activity levels are more strongly correlated with HHO periodicity in these animals. We argue that lemurs evolved this pattern due to selection for risk-averse life histories driven by the unpredictability of the environment in Madagascar. These results reinforce the idea that HHO influences life history evolution differently in response to specific ecological selection regimes.

  13. Lemur Biorhythms and Life History Evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell T Hogg

    Full Text Available Skeletal histology supports the hypothesis that primate life histories are regulated by a neuroendocrine rhythm, the Havers-Halberg Oscillation (HHO. Interestingly, subfossil lemurs are outliers in HHO scaling relationships that have been discovered for haplorhine primates and other mammals. We present new data to determine whether these species represent the general lemur or strepsirrhine condition and to inform models about neuroendocrine-mediated life history evolution. We gathered the largest sample to date of HHO data from histological sections of primate teeth (including the subfossil lemurs to assess the relationship of these chronobiological measures with life history-related variables including body mass, brain size, age at first female reproduction, and activity level. For anthropoids, these variables show strong correlations with HHO conforming to predictions, though body mass and endocranial volume are strongly correlated with HHO periodicity in this group. However, lemurs (possibly excepting Daubentonia do not follow this pattern and show markedly less variability in HHO periodicity and lower correlation coefficients and slopes. Moreover, body mass is uncorrelated, and brain size and activity levels are more strongly correlated with HHO periodicity in these animals. We argue that lemurs evolved this pattern due to selection for risk-averse life histories driven by the unpredictability of the environment in Madagascar. These results reinforce the idea that HHO influences life history evolution differently in response to specific ecological selection regimes.

  14. Life History Theory and Exploitative Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J. Reynolds

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Exploitative strategies involve depriving others of resources while enhancing one’s own. Life history theory suggests that there are individual differences (life history strategy and environmental characteristics (life history contingencies [LHCs] that influence the use of exploitative strategies. However, past work manipulating LHCs has found mixed evidence for the influence of this information on exploitative behavior. We present three studies that help clarify the effects of this type of information. Results indicated that younger individuals are most sensitive to LHC information. We also found, contrary to predictions, that communicating slow LHC information (i.e., high population density, intraspecific competition, and resource scarcity increased rather than decreased the temptation to engage in exploitative behavior. Limitations and future directions are discussed.

  15. Evolutionary assembly rules for fish life histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charnov, E.L.; Gislason, Henrik; Pope, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    history that maximizes Darwinian fitness in non-growing populations. We merge this M, W α power function with other power functions to produce general across-species scaling rules for yearly reproductive allocation, reproductive effort and age at first reproduction in fish. We then suggest a new way...... to classify habitats (or lifestyles) as to the life histories they should contain, and we contrast our scheme with the widely used Winemiller-Rose fish lifestyle classification...

  16. Parasite stress, ethnocentrism, and life history strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueredo, Aurelio José; Gladden, Paul Robert; Black, Candace Jasmine

    2012-04-01

    Fincher & Thornhill (F&T) present a compelling argument that parasite stress underlies certain cultural practices promoting assortative sociality. However, we suggest that the theoretical framework proposed is limited in several ways, and that life history theory provides a more explanatory and inclusive framework, making more specific predictions about the trade-offs faced by organisms in the allocation of bioenergetic and material resources.

  17. Life History Strategy and Disordered Eating Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Salmon

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A sample of female undergraduates completed a packet of questionnaires consisting of the Arizona Life History Battery, a modified version of the Eating Disorders Inventory, the Behavioral Regulation scales from the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, and two measures of Female Intrasexual Competitiveness that distinguished between competition for mates and competition for status. As predicted, Executive Functions completely mediated the relation between Slow Life History Strategy and Disordered Eating Behavior. Surprisingly, however, the relation between Female Intrasexual Competitiveness (competition for mates and competition for status and Disordered Eating Behavior was completely spurious, with executive functions serving as a common cause underlying the inhibition of both Disordered Eating Behavior and Female Intrasexual Competitiveness. The protective function of Slow Life History Strategy with respect to Disordered Eating Behavior apparently resides in a higher degree of Behavioral Regulation, a type of Executive Function. The enhanced Behavioral Regulation or self-control, of individuals with a Slow Life History Strategy is also protective against hazardously escalated levels of Female Intrasexual Competitiveness.

  18. The life trajectories modality of oral history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Gonçalves

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to explore the potential of qualitative research. It presents the life trajectory modality of the oral history method, to discuss the possibility of its utilization in scientific research in the Social Work profession. The epistemological foundations of oral history are discussed to establish its scientific character. The life trajectories modality is presented as a historic and social construction that utilizes different interview techniques to give voice to previously invisible subjects, indicating the principal phases of the methodological procedures used in this approach. The conclusions highlight the importance of the construction of this model and its projection as a research proposal that implies a process of understanding and analyzing the social universes that are contextualized and interconnected, considering the realities of the life trajectories of the subjects studied.

  19. Computer-assisted versus oral-and-written family history taking for identifying people with elevated risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Yannis; Wei, Igor; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem; Sheikh, Aziz

    2011-12-07

    Diabetes is a chronic illness characterised by insulin resistance or deficiency, resulting in elevated glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Because diabetes tends to run in families, the collection of data is an important tool for identifying people with elevated risk of type2 diabetes. Traditionally, oral-and-written data collection methods are employed but computer-assisted history taking systems (CAHTS) are increasingly used. Although CAHTS were first described in the 1960s, there remains uncertainty about the impact of these methods on family history taking, clinical care and patient outcomes such as health-related quality of life.  To assess the effectiveness of computer-assisted versus oral-and-written family history taking for identifying people with elevated risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus. We searched The Cochrane Library (issue 6, 2011), MEDLINE (January 1985 to June 2011), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2011) and CINAHL (January 1981 to June 2011). Reference lists of obtained articles were also pursued further and no limits were imposed on languages and publication status. Randomised controlled trials of computer-assisted versus oral-and-written history taking in adult participants (16 years and older). Two authors independently scanned the title and abstract of retrieved articles. Potentially relevant articles were investigated as full text. Studies that met the inclusion criteria were abstracted for relevant population and intervention characteristics with any disagreements resolved by discussion, or by a third party. Risk of bias was similarly assessed independently. We found no controlled trials on computer-assisted versus oral-and-written family history taking for identifying people with elevated risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. There is a need to develop an evidence base to support the effective development and use of computer-assisted history taking systems in this area of practice. In the absence of evidence on effectiveness

  20. Parasitism shaping host life-history evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredensborg, Brian Lund; Poulin, R

    2006-01-01

    1. Variation in life-history strategies among conspecific populations indicates the action of local selective pressures; recently, parasitism has been suggested as one of these local forces. 2. Effects of trematode infections on reproductive effort, juvenile growth, size at maturity and susceptib......1. Variation in life-history strategies among conspecific populations indicates the action of local selective pressures; recently, parasitism has been suggested as one of these local forces. 2. Effects of trematode infections on reproductive effort, juvenile growth, size at maturity...... and susceptibility were investigated among different natural populations of the marine gastropod Zeacumantus subcarinatus, Sowerby 1855. 3. Reproductive effort was not higher in uninfected snails from populations experiencing a high trematode prevalence, but females from high prevalence populations produced...... to the same infection pressure in the field. 7. Our results strongly indicate that Z. subcarinatus adapt to trematodes by reaching maturity early, thereby maximizing their chance of reproducing in populations experiencing a high prevalence of infection by castrating trematodes....

  1. Life History Strategies in Linnaea borealis

    OpenAIRE

    Niva, Mikael

    2003-01-01

    About 70% of the plant species in the temperate zone are characterised by clonal growth, clonal species are also in majority in the Arctic and Subarctic where they affect the structure and composition of the vegetation. It is therefore of great importance to increase our knowledge about clonal plants and their growth and life histories. I have investigated how ramets of the stoloniferous plant Linnaea borealis are affected by the naturally occurring variation in environmental factors, such as...

  2. The Science of life Written on Birds Second Part : Wattled curass ow (Crax globulosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniceto Nejedeka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bilingual text Muinane-Spanish about the bird species niimɨku ‘Wattled Curassow’ (Crax globulosa, written by Aniceto Nejedeka, based on the knowledge of the elders of the Muinane tribe. This text is the second part of a book, titled “The science of life written on birds’, which we will be publishing is fascicles. Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;}

  3. Linguistic Theory in Approaches to Written Error in US Composition: History and Current Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Horner, Bruce; Lu, Min-Zhan

    2017-01-01

    We trace significant shifts over the last forty years in the assumptions about language, language relations, and language learning made by US composition scholars to understand written error through their use of specific theories and findings of scholarship in linguistics, and we explore the implications of these shifts for the teaching of writing. We identify three sets of assumptions with monolingualism, and a fourth set with a break from monolingualist assumptions and an alignment with tho...

  4. Oxidative stress and life histories : Unresolved issues and current needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speakman, John R.; Blount, Jonathan D.; Bronikowski, Anne M.; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Isaksson, Caroline; Kirkwood, Tom B. L.; Monaghan, Pat; Ozanne, Susan E.; Beaulieu, Michael; Briga, Michael; Carr, Sarah K.; Christensen, Louise L.; Cocheme, Helena M.; Cram, Dominic L.; Dantzer, Ben; Harper, Jim M.; Jurk, Diana; King, Annette; Noguera, Jose C.; Salin, Karine; Sild, Elin; Simons, Mirre J. P.; Smith, Shona; Stier, Antoine; Tobler, Michael; Vitikainen, Emma; Peaker, Malcolm; Selman, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Life-history theory concerns the trade-offs that mold the patterns of investment by animals between reproduction, growth, and survival. It is widely recognized that physiology plays a role in the mediation of life-history trade-offs, but the details remain obscure. As life-history theory concerns

  5. Life history strategy and population characteristics of an unexploited ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Life history strategy and population characteristics of an unexploited riverine cyprinid, Labeo capensis, in the largest impoundment in the Orange River Basin. ... Intraspecific life history comparisons with riverine and early impoundment populations suggest that L. capensis has largely maintained its riverine life history ...

  6. Predicting life-history adaptations to pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltby, L. [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Animal and Plant Sciences

    1995-12-31

    Animals may adapt to pollutant stress so that individuals from polluted environments are less susceptible than those from unpolluted environments. In addition to such direct adaptations, animals may respond to pollutant stress by life-history modifications; so-called indirect adaptations. This paper will demonstrate how, by combining life-history theory and toxicological data, it is possible to predict stress-induced alterations in reproductive output and offspring size. Pollutant-induced alterations in age-specific survival in favor of adults and reductions in juvenile growth, conditions are predicted to select for reduced investment in reproduction and the allocation of this investment into fewer, larger offspring. Field observations on the freshwater crustaceans, Asellus aquaticus and Gammarus pulex, support these predictions. Females from metal-polluted sites had lower investment in reproduction and produced larger offspring than females of the same species from unpolluted sites. Moreover, interpopulation differences in reproductive biology persisted in laboratory cultures indicating that they had a genetic basis and were therefore due to adaptation rather than acclimation. The general applicability of this approach will be considered.

  7. Biograph. A package in R to explore life history data and to enchance multistate modelling of life histories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willekens, F.J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Biograph: Explore life histories Biograph is designed to facilitate the descriptive and statistical analysis of life histories. It follows a multistate perspective on the life course and conceptualizes the life course as a sequence of states and transitions between states (events). Transitions are

  8. Dynamic Model for Life History of Scyphozoa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congbo Xie

    Full Text Available A two-state life history model governed by ODEs is formulated to elucidate the population dynamics of jellyfish and to illuminate the triggering mechanism of its blooms. The polyp-medusa model admits trichotomous global dynamic scenarios: extinction, polyps survival only, and both survival. The population dynamics sensitively depend on several biotic and abiotic limiting factors such as substrate, temperature, and predation. The combination of temperature increase, substrate expansion, and predator diminishment acts synergistically to create a habitat that is more favorable for jellyfishes. Reducing artificial marine constructions, aiding predator populations, and directly controlling the jellyfish population would help to manage the jellyfish blooms. The theoretical analyses and numerical experiments yield several insights into the nature underlying the model and shed some new light on the general control strategy for jellyfish.

  9. Procrastination as a Fast Life History Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-Bin Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Research has revealed that procrastination—the purposive delay of an intended course of action—is a maladaptive behavior. However, by drawing on an evolutionary life history (LF approach, the present study proposes that procrastination may be an adaptive fast LF strategy characterized by prioritizing immediate benefits with little regard to long-term consequences. A total of 199 undergraduate students completed measures of procrastination and future orientation and the Mini-K scale, which measures the slow LF strategy. Structural equation modeling revealed that, as predicted, procrastination was negatively associated with a slow LF strategy both directly and indirectly through the mediation of future orientation. These results define the fast LF origin of procrastination.

  10. The history of Poland as reflected in written versions of the Bible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajmund Pietkiewicz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the connection between selected Polish biblical translations and the national and personal history of Polish people (14th–18th century. The history of Florian Psalter (14th/15th century and that of Queen Sophia’s Bible (15th century are related to the beginning of the Jagiellonian dynasty. The first printed biblical text in Polish (Prologue to the Gospel according to St. John, 1518/1519 and editions of the New Testament translated by Stanisław Murzynowski (1551–1553 testify to the development of Polish orthography. Both, the woodcuts of the Leopolita’s Bible (1561, 1575/1577 and the notes to the commentary on the Acts of the Apostles by Tomas Falconius (1566 give an account of the tumultuous history of Polish Reformation. The dedication in the second edition of Leopolita’s Bible (1975 and its alteration in 1577 attest to the failure of the first free royal election in Poland. The manuscript notes in Wrocław copy of Simon Budny’s Bible (1572 constitute an eyewitness account of the collapse of Poland at the end of 18th century. Whereas, the manuscript notes in the translation of Psalter by W. Wróbel constitute a chronicle of the Wilieziński family. Therefore, while talking about the history of Polish biblical translations one can talk about the history of Poland as a country, at the same time.

  11. Academic Oral History: Life Review in Spite of Itself.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryant, Carl

    The process and content of the life review should not be separated from the creation of an oral history. Several projects, undertaken at the University of Louisville Oral History Center, support the therapeutic aspects of reminiscence. The dichotomy between oral history, as an historical database, and life review, as a therapeutic exercise, breaks…

  12. Dynamic heterogeneity and life history variability in the kittiwake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Orzack, Steven Hecht

    2010-01-01

    differences. We quantify the diversity in life histories by metrics computed from the generating stochastic process. 4. We show how dynamic heterogeneity can be used as a null model and also how it can lead to positive associations between reproduction and survival across the life span. 5. We believe our......1. Understanding the evolution of life histories requires an assessment of the process that generates variation in life histories. Within-population heterogeneity of life histories can be dynamically generated by stochastic variation of reproduction and survival or be generated by individual...... differences that are fixed at birth. 2. We show for the kittiwake that dynamic heterogeneity is a sufficient explanation of observed variation of life histories. 3. The total heterogeneity in life histories has a small contribution from reproductive stage dynamics and a large contribution from survival...

  13. Correlation of Simulation Examination to Written Test Scores for Advanced Cardiac Life Support Testing: Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne L. Strom

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traditional Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS courses are evaluated using written multiple-choice tests. High-fidelity simulation is a widely used adjunct to didactic content, and has been used in many specialties as a training resource as well as an evaluative tool. There are no data to our knowledge that compare simulation examination scores with written test scores for ACLS courses. Objective: To compare and correlate a novel high-fidelity simulation-based evaluation with traditional written testing for senior medical students in an ACLS course. Methods: We performed a prospective cohort study to determine the correlation between simulationbased evaluation and traditional written testing in a medical school simulation center. Students were tested on a standard acute coronary syndrome/ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest scenario. Our primary outcome measure was correlation of exam results for 19 volunteer fourth-year medical students after a 32-hour ACLS-based Resuscitation Boot Camp course. Our secondary outcome was comparison of simulation-based vs. written outcome scores. Results: The composite average score on the written evaluation was substantially higher (93.6% than the simulation performance score (81.3%, absolute difference 12.3%, 95% CI [10.6-14.0%], p<0.00005. We found a statistically significant moderate correlation between simulation scenario test performance and traditional written testing (Pearson r=0.48, p=0.04, validating the new evaluation method. Conclusion: Simulation-based ACLS evaluation methods correlate with traditional written testing and demonstrate resuscitation knowledge and skills. Simulation may be a more discriminating and challenging testing method, as students scored higher on written evaluation methods compared to simulation.

  14. Life history evolution in social insects : A female perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Negroni, Matteo Antoine; Jongepier, Evelien; Feldmeyer, Barbara; Kramer, Boris H.; Foitzik, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Social insects are known for their unusual life histories with fecund, long-lived queens and sterile, short-lived workers. We review ultimate factors underlying variation in life history strategies in female social insects, whose social life reshapes common trade-offs, such as the one between

  15. LIFE HISTORY. Age-related mortality explains life history strategies of tropical and temperate songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Thomas E

    2015-08-28

    Life history theory attempts to explain why species differ in offspring number and quality, growth rate, and parental effort. I show that unappreciated interactions of these traits in response to age-related mortality risk challenge traditional perspectives and explain life history evolution in songbirds. Counter to a long-standing paradigm, tropical songbirds grow at similar overall rates to temperate species but grow wings relatively faster. These growth tactics are favored by predation risk, both in and after leaving the nest, and are facilitated by greater provisioning of individual offspring by parents. Increased provisioning of individual offspring depends on partitioning effort among fewer young because of constraints on effort from adult and nest mortality. These growth and provisioning responses to mortality risk finally explain the conundrum of small clutch sizes of tropical birds. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Psychometric assessment of human life history predicts health related behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Kruger

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Life History Theory is a powerful framework that can help promote understanding of variation in health-related behavioral patterns and why they vary consistent with environmental conditions. An organism's life history reflects tradeoffs made in the allocation of effort towards specific aspects of survival and reproduction across the lifespan. This study examines the relationship between psychological indicators of life history strategy and health related behaviors in a demographically representative sample in the Midwestern USA. Slower life histories predicted higher levels of health promoting behaviors and lower levels of health adverse behaviors, even when controlling for relevant socio-demographic factors. The analyses provide a strong test of the hypothesized relationship between life history and health behavior indicators, as life history variation co-varies with these socio-demographic factors. Traditional public health efforts may be reaching their limits of effectiveness in encouraging health-promoting behaviors. Integrating an evolutionary framework may revitalize behavioral health promotion efforts.

  17. Daily life historyasmodern direction of urban history of Englandof High Middle Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Okhrimenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Historiographical review of recent research is an important aspect of the scientific study of the problems of medieval urban history of England. In 2000s there was marked the beginning of years of studying the history of everyday of medieval towns. The most important works in this field are the studies of Professor C. Dyer. Studying the history of everyday life of the city the researcher has identified as «standards of living». One of the modern directions of the history of everyday life is a history of food. There is the significant research of Professor M. Carlin on the history of English feasting of urban residents of the Middle Ages. In the article Fast food and urban living standards in medieval England, she looked anew at the narrative sources XII-XIV centuries. Another area of daily life history is a history of clothes (fashion. L. A. Wilson in his work De novo modo: The birth of fashion in the Middle Ages analyzes comprehensively the written, visual, and archaeological evidence. Modern interpretations of medieval hygiene (including sanitation of medieval towns related to research in the area of a history body. Its appointed destination for British urban sources dealing D. Jorgensen, D. Keene, U. Ewert, G. Geltner, J. Lee etc. They revised the traditional view medievalists of the nineteenth century. At the present period the historiography of medieval towns of England are mostly social history. Towards the history of everyday life there is a tendency to positive characteristics of urban life in the English Middle Ages. Contemporary scholars refer to the current trends in the world. Active urbanization processes forced researchers to seek appeal of such a way of life in previous centuries, particularly in the Middle Ages. The key features of everyday modern city (commercialization, fast food, fashion, high standards of hygiene etc. historians find their roots in the past.

  18. Nutrition shapes life-history evolution across species

    OpenAIRE

    Swanson, Eli M.; Espeset, Anne; Mikati, Ihab; Bolduc, Isaac; Kulhanek, Robert; White, William A.; Kenzie, Susan; Snell-Rood, Emilie C.

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition is a key component of life-history theory, yet we know little about how diet quality shapes life-history evolution across species. Here, we test whether quantitative measures of nutrition are linked to life-history evolution across 96 species of butterflies representing over 50 independent diet shifts. We find that butterflies feeding on high nitrogen host plants as larvae are more fecund, but their eggs are smaller relative to their body size. Nitrogen and sodium content of host pl...

  19. Primates and the evolution of long, slow life histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James Holland

    2011-09-27

    Primates are characterized by relatively late ages at first reproduction, long lives and low fertility. Together, these traits define a life-history of reduced reproductive effort. Understanding the optimal allocation of reproductive effort, and specifically reduced reproductive effort, has been one of the key problems motivating the development of life-history theory. Because of their unusual constellation of life-history traits, primates play an important role in the continued development of life-history theory. In this review, I present the evidence for the reduced reproductive effort life histories of primates and discuss the ways that such life-history tactics are understood in contemporary theory. Such tactics are particularly consistent with the predictions of stochastic demographic models, suggesting a key role for environmental variability in the evolution of primate life histories. The tendency for primates to specialize in high-quality, high-variability food items may make them particularly susceptible to environmental variability and explains their low reproductive-effort tactics. I discuss recent applications of life-history theory to human evolution and emphasize the continuity between models used to explain peculiarities of human reproduction and senescence with the long, slow life histories of primates more generally. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Primates and the Evolution of Long-Slow Life Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James Holland

    2011-01-01

    Summary Primates are characterized by relatively late ages at first reproduction, long lives and low fertility. Together, these traits define a life-history of reduced reproductive effort. Understanding the optimal allocation of reproductive effort, and specifically reduced reproductive effort, has been one of the key problems motivating the development of life history theory. Because of their unusual constellation of life-history traits, primates play an important role in the continued development of life history theory. In this review, I present the evidence for the reduced reproductive effort life histories of primates and discuss the ways that such life-history tactics are understood in contemporary theory. Such tactics are particularly consistent with the predictions of stochastic demographic models, suggesting a key role for environmental variability in the evolution of primate life histories. The tendency for primates to specialize in high-quality, high-variability food items may make them particularly susceptible to environmental variability and explain their low reproductive-effort tactics. I discuss recent applications of life history theory to human evolution and emphasize the continuity between models used to explain peculiarities of human reproduction and senescence with the long, slow life histories of primates more generally. PMID:21959161

  1. The history of research on the filled pause as evidence of the written language bias in linguistics (Linell, 1982).

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Daniel C; Kowal, Sabine

    2004-11-01

    Erard's (2004) publication in the New York Times of a journalistic history of the filled pause serves as the occasion for this critical review of the past half-century of research on the filled pause. Historically, the various phonetic realizations or instantiations of the filled pause have been presented with an odd recurrent admixture of the interjection ah. In addition, the filled pause has been consistently associated with both hesitation and disfluency. The present authors hold that such a mandatory association of the filled pause with disfluency is the product of The written language bias in linguistics [Linell, 1982] and disregards much cogent evidence to the contrary. The implicit prescriptivism of well formedness--a demand derived from literacy--must be rejected; literate well formedness is not a necessary or even typical property of spontaneous spoken discourse; its structures and functions--including those of the filled pause--are very different from those of written language The recent work of Clark and Fox Tree (2002) holds promise for moving the status of the filled pause not only toward that of a conventional word, but also toward its status as an interjection. This latter development is also being fostered by lexicographers. Nonetheless, in view of ongoing research regarding the disparate privileges of occurrence and functions of filled pauses in comparison with interjections, the present authors are reluctant to categorize the filled pause as an interjection.

  2. How Should the History of Education Be Written? Some Reflections about the Nature of the Discipline from the Perspective of the Reception of Our Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaepe, Marc

    2004-01-01

    How should history of education be written? To put the question is far more easier than to provide a concrete answer. In contemporary research, there continue to be pedagogistic complaints about finding answers to present-day educational problems via history. In our view, such an ahistorical utilitarianism as well as the legitimizing and/or…

  3. To Fairly Tell: Social Mobility, Life Histories, and the Anthropologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benei, Veronique

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on social agents' own understandings of socio-economic mobility and social achievement, exploring the possibilities offered by the tool of "family" life history in the context of formerly Untouchable communities in western India, Maharashtra. While arguing in favour of family life histories as both resource and…

  4. History of the Earth - The History of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, A. Yu.

    2017-05-01

    To date there is more and more evidence that life is a phenomenon of galactic scale, and the problem of the life origin should be moved to an earlier time, at least 1-2 billion years from the usual dating. The process of life formation could begin already at the stage of the formation of solar clusters from molecular clouds, which leads us to consider the possible existence of an RNA world up to 7 billion years ago. Verification of physical conditions on the early Earth with the latest astrobiological and paleontological data shows that the optimal conditions for the existence of ancient bacteria suggest that the average temperature of the ocean is slightly higher than today. Also, thanks to the studies of the last two decades, the hypothesis of the oxygen-free atmosphere of the Earth in the first 2 billion years of its existence is rejected.

  5. Oxidative stress and life histories: unresolved issues and current needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speakman, John R; Blount, Jonathan D; Bronikowski, Anne M; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Isaksson, Caroline; Kirkwood, Tom B L; Monaghan, Pat; Ozanne, Susan E; Beaulieu, Michaël; Briga, Michael; Carr, Sarah K; Christensen, Louise L; Cochemé, Helena M; Cram, Dominic L; Dantzer, Ben; Harper, Jim M; Jurk, Diana; King, Annette; Noguera, Jose C; Salin, Karine; Sild, Elin; Simons, Mirre J P; Smith, Shona; Stier, Antoine; Tobler, Michael; Vitikainen, Emma; Peaker, Malcolm; Selman, Colin

    2015-12-01

    Life-history theory concerns the trade-offs that mold the patterns of investment by animals between reproduction, growth, and survival. It is widely recognized that physiology plays a role in the mediation of life-history trade-offs, but the details remain obscure. As life-history theory concerns aspects of investment in the soma that influence survival, understanding the physiological basis of life histories is related, but not identical, to understanding the process of aging. One idea from the field of aging that has gained considerable traction in the area of life histories is that life-history trade-offs may be mediated by free radical production and oxidative stress. We outline here developments in this field and summarize a number of important unresolved issues that may guide future research efforts. The issues are as follows. First, different tissues and macromolecular targets of oxidative stress respond differently during reproduction. The functional significance of these changes, however, remains uncertain. Consequently there is a need for studies that link oxidative stress measurements to functional outcomes, such as survival. Second, measurements of oxidative stress are often highly invasive or terminal. Terminal studies of oxidative stress in wild animals, where detailed life-history information is available, cannot generally be performed without compromising the aims of the studies that generated the life-history data. There is a need therefore for novel non-invasive measurements of multi-tissue oxidative stress. Third, laboratory studies provide unrivaled opportunities for experimental manipulation but may fail to expose the physiology underpinning life-history effects, because of the benign laboratory environment. Fourth, the idea that oxidative stress might underlie life-history trade-offs does not make specific enough predictions that are amenable to testing. Moreover, there is a paucity of good alternative theoretical models on which contrasting

  6. Life History Strategy and the HEXACO Personality Dimensions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manson, Joseph H

    2015-01-01

    Although several studies have linked Life History Strategy (LHS) variation with variation in the Five Factor Model personality dimensions, no published research has explored the relationship of LHS to the HEXACO personality dimensions...

  7. A database of life-history traits of European amphibians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulherat, Sylvain; Calvez, Olivier; Stevens, Virginie M; Clobert, Jean; Schmeller, Dirk S

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In the current context of climate change and landscape fragmentation, efficient conservation strategies require the explicit consideration of life history traits. This is particularly true for amphibians, which are highly threatened worldwide, composed by more than 7400 species, which is constitute one of the most species-rich vertebrate groups. The collection of information on life history traits is difficult due to the ecology of species and remoteness of their habitats. It is therefore not surprising that our knowledge is limited, and missing information on certain life history traits are common for in this species group. We compiled data on amphibian life history traits from literature in an extensive database with morphological and behavioral traits, habitat preferences and movement abilities for 86 European amphibian species (50 Anuran and 36 Urodela species). When it were available, we reported data for males, females, juveniles and tadpoles. Our database may serve as an important starting point for further analyses regarding amphibian conservation. PMID:25425939

  8. Life-history evolution in ants: the case of Cardiocondyla

    OpenAIRE

    Heinze, J?rgen

    2017-01-01

    Ants are important components of most terrestrial habitats, and a better knowledge of the diversity of their life histories is essential to understand many aspects of ecosystem functioning. The myrmicine genus Cardiocondyla shows a wide range of colony structures, reproductive behaviours, queen and male lifespans, and habitat use. Reconstructing the evolutionary pathways of individual and social phenotypic traits suggests that the ancestral life history of Cardiocondyla was characterized by t...

  9. PATHOGEN LIFE-HISTORY TRADE-OFFS REVEALED IN ALLOPATRY

    OpenAIRE

    Susi, Hanna; Laine, Anna-Liisa

    2013-01-01

    Trade-offs in life-history traits is a central tenet in evolutionary biology, yet their ubiquity and relevance to realized fitness in natural populations remains questioned. Trade-offs in pathogens are of particular interest because they may constrain the evolution and epidemiology of diseases. Here, we studied life-history traits determining transmission in the obligate fungal pathogen, Podosphaera plantaginis, infecting Plantago lanceolata. We find that although traits are positively associ...

  10. Life-history evolution: understanding the proximate mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    history evolution, I was required to write a term paper for a course on 'Advanced evolutionary biol- ogy'. Having worked in the laboratory for about six months and read through numerous papers on life-history evolution,. I was convinced that ...

  11. Astrobiology, history, and society life beyond earth and the impact of discovery

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book addresses important current and historical topics in astrobiology and the search for life beyond Earth, including the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI). The first section covers the plurality of worlds debate from antiquity through the nineteenth century, while section two covers the extraterrestrial life debate from the twentieth century to the present. The final section examines the societal impact of discovering life beyond Earth, including both cultural and religious dimensions. Throughout the book, authors draw links between their own chapters and those of other contributors, emphasizing the interconnections between the various strands of the history and societal impact of the search for extraterrestrial life. The chapters are all written by internationally recognized experts and are carefully edited by Douglas Vakoch, professor of clinical psychology at the California Institute of Integral Studies and Director of Interstellar Message Composition at the SETI Institute. This interd...

  12. Marginal identities, histories and negotiating spaces: life ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research explored some of the conceptual terrain necessary to a study of the life experiences of street children in Bulawayo in the context of their day to day activities and claims for space and places. The study employed an ethnographic approach based on the understanding of street children as autonomous social ...

  13. Predicting life history parameters for all fishes worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorson, James T; Munch, Stephan B; Cope, Jason M; Gao, Jin

    2017-12-01

    Scientists and resource managers need to know life history parameters (e.g., average mortality rate, individual growth rate, maximum length or mass, and timing of maturity) to understand and respond to risks to natural populations and ecosystems. For over 100 years, scientists have identified "life history invariants" (LHI) representing pairs of parameters whose ratio is theorized to be constant across species. LHI then promise to allow prediction of many parameters from field measurements of a few important traits. Using LHI in this way, however, neglects any residual patterns in parameters when making predictions. We therefore apply a multivariate model for eight variables (seven parameters and temperature) in over 32,000 fishes, and include taxonomic structure for residuals (with levels for class, order, family, genus, and species). We illustrate that this approach predicts variables probabilistically for taxa with many or few data. We then use this model to resolve three questions regarding life history parameters in fishes. Specifically we show that (1) on average there is a 1.24% decrease in the Brody growth coefficient for every 1% increase in maximum size; (2) the ratio of natural mortality rate and growth coefficient is not an LHI but instead varies systematically based on the timing of maturation, where movement along this life history axis is predictably correlated with species taxonomy; and (3) three variables must be known per species to precisely predict remaining life history variables. We distribute our predictive model as an R package, FishLife, to allow future life history predictions for fishes to be conditioned on taxonomy and life history data for fishes worldwide. This package also contains predictions (and predictive intervals) for mortality, maturity, size, and growth parameters for all described fishes. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  14. Fertility History and Cognition in Later Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Sanna L; Grundy, Emily M D

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the association between fertility history and cognition in older men and women. We analyzed associations between number of children (parity) and timing of births with level and change in cognition among 11,233 men and women aged 50+ in England using latent growth curve models. Models were adjusted for age, socioeconomic position, health, depressive symptoms, control, social contacts, activities, and isolation. Low (0-1 child) and high parity (3+ children) compared to medium parity (2 children) were associated with poorer cognitive functioning, as was an early age at entry to parenthood (cognition. Late motherhood (>35) was associated with better cognitive function. Associations between fertility history and cognition were to large extent accounted for socioeconomic position, partly because this influenced health and social engagement. Poorer cognition in childless people and better cognition among mothers experiencing child birth at higher ages suggest factors related to childbearing/rearing that are beneficial for later cognitive functioning, although further research into possible earlier selection factors is needed.

  15. Life History Trade-Offs Modulate the Speed of Senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Jones, Owen

    2017-01-01

    The vast amount of scientific attention attracted by ageing research is, to a large extent, due to humanity’s desire to prolong life span and ‘health span’. Still, from a purely ecological and evolutionary point of view, the fact that such a large diversity of longevities exists is extremely...... examined how key life-history traits such as mean life expectancy, generation time and the length of life lived before maturity correlate with this measure of senescence, finding that iteroparous, slow-growing species are more likely to senesce slowly and thus attain long mature life spans. We further...

  16. Experimental life history of Spirometra erinacei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S H; We, J S; Sohn, W M; Hong, S T; Chai, J Y

    1990-09-01

    The complete life cycle of Spirometra erinacei has been experimentally maintained in the laboratory. The cyclops were reared as the first intermediate host, and the tadpoles of Rana nigromaculata as the second intermediate host. ICR mice were used as another second host. The experimental definitive hosts were dogs and cats. Maturation and hatching of the eggs took 8 to 14 days by incubation at 29 degrees C. The coracidium measured 43.8 x 36.9 microns. Mesocyclops leuckarti and Eucyclops serrulatus were susceptible to the coracidial infection. The procercoids older than 5 days in the cyclops had minute spines at the anterior end, calcium corpuscles in the body parenchyme and the cercomer at the posterior end. Procercoids 10 to 20 days old were infective to tadpoles, and 15 or 21 day old worms could infect the mice. The plerocercoids from the tadpoles at 15 days after experimental infection were pear-shaped and shorter than 1 mm in the length and were infective to mice. Fifteen to 18 days after experimental inoculation of plerocercoids to dogs or cats, the adult worms began to produce eggs. One life cycle from egg to egg needed 48 to 67 days in the laboratory. The morphology of larval or adult worms was compatible with the description of Spirometra erinacei.

  17. Life history evolution and comparative developmental biology of echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael W

    2002-01-01

    Evolutionary biologists studying life history variation have used echinoderms in experimental, laboratory, and field studies of life history evolution. This focus on echinoderms grew originally from the tradition of comparative embryology, in which echinoderms were central. The tools for obtaining and manipulating echinoderm gametes and larvae were taken directly from comparative embryological research. In addition, the comparative embryologists employed a diverse array of echinoderms, not a few model species, and this diversity has led to a broad understanding of the development, function, and evolution of echinoderm larvae. As a result, this branch of life history evolution has deep roots in comparative developmental biology of echinoderms. Here two main aspects of this relationship are reviewed. The first is a broad range of studies of fertilization biology, dispersal, population genetics, functional morphology, and asexual reproduction in which developmental biologists might take a keen interest because of the historical origins of this research in echinoderm comparative embryology. The second is a similarly broad variety of topics in life history research in which evolutionary biologists require techniques or data from developmental biology in order to make progress on understanding patterns of life history variation among echinoderm species and higher taxa. Both sets of topics provide opportunities for interaction and collaboration.

  18. Nutrition shapes life-history evolution across species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Eli M; Espeset, Anne; Mikati, Ihab; Bolduc, Isaac; Kulhanek, Robert; White, William A; Kenzie, Susan; Snell-Rood, Emilie C

    2016-07-13

    Nutrition is a key component of life-history theory, yet we know little about how diet quality shapes life-history evolution across species. Here, we test whether quantitative measures of nutrition are linked to life-history evolution across 96 species of butterflies representing over 50 independent diet shifts. We find that butterflies feeding on high nitrogen host plants as larvae are more fecund, but their eggs are smaller relative to their body size. Nitrogen and sodium content of host plants are also both positively related to eye size. Some of these relationships show pronounced lineage-specific effects. Testis size is not related to nutrition. Additionally, the evolutionary timing of diet shifts is not important, suggesting that nutrition affects life histories regardless of the length of time a species has been adapting to its diet. Our results suggest that, at least for some lineages, species with higher nutrient diets can invest in a range of fitness-related traits like fecundity and eye size while allocating less to each egg as offspring have access to a richer diet. These results have important implications for the evolution of life histories in the face of anthropogenic changes in nutrient availability. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Life-History Patterns of Lizards of the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Daniel O; Costa, Gabriel C; Colli, Guarino R; Costa, Taís B; Shepard, Donald B; Vitt, Laurie J; Pianka, Eric R

    2016-06-01

    Identification of mechanisms that promote variation in life-history traits is critical to understand the evolution of divergent reproductive strategies. Here we compiled a large life-history data set (674 lizard populations, representing 297 species from 263 sites globally) to test a number of hypotheses regarding the evolution of life-history traits in lizards. We found significant phylogenetic signal in most life-history traits, although phylogenetic signal was not particularly high. Climatic variables influenced the evolution of many traits, with clutch frequency being positively related to precipitation and clutches of tropical lizards being smaller than those of temperate species. This result supports the hypothesis that in tropical and less seasonal climates, many lizards tend to reproduce repeatedly throughout the season, producing smaller clutches during each reproductive episode. Our analysis also supported the hypothesis that viviparity has evolved in lizards as a response to cooler climates. Finally, we also found that variation in trait values explained by clade membership is unevenly distributed among lizard clades, with basal clades and a few younger clades showing the most variation. Our global analyses are largely consistent with life-history theory and previous results based on smaller and scattered data sets, suggesting that these patterns are remarkably consistent across geographic and taxonomic scales.

  20. Sleep-wake state tradeoffs, impulsivity and life history theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alissa A; Rucas, Stacey L

    2012-04-08

    Evolutionary ecological theory predicts that sleep-wake state tradeoffs may be related to local environmental conditions and should therefore correlate to alterations in behavioral life history strategies. It was predicted that firefighters who slept more and reported better quality sleep on average would exhibit lower impulsivity inclinations related to slower life history trajectories. UPPS impulsivity scores and self-reported sleep averages were analyzed and indicated a negative association between sleep variables and urgency and a positive association with premeditation. Perseverance, and in some cases premeditation, however, disclosed an unpredicted marginally significant positive association between increased and emergency nighttime waking-related sleep deprivation. Sensation seeking was not associated with sleep variables, but was strongly associated with number of biological children. This research contributes to understanding the implications of human sleep across ecological and behavioral contexts and implies further research is necessary for constructing evolutionarily oriented measures of impulsivity inclination and its meaning in the context of life history strategies.

  1. The ecology of life history evolution : genes, individuals and populations

    OpenAIRE

    Visser, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    Natural selection shapes the life histories of organisms. The ecological interactions of these organisms with their biotic and abiotic environment shape the selection pressure on their phenotypes while their genetics determine how fast this selection leads to adaptation to their environment. The field of ecological genetics studies the response to natural selection in the wild and thus plays a key role in our understanding of the adaptive capacity of life, essential to understand how a changi...

  2. Life history of plesionika edwardsi (crustacea, decapoda, Pandalidae)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The life history of Plesionika edwardsi (Brandt, 1851) around the Canary Islands in the Eastern Central Atlantic was investigated, based on a total of 11 434 shrimps ranging in length between 8 and 40 mm carapace length (CL). The species carries out seasonal migrations; they concentrate in deep water during winter, ...

  3. Life history traits of Bathyclarias nyasensis (Siluroidei) in Lake Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Life history traits, including age, growth, reproduction and diet of Bathyclarias nyasensis from Lake Malawi were studied between December 1996 and November 1998. Owing to reabsorp tion of pectoral spines with increasing fish size, and the relatively low number of spines that could be aged reliably, only otoliths were ...

  4. Comparison of the population structure and life-history parameters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blacktail seabream Diplodus capensis were sampled from proximate (10 km apart) exploited and unexploited areas in southern Angola to compare their population structures and life-history parameters. Females dominated the larger size and older age classes in the unexploited area. In the exploited area the length and ...

  5. The life history and fishery potential of Labeo umbratus (Teleostei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The life histories of five populations of moggel, Labeo umbratus, inhabiting small Eastern Cape reservoirs were compared and the differences related to environmental parameters. A significant positive correlation between fish growth and chlorophyll a was noted in four cases. In the eutrophic Dimbaza Reservoir, slow ...

  6. Life history of the springhare ( Pedetes capensis ) from a strongly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The life history of the springhare (Pedetes capensis, Forster, 1778) at 33°S, in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa, was characterized by continuous, aseasonal and asynchronous reproduction. Females were monotocous and consecutive pregnancies were separated by a non pregnant period (30–50 days) similar in ...

  7. Variation in population structure and life-history parameters of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The size and age structures, sex ratio, size- and age-at-sex-change, growth and mortality rate of the protogynous hermaphrodite, steentjie Spondyliosoma emarginatum, were compared to determine the effects on population structure and life-history parameters of exploitation (comparing an unexploited reserve and an ...

  8. Life-history evolution: at the origins of metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, Thomas W; Laudet, Vincent

    2014-02-17

    Metamorphosis is a widespread life history strategy of animals but apart from some model organisms it is poorly characterized. A recent study of moon jellies highlights the similarities and differences between the various types of metamorphosis and illuminates its molecular determinants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Life histories of symbiotic rhizobia and mycorrhizal fungi. Review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denison, R.F.; Kiers, E.T.

    2011-01-01

    Research on life history strategies of microbial symbionts is key to understanding the evolution of cooperation with hosts, but also their survival between hosts. Rhizobia are soil bacteria known for fixing nitrogen inside legume root nodules. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are ubiquitous root

  10. The ecology of life history evolution : genes, individuals and populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    Natural selection shapes the life histories of organisms. The ecological interactions of these organisms with their biotic and abiotic environment shape the selection pressure on their phenotypes while their genetics determine how fast this selection leads to adaptation to their environment. The

  11. Variations in morphological and life-history traits under extreme ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhsudhan

    Drosophila ananassae; genetic variation; morphometric and life-history traits; stressful temperatures .... mounted in insect saline and the number of teeth on the first ... Heritability and evolvability tended to have higher values at both the stressful temperatures. For each trait, h2 values were higher under stressful conditions.

  12. Life Histories of Three Exemplary American Physical Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazers, Gunars

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the following article-style dissertation was to present the life histories of three exemplary physical educators, to give them voice, explore ways in which they experienced marginalization, and describe how they persevered in spite of difficulties they experienced in their careers. The participants included (a) Robin, a female…

  13. Life-history parameters of white stumpnose Rhabdosargus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Life-history parameters of white stumpnose Rhabdosargus globiceps (Pisces: Sparidae) in Saldanha Bay, South Africa, with evidence of stock separation. ... Seasonal variation in the condition index suggests a slightly greater investment in reproduction by males than females. Females grew slightly faster than males and ...

  14. Synchrony in the life-history parameters of different seabirds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    Synchrony in the life-history parameters of different seabirds breeding at a particular locality has sometimes been observed. For example, at Adélie Land, Antarctica, in the 1976/77 breeding season, there was low breeding success followed by high mortality of adults for emperor. Aptenodytes forsteri and Adélie Pygoscelis ...

  15. Plant life history and above–belowground interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deyn, de Gerlinde

    2017-01-01

    The importance of above–belowground interactions for plant growth and community dynamics became clear in the last decades, whereas the numerous studies on plant life history improved our knowledge on eco-evolutionary dynamics. However, surprisingly few studies have linked both research fields

  16. Life-history evolution in ants: the case of Cardiocondyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Jürgen

    2017-03-15

    Ants are important components of most terrestrial habitats, and a better knowledge of the diversity of their life histories is essential to understand many aspects of ecosystem functioning. The myrmicine genus Cardiocondyla shows a wide range of colony structures, reproductive behaviours, queen and male lifespans, and habitat use. Reconstructing the evolutionary pathways of individual and social phenotypic traits suggests that the ancestral life history of Cardiocondyla was characterized by the presence of multiple, short-lived queens in small-sized colonies and a male polyphenism with winged dispersers and wingless fighters, which engage in lethal combat over female sexuals within their natal nests. Single queening, queen polyphenism, the loss of winged males and tolerance among wingless males appear to be derived traits that evolved with changes in nesting habits, colony size and the spread from tropical to seasonal environments. The aim of this review is to bring together the information on life-history evolution in Cardiocondyla and to highlight the suitability of this genus for functional genomic studies of adaptation, phenotypic plasticity, senescence, invasiveness and other key life-history traits of ants. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Do Slower Life History Strategies Reduce Sociodemographic Sex Differences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Elizabeth Chavarria Minera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relations between sociodemographic sex differences and life history strategies in the populations of Mexican States. Sex differences in anatomy and behavior was measured with traits such as educational achievement, mortality, and morbidity. The data were obtained from the Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI and sampled from thirty-one Mexican states and the Federal District (N = 32. An extension analysis was performed selecting only the sex ratio variables that had a correlation with the slow Life History factor greater than or equal to an absolute value of .25. A unit-weighted sex ratio factor was created using these variables. Across 32 Mexican states, the correlation between latent slow life history and sex ratio was .57 (p < .05. These results are consistent with our hypothesis that slower life histories favor reduced sexual dimorphism in physiology and behavior among human subnational populations. The results of the study further understanding of variations in population sex differences, male-biased behaviors toward sexual equality, and the differences among subnational (regional populations within the United States of Mexico. DOI: 10.2458/azu_jmmss.v6i1.18771

  18. Life-history syndromes: integrating dispersal through space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoro, Mathieu; Carlson, Stephanie M

    2014-06-01

    Recent research has highlighted interdependencies between dispersal and other life-history traits, i.e. dispersal syndromes, thereby revealing constraints on the evolution of dispersal and opportunities for improved ability to predict dispersal by considering suites of dispersal-related traits. This review adds to the growing list of life-history traits linked to spatial dispersal by emphasising the interdependence between dispersal through space and time, i.e. life-history diversity that distributes individuals into separate reproductive events. We reviewed the literature that has simultaneously investigated spatial and temporal dispersal to examine the prediction that traits of these two dispersal strategies are negatively correlated. Our results suggest that negative covariation is widely anticipated from theory. Empirical studies often reported evidence of weak negative covariation, although more complicated patterns were also evident, including across levels of biological organisation. Existing literature has largely focused on plants with dormancy capability, one or two phases of the dispersal process (emigration and/or transfer) and a single level of biological organisation (theory: individual; empirical: species). We highlight patterns of covariation across levels of organisation and conclude with a discussion of the consequences of dispersal through space and time and future research areas that should improve our understanding of dispersal-related life-history syndromes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  19. Book Review: Evolutionary Ecology of Birds: Life Histories, Mating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Book Title: Evolutionary Ecology of Birds: Life Histories, Mating Systems and Extinction. Book Authors: P.M. Bennett & I.P.F. Owens. Oxford University. Press. 2002. Pp. 272. Price £24.95 (paperback). ISBN 0 19 851089 6.

  20. Can understanding squid life-history strategies and recruitment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current views of the links between life-history strategies and recruitment processes in fish are contrasted with the pattern emerging for squid. A general perspective is that the roles of space and time are reversed in the two groups, suggesting that management strategies also should differ. The space/time reversal appears to ...

  1. Pathogen life-history trade-offs revealed in allopatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Hanna; Laine, Anna-Liisa

    2013-11-01

    Trade-offs in life-history traits is a central tenet in evolutionary biology, yet their ubiquity and relevance to realized fitness in natural populations remains questioned. Trade-offs in pathogens are of particular interest because they may constrain the evolution and epidemiology of diseases. Here, we studied life-history traits determining transmission in the obligate fungal pathogen, Podosphaera plantaginis, infecting Plantago lanceolata. We find that although traits are positively associated on sympatric host genotypes, on allopatric host genotypes relationships between infectivity and subsequent transmission traits change shape, becoming even negative. The epidemiological prediction of this change in life-history relationships in allopatry is lower disease prevalence in newly established pathogen populations. An analysis of the natural pathogen metapopulation confirms that disease prevalence is lower in newly established pathogen populations and they are more prone to go extinct during winter than older pathogen populations. Hence, life-history trade-offs mediated by pathogen local adaptation may influence epidemiological dynamics at both population and metapopulation levels. © 2013 The Authors. Evolution published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  2. The life-history of Sphacelaria furcigera Kutz. (Phaeophyceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van den C.; Flinterman, A.

    1968-01-01

    Cultural and caryological investigations on Sphacelaria furcigera from Hoek van Holland give evidence of a slightly heteromorphic diplohaplontic life-history in this species. A relatively slender (13.5—31 μ) haploid gametophytic phase alternates with a more robust (19—41 μ) diploid sporophytic

  3. Measuring the Unmeasurable : The Psychometrics of Life History Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruijters, Stefan L K; Fleuren, Bram P I

    2017-11-15

    Within evolutionary biology, life-history theory is used to explain cross-species differences in allocation strategies regarding reproduction, maturation, and survival. Behavioral scientists have recently begun to conceptualize such strategies as a within-species individual characteristic that is predictive of behavior. Although life history theory provides an important framework for behavioral scientists, the psychometric approach to life-history strategy measurement-as operationalized by K-factors-involves conceptual entanglements. We argue that current psychometric approaches attempting to identify K-factors are based on an unwarranted conflation of functional descriptions and proximate mechanisms-a conceptual mix-up that may generate unviable hypotheses and invites misinterpretation of empirical findings. The assumptions underlying generic psychometric methodology do not allow measurement of functionally defined variables; rather these methods are confined to Mayr's proximate causal realm. We therefore conclude that K-factor scales lack validity, and that life history strategy cannot be identified with psychometrics as usual. To align theory with methodology, suggestions for alternative methods and new avenues are proposed.

  4. Height among Women is Curvilinearly Related to Life History Strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, Abraham P.; Pollet, Thomas V.; Klavina, Liga; Figueredo, Aurelio Jose; Dijkstra, Pieternel

    2009-01-01

    It was hypothesized that women of medium height would show a more secure, long-term mating pattern characterized by less jealousy, less intrasexual competition and a "slower" life history strategy. In three samples of female undergraduate students clear support was found for these hypotheses. In

  5. Learning in Life History - psycho-societal interpretation of biographies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2008-01-01

    Taking its point of departure from some critical remarks about some of the most important recent theorizing of learning, this article presents an alternative framework for theorizing learning as a subjective process in a social and societal context, based on life history research. The key concepts...

  6. America: History and Life--A Wide Ranging Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetland, James H.

    1983-01-01

    Description of America: History and Life (AHL)--database including references from over 2,000 periodicals in literature, philosophy, religion, art, sociology, other disciplines of historical value--highlights structure; document treatment; access points; comparison of dissertation coverage between AHL and Comprehensive Dissertation Abstracts;…

  7. Life history parameters of narwhals (Monodon monoceros) from Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Eva; Hansen, Steen H; Ditlevsen, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    assessed based on data from reproductive organs and was estimated to be 8–9 years for females and 12–20 years for males. Pregnancy rates for East and West Greenland were estimated to be 0.38–0.42 and 0.38, respectively. Maximum life span expectancy was found to be approximately 100 years. A population......Life history parameters for narwhals (Monodon monoceros) were estimated based on age estimates from aspartic acid racemization of eye lens nuclei. Eyes, reproductive organs, and measures of body lengths were collected from 282 narwhals in East and West Greenland in the years 1993, 2004, and 2007...

  8. Heterogeneity of life histories in a nonhuman primate population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández Pacheco, Raisa; Steiner, Uli

    2014-01-01

    histories within a primate population is generated by density-dependent dynamics, the demographic data of Cayo Santiago rhesus macaques over 40 years and 7000 individuals was used. A multi-stage model using a first-order Markov process describing reproductive dynamics was constructed and annual entropy......Identifying the sources of variation in life histories, whether fixed (heritable) and/or dynamic differences, remains a fundamental task to address in order to understand the meaning and significance of phenotypic variation within populations. To test whether the variation among individual life...... estimated. Entropy was moderately high (0.71), ranging from 0.59 to 0.88. Variation in annual entropy does not relate to variation in survival nor directly relates to density-dependent effects. However, variation in entropy was related to transition probabilities among non-breeders. This multistage model...

  9. Life History Strategy and the HEXACO Personality Dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph H. Manson

    2015-01-01

    Although several studies have linked Life History Strategy (LHS) variation with variation in the Five Factor Model personality dimensions, no published research has explored the relationship of LHS to the HEXACO personality dimensions. The theoretically expected relationship of the HEXACO Emotionality factor to LHS is unclear. The results of two studies (N = 641) demonstrated that LHS indicators form part of a factor along with HEXACO Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, and (margi...

  10. Industrial energy use and the human life history

    OpenAIRE

    Burger, Oskar; DeLong, John P.; Hamilton, Marcus J.

    2011-01-01

    The demographic rates of most organisms are supported by the consumption of food energy, which is used to produce new biomass and fuel physiological processes. Unlike other species, modern humans use ?extra-metabolic' energy sources acquired independent of physiology, which also influence demographics. We ask whether the amount of extra-metabolic energy added to the energy budget affects demographic and life history traits in a predictable way. Currently it is not known how human demographics...

