WorldWideScience

Sample records for writers cancer survivorship

  1. Your cancer survivorship care plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use to create one: American Society of Clinical Oncology -- www.cancer.net/survivorship/follow-care-after-cancer-treatment/asco- ... your doctor visits. References American Society of Clinical Oncology. Survivorship. Cancer.net. Updated July 2016. www.cancer.net/survivorship . ...

  2. Cancer survivorship and sexual orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmer, Ulrike; Miao, Xiaopeng; Ozonoff, Al

    2011-08-15

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual populations are not part of cancer surveillance, resulting in scarce information about the cancer survivorship of these populations. To address this information gap, the authors examined the prevalence of cancer survivorship by sexual orientation and cancer survivors' self-reported health by sexual orientation. The authors explored these issues by analyzing pooled data from the California Health Interview survey from 2001, 2003, and 2005. By using descriptive statistics and logistic regressions, they examined the cancer prevalence in men and women by sexual orientation and subsequently compared the self-reported health of male and female cancer survivors by sexual orientation. Among women, the authors found no significant differences in cancer prevalence by sexual orientation, but lesbian and bisexual female cancer survivors had 2.0 and 2.3× the odds of reporting fair or poor health compared with heterosexual female cancer survivors. Among men, we found significant differences in cancer prevalence, with gay men having 1.9× the odds of reporting a cancer diagnosis compared with heterosexual men. There were no differences by sexual orientation in male cancer survivors' self-reported health. Our novel findings suggest sex differences in the impact of cancer on lesbian, gay, and bisexual cancer survivors. Lesbian and bisexual cancer survivors need to be targeted by programs and services to assist these cancer survivors in improving their health perceptions, whereas healthcare providers and public health agencies need to be made aware of the higher prevalence of cancer in gay men to prevent future cancers through increased screening and primary prevention. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  3. Lung Cancer Survivorship

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-10-20

    A lung cancer survivor shares her story about diagnosis, treatment, and community support. She also gives advice for other cancer survivors.  Created: 10/20/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/20/2016.

  4. Cancer Survivorship for Primary Care Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Matthew Y; Overholser, Linda; Zittleman, Linda; Westfall, John M

    2015-06-01

    Long-term cancer survivorship care is a relatively new and rapidly advancing field of research. Increasing cancer survivorship rates have created a huge population of long-term cancer survivors whose cancer-specific needs challenge healthcare infrastructure and highlight a significant deficit of knowledge and guidelines in transitional care from treatment to normalcy/prolonged survivorship. As the paradigm of cancer care has changed from a fixation on the curative to the maintenance on long-term overall quality of life, so to, has the delineation of responsibility between oncologists and primary care physicians (PCPs). As more patients enjoy long-term survival, PCPs play a more comprehensive role in cancer care following acute treatment. To this end, this annotated bibliography was written to provide PCPs and other readers with an up-to-date and robust base of knowledge on long-term cancer survivorship, including definitions and epidemiological information as well as specific considerations and recommendations on physical, psychosocial, sexual, and comorbidity needs of survivors. Additionally, significant information is included on survivorship care, specifically Survivorship Care Plans (SPCs) and their evolution, utilization by oncologists and PCPs, and current gaps, as well as an introduction to patient navigation programs. Given rapid advancements in cancer research, this bibliography is meant to serve as current baseline reference outlining the state of the science.

  5. Issues in adult blood cancer survivorship care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugos, Kelly G

    2015-02-01

    To describe the current literature and future directions of survivorship care for the adult blood cancer population including unique features, identification of needs, practice guidelines, care models and the implications for nursing. Peer reviewed literature, government and national advocacy organization reports, professional organization guidelines. Adult blood cancer survivors are a heterogeneous population that often receives complicated treatments to live a longer life. Survivorship needs among this population are often unmet throughout the cancer care continuum. The limited research literature and guidelines point to survivorship care strategies from the day of diagnosis to enhance long-term outcomes and improve quality of life. Nurses are experts in symptom management and central to preventing, detecting, measuring, educating, and treating the effects of cancer and its treatment. Moreover, nurses are key to implementing strategies to support blood cancer survivors, families, and caregivers from the day of diagnosis to the last day of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sources of uncertainty in cancer survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura E

    2012-12-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the common experience of illness-related uncertainty; however, little research has explored the specific sources of uncertainty throughout cancer survivorship. The purpose of this study is to investigate the experience of uncertainty for cancer survivors and their partners. Thus, the following research question is posed: What are the sources of uncertainty in cancer survivorship for survivors and partners? One-on-one interviews were conducted with 35 cancer survivors and 25 partners. Constant comparative methodologies were used to analyze the data. Participants described medical, personal, and social sources of uncertainty that persisted throughout survivorship. Medical sources of uncertainty included questions about the cancer diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. Personal sources of uncertainty included ambiguous valued identities and career-related questions. Social sources of uncertainty included unclear communicative, relational and familial consequences of illness. Survivors and partners in this study experienced uncertainty that persisted long after the completion of cancer treatment. The participants also described sources of uncertainty unique to this illness context. These results have important implications for health care providers and intervention developers and imply that chronic uncertainty should be managed throughout survivorship. The sources of uncertainty described in the current study have important implications for cancer survivors' management of uncertainty. Cancer survivors and their family members must first know the common sources of uncertainty to adaptively adjust to an uncertain survivorship trajectory. The present investigation provides insight into the uncertainty experiences of cancer survivors and implies that continued care may improve well-being after the completion of cancer treatment.

  7. Pursuing Normality: Reflections on Cancer Survivorship Care of Lymphoma Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Louise S; Handberg, Charlotte

    2018-01-16

    The present study explored the reflections on cancer survivorship care of lymphoma survivors in active treatment. Lymphoma survivors have survivorship care needs, yet their participation in cancer survivorship care programs is still reported as low. The aim of this study was to understand the reflections on cancer survivorship care of lymphoma survivors to aid the future planning of cancer survivorship care and overcome barriers to participation. Data were generated in a hematological ward during 4 months of ethnographic fieldwork, including participant observation and 46 semistructured interviews with 9 lymphoma survivors. Interpretive description methodology and social practice theory guided the analytical framework. "Pursuing normality" was an overall finding and was comprised of 2 overarching patterns, "future prospects" and "survivorship care perceptions," both implying an influence on whether to participate in cancer survivorship care programs. Because of "pursuing normality," 8 of 9 participants opted out of cancer survivorship care programming due to prospects of "being cured" and perceptions of cancer survivorship care as "a continuation of the disease." The findings add to our understanding of possible barriers for participation in cancer survivorship care and outline important aspects to account for in the practice of health professionals. The study findings may guide practice to establish a systematic approach for providing information to cancer survivors regarding the possible management of their symptoms and of the content and purpose of cancer survivorship care.

  8. Evidence-Based Cancer Survivorship Activities for Comprehensive Cancer Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, J Michael; Lakhani, Naheed; Finifrock, DeAnna; Pinkerton, Beth; Johnson, Krystal L; Mallory, Sharon H; Migliore Santiago, Patricia; Stewart, Sherri L

    2015-12-01

    One of six priorities of CDC's National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) is to address the needs of cancer survivors within the local population served by individually funded states, tribes, and territories. This report examines cancer survivorship activities implemented in five NCCCP grantees, which have initiated evidence-based activities outlined in A National Action Plan for Cancer Survivorship: Advancing Public Health Strategies (NAP). NCCCP action plans, submitted annually to CDC, from 2010 to 2014 were reviewed in February 2015 to assess implementation of cancer survivorship activities and recommended strategies consistent with the NAP. Four state-level and one tribal grantee with specific activities related to one of each of the four NAP strategies were chosen for inclusion. Brief case reports describing the initiation and impact of implemented activities were developed in collaboration with each grantee program director. New Mexico, South Carolina, Vermont, Washington state, and Fond Du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa programs each implemented activities in surveillance and applied research; communication, education, and training; programs, policies, and infrastructure; and access to quality care and services. This report provides examples for incorporating cancer survivorship activities within Comprehensive Cancer Control programs of various sizes, demographic makeup, and resource capacity. New Mexico, South Carolina, Vermont, Washington state, and Fond Du Lac Band developed creative cancer survivorship activities that meet CDC recommendations. NCCCP grantees can follow these examples by implementing evidence-based survivorship interventions that meet the needs of their specific populations. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Pain management in cancer survivorship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Sjøgren, Per

    2015-01-01

    of the main problems in this population and prevalence varies between 16% and 50%. Most information derives from breast cancer patients assessed by surveys from national or local institutional databases. A Danish population-based survey estimated that 41.5% of all cancer survivors reported chronic pain. PAIN...... survivors. Pain management strategies are discussed according to the biopsychosocial model and with the rapidly growing number of cancer survivors the establishment of multidisciplinary clinics as a part of comprehensive cancer centers are proposed....

  10. Male breast cancer: risk factors, biology, diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruddy, K J; Winer, E P

    2013-01-01

    ...'. Relevant published data regarding risk factors, biological characteristics, presentation and prognosis, appropriate evaluation and treatment, and survivorship issues in male breast cancer patients are presented...

  11. National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the 11 other member organizations of the Cancer Leadership Council sent a letter to Congress expressing “serious concerns about the potential negative impact of tax reform legislation currently under consideration on those living with cancer.” Three areas of ...

  12. Dissemination and Translation: A Frontier for Cancer Survivorship Research

    OpenAIRE

    Pollack, Lori A; Hawkins, Nikki A; Peaker, Brandy L.; Buchanan, Natasha; Risendal, Betsy C.

    2011-01-01

    As the field of survivorship research grows, the need for translation is imperative to expand new knowledge into arenas that directly impact survivors. This commentary seeks to encourage research focused on dissemination and translation of survivorship interventions and programs, including practice-based research. We overview diffusion, dissemination and translation in the context of cancer survivorship and present the RE-AIM and Knowledge to Action frameworks as approaches that can be used t...

  13. A Patient-Centered Perspective on Cancer Survivorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Zebrack

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Survivorship is a complicated notion because people often confuse a process of survivorship with a mythic identity of being a cancer survivor. This confusion may be a distraction to addressing the real-life struggles and challenges experienced by all people diagnosed with cancer. A more expansive perspective of survivorship, one that attends to patients’ physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and existential challenges throughout a continuum of care, would be more in line with what is known empirically about people’s experiences with cancer. In an effort to gain a patient-centered perspective on cancer, and one that emphasizes multiple dimensions of cancer survivorship, the author reports findings from a non-scientific social media poll (via Facebook and personal emails in which survivors and colleagues working in the field of cancer survivorship answered the question: What does cancer survivorship mean to you? The comments are enlightening and useful for guiding the development of a patient-centered, and, thus, more comprehensive, approach to caring for people affected by cancer.

  14. The Role of Advanced Practice Nurses in Cancer Survivorship Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Stacie; Dunne, Megan; McCabe, Mary S

    2015-11-01

    To review advanced practice nursing roles in planning, implementing, and evaluating survivorship care. Review of the literature, published articles, government and organizational reports. The increased focus on improving post-treatment cancer care presents opportunities for advanced practice nurses to meet the physical and psychosocial needs of cancer survivors. As experts in the comprehensive delivery of care, oncology advanced practice nurses are positioned to initiate, deliver, and evaluate survivorship care through innovative models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Building a shared vision for an online cancer survivorship community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jacob B; Lorenzi, Nancy M

    2009-11-14

    In order to achieve comprehensive, closed-loop care for cancer survivors, new strategies are needed to bring together patients, providers, and support services in local communities. To address this challenge, an online community for cancer survivorship was envisioned and designed collaboratively by cancer survivors, family members, community professionals, and informatics researchers in middle Tennessee. The vision developed by the community members serves as a foundation for medical informatics systems to build capacity in local communities to improve cancer care and social support. Using ecological systems theory and social capital as theoretical frameworks, key themes are identified for the future of communication and collaboration in cancer survivorship.

  16. [The transitional survivorship in breast cancer: a narrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Calatayud, M; Carrascosa-Gil, R; Vivar, C G

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a review undertaken to explore the experiences of patients and families in the transition to breast cancer survivorship. The "transitional survivorship" is defined as the period immediately after the end of treatment. During this period, breast cancer survivors aim to return to their "new normality", but this time can be full of physical, emotional and social challenges for which the women may not feel prepared. A narrative review was conducted in the databases MEDLINE, CINAHL, PSYCHINFO and CancerLit for the period 2000-2010. The search terms "breast cancer", "transition", "survivorship", "family: and "experience" were combined. The main emerging categories that explained the experiences of breast cancer survivors during the "transitional survivorship" were "new normality", the sense of loss, uncertainty about the future, loneliness and self-transcendence. . This review shows the importance of knowing the experiences of women with breast cancer during the transitional survivorship in order to meet their needs during this stage of the illness, so as to facilitate their transition into the next phase of survival. There is a lack of knowledge about the experiences of families during this stage of survival and the impact of family relationship on the transitional experiences of breast cancer survivors. Therefore, it seems relevant to focus on this area in future exploratory studies.

  17. Diet, Physical Activity, and Body Weight in Cancer Survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Karishma; Berkowitz, Alyssa; Sanft, Tara

    2017-11-01

    Diet, physical activity, and body weight have been shown to play an important role in cancer survivorship. The impact of each of these lifestyle factors differs slightly among cancer types, and adherence to recommended diet and physical activity guidelines has been associated with positive outcomes, including decrease in the risk of cancer recurrence and improvement of quality of life. Although there are compelling data that appropriate diet, physical activity, and body weight have beneficial effects in cancer survivorship, additional trials are needed to understand the relationship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Concept analysis of cancer survivorship and contributions to oncological nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rafaela Azevedo Abrantes; da Conceição, Vander Monteiro; Araujo, Jeferson Santos; Zago, Márcia Maria Fontão

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to analyse the concept of cancer survivorship using Rodgers' evolutionary concept analysis model. The lack of a consensus definition as well as the confusion and debate concerning the definitions of "survivor" and "cancer survivorship" hinder an understanding of the intrinsic needs associated with the latter. Concept analysis. A systematic literature search was performed using the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, LILACS, and PsycINFO with studies published between 2000 and 2014. The final sample contained 39 studies that were analysed on the basis of Rodgers' model and inductive thematic analysis, discussed through the lens of the medical anthropology concept of culture. Cancer survivorship is a broad concept that can be understood using 8 themes: changes in life plans, positive and negative aspect dualities, life reflections, identity change, individual experiences, symptom control, the need for support, and quality of care. These themes are summarized using 2 attributes: liminality process and culturally congruent care. This article contributes to understanding of cancer survivorship and the processes that are intrinsic to this concept. It calls for future investigations to enhance cancer survivorship across its 2 domains at the personal (patient's life) and clinical (nursing practice) levels. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. The Polaris Oncology Survivorship Transition (POST) System: A Patient- and Provider-Driven Cancer Survivorship Planning Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hea, Erin; Wu, Juliet; Dietzen, Laura; Harralson, Tina; Boudreaux, Edwin D

    2016-11-01

    It is strongly recommended that individuals ending treatment for cancer have a "survivorship plan," and new standards require survivorship planning for accreditation, However, a comprehensive plan is often neglected. To present the development and field test results of a web-based, breast cancer survivorship care planning system. The Polaris Oncology Survivorship Transition (POST) blends input from the electronic health record (EHR), oncology care providers (OCPs), and patients to create a survivorship care plan (SCP). The content of the POST program was created with the assistance of end-user input (patients, oncologists, and primary care providers (PCPs)) and the full program was piloted on women ending treatment for breast cancer. This paper presents the pilot study that field-tested the POST In a clinical setting. Patients were recruited from outpatient care clinics and chemotherapy units in a comprehensive care center. The study included 25 women ending treatment for breast cancer in the past year, 4 OCPs, and PCPs. Patients received the POST computeπzed assessment and a tailored SCP. The POST assists providers in crafting efficient and comprehensive SCPs and was rated highly satisfactory by all end-users. The POST program can be used as a cancer survivorship planning program to assist OCPs in care planning for their patients ending treatment for breast cancer. This study provides support for Incorporating computerized SCP programs into clinical practice. Use of the POST in clinical practice has the potential to improve survivorship planning.

  20. Advancing breast cancer survivorship among African-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Steven S; Yoo, Wonsuk; Whitehead, Mary S; Smith, Selina A

    2015-09-01

    Advances have occurred in breast cancer survivorship but, for many African-American women, challenges and gaps in relevant information remain. This article identifies opportunities to address disparities in breast cancer survival and quality of life, and thereby to increase breast cancer survivorship among African-American women. For breast cancer survivors, common side effects, lasting for long periods after cancer treatment, include fatigue, loss of strength, difficulty sleeping, and sexual dysfunction. For addressing physical and mental health concerns, a variety of interventions have been evaluated, including exercise and weight training, dietary interventions, yoga and mindfulness-based stress reduction, and support groups or group therapy. Obesity has been associated with breast cancer recurrence and poorer survival. Relative to white survivors, African-American breast cancer survivors are more likely to be obese and less likely to engage in physical activity, although exercise improves overall quality of life and cancer-related fatigue. Considerable information exists about the effectiveness of such interventions for alleviating distress and improving quality of life among breast cancer survivors, but few studies have focused specifically on African-American women with a breast cancer diagnosis. Studies have identified a number of personal factors that are associated with resilience, increased quality of life, and positive adaptation to a breast cancer diagnosis. There is a need for a better understanding of breast cancer survivorship among African-American women. Additional evaluations of interventions for improving the quality of life and survival of African-American breast cancer survivors are desirable.

  1. Advancing Breast Cancer Survivorship among African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Steven S.; Yoo, Wonsuk; Whitehead, Mary S.; Smith, Selina A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Advances have occurred in breast cancer survivorship but, for many African American women, challenges and gaps in relevant information remain. Methods This article identifies opportunities to address disparities in breast cancer survival and quality of life, and thereby to increase breast cancer survivorship among African American women. Results For breast cancer survivors, common side effects, lasting for long periods after cancer treatment, include fatigue, loss of strength, difficulty sleeping, and sexual dysfunction. For addressing physical and mental health concerns, a variety of interventions have been evaluated, including exercise and weight training, dietary interventions, yoga and mindfulness-based stress reduction, and support groups or group therapy. Obesity has been associated with breast cancer recurrence and poorer survival. Relative to white survivors, African American breast cancer survivors are more likely to be obese and less likely to engage in physical activity, although exercise improves overall quality of life and cancer-related fatigue. Considerable information exists about the effectiveness of such interventions for alleviating distress and improving quality of life among breast cancer survivors, but few studies have focused specifically on African American women with a breast cancer diagnosis. Studies have identified a number of personal factors that are associated with resilience, increased quality of life, and positive adaptation to a breast cancer diagnosis. Conclusions There is a need for a better understanding of breast cancer survivorship among African American women. Additional evaluations of interventions for improving the quality of life and survival of African American breast cancer survivors are desirable. PMID:26303657

  2. Time to establish multidisciplinary childhood cancer survivorship programs in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Ghim, Thad T.

    2010-01-01

    Improved treatment strategies and better supportive care have resulted in increased survival rates for childhood cancers. However, most of the survivors may have complex, long-term health issues. In 2004, Childhood Cancer Survivorship Study of the United States confirmed that both survivors and the medical community need to be educated about the late effects of childhood cancer treatment. Korea, with an estimated number of childhood cancer survivors of 20,000 to 25,000, faces similar challeng...

  3. Psychosexual care in prostate cancer survivorship: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonewardene, Sanchia Shanika; Persad, Raj

    2015-08-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in men. Due to improvements in medical care, the number of PC survivors is increasing. Current literature demonstrates survivors have significant unmet needs including psychosexual care. We assess patients psychosexual needs by systematic review of literature over the past 20 years up to May 2015 in order to see what issues need to be addressed within psychosexual care. A systematic review was conducted on PC survivorship and psychosexual care. The search strategy aimed to identify all references related to PC survivorship programme components (parts of survivorship programmes) AND survivorship AND psychosexual concerns. Search terms used were as follows: (PC OR prostate neoplasms) AND (survivorship OR survivor*) OR [psychosexual impairment or sexual dysfunction or erectile dysfunction (ED)] AND [comorbidity or quality of life (QoL)]. The systematic review identified 17 papers, examining unmet needs in psychosexual care post PC therapy. These findings of this review may change psychosexual care of PC survivors, as national and international guidance is needed.

  4. An action plan for translating cancer survivorship research into care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Catherine M; Smith, Tenbroeck; de Moor, Janet S; Glasgow, Russell E; Khoury, Muin J; Hawkins, Nikki A; Stein, Kevin D; Rechis, Ruth; Parry, Carla; Leach, Corinne R; Padgett, Lynne; Rowland, Julia H

    2014-11-01

    To meet the complex needs of a growing number of cancer survivors, it is essential to accelerate the translation of survivorship research into evidence-based interventions and, as appropriate, recommendations for care that may be implemented in a wide variety of settings. Current progress in translating research into care is stymied, with results of many studies un- or underutilized. To better understand this problem and identify strategies to encourage the translation of survivorship research findings into practice, four agencies (American Cancer Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, LIVE STRONG: Foundation, National Cancer Institute) hosted a meeting in June, 2012, titled: "Biennial Cancer Survivorship Research Conference: Translating Science to Care." Meeting participants concluded that accelerating science into care will require a coordinated, collaborative effort by individuals from diverse settings, including researchers and clinicians, survivors and families, public health professionals, and policy makers. This commentary describes an approach stemming from that meeting to facilitate translating research into care by changing the process of conducting research-improving communication, collaboration, evaluation, and feedback through true and ongoing partnerships. We apply the T0-T4 translational process model to survivorship research and provide illustrations of its use. The resultant framework is intended to orient stakeholders to the role of their work in the translational process and facilitate the transdisciplinary collaboration needed to translate basic discoveries into best practices regarding clinical care, self-care/management, and community programs for cancer survivors. Finally, we discuss barriers to implementing translational survivorship science identified at the meeting, along with future directions to accelerate this process. Published by Oxford University Press 2014.

  5. Cancer survivorship: Advancing the concept in the context of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Amanda; Payne, Sheila; Brady, Anne-Marie

    2017-08-01

    Previous conceptualizations of cancer survivorship have focused on heterogeneous cancer survivors, with little consideration of the validity of conclusions for homogeneous tumour groups. This paper aims to examine the concept of cancer survivorship in the context of colorectal cancer (CRC). Rodgers' (1989) Evolutionary Method of Concept Analysis guided this study. A systematic search of PUBMED, CINAHL, PsycINFO and The Cochrane Library was conducted in November 2016 to identify studies of CRC survivorship. The Braun and Clarke (2006) framework guided the analysis and interpretation of data extracted from eighty-five publications. Similar to general populations of cancer survivors, CRC survivors experience survivorship as an individual, life-changing process, punctuated by uncertainty and a duality of positive and negative outcomes affecting quality of life. However, CRC survivors experience specific concerns arising from the management of their disease. The concept of cancer survivorship has evolved over the past decade as the importance of navigating the healthcare system and its resources, and the constellation of met and unmet needs of cancer survivors are realised. The results highlight core similarities between survivorship in the context of CRC and other tumour groups, but underlines issues specific to CRC survivorship. Communication and support are key issues in survivorship care which may detrimentally affect CRC survivors' well-being if they are inadequately addressed. Healthcare professionals (HCP's) therefore have a duty to ensure cancer survivors' health, information and supportive care needs are met in the aftermath of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Early breast cancer: diagnosis, treatment and survivorship.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Meade, Elizabeth

    2013-01-11

    Breast cancer is the most common female cancer and globally remains a major public health concern. The diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer continues to develop. Diagnosis is now more precise, surgery is less mutilating and women now have the option of breast conserving therapy with better cosmesis, and without sacrificing survival. Radiotherapy is more targeted and the selection of patients for adjuvant chemotherapy is based not only on prognostic and predictive factors, but also on newer molecular profiling that will ensure that chemotherapy is given to the patients who need and respond to it. These developments all provide a more tailored approach to the treatment of breast cancer. Management now involves a multidisciplinary team approach in order to provide the highest standard of care for patients throughout their cancer journey from diagnosis through treatment and into follow-up care.

  7. Diet and Nutrition in Cancer Survivorship and Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Bazzan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of palliative cancer care is typically to relieve suffering and improve quality of life. Most approaches to diet in this setting have focused only on eating as many calories as possible to avoid cachexia. However, as the concept of palliative care has evolved to include all aspects of cancer survivorship and not just end of life care, there is an increasing need to thoughtfully consider diet and nutrition approaches that can impact not only quality of life but overall health outcomes and perhaps even positively affect cancer recurrence and progression. In this regard, there has been a recent emphasis in the literature on nutrition and cancer as an important factor in both quality of life and in the pathophysiology of cancer. Hence, the primary purpose of this paper is to review the current data on diet and nutrition as it pertains to a wide range of cancer patients in the palliative care setting.

  8. Physical activity motivation and cancer survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Bernardine M; Ciccolo, Joseph T

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) participation has been shown to be helpful in improving physical and mental well-being among cancer survivors. The purpose of this chapter is to review the literature on the determinants of physical activity motivation and behavior among cancer survivors. Using theories of behavior change, researchers have sought to identify the correlates of motivation that predict the participation in regular physical activity in observational studies, while intervention studies have focused on manipulating those factors to support the initiation of physical activity. The majority of this work has been conducted with breast cancer survivors, and there is an interest in expanding this work to survivors of others cancers (e.g., prostate, lung, and colorectal cancer). Results suggest that constructs from the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), Transtheoretical Model (TTM), and Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) are associated with greater motivation for physical activity, and some of these constructs have been used in interventions to promote physical activity adoption. There is scope for understanding the determinants of physical activity adoption in various cancer survivor populations. Much more needs to done to identify the determinants of maintenance of physical activity.

  9. Testicular Cancer Survivorship : Research Strategies and Recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Travis, Lois B.; Beard, Clair; Allan, James M.; Dahl, Alv A.; Feldman, Darren R.; Oldenburg, Jan; Daugaard, Gedske; Kelly, Jennifer L.; Dolan, M. Eileen; Hannigan, Robyn; Constine, Louis S.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Okunieff, Paul; Armstrong, Greg; Wiljer, David; Miller, Robert C.; Gietema, Jourik A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Nichols, Craig R.; Einhorn, Lawrence H.; Fossa, Sophie D.

    2010-01-01

    Testicular cancer represents the most curable solid tumor, with a 10-year survival rate of more than 95%. Given the young average age at diagnosis, it is estimated that effective treatment approaches, in particular, platinum-based chemotherapy, have resulted in an average gain of several decades of

  10. Advocacy, support and survivorship in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, J; Casey, C; Sandoe, D; Hyde, M K; Cheron-Sauer, M-C; Lowe, A; Oliffe, J L; Chambers, S K

    2017-02-01

    Across Australia, prostate cancer support groups (PCSG) have emerged to fill a gap in psychosocial care for men and their families. However, an understanding of the triggers and influencers of the PCSG movement is absent. We interviewed 21 SG leaders (19 PC survivors, two partners), of whom six also attended a focus group, about motivations, experiences, past and future challenges in founding and leading PCSGs. Thematic analysis identified four global themes: illness experience; enacting a supportive response; forming a national collective and challenges. Leaders described men's feelings of isolation and neglect by the health system as the impetus for PCSGs to form and give/receive mutual help. Negotiating health care systems was an early challenge. National affiliation enabled leaders to build a united voice in the health system and establish a group identity and collective voice. Affiliation was supported by a symbiotic relationship with tensions between independence, affiliation and governance. Future challenges were group sustainability and inclusiveness. Study findings describe how a grassroots PCSG movement arose consistent with an embodied health movement perspective. Health care organisations who seek to leverage these community resources need to be cognisant of SG values and purpose if they are to negotiate effective partnerships that maximise mutual benefit. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A Cross-Cultural Perspective on Challenges Facing Comparative Cancer Survivorship Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astri Syse

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer survivorship research includes the study of physical, psychosocial, and economic consequences of cancer diagnosis and treatment among pediatric and adult cancer survivors. Historically, the majority of cancer survivorship studies were from the United States, but survivorship issues are increasingly being addressed in other developed countries. Cross-cultural studies remain, however, scarce. The degree to which knowledge attained may or may not be transferred across cultures, countries, or regions is not known. Some important challenges for comparative research are therefore discussed in a cross-cultural perspective. Several substantive and methodological challenges that complicate the execution of cross-cultural cancer survivorship research are presented with examples and discussed to facilitate comparative research efforts in the establishment of new survivorship cohorts and in the planning and implementation of survivorship studies. Comparative research is one key to understanding the nature of cancer survivorship, distinguishing modifiable from nonmodifiable factors at individual, hospital, societal, and system levels and may thus guide appropriate interventions. Lastly, suggested future courses of action within the field of comparative cancer survivorship research are provided.

  12. Gender and Role Differences in Couples' Communication During Cancer Survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jung-won; Paek, Min-so; Shon, En-jung

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with cancer and their partners often experience communication difficulties. However, questions still remain regarding the influence of gender and role in cancer survivor-partner communication within couples. The current study intended to examine the communication patterns in breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer survivor-partner couples during cancer survivorship and whether gender and role differences in couples communication exist. The dominant-less dominant method of sequential mixed design was used. Ten couples who were recruited from the University Hospital registry in Cleveland, Ohio, participated in both mail surveys and individual interviews. Family and cancer-related communication was assessed in the quantitative phase. Both male survivors and partners demonstrated better family communication scores compared with their female counterparts, whereas there were no gender differences in the cancer-related communication scores. In the qualitative phase, 3 major themes were identified: (1) selective sharing of cancer-related issues, (2) initiation of cancer-related communication, and (3) emotional reaction in communication. The patterns associated with these themes differed between the male survivor-female partner and female survivor-male partner couples. This study provides new knowledge about family and cancer-related communication. Our findings highlight the importance of understanding different perspectives in the quality of communication by gender and role. Exploring couples' communication patterns by gender and role stimulates the research and the development of effective consumer-centered communication interventions. The findings provide assessment tools to inform dyadic communication patterns for clinical and scientific purposes.

  13. Cancer survivorship and return to work: UK occupational physician experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ziv; Wynn, Philip; Whitaker, Stuart; Luker, Karen

    2009-09-01

    Survivorship following diagnosis of cancer is increasing in prevalence. However, cancer survivors continue to report difficulty re-entering the workplace after diagnosis and treatment. To survey UK occupational health physicians (OHPs) regarding their role in rehabilitation of employed survivors of cancer. Following a pilot study, a questionnaire exploring opinions of OHPs regarding supporting cancer survivors' return to work was posted to all members of the UK Society of Occupational Medicine, with a repeat posting 2 months later. Responses were analyzed for significant correlations with OHP age, sex, qualification level, size of businesses advised and years of experience. There were 797 respondents (response rate 51%). Responses suggested opportunities for developing the knowledge base in relation to prognosis and functional outcomes in patients with a cancer diagnosis; instituting information resources on cancer and work for OHPs and developing communications skills training. Most respondents felt managers treated referral to occupational health (OH) differently for employees with cancer compared with management referral for employees with other diagnoses, with 45% of respondents indicating referral may take place too late to be effective in securing a return to work. A significant lack of understanding of the information requirements of employers and the role of OH by treating doctors was identified. This survey raises several possible significant barriers to return to work by cancer survivors. Recommendations to ameliorate these are made.

  14. Perceptions and Barriers of Survivorship Care in Asia: Perceptions From Asian Breast Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Chan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: With the long-term goal to optimize post-treatment cancer care in Asia, we conducted a qualitative study to gather in-depth descriptions from multiethnic Asian breast cancer survivors on their perceptions and experiences of cancer survivorship and their perceived barriers to post-treatment follow-up. Methods: Twenty-four breast cancer survivors in Singapore participated in six structured focus group discussions. The focus group discussions were voice recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by thematic analysis. Results: Breast cancer survivors were unfamiliar with and disliked the term “survivorship,” because it implies that survivors had undergone hardship during their treatment. Cognitive impairment and peripheral neuropathy were physical symptoms that bothered survivors the most, and many indicated that they experienced emotional distress during survivorship, for which they turned to religion and peers as coping strategies. Survivors indicated lack of consultation time and fear of unplanned hospitalization as main barriers to optimal survivorship care. Furthermore, survivors indicated that they preferred receipt of survivorship care at the specialty cancer center. Conclusion: Budding survivorship programs in Asia must take survivor perspectives into consideration to ensure that survivorship care is fully optimized within the community.

  15. Survivorship: Screening for Cancer and Treatment Effects, Version 2.2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dizon, Don; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; Moslehi, Javid J.; O’Connor, Tracey; Overholser, Linda; Paskett, Electra D.; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Raza, Muhammad; Rodriguez, M. Alma; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provide screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for common physical and psychosocial consequences of cancer and cancer treatment. This portion of the guidelines describes recommendations regarding screening for the effects of cancer and its treatment. The panel created a sample screening tool, specifically for use in combination with the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship, to guide providers to topics that require more in-depth assessment. Effective screening and assessment can help providers deliver necessary and comprehensive survivorship care. PMID:25361799

  16. Survivorship: Screening for Cancer and Treatment Effects, Version 2.2014: Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dizon, Don; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.

    2014-01-01

    The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provide screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for common physical and psychosocial consequences of cancer and cancer treatment. This portion of the guidelines describes recommendations regarding screening for the effects of cancer and its treatment. The panel created a sample screening tool, specifically for use in combination with the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship, to guide providers to topics that require more in-depth assessment. Effec...

  17. Perceptions of Survivorship Care among Latina Women with Breast Cancer in Los Angeles County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisnado, Diana M; Mendez-Luck, Carolyn; Metz, Jenifer; Peirce, Katelynn; Montaño, Brian

    2017-03-01

    Cancer "survivorship" is a distinct and important aspect of the cancer experience. More research is needed about survivorship care in underserved populations such as Latinas. This study examined issues of breast cancer survivorship care among Latinas to understand their experiences and needs, to inform the design of future programs. Six English- and six Spanish-language focus groups were conducted, with a nonprobability sample. About 74 Latinas who varied in terms of characteristics including stage, time since diagnosis, and English proficiency were recruited through support groups, health fairs, and promotoras. A semi-structured question guide was used to examine experiences with follow-up care, barriers, and meaning associated with breast cancer survivorship. Results indicate numerous gaps and unmet needs in Latinas' survivorship care experiences, including problems with finances, continuity of care, unmet needs for information, and symptom management. Participants identified sources of support including patient navigators, and assigned both positive and negative meanings to survivorship. This research lays a foundation for future work to develop interventions addressing Latina breast cancer survivors' unmet needs. Recommendations include enhancing peer and professional support services for patients, family, and caregivers. Further work is also needed to promote the implementation of survivorship care plans. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. ReCAP: ASCO Core Curriculum for Cancer Survivorship Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shapiro, Charles L; Jacobsen, Paul B; Henderson, Tara; Hurria, Arti; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Ng, Andrea; Surbone, Antonella; Mayer, Deborah K; Rowland, Julia H

    2016-01-01

    ..., training programs, and policymaking organizations. Adapted from Institute of Medicine recommendations for survivorship care, the core curriculum and competencies include the following subheadings...

  19. Exercise Programme in Endometrial Cancer; Protocol of the Feasibility and Acceptability Survivorship Trial (EPEC-FAST)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, A.; Lopes, A.; Das, N.; Bekkers, R.L.M.; Massuger, L.F.; Galaal, K.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Obesity has been associated with impaired quality of life and poorer outcomes in endometrial cancer survivors. Lifestyle interventions promoting exercise and weight reduction have been proposed for survivorship care. However, studies evaluating exercise programmes for endometrial

  20. Cancer survivorship: A positive side-effect of more successful cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Charlotte Moser

    2014-06-01

    In 2012, the European Organisation of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC Survivorship Task Force was created to focus research efforts on late morbidity of cancer treatment and its impact on society. On 30–31st January 2014, the 1st EORTC Cancer Survivorship Summit was organised to facilitate interaction between clinicians, researchers, social workers, patients, insurers, bankers and policy makers. This important event addressed the needs of cancer survivors, and new collaborations between academic groups, patient advocates, financial and political representatives were formed to guide future European research and health policies in this field. This special issue of the European Journal of Cancer is entirely dedicated to this Summit and addresses, respectively, second malignancies, cardiovascular disease, cognitive dysfunction, infertility/sexuality and psycho-social problems following cancer treatment.

  1. Communication dilemmas in the context of cancer: survivors' and partners' strategies for communicating throughout survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura E

    2014-12-01

    More people are now living longer beyond cancer treatment and are facing the complexities associated with survivorship. Communicating amid a cancer experience, for example, can be difficult for couples, and survivors must face these challenges for extended periods of time. The current study employed a communication perspective to explore couples' conversations throughout cancer survivorship. In-depth interviews with 35 cancer survivors and 25 partners yielded insight into the specific communicative challenges couples face after completing cancer treatment. The data highlight cancer's lingering uncertainties and are discussed in terms of the dyadic challenges inherent in couples' communicative efforts.

  2. Cancer survivorship: current status of research, care, and policy in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Miyako

    2016-07-01

    Progress in early detection and treatment has been changing cancer into a chronic illness, and this has initiated an imperative shift in focus among healthcare providers, researchers and policy makers in many countries, including Japan, to cancer survivorship issues rather than mere survival. This article reviews the history of the cancer survivorship concept and examines how the concept has been integrated into cancer policy in Japan. It also discusses the characteristics of survivorship research and briefly reviews the current status of research and care, both in Japan and globally, regarding five important survivorship topics: developing measures for long-term complications and delayed effects, interpersonal relationships, lifestyle modifications and health promotion, sexuality and fertility, and work-related issues. Cooperation with practitioners and researchers in areas outside the medical fields will be indispensable to promote survivorship research and care practice. Also, the importance of collaboration with cancer survivors for developing support systems and policy measures related to survivorship cannot be emphasized enough. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Quality of life and satisfaction among prostate cancer patients followed in a dedicated survivorship clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Scott M; Dunn, Rodney L; Wittmann, Daniela; Montgomery, Jeffrey S; Hollingsworth, John M; Miller, David C; Hollenbeck, Brent K; Wei, John T; Montie, James E

    2015-05-01

    Integrating quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes into clinics may assist providers in identifying and responding to problems experienced by cancer survivors. To date, however, patient-reported outcomes (PROs) such as QOL are used infrequently to guide care. We integrated QOL assessments into a prostate cancer survivorship clinic and compared recovery and satisfaction among men managed in the survivorship clinic with those followed with more routine care. We conducted a before-after study comparing 235 men treated surgically for prostate cancer who received routine follow-up care with 102 men managed in a survivorship clinic characterized by point-of-care QOL reporting and integration of QOL scores (EPIC) following radical prostatectomy. We then assessed baseline and postprostatectomy QOL at 6 and 12 months, as well as patient satisfaction, and compared outcomes between groups. Although baseline QOL was comparable, scores were generally higher among the survivorship group at 6 months and 1 year compared with those followed with routine care. In particular, sexual function scores were significantly higher among patients managed in the survivorship clinic (52.2 vs 33.6 at 1 year, P Satisfaction scores were consistently higher in the survivorship clinic group compared with the routine-care group (all P Patient QOL and satisfaction were higher among men managed in a survivorship program, suggesting that disease-specific survivorship clinics that integrate QOL reporting into care pathways may yield better outcomes compared with less tailored approaches to patient care following cancer therapy. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  4. Family survivorship and quality of life following a cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, S; Northouse, L L

    2001-12-01

    The objectives of this study were: (a) to examine the quality of life of the family as a unit during the long-term survivor phase of illness and (b) to test a family model of factors that may influence family quality of life. The family survivorship model, which includes illness survival stressors (family stressors, fear of recurrence, and patient somatic concerns), resources (family hardiness and family social support), appraisal (family meaning of the illness), and the outcome, family quality of life, was used to guide this exploratory cross-sectional study. A random, stratified sample of 123 families (N = 246 individuals) was interviewed 1-5 years after treatment ended. The model explained 63% of the variance in family quality of life, with the strongest predictors being concurrent family stressors, family social support, family member fear of recurrence, family meaning of the illness, and patient employment status. The study findings suggest the importance of addressing cancer-related stressors, family resources, and family meaning as key factors related to family quality of life. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Lack of Needs Assessment in Cancer Survivorship Care and Rehabilitation in Hospitals and Primary Care Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Charlotte; Jensen, Charlotte Maria; Maribo, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    the aim of this study was to describe specific survivorship care and rehabilitation needs and plans as stated by patients with cancer at hospitals when diagnosed and when primary care survivorship care and rehabilitation begins. Methods: Needs assessment forms from cancer patients at two hospitals and two...... primary care settings were analyzed. The forms included stated needs and survivorship care and rehabilitation plans. All data were categorized using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Results: Eighty-nine patients at hospitals and 99 in primary care, stated...... their needs. Around 50% of the patients completed a survivorship care and rehabilitation plan. In total, 666 (mean 7.5) needs were stated by hospital patients and 836 (mean 8.0) by those in primary care. The needs stated were primarily within the ICF component “body functions and structure”, and the most...

  6. Barriers and facilitators to implementing cancer survivorship care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulko, Dorothy; Pace, Claire M; Dittus, Kim L; Sprague, Brian L; Pollack, Lori A; Hawkins, Nikki A; Geller, Berta M

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the process of survivorship care plan (SCP) completion and to survey oncology staff and primary care physicians (PCPs) regarding challenges of implementing SCPs. Descriptive pilot study. Two facilities in Vermont, an urban academic medical center and a rural community academic cancer center. 17 oncology clinical staff created SCPs, 39 PCPs completed surveys, and 58 patients (breast or colorectal cancer) participated in a telephone survey. Using Journey Forward tools, SCPs were created and presented to patients. PCPs received the SCP with a survey assessing its usefulness and barriers to delivery. Oncology staff were interviewed to assess perceived challenges and benefits of SCPs. Qualitative and quantitative data were used to identify challenges to the development and implementation process as well as patient perceptions of the SCP visit. SCP, healthcare provider perception of barriers to completion and implementation, and patient perception of SCP visit. Oncology staff cited the time required to obtain information for SCPs as a challenge. Completing SCPs 3-6 months after treatment ended was optimal. All participants felt advanced practice professionals should complete and review SCPs with patients. The most common challenge for PCPs to implement SCP recommendations was insufficient knowledge of cancer survivor issues. Most patients found the care plan visit very useful, particularly within six months of diagnosis. Creation time may be a barrier to widespread SCP implementation. Cancer survivors find SCPs useful, but PCPs feel insufficient knowledge of cancer survivor issues is a barrier to providing best follow-up care. Incorporating SCPs in electronic medical records may facilitate patient identification, appropriate staff scheduling, and timely SCP creation. Oncology nurse practitioners are well positioned to create and deliver SCPs, transitioning patients from oncology care to a PCP in a shared-care model of optimal wellness. Institution support for

  7. Developing a Cancer Survivorship Curriculum for Family Medicine Residents: A Needs Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubart, Jane R.; Gusani, Niraj J.; Kass, Rena; Lewis, Peter

    2013-01-01

    With the increasing survival of cancer patients, primary care residents must be familiar with the late effects of cancer treatment and be able to offer appropriate survivorship care in partnership with cancer care specialists. To address these paired public health and educational needs, an interdisciplinary group at our institution is developing,…

  8. Primary care perspectives on prostate cancer survivorship: implications for improving quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Ted A; Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Northouse, Laurel L; Fagerlin, Angela; Garlinghouse, Carol; Demers, Raymond Y; Rovner, David R; Darwish-Yassine, May; Wei, John T

    2013-08-01

    Primary care providers often care for men with prostate cancer due to its prolonged clinical course and an increasing number of survivors. However, their attitudes and care patterns are inadequately studied. In this context, we surveyed primary care providers regarding the scope of their prostate cancer survivorship care. The 2006 Early Detection and Screening for Prostate Cancer Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice Survey conducted by the Michigan Public Health Institute investigated the beliefs and practice patterns of primary care providers in Michigan. We evaluated responses from 902 primary care providers regarding the timing and content of their prostate cancer survivorship care and relationships with specialty care. Two-thirds (67.6%) of providers cared for men during and after prostate cancer treatment. Providers routinely inquired about incontinence, impotence and bowel problems (83.3%), with a few (14.2%) using surveys to measure symptoms. However, only a minority felt 'very comfortable' managing the side effects of prostate cancer treatment. Clear plans (76.1%) and details regarding management of treatment complications (65.2%) from treating specialists were suboptimal. Nearly one-half (45.1%) of providers felt it was equally appropriate for them and treating specialists to provide prostate cancer survivorship care. Primary care providers reported that prostate cancer survivorship care is prevalent in their practice, yet few felt very comfortable managing side effects of prostate cancer treatment. To improve quality of care, implementing prostate cancer survivorship care plans across specialties, or transferring primary responsibility to primary care providers through survivorship guidelines, should be considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Improving Cancer Survivorship Care: Oncology Nurses’ Educational Needs and Preferred Methods of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Linda M.; Glennon, Catherine; Trunecek, Jill; Irwin, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Oncology nurses are essential in all phases of cancer care; however, their role in survivorship care is unclear. To better understand the self-reported knowledge and educational needs on topics of survivorship care and oncology nurses’ learning preferences, an online survey was conducted. Respondents self-reported knowledge level for 31 care topics, identified areas of most interest, topics needed to assist patients and address patient questions, and reported participation in continuing education and preferred learning methods. Knowledge was rated highest for topics of fatigue, anxiety, and fear of recurrence and lowest for issues related to finance, employment, and insurance. Nurses were most interested in late and long-term physical effects of cancer or treatment, managing emotional issues, cancer screening and surveillance, and complementary and alternative therapies. Study findings suggest that online learning methods would be feasible and well accepted by nurses to meet continuing education needs related to cancer survivorship. PMID:21400040

  10. Care Transitions in Childhood Cancer Survivorship: Providers' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouw, Mary S; Wertman, Eleanor A; Barrington, Clare; Earp, Jo Anne L

    2017-03-01

    Most adolescent and young adult (AYA)-aged childhood cancer survivors develop physical and/or psychosocial sequelae; however, many do not receive long-term follow-up (LTF) critical for screening, prevention, and treatment of late effects. To develop a health services research agenda to optimize care models, we conducted qualitative research with LTF providers examining existing models, and successes and challenges in maintaining survivors' connections to care across their transition to adulthood. We interviewed 20 LTF experts (MDs, RNs, social workers, education specialists, psychologists) from 10 Children's Oncology Group-affiliated institutions, and analyzed data using grounded theory and content analysis techniques. Participants described the complexity of survivors' healthcare transitions. Survivors had pressing educational needs in multiple domains, and imparting the need for prevention was challenging. Multidisciplinary LTF teams focused on prevention and self-management. Care and decisions about transfer were individualized based on survivors' health risks, developmental issues, and family contexts. An interplay of provider and institutional factors, some of which were potentially modifiable, also influenced how transitions were managed. Interviewees rarely collaborated with community primary care providers to comanage patients. Communication systems and collective norms about sharing care limited comanagement capacity. Interviewees described staffing practices, policies, and informal initiatives they found reduced attrition. Results suggest that survivors will benefit from care models that better connect patients, survivorship experts, and community providers for uninterrupted LTF across transitions. We propose research priorities, framing attrition from LTF as a public health concern, transition as the central challenge in LTF, and transition readiness as a multilevel concept.

  11. Cancer survivorship care-planning: Practice, research, and policy implications for social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard W; Pritzker, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of cancer survivors are living longer than 5 years from their diagnosis date. This has resulted in a growing population of cancer survivors, expected to reach 19 million by 2024. Survivors frequently experience late effects caused by cancer and its treatment, reducing survivors' quality of life in multiple domains. Survivorship care-plans may aid the many physical, psychosocial, and financial needs that emerge posttreatment. However, the lack of reimbursement mechanisms, the limited amount of effectiveness research, and minimal guidelines for content and delivery are barriers to the widespread provision of survivorship care-plans. Challenges and opportunities for social work practice, research, and policy are identified and discussed.

  12. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri G. Homan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups’ questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02 and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003. The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy.

  13. Breast cancer survivorship: the role of perceived discrimination and sexual orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabson, Jennifer M; Donatelle, Rebecca J; Bowen, Deborah

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer disproportionately affects sexual minority women (SMW) compared to heterosexual women and a small but growing literature indicates that SMW may have diminished survivorship outcomes; outcomes that are measurably and importantly different from heterosexual breast cancer survivors. However, it remains unknown how sexual orientation influences breast cancer survivorship outcomes such as quality of life. One possible route of influence is SMW's perceived discrimination in the health care setting. This cross-sectional study examines SMW perceptions of discrimination as one of the multiple facets of the breast cancer survivorship process. This study assessed SMW breast cancer survivor's perceptions of discrimination during their breast cancer treatment experience and secondarily, examined the role of this perceived discrimination on SMW's quality of life. Sixty-eight purposefully sampled sexual minority breast cancer survivors completed assessments of quality of life, perceived discrimination, perceived social support and perceived stress via an online survey. Statistical analyses point to perceived discrimination and perceived social support as important indicators for predicting SMW's quality of life. Future research on SMW's breast cancer survivorship should include measures of perceived discrimination.