  11. Individual heterogeneity in life histories and eco-evolutionary dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vindenes, Yngvild; Langangen, Øystein

    2015-05-01

    Individual heterogeneity in life history shapes eco-evolutionary processes, and unobserved heterogeneity can affect demographic outputs characterising life history and population dynamical properties. Demographic frameworks like matrix models or integral projection models represent powerful approaches to disentangle mechanisms linking individual life histories and population-level processes. Recent developments have provided important steps towards their application to study eco-evolutionary dynamics, but so far individual heterogeneity has largely been ignored. Here, we present a general demographic framework that incorporates individual heterogeneity in a flexible way, by separating static and dynamic traits (discrete or continuous). First, we apply the framework to derive the consequences of ignoring heterogeneity for a range of widely used demographic outputs. A general conclusion is that besides the long-term growth rate lambda, all parameters can be affected. Second, we discuss how the framework can help advance current demographic models of eco-evolutionary dynamics, by incorporating individual heterogeneity. For both applications numerical examples are provided, including an empirical example for pike. For instance, we demonstrate that predicted demographic responses to climate warming can be reversed by increased heritability. We discuss how applications of this demographic framework incorporating individual heterogeneity can help answer key biological questions that require a detailed understanding of eco-evolutionary dynamics. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  12. The life-history basis of behavioural innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol, Daniel; Sayol, Ferran; Ducatez, Simon; Lefebvre, Louis

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary origin of innovativeness remains puzzling because innovating means responding to novel or unusual problems and hence is unlikely to be selected by itself. A plausible alternative is considering innovativeness as a co-opted product of traits that have evolved for other functions yet together predispose individuals to solve problems by adopting novel behaviours. However, this raises the question of why these adaptations should evolve together in an animal. Here, we develop the argument that the adaptations enabling animals to innovate evolve together because they are jointly part of a life-history strategy for coping with environmental changes. In support of this claim, we present comparative evidence showing that in birds, (i) innovative propensity is linked to life histories that prioritize future over current reproduction, (ii) the link is in part explained by differences in brain size, and (iii) innovative propensity and life-history traits may evolve together in generalist species that frequently expose themselves to novel or unusual conditions. Combined with previous evidence, these findings suggest that innovativeness is not a specialized adaptation but more likely part of a broader general adaptive system to cope with changes in the environment. PMID:26926277

  13. Rarity as a life-history correlate in Dudleya (Crassulaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Ann E; Wilson, Paul

    2011-07-01

    Differences in rarity among species can be caused by adaptation to local conditions along with correlated evolution in characters that limit geographic range size. For this kind of divergence, the resulting species differ in their ability to thrive in varying environments. Because rare species are more prone to extinction than widespread species, trade-offs in life history predispose the resulting lineages to clade selection. Nine Dudleya species live in the Santa Monica Mountains: five neoendemics, one species intermediate in rarity, and three with broader ranges. Life-history traits were correlated against one another. To understand habitat dependence, the species were grown in an inland garden and in a coastal garden, and the disparity in growth and reproduction in the two gardens was compared among species. Rare species reproduced earlier and grew to be smaller than common species. The small body size of the rare species was correlated with small reproductive outputs compared with those of the large-bodied common species. The growth disparity between plants in the two gardens was greatest for the rare species. The rare species had a lower tolerance for hot, dry conditions compared with the common species. In the Santa Monica Mountains, the habitat conditions required by the rare species are not as prevalent as those of the common species. The data are consistent with the view that differences in life histories constrained by trade-offs affect range size. Such differences in rarity become the grist for clade selection at the scale of macroevolution.

  14. Ecology and life history evolution of frugivorous Drosophila parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Frédéric; Gibert, Patricia; Ris, Nicolas; Allemand, Roland

    2009-01-01

    Parasitoids and their hosts are linked by intimate and harmful interactions that make them well suited to analyze fundamental ecological and evolutionary processes with regard to life histories evolution of parasitic association. Drosophila aspects of what parasitoid Hymenoptera have become model organisms to study aspects that cannot be investigated with other associations. These include the genetic bases of fitness traits variations, physiology and genetics of resistance/virulence, and coevolutionary dynamics leading to local adaptation. Recent research on evolutionary ecology of Drosophila parasitoids were performed mainly on species that thrive in fermenting fruits (genera Leptopilina and Asobara). Here, we review information and add original data regarding community ecology of these parasitoids, including species distribution, pattern of abundance and diversity, host range and the nature and intensity of species interactions. Biology and the evolution of life histories in response to habitat heterogeneity and possible local adaptations leading to specialization of these wasps are reported with special emphasis on species living in southern Europe. We expose the diversity and intensity of selective constraints acting on parasitoid life history traits, which vary geographically and highlight the importance of considering both biotic and abiotic factors with their interactions to understand ecological and evolutionary dynamics of host-parasitoid associations.

  15. Predation life history responses to increased temperature variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Barbosa

    Full Text Available The evolution of life history traits is regulated by energy expenditure, which is, in turn, governed by temperature. The forecasted increase in temperature variability is expected to impose greater stress to organisms, in turn influencing the balance of energy expenditure and consequently life history responses. Here we examine how increased temperature variability affects life history responses to predation. Individuals reared under constant temperatures responded to different levels of predation risk as appropriate: namely, by producing greater number of neonates of smaller sizes and reducing the time to first brood. In contrast, we detected no response to predation regime when temperature was more variable. In addition, population growth rate was slowest among individuals reared under variable temperatures. Increased temperature variability also affected the development of inducible defenses. The combined effects of failing to respond to predation risk, slower growth rate and the miss-match development of morphological defenses supports suggestions that increased variability in temperature poses a greater risk for species adaptation than that posed by a mean shift in temperature.

  16. Height among Women is Curvilinearly Related to Life History Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham P. Buunk

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available It was hypothesized that women of medium height would show a more secure, long-term mating pattern characterized by less jealousy, less intrasexual competition and a “slower” life history strategy. In three samples of female undergraduate students clear support was found for these hypotheses. In Study 1, among 120 participants, height was curvilinearly related to well-established measures of possessive and reactive jealousy, with women of medium height being less jealous than tall as well as short women. In Study 2, among 40 participants, height was curvilinearly related to intrasexual competition, with women of medium height being less competitive towards other women than tall as well as short women. In Study 3, among 299 participants, height was curvilinearly related to the Mini-K, a well-validated measure of “slower” life history strategy, with women of medium height having a slower life history strategy than tall as well as short women. The results suggest that women of medium height tend to follow a different mating strategy than either tall or short women. Various explanations and implications of these results are discussed.

  17. Analysis of Life Histories: A State Space Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajulton, Fernando

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available EnglishThe computer package LIFEHIST written by the author, is meant for analyzinglife histories through a state-space approach. Basic ideas on which the various programs have beenbuilt are described in this paper in a non-mathematical language. Users can use various programs formultistate analyses based on Markov and semi-Markov frameworks and sequences of transitions implied inlife histories. The package is under constant revision and programs for using a few specific modelsthe author thinks will be useful for analyzing longitudinal data will be incorporated in the nearfuture.FrenchLe système d'ordinateur LIFEHIST écrit par l'auteur est établi pour analyser desévénements au cours de la vie par une approche qui tient compte des états aucours du temps. Les idées fondamentales à la base des divers programmes dumodule sont décrites dans un langage non-mathématique. Le systèmeLIFEHIST peut être utilisé pour des analyses Markov et semi-Markov desséquences d’événements au cours de la vie. Le module est sous révisionconstante, et des programmes que l’auteur compte ajouter pour l'usage dedonnées longitudinales sont décrit.

  18. A review of Ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) life history in its ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) have caused and have the potential to cause great ecological damage as invasive species in North America, parts of the European Union, Scandinavian countries, and the United Kingdom. The objectives of this review are to define the Ruffe's native and non-native range, examine the life history requirements of Ruffe, explore the Ruffe life cycle, and differentiate between the life stages. We compare Ruffe in their native range to Ruffe in their non-native range to determine if there are any differences in habitat, size, age, genotype, or migratory patterns in the winter. Literature from both the native and non-native ranges of Ruffe, with a particular emphasis on rare translated literature, is used. Ruffe have variability and plasticity in their chemical, physical, biological, and habitat requirements in their native and non-native ranges. Adult Ruffe have a suite of characteristics that make them adaptable to novel environments, including age and size at maturity, maximum age and length (and/ or weight), reproduction type, genotype, feeding habits, seasonal movements, and spawning movements. There is variability among these characteristics seen between the Ruffe's native, non-native North American, and European non-native populations. Based on the Ruffe's variable life history strategies and their recent range expansion, all of the Great Lakes and many other regions in the U.K., Europe, and Scandinavian countries could be vulnerable t

  19. Life history and bioeconomy of the house mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, R J; Bronson, F H

    1992-11-01

    1. More is known about the western European house mouse, Mus (musculus) domesticus than any other non-human mammal. If laboratory and field information is combined, an extremely valuable understanding of the species' bioeconomy could be obtained. 2. The seven stages of mouse life-history are surveyed (up to birth, nest life, sex life, social structure, population statics and stability, senescence, and death), and the interactions between the changing phenotype and the environment are described. 3. These interactions can be used to build up a model of the opportunities and compromises which result in the fitness of individual mice. It is not yet possible to quantify such a model, but this should in principle be achievable.

  20. The Surprising History of Claims for Life on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Michael J.

    2011-11-01

    Because astronomers are now convinced that it is impossible for life, especially intelligent life, to exist on the Sun and stars, it might be assumed that astronomers have always held this view. This paper shows that throughout most of the history of astronomy, some intellectuals, including a number of well-known astronomers, have advocated the existence of intelligent life on our Sun and thereby on stars. Among the more prominent figures discussed are Nicolas of Cusa, Giordano Bruno, William Whiston, Johann Bode, Roger Boscovich, William Herschel, Auguste Comte, Carl Gauss, Thomas Dick, John Herschel, and François Arago. One point in preparing this paper is to show differences between the astronomy of the past and that of the present.

  1. Survival on the ark: life history trends in captive parrots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Anna M.; Hobson, Elizabeth A.; Lackey, Laurie Bingaman; Wright, Timothy F.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the order Psittaciformes (parrots and cockatoos) are among the most long-lived and endangered avian species. Comprehensive data on lifespan and breeding are critical to setting conservation priorities, parameterizing population viability models, and managing captive and wild populations. To meet these needs, we analyzed 83, 212 life history records of captive birds from the International Species Information System and calculated lifespan and breeding parameters for 260 species of parrots (71% of extant species). Species varied widely in lifespan, with larger species generally living longer than smaller ones. The highest maximum lifespan recorded was 92 years in Cacatua moluccensis, but only 11 other species had a maximum lifespan over 50 years. Our data indicate that while some captive individuals are capable of reaching extraordinary ages, median lifespans are generally shorter than widely assumed, albeit with some increase seen in birds presently held in zoos. Species that lived longer and bred later in life tended to be more threatened according to IUCN classifications. We documented several individuals of multiple species that were able to breed for more than two decades, but the majority of clades examined had much shorter active reproduction periods. Post-breeding periods were surprisingly long and in many cases surpassed the duration of active breeding. Our results demonstrate the value of the ISIS database to estimate life history data for an at-risk taxon that is difficult to study in the wild, and provide life history data that is crucial for predictive modeling of future species endangerment and proactively managing captive populations of parrots. PMID:22389582

  2. The history of life and death: a 'spiritual' history from invisible matter to prolongation of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemelli, Benedino

    2012-01-01

    Over a long period of time, particularly from the nineteenth century on, Francis Bacon's philosophy has been interpreted as centred on the Novum organum and focused on the role that a well-organized method may play in securing a reliable knowledge of nature. In fact, if we examine Bacon's oeuvre as a whole, including some recent manuscript findings (De vijs mortis), we can safely argue that the issues addressed in the Novum organum represent only a part of Bacon's agenda, and not even the most important ones. By contrast, it is apparent that, from the very beginning of his investigations, he emphasized the central role of medicine, the need to establish new approaches in the study of the vital functions and the importance of promoting new discoveries in the medical field, not so much to find a cure for the many illnesses that plagued mankind as to prolong human life. In this sense, Historia vitae et mortis plays a central role in Bacon's programme to extend human knowledge and power, for, in his opinion, human beings could recover their lost ability to live a long and healthy life by embarking on careful investigations of nature. Far from being a purely descriptive or abstract exercise, Bacon's historia can therefore be seen as an operative tool to attain some of mankind's basic aims.

  3. Reflecting on the Tensions Between Emic and Etic Perspectives in Life History Research: Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L. Olive

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available I utilized a life history methodology in this study through which written and oral narratives were obtained from six postsecondary students who self-identified as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and/or Queer (LGBQ. Through this narrative process, I endeavored to understand how past events and behaviors shaped the participants' identities and their sense of resiliency. During the data analysis process, I experienced tension between etic and emic categories and themes. Consequently, I struggled to maintain an inductive position throughout the coding process. This article provides an overview of this process and seeks to add to the discussion regarding etic and emic perspectives in qualitative research. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs140268

  4. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (South Florida). Spiny Lobster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOBSTER, BIOLOGY , AQUATIC ORGANISMS, COASTAL REGIONS, FISHES, CRUSTACEA, DECAPODA, ENVIRONMENTS, INVERTEBRATES , HISTORY, LIFE( BIOLOGY ), POPULATION...BIOLOGISTS, ECOLOGY, REQUIREMENTS, LIFE CYCLES, MARINE BIOLOGY , TAXONOMY, PROFILES, ROCK

  5. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (South Atlantic). American Oyster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OYSTERS, *MARINE BIOLOGY , COASTAL REGIONS, ECOLOGY, ENVIRONMENTS, REQUIREMENTS, LIFE CYCLES, BIOLOGY , AQUATIC ORGANISMS, FISHES, INVERTEBRATES ...HISTORY, LIFE( BIOLOGY ), POPULATION, REPRODUCTION(PHYSIOLOGY), SALINITY, FEEDING, ESTUARIES, TAXONOMY

  6. Measuring selective constraint on fertility in human life histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James Holland; Tuljapurkar, Shripad

    2015-07-21

    Human life histories combine late age at first reproduction, long reproductive span, relatively high fertility, and substantial postreproductive survival. However, even among the most fecund populations, human fertility falls far below its theoretical maximum. The extent of parental care required for successful offspring recruitment and widespread fertility decline under proper economic conditions suggest that selection on fertility is constrained by trade-offs with recruitment. Here we measure the trade-offs between life history traits under selection by approximating the slope of the selective constraint curve on two traits at the observed values. Using a selection of populations that span human demographic space, we find that the substitution elasticity of fertility for infant survival shows age-related patterns, with minimum substitution elasticities ranging from 14 to 22 for the four populations. The age of this minimum occurs earlier in the high-mortality populations relative to generation time than it does in the low-mortality populations. The human curves are qualitatively similar to one of two comparable nonhuman primate age-specific substitution elasticity curves. The curve for rhesus macaques has a similar shape but is shifted down, meaning that the threshold for switching from investing in survival to fertility is lower at all ages. The magnitude of the substitution elasticities is similar between chimpanzees and humans but the shape is quite different, rising more slowly for a longer fraction of the chimpanzee life cycle. The steeply rising substitution elasticities with age in humans has clear implications for the evolution of reproductive senescence.

  7. A psycho-societal approach to life histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2016-01-01

    other forms of language interactive material as moments of life history, i.e. it is basically a hermeneutic approach. Talking about a psycho-societal approach indicates the ambition of attacking the dichotomy of the social and the psychic, both in the interpretation procedure and in some main...... particularly interested in the relations between the culturally mediated and the sensory/bodily aspects of experience processes because this is the boundary zones of knowledge and seat of the dynamics of learning. My psycho-societal approach was developing from interpreting autobiographical and later certain...... theoretical understandings of language, body and mind....

  8. "Ant" and "grasshopper" life-history strategies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymé Spor

    Full Text Available From the evolutionary and ecological points of view, it is essential to distinguish between the genetic and environmental components of the variability of life-history traits and of their trade-offs. Among the factors affecting this variability, the resource uptake rate deserves particular attention, because it depends on both the environment and the genetic background of the individuals. In order to unravel the bases of the life-history strategies in yeast, we grew a collection of twelve strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from different industrial and geographical origins in three culture media differing for their glucose content. Using a population dynamics model to fit the change of population size over time, we estimated the intrinsic growth rate (r, the carrying capacity (K, the mean cell size and the glucose consumption rate per cell. The life-history traits, as well as the glucose consumption rate, displayed large genetic and plastic variability and genetic-by-environment interactions. Within each medium, growth rate and carrying capacity were not correlated, but a marked trade-off between these traits was observed over the media, with high K and low r in the glucose rich medium and low K and high r in the other media. The cell size was tightly negatively correlated to carrying capacity in all conditions. The resource consumption rate appeared to be a clear-cut determinant of both the carrying capacity and the cell size in all media, since it accounted for 37% to 84% of the variation of those traits. In a given medium, the strains that consume glucose at high rate have large cell size and low carrying capacity, while the strains that consume glucose at low rate have small cell size but high carrying capacity. These two contrasted behaviors may be metaphorically defined as "ant" and "grasshopper" strategies of resource utilization. Interestingly, a strain may be "ant" in one medium and "grasshopper" in another. These life-history

  9. The life history of Pygidiopsis macrostomum Travassos, 1928 (Digenea: Heterophyidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Balmant Emerique Simões

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The life history of the trematode Pygidiopsis macrostomum Travassos, 1928 is described for the first time. Rediae and cercariae were obtained from naturally infected snails Heleobia australis (d´Orbigny, a new first intermediate host. Metacercariae were found encysted in the mesenteries of three naturally infected guppies, Phalloptychus januarius (Hensel, Jenynsia multidentata (Jenyns (new host records and Poecilia vivipara Bloch and Schneider. Experimental infections were successfully completed in the intermediate hosts H. australis and Poe. vivipara reared in the laboratory and hamsters Mesocricetus auratus Waterhouse were utilised as a definitive host.

  10. A psycho-societal approach to life histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2016-01-01

    particularly interested in the relations between the culturally mediated and the sensory/bodily aspects of experience processes because this is the boundary zones of knowledge and seat of the dynamics of learning. My psycho-societal approach was developing from interpreting autobiographical and later certain...... other forms of language interactive material as moments of life history, i.e. it is basically a hermeneutic approach. Talking about a psycho-societal approach indicates the ambition of attacking the dichotomy of the social and the psychic, both in the interpretation procedure and in some main...... theoretical understandings of language, body and mind....

  11. Robin's Story: Life History of an Exemplary American Female Physical Education Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazers, Gunars; Curtner-Smith, Matthew D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to construct the life history of Robin, an exemplary female physical educator, to hear her voice, and to explore ways in which she experienced marginalization. Few life histories of exemplary physical educators have been recounted. Method: Robin's life history was investigated in light of the theory of occupational…

  12. Impaired Perinatal Growth and Longevity: A Life History Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah M. Sloboda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Life history theory proposes that early-life cues induce highly integrated responses in traits associated with energy partitioning, maturation, reproduction, and aging such that the individual phenotype is adaptively more appropriate to the anticipated environment. Thus, maternal and/or neonatally derived nutritional or endocrine cues suggesting a threatening environment may favour early growth and reproduction over investment in tissue reserve and repair capacity. These may directly affect longevity, as well as prioritise insulin resistance and capacity for fat storage, thereby increasing susceptibility to metabolic dysfunction and obesity. These shifts in developmental trajectory are associated with long-term expression changes in specific genes, some of which may be underpinned by epigenetic processes. This normative process of developmental plasticity may prove to be maladaptive in human environments in transition towards low extrinsic mortality and energy-dense nutrition, leading to the development of an inappropriate phenotype with decreased potential for longevity and/or increased susceptibility to metabolic disease.

  13. Theorizing Learning in Life History - a psycho-societal approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2007-01-01

    to the understanding of knowledge, based on examples from the author's research into professional learning (general practitioners). The pivotal role of language use and language socialisation is explained in brief, developing a psychodynamic complement to a language game concept of language use.......  Taking it's point of departure in some critical remarks to some of the most important recent theorizing of learning, this article presents an alternative framework for theorizing learning as a subjective process in a social and societal context, based in life history research. Key concepts...... derived from European critical theory, subjectivity and experience, are briefly introduced with a view to their intellectual background. The chapter elaborates the implication of these concepts in relation to the understanding of emotional aspects of learning in everyday life and in relation...

  14. Early-Life Characteristics, Psychiatric History, and Cognition Trajectories in Later Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Although considerable attention has been paid to the relationship between later-life depression and cognitive function, the relationship between a history of psychiatric problems and cognitive function is not very well documented. Few studies of relationships between childhood health, childhood disadvantage, and cognitive…

  15. Movements of Blue Sharks (Prionace glauca) across Their Life History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeperre, Frederic; Aires-da-Silva, Alexandre; Fontes, Jorge; Santos, Marco; Serrão Santos, Ricardo; Afonso, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Spatial structuring and segregation by sex and size is considered to be an intrinsic attribute of shark populations. These spatial patterns remain poorly understood, particularly for oceanic species such as blue shark (Prionace glauca), despite its importance for the management and conservation of this highly migratory species. This study presents the results of a long-term electronic tagging experiment to investigate the migratory patterns of blue shark, to elucidate how these patterns change across its life history and to assess the existence of a nursery area in the central North Atlantic. Blue sharks belonging to different life stages (n = 34) were tracked for periods up to 952 days during which they moved extensively (up to an estimated 28.139 km), occupying large parts of the oceanic basin. Notwithstanding a large individual variability, there were pronounced differences in movements and space use across the species' life history. The study provides strong evidence for the existence of a discrete central North Atlantic nursery, where juveniles can reside for up to at least 2 years. In contrast with previously described nurseries of coastal and semi-pelagic sharks, this oceanic nursery is comparatively vast and open suggesting that shelter from predators is not its main function. Subsequently, male and female blue sharks spatially segregate. Females engage in seasonal latitudinal migrations until approaching maturity, when they undergo an ontogenic habitat shift towards tropical latitudes. In contrast, juvenile males generally expanded their range southward and apparently displayed a higher degree of behavioural polymorphism. These results provide important insights into the spatial ecology of pelagic sharks, with implications for the sustainable management of this heavily exploited shark, especially in the central North Atlantic where the presence of a nursery and the seasonal overlap and alternation of different life stages coincides with a high fishing

  16. Movements of blue sharks (Prionace glauca across their life history.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Vandeperre

    Full Text Available Spatial structuring and segregation by sex and size is considered to be an intrinsic attribute of shark populations. These spatial patterns remain poorly understood, particularly for oceanic species such as blue shark (Prionace glauca, despite its importance for the management and conservation of this highly migratory species. This study presents the results of a long-term electronic tagging experiment to investigate the migratory patterns of blue shark, to elucidate how these patterns change across its life history and to assess the existence of a nursery area in the central North Atlantic. Blue sharks belonging to different life stages (n = 34 were tracked for periods up to 952 days during which they moved extensively (up to an estimated 28.139 km, occupying large parts of the oceanic basin. Notwithstanding a large individual variability, there were pronounced differences in movements and space use across the species' life history. The study provides strong evidence for the existence of a discrete central North Atlantic nursery, where juveniles can reside for up to at least 2 years. In contrast with previously described nurseries of coastal and semi-pelagic sharks, this oceanic nursery is comparatively vast and open suggesting that shelter from predators is not its main function. Subsequently, male and female blue sharks spatially segregate. Females engage in seasonal latitudinal migrations until approaching maturity, when they undergo an ontogenic habitat shift towards tropical latitudes. In contrast, juvenile males generally expanded their range southward and apparently displayed a higher degree of behavioural polymorphism. These results provide important insights into the spatial ecology of pelagic sharks, with implications for the sustainable management of this heavily exploited shark, especially in the central North Atlantic where the presence of a nursery and the seasonal overlap and alternation of different life stages coincides with a

  17. An audit comparing the discrepancies between a verbal enquiry, a written history, and an electronic medical history questionnaire: a suggested medical history/social history form for clinical practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carey, Barbara

    2011-04-01

    In everyday practice, dentists are confronted with an increasing number of patients with complex medical problems. There is divergence of opinion among dentists regarding how to obtain a thorough medical\\/social history.

  18. Life History Strategy and Young Adult Substance Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George B. Richardson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study tested whether life history strategy (LHS and its intergenerational transmission could explain young adult use of common psychoactive substances. We tested a sequential structural equation model using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. During young adulthood, fast LHS explained 61% of the variance in overall liability for substance use. Faster parent LHS predicted poorer health and lesser alcohol use, greater neuroticism and cigarette smoking, but did not predict fast LHS or overall liability for substance use among young adults. Young adult neuroticism was independent of substance use controlling for fast LHS. The surprising finding of independence between parent and child LHS casts some uncertainty upon the identity of the parent and child LHS variables. Fast LHS may be the primary driver of young adult use of common psychoactive substances. However, it is possible that the young adult fast LHS variable is better defined as young adult mating competition. We discuss our findings in depth, chart out some intriguing new directions for life history research that may clarify the dimensionality of LHS and its mediation of the intergenerational transmission of substance use, and discuss implications for substance abuse prevention and treatment.

  19. Life-history evolution and mitogenomic phylogeny of caecilian amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Mauro, Diego; Gower, David J; Müller, Hendrik; Loader, Simon P; Zardoya, Rafael; Nussbaum, Ronald A; Wilkinson, Mark

    2014-04-01

    We analyze mitochondrial genomes to reconstruct a robust phylogenetic framework for caecilian amphibians and use this to investigate life-history evolution within the group. Our study comprises 45 caecilian mitochondrial genomes (19 of them newly reported), representing all families and 27 of 32 currently recognized genera, including some for which molecular data had never been reported. Support for all relationships in the inferred phylogenetic tree is high to maximal, and topology tests reject all investigated alternatives, indicating an exceptionally robust molecular phylogenetic framework of caecilian evolution consistent with current morphology-based supraspecific classification. We used the mitogenomic phylogenetic framework to infer ancestral character states and to assess correlation among three life-history traits (free-living larvae, viviparity, specialized pre-adult or vernal teeth), each of which occurs only in some caecilian species. Our results provide evidence that an ancestor of the Seychelles caecilians abandoned direct development and re-evolved a free-living larval stage. This study yields insights into the concurrent evolution of direct development and of vernal teeth in an ancestor of Teresomata that likely gave rise to skin-feeding (maternal dermatophagy) behavior and subsequently enabled evolution of viviparity, with skin feeding possibly a homologous precursor of oviduct feeding in viviparous caecilians. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Life history strategy and young adult substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, George B; Chen, Ching-Chen; Dai, Chia-Liang; Swoboda, Christopher M

    2014-11-03

    This study tested whether life history strategy (LHS) and its intergenerational transmission could explain young adult use of common psychoactive substances. We tested a sequential structural equation model using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. During young adulthood, fast LHS explained 61% of the variance in overall liability for substance use. Faster parent LHS predicted poorer health and lesser alcohol use, greater neuroticism and cigarette smoking, but did not predict fast LHS or overall liability for substance use among young adults. Young adult neuroticism was independent of substance use controlling for fast LHS. The surprising finding of independence between parent and child LHS casts some uncertainty upon the identity of the parent and child LHS variables. Fast LHS may be the primary driver of young adult use of common psychoactive substances. However, it is possible that the young adult fast LHS variable is better defined as young adult mating competition. We discuss our findings in depth, chart out some intriguing new directions for life history research that may clarify the dimensionality of LHS and its mediation of the intergenerational transmission of substance use, and discuss implications for substance abuse prevention and treatment.

  1. Genetic and life-history consequences of extreme climate events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzi, Simone; Mangel, Marc; Jesensek, Dusan; Garza, John Carlos; Crivelli, Alain J

    2017-02-08

    Climate change is predicted to increase the frequency and intensity of extreme climate events. Tests on empirical data of theory-based predictions on the consequences of extreme climate events are thus necessary to understand the adaptive potential of species and the overarching risks associated with all aspects of climate change. We tested predictions on the genetic and life-history consequences of extreme climate events in two populations of marble trout Salmo marmoratus that have experienced severe demographic bottlenecks due to flash floods. We combined long-term field and genotyping data with pedigree reconstruction in a theory-based framework. Our results show that after flash floods, reproduction occurred at a younger age in one population. In both populations, we found the highest reproductive variance in the first cohort born after the floods due to a combination of fewer parents and higher early survival of offspring. A small number of parents allowed for demographic recovery after the floods, but the genetic bottleneck further reduced genetic diversity in both populations. Our results also elucidate some of the mechanisms responsible for a greater prevalence of faster life histories after the extreme event. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Life-history patterns of fishes in the Hellenic Seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. I. Stergiou

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The available quantitative information (age, growth, maturation and mortality for 103 fish stocks in Hellenic Seas was analysed here in the context of life-history theory and compared with similar information from other areas of the world.

    The results showed that the fish species and stocks inhabiting Hellenic waters are generally small in size, have low longevity, mature at an early age and size, and probably suffer high adult mortality rates. Such a pattern most probably is an adaptation to the synergetic combination of highly oligotrophic conditions and high subtropical temperatures prevailing in Hellenic waters and is consistent with life-history theory.

    Finally, the auximetric grid was used to compare the growth of four species, each represented by more than six stocks. The results revealed that the growth spaces occupied by the four species reflect their strikingly different feeding habits, especially with respect to the size of prey and the relative importance of fish prey to their diet.

  3. Population-specific life histories contribute to metapopulation viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Samniqueka J.; Bell, Timothy J.; McEachern, A. Kathryn; Pavlovic, Noel B.

    2016-01-01

    Restoration efforts can be improved by understanding how variations in life-history traits occur within populations of the same species living in different environments. This can be done by first understanding the demographic responses of natural occurring populations. Population viability analysis continues to be useful to species management and conservation with sensitivity analysis aiding in the understanding of population dynamics. In this study, using life-table response experiments and elasticity analyses, we investigated how population-specific life-history demographic responses contributed to the metapopulation viability of the Federally threatened Pitcher's thistle (Cirsium pitcheri). Specifically, we tested the following hypotheses: (1) Subpopulations occupying different environments within a metapopulation have independent demographic responses and (2) advancing succession results in a shift from a demographic response focused on growth and fecundity to one dominated by stasis. Our results showed that reintroductions had a positive contribution to the metapopulation growth rate as compared to native populations which had a negative contribution. We found no difference in succession on the contribution to metapopulation viability. In addition, we identified distinct population-specific contributions to metapopulation viability and were able to associate specific life-history demographic responses. For example, the positive impact of Miller High Dunes population on the metapopulation growth rate resulted from high growth contributions, whereas increased time of plant in stasis for the State Park Big Blowout population resulted in negative contributions. A greater understanding of how separate populations respond in their corresponding environment may ultimately lead to more effective management strategies aimed at reducing extinction risk. We propose the continued use of sensitivity analyses to evaluate population-specific demographic influences on

  4. Behavioural consistency and life history of Rana dalmatina tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urszán, Tamás János; Török, János; Hettyey, Attila; Garamszegi, László Zsolt; Herczeg, Gábor

    2015-05-01

    The focus of evolutionary behavioural ecologists has recently turned towards understanding the causes and consequences of behavioural consistency, manifesting either as animal personality (consistency in a single behaviour) or behavioural syndrome (consistency across more behaviours). Behavioural type (mean individual behaviour) has been linked to life-history strategies, leading to the emergence of the integrated pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) theory. Using Rana dalmatina tadpoles as models, we tested if behavioural consistency and POLS could be detected during the early ontogenesis of this amphibian. We targeted two ontogenetic stages and measured activity, exploration and risk-taking in a common garden experiment, assessing both individual behavioural type and intra-individual behavioural variation. We observed that activity was consistent in all tadpoles, exploration only became consistent with advancing age and risk-taking only became consistent in tadpoles that had been tested, and thus disturbed, earlier. Only previously tested tadpoles showed trends indicative of behavioural syndromes. We found an activity-age at metamorphosis POLS in the previously untested tadpoles irrespective of age. Relative growth rate correlated positively with the intra-individual variation of activity of the previously untested older tadpoles. In previously tested older tadpoles, intra-individual variation of exploration correlated negatively and intra-individual variation of risk-taking correlated positively with relative growth rate. We provide evidence for behavioural consistency and POLS in predator- and conspecific-naive tadpoles. Intra-individual behavioural variation was also correlated to life history, suggesting its relevance for the POLS theory. The strong effect of moderate disturbance related to standard behavioural testing on later behaviour draws attention to the pitfalls embedded in repeated testing.

  5. Adapting data collection methods in the Australian Life Histories and Health Survey: a retrospective life course study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendig, Hal; Byles, Julie E; O'Loughlin, Kate; Nazroo, James Y; Mishra, Gita; Noone, Jack; Loh, Vanessa; Forder, Peta M

    2014-03-24

    Ideally, life course data are collected prospectively through an ongoing longitudinal study. We report adaptive multimethod fieldwork procedures that gathered life history data by mail survey and telephone interview, comparable with the face-to-face methods employed in the English Longitudinal Study on Ageing (ELSA). The Australian Life Histories and Health (LHH) Survey was a substudy of the Australian 45 and Up Study, with data collection methods modified from the ELSA Study. A self-complete questionnaire and life history calendar were completed by the participants, followed by a computer-assisted telephone interview recording key life events. The LHH survey developed and tested procedures and instruments that gathered rich life history data within an ongoing Australian longitudinal survey on ageing. Data collection proved to be economical. The use of a self-complete questionnaire in conjunction with a life history calendar and coordinated computer-assisted telephone interview was successful in collecting retrospective life course information, in terms of being thorough, practical and efficient. This study has a diverse collection of data covering the life course, starting with early life experiences and continuing with socioeconomic and health exposures and outcomes during adult life. Mail and telephone methodology can accurately and economically add a life history dimension to an ongoing longitudinal survey. The method is particularly valuable for surveying widely dispersed populations. The results will facilitate understanding of the social determinants of health by gathering data on earlier life exposures as well as comparative data across geographical and societal contexts.

  6. From Suns to Life: A Chronological Approach to the History of Life on Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Gargaud, Muriel; López-García, Purificación; Martin, Hervé; Montmerle, Thierry; Pascal, Robert; Reisse, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    This review emerged from several interdisciplinary meetings and schools gathering a group of astronomers, geologists, biologists, and chemists, attempting to share their specialized knowledge around a common question: how did life emerge on Earth? Their ultimate goal was to provide some kind of answer as a prerequisite to an even more demanding question: is life universal? The resulting state-of-the-art articles were written by twenty-five scientists telling a not-so linear story, but on the contrary, highlighting problems, gaps, and controversies. Needless to say, this approach yielded no definitive answers to both questions. However, by adopting a chronological approach to the question of the emergence of life on Earth, the only place where we know for sure that life exists; it was possible to break down this question into several sub-topics that can be addressed by the different disciplines. The main chapters of this review present the formation and evolution of the solar system (3); the building of a habi...

  7. Dynamics and life histories of northern ungulates in changing environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrichsen, D. K.

    2011-12-01

    Regional climate and local weather conditions can profoundly influence life history parameters (growth, survival, fecundity) and population dynamics in northern ungulates (Post and Stenseth 1999, Coulson et al. 2001). The influence is both direct, for example through reduced growth or survival (Aanes et al. 2000, Tyler et al. 2008), and indirect, for example through changes in resource distribution, phenology and quality, changes which subsequently influence consumer dynamics (Post et al. 2008). By comparing and contrasting data from three spatially independent populations of ungulates, I discuss how variation in local weather parameters and vegetation growth influence spatial and temporal dynamics through changes in life history parameters and/or behavioural dynamics. The data originate from long term (11-15 years) monitoring data from three populations of ungulates in one subarctic and two high Arctic sites; semi-domesticated reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) in northern Norway, Svalbard reindeer (R. t. platyrhynchus) on Spitsbergen and muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) in Northeast Greenland. The results show that juvenile animals can be particularly vulnerable to changes in their environment, and that this is mirrored to different degrees in the spatio-temporal dynamics of the three populations. Adverse weather conditions, acting either directly or mediated through access to and quality of vegetation, experienced by young early in life, or even by their dams during pregnancy, can lead to reduced growth, lower survival and reduced reproductive performance later in life. The influence of current climatic variation, and the predictions of how local weather conditions may change over time, differs between the three sites, resulting in potentially different responses in the three populations. Aanes R, Saether BE and Øritsland NA. 2000. Fluctuations of an introduced population of Svalbard reindeer: the effects of density dependence and climatic variation. Ecography

  8. Life history and ecology of Cambarus halli (Hobbs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennard, S.; Peterson, J.T.; Hawthorne, E.S.

    2009-01-01

    The life history of Cambarus halli, a crayfish endemic to the Tallapoosa River Basin, GA, was studied at four sites within the Tallapoosa River. Two sites had allopatric populations of C. halli, and two sites had populations of C. halli sympatric with C. englishi. Three age classes existed across sites. For Cambarus halli, total number of pleopodal eggs was positively related to carapace length, but egg size was only weakly positively related to carapace length. Cambarus halli were smaller across age classes at sympatric sites, but had greater growth rates than at allopatric sites. Cambarus halli density estimates were lower at sympatric sites, while proportions of reproductively active age-1 and age-2 individuals were higher at allopatric sites (63% vs. 33%).

  9. Life history strategy and the HEXACO personality dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Joseph H

    2015-01-16

    Although several studies have linked Life History Strategy (LHS) variation with variation in the Five Factor Model personality dimensions, no published research has explored the relationship of LHS to the HEXACO personality dimensions. The theoretically expected relationship of the HEXACO Emotionality factor to LHS is unclear. The results of two studies (N = 641) demonstrated that LHS indicators form part of a factor along with HEXACO Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, and (marginally) Honesty-Humility. People higher on these dimensions pursue a slower LHS. Neither Openness nor Emotionality was associated with this factor. Holding LHS constant, social involvement with kin was consistently predicted by higher Emotionality and was not consistently predicted by any other HEXACO factor. These results support a view of Emotionality as part of an LHS-independent personality dimension that influences the provision and receipt of kin altruism.

  10. Life History Strategy and the HEXACO Personality Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph H. Manson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although several studies have linked Life History Strategy (LHS variation with variation in the Five Factor Model personality dimensions, no published research has explored the relationship of LHS to the HEXACO personality dimensions. The theoretically expected relationship of the HEXACO Emotionality factor to LHS is unclear. The results of two studies (N = 641 demonstrated that LHS indicators form part of a factor along with HEXACO Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, and (marginally Honesty-Humility. People higher on these dimensions pursue a slower LHS. Neither Openness nor Emotionality was associated with this factor. Holding LHS constant, social involvement with kin was consistently predicted by higher Emotionality and was not consistently predicted by any other HEXACO factor. These results support a view of Emotionality as part of an LHS-independent personality dimension that influences the provision and receipt of kin altruism.

  11. Disturbance, life history, and optimal management for biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Q.

    2003-01-01

    Both frequency and intensity of disturbances in many ecosystems have been greatly enhanced by increasing human activities. As a consequence, the short-lived plant species including many exotics might have been dramatically increased in term of both richness and abundance on our planet while many long-lived species might have been lost. Such conclusions can be drawn from broadly observed successional cycles in both theoretical and empirical studies. This article discusses two major issues that have been largely overlooked in current ecosystem management policies and conservation efforts, i.e., life history constraints and future global warming trends. It also addresses the importance of these two factors in balancing disturbance frequency and intensity for optimal biodiversity maintenance and ecosystem management.

  12. Life Written in Bytes . The Superinformacional and New Technologies Company : Will the End of Privacy and Human Dignity ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleide Aparecida Gomes Rodrigues Fermentão

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent technologies have changed the way media of the human being, which shall establish direct contact with many people anywhere in the world. Allied to this fact, there is a virtualization increasing the human person, culminating in an immersion in the virtual world, which ultimately creates an increasing dependence on technology in order to exist socially. This transformation in the world of concepts makes the virtual pass to have direct impact in the real world. Attracted by the glitter and glamor of virtual network, the person finds no limits to their self-promotion. The private life is increasingly exposed to an undetermined number of people. So the person who is exposed in the virtual media in search of acceptance, forgets that it is not only stripping of his clothes or his privacy, but mainly is stripped of his dignity. The frantic search for some "tanned" finds no limit on common sense, coisificando the person and transforming it into mere virtual profile. The human person is in this state, the total lack of dignity, without realizing it, it becomes an object on display. The internet is a stage conducive to the spectacle of the self virtual, making it fertile ground for the indignity. The history of civilization dating back to fighting and winning the dignity of the human person, however, the time in which we live watch a reverse movement. Contemporaneously it is no longer the state or private to be constant threat to human dignity. Those who, seduced by the possibility of becoming the personality of the time, voluntarily abdicate their dignity in a process whose reversibility is questionable. The legislation can not keep up the speed of the transformations occurred in the virtual world and this mismatch can leave unprotected person especially in relation to their rights to intimacy, privacy and human dignity itself.

  13. Libraries of life: using life history books with depressed care home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plastow, Nicola Ann

    2006-01-01

    Depression is a common, and often undetected, psychiatric disorder in geriatric care home residents. Reminiscence, an independent nursing therapy used by a variety of health and social care professionals, can prevent or reduce depression. This practice development project explored the use of reminiscence life history books as an interpersonal therapeutic tool with 3 depressed care-home residents living in residential care and skilled nursing facilities. The process of choosing to produce a book, assessment of capabilities, and methods of construction are described using 3 illustrative case studies. Three themes emerged: reviewing the past, accepting the present, and dreaming of an alternative future. This project demonstrated that life history books, tailored to individual needs and abilities, can facilitate reminiscence and reduce depression by increasing social interaction. The benefits to residents, their families, and care staff are discussed and the relevance to nursing practice highlighted.

  14. Relative tooth size at birth in primates: Life history correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy D; Muchlinski, Magdalena N; Bucher, Wade R; Vinyard, Christopher J; Bonar, Christopher J; Evans, Sian; Williams, Lawrence E; DeLeon, Valerie B

    2017-11-01

    Dental eruption schedules have been closely linked to life history variables. Here we examine a sample of 50 perinatal primates (28 species) to determine whether life history traits correlate with relative tooth size at birth. Newborn primates were studied using serial histological sectioning. Volumes of deciduous premolars (dp2 -dp4 ), replacement teeth (if any), and permanent molars (M1-2/3 ) of the upper jaw were measured and residuals from cranial length were calculated with least squares regressions to obtain relative dental volumes (RDVs). Relative dental volumes of deciduous or permanent teeth have an unclear relationship with relative neonatal mass in all primates. Relative palatal length (RPL), used as a proxy for midfacial size, is significantly, positively correlated with larger deciduous and permanent postcanine teeth. However, when strepsirrhines alone are examined, larger RPL is correlated with smaller RDV of permanent teeth. In the full sample, RDVs of deciduous premolars are significantly negatively correlated with relative gestation length (RGL), but have no clear relationship with relative weaning age. RDVs of molars lack a clear relationship with RGL; later weaning is associated with larger molar RDV, although correlations are not significant. When strepsirrhines alone are analyzed, clearer trends are present: longer gestations or later weaning are associated with smaller deciduous and larger permanent postcanine teeth (only gestational length correlations are significant). Our results indicate a broad trend that primates with the shortest RGLs precociously develop deciduous teeth; in strepsirrhines, the opposite trend is seen for permanent molars. Anthropoids delay growth of permanent teeth, while strepsirrhines with short RGLs are growing replacement teeth concurrently. A comparison of neonatal volumes with existing information on extent of cusp mineralization indicates that growth of tooth germs and cusp mineralization may be selected for

  15. Life-history tradeoffs and reproductive cycles in Spotted Owls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoelting, Ricka E.; Gutierrez, R.J.; Kendall, William L.; Peery, M. Zachariah

    2015-01-01

    The study of tradeoffs among life-history traits has long been key to understanding the evolution of life-history strategies. However, more recently, evolutionary ecologists have realized that reproductive costs have the potential to influence population dynamics. Here, we tested for costs of reproduction in the California Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis), and assessed whether costs of reproduction in year t − 1 on reproduction in year t could be responsible for regionally synchronized biennial cycles in reproductive output. Logistic regression analysis and multistate mark–recapture models with state uncertainty revealed that breeding reduced the likelihood of reproducing in the subsequent year by 16% to 38%, but had no influence on subsequent survival. We also found that costs of reproduction in year t − 1 were correlated with climatic conditions in year t, with evidence of higher costs during the dry phase of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation. Using a simulation-based population model, we showed that strong reproductive costs had the potential to create biennial cycles in population-level reproductive output; however, estimated costs of reproduction appeared to be too small to explain patterns observed in Spotted Owls. In the absence of strong reproductive costs, we hypothesize that observed natural cycles in the reproductive output of Spotted Owls are related to as-yet-unmeasured, regionally concordant fluctuations in environmental conditions or prey resources. Despite theoretical evidence for demographic effects, our analyses illustrate that linking tradeoffs to actual changes in population processes will be challenging because of the potential confounding effects of individual and environmental variation.

  16. Life history strategy influences parasite responses to habitat fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froeschke, Götz; van der Mescht, Luther; McGeoch, Melodie; Matthee, Sonja

    2013-12-01

    Anthropogenic habitat use is a major threat to biodiversity and is known to increase the abundance of generalist host species such as rodents, which are regarded as potential disease carriers. Parasites have an intimate relationship with their host and the surrounding environment and it is expected that habitat fragmentation will affect parasite infestation levels. We investigated the effect of habitat fragmentation on the ecto- and endoparasitic burdens of a broad niche small mammal, Rhabdomys pumilio, in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. Our aim was to look at the effects of fragmentation on different parasite species with diverse life history characteristics and to determine whether general patterns can be found. Sampling took place within pristine lowland (Fynbos/Renosterveld) areas and at fragmented sites surrounded and isolated by agricultural activities. All arthropod ectoparasites and available gastrointestinal endoparasites were identified. We used conditional autoregressive models to investigate the effects of habitat fragmentation on parasite species richness and abundance of all recovered parasites. Host density and body size were larger in the fragments. Combined ecto- as well as combined endoparasite taxa showed higher parasite species richness in fragmented sites. Parasite abundance was generally higher in the case of R. pumilio individuals in fragmented habitats but it appears that parasites that are more permanently associated with the host's body and those that are host-specific show the opposite trend. Parasite life history is an important factor that needs to be considered when predicting the effects of habitat fragmentation on parasite and pathogen transmission. Copyright © 2013 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Eco-genetic modeling of contemporary life-history evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Erin S; Heino, Mikko; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2009-10-01

    We present eco-genetic modeling as a flexible tool for exploring the course and rates of multi-trait life-history evolution in natural populations. We build on existing modeling approaches by combining features that facilitate studying the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of realistically structured populations. In particular, the joint consideration of age and size structure enables the analysis of phenotypically plastic populations with more than a single growth trajectory, and ecological feedback is readily included in the form of density dependence and frequency dependence. Stochasticity and life-history trade-offs can also be implemented. Critically, eco-genetic models permit the incorporation of salient genetic detail such as a population's genetic variances and covariances and the corresponding heritabilities, as well as the probabilistic inheritance and phenotypic expression of quantitative traits. These inclusions are crucial for predicting rates of evolutionary change on both contemporary and longer timescales. An eco-genetic model can be tightly coupled with empirical data and therefore may have considerable practical relevance, in terms of generating testable predictions and evaluating alternative management measures. To illustrate the utility of these models, we present as an example an eco-genetic model used to study harvest-induced evolution of multiple traits in Atlantic cod. The predictions of our model (most notably that harvesting induces a genetic reduction in age and size at maturation, an increase or decrease in growth capacity depending on the minimum-length limit, and an increase in reproductive investment) are corroborated by patterns observed in wild populations. The predicted genetic changes occur together with plastic changes that could phenotypically mask the former. Importantly, our analysis predicts that evolutionary changes show little signs of reversal following a harvest moratorium. This illustrates how predictions offered by

  18. Evolution, human-microbe interactions, and life history plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rook, Graham; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Levin, Bruce R; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J; McLean, Angela R

    2017-07-29

    A bacterium was once a component of the ancestor of all eukaryotic cells, and much of the human genome originated in microorganisms. Today, all vertebrates harbour large communities of microorganisms (microbiota), particularly in the gut, and at least 20% of the small molecules in human blood are products of the microbiota. Changing human lifestyles and medical practices are disturbing the content and diversity of the microbiota, while simultaneously reducing our exposures to the so-called old infections and to organisms from the natural environment with which human beings co-evolved. Meanwhile, population growth is increasing the exposure of human beings to novel pathogens, particularly the crowd infections that were not part of our evolutionary history. Thus some microbes have co-evolved with human beings and play crucial roles in our physiology and metabolism, whereas others are entirely intrusive. Human metabolism is therefore a tug-of-war between managing beneficial microbes, excluding detrimental ones, and channelling as much energy as is available into other essential functions (eg, growth, maintenance, reproduction). This tug-of-war shapes the passage of each individual through life history decision nodes (eg, how fast to grow, when to mature, and how long to live). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multi-state models: metapopulation and life history analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnason, A. N.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Multi–state models are designed to describe populations that move among a fixed set of categorical states. The obvious application is to population interchange among geographic locations such as breeding sites or feeding areas (e.g., Hestbeck et al., 1991; Blums et al., 2003; Cam et al., 2004 but they are increasingly used to address important questions of evolutionary biology and life history strategies (Nichols & Kendall, 1995. In these applications, the states include life history stages such as breeding states. The multi–state models, by permitting estimation of stage–specific survival and transition rates, can help assess trade–offs between life history mechanisms (e.g. Yoccoz et al., 2000. These trade–offs are also important in meta–population analyses where, for example, the pre–and post–breeding rates of transfer among sub–populations can be analysed in terms of target colony distance, density, and other covariates (e.g., Lebreton et al. 2003; Breton et al., in review. Further examples of the use of multi–state models in analysing dispersal and life–history trade–offs can be found in the session on Migration and Dispersal. In this session, we concentrate on applications that did not involve dispersal. These applications fall in two main categories: those that address life history questions using stage categories, and a more technical use of multi–state models to address problems arising from the violation of mark–recapture assumptions leading to the potential for seriously biased predictions or misleading insights from the models. Our plenary paper, by William Kendall (Kendall, 2004, gives an overview of the use of Multi–state Mark–Recapture (MSMR models to address two such violations. The first is the occurrence of unobservable states that can arise, for example, from temporary emigration or by incomplete sampling coverage of a target population. Such states can also occur for life history reasons, such

  20. Size-dependent mortality induces life-history changes mediated through population dynamical feedbacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kooten, T.; Persson, L.; de Roos, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The majority of taxa grow significantly during life history, which often leads to individuals of the same species having different ecological roles, depending on their size or life stage. One aspect of life history that changes during ontogeny is mortality. When individual growth and development are

  1. Counterfactuals and history: Contingency and convergence in histories of science and life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, Ian

    2016-08-01

    This article examines a series of recent histories of science that have attempted to consider how science may have developed in slightly altered historical realities. These works have, moreover, been influenced by debates in evolutionary science about the opposing forces of contingency and convergence in regard to Stephen Jay Gould's notion of "replaying life's tape." The article argues that while the historians under analysis seem to embrace contingency in order to present their counterfactual narratives, for the sake of historical plausibility they are forced to accept a fairly weak role for contingency in shaping the development of science. It is therefore argued that Simon Conway Morris's theory of evolutionary convergence comes closer to describing the restrained counterfactual worlds imagined by these historians of science than does contingency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Women's Life History Attributes are Associated with Preferences in Mating Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Kruger, Daniel J.; Maryanne L. Fisher

    2008-01-01

    Life history theory (LHT) is a powerful framework for examining relationship choices and other behavioral strategies which integrates evolutionary, ecological, and socio-developmental perspectives. We examine the relationship between psychological and behavioral indicators of women's life history attributes and hypothetical relationship choices with characters representing short-term and long-term male sexual strategies. We demonstrate that psychological indicators of women's life history str...

  3. Life history of Echinoparyphium recurvatum (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, W M

    1998-06-01

    The present study was performed to observe characteristics of the life history of Echinoparyphium recurvatum under both natural and laboratory conditions in Korea. A batch of Radix auricularia coreana was collected from Sunamchon, one of the stream of West Naktonggang (River), in Kangso-gu, Pusan during August and September 1992. Out of 106 snails examined by crushing, 52 (49.0%) were infected with larval E. recurvatum, i.e. rediae, cercariae and metacercariae. Cercariae naturally shed from snails encysted in the snails of same species and loaches, but not in mud-snails. Adult worms were detected from chicks and ducks experimentally infected with metacercariae, but not from rats and mice. The average recovery rate of adults from chicks was 13.1%. Rediae were sac-like, 2.437 x 0.317 mm in average size, with a muscular pharynx and a brownish cecum which reached the anterior half of the body. Cercariae consisted of a spindle-shaped body (0.262 x 0.129 mm in average) and a rod-like tail (0.528 x 0.056 mm in average). In the cercarial body, 45 collar spines were observed on the head crown, and double rows of excretory ducts with fine granules were laterally arranged between the pharynx and the ventral sucker. Metacercariae were spherical, 0.144 x 0.142 mm in average size, with thick hyaline outer and thin elastic inner walls, and many excretory granules. Adults were slender and more attenuated in the anterior end, 2.760 x 0.550 mm in average size, and had 45 collar spines including four end group spines on both ventral corners. From the above results, it was confirmed that R. auricularia coreana plays a pivotal role in the life cycle of E. recurvatum as the first and/or second intermediate hosts in Korea.

  4. Adapting data collection methods in the Australian Life Histories and Health Survey: a retrospective life course study

    OpenAIRE

    Kendig, Hal; Byles, Julie E; O'Loughlin, Kate; Nazroo, James Y; Mishra, Gita; Noone, Jack; Loh, Vanessa; Forder, Peta M

    2014-01-01

    Objective Ideally, life course data are collected prospectively through an ongoing longitudinal study. We report adaptive multimethod fieldwork procedures that gathered life history data by mail survey and telephone interview, comparable with the face-to-face methods employed in the English Longitudinal Study on Ageing (ELSA). Design The Australian Life Histories and Health (LHH) Survey was a substudy of the Australian 45 and Up Study, with data collection methods modified from the ELSA Study...

  5. The Dark Triad Traits from a Life History Perspective in Six Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonason, Peter K; Foster, Joshua D; Egorova, Marina S; Parshikova, Oksana; Csathó, Árpád; Oshio, Atsushi; Gouveia, Valdiney V

    2017-01-01

    Work on the Dark Triad traits has benefited from the use of a life history framework but it has been limited to primarily Western samples and indirect assessments of life history strategies. Here, we examine how the Dark Triad traits (i.e., psychopathy, Machiavellianism, and narcissism) relate to two measures of individual differences in life history strategies. In Study 1 (N = 937), we replicated prior observed links between life history strategies, as measured by the Mini-K, and the Dark Triad traits using samples recruited from three countries. In Study 2 (N = 1032), we measured life history strategies using the Consideration of Future Consequences Scale and correlated it with the Dark Triad traits in samples recruited from three additional countries. While there was some variability across participants' sex and country, the results were generally consistent in that psychopathy and (to a lesser extent) Machiavellianism were related to faster life history strategies and narcissism was related to slower life history strategies. These results add cross-cultural data and the use of two measures of life history speed to understand the Dark Triad traits from a life history perspective.

  6. The Dark Triad Traits from a Life History Perspective in Six Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K. Jonason

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Work on the Dark Triad traits has benefited from the use of a life history framework but it has been limited to primarily Western samples and indirect assessments of life history strategies. Here, we examine how the Dark Triad traits (i.e., psychopathy, Machiavellianism, and narcissism relate to two measures of individual differences in life history strategies. In Study 1 (N = 937, we replicated prior observed links between life history strategies, as measured by the Mini-K, and the Dark Triad traits using samples recruited from three countries. In Study 2 (N = 1032, we measured life history strategies using the Consideration of Future Consequences Scale and correlated it with the Dark Triad traits in samples recruited from three additional countries. While there was some variability across participants’ sex and country, the results were generally consistent in that psychopathy and (to a lesser extent Machiavellianism were related to faster life history strategies and narcissism was related to slower life history strategies. These results add cross-cultural data and the use of two measures of life history speed to understand the Dark Triad traits from a life history perspective.

  7. Functional Linkages for the Pace of Life, Life-history, and Environment in Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joseph B.; Miller, Richard A.; Harper, James M.; Wiersma, Popko

    2010-01-01

    For vertebrates, body mass underlies much of the variation in metabolism, but among animals of the same body mass, metabolism varies six-fold. Understanding how natural selection can influence variation in metabolism remains a central focus of Physiological Ecologists. Life-history theory postulates that many physiological traits, such as metabolism, may be understood in terms of key maturational and reproductive characteristics over an organism’s life-span. Although it is widely acknowledged that physiological processes serve as a foundation for life-history trade-offs, the physiological mechanisms that underlie the diversification of life-histories remain elusive. Data show that tropical birds have a reduced basal metabolism (BMR), field metabolic rate, and peak metabolic rate compared with temperate counterparts, results consistent with the idea that a low mortality, and therefore increased longevity, and low productivity is associated with low mass-specific metabolic rate. Mass-adjusted BMR of tropical and temperate birds was associated with survival rate, in accordance with the view that animals with a slow pace of life tend to have increased life spans. To understand the mechanisms responsible for a reduced rate of metabolism in tropical birds compared with temperate species, we summarized an unpublished study, based on data from the literature, on organ masses for both groups. Tropical birds had smaller hearts, kidneys, livers, and pectoral muscles than did temperate species of the same body size, but they had a relatively larger skeletal mass. Direct measurements of organ masses for tropical and temperate birds showed that the heart, kidneys, and lungs were significantly smaller in tropical birds, although sample sizes were small. Also from an ongoing study, we summarized results to date on connections between whole-organism metabolism in tropical and temperate birds and attributes of their dermal fibroblasts grown in cell culture. Cells derived from

  8. Phylogenetic signal in primate behaviour, ecology and life history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamilar, Jason M.; Cooper, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Examining biological diversity in an explicitly evolutionary context has been the subject of research for several decades, yet relatively recent advances in analytical techniques and the increasing availability of species-level phylogenies, have enabled scientists to ask new questions. One such approach is to quantify phylogenetic signal to determine how trait variation is correlated with the phylogenetic relatedness of species. When phylogenetic signal is high, closely related species exhibit similar traits, and this biological similarity decreases as the evolutionary distance between species increases. Here, we first review the concept of phylogenetic signal and suggest how to measure and interpret phylogenetic signal in species traits. Second, we quantified phylogenetic signal in primates for 31 variables, including body mass, brain size, life-history, sexual selection, social organization, diet, activity budget, ranging patterns and climatic variables. We found that phylogenetic signal varies extensively across and even within trait categories. The highest values are exhibited by brain size and body mass, moderate values are found in the degree of territoriality and canine size dimorphism, while low values are displayed by most of the remaining variables. Our results have important implications for the evolution of behaviour and ecology in primates and other vertebrates. PMID:23569289

  9. A Course on Humanistic Creativity in Later Life: Literature Review, Case Histories, and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuessel, Frank; Van Stewart, Arthur; Cedeno, Aristofanes

    2001-01-01

    Presents case histories of late-life creativity in literature (May Sarton), painting (Marcel Duchamp), music (Leos Janacek), dance (Martha Graham), and theatre (Jessica Tandy). Offers suggestions for a course on humanistic creativity in later life. (Contains 74 references.) (SK)

  10. Migration of steelhead - Genetic basis of migratory tendency and life history plasticity in Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Steelhead and rainbow trout are the same species. However, their life histories diverge - with steelhead undertaking an anadromous life cycle whereas rainbow trout...

  11. Life history theory and breast cancer risk: methodological and theoretical challenges: Response to "Is estrogen receptor negative breast cancer risk associated with a fast life history strategy?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktipis, Athena

    2016-01-01

    In a meta-analysis published by myself and co-authors, we report differences in the life history risk factors for estrogen receptor negative (ER-) and estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers. Our meta-analysis did not find the association of ER- breast cancer risk with fast life history characteristics that Hidaka and Boddy suggest in their response to our article. There are a number of possible explanations for the differences between their conclusions and the conclusions we drew from our meta-analysis, including limitations of our meta-analysis and methodological challenges in measuring and categorizing estrogen receptor status. These challenges, along with the association of ER+ breast cancer with slow life history characteristics, may make it challenging to find a clear signal of ER- breast cancer with fast life history characteristics, even if that relationship does exist. The contradictory results regarding breast cancer risk and life history characteristics illustrate a more general challenge in evolutionary medicine: often different sub-theories in evolutionary biology make contradictory predictions about disease risk. In this case, life history models predict that breast cancer risk should increase with faster life history characteristics, while the evolutionary mismatch hypothesis predicts that breast cancer risk should increase with delayed reproduction. Whether life history tradeoffs contribute to ER- breast cancer is still an open question, but current models and several lines of evidence suggest that it is a possibility. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Foundation for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health.

  12. Fast Mapping Semantic Features: Performance of Adults with Normal Language, History of Disorders of Spoken and Written Language, and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder on a Word-Learning Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Mary; Gutmann, Michelle L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to test the word learning abilities of adults with typical language abilities, those with a history of disorders of spoken or written language (hDSWL), and hDSWL plus attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (+ADHD). Methods: Sixty-eight adults were required to associate a novel object with a novel label, and then…

  13. Reconsidering written language

    CERN Document Server

    Sarma, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    In a previous essay, I argued that European schools of thought on memory and memorization were critical in enabling widespread adoption of the scientific method. Here, as a way of understanding the peculiar relationship the memory arts had to 17th century philosophy and intellectual culture, I propose a historical thought experiment, and examine whether these developments might have occurred several thousand years earlier when the adoption of written language accelerated. I suggest that strong cultural norms discouraging the use of written language may have precipitated a scientific revolution at a much earlier stage in human history. I close by arguing for the value of counter-factual scientific histories in attempting to separate scientific principles from the particular historical circumstances in which they arose.

  14. Seed germination and life history syndromes in the California chaparral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Syndromes are life history responses that are correlated to environmental regimes and are shared by a group of species (Stebbins, 1974). In the California chaparral there are two syndromes contrasted by the timing of seedling recruitment relative to wildfires. One syndrome, here called the fire-recruiter or refractory seed syndrome, includes species (both resprouting and non-resprouting) which share the feature that the timing of seedling establishment is specialized to the first rainy season after fire. Included are woody, suffrutescent and annual life forms but no geophytes have this syndrome. These species are linked by the characteristic that their seeds have a dormancy which is readily broken by environmental stimuli such as intense heat shock or chemicals leached from charred wood. Such seeds are referred to as “refractory” and dormancy, in some cases, is due to seed coat impermeability (such seeds are commonly called hardseeded), but in other cases the mechanism is unknown. Seeds of some may require cold stratification and/or light in addition to fire related stimuli. In the absence of fire related cues, a portion or all of a species’ seed pool remains dormant. Most have locally dispersed seeds that persist in the soil seed bank until the site burns. Dispersal of propagules is largely during spring and summer which facilitates the avoidance of flowering and fruiting during the summer and fall drought. Within a life form (e.g., shrub, suffrutescent, etc.), the seeds of these species have less mass than those of species with non-refractory seeds and this possibly reflects the environmental favorableness of the postfire environment for seedling establishment. Regardless of when fire occurs, germination is normally delayed until late winter or early spring. In the absence of fire, or other disturbance, opportunities for population expansion are largely lacking for species with this syndrome. The other syndrome, here called the fire-resister or non

  15. Life history plasticity and population regulation in sea otters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Daniel H.; Estes, James A.; Bodkin, James L.; Siniff, Donald B.

    2000-01-01

    We contrasted body condition, and age-specific reproduction and mortality between a growing population of sea otters (Enhydralutris) at Kodiak Island and a high-density near-equilibrium population at Amchitka Island, Alaska. We obtained data from marked individuals, population surveys, and collections of beach-cast carcasses. Mass:length ratios indicated that females (but not males) captured in 1992 at Amchitka were in poorer condition than those captured at Kodiak in 1986–1987. In 1993, the condition of females at Amchitka improved in apparent response to two factors: (1) an episodic influx of Pacific smooth lumpsuckers, Aptocyclus ventricocus, from the epi-pelagic zone, which otters consumed; and (2) an increase in the otters’ benthic invertebrate prey resulting from declining otter numbers. Reproductive rates varied with age (0.37 [CI=0.21 to 0.53] births female−1 yr−1 for 2–3-yr-olds, and 0.83 [CI=0.69 to 0.90] for females ≥4 yr old), and were similar at both areas. Weaning success (pups surviving to ≥120 d), in contrast, was almost 50% lower at Amchitka than at Kodiak and for females ≥4 yr of age was 0.52 (CI=0.38 to 0.66) vs 0.94 (CI=0.75 to 0.99), respectively. Sixty-two percent of the preweaning pup losses at Amchitka occurred within a month of parturition and 79% within two months. Postweaning survival was also low at Amchitka as only 18% of instrumented pups were known to be alive one year after mother-pup separation. Adult survival rates appeared similar at Amchitka and Kodiak. Factors affecting survival early in life thus are a primary demographic mechanism of population regulation in sea otters. By maintaining uniformly high reproductive rates over time and limiting investment in any particular reproductive event, sea otters can take advantage of unpredictable environmental changes favorable to pup survival. This strategy is consistent with predictions of “bet-hedging” life history models.

  16. Life-history correlates of extinction risk and recovery potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A; Myers, Ransom A; García, Verónica B; Lucifora, Luis O; Kuparinen, Anna

    2012-06-01

    Extinction risk is inversely associated with maximum per capita population growth rate (r(max)). However, this parameter is not known for most threatened species, underscoring the value in identifying correlates of r(max) that, in the absence of demographic data, would indirectly allow one to identify species and populations at elevated risk of extinction and their associated recovery potential. We undertook a comparative life-history analysis of 199 species from three taxonomic classes: Chondrichthyes (e.g., sharks; n = 82), Actinopterygii (teleost or bony fishes; n = 47), and Mammalia (n = 70, including 16 marine species). Median r(max) was highest for (and similar between) terrestrial mammals (0.71) and teleosts (0.43), significantly lower among chondrichthyans (0.26), and lower still in marine mammals (0.07). Age at maturity was the primary (and negative) correlate of r(max). In contrast, although body size was negatively correlated with r(max) in chondrichthyans and mammals, evidence of an association in teleosts was equivocal, and fecundity was not related to r(max) in fishes, despite recurring assertions to the contrary. Our analyses suggest that age at maturity can serve as a universal predictor of extinction risk in fishes and mammals when r(max) itself is unknown. Moreover, in contrast to what is generally expected, the recovery potential of teleost fishes does not differ from that of terrestrial mammals. Our findings are supportive of the application of extinction-risk criteria that are based on generation time and that are independent of taxonomic affinity.

  17. Love Styles in the Context of Life History Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzec Magdalena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionary function of love is to create a strong bond between the partners with reproduction in view. In order to achieve this goal, humans use various sexual/reproductive strategies, which have evolved due to specific reproductive benefits. The use of particular strategies depends on many factors but one of the most important is early childhood experiences, on which life history theory (LHT focuses. John Lee (1973 identified 6 basic love styles: eros, ludus, storge, pragma, agape, and mania. Our goal was to check whether love styles may be treated as sexual/reproductive strategies in the context of LHT - slow or fast strategy. In our study (N = 177 we found that people who prefer the slow reproductive strategy are inclined to show passionate, pragmatic and friendly love, and those who prefer the fast strategy, treated love as a game. A low level of environmental stress in childhood results in preferring eros, storge and agape love styles, belonging to the slow strategy, and a high one results in preferring ludus, which belongs to the fast strategy. People representing eros, storge or pragma styles have restricted sociosexual orientation so they prefer long-term relationships, whereas those with the ludus style are people with unrestricted orientation, preferring short-term relationships. Besides, storge, agape and pragma seem to determine preferring qualities connected with parental effort in one’s partner, mania - with mating effort, and eros - with both kinds of effort. No correlation was found between the love style and the number of children.

  18. Factors shaping life history traits of two proovigenic parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segoli, Michal; Sun, Shucun; Nava, Dori E; Rosenheim, Jay A

    2017-11-23

    What shapes the relative investment in reproduction vs. survival of organisms is one of the key questions in life history. Proovigenic insects mature all their eggs prior to emergence and are short lived, providing a unique opportunity to quantify their lifetime investments in the different functions. We investigated the initial eggloads and longevity of two proovigenic parasitoid wasps (Anagrus erythroneurae and Anagrus daanei, (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae) that develop within leafhopper eggs in both agricultural vineyards and natural riparian habitats in Northern California. We collected Vitis spp. leaves containing developing parasitoids from three natural sites (Knight Landing, American River and Putah Creek) and three agricultural vineyards (Solano Farm, Davis Campus and Village Homes). We recorded eggloads at parasitoid emergence and female parasitoid longevity with or without honey-feeding. Theory predicts that parasitoids from vineyards (where hosts are abundant) would have higher initial eggloads and lower longevity compared with parasitoids from riparian habitats (where hosts are scarce). Although host density and parasitoid eggloads were indeed higher in vineyards than in riparian habitats, parasitoid longevity did not follow the predicted pattern. Longevity without feeding differed among field sites, but it was not affected by habitat type (natural vs. agricultural), whereas longevity with feeding was not significantly affected by any of the examined factors. Moreover, longevity was positively, rather than negatively, correlated with eggloads at the individual level, even after correcting for parasitoid body size. The combined results suggest a more complex allocation mechanism than initially predicted, and the possibility of variation in host quality that is independent of size. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Life history traits to predict biogeographic species distributions in bivalves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalto, V.; Rinaldi, A.; Sarà, G.

    2015-10-01

    Organismal fecundity ( F) and its relationship with body size (BS) are key factors in predicting species distribution under current and future scenarios of global change. A functional trait-based dynamic energy budget (FT-DEB) is proposed as a mechanistic approach to predict the variation of F and BS as function of environmental correlates using two marine bivalves as model species ( Mytilus galloprovincialis and Brachidontes pharaonis). Validation proof of model skill (i.e., degree of correspondence between model predictions and field observations) and stationarity (i.e., ability of a model generated from data collected at one place/time to predict processes at another place/time) was provided to test model performance in predicting the bivalve distribution throughout the 22 sites in the Central Mediterranean Sea under local conditions of food density and body temperature. Model skill and stationarity were tested through the estimate of commission (i.e., proportion of species' absences predicted present) and omission (i.e., proportion of presences predicted absent) errors of predictions by comparing mechanistic predicted vs. observed F and BS values throughout the study area extrapolated by lab experiments and literature search. The resulting relationship was reliable for both species, and body size and fecundity were highly correlated in M. galloprovincialis compared to B. pharaonis; FT-DEB showed correct predictions of presence in more than 75 % of sites, and the regression between BS predicted vs. observed was highly significant in both species. Whilst recognising the importance of biotic interactions in shaping the distribution of species, our FT-DEB approach provided reliable quantitative estimates of where our species had sufficient F to support local populations or suggesting reproductive failure. Mechanistically, estimating F and BS as key traits of species life history can also be addressed within a broader, scale-dependent context that surpasses the

  20. Host responses in life-history traits and tolerance to virus infection in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Pagán

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Knowing how hosts respond to parasite infection is paramount in understanding the effects of parasites on host populations and hence host-parasite co-evolution. Modification of life-history traits in response to parasitism has received less attention than other defence strategies. Life-history theory predicts that parasitised hosts will increase reproductive effort and accelerate reproduction. However, empirical analyses of these predictions are few and mostly limited to animal-parasite systems. We have analysed life-history trait responses in 18 accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana infected at two different developmental stages with three strains of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV. Accessions were divided into two groups according to allometric relationships; these groups differed also in their tolerance to CMV infection. Life-history trait modification upon virus infection depended on the host genotype and the stage at infection. While all accessions delayed flowering, only the more tolerant allometric group modified resource allocation to increase the production of reproductive structures and progeny, and reduced the length of reproductive period. Our results are in agreement with modifications of life-history traits reported for parasitised animals and with predictions from life-history theory. Thus, we provide empirical support for the general validity of theoretical predictions. In addition, this experimental approach allowed us to quantitatively estimate the genetic determinism of life-history trait plasticity and to evaluate the role of life-history trait modification in defence against parasites, two largely unexplored issues.

  1. Life History of the Red-legged Thrush (Mimocichla plumbea ardosiacea) in Puerto Rico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolle, Francis J.

    1963-01-01

    To the ornithologist the West Indies offer an assortment of field problems. In an area where it is unlikely that new species of birds will be discovered, and where the life histories of only a handful of birds are known, concentrated study of individual life histories becomes of prime importance.

  2. Mapping phenotypic plasticity and genotype-environment interactions affecting life-history traits in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutteling, E.W.; Riksen, J.A.G.; Bakker, J.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity and genotype-environment interactions (GEI) play an important role in the evolution of life histories. Knowledge of the molecular genetic basis of plasticity and GEI provides insight into the underlying mechanisms of life-history changes in different environments. We used a

  3. What have two decades of laboratory life-history evolution studies ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A series of laboratory selection experiments on Drosophila melanogaster over the past two decades has provided insights into the specifics of life-history tradeoffs in the species and greatly refined our understanding of how ecology and genetics interact in life-history evolution. Much of what has been learnt from these ...

  4. Life History and Collective Memory as Methodological Strategies: Studying Teacher Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Ivor; Choi, Pik Lin

    2008-01-01

    The life history method, which achieved a prominent position in the Chicago tradition of sociological research in the early 1920s, has been widely adopted for educational inquiries since the 1980s. The power of the life history method in illuminating subjective teacher experiences in social historical contexts has made it "probably the only…

  5. Agency and Female Teachers' Career Decisions: A Life History Study of 40 Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joan

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on some of the findings of a wider, life history study on the factors affecting the career decisions of 40 female secondary school teachers in England. By using life history interviews, it was possible to gain rich and nuanced insights into the complexity of factors influencing women's career decisions. While acknowledging the…

  6. Life history strategies of cladocerans: comparisons of tropical and temperate taxa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarma, S.S.S.; Nandini, S.; Gulati, R.D.

    2005-01-01

    We review recent works on different life history variables of cladoceran taxa in tropical and temperate freshwater bodies, comparing the strategies that cladocerans have evolved to adapt to contrasting environmental conditions in the two geographical regions. These life-history parameters relate to

  7. A Life History of a Korean Adolescent Girl Who Attempted Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sungeun

    2012-01-01

    The present study explores the life history of a South Korean adolescent girl who attempted suicide. The study focuses on how sociocultural values affected her suicide attempt and how she made meaning out of the experience. The results revealed that her life history was a process of seeking independence and autonomy, and freeing herself from…

  8. Life History Theory and Social Deviance: The Mediating Role of Executive Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenner, C. J.; Bianchi, J.; Figueredo, A. J.; Rushton, J. Philippe; Jacobs, W. J.

    2013-01-01

    The present work examined predicted relations among Life History strategies, Executive Functions, socially antagonistic attitudes, socially antagonistic behaviors, and general intelligence. Life History (LH) theory predicts that Executive Functions and socially antagonistic attitudes and behaviors underpin an interrelated and coherent set of…

  9. Explaining density-dependent regulation in earthworm populations using life-history analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kammenga, J.E.; Spurgeon, D.J.; Svendsen, C.; Weeks, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    At present there is little knowledge about how density regulates population growth rate and to what extent this is determined by life-history patterns. We compared density dependent population consequences in the Nicholsonian sense based oil experimental observations and life-history modeling for

  10. Deconstructing environmental predictability: seasonality, environmental colour and the biogeography of marine life histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Dustin J; Burgess, Scott C

    2015-02-01

    Environmental predictability is predicted to shape the evolution of life histories. Two key types of environmental predictability, seasonality and environmental colour, may influence life-history evolution independently but formal considerations of both and how they relate to life history are exceedingly rare. Here, in a global biogeographical analysis of over 800 marine invertebrates, we explore the relationships between both forms of environmental predictability and three fundamental life-history traits: location of larval development (aplanktonic vs. planktonic), larval developmental mode (feeding vs. non-feeding) and offspring size. We found that both dispersal potential and offspring size related to environmental predictability, but the relationships depended on both the environmental factor as well as the type of predictability. Environments that were more seasonal in food availability had a higher prevalence of species with a planktonic larval stage. Future studies should consider both types of environmental predictability as each can strongly affect life-history evolution. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  11. Human evolution, life history theory, and the end of biological reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, Cadell

    2014-01-01

    Throughout primate history there have been three major life history transitions towards increasingly delayed sexual maturation and biological reproduction, as well as towards extended life expectancy. Monkeys reproduce later and live longer than do prosimians, apes reproduce later and live longer than do monkeys, and humans reproduce later and live longer than do apes. These life history transitions are connected to increased encephalization. During the last life history transition from apes to humans, increased encephalization co-evolved with increased dependence on cultural knowledge for energy acquisition. This led to a dramatic pressure for more energy investment in growth over current biological reproduction. Since the industrial revolution socioeconomic development has led to even more energy being devoted to growth over current biological reproduction. I propose that this is the beginning of an ongoing fourth major primate life history transition towards completely delayed biological reproduction and an extension of the evolved human life expectancy. I argue that the only fundamental difference between this primate life history transition and previous life history transitions is that this transition is being driven solely by cultural evolution, which may suggest some deeper evolutionary transition away from biological evolution is already in the process of occurring.

  12. Life History Consequences of the Facultative Expression of a Dispersal Life Stage in the Phoretic Bulb Mite (Rhizoglyphus robini.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques A Deere

    Full Text Available Life history traits play an important role in population dynamics and correlate, both positively and negatively, with dispersal in a wide range of taxa. Most invertebrate studies on trade-offs between life history traits and dispersal have focused on dispersal via flight, yet much less is known about how life history trade-offs influence species that disperse by other means. In this study, we identify effects of investing in dispersal morphology (dispersal expression on life history traits in the male dimorphic bulb mite (Rhizoglyphus robini. This species has a facultative juvenile life stage (deutonymph during which individuals can disperse by phoresy. Further, adult males are either fighters (which kill other mites or benign scramblers. Here, in an experiment, we investigate the effects of investing in dispersal on size at maturity, sex and male morph ratio, and female lifetime reproductive success. We show that life history traits correlate negatively with the expression of the dispersal stage. Remarkably, all males that expressed the dispersal life stage developed into competitive fighters and none into scramblers. This suggests that alternative, male reproductive strategies and dispersal should not be viewed in isolation but considered concurrently.

  13. The Lowell Mill Girls: Life in the Factory. Perspectives on History Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, JoAnne B., Ed.

    This collection of essays and short stories is designed to provide a glimpse of life in the factory for the women who worked in the cotton mills of Lowell, Massachusetts in the 1840s. The book, which contains two primary sources (i.e., materials written by contemporaries), and three secondary sources, begins with a brief introduction to the…

  14. Life history variation in Barents Sea fish: implications for sensitivity to fishing in a changing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedmann, Magnus A; Primicerio, Raul; Dolgov, Andrey; Ottesen, Camilla A M; Aschan, Michaela

    2014-09-01

    Under exploitation and environmental change, it is essential to assess the sensitivity and vulnerability of marine ecosystems to such stress. A species' response to stress depends on its life history. Sensitivity to harvesting is related to the life history "fast-slow" continuum, where "slow" species (i.e., large, long lived, and late maturing) are expected to be more sensitive to fishing than "fast" ones. We analyze life history traits variation for all common fish species in the Barents Sea and rank fishes along fast-slow gradients obtained by ordination analyses. In addition, we integrate species' fast-slow ranks with ecosystem survey data for the period 2004-2009, to assess life history variation at the community level in space and time. Arctic fishes were smaller, had shorter life spans, earlier maturation, larger offspring, and lower fecundity than boreal ones. Arctic fishes could thus be considered faster than the boreal species, even when body size was corrected for. Phylogenetically related species possessed similar life histories. Early in the study period, we found a strong spatial gradient, where members of fish assemblages in the southwestern Barents Sea displayed slower life histories than in the northeast. However, in later, warmer years, the gradient weakened caused by a northward movement of boreal species. As a consequence, the northeast experienced increasing proportions of slower fish species. This study is a step toward integrating life history traits in ecosystem-based areal management. On the basis of life history traits, we assess the fish sensitivity to fishing, at the species and community level. We show that climate warming promotes a borealization of fish assemblages in the northeast, associated with slower life histories in that area. The biology of Arctic species is still poorly known, and boreal species that now establish in the Arctic are fishery sensitive, which calls for cautious ecosystem management of these areas.

  15. History of Major Depressive Disorder Prospectively Predicts Worse Quality of Life in Women with Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Brent J.; Minton, Susan; Andrykowski, Michael; Jacobsen, Paul B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Data are scarce about whether past history of major depressive disorder in the absence of current depression places breast cancer patients at risk for worse quality of life. Purpose The current study prospectively examined quality of life during chemotherapy in breast cancer patients with a history of resolved major depressive disorder (n=29) and no history of depression (n=144). Methods Women with Stages 0–II breast cancer were assessed prior to and at the completion of chemotherapy. Major depressive disorder was assessed via structured interview and quality of life with the SF-36. Results Patients with past major depressive disorder displayed greater declines in physical functioning relative to patients with no history of depression (p≤0.01). Conclusions Findings suggest that breast cancer patients with a history of resolved major depressive disorder are at increased risk for declines in physical functioning during chemotherapy relative to patients with no history of depression. PMID:22167580

  16. Life history strategies of fish species and biodiversity in eastern USA streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Michael R.; Brown, Larry M.

    2015-01-01

    Predictive models have been used to determine fish species that occur less frequently than expected (decreasers) and those that occur more frequently than expected (increasers) in streams in the eastern U.S. Coupling life history traits with 51 decreaser and 38 increaser fish species provided the opportunity to examine potential mechanisms associated with predicted changes in fish species distributions in eastern streams. We assigned six life history traits – fecundity, longevity, maturation age, maximum total length, parental care, and spawning season duration – to each fish species. Decreaser species were significantly smaller in size and shorter-lived with reduced fecundity and shorter spawning seasons compared to increaser species. Cluster analysis of traits revealed correspondence with a life history model defining equilibrium (low fecundity, high parental care), opportunistic (early maturation, low parental care), and periodic (late maturation, high fecundity, low parental care) end-point strategies. Nearly 50 % of decreaser species were associated with an intermediate opportunistic-periodic strategy, suggesting that abiotic factors such as habitat specialization and streamflow alteration may serve as important influences on life history traits and strategies of decreaser species. In contrast, the percent of increaser species among life history strategy groups ranged from 21 to 32 %, suggesting that life history strategies of increaser species were more diverse than those of decreaser species. This study highlights the utility of linking life history theory to biodiversity to better understand mechanisms that contribute to fish species distributions in the eastern U.S.

  17. Prey nutrient composition has different effects on Pardosa wolf spiders with dissimilar life histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim; Mayntz, David; Toft, Søren

    2011-01-01

    The nutritional composition of prey is known to influence predator life histories, but how the life history strategies of predators affect their susceptibility to nutrient imbalance is less investigated. We used two wolf spider species with different life histories as model predators: Pardosa...... amentata, which have a fixed annual life cycle, and Pardosa prativaga, which reproduce later and can extend development across 2 years. We fed juvenile spiders of the two species ad libitum diets of one of six Drosophila melanogaster fly types varying in lipid:protein composition during three instars, from...... the start of the second instar until the fifth instar moult. We then tested for interactions between predator species and prey nutrient composition on several life history parameters. P. amentata completed the three instars faster and grew larger carapaces and heavier body masses than P. prativaga...

  18. Fast-slow continuum and reproductive strategies structure plant life-history variation worldwide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Jones, Owen R; Jongejans, Eelke

    2016-01-01

    variation in life history are poorly understood. We use demographic data from 418 plant species in the wild, from annual herbs to supercentennial trees, to examine how growth form, habitat, and phylogenetic relationships structure plant life histories and to develop a framework to predict population...... independence of the fast-slow and reproduction strategy axes is general in the plant kingdom. Our findings have similarities with how life-history strategies are structured in mammals, birds, and reptiles. The position of plant species populations in the 2D space produced by both axes predicts their rate......The identification of patterns in life-history strategies across the tree of life is essential to our prediction of population persistence, extinction, and diversification. Plants exhibit a wide range of patterns of longevity, growth, and reproduction, but the general determinants of this enormous...

  19. Dental development and life history in living African and Asian apes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Jay; Schwartz, Gary T.

    2009-01-01

    Life-history inference is an important aim of paleoprimatology, but life histories cannot be discerned directly from the fossil record. Among extant primates, the timing of many life-history attributes is correlated with the age at emergence of the first permanent molar (M1), which can therefore serve as a means to directly compare the life histories of fossil and extant species. To date, M1 emergence ages exist for only a small fraction of extant primate species and consist primarily of data from captive individuals, which may show accelerated dental eruption compared with free-living individuals. Data on M1 emergence ages in wild great apes exist for only a single chimpanzee individual, with data for gorillas and orangutans being anecdotal. This paucity of information limits our ability to make life-history inferences using the M1 emergence ages of extinct ape and hominin species. Here we report reliable ages at M1 emergence for the orangutan, Pongo pygmaeus (4.6 y), and the gorilla, Gorilla gorilla (3.8 y), obtained from the dental histology of wild-shot individuals in museum collections. These ages and the one reported age at M1 emergence in a free-living chimpanzee of approximately 4.0 y are highly concordant with the comparative life histories of these great apes. They are also consistent with the average age at M1 emergence in relation to the timing of life-history events in modern humans, thus confirming the utility of M1 emergence ages for life-history inference and providing a basis for making reliable life-history inferences for extinct apes and hominins. PMID:20080537

  20. The evolution of predictive adaptive responses in human life history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nettle, D.; Frankenhuis, W.E.; Rickard, I.J.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies in humans have shown that adverse experience in early life is associated with accelerated reproductive timing, and there is comparative evidence for similar effects in other animals. There are two different classes of adaptive explanation for associations between early-life adversity

  1. Source, Method, and Surmise: Quality of Life in History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the essay is to demonstrate that study of quality of life can explore eras before our own. There are caches of social data as early as the seventeenth century, and there were people who attempted to formulate social circumstances close to today's concepts of quality of life. Data from England and Ireland are presented and analyzed.

  2. The origin of parental care in relation to male and female life history

    OpenAIRE

    Klug, Hope; Bonsall, Michael B.; Alonzo, Suzanne H.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of maternal, paternal, and bi-parental care has been the focus of a great deal of research. Males and females vary in basic life-history characteristics (e.g., stage-specific mortality, maturation) in ways that are unrelated to parental investment. Surprisingly, few studies have examined the effect of this variation in male and female life history on the evolution of care. Here, we use a theoretical approach to determine the sex-specific life-history characteristics that give ri...

  3. Curriculum as natural history: A life-history case study of an alternative science learning program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windward, Rolfe

    The aim of this study is to further our understanding of the nexus between individual development and conceptions of science curriculum with particular emphasis upon root metaphors. The initial conceptual springboard is based upon the rather consistent conflation of selectionist (Darwinian) and developmental cosmologies in most scientific thinking about complex systems. A partial goal of this study then being the development of a visual metaphor that offers a more coherent heuristic of what it means to be a knowing individual within a changing ecosocial reality. This is a paradigmatic examination and it is conjectured that the root assumptions underlying the bulk of curriculum theory are unrealistic, that the appearance of stability in curriculum and practice is largely a byproduct of misclassification or even category error, and that reconceptualizing curriculum as a description of an adaptive system rather than a system-by-design will assist in unpacking a number of problems including the so-called theory-practice gap. The basic procedure is a life-history case study of seven participants--three female high school students, three male high school students, and their teacher--tracked between three learning contexts: the classroom, an extracurricular science "institute," and a virtual astronomy class. The biography of the researcher is incorporated both as a matter of methodology and as a matter of interventionist stance. It is concluded that the 'science institute' embodied a number of innovative features, including more equality among all participants, that also allowed masking-off of countervailing forces perceived as antithetical to its own development. Its organization was not stable but constituted a strongly expansive instrument in the individuation of all participants, allowing the students to more clearly visualize the multiple natures of science and themselves as individuals and scientists. It also allowed the teacher involved to leverage change in his

  4. The Family Life Course and Health: Partnership, Fertility Histories, and Later-Life Physical Health Trajectories in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Martin; Baxter, Janeen; Haynes, Michele; Turrell, Gavin

    2016-06-01

    Life course perspectives suggest that later-life health reflects long-term social patterns over an individual's life: in particular, the occurrence and timing of key roles and transitions. Such social patterns have been demonstrated empirically for multiple aspects of fertility and partnership histories, including timing of births and marriage, parity, and the presence and timing of a marital disruption. Most previous studies have, however, addressed particular aspects of fertility or partnership histories singly. We build on this research by examining how a holistic classification of family life course trajectories from ages 18 to 50, incorporating both fertility and partnership histories, is linked to later-life physical health for a sample of Australian residents. Our results indicate that long-term family life course trajectories are strongly linked to later-life health for men but only minimally for women. For men, family trajectories characterized by early family formation, no family formation, an early marital disruption, or high fertility are associated with poorer physical health. Among women, only those who experienced both a disrupted marital history and a high level of fertility were found to be in poorer health.

  5. Bone morphologies and histories: Life course approaches in bioarchaeology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sabrina C

    2016-01-01

    The duality of the skeleton as both a biological and cultural entity has formed the theoretical basis of bioarchaeology. In recent years bioarchaeological studies have stretched the early biocultural concept with the adoption of life course approaches in their study design and analyses, making a significant contribution to how we think about the role of postnatal plasticity. Life course theory is a conceptual framework used in several scientific fields of biology and the social sciences. Studies that emphasize life course approaches in the examination of bone morphology in the past are united in their interrogation of human life as a result of interrelated and cumulative events over not only the timeframe of individuals, but also over generations at the community level. This article provides an overview of the theoretical constructs that utilize the life course concept, and a discussion of the different ways these theories have been applied to thinking about trajectories of bone morphology in the past, specifically highlighting key recent studies that have used life course approaches to understand the influence of growth, stress, diet, activity, and aging on the skeleton. The goal of this article is to demonstrate the scope of contemporary bioarchaeological studies that illuminate the importance of environmental and behavioral influence on bone morphology. Understanding how trajectories of bone growth and morphology can be altered and shaped over the life course is critical not only for bioarchaeologists, but also researchers studying bone morphology in living nonhuman primates and fossil primate skeletons. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The evolution of predictive adaptive responses in human life history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettle, Daniel; Frankenhuis, Willem E; Rickard, Ian J

    2013-09-07

    Many studies in humans have shown that adverse experience in early life is associated with accelerated reproductive timing, and there is comparative evidence for similar effects in other animals. There are two different classes of adaptive explanation for associations between early-life adversity and accelerated reproduction, both based on the idea of predictive adaptive responses (PARs). According to external PAR hypotheses, early-life adversity provides a 'weather forecast' of the environmental conditions into which the individual will mature, and it is adaptive for the individual to develop an appropriate phenotype for this anticipated environment. In internal PAR hypotheses, early-life adversity has a lasting negative impact on the individual's somatic state, such that her health is likely to fail more rapidly as she gets older, and there is an advantage to adjusting her reproductive schedule accordingly. We use a model of fluctuating environments to derive evolveability conditions for acceleration of reproductive timing in response to early-life adversity in a long-lived organism. For acceleration to evolve via the external PAR process, early-life cues must have a high degree of validity and the level of annual autocorrelation in the individual's environment must be almost perfect. For acceleration to evolve via the internal PAR process requires that early-life experience must determine a significant fraction of the variance in survival prospects in adulthood. The two processes are not mutually exclusive, and mechanisms for calibrating reproductive timing on the basis of early experience could evolve through a combination of the predictive value of early-life adversity for the later environment and its negative impact on somatic state.

  7. Notes on the life history of Acraea encedon l. (Lepidoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The life cycle of Acraea encedon (Lepidoptera: Acraeidae) was completed in 40.3 + 2.64 days at a mean daily temperature of 27.91 + 0.440C and relative humidity of 84.8 + 2.62%. The duration of the developmental period of the different life stages of the insect are: embryonic development, 7.5 + 0.54 days; 1st instar, 10.4 + ...

  8. Early Life Histories of Fishes: New Developmental, Ecological and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in environmental biology of fishes. It comprises a collection of nine papers, an introduction, a section on ... and is entitled 'Reflections on epigenetic mechanisms: hypotheses and case histories'. It repre- ... process of genetic and epigenetic control of development in the ontogeny of fishes. The ideas are controversial and.

  9. Experimental evolution of parasite life-history traits in Strongyloides ratti (Nematoda)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steve Paterson; Rebecca Barber

    2007-01-01

    ...Evolutionary ecology predicts that parasite life-history traits, including a parasite's survivorship and fecundity within a host, will evolve in response to selection and that their evolution will...

  10. Life history studies and habitat requirements of the apple snail at Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study discusses habitat requirements and life history of the apple snail at Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge. A study was initiated during 1971 to gather...

  11. Application of Dynamic Energy Budget theory for conservation relevant modelling of Bird life histories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teixeira, C.M.G.L.

    2016-01-01

    Teixeira, C.M.G.L. (2016, Januari 13). Application of Dynamic Energy Budget Theory For Conservation Relevant Modelling of Bird Life Histories. Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. Prom./coprom.: prof. dr. S.A.L.M. Kooijman & T. Sousa.

  12. Male personality, life-history strategies and reproductive success in a promiscuous mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réale, D; Martin, J; Coltman, D W; Poissant, J; Festa-Bianchet, M

    2009-08-01

    Recent theoretical work suggests that personality is a component of life history, but links between personality and either age-dependent reproductive success or life-history strategy are yet to be established. Using quantitative genetic analyses on a long-term pedigree we estimated indices of boldness and docility for 105 bighorn sheep rams (Ovis canadensis), born between 1983 and 1999, and compared these indices to their reproductive history from 2 years of age until death. Docility and boldness were highly heritable and negatively genetically correlated. Docile and bold rams survived longer than indocile and shy rams. Docility and boldness had a weak negative effect on reproductive success early in life, but a strong positive effect on older rams. Our findings highlight an important role of personality on reproductive success and suggest that personality could be an important component of life-history strategy.

  13. Chum and pink salmon genetics - Genetic and life history variation of southern chum and pink salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The distribution of genetic and life history variation in chum (Oncorhynchus keta) and pink (O. gorbuscha) salmon in their southern range in North America is key to...

  14. Otolith output - Project to study alternative life history types of fall Chinook based on otoliths

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The life-history complexity of Snake River fall Chinook salmon has hindered efforts to manage the ESU. In particular, the existence of an overwintering behavior in a...

  15. Energy and water budgets of larks in a life history perspective : Parental effort varies with aridity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieleman, BI; Williams, JB; Visser, GH

    We compared physiological, demographic, and ecological variables of larks to gain insights into life history variation along an aridity gradient, incorporating phylogenetic relationships in analyses when appropriate. Quantifying field metabolic rate (FMR). and water influx rate (WIR) of parents

  16. Fast-slow continuum and reproductive strategies structure plant life-history variation worldwide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Jones, Owen R; Jongejans, Eelke

    2016-01-01

    variation in life history are poorly understood. We use demographic data from 418 plant species in the wild, from annual herbs to supercentennial trees, to examine how growth form, habitat, and phylogenetic relationships structure plant life histories and to develop a framework to predict population...... independence of the fast-slow and reproduction strategy axes is general in the plant kingdom. Our findings have similarities with how life-history strategies are structured in mammals, birds, and reptiles. The position of plant species populations in the 2D space produced by both axes predicts their rate...... of recovery from disturbances and population growth rate. This life-history framework may complement trait-based frameworks on leaf and wood economics; together these frameworks may allow prediction of responses of plants to anthropogenic disturbances and changing environments....

  17. Snake River fall Chinook reproductive success - Juvenile life history changes in Snake River fall Chinook salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This population historically migrated as subyearling smolts, but in recent years, the yearling life history has become more common. Environmental conditions...

  18. Can family risk-factors moderate the link between psychopathy and life-history strategy?

    OpenAIRE

    Međedović Janko

    2016-01-01

    Life History Theory is an explanatory evolutionary framework which explains differences in fitness-relevant outcomes using the characteristics of the environment and individual organisms. Basically, individuals can be positioned somewhere on the r/K continuum of the Life History Strategy (LHS): a K or slow strategy represents later maturity and reproduction, a smaller number of offspring with higher investment in them, while the r (or fast) strategy follows the opposite pattern. Previous rese...

  19. Sleep and risk-taking propensity in life history and evolutionary perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Rucas, Stacey L; Alissa A. Miller

    2013-01-01

    Tradeoffs between time allocated to sleeping versus waking result from variations in local ecologies and should correlate to alterations in behavioral life history strategies.  It was predicted that firefighters who sleep less, with lower overall sleep quality, would exhibit greater motivation for risk-taking, an important component of fast life histories.  Firefighters completed evolutionarily relevant questionnaires on five domains of risk-taking propensity that were correlated to sleep qua...

  20. Explanations for attractiveness-related positive biases in an evolutionary perspective of life history theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin-Bin

    2017-01-01

    The mating-related evolutionary explanation that Maestripieri et al. offer does not apply to (1) infants' positive biases toward attractive individuals and (2) adults' positive biases toward attractive infants and children. They are best understood when integrated into an evolutionary life history framework. I argue that the life history of positive biases toward attractive individuals is driven by fundamental trade-offs made throughout development.

  1. Life history migrations of adult Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout in the upper Yellowstone River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertel, Brian D.; McMahon, Thomas E.; Koel, Todd M.; Gresswell, Robert E.; Burckhardt, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of salmonid life history types at the watershed scale is increasingly recognized as a cornerstone for effective management. In this study, we used radiotelemetry to characterize the life history movements of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri in the upper Yellowstone River, an extensive tributary that composes nearly half of the drainage area of Yellowstone Lake. In Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout have precipitously declined over the past 2 decades primarily due to predation from introduced Lake Trout Salvelinus namaycush. Radio tags were implanted in 152 Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout, and their movements monitored over 3 years. Ninety-six percent of tagged trout exhibited a lacustrine–adfluvial life history, migrating upstream a mean distance of 42.6 km to spawn, spending an average of 24 d in the Yellowstone River before returning to Yellowstone Lake. Once in the lake, complex postspawning movements were observed. Only 4% of radio-tagged trout exhibited a fluvial or fluvial–adfluvial life history. Low prevalence of fluvial and fluvial–adfluvial life histories was unexpected given the large size of the upper river drainage. Study results improve understanding of life history diversity in potamodromous salmonids inhabiting relatively undisturbed watersheds and provide a baseline for monitoring Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout response to management actions in Yellowstone Lake.

  2. Life history variation in a marine teleost across a heterogeneous seascape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala-Bozano, Maria; Mariani, Stefano

    2011-05-01

    Life history traits, primarily related to growth and reproduction, often reflect the process of adaptation of organisms to their natural environment. Consequently, life history parameters are expected to differ along heterogeneous habitats. Provided the pivotal role of life-history traits in determining fitness, the description and understanding of life history variation is a central goal in evolutionary ecology. In order to test the influence of the known environmental heterogeneity of Mediterranean coastal seas, populations of the striped sea bream Lithognathus mormyrus, were sampled from five distinct geographic areas within, or adjacent to, the Mediterranean basin (Aborán Sea, Balearic Sea, Tyrrhenian Sea, Adriatic Sea and the Gulf of Cadiz in the Atlantic Ocean). Growth patterns, maturation, sex-ratio, sex change and feeding habits were investigated over two years and revealed large-scale life history variation. Similarly slanted growth, earlier maturation times and smaller size-at-sex change were found in the Tyrrhenian and the Adriatic populations, which appear in contrast with recent population genetic investigation. The potential influence of fishery exploitation on these traits is discussed as a possible determining factor. The present study provides an exemplar of life-history variation across a heterogeneous seascape and makes a case for a more judicious consideration of ecological information for the purpose of identifying population units for management and conservation.

  3. The Tsimane Health and Life History Project: Integrating anthropology and biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurven, Michael; Stieglitz, Jonathan; Trumble, Benjamin; Blackwell, Aaron D; Beheim, Bret; Davis, Helen; Hooper, Paul; Kaplan, Hillard

    2017-04-01

    The Tsimane Health and Life History Project, an integrated bio-behavioral study of the human life course, is designed to test competing hypotheses of human life-history evolution. One aim is to understand the bidirectional connections between life history and social behavior in a high-fertility, kin-based context lacking amenities of modern urban life (e.g. sanitation, banks, electricity). Another aim is to understand how a high pathogen burden influences health and well-being during development and adulthood. A third aim addresses how modernization shapes human life histories and sociality. Here we outline the project's goals, history, and main findings since its inception in 2002. We reflect on the implications of current findings and highlight the need for more coordinated ethnographic and biomedical study of contemporary nonindustrial populations to address broad questions that can situate evolutionary anthropology in a key position within the social and life sciences. © 2017 The Authors Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues, News, and Reviews Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. History of socioeconomic disadvantage and allostatic load in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenewald, Tara L; Karlamangla, Arun S; Hu, Perry; Stein-Merkin, Sharon; Crandall, Carolyn; Koretz, Brandon; Seeman, Teresa E

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing interest in understanding how the experience of socioeconomic status (SES) adversity across the life course may accumulate to negatively affect the functioning of biological regulatory systems important to functioning and health in later adulthood. The goal of the present analyses was to examine whether greater life course SES adversity experience would be associated with higher scores on a multi-system allostatic load (AL) index of physiological function in adulthood. Data for these analyses are from 1008 participants (92.2% White) from the Biomarker Substudy of the Study of Midlife in the US (MIDUS). Multiple indicators of SES adversity in childhood (parent educational attainment, welfare status, financial situation) and two points in adulthood (educational attainment, household income, difficulty paying bills, availability of money to meet basic needs, current financial situation) were used to construct SES adversity measures for each life course phase. An AL score was constructed using information on 24 biomarkers from 7 different physiological systems (sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, cardiovascular, lipid metabolism, glucose metabolism, inflammatory immune activity). Analyses indicate higher AL as a function of greater SES adversity at each phase of, and cumulatively across, the life course. Associations were only moderately attenuated when accounting for a wide array of health status, behavioral and psychosocial factors. Findings suggest that SES adversity experience may cumulate across the life course to have a negative impact on multiple biological systems in adulthood. An important aim of future research is the replication of current findings in this predominantly White sample in more ethnically diverse populations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Using Age-Based Life History Data to Investigate the Life Cycle and Vulnerability of Octopus cyanea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwig, Jade N.; Depczynski, Martial; Roberts, John D.; Semmens, Jayson M.; Gagliano, Monica; Heyward, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Octopus cyanea is taken as an unregulated, recreationally fished species from the intertidal reefs of Ningaloo, Western Australia. Yet despite its exploitation and importance in many artisanal fisheries throughout the world, little is known about its life history, ecology and vulnerability. We used stylet increment analysis to age a wild O. cyanea population for the first time and gonad histology to examine their reproductive characteristics. O. cyanea conforms to many cephalopod life history generalisations having rapid, non-asymptotic growth, a short life-span and high levels of mortality. Males were found to mature at much younger ages and sizes than females with reproductive activity concentrated in the spring and summer months. The female dominated sex-ratios in association with female brooding behaviours also suggest that larger conspicuous females may be more prone to capture and suggests that this intertidal octopus population has the potential to be negatively impacted in an unregulated fishery. Size at age and maturity comparisons between our temperate bordering population and lower latitude Tanzanian and Hawaiian populations indicated stark differences in growth rates that correlate with water temperatures. The variability in life history traits between global populations suggests that management of O. cyanea populations should be tailored to each unique set of life history characteristics and that stylet increment analysis may provide the integrity needed to accurately assess this. PMID:22912898

  6. Using age-based life history data to investigate the life cycle and vulnerability of Octopus cyanea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade N Herwig

    Full Text Available Octopus cyanea is taken as an unregulated, recreationally fished species from the intertidal reefs of Ningaloo, Western Australia. Yet despite its exploitation and importance in many artisanal fisheries throughout the world, little is known about its life history, ecology and vulnerability. We used stylet increment analysis to age a wild O. cyanea population for the first time and gonad histology to examine their reproductive characteristics. O. cyanea conforms to many cephalopod life history generalisations having rapid, non-asymptotic growth, a short life-span and high levels of mortality. Males were found to mature at much younger ages and sizes than females with reproductive activity concentrated in the spring and summer months. The female dominated sex-ratios in association with female brooding behaviours also suggest that larger conspicuous females may be more prone to capture and suggests that this intertidal octopus population has the potential to be negatively impacted in an unregulated fishery. Size at age and maturity comparisons between our temperate bordering population and lower latitude Tanzanian and Hawaiian populations indicated stark differences in growth rates that correlate with water temperatures. The variability in life history traits between global populations suggests that management of O. cyanea populations should be tailored to each unique set of life history characteristics and that stylet increment analysis may provide the integrity needed to accurately assess this.

  7. Replacing qualitative life-history traits by quantitative indices in parasitoid evolutionary ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boivin, G.; Ellers, J.

    2016-01-01

    Life-history traits, which describe the various aspects of the life cycle of a species, can be either quantitative or qualitative. Quantitative traits are likely to adapt to gradual changes in the environment of a species, whereas qualitative traits, which refer to traits that are discontinuous in

  8. Life history traits as predictors of plant rarity, with particular reference to hemiparasitic Orobanchaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, RM; Kwak, MM

    2005-01-01

    We made a comparison between life history and reproductive characteristics of a group of Dutch rare (30) and common (105) plant species, all dicotyledonous and insect-visited forbs. The traits life span, clonality, breeding system, seed production, seed dispersal, and soil seed bank longevity are

  9. Hope Amidst Hopelessness: Life Histories of Illiterate Oraon Tribal Women in Jharkhand, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minz, Nijhar Jharia

    2012-01-01

    This interpretive study asked the question: "What education and literacy insights can be gained from the studies of the life stories of illiterate Oraon women in Jharkhand, India?" Life history methodology was used to gain insights into the lived experiences of illiterate women. I hoped to provide meaning and give voice to the voiceless.…

  10. Life history strategies and biomass allocation : the population dynamics of perennial plants in a regional perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongejans, E.

    2004-01-01

    This study aims to contribute to the knowledge of how plants respond to adverse influences of intensified land use. In particular, attention was paid to the ways in which life history strategies change in order to buffer environmental variation, and which important parts of the life cycle are

  11. Mammalian life histories: their evolution and molecular-genetic mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacher, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Survival curves for various species of mammals are discussed and a table is presented to show recorded maximum life spans of about 30 species of mammals. The range of longevities is from one year for shrews and moles up to more than 80 years for the fin whale. The constitutional correlates of longevity are discussed with regard to body size, brain weight,metabolic rates, and body temperature. It is concluded that longevity evolved as a positive trait, associated with the evolution of large body size and brain size. Life table data for man, the thorough-bred horse, beagle dogs, and the laboratory rodents, Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus are discussed. The data show a pattern of exponential increase of death rate with age. A laboratory model using Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus for the study of the longevity-assurance mechanisms is described. (HLW)

  12. Learning Mathematics in Appalachia: Life Histories of Beginning Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Donna Hardy

    2005-01-01

    Life stories were constructed for three young women from Appalachia to explore their mathematics experiences as students in public schools of the region. Data sources included interviews, school records, and a self-drawn chart of estimated mathematics ability for each year, from kindergarten through twelfth grade. A cross-case analysis revealed similar characteristics among the three women including shyness, difficulty with middle school mathematics and with high school geometry, the choice n...

  13. Telomeres, workload and life-history in great tits

    OpenAIRE

    Atema, Els

    2017-01-01

    Ageing and the effects of increased workload in great tits A new measurement to quantify variation in quality and rate of ageing between individuals is telomere length. Telomeres are a piece of DNA at the end of chromosomes, and they protect the other DNA. In many species shortening of telomere length with increasing age was demonstrated. This shortening is accelerated by processes that also decrease life expectancy. In this project we discovered that telomeres of great tits differ from telom...

  14. Mating modifies female life history in a haplodiploid spider mite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macke, Emilie; Magalhães, Sara; Do-Thi Khanh, Hong; Frantz, Adrien; Facon, Benoît; Olivieri, Isabelle

    2012-05-01

    Mating usually modifies females' resource allocation pattern, often as a result of conflicts between male and female partners. Can such a switch occur even in the absence of sexual conflicts? We addressed this issue in the haplodiploid spider mite Tetranychus urticae, whose biology and population structure considerably reduce conflicts between males and females over reproductive decisions. Comparing virgin and mated females, we tested the hypothesis that mated females modify their allocation pattern so as to maximize their probability of producing daughters. Mated females produced fewer but larger eggs, resulting in an overall similar reproductive effort but an increased probability of producing daughters, since in this species larger eggs are more likely to be fertilized and thus to become female. Moreover, mated females concentrated their reproduction early in life. Again, this might be a way to produce more daughters, since sperm is more abundant early in life. For virgins, spreading reproductive investment might be a way to save resources to extend life span, thus increasing their probability of encountering a sexual partner. Females with multiple opportunities for mating produced fewer eggs and a less female-biased sex ratio than once-mated females, raising the question of why multiple mating often occurs in this species.