  14. Perspectives of the Breast Cancer Survivorship Continuum: Diagnosis through 30 Months Post-Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Hulett

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study explored breast cancer survivors’ perspectives regarding their experiences of the survivorship continuum from diagnosis through 30 months post-treatment. The sample included women (N = 379 with newly-diagnosed breast cancer undergoing treatment at a Midwestern university-affiliated cancer center. Semi-structured interviews were conducted using the Lymphedema and Breast Cancer Questionnaire at time of diagnosis, post-operatively, quarterly during the first year, and then semi-annually thereafter through 30 months post-treatment. A mixed-methodology was used to analyze participants’ comments. Themes central to long-term survivorship experiences included social support, positive worldviews, breast cancer and lymphedema health literacy, religious/spiritual beliefs, self-empowerment, and recovery expectations. These themes were consistent with a psychoneuroimmunological model of health in which psychosocial variables mediate stress and influence health outcomes. Qualitative data showed that social support and positive worldviews were the two themes with the most significant impact on long-term breast cancer survivorship experiences. Survivors expressed a need to advance their health care literacy in order to share ownership of breast cancer and lymphedema treatment decisions. Since breast cancer is an immune-mediated disease, long-term survivorship planning should address psychosocial factors that influence the long-term psychological distress associated with immune dysfunction.

  15. Learning the landscape: implementation challenges of primary care innovators around cancer survivorship care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Denalee; Hudson, Shawna V; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Howard, Jenna; Rubinstein, Ellen; Lee, Heather S; Overholser, Linda S; Shaw, Amy; Givens, Sarah; Burton, Jay S; Grunfeld, Eva; Parry, Carly; Crabtree, Benjamin F

    2017-02-01

    This study describes the experiences of early implementers of primary care-focused cancer survivorship delivery models. Snowball sampling was used to identify innovators. Twelve participants (five cancer survivorship primary care innovators and seven content experts) attended a working conference focused on cancer survivorship population strategies and primary care transformation. Data included meeting discussion transcripts/field notes, transcribed in-depth innovator interviews, and innovators' summaries of care models. We used a multistep immersion/crystallization analytic approach, guided by a primary care organizational change model. Innovative practice models included: (1) a consultative model in a primary care setting; (2) a primary care physician (PCP)-led, blended consultative/panel-based model in an oncology setting; (3) an oncology nurse navigator in a primary care practice; and (4) two subspecialty models where PCPs in a general medical practice dedicated part of their patient panel to cancer survivors. Implementation challenges included (1) lack of key stakeholder buy-in; (2) practice resources allocated to competing (non-survivorship) change efforts; and (3) competition with higher priority initiatives incentivized by payers. Cancer survivorship delivery models are potentially feasible in primary care; however, significant barriers to widespread implementation exist. Implementation efforts would benefit from increasing the awareness and potential value-add of primary care-focused strategies to address survivors' needs. Current models of primary care-based cancer survivorship care may not be sustainable. Innovative strategies to provide quality care to this growing population of survivors need to be developed and integrated into primary care settings.

  16. Cancer Survivorship Care: Person Centered Care in a Multidisciplinary Shared Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Loonen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of childhood and adult-onset cancer are at lifelong risk for the development of late effects of treatment that can lead to serious morbidity and premature mortality. Regular long-term follow-up aiming for prevention, early detection and intervention of late effects can preserve or improve health. The heterogeneous and often serious character of late effects emphasizes the need for specialized cancer survivorship care clinics. Multidisciplinary cancer survivorship care requires a coordinated and well integrated health care environment for risk based screening and intervention. In addition survivors engagement and adherence to the recommendations are also important elements. We developed an innovative model for integrated care for cancer survivors, the “Personalized Cancer Survivorship Care Model”, that is being used in our clinic. This model comprises 1. Personalized follow-up care according to the principles of Person Centered Care, aiming to empower survivors and to support self management, and 2. Organization according to a multidisciplinary and risk based approach. The concept of person centered care is based on three components: initiating, integrating and safeguarding the partnership with the patient. This model has been developed as a universal model of care that will work for all cancer survivors in different health care systems. It could be used for studies to improve self efficacy and the cost-effectiveness of cancer survivorship care.

  17. Coping with breast cancer survivorship in Chinese women: the role of fatalism or fatalistic voluntarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Huilin; Sit, Janet W H; Twinn, Sheila F; Cheng, Karis K F; Thorne, Sally

    2013-01-01

    The existing knowledge on fatalism in the field of cancer has arisen largely from the cancer prevention and screening literature. Little is known about the role of fatalism in cancer survivorship, particularly within Chinese population. This study aimed to explore the role of fatalism in coping with breast cancer survivorship in Chinese women. In-depth interviews were conducted on 29 participants selected from those who attended a local cancer self-help organization in China. Interview transcripts were transcribed and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Although they actively engaged in emotional regulation and self-care management to cope with survivorship, participants believed in fatalism and accepted their inability to change the final outcome of cancer. Such contradictory behavioral and cognitive aspects of coping reported by participants highlighted the role of a complex belief system involving Ming in positively influencing the interpretation of fatalism and the actual coping efforts taken. Findings suggest that fatalism related to coping in the Chinese context combined 2 elements: fatalistic belief in and acceptance of the way things are as well as the exertion of personal efforts over the situation. As such, it seems more effectively depicted in terms of the emerging concept "fatalistic voluntarism." When planning intervention for Chinese population, incorporating fatalistic voluntarism as a cognitive belief system in the process of adaptation to survivorship may be more culturally relevant for facilitating their coping behaviors.

  18. Hormone replacement therapy and women with premature menopause--a cancer survivorship issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Judy; Wynne, Catherine Harper; Assersohn, Laura; Jones, Alison

    2011-07-01

    The importance of addressing survivorship issues has been emphasised in recent years. As cancer therapies improve there is a growing population of cancer survivors, which includes many women with premature menopause. Women who are premenopausal at the time of their cancer diagnosis may have specific survivorship issues to be addressed, including infertility, early menopause and sexual dysfunction. These factors can continue have a significant impact on the quality of life of these patients at long term follow up. Data for this Review were identified by searches of MEDLINE, PubMed, and references from relevant articles using the search terms 'HRT', 'women/female cancer/tumour', 'menopause' and 'survivorship'. Abstracts and reports from meetings were excluded. Only papers published in English between 1980 and 2010 were included. The aims of this review are to: • Address the hormonal factors which impact on cancer survivorship for premenopausal women • Review the debate for the role of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in cancer survivors • Provide information for physicians and patients regarding the management of hormonally driven survivorship issues (for different tumour types), based on current evidence The recommendations for practice are that HRT may be offered for the alleviation of vasomotor symptoms in cancer survivors who undergo premature menopause up to the age of natural menopause (51 years in the UK). HRT (including vaginal oestrogen preparations) is contraindicated in survivors of oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer and low grade endometrial leiomyosarcoma, where non-HRT alternatives should be considered to alleviate symptoms. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Targeting Histone Acetylation: Readers and Writers in Leukemia and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Christopher B; Fiskus, Warren; Bhalla, Kapil N

    Chromatin packaging of DNA provides a framework for transcriptional regulation. Modifications to DNA and histone proteins in nucleosomes lead to conformational changes, alterations in the recruitment of transcriptional complexes, and ultimately modulation of gene expression. We provide a focused review of control mechanisms that help modulate the activation and deactivation of gene transcription specifically through histone acetylation writers and readers in cancer. The chemistry of these modifications is subject to clinically actionable targeting, including state-of-the-art strategies to inhibit basic oncogenic mechanisms related to histone acetylation. Although discussed in the context of acute leukemia, the concepts of acetylation writers and readers are not cell-type-specific and are generalizable to other cancers. We review the challenges and resistance mechanisms encountered to date in the development of such therapeutics and postulate how such challenges may be overcome. Because these fundamental cellular mechanisms are dysregulated in cancer biology, continued research and in-depth understanding of histone acetylation reading and writing are desired to further define optimal therapeutic strategies to affect gene activity to target cancer effectively.

  20. Need for general practitioner involvement and eHealth in colon cancer survivorship care : patients' perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nugteren, Ineke C; Duineveld, Laura A M; Wieldraaijer, Thijs; van Weert, Henk C P M; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Wind, Jan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As colon cancer is increasingly becoming a chronic illness with a broad range of symptoms, there is a need for individually tailored care for these patients. OBJECTIVE: To investigate patients' opinions about GP involvement in survivorship care and the use of eHealth applications, such

  1. Need for general practitioner involvement and eHealth in colon cancer survivorship care: patients' perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nugteren, Ineke C.; Duineveld, Laura A. M.; Wieldraaijer, Thijs; van Weert, Henk C. P. M.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F.; Wind, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Background. As colon cancer is increasingly becoming a chronic illness with a broad range of symptoms, there is a need for individually tailored care for these patients. Objective. To investigate patients' opinions about GP involvement in survivorship care and the use of eHealth applications, such

  2. Treatment-related cardiovascular late effects and exercise training countermeasures in testicular germ cell cancer survivorship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper F; Bandak, Mikkel; Campbell, Anna

    2015-01-01

    -induced cardiovascular dysfunction to prevent premature onset of clinical cardiovascular disease in germ cell cancer survivors, with a view towards highlighting future directions of exercise-based survivorship research in the germ cell cancer setting. CONCLUSION: As exercise training may have the potential to ameliorate...... and/or reverse long-term cardiovascular disease sequelae in germ cell cancer survivors, a strong rationale exists for the promotion of exercise oncology research in this setting, in order to provide exercise recommendations for optimal germ cell cancer survivorship.......BACKGROUND: Treatment of testicular germ cell cancer constitutes a major success story in modern oncology. Today, the vast majority of patients are cured by a therapeutic strategy using one or more highly effective components including surgery (orchiectomy), radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy...

  3. Fertility Preservation: A Key Survivorship Issue for Young Women with Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ana M Angarita; Cynae Alonia Lillian Johnson; Amanda eNickles Fader; Christianson, Mindy S.

    2016-01-01

    Fertility preservation in the young cancer survivor is recognized as a key survivorship issue by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Society of Reproductive Medicine. Thus, health-care providers should inform women about the effects of cancer therapy on fertility and should discuss the different fertility preservation options available. It is also recommended to refer women expeditiously to a fertility specialist in order to improve counseling. Women’s age, diagnosis, p...

  4. The integration of cancer survivorship training in the curriculum of hematology/oncology fellows and radiation oncology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayne, Michelle; Culakova, Eva; Milano, Michael T; Dhakal, Sughosh; Constine, Louis S

    2014-06-01

    Cancer specialists require an understanding of survivors' needs to insure optimal delivery of care. Training programs currently focus on treatment, while survivorship care focuses on time after treatment. Cancer survivorship training represents an education paradigm shift. The Cancer Survivorship Workshop was held at the James P. Wilmot Cancer Center of the University of Rochester in academic year 2011-2012, with six sessions held. Objectives included the following: learning about survivorship from patient, primary care physician, and oncologist perspectives using a curriculum based on survivorship literature; designing treatment summaries (TSs) and survivorship care plans (SCPs) for five malignancies (lung, breast, prostate, colon, and lymphoma); and establishing collaboration between hematology/oncology (HO) and radiation oncology (RO) trainees by working together in teams. Course impact was assessed pre- and post-training using a 13-question survey. Questions were answered using a 10-point scale, with predefined rating for each question. Statistically significant differences in responses to several survey questions were observed comparing pre- and post-course experience. Improvement was noted in comfort discussing survivorship issues with patients (p = 0.001), reported knowledge of survivorship care for five types of cancer (p = 0.002), confidence in ability to explain a SCP (p = 0.001), and comfort discussing late effects of cancer treatment (p = 0.001). Five unique sets of TS and SCPs were completed. This study demonstrates the feasibility of implementing cancer survivorship education into the curriculum of HO and RO training. The project was designed with intension to optimize survivor care through enhanced provider training.

  5. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  6. Prostate cancer survivorship care guideline: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Matthew J; Lacchetti, Christina; Bergman, Jonathan; Hauke, Ralph J; Hoffman, Karen E; Kungel, Terrence M; Morgans, Alicia K; Penson, David F

    2015-03-20

    The guideline aims to optimize health and quality of life for the post-treatment prostate cancer survivor by comprehensively addressing components of follow-up care, including health promotion, prostate cancer surveillance, screening for new cancers, long-term and late functional effects of the disease and its treatment, psychosocial issues, and coordination of care between the survivor's primary care physician and prostate cancer specialist. The American Cancer Society (ACS) Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines were reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Endorsement Panel reviewed the content and recommendations, offering modifications and/or qualifying statements when deemed necessary. The ASCO Endorsement Panel determined that the recommendations from the 2014 ACS Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines are clear, thorough, and relevant, despite the limited availability of high-quality evidence to support many of the recommendations. ASCO endorses the ACS Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines, with a number of qualifying statements and modifications. Assess information needs related to prostate cancer, prostate cancer treatment, adverse effects, and other health concerns and provide or refer survivors to appropriate resources. Measure prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level every 6 to 12 months for the first 5 years and then annually, considering more frequent evaluation in men at high risk for recurrence and in candidates for salvage therapy. Refer survivors with elevated or increasing PSA levels back to their primary treating physician for evaluation and management. Adhere to ACS guidelines for the early detection of cancer. Assess and manage physical and psychosocial effects of prostate cancer and its treatment. Annually assess for the presence of long-term or late effects of prostate cancer and its treatment. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. Reclaiming life on one's own terms: a grounded theory study of the process of breast cancer survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Deborah Witt; Rosedale, Mary; Haber, Judith

    2012-05-01

    To develop a substantive theory of the process of breast cancer survivorship. Grounded theory. A LISTSERV announcement posted on the SHARE Web site and purposeful recruitment of women known to be diagnosed and treated for breast cancer. 15 women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. Constant comparative analysis. Breast cancer survivorship. The core variable identified was Reclaiming Life on One's Own Terms. The perceptions and experiences of the participants revealed overall that the diagnosis of breast cancer was a turning point in life and the stimulus for change. That was followed by the recognition of breast cancer as now being a part of life, leading to the necessity of learning to live with breast cancer, and finally, creating a new life after breast cancer. Participants revealed that breast cancer survivorship is a process marked and shaped by time, the perception of support, and coming to terms with the trauma of a cancer diagnosis and the aftermath of treatment. The process of survivorship continues by assuming an active role in self-healing, gaining a new perspective and reconciling paradoxes, creating a new mindset and moving to a new normal, developing a new way of being in the world on one's own terms, and experiencing growth through adversity beyond survivorship. The process of survivorship for women with breast cancer is an evolutionary journey with short- and long-term challenges. This study shows the development of an empirically testable theory of survivorship that describes and predicts women's experiences following breast cancer treatment from the initial phase of recovery and beyond. The theory also informs interventions that not only reduce negative outcomes, but promote ongoing healing, adjustment, and resilience over time.

  8. Survivorship resources for post-treatment cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Gina M; Rowland, Julia H; Lustig, Craig

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine the scope of services and resources available to cancer survivors who have completed active treatment and their families at National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated comprehensive cancer centers. Patient education program contacts from the 37 NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers participated in a telephone interview. Program contacts were asked to identify the types of medical and psychosocial services that their respective cancer center offered. Telephone interviews were completed by patient education program contacts from all NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers for a total response rate of 100%. Services pertaining to lymphedema management were identified in 70% of cancer centers. Other common services identified specifically for post-treatment cancer survivors at cancer centers were professionally led support groups (49% of cancer centers), long-term medical care (38% of cancer centers), school re-entry programs (19% of cancer centers), nutrition counseling (14% of cancer centers), and counseling addressing fertility and sexual concerns (14% of cancer centers). Results from this project outline the range of services and resources that are provided to post-treatment cancer survivors by NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers, and can be used to develop standards of care for future cancer control programs.

  9. Matching of received social support with need for support in adjusting to cancer and cancer survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merluzzi, Thomas V; Philip, Errol J; Yang, Miao; Heitzmann, Carolyn A

    2016-06-01

    Optimal matching theory posits that the effects of social support are enhanced when its provision is matched with need for support. We hypothesized that matching received social support with the needs of persons with cancer, and cancer survivors would be related to better psychosocial adjustment than a mismatched condition. In a cross-sectional design, sample 1, consisting of 171 cancer patients, and sample 2, consisting of 118 cancer survivors, completed measures of emotional and instrumental received support, physical debilitation, and psychological distress. The optimal matching theory model was confirmed; those needing support (i.e., greater physical debilitation), who did not receive it, experienced more distress than those who needed support and received it. Patients in treatment benefited from the matching of need and provision for both emotional and instrumental support, whereas survivors only benefited from the matching of emotional support. The results suggest that social support is contextualized by the degree of physical impairment and may be somewhat different for cancer patients in treatment compared with cancer survivors. The transition to cancer survivorship may involve a transformation in the need for as well as the type and amount of received social support. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Long-Term Survivorship of Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated with Radical Intent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Agranovich

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the recent trends in definitive management of esophageal cancer, the records of 138 consecutive patients treated with radical intent in a single institution between 1995 and 2003 were reviewed and analyzed. The median follow-up period was 5.7 years (range 1.1 to 10.4 years. Seventy-seven patients were treated with radiation therapy (RT only and 61 with combined regimens (CRT, in which RT was combined with either radical surgery or chemotherapy, or both. The overall survival of the entire cohort was 32% over two years and 20% over five years. The survivorship in the RT group was 17% over two years and 5% over five years. In the CRT group, 51% and 35% survived over two and five years, respectively. From all the potential prognostic factors examined by univariate and multivariate analyses, only male sex and use of CRT were strongly associated with better survivorship. There was no significant difference in the outcomes among the different regimens of CRT. Survivorship was not affected by the location or histology of the tumour, clinical stage, dose of RT or use of endoluminal brachytherapy in addition to external beam RT. There was a greater tendency to use RT only more often in older patients, but patient age did not affect survivorship. The proportion of patients treated with CRT did not change significantly over the last versus the first four years of the observed period. Combined regimens are undoubtedly superior to RT as a single modality. The long-term survivorship of patients in a subgroup of our patients treated with combined modality protocols compared favourably with the previously reported results in the literature and specifically in prospective randomized trials. However, the optimal combined modality regimen is yet to be defined.

  11. Breast cancer survivorship in urban India: self and care in voluntary groups.

    OpenAIRE

    Macdonald, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis explores the lives of middle-class women who have had breast cancer and are charity volunteers for small associative patient groups in urban India. It is through their activities and experiences as ‘post-cancer volunteers’ that the thesis attends to the notion of breast cancer ‘survivorship’ in relation to emergent forms of solidarity, belonging and personhood. The thesis has three main areas of concern. The first explores the role of survivorship in generating a novel form of lay...

  12. Obesity-related endometrial cancer: an update on survivorship approaches to reducing cardiovascular death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskey, R A; McCarroll, M L; von Gruenigen, V E

    2016-01-01

    As the rate of obesity increases worldwide, so will the number of women diagnosed with obesity-related malignancy. The strongest correlation between obesity and cancer is endometrial cancer (EC). Obesity is the most significant modifiable risk factor for development of EC and also contributes to the most common cause of death in EC survivors-cardiovascular disease (CVD). Most cancer survivors after diagnosis do not implement lifestyle changes aimed at weight-loss and CVD risk reduction. This selective review highlights recent novel and unique approaches for managing CVD co-morbidities in EC survivorship. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  13. Breast Cancer Survivorship—A Personal Story

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-09-26

    Pam Bryant, a breast cancer survivor, talks about her personal journey and how being diagnosed with breast cancer under the age of 45 has impacted her life. .  Created: 9/26/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 9/26/2016.

  14. Endometrial cancer and obesity: epidemiology, biomarkers, prevention and survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fader, Amanda Nickles; Arriba, Lucybeth Nieves; Frasure, Heidi E; von Gruenigen, Vivian E

    2009-07-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in the Western world and is strongly associated with obesity. Despite the fact that most cases are diagnosed in early, more favorable stages, endometrial cancer incidence and mortality rates are on the rise. Morbidly obese women with endometrial cancer are more likely to die of their co-morbidities and also of their cancers when compared to their leaner cohorts. Given the increasing rates of morbid obesity in the United States, it is essential to develop appropriate screening tools and guidelines to reduce cancer morbidity and death amongst this group. Through an analysis of the existing literature, we present a review of the epidemiologic trends in obesity and endometrial cancer, discuss the promising role of screening biomarker studies, review prevention efforts and modifiable risk factors, and ways in which health outcomes and quality of life for endometrial cancer survivors may be optimized.

  15. Colorectal cancer patients' preferences for type of caregiver during survivorship care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieldraaijer, T; Duineveld, L A M; Donkervoort, S C; Busschers, W B; van Weert, H C P M; Wind, J

    2018-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors are currently included in a secondary care-led survivorship care programme. Efforts are underway to transfer this survivorship care to primary care, but met with some reluctance by patients and caregivers. This study assesses (1) what caregiver patients prefer to contact for symptoms during survivorship care, (2) what patient factors are associated with a preferred caregiver, and (3) whether the type of symptom is associated with a preferred caregiver. A cross-sectional study of CRC survivors at different time points. For 14 different symptoms, patients reported if they would consult a caregiver, and who they would contact if so. Patient and disease characteristics were retrieved from hospital and general practice records. Two hundred and sixty patients participated (response rate 54%) of whom the average age was 67, 54% were male. The median time after surgery was seven months (range 0-60 months). Patients were divided fairly evenly between tumour stages 1-3, 33% had received chemotherapy. Men, patients older than 65 years, and patients with chronic comorbid conditions preferred to consult their general practitioner (GP). Women, patients with stage 3 disease, and patients that had received chemotherapy preferred to consult their secondary care provider. For all symptoms, patients were more likely to consult their GP, except for (1) rectal blood loss, (2) weight loss, and (3) fear that cancer had recurred, in which case they would consult both their primary and secondary care providers. Patients appreciated all caregivers involved in survivorship care highly; with 8 out of 10 points. CRC survivors frequently consult their GP in the current situation, and for symptoms that could alarm them to a possible recurrent disease consult both their GP and secondary care provider. Patient and tumour characteristics influence patients' preferred caregiver.

  16. Survivorship and the chronic cancer patient: Patterns in treatment-related effects, follow-up care, and use of survivorship care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Melissa A; Vachani, Carolyn C; Bach, Christina; Hampshire, Margaret K; Arnold-Korzeniowski, Karen; Metz, James M; Hill-Kayser, Christine E

    2017-11-01

    The survivorship needs of patients living with chronic cancer (CC) and their use of survivorship care plans (SCPs) have been overlooked and underappreciated. A convenience sample of 39,088 SCPs completed for cancer survivors with an Internet-based SCP tool was examined; it included 5847 CC survivors (15%; CC was defined as chronic leukemia and/or recurrent/metastatic cancer of another nature). Patient-reported treatment effects and follow-up care patterns were compared between CC survivors and survivors treated with curative intent (CI). Responses from a follow-up survey regarding SCP satisfaction and use were reviewed. CC survivors had greater odds of experiencing multiple treatment-related effects than survivors treated with CI; these effects included fatigue, cognitive changes, dyspnea, peripheral neuropathy, lymphedema, and erectile dysfunction. Nearly half of CC survivors were managed by an oncologist alone, and they were less likely than CI patients to be comanaged by a primary care provider and an oncologist. Fewer SCPs were generated by health care providers (HCPs) for CC survivors versus CI survivors. A smaller proportion of CC users versus CI users rated their experience and satisfaction with the SCP tool as very good or excellent, and CC users were less likely to share the HCP summary with their health care team. A substantial number of CC survivors, often considered incurable but treatable, seek survivorship support. Tools to facilitate participation, communication, and coordination of care are valuable for these patients, and future iterations of SCPs should be designed to address the particular circumstances of living with CC. Cancer 2017;123:4268-4276. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  17. Exploring Positive Survivorship Experiences of Indigenous Australian Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Tam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Amongst Indigenous Australians, “cancer” has negative connotations that detrimentally impact upon access to cancer care services. Barriers to accessing cancer services amongst Indigenous Australians are widely reported. In contrast, factors that facilitate this cohort to successfully navigate cancer care services (“enablers” are scarcely reported in the literature. Through qualitative interviews, this article examines factors that assist Indigenous Australians to have positive cancer experiences. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve adult Indigenous oncology patients recruited from a tertiary hospital in Queensland, Australia during 2012–2014. Data generated from the interviews were independently reviewed by two researchers via inductive thematic analytical processes. Discussions followed by consensus on the major categories allowed conclusions to be drawn on potential enablers. Two major categories of enablers were identified by the researchers: resilience and communication. Individual’s intrinsic strength, their coping strategies, and receipt of support improved participant’s resilience and consequently supported a positive experience. Communication methods and an effective patient-provider relationship facilitated positive experiences for participants. Despite potential barriers to access of care for Indigenous cancer patients, participants in the study demonstrated that it was still possible to focus on the positive aspects of their cancer experiences. Many participants explained how cancer changed their outlook on life, often for the better, with many feeling empowered as they progressed through their cancer diagnosis and treatment processes.

  18. Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivorship Educational Programming: A Qualitative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer Dahlke, Deborah; Fair, Kayla; Hong, Yan Alicia; Kellstedt, Debra; Ory, Marcia G

    2017-02-10

    This program evaluation considers the need for increased professional and patient education for adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivorship. Due to the high incidence of late effects of cancer treatment among AYA cancer survivors, knowledge sharing and communications are needed throughout the transition from cancer care into community care. AYA survivors are likely to need developmentally appropriate psychosocial care as well as extensive follow-on surveillance by physicians who are educated and aware of the likely chronic conditions and late effects that may occur in these patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of the After Cancer Care Ends, Survivorship Starts for Adolescent and Young Adults (ACCESS AYA) programming. The intent of the ACCESS AYA program was to build health literacy around AYA survivorship issues and to stimulate improved communications between survivors and health care providers. This paper addresses the central research question of "How did the ACCESS AYA program increase health literacy, communications, and understanding among AYA survivors and providers?" The primarily qualitative evaluation included a brief introductory survey of participant awareness and effectiveness of the ACCESS AYA project serving as a recruitment tool. Survey respondents were invited to participate in in-depth interviews based on interview guides tailored to the different stakeholder groups. The evaluation used the Atlas Ti qualitative database and software for coding and key word analyses. Interrater reliability analyses were assessed using Cohen kappa analysis with Stata 12.1 (StataCorp LLC) software. The key themes, which included survivor wellbeing, health care professional education, cancer advocates role and education, hospital and community-based resources, and the role of societal support, are presented in a concept map. The interrater reliability scores (ranging from 1 to minus 1) were .893 for first cycle coding and .784

  19. Biomarkers, the molecular gaze and the transformation of cancer survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Kirsten

    2013-06-01

    Over the past two decades, molecular technologies have transformed the landscape of cancer diagnosis, treatment and disease surveillance. However, although the effects of these technologies in the areas of primary and secondary cancer prevention have been the focus of growing study, their role in tertiary prevention remains largely unexamined. Treating this topic as a problematic to be conceptually explored rather than empirically demonstrated, this article focuses on the molecularisation of tertiary prevention, especially the growing use of molecular biomarkers to monitor disease recurrence. Taking a semiotic approach, I speculate on the potential meanings of molecular biomarkers for people living with and beyond cancer and suggest the meanings of these technologies may differ in important ways for those on both sides of the risk divide: that is, those 'at risk' for cancer and those living with realised risk. Although molecular biomarkers may intensify a sense of 'measured vulnerability', by indexing cancer's presence they may also prove reassuring. Moreover, as an invisible but ostensibly 'transparent' sign, in some contexts they appear to enable cancer survivors to challenge biomedical decision making. In the light of recent oncological debates about the value of these biomarkers in tertiary prevention, I conclude by suggesting that signs can never be reduced to their 'objective' biomedical denotation in spite of professional attempts to expunge meaning and value from care.

  20. Emotions and Emotion Regulation in Breast Cancer Survivorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire C. Conley

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Emotional distress in cancer patients is an important outcome; however, emotional experience does not begin and end with emotion generation. Attempts to regulate emotions may lessen their potentially negative effects on physical and psychological well-being. Researchers have called for the study of emotion regulation (ER in health psychology and psycho-oncology. Thus, this review has three aims. First, we discuss current understandings of emotion and ER across the cancer trajectory, including the principles of ER and methods for its assessment. Second, we present a model for examining the mediating effects of ER on psychosocial outcomes. Third, we “round out” the discussion with an example: new data on the role of ER in recurrent breast cancer. Taken together, these aims illustrate the impact of affective regulatory processes on cancer patients’ long-term outcomes. As survival rates increase, long-term follow-up studies are needed to characterize the dynamic, reciprocal effects of emotion and ER for cancer survivors. Further research on ER may help women with breast cancer better manage the challenges associated with diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Emotions and Emotion Regulation in Breast Cancer Survivorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Claire C.; Bishop, Brenden T.; Andersen, Barbara L.

    2016-01-01

    Emotional distress in cancer patients is an important outcome; however, emotional experience does not begin and end with emotion generation. Attempts to regulate emotions may lessen their potentially negative effects on physical and psychological well-being. Researchers have called for the study of emotion regulation (ER) in health psychology and psycho-oncology. Thus, this review has three aims. First, we discuss current understandings of emotion and ER across the cancer trajectory, including the principles of ER and methods for its assessment. Second, we present a model for examining the mediating effects of ER on psychosocial outcomes. Third, we “round out” the discussion with an example: new data on the role of ER in recurrent breast cancer. Taken together, these aims illustrate the impact of affective regulatory processes on cancer patients’ long-term outcomes. As survival rates increase, long-term follow-up studies are needed to characterize the dynamic, reciprocal effects of emotion and ER for cancer survivors. Further research on ER may help women with breast cancer better manage the challenges associated with diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27517969

  2. From diagnosis through survivorship: health-care experiences of colorectal cancer survivors with ostomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Marcia; McMullen, Carmit K.; Altschuler, Andrea; Mohler, M. Jane; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Herrinton, Lisa J.; Krouse, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The journey from diagnosis through treatment to survivorship can be challenging for colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors with permanent ostomies. Memories of both the positive and negative health-care interactions can persist years after the initial diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this paper is to describe the health-care experiences of long-term (>5 years) CRC survivors with ostomies. Methods Thirty-three CRC survivors with ostomies who were members of Kaiser Permanente, an integrated care organization, in Oregon, southwestern Washington and northern California participated in eight focus groups. Discussions from the focus groups were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for potential categories and themes. Results Health-care-related themes described CRC survivors’ experiences with diagnosis, treatment decision-making, initial experiences with ostomy, and survivorship. Participants discussed both positive and negative health-care-related experiences, including the need for continued access to trained nurses for ostomy self-care, access to peer support, and resources related to managing persistent, debilitating symptoms. Conclusions Long-term CRC survivors with ostomies have both positive and negative health-care experiences, regardless of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and gender. Long-term support mechanisms and quality survivorship care that CRC survivors with ostomies can access are needed to promote positive adjustments and improved HRQOL. Structured abstract The current literature in CRC survivor-ship suggests that HRQOL concerns can persist years after treatment completion. The coordination of care to manage persistent late- and long-term effects are still lacking for CRC survivors living with an ostomy. Findings from this qualitative analysis will aid in the development of support strategies that foster more positive adjustments for CRC survivors living with an ostomy and support their ongoing ostomy-related needs. PMID:24442998

  3. A step forward in addressing cancer survivorship in the Asia-Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Raymond Javan; Chan, Alexandre; Yates, Patsy; Molassiotis, Alex

    2017-01-26

    Cancer survivorship is being increasingly recognized as an important component of cancer care. This commentary reviews the key findings reported in the recent BMC Medicine publication of the ACTION study, which focuses on the health-related quality of life and psychological distress in 5249 cancer survivors in eight low- and middle-income countries in Southeast Asia. The study identified that more than one-third of survivors experience at least mild levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms and that poorer outcomes in quality of life, anxiety, and depressive symptoms are linked to a number of clinical and demographic factors. Such data provides an important foundation to inform cancer policy and service planning in Asia. Future research efforts are required to further understand the needs of cancer survivors in this region and determine interventions to improve outcomes for this population.Please see related article: http://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12916-016-0768-2 .

  4. Atrophic Vaginitis in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Difficult Survivorship Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Lester

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Management of breast cancer includes systematic therapies including chemotherapy and endocrine therapy can lead to a variety of symptoms that can impair the quality of life of many breast cancer survivors. Atrophic vaginitis, caused by decreased levels of circulating estrogen to urinary and vaginal receptors, is commonly experienced by this group. Chemotherapy induced ovarian failure and endocrine therapies including aromatase inhibitors and selective estrogen receptor modulators can trigger the onset of atrophic vaginitis or exacerbate existing symptoms. Symptoms of atrophic vaginitis include vaginal dryness, dyspareunia, and irritation of genital skin, pruritus, burning, vaginal discharge, and soreness. The diagnosis of atrophic vaginitis is confirmed through patient-reported symptoms and gynecological examination of external structures, introitus, and vaginal mucosa. Lifestyle modifications can be helpful but are usually insufficient to significantly improve symptoms. Non-hormonal vaginal therapies may provide additional relief by increasing vaginal moisture and fluid. Systemic estrogen therapy is contraindicated in breast cancer survivors. Continued investigations of various treatments for atrophic vaginitis are necessary. Local estrogen-based therapies, DHEA, testosterone, and pH-balanced gels continue to be evaluated in ongoing studies. Definitive results are needed pertaining to the safety of topical estrogens in breast cancer survivors.

  5. Survivorship education for Latina breast cancer survivors: Empowering Survivors through education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Gloria; Mayorga, Lina; Hurria, Arti; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Nueva Luz is an English and Spanish quality of life (QOL) intervention developed to address the educational needs of Latina breast cancer survivors and provide strategies to assist in their transition into survivorship. A qualitative approach was used to evaluate the English and Spanish educational intervention (Nueva Luz). A purposive sample of eight Latina breast cancer survivors was selected from the group who received the intervention to participate in a digitally recorded interview. Data was analyzed using thematic analysis. Findings provide evidence that the one-on-one tailored approach is a feasible and acceptable method of providing a bilingual psychosocial intervention. The provision of printed bilingual information along with the verbal instruction from a bilingual and culturally competent health care provider can be effective in helping Latina breast cancer survivor's transition successfully into survivorship, improve QOL and contribute to better patient outcomes. The study informs our understanding of the cultural context in patient education content and delivery of psychosocial interventions. The findings may also have relevance for other ethnic minority cancer survivors.

  6. Breast Cancer Survivorship: A Comprehensive Review of Long-Term Medical Issues and Lifestyle Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodai, Balazs I; Tuso, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Long-term survival rates after a diagnosis of breast cancer are steadily rising. This is good news, but clinicians must also recognize that this brings new challenges to the medical community. As breast cancer becomes a chronic condition rather than a life-threatening illness owing to advances in early diagnosis and more effective treatments, health care practitioners must recognize and manage the long-term sequelae of the constellation of therapeutic modalities. Survivors of breast cancer represent a unique and extremely complex group of patients; not only do they have the challenge of dealing with multiple long-term side effects of treatment protocols, but many are also forced to address the preexisting comorbidities of their therapies, which often include multiple other issues. Therapies have additional and/or additive side effects that may interfere with treatments directed toward the new primary diagnosis of breast cancer. Our mandate is to establish a smooth transition from patient with breast cancer to survivor of breast cancer while providing ongoing and future guidance. Certainly, the information and resources to accomplish this transition are readily available; however, they are scattered throughout the literature and therefore are not easily accessible or available to the primary care physician. It is imperative that the information available regarding survivorship issues be accessible in an organized and useful format. This article is a modest attempt to provide a comprehensive review of the long-term medical issues relevant to survivorship after the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. A predicted shortage of oncologists by 2020 is well-recognized. Therefore, the bulk of long-term care will become dependent on the primary care physician. This shift of care means that these physicians will need to be well educated in the long-term medical issues related to breast cancer treatment. PMID:25902343

  7. Survivorship After Prostate Cancer Treatment: Spouses’ Quality of Life at 36 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Janet; Sanda, Martin G.; Wei, John Thomas; Yarandi, Hossein N.; Hembroff, Larry; Hardy, Jill; Northouse, Laurel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: To determine the long-term effects of prostate cancer treatment on spouse quality of life (QOL) at 36 months following treatment. Design: Descriptive-exploratory; community-based study. Setting: Telephone interviews. Sample: 95 female spouses of men treated for early-stage prostate cancer. Methods: A computer-assisted telephone interview was used to evaluate QOL among spouses of prostate cancer survivors at 36 months after initial prostate cancer treatment. Main Research Variables: Quality of life, dyadic adjustment, sexual satisfaction, appraisal of caregiving, and demographic information. Findings: Spouses who had more negative appraisal of caregiving had lower sexual satisfaction, poorer cancer-specific QOL, and poorer mental QOL. Spouses who perceived bother related to the patient’s sexual or hormone function reported more threatening appraisals of caregiving, less sexual satisfaction, and poorer QOL. Conclusions: Spouses continued to experience negative appraisal of caregiving, which affected QOL 36 months after their husbands’ treatment for prostate cancer. Additional studies related to factors that influence spouse QOL during survivorship will help guide clinical practice. Implications for Nursing: Healthcare providers must help spouses find strategies that promote positive coping and lessen negative appraisal. Giving caregivers information early in the treatment process will help them understand what to expect over time. Supporting caregivers and helping them manage stress will enhance QOL during survivorship. Knowledge Translation: Spouses who experienced more bother related to urinary, sexual, and hormonal function experience more stress and worse QOL at 36 months post-treatment. Spouse appraisal can have a significant effect on QOL. Offering counseling to couples following treatment for prostate cancer may improve QOL by helping couples manage relationship intimacy. PMID:24161635

  8. Survivorship after prostate cancer treatment: spouses' quality of life at 36 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Janet; Sanda, Martin G; Wei, John Thomas; Yarandi, Hossein N; Hembroff, Larry; Hardy, Jill; Northouse, Laurel

    2013-11-01

    To determine the long-term effects of prostate cancer treatment on spouse quality of life (QOL) at 36 months following treatment. Descriptive-exploratory; community-based study. Telephone interviews. 95 female spouses of men treated for early-stage prostate cancer. A computer-assisted telephone interview was used to evaluate QOL among spouses of prostate cancer survivors at 36 months after initial prostate cancer treatment. Lymphedema, demographic information, self-reported comorbid diseases or medical issues, and medication usage. Spouses who had more negative appraisal of caregiving had lower sexual satisfaction, poorer cancer-specific QOL, and poorer mental QOL. Spouses who perceived bother related to the patient's sexual or hormone function reported more threatening appraisals of caregiving, less sexual satisfaction, and poorer QOL. Spouses continued to experience negative appraisal of caregiving, which affected QOL 36 months after their husbands' treatment for prostate cancer. Additional studies related to factors that influence spouse QOL during survivorship will help guide clinical practice. Healthcare providers must help spouses find strategies that promote positive coping and lessen negative appraisal. Giving caregivers information early in the treatment process will help them understand what to expect over time. Supporting caregivers and helping them manage stress will enhance QOL during survivorship. Spouses who experienced more bother related to urinary, sexual, and hormonal function experience more stress and worse QOL at 36 months post-treatment. Spouse appraisal can have a significant effect on QOL. Offering counseling to couples following treatment for prostate cancer may improve QOL by helping couples manage relationship intimacy.

  9. The Role of Environmental Design in Cancer Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Survivorship: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaveis, Arsalan; Kazem-Zadeh, Mahshad

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to provide a better understanding of the impact that environmental design can have on the process of cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship. Cancer is considered a chronic disease in the United States, and more than 1.6 million new cases are diagnosed annually. New strategies of cancer care propose patient-centered services to achieve the best outcome, and researchers have found that environmental design can be an important part of improving this care. Searches were conducted in the PubMed and Google Scholar databases as well as in specific healthcare design journals such as Health Environments Research & Design, Environmental Psychology, and Environment and Behavior. The criteria for articles included in the review were (a) English-language articles related to facility design, which addressed (b) the topics of built environment in relation to cancer diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship, and were (c) published in peer-reviewed journals between 2000 and 2017. Finally, 10 articles were selected, and the contents were analyzed. The selected articles demonstrate that environmental design is one of the critical factors for success throughout the whole continuum of cancer care from diagnosis to end-of-treatment. Some of the specific conclusions from the review are that "neighborhood-oriented" design strategies can be beneficial (by providing accessibility to all facilities along the patient's path), that access to nature for patients, staff, and visitors alike is associated with better outcomes, and that provisions for natural lighting and noise reduction are associated with cancer patients' well-being.

  10. Is it time to address survivorship in advanced breast cancer? A review article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lascio, Simona; Pagani, Olivia

    2017-02-01

    The outcome of advanced breast cancer has significantly improved over recent decades. As a consequence, the complex needs of patients living with the disease and their care-givers should be addressed not only in terms of supportive and palliative care but also of "survivorship" requirements. The multidisciplinary approach to advanced breast cancer should encompass - early in the history of the disease - not only physical but also functional, social, psychological and spiritual domains. It is important to clearly define the disease context with patients and families ("chronic" preferred to "incurable"), addressing the concept of uncertainty, and tailoring the treatment strategy according to both disease status and individual priorities. Specific psychosocial needs of young and elderly women and male patients - i.e. social security, job flexibility, rehabilitation (including sexuality), home and child care - should be recognized and supported. This review will address the key questions associated with survivorship in this disease context, recognizing the dearth of specific data and the urgent need for targeted clinical research and tailored interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cancer Survivorship Research in Europe and the United States: Where have we been, where are we going, and what can we learn from each other?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Erin E.; Forsythe, Laura P.; Loge, Jon Håvard; Hjorth, Lars; Glaser, Adam; Mattioli, Vittorio; Fosså, Sophie D.

    2013-01-01

    The growing number of cancer survivors worldwide has led to of the emergence of diverse survivorship movements in the United States and Europe. Understanding the evolution of cancer survivorship within the context of different political and healthcare systems is important for identifying the future steps that need to be taken and collaborations needed to promote research among and enhance the care of those living after cancer. We first review the history of survivorship internationally and important related events in both the US and Europe. We then discuss lessons learned from survivorship research broadly, followed by examination of the infrastructure needed to sustain and advance this work, including: platforms for research, assessment tools, and vehicles for the dissemination of findings. We end with future perspectives, identifying the collaborative opportunities for investigators in Europe and the United States to accelerate the pace of survivorship science going forward. PMID:23695922

  12. Nutritional Counseling in Survivors of Childhood Cancer: An Essential Component of Survivorship Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena J. Ladas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that nutritional status during treatment for cancer has a significant impact on treatment-related toxicities and outcomes among children and adolescents with cancer. The effects of nutritional status appear to extend into survivorship with a large proportion of survivors at risk for a variety of nutrition-related morbidities. The influence of dietary intake on overall treatment outcomes and long-term morbidities is largely unknown. In adults, evidence suggests that greater adherence to cancer prevention dietary guidelines improves long-term health outcomes among survivors of cancer. Surveys describing dietary intake among survivors of childhood cancer have found that most survivors are not meeting the recommended guidelines for many dietary nutrients and this may have an unfavorable effect on nutrition-related outcomes. However, more research is needed in this area so that well-designed clinical trials may be developed and tested. This review presents an overview of the existing literature describing dietary intake among survivors of childhood cancer, the clinical implications of reported dietary behaviors among survivors, and identifies areas for future research.

  13. Interventions to promote energy balance and cancer survivorship: priorities for research and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Catherine M; Molfino, Alessio; Muscaritoli, Maurizio

    2013-06-01

    The growing population of cancer survivors worldwide and the growing epidemics of obesity and physical inactivity have brought increased attention to the role that interventions to promote exercise and a healthy body weight may play in mitigating the chronic and late effects of cancer. In this light, the authors describe the similarities and differences in research and clinical priorities related to energy balance interventions among post-treatment cancer survivors in Europe versus North America. Randomized controlled trials that targeted nutrition, exercise, and weight are reviewed to determine the affect on survivorship outcomes. Interventions focused on improving prognosis or survival are investigated along with the emerging literature on the interventions targeting pathways and mechanisms of prognosis or survival. Current North American and European guidelines for diet, exercise, and weight control among cancer survivors also are investigated along with the implications of the current state of this science for clinical care. Finally, the authors delineate future European and American priorities for research and care involving energy balance among survivors. It is hoped that this dialogue launches an international conversation that will lead to better research and care for all post-treatment cancer survivors. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  14. Cancer survivorship in the age of YouTube and social media: a narrative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia; Hunt, Yvonne; Folkers, Anna; Augustson, Erik

    2011-01-17

    As evidenced by the increasing popularity of YouTube (www.youtube.com), personal narratives shared through social media are an area of rapid development in communication among cancer survivors. Identifying the thematic and linguistic characteristics of YouTube cancer stories can provide a better understanding of this naturally occurring communication channel and inform social media communication efforts aiming to use personal stories to reach individuals with serious illnesses. The objective of our study was to provide an in-depth description of authentic personal cancer stories. Through a linguistically based narrative analysis of YouTube stories, the analysis explicates the common attributes of these narratives. Informed by narrative theories, we conducted an iterative, bottom-up analysis of 35 YouTube videos identified by the search terms "cancer survivor" and "cancer stories". A list of shared thematic and linguistic characteristics was identified and analyzed. A subnarrative on the cancer diagnosis was present in 86% (30/35) of the stories under analysis. These diagnostic narratives were characterized by dramatic tension, emotional engagement, markers of the loss of agency or control, depersonalized reference to the medical personnel, and the unexpectedness of a cancer diagnosis. The analysis highlights the themes of story authenticity and emotional engagement in this online communication medium. Internet advances have enabled new and efficient exchange of personal stories, including the sharing of personal cancer experience among cancer survivors and their caregivers. The analytic results of this descriptive study point to the common characteristics of authentic cancer survivorship stories online. Furthermore, the results of this descriptive study may inform development of narrative-based communication, particularly in maintaining authenticity and emotional engagement.

  15. Exercise Programme in Endometrial Cancer; Protocol of the Feasibility and Acceptability Survivorship Trial (EPEC-FAST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Anke; Lopes, Alberto; Das, Nagindra; Bekkers, Ruud; Massuger, Leon; Galaal, Khadra

    2015-12-16

    Obesity has been associated with impaired quality of life and poorer outcomes in endometrial cancer survivors. Lifestyle interventions promoting exercise and weight reduction have been proposed for survivorship care. However, studies evaluating exercise programmes for endometrial cancer survivors are lacking. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of an individualised exercise intervention for endometrial cancer survivors to improve quality of life. This is a feasibility study in which women will undergo a 10-week exercise programme with a personal trainer. The study population comprises women with confirmed diagnosis of endometrial cancer, who have completed surgical treatment with curative intent, and are aged 18 years or older. The study will take place at the Royal Cornwall Hospital Trust, UK. Feasibility will be evaluated in terms of recruitment, adherence and compliance to the programme. Secondary outcomes are quality of life, psychological distress, fatigue, pain and complication rates. In addition, the acceptability of the programme will be assessed. Ethical approval was obtained through the Exeter NRES Committee. The study results will be used to optimise the intervention content, and may serve as the foundation for a larger definitive trial. Results will be disseminated through peer-review journals, congresses, relevant clinical groups and presented on the Trust's website. NCT02367950; pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Beyond treatment – Psychosocial and behavioural issues in cancer survivorship research and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil K. Aaronson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The population of cancer survivors has grown steadily over the past several decades. Surviving cancer, however, is not synonymous with a life free of problems related to the disease and its treatment. In this paper we provide a brief overview of selected physical and psychosocial health problems prevalent among cancer survivors, namely pain, fatigue, psychological distress and work participation. We also address issues surrounding self-management and e-Health interventions for cancer survivors, and programmes to encourage survivors to adopt healthier lifestyles. Finally, we discuss approaches to assessing health-related quality of life in cancer survivors, and the use of cancer registries in conducting psychosocial survivorship research. We highlight research and practice priorities in each of these areas. While the priorities vary per topic, common themes that emerged included: (1 Symptoms should not be viewed in isolation, but rather as part of a cluster of interrelated symptoms. This has implications for both understanding the aetiology of symptoms and for their treatment; (2 Psychosocial interventions need to be evidence-based, and where possible should be tailored to the needs of the individual cancer survivor. Relatively low cost interventions with self-management and e-Health elements may be appropriate for the majority of survivors, with resource intensive interventions being reserved for those most in need; (3 More effort should be devoted to disseminating and implementing interventions in practice, and to evaluating their cost-effectiveness; and (4 Greater attention should be paid to the needs of vulnerable and high-risk populations of survivors, including the socioeconomically disadvantaged and the elderly.

  17. The Malaysian Breast Cancer Survivorship Cohort (MyBCC): a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Tania; Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala; Su, Tin Tin; Majid, Hazreen Abdul; Nahar, Azmi Mohd; Ng, Chong Guan; Dahlui, Maznah; Hussain, Samsinah; Cantwell, Marie; Murray, Liam; Taib, Nur Aishah

    2015-10-26

    Over recent decades, the burden of breast cancer has been increasing at an alarming rate in Asia. Prognostic research findings from Western countries may not readily be adapted to Asia, as the outcome of breast cancer depends on a multitude of factors ranging from genetic, clinical and histological predictors, to lifestyle and social predictors. The primary aim of this study is to determine the impact of lifestyle (eg, nutrition, physical activity), mental and sociocultural condition, on the overall survival and quality of life (QoL) among multiethnic Malaysian women following diagnosis of breast cancer. This study aims to advance the evidence on prognostic factors of breast cancer within the Asian setting. The findings may guide management of patients with breast cancer not only during active treatment but also during the survivorship period. This hospital-based prospective cohort study will comprise patients with breast cancer (18 years and above), managed in the University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC). We aim to recruit 1000 cancer survivors over a 6-year period. Data collection will occur at baseline (within 3 months of diagnosis), 6 months, and 1, 3 and 5 years following diagnosis. The primary outcomes are disease-free survival and overall survival, and secondary outcome is QoL. Factors measured are demographic and socioeconomic factors, lifestyle factors (eg, dietary intake, physical activity), anthropometry measurements (eg, height, weight, waist, hip circumference, body fat analysis), psychosocial aspects, and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) usage. This protocol was approved by the UMMC Ethical Committee in January 2012. All participants are required to provide written informed consent. The findings from our cohort study will be disseminated via scientific publication as well as presentation to stakeholders including the patients, clinicians, the public and policymakers, via appropriate avenues. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  18. The role of diet and physical activity in breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer survivorship: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, N J; Batehup, L; Thomas, R

    2011-11-08

    Evidence for the role of diet and physical activity in cancer incidence is well documented, but owing to increased cancer survivorship, an understanding of these lifestyle factors after a cancer diagnosis is of crucial importance. The purpose of this review was to update the literature in a review undertaken for the National Cancer Survivorship Initiative and to include observational studies that were not included in the WCRF survivorship systematic review. Evidence was initially gathered from pre-defined searches of the Cochrane Library Database and PubMed from March 2006 to February 2010. After a comprehensive review regarding lifestyle and cancer, for the purpose of this article, any studies not related to diet and physical activity, prognostic outcomes, and breast, colorectal or prostate cancers were excluded. Another search of 2011 literature was conducted to update the evidence. A total of 43 records were included in this review. Evidence from observational studies suggests that a low-fat, high-fibre diet might be protective against cancer recurrence and progression. However, there is a paucity of RCTs substantiating this. There is more support for physical activity, with a dose response for better outcomes. When synthesized with findings from the World Cancer Research Fund review of RCTs investigating the effect of diet and physical activity interventions on cancer survival, evidence suggests that the mechanism of benefit from diet and physical activity pertains to body weight, with excess body weight being a risk factor, which is modifiable through lifestyle. Cancer survivors would like to have a more active role in their health care and to know how to look after themselves after diagnosis, including what diet and lifestyle changes they should make. The challenge is in integrating lifestyle support into standardised models of aftercare.

  19. Perceptions of weight management counseling among gynecologic cancer survivors: opportunities for enhancing survivorship care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleta, Alexandra K; Neff, Robert; McCann, Georgia A; O'Malley, David M; Carpenter, Kristen M

    2017-05-01

    Oncology practice guidelines recommend incorporating weight management efforts throughout survivorship care; however, some oncologists raise concerns about implementing weight management counseling without damaging patient-provider relationships. This study explores cancer survivors' receptivity to weight management counseling and examines whether views of counseling effectiveness are associated with individual characteristics including health-related perceptions or psychological distress. Patients presenting to a NCI Comprehensive Cancer Center gynecologic oncology ambulatory clinic were asked to complete a survey assessing health and weight history, health perceptions, psychological distress, provider preferences, and weight management counseling perceptions. Two hundred forty-four gynecologic cancer patients (38% endometrial, 37% ovarian, 16% cervical, 8% other) completed surveys. Mean participant BMI was 31.6 (SD = 9.6); 69% were overweight/obese. Most survivors (≥85%) agreed that oncologists should discuss healthy eating, exercise, and weight loss; only 14% reported receiving weight management counseling from their oncologist. 79% reported being more likely to attempt weight loss if counseled by a physician; 59% reported counseling would not be offensive. Regression results indicated that viewing weight management counseling as effective was associated with fewer depressive symptoms and greater enjoyment of physical activity, while viewing counseling unfavorably was associated with a history of attempting multiple weight loss strategies and an overall view of healthy behaviors as less beneficial (ps cancer survivors want weight management counseling from oncologists and believe counseling is effective rather than deleterious, yet obesity remains inadequately addressed. Results from this study highlight important topics to be incorporated into weight management counseling.

  20. Psychological health in long-term cancer survivorship: an Italian survey on depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzatti, Barbara; Giovannini, Lorena; Romito, Francesca; Cormio, Claudia; Barberio, Daniela; Abate, Valentina; De Falco, Francesco; Annunziata, Maria Antonietta

    2017-01-01

    Since long-term survivorship is now a reality for an increasingly number of people with a history of cancer, understanding their psychological health can inform health care policy as well as help supporting individual patients. This study was aimed to describe depression and anxiety (i.e. two of the most common psychological symptoms reported in oncology) in a sample of Italian long-term cancer survivors (LTCSs) defined as people who have been free from cancer and cancer treatments for at least five years. Four hundred and four Italian adult LTCSs completed a battery of questionnaires including the Zung Self-rating Depression Scale and the State Anxiety sub-scale of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory respectively for depression and anxiety assessment. 16.5% of the sample displayed mild depression, 11.1% moderate depression, and 7.1% severe depression. depression was negatively associated with education (p = .017), perceived social support as provided by the family (p = .028), and perceived social support provided by friends (p = .008), and it was positively associated with occupational status (p = .023), presence of health issues (p = .010), and anxiety (p anxiety. Anxiety was negatively associated with occupational status (p = .038) and it was positively associated with depression (p anxiety in LTCSs, and stimulate the development and testing of psychological interventions for such individuals. In addition, they encourage further study on the psychological health of this specific population.

  1. The Impact of a Primary Care Education Program Regarding Cancer Survivorship Care Plans: Results from an Engineering, Primary Care, and Oncology Collaborative for Survivorship Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, SarahMaria; Haine, James E; Li, Zhanhai; Trowbridge, Elizabeth R; Kamnetz, Sandra A; Feldstein, David A; Sosman, James M; Wilke, Lee G; Sesto, Mary E; Tevaarwerk, Amye J

    2017-09-20

    Survivorship care plans (SCPs) have been recommended as tools to improve care coordination and outcomes for cancer survivors. SCPs are increasingly being provided to survivors and their primary care providers. However, most primary care providers remain unaware of SCPs, limiting their potential benefit. Best practices for educating primary care providers regarding SCP existence and content are needed. We developed an education program to inform primary care providers of the existence, content, and potential uses for SCPs. The education program consisted of a 15-min presentation highlighting SCP basics presented at mandatory primary care faculty meetings. An anonymous survey was electronically administered via email (n = 287 addresses) to evaluate experience with and basic knowledge of SCPs pre- and post-education. A total of 101 primary care advanced practice providers (APPs) and physicians (35% response rate) completed the baseline survey with only 23% reporting prior receipt of a SCP. Only 9% could identify the SCP location within the electronic health record (EHR). Following the education program, primary care physicians and APPs demonstrated a significant improvement in SCP knowledge, including improvement in their ability to locate one within the EHR (9 vs 59%, p primary care physician and APP knowledge in these areas, which are prerequisites for using SCP in clinical practice.

  2. Cost effectiveness of a survivorship care plan for breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Doug; Grunfeld, Eva; Coyle, Kathryn; Pond, Gregory; Julian, Jim A; Levine, Mark N

    2014-03-01

    Survivorship care plans (SCPs) are recommended for patients who have completed primary treatment and are transitioning to routine follow-up care. However, SCPs may be costly, and their effectiveness is unproven. The study objective was to assess the cost effectiveness of an SCP for breast cancer survivors transitioning to routine follow-up care with their own primary care physician (PCP) using data from a recent randomized controlled trial (RCT). Resource use and utility data for 408 patients with breast cancer enrolled in the RCT comparing an SCP with standard care (no SCP) were used. The intervention group received a 30-minute educational session with a nurse and their SCP, and their PCPs received the SCP plus a full guideline on follow-up. Analysis assessed the societal costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for the intervention group and the control group over the 2-year follow-up of the RCT. Uncertainty concerning cost effectiveness was assessed through nonparametric bootstrapping and deterministic sensitivity analysis. The no-SCP group had better outcomes than the SCP group: total costs per patient were lower for standard care (Canadian $698 v $765), and total QALYs were almost equivalent (1.42 for standard care v 1.41 for the SCP). The probability that the SCP was cost effective was 0.26 at a threshold value of a QALY of $50,000. A variety of sensitivity analyses did not change the conclusions of the analysis. This SCP would be costly to introduce and would not be a cost effective use of scarce health care resources.

  3. Profiling sedentary behavior in breast cancer survivors: Links with depression symptoms during the early survivorship period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabiston, Catherine M; Lacombe, Jason; Faulkner, Guy; Jones, Jennifer; Trinh, Linda

    2017-08-01

    Depression symptoms are prevalent among breast cancer survivors (BCS). Reducing sedentary behavior (SED) may be a non-pharmaceutical strategy for alleviating depression symptoms. However, little is known about SED among BCS. The present study aimed to: (i) describe SED behaviors among BCS and identify unique SED groups based on different SED dimensions; (ii) identify personal and cancer-specific factors that discriminate SED clusters; and (iii) examine the association between SED clusters and depression symptoms. Baseline self-report demographic and medical information was collected from 187 BCS. SED and physical activity were assessed over seven days using an accelerometer. Self-reported depression symptoms were reported three months later. Multiple dimensions of SED were identified and examined in cluster analysis. The clusters were examined for differences using multivariate analysis of variance and chi-square analyses. The difference in depression symptoms among SED groups was assessed using an analysis of covariance. High and low SED groups were identified. Survivors in the high SED cluster were significantly older, heavier, less physically active, reported less education, and were more likely to have undergone lymph/axial node dissection. Women in the high SED cluster reported significantly higher depression symptoms prospectively (M = 9.50, SD = 6.07) compared to women in the low SED group (M = 6.89, SD = 5.18), F(8,179) = 4.97, p = 0.03, R2  = 0.34. The importance of understanding multiple dimensions of SED among BCS was highlighted. Reducing SED during the early survivorship period may alleviate depression symptoms. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Development and Implementation of an Internet-Based Survivorship Care Program for Cancer Survivors Treated with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrjala, Karen L.; Stover, Allison C.; Yi, Jean C.; Artherholt, Samantha B.; Romano, Eleni M.; Schoch, Gary; Stewart, Susan; Flowers, Mary E.D.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The internet provides a widely accessible modality for meeting survivorship care needs of cancer survivors. In this paper we describe the development and implementation of an internet site designed as a base from which to conduct a randomized controlled trial to meet psycho-educational needs of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) survivors. Methods A cross-disciplinary team designed, wrote content and programmed an internet site for online study registration, consent, assessment, and study implementation. All 3–18 year survivors of HSCT for hematologic malignancy treated at one transplant center were approached by mail for participation. All study activities could be conducted without study staff contact. However, participants had options for phone or email contact with study staff as desired. Results Of 1775 participants approached for the study, 775 (58% of those eligible) consented and completed baseline assessment. Mean age was 51.7 (SD=12.5, age range 18–79), with 56% male. 57% required staff contact one or more times; a majority were for minor technical issues or delays in completion of enrollment or baseline assessment. Discussions/Conclusions This study demonstrated the potential for providing internet-based survivorship care to long-term survivors of HSCT. Although building a survivorship internet site requires a team with diverse expertise, once built, these resources can be implemented rapidly with large numbers of survivors. Implications for Cancer Survivors While internet-based services will not meet all the needs of cancer survivors, this methodology represents an important modality for augmenting onsite clinical services as a method for meeting psycho-educational, information and resource needs of cancer survivors. PMID:21544671

  5. Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the American Cancer Society Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Lacchetti, Christina; Davis, Nancy B; Garvey, Thomas Q; Goldstein, David P; Nunnink, J Chris; Ninfea, Jose I Ruades; Salner, Andrew L; Salz, Talya; Siu, Lillian L

    2017-05-10

    Purpose This guideline provides recommendations on the management of adults after head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment, focusing on surveillance and screening for recurrence or second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, care coordination, and practice implications. Methods ASCO has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The American Cancer Society (ACS) HNC Survivorship Care Guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. An ASCO Expert Panel reviewed the content and recommendations, offering modifications and/or qualifying statements when deemed necessary. Results The ASCO Expert Panel determined that the ACS HNC Survivorship Care Guideline, published in 2016, is clear, thorough, clinically practical, and helpful, despite the limited availability of high-quality evidence to support many of the recommendations. ASCO endorsed the ACS HNC Survivorship Care Guideline, adding qualifying statements aimed at promoting team-based, multispecialty, multidisciplinary, collaborative head and neck survivorship care. Recommendations The ASCO Expert Panel emphasized that caring for HNC survivors requires a team-based approach that includes primary care clinicians, oncology specialists, otolaryngologists, dentists, and other allied professionals. The HNC treatment team should educate the primary care clinicians and patients about the type(s) of treatment received, the likelihood of potential recurrence, and the potential late and long-term complications. Primary care clinicians should recognize symptoms of recurrence and coordinate a prompt evaluation. They should also be prepared to manage late effects either directly or by referral to appropriate specialists. Health promotion is critical, particularly regarding tobacco cessation and dental care. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/HNC-Survivorship

  6. Apps seeking theories: results of a study on the use of health behavior change theories in cancer survivorship mobile apps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer Dahlke, Deborah; Fair, Kayla; Hong, Y Alicia; Beaudoin, Christopher E; Pulczinski, Jairus; Ory, Marcia G

    2015-03-27

    Thousands of mobile health apps are now available for use on mobile phones for a variety of uses and conditions, including cancer survivorship. Many of these apps appear to deliver health behavior interventions but may fail to consider design considerations based in human computer interface and health behavior change theories. This study is designed to assess the presence of and manner in which health behavior change and health communication theories are applied in mobile phone cancer survivorship apps. The research team selected a set of criteria-based health apps for mobile phones and assessed each app using qualitative coding methods to assess the application of health behavior change and communication theories. Each app was assessed using a coding derived from the taxonomy of 26 health behavior change techniques by Abraham and Michie with a few important changes based on the characteristics of mHealth apps that are specific to information processing and human computer interaction such as control theory and feedback systems. A total of 68 mobile phone apps and games built on the iOS and Android platforms were coded, with 65 being unique. Using a Cohen's kappa analysis statistic, the inter-rater reliability for the iOS apps was 86.1 (Pcommunication theory and practice.

  7. Cancer Survivorship: Defining the Incidence of Incisional Hernia After Resection for Intra-Abdominal Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baucom, Rebeccah B; Ousley, Jenny; Beveridge, Gloria B; Phillips, Sharon E; Pierce, Richard A; Holzman, Michael D; Sharp, Kenneth W; Nealon, William H; Poulose, Benjamin K

    2016-12-01

    Cancer survivorship focuses largely on improving quality of life. We aimed to determine the rate of ventral incisional hernia (VIH) formation after cancer resection, with implications for survivorship. Patients without prior VIH who underwent abdominal malignancy resections at a tertiary center were followed up to 2 years. Patients with a viewable preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan and CT within 2 years postoperatively were included. Primary outcome was postoperative VIH on CT, reviewed by a panel of surgeons uninvolved with the original operation. Factors associated with VIH were determined using Cox proportional hazards regression. 1847 CTs were reviewed among 491 patients (59 % men), with inter-rater reliability 0.85 for the panel. Mean age was 60 ± 12 years; mean follow-up time 13 ± 8 months. VIH occurred in 41 % and differed across diagnoses: urologic/gynecologic (30 %), colorectal (53 %), and all others (56 %) (p VIH (adjusting for stage, age, adjuvant therapy, smoking, and steroid use) included: incision location [flank (ref), midline, hazard ratio (HR) 6.89 (95 %CI 2.43-19.57); periumbilical, HR 6.24 (95 %CI 1.84-21.22); subcostal, HR 4.55 (95 %CI 1.51-13.70)], cancer type [urologic/gynecologic (ref), other {gastrointestinal, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, retroperitoneal, and others} HR 1.86 (95 %CI 1.26-2.73)], laparoscopic-assisted operation [laparoscopic (ref), HR 2.68 (95 %CI 1.44-4.98)], surgical site infection [HR 1.60 (95 %CI 1.08-2.37)], and body mass index [HR 1.06 (95 %CI 1.03-1.08)]. The rate of VIH after abdominal cancer operations is high. VIH may impact cancer survivorship with pain and need for additional operations. Further studies assessing the impact on QOL and prevention efforts are needed.

  8. Cancer survivorship and opioid prescribing rates: A population-based matched cohort study among individuals with and without a history of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, Rinku; Lokku, Armend; Barbera, Lisa

    2017-11-01

    Little is known about opioid prescribing among individuals who have survived cancer. Our aim is to examine a predominantly socio-economically disadvantaged population for differences in opioid prescribing rates among cancer survivors compared with matched controls without a prior diagnosis of cancer. This was a retrospective population-wide matched cohort study. Starting in 2010, individuals residing in Ontario, Canada, who were 18 to 64 years of age and at least 5 years past their cancer diagnosis were matched to controls without a prior cancer diagnosis based on sex and calendar year of birth. Follow-up was terminated at any indication of cancer recurrence, second malignancy, or new cancer diagnosis. To examine the association between survivorship and the rate of opioid prescriptions, an Andersen-Gill recurrent event regression model was implemented, adjusting for numerous individual-level characteristics and also accounting for the matched design. The rate of opioid prescribing was 1.22 times higher among survivors than among their corresponding matched controls (adjusted relative rate, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.11-1.34). Individuals from lower income quintiles who were younger, were from rural neighborhoods, and had more comorbidities had significantly higher prescribing rates. Sex was not associated with prescribing rates. This increased rate of opioid prescribing was also seen among survivors who were 10 or more years past their cancer diagnosis (compared with their controls). This study demonstrates substantially higher opioid prescribing rates among cancer survivors, even long after attaining survivorship. This raises concerns about the diagnosis and management of chronic pain problems among survivors stemming from their cancer diagnosis or treatment. Cancer 2017;123:4286-4293. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  9. Adoption, Acceptability, and Effectiveness of a Mobile Health App for Personalized Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care: Protocol for a Realist Case Study of the Ned App.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Quynh; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Feifer, Andrew

    2017-10-12

    By 2030, prostate cancer will be the most commonly diagnosed cancer in North America. To mitigate this impending challenge, comprehensive support mechanisms for disease- and treatment-specific changes in health and well-being must be proactively designed and thoughtfully implemented for streamlined survivorship care. mHealth apps have been lauded as a promising complement to current outpatient treatment and monitoring strategies, but have not yet been widely used to support prostate cancer survivorship needs. A realist evaluation is needed to examine the impact of such apps on the prostate cancer survivorship experience. We seek to gain an understanding of how an mHealth app for prostate cancer survivorship care called Ned (No Evident Disease) is adopted and accepted by patients, caregivers, and clinicians. We also aim to determine the effect of Ned on health-related quality of life, satisfaction with cancer care, unmet needs, self-efficacy, and prostate cancer-related levels of anxiety. The Ned case study is a 12-month mixed-methods embedded single-case study with a nested within-group pre-post comparison of health outcomes. We will give 400 patients, 200 caregivers, and 10 clinicians access to Ned. Participants will be asked to complete study assessments at baseline, 2 months, 6 months, and 12 months. We will conduct 30 semistructured qualitative interviews with patients (n=20) and their caregivers (n=10) poststudy to gain insight into their experience with the app. We recruited our first survivor in October 2017 and anticipate completing this study by May 2019. This will, to our knowledge, be the first realist case study to evaluate an app for prostate cancer survivorship care. Prostate cancer survivors are set to increase in number and longevity, heightening the need for integrated survivorship solutions to provide them with optimal and durable outcomes. The knowledge gained from this study will comprehensively inform how and why Ned works, for whom, and in

  10. Family estimates of risk for neurocognitive late effects following pediatric cancer: From diagnosis through the first three years of survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Emily L; Lehmann, Vicky; Rausch, Joseph R; Keim, Madelaine C; Winning, Adrien M; Olshefski, Randal S; Vannatta, Kathryn A; Compas, Bruce E; Gerhardt, Cynthia A

    2017-09-01

    Families often express a need for additional information about neurocognitive late effects (NCLE) after a pediatric cancer diagnosis. Therefore, we examined: (i) differences in parent, child, and oncologist estimates of risk for NCLE; (ii) whether the estimates of parents and/or children change over time; and (iii) whether estimates are different for children treated with central nervous system (CNS) directed therapies. Mothers, fathers, and children (initial age: 5-17, self-report: >10) from 258 families reported their perceived likelihood of the child developing "thinking/learning problems" on a visual analog scale (0-100%) at 2 months (T1), 1 year (T2), and 3 years (T3) following cancer diagnosis/relapse. Oncologists estimated the likelihood of NCLE at T1. Children were separated into groups based on CNS-directed treatment (n = 137; neurosurgery, intrathecal chemotherapy, and/or craniospinal radiation) or no CNS treatment. Mother, father, and child estimates of risk for NCLE were similar to oncologists and to one another around diagnosis (T1). Although there were no significant mean differences, a considerable subset of family members either underestimated their child's risk for NCLE (>40%) or overestimated the risk for NCLE (20%) in comparison to oncologists. At T2 and T3, the estimates of mothers were significantly higher than children. Linear growth curves indicated that mothers' estimates for children with CNS-directed treatment significantly increased throughout the first 3 years of survivorship. Considering that accurate understanding of NCLE is essential to seeking appropriate assessment and intervention, healthcare providers should focus on implementing family-based education early in treatment and throughout survivorship care. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Survivorship care planning in skin cancer: An unbiased statistical approach to identifying patterns of care-plan use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benci, Joseph L; Minn, Andy J; Vachani, Carolyn C; Bach, Christina; Arnold-Korzeniowski, Karen; Hampshire, Margaret K; Metz, James M; Hill-Kayser, Christine E

    2017-09-08

    Nearly 1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer, and as a result, survivors of skin cancer compose one of the largest groups of cancer survivors. Survivorship care plans (SCPs) are an important tool for improving patient outcomes and provide critical information to both survivors and health care professionals. Recent efforts have been made to expand SCP utilization; however, which patients currently receive SCPs is poorly understood. This study used 596 individuals with a diagnosis of melanoma (n = 391) or nonmelanoma skin cancer (n = 205) who had used an Internet-based SCP tool from May 2010 to December 2016 to model the patient and provider characteristics that determine SCP utilization. Survivors were predominantly white (95.3%) and female (56.5%). Survivors who received a treatment summary were more likely to also receive an SCP. University and nonuniversity cancer centers used SCPs at a higher rate than other care settings. Survivors whose care was managed by a team rather than just an individual physician were also more likely to receive an SCP. Survivors older than 70 years at diagnosis were almost twice as likely to receive a plan as survivors who were diagnosed at a younger age. With a convenience sample of skin cancer survivors, it is possible to model factors that predict the receipt of SCPs. Important variables include the diagnosis age, treatment setting, physician type, and treatment-summary utilization. A closer examination of these variables identified several disparities in care-plan use and, therefore, opportunities to improve the distribution of SCPs. Further validation in additional cohorts of survivors is necessary to confirm these conclusions. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  12. Do Perceived Needs Affect Willingness to Use Traditional Chinese Medicine for Survivorship Care Among Chinese Cancer Survivors? A Cross-Sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyun Sun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We aimed to quantify Chinese cancer survivors’ perceived needs for survivorship care and to evaluate whether these needs could impact their willingness to use traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey with members of the Beijing Anti-Cancer Association in China. We measured perceived needs with the seven-item Brief Chinese Cancer Survivorship Needs Scale that assesses psychological, functional, nutritional, social, body image, pain, and symptom needs. The outcome variable was willingness to use TCM for survivorship care. We performed multivariable logistic regression analyses to evaluate whether perceived needs are associated with willingness. Results: A total of 600 patients were invited, with a response rate of 81%. The mean (standard deviation score of the perceived needs scale (0 to 10 was 4.4 (2.2, with the majority of participants endorsing nutritional (72%, symptom (65%, and psychological (54% needs. Among survivors, 387 (80%; 95% CI, 76% to 83% were willing to use TCM for survivorship care. In multivariable analysis, a higher perceived needs score (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.33; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.56; P < .001 was associated with greater willingness to use TCM. Specifically, nutritional (OR, 3.17; 95% CI, 1.79 to 5.62; P < .001 and symptom needs (OR, 3.15; 95% CI, 1.79 to 5.55; P < .001 had the strongest relationship. Conclusion: A higher level of perceived needs, especially in the areas of nutrition and symptoms, was associated with greater willingness to use TCM for survivorship care.

  13. Multilingual Self-Management Resources for Prostate Cancer Survivors and Their Partners: Results of a Long-Term Academic-State Health Department Partnership to Promote Survivorship Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Ted A; Ragnoni, Jennifer A; Garlinghouse, Carol; Schafenacker, Ann; Webster, Debbie; Hager, Polly; Wittmann, Daniela; Northouse, Laurel

    2017-12-01

    To provide innovative, evidence-based self management information and supportive care for prostate cancer survivors and their partners. We describe how an academic-public partnership facilitated the broad dissemination of evidence-based, multilingual survivorship educational materials via a state-managed prostate cancer website. We outline the steps of an academic-public partnership leading to dissemination of online, survivorship materials as a resource for prostate cancer survivors and their partners. We examined the 5-year utilization of the materials from January 2011 to December 2015 according to 14 content areas (e.g., urinary, bowel, and sexual problems, fatigue, communication, cancer stress) and across 3 languages (English, Spanish, Arabic). The total number of prostate cancer survivorship materials downloaded from January 2011 to December 2015 was 89,348. The number of downloaded materials increased over time from 6,421 in 2011 to 17,496 in 2015. The most commonly downloaded content area was urine problems (27.5%), followed by bowel problems (23.4%) and sexual side effects (16.2%). The majority of downloaded materials was in English (86.3%), followed by Spanish (9.8%) and Arabic (3.9%). The academic-public partnership facilitated broad dissemination of evidence-based informational materials for prostate cancer survivors and their partners through a state-managed website from 2011 to 2015. Given the increasing role of academic-public partnerships in funding and development of robust, sustainable prostate cancer survivorship resources, this work serves as an introduction to these evidence-based materials and highlights a successful model of engagement between practitioners, research scientists, and public health administration. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Patient-reported quality of life, unmet needs and care coordination outcomes: Moving toward targeted breast cancer survivorship care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Meagan Elizabeth; Butow, Phyllis; Spillane, Andrew John; Boyle, Frances

    2016-06-01

    Survivorship care plans (SCPs) have been proposed for universal use with the aim of addressing the many unmet needs of cancer survivors. Trials have failed to find a significant impact of SCPs on quality of life outcomes. This study evaluated quality of life, unmet needs, satisfaction with health care and perception of cancer care coordination at the end of treatment in a cohort of women at the end of treatment for early breast cancer. The aim was to identify specific needs to assist in the design of a tailored SCP. Women completed patient-reported measures of health-related quality of life (FACT-B [ES]), unmet needs (CaSUN), satisfaction with medical care and cancer care coordination. Total scores and subscale scores for the whole cohort and results of analysis comparing three age groups were reported. Sixty-eight women (mean age 56) participated. Mean score for FACT-B = 108 and FACT-B (ES) = 167.4. Younger women (quality of life (P = 0.001 for FACT-B, TOI and FACT-B [ES]). Using CaSUN, 76.1% of participants reported at least one unmet need; mean number of unmet needs = 6.2. Younger women reported more unmet needs than older women. The most frequently reported unmet need was fear of cancer recurrence. Overall, participants were very satisfied with medical care and cancer care coordination. Younger women reported poorer quality of life and more unmet needs. SCPs should specifically target younger women and must include strategies to address fear of cancer recurrence if they are to lead to a measureable difference in outcomes. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Development of a text messaging system to improve receipt of survivorship care in adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, Jacqueline; Goyal, Anju; Bryman, Jason; Alquaddoomi, Faisal; Ganz, Patricia A; Lidington, Emma; Macadangdang, Joshua; Estrin, Deborah

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to develop and examine the acceptability, feasibility, and usability of a text messaging, or Short Message Service (SMS), system for improving the receipt of survivorship care for adolescent and young adult (AYA) survivors of childhood cancer. Researchers developed and refined the text messaging system based on qualitative data from AYA survivors in an iterative three-stage process. In stage 1, a focus group (n = 4) addressed acceptability; in stage 2, key informant interviews (n = 10) following a 6-week trial addressed feasibility; and in stage 3, key informant interviews (n = 23) following a 6-week trial addressed usability. Qualitative data were analyzed using a constant comparative analytic approach exploring in-depth themes. The final system includes programmed reminders to schedule and attend late effect screening appointments, tailored suggestions for community resources for cancer survivors, and messages prompting participant feedback regarding the appointments and resources. Participants found the text messaging system an acceptable form of communication, the screening reminders and feedback prompts feasible for improving the receipt of survivorship care, and the tailored suggestions for community resources usable for connecting survivors to relevant services. Participants suggested supplementing survivorship care visits and forming AYA survivor social networks as future implementations for the text messaging system. The text messaging system may assist AYA survivors by coordinating late effect screening appointments, facilitating a partnership with the survivorship care team, and connecting survivors with relevant community resources. The text messaging system has the potential to improve the receipt of survivorship care.

  16. Interventions to Improve the Quality of Life and Survivorship of Older Adults with Cancer: The Funding Landscape at NIH, ACS and PCORI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Marie; Mohile, Supriya Gupta; Dale, William; Arora, Neeraj K.; Azar, Lauren; Breslau, Erica S.; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Dotan, Efrat; Eldadah, Basil A.; Leach, Corinne R.; Mitchell, Sandra A.; Rowland, Julia H.; Hurria, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Identifying knowledge gaps and research opportunities in cancer and aging research was the focus of a three-part conference series led by the Cancer and Aging Research Group from 2010 to 2015. The third meeting, featured representatives from the NIA, NCI, ACS and PCORI each of whom discussed research priorities and funding opportunities in cancer and aging at their respective agencies. This manuscript reports on the proceedings of that conference with a specific focus on funding priorities for interventions to improve the quality of life and survivorship of older adults with cancer. Helpful tips from each funder regarding writing a good research proposal are presented. PMID:27197917

  17. Considerations for developing chronic care system for traumatic brain injury based on comparisons of cancer survivorship and diabetes management care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiden, Siobhan M; Caldwell, Barrett S

    2018-01-01

    Experts in traumatic brain injury (TBI) rehabilitation recently proposed the framing of TBI as a chronic disease rather than a discrete event. Within the framework of the Chronic Care Model (CCM), a systematic comparison of three diseases - cancer survivorship, diabetes management and TBI chronic care - was conducted regarding chronic needs and the management of those needs. In addition, comparisons of these conditions require comparative evaluations of disease management characteristics and the survivor concept. The analysis found diabetes is more established within the CCM, where care is integrated across specialists and primary care providers. No single comparison provides a full analogue for understanding the chronic care health delivery system for TBI, indicating the need for a separate model to address needs and resources for TBI survivors. The findings from this research can provide practitioners with a context to develop a robust continued care health system for TBI. Practitioner Summary: We examine development of a chronic care system for traumatic brain injury. We conducted a systematic comparison of Chronic Care Model elements of decision and information support. Development of capabilities using a benchmark of diabetes care, with additional insights from cancer care, provides insights for implementing TBI chronic care systems.

  18. Student Writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Alan

    1982-01-01

    Discusses length and speed, spontaneity, and discipline as the attributes that affect creative writing assignments, students' development as creative writers, and appropriate methods of teaching creative writing. (RL)

  19. Impact of obesity on cancer survivorship and the potential relevance of race and ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Kathryn H; Neuhouser, Marian L; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Zanetti, Krista A; Cadmus-Bertram, Lisa; Dean, Lorraine T; Drake, Bettina F

    2013-09-18

    Evidence that obesity is associated with cancer incidence and mortality is compelling. By contrast, the role of obesity in cancer survival is less well understood. There is inconsistent support for the role of obesity in breast cancer survival, and evidence for other tumor sites is scant. The variability in findings may be due in part to comorbidities associated with obesity itself rather than with cancer, but it is also possible that obesity creates a physiological setting that meaningfully alters cancer treatment efficacy. In addition, the effects of obesity at diagnosis may be distinct from the effects of weight change after diagnosis. Obesity and related comorbid conditions may also increase risk for common adverse treatment effects, including breast cancer-related lymphedema, fatigue, poor health-related quality of life, and worse functional health. Racial and ethnic groups with worse cancer survival outcomes are also the groups for whom obesity and related comorbidities are more prevalent, but findings from the few studies that have addressed these complexities are inconsistent. We outline a broad theoretical framework for future research to clarify the specifics of the biological-social-environmental feedback loop for the combined and independent contributions of race, comorbid conditions, and obesity on cancer survival and adverse treatment effects. If upstream issues related to comorbidities, race, and ethnicity partly explain the purported link between obesity and cancer survival outcomes, these factors should be among those on which interventions are focused to reduce the burden of cancer.

  20. Anxiety among adolescent survivors of pediatric cancer: A missing link in the survivorship literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Glynnis; Baily, Charles; Schuler, Tammy; Verdeli, Helen

    2015-04-01

    With growing numbers of pediatric cancer survivors, it is becoming increasingly important to investigate the psychosocial sequelae of surviving cancer diagnosed during childhood or adolescence. It is particularly important to study the psychosocial needs of adolescent survivors of pediatric cancer because adolescence is a critical time during psychosocial development. Although there is existent literature about the general psychosocial adjustment of this population, the literature regarding anxiety is scant. This brief review aimed to assesses currently available literature that addresses anxiety in adolescent cancer survivors. Articles assessing psychosocial adjustment in adolescent survivors of pediatric cancer were reviewed for information regarding anxiety symptoms. To the authors' knowledge, there is no literature that focuses specifically on anxiety in this population. However, many articles reported results that indicated the possibility of increased anxiety in this group. It is critical to further investigate anxiety in this group and develop appropriate interventions if necessary. Doing so will aid the process of enhancing psychosocial care for adolescent cancer survivors.

  1. Impact of Obesity on Cancer Survivorship and the Potential Relevance of Race and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Evidence that obesity is associated with cancer incidence and mortality is compelling. By contrast, the role of obesity in cancer survival is less well understood. There is inconsistent support for the role of obesity in breast cancer survival, and evidence for other tumor sites is scant. The variability in findings may be due in part to comorbidities associated with obesity itself rather than with cancer, but it is also possible that obesity creates a physiological setting that meaningfully alters cancer treatment efficacy. In addition, the effects of obesity at diagnosis may be distinct from the effects of weight change after diagnosis. Obesity and related comorbid conditions may also increase risk for common adverse treatment effects, including breast cancer–related lymphedema, fatigue, poor health–related quality of life, and worse functional health. Racial and ethnic groups with worse cancer survival outcomes are also the groups for whom obesity and related comorbidities are more prevalent, but findings from the few studies that have addressed these complexities are inconsistent. We outline a broad theoretical framework for future research to clarify the specifics of the biological–social–environmental feedback loop for the combined and independent contributions of race, comorbid conditions, and obesity on cancer survival and adverse treatment effects. If upstream issues related to comorbidities, race, and ethnicity partly explain the purported link between obesity and cancer survival outcomes, these factors should be among those on which interventions are focused to reduce the burden of cancer. PMID:23990667

  2. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamen, Charles

    2018-02-01

    To discuss lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT)-specific survivorship issues including: integrating sexual and gender minority identities with cancer survivor identities; coordinating medical care and disclosing identities to health care providers; dealing with late effects of treatment; and addressing LGBT family and relationship issues. Published articles, quotes from an online survey of 311 LGBT survivors. The transition from active cancer treatment to survivorship presents challenges, and LGBT cancer survivors may face additional challenges as they enter the survivorship phase. Oncology nurses can improve the quality of survivorship care delivered to LGBT survivors and their caregivers by addressing the disparities and gaps in health care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Beyond treatment : Psychosocial and behavioural issues in cancer survivorship research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaronson, N.K.; Mattioli, V.; Minton, O.; Weis, J.; Johansen, C.; Dalton, S.O.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I.M.; Stein, K.D.; Alfano, C.M.; Mehnert, A.; de Boer, A.; van de Poll-Franse, L.

    2014-01-01

    The population of cancer survivors has grown steadily over the past several decades. Surviving cancer, however, is not synonymous with a life free of problems related to the disease and its treatment. In this paper we provide a brief overview of selected physical and psychosocial health problems

  4. Beyond treatment - Psychosocial and behavioral issues in cancer survivorship research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaronson, N.K.; Mattioli, V.; Minton, O.; Weis, J.; Johansen, C.; Dalton, S.O.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I.M.; Stein, K.D.; Alfano, C.M.; Mehnert, A.; de Boer, A.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.

    2014-01-01

    The population of cancer survivors has grown steadily over the past several decades. Surviving cancer, however, is not synonymous with a life free of problems related to the disease and its treatment. In this paper we provide a brief overview of selected physical and psychosocial health problems

  5. Beyond treatment – Psychosocial and behavioural issues in cancer survivorship research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaronson, N.K.; Mattioli, V.; Minton, O.; Weis, J.; Johansen, C.; Dalton, S.O.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I.M.; Stein, K.D.; Alfano, C.M.; Mehnert, A.; de Boer, A.; van de Poll-Franse, L.

    2014-01-01

    The population of cancer survivors has grown steadily over the past several decades. Surviving cancer, however, is not synonymous with a life free of problems related to the disease and its treatment. In this paper we provide a brief overview of selected physical and psychosocial health problems

  6. Beyond treatment - Psychosocial and behavioural issues in cancer survivorship research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaronson, Neil K.; Mattioli, Vittorio; Minton, Ollie; Weis, Joachim; Johansen, Christoffer; Dalton, Susanne O.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.; Stein, Kevin D.; Alfano, Catherine M.; Mehnert, Anja; de Boer, Angela; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V.

    2014-01-01

    The population of cancer survivors has grown steadily over the past several decades. Surviving cancer, however, is not synonymous with a life free of problems related to the disease and its treatment. In this paper we provide a brief overview of selected physical and psychosocial health problems

  7. Long-Term Impact of Endometrial Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment on Health-Related Quality of Life and Cancer Survivorship: Results From the Randomized PORTEC-2 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Stephanie M; Nout, Remi A; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M; Jobsen, Jan J; Lutgens, Ludy C H W; van der Steen-Banasik, Elzbieta M; Mens, Jan Willem M; Slot, Annerie; Stenfert Kroese, Marika C; Oerlemans, Simone; Putter, Hein; Verhoeven-Adema, Karen W; Nijman, Hans W; Creutzberg, Carien L

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate the long-term health-related quality of life (HRQL) after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) among PORTEC-2 trial patients, evaluate long-term bowel and bladder symptoms, and assess the impact of cancer on these endometrial cancer (EC) survivors. In the PORTEC-2 trial, 427 patients with stage I high-intermediate-risk EC were randomly allocated to EBRT or VBT. The 7- and 10-year HRQL questionnaires consisted of EORTC QLQ-C30; subscales for bowel and bladder symptoms; the Impact of Cancer Questionnaire; and 14 questions on comorbidities, walking aids, and incontinence pads. Analysis was done using linear mixed models for subscales and (ordinal) logistic regression with random effects for single items. A two-sided P value sexual activity was seen between treatment arms. Long-term impact of cancer scores was higher among the patients who had an EC recurrence or second cancer. More than 7 years after treatment, EBRT patients reported more bowel symptoms with impact on daily activities, and a trend for more urinary symptoms, without impact on overall quality of life or difference in cancer survivorship issues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Advancing Cancer Survivorship in a Country with 1.35 Billion People: The China Lymphoma Project

    OpenAIRE

    Coughlin, Steven; Reno, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Rates of lymphoma are rising rapidly and lymphoma is now the ninth most common cancer among Chinese males. The China Lymphoma Project was founded to increase awareness of lymphoma in China, including the survivability of the disease and the availability of potentially life-saving treatments, and to provide social support for men, women, and children in China who are living with the disease. The project is working with China government officials, several of the top cancer hospitals in China an...

  9. Cancer Survivorship in the Age of YouTube and Social Media: A Narrative Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia; Hunt, Yvonne; Folkers, Anna; Augustson, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Background As evidenced by the increasing popularity of YouTube (www.youtube.com), personal narratives shared through social media are an area of rapid development in communication among cancer survivors. Identifying the thematic and linguistic characteristics of YouTube cancer stories can provide a better understanding of this naturally occurring communication channel and inform social media communication efforts aiming to use personal stories to reach individuals with serious illnesses. Obj...

  10. Individuel survivorship program for ovarian cancer patients based on PROM and shared decision making - PROMova

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kargo, Anette Stolberg; Coulter, Angela; Hjøllund, Niels Henrik Ingvar

    -up arrangements for these patients on the grounds that routine monitoring is ineffective and that follow-up should be individualized. These changes have caused concern among clinicians who fear that omission of routine examinations will hamper detection of recurrence, since clinical symptoms of relapse can...... and the Danish Cancer Society will aim to make recommendations on the use of PROMs in ovarian cancer follow up, including their potential for clinical implementation after the research period....

  11. Do Active Duty Cancer Survivors with a Concurrent Behavioral Health Diagnosis Have Distinct Survivorship Care Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-23

    Anxiety/Adjustment (χ2(1, N = 347) = 10.65, p < 0.01), and Other Disorders (χ2(1, N = 347) = 5.90, p < 0.05), than non-Active Duty cancer survivors...14   Military-specific risk factors for behavioral health disorders ............................... 15   Stigma...genes), which causes maladaptive cellular processes, inflammation, immunosuppression, and ultimately cancer (62; 86; 133). 7 While new

  12. Is cancer survivorship associated with reduced work engagement? A NOCWO Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg Gudbergsson, Saevar; Fosså, Sophie D; Dahl, Alv A

    2008-09-01

    This study explores work engagement in employed tumor-free cancer survivors (CSs) compared to matched controls from the general population (NORM). The sample consisted of 446 CSs tumor-free after primary treatment [226 females with breast cancer and 220 males (166 testicular cancer and 54 prostate cancer)] diagnosed 2-6 years prior to the study. All had returned to work and had favourable prognosis. NORM sample consisted of 588 employed controls (319 females, 269 males). All CSs and NORM filled in a mailed questionnaire covering demography, morbidity, and work-related issues including work engagement which was self-rated by the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES). No differences in work engagement were observed between the CSs and NORM measured by the UWES total scale score or by the Dedication and Absorption domain scores. The Vigor domains score was statistically lower among CSs (p = .03), but the effect size was only 0.19. The CSs reported significantly poorer work ability, poorer health status, greater numbers of disease symptoms, more anxiety, and reduced physical quality of life, and scored significantly higher on both neuroticism and extraversion. CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS FOR CSS: In spite of poorer health CSs who had returned to work after their treatment for breast, prostate, and testicular cancer showed similar work engagement as individuals without cancer. In such CSs employers have no reason to expect reduced work engagement. Future research should preferably have a prospective and comparative design.

  13. About Survivorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... expect At the end of active treatment, a patient’s safety net of regular, frequent contact with the health ... who care for and about them to help patients and families make informed health care decisions. Find a Cancer ... Clinical Oncology Journal of Oncology Practice ASCO University Donate Contact ...

  14. Nonsurgical Management of Cervical Cancer: Locally Advanced, Recurrent, and Metastatic Disease, Survivorship, and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Helen J.; Wenzel, Lari; Mileshkin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Overview Despite the declining incidence of cervical cancer as a result of the introduction of screening programs, globally it remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Outcomes for patients who are diagnosed with anything but early-stage disease remain poor. Here we examine emerging strategies to improve the treatment of locally advanced disease. We discuss emerging biologic data, which are informing our investigation of new therapeutic interventions in persistent, recurrent, and metastatic cervical cancer. We recognize the importance of interventions to improve quality of life and to prevent long-term sequelae in women undergoing treatment. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we recognize the need for global collaboration and advocacy to improve the outcome for all women at risk of and diagnosed with this disease. PMID:25993189

  15. Patterns and predictors of survivorship clinic attendance in a population-based sample of pediatric and young adult childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Daniel J; Sint, Kyaw; Mitchell, Hannah-Rose; Kadan-Lottick, Nina S

    2016-06-01

    Because many survivors do not receive recommended follow-up, we sought to characterize patterns and predictors of survivorship clinic attendance in a population-based sample of childhood cancer survivors. Using the Connecticut Tumor Registry, we identified all patients diagnosed with cancer at age ≤ 18 years from March 1, 1998 to March 1, 2008, still in follow-up 5 years post-diagnosis, and living survivors currently 19.1 ± 6.2 years old were diagnosed at a mean age of 9.1 ± 5.8 years with leukemias/lymphomas (47.2 %), central nervous system tumors (16.4 %), sarcomas (11.2 %), thyroid cancers or melanomas (7.8 %), and other solid tumors (17.4 %). The 10-year post-diagnosis clinic attendance probability was 27.8 % (SE = 2.3) overall, and 36.9 % (SE = 4.4) and 40.8 % (SE = 3.8), in patients with radiation and anthracycline exposure, respectively. In adjusted analysis, patients with insurance (HR = 2.90; p cancer survivors in our population-based sample had not attended survivorship clinic, even among those with high-risk exposures. Health care access, as measured by insurance status, was an important predictor of clinic attendance. More research is needed to clarify the link between insurance status and survivorship care to increase appropriate late effects surveillance in this population.

  16. Top 10 Research Questions Related to Physical Activity and Cancer Survivorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courneya, Kerry S.; Rogers, Laura Q.; Campbell, Kristin L.; Vallance, Jeff K.; Friedenreich, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, there are more than 14 million cancer survivors. Many of these survivors have been treated with multimodal therapy including surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapies. These therapies improve survival; however, they also cause acute and chronic side effects that can undermine health and quality of life.…

  17. Cancer Survivorship Care Plan Utilization and Impact on Clinical Decision-Making at Point-of-Care Visits with Primary Care: Results from an Engineering, Primary Care, and Oncology Collaborative for Survivorship Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, SarahMaria; Haine, James E; Li, Zhanhai; Feldstein, David A; Micek, Mark; Trowbridge, Elizabeth R; Kamnetz, Sandra A; Sosman, James M; Wilke, Lee G; Sesto, Mary E; Tevaarwerk, Amye J

    2017-11-02

    Every cancer survivor and his/her primary care provider should receive an individualized survivorship care plan (SCP) following curative treatment. Little is known regarding point-of-care utilization at primary care visits. We assessed SCP utilization in the clinical context of primary care visits. Primary care physicians and advanced practice providers (APPs) who had seen survivors following provision of an SCP were identified. Eligible primary care physicians and APPs were sent an online survey, evaluating SCP utilization and influence on decision-making at the point-of-care, accompanied by copies of the survivor's SCP and the clinic note. Eighty-eight primary care physicians and APPs were surveyed November 2016, with 40 (45%) responding. Most respondents (60%) reported discussing cancer or related issues during the visit. Information needed included treatment (66%) and follow-up visits, and the cancer team was responsible for (58%) vs primary care (58%). Respondents acquired this information by asking the patient (79%), checking oncology notes (75%), the SCP (17%), or online resources (8%). Barriers to SCP use included being unaware of the SCP (73%), difficulty locating it (30%), and finding needed information faster via another mechanism (15%). Despite largely not using the SCP for the visit (90%), most respondents (61%) believed one would be quite or very helpful for future visits. Most primary care visits included discussion of cancer or cancer-related issues. SCPs may provide the information necessary to deliver optimal survivor care but efforts are needed to reduce barriers and design SCPs for primary care use.

  18. Feasibility of an eHealth application "OncoKompas" to improve personalized survivorship cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman-Lubberding, S; van Uden-Kraan, C F; Jansen, F; Witte, B I; van der Velden, L A; Lacko, M; Cuijpers, P; Leemans, C R; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I M

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of an online self-management application (OncoKompas) among cancer survivors. In OncoKompas, cancer survivors can monitor their quality of life (QOL) via participant reported outcomes (PROs) ("Measure"), which is followed by automatically generated individually tailored feedback ("Learn") and personalized advice on supportive care services ("Act"). A pretest-posttest design was used, conducting a survey before providing access to OncoKompas, and 2 weeks after, followed by an interview by a nurse. Adoption was defined as the percentage of cancer survivors that agreed to participate in the study and returned the T0 questionnaire. Implementation was defined as the percentage of participants that actually used OncoKompas as intended (T1). General satisfaction was assessed based on the mean score of three study-specific questions: (1) general impression of OncoKompas, (2) the user-friendliness, and (3) the ability to use OncoKompas without assistance (10-point Likert scales). Furthermore, satisfaction was measured with the Net Promotor Scale (NPS). OncoKompas was feasible with an adoption grade of 64 %, an implementation grade of 75-91 %, a mean satisfaction score of 7.3, and a positive NPS (1.9). Sociodemographic and clinical factors and QOL were not associated with satisfaction. Several facilitators and barriers related to the feasibility of OncoKompas were identified. OncoKompas is considered feasible, but has to be further improved. In order to enhance feasibility and increase satisfaction, we have to balance the time it takes to use OncoKompas, measurement precision, and tailoring towards personalized advices.