  15. Effects of maternal history of depression and early life maltreatment on children's health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Katja; Fuchs, Anna; Bermpohl, Felix; Meyer, Justus; Führer, Daniel; Reichl, Corinna; Reck, Corinna; Kluczniok, Dorothea; Kaess, Michael; Hindi Attar, Catherine; Möhler, Eva; Bierbaum, Anna-Lena; Zietlow, Anna-Lena; Jaite, Charlotte; Winter, Sibylle Maria; Herpertz, Sabine C; Brunner, Romuald; Bödeker, Katja; Resch, Franz

    2018-01-01

    There is a well-established link between maternal depression and child mental health. Similar effects have been found for maternal history of early life maltreatment (ELM). However, studies investigating the relationship of children's quality of life and maternal depression are scarce and none have been conducted for the association with maternal ELM. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of maternal history of ELM and depression on children's health-related quality of life and to identify mediating factors accounting for these effects. Our study involved 194 mothers with and without history of depression and/or ELM and their children between five and 12 years. Children's health-related quality of life was assessed by maternal proxy- and child self-ratings using the KIDSCREEN. We considered maternal sensitivity and maternal parenting stress as potential mediators. We found an effect of maternal history of depression but not of maternal history of ELM on health-related quality of life. Maternal stress and sensitivity mediated the effects of maternal depression on child global health-related quality of life, as well as on the dimensions Autonomy & Parent Relation, School Environment (maternal and child rating), and Physical Wellbeing (child rating). Due to the cross-sectional design of the study, causal interpretations must be made with caution. Some scales yielded low internal consistency. Maternal impairments in areas of parenting which possibly developed during acute depression persist even after remission of acute affective symptoms. Interventions should target parenting stress and sensitivity in parents with prior depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Eggshell Types and Their Evolutionary Correlation with Life-History Strategies in Squamates.

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    Konstantin Hallmann

    Full Text Available The eggshell is an important physiological structure for the embryo. It enables gas exchange, physical protection and is a calcium reserve. Most squamates (lizards, snakes, worm lizards lay parchment-shelled eggs, whereas only some gekkotan species, a subgroup of lizards, have strongly calcified eggshells. In viviparous (live-bearing squamates the eggshell is reduced or completely missing (hereafter "shell-less". Recent studies showed that life-history strategies of gekkotan species differ between species with parchment- and rigid-shelled eggshells. Here we test if the three different eggshell types found in the squamates are also associated with different life-history strategies. We first investigated the influence of the phylogeny on the trait "eggshell type" and on six life-history traits of 32 squamate species. Phylogenetic principal component analysis (pPCA was then conducted to identify an association between life-history strategies and eggshell types. Finally, we also considered adult weight in the pPCA to examine its potential effect on this association. Eggshell types in squamates show a strong phylogenetic signal at a low taxonomical level. Four out of the six life-history traits showed also a phylogenetic signal (birth size, clutch size, clutches per year and age at female maturity, while two had none (incubation time, maximum longevity. The pPCA suggested an association of life-history strategies and eggshell types, which disappeared when adult weight was included in the analysis. We conclude that the variability seen in eggshell types of squamates is weakly influenced by phylogeny. Eggshell types correlate with different life-history strategies, and mainly reflect differences in adult weights of species.

  17. Growth and life history variability of the grey reef shark (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) across its range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Darcy; Conklin, Eric; Papastamatiou, Yannis P.; McCauley, Douglas J.; Pollock, Kydd; Kendall, Bruce E.; Gaines, Steven D.; Caselle, Jennifer E.

    2017-01-01

    For broadly distributed, often overexploited species such as elasmobranchs (sharks and rays), conservation management would benefit from understanding how life history traits change in response to local environmental and ecological factors. However, fishing obfuscates this objective by causing complex and often mixed effects on the life histories of target species. Disentangling the many drivers of life history variability requires knowledge of elasmobranch populations in the absence of fishing, which is rarely available. Here, we describe the growth, maximum size, sex ratios, size at maturity, and offer a direct estimate of survival of an unfished population of grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) using data from an eight year tag-recapture study. We then synthesized published information on the life history of C. amblyrhynchos from across its geographic range, and for the first time, we attempted to disentangle the contribution of fishing from geographic variation in an elasmobranch species. For Palmyra’s unfished C. amblyrhynchos population, the von Bertalanffy growth function (VBGF) growth coefficient k was 0.05 and asymptotic length L∞ was 163.3 cm total length (TL). Maximum size was 175.5 cm TL from a female shark, length at maturity was estimated at 116.7–123.2 cm TL for male sharks, maximum lifespan estimated from VBGF parameters was 18.1 years for both sexes combined, and annual survival was 0.74 year-1. Consistent with findings from studies on other elasmobranch species, we found significant intraspecific variability in reported life history traits of C. amblyrhynchos. However, contrary to what others have reported, we did not find consistent patterns in life history variability as a function of biogeography or fishing. Ultimately, the substantial, but not yet predictable variability in life history traits observed for C. amblyrhynchos across its geographic range suggests that regional management may be necessary to set sustainable harvest

  18. Maturation characteristics and life history strategies of the Pacific Lamprey, Entosphenus tridentatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Benjamin J.; van de Wetering, Stan; Sower, Stacia A.; Schreck, Carl B.

    2013-01-01

    Lampreys (Petromyzontiformes) have persisted over millennia and now suffer a recent decline in abundance. Complex life histories may have factored in their persistence; anthropogenic perturbations in their demise. The complexity of life histories of lampreys is not understood, particularly for the anadromous Pacific lamprey, Entosphenus tridentatus Gairdner, 1836. Our goals were to describe the maturation timing and associated characteristics of adult Pacific lamprey, and to test the null hypothesis that different life histories do not exist. Females exhibited early vitellogenesis – early maturation stages; males exhibited spermatogonia – spermatozoa. Cluster analyses revealed an “immature” group and a “maturing–mature” group for each sex. We found statistically significant differences between these groups in the relationships between (i) body mass and total length in males; (ii) Fulton’s condition factor and liver lipids in males; (iii) the gonadosomatic index (GSI) and liver lipids in females; (iv) GSI and total length in females; (v) mean oocyte diameter and liver lipids; and (vi) mean oocyte diameter and GSI. We found no significant difference between the groups in the relationship of muscle lipids and body mass. Our analyses support rejection of the hypothesis of a single life history. We found evidence for an “ocean-maturing” life history that would likely spawn within several weeks of entering fresh water, in addition to the formerly recognized life history of spending 1 year in fresh water prior to spawning—the “stream-maturing” life history. Late maturity, semelparity, and high fecundity suggest that Pacific lamprey capitalize on infrequent opportunities for reproduction in highly variable environments.

  19. Life atomic a history of radioisotopes in science and medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Creager, Angela N H

    2013-01-01

    After World War II, the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) began mass-producing radioisotopes, sending out nearly 64,000 shipments of radioactive materials to scientists and physicians by 1955. Even as the atomic bomb became the focus of Cold War anxiety, radioisotopes represented the government's efforts to harness the power of the atom for peace-advancing medicine, domestic energy, and foreign relations.             In Life Atomic, Angela N. H. Creager tells the story of how these radioisotopes, which were simultaneously scientific tools and political icons, transformed biomedicine and ecolog

  20. NARRATIVE: A short history of my life in science A short history of my life in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Joseph R.

    2010-08-01

    I was certainly surprised, and felt extremely honored, when Salvador Miret-Artés suggested that he would like to organize this festschrift. Before that day I never anticipated that such an honor would come to me. I would like to thank Salvador for the large amount of time and work he has expended in organizing this special issue, the Editors of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for making it possible, and also the contributing authors for their efforts. My family home was outside of Petersburg, Virginia in Dinwiddie County in an area that was, during my youth, largely occupied by small farms. This is a region rich in American history and our earliest ancestors on both sides of the family settled in this area, beginning in the decade after the first Virginia settlement in Jamestown. My father was an engineer and my mother was a former school teacher, and their parents were small business owners. From earliest memories I recall being interested in finding out how things worked and especially learning about the wonders of nature. These interests were fostered by my parents who encouraged such investigations during long walks, visits to friends and relatives, and trips to museums. However, my earliest memory of wanting to become a scientist is associated with a Christmas gift of a chemistry set when I was about ten years old. I was absolutely fascinated by the amazing results that could be achieved with simple chemical reactions and realized then that I wanted to do something in life that would be associated with science. The gift of that small chemistry set developed over the next few years into a serious interest in chemistry, and throughout my junior high-school years I spent nearly all the money I earned doing odd jobs for neighbors on small laboratory equipment and chemical supplies, eventually taking over our old abandoned chicken house and turning it into a small chemistry lab. I remember being somewhat frustrated at the limits, mainly financial, that kept

  1. Life lines: An art history of biological research around 1800.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, Matthias

    2011-12-01

    Around 1800, the scientific "illustrator" emerged as a new artistic profession in Europe. Artists were increasingly sought after in order to picture anatomical dissections and microscopic observations and to translate drawings into artworks for books and journals. By training and technical expertise, they introduced a particular kind of knowledge into scientific perception that also shaped the common image of nature. Illustrations of scientific publications, often undervalued as a biased interpretation of facts and subordinate to logic and description, thus convey an 'art history' of science in its own right, relevant both for the understanding of biological thought around 1800 as well as for the development of the arts and their historiography. The article is based on an analysis of botanical treatises produced for the Göttingen Society of Sciences in 1803, during an early phase of microscopic cell research, in order to determine the constitutive role of artistic knowledge and the media employed for the visualization and conceptualization of biological issues. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular phylogenetics of the genus Neoconocephalus (orthoptera, tettigoniidae and the evolution of temperate life histories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L Snyder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The katydid genus Neoconocephalus (25+ species has a prominent acoustic communication system and occurs in large parts of the Neotropics and Nearctic. This group has been subject of numerous behavioral, physiological, and evolutionary studies of its acoustic communication system. Two distinct life histories occur in this group: The tropical life history incorporates multiple generations/year and direct egg development without environmental triggers. Temperate life history is characterized by overwintering in the egg stage, cold trigger of egg development, and one generation/year. This study reconstructs the phylogenetic relationships within the genus to (1 determine the evolutionary history of the temperate life history, and (2 to support comparative studies of evolutionary and physiological problems in this genus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLP, and sequences of two nuclear loci and one mitochondrial locus to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships. The analysis included 17 ingroup and two outgroup species. AFLP and mitochondrial data provided resolution at the species level while the two nuclear loci revealed only deeper nodes. The data sets were combined in a super-matrix to estimate a total evidence tree. Seven of the temperate species form a monophyletic group; however, three more temperate species were placed as siblings of tropical species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analyses support the reliability of the current taxonomic treatment of the Neoconocephalus fauna of Caribbean, Central, and North America. Ancestral state reconstruction of life history traits was not conclusive, however at least four transitions between life histories occurred among our sample of species. The proposed phylogeny will strengthen conclusions from comparative work in this group.

  3. Life-history evolution in guppies VIII: the demographics of density regulation in guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznick, David N; Bassar, Ronald D; Travis, Joseph; Helen Rodd, F

    2012-09-01

    In prior research, we found the way guppy life histories evolve in response to living in environments with a high or low risk of predation is consistent with life-history theory that assumes no density dependence. We later found that guppies from high-predation environments experience higher mortality rates than those from low-predation environments, but the increased risk was evenly distributed across all age/size classes. Life-history theory that assumes density-independent population growth predicts that life histories will not evolve under such circumstances, yet we have shown with field introduction experiments that they do evolve. However, theory that incorporates density regulation predicts this pattern of mortality can result in the patterns of life-history evolution we had observed. Here we report on density manipulation experiments performed in populations of guppies from low-predation environments to ask whether natural populations normally experience density regulation and, if so, to characterize the short-term demographic changes that underlie density regulation. Our experiments reveal that these populations are density regulated. Decreased density resulted in higher juvenile growth, decreased juvenile mortality rates, and increased reproductive investment by adult females. Increased density causes reduced offspring size, decreased fat storage by adult females, and increased adult mortality. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  4. The importance of population growth and regulation in human life history evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Explaining the evolution of human life history traits remains an important challenge for evolutionary anthropologists. Progress is hindered by a poor appreciation of how demographic factors affect the action of natural selection. I review life history theory showing that the quantity maximized by selection depends on whether and how population growth is regulated. I show that the common use of R, a strategy's expected lifetime number of offspring, as a fitness maximand is only appropriate under a strict set of conditions, which are apparently unappreciated by anthropologists. To concretely show how demography-free life history theory can lead to errors, I reanalyze an influential model of human life history evolution, which investigated the coevolution of a long lifespan and late age of maturity. I show that the model's conclusions do not hold under simple changes to the implicitly assumed mechanism of density dependence, even when stated assumptions remain unchanged. This analysis suggests that progress in human life history theory requires better understanding of the demography of our ancestors.

  5. The origin of parental care in relation to male and female life history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Hope; Bonsall, Michael B; Alonzo, Suzanne H

    2013-04-01

    The evolution of maternal, paternal, and bi-parental care has been the focus of a great deal of research. Males and females vary in basic life-history characteristics (e.g., stage-specific mortality, maturation) in ways that are unrelated to parental investment. Surprisingly, few studies have examined the effect of this variation in male and female life history on the evolution of care. Here, we use a theoretical approach to determine the sex-specific life-history characteristics that give rise to the origin of paternal, maternal, or bi-parental care from an ancestral state of no care. Females initially invest more into each egg than males. Despite this inherent difference between the sexes, paternal, maternal, and bi-parental care are equally likely when males and females are otherwise similar. Thus, sex differences in initial zygotic investment do not explain the origin of one pattern of care over another. However, sex differences in adult mortality, egg maturation rate, and juvenile survival affect the pattern of care that will be most likely to evolve. Maternal care is more likely if female adult mortality is high, whereas paternal care is more likely if male adult mortality is high. These findings suggest that basic life-history differences between the sexes can alone explain the origin of maternal, paternal, and bi-parental care. As a result, the influence of life-history characteristics should be considered as a baseline scenario in studies examining the origin of care.

  6. Contrasting latitudinal patterns of life-history divergence in two genera of new world thrushes (Turdinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Andy J.; Martin, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    Several long-standing hypotheses have been proposed to explain latitudinal patterns of life-history strategies. Here, we test predictions of four such hypotheses (seasonality, food limitation, nest predation and adult survival probability) by examining life-history traits and age-specific mortality rates of several species of thrushes (Turdinae) based on field studies at temperate and tropical sites and data gathered from the literature. Thrushes in the genus Catharus showed the typical pattern of slower life-history strategies in the tropics while co-occuring Turdus thrushes differed much less across latitudes. Seasonality is a broadly accepted hypothesis for latitudinal patterns, but the lack of concordance in latitudinal patterns between co-existing genera that experience the same seasonal patterns suggests seasonality cannot fully explain latitudinal trait variation in thrushes. Nest-predation also could not explain patterns based on our field data and literature data for these two genera. Total feeding rates were similar, and per-nestling feeding rates were higher at tropical latitudes in both genera, suggesting food limitation does not explain trait differences in thrushes. Latitudinal patterns of life histories in these two genera were closely associated with adult survival probability. Thus, our data suggest that environmental influences on adult survival probability may play a particularly strong role in shaping latitudinal patterns of life-history traits.

  7. Predicting responses to climate change requires all life-history stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, Sara

    2013-01-01

    In Focus: Radchuk, V., Turlure, C. & Schtickzelle, N. (2013) Each life stage matters: the importance of assessing response to climate change over the complete life cycle in butterflies. Journal of Animal Ecology, 82, 275-285. Population-level responses to climate change depend on many factors, including unexpected interactions among life history attributes; however, few studies examine climate change impacts over complete life cycles of focal species. Radchuk, Turlure & Schtickzelle () used experimental and modelling approaches to predict population dynamics for the bog fritillary butterfly under warming scenarios. Although they found that warming improved fertility and survival of all stages with one exception, populations were predicted to decline because overwintering larvae, whose survival declined with warming, were disproportionately important contributors to population growth. This underscores the importance of considering all life history stages in analyses of climate change's effects on population dynamics. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2012 British Ecological Society.

  8. Brief Self-Report Scales Assessing Life History Dimensions of Mating and Parenting Effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Daniel J

    2017-01-01

    Life history theory (LHT) is a powerful evolutionary framework for understanding physiological, psychological, and behavioral variation both between and within species. Researchers and theorists are increasingly integrating LHT into evolutionary psychology, as it provides a strong foundation for research across many topical areas. Human life history variation has been represented in psychological and behavioral research in several ways, including indicators of conditions in the developmental environment, indicators of conditions in the current environment, and indicators of maturation and life milestones (e.g., menarche, initial sexual activity, first pregnancy), and in self-report survey scale measures. Survey scale measures have included constructs such as time perspective and future discounting, although the most widely used index is a constellation of indicators assessing the K-factor, thought to index general life history speed (from fast to slow). The current project examined the utility of two brief self-report survey measures assessing the life history dimensions of mating effort and parenting effort with a large undergraduate sample in the United States. Consistent with the theory, items reflected two inversely related dimensions. In regressions including the K-factor, the Mating Effort Scale proved to be a powerful predictor of other constructs and indicators related to life history variation. The Parenting Effort Scale had less predictive power overall, although it explained unique variance across several constructs and was the only unique predictor of the number of long-term (serious and committed) relationships. These scales may be valuable additions to self-report survey research projects examining life history variation.

  9. Brief Self-Report Scales Assessing Life History Dimensions of Mating and Parenting Effort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Kruger

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Life history theory (LHT is a powerful evolutionary framework for understanding physiological, psychological, and behavioral variation both between and within species. Researchers and theorists are increasingly integrating LHT into evolutionary psychology, as it provides a strong foundation for research across many topical areas. Human life history variation has been represented in psychological and behavioral research in several ways, including indicators of conditions in the developmental environment, indicators of conditions in the current environment, and indicators of maturation and life milestones (e.g., menarche, initial sexual activity, first pregnancy, and in self-report survey scale measures. Survey scale measures have included constructs such as time perspective and future discounting, although the most widely used index is a constellation of indicators assessing the K-factor, thought to index general life history speed (from fast to slow. The current project examined the utility of two brief self-report survey measures assessing the life history dimensions of mating effort and parenting effort with a large undergraduate sample in the United States. Consistent with the theory, items reflected two inversely related dimensions. In regressions including the K-factor, the Mating Effort Scale proved to be a powerful predictor of other constructs and indicators related to life history variation. The Parenting Effort Scale had less predictive power overall, although it explained unique variance across several constructs and was the only unique predictor of the number of long-term (serious and committed relationships. These scales may be valuable additions to self-report survey research projects examining life history variation.

  10. Life history correlates of inbreeding depression in mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, M; Setchell, J M; Prugnolle, F; Wickings, E J; Peignot, P; Balloux, F; Hossaert-McKey, M

    2006-01-01

    Inbreeding depression reflects the negative consequences of increased homozygosity at genes that affect fitness. We investigate inbreeding depression in a semi-free-ranging colony of mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx), using high-quality pedigree data, comprising five maternal generations and 20 years of morphological and demographic data. We examine the relationship between inbreeding coefficients and four fitness correlates: two growth parameters (mass and height for age) and longevity in both sexes, and age at first conception in females. Inbreeding was correlated with both growth parameters, but only in females, with inbred females being smaller than noninbred females. Inbreeding was also correlated significantly with age at first conception, with inbred females giving birth earlier in life than noninbred females. We suggest that sex-biased maternal investment may explain this sex-differential response to inbreeding, although the lack of a significant association between inbreeding and growth in males may also be due to the provisioned nature of the colony. The surprising relationship between age at first conception and inbreeding may be related to smaller adult size in inbred females, or to their being less able to escape from male sexual coercion.

  11. The Teacher I Wish to Be: Exploring the Influence of Life Histories on Student Teacher Idealised Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of life histories and apprenticeship of observation on the formation of student teachers' idealised identities. The life histories of 15 student teachers are decoded. Through eliciting from the student teachers the teacher they wish to be, the paper focuses on the interplay between the personal histories and ideal…

  12. Integrating the pace-of-life syndrome across species, sexes and individuals: covariation of life history and personality under pesticide exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debecker, Sara; Sanmartín-Villar, Iago; de Guinea-Luengo, Miguel; Cordero-Rivera, Adolfo; Stoks, Robby

    2016-05-01

    The pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis integrates covariation of life-history traits along a fast-slow continuum and covariation of behavioural traits along a proactive-reactive personality continuum. Few studies have investigated these predicted life-history/personality associations among species and between sexes. Furthermore, whether and how contaminants interfere with POLS patterns remains unexplored. We tested for covariation patterns in life history and in behaviour, and for life-history/personality covariation among species, among individuals within species and between sexes. Moreover, we investigated whether pesticide exposure affects covariation between life history and behaviour and whether species and sexes with a faster POLS strategy have a higher sensitivity to pesticides. We reared larvae of four species of Ischnura damselflies in a common garden experiment with an insecticide treatment (chlorpyrifos absent/present) in the final instar. We measured four life-history traits (larval growth rate during the pesticide treatment, larval development time, adult mass and life span) and two behavioural traits (larval feeding activity and boldness, each before and after the pesticide treatment). At the individual level, life-history traits and behavioural traits aligned along a fast-slow and a proactive-reactive continuum, respectively. Species-specific differences in life history, with fast-lived species having a faster larval growth and development, a lower mass at emergence and a shorter life span, suggested that time constraints in the larval stage were predictably driving life-history evolution both in the larval stage and across metamorphosis in the adult stage. Across species, females were consistently more slow-lived than males, reflecting that a large body size and a long life span are generally more important for females. In contrast to the POLS hypothesis, there was only little evidence for the expected positive coupling between life-history

  13. Early life history and habitat ecology of estuarine fishes: responses to natural and human induced change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Able

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the early life history of fishes and their habitats has proceeded from basic natural history to ecology, but we often need to return to natural history to address deficiencies in conceptual and quantitative models of ecosystems. This understanding is further limited by the complex life history of fishes and the lack of appreciation of shifting baselines in estuaries. These inadequacies are especially evident when we try to address the effects of human influences, e.g. fishing, urbanization, and climate change. Often our baselines are inadequate or inaccurate. Our work has detected these along the coasts of the U.S. in extensive time series of larval fish ingress into estuaries, studies of the effects of urbanization, and responses to catastrophes such as the BP oil spill. Long-term monitoring, especially, continues to provide critical insights

  14. Evolution of boldness and life-history in response to selective harvesting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Marty, Lise; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Whether intensive harvesting alters the behavioral repertoire of exploited fishes is currently unknown, but plausible. We extend a fish life-history model to account for boldness as a personality trait that affects foraging intensity, which affects energy intake and risk from predation and fishing...... gear. We systematically investigate life-history and behavioral trait evolution along the boldness–timidity axis in response to the full range of common selectivity and exploitation patterns in fisheries. In agreement with previous studies, we find that any type of harvesting selects for fast life...... histories and that merely elevated, yet unselective, fishing mortality favors boldness. We also find that timid-selective fishing (which can be expected in species targeted by active gear types) selects for increased boldness. By contrast, increased timidity is predicted when fishing targets bolder...

  15. Population transcriptomics of life-history variation in the genus Salmo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giger, T.; Excoffier, L.; Amstutz, U.

    2008-01-01

    design involving 180 cDNA microarray experiments, we measured gene-expression levels from 1098 transcript probes in 90 individuals originating from six brown trout (Salmo trutta) and one Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) population, which follow either a migratory or a sedentary life history. We identified...... several candidate genes associated with preparatory adaptations to different life histories in salmonids, including genes encoding for transaldolase 1, constitutive heat-shock protein HSC70-1 and endozepine. Some of these genes clustered into functional groups, providing insight into the physiological...... with physiological changes that are likely to be involved in preadaptations to seawater in anadromous populations of the genus Salmo, one of which was identified to encode for nucleophosmin 1. Our findings thus provide new molecular insights into salmonid life-history variation, opening new perspectives in the study...

  16. Fine scale relationships between sex, life history, and dispersal of masu salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanishi, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Toshiaki; Koizumi, Itsuro; Dunham, Jason B.; Higashi, Seigo

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the patterns and processes driving dispersal is critical for understanding population structure and dynamics. In many organisms, sex-biased dispersal is related to the type of mating system. Considerably less is known about the influence of life history variability on dispersal. Here we investigated patterns of dispersal in masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou) to evaluate influences of sex and life history on dispersal. As expected, assignment tests and isolation by distance analysis revealed that dispersal of marine-migratory masu salmon was male-biased. However, dispersal of resident and migratory males did not follow our expectation and marine-migratory individuals dispersed more than residents. This may be because direct competition between marine-migratory and resident males is weak or that the cost of dispersal is smaller for marine-migratory individuals. This study revealed that both sex and migratory life history influence patterns of dispersal at a local scale in masu salmon.

  17. Tooth microstructure tracks the pace of human life-history evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher Dean, M

    2006-01-01

    A number of fundamental milestones define the pace at which animals develop, mature, reproduce and age. These include the length of gestation, the age at weaning and at sexual maturity, the number of offspring produced over a lifetime and the length of life itself. Because a time-scale for dental development can be retrieved from the internal structure of teeth and many of these life-history variables tend to be highly correlated, we can discover more than might be imagined about fossil primates and more, in particular, about fossil hominids and our own evolutionary history. Some insights into the evolutionary processes underlying changes in dental development are emerging from a better understanding of the mechanisms controlling enamel and dentine formation. Our own 18–20-year period of growth and development probably evolved quite recently after ca 17 million years of a more ape-like life-history profile. PMID:17015331

  18. Mutation accumulation may be a minor force in shaping life history traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dańko, Maciej Jan; Kozłowski, Jan; Vaupel, James Walton

    2012-01-01

    -strings to capture different age-specific mutational patterns. Each pattern represents a genotype and for each genotype we find the life history strategy that maximizes fitness. Genotypes compete with each other and are subject to selection and to new mutations over generations until equilibrium in gene......-frequencies is reached. The mutation-selection equilibrium provides information about mutational load and the differential effects of mutations on a life history trait--the optimal age at maturity. We find that mutations accumulate only at ages with negligible impact on fitness and that mutation accumulation has very...... little effect on the optimal age at maturity. These results suggest that life histories are largely determined by adaptive processes. The non-adaptive process of mutation accumulation seems to be unimportant at evolutionarily relevant ages....

  19. Life-history traits predict perennial species response to fire in a desert ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shryock, Daniel F.; DeFalco, Lesley A.; Esque, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    The Mojave Desert of North America has become fire-prone in recent decades due to invasive annual grasses that fuel wildfires following years of high rainfall. Perennial species are poorly adapted to fire in this system, and post-fire shifts in species composition have been substantial but variable across community types. To generalize across a range of conditions, we investigated whether simple life-history traits could predict how species responded to fire. Further, we classified species into plant functional types (PFTs) based on combinations of life-history traits and evaluated whether these groups exhibited a consistent fire-response. Six life-history traits varied significantly between burned and unburned areas in short (up to 4 years) or long-term (up to 52 years) post-fire datasets, including growth form, lifespan, seed size, seed dispersal, height, and leaf longevity. Forbs and grasses consistently increased in abundance after fire, while cacti were reduced and woody species exhibited a variable response. Woody species were classified into three PFTs based on combinations of life-history traits. Species in Group 1 increased in abundance after fire and were characterized by short lifespans, small, wind-dispersed seeds, low height, and deciduous leaves. Species in Group 2 were reduced by fire and distinguished from Group 1 by longer lifespans and evergreen leaves. Group 3 species, which also decreased after fire, were characterized by long lifespans, large non-wind dispersed seeds, and taller heights. Our results show that PFTs based on life-history traits can reliably predict the responses of most species to fire in the Mojave Desert. Dominant, long-lived species of this region possess a combination of traits limiting their ability to recover, presenting a clear example of how a novel disturbance regime may shift selective environmental pressures to favor alternative life-history strategies.

  20. Differential reproductive responses to stress reveal the role of life-history strategies within a species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultner, J; Kitaysky, A S; Gabrielsen, G W; Hatch, S A; Bech, C

    2013-11-22

    Life-history strategies describe that 'slow'- in contrast to 'fast'-living species allocate resources cautiously towards reproduction to enhance survival. Recent evidence suggests that variation in strategies exists not only among species but also among populations of the same species. Here, we examined the effect of experimentally induced stress on resource allocation of breeding seabirds in two populations with contrasting life-history strategies: slow-living Pacific and fast-living Atlantic black-legged kittiwakes. We tested the hypothesis that reproductive responses in kittiwakes under stress reflect their life-history strategies. We predicted that in response to stress, Pacific kittiwakes reduce investment in reproduction compared with Atlantic kittiwakes. We exposed chick-rearing kittiwakes to a short-term (3-day) period of increased exogenous corticosterone (CORT), a hormone that is released during food shortages. We examined changes in baseline CORT levels, parental care and effects on offspring. We found that kittiwakes from the two populations invested differently in offspring when facing stress. In response to elevated CORT, Pacific kittiwakes reduced nest attendance and deserted offspring more readily than Atlantic kittiwakes. We observed lower chick growth, a higher stress response in offspring and lower reproductive success in response to CORT implantation in Pacific kittiwakes, whereas the opposite occurred in the Atlantic. Our findings support the hypothesis that life-history strategies predict short-term responses of individuals to stress within a species. We conclude that behaviour and physiology under stress are consistent with trade-off priorities as predicted by life-history theory. We encourage future studies to consider the pivotal role of life-history strategies when interpreting inter-population differences of animal responses to stressful environmental events.

  1. Primate enamel evinces long period biological timing and regulation of life history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromage, Timothy G; Hogg, Russell T; Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Hou, Chen

    2012-07-21

    The factor(s) regulating the combination of traits that define the overall life history matrix of mammalian species, comprising attributes such as brain and body weight, age at sexual maturity, lifespan and others, remains a complete mystery. The principal objectives of the present research are (1) to provide evidence for a key variable effecting life history integration and (2) to provide a model for how one would go about investigating the metabolic mechanisms responsible for this rhythm. We suggest here that a biological rhythm with a period greater than the circadian rhythm is responsible for observed variation in primate life history. Evidence for this rhythm derives from studies of tooth enamel formation. Enamel contains an enigmatic periodicity in its microstructure called the striae of Retzius, which develops at species specific intervals in units of whole days. We refer to this enamel rhythm as the repeat interval (RI). For primates, we identify statistically significant relationships between RI and all common life history traits. Importantly, RI also correlates with basal and specific metabolic rates. With the exception of estrous cyclicity, all relationships share a dependence upon body mass. This dependence on body mass informs us that some aspect of metabolism is responsible for periodic energy allocations at RI timescales, regulating cell proliferation rates and growth, thus controlling the pace, patterning, and co-variation of life history traits. Estrous cyclicity relates to the long period rhythm in a body mass-independent manner. The mass-dependency and -independency of life history relationships with RI periodicity align with hypothalamic-mediated neurosecretory anterior and posterior pituitary outputs. We term this period the Havers-Halberg Oscillation (HHO), in reference to Clopton Havers, a 17th Century hard tissue anatomist, and Franz Halberg, a long-time explorer of long-period rhythms. We propose a mathematical model that may help elucidate

  2. The conservation and management of tunas and their relatives: setting life history research priorities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Juan-Jordá

    Full Text Available Scombrids (tunas, bonitos, Spanish mackerels and mackerels support important fisheries in tropical, subtropical and temperate waters around the world, being one of the most economically- and socially-important marine species globally. Their sustainable exploitation, management and conservation depend on accurate life history information for the development of quantitative fisheries stock assessments, and in the fishery data-poor situations for the identification of vulnerable species. Here, we assemble life history traits (maximum size, growth, longevity, maturity, fecundity, spawning duration and spawning interval for the 51 species of scombrids globally. We identify major biological gaps in knowledge and prioritize life history research needs in scombrids based on their biological gaps in knowledge, the importance of their fisheries and their current conservation status according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List. We find that the growth and reproductive biology of tunas and mackerel species have been more extensively studied than for Spanish mackerels and bonitos, although there are notable exceptions in all groups. We also reveal that reproductive biology of species, particular fecundity, is the least studied biological aspect in scombrids. We identify two priority groups, including 32 species of scombrids, and several populations of principal market tunas, for which life history research should be prioritized following the species-specific life history gaps identified in this study in the coming decades. By highlighting the important gaps in biological knowledge and providing a priority setting for life history research in scombrid species this study provides guidance for management and conservation and serves as a guide for biologists and resource managers interested in the biology, ecology, and management of scombrid species.

  3. Beware of primate life history data: a plea for data standards and a repository.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Borries

    Full Text Available Life history variables such as the age at first reproduction and the interval between consecutive births are measures of investment in growth and reproduction in a particular population or species. As such they allow for meaningful comparisons of the speed of growth and reproduction between species and between larger taxa. Especially in primates such life history research has far reaching implications and has led for instance to the "grandmother hypothesis". Other links have been proposed with respect to dietary adaptations: Because protein is essential for growth and one of the primary sources of protein, leaves, occurs much less seasonally than fruits, it has been predicted that folivorous primates should grow faster compared to frugivorous ones. However, when comparing folivorous Asian colobines with frugivorous Asian macaques we recently documented a longer, instead of a shorter gestation length in folivores while age at first reproduction and interbirth interval did not differ. This supports earlier findings for Malagasy lemurs in which all life history variables tested were significantly longer in folivores compared to frugivores. Wondering why these trends were not apparent sooner, we tried to reconstruct our results for Asian primates with data from four popular life history compilations. However, this attempt failed; even the basic, allometric relationship with adult female body mass that is typical for life history variables could not be recovered. This negative result hints at severe problems with data quality. Here we show that data quality can be improved significantly by standardizing the variables and by controlling for factors such as nutritional conditions or infant mortality. Ideally, in the future, revised primate life history data should be collated in a central database accessible to everybody. In the long run such an initiative should be expanded to include all mammalian species.

  4. Disease-associated change in an amphibian life-history trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheele, Benjamin C; Skerratt, Lee F; Hunter, David A; Banks, Sam C; Pierson, Jennifer C; Driscoll, Don A; Byrne, Philip G; Berger, Lee

    2017-07-14

    Emerging pathogens can drive evolutionary shifts in host life-history traits, yet this process remains poorly documented in vertebrate hosts. Amphibian chytridiomycosis, caused by infection with the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is the worst recorded wildlife disease and has caused the extinction of over 100 species across multiple continents. A similar number of additional species have experienced mass declines and Bd remains a major source of mortality in many populations of declined species now persisting with the pathogen. Life-history theory predicts that increased extrinsic mortality in Bd-infected populations may alter amphibian life-history traits, but this has not been examined. Here, we investigate whether population Bd status is associated with age and size at maturity by comparing long-exposed Bd-infected populations, Bd-free populations, and museum specimens collected prior to Bd emergence for the endangered Australian frog Litoria verreauxii alpina. We show that Bd-infected populations have a higher proportion of males that mature at 1 year of age, and females that mature at 2 years of age, compared to Bd-free populations. Earlier maturation was associated with reduced size at maturity in males. Consistent with life-history theory, our findings may represent an adaptive evolutionary shift towards earlier maturation in response to high Bd-induced mortality. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence for a post-metamorphic Bd-associated shift in an amphibian life-history trait. Given high mortality in other Bd-challenged species, we suggest that chytridiomycosis may be a substantial new selection pressure shaping life-history traits in impacted amphibian species across multiple continents.

  5. Using evolutionary demography to link life history theory, quantitative genetics and population ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Tim; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Childs, Dylan Z

    2010-11-01

    1. There is a growing number of empirical reports of environmental change simultaneously influencing population dynamics, life history and quantitative characters. We do not have a well-developed understanding of links between the dynamics of these quantities. 2. Insight into the joint dynamics of populations, quantitative characters and life history can be gained by deriving a model that allows the calculation of fundamental quantities that underpin population ecology, evolutionary biology and life history. The parameterization and analysis of such a model for a specific system can be used to predict how a population will respond to environmental change. 3. Age-stage-structured models can be constructed from character-demography associations that describe age-specific relationships between the character and: (i) survival; (ii) fertility; (iii) ontogenetic development of the character among survivors; and (iv) the distribution of reproductive allocation. 4. These models can be used to calculate a wide range of useful biological quantities including population growth and structure; terms in the Price equation including selection differentials; estimates of biometric heritabilities; and life history descriptors including generation time. We showcase the method through parameterization of a model using data from a well-studied population of Soay sheep Ovis aries. 5. Perturbation analysis is used to investigate how the quantities listed in summary point 4 change as each parameter in each character-demography function is altered. 6. A wide range of joint dynamics of life history, quantitative characters and population growth can be generated in response to changes in different character-demography associations; we argue this explains the diversity of observations on the consequences of environmental change from studies of free-living populations. 7. The approach we describe has the potential to explain within and between species patterns in quantitative characters, life

  6. Old world versus new world: life-history alterations in a successful invader introduced across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Michael G; Copp, Gordon H

    2014-02-01

    We examined differences in pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus) life-history traits between native North American and introduced European populations, and tested three life-history predictions related to the effect of temperature, growth, waterbody size, and the presence/absence of predators on native and non-native populations. Pumpkinseed populations exhibit more 'opportunistic' traits (earlier maturity, smaller size at maturity, and higher reproductive allocation) in their introduced European range than those in their native range. Predictions of life-history traits were improved when indicators of juvenile growth rate (mean length at age 2), waterbody size (surface area), and thermal regime (air temperature degree-days above 10 °C) were incorporated into models along with continental location, but European pumpkinseed populations exhibit more opportunistic life-history traits than North American populations even when these factors are accounted for. Native pumpkinseed in waterbodies containing piscivores mature later and at a larger size, and have lower gonadosomatic indices than those in waterbodies lacking piscivores, whereas there is no significant difference in the same three life-history traits between European waterbodies containing or lacking piscivores. Because congeneric competitors of the pumpkinseed are absent from Europe, the apparent absence of a predator life-history effect there could also be due to the absence of the major sunfish competitors. In either case, the evolution and maintenance of more opportunistic traits in European pumpkinseed can likely be attributed to enemy release, and this may explain the successful establishment and spread of pumpkinseed in many parts of Europe.

  7. Skagit River coho salmon life history model—Users’ guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Andrea; Kirby, Grant; Morris, Scott

    2017-09-29

    Natural resource management is conducted in the context of multiple anthropogenic stressors and is further challenged owing to changing climate. Experiments to determine the effects of climate change on complex ecological systems are nearly impossible. However, using a simulation model to synthesize current understanding of key ecological processes through the life cycle of a fish population can provide a platform for exploring potential effects of and management responses to changing conditions. Potential climate-change scenarios can be imposed, responses can be observed, and the effectiveness of potential actions can be evaluated. This approach is limited owing to future conditions likely deviating in range and timing from conditions used to create the model so that the model is expected to become obsolete. In the meantime, however, the modeling process explicitly states assumptions, clarifies information gaps, and provides a means to better understand which relationships are robust and which are vulnerable to changing climate by observing whether and why model output diverges from actual observations through time. The purpose of the model described herein is to provide such a decision-support tool regarding coho (Oncorhynchus kisutch) salmon for the Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe of Washington State.The Skagit coho salmon model is implemented in a system dynamics format and has three primary stocks—(1) predicted smolts, (2) realized smolts, and (3) escapement. “Predicted smolts” are the number of smolts expected based on the number of spawners in any year and the Ricker production curve. Pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) return to the Skagit River in odd years, and when they overlap with juvenile rearing coho salmon, coho smolt production is substantially higher than in non-pink years. Therefore, the model uses alternative Ricker equations to predict smolts depending on whether their juvenile year was a pink or non-pink year. The stock “realized smolts

  8. Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Life History Investigations, Annual Report 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F. [U.S. Geological Survey; Connor, William P. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Bellgraph, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2009-09-15

    This study was initiated to provide empirical data and analyses on the dam passage timing, travel rate, survival, and life history variation of fall Chinook salmon that are produced in the Clearwater River. The area of interest for this study focuses on the lower four miles of the Clearwater River and its confluence with the Snake River because this is an area where many fish delay their seaward migration. The goal of the project is to increase our understanding of the environmental and biological factors that affect juvenile life history of fall Chinook salmon in the Clearwater River. The following summaries are provided for each of the individual chapters in this report.

  9. Life history and demographic drivers of reservoir competence for three tick-borne zoonotic pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S Ostfeld

    Full Text Available Animal and plant species differ dramatically in their quality as hosts for multi-host pathogens, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. A group of small mammals, including small rodents and shrews, are among the most competent natural reservoirs for three tick-borne zoonotic pathogens, Borrelia burgdorferi, Babesia microti, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum, in eastern North America. For a group of nine commonly-infected mammals spanning >2 orders of magnitude in body mass, we asked whether life history features or surrogates for (unknown encounter rates with ticks, predicted reservoir competence for each pathogen. Life history features associated with a fast pace of life generally were positively correlated with reservoir competence. However, a model comparison approach revealed that host population density, as a proxy for encounter rates between hosts and pathogens, generally received more support than did life history features. The specific life history features and the importance of host population density differed somewhat between the different pathogens. We interpret these results as supporting two alternative but non-exclusive hypotheses for why ecologically widespread, synanthropic species are often the most competent reservoirs for multi-host pathogens. First, multi-host pathogens might adapt to those hosts they are most likely to experience, which are likely to be the most abundant and/or frequently bitten by tick vectors. Second, species with fast life histories might allocate less to certain immune defenses, which could increase their reservoir competence. Results suggest that of the host species that might potentially be exposed, those with comparatively high population densities, small bodies, and fast pace of life will often be keystone reservoirs that should be targeted for surveillance or management.

  10. Divergent life histories of invasive round gobies (Neogobius melanostomus) in Lake Michigan and its tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornis, Matthew; Weidel, Brian C.; Vander Zanden, M. Jake

    2017-01-01

    Round gobies (Neogobius melanostomus) have invaded benthic habitats of the Laurentian Great Lakes and connected tributary streams. Although connected, these two systems generally differ in temperature (Great Lakes are typically colder), food availability (Dreissenid mussels are more prevalent in Great Lakes), and system size and openness. Here, we compare round goby life histories from inshore Lake Michigan and adjacent tributary systems—an uncommon case study of life-history differences between connected systems. Tributary round gobies grew much faster (average length-at-age of 122.3 vs. 65.7 mm for Age 2 +  round gobies), appeared to have shorter life spans (maximum observed age of 2 vs. 5) and had lower age-at-50% maturity (1.6 vs. 2.4 years; females only) compared to gobies from Lake Michigan. In addition, tributary gobies had greater fecundity at Ages 1–2 than lake gobies, but had fewer eggs for a given body size prior to the first spawning event of the summer. We were not able to determine the cause of the observed life-history differences. Nonetheless, the observed differences in growth, maturation and longevity were consistent with known effects of water temperature, as well as predictions of life-history theory for animals at invasion fronts exposed to novel environmental conditions. The high degree of phenotypic plasticity in connected populations of this invasive species has implications for our understanding of invasive species impacts in different habitats.

  11. [On the problems of the evolutionary optimization of life history. I. A Markov model of the Leslie life history and optimization of fertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasekov, V P

    2013-03-01

    The paper considers the properties of individual life history corresponding to the Leslie model of age-structured population. The life history is simulated as a finite Markov chain with absorption at a death state of individual. In this model, individual longevity, average number of offspring R(L) (produced by an individual over the entire life), and some other known parameters of the life history have been derived using simple probability methods that do not involve matrix calculus and their individual components have been interpreted. In the Leslie linear population model (derived by simple modification of a Markov chain), R(L) determines the growth or decline of a population. Individuals with higher R(L) values have evolutionary advantages in the population due to accelerated growth in their number The selection of fertility as a factor of the increase in R(L) is considered. In the Leslie model, fertility is a set of correlated quantitative traits, where the age-specific fertility components determined both by multipl loci and the environment. According to the genetic theory of quantitative trait selection, they evolve towards an increase in R(L). Taking into account the limited resources for reproduction, selection optimizes the fertility distribution according to age. Optimal distribution corresponds to the attainment of the maximum R(L). This complies with the maximization of the rate of population growth (r-selection), which is characteristic of linear population models. The search for the RL maximum and optimal distribution of fertility belongs to the field of linear programming.

  12. Life history tradeoffs of pathogens and the treatment principle of antibiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-An Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There are no eternal individual lives so life continues by relaying with reproduction. Consequently, lifespan and fecundity are two essential genetic traits of life. The life history tradeoffs theory holds that there is an inverse relationship between lifespan and fecundity. This paper proposes two new concepts, i.e., “lifespan of pathogens” and treatment of infections by “antibiogenesis”. The lifespan of pathogens is the time limitation of those tiny lives just as other large creatures. Notably, the lifespan of bacterium is the time interval from the cell division by which it is produced to next division by then its life ends and transforms to two new lives, or dies. Antibiogenesis means inhibiting generation of new lives. By the principle of life history tradeoffs, the lifespan of pathogens determines the speed of their proliferations and consequently the modality of infection. The treatment principle of antibiogenesis requires the duration of treatment to be determined by the lifespan of infected pathogens. The life history tradeoffs theory and the two concepts are helpful to understanding the pathobiology and shaping the clinical aspects of infectious diseases.

  13. The role of life histories and trophic interactions in population recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audzijonyte, Asta; Kuparinen, Anna

    2016-08-01

    Factors affecting population recovery from depletion are at the focus of wildlife management. Particularly, it has been debated how life-history characteristics might affect population recovery ability and productivity. Many exploited fish stocks have shown temporal changes towards earlier maturation and reduced adult body size, potentially owing to evolutionary responses to fishing. Whereas such life-history changes have been widely documented, their potential role on stock's ability to recover from exploitation often remains ignored by traditional fisheries management. We used a marine ecosystem model parameterized for Southeastern Australian ecosystem to explore how changes towards "faster" life histories might affect population per capita growth rate r. We show that for most species changes towards earlier maturation during fishing have a negative effect (3-40% decrease) on r during the recovery phase. Faster juvenile growth and earlier maturation were beneficial early in life, but smaller adult body sizes reduced the lifetime reproductive output and increased adult natural mortality. However, both at intra- and inter-specific level natural mortality and trophic position of the species were as important in determining r as species longevity and age of maturation, suggesting that r cannot be predicted from life-history traits alone. Our study highlights that factors affecting population recovery ability and productivity should be explored in a multi-species context, where both age-specific fecundity and survival schedules are addressed simultaneously. It also suggests that contemporary life-history changes in harvested species are unlikely to increase their resilience and recovery ability. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  14. Seasonal time constraints reduce genetic variation in life-history traits along a latitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sniegula, Szymon; Golab, Maria J; Drobniak, Szymon M; Johansson, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Time constraints cause strong selection on life-history traits, because populations need to complete their life cycles within a shorter time. We therefore expect lower genetic variation in these traits in high- than in low-latitude populations, since the former are more time-constrained. The aim was to estimate life-history traits and their genetic variation in an obligately univoltine damselfly along a latitudinal gradient of 2730 km. Populations were grown in the laboratory at temperatures and photoperiods simulating those at their place of origin. In a complementary experiment, individuals from the same families were grown in constant temperature and photoperiod that mimicked average conditions across the latitude. Development time and size was faster and smaller, respectively, and growth rate was higher at northern latitudes. Additive genetic variance was very low for life-history traits, and estimates for egg development time and larval growth rate showed significant decreases towards northern latitudes. The expression of genetic effects in life-history traits differed considerably when individuals were grown in constant rather than simulated and naturally variable conditions. Our results support strong selection by time constraints. They also highlight the importance of growing organisms in their native environment for correct estimates of genetic variance at their place of origin. Our results also suggest that the evolutionary potential of life-history traits is very low at northern compared to southern latitudes, but that changes in climate could alter this pattern. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2015 British Ecological Society.

  15. Wolf in sheep's clothing: Model misspecification undermines tests of the neutral theory for life histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authier, Matthieu; Aubry, Lise M; Cam, Emmanuelle

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the processes behind change in reproductive state along life-history trajectories is a salient research program in evolutionary ecology. Two processes, state dependence and heterogeneity, can drive the dynamics of change among states. Both processes can operate simultaneously, begging the difficult question of how to tease them apart in practice. The Neutral Theory for Life Histories (NTLH) holds that the bulk of variations in life-history trajectories is due to state dependence and is hence neutral: Once previous (breeding) state is taken into account, variations are mostly random. Lifetime reproductive success (LRS), the number of descendants produced over an individual's reproductive life span, has been used to infer support for NTLH in natura. Support stemmed from accurate prediction of the population-level distribution of LRS with parameters estimated from a state dependence model. We show with Monte Carlo simulations that the current reliance of NTLH on LRS prediction in a null hypothesis framework easily leads to selecting a misspecified model, biased estimates and flawed inferences. Support for the NTLH can be spurious because of a systematic positive bias in estimated state dependence when heterogeneity is present in the data but ignored in the analysis. This bias can lead to spurious positive covariance between fitness components when there is in fact an underlying trade-off. Furthermore, neutrality implied by NTLH needs a clarification because of a probable disjunction between its common understanding by evolutionary ecologists and its translation into statistical models of life-history trajectories. Irrespective of what neutrality entails, testing hypotheses about the dynamics of change among states in life histories requires a multimodel framework because state dependence and heterogeneity can easily be mistaken for each other.

  16. Phenotypic plasticity in adult life-history strategies compensates for a poor start in life in Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Sonya K

    2010-12-01

    Low food availability during early growth and development can have long-term negative consequences for reproductive success. Phenotypic plasticity in adult life-history decisions may help to mitigate these potential costs, yet adult life-history responses to juvenile food conditions remain largely unexplored. I used a food-manipulation experiment with female Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata) to examine age-related changes in adult life-history responses to early food conditions, whether these responses varied across different adult food conditions, and how these responses affected overall reproductive success. Guppy females reared on low food as juveniles matured at a later age, at a smaller size, and with less energy reserves than females reared on high food as juveniles. In response to this setback, they changed their investment in growth, reproduction, and fat storage throughout the adult stage such that they were able to catch up in body size, increase their reproductive output, and restore their energy reserves to levels comparable to those of females reared on high food as juveniles. The net effect was that adult female guppies did not merely mitigate but surprisingly were able to fully compensate for the potential long-term negative effects of poor juvenile food conditions on reproductive success.

  17. Examining life's origins : history and epistemic principles in the search for the origins of life

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Eric Collin

    2010-01-01

    My dissertation provides a novel philosophical and historical analysis of origins of life research, a scientific field that poses significant conceptual challenges to evolutionary theory, standard experimental methodology, and theory integration across disciplines. The origin of life is sometimes considered "the most fundamental problem in biology." Despite its theoretical significance, the field of study is fraught with fundamental disagreements over theories, methods and approaches. The ori...

  18. Octopus life history relative to age, in a multi-geared developmental fishery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leporati, S.C.; Hart, A.M.; Larsen, R.; Franken, Linda E; De Graaf, M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to obtain broad-scale age information for an exploited octopus population enables the identification of essential life history information, such as age at maturity, recruitment pulses and seasonal effects on growth. This study uses stylet weight (reduced internal shell) as a proxy to age

  19. Predator-induced phenotypic plasticity in Daphnia pulex: Uncoupling morphological defenses and life history shifts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Repka, S.; Pihlajamaa, K.

    1996-01-01

    Chemical cues from a predator Chaoborus sp. induce morphological defense (neck spine) and life history shifts (later reproduction, decreased fecundity but larger juvenile size) in the waterflea Daphnia pulex. These shifts have been interpreted either as costs of defense or as separate adaptation. In

  20. Life-history characteristics of an age-validated established invasive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has been suggested that the invasive, omnivorous Clarias garipienus is capable of rapid invasions and long-term persistence in recently inhabited freshwater systems. To test this hypothesis, the life history of the established, extralimital Darlington Dam (33°10'31”S, 25°09'13”E) population was investigated. By counting ...

  1. Life-history evolution in hymenopteran parasitoids the roles of host and climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askari Seyahooei, Majeed

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis I studied the relationships between parasitoids, hosts and climate from an evolutionary point of view by using hymenopteran parasitoids as a model system. A comparative approach was used to study the variation in life-history traits of species or populations from different habitats. I

  2. Levels of genetic variation in trees: influence of life history characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. L Hamrick; J. B. Milton; Y. B. Linhart

    1981-01-01

    In a previous study, levels of genetic variation, as measured by isozyme analyses, were compared for 113 taxa of vascular plants. Each species was classified for 12 life history and ecological traits and three measures of genetic variation were calculated. Plants with large ranges, high fecundities, an outcrossing mode of reproduction, wind pollination, a long...

  3. The ecology of life history evolution : genes, individuals and populations : inaugural lecture (oratie)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    Natural selection shapes the life histories of organisms. The ecological interactions of these organisms with their biotic and abiotic environment shape the selection pressure on their phenotypes while their genetics determine how fast this selection leads to adaptation to their environment. The

  4. Life history trade-offs and relaxed selection can decrease bacterial virulence in environmental reservoirs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauri Mikonranta

    Full Text Available Pathogen virulence is usually thought to evolve in reciprocal selection with the host. While this might be true for obligate pathogens, the life histories of opportunistic pathogens typically alternate between within-host and outside-host environments during the infection-transmission cycle. As a result, opportunistic pathogens are likely to experience conflicting selection pressures across different environments, and this could affect their virulence through life-history trait correlations. We studied these correlations experimentally by exposing an opportunistic bacterial pathogen Serratia marcescens to its natural protist predator Tetrahymena thermophila for 13 weeks, after which we measured changes in bacterial traits related to both anti-predator defence and virulence. We found that anti-predator adaptation (producing predator-resistant biofilm caused a correlative attenuation in virulence. Even though the direct mechanism was not found, reduction in virulence was most clearly connected to a predator-driven loss of a red bacterial pigment, prodigiosin. Moreover, life-history trait evolution was more divergent among replicate populations in the absence of predation, leading also to lowered virulence in some of the 'predator absent' selection lines. Together these findings suggest that the virulence of non-obligatory, opportunistic bacterial pathogens can decrease in environmental reservoirs through life history trade-offs, or random accumulation of mutations that impair virulence traits under relaxed selection.

  5. Behavioral and life history responses to extreme climatic conditions: Studies on a migratory songbird

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Møller

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral responses to environmental change are the mechanisms that allow for rapid phenotypic change preventing temporary or permanent damage and hence preventing reductions in fitness. Extreme climatic events are by definition rare, although they are predicted to increase in amplitude and frequency in the coming years. However, our current knowledge about behavioral responses to such extreme events is scarce. Here I analyze two examples of the effects of extreme weather events on behavior and life history: (1 A comparison of behavior and life history during extremely warm and extremely cold years relative to normal years; and (2 a comparison of behavior before and after the extremely early snowfall in fall 1974 when numerous birds died in the Alps during September-October. Behavioral and life history responses of barn swallows Hirundo rustica to extremely cold and extremely warm years were positively correlated, with particularly large effect sizes in cold years. Extreme mortality in barn swallows during fall migration 1974 in the Alps eliminated more than 40% of the breeding population across large areas in Central and Northern Europe, and this affected first arrival date, changes in timing and extent of reproduction and changes in degree of breeding sociality supposedly as a consequence of correlated responses to selection. Finally, I provide directions for research that will allow us to better understand behavior and life history changes in response to extreme climate change [Current Zoology 57 (3: 351–362, 2011].

  6. Wood mechanics, allometry, and life-history variation in a tropical rain forest tree community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelder, van H.A.; Poorter, L.; Sterck, F.J.

    2006-01-01

    ¿ Wood density plays a central role in the life-history variation of trees, and has important consequences for mechanical properties of wood, stem and branches, and tree architecture. ¿ Wood density, modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity, and safety factors for buckling and bending were

  7. Life history flexibility allows Sargassum polyceratium to persist in different environments subjected to stochastic disturbance events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, AH; Breeman, AM; Olsen, JL; Stam, WT; Aberg, P

    2005-01-01

    Stochastic, stage-based matrix models were used to investigate the life history strategy of the seaweed Sargassum polyceratium in shallow intertidal and deep-water (18 m) populations. Matrix models were parameterized with 3 years of yearly transitions among four plant stages quantified from three

  8. Egg size effects across multiple life-history stages in the marine annelid Hydroides diramphus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M Allen

    Full Text Available The optimal balance of reproductive effort between offspring size and number depends on the fitness of offspring size in a particular environment. The variable environments offspring experience, both among and within life-history stages, are likely to alter the offspring size/fitness relationship and favor different offspring sizes. Hence, the many environments experienced throughout complex life-histories present mothers with a significant challenge to optimally allocate their reproductive effort. In a marine annelid, we tested the relationship between egg size and performance across multiple life-history stages, including: fertilization, larval development, and post-metamorphosis survival and size in the field. We found evidence of conflicting effects of egg size on performance: larger eggs had higher fertilization under sperm-limited conditions, were slightly faster to develop pre-feeding, and were larger post-metamorphosis; however, smaller eggs had higher fertilization when sperm was abundant, and faster planktonic development; and egg size did not affect post-metamorphic survival. The results indicate that egg size effects are conflicting in H. diramphus depending on the environments within and among life-history stages. We suggest that offspring size in this species may be a compromise between the overall costs and benefits of egg sizes in each stage and that performance in any one stage is not maximized.

  9. Life-history traits of the northwest European flora : The LEDA database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knevel, IC; Bekker, RM; Bakker, JP; Kleyer, M

    An international group of scientists is building a 'trait base', an open internet database of life-history traits of the Northwest European flora (LEDA) that can be used as a tool in planning, in nature conservation and restoration, and in other applied research. The species-trait matrix will

  10. Stories of Learning across the Lifespan: Life History and Biographical Research in Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouthro, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Life history or biographical approaches to research in lifelong learning may be particularly useful for researchers working from a social purpose and/or feminist perspective. Adult educators working from an emancipatory framework are often curious about factors that shape people's lives, both from an individualistic, biographical perspective and…

  11. Reevaluating geographic variation in life-history traits of a widespread Nearctic amphibian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Jon M.; Hossack, Blake R.

    2016-01-01

    Animals from cold environments are usually larger than animals from warm environments, which often produce clines in body size. Because variation in body size can lead to trade-offs between growth and reproduction, life-history traits should also vary across climatic gradients. To determine if life-history traits of wood frogs Rana sylvatica vary with climate, we examined female and male body length, clutch size, and ovum size from 37 locations across an unprecedented 32° of latitude. In conflict with recent research, body size, and ovum size decreased in cold climates and at higher latitudes. Clutch size did not vary with climate or latitude, but reproductive effort (clutch size:female size) did, suggesting selection for a life-history traits that favors maximizing propagule number over propagule size in cold climates. With accelerating climate change that will expose populations to novel environmental conditions, it is important to identify the limits of adaptation, which can be informed by greater understanding of variation in life-history traits.

  12. Living under stressful conditions: Fish life history strategies across environmental gradients in estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, Nils; Pasquaud, Stéphanie; Borja, Angel; Chust, Guillem; Uriarte, Ainhize; Lepage, Mario

    2017-03-01

    The life history strategies of fishes can be defined by specific combinations of demographic traits that influence species performances depending on environmental features. Hence, the constraints imposed by the local conditions restrict the range of successful strategies by excluding species poorly adapted. In the present study, we compared the demographic strategies of fish caught in 47 estuaries of the North East Atlantic coast, aiming to determine the specific attributes of resident species and test for changes in trait associations along the environmental gradients. Eight demographic traits were considered to project our findings within a conceptual triangular model, composed on three endpoint strategies: (i) periodic (large size, long generation time, high fecundity); (ii) opportunistic (small size, short generation time, high reproductive effort); and (iii) equilibrium (low fecundity, large egg size, parental care). We demonstrated that various life history strategies co-exist in estuaries, but equilibrium species were scarce and restricted to euhaline open-water. Resident species form a specialised assemblage adapted to high spatiotemporal variability of estuarine conditions, i.e. opportunistic attributes associated with parental care. Even with these singular attributes, our findings revealed changes in distribution of resident species across the estuarine gradients linked to their life history traits. Among other patterns, the diversity of life history strategies significantly decreased from euhaline to oligohaline areas and along gradient of human disturbances. These trends were associated with a convergence of species traits toward short generation times, suggesting that long-lived species with late maturation are more severely impacted by disturbance and environmental stress.

  13. The Power of Life Histories: Moving Readers to Greater Acts of Empathy through Literature and Memoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Valarie G.; Madden, Marjorie E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues that narratives, specifically literature and memoir, offer a way to build empathy and understanding by moving readers to deeper levels of text interpretation and critique. The paper examines a new literacy framework, Life Histories, that uses talk, collaboration, writing, and performance to understand the complex relationships…

  14. A mechanism that maintains alternative life histories in a loggerhead sea turtle population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatase, Hideo; Omuta, Kazuyoshi; Tsukamoto, Katsumi

    2013-11-01

    Intrapopulation variation in habitat use is commonly seen among mobile animals, yet the mechanisms maintaining it have rarely been researched among untrackable species. To investigate how alternative life histories are maintained in a population of the loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta), cumulative reproductive output was evaluated and compared between small planktivores inhabiting oceanic areas (with water depths > 200 m) and large benthivores inhabiting neritic areas (depths life history parameters (clutch size, clutch frequency, breeding frequency, and remigration intervals), with the exception of emergence success. We did not find evidence of life history trade-offs, nor age-related changes in fecundity. Over the 26-year study period, we calculated a 2.4-fold greater reproductive output for neritic foragers than for oceanic ones, accounting for breeding and clutch frequency. Temporal consistencies in stable isotope ratios and remigration intervals within females suggested that female Japanese loggerheads show fidelity to respective foraging habitats throughout the adult stage. The large difference in productivity between the two groups was unlikely to be offset by the difference in survival during the period from aboveground emergence to first reproduction, suggesting that oceanic foragers have a lower level of fitness than neritic ones. Together with an absence of genetic structure between foraging groups, we infer that alternative life histories in a loggerhead turtle population are maintained by a conditional strategy.

  15. Response of endemic Clarias species' life-history biometrics to land ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Mpologoma River wetland is highly negatively impacted by rice growing and yet it provides habitat to endemic Clarias species that are important to the wetland fishery. Variations in life-history biometrics of small Clarias species at various wetland sites in relation to land-use changes within the wetland were studied in ...

  16. Life-history consequences for Daphnia pulex exposed to pharmaceutical carbamazepine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lürling, M.F.L.L.W.; Sargant, E.M.; Roessink, I.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the antiepileptic, analgesic drug carbamazepine on the growth, morphology, and life-history characteristics of Daphnia pulex were examined at nominal concentrations of 0, 0.1, 1, 10, 100, and 200 mu g L-1. At 1 mu g carbamazepine L-1, Daphnia matured and reproduced slightly earlier

  17. Enriching the Historiography of Religious Education: Insights from Oral Life History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doney, Jonathan; Parker, Stephen G.; Freathy, Rob

    2017-01-01

    This article seeks to exemplify the extent to which oral life history research can enrich existing historiographies of English Religious Education (RE). Findings are reported from interviews undertaken with a sample of key informants involved in designing and/or implementing significant curriculum changes in RE in the 1960s and 1970s. The…

  18. Contrasting life history strategies in a phylogenetically diverse community of freshwater amphipods (Crustacea: Malacostraca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copilaş-Ciocianu, Denis; Boroş, Bianca V

    2016-02-01

    Differences in life histories are commonly exhibited within ecological communities, especially among species that display increased variations in body size and morphology and are phylogenetically distant. To examine the relationship between morphological dissimilarity and life history divergence, we investigated three morphologically distinct and distantly related species of freshwater amphipods that co-occur throughout the Danube lowlands - Gammarus balcanicus dacicus, Niphargus valachicus and Synurella ambulans - by collecting monthly samples during a one-year period. Results revealed that the studied species differ significantly with respect to fecundity, size at maturity, number of generations per year, duration and timing of the reproductive period and egg volume. Despite some overlap, each species possesses a unique combination of traits, supporting the hypothesis that life history variation within freshwater amphipod communities can reflect dissimilarities regarding body size, morphology and evolutionary relationships. However, it is not yet clear which of these factors has the most significant contribution to life history divergence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Masked expression of life-history traits in a highly variable environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoer, Jason A.; Fontaine, Joseph J.; Chizinski, Christopher J.; Pope, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Differing life-history strategies may act as a constraint on reproductive expression that ultimately limits the ability of individual species to respond to changes in the magnitude or frequency of environmental variation, and potentially underlies the variation often inherent in phenotypic and evolved responses to anthropogenic change. Alternatively, if there are environmental cues that predict reproductive potential, differential expression of life-history strategies may represent differences in the adaptive capacity to optimize current reproductive value given variation in environmental conditions. We compared several aspects of walleye Sander vitreus spawning ecology at two reservoirs that differ in environmental variability (i.e., annual water-level fluctuation) to identify the capacity of phenotypic expression and the corresponding association with age. Despite significant differences in female body and liver masses between reservoirs that differ in environmental variability, we found no difference in reproductive investment measured by egg size and fecundity. Walleye in a highly variable environment appear to exhibit reproductive traits more typical of a short-lived life-history strategy, which may be resultant from the interaction of environmental and anthropogenic pressures. This finding emphasizes the need to identify the degree to which life-history expression represents physiological constraints versus ecological optimization, particularly as anthropogenic change continues to alter environmental conditions. 

  20. A sensitive mass spectrometry platform identifies metabolic changes of life history traits in C-elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Arwen W.; Chatzispyrou, Iliana A.; Kamble, Rashmi; Liu, Yasmine J.; Herzog, Katharina; Smith, Reuben L.; van Lenthe, Henk; Vervaart, Martin A. T.; van Cruchten, Arno; Luyf, Angela C.; van Kampen, Antoine; Pras-Raves, Mia L.; Vaz, Frédéric M.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal nutrient metabolism is a hallmark of aging, and the underlying genetic and nutritional framework is rapidly being uncovered, particularly using C. elegans as a model. However, the direct metabolic consequences of perturbations in life history of C. elegans remain to be clarified. Based on

  1. Life History and Biology of Ips latidens (LeConte) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)\\t

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.R. Miller; J.H. Borden

    1985-01-01

    The life history and biology of Ips latidens (LeConte) were investigated using bark-sandwich and whole-log rearing methods. In contrast with other Ips spp., some females initiated galleries under conditions of female-biased sex ratios, and sometimes 2 or more males were present in a gallery. In general, however, I....

  2. Effects of food quality on life history of the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus Pallas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, T.C.; Verschoor, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    1. Herbivorous zooplankton face considerable temporal and spatial variation in food quality, to which they respond by adapting their life histories. Zooplankton may even take up mineral nutrients directly, and use these to counter the effects of algal nutrient limitation (mineral compensation). This

  3. A Latino Superintendent's Life History: A Re-Examination through Brown Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Alma Yvette

    2017-01-01

    Research indicates Latino males are under-represented in the educational pipeline and administrative ranks of public education. Further studies attribute the Latino culture as contributing to the obstacles encountered in Latino advancement. This qualitative study was a life history of a first generation U.S. born Latino raised in a Texas-Mexico…

  4. Early life history of pomatomus saltatrix off the East coast of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Beckley, LE

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Several authors have stated that southward transport of the early life-history stages of Pomatomus saltatrix also known as the elf or shad occurs by passive drift in the Agulhas Current, a strong western boundary current which flows southwards...

  5. The "Battlefield": Life Histories of Two Higher Education Staff Members of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Mary Louise; Ocasio, Kelly; Lachuk, Amy Johnson; Powell, Shameka N.

    2015-01-01

    Deploying Russian philosopher M. M. Bakhtin's notions of utterances or communicative interactions, we explore the life histories of two administrators at State University, a predominantly White institution of higher education in the Midwestern United States. In particular, we explore how working with White students, peers, and supervisors demands…

  6. Life history comparison of two green lacewing species Chrysoperla johnsoni and Chrysoperla carnea (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekare, Kaushalya G; Shearer, Peter W

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the life histories of two green lacewing species, Chrysoperla johnsoni Henry, Wells, and Pupedis from western North America, and Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) from western Europe in the laboratory. There were both similarities and differences in their life history characteristics. C. johnsoni exhibited a significantly longer developmental time for egg, first instar, and pupal stage than C. carnea. C. carnea exhibited a significantly shorter egg to adult developmental time than C. johnsoni. Except for the pupal stage, the survival of all other life history stages was not species-specific. All C. carnea pupae were able to develop into adults, whereas only 92% of adult eclosion was observed from C. johnsoni pupae. There was no difference in egg to adult survival between the two species. Adult longevity was not species- or gender-specific. Sex ratio of emerged adults was ≈50% in both species. C. johnsoni had a longer preoviposition period than C. carnea, while the oviposition period was similar for both species. C. carnea had higher lifetime fecundity and fertility than C. johnsoni, as measured by total number of eggs laid and production of fertile eggs, respectively. Egg viability did not differ between the two species. Intrinsic rates of increase (rm) for C. carnea and C. johnsoni were 0.161 and 0.132, respectively. All lacewings used in this experiment were laboratory reared under environmental conditions similar to field as possible. This is the first available information on the life history parameters of C. johnsoni.

  7. Fast-slow continuum and reproductive strategies structure plant life-history variation worldwide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Jones, Owen R; Jongejans, Eelke

    2016-01-01

    independence of the fast-slow and reproduction strategy axes is general in the plant kingdom. Our findings have similarities with how life-history strategies are structured in mammals, birds, and reptiles. The position of plant species populations in the 2D space produced by both axes predicts their rate...

  8. Size-Mediated Tradeoffs in Life-History Traits in Dusky Salamanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard C. Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Among salamanders of the genus Desmognathus, the larger species tend to be more aquatic and the smaller more terrestrial. I studied life histories in assemblages of Desmognathus in the southern Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina at sites in the Cowee and southern Nantahala Mountains. Traits evaluated included mortality/survival...

  9. Root colonization dynamics of two ectomycorrhizal fungi of contrasting life history strategies are mediated by

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erik A. Lilleskov; Thomas D. Bruns

    2003-01-01

    -Here we investigated whether root colonization dynamics of ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) of contrasting life history strategies (i.e. early vs late successional dominants) were affected by resource availability, as mediated either directly via the soil, or indirectly via host nutrition. -In a two phase experiment, Pinusm muricata seedlings were co-...

  10. Geographic, genetic and life-history variability in a sex-changing fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Benvenuto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sequential hermaphroditism, commonly referred to as sex change or sex reversal, is a striking phenomenon in mating-system evolution and the most remarkable example of sexual plasticity. Among vertebrates, it is specific to teleosts. Some fish species reproduce initially as females and then change into males (protogynous hermaphrodites or vice versa (protandrous hermaphrodites. The white sea bream, Diplodus sargus, exhibits a high degree of sexual plasticity: populations have been reported to be gonochoristic, protandrous or digynic (with primary females, derived from intersexual juveniles, and secondary females, derived from males. We analysed populations collected from eight different locations across the species distribution range (between the Mediterranean and the North-Eastern Atlantic. These populations are characterized by different degrees of connectivity, spatial demographics and life histories. Using individual-based analyses, we linked the genetic structure of each specimen with environmental heterogeneity, life-history traits and reproductive modes. Our aim is to gather a better understanding of the variation in reproductive life-history strategies in this sexually plastic species. Diplodus sargus is a valuable candidate organism to investigate sequential hermaphroditism and it also has a commercial value. The application of population genetics tools against the background of life-history theory can bring valuable insights for the management of marine resources. The geographical patterns of sex change (and of age- and size-at-sex change linked with population genetics can be pivotal for both theoretical investigations and conservation and management plans in marine areas.

  11. Unrestricted migration favours virulent pathogens in experimental metapopulations: evolutionary genetics of a rapacious life history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshelman, Christal M.; Vouk, Roxanne; Stewart, Jodi L.; Halsne, Elizabeth; Lindsey, Haley A.; Schneider, Stacy; Gualu, Miliyard; Dean, Antony M.; Kerr, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Understanding pathogen infectivity and virulence requires combining insights from epidemiology, ecology, evolution and genetics. Although theoretical work in these fields has identified population structure as important for pathogen life-history evolution, experimental tests are scarce. Here, we explore the impact of population structure on life-history evolution in phage T4, a viral pathogen of Escherichia coli. The host–pathogen system is propagated as a metapopulation in which migration between subpopulations is either spatially restricted or unrestricted. Restricted migration favours pathogens with low infectivity and low virulence. Unrestricted migration favours pathogens that enter and exit their hosts quickly, although they are less productive owing to rapid extirpation of the host population. The rise of such ‘rapacious’ phage produces a ‘tragedy of the commons’, in which better competitors lower productivity. We have now identified a genetic basis for a rapacious life history. Mutations at a single locus (rI) cause increased virulence and are sufficient to account for a negative relationship between phage competitive ability and productivity. A higher frequency of rI mutants under unrestricted migration signifies the evolution of rapaciousness in this treatment. Conversely, spatially restricted migration favours a more ‘prudent’ pathogen strategy, in which the tragedy of the commons is averted. As our results illustrate, profound epidemiological and ecological consequences of life-history evolution in a pathogen can have a simple genetic cause. PMID:20643740

  12. Population dynamics, life-history traits of and habitat use by two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population dynamics and life-history traits of two sympatric nothobranchiid killifishes, Epiplatys bifasciatus and E. spilargyreius, were studied for 24 months in an intermittent stream in the Kainji Lake Basin, Nigeria. Epiplatys bifasciatus was more abundant throughout the study period, but monthly abundance of both species ...

  13. Using life-history traits to explain bird population responses to changing weather variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cormont, A.; Vos, C.C.; Turnhout, van C.A.M.; Foppen, R.P.B.; Braak, ter C.J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Bird population dynamics are expected to change in response to increased weather variability, an expression of climate change. The extent to which species are sensitive to effects of weather on survival and reproduction depends on their life-history traits. We investigated how breeding bird species

  14. The evolution of alternative parasitic life histories in large blue butterflies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als, Thomas Damm; Vila, Roger; Kandul, Nikolai P

    2004-01-01

    Large blue (Maculinea) butterflies are highly endangered throughout the Palaearctic region, and have been the focus of intense conservation research. In addition, their extraordinary parasitic lifestyles make them ideal for studies of life history evolution. Early instars consume flower buds of s...

  15. Life history factors, personality and the social clustering of sexual experience in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Abram J; Mace, Ruth

    2016-10-01

    Adolescent sexual behaviour may show clustering in neighbourhoods, schools and friendship networks. This study aims to assess how experience with sexual intercourse clusters across the social world of adolescents and whether predictors implicated by life history theory or personality traits can account for its between-individual variation and social patterning. Using data on 2877 adolescents from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, we ran logistic multiple classification models to assess the clustering of sexual experience by approximately 17.5 years in schools, neighbourhoods and friendship networks. We examined how much clustering at particular levels could be accounted for by life history predictors and Big Five personality factors. Sexual experience exhibited substantial clustering in friendship networks, while clustering at the level of schools and neighbourhoods was minimal, suggesting a limited role for socio-ecological influences at those levels. While life history predictors did account for some variation in sexual experience, they did not explain clustering in friendship networks. Personality, especially extraversion, explained about a quarter of friends' similarity. After accounting for life history factors and personality, substantial unexplained similarity among friends remained, which may reflect a tendency to associate with similar individuals or the social transmission of behavioural norms.

  16. Herbivore-mediated ecological costs of reproduction shape the life history of an iteroparous plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tom E X; Tenhumberg, Brigitte; Louda, Svata M

    2008-02-01

    Plant reproduction yields immediate fitness benefits but can be costly in terms of survival, growth, and future fecundity. Life-history theory posits that reproductive strategies are shaped by trade-offs between current and future fitness that result from these direct costs of reproduction. Plant reproduction may also incur indirect ecological costs if it increases susceptibility to herbivores. Yet ecological costs of reproduction have received little empirical attention and remain poorly integrated into life-history theory. Here, we provide evidence for herbivore-mediated ecological costs of reproduction, and we develop theory to examine how these costs influence plant life-history strategies. Field experiments with an iteroparous cactus (Opuntia imbricata) indicated that greater reproductive effort (proportion of meristems allocated to reproduction) led to greater attack by a cactus-feeding insect (Narnia pallidicornis) and that damage by this herbivore reduced reproductive success. A dynamic programming model predicted strongly divergent optimal reproductive strategies when ecological costs were included, compared with when these costs were ignored. Meristem allocation by cacti in the field matched the optimal strategy expected under ecological costs of reproduction. The results indicate that plant reproductive allocation can strongly influence the intensity of interactions with herbivores and that associated ecological costs can play an important selective role in the evolution of plant life histories.

  17. Life history and ecology of the southern redback salamander, Plethodon serratus, in Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura A. Herbeck

    2000-01-01

    The life history and ecology of Plethodon serratus were studied in two populations in southcentral and southeastern Missouri, USA. One population was located on private land in Perry County and the other was located in Mark Twain National Forest in Phelps County. Courtship and insemination probably occurred between December and March. Oviposition...

  18. Social environment affects the life history tactic of a phoretic mite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehring, Volker; Müller, Josef K

    2009-01-01

    Phoretic animals use their hosts for travelling to habitat patches suitable for reproduction. Some species, such as the mite Poecilochirus carabi, are phoretic as juveniles and cannot leave their habitat once they reach adulthood. Previous work has shown that mites exercise choice over the habitat...... influence of the social environment on a phoretic's habitat choice and life history....

  19. Walking a Fine Balance: The Life History of a Woman Principal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Hope-Arlene

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the leadership journey of Kathryn, an educational leader, in relation to current research on women's experiences as educational leaders. This life history was developed as a grounded theory (Glaser & Strauss, 1967) study. Conducted over a two-year period, the semi-structured interviews used to conduct the study were…

  20. Life history, population viability, and the potential for local adaptation in isolated trout populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. J. Carim; Y. Vindenes; L. A. Eby; C. Barfoot; L. A. Vollestad

    2017-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation have caused population decline across taxa through impacts on life history diversity, dispersal patterns, and gene flow. Yet, intentional isolation of native fish populations is a frequently used management strategy to protect against negative interactions with invasive fish species. We evaluated the population viability and genetic...

  1. Intersections of life histories and science identities : the stories of three preservice elementary teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avraamidou, Lucy

    Grounded within Connelly and Clandinin's conceptualization of teachers' professional identity in terms of stories to live by' and through a life-history lens, this multiple case study aimed to respond to the following questions: (a) How do three preservice elementary teachers view themselves as

  2. Differential host utilisation by different life history stages of the fish ectoparasite Argulus foliaceus (Crustacea: Branchiura).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Peter D; Harris, Jack E; van der Velde, Gerard; Bonga, Sjoerd E Wendelaar

    2008-06-01

    In this study we examine differences in the occurrence of life history stages of the destructive fish ectoparasite Argulus foliaceus (L., 1758) on eight fish species (stickleback, rudd, roach, gudgeon, bream, tench, crucian carp and common carp) sampled from a mixed-species recreational fishing lake on nine occasions during late spring and summer. Total numbers ofA. foliaceus, as well as the number of larval, juvenile and adult parasite stages, from each fish were recorded along with the fish species. Lice generally exhibited an aggregated distribution approximating a negative binomial distribution. Significant differences in the prevalence, intensity and intensity frequency distribution were observed between life history stages and between host species. In general, all life history stages of A. foliaceus exhibited an over-dispersed distribution. However, larval lice did show some degree of aggregation particularly within the stickleback samples. Infection data for parasite larval stages suggested that sticklebacks are more likely to be infected than other host species. For adult lice, however, carp appeared to be the main host. We propose that A. foliaceus infection characteristics are predominantly determined by the level of host exposure to the parasite and its life history stages (larval, juvenile and adult) rather than by an innate difference in host susceptibility related to individual host factors such as immune responses. We conclude that host exposure is determined by the parasite-host behavioural interplay related to species-specific ecology and behavioural traits such as microhabitat preference and normal swimming speed.

  3. Psychometrics and life history strategy: the structure and validity of the High K Strategy Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copping, Lee T; Campbell, Anne; Muncer, Steven

    2014-03-22

    In this paper, we critically review the conceptualization and implementation of psychological measures of life history strategy associated with Differential K theory. The High K Strategy Scale (HKSS: Giosan, 2006) was distributed to a large British sample (n = 809) with the aim of assessing its factor structure and construct validity in relation to theoretically relevant life history variables: age of puberty, age of first sexual encounter, and number of sexual partners. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses indicated that the HKSS in its current form did not show an adequate statistical fit to the data. Modifications to improve fit indicated four correlated factors (personal capital, environmental stability, environmental security, and social capital). Later puberty in women was positively associated with measures of the environment and personal capital. Among men, contrary to Differential K predictions but in line with female mate preferences, earlier sexual debut and more sexual partners were positively associated with more favorable environments and higher personal and social capital. We raise concerns about the use of psychometric indicators of lifestyle and personality as proxies for life history strategy when they have not been validated against objective measures derived from contemporary life history theory and when their status as causes, mediators, or correlates has not been investigated.

  4. Facultative anadromy in salmonids: linking habitat, individual life history decisions, and population-level consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven F. Railsback; Bret C. Harvey; Jason L. White

    2014-01-01

    Modeling and management of facultative anadromous salmonids is complicated by their ability to select anadromous or resident life histories. Conventional theory for this behavior assumes individuals select the strategy offering highest expected reproductive success but does not predict how population-level consequences such as a stream’s smolt production emerge from...

  5. A life-history approach to the early ontogeny of the Mozambique tilapia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-07-16

    Jul 16, 1991 ... A life-history approach to the early ontogeny of the Mozambique tilapia. Oreochromis mossambicus (Pisces, Cichlidae) ... As the Mozambique tilapia, O. mossambicus (peters. 1852) (Pisces, Cichlidae), is easily bred in ...... present in the brain below the skin surface. Gill filaments were present on the first four ...

  6. Life-history traits of the bluenose shiner, Pteronotropis welaka (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol E. Johnston; Charles L. Knight

    1999-01-01

    Life-history aspects and behavioral ecology of the bluenose shiner (Pteronotropis welaka) were investigated from May 1993 to June 1994 in a small tributary of the lower Pearl River in Marion County, MS. Samples were taken monthly or biweekly to provide information about preferred habitat, reproductive biology, and demography. Observations were made during the breeding...

  7. Life-history regulation in the subtidal red alga Calliblepharis ciliata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, FJ; Venekamp, LAH; Breeman, AM

    The life-history strategy of the subtidal red alga Calliblepharis ciliata has been studied in the field and in laboratory culture. Bi-monthly observations on a C. ciliata population at Roscoff (Brittany, France) revealed a clear seasonal pattern. In April young plants appeared and grew through the

  8. Psychometrics and Life History Strategy: The Structure and Validity of the High K Strategy Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee T. Copping

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we critically review the conceptualization and implementation of psychological measures of life history strategy associated with Differential K theory. The High K Strategy Scale (HKSS: Giosan, 2006 was distributed to a large British sample (n = 809 with the aim of assessing its factor structure and construct validity in relation to theoretically relevant life history variables: age of puberty, age of first sexual encounter, and number of sexual partners. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses indicated that the HKSS in its current form did not show an adequate statistical fit to the data. Modifications to improve fit indicated four correlated factors (personal capital, environmental stability, environmental security, and social capital. Later puberty in women was positively associated with measures of the environment and personal capital. Among men, contrary to Differential K predictions but in line with female mate preferences, earlier sexual debut and more sexual partners were positively associated with more favorable environments and higher personal and social capital. We raise concerns about the use of psychometric indicators of lifestyle and personality as proxies for life history strategy when they have not been validated against objective measures derived from contemporary life history theory and when their status as causes, mediators, or correlates has not been investigated.

  9. From traits to life-history strategies: Deconstructing fish community composition across European seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécuchet, Lauréne; Lindegren, Martin; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The life history of a species is determined by trade-offs between growth, survival and reproduction to maximize fitness in a given environment. Following a theoretical model, we investigate whether the composition of marine fish communities can be understood in terms of a set of lifehistory...

  10. Quality of Life and Behavioral Functioning in Dutch Children with a History of Kawasaki Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tacke, Carline E.; Haverman, Lotte; Berk, Birgit M.; van Rossum, Marion A.; Kuipers, Irene M.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The authors evaluated health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and behavioral functioning in patients with a history of Kawasaki disease (KD). Study design A cross-sectional study was conducted at a tertiary referral center for KD follow-up in 280 patients (mean age 8.6 years, 60.0% male).

  11. The use of the life course paradigm and life course charts to explore referral for family history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Caroline; Flynn, Maria; Hallett, Christine; Ellis, Ian; Booth, Katie

    2008-01-01

    Life course research methodologies are used extensively in historical and social science research. In 1998 the life course paradigm was introduced to provide a way of tracing the interplay of person and setting. The method has had a very limited use in nursing research, but in this study it was utilized as a way of capturing dynamic change by placing the individual within a context of four domains; location in time and place, linked lives, human agency and timing of lives. To describe the paradigm, review its use in healthcare research and provide a specific example of its use in healthcare. This paper discusses a novel method of creating life course charts for a qualitative study exploring the differing experiences of women referred from primary care to specialist services due to a family history of breast cancer. A nurse-led breast cancer family history clinic in the UK. Twenty-two women. Life charts were used in conjunction with a grounded theory approach to analyse data collected from semi-structured interviews. Twenty-two life charts were created and the ability to layer the charts of multiple women to visualise similarities and differences aided the analysis. The life charts were a useful tool in the development of theoretical understandings and the psychosocial process of realisation of risk emerged as central to the initiation of referral. This was often apparent when approaching the age of an affected relative (anticipated onset) or when current circumstances emulate past experience (generational transference). This approach to charting complex psychological, social and contextual factors throughout the life course was methodologically beneficial and could have a wider utility in nursing and healthcare research. As a research tool it enhanced a holistic approach to patient care issues and was helpful as an aid to understanding health behaviours linked to familial risk.

  12. Characterizing the early life history of an imperiled freshwater mussel (Ptychobranchus jonesi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcleod, John; Jelks, Howard; Pursifull, Sandra; Johnson, Nathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Conservation of imperiled species is frequently challenged by insufficient knowledge of life history and the environmental factors that affect various life stages. The larvae (glochidia) of most freshwater mussels in the family Unionidae are obligate ectoparasites of fishes. We describe the early life history of the federally endangered Southern Kidneyshell, Ptychobranchus jonesi, and compare methods for estimating fecundity and conducting host trials on conglutinate-producing mussel species. Both the glochidial inoculation baths and direct feeding of conglutinates to Percina nigrofasciata, Etheostoma edwini, and Etheostoma fusiforme resulted in successful metamorphosis to the juvenile life stage. Ptychobranchus jonesi glochidia did not metamorphose on the 25 other species of fishes tested representing 11 families. Three juveniles were recovered from Gambusia holbrooki resulting in a metamorphosis rate 90% for at least 5 days. Directly feeding conglutinates to fishes allowed us to estimate natural infestation rates and calculate average numbers of juveniles produced per conglutinate, unlike the traditional approach of infesting fish hosts using an inoculation bath. Each method for measuring fecundity produced similar estimates but the regression, which estimated fecundity based on the physical dimensions of each conglutinate or conglutinate segment, was most practical. The distribution information, coupled with early life history description and methods developed for determining fecundity and conducting host trials, may assist in the conservation of P. jonesi, specifically during recovery options that include captive propagation, augmentation, and reestablishment.

  13. Life history variation in Cirsium palustre and its consequences for the population demography in vegetation succesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Falińska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to describe the life-history pattern of the biennial species Cirsium palustre. It has been demonstrated that under optimum conditions in the greenhouse individuals live 1.5 to 2 years, in a mown meadow 2 to 3 years, and during the plant succession in abandoned meadows they prolong their life to several years. This is accompanied by a gradual decrease of C. palustre population size. A relationship between the life-history pattern differences during a plant succession and the population abundance dynamics has been found. Reproductive-phase age is correlated with the rosette size. In spite of the occurrence of many limiting factors during a succession (closed plant cover, shading by macroforbs, willows C. palustre survives until the formation of forest communities. Its persistence is favoured by: protracted life history, attainment the reproductive phase at different ages (not only in the second year, formation of a permanent seed bank, air-borne seeds and the emergence and survival of seedlings under the canopy of several-year old rosettes during a strong competition. The arresting of juvenile individuals under the rosettes for several years has been termed the "rosette mechanism". Cirsium palustre can be included among facultative biennials. In every conditions a proportion of individuals in a population attain the flowering phase in life year 2. During a succession the proportions of "triennial" and "quadriennial" forms, and at the terminal stage - of perennial monocarpic forms increase.

  14. Life-history correlations with seasonal cold hardiness in maritime pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Eva; Climent, José; Alía, Ricardo; Díaz, Raquel

    2016-12-01

    Plants have developed mechanisms to withstand stressful environmental conditions, but the high energetic cost of these mechanisms may involve exchanges with other key functions. While trade-offs between cold hardiness and growth rates are a general assumption, we lack information regarding genetically based trade-offs between cold hardiness and other life-history traits. Such information has strong implications for tree conservation and breeding, especially in the context of ongoing climate change. We used a common garden progeny test to examine the relationships between seasonal cold hardiness and life-history traits of growth, reproduction, juvenile ontogeny, and phenology in 75 families of six maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.) populations, three of continental and three of coastal origins. We found a clear differentiation among populations with regard to cold hardiness and life-history traits. Two continental Iberian populations showed high cold tolerance and slower growth, but faster ontogenetic development in relation to both vegetative heteroblastic change in juveniles and the onset of female reproduction. The coastal populations displayed the opposite behavior, while the continental Moroccan population presented a unique combination of traits. We confirmed trade-offs between cold-hardiness and growth at the population level, but not within populations. There were no trade-offs with other life-history traits at either level. Relevant local adaptation syndromes were identified in the relationship between cold hardiness and life-history traits. These should be considered in developing tree management guidelines aimed at increasing productivity or adaptability under the expected conditions of climate change. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  15. Diagnosing the dangerous demography of manta rays using life history theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulvy, Nicholas K; Pardo, Sebastián A; Simpfendorfer, Colin A; Carlson, John K

    2014-01-01

    Background. The directed harvest and global trade in the gill plates of mantas, and devil rays, has led to increased fishing pressure and steep population declines in some locations. The slow life history, particularly of the manta rays, is cited as a key reason why such species have little capacity to withstand directed fisheries. Here, we place their life history and demography within the context of other sharks and rays. Methods. Despite the limited availability of data, we use life history theory and comparative analysis to estimate the intrinsic risk of extinction (as indexed by the maximum intrinsic rate of population increase r max) for a typical generic manta ray using a variant of the classic Euler-Lotka demographic model. This model requires only three traits to calculate the maximum intrinsic population growth rate r max: von Bertalanffy growth rate, annual pup production and age at maturity. To account for the uncertainty in life history parameters, we created plausible parameter ranges and propagate these uncertainties through the model to calculate a distribution of the plausible range of r max values. Results. The maximum population growth rate r max of manta ray is most sensitive to the length of the reproductive cycle, and the median r max of 0.116 year(-1) 95th percentile [0.089-0.139] is one of the lowest known of the 106 sharks and rays for which we have comparable demographic information. Discussion. In common with other unprotected, unmanaged, high-value large-bodied sharks and rays the combination of very low population growth rates of manta rays, combined with the high value of their gill rakers and the international nature of trade, is highly likely to lead to rapid depletion and potential local extinction unless a rapid conservation management response occurs worldwide. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to derive important insights into the demography extinction risk of data-poor species using well-established life history theory.

  16. Diagnosing the dangerous demography of manta rays using life history theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas K. Dulvy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. The directed harvest and global trade in the gill plates of mantas, and devil rays, has led to increased fishing pressure and steep population declines in some locations. The slow life history, particularly of the manta rays, is cited as a key reason why such species have little capacity to withstand directed fisheries. Here, we place their life history and demography within the context of other sharks and rays.Methods. Despite the limited availability of data, we use life history theory and comparative analysis to estimate the intrinsic risk of extinction (as indexed by the maximum intrinsic rate of population increase rmax for a typical generic manta ray using a variant of the classic Euler–Lotka demographic model. This model requires only three traits to calculate the maximum intrinsic population growth rate rmax: von Bertalanffy growth rate, annual pup production and age at maturity. To account for the uncertainty in life history parameters, we created plausible parameter ranges and propagate these uncertainties through the model to calculate a distribution of the plausible range of rmax values.Results. The maximum population growth rate rmax of manta ray is most sensitive to the length of the reproductive cycle, and the median rmax of 0.116 year−1 95th percentile [0.089–0.139] is one of the lowest known of the 106 sharks and rays for which we have comparable demographic information.Discussion. In common with other unprotected, unmanaged, high-value large-bodied sharks and rays the combination of very low population growth rates of manta rays, combined with the high value of their gill rakers and the international nature of trade, is highly likely to lead to rapid depletion and potential local extinction unless a rapid conservation management response occurs worldwide. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to derive important insights into the demography extinction risk of data-poor species using well-established life

  17. The Mass-Longevity Triangle: Pareto Optimality and the Geometry of Life-History Trait Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, Pablo; Korem, Yael; Moran, Uri; Mayo, Avi; Alon, Uri

    2015-10-01

    When organisms need to perform multiple tasks they face a fundamental tradeoff: no phenotype can be optimal at all tasks. This situation was recently analyzed using Pareto optimality, showing that tradeoffs between tasks lead to phenotypes distributed on low dimensional polygons in trait space. The vertices of these polygons are archetypes--phenotypes optimal at a single task. This theory was applied to examples from animal morphology and gene expression. Here we ask whether Pareto optimality theory can apply to life history traits, which include longevity, fecundity and mass. To comprehensively explore the geometry of life history trait space, we analyze a dataset of life history traits of 2105 endothermic species. We find that, to a first approximation, life history traits fall on a triangle in log-mass log-longevity space. The vertices of the triangle suggest three archetypal strategies, exemplified by bats, shrews and whales, with specialists near the vertices and generalists in the middle of the triangle. To a second approximation, the data lies in a tetrahedron, whose extra vertex above the mass-longevity triangle suggests a fourth strategy related to carnivory. Each animal species can thus be placed in a coordinate system according to its distance from the archetypes, which may be useful for genome-scale comparative studies of mammalian aging and other biological aspects. We further demonstrate that Pareto optimality can explain a range of previous studies which found animal and plant phenotypes which lie in triangles in trait space. This study demonstrates the applicability of multi-objective optimization principles to understand life history traits and to infer archetypal strategies that suggest why some mammalian species live much longer than others of similar mass.

  18. The Mass-Longevity Triangle: Pareto Optimality and the Geometry of Life-History Trait Space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Szekely

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available When organisms need to perform multiple tasks they face a fundamental tradeoff: no phenotype can be optimal at all tasks. This situation was recently analyzed using Pareto optimality, showing that tradeoffs between tasks lead to phenotypes distributed on low dimensional polygons in trait space. The vertices of these polygons are archetypes--phenotypes optimal at a single task. This theory was applied to examples from animal morphology and gene expression. Here we ask whether Pareto optimality theory can apply to life history traits, which include longevity, fecundity and mass. To comprehensively explore the geometry of life history trait space, we analyze a dataset of life history traits of 2105 endothermic species. We find that, to a first approximation, life history traits fall on a triangle in log-mass log-longevity space. The vertices of the triangle suggest three archetypal strategies, exemplified by bats, shrews and whales, with specialists near the vertices and generalists in the middle of the triangle. To a second approximation, the data lies in a tetrahedron, whose extra vertex above the mass-longevity triangle suggests a fourth strategy related to carnivory. Each animal species can thus be placed in a coordinate system according to its distance from the archetypes, which may be useful for genome-scale comparative studies of mammalian aging and other biological aspects. We further demonstrate that Pareto optimality can explain a range of previous studies which found animal and plant phenotypes which lie in triangles in trait space. This study demonstrates the applicability of multi-objective optimization principles to understand life history traits and to infer archetypal strategies that suggest why some mammalian species live much longer than others of similar mass.

  19. Diagnosing the dangerous demography of manta rays using life history theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Sebastián A.; Simpfendorfer, Colin A.; Carlson, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The directed harvest and global trade in the gill plates of mantas, and devil rays, has led to increased fishing pressure and steep population declines in some locations. The slow life history, particularly of the manta rays, is cited as a key reason why such species have little capacity to withstand directed fisheries. Here, we place their life history and demography within the context of other sharks and rays. Methods. Despite the limited availability of data, we use life history theory and comparative analysis to estimate the intrinsic risk of extinction (as indexed by the maximum intrinsic rate of population increase rmax) for a typical generic manta ray using a variant of the classic Euler–Lotka demographic model. This model requires only three traits to calculate the maximum intrinsic population growth rate rmax: von Bertalanffy growth rate, annual pup production and age at maturity. To account for the uncertainty in life history parameters, we created plausible parameter ranges and propagate these uncertainties through the model to calculate a distribution of the plausible range of rmax values. Results. The maximum population growth rate rmax of manta ray is most sensitive to the length of the reproductive cycle, and the median rmax of 0.116 year−1 95th percentile [0.089–0.139] is one of the lowest known of the 106 sharks and rays for which we have comparable demographic information. Discussion. In common with other unprotected, unmanaged, high-value large-bodied sharks and rays the combination of very low population growth rates of manta rays, combined with the high value of their gill rakers and the international nature of trade, is highly likely to lead to rapid depletion and potential local extinction unless a rapid conservation management response occurs worldwide. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to derive important insights into the demography extinction risk of data-poor species using well-established life history theory

  20. Evolutionary ecology of endocrine-mediated life-history variation in the garter snake Thamnophis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkman, Amanda M; Vleck, Carol M; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2009-03-01

    The endocrine system plays an integral role in the regulation of key life-history traits. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is a hormone that promotes growth and reproduction, and it has been implicated in the reduction of lifespan. IGF-1 is also capable of responding plastically to environmental stimuli such as resource availability and temperature. Thus pleiotropic control of life-history traits by IGF-1 could provide a mechanism for the evolution of correlated life-history traits in a new or changing environment. An ideal system in which to investigate the role of IGF-1 in life-history evolution exists in two ecotypes of the garter snake Thamnophis elegans, which derive from a single recent ancestral source but have evolved genetically divergent life-history characteristics. Snakes from meadow populations near Eagle Lake, California (USA) exhibit slower growth rates, lower annual reproductive output, and longer median adult lifespans relative to populations along the lakeshore. We hypothesized that the IGF-1 system has differentiated between these ecotypes and can account for increased growth and reproduction and reduced survival in lakeshore vs. meadow snakes. We tested for a difference in plasma IGF-1 levels in free-ranging snakes from replicate populations of each ecotype over three years. IGF-1 levels were significantly associated with adult body size, reproductive output, and season in a manner that reflects established differences in prey ecology and age/size-specific reproduction between the ecotypes. These findings are discussed in the context of theoretical expectations for a tradeoff between reproduction and lifespan that is mediated by pleiotropic endocrine mechanisms.

  1. LIFE HISTORIES OF GIRLS WITH EXPERIENCE OF LIFE IN THE STREETS: PERSPECTIVES TO THE INCLUSION SOCIAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Normalene Sena de Oliveira

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: It is a qualitative study approaching the life histories of eight girls with living experience in the streets and their social inclusion process. The objectives of this research was to analyze the meaning of social reintegration; to identify the pedagogic actions of the institution in the process of social reintegration; to know the meaning and the impact of the social recovery for girls with life experience in the streets. The collection of data was developed by semi-structured interview, field diary and participant observation. The results showed that the rescue and the process of social inclusion of the subjects is possible starting from the educator's relationship interpersonal with these into the institution. Thus, we understand that in despite of a life history marked by the abandonment and social exclusion, the awakening of new life possibility occurs because the pedagogic actions and interrelationship empowerment among the girls and educators inserted in this reintegration social process. Key words: Homeless Youth, Social Adjustment, Public Health Nursing.

  2. The Societal Impact of Extraterrestrial Life: The Relevance of History and the Social Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Steven J.

    This chapter reviews past studies on the societal impact of extraterrestrial life and offers four related ways in which history is relevant to the subject: the history of impact thus far, analogical reasoning, impact studies in other areas of science and technology, and studies on the nature of discovery and exploration. We focus particularly on the promise and peril of analogical arguments, since they are by necessity widespread in the field. This chapter also summarizes the relevance of the social sciences, particularly anthropology and sociology, and concludes by taking a closer look at the possible impact of the discovery of extraterrestrial life on theology and philosophy. In undertaking this study we emphasize three bedrock principles: (1) we cannot predict the future; (2) society is not monolithic, implying many impacts depending on religion, culture and worldview; (3) the impact of any discovery of extraterrestrial life is scenario-dependent.

  3. Olfactory learning and chemical ecology of olfaction in disease vector mosquitoes: a life history perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Eleanor K; Lahondère, Chloé; Vinauger, Clément; Riffell, Jeffrey A

    2017-04-01

    Mosquitoes transmit many debilitating diseases including malaria, dengue and Zika. Odors mediate behaviors that directly impact disease transmission (blood-feeding) as well as life history events that contribute to mosquito survival and fitness (mating and oviposition, nectar foraging, larval foraging and predator avoidance). In addition to innate olfaction-mediated behaviors, mosquitoes rely on olfactory experience throughout their life to inform advantageous choices in many of these important behaviors. Previous reviews have addressed either the chemical ecology of mosquitoes, or olfactory-driven behaviors including host-feeding or oviposition. Adding to this literature, we use a holistic life history perspective to integrate and compare innate and learned olfactory behavior at various stages of mosquito development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Defoliation and bark harvesting affect life-history traits of a tropical tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaoue, Orou; Horvitz, Carol; Ticktin, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    of life expectancy to perturbation of vital rates to the elasticities of population growth rate, emphasizing how the two kinds of elasticity address distinct biological issues and management goals. Life expectancy was shorter and reproduction delayed in the dry than in the moist region, indicating a cost......Selectively harvesting whole individuals in managed populations (e.g. fisheries, hunting) has substantial effects on life expectancy and age at maturity. Although demographic rates of trees are impacted by recurrent harvest of plant organs (e.g. fruit, leaf, bark) known as non-timber forest...... of drought to life-history traits. Harvesting at constant rates only affects (increased) life expectancy in the moist region and (reduced) age at first reproduction in the dry region. Models in which harvest intensity varies stochastically over time show results similar to those with constant harvesting rate...

  5. Early Childhood Education Teachers: Life History, Life Course, and the Problem of Family-Work Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullough, Robert V., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the wider education literature, rather little is known about the lives of early childhood education (ECE) teachers and the impact of those lives on their practice. Drawing on surveys completed by Head Start assistant and lead teachers, teacher lifelines, and interviews, and through the lens of life-course theory, the author portrays…

  6. Recurrent evolution of life history ecotypes in sockeye salmon: implications for conservation and future evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chris C; Bickham, John W; John Nelson, R; Foote, Chris J; Patton, John C

    2008-01-01

    We examine the evolutionary history and speculate about the evolutionary future of three basic life history ecotypes that contribute to the biocomplexity of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). The ‘recurrent evolution’ (RE) hypothesis claims that the sea/river ecotype is ancestral, a ‘straying’ form with poorly differentiated (meta)population structure, and that highly structured populations of lake-type sockeye and kokanee have evolved repeatedly in parallel adaptive radiations between recurrent glaciations of the Pleistocene Epoch. Basic premises of this hypothesis are consistent with new, independent evidence from recent surveys of genetic variation in mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA: (1) sockeye salmon are most closely related to pink (O. gorbuscha) and chum (O. keta) salmon with sea-type life histories; (2) the sockeye life history ecotypes exist as polyphyletic lineages within large drainages and geographic regions; (3) the sea/river ecotype exhibits less genetic differentiation among populations than the lake or kokanee ecotypes both within and among drainages; and (4) genetic diversity is typically higher in the sea/river ecotype than in the lake and kokanee ecotypes. Anthropogenic modification of estuarine habitat and intensive coastal fisheries have likely reduced and fragmented historic metapopulations of the sea/river ecotype, particularly in southern areas. In contrast, the kokanee ecotype appears to be favoured by marine fisheries and predicted changes in climate. PMID:25567627

  7. Does encephalization correlate with life history or metabolic rate in Carnivora?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finarelli, John A

    2010-06-23

    A recent analysis of brain size evolution reconstructed the plesiomorphic brain-body size allometry for the mammalian order Carnivora, providing an important reference frame for comparative analyses of encephalization (brain volume scaled to body mass). I performed phylogenetically corrected regressions to remove the effects of body mass, calculating correlations between residual values of encephalization with basal metabolic rate (BMR) and six life-history variables (gestation time, neonatal mass, weaning time, weaning mass, litter size, litters per year). No significant correlations were recovered between encephalization and any life-history variable or BMR, arguing against hypotheses relating encephalization to maternal energetic investment. However, after correcting for clade-specific adaptations, I recovered significant correlations for several variables, and further analysis revealed a conserved carnivoran reproductive strategy, linking degree of encephalization to the well-documented mammalian life-history trade-off between neonatal mass and litter size. This strategy of fewer, larger offspring correlating with increased encephalization remains intact even after independent changes in encephalization allometries in the evolutionary history of this clade.

  8. Life history variation within a parthenogenetic population of Daphnia parvula (Crustacea: Cladocera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Michael L; Porter, Karen; Feig, Yvette S

    1984-07-01

    Evidence for genetically determined life history variability within a population or a species is rare. In this three year experimental examination of a parthenogenetically reproducing population of the planktonic crustacean Daphnia parvula, we found evidence for a succession of clones or groups of clones that exhibited distinctive body size and reproductive differences that were maintained after numerous generations under standardized conditions in the laboratory. The D. parvula population reached maximum density in the fall and maintained relatively high densities through the winter and spring. Isolates from this fall-winter-spring period all had a larger body size at death and higher fecundity when compared with summer isolates under natural food and temperature conditions. These differences could not be accounted for by differences in temperature and food abundance among the seasons. An additional difference in these experiments was a shift in reproductive effort by the summer isolate which produced a higher proportion of its offspring in the first two broods. The shift in life history characteristics and a summer decline of the Daphnia parvula population was correlated with both an increase in inedible and perhaps toxic blue-green algae and an increase in a dipteran predator Chaoborus. Comparison of the survivorship curves for all of the seasonal life history experiments indicated that D. parvula survivorship was not lower during the summer discounting a toxic effect from blue-green algae. Positive population growth on natural food in the laboratory at this time indicated food was not limiting and that predation was the probable cause of the population decline.Laboratory life history experiments under standardized food and temperature conditions were run with D. parvula isolates from the spring and summer plankton. Genetically based differences as determined in these experiments were smaller body size, lower fecundity, smaller brood size, and shorter life span

  9. Historie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jens Aage

    Historie i serien handler om læreplaner og læremidler og deres brug i skolefaget historie. Bogen indeholder nyttige redskaber til at analysere og vurdere læremidler......Historie i serien handler om læreplaner og læremidler og deres brug i skolefaget historie. Bogen indeholder nyttige redskaber til at analysere og vurdere læremidler...

  10. The nature and dynamics of world religions: a life-history approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumard, Nicolas; Chevallier, Coralie

    2015-11-07

    In contrast with tribal and archaic religions, world religions are characterized by a unique emphasis on extended prosociality, restricted sociosexuality, delayed gratification and the belief that these specific behaviours are sanctioned by some kind of supernatural justice. Here, we draw on recent advances in life history theory to explain this pattern of seemingly unrelated features. Life history theory examines how organisms adaptively allocate resources in the face of trade-offs between different life-goals (e.g. growth versus reproduction, exploitation versus exploration). In particular, recent studies have shown that individuals, including humans, adjust their life strategy to the environment through phenotypic plasticity: in a harsh environment, organisms tend to adopt a 'fast' strategy, pursuing smaller but more certain benefits, while in more affluent environments, organisms tend to develop a 'slow' strategy, aiming for larger but less certain benefits. Reviewing a range of recent research, we show that world religions are associated with a form of 'slow' strategy. This framework explains both the promotion of 'slow' behaviours such as altruism, self-regulation and monogamy in modern world religions, and the condemnation of 'fast' behaviours such as selfishness, conspicuous sexuality and materialism. This ecological approach also explains the diffusion pattern of world religions: why they emerged late in human history (500-300 BCE), why they are currently in decline in the most affluent societies and why they persist in some places despite this overall decline. © 2015 The Author(s).