  19. Interventions to improve the quality of life and survivorship of older adults with cancer: The funding landscape at NIH, ACS and PCORI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Marie; Mohile, Supriya Gupta; Dale, William; Arora, Neeraj K; Azar, Lauren; Breslau, Erica S; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Dotan, Efrat; Eldadah, Basil A; Leach, Corinne R; Mitchell, Sandra A; Rowland, Julia H; Hurria, Arti

    2016-07-01

    Identifying knowledge gaps and research opportunities in cancer and aging research was the focus of a three-part conference series led by the Cancer and Aging Research Group from 2010 to 2015. The third meeting, featured representatives from the NIA, NCI, ACS and PCORI each of whom discussed research priorities and funding opportunities in cancer and aging at their respective agencies. This manuscript reports on the proceedings of that conference with a specific focus on funding priorities for interventions to improve the quality of life and survivorship of older adults with cancer. Helpful tips from each funder regarding writing a scientifically strong research proposal are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Recruiting primary care physicians to qualitative research: Experiences and recommendations from a childhood cancer survivorship study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Christina; Wakefield, Claire E; Fardell, Joanna E; Thornton-Benko, Elysia; Emery, Jon; McLoone, Jordana K; Cohn, Richard J

    2018-01-01

    Primary care physicians (PCPs) are essential for healthcare delivery but can be difficult to recruit to health research. Low response rates may impact the quality and value of data collected. This paper outlines participant and study design factors associated with increased response rates among PCPs invited to participate in a qualitative study at Sydney Children's Hospital, Australia. We invited 160 PCPs by post, who were nominated by their childhood cancer patients in a survey study. We followed-up by telephone, email, or fax 2 weeks later. Without any follow-up, 32 PCPs opted in to the study. With follow-up, a further 42 PCPs opted in, with email appearing to be the most effective method, yielding a total of 74 PCPs opting in (46.3%). We reached data saturation after 51 interviews. On average, it took 34.6 days from mail-out to interview completion. Nonrespondents were more likely to be male (P = 0.013). No survivor-related factors significantly influenced PCPs' likelihood of participating. Almost double the number of interviews were successfully completed if scheduled via email versus phone. Those requiring no follow-up did not differ significantly to late respondents in demographic/survivor-related characteristics. PCP factors associated with higher opt in rates, and early responses, may be of interest to others considering engaging PCPs and/or their patients in cancer-related research, particularly qualitative or mixed-methods studies. Study resources may be best allocated to email follow-up, incentives, and personalization of study documents linking PCPs to patients. These efforts may improve PCP participation and the representativeness of study findings. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Long-Term Impact of Endometrial Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment on Health-Related Quality of Life and Cancer Survivorship: Results From the Randomized PORTEC-2 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boer, Stephanie M. de, E-mail: s.m.de_boer.ONCO@lumc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Jobsen, Jan J. [Department of Radiotherapy, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Lutgens, Ludy C.H.W. [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), University Medical Centre Maastricht (Netherlands); Steen-Banasik, Elzbieta M. van der [Arnhem Radiotherapy Institute (ARTI), Arnhem (Netherlands); Mens, Jan Willem M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Slot, Annerie [Radiotherapy Institute Friesland, Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Stenfert Kroese, Marika C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radiotherapy Group Deventer, Deventer (Netherlands); Oerlemans, Simone [Research Department, Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organization, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases, Tilburg University, Tilburg (Netherlands); Putter, Hein [Department of Medical Statistics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Verhoeven-Adema, Karen W. [Comprehensive Cancer Center The Netherlands-West, Leiden (Netherlands); Nijman, Hans W. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Creutzberg, Carien L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term health-related quality of life (HRQL) after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) among PORTEC-2 trial patients, evaluate long-term bowel and bladder symptoms, and assess the impact of cancer on these endometrial cancer (EC) survivors. Patients and Methods: In the PORTEC-2 trial, 427 patients with stage I high–intermediate-risk EC were randomly allocated to EBRT or VBT. The 7- and 10-year HRQL questionnaires consisted of EORTC QLQ-C30; subscales for bowel and bladder symptoms; the Impact of Cancer Questionnaire; and 14 questions on comorbidities, walking aids, and incontinence pads. Analysis was done using linear mixed models for subscales and (ordinal) logistic regression with random effects for single items. A two-sided P value <.01 was considered statistically significant. Results: Longitudinal HRQL analysis showed persisting higher rates of bowel symptoms with EBRT, without significant differences in global health or any of the functioning scales. At 7 years, clinically relevant fecal leakage was reported by 10.6% in the EBRT group, versus 1.8% for VBT (P=.03), diarrhea by 8.4% versus 0.9% (P=.04), limitations due to bowel symptoms by 10.5% versus 1.8% (P=.001), and bowel urgency by 23.3% versus 6.6% (P<.001). Urinary urgency was reported by 39.3% of EBRT patients, 25.5% for VBT, P=.05. No difference in sexual activity was seen between treatment arms. Long-term impact of cancer scores was higher among the patients who had an EC recurrence or second cancer. Conclusions: More than 7 years after treatment, EBRT patients reported more bowel symptoms with impact on daily activities, and a trend for more urinary symptoms, without impact on overall quality of life or difference in cancer survivorship issues.

  2. [Alajouanine's writers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillet, M

    1997-01-01

    Great scholar and enthusiastic bibliophile, Pr Alajouanine privileged relationships with three famous writers during his neurological career. Valery Larbaud and Léon-Paul Fargue were his patients and then became his friends. Dostoievski's biography and works provided him with a penetrating look into the world of epilepsy.

  3. Nutritional Status of Breast Cancer Survivors 1 Year after Diagnosis: A Preliminary Analysis from the Malaysian Breast Cancer Survivorship Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Hazreen Abd; Keow, Low Phei; Islam, Tania; Su, Tin Tin; Cantwell, Marie; Taib, Nur Aishah

    2017-07-27

    Lifestyle factors, such as diet, body weight, and physical activity, are linked to better survival after breast cancer (BC) diagnosis. A high percentage of the Malaysian population is overweight or obese. In addition, studies have shown a disparity in survival among Malaysian women compared with other higher-income countries. The Malaysian Breast Cancer Survivorship Cohort (MyBCC) study aims to study lifestyle factors that affect survival in BC survivors. These are the preliminary findings on the nutritional status of Malaysian BC survivors. Our aim was to evaluate the nutritional status of BC survivors at 1 year after diagnosis. This was a cross-sectional study of 194 participants from the MyBCC study, recruited within 1 year of their diagnosis. Participants completed a 3-day food diary. Malaysian women (aged 18 years and older) who were newly diagnosed with primary BC, managed at the University Malaya Medical Center, and able to converse either in Malay, English, or Mandarin were included. Dietary intake and prevalence of overweight or obesity among participants 1 year after diagnosis were measured. Student's t test and analysis of variance or its equivalent nonparametric test were used for association in continuous variables. About 66% (n=129) of participants were overweight or obese and >45% (n=86) had high body fat percentage 1 year after diagnosis. The participants' diets were low in fiber (median=8.7 g/day; interquartile range=7.2 g/day) and calcium (median=458 mg/day; interquartile range=252 mg/day). Ethnicity and educational attainment contributed to the differences in dietary intake among participants. Higher saturated fat and lower fiber intake were observed among Malay participants compared with other ethnic groups. Overweight and obesity were highly prevalent among BC survivors and suboptimal dietary intake was observed. Provision of an individualized medical nutrition therapy by a qualified dietitian is crucial as part of comprehensive BC survivorship

  4. Paper-Based Survivorship Care Plans May be Less Helpful for Cancer Patients Who Search for Disease-Related Information on the Internet: Results of the Registrationsystem Oncological Gynecology (ROGY) Care Randomized Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolaije, K.A.; Ezendam, N.P.; Pijnenborg, J.M.A.; Boll, D.; Vos, M.C.; Kruitwagen, R.F.; Poll-Franse, L.V. van de

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Institute of Medicine recommends Survivorship Care Plans (SCPs) for all cancer survivors. However, it is unclear whether certain patient groups may or may not benefit from SCPs. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to assess whether the effects of an automatically generated paper SCP on patients'

  5. Paper-based survivorship care plans may be less helpful for cancer patients who search for disease-related information on the internet : Results of the Registrationsystem Oncological Gynecology (ROGY) care randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolaije, K.A.H.; Ezendam, N.P.M.; Pijnenborg, Johanna Ma; Boll, Dorry; Vos, Maria Caroline; Kruitwagen, Roy Fpm; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Institute of Medicine recommends Survivorship Care Plans (SCPs) for all cancer survivors. However, it is unclear whether certain patient groups may or may not benefit from SCPs. Objective: The aim was to assess whether the effects of an automatically generated paper SCP on patients’

  6. Spontaneously published illness stories on a website for young women with breast cancer: Do writers and themes reflect the wider population?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overberg, R.; Man, A. de; Wolterbeek, R.; Otten, W.; Zwetsloot-Schonk, B.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined writer characteristics and themes written about in a set of 167 spontaneously published stories on a Dutch website for young women with breast cancer. The stories were coded for 6 disease characteristics and 16 themes. Coding results were compared with the characteristics of

  7. Survivorship care planning after participation in communication skills training intervention for a consultation about lymphoma survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Smita C; Matasar, Matthew J; Bylund, Carma L; Horwitz, Steven; McLarney, Kara; Levin, Tomer; Jacobsen, Paul B; Parker, Patricia; Astrow, Alan; Kissane, David W

    2015-12-01

    A survivorship care plan refers to a written summary of the treatment received and recommendations regarding surveillance and management of late effects. To provide evaluation of a communication skills training (CST) intervention to enhance the transition of lymphoma survivors to cancer survivorship. Nineteen oncologists specializing in lymphoma treatment were recruited and completed a survivorship CST workshop, and two standardized patient assessments (SPAs), one pretraining and one posttraining. Significant improvements in SPA scores were observed in six of the seven SPA assessment categories: use of survivorship care plan, review of disease and treatment details, long-term effects, potential late effects, specific physician recommendations, and additional health maintenance recommendations. The intervention had significant effects on physicians' uptake of new strategies and skills, as measured through pre- and posttraining SPAs, as well as on the physicians' self-efficacy about having these conversations.

  8. Writer`s guide for technical procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    A primary objective of operations conducted in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex is safety. Procedures are a critical element of maintaining a safety envelope to ensure safe facility operation. This DOE Writer`s Guide for Technical Procedures addresses the content, format, and style of technical procedures that prescribe production, operation of equipment and facilities, and maintenance activities. The DOE Writer`s Guide for Management Control Procedures and DOE Writer`s Guide for Emergency and Alarm Response Procedures are being developed to assist writers in developing nontechnical procedures. DOE is providing this guide to assist writers across the DOE complex in producing accurate, complete, and usable procedures that promote safe and efficient operations that comply with DOE orders, including DOE Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations for DOE Facilities, and 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors.

  9. Linking dispositional mindfulness and positive psychological processes in cancer survivorship: a multivariate path analytic test of the mindfulness-to-meaning theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Eric L; Thielking, Paul; Thomas, Elizabeth A; Coombs, Mary; White, Shelley; Lombardi, Joy; Beck, Anna

    2017-05-01

    Research indicates that dispositional mindfulness is associated with positive psychological functioning. Although this disposition has been linked with beneficial outcomes in the broader mental health literature, less is known about dispositional mindfulness in cancer survivors and how it may be linked with indices of psychological and physical health relevant to cancer survivorship. We conducted a multivariate path analysis of data from a heterogeneous sample of cancer patients (N = 97) to test the Mindfulness-to-Meaning Theory, an extended process model of emotion regulation linking dispositional mindfulness with cancer-related quality of life via positive psychological processes. We found that patients endorsing higher levels of dispositional mindfulness were more likely to pay attention to positive experiences (β = .56), a tendency which was associated with positive reappraisal of stressful life events (β = .51). Patients who engaged in more frequent positive reappraisal had a greater sense of meaning in life (β = .43) and tended to savor rewarding or life affirming events (β = .50). In turn, those who engaged in high levels of savoring had better quality of life (β = .33) and suffered less from emotional distress (β = -.54). Findings provide support for the Mindfulness-to-Meaning Theory and help explicate the processes by which mindfulness promotes psychological flourishing in the face of cancer. Cancer survivors may benefit from enhancing mindfulness, reappraisal, and savoring. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Writer identification and verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schomaker, Lambert; Ratha, N; Govindaraju, V

    2008-01-01

    Writer identification and verification have gained increased interest recently, especially in the fields of forensic document examination and biometrics. Writer identification assigns a handwriting to one writer out of a set of writers. It determines whether or not a given handwritten text has in

  11. Damocles' syndrome revisited: Update on the fear of cancer recurrence in the complex world of today's treatments and survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupit-Link, Margaret; Syrjala, Karen L; Hashmi, Shahrukh K

    2018-02-19

    Improvements in curative treatments for many types of cancer have emerged over the past several decades, resulting in a growing population of long-term cancer survivors - of both adult and childhood cancers. Despite this incredible medical achievement, long-term survivors of cancer face a unique fear: the fear of relapse. We conducted a review of the literature for data on fear of relapse among cancer survivors. The fear of cancer recurrence is present in survivors of childhood and adult cancers as well as family members and often leads to psychological sequelae. Literature on the fear of cancer recurrence has begun to emerge. However, herein we provide a unique approach through the use of a metaphor: Cicero's story of Damocles' sword. We aim to outline the many fear-related and emotional challenges faced by cancer survivors with an extensive review of studies demonstrating such challenges. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Health care access and smoking cessation among cancer survivors: implications for the Affordable Care Act and survivorship care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcu, Mehmet; Steinberger, Eileen K; Sorkin, John D

    2016-02-01

    The study objectives are to examine prevalence of current smoking, and to assess the association of both health insurance (HI) and access to care with smoking cessation among cancer survivors. We performed an analysis from a cross-sectional study of cancer survivors aged 18-64 years using nationally representative data from the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey. We assessed the prevalence of current smoking among cancer survivors. Also, in a subset excluding never smokers, we assessed cessation status of cancer survivors operationalized as comparing current to former smokers. The study population (N = 18,896) was predominantly 45-64 years of age, female, and white. The prevalence of current smoking was substantially greater among cancer survivors without HI (40.9 %) than for those with HI (19.5 %). Cancer survivors with no HI had 2-fold greater adjusted odds of not quitting cigarette smoking compared to those with HI. Among those with insurance, cancer survivors who did not have regular health care provider or could not see doctor due to cost or had their last routine checkup ≥1 year ago had 60-80 % fold greater adjusted odds of not quitting cigarette smoking compared to cancer survivors who had better access to health care. Cancer survivors without HI have substantially greater current smoking rates compared with those with HI. Among cancer survivors with HI, those who experienced health care access-related problems had lower cessation rates than their counterparts. Smoking cessation needs to be recognized as a crucial component of preventive care for cancer survivors. Continuous patient engagement and cancer-patient-centered strategies are urgently needed to achieve optimal results for quit rates particularly for young cancer survivors who are most susceptible to current smoking.

  13. Survivorship: Sleep Disorders, Version 1.2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; Moslehi, Javid J.; O’Connor, Tracey; Overholser, Linda; Paskett, Electra D.; Raza, Muhammad; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disorders, including insomnia and excessive sleepiness, affect a significant proportion of patients with cancer and survivors, often in combination with fatigue, anxiety, and depression. Improvements in sleep lead to improvements in fatigue, mood, and quality of life. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides screening, diagnosis, and management recommendations for sleep disorders in survivors. Management includes combinations of sleep hygiene education, physical activity, psychosocial interventions, and pharmacologic treatments. PMID:24812132

  14. Complementary therapy support in cancer survivorship: a survey of complementary and alternative medicine practitioners' provision and perception of skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, C A; Faithfull, S

    2014-03-01

    This study reviewed the confidence and perceived skills of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners in providing care and symptom management for clients post cancer. An e-survey was mailed to approximately 21, 000 CAM practitioners, targeted at those working with clients who were experiencing consequences of cancer and its treatments. Questions were asked about the main symptoms and concerns of clients, the confidence and current skill levels of practitioners and additional training requirements. Six hundred and twelve practitioners responded to the survey, 507 of whom were working with individuals experiencing the consequences of cancer and its treatments. Forty-five per cent (n = 134) had undertaken training in cancer prior to working with cancer patients, 61% (n = 182) had undertaken courses or study days relative to cancer care in the past two years. The most often treated symptoms or concerns of patients were those of a psychosocial nature, pain management and lymphoedema. CAM practitioners with limited knowledge and training are providing support to cancer survivors, particularly in services where the National Health Service has limited provision. CAM practitioners may fulfil a future role in providing long-term support for cancer survivors; however, in order to properly safeguard patients they are in need of further training and development. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Survivorship: Fatigue, Version 1.2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; Moslehi, Javid J.; O’Connor, Tracey; Overholser, Linda; Paskett, Electra D.; Raza, Muhammad; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G.; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer survivors report that fatigue is a disruptive symptom even after treatment ends. Persistent cancer-related fatigue affects quality of life, because individuals become too tired to fully participate in the roles and activities that make life meaningful. Identification and management of fatigue remains an unmet need for many cancer survivors. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides screening, evaluation, and management recommendations for fatigue in survivors. Management includes education and counseling, physical activity, psychosocial interventions, and pharmacologic treatments. PMID:24925198

  16. The Integration of Emotional, Immunological and Communication Responses to Medical Oncology Surveillance Appointments During Breast Cancer Survivorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingley, Catherine; Donaldson, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Background Breast cancer survivors regularly interact with providers during routine surveillance medical oncology visits, discussing uncertainty / anxiety about cancer recurrence many years post-treatment. Because breast cancer onset frequently occurs in older women, survivors may have additional age-related illnesses and symptoms yet be uncertain about whether the cause of their symptoms is normal aging, another illness, or breast cancer recurrence. Physiologic responses such as immune alterations may predispose women to exacerbations of these illnesses. The survivor-provider relationship is also influential give the long standing nature of ongoing breast cancer surveillance post active treatment completion. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate relationships between emotional distress (uncertainty, anxiety, fear of recurrence), immunity (cytokine levels, lymphocyte counts), and communication events (women’s plans for their visit, the ability to negotiate decision-making roles) immediately before and 24 hours after a regularly scheduled medical oncology surveillance visit. Methods We evaluated relationships between emotional distress (uncertainty, anxiety, fear of recurrence), immunity (cytokine levels, lymphocyte counts), women’s plans for their visit, and their ability negotiate decision-making roles, before and after a medical oncology visit. Results Emotional responses (uncertainty, anxiety, fear of cancer recurrence) to an upcoming medical oncology were associated with change in immune status pre-post visit. Post-visit NK cells increased in 70% of women, and uncertainty/anxiety decreased. Most women had a plan for their oncology visit and 66% successfully negotiated decision-making roles with providers although these factors did not predict emotional or immune outcomes, perhaps due to longstanding relationships previously established with their medical oncology provider. Conclusions breast cancer survivors in this study, as in others, report

  17. Healing stories: narrative characteristics in cancer survivorship narratives and psychological health among hematopoietic stem cell transplant survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benish-Weisman, Maya; Wu, Lisa M; Weinberger-Litman, Sarah L; Redd, William H; Duhamel, Katherine N; Rini, Christine

    2014-08-01

    Survivors of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) have experienced a life threatening and potentially traumatic illness and treatment that make them vulnerable to long lasting negative psychological outcomes, including anxiety and depression. Nevertheless, studies show that overcoming cancer and its treatment can present an opportunity for personal growth and psychological health (reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression and high levels of emotional well-being) through resilience. However, research has not yet clarified what differentiates HSCT survivors who experience psychological growth from those who do not. By analyzing recovery narratives, we examined whether HSCT survivors' interpretation of their experiences helps explain differences in their post-treatment psychological health. Guided by narrative psychology theory, we analyzed the narratives of 23 HSCT survivors writing about their experience of cancer treatment. Psychological health was measured by: (1) emotional well-being subscale part of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Bone Marrow Transplant (FACT-BMT), (2) depression, and (3) anxiety subscales of the Brief Symptom Inventory. Findings revealed a positive relation between psychological health and a greater number of redemption episodes (going from an emotionally negative life event to an emotionally positive one) as well as fewer negative emotional expressions. SIGNIFICANCE OF THE RESULTS: Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed, showing how narratives can inform interventions to assist cancer survivors with their psychological recovery.

  18. The Integration of Emotional, Physiologic, and Communication Responses to Medical Oncology Surveillance Appointments During Breast Cancer Survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Margaret F; Dingley, Catherine; Donaldson, Gary

    Breast cancer survivors regularly interact with providers during routine surveillance medical oncology visits, discussing uncertainty and anxiety about potential cancer recurrence for many years after treatment. Physiologic alteration can also occur as a stress response, triggered by an upcoming surveillance visit. Survivor-provider communication can theoretically allay emotional distress. The aim of this study was to evaluate associations between emotional (uncertainty, anxiety, concerns about recurrence) and physiologic responses (cytokine levels, lymphocyte counts), and survivor-provider communication (women's plans for their visit, negotiation of decision-making roles). Twenty-seven community-dwelling breast cancer survivors participated. Blood specimens, and self-reported data focusing on the previous month, were collected immediately before and the morning after a regularly scheduled medical oncology visit. Global concerns about cancer recurrence and acute anxiety and uncertainty were associated with changes in immune status before and after the visit. Postvisit natural killer cells increased in 70% of women, and uncertainty/anxiety decreased. Thirty-three percent of women reported a previous minor illness. Most women had a visit plan; 66% successfully negotiated decision-making roles with providers. Triggered by an upcoming medical oncology visit, women experience uncertainty, anxiety, and altered immunity, potentially placing them at risk of disease exacerbations. Not all women respond similarly to a routine surveillance visit; thus, providers must determine who may be at increased risk of emotional distress and physiologic alteration. Survivor-provider communication facilitates immediate resolution of concerns. Explanations of symptom meaning reduce anxiety and uncertainty and by extension may help resolve immune alteration. Between visits, this could be done by nurse-operated telephone-based "help lines."

  19. Survivorship: Healthy Lifestyles, Version 2.2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dizon, Don; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; Moslehi, Javid J.; O’Connor, Tracey; Overholser, Linda; Paskett, Electra D.; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Raza, Muhammad; Rodriguez, M. Alma; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G.; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole R.; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Healthy lifestyle habits have been associated with improved health outcomes and quality of life and, for some cancers, a reduced risk of recurrence and death. The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship therefore recommend that cancer survivors be encouraged to achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle, with attention to weight management, physical activity, and dietary habits. This section of the NCCN Guidelines focuses on recommendations regarding physical activity in survivors, including assessment for the risk of exercise-induced adverse events, exercise prescriptions, guidance for resistance training, and considerations for specific populations (eg, survivors with lymphedema, ostomies, peripheral neuropathy). In addition, strategies to encourage health behavioral change in survivors are discussed. PMID:25190692

  20. Survivorship: Cognitive Function, Version 1.2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; Moslehi, Javid J.; O’Connor, Tracey; Overholser, Linda; Paskett, Electra D.; Raza, Muhammad; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G.; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole R.; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common complaint among cancer survivors and may be a consequence of the tumors themselves or direct effects of cancer-related treatment (eg, chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, radiation). For some survivors, symptoms persist over the long term and, when more severe, can impact quality of life and function. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides assessment, evaluation, and management recommendations for cognitive dysfunction in survivors. Nonpharmacologic interventions (eg, instruction in coping strategies; management of distress, pain, sleep disturbances, and fatigue; occupational therapy) are recommended, with pharmacologic interventions as a last line of therapy in survivors for whom other interventions have been insufficient. PMID:24994918

  1. Oncology providers' evaluation of the use of an automatically generated cancer survivorship care plan: longitudinal results from the ROGY Care trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaije, Kim A H; Ezendam, Nicole P M; Vos, M Caroline; Pijnenborg, Johanna M A; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V; Kruitwagen, Roy F P M

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have merely investigated oncology providers' a priori attitudes toward SCPs. The purpose of the current study was to longitudinally evaluate oncology providers' expectations and actual experiences with the use of an automatically generated Survivorship Care Plan (SCP) in daily clinical practice. Between April 2011 and October 2012, the participating oncology providers (i.e., gynecologists, gynecologic oncologists, oncology nurses) provided usual care or SCP care to 222 endometrial and 85 ovarian cancer patients included in the Registrationsystem Oncological GYnecology (ROGY) Care trial. All (n = 43) oncology providers in both arms were requested to complete a questionnaire before and after patient inclusion regarding their expectations and evaluation of SCP care. Before patient inclusion, 38 (88%; 21 SCP, 17 usual care), and after patient inclusion, 35 (83%; 20 SCP, 15 usual care) oncology providers returned the questionnaire. After patient inclusion, oncology providers were generally satisfied with the SCP (M = 7.1, SD = 1.3, with 1 = not at all-10 = very much) and motivated to keep using the SCP (M = 7.9, SD = 1.5). Most providers (64%) encountered barriers. Twenty-five percent felt they used more time for consultations (M = 7.3 min, SD = 4.6). However, self-reported consultation time did not differ between before (M = 21.8 min, SD = 11.6) and after patient inclusion (M = 18.7, SD = 10.6; p = 0.22) or between SCP care (M = 18.5, SD = 10.3) and usual care (M = 22.0, SD = 12.2; p = 0.21). Oncology providers using the SCP were generally satisfied and motivated to keep using the SCP. However, the findings of the current study suggest that even when the SCP can be generated automatically, oncology providers still have difficulties with finding the time to discuss the SCP with their patients. If SCP care is indeed effective, overcoming the perceived barriers is needed before

  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers Survivorship ... Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers ...

  3. Practice patterns and perceptions of survivorship care in Canadian genitourinary oncology: A multidisciplinary perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almatar, Ashraf; Richter, Suzanne; Lalani, Nafisha; Bender, Jackie L.; Wiljer, David; Alkazaz, Nour; Legere, Laura; Maganti, Manjula; Sridhar, Srikala S.; Catton, Pamela P.; Jewett, Michael A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: There is little knowledge of survivorship care specific to genitourinary (GU) cancers. To improve care delivery to this patient population, we need to clearly define physician perceptions of survivorship care. We therefore conducted a study to determine the challenges to GU cancer survivorship care in Canada. Methods: A web-based questionnaire was e-mailed to physicians treating GU cancers in Canada, including urologists, radiation oncologists, and medical oncologists. Five domains were assessed: demography, current post-cancer treatment care, perspectives on barriers to survivorship care, accessibility to survivorship resources, and perspectives about advocacy groups. Results: There were 306 responses, with 260 eligible for study. A total of 82% of physicians involve primary care practitioners (PCPs) at some point in survivorship care. Most physicians provide some form of written follow-up plan to PCPs. However, only 25% provided lifestyle recommendations and 53% included persistent and late effects of therapy. Lack of time or resources dedicated to survivorship care was the most commonly reported barrier. There was variation in accessibility to survivorship support programs among different subspecialties and regions. Advocacy groups generally were underutilized, particularly in testis cancer. Low response rate and the potential response bias are the main limitations of this survey. Conclusion: To our knowledge this is the first study to address the challenges of GU cancer survivorship care in Canada. The barriers and accessibility of survivorship care quoted in this survey may be used to improve care for this group of patients. Underutilization of advocacy groups may stimulate the advocacy groups and institutions to address its causes and solutions. PMID:25553154

  4. Writers at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSalvo, Louise A.

    1979-01-01

    Argues that educators need to demystify the writing process so that students can approach the world of literature realistically. Suggests that exposure to how writers work and to the kinds of situations from which they draw inspiration can provide insights into what is required of a would-be writer. (FL)

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers Survivorship Questions to Ask About Cancer ... Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers Questions to Ask About Cancer Advanced ...

  6. Long-term impact of endometrial cancer diagnosis and treatment on health-related quality of life and cancer survivorship : Results from the randomized PORTEC-2 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Stephanie M.; Nout, Remi A.; Jurgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Jobsen, Jan J.; Lutgens, Ludy C. H. W.; van der Steen-Banasik, Elzbieta M.; Mens, Jan Willem M.; Slot, Annerie; Kroese, Marika C. Stenfert; Oerlemans, Simone; Putter, Hein; Verhoeven-Adema, Karen W.; Nijman, Hans W.; Creutzberg, Carien L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the long-term health-related quality of life (HRQL) after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) among PORTEC-2 trial patients, evaluate long-term bowel and bladder symptoms, and assess the impact of cancer on these endometrial cancer (EC)

  7. Long-Term Impact of Endometrial Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment on Health-Related Quality of Life and Cancer Survivorship : Results From the Randomized PORTEC-2 Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Stephanie M.; Nout, Remi A.; Jurgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Jobsen, Jan J.; Lutgens, Ludy C. H. W.; van der Steen-Banasik, Elzbieta M.; Mens, Jan Willem M.; Slot, Annerie; Kroese, Marika C. Stenfert; Oerlemans, Simone; Putter, Hein; Verhoeven-Adema, Karen W.; Nijman, Hans W.; Creutzberg, Carien L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term health-related quality of life (HRQL) after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) among PORTEC-2 trial patients, evaluate long-term bowel and bladder symptoms, and assess the impact of cancer on these endometrial cancer (EC)

  8. Survey of Policies and Guidelines on Antioxidant Use for Cancer Prevention, Treatment, and Survivorship in North American Cancer Centers: What Do Institutions Perceive as Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Gyeongyeon; White, Jennifer; Zhong, Lihong; Carlson, Linda E

    2015-07-01

    Health care policies and guidelines that are clear and consistent with research evidence are important for maximizing clinical outcomes. To determine whether cancer centers in Canada and the United States had policies and/or guidelines about antioxidant use, and whether policies were aligned with the evidence base, we reviewed current research evidence in the field, and we undertook a survey of the policies and guidelines on antioxidant use at cancer institutions across North America. A survey of policies and guidelines on antioxidant use and the development and communication of the policies and guidelines was conducted by contacting cancer institutions in North America. We also conducted a Website search for each institution to explore any online resources. Policies and guidelines on antioxidant use were collected from 78 cancer institutions. Few cancer institutions had policies (5%) but most provided guidelines (69%). Antioxidants from diet were generally encouraged at cancer institutions, consistent with the current research evidence. In contrast, specific antioxidant supplements were generally not recommended at cancer institutions. Policies and guidelines were developed using evidence-based methods (53%), by consulting another source (35%), or through discussions/conference (26%), and communicated mainly through online resources (65%) or written handouts (42%). For cancer institutions that had no policy or guideline on antioxidants, lack of information and lack of time were the most frequently cited reasons. Policies and guidelines on antioxidants from diet were largely consistent with the research evidence. Policies and guidelines on antioxidant supplements during treatment were generally more restrictive than the research evidence might suggest, perhaps due to the specificity of results and the inability to generalize findings across antioxidants, adding to the complexity of their optimal and safe use. Improved communication of comprehensive research

  9. Survivorship Care for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will see specialists (in cardiology , endocrinology , fertility , nutrition , psychology , and/or pulmonology , for example) who will monitor ... and how it was treated, as well as personal factors, such as: Cancer-related factors such as ...

  10. Oncology nurses' knowledge of survivorship care planning: the need for education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Joanne L; Wessels, Andrew L; Jung, Yoonsuh

    2014-03-01

    To survey nurses about their knowledge of cancer survivorship care. Descriptive, cross-sectional. Midwestern comprehensive cancer center. 223 registered and advanced practice nurses. Online survey of survivorship knowledge using a 50-item questionnaire derived from the Institute of Medicine report and related publications. Concepts of survivorship care and common long-term symptoms. Most nurses reported having knowledge about healthy lifestyle habits; more than 50% of nurses reported having knowledge about chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation therapy, as well as side effects of fatigue, depression, limitations of daily activities, and weight gain; less than 50% of nurses reported having knowledge of impact on family, biologic agents, lymphedema, immunizations or vaccinations, and osteoporosis screening; less than 40% of nurses reported having knowledge about marital and partner relationships, osteoporosis prevention and care, sexuality, side effects of bone marrow transplantation, employment issues, and angiogenesis agents; and less than 25% of nurses reported having knowledge on genetic risks, as well as fertility, financial, and insurance issues. Oncology nurses at an academic comprehensive cancer center reported gaps in knowledge consistent with previous studies about knowledge of survivorship care. The Institute of Medicine has challenged oncology providers to address cancer survivorship care planning. Gaps in cancer survivorship knowledge are evident and will require focused education for this initiative to be successful.

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers Survivorship Questions to Ask About ... to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers Questions to Ask About ...

  12. Towards explainable writer verification and identification using vantage writers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, Axel; Schomaker, Lambert; Bulacu, Marius; Werner, B

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a new method for off-line writer verification and identification is proposed which encodes writer features as a mix of typical handwriting styles, written by so-called vantage writers. Since their handwriting can be shown to the user the method provides a degree of transparency that is

  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers ...

  14. Survivorship: Immunizations and Prevention of Infections, Version 2.2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dizon, Don; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; Moslehi, Javid J.; O’Connor, Tracey; Overholser, Linda; Paskett, Electra D.; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Raza, Muhammad; Rodriguez, M. Alma; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G.; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole R.; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer survivors are at an elevated risk for infection because of immune suppression associated with prior cancer treatments, and they are at increased risk of complications from vaccine-preventable diseases. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides recommendations for the prevention of infections in survivors through education, antimicrobial prophylaxis, and the judicious use of vaccines. These guidelines provide information about travel and gardening precautions and safe pet care/avoidance of zoonosis, and include detailed recommendations regarding vaccinations that should be considered and encouraged in cancer and transplant survivors. PMID:25099442

  15. Survivorship programs and care plans in practice: variations on a theme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Erin E; Ganz, Patricia A

    2011-03-01

    THIS QUALITATIVE STUDY EXAMINED CANCER SURVIVORSHIP PROGRAMS AT FOUR HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATIONS IN LOS ANGELES COUNTY, CA: an academic medical center, a community hospital, a primary-care medical group, and a county hospital. The purpose was to describe the successful implementation of four distinctly different models of care, focusing on the creative development and use of the Institute of Medicine-recommended survivorship care plan (SCP) document in each setting. In-depth semistructured interviews were done with survivorship teams to characterize each program and the development and use of the SCP at each institution. Each survivorship program has developed and implemented unique types of SCP documents. Specifically, a comprehensive SCP at the academic center, completed by the clinical team, which covers many facets of cancer survivorship; a patient-directed SCP at the community hospital, completed by the survivor with assistance of an oncology nurse and focused on treatment history and appropriate surveillance; an adapted ASCO SCP template at the primary-care medical group, completed via a partnership with contracted oncologists and focused on the treatment history, surveillance, and shared care between oncology and primary care; an adapted ASCO SCP template at the county hospital, completed by the survivorship nurse practitioner and focused on patient education, post-treatment care, and institutional care coordination. The SCP document is a flexible tool that can be successfully adapted for use in extremely varied settings, from primary care to hospitals, to inform and educate patients and providers alike.

  16. Survivorship: Nutrition and Weight Management, Version 2.2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dizon, Don; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; Moslehi, Javid J.; O’Connor, Tracey; Overholser, Linda; Paskett, Electra D.; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Raza, Muhammad; Rodriguez, M. Alma; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G.; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole R.; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Healthy lifestyle habits have been associated with improved health outcomes and quality of life and, for some cancers, a reduced risk of recurrence and death. The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship therefore recommend that cancer survivors be encouraged to achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle, including attention to weight management, physical activity, and dietary habits. This section of the NCCN Guidelines focuses on recommendations regarding nutrition, weight management, and supplement use in survivors. Weight management recommendations are based on the survivor’s body mass index and include discussions of nutritional, weight management, and physical activity principles, with referral to community resources, dietitians, and/or weight management programs as needed. PMID:25313179

  17. Manual braille writer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Lawrence S.; Turner, Joe H.

    1992-01-01

    A manual-type braille writer that provides for both writing and reading in a normal left-to-right manner. In the preferred form, this braille writer has a clip board type base, and in the preferred embodiment a guide plate assembly can be moved to, and releasable fixed at, selected vertical locations along this base. The guide plate assembly is provided with a plurality of character cells uniformly spaced along rows across the guide plate assembly as well as in uniformly spaced rows. This guide plate assembly has a lower portion to be placed under a sheet of paper positioned on the clip board base and an upper portion to be positioned on top of the sheet. This upper portion is hinged with respect to the lower portion. Each character cell is typically made up of six appropriately spaced pins extending up from the lower portion that are aligned with a rosette-shaped cutout in the upper portion. A stylus member is provided that has a distal end to be fitted into the cutout of the character cell so that a recess in the end thereof presses the writing paper over the pin associated with that recess to produce a braille dot at that location. When desired, the upper portion can be lifted up so that the text already written can be read or to determine the place for initiating writing when writing has been interrupted.

  18. Improving anxiety regulation in patients with breast cancer at the beginning of the survivorship period: a randomized clinical trial comparing the benefits of single-component and multiple-component group interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merckaert, Isabelle; Lewis, Florence; Delevallez, France; Herman, Sophie; Caillier, Marie; Delvaux, Nicole; Libert, Yves; Liénard, Aurore; Nogaret, Jean-Marie; Ogez, David; Scalliet, Pierre; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Van Houtte, Paul; Razavi, Darius

    2017-08-01

    To compare in a multicenter randomized controlled trial the benefits in terms of anxiety regulation of a 15-session single-component group intervention (SGI) based on support with those of a 15-session multiple-component structured manualized group intervention (MGI) combining support with cognitive-behavioral and hypnosis components. Patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer were randomly assigned at the beginning of the survivorship period to the SGI (n = 83) or MGI (n = 87). Anxiety regulation was assessed, before and after group interventions, through an anxiety regulation task designed to assess their ability to regulate anxiety psychologically (anxiety levels) and physiologically (heart rates). Questionnaires were used to assess psychological distress, everyday anxiety regulation, and fear of recurrence. Group allocation was computer generated and concealed till baseline completion. Compared with patients in the SGI group (n = 77), patients attending the MGI group (n = 82) showed significantly reduced anxiety after a self-relaxation exercise (P = .006) and after exposure to anxiety triggers (P = .013) and reduced heart rates at different time points throughout the task (P = .001 to P = .047). The MGI participants also reported better everyday anxiety regulation (P = .005), greater use of fear of recurrence-related coping strategies (P = .022), and greater reduction in fear of recurrence-related psychological distress (P = .017) compared with the SGI group. This study shows that an MGI combining support with cognitive-behavioral techniques and hypnosis is more effective than an SGI based only on support in improving anxiety regulation in patients with breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Writer\\'s stance in disciplinary discourses: A developmental view ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article describes a training activity in the Writing Centre at the University of Cape Town which led the authors to evaluate the concept of writer\\'s stance as used in corpus studies against the way it is used by academic literacy practitioners working in developmental fields.Corpus analysts tend to construct a general and ...

  20. Why writers make lousy lovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, J

    2000-01-01

    SUMMARY Jess Wells takes a light-hearted look at the pit-falls of being in love with a writer, describing the difficulties with time and reality. Wells then encourages lesbian authors to develop diversity among their art forms,Income and inspiration sources. She wraps up with a call for lesbian writers to cultivate discipline and gratitude.

  1. Development and utilization of complementary communication channels for treatment decision making and survivorship issues among cancer patients: The CIS Research Consortium Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, Linda; Wen, Kuang Yi; Miller, Suzanne M; Diefenbach, Michael; Stanton, Annette L; Ropka, Mary; Morra, Marion; Raich, Peter C

    2015-11-01

    Cancer patients and survivors are assuming active roles in decision-making and digital patient support tools are widely used to facilitate patient engagement. As part of Cancer Information Service Research Consortium's randomized controlled trials focused on the efficacy of eHealth interventions to promote informed treatment decision-making for newly diagnosed prostate and breast cancer patients, and post-treatment breast cancer, we conducted a rigorous process evaluation to examine the actual use of and perceived benefits of two complementary communication channels -- print and eHealth interventions. The three Virtual Cancer Information Service (V-CIS) interventions were developed through a rigorous developmental process, guided by self-regulatory theory, informed decision-making frameworks, and health communications best practices. Control arm participants received NCI print materials; experimental arm participants received the additional V-CIS patient support tool. Actual usage data from the web-based V-CIS was also obtained and reported. Print materials were highly used by all groups. About 60% of the experimental group reported using the V-CIS. Those who did use the V-CIS rated it highly on improvements in knowledge, patient-provider communication and decision-making. The findings show that how patients actually use eHealth interventions either singularly or within the context of other communication channels is complex. Integrating rigorous best practices and theoretical foundations is essential and multiple communication approaches should be considered to support patient preferences.

  2. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship : highlights from the third European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, J.; Albers, P.; Altena, R.; Aparicio, J.; Bokemeyer, C.; Busch, J.; Cathomas, R.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Clarke, N. W.; Classen, J.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Dahl, A. A.; Daugaard, G.; De Giorgi, U.; De Santis, M.; De Wit, M.; De Wit, R.; Dieckmann, K. P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S. D.; Germa Lluch, J. R.; Gietema, J. A.; Gillessen, S.; Giwercman, A.; Hartmann, J.T.; Heidenreich, A.; Hentrich, M.; Honecker, F.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R. A.; Kliesch, S.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Krege, S.; Laguna, M. P.; Looijenga, L. H. J.; Lorch, A.; Lotz, J. P.; Mayer, F.; Necchi, A.; Nicolai, N.; Nuver, J.; Oechsle, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Oosterhuis, J.W.; Powles, T.; Rajpert-De Meyts, E.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Schrader, M.; Schweyer, S.; Sedlmayer, F.; Sohaib, A.; Souchon, R.; Tandstad, T.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.

    In November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et al. European

  3. Randomized controlled trial of aerobic exercise on insulin and insulin-like growth factors in breast cancer survivors: the Yale Exercise and Survivorship study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Melinda L; Varma, Katie; Alvarez-Reeves, Marty; Cadmus, Lisa; Wiley, Andrew; Chung, Gina G; Dipietro, Loretta; Mayne, Susan T; Yu, Herbert

    2009-01-01

    High insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels may be associated with an increased breast cancer risk and/or death. Given the need to identify modifiable factors that decrease insulin, IGF-I, and breast cancer risk and death, we investigated the effects of a 6-month randomized controlled aerobic exercise intervention versus usual care on fasting insulin, IGF-I, and its binding protein (IGFBP-3) in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. Seventy-five postmenopausal breast cancer survivors were identified from the Yale-New Haven Hospital Tumor Registry and randomly assigned to an exercise (n = 37) or usual care (n = 38) group. The exercise group participated in 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. The usual care group was instructed to maintain their current physical activity level. A fasting blood sample was collected on each study participant at baseline and 6 months. Blood levels of insulin and IGF were measured with ELISA. On average, exercisers increased aerobic exercise by 129 minutes per week compared with 45 minutes per week among usual care participants (P exercise experienced decreases in insulin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-3, whereas women randomized to usual care had increases in these hormones. Between-group differences in insulin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-3 were 20.7% (P = 0.089), 8.9% (P = 0.026), and 7.9% (P = 0.006), respectively. Moderate-intensity aerobic exercise, such as brisk walking, decreases IGF-I and IGFBP-3. The exercise-induced decreases in IGF may mediate the observed association between higher levels of physical activity and improved survival in women diagnosed with breast cancer.

  4. Supervivencia al cáncer de mama: Una historia personal (Breast Cancer Survivorship—A Personal Story)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-10-18

    Pam Bryant, una sobreviviente de cáncer de mama, habla sobre su viaje personal y cómo impactó su vida el recibir un diagnóstico de cáncer de mama antes de los 45 años. .  Created: 10/18/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 10/18/2016.

  5. Survivorship: Fatigue, Version 1.2014: Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.; Melisko, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Many cancer survivors report that fatigue is a disruptive symptom even after treatment ends. Persistent cancer-related fatigue affects quality of life, because individuals become too tired to fully participate in the roles and activities that make life meaningful. Identification and management of fatigue remains an unmet need for many cancer survivors. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides screening, evaluation, and management recommendations for fatigue in survivors. ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers ... Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for ...

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with Cancer Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for ... Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support ...

  8. Paper-Based Survivorship Care Plans May be Less Helpful for Cancer Patients Who Search for Disease-Related Information on the Internet: Results of the Registrationsystem Oncological Gynecology (ROGY) Care Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaije, Kim Ah; Ezendam, Nicole Pm; Pijnenborg, Johanna Ma; Boll, Dorry; Vos, Maria Caroline; Kruitwagen, Roy Fpm; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V

    2016-07-08

    The Institute of Medicine recommends Survivorship Care Plans (SCPs) for all cancer survivors. However, it is unclear whether certain patient groups may or may not benefit from SCPs. The aim was to assess whether the effects of an automatically generated paper SCP on patients' satisfaction with information provision and care, illness perceptions, and health care utilization were moderated by disease-related Internet use. Twelve hospitals were randomized to either SCP care or usual care in the pragmatic cluster randomized Registrationsystem Oncological GYnecology (ROGY) Care trial. Newly diagnosed endometrial cancer patients completed questionnaires after diagnosis (N=221; response: 74.7%, 221/296), 6 months (n=158), and 12 months (n=147), including patients' satisfaction with information provision and care, illness perceptions, health care utilization (how many times patients visited a medical specialist or primary care physician about their cancer in the past 6 months), and disease-related Internet use (whether patients used the Internet to look for information about cancer). In total, 80 of 221 (36.2%) patients used the Internet to obtain disease-related information. Disease-related Internet use moderated the SCP care effect on the amount of information received about the disease (P=.03) and medical tests (P=.01), helpfulness of the information (P=.01), and how well patients understood their illness (P=.04). All stratified analyses were not statistically significant. However, it appeared that patients who did not seek disease-related information on the Internet in the SCP care arm reported receiving more information about their disease (mean 63.9, SD 20.1 vs mean 58.3, SD 23.7) and medical tests (mean 70.6, SD 23.5 vs mean 64.7, SD 24.9), finding the information more helpful (76.7, SD 22.9 vs mean 67.8, SD 27.2; scale 0-100), and understanding their illness better (mean 6.6, SD 3.0 vs mean 6.1, SD 3.2; scale 1-10) than patients in the usual care arm did. In

  9. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Survivorship in Radiation Oncology: Overcoming the Cons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Arthur K.; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Movsas, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although patient-reported outcomes (PROs) have become a key component of clinical oncology trials, many challenges exist regarding their optimal application. The goal of this article is to methodically review these barriers and suggest strategies to overcome them. This review will primarily focus on radiation oncology examples, will address issues regarding the “why, how, and what” of PROs, and will provide strategies for difficult problems such as methods for reducing missing data. This review will also address cancer survivorship because it closely relates to PROs. Methods Key articles focusing on PROs, quality of life, and survivorship issues in oncology trials are highlighted, with an emphasis on radiation oncology clinical trials. Publications and Web sites of various governmental and regulatory agencies are also reviewed. Results The study of PROs in clinical oncology trials has become well established. There are guidelines provided by organizations such as the US Food and Drug Administration that clearly indicate the importance of and methodology for studying PROs. Clinical trials in oncology have repeatedly demonstrated the value of studying PROs and suggested ways to overcome some of the key challenges. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) has led some of these efforts, and their contributions are highlighted. The current state of cancer survivorship guidelines is also discussed. Conclusion The study of PROs presents significant benefits in understanding and treating toxicities and enhancing quality of life; however, challenges remain. Strategies are presented to overcome these hurdles, which will ultimately improve cancer survivorship. PMID:25113760

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers Survivorship Questions to Ask ... Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers Questions ...

  11. Survivorship: Immunizations and Prevention of Infections, Version 2.2014: Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dizon, Don; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer survivors are at an elevated risk for infection because of immune suppression associated with prior cancer treatments, and they are at increased risk of complications from vaccine-preventable diseases. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides recommendations for the prevention of infections in survivors through education, antimicrobial prophylaxis, and the judicious use of vaccines. These guidelines provide information about travel and gardening precautions and saf...

  12. Survivorship: Cognitive Function, Version 1.2014: Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.; Melisko, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common complaint among cancer survivors and may be a consequence of the tumors themselves or direct effects of cancer-related treatment (eg, chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, radiation). For some survivors, symptoms persist over the long term and, when more severe, can impact quality of life and function. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides assessment, evaluation, and management recommendations for cognitive dysfunction in survivors. Nonpharm...

  13. Survivorship: Nutrition and Weight Management, Version 2.2014: Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dizon, Don; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.