  11. Imitative and Direct Learning as Interacting Factors in Life History Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullinaria, John A

    2017-01-01

    The idea that lifetime learning can have a significant effect on life history evolution has recently been explored using a series of artificial life simulations. These involved populations of competing individuals evolving by natural selection to learn to perform well on simplified abstract tasks, with the learning consisting of identifying regularities in their environment. In reality, there is more to learning than that type of direct individual experience, because it often includes a substantial degree of social learning that involves various forms of imitation of what other individuals have learned before them. This article rectifies that omission by incorporating memes and imitative learning into revised versions of the previous approach. To do this reliably requires formulating and testing a general framework for meme-based simulations that will enable more complete investigations of learning as a factor in any life history evolution scenarios. It does that by simulating imitative information transfer in terms of memes being passed between individuals, and developing a process for merging that information with the (possibly inconsistent) information acquired by direct experience, leading to a consistent overall body of learning. The proposed framework is tested on a range of learning variations and a representative set of life history factors to confirm the robustness of the approach. The simulations presented illustrate the types of interactions and tradeoffs that can emerge, and indicate the kinds of species-specific models that could be developed with this approach in the future.

  12. Nyai Dadah : The Elasticity of Gender Roles and Life History of Pesantren Woman Leader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Chusniyah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This articles discusses the life of Nyai Dadah, a woman leader of pesantren in Central Java Indonesia, through life history method, to shed light upon the gender elasticity of pesantren and the struggle of its woman to promote girls education in Indonesia. Nyai Dadah is the eldest daughter of Kiai Zubaidi, the founder of Pesantren Al Asror. When her father passed away, she continued the struggle of her father managing the pesantren. His younger brother was still in religious training, and when he completed the study she passed the leadership to him and then created a pesantren for girls. The study reveals that pesantren women have strategies to promote girls education and  pesantren doesnot close itself from the rise of women’s leadership. Nyai Dadah with her capabilities is able to manage the pesantren for girls. Nyai Dadah plays the roles either as a nyai in pesantren or a housewife, and religious leader in her village.Menggunakan metode life history, penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengungkapkan secara detil ketokohan seorang figur perempuan atau pemimpin pesantren di Semarang, yang disebut sebagai nyai. Life history nyai digunakan untuk menyampaikan perjuangan dan peran beliau di pesantren dan masyarakat. Nyai yang dikaji dalam penelitian ini adalah Nyai Dadah, anak perempuan tertua dari Kiai Zubaidi, pendiri Pesantren Al Asror, yang sekarang menjadi nyai di Pesantren Putri Huffadhul Quran Al Asror sejak tahun 2002 hingga sekarang. Studi ini berdasarkan pada konsep life history dan teori negosiasi gender. Penelitian menunjukkan bahwa pesantren tidak selalu menutup dirinya terhadap munculnya kepemimpinan perempuan. Nyai Dadah dengan kemampuannya, mampu mendirikan dan mengelola pesantren putri. Nyai Dadah menjalankan perannya baik sebagai seorang nyai di pesantren atau seorang ibu rumah tangga. Nyai Dadah juga berkontribusi di dalam masyarakat dengan menjadi penasehat Fatayat NU cabang Patemon dan memprakarsai ngaji selapanan sejak sepuluh

  13. The life history and its environmental regulation in the subtidal red alga, Acrosymphyton purpuriferum (J. Ag.) Sjöst.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeman, Antje Maatje

    1979-01-01

    In this thesis a descrlption is given of the life history of the benthic marine red alga Acrosymphyton puriferum (J. Ag.) Sjöst. (Rhodophyceae, Cryptonemiales) and of the influence environmental factors have on the course of this life history. ... Zie: Summary

  14. An Ethics of Access: Using Life History to Trace Preservice Teachers' Initial Viewpoints on Teaching for Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Amy Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    This article demonstrates how life history methods can be used to trace preservice teachers' emergent ethics toward teaching for equity and social justice. Through qualitative analyses of 10 European American, middle-class, female preservice teachers' life history interviews, access to diverse individuals and diverse materials was identified as a…

  15. Life-history evolution in the anthropocene: effects of increasing nutrients on traits and trade-offs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell-Rood, Emilie; Cothran, Rickey; Espeset, Anne; Jeyasingh, Punidan; Hobbie, Sarah; Morehouse, Nathan I

    2015-08-01

    Variation in life-history traits can have major impacts on the ecological and evolutionary responses of populations to environmental change. Life-history variation often results from trade-offs that arise because individuals have a limited pool of resources to allocate among traits. However, human activities are increasing the availability of many once-limited resources, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, with potentially major implications for the expression and evolution of life-history trade-offs. In this review, we synthesize contemporary life history and sexual selection literature with current research on ecosystem nutrient cycling to highlight novel opportunities presented by anthropogenic environmental change for investigating life-history trait development and evolution. Specifically, we review four areas where nutrition plays a pivotal role in life-history evolution and explore possible implications in the face of rapid, human-induced change in nutrient availability. For example, increases in the availability of nutrients may relax historical life-history trade-offs and reduce the honesty of signaling systems. We argue that ecosystems experiencing anthropogenic nutrient inputs present a powerful yet underexplored arena for testing novel and longstanding questions in organismal life-history evolution.

  16. Evidence of panmixia between sympatric life history forms of coastal cutthroat trout in two lower Columbia River tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Baumsteiger, Jason; Zydlewski, Joseph D.; Hudson, J. Michael; Ardren, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Coastal cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii exhibit resident and migratory life history strategies that often occur sympatrically, but the relationship between these forms within a population is poorly characterized. Through use of passive integrated transponder technology, migratory and resident coastal cutthroat trout were identified in two lower Columbia River tributaries (Abernathy Creek and the Chinook River) separated by more than 80 km. Genetic data from 17 highly variable microsatellite loci were used to ascertain the genetic population structure of these life history forms within and between streams. No distinct genetic separation was observed between the life history forms within a stream, as assessed by four different statistical approaches: permutation tests based on the genetic differentiation index F ST, principal components analysis of individuals, analysis of molecular variance, and contingency tests of allele frequency heterogeneity. Genetic differences were an order of magnitude higher between stream samples (F ST > 0.03) than between life history forms within a stream (F ST differences between migratory and resident life history forms in Abernathy Creek (P = 0.001), but this result was influenced more by age-class structure than by reproductive isolation between life history forms. Results are consistent with a single, randomly mating population in each stream producing both migratory and resident life history forms. These data suggest that individual life history strategy in coastal cutthroat trout is predominantly determined by phenotypic plasticity rather than genotype.

  17. Exploring the Interplay of Cultural Capital, "Habitus," and Field in the Life Histories of Two West African Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gloria; Rinke, Carol; Mawhinney, Lynnette

    2016-01-01

    This paper captures the life histories of two West African pre-service teachers pursuing their education in the United States. Based on a larger study examining the life histories of 45 undergraduate pre-service teachers, these narratives focus specifically on international student experiences in the US. Grounded in Bourdieu's theory of…

  18. Life-history strategies as a tool to identify conservation constraints: A case-study on ants in chalk grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordwijk, C.G.E.; Boer, P.; Mabelis, A.A.; Verberk, W.C.E.P.; Siepel, H.

    2012-01-01

    Species’ life-history traits underlie species–environment relationships. Therefore, analysis of species traits, combined into life-history strategies, can be used to identify key factors shaping the local species composition. This is demonstrated in a case-study on ants in chalk grasslands. We

  19. The life-history of a springtail Folsomia candida living in soil contaminated with nonylphenol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widarto, T. H.; Krogh, P. H.; Forbes, V.

    population growth rate (l). Decomposition analysis to investigate the contribution of each of the affected life-history traits to the effects observed on l, and elasticity analysis to examine the relative sensitivity of l to changes in each of the life history traits provided valuable insight...

  20. Work Identity and Contradictory Experiences of Welfare Workers in a Life-history Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybbroe, Betina

    2013-01-01

    »Arbeitsidentität und widersprüchliche Erfahrungen in der Lebensgeschichte von Sozialarbeiter/innen und Krankenschwestern«. Transformation of the welfare sectors challenge professional identities of care and welfare workers in Scandinavia. At the same time welfare and care workers take part...... in these changes and are changed in the psycho-social setting of the workplace. This article presents research about care work in Denmark with a focus on subjective processing of work identity, applying a psycho-societal theoretical and methodical approach. A life historical and experiential understanding...... of their potentials for analyzing workers' experience. The analysis is based on a combined ethnographic and life historical investigation in nursing and involves a young nurse in scenes of the hospital, where gendered life history is re-enacted and present in a gendered work life with fragile possibilities...

  1. The importance of life and faith histories in the methodology of Practical Theology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riet Bons-Storm

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The basic questions of Practical Theology concern the development of a community of faith built on, and building the faithful lives of its members in their particular contexts. This article is an exploration of the biographical method – as a means of qualitative empirical research – to obtain data concerning the possibilities of people in their everyday life of coming to an understanding of their particular situation in the light of their understanding of the Christian tradition. This understanding, individual faith develops in conjunction with the particular theological context in which a person lives her/his life. The author chooses to listen to the life and faith histories of people as a feminist. This means that the role gender plays in life and faith, is taken seriously.

  2. Environmental change controls postglacial forest dynamics through interspecific differences in life-history traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacourse, Terri

    2009-08-01

    A key goal of functional ecology is identifying relationships between species traits and environmental conditions. Here, the nature and significance of these relationships to community composition on long ecological timescales is investigated using paleoecological and paleoenvironmental data from coastal British Columbia, Canada. RLQ and fourth-corner analyses, two three-table statistical techniques, are used to link traits of the region's dominant woody plants to environmental conditions over the last 15 000 calendar years (cal yr) through a fossil pollen record derived from lake sediments. Both RLQ and fourth-corner analyses revealed highly significant correlations between plant traits and temporal changes in environmental conditions. Axis 1 of the RLQ explained 92% of the total covariance between plant species traits and paleoenvironmental variables and was correlated most strongly with temperature and relative growth rate. In general, climate change during the cold period following deglaciation favored species such as Alnus sinuata and Pinus contorta that exhibit a "fast" life-history strategy (e.g., high relative growth rate, short life span, low shade tolerance), whereas the relative climatic stability of the last 8000 cal yr favored species such as Tsuga heterophylla that exhibit a "slow" life-history strategy (e.g., low relative growth rate, long life span, high shade tolerance). Fourth-corner analyses revealed significant correlations between all paleoenvironmental variables (i.e., temperature, precipitation, summer insolation, vegetation density) and most plant traits (relative growth rate, minimum seed-bearing age, seed mass, height, life span, and shade, drought, and waterlogging tolerances). The strongest correlation was between paleotemperature and height, reflecting the positive effect of temperature on plant growth and development and the overarching competitive advantage that height confers. This research demonstrates that environmental conditions

  3. Niche Partitioning in Sympatric Gorilla and Pan from Cameroon: Implications for Life History Strategies and for Reconstructing the Evolution of Hominin Life History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, Gabriele A.; Lee-Thorp, Julia A.

    2014-01-01

    Factors influencing the hominoid life histories are poorly understood, and little is known about how ecological conditions modulate the pace of their development. Yet our limited understanding of these interactions underpins life history interpretations in extinct hominins. Here we determined the synchronisation of dental mineralization/eruption with brain size in a 20th century museum collection of sympatric Gorilla gorilla and Pan troglodytes from Central Cameroon. Using δ13C and δ15N of individuals’ hair, we assessed whether and how differences in diet and habitat use may have impacted on ape development. The results show that, overall, gorilla hair δ13C and δ15N values are more variable than those of chimpanzees, and that gorillas are consistently lower in δ13C and δ15N compared to chimpanzees. Within a restricted, isotopically-constrained area, gorilla brain development appears delayed relative to dental mineralization/eruption [or dental development is accelerated relative to brains]: only about 87.8% of adult brain size is attained by the time first permanent molars come into occlusion, whereas it is 92.3% in chimpanzees. Even when M1s are already in full functional occlusion, gorilla brains lag behind those of chimpanzee (91% versus 96.4%), relative to tooth development. Both bootstrap analyses and stable isotope results confirm that these results are unlikely due to sampling error. Rather, δ15N values imply that gorillas are not fully weaned (physiologically mature) until well after M1 are in full functional occlusion. In chimpanzees the transition from infant to adult feeding appears (a) more gradual and (b) earlier relative to somatic development. Taken together, the findings are consistent with life history theory that predicts delayed development when non-density dependent mortality is low, i.e. in closed habitats, and with the “risk aversion” hypothesis for frugivorous species as a means to avert starvation. Furthermore, the results

  4. Tooth microstructure tracks the pace of human life-history evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Dean, M

    2006-01-01

    A number of fundamental milestones define the pace at which animals develop, mature, reproduce and age. These include the length of gestation, the age at weaning and at sexual maturity, the number of offspring produced over a lifetime and the length of life itself. Because a time-scale for dental development can be retrieved from the internal structure of teeth and many of these life-history variables tend to be highly correlated, we can discover more than might be imagined about fossil prima...

  5. Life history traits in a population of Hemidacylus turcicus (Turkish gecko

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah ALTUNIŞIK

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have shown that ecological factors influence life story traits of animal populations. In this study, some life history characteristics such as age, longevity, age at maturity and sexual size dimorphism were analyzed in a population of H.turcicus (Turkish gecko. The results have shown that maximum lifespan and age at maturity were 7 and 2-3 years in this population, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between female and male individuals in terms of mean age and body size. A significant positive correlation was found between body size and age in both males and females.

  6. Life histories and the evolution of aging in bacteria and other single-celled organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Leah R; Mangel, Marc

    2006-10-01

    The disposable soma theory of aging was developed to explore how differences in lifespans and aging rates could be linked to life history trade-offs. Although generally applied for multicellular organisms, it is also useful for exploring life history strategies of single-celled organisms such as bacteria. Motivated by recent research of aging in E. coli, we explore the effects of aging on the fitness of simple single-celled organisms. Starting from the Euler-Lotka equation, we propose a mathematical model to explore how a finite reproductive lifespan affects fitness and resource allocation in simple organisms. This model provides quantitative predictions that have the potential for direct comparison with experiment, providing an opportunity to test the disposable soma theory more directly.

  7. Selection for life-history traits to maximize population growth in an invasive marine species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaspers, Cornelia; Marty, Lise; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Species establishing outside their natural range, negatively impacting local ecosystems, are of increasing global concern. They often display life-history features characteristic for r-selected populations with fast growth and high reproduction rates to achieve positive population growth rates (r......) in invaded habitats. Here, we demonstrate substantially earlier maturation at a 2 orders of magnitude lower body mass at first reproduction in invasive compared to native populations of the comb jelly Mnemiopsis leidyi. Empirical results are corroborated by a theoretical model for competing life......-history traits that predicts maturation at the smallest possible size to optimize r, while individual lifetime reproductive success (R0 ), optimized in native populations, is near constant over a large range of intermediate maturation sizes. We suggest that high variability in reproductive tactics in native...

  8. Multidisciplinary perspectives on the history of human interactions with life in the ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacDiarmid, Alison; MacKenzie, Brian; Ojaveer, Henn

    2016-01-01

    There is an essentially circular interaction between the human social system and the marine ecosystem. The Oceans Past V Conference "Multidisciplinary perspectives on the history of human interactions with life in the ocean" held in Tallinn, Estonia, in May 2015 was an opportunity for the present......There is an essentially circular interaction between the human social system and the marine ecosystem. The Oceans Past V Conference "Multidisciplinary perspectives on the history of human interactions with life in the ocean" held in Tallinn, Estonia, in May 2015 was an opportunity......-term changes of affected species and define appropriate and realistic management targets. Second, increased multi-and trans-disciplinary effort is required to better understand the relative importance of different human demographic, technological, economic, and cultural drivers on the patterns, intensities...

  9. Conserving marine biodiversity: insights from life-history trait candidate genes in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Hemmer; Therkildsen, Nina Overgaard; Meldrup, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    Recent technological developments have facilitated an increased focus on identifying genomic regions underlying adaptive trait variation in natural populations, and it has been advocated that this information should be important for designating population units for conservation. In marine fishes......, phenotypic studies have suggested adaptation through divergence of life-history traits among natural populations, but the distribution of adaptive genetic variation in these species is still relatively poorly known. In this study, we extract information about the geographical distribution of genetic...... variation for 33 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with life-history trait candidate genes, and compare this to variation in 70 putatively neutral SNPs in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). We analyse samples covering the major population complexes in the eastern Atlantic and find strong evidence...

  10. Multidisciplinary perspectives on the history of human interactions with life in the ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacDiarmid, Alison; MacKenzie, Brian; Ojaveer, Henn

    2016-01-01

    There is an essentially circular interaction between the human social system and the marine ecosystem. The Oceans Past V Conference "Multidisciplinary perspectives on the history of human interactions with life in the ocean" held in Tallinn, Estonia, in May 2015 was an opportunity for the present......There is an essentially circular interaction between the human social system and the marine ecosystem. The Oceans Past V Conference "Multidisciplinary perspectives on the history of human interactions with life in the ocean" held in Tallinn, Estonia, in May 2015 was an opportunity...... policy development, practitioners need to work more routinely with population and ecological modellers and statisticians. This will allow greater processing of the available historical data to derive ecologically meaningful properties that can then be used to assess the ecological impact of long...

  11. Shifting the life-history paradigm: discovery of novel habitat use by hawksbill turtles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaos, Alexander R.; Lewison, Rebecca L.; Yañez, Ingrid L.; Wallace, Bryan P.; Liles, Michael J.; Nichols, Wallace J.; Baquero, Andres; Hasbún, Carlos R.; Vasquez, Mauricio; Urteaga, José; Seminoff, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Adult hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) are typically described as open-coast, coral reef and hard substrate dwellers. Here, we report new satellite tracking data on female hawksbills from several countries in the eastern Pacific that revealed previously undocumented behaviour for adults of the species. In contrast to patterns of habitat use exhibited by their Caribbean and Indo-Pacific counterparts, eastern Pacific hawksbills generally occupied inshore estuaries, wherein they had strong associations with mangrove saltwater forests. The use of inshore habitats and affinities with mangrove saltwater forests presents a previously unknown life-history paradigm for adult hawksbill turtles and suggests a potentially unique evolutionary trajectory for the species. Our findings highlight the variability in life-history strategies that marine turtles and other wide-ranging marine wildlife may exhibit among ocean regions, and the importance of understanding such disparities from an ecological and management perspective. PMID:21880620

  12. Predicting the natural mortality of marine fish from life history characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislason, Henrik

    For fish much of the life history is determined by body size. Body size and asymptotic size significantly influences important life history processes such as growth, maturity, egg production, and natural mortality. Futhermore, for a population to persist, offspring must be able to replace...... their parents on a one-for-one basis in the long run. Otherwise the population would either increase exponentially or become extinct. Combining data on growth and specific fecundity in a size-based fish community model of the North Sea and using the requirement of a one-for-one replacement provides...... the information necessary to estimate the scaling of natural mortality with size and asymptotic size. The estimated scaling is compared with output from multispecies fish stock models, with the empirical scaling of the maximum number of recruits per unit of spawning stock biomass with body size...

  13. Life history traits and life table analysis of Lobiopa insularis (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae fed on strawberry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Greco

    Full Text Available Lobiopa insularis is a newly reported pest of strawberry in Argentina. We investigated characteristics of its biology in the laboratory, including survivorship and reproduction. We also estimated population growth for L. insularis fed ripe strawberry fruits. Lobiopa insularis was not observed ovipositing on strawberry fruits. A higher proportion of egg masses were recorded from a depth of 1 cm within the soil than on either the soil surface or deeper than 1cm (i.e. between 1and 2 cm within the soil. The duration of preimaginal developmental stages represented ~18.5% of the total life cycle, while the adult stage represented 81.5%. Survival from egg to adult was 64.20% and mean longevity of females and males adults was 121.84, (SE = 8.86 and 118.58 (SE = 5.90 days, respectively. Females laid eggs only when they were with a male, so reproductive period was dependent on male presence. The number of eggs/female/day was 18.01 (SE = 1.71; and total fecundity was 1655 (ES = 249.53 eggs/female. The long life span of adults and high reproductive output, i.e high fecundity and long reproductive period, indicate that availability and concentration of suitable developmental resources are important factors in the population dynamics of Lobiopa insularis associated with strawberry crops.

  14. Life history traits and life table analysis of Lobiopa insularis (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) fed on strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Nancy; Cluigt, Nicolás; Cline, Andrew; Liljesthröm, Gerardo

    2017-01-01

    Lobiopa insularis is a newly reported pest of strawberry in Argentina. We investigated characteristics of its biology in the laboratory, including survivorship and reproduction. We also estimated population growth for L. insularis fed ripe strawberry fruits. Lobiopa insularis was not observed ovipositing on strawberry fruits. A higher proportion of egg masses were recorded from a depth of 1 cm within the soil than on either the soil surface or deeper than 1cm (i.e. between 1and 2 cm) within the soil. The duration of preimaginal developmental stages represented ~18.5% of the total life cycle, while the adult stage represented 81.5%. Survival from egg to adult was 64.20% and mean longevity of females and males adults was 121.84, (SE = 8.86) and 118.58 (SE = 5.90) days, respectively. Females laid eggs only when they were with a male, so reproductive period was dependent on male presence. The number of eggs/female/day was 18.01 (SE = 1.71); and total fecundity was 1655 (ES = 249.53) eggs/female. The long life span of adults and high reproductive output, i.e high fecundity and long reproductive period, indicate that availability and concentration of suitable developmental resources are important factors in the population dynamics of Lobiopa insularis associated with strawberry crops.

  15. Plant species loss affects life-history traits of aphids and their parasitoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana S Petermann

    Full Text Available The consequences of plant species loss are rarely assessed in a multi-trophic context and especially effects on life-history traits of organisms at higher trophic levels have remained largely unstudied. We used a grassland biodiversity experiment and measured the effects of two components of plant diversity, plant species richness and the presence of nitrogen-fixing legumes, on several life-history traits of naturally colonizing aphids and their primary and secondary parasitoids in the field. We found that, irrespective of aphid species identity, the proportion of winged aphid morphs decreased with increasing plant species richness, which was correlated with decreasing host plant biomass. Similarly, emergence proportions of parasitoids decreased with increasing plant species richness. Both, emergence proportions and proportions of female parasitoids were lower in plots with legumes, where host plants had increased nitrogen concentrations. This effect of legume presence could indicate that aphids were better defended against parasitoids in high-nitrogen environments. Body mass of emerged individuals of the two most abundant primary parasitoid species was, however, higher in plots with legumes, suggesting that once parasitoids could overcome aphid defenses, they could profit from larger or more nutritious hosts. Our study demonstrates that cascading effects of plant species loss on higher trophic levels such as aphids, parasitoids and secondary parasitoids begin with changed life-history traits of these insects. Thus, life-history traits of organisms at higher trophic levels may be useful indicators of bottom-up effects of plant diversity on the biodiversity of consumers.

  16. The importance of habitat and life history to extinction risk in sharks, skates, rays and chimaeras

    OpenAIRE

    García, Verónica B.; Lucifora, Luis O.; Myers, Ransom A

    2007-01-01

    We compared life-history traits and extinction risk of chondrichthyans (sharks, rays and chimaeras), a group of high conservation concern, from the three major marine habitats (continental shelves, open ocean and deep sea), controlling for phylogenetic correlation. Deep-water chondrichthyans had a higher age at maturity and longevity, and a lower growth completion rate than shallow-water species. The average fishing mortality needed to drive a deep-water chondrichthyan species to extinction (...

  17. Control and adaptation strategies for invasive species with different life history

    OpenAIRE

    Elofsson, Katarina; Gren, Ing-Marie

    2013-01-01

    The issue of timing and scope of policies to manage invasive species has achieved considerable attention in the economic literature. Whereas many earlier studies compare prevention and control for a single invading species, we focus instead on the optimal balance of adaptation and control when an invasive species competes for scarce resources with a resident species. In particular, we focus on the role that species’ life history, i.e. the degree of evolutionary specialization in survival or r...

  18. Harsh Environments, Life History Strategies, and Adjustment: A Longitudinal Study of Oregon Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Hampson, Sarah E.; Andrews, Judy A.; Barckley, Maureen; Gerrard, Meg; Gibbons, Frederick X.

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the effects of harsh environments in childhood on adjustment in early emerging adulthood, through parenting style and the development of fast Life History Strategies (LHS; risky beliefs and behaviors) in adolescence. Participants were from the Oregon Youth Substance Use Project (N = 988; 85.7% White). Five cohorts of children in Grades 1–5 at recruitment were assessed through one-year post high school. Greater environmental harshness (neighborhood quality and family poverty) in Gra...

  19. Potential fitness benefits of the half-pounder life history in Klamath River steelhead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Brian W.; Wilzbach, Peggy; Duffy, Walter G.

    2014-01-01

    Steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss from several of the world's rivers display the half-pounder life history, a variant characterized by an amphidromous (and, less often, anadromous) return to freshwater in the year of initial ocean entry. We evaluated factors related to expression of the half-pounder life history in wild steelhead from the lower Klamath River basin, California. We also evaluated fitness consequences of the half-pounder phenotype using a simple life history model that was parameterized with our empirical data and outputs from a regional survival equation. The incidence of the half-pounder life history differed among subbasins of origin and smolt ages. Precocious maturation occurred in approximately 8% of half-pounders and was best predicted by individual length in freshwater preceding ocean entry. Adult steelhead of the half-pounder phenotype were smaller and less fecund at age than adult steelhead of the alternative (ocean contingent) phenotype. However, our data suggest that fish of the half-pounder phenotype are more likely to spawn repeatedly than are fish of the ocean contingent phenotype. Models predicted that if lifetime survivorship were equal between phenotypes, the fitness of the half-pounder phenotype would be 17–28% lower than that of the ocean contingent phenotype. To meet the condition of equal fitness between phenotypes would require that first-year ocean survival be 21–40% higher among half-pounders in freshwater than among their cohorts at sea. We concluded that continued expression of the half-pounder phenotype is favored by precocious maturation and increased survival relative to that of the ocean contingent phenotype.

  20. Hormone and Metabolite Profiles in Nesting Green and Flatback Turtles: Turtle Species with Different Life Histories

    OpenAIRE

    Ikonomopoulou, Maria P.; Bradley, Adrian J.; Kammarudin Ibrahim; Limpus, Colin J.; Fernandez-Rojo, Manuel A.; Dimitrios Vagenas; Whittier, Joan M.

    2014-01-01

    Herbivorous turtle, Chelonia mydas, inhabiting the south China Sea and breeding in Peninsular Malaysia, and Natator depressus, a carnivorous turtle inhabiting the Great Barrier Reef and breeding at Curtis Island in Queensland, Australia, differ both in diet and life history. Analysis of plasma metabolites levels and six sex steroid hormones during the peak of their nesting season in both species showed hormonal and metabolite variations. When compared with results from other studies progester...

  1. Bridging Developmental Boundaries: Lifelong Dietary Patterns Modulate Life Histories in a Parthenogenetic Insect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roark, Alison M.; Bjorndal, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the effects of lifelong intake patterns on performance is challenging for many species, primarily because of methodological constraints. Here, we used a parthenogenetic insect (Carausius morosus) to determine the effects of limited and unlimited food availability across multiple life-history stages. Using a parthenogen allowed us to quantify intake by juvenile and adult females and to evaluate the morphological, physiological, and life-history responses to intake, all without the confounding influences of pair-housing, mating, and male behavior. In our study, growth rate prior to reproductive maturity was positively correlated with both adult and reproductive lifespans but negatively correlated with total lifespan. Food limitation had opposing effects on lifespan depending on when it was imposed, as it protracted development in juveniles but hastened death in adults. Food limitation also constrained reproduction regardless of when food was limited, although decreased fecundity was especially pronounced in individuals that were food-limited as late juveniles and adults. Additional carry-over effects of juvenile food limitation included smaller adult size and decreased body condition at the adult molt, but these effects were largely mitigated in insects that were switched to ad libitum feeding as late juveniles. Our data provide little support for the existence of a trade-off between longevity and fecundity, perhaps because these functions were fueled by different nutrient pools. However, insects that experienced a switch to the limited diet at reproductive maturity seem to have fueled egg production by drawing down body stores, thus providing some evidence for a life-history trade-off. Our results provide important insights into the effects of food limitation and indicate that performance is modulated by intake both within and across life-history stages. PMID:25365446

  2. Growth, life history, and species interactions of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) under heavy predation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belk, Mark Carl [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was, first, to compare growth and life history characteristics of an unfished population of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) in the presence of an abundant predator population to characteristic exhibited by bluegills in typical southeastern US reservoirs where the abundance of predators is reduced, but fishing is increased. The second objective was to determine if differences observed between populations were determined genetically or environmentally.

  3. Effects of salinity tolerances on survival and life history of 2 cladocerans

    OpenAIRE

    GÖKÇE, Didem; TURHAN, Duygu ÖZHAN

    2014-01-01

    Salinity alterations in freshwater ecosystems greatly affect the survival and life history of zooplankton and, therefore, have an effect on higher trophic levels. Salinity is an essential and critical factor in determining the presence, dominance, and succession of organisms. After being collected in the field, Scapholeberis mucronata and Simocephalus vetulus were brought to the laboratory in water. Under laboratory conditions (24 ± 1 °C; 16:8 h photoperiod), we evaluated the effect of differ...

  4. Cancer history and other personal factors affect quality of life in patients with hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toro Charlene

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC have been found to have reduced quality of life, little is known about how other characteristics affect their quality of life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of other characteristics, including history of cancer, on quality of life in patients with CHC. Methods One hundred forty patients from clinics at three hospitals in New York City completed a detailed epidemiologic interview about demographic and lifestyle characteristics and the SF-36 measuring health-related quality of life. We compared results from our patients to normative data using t-tests of differences between means. We used multivariate analyses to determine other personal and health-related factors associated with quality of life outcomes. Results Compared to normative data, these patients had reduced quality of life, particularly on physical functioning. The summary Physical Component Score (PCS was 45.4 ± 10.6 and the Mental Component Score (MCS was 48.2 ± 11.1, vs norms of 50 ± 10.0; p-values were Conclusion Several health and lifestyle factors independently influence quality of life in CHC patients. Different factors are important for men and women.

  5. Cranial asymmetry arises later in the life history of the blind Mexican cavefish, Astyanax mexicanus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda K Powers

    Full Text Available As a consequence of adaptation to the cave environment, the blind Mexican cavefish, Astyanax mexicanus, has evolved several cranial aberrations including changes to bone sizes, shapes and presence of numerous lateral asymmetries. Prior studies of cranial asymmetry in cavefish focused strictly on adult specimens. Thus, the extent to which these asymmetries emerge in adulthood, or earlier in the life history of cavefish, was unknown. We performed a geometric morphometric analysis of shape variation in the chondrocranium and osteocranium across life history in two distinct cavefish populations and surface-dwelling fish. The cartilaginous skull in juveniles was bilaterally symmetric and chondrocranial shape was conserved in all three populations. In contrast, bony skull shapes segregated into significantly distinct groups in adults. Cavefish demonstrated significant asymmetry for the bones surrounding the collapsed eye orbit, and the opercle bone posterior to the eye orbit. Interestingly, we discovered that cavefish also exhibit directional "bends" in skull shape, almost always biased to the left. In sum, this work reveals that asymmetric craniofacial aberrations emerge later in the cavefish life history. These abnormalities may mirror asymmetries in the lateral line sensory system, reflect a 'handedness' in cavefish swimming behavior, or evolve through neutral processes.

  6. Amphibian terrestrial habitat selection and movement patterns vary with annual life-history period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groff, Luke A.; Calhoun, Aram J.K.; Loftin, Cynthia S.

    2017-01-01

    Identification of essential habitat is a fundamental component of amphibian conservation; however, species with complex life histories frequently move among habitats. To better understand dynamic habitat use, we evaluated Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus (LeConte, 1825)) habitat selection and movement patterns during the spring migration and foraging periods and described the spatiotemporal variability of habitats used during all annual life-history periods. We radio-tracked 71 frogs in Maine during 2011–2013 and evaluated spring migration, foraging activity center (FAC), and within-FAC habitat selection. Telemetered frogs spent the greatest percentage of each field season in hibernacula (≥54.4%), followed by FACs (≥25.5%), migration habitat (≥16.9%), and breeding sites (≥4.5%). FACs ranged 49 – 1 335 m2 (568.0 ± 493.4 m2) and annual home ranges spanned 1 413 – 32 165 m2 (11 780.6 ± 12 506.1 m2). During spring migration, Wood Frogs exhibited different movement patterns (e.g., turn angles), selected different habitat features, and selected habitat features less consistently than while occupying FACs, indicating that the migration and foraging periods are ecologically distinct. Habitat-use studies that do not discriminate among annual life-history periods may obscure true ecological relationships and fail to identify essential habitat necessary for sustaining amphibian populations.

  7. Intrapopulation genome size variation in D. melanogaster reflects life history variation and plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa L Ellis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We determined female genome sizes using flow cytometry for 211 Drosophila melanogaster sequenced inbred strains from the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, and found significant conspecific and intrapopulation variation in genome size. We also compared several life history traits for 25 lines with large and 25 lines with small genomes in three thermal environments, and found that genome size as well as genome size by temperature interactions significantly correlated with survival to pupation and adulthood, time to pupation, female pupal mass, and female eclosion rates. Genome size accounted for up to 23% of the variation in developmental phenotypes, but the contribution of genome size to variation in life history traits was plastic and varied according to the thermal environment. Expression data implicate differences in metabolism that correspond to genome size variation. These results indicate that significant genome size variation exists within D. melanogaster and this variation may impact the evolutionary ecology of the species. Genome size variation accounts for a significant portion of life history variation in an environmentally dependent manner, suggesting that potential fitness effects associated with genome size variation also depend on environmental conditions.

  8. Genetic effects on life-history traits in the Glanville fritillary butterfly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Duplouy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Adaptation to local habitat conditions may lead to the natural divergence of populations in life-history traits such as body size, time of reproduction, mate signaling or dispersal capacity. Given enough time and strong enough selection pressures, populations may experience local genetic differentiation. The genetic basis of many life-history traits, and their evolution according to different environmental conditions remain however poorly understood. Methods We conducted an association study on the Glanville fritillary butterfly, using material from five populations along a latitudinal gradient within the Baltic Sea region, which show different degrees of habitat fragmentation. We investigated variation in 10 principal components, cofounding in total 21 life-history traits, according to two environmental types, and 33 genetic SNP markers from 15 candidate genes. Results We found that nine SNPs from five genes showed strong trend for trait associations (p-values under 0.001 before correction. These associations, yet non-significant after multiple test corrections, with a total number of 1,086 tests, were consistent across the study populations. Additionally, these nine genes also showed an allele frequency difference between the populations from the northern fragmented versus the southern continuous landscape. Discussion Our study provides further support for previously described trait associations within the Glanville fritillary butterfly species across different spatial scales. Although our results alone are inconclusive, they are concordant with previous studies that identified these associations to be related to climatic changes or habitat fragmentation within the Åland population.

  9. Intrapopulation Genome Size Variation in D. melanogaster Reflects Life History Variation and Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Lisa L.; Huang, Wen; Quinn, Andrew M.; Ahuja, Astha; Alfrejd, Ben; Gomez, Francisco E.; Hjelmen, Carl E.; Moore, Kristi L.; Mackay, Trudy F. C.; Johnston, J. Spencer; Tarone, Aaron M.

    2014-01-01

    We determined female genome sizes using flow cytometry for 211 Drosophila melanogaster sequenced inbred strains from the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, and found significant conspecific and intrapopulation variation in genome size. We also compared several life history traits for 25 lines with large and 25 lines with small genomes in three thermal environments, and found that genome size as well as genome size by temperature interactions significantly correlated with survival to pupation and adulthood, time to pupation, female pupal mass, and female eclosion rates. Genome size accounted for up to 23% of the variation in developmental phenotypes, but the contribution of genome size to variation in life history traits was plastic and varied according to the thermal environment. Expression data implicate differences in metabolism that correspond to genome size variation. These results indicate that significant genome size variation exists within D. melanogaster and this variation may impact the evolutionary ecology of the species. Genome size variation accounts for a significant portion of life history variation in an environmentally dependent manner, suggesting that potential fitness effects associated with genome size variation also depend on environmental conditions. PMID:25057905

  10. Allocation tradeoffs among chaparral shrub seedlings with different life history types (Rhamnaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, R Brandon; Jacobsen, Anna L; Hernandez, Jessica; Ewers, Frank W; North, Gretchen B; Davis, Stephen D

    2012-09-01

    California chaparral shrub species have different life history types: Nonsprouters (NS) are killed by fire and persist through a fire-stimulated seed bank; facultative sprouters (FS) reestablish by a combination of vegetative sprouting and seeding; and obligate sprouters (OS) reestablish exclusively by sprouting. Nonsprouters and FS establish seedlings in open-canopy postfire environments, whereas OS establish seedlings between fires in the shady understory. We hypothesized that allocation differences among seedlings of postfire sprouters and nonsprouters and regeneration niche differences would lead to contrasting patterns in biomass accumulation (NS > FS > OS, in sun; OS > FS > NS, in shade). Seedlings of three species from each life history type were grown in sun and 75% shade. We measured net carbon assimilation and biomass accumulation after one year. Biomass accumulation was similar in the sun except FS>OS. In the shade, NS had lower biomass than FS and OS. Assimilation rates, nitrogen relations, and allocation differences could not fully explain biomass accumulation differences. Instead, biomass accumulation was inversely related to water-stress tolerance and shade tolerance. Additionally, OS and FS differed in root/shoot allocation even though both are sprouters. Seedling growth and carbon assimilation rates were divergent among three life history types and were consistent with differences in tolerance to water stress and shade or sun regeneration niches, but not tradeoffs in sprouting-related allocation differences per se.

  11. Impact of landfill liner time-temperature history on the service life of HDPE geomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, R Kerry; Islam, M Z

    2009-10-01

    The observed temperatures in different landfills are used to establish a number of idealized time-temperature histories for geomembrane liners in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. These are then used for estimating the service life of different HDPE geomembranes. The predicted antioxidant depletion times (Stage I) are between 7 and 750 years with the large variation depending on the specific HDPE geomembrane product, exposure conditions, and most importantly, the magnitude and duration of the peak liner temperature. The higher end of the range corresponds to data from geomembranes aged in simulated landfill liner tests and a maximum liner temperature of 37 degrees C. The lower end of the range corresponds to a testing condition where geomembranes were immersed in a synthetic leachate and a maximum liner temperature of 60 degrees C. The total service life of the geomembranes was estimated to be between 20 and 3300 years depending on the time-temperature history examined. The range illustrates the important role that time-temperature history could play in terms of geomembrane service life. The need for long-term monitoring of landfill liner temperature and for geomembrane ageing studies that will provide improved data for assessing the likely long-term performance of geomembranes in MSW landfills are highlighted.

  12. Distribution, ecology, life history, genetic variation, and risk of extinction of nonhuman primates from Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaldívar, Maria E; Rocha, Oscar; Glander, Kenneth E; Aguilar, Gabriel; Huertas, Ana S; Sánchez, Ronald; Wong, Grace

    2004-09-01

    We examined the association between geographic distribution, ecological traits, life history, genetic diversity, and risk of extinction in nonhuman primate species from Costa Rica. All of the current nonhuman primate species from Costa Rica are included in the study; spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi), howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata), capuchins (Cebus capucinus), and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri oerstedii). Geographic distribution was characterized accessing existing databases. Data on ecology and life history traits were obtained through a literature review. Genetic diversity was characterized using isozyme electrophoresis. Risk of extinction was assessed from the literature. We found that species differed in all these traits. Using these data, we conducted a Pearson correlation between risk of extinction and ecological and life history traits, and genetic variation, for widely distributed species. We found a negative association between risk of extinction and population birth and growth rates; indicating that slower reproducing species had a greater risk of extinction. We found a positive association between genetic variation and risk of extinction; i.e., species showing higher genetic variation had a greater risk of extinction. The relevance of these traits for conservation efforts is discussed.

  13. Early unpredictability predicts increased adolescent externalizing behaviors and substance use: A life history perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doom, Jenalee R; Vanzomeren-Dohm, Adrienne A; Simpson, Jeffry A

    2016-11-01

    According to evolutionary life history models, environmental harshness and unpredictability can both promote a fast life history strategy characterized by increased risk taking and enacting short-term, opportunistic behaviors. The current longitudinal study tests whether environmental unpredictability during childhood has stronger effects on risky behavior during adolescence than harshness, and whether there may be an early "sensitive period" during which unpredictability has particularly strong and unique effects on these outcomes. Using data from the Minnesota Longitudinal Study of Risk and Adaptation, prospective assessments of environmental unpredictability (changes in residence, cohabitation, and parental occupation) and harshness (mean socioeconomic status) from birth into adolescence were used to predict self-reported externalizing behaviors and substance use at age 16 (N = 220). Exposure to greater early unpredictability (between ages 0 and 5) predicted more externalizing behaviors as well as more alcohol and marijuana use at age 16, controlling for harshness and later unpredictability (between ages 6 and 16). Harshness predicted adolescent substance use, and later unpredictability predicted adolescent externalizing behaviors at the trend level. Early unpredictability and harshness also interacted, such that the highest levels of risk taking occurred in individuals who experienced more early unpredictability and lived in harsher environments. Age 16 externalizing behaviors, but not substance use, mediated the association between early unpredictability and externalizing/criminal behaviors at age 23. We discuss how exposure to early environmental unpredictability may alter biological and social-cognitive functioning from a life history perspective.

  14. Parental care trade-offs and life-history relationships in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, James D J; Manica, Andrea

    2010-08-01

    Insect parental care is extensive and varied, but its life-history implications have never been comparatively tested. Using original and literature data, we tested predictions about egg size, egg number (lifetime fecundity), and body size under different parental care modes across a phylogeny of 287 insect species. Life-history theory and both comparative and intraspecific evidence from ectotherms suggest parental care should select for bigger, fewer eggs, but that allometric scaling of egg size and lifetime fecundity may depend on whether care consists of provisioning (density-dependent offspring survival) or merely guarding (density-independent offspring survival). Against expectation, egg size was indistinguishable among parental care modes, covarying only with body size. This refutes most theory of egg size evolution under parental care. Lifetime fecundity scaled differently depending on parental investment-positively under no care and guarding, as in most ectotherms, but negatively under provisioning. Reproductive allocation in provisioning insects resembled that in mammals and birds, also groups with obligate provisioning. We propose that the metabolic demands of multiple offspring must scale with species body size more steeply than the parent's provisioning capacity, resulting in larger females laying fewer eggs. These patterns lay the groundwork for a more general understanding of parental care and life history.

  15. Nutrient availability modulates both host and parasite life histories in a snail-trematode interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandland, Gregory J; Josephson, Katherine A

    2017-10-18

    Host nutrient availability can have important life history consequences for hosts and their parasites. The responses of each participant within the association can vary extensively across host-parasite systems. In this paper, we outline the life history responses of the aquatic snail Biomphalaria glabrata and its trematode parasite Echinostoma caproni during host nutrient restriction. The onset of host starvation had rapid and strong effects on snail reproduction, significantly reducing egg output in control snails and eliminating egg production in infected individuals. The combination of E. caproni infection and nutrient restriction also had a dramatic effect on B. glabrata survival, with starved infected snails dying at a faster rate than hosts from any other treatment. In terms of parasite reproduction, host nutrient restriction did not influence the quantity of parasite larvae produced after starvation onset but did influence parasite quality, reducing both larval swimming time and overall longevity. Together these results demonstrate that nutrient restriction can strongly influence both host and parasite life histories, and therefore should be considered in future studies attempting to understand patterns of disease in host populations.

  16. Life histories and Cope's rule from an explicit resource-consumer model based on metabolic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yixian; Scheu, Stefan; Drossel, Barbara

    2012-10-07

    We explore the consequences of metabolic theory for life histories and life history evolution. We use a mathematical model for an iteroparous species and its resources, taking into account the allometric scaling of consumption, metabolism, and mortality with consumer body mass. Mortality is assumed to be density-dependent, and the dynamics of resources are modeled explicitly. By evaluating life history features in equilibrium populations, we find that in populations that use more or faster growing resources the individuals have a shorter lifespan and a higher mortality, and that individuals in populations with a larger adult body mass have a longer lifespan, a larger number of offspring per female, and a higher biomass density. When we allow the adult body mass to evolve, it increases in time without limits. When we allow the offspring body mass to evolve independently from adult body mass, it becomes smaller. However, when we take into account that larger individuals have larger offspring, both body masses evolve to larger values. These trends result from the allometric scaling of mortality and can be kept in limits by trade-offs other than those included in our model. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Life History Traits of an Extended Longevity Phenotype of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepashree, S; Shivanandappa, T; Ramesh, S R

    2017-01-01

    Aging or senescence is a complex biological phenomenon. Artificially selected Drosophila for extended longevity is one of the experimental models used to understand the mechanisms involved in aging and to test various theories. To examine the life history traits and biochemical defenses in relation to aging in an extended longevity phenotype of Drosophila melanogaster. Life history traits viz., survivability, fecundity, development time, dry weight, wing size, lipid content, starvation, desiccation and cold resistances, locomotory ability, antioxidant enzyme activities and reactive oxygen species level between control and selected lines of D. melanogaster were investigated. In our model of Drosophila, extended longevity is associated with no trade-off in fecundity and shows variable resistance to environmental stress such as starvation, cold and desiccation. Enhanced biochemical defense involving the antioxidant enzymes was positively correlated with longevity. Extended longevity phenotypes of Drosophila represent genomic plasticity associated with variable life history traits attributed to the genetic background of the progenitor population and the environment of selection. Oxidative stress resistance seems to be a significant factor in longevity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Natural selection drives clinal life history patterns in the perennial sunflower species, Helianthus maximiliani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Takeshi; Morgan, Theodore J; Nippert, Jesse B; Ocheltree, Troy W; Keith, Rose; Dhakal, Preeti; Ungerer, Mark C

    2011-06-01

    In plants, ecologically important life history traits often display clinal patterns of population divergence. Such patterns can provide strong evidence for spatially varying selection across environmental gradients but also may result from nonselective processes, such as genetic drift, population bottlenecks and spatially restricted gene flow. Comparison of population differentiation in quantitative traits (measured as Q(ST) ) with neutral molecular markers (measured as F(ST) ) provides a useful tool for understanding the relative importance of adaptive and nonadaptive processes in the formation and maintenance of clinal variation. Here, we demonstrate the existence of geographic variation in key life history traits in the diploid perennial sunflower species Helianthus maximiliani across a broad latitudinal transect in North America. Strong population differentiation was found for days to flowering, growth rate and multiple size-related traits. Differentiation in these traits greatly exceeds neutral predictions, as determined both by partial Mantel tests and by comparisons of global Q(ST) values with theoretical F(ST) distributions. These findings indicate that clinal variation in these life history traits likely results from local adaptation driven by spatially heterogeneous environments. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Evolution of dispersal and life history interact to drive accelerating spread of an invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, T Alex; Phillips, Benjamin L; Baskett, Marissa L; Hastings, Alan

    2013-08-01

    Populations on the edge of an expanding range are subject to unique evolutionary pressures acting on their life-history and dispersal traits. Empirical evidence and theory suggest that traits there can evolve rapidly enough to interact with ecological dynamics, potentially giving rise to accelerating spread. Nevertheless, which of several evolutionary mechanisms drive this interaction between evolution and spread remains an open question. We propose an integrated theoretical framework for partitioning the contributions of different evolutionary mechanisms to accelerating spread, and we apply this model to invasive cane toads in northern Australia. In doing so, we identify a previously unrecognised evolutionary process that involves an interaction between life-history and dispersal evolution during range shift. In roughly equal parts, life-history evolution, dispersal evolution and their interaction led to a doubling of distance spread by cane toads in our model, highlighting the potential importance of multiple evolutionary processes in the dynamics of range expansion. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  20. Can family risk-factors moderate the link between psychopathy and life-history strategy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Međedović Janko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Life History Theory is an explanatory evolutionary framework which explains differences in fitness-relevant outcomes using the characteristics of the environment and individual organisms. Basically, individuals can be positioned somewhere on the r/K continuum of the Life History Strategy (LHS: a K or slow strategy represents later maturity and reproduction, a smaller number of offspring with higher investment in them, while the r (or fast strategy follows the opposite pattern. Previous research offered evidence that psychopathy can represent a trait associated with fast LHS. In the present research we examined the relations between the family risk-factors, a four-factor model of psychopathy and the LHS in a sample of male convicts (N=181. The results have shown that a manipulative and deceitful interpersonal style is associated with slow LHS while shallow affect and antisocial tendencies are related to fast LHS. The interactions between psychopathy and family risk-factors revealed that parental criminal behaviour enhances the relation between fast LHS and psychopathic traits, including the manipulative interpersonal style. The findings are in accordance with the Life History Theory and provide a deeper understanding of the preservation of psychopathy in contemporary populations.

  1. Life-history consequences of adaptation to pollution. "Daphnia longispina clones historically exposed to copper".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agra, Ana Raquel; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Barata, Carlos

    2011-05-01

    The present study was conducted to assess life history effects of adaptation to pollution in Daphnia longispina clones historically exposed to an acid mine drainage from an abandoned pyrite mine. Four sensitive and resistant clones from reference and impacted populations were exposed to a range of copper exposure levels and their life history and physiological responses in terms of survival, reproduction, respiration and feeding rates compared. The most resistant clone was from 16 to 48 fold more tolerant to copper in terms of LC(50) and population growth rates than sensitive ones, respectively. The genetic differences between the resistant and sensitive clones were that in the polluted environment individuals of the resistant clone survived 50% better, reproduced 3 days earlier, grew 20% better, produced three more offspring per day and had population growth rates 45% greater. In the unpolluted environment, however, individuals from the resistant clone had the lowest reproduction and somatic growth rates but equivalent population growth rates, than sensitive daphnids. Thus, these life history changes did not translate into lower fitness in unpolluted environments in terms of population growth rates. Observed higher respiration rates of the most resistant clone support in part the energy cost hypothesis of tolerance, whereas increase feeding, reproduction and growth rates across copper exposure levels may also, indicate that resistant individuals need copper to fulfil they physiological demands thus supporting the metal deficiency hypothesis as well. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

  2. Temperature effects on gametophyte life-history traits and geographic distribution of two cryptic kelp species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppliger, L Valeria; Correa, Juan A; Engelen, Aschwin H; Tellier, Florence; Vieira, Vasco; Faugeron, Sylvain; Valero, Myriam; Gomez, Gonzalo; Destombe, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    A major determinant of the geographic distribution of a species is expected to be its physiological response to changing abiotic variables over its range. The range of a species often corresponds to the geographic extent of temperature regimes the organism can physiologically tolerate. Many species have very distinct life history stages that may exhibit different responses to environmental factors. In this study we emphasized the critical role of the haploid microscopic stage (gametophyte) of the life cycle to explain the difference of edge distribution of two related kelp species. Lessonia nigrescens was recently identified as two cryptic species occurring in parapatry along the Chilean coast: one located north and the other south of a biogeographic boundary at latitude 29-30°S. Six life history traits from microscopic stages were identified and estimated under five treatments of temperature in eight locations distributed along the Chilean coast in order to (1) estimate the role of temperature in the present distribution of the two cryptic L. nigrescens species, (2) compare marginal populations to central populations of the two cryptic species. In addition, we created a periodic matrix model to estimate the population growth rate (λ) at the five temperature treatments. Differential tolerance to temperature was demonstrated between the two species, with the gametophytes of the Northern species being more tolerant to higher temperatures than gametophytes from the south. Second, the two species exhibited different life history strategies with a shorter haploid phase in the Northern species contrasted with considerable vegetative growth in the Southern species haploid stage. These results provide strong ecological evidence for the differentiation process of the two cryptic species and show local adaptation of the life cycle at the range limits of the distribution. Ecological and evolutionary implications of these findings are discussed.

  3. Life histories of female elementary teachers and their science/teacher role construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseur, Aletha Johnson

    The research conducted in this study focuses on life histories of female elementary teachers and their science/teacher role construction. Identity theorists argue that the self consists of a collection of identities founded on occupying a particular role. Who we are depends on the roles we occupy. These roles are often referred to as "role identities". In the case of these participants, many role identities (mother, wife, sibling, and teacher) exist. This study focuses primarily on their (science) teacher role identity. Literature on women's lives, as learners and teachers, suggest that women's experiences, currently and throughout history influenced their teacher role construction. There is however, little knowledge of women's lives as elementary teachers of science and the affect of their experiences, currently and throughout history, on their (science) teacher identity construction. Schools delineated by race, class, and gender relations, are similar to other sectors of society's, social and cultural spheres within which race, class, and gender identities are constructed. Using in-depth-interviews female elementary teachers were encouraged to actively reconstruct their life and work-life experiences focusing on family, school and science interactions. They addressed the intellectual and emotional connections between their life and work experiences by focusing on details of their past and present experiences and examining the meaning of those experiences. It was the scrutiny of these connections between their life and work experiences, the meaning derived from them and historical events, and the constraints imposed on their personal choices by broader power relations, such as those of class, race, and gender that informed why we teach, how we teach, and what we teach.

  4. Temperature effects on gametophyte life-history traits and geographic distribution of two cryptic kelp species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Valeria Oppliger

    Full Text Available A major determinant of the geographic distribution of a species is expected to be its physiological response to changing abiotic variables over its range. The range of a species often corresponds to the geographic extent of temperature regimes the organism can physiologically tolerate. Many species have very distinct life history stages that may exhibit different responses to environmental factors. In this study we emphasized the critical role of the haploid microscopic stage (gametophyte of the life cycle to explain the difference of edge distribution of two related kelp species. Lessonia nigrescens was recently identified as two cryptic species occurring in parapatry along the Chilean coast: one located north and the other south of a biogeographic boundary at latitude 29-30°S. Six life history traits from microscopic stages were identified and estimated under five treatments of temperature in eight locations distributed along the Chilean coast in order to (1 estimate the role of temperature in the present distribution of the two cryptic L. nigrescens species, (2 compare marginal populations to central populations of the two cryptic species. In addition, we created a periodic matrix model to estimate the population growth rate (λ at the five temperature treatments. Differential tolerance to temperature was demonstrated between the two species, with the gametophytes of the Northern species being more tolerant to higher temperatures than gametophytes from the south. Second, the two species exhibited different life history strategies with a shorter haploid phase in the Northern species contrasted with considerable vegetative growth in the Southern species haploid stage. These results provide strong ecological evidence for the differentiation process of the two cryptic species and show local adaptation of the life cycle at the range limits of the distribution. Ecological and evolutionary implications of these findings are discussed.

  5. Association of abuse history with symptom severity and quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Juan; Vincent, Ann; Cha, Stephen S; Luedtke, Connie A; Oh, Terry H

    2015-03-01

    A high prevalence of abuse has been reported in patients with fibromyalgia. We aimed to examine the association between self-reported abuse history and symptom severity and quality of life (QOL) in 962 patients with fibromyalgia. All patients completed the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and the Short Form 36 health survey (SF-36). Multivariate regression analyses were performed. In total, 289 patients (30%) reported a history of abuse. Of those who specified abuse types, 161 patients (59%) reported more than 1 type of abuse (36% emotional, 32% physical, 25% sexual, and 7% verbal). Patients in the abuse group were younger and more likely to be female, unemployed, unmarried, and current smokers compared with patients who reported no abuse. After adjusting for these differences, abuse history was associated with worse symptoms, as indicated by a higher FIQ total score (P anxiety (P fibromyalgia was associated with worse symptoms and QOL compared with those patients without abuse history. Future studies are needed to assess whether additional tailored interventions as part of fibromyalgia treatment are helpful for patients with a history of abuse.

  6. Carryover effects of predation risk on postembryonic life-history stages in a freshwater shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ituarte, Romina Belén; Vázquez, María Guadalupe; González-Sagrario, María de los Ángeles; Spivak, Eduardo Daniel

    2014-04-01

    For organisms with complex life histories it is well known that risk experienced early in life, as embryos or larvae, may have effects throughout the life cycle. Although carryover effects have been well documented in invertebrates with different levels of parental care, there are few examples of predator-induced responses in externally brooded embryos. Here, we studied the effects of nonlethal predation risk throughout the embryonic development of newly spawned eggs carried by female shrimp on the timing of egg hatching, hatchling morphology, larval development and juvenile morphology. We also determined maternal body mass at the end of the embryonic period. Exposure to predation risk cues during embryonic development led to larger larvae which also had longer rostra but reached the juvenile stage sooner, at a smaller size and with shorter rostra. There was no difference in hatching timing, but changes in larval morphology and developmental timing showed that the embryos had perceived waterborne substances indicative of predation risk. In addition to carryover effects on larval and juvenile stages, predation threat provoked a decrease of body mass in mothers exposed to predator cues while brooding. Our results suggest that risk-exposed embryos were able to recognize the same infochemicals as their mothers, manifesting a response in the free-living larval stage. Thus, future studies assessing anti-predator phenotypes should include embryonic development, which seems to determine the morphology and developmental time of subsequent life-history stages according to perceived environmental conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Life history, habitat saturation and the evolution of fecundity and survival altruism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, Sébastien; Gandon, Sylvain

    2010-06-01

    Hamilton's rule provides a general description of the conditions for the evolution of altruism. But altruism can take different forms depending on which life-history trait is affected by the helping behavior (fecundity vs. survival helping). In particular, these different forms of helping may have very different demographic consequences, which may feed back on evolution. We examine the interplay between various forms of helping and demography in viscous populations with empty sites. A key component of our analysis is the local density of empty sites experienced by a focal individual, which provides a measure of habitat saturation. Habitat saturation is shown to have contrasting effects depending on (1) whether the physiological costs and benefits of helping affect fecundity, survival or both; and (2) whether the costs of helping are paid in a density-dependent or density-independent manner. For a given level of habitat saturation and with density-dependent reproduction, we find that the conditions for the evolution of helping should be more favorable in the survival altruism life cycle with a cost on fecundity, and more stringent in the fecundity altruism life cycle with a cost on survival. More generally, our analysis stresses the importance of taking into account the feedback between population demography, life history, and kin selection when investigating the selective pressures on altruism.

  8. Seasonal life history trade-offs in two leafwing butterflies: Delaying reproductive development increases life expectancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElderry, Robert M

    2016-04-01

    Surviving inhospitable periods or seasons may greatly affect fitness. Evidence of this exists in the prevalence of dormant stages in the life cycles of most insects. Here I focused on butterflies with distinct seasonal morphological types (not a genetic polymorphism) in which one morphological type, or form, delays reproduction until favorable conditions return, while the other form develops in an environment that favors direct reproduction. For two butterflies, Anaea aidea and A. andria, I tested the hypothesis that the development of each seasonal form involves a differential allocation of resources to survival at eclosion. I assayed differences in adult longevity among summer and winter forms in either a warm, active environment or a cool, calm environment. Winter form adults lived 40 times longer than summer form but only in calm, cool conditions. The magnitude of this difference provided compelling evidence that the winter form body plan and metabolic strategy (i.e. resource conservatism) favor long term survival. This research suggests that winter form adults maintain lowered metabolic rate, a common feature of diapause, to conserve resources and delay senescence while overwintering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Young adult patients with a history of pediatric disease: impact on course of life and transition into adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, Heleen; Hartman, Esther E.; Deurloo, Jacqueline A.; Groothoff, Jaap; Grootenhuis, Martha A.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the course of life of young adults who grew up with a chronic or life-threatening disease, and to compare their course of life with that of peers from the general population. Optimal transition from pediatric to adult health care requires knowledge of the psychosocial history of

  10. Life-history stages of the jellyfish Aurelia aurita - towards a demographic understanding of jellyfish blooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, Josephine

    2017-01-01

    Jellyfish blooms are conspicuous demographic events that have received increasing attention by the public and the scientific community over the last decades due to their negative impact on fisheries, tourism and other human industries. Several aspects of the complex life cycles of the jellyfish...... species involved in mass occurrence have been covered in previous studies, providing important insight into diverse life stage-specific adaptation strategies to changing environmental conditions. Quantification of the demographic rates that characterize different life-history stages however has remained......, including frequent mass occurrence of A. aurita medusae in temperate Danish waters. The present novel data show for instance, that jellyfish blooms of A. aurita are strongly affected by food availability and corresponding shifts between asexually reproducing benthic polyps and sexually reproducing pelagic...

  11. Work Identity and Contradictory Experiences of Welfare Workers in a Life-history Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybbroe, Betina

    2012-01-01

    Transformation of the welfare sectors challenge professional identities of care and welfare workers in Scandinavia. At the same time welfare and care workers take part in these changes and are changed in the psycho-social setting of the workplace. This article presents research about care work...... in Denmark with a focus on subjective processing of work identity, applying a psycho-societal theoretical and methodical approach. A life historical and experiential understanding of Alfred LORENZER's cultural theory is applied to understand societal transformations, here in the work place...... in nursing and involves a young nurse in scenes of the hospital, where gendered life history is re-enacted and present in a gendered work life with fragile possibilities of identification . Social dynamics interact with subjective dynamics in ways that illuminate not only habitual and creative orientations...

  12. Work Identity and Contradictory Experiences of Welfare Workers in a Life-history Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybbroe, Betina

    2012-01-01

    in nursing and involves a young nurse in scenes of the hospital, where gendered life history is re-enacted and present in a gendered work life with fragile possibilities of identification . Social dynamics interact with subjective dynamics in ways that illuminate not only habitual and creative orientations......Transformation of the welfare sectors challenge professional identities of care and welfare workers in Scandinavia. At the same time welfare and care workers take part in these changes and are changed in the psycho-social setting of the workplace. This article presents research about care work...... in Denmark with a focus on subjective processing of work identity, applying a psycho-societal theoretical and methodical approach. A life historical and experiential understanding of Alfred LORENZER's cultural theory is applied to understand societal transformations, here in the work place...

  13. The definition of life: a brief history of an elusive scientific endeavor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirard, Stephane; Morange, Michel; Lazcano, Antonio

    2010-12-01

    In spite of the spectacular developments in our understanding of the molecular basis that underlies biological phenomena, we still lack a generally agreed-upon definition of life, but this is not for want of trying. Life is an empirical concept; and, as suggested by the many unsuccessful efforts to define it, this task is likely to remain, at best, a work in progress. Although phenomenological characterizations of life are feasible, a precise definition of life remains an elusive intellectual endeavor. This is not surprising: as Nietszche once wrote, there are concepts that can be defined, whereas others only have a history. The purpose of this essay is to discuss some of the manifold (and often unsatisfactory) definitions of life that have been attempted from different intellectual and scientific perspectives and reflect, at least in part, the key role that historical frameworks play. Although some efforts have been more fruitful, the lack of an all-embracing, generally agreed-upon definition of life sometimes gives the impression that what is meant by life's origin is defined in somewhat imprecise terms and that several entirely different questions are often confused. The many attempts made to reduce the nature of living systems to a single living compound imply that life can be so well defined that the exact point at which it started can be established with the sudden appearance of the first replicating molecule. On the other hand, if the emergence of life is seen as the stepwise (but not necessarily slow) evolutionary transition between the non-living and the living, then it may be meaningless to draw a strict line between them.

  14. Fitness consequences of alternative life histories in water striders, Aquarius remigis (Heteroptera: Gerridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanckenhorn, W U

    1994-04-01

    Using field and laboratory observations and experiments over 3 years, I investigated whether reproductive trade-offs shape individual life histories in two natural populations of the water strider, Aquarius remigis, in which univoltine and bivoltine life cycles coexist. Both later eclosion dates and food shortages, even after adult eclosion, induced diapause in females, thus deferring reproduction to the following spring. Adult body size was positively affected by food availability during juvenile development. Higher food levels also increased the reproductive output of females, but not their longevity or oviposition period. When compared to spring breeders (univoltine life cycle), direct (summer) breeders (bivoltine life cycle) experienced reduced lifetime egg numbers and longevity, as well as reduced survivorship of their second-summer-generation offspring; these reproductive costs offset, at least in part, the advantage in non-decreasing populations of having two generations per year. Fecundity was correlated with body size, and among summer-generation females direct breeders were larger than non-breeders. The time remaining before the onset of winter and/or the time since adult eclosion augmented cumulative energy uptake, and consequently the lipid reserves and winter survival probability of non-breeding (diapausing) summer adults approaching hibernation. Overwintered spring reproductives died at faster rates than non-reproductive summer individuals despite greater food availability in spring, indicating a mortality cost of reproduction. Body length correlated with absolute and not with proportional lipid content but showed no consistent relationship with survivorship in the field. These results are in agreement with current theory on the evolution of insect voltinism patterns, and further indicate high degrees of life history flexibility (phenotypic plasticity) in the study populations in response to variable environmental factors (notably photoperiod and food

  15. Potential effects of changes in temperature and food resources on life history trajectories of juvenile Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Joseph R.; Connolly, Patrick J.; Romine, Jason G.; Perry, Russell W.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing temperatures and changes in food resources owing to climate change may alter the growth and migratory behavior of organisms. This is particularly important for salmonid species like Oncorhynchus mykiss, where some individuals remain in freshwater to mature (nonanadromous Rainbow Trout) and others migrate to sea (anadromous Steelhead). Whether one strategy is adopted over the other may depend on the individual's growth and size. In this study, we explored (1) how water temperature in Beaver Creek, a tributary to the Methow River, Washington, may increase under four climate scenarios, (2) how these thermal changes may alter the life history trajectory followed by O. mykiss (i.e., when and if to smolt), and (3) how changes in food quality or quantity might interact with increasing temperatures. We combined bioenergetic and state-dependent life history models parameterized for O. mykiss in Beaver Creek to mimic baseline life history trajectories. Based on our simulations, when mean water temperature was increased by 0.6°C there was a reduction in life history diversity and a 57% increase in the number of individuals becoming smolts. When mean temperature was increased by 2.7°C, it resulted in 87% fewer smolts than in the baseline and fewer life history trajectories expressed. A reduction in food resources led to slower growth, more life history trajectories, and a greater proportion of smolts. In contrast, when food resources were increased, fish grew faster, which reduced the proportion of smolts and life history diversity. Our modeling suggests that warmer water temperatures associated with climate change could decrease the life history diversity of O. mykiss in the central portion of their range and thereby reduce resiliency to other disturbances. In addition, changes in food resources could mediate or exacerbate the effect of water temperature on the life history trajectories of O. mykiss.

  16. Student-generated illustrations and written narratives of biological science concepts: The effect on community college life science students' achievement in and attitudes toward science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Robert Christopher

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two conceptually based instructional strategies on science achievement and attitudes of community college biological science students. The sample consisted of 277 students enrolled in General Biology 1, Microbiology, and Human Anatomy and Physiology 1. Control students were comprised of intact classes from the 2005 Spring semester; treatment students from the 2005 Fall semester were randomly assigned to one of two groups within each course: written narrative (WN) and illustration (IL). WN students prepared in-class written narratives related to cell theory and metabolism, which were taught in all three courses. IL students prepared in-class illustrations of the same concepts. Control students received traditional lecture/lab during the entire class period and neither wrote in-class descriptions nor prepared in-class illustrations of the targeted concepts. All groups were equivalent on age, gender, ethnicity, GPA, and number of college credits earned and were blinded to the study. All interventions occurred in class and no group received more attention or time to complete assignments. A multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) via multiple regression was the primary statistical strategy used to test the study's hypotheses. The model was valid and statistically significant. Independent follow-up univariate analyses relative to each dependent measure found that no research factor had a significant effect on attitude, but that course-teacher, group membership, and student academic characteristics had a significant effect (p < .05) on achievement: (1) Biology students scored significantly lower in achievement than A&P students; (2) Microbiology students scored significantly higher in achievement than Biology students; (3) Written Narrative students scored significantly higher in achievement than Control students; and (4) GPA had a significant effect on achievement. In addition, given p < .08: (1

  17. The roles of life-history selection and sexual selection in the adaptive evolution of mating behavior in a beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklakov, Alexei A; Cayetano, Luis; Brooks, Robert C; Bonduriansky, Russell

    2010-05-01

    Although there is continuing debate about whether sexual selection promotes or impedes adaptation to novel environments, the role of mating behavior in such adaptation remains largely unexplored. We investigated the evolution of mating behavior (latency to mating, mating probability and duration) in replicate populations of seed beetles Callosobruchus maculatus subjected to selection on life-history ("Young" vs. "Old" reproduction) under contrasting regimes of sexual selection ("Monogamy" vs. "Polygamy"). Life-history selection is predicted to favor delayed mating in "Old" females, but sexual conflict under polygamy can potentially retard adaptive life-history evolution. We found that life-history selection yielded the predicted changes in mating behavior, but sexual selection regime had no net effect. In within-line crosses, populations selected for late reproduction showed equally reduced early-life mating probability regardless of mating system. In between-line crosses, however, the effect of life-history selection on early-life mating probability was stronger in polygamous lines than in monogamous ones. Thus, although mating system influenced male-female coevolution, removal of sexual selection did not affect the adaptive evolution of mating behavior. Importantly, our study shows that the interaction between sexual selection and life-history selection can result in either increased or decreased reproductive divergence depending on the ecological context.

  18. Diversity and Life Histories in Freshwater Mussel Communities of the Gulf Coastal Plain, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, W. R.; Warren, M. L.

    2005-05-01

    The Gulf Coastal Plain supports a diverse mussel fauna including many endemic species. Richness among drainages was associated strongly and positively with watershed size. Assemblage similarity among drainages identified three major faunal groupings: Pontchartrain-Pearl-Pascagoula-Mobile; Escambia-Choctawhatchee; and Apalachicola-Ochlockonee-Suwannee. The Escambia-Choctawhatchee showed greater affinity to the Apalachicola than to the Mobile Basin. Patterns of mussel assemblages among drainages were associated strongly with fish assemblages suggesting two non-mutually exclusive hypotheses: 1) biogeographic history affected both groups similarly, and 2) the fish host relationship was important in shaping mussel communities. Based on interspecific variation in life history traits including host use, longevity, offspring size, and fecundity, we established seven guilds to represent regional diversity in life history strategies. The number of guilds decreased from west to east indicating reduced ecological complexity. For widely represented guilds, drainages showed either 1) similar guild composition because of replacement by ecologically similar species, or 2) a shift in dominance among guilds along a west-east continuum. This dichotomy cannot be reconciled currently because data are lacking for numerous species of Elliptio, a dominant genus in eastern Gulf Coastal Plain mussel communities. This information gap illustrates the abundant opportunities for ecological research in the region.

  19. [Evaluation of quality of life in school children with a history of early severe malnutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grandis, E S; Armelini, P A; Cuestas, E

    2014-12-01

    Severe malnutrition in young children may lead to long-term complications, in particular learning and psychosocial disorders linked to health related quality of life (HRQOL). The aim of this study was to evaluate HRQOL in children whit a history of severe malnutrition before 2 years of life, expecting to find lower scores in these patients. A comparative study was performed on schoolchildren between 5 and 12 years with a history of early severe malnutrition, excluding those with chronic diseases. The Controls were healthy siblings of patients. The sample size was estimated as 26 subjects per group (Total=52). Sociodemographic variables were recorded and the HRQOL was assessed with PedsQL4.0. Chi square and Student t test were applied. Significance level: Psocial dimension: 88.80±3.05 vs 95.71±1.52 (P<.0001), and school dimension: 74.58±3.80 vs 85.00±3.51 (P<.0001). Patients with a history of early severe malnutrition, showed significantly lower HRQOL scores compared with controls. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Revealing life-history traits by contrasting genetic estimations with predictions of effective population size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Gili; Renan, Sharon; Templeton, Alan R; Bouskila, Amos; Saltz, David; Rubenstein, Daniel I; Bar-David, Shirli

    2017-12-22

    Effective population size, a central concept in conservation biology, is now routinely estimated from genetic surveys, and can also be theoretically-predicted from demographic, life-history and mating-system hypotheses. However, by evaluating the consistency of theoretical predictions with empirically-estimated effective size, insights can be gained regarding life-history characteristics, as well as the relative impact of different life-history traits on genetic drift. These insights can be used to design and inform management strategies aimed at increasing effective population size. Here we describe and demonstrate this approach by addressing the conservation of a reintroduced population of Asiatic wild ass (Equus hemionus). We estimate the variance effective size (Nev ) from genetic data (Nev = 24.3), and we formulate predictions for the impacts on Nev of demography, polygyny, female variance in life-time reproductive success, and heritability of female reproductive success. By contrasting the genetic estimation with theoretical predictions, we find that polygyny is the strongest factor effecting genetic drift, as only when accounting for polygyny were predictions consistent with the genetically-measured Nev , with 10.6% mating males per generation when heritability of female RS was unaccounted for (polygyny responsible for 81% decrease in Nev ), and 19.5% when it was accounted for (polygyny responsible for 67% decrease in Nev ). Heritability of female reproductive success was also found to affect Nev , with hf2 = 0.91 (heritability responsible for 41% decrease in Nev ). The low effective population size is of concern, and we suggest specific management actions focusing on factors identified as strongly affecting Nev -increasing the availability of artificial water sources to increase number of dominant males contributing to the gene pool. This approach - evaluating life-history hypotheses, in light of their impact on effective population size, and contrasting

  1. Star formation history written in spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellerbroek, L.E.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, the process of star formation is mapped from large to small scales, using the world's most advanced observatories. Discoveries of several young stars with peculiar environments are reported. Dynamics of circumstellar gas and dust are analyzed in a diverse ensemble of young stars. The

  2. History must be re-written

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahonou, Eric Komlavi; Pelckmans, Lotte

    2012-01-01

    The chapter addresses the silence that characterizes African domestic slavery in West Africa. Whereas the trans-Atlantic slave trade is remembered and commemorated, domestic slavery has long remained a taboo topic. The authors examine the ways in which African domestic slavery is disregarded and ...

  3. Life history tactics shape amphibians' demographic responses to the North Atlantic Oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayuela, Hugo; Joly, Pierre; Schmidt, Benedikt R; Pichenot, Julian; Bonnaire, Eric; Priol, Pauline; Peyronel, Olivier; Laville, Mathias; Besnard, Aurélien

    2017-11-01

    Over the last three decades, climate abnormalities have been reported to be involved in biodiversity decline by affecting population dynamics. A growing number of studies have shown that the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) influences the demographic parameters of a wide range of plant and animal taxa in different ways. Life history theory could help to understand these different demographic responses to the NAO. Indeed, theory states that the impact of weather variation on a species' demographic traits should depend on its position along the fast-slow continuum. In particular, it is expected that NAO would have a higher impact on recruitment than on adult survival in slow species, while the opposite pattern is expected occur in fast species. To test these predictions, we used long-term capture-recapture datasets (more than 15,000 individuals marked from 1965 to 2015) on different surveyed populations of three amphibian species in Western Europe: Triturus cristatus, Bombina variegata, and Salamandra salamandra. Despite substantial intraspecific variation, our study revealed that these three species differ in their position on a slow-fast gradient of pace of life. Our results also suggest that the differences in life history tactics influence amphibian responses to NAO fluctuations: Adult survival was most affected by the NAO in the species with the fastest pace of life (T. cristatus), whereas recruitment was most impacted in species with a slower pace of life (B. variegata and S. salamandra). In the context of climate change, our findings suggest that the capacity of organisms to deal with future changes in NAO values could be closely linked to their position on the fast-slow continuum. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Life history evolution, reproduction, and the origins of sex-dependent aging and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Robert C; Garratt, Michael G

    2017-02-01

    Males and females in many species differ in how they age and how long they live. These differences have motivated much research, concerning both their evolution and the underlying mechanisms that cause them. We review how differences in male and female life histories have evolved to shape patterns of aging and some of the mechanisms and pathways involved. We pay particular attention to three areas where considerable potential for synergy between mechanistic and evolutionary research exists: (1) the role of estrogens, androgens, the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 pathway, and the mechanistic target of rapamycin signaling pathway in sex-dependent growth and reproduction; (2) sexual conflict over mating rate and fertility, and how mate presence or mating can become an avenue for males and females to directly affect each other's life span; and (3) the link between dietary restriction and aging, and the emerging understanding that only the restriction of certain nutrients is involved and that this is linked to reproduction. We suggest that ideas about life histories, sex-dependent selection, and sexual conflict can inform and be informed by the ever more refined and complex understanding of the mechanisms that cause aging. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. Life history comparison of two terrestrial isopods in relation to habitat specialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadros, Aline Ferreira; Caubet, Yves; Araujo, Paula Beatriz

    2009-03-01

    For many animal species, there is a relationship between life history strategies, as predicted by the r- K-selection theory, degree of habitat specialization and response to habitat alteration and loss. Here we compare two sympatric woodlice species with contrasting patterns of habitat use and geographical distribution. We predict that Atlantoscia floridana (Philosciidae), considered a habitat generalist, would exhibit the r-selected traits, whereas Balloniscus glaber (Balloniscidae), considered a habitat specialist, should have the K-selected traits. We analyzed several life history traits as well as life and fecundity tables using 715 and 842 females of A. floridana and B. glaber, respectively, from populations living in syntopy in southern Brazil. As predicted, most evaluated traits allow A. floridana to be considered an r-strategist and B. glaber a K-strategist: A. floridana showed a shorter lifetime, faster development, earlier reproduction, a smaller parental investment, higher net reproductive rate ( R0), a higher growth rate ( r) and a shorter generation time ( T) in comparison to B. glaber. A. floridana seems to be a successful colonizer with a high reproductive output. These characteristics explain its local abundance, commonness and wide geographical distribution. On the contrary, B. glaber has a restricted geographical distribution that is mainly associated with Atlantic forest fragments, a biome threatened by deforestation and replacement by monocultures. Its narrow distribution combined with the K-selected traits may confer to this species an increased extinction risk.

  6. Linking immune patterns and life history shows two distinct defense strategies in land snails (gastropoda, pulmonata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Jacqueline; Madec, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Life history integration of the defense response was investigated at intra- and interspecific levels in land snails of the family Helicidae. Two hypotheses were tested: (i) fitness consequences of defense responses are closely related to life history traits such as size at maturity and life span; (ii) different pathways of the immune response based on "nonspecific" versus "specific" responses may reflect different defense options. Relevant immune responses to a challenge with E. coli were measured using the following variables: blood cell density, cellular or plasma antibacterial activity via reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, and bacterial growth inhibition. The results revealed that the largest snails did not exhibit the strongest immune response. Instead, body mass influenced the type of response in determining the appropriate strategy. Snails with a higher body mass at maturity had more robust plasma immune responses than snails with a lower mass, which had greater cell-mediated immune responses with a higher hemocyte density. In addition, ROS appeared also to be a stress mediator as attested by differences between sites and generations for the same species.

  7. Life history of the Marbled Whiptail Lizard Aspidoscelis marmorata from the central Chihuahuan Desert, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Gadsden

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The life history of a population of marbled whiptail lizard, Aspidoscelis marmorata, was examined from 1989 to 1994 in the sand dunes of the Biosphere Reserve of Mapimí, in Northern México. Lizards were studied using mark-recapture techniques. Reproduction in females occurred between May and August, with birth hatchlings matching the wet season in August. Reproductive activity was highest in the early wet season (July. Males and females reached adult size class at an average age of 1.7 years and 1.8 years, respectively. Body size of males attained an asymptote around 90 mm snout-vent length and females around 82 mm snout-vent length, at an age of approximately 3.6 years and 3.0 years, respectively. The density varied from 7 to 85 individuals / 1.0 ha. The Mexican population had late maturity, relatively long life expectancy, and fewer offspring. Overall, the observed data for A. marmorata and the expectations of life history theory for a late maturing species (K-rate selection are in agreement.

  8. Life-history traits in the tardigrade species Paramacrobiotus kenianus and Paramacrobiotus palaui

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph O. Schill

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Although tardigrades have been studied for a long time, little is still known about their life-history traits. In the present study, two populations of the parthenogenetic African tardigrade species Paramacrobiotus kenianus, and the parthenogenetic species Paramacrobiotus palaui from the pacific islands of Palau were examined and analysed related to their life-history traits under laboratory conditions. The longevity in days (mean±SD do not vary between the P. kenianus population (I (125±35 and (II (141±54, but P. palaui showed a significant shorter longevity (97±31. A recorded maximum age of 212 days was reached by P. kenianus population (II. P. kenianus population (I laid 138±71 eggs (mean±SD and population (II 124±78 eggs (mean±SD during their life, whereas P. palaui laid only 42±54 eggs (mean±SD. While the hatching time was similar in all species, starting after 6 to 9 days, the hatching rate in P. kenianus population (I was 33%, compared with 51% of population (II and 54% of P. palaui.

  9. Life history and emergence pattern of Cloeon dipterum (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae) in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cha Young; Kim, Dong Gun; Baek, Min Jeong; Choe, Lak Jung; Bae, Yeon Jae

    2013-12-01

    Cloeon dipterum (L.) (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae), the common wetland mayfly, emerges and oviposits every season, except winter, and has overlapping generations in the temperate region. We investigated the life history of C. dipterum associated with drought. Field experiments and sampling were conducted in a wetland (25 by 80 m) located in central Korea. Larvae were sampled weekly within two habitat types (a large, deep wetland and a small, shallow wetland) using a dredge sampler, and adults were sampled every 2 d with cube emergence traps, from July 2011 to September 2012 (except winter). C. dipterum had an extended emergence period from late April to early October with four peaks: early May, mid-June, July, and August/September. When the water depth was shallow because of drought, emergence was suppressed and delayed. The accumulated degree-days and body length of the overwintering cohort that emerged in spring 2012 were markedly larger and longer than those of other cohorts. Adults emerged intensively around sunset. C. dipterum has a multivoltine life cycle with four cohorts per year; its life history and population density can be changed by natural disturbances such as drought and fish predation.

  10. Life-history differences favor evolution of male dimorphism in competitive games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallegange, Isabel M; Johansson, Jacob

    2014-02-01

    Many species exhibit two discrete male morphs: fighters and sneakers. Fighters are large and possess weapons but may mature slowly. Sneakers are small and have no weapons but can sneak matings and may mature quickly to start mating earlier in life than fighters. However, how differences in competitive ability and life history interact to determine male morph coexistence has not yet been investigated within a single framework. Here we integrate demography and game theory into a two-sex population model to study the evolution of strategies that result in the coexistence of fighters and sneakers. We incorporate differences in maturation time between the morphs and use a mating-probability matrix analogous to the classic hawk-dove game. Using adaptive dynamics, we show that male dimorphism evolves more easily in our model than in classic game theory approaches. Our results also revealed an interaction between life-history differences and sneaker competitiveness, which shows that demography and competitive games should be treated as interlinked mechanisms to understand the evolution of male dimorphism. Applying our approach to empirical data on bulb mites (Rhizoglyphus robini), coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), and bullhorned dung beetles (Onthophagus taurus) indicates that observed occurrences of male dimorphism are in general agreement with model predictions.

  11. Enlightening the life sciences: the history of halobacterial and microbial rhodopsin research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Mathias; O'Malley, Maureen A

    2011-11-01

    The history of research on microbial rhodopsins offers a novel perspective on the history of the molecular life sciences. Events in this history play important roles in the development of fields such as general microbiology, membrane research, bioenergetics, metagenomics and, very recently, neurobiology. New concepts, techniques, methods and fields have arisen as a result of microbial rhodopsin investigations. In addition, the history of microbial rhodopsins sheds light on the dynamic connections between basic and applied science, and hypothesis-driven and data-driven approaches. The story begins with the late nineteenth century discovery of microorganisms on salted fish and leads into ecological and taxonomical studies of halobacteria in hypersaline environments. These programmes were built on by the discovery of bacteriorhodopsin in organisms that are part of what is now known as the archaeal genus Halobacterium. The transfer of techniques from bacteriorhodopsin studies to the metagenomic discovery of proteorhodopsin in 2000 further extended the field. Microbial rhodopsins have also been used as model systems to understand membrane protein structure and function, and they have become the target of technological applications such as optogenetics and nanotechnology. Analysing the connections between these historical episodes provides a rich example of how science works over longer time periods, especially with regard to the transfer of materials, methods and concepts between different research fields. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Long way home The life history of Chinese-Indonesian migrants in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumi Kitamura

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to trace the modern history of Indonesia through the experience of two Chinese Indonesians who migrated to the Netherlands at different periods of time. These life stories represent both post-colonial experiences and the Cold War politics in Indonesia. The migration of Chinese Indonesians since the beginning of the twentieth century has had long history, however, most of the previous literature has focused on the experiences of the “Peranakan” group who are not representative of various other groups of Chinese Indonesian migrants who have had different experiences in making their journey to the Netherlands. This paper will present two stories as a parallel to the more commonly known narratives of the “Peranakan” experience.

  13. The life history of Pseudomonas syringae: linking agriculture to earth system processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Cindy E; Monteil, Caroline L; Berge, Odile

    2013-01-01

    The description of the ecology of Pseudomonas syringae is moving away from that of a ubiquitous epiphytic plant pathogen to one of a multifaceted bacterium sans frontières in fresh water and other ecosystems linked to the water cycle. Discovery of the aquatic facet of its ecology has led to a vision of its life history that integrates spatial and temporal scales spanning billions of years and traversing catchment basins, continents, and the planet and that confronts the implication of roles that are potentially conflicting for agriculture (as a plant pathogen and as an actor in processes leading to rain and snowfall). This new ecological perspective has also yielded insight into epidemiological phenomena linked to disease emergence. Overall, it sets the stage for the integration of more comprehensive contexts of ecology and evolutionary history into comparative genomic analyses to elucidate how P. syringae subverts the attack and defense responses of the cohabitants of the diverse environments it occupies.

  14. Model-based estimates of annual survival rate are preferable to observed maximum lifespan statistics for use in comparative life-history studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krementz, D.G.; Sauer, J.R.; Nichols, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Estimates of longevity are available for many animals, and are commonly used in comparative life-history analyses. We suggest that annual survival rate is more appropriate life history parameter for most comparative life history analyses. Observed maximum longevities were not correlated with the annual survival rate estimates and appear to be unstable over time. We recommend that observed maximum lifespans not be used in life history analyses.

  15. Influences on Bythotrephes longimanus life-history characteristics in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothoven, Steven A.; Vanderploeg, Henry A.; Warner, David M.; Schaeffer, Jeffrey S.; Ludsin, Stuart A.; Claramunt, Randall M.; Nalepa, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    We compared Bythotrephes population demographics and dynamics to predator (planktivorous fish) and prey (small-bodied crustacean zooplankton) densities at a site sampled through the growing season in Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Erie. Although seasonal average densities of Bythotrephes were similar across lakes (222/m2 Erie, 247/m2 Huron, 162/m2 Michigan), temporal trends in abundance differed among lakes. In central Lake Erie where Bythotrephes' prey assemblage was dominated by small individuals (60%), where planktivorous fish densities were high (14,317/ha), and where a shallow water column limited availability of a deepwater refuge, the Bythotrephes population was characterized by a small mean body size, large broods with small neonates, allocation of length increases mainly to the spine rather than to the body, and a late summer population decline. By contrast, in Lake Michigan where Bythotrephes' prey assemblage was dominated by large individuals (72%) and planktivorous fish densities were lower (5052/ha), the Bythotrephes population was characterized by a large mean body size (i.e., 37–55% higher than in Erie), small broods with large neonates, nearly all growth in body length occurring between instars 1 and 2, and population persistence into fall. Life-history characteristics in Lake Huron tended to be intermediate to those found in Lakes Michigan and Erie, reflecting lower overall prey and predator densities (1224/ha) relative to the other lakes. Because plasticity in life history can affect interactions with other species, our findings point to the need to understand life-history variation among Great Lakes populations to improve our ability to model the dynamics of these ecosystems.

  16. An eco-physiological model of the impact of temperature on Aedes aegypti life history traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabha, Harish; Correa, Fabio; Legros, Mathieu; Nijhout, H Fredrick; Lord, Cynthia; Lounibos, L Philip

    2012-12-01

    Physiological processes mediate the impact of ecological conditions on the life histories of insect vectors. For the dengue/chikungunya mosquito, Aedes aegypti, three life history traits that are critical to urban population dynamics and control are: size, development rate and starvation mortality. In this paper we make use of prior laboratory experiments on each of these traits at 2°C intervals between 20 and 30°C, in conjunction with eco-evolutionary theory and studies on A.aegypti physiology, in order to develop a conceptual and mathematical framework that can predict their thermal sensitivity. Our model of reserve dependent growth (RDG), which considers a potential tradeoff between the accumulation of reserves and structural biomass, was able to robustly predict laboratory observations, providing a qualitative improvement over the approach most commonly used in other A.aegypti models. RDG predictions of reduced size at higher temperatures, but increased reserves relative to size, are supported by the available evidence in Aedes spp. We offer the potentially general hypothesis that temperature-size patterns in mosquitoes are driven by a net benefit of finishing the growing stage with proportionally greater reserves relative to structure at warmer temperatures. By relating basic energy flows to three fundamental life history traits, we provide a mechanistic framework for A.aegypti development to which ecological complexity can be added. Ultimately, this could provide a framework for developing and field testing hypotheses on how processes such as climate variation, density dependent regulation, human behavior or control strategies may influence A.aegypti population dynamics and disease risk. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cellular Metabolic Rate Is Influenced by Life-History Traits in Tropical and Temperate Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Van Brocklyn, James; Wortman, Matthew; Williams, Joseph B.

    2014-01-01

    In general, tropical birds have a “slow pace of life,” lower rates of whole-animal metabolism and higher survival rates, than temperate species. A fundamental challenge facing physiological ecologists is the understanding of how variation in life-history at the whole-organism level might be linked to cellular function. Because tropical birds have lower rates of whole-animal metabolism, we hypothesized that cells from tropical species would also have lower rates of cellular metabolism than cells from temperate species of similar body size and common phylogenetic history. We cultured primary dermal fibroblasts from 17 tropical and 17 temperate phylogenetically-paired species of birds in a common nutritive and thermal environment and then examined basal, uncoupled, and non-mitochondrial cellular O2 consumption (OCR), proton leak, and anaerobic glycolysis (extracellular acidification rates [ECAR]), using an XF24 Seahorse Analyzer. We found that multiple measures of metabolism in cells from tropical birds were significantly lower than their temperate counterparts. Basal and uncoupled cellular metabolism were 29% and 35% lower in cells from tropical birds, respectively, a decrease closely aligned with differences in whole-animal metabolism between tropical and temperate birds. Proton leak was significantly lower in cells from tropical birds compared with cells from temperate birds. Our results offer compelling evidence that whole-animal metabolism is linked to cellular respiration as a function of an animal’s life-history evolution. These findings are consistent with the idea that natural selection has uniquely fashioned cells of long-lived tropical bird species to have lower rates of metabolism than cells from shorter-lived temperate species. PMID:24498080

  18. Entanglement is a costly life-history stage in large whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hoop, Julie; Corkeron, Peter; Moore, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Individuals store energy to balance deficits in natural cycles; however, unnatural events can also lead to unbalanced energy budgets. Entanglement in fishing gear is one example of an unnatural but relatively common circumstance that imposes energetic demands of a similar order of magnitude and duration of life-history events such as migration and pregnancy in large whales. We present two complementary bioenergetic approaches to estimate the energy associated with entanglement in North Atlantic right whales, and compare these estimates to the natural energetic life history of individual whales. Differences in measured blubber thicknesses and estimated blubber volumes between normal and entangled, emaciated whales indicate between 7.4 × 1010 J and 1.2 × 1011 J of energy are consumed during the course to death of a lethal entanglement. Increased thrust power requirements to overcome drag forces suggest that when entangled, whales require 3.95 × 109 to 4.08 × 1010 J more energy to swim. Individuals who died from their entanglements performed significantly more work (energy expenditure × time) than those that survived; entanglement duration is therefore critical in determining whales' survival. Significant sublethal energetic impacts also occur, especially in reproductive females. Drag from fishing gear contributes up to 8% of the 4-year female reproductive energy budget, delaying time of energetic equilibrium (to restore energy lost by a particular entanglement) for reproduction by months to years. In certain populations, chronic entanglement in fishing gear can be viewed as a costly unnatural life-history stage, rather than a rare or short-term incident.

  19. On the ability of plant life-history strategies to shape bio-geomorphologic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Christian; van Belzen, Jim; Zhu, ZhenChang; Bouma, Tjeerd; van de Koppel, Johan; Gourgue, Olivier; Temmerman, Stijn

    2017-04-01

    Previous work studying bio-geomorphologic interactions in intertidal habitats underlined the importance of wetland vegetation shaping their environment (e.g. tidal channel networks). Up to this point the potential of wetland vegetation to shape their environment was linked to their physical plant properties, such as stiffness, stem diameter or stem density. However the effect of life-history strategies, i.e. the mode of plant proliferation such as sexual reproduction from seeds, non-sexual lateral expansion or a combination of the former two was hitherto ignored. We present numerical experiments based on a wetland ecosystem present in the Western Scheldt Estuary (SW, the Netherlands) showing the importance of life-history strategies shaping bio-geomorphologic interactions. We specifically compare two extremes in life-history strategies, (1) one species solely establishing from seeds and relying on their mass recruitment (Salicornia europea); And a second species (Spartina anglica) which relies on a mixed establishment strategy consisting of seed dispersal and asexual lateral expansion through tillering, with a very low seed recruitment success per year. Based on conducted numerical experiments using TELEMAC2D we show that the Spartina-case facilitates relative low channel densities with pronounced channel networks, whereas the Salicornia-case favors high channel densities with less pronounced intertidal channels. The conducted numerical experiments are the first indication showing that plant proliferation strategies exert a major control on emerging patterns in bio-geomorphologic systems. This provides a deeper understanding in the constraining factors and dynamics shaping the emergence and resilience of bio-geomorphologic systems.

  20. Primary bone microanatomy records developmental aspects of life history in catarrhine primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlin, Shannon C; Terranova, Carl J; Zihlman, Adrienne L; Bromage, Timothy G

    2016-03-01

    A central challenge in human origins research is to understand how evolution has shaped modern human life history. As fossilized remains of our ancestors provide the only direct evidence for life history evolution, efforts to reconstruct life history in paleontological contexts have focused on hard tissues, particularly on dental development. However, among investigators of other vertebrate groups, there is a long tradition of examining primary bone microstructure to decipher growth rates and maturational timing, based on an empirical relationship between the microanatomy of primary bone and the rate at which it is deposited. We examined ontogenetic variation in primary bone microstructure at the midshaft femur of Chlorocebus aethiops, Hylobates lar, and Pan troglodytes to test whether tissue type proportions vary in accordance with predictions based on body mass growth patterns described previously. In all taxa, younger age classes were characterized by significantly higher percent areas of fibro-lamellar and/or parallel-fibered tissues, while older age classes showed significantly higher proportions of lamellar bone. In prior experimental studies, fibro-lamellar and parallel-fibered tissue types have been associated with faster depositional rates than lamellar bone. Principal components analysis revealed differences among taxa in the timing of this transition, and in the particular tissue types observed among individuals of similar dental emergence status. Among M1 and M2 age classes, higher proportions of parallel-fibered and fibro-lamellar tissues were observed in those taxa characterized by reportedly faster body mass growth rates. Further, persistence of fibro-lamellar tissue throughout DECID, M1 and M2 age classes in chimpanzees contrasts with the pattern reported previously for modern humans. Despite the necessary limitations of our cross-sectional study design and the secondary remodeling of bone in primates, large areas of primary bone remain intact and

  1. Effect of watermelon silver mottle virus on the life history and feeding preference of Thrips palmi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Te Chen

    Full Text Available Thrips-borne tospoviruses cause numerous plant diseases that produce severe economic losses worldwide. In the disease system, thrips not only damage plants through feeding but also transmit causative agents of epidemics. In addition, thrips are infected with tospoviruses in the course of virus transmission. Most studies on the effect of tospoviruses on vector thrips have focused on the Tomato spotted wilt virus-Frankliniella occidentalis system. Thus, we focused on another thrips-borne tospovirus, Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV, to examine the effect of virus infection on its vector, Thrips palmi. In this study, the direct and indirect effects of WSMoV on the life history traits and feeding preference of T. palmi were examined. The survival rate and developmental time of the WSMoV-infected larval thrips did not differ significantly from those of the virus-free thrips. Comparing the developmental time of larval thrips fed on the healthy plants, thrips-damaged plants, and thrips-inoculated plants (the WSMoV-infected plants caused by thrips feeding, feeding on the thrips-damaged plants reduced the developmental time, and the WSMoV infection in host plants partially canceled the effect of thrips damage on the developmental time. In addition, no significant variations between the virus-free and WSMoV-infected adult thrips regarding longevity and fecundity were observed. These results implied that WSMoV did not directly affect the life history traits of T. palmi, but the WSMoV infection indirectly affected the development of T. palmi through the virus-infected plants. Furthermore, feeding preference tests indicated that T. palmi preferred feeding on either the thrips-damaged plants or the thrips-inoculated plants to the healthy plants. The effect of tospoviruses on the life history and feeding preference of vector thrips might vary among host plants, virus species, vector species, and environmental factors.

  2. Effect of watermelon silver mottle virus on the life history and feeding preference of Thrips palmi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Te; Tseng, Chien-Hao; Tsai, Chi-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Thrips-borne tospoviruses cause numerous plant diseases that produce severe economic losses worldwide. In the disease system, thrips not only damage plants through feeding but also transmit causative agents of epidemics. In addition, thrips are infected with tospoviruses in the course of virus transmission. Most studies on the effect of tospoviruses on vector thrips have focused on the Tomato spotted wilt virus-Frankliniella occidentalis system. Thus, we focused on another thrips-borne tospovirus, Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV), to examine the effect of virus infection on its vector, Thrips palmi. In this study, the direct and indirect effects of WSMoV on the life history traits and feeding preference of T. palmi were examined. The survival rate and developmental time of the WSMoV-infected larval thrips did not differ significantly from those of the virus-free thrips. Comparing the developmental time of larval thrips fed on the healthy plants, thrips-damaged plants, and thrips-inoculated plants (the WSMoV-infected plants caused by thrips feeding), feeding on the thrips-damaged plants reduced the developmental time, and the WSMoV infection in host plants partially canceled the effect of thrips damage on the developmental time. In addition, no significant variations between the virus-free and WSMoV-infected adult thrips regarding longevity and fecundity were observed. These results implied that WSMoV did not directly affect the life history traits of T. palmi, but the WSMoV infection indirectly affected the development of T. palmi through the virus-infected plants. Furthermore, feeding preference tests indicated that T. palmi preferred feeding on either the thrips-damaged plants or the thrips-inoculated plants to the healthy plants. The effect of tospoviruses on the life history and feeding preference of vector thrips might vary among host plants, virus species, vector species, and environmental factors.

  3. Nematode parasite diversity in birds: the role of host ecology, life history and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Tommy L F; Koprivnikar, Janet

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies have found that migratory birds generally have a more diverse array of pathogens such as parasites, as well as higher intensities of infection. However, it is not clear whether this is driven by the metabolic and physiological demands of migration, differential selection on host life-history traits or basic ecological differences between migratory and non-migratory species. Parasitic helminths can cause significant pathology in their hosts, and many are trophically transmitted such that host diet and habitat use play key roles in the acquisition of infections. Given the concurrent changes in avian habitats and migratory behaviour, it is critical to understand the degree to which host ecology influences their parasite communities. We examined nematode parasite diversity in 153 species of Anseriformes (water birds) and Accipitriformes (predatory birds) in relation to their migratory behaviour, diet, habitat use, geographic distribution and life history using previously published data. Overall, migrators, host species with wide geographic distributions and those utilizing multiple aquatic habitats had greater nematode richness (number of species), and birds with large clutches harboured more diverse nematode fauna with respect to number of superfamilies. Separate analyses for each host order found similar results related to distribution, habitat use and migration; however, herbivorous water birds played host to a less diverse nematode community compared to those that consume some animals. Birds using multiple aquatic habitats have a more diverse nematode fauna relative to primarily terrestrial species, likely because there is greater opportunity for contact with parasite infectious stages and/or consumption of infected hosts. As such, omnivorous and carnivorous birds using aquatic habitats may be more affected by environmental changes that alter their diet and range. Even though there were no overall differences in their ecology and life history

  4. Cellular metabolic rate is influenced by life-history traits in tropical and temperate birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gabriela Jimenez

    Full Text Available In general, tropical birds have a "slow pace of life," lower rates of whole-animal metabolism and higher survival rates, than temperate species. A fundamental challenge facing physiological ecologists is the understanding of how variation in life-history at the whole-organism level might be linked to cellular function. Because tropical birds have lower rates of whole-animal metabolism, we hypothesized that cells from tropical species would also have lower rates of cellular metabolism than cells from temperate species of similar body size and common phylogenetic history. We cultured primary dermal fibroblasts from 17 tropical and 17 temperate phylogenetically-paired species of birds in a common nutritive and thermal environment and then examined basal, uncoupled, and non-mitochondrial cellular O2 consumption (OCR, proton leak, and anaerobic glycolysis (extracellular acidification rates [ECAR], using an XF24 Seahorse Analyzer. We found that multiple measures of metabolism in cells from tropical birds were significantly lower than their temperate counterparts. Basal and uncoupled cellular metabolism were 29% and 35% lower in cells from tropical birds, respectively, a decrease closely aligned with differences in whole-animal metabolism between tropical and temperate birds. Proton leak was significantly lower in cells from tropical birds compared with cells from temperate birds. Our results offer compelling evidence that whole-animal metabolism is linked to cellular respiration as a function of an animal's life-history evolution. These findings are consistent with the idea that natural selection has uniquely fashioned cells of long-lived tropical bird species to have lower rates of metabolism than cells from shorter-lived temperate species.

  5. Interspecific variation in life history relates to antipredator decisions by marine mesopredators on temperate reefs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Frid

    Full Text Available As upper-level predatory fishes become overfished, mesopredators rise to become the new 'top' predators of over-exploited marine communities. To gain insight into ensuing mechanisms that might alter indirect species interactions, we examined how behavioural responses to an upper-level predatory fish might differ between mesopredator species with different life histories. In rocky reefs of the northeast Pacific Ocean, adult lingcod (Ophiodon elongatus are upper-level predators that use a sit-and-wait hunting mode. Reef mesopredators that are prey to adult lingcod include kelp greenling (Hexagrammos decagrammus, younger lingcod, copper rockfish (Sebastes caurinus and quillback rockfish (S. maliger. Across these mesopredators species, longevity and age at maturity increases and, consequently, the annual proportion of lifetime reproductive output decreases in the order just listed. Therefore, we hypothesized that the level of risk taken to acquire resources would vary interspecifically in that same order. During field experiments we manipulated predation risk with a model adult lingcod and used fixed video cameras to quantify interactions between mesopredators and tethered prey (Pandalus shrimps. We predicted that the probabilities of inspecting and attacking tethered prey would rank from highest to lowest and the timing of these behaviours would rank from earliest to latest as follows: kelp greenling, lingcod, copper rockfish, and quillback rockfish. We also predicted that responses to the model lingcod, such as avoidance of interactions with tethered prey, would rank from weakest to strongest in the same order. Results were consistent with our predictions suggesting that, despite occupying similar trophic levels, longer-lived mesopredators with late maturity have stronger antipredator responses and therefore experience lower foraging rates in the presence of predators than mesopredators with faster life histories. The corollary is that the fishery

  6. Cellular metabolic rate is influenced by life-history traits in tropical and temperate birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Van Brocklyn, James; Wortman, Matthew; Williams, Joseph B

    2014-01-01

    In general, tropical birds have a "slow pace of life," lower rates of whole-animal metabolism and higher survival rates, than temperate species. A fundamental challenge facing physiological ecologists is the understanding of how variation in life-history at the whole-organism level might be linked to cellular function. Because tropical birds have lower rates of whole-animal metabolism, we hypothesized that cells from tropical species would also have lower rates of cellular metabolism than cells from temperate species of similar body size and common phylogenetic history. We cultured primary dermal fibroblasts from 17 tropical and 17 temperate phylogenetically-paired species of birds in a common nutritive and thermal environment and then examined basal, uncoupled, and non-mitochondrial cellular O2 consumption (OCR), proton leak, and anaerobic glycolysis (extracellular acidification rates [ECAR]), using an XF24 Seahorse Analyzer. We found that multiple measures of metabolism in cells from tropical birds were significantly lower than their temperate counterparts. Basal and uncoupled cellular metabolism were 29% and 35% lower in cells from tropical birds, respectively, a decrease closely aligned with differences in whole-animal metabolism between tropical and temperate birds. Proton leak was significantly lower in cells from tropical birds compared with cells from temperate birds. Our results offer compelling evidence that whole-animal metabolism is linked to cellular respiration as a function of an animal's life-history evolution. These findings are consistent with the idea that natural selection has uniquely fashioned cells of long-lived tropical bird species to have lower rates of metabolism than cells from shorter-lived temperate species.

  7. A spatially and temporally explicit, individual-based, life-history and productivity modeling approach for aquatic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realized life history expression and productivity in aquatic species, and salmonid fishes in particular, is the result of multiple interacting factors including genetics, habitat, growth potential and condition, and the thermal regime individuals experience, both at critical stag...

  8. Inter- and intra-specific density-dependent effects on life history and development strategies of larval mosquitoes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsurim, Ido; Silberbush, Alon; Ovadia, Ofer; Blaustein, Leon; Margalith, Yoel

    2013-01-01

    We explored how inter- and intra-specific competition among larvae of two temporary-pool mosquito species, Culiseta longiareolata and Ochlerotatus caspius, affect larval developmental strategy and life history traits...

  9. Description of the immature stages and life history of Euselasia (Lepidoptera: Riodinidae) on Miconia (Melastomataceae) in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. Nishida

    2010-01-01

    The immature stages and life histories of Euselasia chrysippe (Bates, 1866) and E. bettina (Hewitson, 1869) are described, providing the first detailed morphological characters for the subfamily Euselasiinae. The larvae of Euselasia chrysippe and E. bettina ...

  10. Executive Risk Propensity and Accounting Conservatism Through the Lens of Life History Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Morten; Schneider, Melanie L.

    First, we intend to investigate the impact of CFO risk propensity on accounting conservatism. Second, we will examine the role of CEOs in this context. By drawing on life history theory, we propose variables reflecting executive risk propensity. Based on this, we hypothesize that CFO risk...... propensity is negatively associated with accounting conservatism. Additionally, we hypothesize that CEO risk propensity exerts a moderating effect on this association. To test our hypotheses, we will conduct multivariate analyses based on a sample of Danish panel data. By utilizing innovative proxies...... for risk propensity, we intend to expand research on executives´ influence on accounting conservatism (Francis et al. [2015])....

  11. Stochastic population dynamics in populations of western terrestrial garter snakes with divergent life histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David A.; Clark, W.R.; Arnold, S.J.; Bronikowski, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Comparative evaluations of population dynamics in species with temporal and spatial variation in life-history traits are rare because they require long-term demographic time series from multiple populations. We present such an analysis using demographic data collected during the interval 1978-1996 for six populations of western terrestrial garter snakes (Thamnophis elegans) from two evolutionarily divergent ecotypes. Three replicate populations from a slow-living ecotype, found in mountain meadows of northeastern California, were characterized by individuals that develop slowly, mature late, reproduce infrequently with small reproductive effort, and live longer than individuals of three populations of a fast-living ecotype found at lakeshore locales. We constructed matrix population models for each of the populations based on 8-13 years of data per population and analyzed both deterministic dynamics based on mean annual vital rates and stochastic dynamics incorporating annual variation in vital rates. (1) Contributions of highly variable vital rates to fitness (??s) were buffered against the negative effects of stochastic variation, and this relationship was consistent with differences between the meadow (M-slow) and lakeshore (L-fast) ecotypes. (2) Annual variation in the proportion of gravid females had the greatest negative effect among all vital rates on ?? s. The magnitude of variation in the proportion of gravid females and its effect on ??s was greater in M-slow than L-fast populations. (3) Variation in the proportion of gravid females, in turn, depended on annual variation in prey availability, and its effect on ??s was 4- 23 times greater in M-slow than L-fast populations. In addition to differences in stochastic dynamics between ecotypes, we also found higher mean mortality rates across all age classes in the L-fast populations. Our results suggest that both deterministic and stochastic selective forces have affected the evolution of divergent life-history

  12. Experimental reintroduction reveals novel life-history variation in Laysan Ducks (Anas laysanensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Jeffrey R.; Reynolds, Michelle H.