    2014-01-01

    Healthy lifestyle habits have been associated with improved health outcomes and quality of life and, for some cancers, a reduced risk of recurrence and death. The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship therefore recommend that cancer survivors be encouraged to achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle, including attention to weight management, physical activity, and dietary habits. This section of the NCCN Guidelines focuses on recommendations regarding nutrition, weight management, and supplement u...

  14. Survivorship: Healthy Lifestyles, Version 2.2014: Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dizon, Don; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.

    2014-01-01

    Healthy lifestyle habits have been associated with improved health outcomes and quality of life and, for some cancers, a reduced risk of recurrence and death. The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship therefore recommend that cancer survivors be encouraged to achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle, with attention to weight management, physical activity, and dietary habits. This section of the NCCN Guidelines focuses on recommendations regarding physical activity in survivors, including assessmen...

  15. Reading and esl writers Reading and esl writers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Edlund

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Whether the student population consists of basic writers, non-native speakers, or well-prepared freshmen and whether the primary goal of the class is improvement in writing ability, language and vocabulary acquisition, or critical thinking skills, there is considerable evidence that substantial amounts of reading arc an essential component of the course (See Krashen Writing: Research, Theory and Applications for a summary. This is especially true in the ESL composition class, where language acquisition is still a major factor in the student's success as a writer. Whether the student population consists of basic writers, non-native speakers, or well-prepared freshmen and whether the primary goal of the class is improvement in writing ability, language and vocabulary acquisition, or critical thinking skills, there is considerable evidence that substantial amounts of reading arc an essential component of the course (See Krashen Writing: Research, Theory and Applications for a summary. This is especially true in the ESL composition class, where language acquisition is still a major factor in the student's success as a writer.

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers Questions to Ask About Cancer Advanced Cancer Choices For Care Talking About Advanced Cancer Coping With ...

  17. Basic Cancer Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Considerations How Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young Adults For Older Adults Prevention and Healthy Living Cancer.Net Videos Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog ...

  18. The freelance nurse writer role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, B

    1999-01-01

    Freelance nurse writers are skilled in facilitating a dialogue and writing from the perspective of the group. This article, written by an experienced freelance author, describes efficient methods to incorporate information gleaned from group interviews. The author provides tips on what type of projects to look for, how to develop the role, and even how to charge.

  19. Anmeldelse: The Writer's Handbooks 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2008-01-01

    Anmeldelse af: Barry Turner (red.) (2008) The Writer’s Handbook 2009. The complete guide for all writers, publishers, editors, agents, and broadcasts. New York: MacMillan Barry Turner (red.) (2008) The Screenwriter’s Handbook 2009. The essential companion for screenwriters. New York: MacMillan...

  20. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beyer, Jürgen; Albers, Peter Hjorth; Altena, R

    2013-01-01

    consensus on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG). Ann Oncol 2004; 15: 1377-1399; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting...... of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 478-496; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part II. Eur...... Urol 2008; 53: 497-513]. A panel of 56 of 60 invited GCC experts from all across Europe discussed all aspects on diagnosis and treatment of GCC, with a particular focus on acute and late toxic effects as well as on survivorship issues.The panel consisted of oncologists, urologic surgeons...

  1. South Asian American Writers: Geography and Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrak, Ketu H.

    1996-01-01

    Explores post-1965 South Asian American writers writing in English and the role of geography and memory and how political and societal factors of the "capitalist new world order" continue to determine the physical and metaphorical location of postcolonial writers in the diaspora. It examines South Asian American writers' compelling evocations of…

  2. [Medical writers in medical research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Danielsen, Anne Kjærgaard; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2013-08-19

    Larger research units often comprise persons of several professions in order to secure a high level of efficiency and quality in the different tasks. In Denmark, employees with special competencies within the field of writing and publication are rarely used in research units. The purpose of this study was to present the advantages and challenges associated with the involvement of medical writers in academic environments.

  3. Medical writers i medicinsk forskning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Danielsen, Anne Kjærgaard

    2013-01-01

    Larger research units often comprise persons of several professions in order to secure a high level of efficiency and quality in the different tasks. In Denmark, employees with special competencies within the field of writing and publication are rarely used in research units. The purpose of this ...... of this study was to present the advantages and challenges associated with the involvement of medical writers in academic environments....

  4. Survivorship: Sleep Disorders, Version 1.2014: Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.; Melisko, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disorders, including insomnia and excessive sleepiness, affect a significant proportion of patients with cancer and survivors, often in combination with fatigue, anxiety, and depression. Improvements in sleep lead to improvements in fatigue, mood, and quality of life. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides screening, diagnosis, and management recommendations for sleep disorders in survivors. Management includes combinations of sleep hygiene education, physical act...

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers ...

  6. Surviving Cancer, Eating Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer survivors are taught about healthy eating and weight management. For people who want to learn more about cancer survivorship, an NCI ... leads the National Cancer Program and the NIH effort to dramatically reduce the ...

  7. Issues of Selection in Human Survivorship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Oluf

    Is variation in empirical mortality across populations consistent with a hypothesis of selec-tion? To examine this proposition an extended frailty mortality model is put forward; incor-porating biological frailty; a common non-parametric hazard, joint for men and women, rep-resenting endogenous......, and Iceland during the past 250 years and in Japan any ten years between 1950 and 1990 is approached appropriately by the model. Reduced natural selection may account for a substantial part of the empirical mortality change in the course of the demographic transition. Survivorship in the late nineteenth...

  8. Fear of recurrence in long-term breast cancer survivors-still an issue. Results on prevalence, determinants, and the association with quality of life and depression from the cancer survivorship--a multi-regional population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Lena; Bertram, Heike; Eberle, Andrea; Holleczek, Bernd; Schmid-Höpfner, Sieglinde; Waldmann, Annika; Zeissig, Sylke R; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Fear of recurrence (FoR) is a widespread problem among breast cancer survivors. So far, little is known about prevalence, determinants, and consequences of FoR specifically in long-term breast cancer survivors, even though it was found to be one of the most important concerns in this group. Analyses are based on data of several population-based cohorts of long-term breast cancer survivors, recruited by six German cancer registries. Overall, 2671 women were included in the analyses. FoR was assessed using the short form of the Fear of Progression Questionnaire. Potential determinants of moderate/high FoR and the association with depression and quality of life (QoL) were explored via multiple logistic and linear regression. Even though the majority of women reported low levels of FoR (82%), a substantial percentage experienced moderate (11%) and high (6%) FoR. Younger age (odds ratio = 3.00, confidence intervals = 1.91-4.73 for women below age 55 years) and considering oneself as a tumor patient (odds ratio = 3.36, confidence intervals = 2.66-4.25) were found to exhibit the strongest associations with moderate/high FoR. Overall, psychosocial and sociodemographic factors played a far bigger role in FoR than clinical factors. Higher FoR was associated with higher depression and lower QoL. Fear of recurrence (mostly low levels) is highly prevalent among long-term breast cancer survivors and can negatively affect QoL and well-being. Therefore, it should be given appropriate consideration in research and clinical practice. As specifically younger women tended to be impacted by FoR, it is crucial to be particularly attentive to specific needs of younger survivors. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. The Next Step: LogoWriter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papert, Seymour

    1986-01-01

    Describes features and uses of LogoWriter, a revised and expanded version of Logo. With LogoWriter, a student can not only command the turtle to draw pictures but also (because of a built-in word processor) can add text to the screen. (JN)

  10. Teachers as Writers: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremin, Teresa; Oliver, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    This paper is a critical literature review of empirical work from 1990 to 2015 on teachers as writers. It interrogates the evidence on teachers' attitudes to writing, their sense of themselves as writers and the potential impact of teacher writing on pedagogy or student outcomes in writing. The methodology was carried out in four stages. Firstly,…

  11. Empowering Primary Writers through Daily Journal Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jill; East, Jill

    2010-01-01

    Incorporating a journal writing routine into the classroom is critical to developing autonomous writers. During the course of a full year, a first-grade classroom embarked on a quest to discover the importance of creating successful writers. This study confirms the significance of implementing and establishing authentic and meaningful journal…

  12. The impact of the survivorship care plan on health care use : 2 year follow up results of the rogy care trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeppesen, M.M.; Ezendam, N.P.M.; Pijnenborg, J.M.A.; Vos, M.C.; Boll, D.; Kruitwagen, R.F.P.M.; Jensen, P.T.; van de Poll, L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper was to assess the impact of survivorship care plan (SCP) provision and moderating factors on health care use following endometrial cancer treatment. Methods Women newly diagnosed with endometrial cancer were included in a pragmatic cluster randomized trial at 12

  13. Automatic writer identification of ancient Greek inscriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Michail; Papaodysseus, Constantin; Rousopoulos, Panayiotis; Dafi, Dimitra; Tracy, Stephen

    2009-08-01

    This paper introduces a novel methodology for the classification of ancient Greek inscriptions according to the writer who carved them. Inscription writer identification is crucial for dating the written content, which in turn is of fundamental importance in the sciences of history and archaeology. To achieve this, we first compute an ideal or "platonic" prototype for the letters of each inscription separately. Next, statistical criteria are introduced to reject the hypothesis that two inscriptions are carved by the same writer. In this way, we can determine the number of distinct writers who carved a given ensemble of inscriptions. Next, maximum likelihood considerations are employed to attribute all inscriptions in the collection to the respective writers. The method has been applied to 24 Ancient Athenian inscriptions and attributed these inscriptions to six different identified hands in full accordance with expert epigraphists' opinions.

  14. Unified mask data formats for EB writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Koki; Suzuki, Toshio; Hirumi, Junji; Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Hojo, Yutaka; Kawase, Yuichi; Hara, Shigehiro; Hoga, Morihisa; Watanabe, Satoshi W.; Inoue, Masa; Kawase, Hidemuchi; Kamimoto, Tomoko

    2003-08-01

    Mask data preparation is a complicated process because many kinds of pattern files and jobdeck files flow into mask manufacturers. This situation has a significant impact on data preparation operations especially in mask manufacturers. In this paper, we propose a solution to this problem: use of unified mask data formats for EB writers and a model of data preparation flow from a device manufacturer to an EB writer. The unified formats consist of pattern data format named "NEO", and mask layout format named "MALY". NEO is a stream format which retains upper compatibility to GDSII and has higher compression rate than GDSII. NEO is intended to be a general input format of Variable-Shaped-Beam (VSB) mask writers in principle, not particularly designed for any specific equipment or software. Data conversion process between mask writers being taken into account, NEO requires some constraints for VSB mask writers, such as removal of overlapping figures. Due to many differences in jobdeck syntax and functions among mask writers, it is a complicated task to edit or modify a jobdeck, and convert it into another format. MALY is a text-based format whose purpose is to standardize mask layout information among mask writers. This unification of mask layout information optimized for EB writers is expected to reduce workload of mask data preparation significantly. Besides the information described in MALY, some other information specific to the target EB writer, such as drawing parameters, has to be prepared separately. This paper illustrates a model of data flow and benefits of using these unified formats. The format and the data flow are effective in reducing data handling cost, providing flexible data handling solution. Applying the handling flow using NEO and MALY would result in reducing the load on mask manufacturers. Moreover, device manufacturers would be freed from the need to specify the mask writer to be used when ordering masks to mask manufacturers.

  15. Nausea and Vomiting Caused by Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Considerations How Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young Adults For Older Adults Prevention and Healthy Living Cancer.Net Videos Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog ...

  16. Cancer Terms: After Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adults Prevention and Healthy Living Cancer.Net Videos Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About ... means different things to different people. Two common definitions include having no disease after the completion of ...

  17. Water Quality Trading Toolkit for Permit Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Water Quality Trading Toolkit for Permit Writers is EPA’s first “how-to” manual on designing and implementing water quality trading programs. It helps NPDES permitting authorities incorporate trading provisions into permits.

  18. Literary Journalism Courses and Professional Writers (Commentary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Norman

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the classroom approaches and teaching techniques professional writers use when teaching literary journalism. Comments on discussions with John McPhee, Mark Kramer, Madeleine Blais, and Tracy Kidder. (MG)

  19. An Assignment Sequence for Underprepared Writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, Kristi

    2000-01-01

    Presents a sequenced writing assignment on shopping to aid basic writers. Describes a writing assignment focused around online and mail-order shopping. Notes steps in preparing for the assignment, the sequence, and discusses responses to the assignments. (SC)

  20. Transcultural Space and the Writer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inez Baranay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available (1 As a long time writer, I always found, even before I began to publish, that my work was difficult to categorise, even while categories seemed essential for publication, reception and visibility. (2 In this personal essay, I apply the notion of the transcultural to a short writing [auto]biography. The methodology adopted for this purpose is a form of autoethnography: “a form of self-reflection and writing that explores the researcher’s personal experience and connects this autobiographical story to wider cultural, political, and social meanings and understandings”1 to explore how my immigrant background and transcultural lived experience is reflected in my creative writing, and to give an account of how my literary output has been placed in various but always restrictive pre-existing categories. I am also encouraged by Mikhail Epstein’s proposed “scriptorics”, the study of the one who writes Each section of the essay is divided into two: the first sections provide a succinct version of the issues in a developing writer’s life, framed by the need for the practice and production to “belong” somewhere; the second sections take them to a posited “Transcultural Space” where the work seems more authentically to have originated and in which it seems to be more perceptively read. (3 The result is not so much a conventional academic article as a fiction writer’s reflection on her work in the embrace of an inclusive and meaning-making realm.

  1. Michelangelo, a Tireless Letter Writer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelin Charles Fiorato

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A titan of artistic creation, the sculptor-painter-architect Michelangelo was also a tireless letter writer. Five hundred and eighteen of his letters have reached us, stretching from his youth to the eve of his death, but we know that many others have been lost. Written in a kind of familiar Florentine and in a style of minimalist ‘realism’ – which does not prevent the presence of either impetuous polemical flights or pages of literary indulgence – these letters deal mainly with everyday subjects: day-by-day relationships, either endearing or resentful, with his relatives, financial or property matters and, above all, the marriage problems which concerned his nephew Leonardo, the sole heir of the family. But one also discovers in them the artist’s warm feelings of friendship and love, his poetic and aesthetic exchanges, his relationships, often conflictual, with his fellow-artists and patrons as well as his reflections on old age and death. All in all, these letters represent a documentary chronicle of a Florentine bourgeois family and the technical hassle of an entrepreneur’s activity. If, on the one hand, the Carteggio does not shed light either on Michelangelo’s conception of art or the way in which he realized his works, on the other it illustrates certain latent aspects of his projects, as well as of his personality, which was at the same time melancholy and aggressive, surprisingly whole and manifold. This luxuriant correspondence presents, so to speak, a ‘genetic’ interest, since it reveals the hidden face of the brilliant conceiver and creator, of the artist and entrepreneur struggling with the obstacles whose overcoming makes creation possible. 

  2. The impact of the survivorship care plan on health care use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Mette Moustgaard; Ezendam, Nicole P M; Pijnenborg, Johanna M A

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper was to assess the impact of survivorship care plan (SCP) provision and moderating factors on health care use following endometrial cancer treatment. METHODS: Women newly diagnosed with endometrial cancer were included in a pragmatic cluster randomized trial at 12...... hospitals in the Netherlands and were randomly assigned to SCP or usual care (n = 221; 75% response). The SCP was generated using the web-based Registrationsystem Oncological GYnecology (ROGY) and provided tailored information regarding disease, treatment, and possible late-effects. Cancer-related use...... of general practitioner, specialist, and additional health care was collected through questionnaires after diagnosis and at 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up and compared using linear multilevel regression analyses. RESULTS: Women who received an SCP had more cancer-related primary care visits compared...

  3. The Teacher/Writer: Model, Learner, Human Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Geraldine Lee

    1984-01-01

    Describes observations of classrooms in which the teachers participated with the students in writing exercises. Discusses the three teacher/writer roles that emerged during the class--teacher/writer as model, teacher/writer as learner, and teacher/writer as human being--and the bond of understanding that developed as the teachers as students…

  4. Breast cancer fear in African American breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Lynette M; Thomas, Sheila; Parker, Veronica; Mayo, Rachel; Wetsel, Margaret Ann

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe breast cancer fear according to phase of survivorship, determine whether breast cancer fear levels differed among survivorship phases, and determine the relationship between fear and age in African-American breast cancer survivors. The study utilized secondary data analysis from the study, Inner Resources as Predictors of Psychological Well-Being in AABCS. A new subscale entitled, "Breast Cancer Fear" was adapted from the Psychological Well Being Subscale by Ferrell and Grant. There was no significant difference between fear and phase of survivorship. There was a significant positive relationship between age and fear.

  5. Living and Labouring as a Music Writer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawson Fletcher

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Like many other creative endeavours, music writing is a proto-professional practice built on the back of amateur enthusiasm, unpaid labour and informal networks of referrals and recruiting. Drawing on interviews with Australian music critics and journalists at different stages of their careers, this article examines the highly specific configurations of cultural, social and economic capital at work within this field. The authors begin by exploring the diverse career pathways of writers, before considering how writers locate themselves within industrial and creative networks. As amateur intermediaries engaged in the mediation of the cultural productions of others, music writers maintain particular notions of value that do not always align easily with creative labour models premised on artistic fulfilment or economic exploitation.

  6. Dietary changes and dietary supplement use, and underlying motives for these habits reported by colorectal cancer survivors of the Patient Reported Outcomes Following Initial Treatment and Long-Term Evaluation of Survivorship (PROFILES) registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bours, M.J.; Beijer, S.; Winkels, R.G.F.; van Duijnhoven, F.J.; Mols, F.; Breedveld-Peters, J.J.; Kampman, E.; Weijenberg, M.P.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to describe dietary changes made post-diagnosis and current dietary supplement use by survivors of colorectal cancer (CRC), and explore the underlying motives for these lifestyle habits. Cross-sectional analyses were performed for 1458 stage I–IV CRC survivors of the

  7. Survivorship patterns of histopathological variants and molecular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the relationship of histopathological characteristics, molecular subtypes of breast cancer and survival in a low resource setting. Design: Tumours from prospectively ascertained patients newly diagnosed with breast cancer were analyzed. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded sections were constructed ...

  8. Every Child a Writer Program Evaluation 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochester, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Every Child a Writer is a genre-based model of writing instruction promoted by the National Literacy Coalition. This paper reports on Colorado schools implementing the model. Statistical analyses of achievement patterns in implementing schools were compared to statewide achievement results. A student cohort design across multiple years was…

  9. UNIX Writer's Workbench: Software for Streamlined Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frase, Lawrence T; Diel, Mary

    1986-01-01

    Discusses computer editing and describes the capacities and features of an integrated software package, Writer's Workbench. Suggests ways in which this program can be used to improve writing skills. Reviews the effects of this program on technical users, college students, and high school students. (ML)

  10. Nurturing young writers: sustaining quality, not quantity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looi, L M

    2009-11-01

    The exponential growth in scientific journals and advent of the electronic era have led to such information overload that the sustainability of credible and quality publications is more urgent than ever. Editors and academics who commit themselves to nurturing young writers need to reaffirm their focus on quality rather than quantity of papers. Bearing in mind that publications should firstly be founded on good science, there are several approaches in helping the uninitiated develop and hone writing skills. Academic journals faithfully publish instructions to guide potential authors on the preparation and submission of manuscripts. For those with a gift for writing, this may suffice to start them soaring in their writing career. Others find the hands-on approach of writing workshops more effective in clarifying the rules of the writing game and dispelling the fear of writing. Workshops are good at demonstrating the basics, but the forging of a good writer is a long process in which a mentor can play an invaluable role. A nurturing mentor-mentee relationship should not be a stifling one, but one that leads, grows and finally liberates an independent writer. It is inevitable that the nature of scientific publications will change over time. Nonetheless, the sustainability of quality journals will remain linked to the continual generation of writers who uphold scientific truth and good writing values.

  11. Automatic allograph matching in forensic writer identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niels, R; Vuurpijl, L.; Schomaker, L.R.B.

    A well-established task in forensic writer identification focuses on the comparison of prototypical character shapes (allographs) present in handwriting. In order for a computer to perform this task convincingly, it should yield results that are plausible and understandable to the human expert.

  12. The Teachers & Writers Guide to Walt Whitman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Ron, Ed.

    Fifteen poets have created this guide to teaching the work of Walt Whitman from kindergarten to college level. In essays based on the personal experience of these imaginative writers, the guide presents practical ideas for fresh ways to read Whitman and to write poetry and prose inspired by him. The guide also includes three pieces on education by…

  13. Talented Young Writers' Relationships with Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olthouse, Jill M.

    2012-01-01

    Through a qualitative research design, the author explored how eight talented young creative writers related to their craft. The construct, "relationship with writing," emerged as the study's overarching theme; this theme includes students' influences, goals, values, identity, and emotions as these relate to writing. The findings indicated…

  14. The Basic Writer as Reluctant Oralist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Victor

    By identifying speculations concerning cognitive abilities and cognition's relation to culture, this paper outlines some of the work surrounding basic writers and speaking-writing relationships. Beginning with a discussion of the differences between speaking and writing popularized by Mina Shaughnessy, the paper goes on to examine studies that…

  15. The Vulnerability of the Fanfiction Writer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thessa

    Writing and publishing fanfiction is done freely and without any prospect of monetary or materialistic reward. The acknowledgement by the readers through comments, reviews, and kudos has to suffice instead. In their interactions with the reader the writer relies on the reader's recognition of Løg...

  16. 10 Things Every Writer Needs to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Whether writing a blog entry or a high-stakes test essay, fiction or nonfiction, short story or argumentation, students need to know certain things in order to write effectively. In 10 Things Every Writer Needs to Know, Jeff Anderson focuses on developing the concepts and application of ten essential aspects of good writing--motion, models, focus,…

  17. Nutshells, Monkeys, and the Writer's Craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Brenda Miller

    1996-01-01

    Considers five ways in which the theories that inform writers' workshop have been oversimplified to the point where the power and intent of the original idea is lost. Argues that these oversimplified ideas need to be examined and made complex again. Presents Donald Murray's supportive response to the article. (SR)

  18. LD College Writers: An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Linda

    Seven research-based papers on writing disorders of learning-disabled college students are listed and reviewed. The papers deal with persistent auditory language deficits in adults with learning disabilities; error patterns and instructional alternatives relating to college learning-disabled writers; syntactic complexity in written expression;…

  19. Lymphedema after breast cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brahmi, Sami Aziz; Ziani, Fatima Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Image in medicine Lymphedema is one of the most significant survivorship issues after the surgical treatment of breast cancer and in this population it has been documented to have significant quality...

  20. Gompertz' survivorship law as an intrinsic principle of aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sas, Arthur A.; Snieder, Harold; Korf, Jakob

    We defend the hypothesis that life-spanning population survivorship curves, as described by Gompertz' law and composed from cross-sectional data (here mortality), reflect an intrinsic aging principle active in each subject of that population. In other words Gompertz' law reflects aging of a

  1. Writing for Whom? Cognition, Motivation, and a Writer's Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnifico, Alecia Marie

    2010-01-01

    When writers write, how do they decide to whom they are speaking? How does this decision affect writers' cognition about writing? Their motivation to write? In this article, I review literature on cognitive and social processes of writing, conceptualizations of audience, writing across distinct learning environments, and writers' motivations. I…

  2. Collecting, curating, and researching writers' libraries a handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Oram, Richard W

    2014-01-01

    Collecting, Curating, and Researching Writers' Libraries: A Handbook is the first book to examine the history, acquisition, cataloging, and scholarly use of writers' personal libraries. This book also includes interviews with several well-known writers, who discuss their relationship with their books.

  3. The Sylvia Plath Effect: Mental Illness in Eminent Creative Writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, James C.

    2001-01-01

    Two studies involving a total of 2149 writers and other eminent individuals found that female poets were significantly more likely to suffer from mental illness than female fiction writers, than male writers of any type, or than eminent individuals in other fields. This finding has been dubbed the "Sylvia Plath" effect. (Contains…

  4. A Field Guide for Science Writers - The Official Guide of the National Association of Science Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Deborah; Knudson, Mary; Marantz Henig, Robin

    2005-09-01

    This is the official text for the National Association of Science Writers. In the eight years since the publication of the first edition of A Field Guide for Science Writing, much about the world has changed. Some of the leading issues in today's political marketplace - embryonic stem cell research, global warming, health care reform, space exploration, genetic privacy, germ warfare - are informed by scientific ideas. Never has it been more crucial for the lay public to be scientifically literate. That's where science writers come in. And that's why it's time for an update to the Field Guide, already a staple of science writing graduate programs across the country. The academic community has recently recognized how important it is for writers to become more sophisticated, knowledgeable, and skeptical about what they write. More than 50 institutions now offer training in science writing. In addition mid-career fellowships for science writers are growing, giving journalists the chance to return to major universities for specialized training. We applaud these developments, and hope to be part of them with this new edition of the Field Guide. In A Field Guide for Science Writers, 2nd Edition, the editors have assembled contributions from a collections of experienced journalists who are every bit as stellar as the group that contributed to the first edition. In the end, what we have are essays written by the very best in the science writing profession. These wonderful writers have written not only about style, but about content, too. These leaders in the profession describe how they work their way through the information glut to find the gems worth writing about. We also have chapters that provide the tools every good science writer needs: how to use statistics, how to weigh the merits of conflicting studies in scientific literature, how to report about risk. And, ultimately, how to write.

  5. Cyber Literature: A Reader – Writer Interactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathu Rahman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyber Literature is a term known since the coming of the internet which brings a convenience, changing habit and world view. This study is a survey-based on respondents’ opinion about the existence of cyber literature on social media; of its benefit and impact to the reader. This study limits to the poems on Facebook group. The reason is simple; it favors the short form. For the study of a reader-writer interactivity in cyber literature is more likely on poetry. The approach is reader response literary theory with focus on the reader-writer interactivity on Facebook. This research aimed at uncovering the motivation of readers to response the uploaded text, the reasons why they love it and what its advantages. The results showed that cyber literature is successfully to introduce a new literary genre as well as to raise motivation and creativity of authors to make use the internet space.

  6. Multi-beam mask writer MBM-1000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Tamura, Takao; Ohtoshi, Kenji

    2017-07-01

    Multi-beam mask writer MBM-1000 will be released in Q4 2017 for N5 semiconductor production. Performance of MBM-1000 is under verification and tuning by using alpha tool upgraded to high-volume manufacturing (HVM) system. It is designed to realize better resolution and higher throughput than EBM-9500, our latest variable-shaped-beam writer, at shot count higher than 500 Gshot/pass. Writing test after upgrade confirmed that MBM-1000 has better beam resolution than EBM-9500 as expected by optics design. It also showed that position of beam array projected on target was stable during one hour writing enough to accomplish registration target. Design of data transfer system and BAA for 300-Gbps data rate is described.

  7. How to become a competent medical writer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhasini Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical writing involves writing scientific documents of different types which include regulatory and research-related documents, disease or drug-related educational and promotional literature, publication articles like journal manuscripts and abstracts, content for healthcare websites, health-related magazines or news articles. The scientific information in these documents needs to be presented to suit the level of understanding of the target audience, namely, patients or general public, physicians or the regulators. Medical writers require an understanding of the medical concepts and terminology, knowledge of relevant guidelines as regards the structure and contents of specific documents, and good writing skills. They also need to be familiar with searching medical literature, understanding and presenting research data, the document review process, and editing and publishing requirements. Many resources are now available for medical writers to get the required training in the science and art of medical writing, and upgrade their knowledge and skills on an ongoing basis. The demand for medical writing is growing steadily in pharmaceutical and healthcare communication market. Medical writers can work independently or be employed as full time professionals. Life sciences graduates can consider medical writing as a valuable career option.

  8. Attendance at a survivorship clinic: impact on knowledge and psychosocial adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jennifer S; Chou, Joanne F; Sklar, Charles A

    2013-12-01

    Due to their heightened risk of developing late-occurring adverse outcomes, pediatric cancer survivors are advised to receive follow-up care in specialized Survivor Clinics. However, little is known about the impact of attending such clinics on psychosocial adjustment, knowledge, and morbidity. This study assesses the differences between those who attended a Survivorship Clinic and those who did not on knowledge, perception of risk, and psychosocial adjustment. We assessed 102 survivors who attended our Long-Term Follow-Up (LTFU) Clinic and 71 survivors never seen in a specialized clinic (non-LTFU). Participants were diagnosed at least 5 years prior to the assessment, were at least 20 years old, and had no evidence of active disease. Groups were matched on gender, age at cancer diagnosis, diagnosis, and race. On average, participants were currently 30 years of age and had been diagnosed with cancer around age 12. Most common reasons that non-LTFU survivors did not attend the clinic were "not aware" (71 %) or "not interested" (16 %). Survivors in each group were able to accurately report their cancer diagnosis, but few knew specific treatment information. There were no significant differences regarding survivors' perceptions of risk of future health problems with both groups similarly underestimating their risks. A significant minority in each group reported psychological or emotional problems (16-18 %), post-traumatic stress disorder (4.2-6.9 %), and/or psychological distress (7.8-19.7 %). Survivors are in need of continued education about their specific cancer treatments, recommended follow-up practices, the importance of survivorship care, and their specific risks for late effects. Among those childhood cancer survivors who do attend a Survivor clinic, a majority are in need of continued education about their specific cancer treatments, recommended follow-up practices, and risk of late effects. As many survivors of pediatric cancer appear to be unaware of

  9. Jewish postmodern writers and national identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lončar-Vujnović Mirjana N.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of the peculiarity in Jewish national identity has been a very actual detail for hundreds of years to this day. It has been a matter of controversy from the time of patriarchate, especially after the creation of Diaspora, not only among Jews but among all people in the world. Recent disputations in Jewish Knesset, about who can be called a Jew, summarize all the questions of Jewish origins and the question above all questions - what essentially determines the essence of Jewish identity in relation to other nations? We find two types of classification which relate to Jewish writers: 1. by the language; 2. by the topic. Some of the significant authors, especially in America, who had written prose with Jewish subject matter, could be classified into two main groups by the language in which they had written: Hebrew and English. A strict classification by topic is not possible, but comparing the writers' attitudes towards different questions of life, Judaism and modern tendencies, the following topics have emerged as the unique themes being shared by the various numbers of authors: religious and mythological questions; historical questions; solitude and alienation; infiltration into another societies; Jewish sufferings; family in Jewish community. In this paper we shall try to express the most frequent indicators of the Jewish construction in their literary works as the main characteristics of Jewish national figure and their identity. They have represented the indicators of their bad destiny, their sacrifice for the better world by the solitude and alienation of Jewish individual in America, turning back to the historical facts (since World War II as the cause for anti-Jewish atrocity and suffering then and now. The writers put the Jews on the pedestal of a sublime nation and at the same time made them the victims of modern society.

  10. The Experiences of Young Adults With Hodgkin Lymphoma Transitioning to Survivorship: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Lauren; Boulton, Mary; Lavender, Verna; Collins, Graham; Mitchell-Floyd, Tracy; Watson, Eila

    2016-09-01

    To explore the experiences of young adults with Hodgkin lymphoma during the first year following the end of initial treatment. 
. A qualitative grounded theory study.
. Interviews with patients recruited from three cancer centers in England.
. 10 Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (four men and six women aged 21-39 years) recruited as part of a larger study of 28 young adult cancer survivors.
. Semistructured interviews were conducted about two months after treatment completion, and follow-up interviews were conducted seven months later. The authors' grounded theory of positive psychosocial adjustment to cancer provided the conceptual framework.
. Positive reframing, informal peer support, acceptance, and normalization helped young adults dismantle the threats of Hodgkin lymphoma during the course of treatment. However, they described losing a sense of security following treatment completion. Greater age-specific information to enable better preparation for the future was desired regarding body image, fertility, sexual relationships, work, and socializing.
. Informal support mechanisms, like peer support and patient navigator interventions, may be useful ways to further support young adults after treatment completion.
. Positive psychosocial adjustment to cancer survivorship in young adults is facilitated by having informal peer support; being able to positively reframe, accept, and normalize their experience; and being prepared for the future.

  11. Children's Sense of Being a Writer: Identity Construction in Second Grade Writers Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seban, Demet; Tavsanli, Ömer Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Literacy activities in which children invest in and understand literacy creates spaces for them to construct their identity as readers/writers and build their personal theories of literacy. This study presents the identity construction of second grade students who identified as successful, average or struggling in their first time engagement with…

  12. LAZA K. LAZAREVIC, DOCTOR AND WRITER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rade R. Babić

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Laza K. Lazarevic was born on the 13th of May in 1851. He died on the 11th of January in 1891 in Belgrade. Laza K. Lazarevic was a Serb, jurist, warrior, doctor and writer. He studied medicine in Berlin and law in Belgrade. He took part in the Serbian-Turkish war and the Serbian-Bulgarian war. He published seventy-two professional and scientific papers on medicine. He gave some explanations on the appearance of pain in sciatica. He wrote nine short stories. He is an Associate Member of the Serbian Royal Academy. He spoke Russian, German and French. He was a personal doctor of King Milan.

  13. Writer identification system for Ethiopic handwriting | Demoze | Zede ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Writer identification is a popular and ongoing research area having a wide variety of applications in banking, criminal justice system, access control, determining the authenticity of handwritten mails, etc. In this paper, an off-line text independent Ethiopic writer identification system has been proposed. The system uses 50 ...

  14. The management of writer-reader interaction in newspaper editorials

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the management of interaction between the writer and the readers in newspaper editorials. It aims at exploring how editorial writers include the readers as participants in the discourse while maintaining their authorial persona. It investigates how the readers are aligned and disaligned with the views ...

  15. The Hierarchical Personality Structure of Aspiring Creative Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslej, Marta M.; Rain, Marina; Fong, Katrina; Oatley, Keith; Mar, Raymond A.

    2014-01-01

    Empirical studies of personality traits in creative writers have demonstrated mixed findings, perhaps due to issues of sampling, measurement, and the reporting of statistical information. The goal of this study is to quantify the personality structure of aspiring creative writers according to a modern hierarchal model of trait personality. A…

  16. Rethinking Writing Center Conferencing Strategies for the ESL Writer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Judith K.

    1993-01-01

    Presents typical problems encountered by tutors at writing centers when they conference with ESL writers. Discusses processes and ways of adapting collaborative conferencing strategies for second-language writers at the University of Wyoming Writing Center, including a need for intervention, that have proven effective in alleviating these…

  17. The Community Publishing Project: assisting writers to self-publish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Community Publishing Project: assisting writers to self-publish. Colleen Higgs. Abstract. This article examines the need for a small project such as the Community Publishing Project in South Africa and explores its aims. The method of involving writers and community groups in the publication process is described and ...

  18. The Woman Writer and the Element of Destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killoh, Ellen Peck

    1972-01-01

    Using Anais Nin as an example, the author describes the problem of the female writer as an agent of destruction. She is angered over the fact that women writers misdirected so much of their creative energy through fear of adopting any but the submissive, passive, feminine role. (Author/NL)

  19. Identity Practices of Multilingual Writers in Social Networking Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-I

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the literacy practices of two multilingual writers in social networking communities. The findings show that the multilingual writers explored and reappropriated symbolic resources afforded by the social networking site as they aligned themselves with particular collective and personal identities at local and global levels.…

  20. A Comparison of Note Writers and No Note Writers in Homicide-Suicide Cases in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeke, Anna; Oberwittler, Dietrich

    2017-03-24

    The aim of this study is to investigate potential differences between homicide-suicide cases in which the perpetrator does or does not write a suicide note. As homicide-suicides are complex types of lethal violence for which the aggressor cannot be held accountable, suicide notes may be a valuable source of information about the background of these cases and the perpetrators' motives. We use a national sample of N = 288 homicide-suicide cases in Germany applying group comparisons and chi-square tests for relevant variables. Perpetrators killing their own children and perpetrators leaving children behind before killing themselves write significantly more suicide notes than other perpetrators. Even though note writers and no note writers are similar regarding most sociodemographic characteristics, other differences question the generalizability between these 2 groups.

  1. Harnessing benefits of helping others: a randomized controlled trial testing expressive helping to address survivorship problems after hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rini, Christine; Austin, Jane; Wu, Lisa M; Winkel, Gary; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis; Stanton, Annette L; Isola, Luis; Rowley, Scott; Redd, William H

    2014-12-01

    Prior research supports the hypothesis that cancer survivors who help others face treatment experience a range of psychosocial and health-related benefits as a result of peer helping. This study investigates an expressive helping (EH) intervention designed to harness those benefits by targeting survivorship problems among cancer survivors treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplant. EH includes two components: (a) emotionally expressive writing (EW; writing one's deepest thoughts and feelings about the transplant experience in a series of brief, structured writing sessions) followed by (b) peer helping (PH; helping other people prepare for transplant by sharing one's own transplant experiences along with advice and encouragement through a written narrative). EH was compared with neutral writing (NW), EW (without PH), and PH (without EW) in a 4-arm randomized controlled trial in which survivors completed baseline measures, 4 structured writing exercises (with instructions depending on randomization), and postintervention measures including validated measures of general psychological distress, physical symptoms, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Among survivors with moderate-severe survivorship problems, EH reduced distress (compared with NW and PH; ps writing benefits transplant survivors with moderate-severe survivorship problems, but only if they have first completed expressive writing.

  2. Mobility and safety in the multiple myeloma survivor: survivorship care plan of the International Myeloma Foundation Nurse Leadership Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rome, Sandra I; Jenkins, Bonnie S; Lilleby, Kathryn E

    2011-08-01

    As in many other cancers, survivorship of multiple myeloma involves handling treatment, recovery from therapeutic interventions, the effects of the disease, and ongoing therapies. Although mobility challenges vary among survivors of multiple myeloma, these patients have an increased risk of impaired mobility because of side effects of therapy and the pathology of the disease, as well as other factors (e.g., increasing age). Health maintenance increasingly is becoming a part of the cancer control continuum, and nurses have the opportunity to help survivors of multiple myeloma optimize their functional mobility and safety, thereby preserving quality of life. The purpose of these practice recommendations is to provide the healthcare professional with information on mobility, fall risk, and planned activity as an integral part of the plan of care for patients with multiple myeloma. Tools for nurses and physicians for assessing and evaluating the newly diagnosed patient, the patient undergoing treatment, and the long-term survivor of multiple myeloma will be provided.

  3. How to be an Effective Technical Writer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Solaiman Ali

    2012-07-01

    (patterns of organization of information to suit the technical writing task, checking for technical accuracy and following three levels of editing to help increase the readability of a technical text. Finally, in part 8 (Ethical/legal considerations for the technical writer, the authors suggest ways for the technical writer to overcome ethical/legal dilemmas on the job.

  4. Combining macro and micro features for writer identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangjik; Cha, Sung-Hyuk; Srihari, Sargur N.

    2001-12-01

    In our previous work of writer identification, a database of handwriting samples (written in English) of over one thousand individuals was created, and two types of computer-generated features of sample handwriting were extracted: macro and micro features. Using these features, writer identification experiments were performed: given that a document is written by one of n writers, the task is to determine the writer. With n = 2, we correctly determined the writer with a 99% accuracy using only 10-character micro features in the writing; with n = 1000, the accuracy is dropped to 80%. To obtain higher performance, we propose a combination of macro and micro level features. First, macro level features are used in a filtering model: the computer program is presented with multiple handwriting samples from a large number (1000) of writers, and the question posed is: Which of the samples are consistent with a test sample? As a result of using the filtering model, a reduced set of documents (100) is obtained and presented to the final identification model which uses the micro level features. We improved our writer identification system from 80% to 87.5% by the proposed filtering-combination technique when n = 1000.

  5. Tools students need to be skillful writers building better sentences

    CERN Document Server

    Hostmeyer, Phyllis

    2012-01-01

    Build stronger writers one sentence at a time.Imagine a classroom full of enthusiastic student writers, capable of reviewing their own work with a critical eye, then crafting a polished, convincing piece. This is possible, if you take writing instruction down to its basic building block-a solid sentence-and advance from there. Phyllis Hostmeyer can show you how with Tools Students Need to Be Skillful Writers, your blueprint for effective writing instruction and unit development. Packed with lessons across grades 3-12, this indispensable

  6. APPRAISAL ANALYSIS IN FREEDOM WRITERS MOVIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nani Hidayati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to find out conveyed messages in the movie from the realization of the appraisal and narrative structure as well as to describe the use of the Appraisal System to express LaGravenese's (a Attitudes, (bEngagement & (c Graduation towards the main characters in Freedom Writers movie screenplay. Using both quantitative and qualitative descriptive approach for discourse appraisal system analysis, the result of this study reveals several messages of tolerance, earning respect and trust, honor diversity, and striving for success and trust from the realization of Appraisal and Narrative Structure either in the dialogues or monologues of Freedom Writers’ characters. The result from the Appraisal Devices realizing (a Attitudes reveals that LaGravenese likes to express characters’ negative emotion explicitly than implicitly. He likes to express characters’ negative capability than other kinds of Judgments. He appreciates the characters using more Negative Value which denotes that in his opinion, they see each other negatively. (bEngagement used in the screenplay describes that he emphasizes more on characters’ denial towards each other’s opinion and existence with the use of more Disclaim Heterogloss in the screenplay. (cGraduation used in the screenplay describes that the use of more Sharpening Focus indicates he emphasizes on characters’ category boundary more than scaling of intensity. Keywords: Appraisal Devices, Attitude, Engagement, and Graduation.

  7. The Planetary Consciousness of British Travel Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, H.

    2013-04-01

    Global travel, advanced in the early 20th century by trains, automobiles, and airplanes, transformed modernist thought and experience. Stephen Kern has commented that in the modern period “a series of sweeping changes in technology and culture created distinctive new modes of thinking about and experiencing of time and space. Technological innovations including the telephone, wireless telegraph, x-ray, cinema, bicycle, automobile, and airplane established the material foundation for this reorientation.” (1983, pp. 1-2). Emerging travel technologies not only hurled passengers through multiple time zones in a day but also brought to the fore a global awareness regarding Earth as a globe in space and one's position on it. As early as 1909, while traveling in Florence, Virginia Woolf had noted in her diary, “It is strange how one begins to hold a globe in one's head: I can travel from Florence to Fitzroy Square on solid land all the time” (1984, p. 399). This paper traces the ways modernist British travel writers challenged England's geographical and geopolitical imagination at the turn of the 20th century through their travel narratives.

  8. A new therapeutic proposal for writer's cramp: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Quadros Boisson Waissman

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Writer's cramp is a kind of focal hand dystonia that appears when individuals are writing. Since pharmacological treatment has not shown the desired therapeutic response, a study on immobilization of the damaged musculature was performed on two individuals with writer's cramp, using splints with the objective of reducing the handwriting abnormalities. CASE REPORT: Two patients presenting writer's cramp who had previously undergone different therapies, including botulinum toxin, without an adequate response, participated in a body awareness program, followed by immobilization of the hand musculature damaged by dystonia, by means of splints, with handwriting training. At the end of the procedure, objective and subjective improvements in the motor pattern of writing could be observed. The immobilization of the dystonic musculature of the hand by means of splints and the motor training of handwriting helped to improve and consequently to reduce the dystonic component observed in the writer's cramp.

  9. Specificity in Context: Some Difficulties for the Inexperienced Writer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Susan Peck

    1986-01-01

    Explores the complexity of the concept "specificity," then looks at some of the misinterpretations made by developmental writers to illustrate how developmental writing students have difficulty moving from abstract to concrete. (HTH)

  10. Reproduction, abundance and survivorship of two Alveopora spp. in the mesophotic reefs of Eilat, Red Sea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eyal-Shaham, Lee; Eyal, Gal; Tamir, Raz; Loya, Yossi

    2016-01-01

    ...) found at 30-150 m depth. Here, we report for the first time on the reproductive patterns, living cover, and survivorship under different light treatments of two scleractinian species from the MCEs of Eilat, Red-Sea...

  11. Teachers as Writers, Writers as Teachers: A Narrative Inquiry into Teachers' Perceptions of Self as Teachers, Writers, and Teachers of Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillahunty, Donna Carol

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore, narratively, teachers' perceptions of self/identity as teachers, as writers, as teachers of writing, and how those perceptions shaped the instructional practices of teachers. Basing the study in research on writing theorists, identity, experience, and reflection, narrative inquiry in the tradition of…

  12. Writing orthotic device for the management of writer's cramp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanasarma V. Singam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral therapies and chemodenervation procedures are often unrewarding in the treatment of focal, task-specific hand disorders such as writer's cramp or primary writing tremor. Methods: A portable writing orthotic device was evaluated on fifteen consecutively recruited writer's cramp and primary writing tremor subjects. We measured overall impairment at baseline and after two weeks of at-home use with the Writer’s Cramp Rating Scale (range = 0-8, higher is worse and writing quality and comfort with a visual analog scale (range = 0-10. Results: Compared to regular pen, the writing orthotic device improved the Writer's Cramp Rating Scale scores at first-test (p=0.001 and re-test (p=0.005 as well as writing quality and device comfort in writer's cramp subjects. Benefits were sustained at two weeks. Primary writing tremor subjects demonstrated no improvements.Conclusions: Writing orthotic devices exploiting a muscle-substitution strategy may yield immediate benefits in patients with writer's cramp.

  13. Writers, Athletes and Engineers Learn by Doing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2009-12-01

    The author strongly believes that when one provides students more opportunity to write and publish, one actually is helping those students learn better. Writing in reality reinforces the knowledge acquired and clarifies fuzzy, indistinct and indefinable points. In a Learning Paradigm or a Discovery Paradigm, it is observed that evaluation is holistic, and student success outcomes are those that are actually measured. Many scholars have recommended and supported a value-added concept of education by doing assessments before, during, and after a course (Barr & Tagg, 1995). Other scholars have argued that achievement of educational objectives is becoming less and less measurable whereas the need for accountability is rising to the surface more frequently. The literature supports our intuitive belief that education in a new learning paradigm will prepare students for the work ahead of them (Cox, Grasha, & Richlin 1997, March). Technical writing has been a part of engineering education for a long time. Regardless, it appears that engineering students are more interested in spending productive time learning the mathematical aspects of subject matter. The students are reluctant to devote time and effort that involves descriptive writing. The trend is to develop an interactive problem-solving pedagogy that encourages the development of learner’s creativity, understanding, written and oral communication skills (Saxe, 1988; Senge, 1990; Sims, 1995; Young & Young, 1999). It is essential for the students to recognize the fact that writing indeed enhances their grasp over technical content. The author has outlined seven areas for assessing a writing assignment. 1. The student writing has an identified a specific focus on a given purpose. 2. The author has indicated an audience for the writing assignment. 3. The writer has specified conventions for format, flow and structure. 4. The learner has documented conventions for formality, voice and tone. 5. The individual has

  14. Mortality of western corn rootworm larvae on MIR604 transgenic maize roots: field survivorship has no significant impact on survivorship of F1 progeny on MIR604.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbard, Bruce E; Clark, Thomas L; Ellersieck, Mark R; Meihls, Lisa N; El Khishen, Ahmed A; Kaster, Von; Steiner, Henry-York; Kurtz, Ryan

    2010-12-01

    Mortality of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, larvae due to MIR604 transgenic corn, Zea mays L., expressing the modified Cry3A (mCry3A) protein relative to survivorship on corn with the same genetic background without the gene (isoline corn) was evaluated at three Missouri sites in both 2005 and 2006. We made these comparisons by using wild-type western corn rootworm at three different egg densities (6,000, 3,000, and 1,500 eggs per m) so that the role of density-dependent mortality would be known. The mortality due to the mCry3A protein was 94.88% when averaged across all environments and both years. Fifty percent emergence of beetles was delayed approximately 5.5 d. Beetles were kept alive and their progeny evaluated on MIR604 and isoline corn in the greenhouse to determine whether survivorship on MIR604 in the field for one generation increased survivorship on MIR604 in the greenhouse in the subsequent generation. There was no significant difference in survivorship on MIR604 in greenhouse assays between larvae whose parents survived isoline and larvae whose parents survived MIR604 in the field the previous generation, indicating that many susceptible beetles survived MIR604 in the field the previous season along with any potentially resistant beetles. The data are discussed in terms of rootworm insect resistance management.

  15. 'Intensive care unit survivorship' - a constructivist grounded theory of surviving critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, Susanne; Salisbury, Lisa G; Rattray, Janice; Walsh, Timothy S; Huby, Guro; Ramsay, Pamela

    2017-10-01

    To theorise intensive care unit survivorship after a critical illness based on longitudinal qualitative data. Increasingly, patients survive episodes of critical illness. However, the short- and long-term impact of critical illness includes physical, psychological, social and economic challenges long after hospital discharge. An appreciation is emerging that care needs to extend beyond critical illness to enable patients to reclaim their lives postdischarge with the term 'survivorship' being increasingly used in this context. What constitutes critical illness survivorship has, to date, not been theoretically explored. Longitudinal qualitative and constructivist grounded theory. Interviews (n = 46) with 17 participants were conducted at four time points: (1) before discharge from hospital, (2) four to six weeks postdischarge, (3) six months and (4) 12 months postdischarge across two adult intensive care unit setting. Individual face-to-face interviews. Data analysis followed the principles of Charmaz's constructivist grounded theory. 'Intensive care unit survivorship' emerged as the core category and was theorised using concepts such as status passages, liminality and temporality to understand the various transitions participants made postcritical illness. Intensive care unit survivorship describes the unscheduled status passage of falling critically ill and being taken to the threshold of life and the journey to a life postcritical illness. Surviving critical illness goes beyond recovery; surviving means 'moving on' to life postcritical illness. 'Moving on' incorporates a redefinition of self that incorporates any lingering intensive care unit legacies and being in control of one's life again. For healthcare professionals and policymakers, it is important to realise that recovery and transitioning through to survivorship happen within an individual's time frame, not a schedule imposed by the healthcare system. Currently, there are no care pathways or policies in

  16. Contrasting Seasonal Survivorship of Two Migratory Songbirds Wintering in Threatened Mangrove Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Calvert

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Long-distance migrants wintering in tropical regions face a number of critical conservation threats throughout their lives, but seasonal estimates of key demographic parameters such as winter survival are rare. Using mist-netting-based mark-recapture data collected in coastal Costa Rica over a six-year period, we examined variation in within- and between-winter survivorship of the Prothonotary Warbler (Protonotaria citrea; 753 young and 376 adults banded, a declining neotropical habitat specialist that depends on threatened mangrove forests during the nonbreeding season. We derived parallel seasonal survivorship estimates for the Northern Waterthrush (Seiurus noveboracensis; 564 young and 93 adults banded, a cohabitant mangrove specialist that has not shown the same population decline in North America, to assess whether contrasting survivorship might contribute to the observed differences in the species' population trajectories. Although average annual survival probability was relatively similar between the two species for both young and adult birds, monthly estimates indicated that relative to Northern Waterthrush, Prothonotary Warblers exhibited: greater interannual variation in survivorship, especially within winters; greater variation in survivorship among the three study sites; lower average between-winter survivorship, particularly among females, and; a sharp decline in between-winter survivorship from 2003 to 2009 for both age groups and both sexes. Rather than identifying one seasonal vital rate as a causal factor of Prothonotary Warbler population declines, our species comparison suggests that the combination of variable within-winter survival with decreasing between-winter survival demands a multi-seasonal approach to the conservation of this and other tropical-wintering migrants.

  17. James Baldwin: Biographical Dispatches on a Freedom Writer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Luke Sinitiere

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay presents the idea of James Baldwin as a freedom writer, the organizing idea of my biography in progress. As a freedom writer, Baldwin was a revolutionary intellectual, an essayist and novelist committed unfailingly to the realization of racial justice, interracial political equality, and economic democracy. While the book is still in process, this short essay narrates autobiographically how I came to meet and know Baldwin’s work, explains in critical fashion my work in relation to existing biographies, and reflects interpretively my thoughts-in- progress on this fascinating and captivating figure of immense historical and social consequence.

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is also called disease-specific survival. In most cases, cancer-specific survival is based on causes of ... may be owned by their creator. In such cases, it is necessary to contact the writer, artists, ...

  19. Exercise and the breast cancer survivor: the role of the nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall-Alston, Jane

    2015-10-01

    Patients with cancer are living longer with their disease and have improved survival rates because of early detection and more effective cancer treatments. Lifestyle modification and exercise improve clinical outcomes in breast cancer survivors. Exercise has important implications for the survivor and should be integrated into the aftercare trajectory of survivorship. A literature review of articles published from 2002-2014 was conducted using the key words cancer survivor, survivorship, breast cancer, collaboration, and exercise. PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and CINAHL® databases were searched. Nurse practitioners can build an environment to motivate patients to exercise, empowering them to be active participants in their own survivorship care. Collaboration is necessary to ensure that healthy lifestyle choices, including exercise, are being discussed and implemented in survivorship care plans to help optimize patient outcomes.

  20. Reflections on Research on Writing and Technology for Struggling Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, I discuss research on the use of technology to support the writing of students with learning disabilities. Struggling writers can benefit from a wide range of computer applications for writing. Word processing, spelling checkers, word prediction, and speech recognition offer support for transcription and revision. Word processing…

  1. Treatment of writer's sodium valproate and cramp with baclofen

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of a 27-year-old Black man with writer's cramp with a combin'ation of sodium valproate (Epi- lim) and baclofen (Lioresal) resulted in dramatic improvement of symptoms and signs. The possible mechanism of action of these drugs is discussed. This combination should be tried in the initial man- agement of this ...

  2. PROCESS WRITING: SUCCESSFUL AND UNSUCCESSFUL WRITERS; DISCOVERING WRITING BEHAVIOURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Baroudy

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Successful and unsuccessful strategies practically complied with in the act of writing have been so far experimentally tapped and scholastically rehearsed by several authors. In this study, a complementary task using a questionnaire worked out to comprehensively specify and cover almost all types of writing behaviours has been inquisitively manipulated. By analysing and inspecting the findings elicited from student-writers’ response sheets, successful and unsuccessful writing strategies are then contrastively identified, categorised and demonstrated. Based on the awareness accomplished, writing teachers’ consciousness will be raised and boosted, thus, helping their poor student-writers justifiably quit their debilitative habits and adopt instead, facilitative ones, those competent writers implement while writing. In the questionnaire, the student-writers would reflect upon their creeping experience and pass informative judgements about their own strategies. Student-writers will respond to fact-finding statements regarding five writing components delineated as rehearsing, drafting, revising, student-writers’ role and the role of instructional materials

  3. The Community Publishing Project: assisting writers to self-publish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the need for a small project such as the Community Publishing Project in South Africa and explores its aims. The method of involving writers and community groups in the publication process is described and two completed projects are evaluated. Lessons learnt by the Centre for the Book in managing ...

  4. Turkish and Native English Academic Writers' Use of Lexical Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Yusuf; Köse, Gül Durmusoglu

    2016-01-01

    Lexical bundles such as "on the other hand" and "as a result of" are extremely common and important in academic discourse. The appropriate use of lexical bundles typical of a specific academic discipline is important for writers and the absence of such bundles may not sound fluent and native-like. Recent studies (e.g. Adel…

  5. George Orwell (1903 -1950) - writer, socialist, eccentric and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    George Orwell, born Eric Blair in India in 1903, the third generation of colonial service stock, joined the Indian. Imperial Police in Burma in 1922 after leaving school in. England. Rejecting the racial and cultural barriers of colonial rule he encountered there, he returned to England to become a writer. He became allied to ...

  6. Curriculum-Based Measurement for Beginning Writers (K-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombek, Jennifer L.; Al Otaiba, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Assessment and instruction of reading tend to dominate current discussions of early literacy. Shifting the focus to writing, this article addresses the assessment of writing for students in kindergarten through second grade. Using curriculum-based measurement of written expression for beginning writers, teachers can measure growth of smaller…

  7. Teaching Talented Writers with Web 2.0 Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olthouse, Jill M.; Miller, Myriah Tasker

    2012-01-01

    This article is a review of 12 online writing resources and contains suggestions about how such resources might be used in a differentiated classroom with talented writers. Youth with writing talent are defined by distinguishing characteristics and the authors discuss how those characteristics can be supported and enhanced using Web 2.0 tools.…

  8. Creative Writers and Human Behaviour: An Evaluation of Rems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UJAH: Unizik Journal of Arts and Humanities ... Prior to the developments in psychology, which is a relatively new science of mental process and behaviour, the creative writers have had interest in the sources of the behaviour of their fictive characters, which are people portrayed in the worlds of their literary texts.

  9. The Writers of Belogradchik: Ignat P. Daskalov [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.V. Toshev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A small-scale research identifies Ignat Daskalov as one of the writers of Belogradchik. Only one short story is published by him. The title is “In Peace of the Dead”. The dramatic plot unfolds in Belogradchik. The story is published in the magazine “Illustration Light” in 1919.

  10. Teacher as Writer: Remembering the Agony, Sharing the Ecstasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augsburger, Deborah J.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that teachers who write are in a better position to guide students, provide useful feedback, and show the real value of writing. Discusses remembering the agony, sharing the ecstasy, giving authentic feedback, growing a community of writers, and remembering the reason people bother to write at all. (SR)

  11. A Multicomponent Measure of Writing Motivation with Basic College Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, Charles A.; Philippakos, Zoi A.; Graham, Steve

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to develop and validate a measure of motivation for use with basic college writers that would measure self-efficacy, achievement goals, beliefs, and affect. As part of a design research project on curriculum for community college developmental writing classes, 133 students in 11 classes completed the motivation…

  12. A Sense of Story: Essays on Contemporary Writers for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, John Rowe

    This is an introduction to the work of 19 contemporary English-language writers for children. It consists of critical essays on the works of Joan Aiken, L. M. Boston, H. F. Brinsmead, John Christopher, Helen Cresswell, Meindert DeJong, Eleanor Estes, Paula Fox, Leon Garfield, Alan Garner, Madeleine L'Engle, William Mayne, Andre Norton, Scott…

  13. Verb Errors of Bilingual and Monolingual Basic Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Olga

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzed the grammatical control of verbs exercised by 145 monolingual English and Generation 1.5 bilingual developmental writers in narrative essays using quantitative and qualitative methods. Generation 1.5 students made more errors than their monolingual peers in each category investigated, albeit in only 2 categories was the…

  14. Journal of EEA, Vol. 27, 2010 WRITER IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    messy

    iris, retinal blood vessels, hand geometry, DNA) and behavioral biometrics that use individual traits of a person's behavior for identification (e.g. voice, gait, keystroke dynamics, signature, handwriting). Identifying the writer of a handwritten sample using automatic image-based methods is an interesting pattern recognition ...

  15. The Youth Writers: Developing Curriculum for Their Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehbiel, Michelle; Fenton, Melissa S.; Fairchild, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Curricula designed for youth are often lacking a young person's influence and perspective. In order to provide engaging, "fresh" materials for youth, 4-H professionals can recruit youth as curriculum writers. Youth are given an opportunity to form positive partnerships with adults, produce engaging and creative materials for their peers,…

  16. Writer's cramp: Increased dorsal premotor activity during intended writing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delnooz, C.C.S.; Helmich, R.C.G.; Medendorp, W.P.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Toni, I.

    2013-01-01

    Simple writer's cramp (WC) is a task-specific form of dystonia, characterized by abnormal movements and postures of the hand during writing. It is extremely task-specific, since dystonic symptoms can occur when a patient uses a pencil for writing, but not when it is used for sharpening. Maladaptive

  17. Writer's cramp: increased dorsal premotor activity during intended writing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delnooz, C.C.S.; Helmich, R.C.G.; Medendorp, W.P.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Toni, I.

    2013-01-01

    Simple writer's cramp (WC) is a task-specific form of dystonia, characterized by abnormal movements and postures of the hand during writing. It is extremely task-specific, since dystonic symptoms can occur when a patient uses a pencil for writing, but not when it is used for sharpening. Maladaptive

  18. Understanding and Reducing the Knowledge Effect: Implications for Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, John R.; Bajzek, Diana

    2008-01-01

    To be effective, writers must understand what knowledge they share with the audience and what they do not. Achieving this understanding is made difficult by the knowledge effect--a tendency of individuals to assume that their own knowledge is shared by others. Understanding the knowledge effect and methods for reducing it is potentially useful for…

  19. Journal of EEA, Vol. 27, 2010 WRITER IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    messy

    further processing by the identification system. Two approaches ... identification, writer verification, image pre-processing, multi-channel .... yxf be digital value of pixel ),( yx in digital image, where zero value correspond to black pixel and one correspond to white pixel. The horizontal projection profile. (HPP) is defined as. ∑.

  20. Writers as Performers: Developing Reflexive and Creative Writing Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Writing is a complex and learned activity in that it requires us to shape our thoughts into words and texts that are appropriate for the purpose, audience and medium of a variety of communicative forms. Writers must constantly make decisions about how to represent their subject matter and themselves through language. In this way, writing can be…

  1. Go Out and Prosper, Technocrats: Technical Writers and Rhetorical Translations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Carmen

    The University of Southwestern Louisiana offers an English major in technical writing. Many assignments and topics are covered in the junior technical writing course, but one of the most effective projects combines the students' and the professor's expertise and focuses on writing for a specific audience. The technical writer's job is to know how…

  2. The Impact of Alcoholism: The Writer, the Story, the Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, Roy

    1990-01-01

    College teachers can help students rethink two stereotypes emerging in American literature classes--the self-destructive writer who must necessarily be addicted, and the beer-guzzling, wild-partying college student--through an examination of the impact of alcoholism on the author's life. A course on Tennessee Williams illustrates the approach.…

  3. Using Curriculum-Based Measurement for Struggling Beginning Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, Kristen L.; Du, Xiaoqing; Parker, David C.; Pinto, Viveca

    2011-01-01

    Many students struggle with writing, which impacts their school and lifelong success, but early identification and intervention can help prevent long-term writing problems. Reliable and valid assessment tools are needed for early identification of struggling writers, as well as to monitor their progress and evaluate the effects of early…

  4. Graphic Novels: A Scaffolding Strategy for Young Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Caryn

    2016-01-01

    Young readers notice details in pictures and images with great precision, yet young writers often struggle in adding enough detail to their writing. Third-grade students use a published author's scene from a graphic novel as a scaffold for storytelling. Partners notice the detail in the images; they take turns orally telling the story, and finally…

  5. Word Processing: A Helpful Tool for Basic Writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchison, Craig

    1989-01-01

    Examines the effects of word processing on writing quality and the amount of text produced by basic writers. Finds that students using computers wrote more, but that there was no difference in quality between those who used a word processor and those who did not. (MS)

  6. the management of writer-reader interaction in newspaper editorials

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ntsane

    how dialogically expansive and contractive resources are used in this respect in editorials from different newspapers. ... use of linguistic resources. The writer shows awareness of his/her readers by ... information the readers expect from a text and they also anticipate the readers' questions or reactions to what is written.

  7. Writer identity while learning discipline-specific academic literacy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Constructing an effective identity in academic writing is considered crucial in establishing a favourable reader-writer relationship; in eliciting a positive reader response to the text and even in developing a convincing argument (Hyland, 2004). But different expectations of authorial presence in academic writing between ...

  8. Preserving local writers, genealogy, photographs, newspapers, and related materials

    CERN Document Server

    Smallwood, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Preserving Local Writers, Genealogy, Photographs, Newspapers, and Related Materials draws on the practical knowledge of archivists, preservationists, librarians, and others who share the goal of making local history accessible to future generations. Anyone who plans to start a local history project or preserve important historical materials will find plenty of tips, techniques, sample documents, project ideas, and inspiration in its pages.

  9. Writer adaptation in off-line Arabic handwriting recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Gregory R.; Srihari, Sargur N.

    2008-01-01

    Writer adaptation or specialization is the adjustment of handwriting recognition algorithms to a specific writer's style of handwriting. Such adjustment yields significantly improved recognition rates over counterpart general recognition algorithms. We present the first unconstrained off-line handwriting adaptation algorithm for Arabic presented in the literature. We discuss an iterative bootstrapping model which adapts a writer-independent model to a writer-dependent model using a small number of words achieving a large recognition rate increase in the process. Furthermore, we describe a confidence weighting method which generates better results by weighting words based on their length. We also discuss script features unique to Arabic, and how we incorporate them into our adaptation process. Even though Arabic has many more character classes than languages such as English, significant improvement was observed. The testing set consisting of about 100 pages of handwritten text had an initial average overall recognition rate of 67%. After the basic adaptation was finished, the overall recognition rate was 73.3%. As the improvement was most marked for the longer words, and the set of confidently recognized longer words contained many fewer false results, a second method was presented using them alone, resulting in a recognition rate of about 75%. Initially, these words had a 69.5% recognition rate, improving to about a 92% recognition rate after adaptation. A novel hybrid method is presented with a rate of about 77.2%.

  10. Treatment of writer's cramp with sodium valproate and baclofen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of a 27-year-old Black man with writer's cramp with a combin'ation of sodium valproate (Epilim) and baclofen (Lioresal) resulted in dramatic improvement of symptoms and signs. The possible mechanism of action of these drugs is discussed. This combination should be tried in the initial management of this ...

  11. A Dose of Writing Reality: Helping Students become Better Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Christine Love

    2011-01-01

    When teachers are overly focused on the teaching of grammar instead of the teaching of writing, students' quality of work suffers. Teachers should provide examples of writer's craft and author's voice to help students learn how to write their own stories.

  12. The French Language And The Francophone African Creative Writer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explains the external and internal factors in the survival of the French language, especially in West Africa, where nationalism could have informed an endogenous language policy. Rather, multilingualism privileges French as a vehicle of expression. This essay examines the attitudes of African writers to the use of ...

  13. Prime Time Power: Women Producers, Writers and Directors on TV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenland, Sally

    This report analyzes the number of women working in the following six decision making jobs in prime time television: (1) executive producer; (2) supervising producer; (3) producer; (4) co-producer; (5) writer; and (6) director. The women who hold these positions are able to influence the portrayal of women on television as well as to improve the…

  14. Fabrication of back contacts using laser writer and photolithography ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The pattern was inscribed without proximity effect and stitching errors, which was characterized using optical microscope and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). It was proven that writing speed of a mask-writer is decided according to the intended feature size and line width. As the writing speed ...

  15. Writer identification using directional ink-trace width measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, A. A.; Smit, J.; Bulacu, M. L.; Schomaker, L. R. B.

    As suggested by modern paleography, the width of ink traces is a powerful source of information for off-line writer identification, particularly if combined with its direction. Such measurements can be computed using simple, fast and accurate methods based on pixel contours, the combination of which

  16. Scott Fitzgerald: famous writer, alcoholism and probable epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana M. Wolski

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Scott Fitzgerald, a world-renowned American writer, suffered from various health problems, particularly alcohol dependence, and died suddenly at the age of 44. According to descriptions in A Moveable Feast, by Ernest Hemingway, Fitzgerald had episodes resembling complex partial seizures, raising the possibility of temporal lobe epilepsy.

  17. Scott Fitzgerald: famous writer, alcoholism and probable epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolski, Mariana M; Paola, Luciano de; Teive, Hélio A G

    2017-01-01

    Scott Fitzgerald, a world-renowned American writer, suffered from various health problems, particularly alcohol dependence, and died suddenly at the age of 44. According to descriptions in A Moveable Feast, by Ernest Hemingway, Fitzgerald had episodes resembling complex partial seizures, raising the possibility of temporal lobe epilepsy.

  18. It takes a (virtual) village: crowdsourcing measurement consensus to advance survivorship care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Carla; Beckjord, Ellen; Moser, Richard P; Vieux, Sana N; Padgett, Lynne S; Hesse, Bradford W

    2015-03-01

    We report results from the use of an innovative tool (the Grid-Enabled Measures (GEM) database) to drive consensus on the use of measures evaluating the efficacy and implementation of survivorship care plans. The goal of this initiative was to increase the use of publicly available shared measures to enable comparability across studies. Between February and August 2012, research and practice communities populated the GEM platform with constructs and measures relevant to survivorship care planning, rated the measures, and provided qualitative feedback on the quality of the measures. Fifty-one constructs and 124 measures were entered into the GEM-Care Planning workspace by participants. The greatest number of measures appeared in the domains of Health and Psychosocial Outcomes, Health Behaviors, and Coordination of Care/Transitional Care. Using technology-mediated social participation, GEM presents a novel approach to how we measure and improve the quality of survivorship care.

  19. Resource competition induces heterogeneity and can increase cohort survivorship: selection-event duration matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Jennifer L; Anderson, James J

    2013-12-01

    Determining when resource competition increases survivorship can reveal processes underlying population dynamics and reinforce the importance of heterogeneity among individuals in conservation. We ran an experiment mimicking the effects of competition in a growing season on survivorship during a selection event (e.g., overwinter starvation, drought). Using a model fish species (Poecilia reticulata), we studied how food availability and competition affect mass in a treatment stage, and subsequently survivorship in a challenge stage of increased temperature and starvation. The post-treatment mean mass was strongly related to the mean time to mortality and mass at mortality at all levels of competition. However, competition increased variance in mass and extended the right tail of the survivorship curve, resulting in a greater number of individuals alive beyond a critical temporal threshold ([Formula: see text]) than without competition. To realize the benefits from previously experienced competition, the duration of the challenge ([Formula: see text]) following the competition must exceed the critical threshold [Formula: see text] (i.e., competition increases survivorship when [Formula: see text]). Furthermore, this benefit was equivalent to increasing food availability by 20 % in a group without competition in our experiment. The relationship of [Formula: see text] to treatment and challenge conditions was modeled by characterizing mortality through mass loss in terms of the stochastic rate of loss of vitality (individual's survival capacity). In essence, when the duration of a selection event exceeds [Formula: see text], competition-induced heterogeneity buffers against mortality through overcompensation processes among individuals of a cohort. Overall, our study demonstrates an approach to quantify how early life stage heterogeneity affects survivorship.

  20. Parents benefit from eating offspring: density-dependent egg survivorship compensates for filial cannibalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Hope; Lindström, Kai; St Mary, Colette M

    2006-10-01

    Why should animals knowingly consume their own young? It is difficult to imagine many circumstances in which eating one's own young (i.e., filial cannibalism) actually increases an individual's fitness; however, filial cannibalism commonly co-occurs with parental care in fishes. The evolutionary significance of filial cannibalism remains unclear. The most commonly accepted explanation is that filial cannibalism is a mechanism by which caring males gain energy or nutrients that they reinvest into future reproduction, thereby increasing net reproductive success. There is mixed support for this hypothesis and, at best, it can only explain filial cannibalism in some species. A recent alternative hypothesis suggests that filial cannibalism improves the survivorship of remaining eggs by increasing oxygen availability, and thus increases current reproductive success. This theory has received little attention as of yet. We evaluated the hypothesis of oxygen-mediated filial cannibalism in the sand goby by examining the effect of oxygen and egg density on the occurrence of filial cannibalism, evaluating the effects of partial clutch cannibalism on the survivorship of remaining eggs, and comparing potential costs and benefits of filial cannibalism related to the net number of eggs surviving. Indeed, we found that oxygen level and egg density affected the occurrence of cannibalism and that simulated partial clutch cannibalism improved survivorship of the remaining eggs. Additionally, because increased egg survivorship, stemming from partial egg removal, compensated for the cost of cannibalism (i.e., number of eggs removed) at a range of cannibalism levels, filial cannibalism potentially results in no net losses in reproductive success. However, oxygen did not affect egg survivorship. Thus, we suggest a more general hypothesis of filial cannibalism mediated by density-dependent egg survivorship.

  1. Metadiscourse Markers in Biological Research Articles and Journal Impact Factor: Non-Native Writers vs. Native Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Javad; Ilghami, Roghayeh

    2016-01-01

    Metadiscourse markers (MDMs) are lexical resources that writers employ to organize their discourse and state their stance towards the content or the reader. This study investigated the frequency with which interactive and interactional MDMs were employed in biological research articles (RAs). It also explored the possible relationship between the…

  2. L1/L2/L3 Writing Development: Longitudinal Case Study of a Japanese Multicompetent Writer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroe; Rinnert, Carol

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal case study, supplemented by cross-sectional comparisons among five groups of writers with differing backgrounds, investigates how Natsu, a Japanese multilingual writer, developed her L1, L2 (English), and L3 (Chinese) writing competence over two and a half years. To create a comprehensive picture of this multilingual writer, the…

  3. Portfolios and Second Graders' Self-Assessments of Their Development as Writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, Joyce; Ley, Terry C.

    1996-01-01

    Investigates the impact of portfolio assessment strategies on second graders' perceptions of themselves as writers. Finds that the process had positive effects on students' perceptions of themselves as writers; their ability to describe strengths and weaknesses in their writing; their ability to identify changes in themselves as writers; and their…

  4. Disciplinary Literacy in Elementary School: How a Struggling Student Positions Herself as a Writer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håland, Anne

    2017-01-01

    This article focuses on disciplinary literacy and how a struggling writer in a Norwegian classroom positions herself as a disciplinary writer when given model texts. The study explores how model texts can scaffold students' disciplinary writing and give them the opportunity to position themselves as disciplinary writers in lab reports and factual…

  5. Non-Intentional Invention: The Promethean, Trickster, and Improvisational Invention Heuristics of Academic Writers and Poets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This essay introduces a novel way to conceptualize writerly invention -- invention as adopting a non-intentional intellectual stance wherein heuristics are experienced as acting upon the writer as opposed to being enacted by the writer. This view of invention complicates and extends the traditional, Aristotelian view of invention as discreet…

  6. Stigma, survivorship and solutions: Addressing the challenges of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Age at presentation. Newman[1] demonstrated that the overall mean age at which African women present with breast cancer is 35 - 45 years, 10 - 15 years earlier than their. Caucasian counterparts.[2] A 3-year retrospective review of 374 breast cancer patients in Kenya showed a median age of 44 years at presentation;[2] ...

  7. Stigma, survivorship and solutions: Addressing the challenges of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    screening programmes exist.[8] These are accentuated in low-resource environments where facilities do not exist. Patients in low-resource settings face unique challenges in having to cope with breast cancer. Not only do they have to deal with the emotional impact of a cancer diagnosis, but also with the additional.

  8. Supporting Young Writers with Award-Winning Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Kathryn Lake; Ricks, Paul H.; Young, Terrell A.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a way to use award-winning books as mentor texts for very young writers. Books were selected as mentor texts from the winners of the Australian Early Childhood Children's Book of the Year Award and the American Theodor Seuss Geisel Award. The authors explain the value of using award-winning texts in the classroom and describe…

  9. Interview with Contemporary Armenian Writer and Translator Diana Hambardzumyan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Tottossy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A conversation with Diana Hambardzumyan, a contemporary Armenian writer, translator and lecturer in English Literature at the University of Yerevan, foregrounds a series of significant features of contemporary Armenian literature and the country’s key social and cultural issues. She interconnects current events with the literary memory, highlighting and confirming the Armenian writers’ need to maintain their traditional role as representatives of the cultural will of their people.

  10. Restaging Hysteria: Mary Wigman as Writer and Dancer

    OpenAIRE

    Laura A. McLary

    2003-01-01

    Mary Wigman was not only a leading proponent of the early twentieth-century Expressionist dance movement, but also a writer of poetry and short poetic prose. Despite her assertion that dance was beyond language, she wrote often about dance in an attempt to articulate the kinesthetic experience of dance through languages. This interdisciplinary study explores the intersection of dance and writing for Wigman, focusing on gender coding in writing and dance within the context of early twentieth-c...

  11. Digital network of writers helps to foster spirit of collaboration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Klimas, J

    2015-07-29

    Nurse Liz Charalambous has shown how a Facebook group can help boost writing (careers, June 3). We would like to take this idea one step further and argue that, contrary to a commonly held notion, \\'too many cooks do not spoil the broth\\' when it comes to group writing. Instead, this approach fosters collaboration between writers, as Ms Charalambous suggests, and which has also been our experience.

  12. Effect of non-nutritive sugars to decrease the survivorship of spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we investigated the effects of non-nutritive sugars and sugar alcohols on the survivorship of spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, and found erythritol and erythrose as potentially toxic to the fly. In a dose-dependent study, erythritol and erythrose significantly reduced fly ...

  13. The Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) Program: overview and progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    David F. DeSante; Oriane E. Williams; Kenneth M. Burton

    1993-01-01

    It is generally agreed that populations of many North American landbird species, especially forest-inhabiting Neotropical migratory species in eastern North America, are declining. Existing population-trend data, however, provide no information on primary demographic parameters (productivity and survivorship) and thus provide no means for determining at what point in...

  14. Translocation as a conservation tool for Agassiz's desert tortoises: Survivorship, reproduction, and movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. E. Nussear; C. R. Tracy; P. A. Medica; D. S. Wilson; R. W. Marlow; P. S. Corn

    2012-01-01

    We translocated 120 Agassiz's desert tortoises to 5 sites in Nevada and Utah to evaluate the effects of translocation on tortoise survivorship, reproduction, and habitat use. Translocation sites included several elevations, and extended to sites with vegetation assemblages not typically associated with desert tortoises in order to explore the possibility of moving...

  15. Modelling the survivorship of Nigeria children in their first 10 years of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fagbamigbe

    Methods: We used the data from the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey to carry out a retrospective analysis of children survival. .... older children experiencing the survival disadvantages associated with polygyny. ..... more than secondary education after the first three years, survivorship of children from other.

  16. On the survivorship and historical growth of the South African cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural survivorship parameters for male and female Cape rock lobsters Jasus lalandii are estimated using size-structure information from pristine sections of the population, such as animals in sanctuaries. It is assumed that these pristine subpopulations are at steady states, i.e. that annual juvenile settlement is constant, ...

  17. Long-term survivorship of the Corail™ standard stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louboutin, L; Viste, A; Desmarchelier, R; Fessy, M-H

    2017-11-01

    The Corail™ stem, which was first introduced in 1986, has since been modified twice: first to make the neck thinner and then to change the location of the laser markings. The survival and complications of the first-generation straight, titanium, hydroxyapatite-coated stem are known; however, there is little specific information about the latest-generation stem. This led us to conduct a retrospective study to determine the: (1) long-term survival; (2) clinical and radiographic outcomes; (3) complications; and (4) risk factors for revision of the newest Corail™ stem. The newest Corail™ AMT (Articul/EZE™ Mini Taper) standard stem has comparable survival to prior models. This single-center, retrospective study included 133 patients (140 hips), who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty (THA), between January and December 2004, in which a Corail™ Standard stem was implanted using a posterolateral approach. Patients who underwent revision THA, THA due to femoral neck fracture or who received lateralized (offset) stems were excluded. The mean age at the time of THA was 69±13 years [35-92] in 85 men (61%) and 55 women (39%) who had a mean BMI of 27kg/m2±11 [16-39]. At the latest follow-up, 32 patients (32 hips) had died and 8 patients (8 hips) had less than 3 years' follow-up, thus were not included in the clinical evaluation. The Merle d'Aubigné (PMA) score was collected. The stem's survivorship was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method with revision for aseptic loosening and revision or implant removal for any reason as the end-points. The Cox model was used to analyze risk factors for revision. The mean follow-up was 10±3 years [3-12]. The PMA score was 12±2.6 [5-17] preoperatively and 16±2.7 [7-18] at the last follow-up (Pstem change plus wire cerclage), 2 greater trochanter fractures (treated non-surgically) and 2 cases of sciatic nerve palsy. There were 3 late complications: 2 cases of iliopsoas irritation and 1 ceramic insert

  18. Writer's Guide for technical procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    A primary objective throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex is that operations be conducted in a deliberate and controlled manner with emphasis upon recognition and maintenance of the facility-specific safety envelope. One critical element of maintaining the safety envelope is procedures. DOE is providing guidance through this and other writer's guides to assist procedure writers across the DOE complex in producing accurate, complete, and usable procedures that promote safe and efficient operations in keeping with such DOE Orders as 5480.19, Conduct of Operations for DOE Facilities'', 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear facilities'', and 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors''. This Writer's Guide addresses the content, format, and style of technical procedures (procedures that prescribe production, operation of equipment and facilities, and maintenance activities) and is intended to be applied in a manner appropriate to the individual facility, 15 refs.

  19. Writers Identification Based on Multiple Windows Features Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadhil, Murad Saadi; Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Rehman, Amjad; Saba, Tanzila

    2016-03-01

    Now a days, writer identification is at high demand to identify the original writer of the script at high accuracy. The one of the main challenge in writer identification is how to extract the discriminative features of different authors' scripts to classify precisely. In this paper, the adaptive division method on the offline Latin script has been implemented using several variant window sizes. Fragments of binarized text a set of features are extracted and classified into clusters in the form of groups or classes. Finally, the proposed approach in this paper has been tested on various parameters in terms of text division and window sizes. It is observed that selection of the right window size yields a well positioned window division. The proposed approach is tested on IAM standard dataset (IAM, Institut für Informatik und angewandte Mathematik, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland) that is a constraint free script database. Finally, achieved results are compared with several techniques reported in the literature.

  20. Improvement of unified mask data formats for EB writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Toshio; Hirumi, Junji; Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Hojyo, Yutaka; Kawase, Yuichi; Hara, Shigehiro; Kuriyama, Koki; Hoga, Morihisa; Watanabe, Satoshi W.; Kawase, Hidemichi; Kamimoto, Tomoko; Kato, Kokoro

    2004-08-01

    Mask data preparation (MDP) is a complicated process because many kinds of EB data files and jobdeck data files are used in mask manufacturers and EB data files continue to become bigger. Therefore we have developed unified mask data formats for Variable-Shaped-Beam (VSB) EB writers with efficient data compaction. The unified mask data formats are composed of a pattern data format for EB writers named "NEO" and a layout format named "MALY". We released NEO and MALY on April 2003. To evaluate NEO and MALY, we have made a prototype system of MDP such as a converter from design data to NEO/MALY and converters from NEO/MALY to each EB data. We have evaluated about functions and performance of the MDP flow using real design data in device manufacturers. As a result, some improvements in NEO and MALY were achieved and we have revised the specification of NEO and MALY as the final version. We have confirmed that NEO and MALY can be used for a set of unified mask data formats among VSB EB writers and can reduce complexity of mask data handling in mask manufacturers. They will be put to practical use in MDP flow.

  1. Ascertainment of Unmet Needs and Participation in Health Maintenance and Screening of Adult Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Survivors Followed in a Formal Survivorship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Theresa; Paplham, Pamela; Austin-Ketch, Tammy; Zhang, Yali; Grimmer, Jennifer; Burns, Michael; Balderman, Sophia; Ross, Maureen; McCarthy, Philip L

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to ascertain unmet needs in autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients actively followed in an established long-term survivorship clinic at Roswell Park Cancer Institute from 2006 to 2012. The Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SUNS) was mailed to 209 eligible patients and returned by 110 (53% participation rate). SUNS includes 89 items covering 5 domains: Emotional Health, Access and Continuity of Care, Relationships, Financial Concerns, and Information. The top 5 specific unmet needs for autologous HCT patients were inability to set future goals/long-term plans, changes in appearance, bad memory/lacking focus, losing confidence in abilities, and paying household or other bills. For allogeneic HCT patients these 5 unmet needs were tied at 21% of respondents: ability to earn money, pay bills, feeling tired, feeling depressed, and dealing with others' expectations of "returning to normal." The top 5 needs reported by females were all from the emotional health domain, whereas males reported financial domain unmet needs. Self-reported participation in health maintenance and screening tests varied greatly from 88% of patients having routine annual bloodwork to 13% of patients having an exercise stress test in the past year. Our findings demonstrate unmet needs in emotional health and financial burden in HCT survivors and variable compliance with survivorship screening. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Supporting Education PhD and DEd Students to Become Confident Academic Writers: An Evaluation of Thesis Writers' Circles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcombe, Wendy; McCosker, Anthony; O'Loughlin, Kieran

    2007-01-01

    This paper critically evaluates the pilot of a Thesis Writers' Circles program offered to Education PhD and DEd students at the University of Melbourne in semester 2, 2005. The analysis focuses on the needs of those students that were felt to be well-met by this model of support. Broadly, the paper identifies two distinct but inter-related themes:…

  3. Philip roth's parodies of Jamesian writer/reader relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Pughe, Tom

    2017-01-01

    In this essay I should like to conceive of the way one particular reader approaches the work of Henry James in terms of a breaking-point because I think that the discussion of this writer/reader relationship can contribute to our understanding of that much larger breaking-point that we allude to when we try to distinguish between modernism and postmodernism. The postmodern reader of James I shall be concerned with is Philip Roth. By the term "reader" I want to suggest, on the one hand, the wa...

  4. Literary Legacy: Rachel Carson's Influence on Contemporary Women Nature Writers

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Erin

    2017-01-01

    While Rachel Carson is perhaps best known for her book Silent Spring and her work as a scientist and environmentalist, she is often overlooked as an important writer of literature, as evidenced through Silent Spring but also through her three books about the sea. This thesis poses the question: if Carson made such a lasting impact on the way Americans think about the environment through her writing, how has she affected the discipline of nature writing in the US? Through an examination of C...

  5. Sentiment Perception of Readers and Writers in Emoji use

    OpenAIRE

    Berengueres, Jose; Castro, Dani

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has traditionally analyzed emoji sentiment from the point of view of the reader of the content not the author. Here, we analyze emoji sentiment from the point of view of the author and present a emoji sentiment benchmark that was built from an employee happiness dataset where emoji happen to be annotated with daily happiness of the author of the comment. The data spans over 3 years, and 4k employees of 56 companies based in Barcelona. We compare sentiment of writers to reade...

  6. From Your Land to Poland. On the Commitment of Writers

    OpenAIRE

    Bandura, Michał

    2014-01-01

    L’ouvrage From Your Land to Poland. On the Commitment of Writers est le fruit d’une conférence organisée par les polonistes de trois universités belges – l’Université Libre de Bruxelles, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven et Universiteit Gent – en novembre 2011 à l’Université libre de Bruxelles. Les organisateurs y posaient les questions suivantes : l’engagement social et politique des écrivains est-il possible à une époque où les conditions de fonctionnement de la littérature sont dictées par le...

  7. Defective cerebellar control of cortical plasticity in writer's cramp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubsch, Cecile; Roze, Emmanuel; Popa, Traian; Russo, Margherita; Balachandran, Ammu; Pradeep, Salini; Mueller, Florian; Brochard, Vanessa; Quartarone, Angelo; Degos, Bertrand; Vidailhet, Marie; Kishore, Asha; Meunier, Sabine

    2013-07-01

    A large body of evidence points to a role of basal ganglia dysfunction in the pathophysiology of dystonia, but recent studies indicate that cerebellar dysfunction may also be involved. The cerebellum influences sensorimotor adaptation by modulating sensorimotor plasticity of the primary motor cortex. Motor cortex sensorimotor plasticity is maladaptive in patients with writer's cramp. Here we examined whether putative cerebellar dysfunction in dystonia is linked to these patients' maladaptive plasticity. To that end we compared the performances of patients and healthy control subjects in a reaching task involving a visuomotor conflict generated by imposing a random deviation (-40° to 40°) on the direction of movement of the mouse/cursor. Such a task is known to involve the cerebellum. We also compared, between patients and healthy control subjects, how the cerebellum modulates the extent and duration of an ongoing sensorimotor plasticity in the motor cortex. The cerebellar cortex was excited or inhibited by means of repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation before artificial sensorimotor plasticity was induced in the motor cortex by paired associative stimulation. Patients with writer's cramp were slower than the healthy control subjects to reach the target and, after having repeatedly adapted their trajectories to the deviations, they were less efficient than the healthy control subjects to perform reaching movement without imposed deviation. It was interpreted as impaired washing-out abilities. In healthy subjects, cerebellar cortex excitation prevented the paired associative stimulation to induce a sensorimotor plasticity in the primary motor cortex, whereas cerebellar cortex inhibition led the paired associative stimulation to be more efficient in inducing the plasticity. In patients with writer's cramp, cerebellar cortex excitation and inhibition were both ineffective in modulating sensorimotor plasticity. In patients with writer's cramp, but not in healthy

  8. The effect of vessel speed on the survivorship of biofouling organisms at different hull locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Ashley D M; Piola, Richard F; Taylor, Michael D; Hewitt, Chad L; Gardner, Jonathan P A

    2010-07-01

    This study used a specially designed MAGPLATE system to quantify the en route survivorship and post-voyage recovery of biofouling assemblages subjected to short voyages (bow, amidships and stern) was also examined. While no significant differences were evident in en route survivorship of biofouling organisms amongst hull locations, biofouling cover and richness were markedly reduced on faster vessels relative to slower craft. Therefore, the potential inoculum size of non-indigenous marine species and richness is likely to be reduced for vessels that travel at faster speeds (> 14 knots), which is likely to also reduce the chances of successful introductions. Despite this, the magnitude of introductions from biofouling on fast vessels can be considered minor, especially for species richness where 90% of source-port species were recorded at destinations.

  9. Fiction writers, university students and the restrictions of Brazil’s literary field today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Agostini Mello

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses aspects of the contemporary Brazilian literary field, focusing on the most recent tendencies and positions of writers and critics. Arguably, substantial changes have occurred in the way writers relate to the public sphere as well in the way cultural and scholarly capital is acquired. In the field of criticism, the problem of its discursive restrictions, in relation to what happens with writers, is considered.

  10. Reproduction, abundance and survivorship of two Alveopora spp. in the mesophotic reefs of Eilat, Red Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Eyal-Shaham; Gal Eyal; Raz Tamir; Yossi Loya

    2016-01-01

    Although the study of coral reproduction has advanced tremendously over the last few decades, a particular gap exists in our knowledge of the reproductive modes of corals from ?mesophotic coral ecosystems? (MCEs) found at 30?150?m depth. Here, we report for the first time on the reproductive patterns, living cover, and survivorship under different light treatments of two scleractinian species from the MCEs of Eilat, Red-Sea: Alveopora allingi and A. ocellata. Both species are found exclusivel...

  11. Effects of intraspecific diversity on survivorship, growth, and recruitment of the eastern oyster across sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Torrance C; Hughes, A Randall; Williams, Bethany; Garland, Hanna; Kimbro, David L

    2016-06-01

    Intraspecific diversity, particularly of foundation species, can significantly affect population, community, and ecosystem processes. Examining how genetic diversity relates to demographic traits provides a key mechanistic link from genotypic and phenotypic variation of taxa with complex life histories to their population dynamics. We conducted a field experiment to assess how two metrics of intraspecific diversity (cohort diversity, the number of independent juvenile cohorts created from different adult source populations, and genetic relatedness, genetic similarity among individuals within and across cohorts) affect the survivorship, growth, and recruitment of the foundation species Crassostrea virginica. To assess the effects of both cohort diversity and genetic relatedness on oyster demographic traits under different environmental conditions, we manipulated juvenile oyster diversity and predator exposure (presence/absence of a cage) at two sites differing in resource availability and predation intensity. Differences in predation pressure between sites overwhelmingly determined post-settlement survivorship of oysters. However, in the absence of predation (i.e., cage treatment), one or both metrics of intraspecific diversity, in addition to site, influenced long-term survivorship, growth, and recruitment. While both cohort diversity and genetic relatedness were negatively associated with long-term survivorship, genetic relatedness alone showed a positive association with growth and cohort diversity alone showed a positive association with recruitment. Thus, our results demonstrate that in the absence of predation, intraspecific diversity can affect multiple demographic traits of a foundation species, but the relative importance of these effects depends on the environmental context. Moreover, the magnitude and direction of these effects vary depending on the diversity metric, cohort diversity or genetic relatedness, suggesting that although they are inversely

  12. We are all angels: acting, reclaiming and moving beyond survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ariane B

    2014-01-01

    This article aspires to an embodiment of dynamic living versus mere survival. The term cancer survivor, including a survivor who is in remission, has been legitimated (Berger and Luckmann, The social construction of reality, p. 94 1967) by language which creates knowledge of what a cancer survivor is and does. Because we act under descriptions (Hacking, The social construction of what?, p. 103 1999), those of us who have passed through illnesses such as cancer not only have been given the name and the idea of survivor, we have assumed and conform to some or most of the characteristics assigned to it; examples of some of those characteristics are discussed throughout this project. Whether or not we choose to enact all that falls under the grammar of the classification of survivor, we still live with, create, and experience ourselves and others as legitimated by such a classification. The term survivor operates through a number of institutions (medical, capitalism, and media) resulting in individuals' awareness of such classifications about themselves and others. Many, if not most, who are aware of being classified as survivors may wish to modify or resist the constraining aspects of those classifications and their descriptions. Through layered accounts of interviews and prose, I interact with this term as one who is both caught in and wants to go against the stream of classification and description. I want to transcend what I know, yet I am aware that whatever story I make and tell is a part of the whole-my story is part of two other survivor's stories which I include in the following telling of my own. All of our stories matter. Still, I want to look beyond what is in front of me, move beyond it, dream. I do so with a desire to tell my story as part of other survivors' stories.

  13. "Ideologically Incorrect" Responses to the Holocaust by Three Israeli Women Writers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feldhay Brenner, Rachel; Feldhay Brenner, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    In her article "'Ideologically Incorrect' Responses to the Holocaust by Three Israeli Women Writers" Rachel Feldhay Brenner examines the departure from the accepted literary response to the Holocaust...

  14. Writer by Trade: James Ralph’s Claims to Authorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Thomas Mari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To the enterprising journalists of early eighteenth-century Great Britain, the refined status of “author” remained elusive. Journalism itself was a nascent occupation formed in the processes of cultural legitimatization, commercialization, and politicization of authorship. In London, James Ralph, an American expatriate and political writer, emerged as a spokesman for journalism. In his Case of Authors by Profession or Trade, a short treatise published in 1758, Ralph argued that “professional” authors included journalists and other non-patroned writers. They deserved respect as an occupational group, and a special role in society. Ralph equated and extended the privileged notions of authorship and the role of the author — essentially, respectability and some limited independence from political and financial pressures — to his fellow journalists. His Case is worth revisiting because it shows how literary culture was being challenged in his era, extended and subverted as it was by his fellow journalists and their more transitory creations.

  15. High medium-term survivorship and durability of Zweymüller-Plus total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korovessis, Panagiotis; Repantis, Thomas; Zafiropoulos, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    The Zweymüller-Plus system (SL-Plus stem, Bicon-Plus threaded cup) for primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) was introduced in 1993, as a successor of the Alloclassic THA with a few modifications in the conical stem shape and a new biconical threaded cup with a spherical shape. The medium-term performance of this system is not well established. To better understand the potential impact these design changes have had on (1) survivorship, (2) implant stability and (3) periprosthetic osteolysis, we studied patients who underwent THA using the SL-Plus stem and Bicon-Plus. We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 148 patients (153 hips) who underwent Zweymüller-Plus primary THA after an average of 11 years. With revision for aseptic failure of biological fixation as the endpoint, survivorship was 98% for the stem and 100% for the cup. Focal osteolysis was observed in 6.6% of cups and 29% of stems. Four hips (2.6%) were revised because of aseptic failure of the biologic fixation and three hips (1.95%) for deep infection. As much as 146 stems and 149 cups were evaluated to be stable. Zweymüller-Plus THA resulted in high survivorship and durability at 11 years, although the rate of osteolysis around the stem indicated polyethylene wear.

  16. OBESITY IN CANCER SURVIVAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Niyati; Chandran, Urmila; Bandera, Elisa V.

    2013-01-01

    Although obesity is a well known risk factor for several cancers, its role on cancer survival is poorly understood. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess the current evidence evaluating the impact of body adiposity on the prognosis of the three most common obesity-related cancers: prostate, colorectal, and breast. We included 33 studies of breast cancer, six studies of prostate cancer, and eight studies of colorectal cancer. We note that the evidence over-represents breast cancer survivorship research and is sparse for prostate and colorectal cancers. Overall, most studies support a relationship between body adiposity and site-specific mortality or cancer progression. However, most of the research was not specifically designed to study these outcomes and, therefore, several methodological issues should be considered before integrating their results to draw conclusions. Further research is urgently warranted to assess the long-term impact of obesity among the growing population of cancer survivors. PMID:22540252

  17. Obesity in cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Niyati; Chandran, Urmila; Bandera, Elisa V

    2012-08-21

    Although obesity is a well-known risk factor for several cancers, its role on cancer survival is poorly understood. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess the current evidence evaluating the impact of body adiposity on the prognosis of the three most common obesity-related cancers: prostate, colorectal, and breast. We included 33 studies of breast cancer, six studies of prostate cancer, and eight studies of colo-rectal cancer. We note that the evidence overrepresents breast cancer survivorship research and is sparse for prostate and colorectal cancers. Overall, most studies support a relationship between body adiposity and site-specific mortality or cancer progression. However, most of the research was not specifically designed to study these outcomes and, therefore, several methodological issues should be considered before integrating their results to draw conclusions. Further research is urgently warranted to assess the long-term impact of obesity among the growing population of cancer survivors.

  18.  “The Writer at the Far Margin”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Martín Salván

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes Don DeLillo’s narrative in terms of the artistic ethics built into it in connection to the ongoing debate on whether postmodernist as a cultural movement is able to work as a tool for critique in capitalist societies. I will take Mao II (1991 as a representative example of the narrative pattern of a writer’s resistance to the established order, a stance that is continuous throughout DeLillo’s work. I will argue that the articulation of an artistic ethics within his novels replicates his often quoted statement that “the writer is the person who stands outside society, independent of affiliation and independent of influence.” Moreover, I will claim that the insistence with which this artistic ethics appears in DeLillo’s work can be related to the growing difficulties to classify it as postmodernist.