    2013-01-01

    Subfossil remains indicate that the Laysan Duck (Anas laysanensis) formerly occurred throughout the Hawaiian archipelago, but for more than 150 years it has been confined to a single, small atoll in the northwestern chain, Laysan Island. In 2004–2005, 42 ducks were reintroduced from Laysan to Midway Atoll, where they exhibited variation in life history never observed on Laysan. On Laysan, females have never been observed to breed successfully at age 1 year and few attempt it, whereas on Midway, females routinely raised young at reintroductions of this species may provide opportunities to test hypotheses about mechanisms underlying phenotypic plasticity.

  13. Heterochronies in the cranial development of Asian tree frogs (Amphibia: Anura: Rhacophoridae) with different life histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilieva, A B

    2017-03-01

    The development of bony skull was studied in four species of Asian tree frogs (Rhacophoridae) with different life histories: biphasic development with free larval stage and direct development. In biphasic rhacophorids the sequence of the appearance of cranial bones generally followed the generalized pattern of craniogenesis, which was described for most studied anurans. In contrast, direct-developing species displayed some heterochronies in the formation of skull bones, namely, the accelerated formation of the anlagen of jaw and suspensorium bones. The obtained results support that the embryonization in amphibians is regularly accompanied by a heterochronic repatterning of craniogenesis, rather similar in different phyletic groups.

  14. Immediate survival focus: synthesizing life history theory and dual process models to explain substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, George B; Hardesty, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have recently applied evolutionary life history theory to the understanding of behaviors often conceived of as prosocial or antisocial. In addition, researchers have applied cognitive science to the understanding of substance use and used dual process models, where explicit cognitive processes are modeled as relatively distinct from implicit cognitive processes, to explain and predict substance use behaviors. In this paper we synthesized these two theoretical perspectives to produce an adaptive and cognitive framework for explaining substance use. We contend that this framework provides new insights into the nature of substance use that may be valuable for both clinicians and researchers.

  15. Optimal foraging and diel vertical migration in a life history model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sainmont, Julie; Andersen, Ken Haste; Visser, Andre

    in the model, unsuited for life history modeling. We propose a method based on optimal foraging theory to take into account the emergent feeding rates as a function of the copepod metabolic cost, latitude, time and predation. We predict that copepods will balance their growth rate and mortality, playing a safe...... strategy when food is plentiful, but taking greater risks at low food concentrations. We apply these concepts to high latitude ecosystems where there is a strong seasonal variation in both food availability and day length. Specifically, during the summer, the midnight sun will force the animals to take...

  16. Sex differences in life history drive evolutionary transitions among maternal, paternal, and bi-parental care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Hope; Bonsall, Michael B; Alonzo, Suzanne H

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary transitions among maternal, paternal, and bi-parental care have been common in many animal groups. We use a mathematical model to examine the effect of male and female life-history characteristics (stage-specific maturation and mortality) on evolutionary transitions among maternal, paternal, and bi-parental care. When males and females are relatively similar – that is, when females initially invest relatively little into eggs and both sexes have similar mortality and maturation – transitions among different patterns of care are unlikely to be strongly favored. As males and females become more different, transitions are more likely. If females initially invest heavily into eggs and this reduces their expected future reproductive success, transitions to increased maternal care (paternal → maternal, paternal → bi-parental, bi-parental → maternal) are favored. This effect of anisogamy (i.e., the fact that females initially invest more into each individual zygote than males) might help explain the predominance of maternal care in nature and differs from previous work that found no effect of anisogamy on the origin of different sex-specific patterns of care from an ancestral state of no care. When male mortality is high or male egg maturation rate is low, males have reduced future reproductive potential and transitions to increased paternal care (maternal → paternal, bi-parental → paternal, maternal → bi-parental) are favored. Offspring need (i.e., low offspring survival in the absence of care) also plays a role in transitions to paternal care. In general, basic life-history differences between the sexes can drive evolutionary transitions among different sex-specific patterns of care. The finding that simple life-history differences can alone lead to transitions among maternal and paternal care suggests that the effect of inter-sexual life-history differences should be considered as a baseline scenario when attempting to understand how other

  17. Survival trees: an alternative non-parametric multivariate technique for life history analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rose, A; Pallara, A

    1997-01-01

    "In this paper an extension of tree-structured methodology to cover censored survival analysis is discussed.... The tree-shaped diagram...can be used to draw meaningful patterns of behaviour throughout the individual life history.... The fundamentals of tree methodology are outlined; [then] an application of the technique to real data from a survey on the progression to marriage among adult women in Italy is illustrated; [and] some comments are presented on the main advantages and problems related to tree-structured methodology for censored survival analysis." (EXCERPT)

  18. Life history attributes data for Arizona Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum ammolegus) in Arizona 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Janet M.

    2017-01-01

    Ammodramus savannarum ammolegus (commonly referred to as the Arizona Grasshopper Sparrow) occurs in the desert and plains grasslands of southeastern Arizona, southwestern New Mexico, and northern Sonora, Mexico. Although a subspecies of conservation concern, this data was produced as part of the first intensive study of its life history and breeding ecology, providing baseline data and facilitating comparisons with other North American Grasshopper Sparrow subspecies. This study is described in the publication listed in the larger work citation of this metadata record. 

  19. "Never Really Had a Good Education You Know, Until I Came in Here": Educational Life Histories of Young Adult Male Prisoner Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Jane; Maunsell, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the educational life histories of nine prisoner learners aged between 18 and 21 years which were collated as part of doctoral work which sought to access the life histories of adult male prisoners who were attending a prison school while incarcerated in prison. The nine life histories of the young men were collated not only…

  20. Prediction of Fatigue Life of a Continuous Bridge Girder Based on Vehicle Induced Stress History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Rao

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue damage assessment of bridge components by conducting a full scale fatigue testing is often prohibitive. A need, therefore, exists to estimate the fatigue damage in bridge components by a simulation of bridge-vehicle interaction dynamics due to the action of the actual traffic. In the present paper, a systematic method has been outlined to find the fatigue damage in the continuous bridge girder based on stress range frequency histogram and fatigue strength parameters of the bridge materials. Vehicle induced time history of maximum flexural stresses has been obtained by Monte Carlo simulation process and utilized to develop the stress range frequency histogram taking into consideration of the annual traffic volume. The linear damage accumulation theory is then applied to calculate cumulative damage index and fatigue life of the bridge. Effect of the bridge span, pavement condition, increase of vehicle operating speed, weight and suspension characteristics on fatigue life of the bridge have been examined.

  1. The university educational guidance using the method of history of professional life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Ramos-Romero

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The relation between the educational orientation and the method of history of life constitutes the essence of this work, both related to the professional area, with the intent that students get the appropriate knowledge for their future job performance. The contact with the work of outstanding educators in the field of formation is an effective way for the educational orientation of future professors, even more when they are teachers of the same institution; this ensures greater empathy in the knowledge of a pedagogical endeavor contextualized at the same stage of vocational training. The experience has been developed with students from the first year of the career pedagogy-psychology of this university, stimulating the formative process with the creation by students of synopsis of stories of professional life to professors of the university selected by them.

  2. Neutral theory for life histories and individual variability in fitness components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad

    2012-01-01

    that large differences in fitness components are likely adaptive, resulting from and driving evolution by natural selection. To examine this argument we use unique formulas to compute exactly the variance in life span and in lifetime reproductive success among individuals with identical (genotypic) vital...... rates (assuming a common genotype for all individuals). Such individuals have identical fitness but vary substantially in their realized individual fitness components. We show by example that our computed variances and corresponding simulated distribution of fitness components match those observed...... the case), small selective differences in life histories will be hard to measure, and the effects of random drift will be amplified in natural populations by the large variances among individuals....

  3. (Trans)National Language Ideologies and Family Language Practices: A Life History Inquiry of Judeo-Spanish in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seloni, Lisya; Sarfati, Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the diminished use of Judeo-Spanish among Jews living in Turkey and asks the following research question: What factors, ideologies, and practices contribute to the demise of Judeo-Spanish? To address this question, we employed life history inquiry based on two oral history archives documenting elderly Turkish-Jewish community…

  4. Life history of the Small Sandeel, Ammodytes tobianus, inferred from otolith microchemistry. A methodological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugier, F.; Feunteun, E.; Pecheyran, C.; Carpentier, A.

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge of life history and connectivity between essential ecological habitats are relevant for conservation and management of species and some natural tracers could be used to study the lifecycles of small or short-lived marine fishes. Although sandeels are central in marine food webs and are key species, there is incomplete knowledge about population mixing and migration patterns. For the first time the use of the otolith microchemistry on sandeel species is evaluated in the case of the Small Sandeel. Variations in microchemical fingerprints of 13 trace elements are performed with a Femtosecond LA-ICPM from the core to the margin of sagittal otolith and are compared within and between otoliths extracted from 34 fishes sampled in three different sites along the coast of the south-western English Channel in France. Firstly, preliminary investigations on the validity of the method revealed that Mg/Ca was the only ratio significantly dependant on fish ontogeny and sampling season. Secondly, the Mn/Ca, Zn/Ca, and Cu/Ca ratios enabled us to significantly discriminate among sampling sites. Thirdly, microchemical fingerprints of each life stage varied significantly among sampling sites but not within them, suggesting high site fidelity over relatively short distances. Finally, the fingerprints of all life stages were significantly different from those of the larval and metamorphosis stages. The otolith microchemistry could detect change of signature relative to the shift from a pelagic behaviour to a resident bentho-pelagic behaviour during the middle of the juvenile stage in Small Sandeels. Hence, analysis of trace element fingerprints in otoliths appears to be a valuable method to further studies on ontogenic habitat change, population mixing and variation of life history and be helpful for the management at local or regional scales of short-lived species such as those belonging to other Ammodytidae.

  5. Climatic and geographic predictors of life history variation in Eastern Massasauga (Sistrurus catenatus: A range-wide synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric T Hileman

    Full Text Available Elucidating how life history traits vary geographically is important to understanding variation in population dynamics. Because many aspects of ectotherm life history are climate-dependent, geographic variation in climate is expected to have a large impact on population dynamics through effects on annual survival, body size, growth rate, age at first reproduction, size-fecundity relationship, and reproductive frequency. The Eastern Massasauga (Sistrurus catenatus is a small, imperiled North American rattlesnake with a distribution centered on the Great Lakes region, where lake effects strongly influence local conditions. To address Eastern Massasauga life history data gaps, we compiled data from 47 study sites representing 38 counties across the range. We used multimodel inference and general linear models with geographic coordinates and annual climate normals as explanatory variables to clarify patterns of variation in life history traits. We found strong evidence for geographic variation in six of nine life history variables. Adult female snout-vent length and neonate mass increased with increasing mean annual precipitation. Litter size decreased with increasing mean temperature, and the size-fecundity relationship and growth prior to first hibernation both increased with increasing latitude. The proportion of gravid females also increased with increasing latitude, but this relationship may be the result of geographically varying detection bias. Our results provide insights into ectotherm life history variation and fill critical data gaps, which will inform Eastern Massasauga conservation efforts by improving biological realism for models of population viability and climate change.

  6. Effects of temperature and salinity on life history of the marine amphipod Gammarus locusta. Implications for ecotoxicological testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuparth, T; Costa, F O; Costa, M H

    2002-02-01

    The life history of Gammarus locusta was analysed in the laboratory under the following temperature and salinity combinations: 20 degrees C-33/1000, 15 degrees C-20/1000 and 15 degrees C-33/1000 (reference condition). Life history analysis comprised survival, individual growth, reproductive traits and life table parameters. Compared to 15 degrees C, life history at 20 degrees C was characterised by at least a four-week reduction in the life-span, lower life expectancy, shorter generation time, faster individual growth, anticipation of age at maturity and higher population growth rate. These temperature effects constituted an acceleration and condensation of the life cycle, compared to the reference condition. Concerning salinity effects, with few exceptions, results show that overall this amphipod life history did not differ significantly between the salinity conditions tested. Regarding ecotoxicological testing implications, findings from this study indicate that the range of temperature and salinity conditions acceptable for testing was substantially expanded both for acute and chronic assays. A temperature of 20 degrees C or higher (for a salinity of 33/1000) is suggested for routine chronic sediment toxicity testing with G. locusta, in order to reduce the life cycle and consequently improve cost-effectiveness and standardisation. Results also suggest that a multiple-response approach, including survival, growth and reproduction, should be applied in chronic toxicity tests.

  7. Written Expression: Assessment and Remediation for Learning Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Ann M.

    1982-01-01

    The educational evaluation and remediation of written language disorders in learning disabled students are considered. It is suggested that a written language assessment should involve a thorough educational history and a complete psychoeducational evaluation. Attention is directed to written language assessment and remediation for handwriting,…

  8. Ecoimmunology and microbial ecology: Contributions to avian behavior, physiology, and life history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jessica K; Buchanan, Katherine L; Griffith, Simon C; Klasing, Kirk C; Addison, BriAnne

    2017-02-01

    Bacteria have had a fundamental impact on vertebrate evolution not only by affecting the evolution of the immune system, but also generating complex interactions with behavior and physiology. Advances in molecular techniques have started to reveal the intricate ways in which bacteria and vertebrates have coevolved. Here, we focus on birds as an example system for understanding the fundamental impact bacteria have had on the evolution of avian immune defenses, behavior, physiology, reproduction and life histories. The avian egg has multiple characteristics that have evolved to enable effective defense against pathogenic attack. Microbial risk of pathogenic infection is hypothesized to vary with life stage, with early life risk being maximal at either hatching or fledging. For adult birds, microbial infection risk is also proposed to vary with habitat and life stage, with molt inducing a period of increased vulnerability. Bacteria not only play an important role in shaping the immune system as well as trade-offs with other physiological systems, but also for determining digestive efficiency and nutrient uptake. The relevance of avian microbiomes for avian ecology, physiology and behavior is highly topical and will likely impact on our understanding of avian welfare, conservation, captive breeding as well as for our understanding of the nature of host-microbe coevolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A unique life history among tetrapods: an annual chameleon living mostly as an egg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, Kristopher B; Andriamandimbiarisoa, Laza N; Fox, Stanley F; Raxworthy, Christopher J

    2008-07-01

    The approximately 28,300 species of tetrapods (four-limbed vertebrates) almost exclusively have perennial life spans. Here, we report the discovery of a remarkable annual tetrapod from the arid southwest of Madagascar: the chameleon Furcifer labordi, with a posthatching life span of just 4-5 months. At the start of the active season (November), an age cohort of hatchlings emerges; larger juveniles or adults are not present. These hatchlings grow rapidly, reach sexual maturity in less than 2 months, and reproduce in January-February. After reproduction, senescence appears, and the active season concludes with population-wide adult death. Consequently, during the dry season, the entire population is represented by developing eggs that incubate for 8-9 months before synchronously hatching at the onset of the following rainy season. Remarkably, this chameleon spends more of its short annual life cycle inside the egg than outside of it. Our review of tetrapod longevity (>1,700 species) finds no others with such a short life span. These findings suggest that the notorious rapid death of chameleons in captivity may, for some species, actually represent the natural adult life span. Consequently, a new appraisal may be warranted concerning the viability of chameleon breeding programs, which could have special significance for species of conservation concern. Additionally, because F. labordi is closely related to other perennial species, this chameleon group may prove also to be especially well suited for comparative studies that focus on life history evolution and the ecological, genetic, and/or hormonal determinants of aging, longevity, and senescence.

  10. Fast mapping semantic features: performance of adults with normal language, history of disorders of spoken and written language, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder on a word-learning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Mary; Gutmann, Michelle L

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to test the word learning abilities of adults with typical language abilities, those with a history of disorders of spoken or written language (hDSWL), and hDSWL plus attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (+ADHD). Sixty-eight adults were required to associate a novel object with a novel label, and then recognize semantic features of the object and phonological features of the label. Participants were tested for overt ability (accuracy) and covert processing (reaction time). The +ADHD group was less accurate at mapping semantic features and slower to respond to lexical labels than both other groups. Different factors correlated with word learning performance for each group. Adults with language and attention deficits are more impaired at word learning than adults with language deficits only. Despite behavioral profiles like typical peers, adults with hDSWL may use different processing strategies than their peers. Readers will be able to: (1) recognize the influence of a dual disability (hDSWL and ADHD) on word learning outcomes; (2) identify factors that may contribute to word learning in adults in terms of (a) the nature of the words to be learned and (b) the language processing of the learner.

  11. Patterns and drivers of intraspecific variation in avian life history along elevational gradients: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alice Boyle, W; Sandercock, Brett K; Martin, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    Elevational gradients provide powerful natural systems for testing hypotheses regarding the role of environmental variation in the evolution of life-history strategies. Case studies have revealed shifts towards slower life histories in organisms living at high elevations yet no synthetic analyses exist of elevational variation in life-history traits for major vertebrate clades. We examined (i) how life-history traits change with elevation in paired populations of bird species worldwide, and (ii) which biotic and abiotic factors drive elevational shifts in life history. Using three analytical methods, we found that fecundity declined at higher elevations due to smaller clutches and fewer reproductive attempts per year. By contrast, elevational differences in traits associated with parental investment or survival varied among studies. High-elevation populations had shorter and later breeding seasons, but longer developmental periods implying that temporal constraints contribute to reduced fecundity. Analyses of clutch size data, the trait for which we had the largest number of population comparisons, indicated no evidence that phylogenetic history constrained species-level plasticity in trait variation associated with elevational gradients. The magnitude of elevational shifts in life-history traits were largely unrelated to geographic (altitude, latitude), intrinsic (body mass, migratory status), or habitat covariates. Meta-population structure, methodological issues associated with estimating survival, or processes shaping range boundaries could potentially explain the nature of elevational shifts in life-history traits evident in this data set. We identify a new risk factor for montane populations in changing climates: low fecundity will result in lower reproductive potential to recover from perturbations, especially as fewer than half of the species experienced higher survival at higher elevations. © 2015 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  12. Accounting for measurement error in human life history trade-offs using structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, Samuli

    2017-11-11

    Revealing causal effects from correlative data is very challenging and a contemporary problem in human life history research owing to the lack of experimental approach. Problems with causal inference arising from measurement error in independent variables, whether related either to inaccurate measurement technique or validity of measurements, seem not well-known in this field. The aim of this study is to show how structural equation modeling (SEM) with latent variables can be applied to account for measurement error in independent variables when the researcher has recorded several indicators of a hypothesized latent construct. As a simple example of this approach, measurement error in lifetime allocation of resources to reproduction in Finnish preindustrial women is modelled in the context of the survival cost of reproduction. In humans, lifetime energetic resources allocated in reproduction are almost impossible to quantify with precision and, thus, typically used measures of lifetime reproductive effort (e.g., lifetime reproductive success and parity) are likely to be plagued by measurement error. These results are contrasted with those obtained from a traditional regression approach where the single best proxy of lifetime reproductive effort available in the data is used for inference. As expected, the inability to account for measurement error in women's lifetime reproductive effort resulted in the underestimation of its underlying effect size on post-reproductive survival. This article emphasizes the advantages that the SEM framework can provide in handling measurement error via multiple-indicator latent variables in human life history studies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Life-history predicts past and present population connectivity in two sympatric sea stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puritz, Jonathan B; Keever, Carson C; Addison, Jason A; Barbosa, Sergio S; Byrne, Maria; Hart, Michael W; Grosberg, Richard K; Toonen, Robert J

    2017-06-01

    Life-history traits, especially the mode and duration of larval development, are expected to strongly influence the population connectivity and phylogeography of marine species. Comparative analysis of sympatric, closely related species with differing life histories provides the opportunity to specifically investigate these mechanisms of evolution but have been equivocal in this regard. Here, we sample two sympatric sea stars across the same geographic range in temperate waters of Australia. Using a combination of mitochondrial DNA sequences, nuclear DNA sequences, and microsatellite genotypes, we show that the benthic-developing sea star, Parvulastra exigua, has lower levels of within- and among-population genetic diversity, more inferred genetic clusters, and higher levels of hierarchical and pairwise population structure than Meridiastra calcar, a species with planktonic development. While both species have populations that have diverged since the middle of the second glacial period of the Pleistocene, most P. exigua populations have origins after the last glacial maxima (LGM), whereas most M. calcar populations diverged long before the LGM. Our results indicate that phylogenetic patterns of these two species are consistent with predicted dispersal abilities; the benthic-developing P. exigua shows a pattern of extirpation during the LGM with subsequent recolonization, whereas the planktonic-developing M. calcar shows a pattern of persistence and isolation during the LGM with subsequent post-Pleistocene introgression.

  14. The advantages and disadvantages of Art History to Life: Alois Riegl and historicism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Reynolds Cordileone

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Alois Riegl was one of the seminal art historians of the early twentieth century, but very little is known about his career as adjunct-curator of textiles at the Austrian Museum for Art and Industry. He worked at the Museum from 1884 and combined this position with University teaching until he left this post to become a full Professor of Art History at the University of Vienna in 1897. While interest in Riegl has shown no signs of abating in recent years, most scholars continue to debate Riegl’s theories and methods. The aim of this paper, however, is to demonstrate just how much of Riegl’s theorizing was brought into focus by practical issues at the Museum for Art and Industry. As recent studies have indicated, Riegl was much more than an ivory tower theoretician; his work reverberated with the type of cross-disciplinary cultural criticism we associate with the intellectual life of fin-de-siècle Vienna. Another goal of this paper is to contribute to our expanding understanding of Riegl in his social and institutional contexts. Finally, it traces ways in which Riegl used his early exposure to Nietzsche, particularly Nietzsche’s second Untimely Meditation (The advantages and disadvantages of History to life to craft his responses to contemporary artistic and social crises in the final decade of the nineteenth century.

  15. Fast life history traits promote invasion success in amphibians and reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, William L; Street, Sally E; Capellini, Isabella

    2017-02-01

    Competing theoretical models make different predictions on which life history strategies facilitate growth of small populations. While 'fast' strategies allow for rapid increase in population size and limit vulnerability to stochastic events, 'slow' strategies and bet-hedging may reduce variance in vital rates in response to stochasticity. We test these predictions using biological invasions since founder alien populations start small, compiling the largest dataset yet of global herpetological introductions and life history traits. Using state-of-the-art phylogenetic comparative methods, we show that successful invaders have fast traits, such as large and frequent clutches, at both establishment and spread stages. These results, together with recent findings in mammals and plants, support 'fast advantage' models and the importance of high potential population growth rate. Conversely, successful alien birds are bet-hedgers. We propose that transient population dynamics and differences in longevity and behavioural flexibility can help reconcile apparently contrasting results across terrestrial vertebrate classes. © 2017 The Authors. Ecology Letters published by CNRS and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Experimental evolution of parasite life-history traits in Strongyloides ratti (Nematoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Steve; Barber, Rebecca

    2007-06-22

    Evolutionary ecology predicts that parasite life-history traits, including a parasite's survivorship and fecundity within a host, will evolve in response to selection and that their evolution will be constrained by trade-offs between traits. Here, we test these predictions using a nematode parasite of rats, Strongyloides ratti, as a model. We performed a selection experiment by passage of parasite progeny from either early in an infection ('fast' lines) or late in an infection ('slow' lines). We found that parasite fecundity responded to selection but that parasite survivorship did not. We found a trade-off mediated via conspecific density-dependent constraints; namely, that fast lines exhibit higher density-independent fecundity than slow lines, but fast lines suffered greater reduction in fecundity in the presence of density-dependent constraints than slow lines. We also found that slow lines both stimulate a higher level of IgG1, which is a marker for a Th2-type immune response, and show less of a reduction in fecundity in response to IgG1 levels than for fast lines. Our results confirm the general prediction that parasite life-history traits can evolve in response to selection and indicate that such evolutionary responses may have significant implications for the epidemiology of infectious disease.

  17. Life history trade-offs in human growth: adaptation or pathology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogin, Barry; Silva, Maria Inês Varela; Rios, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Human beings growing-up in adverse biocultural environments, including undernutrition, exposure to infection, economic oppression/poverty, heavy workloads, high altitude, war, racism, and religious/ethnic oppression, may be stunted, have asymmetric body proportions, be wasted, be overweight, and be at greater risk for disease. One group of researchers explains this as a consequence of "developmental programming" (DP). Another group uses the phrase "predictive adaptive response" (PAR). The DP group tends to view the alterations as having permanent maladaptive effects that place people at risk for disease. The PAR group considers the alterations at two levels of adaptation: (1) "short-term adaptive responses for immediate survival" and (2) "predictive responses required to ensure postnatal survival to reproductive age." The differences between the DP and PAR hypotheses are evaluated in this article. A life history theory analysis rephrases the DP versus PAR debate from disease or adaptation to the concept of "trade-offs." Even under good conditions, the stages of human life history are replete with trade-offs for survival, productivity, and reproduction. Under adverse conditions, trade-offs result in reduced survival, poor growth, constraints on physical activity, and poor reproductive outcomes. Models of human development may need to be refined to accommodate a greater range of the biological and cultural sources of adversity as well as their independent and interactive influences. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Environmental contingency in life history strategies: the influence of mortality and socioeconomic status on reproductive timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griskevicius, Vladas; Delton, Andrew W; Robertson, Theresa E; Tybur, Joshua M

    2011-02-01

    Why do some people have children early, whereas others delay reproduction? By considering the trade-offs between using one's resources for reproduction versus other tasks, the evolutionary framework of life history theory predicts that reproductive timing should be influenced by mortality and resource scarcity. A series of experiments examined how mortality cues influenced the desire to have children sooner rather than later. The effects of mortality depended critically on whether people grew up in a relatively resource-scarce or resource-plentiful environment. For individuals growing up relatively poor, mortality cues produced a desire to reproduce sooner--to want children now, even at the cost of furthering one's education or career. Conversely, for individuals growing up relatively wealthy, mortality cues produced a desire to delay reproduction--to further one's education or career before starting a family. Overall, mortality cues appear to shift individuals into different life history strategies as a function of childhood socioeconomic status, suggesting important implications for how environmental factors can influence fertility and family size. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Optimal life-history strategies in seasonal consumer-resource dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetzhanov, Andrei R; Grognard, Frederic; Mailleret, Ludovic

    2011-11-01

    The interplay between individual adaptive life histories and populations dynamics is an important issue in ecology. In this context, we considered a seasonal consumer-resource model with nonoverlapping generations. We focused on the consumers decision-making process through which they maximize their reproductive output via a differential investment into foraging for resources or reproducing. Our model takes a semi-discrete form, and is composed of a continuous time within-season part, similar to a dynamic model of energy allocation, and of a discrete time part, depicting the between seasons reproduction and mortality processes. We showed that the optimal foraging-reproduction strategies of the consumers may be "determinate" or "indeterminate" depending on the season length. More surprisingly, it depended on the consumers population density as well, with large densities promoting indeterminacy. A bifurcation analysis showed that the long-term dynamics produced by this model were quite rich, ranging from both populations' extinction, coexistence at some season-to-season equilibrium or on (quasi)-periodic motions, to initial condition-dependent dynamics. Interestingly, we observed that any long-term sustainable situation corresponds to indeterminate consumers' strategies. Finally, a comparison with a model involving typical nonoptimal consumers highlighted the stabilizing effects of the optimal life histories of the consumers. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  20. Life history of the amphipod Gammarus locusta in the Sado estuary (Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Filipe O.; Costa, Maria Helena

    1999-07-01

    A 2-year study was conducted on the life history of the amphipod Gammarus locusta (L.) in the Sado estuary, which comprised the analysis of distribution, abundance, dynamics and reproduction. Sampling was performed monthly at low tide by collecting the macroalgae within a 0.25-m 2 area. G. locusta is distributed along the euhaline and polihaline areas of the Sado estuary and it is usually found among macroalgae and under small stones. The lowest and highest population densities were recorded in the first and last quarter of the year, respectively. The density fluctuations were tightly coupled with the algal biomass, particularly Ulva sp. The females are iteroparous and reproduce for the first time when they reach 6-mm total length. Comparatively to other gammaridean amphipods, G. locusta has a high fecundity. Reproduction takes place throughout the year. The population is semi-annual and the reproductive cycle is of the multivoltine type. The sum of these characteristics revealed an adaptive type `r' strategy. These results are in general agreement with the current models of latitudinal variations in gammaridean life histories.

  1. Advances in finding Alba: the locus affecting life history and color polymorphism in a Colias butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woronik, A; Wheat, C W

    2017-01-01

    Although alternative life-history strategies exist within many populations, very little is known about their genetic basis and mechanistic insight into these traits could greatly advance the understanding of eco-evolutionary dynamics. Many species of butterfly within the genus Colias exhibit a sex-limited wing colour polymorphism, called Alba, which is correlated with an alternative life-history strategy. Here, we have taken the first steps in localizing the region carrying Alba in Colias croceus, a species with no genomic resources, by generating whole genome sequence of a single Alba mother and two sequencing pools, one for her Alba and another for her orange, offspring. These data were used in a bulk-segregant analysis wherein SNPs fulfilling the Mendelian inheritance expectations of Alba were identified. Then, using the conserved synteny in Lepidoptera, the Alba locus was assigned to chromosome 15 in Bombyx mori. We then identified candidate regions within the chromosome by investigating the distribution of Alba SNPs along the chromosome and the difference in nucleotide diversity in exons between the two pools. A region spanning ~ 5.7 Mbp at the 5' end of the chromosome was identified as likely to contain the Alba locus. These insights set the stage for more detailed genomic scans and mapping of the Alba phenotype, and demonstrate an efficient use of genomic resources in a novel species. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  2. Risk assessment, life history strategies, and turtles: could declines be prevented or predicted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, J; Garber, S D

    1995-12-01

    The process of ecological risk assessment should involve the ability to predict adverse outcomes of particular environmental contaminants or human intrusions. Ecological risk assessment generally focuses on populations, communities, and ecosystems, rather than on individual health. We explore the importance of life history strategies of aquatic turtles to their risk from environmental contaminants and other human activities using three examples: the wood turtle Clemmys insculpta, a freshwater species; the diamondback terrapin Malaclemys terrapin, a littoral species; and marine turtles as a group. These turtles are partly herbivorous and are at low or intermediate levels on the food chain, yet are particularly vulnerable due to their life history strategies of being long-lived with relatively low survival of young. They suffer a variety of natural mortality factors that include predation, starvation, and disease, as well as inundation and destruction of nesting beaches and their eggs by storms. Yet they also face a number of anthropogenic hazards, including toxic chemicals and floatables (plastics); capture for food, other products, and pets; incidental mortality in fishing gear; disturbance while nesting or moving on land; injuries or death by collision with boats; and increased predator exposure because of humans. The three turtle species (or groups of species) examined have experienced these natural and anthropogenic pressures differentially, with resultant differences in the rates of population declines. Because they are lower on the food chain than other obligate carnivores, they are less vulnerable to toxics, and to date, toxics seem a relatively inconsequential environmental risk to turtles.

  3. Simple life-history traits explain key effective population size ratios across diverse taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waples, Robin S; Luikart, Gordon; Faulkner, James R; Tallmon, David A

    2013-10-07

    Effective population size (Ne) controls both the rate of random genetic drift and the effectiveness of selection and migration, but it is difficult to estimate in nature. In particular, for species with overlapping generations, it is easier to estimate the effective number of breeders in one reproductive cycle (Nb) than Ne per generation. We empirically evaluated the relationship between life history and ratios of Ne, Nb and adult census size (N) using a recently developed model (agene) and published vital rates for 63 iteroparous animals and plants. Nb/Ne varied a surprising sixfold across species and, contrary to expectations, Nb was larger than Ne in over half the species. Up to two-thirds of the variance in Nb/Ne and up to half the variance in Ne/N was explained by just two life-history traits (age at maturity and adult lifespan) that have long interested both ecologists and evolutionary biologists. These results provide novel insights into, and demonstrate a close general linkage between, demographic and evolutionary processes across diverse taxa. For the first time, our results also make it possible to interpret rapidly accumulating estimates of Nb in the context of the rich body of evolutionary theory based on Ne per generation.

  4. Colonisation of toxic environments drives predictable life-history evolution in livebearing fishes (Poeciliidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, Rüdiger; Plath, Martin; Schlupp, Ingo; Tobler, Michael; Brian Langerhans, R

    2014-01-01

    New World livebearing fishes (family Poeciliidae) have repeatedly colonised toxic, hydrogen sulphide-rich waters across their natural distribution. Physiological considerations and life-history theory predict that these adverse conditions should favour the evolution of larger offspring. Here, we examined nine poeciliid species that independently colonised toxic environments, and show that these fishes have indeed repeatedly evolved much larger offspring size at birth in sulphidic waters, thus uncovering a widespread pattern of predictable evolution. However, a second pattern, only indirectly predicted by theory, proved additionally common: a reduction in the number of offspring carried per clutch (i.e. lower fecundity). Our analyses reveal that this secondary pattern represents a mere consequence of a classic life-history trade-off combined with strong selection on offspring size alone. With such strong natural selection in extreme environments, extremophile organisms may commonly exhibit multivariate phenotypic shifts even though not all diverging traits necessarily represent adaptations to the extreme conditions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  5. Potential for anthropogenic disturbances to influence evolutionary change in the life history of a threatened salmonid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John G; Zabel, Richard W; Waples, Robin S; Hutchings, Jeffrey A; Connor, William P

    2008-05-01

    Although evolutionary change within most species is thought to occur slowly, recent studies have identified cases where evolutionary change has apparently occurred over a few generations. Anthropogenically altered environments appear particularly open to rapid evolutionary change over comparatively short time scales. Here, we consider a Pacific salmon population that may have experienced life-history evolution, in response to habitat alteration, within a few generations. Historically, juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from the Snake River migrated as subyearlings to the ocean. With changed riverine conditions that resulted from hydropower dam construction, some juveniles now migrate as yearlings, but more interestingly, the yearling migration tactic has made a large contribution to adult returns over the last decade. Optimal life-history models suggest that yearling juvenile migrants currently have a higher fitness than subyearling migrants. Although phenotypic plasticity likely accounts for some of the change in migration tactics, we suggest that evolution also plays a significant role. Evolutionary change prompted by anthropogenic alterations to the environment has general implications for the recovery of endangered species. The case study we present herein illustrates the importance of integrating evolutionary considerations into conservation planning for species at risk.

  6. Density-dependent coral recruitment displays divergent responses during distinct early life-history stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doropoulos, Christopher; Evensen, Nicolas R; Gómez-Lemos, Luis A; Babcock, Russell C

    2017-05-01

    Population growth involves demographic bottlenecks that regulate recruitment success during various early life-history stages. The success of each early life-history stage can vary in response to population density, interacting with intrinsic (e.g. behavioural) and environmental (e.g. competition, predation) factors. Here, we used the common reef-building coral Acropora millepora to investigate how density-dependence influences larval survival and settlement in laboratory experiments that isolated intrinsic effects, and post-settlement survival in a field experiment that examined interactions with environmental factors. Larval survival was exceptionally high (greater than 80%) and density-independent from 2.5 to 12 days following spawning. By contrast, there was a weak positive effect of larval density on settlement, driven by gregarious behaviour at the highest density. When larval supply was saturated, settlement was three times higher in crevices compared with exposed microhabitats, but a negative relationship between settler density and post-settlement survival in crevices and density-independent survival on exposed surfaces resulted in similar recruit densities just one month following settlement. Moreover, a negative relationship was found between turf algae and settler survival in crevices, whereas gregarious settlement improved settler survival on exposed surfaces. Overall, our findings reveal divergent responses by coral larvae and newly settled recruits to density-dependent regulation, mediated by intrinsic and environmental interactions.

  7. Energetics of feeding, social behavior, and life history in non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery Thompson, Melissa

    2017-05-01

    Energy is a variable of key importance to a wide range of research in primate behavioral ecology, life history, and conservation. However, obtaining detailed data on variation in energetic condition, and its biological consequences, has been a considerable challenge. In the past 20years, tremendous strides have been made towards non-invasive methods for monitoring the physiology of animals in their natural environment. These methods provide detailed, individualized data about energetic condition, as well as energy allocations to growth, reproduction, and somatic health. In doing so, they add much-needed resolution by which to move beyond correlative studies to research programs that can discriminate causes from effects and disaggregate multiple correlated features of the social and physical environment. In this review, I describe the conceptual and methodological approaches for studying primate energetics. I then discuss the core questions about primate feeding ecology, social behavior, and life history that can benefit from physiological studies, highlighting the ways in which recent research has done so. Among these are studies that test, and often refute, common assumptions about how feeding ecology shapes primate biology, and those that reveal proximate associations between energetics and reproductive strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Life History Theory of Father Absence and Menarche: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory D. Webster

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Is the absence of biological fathers related to their daughters' earlier age at menarche? Drawing on evolutionary psychology and life history theory, prior research has suggested such a relationship (Belsky, Steinberg, and Draper, 1991; Draper and Harpending, 1982; Ellis, 2004. Although qualitative reviews have shown narrative support for this relationship (Allison and Hyde, 2013; Ellis, 2004; Kim, Smith, and Palermiti, 1997; Susman and Dorn, 2009, no quantitative review exists to provide empirical support for this relationship or to explain mixed results. Thus, we conducted a random-effects meta-analysis of correlations (Card, 2012 on father absence and daughter menarcheal age (k = 33; N = 70,403. The weighted mean correlation was .14, 95% CI [.09, .19], suggesting that father absence was significantly related to earlier menarche; effect sizes were heterogeneous. Egger's regression (Egger, Smith, Schneider, and Minder, 1997 showed no evidence of publication bias (file-drawer effect; r = .34, p = .052. Outcome measure differences (menarcheal age vs. menarcheal age embedded in a multi-item pubertal timing scale did not moderate effect sizes. Study year effects (Schooler, 2011 were also non-significant. Our findings support one aspect of the life history model and provide groundwork for subsequent examination of other pathways in the model.

  9. Biological and ecological traits of Trichoptera: the influence of phylogeny on life history and behavioral traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, P. K.; Resh, V. H.

    2005-05-01

    Biological and ecological traits of fauna have the potential to indicate changes in community structure that relate to function as an alternative to using traditional taxonomic descriptors. However, traits may be inherited, and consequently, not all species traits are independent of phylogeny. When used in analyses of community structure, results based on traits may be difficult to interpret; suites of traits may respond together even if only one trait is responding to changes in the habitat. To determine the relationship between traits and phylogeny, we examined life history and behavioral traits for the extant 45 families of Trichoptera. Traits such as larval size, respiratory strategies, case or net materials, locomotion, food and functional feeding group, voltanism, diapause, habitat, and reproduction were collected from published life histories. Traits were then coded and mapped onto the phylogeny of Trichoptera to determine the correlations between traits, as well as correlations directly influenced by the phylogeny. Traits such as functional feeding group, reproductive strategies, and building materials were correlated with phylogeny, while traits such as locomotion and habitat type were less influenced by phylogeny. Consideration of macroinvertebrate phylogenies when selecting biological and ecological traits may be essential for accurate interpretation of community function.

  10. Chance, choice and opportunity: Life history study of two exemplary female elementary science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Kathleen Milligan

    The purpose of this two-year study was to investigate why two female elementary teachers became exemplary science teachers, despite conditions which do not promote such achievement. Each teachers' progress was examined using life history methodology. The study's theoretical grounding included females' academic and attitudinal success in science education. Purposeful sampling of peers, administrators, and college professors produced two research participants. Both teachers participated in interviews, observations, and member checks lasting over one year. Data were analyzed inductively, resulting in two life histories. Comparing the life stories using confluence theory (Feldman, 1986) indicated four major categories for consideration: risk-taking; life-long learning; gender equity; and mentors. Risk-taking is necessary for female elementary teachers because of their often poor educational background. Few female role models support efforts for achievement. Life-long learning, including extensive reading and graduate-level classes, supports female teachers' personal and professional growth. Exposure to new ideas and teacher practices encourages curricular change and refinement in science education. Gender inequity and the male-packaging of science is an issue to be resolved by female elementary teachers. Mentors can provide interaction and feedback to refine science instructional practices. Professors, peers, and mentor teachers support instructional and content knowledge efforts. Recommendations for science education in classroom practices, preservice teacher education and continuing professional development include female-friendly approaches to science instruction. Decreased competitive practices through cooperative learning and gender inclusive language encourages female participation and achievement in classrooms. Hands-on, inquiry-based instruction and verbalization encourages female students' achievement in science education. Preservice teachers must receive

  11. Bringing dinosaurs back to life: exhibiting prehistory at the American Museum of Natural History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieppel, Lukas

    2012-09-01

    This essay examines the exhibition of dinosaurs at the American Museum of Natural History during the first two decades of the twentieth century. Dinosaurs provide an especially illuminating lens through which to view the history of museum display practices for two reasons: they made for remarkably spectacular exhibits; and they rested on contested theories about the anatomy, life history, and behavior of long-extinct animals to which curators had no direct observational access. The American Museum sought to capitalize on the popularity of dinosaurs while mitigating the risks of mounting an overtly speculative display by fashioning them into a kind of mixed-media installation made of several elements, including fossilized bone, shellac, iron, and plaster. The resulting sculptures provided visitors with a vivid and lifelike imaginative experience. At the same time, curators, who were anxious to downplay the speculative nature of mounted dinosaurs, drew systematic attention to the material connection that tied individual pieces of fossilized bone to the actual past. Freestanding dinosaurs can therefore be read to have functioned as iconic sculptures that self-consciously advertised their indexical content.

  12. [The life of Dr. RO Kishun, a reflection of modern Korean medical history of the borders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young-Jeon; Park, Se-Hong

    2009-06-01

    borderlands or frontiers of Joseon Korea, China, and Japan, where the history of the three nations met and intermingled with one another. He was a biochemist and researcher, practicing physician and medical professor of the era under Japanese Rule and the one following it. In modern Korean medicine, his life is viewed as a history of the borders, or a transnational legacy going beyond individual history of Korea, China, and Japan.

  13. The plastic fly: the effect of sustained fluctuations in adult food supply on life-history traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, J; Zandveld, J; Mulder, M; Brakefield, P M; Kirkwood, T B L; Shanley, D P; Zwaan, B J

    2014-11-01

    Many adult traits in Drosophila melanogaster show phenotypic plasticity, and the effects of diet on traits such as lifespan and reproduction are well explored. Although plasticity in response to food is still present in older flies, it is unknown how sustained environmental variation affects life-history traits. Here, we explore how such life-long fluctuations of food supply affect weight and survival in groups of flies and affect weight, survival and reproduction in individual flies. In both experiments, we kept adults on constant high or low food and compared these to flies that experienced fluctuations of food either once or twice a week. For these 'yoyo' groups, the initial food level and the duration of the dietary variation differed during adulthood, creating four 'yoyo' fly groups. In groups of flies, survival and weight were affected by adult food. However, for individuals, survival and reproduction, but not weight, were affected by adult food, indicating that single and group housing of female flies affects life-history trajectories. Remarkably, both the manner and extent to which life-history traits varied in relation to food depended on whether flies initially experienced high or low food after eclosion. We therefore conclude that the expression of life-history traits in adult life is affected not only by adult plasticity, but also by early adult life experiences. This is an important but often overlooked factor in studies of life-history evolution and may explain variation in life-history experiments. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society for Evolutionary Biology.

  14. Life-history traits of the Miocene Hipparion concudense (Spain inferred from bone histological structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cayetana Martinez-Maza

    Full Text Available Histological analyses of fossil bones have provided clues on the growth patterns and life history traits of several extinct vertebrates that would be unavailable for classical morphological studies. We analyzed the bone histology of Hipparion to infer features of its life history traits and growth pattern. Microscope analysis of thin sections of a large sample of humeri, femora, tibiae and metapodials of Hipparion concudense from the upper Miocene site of Los Valles de Fuentidueña (Segovia, Spain has shown that the number of growth marks is similar among the different limb bones, suggesting that equivalent skeletochronological inferences for this Hipparion population might be achieved by means of any of the elements studied. Considering their abundance, we conducted a skeletechronological study based on the large sample of third metapodials from Los Valles de Fuentidueña together with another large sample from the Upper Miocene locality of Concud (Teruel, Spain. The data obtained enabled us to distinguish four age groups in both samples and to determine that Hipparion concudense tended to reach skeletal maturity during its third year of life. Integration of bone microstructure and skeletochronological data allowed us to identify ontogenetic changes in bone structure and growth rate and to distinguish three histologic ontogenetic stages corresponding to immature, subadult and adult individuals. Data on secondary osteon density revealed an increase in bone remodeling throughout the ontogenetic stages and a lesser degree thereof in the Concud population, which indicates different biomechanical stresses in the two populations, likely due to environmental differences. Several individuals showed atypical growth patterns in the Concud sample, which may also reflect environmental differences between the two localities. Finally, classification of the specimens' age within groups enabled us to characterize the age structure of both samples, which is

  15. Genetic Drift, Not Life History or RNAi, Determine Long-Term Evolution of Transposable Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szitenberg, Amir; Cha, Soyeon; Opperman, Charles H; Bird, David M; Blaxter, Mark L; Lunt, David H

    2016-10-05

    Transposable elements (TEs) are a major source of genome variation across the branches of life. Although TEs may play an adaptive role in their host's genome, they are more often deleterious, and purifying selection is an important factor controlling their genomic loads. In contrast, life history, mating system, GC content, and RNAi pathways have been suggested to account for the disparity of TE loads in different species. Previous studies of fungal, plant, and animal genomes have reported conflicting results regarding the direction in which these genomic features drive TE evolution. Many of these studies have had limited power, however, because they studied taxonomically narrow systems, comparing only a limited number of phylogenetically independent contrasts, and did not address long-term effects on TE evolution. Here, we test the long-term determinants of TE evolution by comparing 42 nematode genomes spanning over 500 million years of diversification. This analysis includes numerous transitions between life history states, and RNAi pathways, and evaluates if these forces are sufficiently persistent to affect the long-term evolution of TE loads in eukaryotic genomes. Although we demonstrate statistical power to detect selection, we find no evidence that variation in these factors influence genomic TE loads across extended periods of time. In contrast, the effects of genetic drift appear to persist and control TE variation among species. We suggest that variation in the tested factors are largely inconsequential to the large differences in TE content observed between genomes, and only by these large-scale comparisons can we distinguish long-term and persistent effects from transient or random changes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. Nautilus pompilius life history and demographics at the Osprey Reef Seamount, Coral Sea, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, Andrew J; Ward, Peter D; Marshall, N Justin

    2011-02-10

    Nautiloids are the subject of speculation as to their threatened status arising from the impacts of targeted fishing for the ornamental shell market. Life history knowledge is essential to understand the susceptibility of this group to overfishing and to the instigation of management frameworks. This study provides a comprehensive insight into the life of Nautilus in the wild. At Osprey Reef from 1998-2008, trapping for Nautilus was conducted on 354 occasions, with 2460 individuals of one species, Nautilus pompilius, captured and 247 individuals recaptured. Baited remote underwater video systems (BRUVS) were deployed on 15 occasions and six remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives from 100-800 m were conducted to record Nautilus presence and behavior. Maturity, sex and size data were recorded, while measurements of recaptured individuals allowed estimation of growth rates to maturity, and longevity beyond maturity. We found sexual dimorphism in size at maturity (males: 131.9±SD = 2.6 mm; females: 118.9±7.5 mm shell diameter) in a population dominated by mature individuals (58%). Mean growth rates of 15 immature recaptured animals were 0.061±0.023 mm day(-1) resulting in an estimate of around 15.5 years to maturation. Recaptures of mature animals after five years provide evidence of a lifespan exceeding 20 years. Juvenile Nautilus pompilius feeding behavior was recorded for the first time within the same depth range (200-610 m) as adults. Our results provide strong evidence of a K-selected life history for Nautilus from a detailed study of a 'closed' wild population. In conjunction with population size and density estimates established for the Osprey Reef Nautilus, this work allows calculations for sustainable catch and provides mechanisms to extrapolate these findings to other extant nautiloid populations (Nautilus and Allonautilus spp.) throughout the Indo-Pacific.

  17. Nautilus pompilius life history and demographics at the Osprey Reef Seamount, Coral Sea, Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Dunstan

    Full Text Available Nautiloids are the subject of speculation as to their threatened status arising from the impacts of targeted fishing for the ornamental shell market. Life history knowledge is essential to understand the susceptibility of this group to overfishing and to the instigation of management frameworks. This study provides a comprehensive insight into the life of Nautilus in the wild. At Osprey Reef from 1998-2008, trapping for Nautilus was conducted on 354 occasions, with 2460 individuals of one species, Nautilus pompilius, captured and 247 individuals recaptured. Baited remote underwater video systems (BRUVS were deployed on 15 occasions and six remotely operated vehicle (ROV dives from 100-800 m were conducted to record Nautilus presence and behavior. Maturity, sex and size data were recorded, while measurements of recaptured individuals allowed estimation of growth rates to maturity, and longevity beyond maturity. We found sexual dimorphism in size at maturity (males: 131.9±SD = 2.6 mm; females: 118.9±7.5 mm shell diameter in a population dominated by mature individuals (58%. Mean growth rates of 15 immature recaptured animals were 0.061±0.023 mm day(-1 resulting in an estimate of around 15.5 years to maturation. Recaptures of mature animals after five years provide evidence of a lifespan exceeding 20 years. Juvenile Nautilus pompilius feeding behavior was recorded for the first time within the same depth range (200-610 m as adults. Our results provide strong evidence of a K-selected life history for Nautilus from a detailed study of a 'closed' wild population. In conjunction with population size and density estimates established for the Osprey Reef Nautilus, this work allows calculations for sustainable catch and provides mechanisms to extrapolate these findings to other extant nautiloid populations (Nautilus and Allonautilus spp. throughout the Indo-Pacific.

  18. Life-History Traits of the Miocene Hipparion concudense (Spain) Inferred from Bone Histological Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Maza, Cayetana; Alberdi, Maria Teresa; Nieto-Diaz, Manuel; Prado, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    Histological analyses of fossil bones have provided clues on the growth patterns and life history traits of several extinct vertebrates that would be unavailable for classical morphological studies. We analyzed the bone histology of Hipparion to infer features of its life history traits and growth pattern. Microscope analysis of thin sections of a large sample of humeri, femora, tibiae and metapodials of Hipparion concudense from the upper Miocene site of Los Valles de Fuentidueña (Segovia, Spain) has shown that the number of growth marks is similar among the different limb bones, suggesting that equivalent skeletochronological inferences for this Hipparion population might be achieved by means of any of the elements studied. Considering their abundance, we conducted a skeletechronological study based on the large sample of third metapodials from Los Valles de Fuentidueña together with another large sample from the Upper Miocene locality of Concud (Teruel, Spain). The data obtained enabled us to distinguish four age groups in both samples and to determine that Hipparion concudense tended to reach skeletal maturity during its third year of life. Integration of bone microstructure and skeletochronological data allowed us to identify ontogenetic changes in bone structure and growth rate and to distinguish three histologic ontogenetic stages corresponding to immature, subadult and adult individuals. Data on secondary osteon density revealed an increase in bone remodeling throughout the ontogenetic stages and a lesser degree thereof in the Concud population, which indicates different biomechanical stresses in the two populations, likely due to environmental differences. Several individuals showed atypical growth patterns in the Concud sample, which may also reflect environmental differences between the two localities. Finally, classification of the specimens’ age within groups enabled us to characterize the age structure of both samples, which is typical of

  19. Leaf and life history traits predict plant growth in a green roof ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Lundholm

    Full Text Available Green roof ecosystems are constructed to provide services such as stormwater retention and urban temperature reductions. Green roofs with shallow growing media represent stressful conditions for plant survival, thus plants that survive and grow are important for maximizing economic and ecological benefits. While field trials are essential for selecting appropriate green roof plants, we wanted to determine whether plant leaf traits could predict changes in abundance (growth to provide a more general framework for plant selection. We quantified leaf traits and derived life-history traits (Grime's C-S-R strategies for 13 species used in a four-year green roof experiment involving five plant life forms. Changes in canopy density in monocultures and mixtures containing one to five life forms were determined and related to plant traits using multiple regression. We expected traits related to stress-tolerance would characterize the species that best grew in this relatively harsh setting. While all species survived to the end of the experiment, canopy species diversity in mixture treatments was usually much lower than originally planted. Most species grew slower in mixture compared to monoculture, suggesting that interspecific competition reduced canopy diversity. Species dominant in mixture treatments tended to be fast-growing ruderals and included both native and non-native species. Specific leaf area was a consistently strong predictor of final biomass and the change in abundance in both monoculture and mixture treatments. Some species in contrasting life-form groups showed compensatory dynamics, suggesting that life-form mixtures can maximize resilience of cover and biomass in the face of environmental fluctuations. This study confirms that plant traits can be used to predict growth performance in green roof ecosystems. While rapid canopy growth is desirable for green roofs, maintenance of species diversity may require engineering of conditions that

  20. Physical activity history and end-of-life hospital and long-term care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B; Rantanen, Taina; Leinonen, Raija

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the early predictors of need for care in late life. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether physical activity from midlife onward was associated with hospital and long-term care in the last year of life. METHODS: We studied a decedent population of 846...... persons aged 66-98 years at death, who, on average 5.8 years prior to death, had participated in an interview about their current and earlier physical activity. Data on the use of care in the last year of life are register-based data and complete. RESULTS: Men needed on average 96 days (SD 7.0) and women...... had been consistently physically active, whereas use of long-term care did not correlate with physical activity history. Among women, the risk for long-term care was higher for those who had been sedentary (IRR 2.03, 95% CI 1.28-3.21) or only occasionally physically active (IRR 1.60, 95% CI 1...