  19. On the Correctness of Atomic Multi-Writer Registers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-07

    END; 4 END; FOR i .. 1 TO in DO w FORj 1: 1 TO mn DO Scan..VN~i,,1 VNji,j]; END; FOR, 1~ TO mDO Scan..OVN~i,,3:0 OVNIs ,,1; END; FOR~ :. 1 TO in DO Scan...OVNfj, k] = OVNI , k]w PVNj, k], = PVN[j,kju = PVN[j, kt = PVN, kw for all writers k as desired. 13 0 This result permits us to think of the values...OVN[,,?):- OVNI ,j); END; FOR I= 1 TO in DO Scan-PVN(.,jl :. PVN(i,ji; END; Scan..Volue[sj :- Valsu.(a]; -e END; - Same-Scans. 1; % REP EAT FOR I TO m DO

  20. WRITERS IN BETWEEN LANGUAGES: MINORITY LITERATURES IN THE GLOBAL SCENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Iglesias

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Writers in Between Languages reúne las ponencias presentadas en el simposio internacional del mismo nombre organizado por el Centro de Estudios Vascos de la Universidad de Nevada. Mari Jose Olaziregi, editora del volumen, ha debido enfrentarse a la difícil tarea de dar unidad a un libro que nace fragmentado, un libro donde la unidad debe buscarse en un discurso base capaz de hilvanar los diferentes artículos. Dividido en dos grandes bloques, el de los escritores y el de los académicos, el libro se pregunta por la significación que todavía hoy tiene el hecho de escribir en vasco...

  1. Meeting the mother man: rediscovering Walt Whitman, writer and nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macduff, C

    1997-01-01

    Despite a long history of men working as nurses, there is a dearth of prominent male role models in nursing history. This article reevaluates the legacy left for nursing by Walt Whitman, the famous American writer who spent three years visiting hospitals and doing voluntary nursing work during the American Civil War. Whitman's nursing practice and beliefs are examined in historical context. His motivation is also explored and related to current perspectives on males in nursing. Whitman emerges as a singular man with a talent for caring and communicating its value. He is posited as a significant figure in the history of males in nursing, whose status as a gay archetype required further research. His writings comprise a substantial legacy for the whole nursing community.

  2. Brief considerations on why the writers of literature commit suicide?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Patrocinio Alarcón Velandia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article pursues the objective to initiate a debate on the concerns regarding the death of literature writers and their characters. Avoiding the temptation to impregnate the role of theoretical arguments on the various causes of suicide in a person, despite the presence of common factors, here it aims to recognize the existence of particular and specific reasons in each suicide. While countless treaties and literary works have been written on suicide, those follow religious, philosophical, socio-anthropological, economic, medical and psychiatric and genetic approaches. Thus, without claiming to exhaust the subject, rather than closing with concluding thoughts, some questions are formulated to continue the reflection on the phenomenon of suicide.

  3. EXPLORING WRITER IDENTITY IN MEXICAN EFL STUDENTS' ACADEMIC WRITING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Roux Rodríguez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to explore writer identity in Mexican undergraduate students of Applied Linguistics writing in English. We focused on the participants' use of first person pronouns and the ways in which they conceptualized their identity as authors of their essays. We employed a combination of text analysis and discourse-based interview methodologies. Findings indicate that participants that made ample use of first person pronouns employed them to present personal experiences rather than to project a strong authorial self. By contrast, those who made little use of first person pronouns seemed to project stronger authorial selves by employing a broader range of stylistic choices. The use of first person pronouns is not essential in the development of strong authorial selves. Higher education should provide better opportunities and resources for students to learn how to project a strong authorial presence in the academic texts they write in English.

  4. The technical writer's handbook writing with style and clarity

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Matt

    2002-01-01

    "The Technical Writer's Handbook" is by a practising scientist who screens hundreds of manuscripts each year. It is directed at scientists, engineers and others who want to improve their writing and communication. It teaches that technical writing, although it has its own special requirements, is no different from ordinary writing and should be written with short, clear sentences and in the active voice. Divided into two parts, the first part is an introduction to technical and report writing and provides a sort of prescription for writing and organizing technical papers of all kinds. The second part is written in dictionary format and contains entries on grammar, style, and organization, as well as entries on topics such as common errors, resume writing, metric units, jargon, conference proceedings, figures, tables and slides. A comprehensive list of cross-references reveals related topics quickly and easily.

  5. So you want to be a science writer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, John; Szalinski, Christina

    2014-07-01

    The Internet destroyed the ecology of traditional science journalism, drying up ad revenues and pushing "old school" mass media toward extinction. But the new technology opened a wider landscape for digital science writers, online "content curators," and scientists to chronicle the wonders and worries of modern science. For those thinking of a career in science writing, here is a flash history, a quick overview, some advice, and a few cautions. © 2014 Fleischman and Szalinski. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  6. Teacher researchers as writers: A way to sharing findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melba Libia Cárdenas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A teacher development programme (TDP for teachers of English at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia in Bogotá has incorporated the research element as a means to motivate practitioners to widen professional knowledge. Based on the assumption that research findings gain real value if shared with other people, teachers have been challenged to establish a dialogue with academic communities by writing formal reports required by the University and articles describing the research processes they have accomplished. This paper examines the experiences of teacher researchers as writers as revealed in a research project in progress. I start by providing some background information about the TDP and then refer to the criteria that helped us to complete the writing tasks. Difficulties and strategies used to overcome them are also pointed out. Finally, I mention the benefits teachers identified after publishing their research reports in the PROFILE journal as well as some pedagogical implications.

  7. Preparing English Learners for Effective Peer Review in the Writers' Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Hyon

    2015-01-01

    English Language Learners (ELLs) often face challenges when participating in peer review activities in writers' workshops. This article identifies some of the potential difficulties that ELL writers may experience, and provides teachers with strategies to address these problems. The author describes a simple three-step peer review training model…

  8. Introduction in Indonesian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Articles: How Indonesian Writers Justify Their Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsyad, Safnil; Wardhana, Dian Eka Chandra

    2014-01-01

    The introductory part of a research article (RA) is very important because in this section writers must argue about the importance of their research topic and project so that they can attract their readers' attention to read the whole article. This study analyzes RA introductions written by Indonesian writers in social sciences and humanities…

  9. Argumentation Text Construction by Japanese as a Foreign Language Writers: A Dynamic View of Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinnert, Carol; Kobauashi, Hiroe; Katayama, Akemi

    2015-01-01

    This study takes a dynamic view of transfer as reusing and reshaping previous knowledge in new writing contexts to investigate how novice Japanese as a foreign language (JFL) writers draw on knowledge across languages to construct L1 and L2 texts. We analyzed L1 English and L2 Japanese argumentation essays by the same JFL writers (N = 19) and L1…

  10. An Ongian Perspective on the History of Literacy: Psychological Context and Today's College Student Writer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comprone, Joseph J.

    To link the perspectives of Walter Ong on the history of literacy to the psychological context of college writers, this paper contrasts the mind-sets that are important to writers: the oral community of the ancient epic and the modern psychological perspective, with its emphasis on the one against the many. In the first section of the paper, Ong's…

  11. Using codebooks of fragmented connected-component contours in forensic and historic writer identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schomaker, L.R.B.; Franke, K.; Bulacu, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in 'off-line' writer identification allow for new applications in handwritten text retrieval from archives of scanned historical documents. This paper describes new algorithms for forensic or historical writer identification, using the contours of fragmented connected-components in

  12. A New Rendition of an Old Classic: The Young Writers Program as a Writing Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalas, Laura; Ryan, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    The Young Writers Program (YWP) is the latest writing workshop to be developed for the classroom. It challenges students to choose a topic and write a novel-length piece based on that topic, without worrying about spelling or grammar. While the foundation of this philosophy is solid, the support and structure of the Young Writers Program website…

  13. Leveraging Digital Mentor Texts to Write Like a Digital Writer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werderich, Donna E.; Manderino, Michael; Godinez, Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    This article presents an approach to reading like a digital writer to support adolescents' narrative writing in digital formats. By providing digital mentor texts for students to read like digital writers, a more comprehensive and perhaps deeper understanding of digital writing and the memoir genre can emerge.

  14. Citation Practices among Non-Native Expert and Novice Scientific Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansourizadeh, Kobra; Ahmad, Ummul K.

    2011-01-01

    Citation is one of the most prominent features of academic writing through which academic writers both exhibit the breadth of their scholarship in a specific research area and subtly demonstrate their memberships of the disciplinary community. Citations are important rhetorical devices that allow seasoned writers to promote their current research…

  15. Computer-Based Writing Tools and the Cognitive Needs of Novice Writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozma, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    Examines the cognitive needs of novice writers and the role of word processors in the instruction of those writers. Reviews writing software in the categories of idea organizers, text analyzers, process prompters, communication packages, and artificially intelligent writing environments. Suggests future research areas. (SG)

  16. The Development of Writing Habitus: A Ten-Year Case Study of a Young Writer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton-Lilly, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Peter, an African American writer from a low-income community, is followed across a 10-year period as he progresses from first grade through high school. Drawing on writing samples and interviews, the author identifies a set of interrelated dispositions that contribute to his development of "habitus" as a writer. This article considers…

  17. Empowering L2 Tutoring: A Case Study of a Second Language Writer's Vocabulary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severino, Carol; Deifell, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Writing center tutors play a key role in advancing L2 writers' language learning because the tutorial interaction involves the introduction of new language and vocabulary at the point of need or interest. This tutor-research case study presents a detailed, complex portrait of how a second language writer in a US writing center learned and used…

  18. Graduate Students as Academic Writers: Writing Anxiety, Self-Efficacy and Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Margarita; Goodson, Patricia; Beigi, Mina; Chlup, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Researchers interested in psychological factors affecting writers in higher-education institutions, or academic writers, are concerned with internal variables affecting writing productivity; however few empirical studies explore these factors with samples of students who are in the process of earning master's or doctoral degrees (i.e., graduate…

  19. Kidwatching and the development of children as writers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruíz Nubia Cecilia

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available This research project aims at exploring, understanding, and analyzing second graders’ development as writers in a private school of Bogotá. Group reading, writing stories, hyper-stories (non-linear stories and messages as literacy activities were carried out with these children and allowed them to grow as writers in an EFL context. The findings are the result of data triangulation collected through interviews, teacherstudent conferences and second graders’ samples and show evidence of the significant growth in the type of texts written by children and in the quality of interaction they had when they constructed texts. Key words: Children as authors-Primary School, Creative Ability in Children- Research, Writing-Teaching, Reading-Teaching, Reading Readiness-Teaching Este proyecto de investigación pretende explorar, entender y analizar el desarrollo como escritores de los estudiantes de segundo de primaria de un colegio privado de Bogotá. Las actividades de lecto-escritura como la lectura en grupo, la creación escrita de historias, hiper-historias (historias no lineales y mensajes permitieron que los niños se desarrollaran como escritores en un contexto extranjero. Los hallazgos como resultado de la triangulación de datos a través de entrevistas, conferencias entre el profesor(a y el estudiante, y los trabajos elaborados por los estudiantes de segundo evidencian el crecimiento significativo en la clase de textos escritos por los niños y en la calidad de interacción presente cuando construyeron los textos. Palabras claves: Niños autores-Enseñanza elemental, Aptitud creadora en niños- Investigación, Escritura-Enseñanza, Lectura-Enseñanza, Facilidad de lectura- Enseñanza

  20. Tailored Communication to Enhance Adaption Across the Breast Cancer Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    information script is generated covering such topics as diet, dietary supplements and exercise. The Project Coordinator reviews each script to ensure...study protocols related to breast cancer survivorship and lymphedema . She continues to collect data on women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer

  1. The future of cancer rehabilitation: emerging subspecialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Gail L; Gerber, Lynn H; Spill, Gayle R; Paul, Kelly L

    2011-05-01

    In this article, the subject of the future for the field of cancer rehabilitation is embarked upon. Future practice innovation models must involve the appropriate and comprehensive evaluation of cancer patients' rehabilitation needs using better functional measurement tools, as well as the forging of new partnerships through the presence and initiation of physiatric coordinated rehabilitation teams, particularly during the acute phases of treatment. Partnering rehabilitation teams closely with oncology colleagues during surveillance years, through the development of outpatient survivorship clinics for diagnosis and treatment of many of cancer patients' ongoing symptoms and functional limitations, will allow for more comprehensive and coordinated follow-up cancer care. Integration of rehabilitation into palliative care and continued efforts to increase oncology's awareness and acceptance of rehabilitation benefits and expertise are needed. Future education models for medical school, residency, and postresidency training are discussed, as are future research goals to help in placing cancer rehabilitation at the forefront of acute cancer care and survivorship care.

  2. Clinical Outcomes and Survivorship of Lateral Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: Does Surgical Approach Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmiston, Tori A; Manista, Gregory C; Courtney, P Maxwell; Sporer, Scott M; Della Valle, Craig J; Levine, Brett R

    2017-09-21

    Lateral unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) has been shown to be an effective procedure to treat isolated lateral compartment osteoarthritis with excellent long-term survivorship. Whether a medial parapatellar approach or a lateral parapatellar approach is superior in lateral UKA is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a difference in intermediate-term clinical outcomes in patients undergoing lateral UKA through a lateral vs medial parapatellar approach. We retrospectively reviewed a consecutive series of 65 patients who underwent lateral UKA with a minimum of 2-year follow-up. Fifty-two patients (80%) had a lateral approach and 13 (20%) a medial parapatellar approach. Patient demographics, preoperative and postoperative radiographic findings, need for revision surgery, Knee Society Score, and range of motion were assessed. Overall survivorship was 94% at a mean of 82 months; with the sample size available for study, there was no difference in survivorship between the groups. There was no difference in Knee Society Score or revision to total knee arthroplasty (5% vs 7%, P = 1.000) between the medial and lateral approach groups. Comparatively, the lateral approach group did have significantly greater postoperative flexion (123.6° vs 116.5°, P = .006) and greater improvement in flexion from preoperative measurements (3.0 vs -8.0°, P = .010). Although our sample size was small, we could not demonstrate a difference in revision rates or clinical outcome scores when comparing a lateral or a medial approach with lateral UKA at intermediate-term follow-up. A lateral approach did have greater postoperative flexion, but its clinical significance remains undetermined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Host Plant Effects on Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) Nymphal Development and Survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acebes-Doria, Angelita L; Leskey, Tracy C; Bergh, J Christopher

    2016-03-24

    Halyomorpha halys(Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) is a highly polyphagous invasive species and an important pest of orchard crops in the United States. In the Mid-Atlantic region, wild hosts ofH. halysare common in woodlands that often border orchards, andH. halysmovement from them into orchards poses ongoing management issues. To improve our understanding of host plant effects onH. halyspopulations at the orchard-woodland interface, nymphal survivorship, developmental duration, and adult fitness (size and fresh weight) on apple (Malus domesticaBorkh.), peach (Prunus persica(L.) Batsch), Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima(Mill.) Swingle), and northern catalpa (Catalpa speciosa(Warder)) were examined in laboratory studies. Specifically, we investigated nymphal performance on the foliage and fruiting structures of those hosts and on single- versus mixed-host diets, as well as the effects of host phenology on their suitability. Nymphal performance was poor on a diet of foliage alone, regardless of host. When fruiting structures were combined with foliage, peach was highly suitable for nymphal development and survivorship, whereas apple, Tree of Heaven, and catalpa were less so, although nymphal survival on Tree of Heaven was much greater later in the season than earlier. Mixed-host diets yielded increased nymphal survivorship and decreased developmental duration compared with diets of suboptimal single hosts. Adult size and weight were generally greater when they developed from nymphs reared on mixed diets. The implications of our results to the dispersal behavior, establishment, and management ofH. halysare discussed. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Writer-reader contagion of inspiration and related states: Conditional process analyses within a cross-classified writer × reader framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrash, Todd M; Maruskin, Laura A; Moldovan, Emil G; Oleynick, Victoria C; Belzak, Will C

    2017-09-01

    A longstanding tradition in the humanities holds that a writer's inspiration is infectious, but this thesis has not been tested. We hypothesized that (a) inspiration is infectious, such that inspired writers are more inspiring to the average reader; (b) contagion is mediated by the insightfulness of the text; and (c) contagion is moderated by readers' openness to experience, such that open readers are more prone to contagion. To test these hypotheses, a sample of 195 student writers, each of whom wrote 1 poem, was crossed with a sample of 220 student readers, who read all poems. Data were available for 36,020 cells of the resulting Writer × Reader matrix. Our analytic approach integrated cross-classified multilevel modeling with conditional process analysis. As hypothesized, writers who were more inspired elicited higher levels of inspiration in the average reader. Inspiration contagion was mediated by the insightfulness and pleasantness of the text and was partially suppressed by originality. Inspiration contagion was moderated by reader openness. Moderated mediation analyses indicated that open readers were prone to contagion because they were tolerant of the originality and sublimity of inspired writing. Additional analyses differentiated contagion of inspiration from contagion of its covariates (awe, positive affect), documented effects of writer inspiration on reader enthrallment (awe, chills), and showed that writer effort is a poor predictor of reader states. The infectiousness of inspiration-through poetry, if not also through scripture and academic writing-suggests that a given instance of inspiration may have far-reaching cultural implications, including dissemination of innovations and ideologies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Role of resilience among Nazi Holocaust survivors: a strength-based paradigm for understanding survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Roberta R; Graham, Sandra A

    2009-01-01

    This article reports preliminary results of a Templeton Foundation-funded research project on the role of resiliency and forgiveness in 133 elderly Holocaust survivors. We use resilience theory to explore how individuals heal following exposure to an adverse event. We present preliminary findings on survivors' perceptions of their resiliency before, during, and after the Holocaust and suggest a paradigm shift to one in which maintaining competence is primary. In subsequent publications, we will synthesize the frameworks that comprise survivorship to create a model. These findings inform mental health care practitioners' understanding of factors that buffer against the effects of adverse events.

  6. Development of Writing Knowledge in Grades 2-8: A Comparison of Typically Developing Writers and Their Struggling Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shin-Ju Cindy; Monroe, Brandon W.; Troia, Gary A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined student perspectives about writing by interviewing both typically developing and struggling writers in Grades 2 through 8. The findings revealed a progressive developmental pattern of writing knowledge in which novice writers place more emphasis on the physical product and local meaning, while more experienced writers focus on…

  7. The 1965 Indonesian Killing Discourse by Generation 2000 Writers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diah Ariani Arimbi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The fall of Soeharto’s authority in 1998 has indeed impacted numerous sides of Indonesian life: political, social and cultural. The shifting of authoritative government to the state of “reformation” and “democratization” has forced the nation to redefine its authority to its members. This paper aims to look at these public responses which are narrated in contemporary Indonesian fiction. Although fiction may be seen as imaginative production, discursive ideologies can be examined clearly. By examining thematic significant of the narratives about G30S/PKI and the killings aftermath in the literary writings published in post 1998 by contemporary Indonesia writers, who are known as the Generation 2000 writers (who were mostly born in 1970s at least five years after the 1965 incident: also known as the millennials, this paper will attempt to answer whether or not this generation presents shift and creates its own notions of the incident. Abstrak: Jatuhnya kekuasaan Soeharto pada tahun 1998 berdampak pada berbagai sisi kehidupan di Indonesia: politik, sosial, dan budaya. Pergeseran dari pemerintahan yang dulunya otoritatif menjadi pemerintahan yang sarat dengan "reformasi" dan "demokratisasi" telah memaksa negara untuk mendefinisikan kembali wewenangnya kepada para anggotanya. Makalah ini bertujuan untuk melihat respons publik yang diceritakan dalam fiksi Indonesia kontemporer. Walaupun fiksi dapat dipandang sebagai produk imajinatif, ideologi diskursif dapat dilihat dengan je-las. Dengan memeriksa tema-tema yang secara signifikan dimunculkan dari narasi tentang G30S/PKI dan tragedi pembunuhan sesudahnya dalam tulisan-tulisan sastra yang diterbitkan pasca tahun 1998 oleh penulis Indonesia kontemporer, yang dikenal sebagai penulis Generasi 2000 (penulis yang kebanyakan lahir di tahun 1970-an setidaknya 5 tahun setelah 1965 kejadian: juga dikenal sebagai millenials, makalah ini berusaha menjawab apakah generasi baru mengalami pergeseran dalam

  8. Graduation Resources in Medical Case Reports Written by Native and Non-Native Medical Writers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna Abdulhussein Swear

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Appraisal Theory includes three subsystems of evaluation; Attitude, Engagement, and Graduation. This study  focuses on Graduation subsystem which  is used by writers to amplify or diminish the scope of these two subsystems. It consists of Focus and Force options. Focus expressions are usually non-gradable they tend to sharpen or soften the utterances.  Force, on the other hand modulates gradable expressions; which can be emphasized or downtoned the writer's utterances in terms of Intensification and Quantification. This pilot test is conducted to characterize the Force: Graduation of the heteroglossic resources in 20 MCR written in English by NS and NNS (Malaysian medical writers. MCR is a medical genre that has proven recently to be very important in the advancement of medical researches and in serving pedagogical purposes to offer a description to the practical strength of the clinical decision-making. Many incidents of Force: Graduation are collected for the purpose of analysis. The analysis includes investigating   the gradable heteroglossic resources in the MCRs of both groups of writers and examining the differences in employing these resources. The results indicate a little bit more frequent occurrence in the NS medical writers MCRs gradable heteroglossic expressions compared with those of NNS medical writers. Additionally, the use of these resources in the discussion sections of both groups is higher than in the other sections for both writers. Keywords: graduation resources, appraisal theory, corpus-based research

  9. Sex-biased survivorship and differences in migration of wild steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) smolts from two coastal Oregon rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Neil F.; Leblanc, Camille A.; Romer, Jeremy D.; Schreck, Carl B.; Blouin, Michael S.; Noakes, David L. G.

    2016-01-01

    In salmonids with partial migration, females are more likely than males to undergo smoltification and migrate to the ocean (vs. maturing in freshwater). However, it is not known whether sex affects survivorship during smolt migration (from fresh water to entry into the ocean). We captured wild steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) smolts in two coastal Oregon rivers (USA) and collected fin tissue samples for genetic sex determination (2009; N = 70 in the Alsea and N = 69 in the Nehalem, 2010; N = 25 in the Alsea). We implanted acoustic tags and monitored downstream migration and survival until entry in to the Pacific Ocean. Survival was defined as detection at an estuary/ocean transition array. We found no effect of sex on smolt survivorship in the Nehalem River in 2009, or in the Alsea River in 2010. However, males exhibited significantly lower survival than females in the Alsea River during 2009. Residency did not influence this result as an equal proportion of males and females did not reach the estuary entrance (11% of males, 9% of females). The sexes did not differ in timing or duration of migration, so those variables seem unlikely to explain sex-biased survivorship. Larger males had higher odds of survival than smaller males in 2009, but the body size of females did not affect survivorship. The difference in survivorship between years in the Alsea River could be due to flow conditions, which were higher in 2010 than in 2009. Our findings suggest that sex may affect steelhead smolt survival during migration, but that the difference in survivorship may be weak and not a strong factor influencing adult sex ratios.

  10. Social Criticism on Works of Contemporary Women Story Writers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Mahmoodi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Goldmann's genetic structuralism approach is one of the literary critique approaches and believes that the literary text are derived from the ideology governing the classes of society, and focuses on study of stories and their structures to know the social structures. A review of the changes made in the themes and subjects of the works of the Iranian story writers that most of them are from the middle class of society, indicates the growth of awareness and understanding of Iranian women about their identity and individuality and the achievement of conditions beyond what they are. Although in popular stories, most Iranian female storytellers are still interested in the reproduction of traditional gender stereotypes, but female storywriters in the field of transcendental literature have entered the changes made in their cognitive realm to the actions of characters of their stories. This reveals that they seek to understand their own self and place in the world around them. Love and loneliness resulted by the confrontation between men and women are a common theme in these works that have been narrated on the various issues arising from the family and social relationships of women.

  11. A Clinical Profile of 125 Patients with Writer's Cramp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhunjhunwala, Ketan; Lenka, Abhishek; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics of writer's cramp (WC) may vary according to native languages and scripts. We report the clinical profile of a large cohort of patients with WC from India. A chart review of 125 patients (F:M = 16:109) with WC seen over 10 years at the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), India. The mean age of patients was 36.8 ± 14.3, the mean age at onset (AAO) of symptoms was 31.5 ± 2.7 and the mean duration of difficulty in writing was 5.3 ± 6.3. The most common presenting complaint while writing was pain in the forearm (56%), followed by tremulousness of hand (28.8%) and abnormal posturing of hand (15.2%). Along with writing difficulty, 5.6% had difficulty in typing. The mean AAO of writing difficulty was significantly earlier in women than in men (22.8 ± 3.5 vs. 32.8 ± 4.2 years, p writing, excessive extension (41.6%) of wrist was the most common abnormality, followed by excessive flexion (37.6%) and extension (19.2%) of index finger. Women with WC have a significantly earlier age of onset than men. Excessive extension of wrist with flexion of thumb and index finger were the most common abnormalities noted in WC. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Restaging Hysteria: Mary Wigman as Writer and Dancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. McLary

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Mary Wigman was not only a leading proponent of the early twentieth-century Expressionist dance movement, but also a writer of poetry and short poetic prose. Despite her assertion that dance was beyond language, she wrote often about dance in an attempt to articulate the kinesthetic experience of dance through languages. This interdisciplinary study explores the intersection of dance and writing for Wigman, focusing on gender coding in writing and dance within the context of early twentieth-century dialogues. Despite the pervasive equation of (feminine hysteria with dance and (masculine subjectivity with authorship, Wigman engaged in both activities. I argue that Wigman is able to reclaim and redefine the "hysteria" of the dance experience through writing about dance. In her dance poetry, the act of looking at herself in a mirror as she dances allows Wigman to circumvent the traditional objectification through the male gaze experienced by the female dancer. Through the act of writing, Wigman asserts her subjectivity, taking control of the out-of-body experience of dance creation.

  13. Writing about patients: what clinical and literary writers share.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elise

    2009-10-01

    Anyone who seeks publication wants readers, but self-expression, self-assertion, and self-promotion have consequences, especially for those who draw on clinical material and who must honor publication standards of integrity and reliability, as well as ethical codes governing confidentiality, consent, disguise, and collaboration. This paper employs tools of literary analysis, principles of moral philosophy, and psychoanalytic theories about writing to show that writers of fiction and autobiography also struggle with these dilemmas. They worry about their responsibilities to the sources of their stories, and wonder if changing names and dates will prevent friends and family, whose lives get used as material, from feeling embarrassed, betrayed, or exploited. Because they understand that the composing process blurs boundaries between fiction and nonfiction, fantasy and memory, self and other, they recognize that an author's relationship with his or her subject (matter) can disable the capacity to recognize when self-interest has taken over a concern for the welfare of others. More important, literary authors are free to write about writing, and what they render transparent about primitive, unconscious processes suggests that what clinical writing has in common with fiction and autobiography should be included in efforts to update ethical standards and procedures regarding psychoanalytic publication.

  14. Co-creation of an ICT-supported cancer rehabilitation program for lung cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, Josien; Tönis, Thijs; Stuiver, M.M.; van Weering, Marit; Wouters, M.W.J.M.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé

    Background: Lung cancer (LC) patients experience high symptom burden and significant decline of physical fitness and Quality of Life following lung resection. Good quality of survivorship care post-surgery is essential to optimize recovery and prevent unscheduled healthcare use. The use of

  15. Survivorship rates of adult Anolis mariarum (Squamata: Polychrotidae in two populations with differing mean and asymptotic body sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C. Bock

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared adult survivorships in two populations of the lizard Anolis mariarum with different mean and asymptotic body sizes to examine one prediction of age-specific mortality theory; that populations that experience higher adult mortality should exhibit earlier maturation and smaller adult body sizes. We used a maximum likelihood approach to evaluate different survivorship models and model-averaging to estimate survivorship and capture probabilities for each site and sex. Relative tail length did not affect survivorship rates of adults in these two populations, but body size was related to survivorship, with the largest individuals at the time of first capture having lower survivorship rates, so body size was included as a covariate in some of the models examined. Analyses revealed that males at both sites had higher survivorships than females, but there were no differences among the sites in survivorship rates or capture probabilities for either sex. The differences in body sizes documented for these sites still could represent life history adaptations to differences among the sites in mortality rates in the egg or juvenile stages of the life cycle, or may represent a case of phenotypic plasticity to differing environmental conditions, but they appear not to be related to differences in adult survivorships. The estimates of annual survivorships (11.7% to 21.2% were high for a small, mainland Anolis, and this is the first report of survivorships of male anoles exceeding those of females.Comparamos las sobrevivencias de los adultos en dos poblaciones de la lagartija Anolis mariarum con distintos promedio y asíntotas de sus tamaños corporales, para examinar una predicción de la teoría de mortalidad específica de edad; que las poblaciones que experimentan mayor mortalidad de los adultos deben exhibir maduración sexual más temprana y menores tamaños corporales en los adultos. Utilizamos la técnica de máxima verosimilitud para evaluar

  16. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prostate cancer Lung cancer Colorectal cancer In US women, other than skin cancer the three most common cancers are: Breast cancer Lung cancer Colorectal cancer Some cancers are more common in certain parts of the world. For example, in Japan, there are many cases of stomach cancer . But ...

  17. Case Report of Writer's Cramp Syndrome Along with Myoclonic Epilepsy and Compulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nasseri

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The writer's cramp syndrome is a kind of local dystonia which appears in the hands due to uncontrollable muscular spasms, making a hard and tiring job of writing for patients.Case Report: The present study investigates a 55 year old married male, a bank officer, who has been suffering from myoclonic epilepsy and compulsion since the age of 17, and a few years later developed the writer's cramp syndrome following a sudden stress. There is no report on the simultaneity of the writer's cramp, myoclonic epilepsy and compulsion.Conclusion: The patient's myoclonic epilepsy condition has been under control by a daily dosage of 5 mg of diazepam. However, the writer's cramp syndrome and the compulsion have not been under appropriate therapeutic control.

  18. Native speaker advantage in academic writing? Conjunctive realizations in EAP writing by four groups of writers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jun Zhao

    2017-01-01

    This paper joins the Native vs. Non-native writer dichotomy discussion of whether native speakers of English enjoy advantage in the academic writing context from the linguistic perspective by analyzing conjunctive realizations...

  19. Urban Villages as Spaces of Cultural Identity: Urban Migrant Writers in the Pearl River Delta

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li Lingling

    2013-01-01

      Through an analysis of a case study of urban migrant writers and urban villages in the Pearl River Delta, this article examines the relationship between migrants and urban spaces in contemporary China...

  20. Toward a Diaspora Literature: Black Women Writers from Africa, the Caribbean, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilentz, Gay

    1992-01-01

    Adds to the growing dialogue on diaspora literature in relation to women's writings. Examines Anglophone West African, African-American, and Caribbean women writers for hidden and not so hidden commonalities in their works. (RS)

  1. WRITER'S STRATEGIES IN THE INTERCOURSE WITH THE READER IN BELLES-LETTRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Komarov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to some strategies aimed at involving the reader into the writer's book by means of making the reader's attitude to its content personal or subjective. In the article it is stated that there are two components which are intrinsic to virtual intercourse between writer and reader. One of the components is the content of the writer's publication while the other is the reader's attitude towards the content suggested. The article shows that the reader's attitude encompasses two processes: the process of self-estrangement from the writer's content and the process of self-involvement into it. In the article, the author analyses these two processes in relation to the content of the book. In the article, the author singles out and gives descriptions of such dimensions of the book's content as its topical and emotional dimension, its depth, human nature dimension and interpersonal relations dimension as well as of strategies used by the writer in order to involve the reader into his writings. The author argues that a successful strategy is based on managing to touch the reader to the quick, i.e. his or her subjectivity, and the result of successfulness can be measured by the reader's readiness and willingness to sink into one of the dimensions suggested. The author of the article comes to the conclusion that signs of the successful strategy can be traced in the reader's return to the intercourse with the writer when he or she rereads the writer's books, repeats or makes references to words, situations or ideas suggested or described by the writer who has grasped the reader's attention in one or several content dimensions.

  2. Model-based MPC enables curvilinear ILT using either VSB or multi-beam mask writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Linyong; Takatsukasa, Yutetsu; Hara, Daisuke; Pomerantsev, Michael; Su, Bo; Fujimura, Aki

    2017-07-01

    Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) is becoming the choice for Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) of advanced technology nodes in IC design and production. Multi-beam mask writers promise significant mask writing time reduction for complex ILT style masks. Before multi-beam mask writers become the main stream working tools in mask production, VSB writers will continue to be the tool of choice to write both curvilinear ILT and Manhattanized ILT masks. To enable VSB mask writers for complex ILT style masks, model-based mask process correction (MB-MPC) is required to do the following: 1). Make reasonable corrections for complex edges for those features that exhibit relatively large deviations from both curvilinear ILT and Manhattanized ILT designs. 2). Control and manage both Edge Placement Errors (EPE) and shot count. 3. Assist in easing the migration to future multi-beam mask writer and serve as an effective backup solution during the transition. In this paper, a solution meeting all those requirements, MB-MPC with GPU acceleration, will be presented. One model calibration per process allows accurate correction regardless of the target mask writer.

  3. Investigating Generic Structure of English Research Articles: Writing Strategy Differences between English and Indonesian Writers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Ketut Mirahayuni

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Research into English research articles (RAs has largely been focused on articles produced by native English writers. This paper reports a study aiming to investigate the textual structure of research articles written by non-native English (i.e. Indonesian writers, which may contribute to their acceptance for international publication. A comparison is made between RAs written by native English speakers, an Indonesian writers writing in English, all in the field of Language and Language Teaching. It explores the relation of text's generic structure. The thesis develops a framework for the generic structure analysis based on Swales' (1990 Create-A­Research-Space (CARS model of moves. The analysis focuses on two RA sections: Introduction and Discussion. The findings indicate significant differences in both forms and functions of organizing strategics between the native and non-native texts. The differences may partly be due to the influence of writing practices in the non-native writers' first language and partly to the writer's attempt to find an appropriate format in the absence of well-established research writing conventions in the first language. Consequently, non-native English texts may show organizing strategies unfamiliar to both the native English and native Indonesian texts. Findings from the research highlight two issues. First, formal and functional differences of generic structure elements and their realizations between the native and non-native English texts may disadvantage the non-native writers, particularly with regards to employment of unfamiliar organizational

  4. Group size effects on survivorship and adult development in the gregarious larvae of Euselasia chrysippe (Lepidoptera, Riodinidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. E. Allen

    2010-01-01

    Caterpillars living in aggregations may derive several benefits that outweigh the costs, including better survivorship and improved growth rates. I tested whether larval group size had an effect on these two vital rates in Euselasia chrysippe. These caterpillars feed gregariously during all instars and move in processionary form over the host plant...

  5. Survivorship and longevity of adult Diamesa mendotae Muttkowski, 1915 (Diptera: Chironomidae) at controlled, sub-freezing temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazack, Jane E.; Kranzfelder, Petra; Anderson, Alyssa M.; Bouchard, William; Perry, James; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Ferrington, Leonard C.

    2014-01-01

    Diamesa mendotae Muttkowski, 1915 is a winter-active species common in groundwater-buffered streams of Minnesota and Wisconsin. This species is capable of surviving under snow cover for at least 28 days. Field collections of adult D. mendotae were used to determine survivorship under long-term exposure to controlled sub-freezing conditions. Specimens were placed into a controlled temperature chamber at −5 °C, batches removed at weekly intervals, and subsequently held at 6 °C to determine survivorship and longevity. Our results indicate that overall survivorship is negatively related to treatment duration of sub-freezing treatment, individuals can survive sub-freezing temperatures for at least 70 days, with total longevity of 92 days. Additionally, males had a significantly higher rate of survivorship than females within treatments. Total longevity increased with treatment time, suggesting adult D. mendotae may survive long periods of below-freezing temperatures under natural conditions before mating, which may convey population-level advantages.

  6. Field biology of Halimeda tuna (Bryopsidales, Chlorophyta) across a depth gradient : comparative growth, survivorship, recruitment, and reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroom, P.S.; Smith, C.M.; Coyer, J.A.; Walters, L.; Hunter, C.L.; Beach, K.S.; Smith, J.E.

    Growth, survivorship, recruitment, and reproduction of Halimeda tuna, a dominant green alga in many reef systems of the Florida Keys, were monitored at a shallow back reef ( 4 - 7m) and deep reef slope ( 15 - 22 m) on Conch Reef. Despite lower light intensities and similar grazing pressures,

  7. Supervivencia al cáncer de pulmón (Lung Cancer Survivorship)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-10-20

    Una sobreviviente de cáncer comparte su historia sobre el diagnóstico, el tratamiento y el apoyo de su comunidad; ella también les da consejos a otros sobrevivientes de cáncer.  Created: 10/20/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/15/2017.

  8. Survivors on Cancer: the portrayal of survivors in print news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromm, Elizabeth Edsall; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Singer, Rachel Friedman

    2007-12-01

    This study examines the types of news stories that include comments by everyday cancer survivors and the messages or information these individuals provide. Even though these non-celebrity survivors increasingly serve on the front lines of cancer prevention and advocacy efforts and often engage with media, the role they play in the media discourse on cancer has not been a focus of research. We conducted a thematic content analysis of print news articles of non-celebrity cancer survivors in 15 leading national daily newspapers for four consecutive months starting in June 2005 to identify the issues or events that included a survivor perspective and the messages or information conveyed by the everyday survivors. Journalists included survivor commentary primarily when covering cancer fundraising events and when focusing on individual survivorship stories. In overall news coverage involving survivors, breast and prostate cancers received the greatest attention, followed by blood and lung cancers. Survivors spoke mainly about the diagnosis experience and life post-cancer. Our analysis of survivors' comments revealed that discussions of the diagnosis experience often convey fear and a lack of confidence in cancer screening practices, while cancer is portrayed as a positive life event. While evidence of a positive and hopeful portrayal of survivorship is an encouraging finding for continued efforts to decrease stigma associated with a cancer diagnosis and for the public understanding of the disease, it is important to consider potential negative implications of an idealized and restricted media discourse on survivorship. The increasing size and capacity of the survivor community offers opportunities for the cancer advocacy community to consider how news media portrayal of cancer and survivorship may contribute in both positive and potentially detrimental ways to public understanding of this disease, its survivors and life after cancer.

  9. The effect of structural complexity, prey density, and "predator-free space" on prey survivorship at created oyster reef mesocosms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin T Humphries

    Full Text Available Interactions between predators and their prey are influenced by the habitat they occupy. Using created oyster (Crassostrea virginica reef mesocosms, we conducted a series of laboratory experiments that created structure and manipulated complexity as well as prey density and "predator-free space" to examine the relationship between structural complexity and prey survivorship. Specifically, volume and spatial arrangement of oysters as well as prey density were manipulated, and the survivorship of prey (grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio in the presence of a predator (wild red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus was quantified. We found that the presence of structure increased prey survivorship, and that increasing complexity of this structure further increased survivorship, but only to a point. This agrees with the theory that structural complexity may influence predator-prey dynamics, but that a threshold exists with diminishing returns. These results held true even when prey density was scaled to structural complexity, or the amount of "predator-free space" was manipulated within our created reef mesocosms. The presence of structure and its complexity (oyster shell volume were more important in facilitating prey survivorship than perceived refugia or density-dependent prey effects. A more accurate indicator of refugia might require "predator-free space" measures that also account for the available area within the structure itself (i.e., volume and not just on the surface of a structure. Creating experiments that better mimic natural conditions and test a wider range of "predator-free space" are suggested to better understand the role of structural complexity in oyster reefs and other complex habitats.

  10. The psychosocial needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolies, Liz

    2014-08-01

    Because of discrimination and secrecy, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people have poorer health outcomes, which include an increased risk for certain cancers and additional challenges in cancer treatment and survivorship. The oncology nurse also should be aware of issues of LGBT sexuality and the impact that oncology treatment may have on the LGBT patient's immediate and long-term sexual functioning.

  11. Integrating Primary Care Providers in the Care of Cancer Survivors: Gaps in Evidence and Future Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; O’Malley, Denalee M.; Hudson, Shawna V.

    2017-01-01

    For over a decade since the release of the Institute of Medicine report, From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition, there has been a focus on providing coordinated, comprehensive care for cancer survivors that emphasized the role of primary care. Several models of care have been described which primarily focused on primary care providers (PCPs) as receivers of cancer survivors and specific types of information (e.g. survivorship care plans) from oncology based care, and not as active members of the cancer survivorship team. In this paper, we reviewed survivorship models that have been described in the literature, and specifically focused on strategies aiming to integrate primary care providers in caring for cancer survivors across different settings. We offer insights differentiating primary care providers’ level of expertise in cancer survivorship and how such expertise may be utilized. We provide recommendations for education, clinical practice, research and policy initiatives that may advance the integration of primary care providers in the care of cancer survivors in diverse clinical settings. PMID:28049575

  12. Implications of Childhood Cancer Survivors in the Classroom and the School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, Sherri Sheinfeld; McAuliffe, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this paper are to: briefly review the long-term or late effects of cancer diagnosis and treatment on children and youth; examine the implications of these effects on the educational needs of the child or youth; explore the implications of childhood cancer survivorship on the school, particularly for female students. Over the…

  13. [Experimental study on the intolerance of uncertainty and cognitive biases in parents of child cancer survivor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Haegen, M; Etienne, A M; Piette, C

    2017-03-01

    Studies in pediatric oncology describe a relative good quality of life in child cancer survivor. However, few studies were interested in the parents of a child cancer survivor. 61 parents are recruited in the Belgian hospitals. Three groups of parents are constituted : the parents whose child is in 4 years of survivorship (group 1), in 5 years of survivorship (group 2) and in 6 years of survivorship (group 3). Clinical scales and a Stroop emotion task are administered. Parents (of the 3 groups) present a low tolerance of uncertainty, have excessive worries about the evolution of the health of their child, and suffer from anxious symptoms. The Stroop emotion tasks reveals a cognitive bias of the attention in favour of threatening stimuli. The study highlights the importance to detect parents who are intolerant of uncertainty at the cancer diagnosis stage and their continuous psychological follow-up once the treatments are ended.

  14. The continuum of "survivorship": definitional issues in the aftermath of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerel, Julie; McIntosh, John L; Neimeyer, Robert A; Maple, Myfanwy; Marshall, Doreen

    2014-12-01

    In light of prevailing confusion over the meaning of the term "suicide survivor," we propose a more exact terminology for designating different levels of impact on those left behind by suicide, ranging on a continuum from those exposed to suicide through those who are affected by it and finally to those who are bereaved by suicide in the short- or long-term, as a function of their loss of a close emotional attachment through this tragic form of loss. We briefly note the possible utility of this terminological specificity in promoting more clearly targeted research and intervention efforts, and call for closer investigation of various categories of "survivorship" in future studies. © 2014 The American Association of Suicidology.

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical records. Relative survival This statistic is another method used to estimate cancer-specific survival that does ... your prognosis. Survival statistics most often come from studies that compare ... by their creator. In such cases, it is necessary to contact the writer, artists, ...

  16. Breast Cancer Translational Research Center of Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    States Armed Forces. Breast cancer mortality among women អ years accounts for >40% of years of life lost due to this disease. The economic, social and... cancer is a curable disease if it is detected early; as such early detection is related to survivorship, cost of treatment and quality of life for the...certain life style factors as well as comorbidities. For Theme 2 studies, profiling of human biospecimens alone is important but insufficient

  17. Incidence, indications, outcomes, and survivorship of stems in primary total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Brian T; Oi, Kathryn K; Lee, Yuo-Yu; Joseph, Amethia D; Alexiades, Michael M

    2017-11-01

    The indications, incidence, outcomes, and survivorship of stems in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are lacking in the contemporary literature. Our hypothesis is stems in primary TKA would result in worse outcomes and survivorship. All primary TKAs between 2007 and 2011 with 2-year follow-up were identified. Revision TKA or UKA conversion was excluded. Demographic information (age, sex, race, BMI, primary diagnosis, and Charlson-Deyo comorbidity index), outcome measures including KOOS and WOMAC, and any revisions were identified from the registry. A 2:1 matched cohort of non-stemmed/stemmed primary TKA patients was created to compare revision rates and outcomes at baseline and 2 years post-TKA. Subgroup analyses of long versus short stems, 1 versus 2 stems, and cemented versus hybrid stem fixation were completed. Two-sample t tests and Chi-square tests were used to compare conventional and stemmed TKA groups. The registry review included 13,507 conventional TKA and 318 stemmed TKA resulting in an incidence of 2.3 % in primary TKA. The mean follow-up was approximately 49 months in both groups. No difference was found in revision rates between stemmed TKA (2.5 %) and conventional TKA (2.2 %). Patients with post-traumatic arthritis had an odds ratio of 10.5 (95 % CI 1.2-15.3) of receiving stems. Stem length did not affect revision rates. Patients with two stems had worse KOOS and WOMAC scores at baseline which equalized to single-stem patients at 2 years. The use of stems may provide a survival benefit in complex primary TKA over the short term and no adverse effect on patient outcomes or satisfaction. III.

  18. Halo vest treatment of cervical spine injuries: a success and survivorship analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bransford, Richard J; Stevens, David W; Uyeji, Staci; Bellabarba, Carlo; Chapman, Jens R

    2009-07-01

    A retrospective study of a consecutive series of traumatic cervical spine injuries treated with halo vest immobilization (HVI) over an 8-year period at a level 1 trauma center. To assess survivorship, success, and causes of failure of HVI in the management of cervical spine injuries. The use of HVI has been increasingly questioned as an immobilization technique in cervical trauma due to reports of high complication rates and unacceptable treatment results. It was our hypothesis that selective use of updated HVI could demonstrate higher clinical success rates and lower complication rates compared to several previous landmark studies. All patients with traumatic cervical spine injuries treated with HVI between 1998 and 2006 at a single level 1 trauma center were reviewed retrospectively. With Internal Review Board approval, the trauma, spine, and orthotics databases were reviewed for (1) injury type, (2) patient age, (3) complications and comorbidities, (4) survivorship of the device and (5) treatment outcome. Four hundred ninety traumatic cervical spine injuries in 342 patients were treated with HVI. Thirty-one (9%) patients were lost to follow-up. Average age was 41 years (2-94). HVI was used as definitive treatment in 288 (84%) patients and in conjunction with surgical intervention in 54 (16%) patients. One hundred thirteen (35%) complications occurred, the most common of which were pin site infections (39) and instability (38). Two hundred seven (74%) of the 289 halo survivors with appropriate follow-up completed the initially prescribed time period of HVI. Two hundred eight of 247 (85%) halos placed as stand-alone management achieved their intended goal. Treatment with HVI was successful in 85% of patients and 74% of survivors completed their intended treatment period. Complications, though common, were mostly not severe. HVI is still a reasonable treatment option in managing cervical spine injuries.

  19. Exploring Metadiscourse in Master’s Dissertation Abstracts: Cultural and Linguistic Variations across Postgraduate Writers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Akbas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates metadiscourse in the dissertation abstracts written by Native Speakers of Turkish (NST, Turkish Speakers of English (TSE and Native Speakers of English (NSE in the Social Sciences to determine how they make use of metadiscourse devices. It attempts to determine whether student writers from a shared cultural background (Turkish tend to use similar rhetorical features to those of their mother tongue or harmonise themselves with the language (English in which they are writing. Metadiscourse as a rhetorical device for the effective use of language facilitates writers in guiding their readers, conveying their ideas, establishing and determining the social distance of the reader-writer relationship, and creating an involved style of writer persona or a more remote stance. In that sense, interactive resources employed by writers help readers to find the information needed and interactional resources convey to readers the personality of the writers and their assertions. In addition, using ‘more personal’ resources is a way of keeping readers more intentionally within the text to interpret what is proposed by the writers personally and to judge them. The overall aim of the study is to compare and contrast 90 abstracts of dissertations produced by native Turkish speakers (30, native English speakers (30 and Turkish speakers of English (30 in the Social Sciences and to consider how writing in English (L2 deviates from writing in Turkish (L1 and becomes closer to the target language in terms of the metadiscourse elements, that is, interactive resources (transitions, frame markers, endophoric markers, evidentials and code glosses and interactional resources (hedges, boosters, attitude markers, engagement markers and self-mentions.1 Keywords: metadiscourse, written academic discourse, postgraduate student writing, contrastive rhetoric, learner corpus

  20. nvestigating Generic Structure of English Research Articles: Writing Strategy Differences between English and Indonesian Writers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Ketut Mirahayuni

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Research into English research articles (RAs has largely been focused on articles produced by native English writers. This paper reports a study aiming to investigate the textual structure of research articles written by non-native English (i.e. Indonesian writers, which may contribute to their acceptance for international publication. A comparison is made between RAs written by native English speakers, an Indonesian writers writing in English, all in the field of Language and Language Teaching. It explores the relation of text's generic structure. The thesis develops a framework for the generic structure analysis based on Swales' (1990 Create-A-Research-Space (CARS model of moves. The analysis focuses on two RA sections: Introduction and Discussion. The findings indicate significant differences in both forms and functions of organizing strategies between the native and non-native texts. The differences may partly be due to the influence of writing practices in the non-native writers' first language and partly to the writer's attempt to find an appropriate format in the absence of well-established research writing conventions in the first language. Consequently, non-native English texts may show organizing strategies unfamiliar to both the native English and native Indonesian texts. Findings from the research highlight two issues. First, formal and functional differences of generic structure elements and their realizations between the native and non-native English texts may disadvantage the non-native writers, particularly with regards to employment of unfamiliar organizational strategies. Second, non-native English writers need to acquire knowledge of commonly used formal generic structure, and more importantly, the knowledge of the nature of scientific writing in English to be able to gain wider readership. The implications for further research and the teaching of academic writing are discussed.

  1. Cancer in Europe: Death sentence or life sentence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Lifang; O'Donnell, Peter; Sullivan, Richard; Katalinic, Alexander; Moser, Lotte; de Boer, Angela; Meunier, Francoise

    2016-01-01

    With so many adults and children receiving successful treatment for their cancer, survivorship is now a 'new' and critical issue. It is increasingly recognised that the growing numbers of survivors face new challenges in their bid to return to 'normal' life. What is not yet so widely recognised is

  2. Quality of Life and Survivorship Care in Patients Undergoing Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    Advanced Malignant Mesothelioma; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  3. Co-creation of an ICT-supported cancer rehabilitation application for resected lung cancer survivors: design and evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, Josien G.; Tönis, Thijs M.; Dekker-van Weering, Marit G. H.; Stuiver, Martijn M.; Wouters, Michel W. J. M.; van Harten, Wim H.; Hermens, Hermie J.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) patients experience high symptom burden and significant decline of physical fitness and quality of life following lung resection. Good quality of survivorship care post-surgery is essential to optimize recovery and prevent unscheduled healthcare use. The use of Information and

  4. Co-creation of an ICT-supported cancer rehabilitation application for resected lung cancer survivors: design and evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, Josien; Tönis, Thijs; van Weering, Marit; Stuiver, Martijn M.; Wouters, Michel W.J.M.; van Harten, Willem H.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer (LC) patients experience high symptom burden and significant decline of physical fitness and quality of life following lung resection. Good quality of survivorship care post-surgery is essential to optimize recovery and prevent unscheduled healthcare use. The use of

  5. A Set of Handwriting Features for Use in Automated Writer Identification().

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John J; Patterson, Robert Bradley; Gantz, Donald T; Saunders, Christopher P; Walch, Mark A; Buscaglia, JoAnn

    2017-05-01

    A writer's biometric identity can be characterized through the distribution of physical feature measurements ("writer's profile"); a graph-based system that facilitates the quantification of these features is described. To accomplish this quantification, handwriting is segmented into basic graphical forms ("graphemes"), which are "skeletonized" to yield the graphical topology of the handwritten segment. The graph-based matching algorithm compares the graphemes first by their graphical topology and then by their geometric features. Graphs derived from known writers can be compared against graphs extracted from unknown writings. The process is computationally intensive and relies heavily upon statistical pattern recognition algorithms. This article focuses on the quantification of these physical features and the construction of the associated pattern recognition methods for using the features to discriminate among writers. The graph-based system described in this article has been implemented in a highly accurate and approximately language-independent biometric recognition system of writers of cursive documents. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  6. MRI guided stereotactic ventrointermediate thalamotomy for writer's cramp: two cases report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-shi NIU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the methods and curative effect of stereotactic surgery for treating writer's cramp (WC. Methods and Results Two patients with writer's cramp (tremor type underwent MRI guided stereotactic ventrointermediate (Vim thalamotomy on the left side. The symptoms of one patient disappeared immediately after operation, and the patient could write legibly. The tremor of right upper extremity in another patient was improved significantly. Two patients did not present obvious complications, and the previous symptoms were not found to recur during follow-up period respectively. Conclusions Stereotactic surgery for treatment of writer's cramp has definite therapeutic effect. MRI guided stereotactic technique can effectively avoid the complications of Vim thalamotomy. However, the indications of two methods in surgical treatment [thalamotomy and deep brain stimulation (DBS] and the respective merits still need further study. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.10.009

  7. The grant writer's handbook how to write a research proposal and succeed

    CERN Document Server

    Crawley, Gerard M

    2016-01-01

    The Grant Writer's Handbook: How to Write a Research Proposal and Succeed provides useful and practical advice on all aspects of proposal writing, including developing proposal ideas, drafting the proposal, dealing with referees, and budgeting. The authors base their advice on many years of experience writing and reviewing proposals in many different countries at various levels of scientific maturity. The book describes the numerous kinds of awards available from funding agencies, in particular large collaborative grants involving a number of investigators, and addresses the practical impact of a grant, which is often required of proposals. In addition, information is provided about selection of reviewers and the mechanics of organizing a research grant competition to give the proposal writer the necessary background information. The book includes key comments from a number of experts and is essential reading for anyone writing a research grant proposal.The Grant Writer's Handbook's companion website, featuri...

  8. JOHN MILTON’S INFLUENCE ON POETS, WRITERS AND COMPOSERS OF HIS PERIOD AND AFTERMATH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Recep TAŞ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available John Milton is doubtless one of the most important and influential poets in English Language and Literature. He has always been a major influence in literature both during his lifetime and after his death. His reputation among the readers and the poets is a known fact since it has been proven that several writers and poets frequently wrote under the influence of this great epic poet. Milton was an artist who had written about various subjects, he was both a poet and a renowned prose writer. As he had something to say about every field of life his admirers and followers were not necessarily from just one category. Many people, including politicians, poets, writers, composers found something valuable in Milton and his works. The purpose of this article is to reevaluate Milton’s controversial works and lay down the influence of Milton on the mentioned figures of the period and aftermath.

  9. The Internet as a source of health information: experiences of cancer survivors and caregivers with healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolce, Maria C

    2011-05-01

    To describe the experiences of cancer survivors and caregivers with healthcare providers in the context of the Internet as a source of health information. Qualitative description. Online cancer communities hosted by the Association of Cancer Online Resources. Purposive sample of 488 cancer survivors, with varying cancer types and survivorship stages, and caregivers. Secondary data analysis using Krippendorff's thematic clustering technique of qualitative content analysis. Survivorship, healthcare relationships, and the Internet. Disenchantment with healthcare relationships was associated with failed expectations related to evidence-based practice, clinical expertise, informational support, and therapeutic interpersonal communication. Survivors and caregivers exercised power in healthcare relationships through collaboration, direct confrontation, becoming expert, and endorsement to influence and control care decisions. Disenchantment propelled cancer survivors and caregivers to search the Internet for health information and resources. Conversely, Internet information-seeking precipitated the experience of disenchantment. Through online health information and resources, concealed failures in healthcare relationships were revealed and cancer survivors and caregivers were empowered to influence and control care decisions. The findings highlight failures in cancer survivorship care and underscore the importance of novel interdisciplinary programs and models of care that support evidence-informed decision making, self-management, and improved quality of life. Healthcare professionals need to receive education on survivors' use of the Internet as a source of health information and its impact on healthcare relationships. Future research should include studies examining the relationship between disenchantment and survivorship outcomes.

  10. Correlated duplications and losses in the evolution of palmitoylation writer and eraser families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittouck, Stijn; van Noort, Vera

    2017-03-20

    Protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) change protein properties. Each PTM type is associated with domain families that apply the modification (writers), remove the modification (erasers) and bind to the modified sites (readers) together called toolkit domains. The evolutionary origin and diversification remains largely understudied, except for tyrosine phosphorylation. Protein palmitoylation entails the addition of a palmitoyl fatty acid to a cysteine residue. This PTM functions as a membrane anchor and is involved in a range of cellular processes. One writer family and two erasers families are known for protein palmitoylation. In this work we unravel the evolutionary history of these writer and eraser families. We constructed a high-quality profile hidden Markov model (HMM) of each family, searched for protein family members in fully sequenced genomes and subsequently constructed phylogenetic distributions of the families. We constructed Maximum Likelihood phylogenetic trees and using gene tree rearrangement and tree reconciliation inferred their evolutionary histories in terms of duplication and loss events. We identified lineages where the families expanded or contracted and found that the evolutionary histories of the families are correlated. The results show that the erasers were invented first, before the origin of the eukaryotes. The writers first arose in the eukaryotic ancestor. The writers and erasers show co-expansions in several eukaryotic ancestral lineages. These expansions often seem to be followed by contractions in some or all of the lineages further in evolution. A general pattern of correlated evolution appears between writer and eraser domains. These co-evolution patterns could be used in new methods for interaction prediction based on phylogenies.

  11. Sexual minority cancer survivors' satisfaction with care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabson, Jennifer M; Kamen, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Satisfaction with care is important to cancer survivors' health outcomes. Satisfaction with care is not equal for all cancer survivors, and sexual minority (i.e., lesbian, gay, and bisexual) cancer survivors may experience poor satisfaction with care. Data were drawn from the 2010 LIVESTRONG national survey. The final sample included 207 sexual minority cancer survivors and 4,899 heterosexual cancer survivors. Satisfaction with care was compared by sexual orientation, and a Poisson regression model was computed to test the associations between sexual orientation and satisfaction with care, controlling for other relevant variables. Sexual minority cancer survivors had lower satisfaction with care than did heterosexual cancer survivors (B = -0.12, SE = 0.04, Wald χ(2) = 9.25, pSexual minorities experience poorer satisfaction with care compared to heterosexual cancer survivors. Satisfaction with care is especially relevant to cancer survivorship in light of the cancer-related health disparities reported among sexual minority cancer survivors.

  12. Survivorship in micro fungi and crustacean resting stages during ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum land testing of EXPOSE unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, Victor; Alekseev, Victor; Novikova, Nataliya; Sychev, Vladimir; Levinskikh, Margarita; Deshevaya, Elena; Brancelj, Anton; Malyavin, Stanislav

    Dormancy protects animals and plants in harsh environmental conditions within a special resting phases of life cycle lasting from months up to hundred years. This phenomenon is perspective for space researches on interplanetary quarantine within space missions. Direct experiments in open space supported in principle the fact of survivorship of bacteria and fungi spores in open space during long time experiments (Novikova et al. 2007). The rate of survivorship in long-term mission was low but enough to conclude that biological invasion to Mars is a real danger. The possibility for resting stages to survive under UV treatment in vacuum without some protection was not clear. To test it dormant stages (spores) of primitive fungi Aspergillus versicolor, Aspergillus sydowii, Penicillium expansum, and Penicillium aurantiogriseum derived from ISS environment were used in the land EXPOSE imitation of outside space station UV and vacuum conditions. Survivorship in resting eggs of some crustaceans with dried (cladoceran Daphnia magna, fair-shrimp Streptocephalus torvicornis and ostracode Eucypris ornate from hemi desert Caspian area) and wet diapause state (copepod Mixodiaptomus tatricus from the Tatra mountains, altitude 1510 m) was tested also. The total UV dose of 9,1x10 to the 4th KJ/m2 during this imitation was accomplished with a SOL 2000 sun simulator lamp. The final vacuum value achieved during EST was 10 to the minus 6 Pa. Temperature during the experiment fluctuated in the range 19-25 o C. Micro fungi showed a high level of survivorship in samples treated with UV samples varied from 95 till 100 Supported by RFBR grant 07-04-00006.

  13. The Culture of Writing of L2 Writers in Transition from Secondary School to Postsecondary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Lai Fong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study looks at the culture of writing of second language (L2 writers in English who are in transition from secondary school to postsecondary education. It looks at four case studies of students in their first semester of postsecondary education in a public university. It examines their negotiation of culture of writing in secondary school to the culture of writing in postsecondary education from the perspective of sociocultural theory. Data was obtained from interviews, personal narratives and observation. The findings show that sociocultural theory can offer an understanding of these ESL writers as they move from one culture of writing to another

  14. Margiad Evans (1909-1958): a history of epilepsy in a creative writer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larner, A J

    2009-12-01

    The author Margiad Evans (1909-1958), a celebrated Anglo-Welsh writer of the 1930s and 1940s, developed epilepsy in 1950, and subsequently wrote accounts of her experiences of seizures, their diagnosis, and their management. These documents are among the first patient accounts of epilepsy, and remain of value today, not least because they prefigure ongoing problems in epilepsy management such as pregnancy and the adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs. They also give some insights into the consequences of epilepsy for a creative writer.

  15. Genotype and local environment dynamically influence growth, disturbance response and survivorship in the threatened coral, Acropora cervicornis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawford Drury

    Full Text Available The relationship between the coral genotype and the environment is an important area of research in degraded coral reef ecosystems. We used a reciprocal outplanting experiment with 930 corals representing ten genotypes on each of eight reefs to investigate the influence of genotype and the environment on growth and survivorship in the threatened Caribbean staghorn coral, Acropora cervicornis. Coral genotype and site were strong drivers of coral growth and individual genotypes exhibited flexible, non-conserved reaction norms, complemented by ten-fold differences in growth between specific G-E combinations. Growth plasticity may diminish the influence of local adaptation, where foreign corals grew faster than native corals at their home sites. Novel combinations of environment and genotype also significantly affected disturbance response during and after the 2015 bleaching event, where these factors acted synergistically to drive variation in bleaching and recovery. Importantly, small differences in temperature stress elicit variable patterns of survivorship based on genotype and illustrate the importance of novel combinations of coral genetics and small differences between sites representing habitat refugia. In this context, acclimatization and flexibility is especially important given the long lifespan of corals coping with complex environmental change. The combined influence of site and genotype creates short-term differences in growth and survivorship, contributing to the standing genetic variation needed for adaptation to occur over longer timescales and the recovery of degraded reefs through natural mechanisms.

  16. Genotype and local environment dynamically influence growth, disturbance response and survivorship in the threatened coral, Acropora cervicornis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Crawford; Manzello, Derek; Lirman, Diego

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between the coral genotype and the environment is an important area of research in degraded coral reef ecosystems. We used a reciprocal outplanting experiment with 930 corals representing ten genotypes on each of eight reefs to investigate the influence of genotype and the environment on growth and survivorship in the threatened Caribbean staghorn coral, Acropora cervicornis. Coral genotype and site were strong drivers of coral growth and individual genotypes exhibited flexible, non-conserved reaction norms, complemented by ten-fold differences in growth between specific G-E combinations. Growth plasticity may diminish the influence of local adaptation, where foreign corals grew faster than native corals at their home sites. Novel combinations of environment and genotype also significantly affected disturbance response during and after the 2015 bleaching event, where these factors acted synergistically to drive variation in bleaching and recovery. Importantly, small differences in temperature stress elicit variable patterns of survivorship based on genotype and illustrate the importance of novel combinations of coral genetics and small differences between sites representing habitat refugia. In this context, acclimatization and flexibility is especially important given the long lifespan of corals coping with complex environmental change. The combined influence of site and genotype creates short-term differences in growth and survivorship, contributing to the standing genetic variation needed for adaptation to occur over longer timescales and the recovery of degraded reefs through natural mechanisms.

  17. Hylan GF-20 Viscosupplementation in the Treatment of Symptomatic Osteoarthritis of the Knee: Clinical Effect Survivorship at 5 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutefnouchet, Tarek; Puranik, Guru; Holmes, Esther; Bell, Karl M

    2017-06-01

    Controversies remain surrounding the choice of hyaluronic acid products and patient selection. A study was conducted to report the long-term survivorship of intra-articular injection effect of high molecular weight hyaluronic preparation hylan GF-20 (Synvisc-One) for patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. A retrospective observational analysis of a single therapeutic series was carried out. The analysis was conducted to determine therapeutic effect survivorship taking arthroplasty and any other surgical interventions as endpoint results. Seventy-seven consecutive patients (82 knees) were followed up for five years. At one-year follow-up, 71 knees (87%) responded to treatment and only 8 knees (10%) were offered arthroplasty due to persistence of symptoms. At five-year follow-up, 41 (50%) were still considered responders. During the study period, repeat injection was given in 9 knees (11%). Arthroplasty (either total or unicompartmental) was required in 26 (31%). Kaplan-Meier survivorship analysis of therapeutic effect demonstrated 67% survival at 5 years with arthroplasty as endpoint and 58% survival at 5 years with all secondary interventions as endpoint. This study demonstrates a significantly longer duration of clinical benefit of hylan GF-20 injection. Present results may suggest a notion of an ideal delay therapeutic strategy for patients not ready to receive an arthroplasty. Further studies will be required to help characterise these subsets of patients.

  18. Distribution, survivorship and mortality sources in immature stages of the neotropical leaf miner Pachyschelus coeruleipennis Kerremans (Coleoptera: Buprestidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. QUEIROZ

    Full Text Available Distribution, sources of mortality, and survivorship of immatures was investigated during the reproductive season of the neotropical buprestid leaf miner, Pachyschelus coeruleipennis, that burrows in leaves of Croton floribundus (Euphorbiaceae in SE, Brazil. Immature distribution was investigated by a random sample of 120 shrubs of C. floribundus growing along forest edges. Marked leaves were followed to recorded sources of mortality and survivorship of immature stages. Females lay their eggs preferentially in the young leaves of the host plant, with mines and pupal cells having been found on the middle part of plants. Densities of eggs, active mines, and pupal cells were, respectively, 25 ± 2, 6 ± 1, and 1 ± 0.3 per 100 leaves. Predators and parasitoids accounted for the majority of losses in the immature P. coeruleipennis population. Mortality was 3 times lower in the egg stage than in the last larval instar. Predation rate was greater than parasitism but the latter increased much more during the development of immatures. Survivorship and sources of mortality were different between early and late season sample of leaf-miner immatures. Parasitism rate was greater in the late-season whereas predation was greater in early-season samples. These results are compared with mortality patterns described for other buprestid leaf miners in temperate and tropical regions.

  19. Distribution, survivorship and mortality sources in immature stages of the neotropical leaf miner Pachyschelus coeruleipennis Kerremans (Coleoptera: Buprestidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QUEIROZ J. M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Distribution, sources of mortality, and survivorship of immatures was investigated during the reproductive season of the neotropical buprestid leaf miner, Pachyschelus coeruleipennis, that burrows in leaves of Croton floribundus (Euphorbiaceae in SE, Brazil. Immature distribution was investigated by a random sample of 120 shrubs of C. floribundus growing along forest edges. Marked leaves were followed to recorded sources of mortality and survivorship of immature stages. Females lay their eggs preferentially in the young leaves of the host plant, with mines and pupal cells having been found on the middle part of plants. Densities of eggs, active mines, and pupal cells were, respectively, 25 ± 2, 6 ± 1, and 1 ± 0.3 per 100 leaves. Predators and parasitoids accounted for the majority of losses in the immature P. coeruleipennis population. Mortality was 3 times lower in the egg stage than in the last larval instar. Predation rate was greater than parasitism but the latter increased much more during the development of immatures. Survivorship and sources of mortality were different between early and late season sample of leaf-miner immatures. Parasitism rate was greater in the late-season whereas predation was greater in early-season samples. These results are compared with mortality patterns described for other buprestid leaf miners in temperate and tropical regions.

  20. Reproduction, abundance and survivorship of two Alveopora spp. in the mesophotic reefs of Eilat, Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal-Shaham, Lee; Eyal, Gal; Tamir, Raz; Loya, Yossi

    2016-01-01

    Although the study of coral reproduction has advanced tremendously over the last few decades, a particular gap exists in our knowledge of the reproductive modes of corals from ‘mesophotic coral ecosystems’ (MCEs) found at 30–150 m depth. Here, we report for the first time on the reproductive patterns, living cover, and survivorship under different light treatments of two scleractinian species from the MCEs of Eilat, Red-Sea: Alveopora allingi and A. ocellata. Both species are found exclusively within MCEs and are high in both abundance and relative cover. These species display a synchronous gametogenic cycles with consecutive oocyte growth and development. Peak of reproductive activity occurs in late summer (September-October), typified by accelerated oocyte growth, coinciding with the rise in seawater temperature. Estimates of fecundity show mean monthly maxima of 48.5 ± 26.3 and 23.5 ± 11.8 (Mean ± SE) oocytes per cm2 for A. allingi and A. ocellata respectively, prior to spawning. A comparison of light and temperature regimes in the shallow vs. MCE environments is presented, and the response of these species to changes in these parameters is discussed. A call encouraging the much-needed studies on the sexuality and reproductive modes of MCE coral species is expressed. PMID:26860656

  1. Spatial patterns of coral survivorship: impacts of adult proximity versus other drivers of localized mortality

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    David A. Gibbs

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Species-specific enemies may promote prey coexistence through negative distance- and density-dependent survival of juveniles near conspecific adults. We tested this mechanism by transplanting juvenile-sized fragments of the brooding corals Pocillopora damicornis and Seriatopora hystrix 3, 12, 24 and 182 cm up- and down-current of conspecific adults and monitoring their survival and condition over time. We also characterized the spatial distribution of P. damicornis and S. hystrix within replicate plots on three Fijian reef flats and measured the distribution of small colonies within 2 m of larger colonies of each species. Juvenile-sized transplants exhibited no differences in survivorship as a function of distance from adult P. damicornis or S. hystrix. Additionally, both P. damicornis and S. hystrix were aggregated rather than overdispersed on natural reefs. However, a pattern of juveniles being aggregated near adults while larger (and probably older colonies were not suggests that greater mortality near large adults could occur over longer periods of time or that size-dependent mortality was occurring. While we found minimal evidence of greater mortality of small colonies near adult conspecifics in our transplant experiments, we did document hot-spots of species-specific corallivory. We detected spatially localized and temporally persistent predation on P. damicornis by the territorial triggerfish Balistapus undulatus. This patchy predation did not occur for S. hystrix. This variable selective regime in an otherwise more uniform environment could be one mechanism maintaining diversity of corals on Indo-Pacific reefs.

  2. Reproduction, abundance and survivorship of two Alveopora spp. in the mesophotic reefs of Eilat, Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal-Shaham, Lee; Eyal, Gal; Tamir, Raz; Loya, Yossi

    2016-02-10

    Although the study of coral reproduction has advanced tremendously over the last few decades, a particular gap exists in our knowledge of the reproductive modes of corals from 'mesophotic coral ecosystems' (MCEs) found at 30-150 m depth. Here, we report for the first time on the reproductive patterns, living cover, and survivorship under different light treatments of two scleractinian species from the MCEs of Eilat, Red-Sea: Alveopora allingi and A. ocellata. Both species are found exclusively within MCEs and are high in both abundance and relative cover. These species display a synchronous gametogenic cycles with consecutive oocyte growth and development. Peak of reproductive activity occurs in late summer (September-October), typified by accelerated oocyte growth, coinciding with the rise in seawater temperature. Estimates of fecundity show mean monthly maxima of 48.5 ± 26.3 and 23.5 ± 11.8 (Mean ± SE) oocytes per cm(2) for A. allingi and A. ocellata respectively, prior to spawning. A comparison of light and temperature regimes in the shallow vs. MCE environments is presented, and the response of these species to changes in these parameters is discussed. A call encouraging the much-needed studies on the sexuality and reproductive modes of MCE coral species is expressed.

  3. A New Chapter. The Fresh Voices of Hispanic Fiction Writers Are Being Heard by a Growing Mainstream Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frase-Blunt, Martha

    1992-01-01

    Highlights numerous Hispanic fiction writers who are beginning to experience popularity. Describes Hispanic genre such as "magic realism" in which real action is tinged with dreamlike surrealism. Discusses Hispanic writers' experiences with small independent presses as well as major publishers. Expresses such concerns as patronization and the lack…

  4. The defense of provincial identity in a literary association: the Pampean Association of Writers of Santa Rosa, La Pampa

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    Daniela Bassa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the notion of provincial identity in the Pampean Association of Writers of Santa Rosa, province of La Pampa. Although the group was shaped around literature, discourses and actions overflow this purpose and present a particular ideological stance regarding Pampean identity. Analysis focuses on interviews to members and documents produced both by local writers and the Association.

  5. Rhetorical Structures in Academic Research Writing by Non-Native Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryani, Ina; Kamaruddin, H.; Hashima, Noor; Yaacob, Aizan; Rashid, Salleh Abd; Desa, Hazry

    2014-01-01

    Writers of research articles are expected to present research information in a structured manner by following a certain rhetorical patterns determined by the discourse community. Failures to keep to the writing standard and rhetorical pattern are likely to lower the acceptance rate. While producing a research article is understandably a complex…

  6. The Impact of Teacher Corrective Feedback on EFL Student Writers' Grammatical Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermsook, Kanyakorn; Liamnimitr, Jiraporn; Pochakorn, Rattaneekorn

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to provide information about teacher corrective feedback that would be helpful for EFL students' writing improvement. It focuses on feedback provided to correct grammatical errors made by student writers as the author finds that this type of errors can obstruct the effectiveness of students' pieces of writing and may result in…

  7. The Use of Paraphrase in Summary Writing: A Comparison of L1 and L2 Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Casey

    2006-01-01

    Paraphrasing is considered by many to be an important skill for academic writing, and some have argued that the teaching of paraphrasing might help students avoid copying from source texts. Few studies, however, have investigated the ways in which both L1 and L2 academic writers already use paraphrasing as a textual borrowing strategy when…

  8. Training L2 Writers to Reference Corpora as a Self-Correction Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Corpora have the potential to support the L2 writing process at the discourse level in contrast to the isolated dictionary entries that many intermediate writers rely on. To take advantage of this resource, learners need to be trained, which involves practising corpus research and referencing skills as well as learning to make data-based…

  9. Metacognitive Awareness of EFL Student Writers in a Chinese ELT Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zhoulin

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into metacognitive awareness of Chinese English as a foreign language (EFL) student writers, under a threefold metacognition framework--person, task, and strategy variables, and within the broader domain of cognitive writing theories. Data were collected in a Chinese tertiary English language teaching (ELT)…

  10. Peter and the Monolith: A Psychoanalytic Study of a Case of Writer's Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingle, Nick

    1998-01-01

    Argues that: (1) the disturbing effects of writer's block the student experienced were the result of self-disintegration; (2) the student's cognitive powers were devoted to a defensive stabilization of the self; (3) the defining qualities of his writing were a product of his psychological configuration; and (4) his tendency toward narcissistic…

  11. Seeing with New Eyes: A Guidebook on Teaching and Assessing Beginning Writers. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spandel, Vicki

    Noting that primary-school writers are imaginative, and that their writing often reflects a mixture of creative, highly individual styles, this book places teaching ideas and students' writing and drawings in perspective and views the experimentations and playfulness of students as ways of learning. The Six-Trait Analytical Model for Assessing…

  12. Margaret Fulton: A study of a 1960s Australian food writer as an activist

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    Donna Lee Brien

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Today, food writing makes up a significant proportion of the texts written, published, sold and read each year in Australia. While the food writing published in magazines and cookbooks has often been thought of as providing useful, but relatively banal, practical skills-based information to its readers, relatively recent reassessments suggest that food writing is much more interesting and important than this. In the contemporary context, when the mere mention of food engenders considerable anxiety, food writers play a number of roles beyond providing information on how to buy, store, prepare and serve various provisions. Instead, contemporary food writers engage with a range of important issues around food production and consumption including sustainable and ethical agriculture, biodiversity and genetic modification, food miles and fair trade, food safety and security, and obesity, diabetes and other health issues. In this, Australian food writers not only provide comment on any important issues in progress, they are also, I suggest, forward-thinking activists, advocating and campaigning for change. This paper focuses on prominent Australian food writer Margaret Fulton’s career in the 1960s to begin to investigate her work as an activist: that is, one who advocates and campaigns to bring about change.

  13. Second Language Cyber Rhetoric: A Study of Chinese L2 Writers in an Online Usenet Group

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    Joel Bloch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that the expectations of traditional L2 writing classroom can be problematic for Chinese students, particularly in the area of argumentation and critical thinking. On the other hand, writing on the Internet has been shown to be substantially different in ways that may liberate the students from the constraints of the classroom. This argument, however, has typically focused on American writers, ignoring how cyberspace is being appropriated by those outside of the Western tradition of rhetoric. In this study, I examine how Chinese writers use the Internet as an alternative writing space to produce a rhetoric that incorporates traditional Chinese rhetorical forms expressed in English. The study focuses on how a group of Chinese writers respond on the Internet to a television segment accusing the Chinese government of planting spies. I found that the Chinese writers use the Internet to build a collective response to the television show using a variety of rhetorical strategies, even to the point of forcing the television network to meet with them. By situating their arguments in the tradition of Chinese rhetoric, I found that these alternative forms of writing found in cyberspace are affected by the traditions of Chinese rhetoric.

  14. Thomas Merton’s poetics of translation in his letters to writers

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    Marcela María Raggio

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article explores Thomas Merton’s poetics of translation as reflected in his letters to writers. There, Merton expresses his ideas on poetic translation, the methods and the experience of approaching foreign literature through translation. Then, a translation analysis of a sample revises the connection between Merton’s poetics and practice of translation.

  15. An Analysis of Feedback Given to Strong and Weak Student Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnen, Janet L. D.; Collopy, Rachel M. B.

    2009-01-01

    Improvement-oriented feedback has been shown to be more effective at raising writing achievement than simple evaluative feedback. This study investigates whether teachers differ in the feedback they give to weak and strong writers as well as how feedback differs across grades. Interviews were conducted with 15 teachers about the feedback they gave…

  16. A Basic Writing Course Design to Promote Writer Identity: Three Analyses of Student Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of three comparative analyses on forty-seven student papers in order to examine the effectiveness of a basic writing course in developing students' academic writer identity. The course curriculum, grounded in social identity theory, focuses on the core writing concepts and dispositions that promote writer…

  17. An Analysis of English Language Teaching Coursebooks by Turkish Writers: "Let's Speak English 7" Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekir, Serpil; Arikan, Arda

    2007-01-01

    It is known that English language coursebooks written by Turkish writers is widely used in Turkey although much research is needed to assess their quality as educational materials. In this research study, opinions of 7th grade students' and teachers' on "Let's Speak English 7" were studied through teacher and student questionnaires…

  18. Does Interface Matter? A Study of Web Authoring and Editing by Inexperienced Web Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Rodney F.

    2006-01-01

    This study explores the complicated nature of the interface as a mediational tool for inexperienced writers as they composed hypertext documents. Because technology can become so quickly and inextricably connected to people's everyday lives, it is essential to explore the effects on these technologies before they become invisible. Because…

  19. Examining Instructional Practices, Intellectual Challenge, and Supports for African American Student Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Chandra L.

    2012-01-01

    The debate surrounding how best to support African American student writers continues today as the gap between achievement scores persists. This qualitative analysis documents the classroom structures and instructional practices of two English Language Arts teachers working in a predominately African American public middle school, whose students…

  20. Writing profiles: the effect of the writing mode on pausing and revision patterns of experienced writers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Waes, Luuk; van Waes, L.; Schellens, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated how writing processes are affected by physical aspects of the task environment, specifically the use of a word processor, with respect to patterns of pausing and revision. Consistent with the tradition of cognitive writing research, the writing processes of experienced writers were

  1. The Development of Young Writers in an English Classroom: Opening up Dialogue with Year 8 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Reetu

    2015-01-01

    This essay explores what the development of writing might look like and how it might take shape in a secondary English classroom. The study problematises current definitions of progress. In direct opposition to standards-driven models, I propose an alternative way of thinking about the development of writers through a series of narrative accounts…

  2. Transfer Institutions, Transfer of Knowledge: The Development of Rhetorical Adaptability and Underprepared Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Holly; Giordano, Joanne Baird

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, the authors describe the results of a scholarship of teaching and learning project that conducted a qualitative study of the writing development of 21 student writers during the first year of college, tracking their progress in an English 101 course and following them as they moved into the core, transfer-level composition course.…

  3. Writer's cramp: restoration of striatal D2-binding after successful biofeedback-based sensorimotor training.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, H.J.C.; Werf, S.P. van der; Horstink, C.A.; Cools, A.R.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Horstink, M.W.I.M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Previous studies of writer's cramp have detected cerebral sensorimotor abnormalities in this disorder and, more specifically, a reduced striatal D2-binding as assessed by [(123)I]IBZM SPECT. However, empirical data were lacking about the influence of effective biofeedback-based

  4. Handwriting performance in the absence of visual control in writer's cramp patients: Initial observations

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    Losch Florian

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study was aimed at investigating the writing parameters of writer's cramp patients and control subjects during handwriting of a test sentence in the absence of visual control. Methods Eight right-handed patients with writer's cramp and eight healthy volunteers as age-matched control subjects participated in the study. The experimental task consisted in writing a test sentence repeatedly for fifty times on a pressure-sensitive digital board. The subject did not have visual control on his handwriting. The writing performance was stored on a PC and analyzed off-line. Results During handwriting all patients developed a typical dystonic limb posture and reported an increase in muscular tension along the experimental session. The patients were significantly slower than the controls, with lower mean vertical pressure of the pen tip on the paper and they could not reach the endmost letter of the sentence in the given time window. No other handwriting parameter differences were found between the two groups. Conclusion Our findings indicate that during writing in the absence of visual feedback writer's cramp patients are slower and could not reach the endmost letter of the test sentence, but their level of automatization is not impaired and writer's cramp handwriting parameters are similar to those of the controls except for even lower vertical pressure of the pen tip on the paper, which is probably due to a changed strategy in such experimental conditions.

  5. Teaching Elementary School Students to Be Effective Writers. Practice Guide Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2017

    2017-01-01

    An early foundation in writing offers students a valuable tool for learning, communication, and self-expression. Authored by a panel of experts, the "Teaching Elementary School Students to Be Effective Writers" practice guide presents four recommendations educators can use to help elementary students strengthen their writing skills. The…

  6. On the Grammar of Silence: The Structure of My Undocumented Immigrant Writer's Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    In this reflective essay, Alberto Ledesma explores how being undocumented can produce a particular form of writer's block. He argues that there is a pattern of predictable silences and obfuscations inherent in all undocumented immigrant autobiographies that cannot be easily negotiated when undocumented students are asked to write about "their…

  7. Professional Writers Don't Write Like That, So Why Should You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Alix

    A teacher describes what happens when professional writers are invited into his college composition classroom to talk about and show the processes they employ in revising their work, and reports that students benefit not only by hearing about but also by actually seeing successive drafts. In the class, the students begin the semester by analyzing…

  8. Octavia Butler and Virginia Hamilton: Black Women Writers and Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Gregory Jerome; Brooks, Wanda M.

    2003-01-01

    Notes that African American literature has always had science fiction elements in its focus on narratives of the alienated and marginalized "other." Contends that Octavia Butler and Virginia Hamilton are two African American writers of science fiction who examine the connections between the stories of a culture and the genre of science…

  9. The African Female Writer and Her Craft: Aspects of Yvonne Vera's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is particularly concerned with identifying and examining some peculiar features of Yvonne Vera's literary artistry. It essentially explores the varied ways the Zimbabwean writer has articulated some aspects of her feminist viewpoint through the unique manner she crafts her novels. While drawing illustrations from ...

  10. Primary Pupils' Creative Writing: Enacting Identities in a Community of Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Tom; Stephenson, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on a Community of Writers creative writing project where 25 primary school pupils from lower socio-economic backgrounds took part in creative writing workshops over a 2-week period at a higher education institution. Using practitioner enquiry and discourse analysis, this paper views identity as participation in "figured…

  11. Invent an Audience--Create a Context: How Writers Are Referring to Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Kirsten

    In teaching writing, the "audience" became and still is fundamental, leading to the question of how students can learn to adapt their text to the assumed readership and at the same time, learn to write for their addressees. A study focused on how writers cope with the writing process, asking several questions about the concept of…

  12. Developing the Relation of Author to Idea, or, Curing the Student-Writer's Transference Neurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micham, Dennis L.

    Meaningful use of language involves intending to have an effect and intending the audience to recognize that aim. In a Freudian modification of this premise, allowing for different levels of intentional awareness, writing can be discussed in terms of how writers intend to affect readers, as well as how aware they are themselves of their intentions…

  13. Growing Up as a Minority in America: Four African-American Writers' Testimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Leonard A., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Examines works of four Black writers who speak directly to adolescents. Explores the bitterness caused by racism and social degradation in the writings of James Baldwin, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, and Leonard A. Slade, Jr. Concludes that their works reveal that the fight against injustice begins in the heart. (PRA)

  14. Women Writers and the Canon. Focused Access to Selected Topics FAST Bib No. 72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Melinda; Moke, Susan

    Reflecting educators' ongoing efforts to incorporate the female literary tradition into the canon that is commonly taught in high school and college classrooms, this bibliography derived from the ERIC database presents annotations of 21 journal articles and books concerning women writers and the canon published between 1984 and 1992. Sections of…

  15. Mainstream Teacher Candidates' Perspectives on ESL Writing: The Effects of Writer Identity and Rater Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Sook; Veitch, Hillary

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the extent to which the ethnic identity of a writer and the background (gender and area of teaching) of a rater can influence mainstream teacher candidates' evaluation of English as a second language (ESL) writing, using a matched-guise method. A one-page essay was elicited from an ESL learner enrolled in an intensive English…

  16. Changes to English as an Additional Language Writers' Research Articles: From Spoken to Written Register

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyalan, Aylin; Mumford, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The process of writing journal articles is increasingly being seen as a collaborative process, especially where the authors are English as an Additional Language (EAL) academics. This study examines the changes made in terms of register to EAL writers' journal articles by a native-speaker writing centre advisor at a private university in Turkey.…

  17. Writing Is More than "Exciting": Equipping Primary Children To Become Reflective Writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corden, Roy

    2003-01-01

    Describes work undertaken as part of a partnership program initiated to encourage collaborative research between primary school teachers in England and university tutors. Notes the teachers explored ways of developing children as reflective writers. Illustrates the impact on achievement, analyzes some examples of writing, and discusses evidence of…

  18. Navigating an English-Only Classroom: Multiple Identities in a Primary Writer's Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sally

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative case study analyzes literacy events that were co-constructed by one bilingual, Mexican student and his English-only peers. The article examines the linguistic resources and literacy practices that Juan used as he created a picture book during writer's workshop. Data included video-taped interactions, artifacts, and interviews. The…

  19. Supporting Struggling Writers with Class-Wide Teacher Implementation of a Computer-Based Graphic Organizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Kelley; Evmenova, Anya S.; Boykin, Andrea; Sacco, Donna; Good, Kevin; Ahn, Soo Y.; MacVittie, Nichole; Hughes, Melissa D.

    2017-01-01

    Following professional development, 4 teachers implemented instructional lessons designed to improve the written expression of 6th- and 7th-grade struggling writers in inclusive, self-contained, and co-taught classrooms. A multiple-baseline study investigated the effects of a computer-based graphic organizer (CBGO) with embedded self-regulated…

  20. Women of Mystery: Investigating Learning Pathways of Canadian and American Female Crime Fiction Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouthro, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the learning pathways of 15 Canadian and American female crime fiction authors. Using a critical feminist perspective, it argues that despite the neoliberal rhetoric of individual choice, as in most careers, there are social-structural factors that create opportunities and barriers for women mystery writers. The article…

  1. An Ongian Perspective on the History of Literacy: Psychological Context and Today's College Student Writer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comprone, Joseph

    1986-01-01

    Shows how Walter Ong's interpretation of the history of literacy helps explain the split between individual orientation and social perspective as it influences modern writers, applies historical patterns to current literacy problems, and discusses the teaching implications of the theory. (EL)

  2. Understanding the Use of Graphic Novels to Support the Writing Skills of a Struggling Writer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Christina L.

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods study combining a single-subject experimental design with an embedded case study focuses on the impact of a visual treatment on the handwritten and typed output of a struggling male writer during his 5th through 7th grades who has undergone a longitudinal remedial phase of two and a half years creating text-only material as well…

  3. Perceptions of Diverse First-Grade Learners of Their Writing Instruction and Growth as Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Writing is an essential component of young children's early literacy development, and active participation in writing instruction contributes to their growth as writers. Providing engaging writing instruction to meet the academically diverse needs of young learners, however, can challenge early childhood teachers. The purpose of this study was to…

  4. Critical Argument and Writer Identity: Social Constructivism as a Theoretical Framework for EFL Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Jim

    2015-01-01

    This article makes the argument that we need to situate student's academic writing as socially constructed pieces of writing that embody a writer's cultural identity and critical argument. In support, I present and describe a comprehensive model of an original English as a Foreign Language (EFL) writing analytical framework. This article explains…

  5. Mature Taiwanese Writers' Development of Writing and Voices between Different Academic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shu-Fen

    2015-01-01

    The present study explores four L2 mature writers' development of writing and voices in English between different academic environments, and seeks to create more meaningful grounds for teaching academic ESL writing in the U.S. and college writing in Taiwan. The approach of this study is influenced by Hirvela and Belcher's (2001) reading of terms…

  6. Spelling and Assistive Technology: Helping Students with Disabilities Be Successful Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Kate D.; Carpenter, Laura B.

    2010-01-01

    Successful writers have proficient skills in three areas: handwriting, spelling and composition. Many students with disabilities experience difficulties in the area of spelling, which in turn may lead to difficulty in composing written work. Spelling deficits should be addressed by the student's Individualized Education Program (IEP) team to…

  7. Writing under wartime conditions : North and South Korean writers during the Korean war (1950-1953)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, Jerôme Willem Andries de

    2015-01-01

    Writing under Wartime Conditions is a study into North and South Korean literature written during the Korean War. It depicts the views and activities of the authors on war and traces the historical and social circumstances under which the writers had to write their literature. The North and South

  8. Native speaker advantage in academic writing? Conjunctive realizations in EAP writing by four groups of writers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper joins the Native vs. Non-native writer dichotomy discussion of whether native speakers of English enjoy advantage in the academic writing context from the linguistic perspective by analyzing conjunctive realizations of four groups of writers: English L1 and L2 graduate students; English L1 and L2 scholars in applied linguistics. Fifteen essays from each group are compared on their explicit conjunctions and Logical Grammatical Metaphors (LGMs. Both graduate student groups employ explicit conjunctions more than the two scholar groups. For LGMs, not only do both graduate student groups differ from the two scholar groups, they also differ significantly from each other. In contrast, the two scholar groups show similar usage in explicit conjunctions and LGMs. Qualitative differences of conjunctive usage and lexical varieties are also found among the four groups. The study points out that writer experience overweighs their native-speaker status in academic writing. The findings question the native-speaker linguistic advantage to a certain extent and indicate complexity of this issue. As language for academic purposes is strikingly different from spoken language and cognitively more demanding, academic language needs to be learned and developed out of disciplinary studies with targeted instruction for all novice writers, regardless of their native or non-native speaker status.

  9. Integrative vs. Non-Integrative Citations among Native and Nonnative English Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabab'ah, Ghaleb; Al-Marshadi, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates citation practices among native and nonnative English writers. Five Master EFL theses written by Arab EFL learners were compared to 5 Master EFL theses written by native speakers of English. Adopting Swales' (1990) categorization, the employed citation patterns were analyzed and categorized into two types: integral and…

  10. When Access Is Not Enough: Retaining Basic Writers at an Open-Admission University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb-Sunderhaus, Sara

    2010-01-01

    The author describes the challenges of a four-year, open-admission institution where equality of access has not equaled equality of success for basic writers. While there is a good deal of scholarship on student departure by compositions and experts in student retention and persistence, some models of student departure and success offered by these…

  11. Awakening Brilliance in the Writer's Workshop: Using Notebooks, Mentor Texts, and the Writing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Master teacher Lisa Morris invites you to share her secrets of success with writer's workshops. After years of experimenting with the workshop model, she has developed the most effective ways to apply it in the classroom, yielding higher test scores and increased student engagement. Through practical, step-by-step instruction, Morris demonstrates…

  12. Contextualized Support for Urban Teachers Implementing Writer's Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    Gladwell (2000) describes context as "the tipping point" for leveraging change. This paper explores how differentiated learning opportunities situated in the school context supported changes in practice for urban elementary teachers during the implementation of Writer's Work-shop (Calkins, 2003 & 2006). The teachers in this…

  13. Simon's Writing Develops: A Case Study of a Successful Adolescent Writer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Sandra

    Observations of a 12-year-old boy provide an in-depth look at the writing of a successful adolescent writer, as it developed over a 2-year period. The subject was interviewed once a week in his home. In addition to the information obtained in interviews, his texts were analyzed for formal features. Three factors emerged as particularly…

  14. Thomas Merton’s poetics of translation in his letters to writers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela María Raggio

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article explores Thomas Merton’s poetics of translation as reflected in his letters to writers. There, Merton expresses his ideas on poetic translation, the methods and the experience of approaching foreign literature through translation. Then, a translation analysis of a sample revises the connection between Merton’s poetics and practice of translation.

  15. Thomas Merton’s poetics of translation in his letters to writers

    OpenAIRE

    Marcela María Raggio

    2016-01-01

    This article explores Thomas Merton’s poetics of translation as reflected in his letters to writers. There, Merton expresses his ideas on poetic translation, the methods and the experience of approaching foreign literature through translation. Then, a translation analysis of a sample revises the connection between Merton’s poetics and practice of translation.

  16. On-Site Fertility Preservation Services for Adolescents and Young Adults in a Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peavey, Mary; Arian, Sara; Gibbons, William; Lu, Karen; Gershenson, David; Woodard, Terri

    2017-06-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) receiving cancer treatments that may impair fertility should receive counseling about risk of infertility and options for fertility preservation (FP) before treatment and/or during survivorship. Our objective was to define the AYA patient population referred to an on-site fertility consultation service within a comprehensive cancer center and determine factors associated with patients proceeding with FP treatment. We conducted a retrospective chart review of AYA women who completed a consultation at the MD Anderson Fertility Preservation and Family Building Service during the first year of service. Records of 154 referred AYA patients were reviewed for age, ethnicity, cancer type gravidity and parity, survivorship status, and decision to pursue FP treatment. Patients (mean age 29.7) were Caucasian (55%), Hispanic (23%), and African American (10%). The majority of women (67%) were seen for FP before cancer treatment and the remaining sought options for family building while in survivorship. The most common cancer types were hematologic (29%), breast (25%), and gynecologic (23%). Patients referred to an on-site fertility consultation service were medically and ethnically diverse. Interest in fertility counseling and treatment was apparent in both survivorship pre- and postcancer treatment. Although the referral group was ethnically diverse, Caucasian women were most likely to pursue FP treatment compared to women of other ethnicities.

  17. Hypnosis for cancer care: over 200 years young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Guy H; Schnur, Julie B; Kravits, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Hypnosis has been used to provide psychological and physical comfort to individuals diagnosed with cancer for nearly 200 years. The goals of this review are: 1) to describe hypnosis and its components and to dispel misconceptions; 2) to provide an overview of hypnosis as a cancer prevention and control technique (covering its use in weight management, smoking cessation, as an adjunct to diagnostic and treatment procedures, survivorship, and metastatic disease); and 3) to discuss future research directions. Overall, the literature supports the benefits of hypnosis for improving quality of life during the course of cancer and its treatment. However, a great deal more work needs to be done to explore the use of hypnosis in survivorship, to understand the mediators and moderators of hypnosis interventions, and to develop effective dissemination strategies. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  18. The requirements for the future e-beam mask writer: statistical analysis of pattern accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Hee; Choi, Jin; Kim, Hee Bom; Kim, Byung Gook; Cho, Han-Ku

    2011-11-01

    As semiconductor features shrink in size and pitch, the extreme control of CD uniformity, MTT and image placement is needed for mask fabrication with e-beam lithography. Among the many sources of CD and image placement error, the error resulting from e-beam mask writer becomes more important than before. CD and positioning error by e-beam mask writer is mainly related to the imperfection of e-beam deflection accuracy in optic system and the charging and contamination of column. To avoid these errors, the e-beam mask writer should be designed taking into account for these effects. However, the writing speed is considered for machine design with the highest priority, because the e-beam shot count is increased rapidly due to design shrink and aggressive OPC. The increment of shot count can make the pattern shift problem due to statistical issue resulting from e-beam deflection error and the total shot count in layout. And it affects the quality of CD and image placement too. In this report, the statistical approach on CD and image placement error caused by e-beam shot position error is presented. It is estimated for various writing conditions including the intrinsic e-beam positioning error of VSB writer. From the simulation study, the required e-beam shot position accuracy to avoid pattern shift problem in 22nm node and beyond is estimated taking into account for total shot count. And the required local CD uniformity is calculated for various e-beam writing conditions. The image placement error is also simulated for various conditions including e-beam writing field position error. Consequently, the requirements for the future e-beam mask writer and the writing conditions are discussed. And in terms of e-beam shot noise, LER caused by exposure dose and shot position error is studied for future e-beam mask writing for 22nm node and beyond.

  19. Online parent-targeted cognitive-behavioural therapy intervention to improve quality of life in families of young cancer survivors: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakefield, Claire E.; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M.; McGill, Brittany C.; McCarthy, Maria; Girgis, Afaf; Grootenhuis, Martha; Barton, Belinda; Patterson, Pandora; Osborn, Michael; Lowe, Cherie; Anazodo, Antoinette; Miles, Gordon; Cohn, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in multimodal therapies, most children survive cancer. In addition to the stresses of diagnosis and treatment, many families are now navigating the challenges of survivorship. Without sufficient support, the ongoing distress that parents experience after their child's cancer

  20. Is cancer a chronic disease? Comparison of health‐related quality of life and health care use in cancer survivors and patients with a chronic disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Korevaar, J.C.; Hopman, E.J.C.; Donker, G.A.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The number of cancer survivors steadily increases. The long‐term planning of care in the survivorship phase necessitates a different approach than the short‐term planning in the treatment phase. Principles of disease management programs could provide an interesting perspective to improve