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Sample records for wrist extensor muscles

  1. Prophylactic Effects of Sauna on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness of the Wrist Extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamwong, Peanchai; Paungmali, Aatit; Pirunsan, Ubon; Joseph, Leonard

    2015-06-01

    High-intensity of exercise or unaccustomed eccentric exercise can cause the phenomenon of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage (EIMD) which usually results in cramps, muscle strain, impaired muscle function and delayed-onset muscle soreness. This study investigated the prophylactic effects of sauna towards the symptoms associated with muscle damage from eccentric exercises of wrist extensor muscle group. A total of twenty-eight subjects (mean age 20.9 years old, SD = 1.6) were randomly divided into the sauna group (n = 14) and the control group (n = 14). In the sauna group, subjects received sauna before eccentric exercise of the wrist extensor. The eccentric exercises were conducted on the non-dominant arm by using an isokinetic dynamometer. Pain Intensity (PI), Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) and passive range of motion of wrist flexion (PF-ROM) and extension (PE-ROM) were measured as pain variables. Grip Strength (GS) and Wrist Extension Strength (WES) were measured as variables of wrist extensor muscle function. All the measurements were performed at baseline, immediately after and from 1st to 8th days after the exercise-induced muscle damage. The sauna group significantly demonstrated a lower deficit in ROM (passive flexion and passive extension), GS and WES following exercise than that of the control group (P wrist extensor muscle group.

  2. Anatomical variation of radial wrist extensor muscles: a study in cadavers

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    Soubhagya Ranjan Nayak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The tendons of the extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis muscles are quite useful in tendon transfer, such as in correction of finger clawing and restoration of thumb opposition. Knowledge of additional radial wrist extensor muscle bellies with independent tendons is useful in the above-mentioned surgical procedures. METHODS: The skin, subcutaneous tissue, and antebrachial fascia of 48 (24 on the right side and 24 on left side male upper limb forearms were dissected. The following aspects were then analyzed: (a the presence of additional muscle bellies of radial wrist extensors, (b the origin and insertion of the additional muscle, and (c measurements of the muscle bellies and their tendons. RESULTS: Five out of 48 upper limbs (10.41% had additional radial wrist extensors; this occurred in 3 out of 24 left upper limbs (12.5% and 2 out of 24 right upper limbs (8.3%. In one of the right upper limbs, two additional muscles were found. The length and width of each additional muscle belly and its tendon ranged between 2 - 15cm by 0.35 - 6.4cm and 2.8 - 20.8cm by 0.2 0.5cm, respectively. The additional radial wrist extensor tendons in our study basically originated either from the extensor carpi radialis longus or brevis muscles and were inserted at the base of the 2nd or 3rd metacarpal bone. CONCLUSION: The present study will inform surgeons about the different varieties of additional radial wrist extensors and the frequency of their occurrence.

  3. Prophylactic Effects of Sauna on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness of the Wrist Extensors

    OpenAIRE

    Khamwong, Peanchai; Paungmali, Aatit; Pirunsan, Ubon; Joseph, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Background: High-intensity of exercise or unaccustomed eccentric exercise can cause the phenomenon of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage (EIMD) which usually results in cramps, muscle strain, impaired muscle function and delayed-onset muscle soreness. Objectives: This study investigated the prophylactic effects of sauna towards the symptoms associated with muscle damage from eccentric exercises of wrist extensor muscle group. Patients and Methods: A total of twenty-eight subjects (mean age 20.9 y...

  4. EFFECT OF USING WRIST ORTHOSES ON FOREARM FLEXOR AND EXTENSOR MUSCLE ACTIVATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novais Van Petten, Adriana Maria Valladão; Ávila, Antônio Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of using wrist immobilization orthoses made from different materials, on activation of the flexor and extensor musculature of the forearm while performing specific tasks. Twenty-six adults, with an average age of 26.2 years, underwent the Jebsen-Taylor functional hand test and the grip strength test (Jamar(®) dynamometer) under three conditions: free hand, wearing a composite orthosis and wearing a thermoplastic orthosis. The tests were carried out using the dominant hand only. During the tests, surface electrodes were attached to the flexor and extensor muscles of the forearm to record the muscle electrical activity. The results obtained under the three conditions were compared and analyzed using the Wilcoxon statistical test. Significant differences in muscle activation were found between using the free hand and using any of the orthoses. There was no significant difference in muscle activation between the two types of orthosis. A decrease in activity of the extensor muscles of the forearm was observed during all the tasks, as well as an increase in activation of the flexor muscles with the use of the orthoses. These results are important for defining whether an orthosis should be prescribed during the rehabilitation process for a wide range of disorders, such as tendinitis of the flexors and extensors of the wrist and fingers, as well as for predicting the length of time for which these devices should be used.

  5. Comparison of muscle activity of wrist extensors and kinematics of wrist joint during wrist extension in automobile assembly line workers with and without lateral epicondylitis.

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    Choung, Sung-Dae; Park, Kyue-Nam; Kim, Si-Hyun; Kwon, Oh-Yun

    2016-09-27

    Overuse of the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) may play a role in the development of lateral epicondylitis (LE). However, no studies have investigated the muscle activity ratio between the ECR and extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) associated with the kinematics during wrist extension in workers with LE. We compared the ratio (ECR/ECU) of muscle activity between the ECR and ECU and the kinematics of the wrist during wrist extension between workers with and without LE. Fifteen automobile assembly line workers with LE and 15 workers without LE participated in this study. The ratio of muscle activity was measured using surface electromyography, and wrist kinematics were measured by a three-dimensional motion analysis system while the workers extended their wrists actively to the maximum range to which they did not feel uncomfortable. Significantly greater ratios of muscle activity, ranges of radial deviation, and combined motion of radial deviation and extension (CMDE) were shown in workers with LE compared to those without LE. Also, the range of wrist extension was significantly lower in workers with LE than in those without LE. Quantifying the ratio of muscle activity with altered kinematics of wrist extension may help researchers to understand why overuse of ECR is occurring and explain LE development in automobile assembly line workers.

  6. Myoelectric Signals from Paretic Wrist Extensor Controlling Electrical Stimulation of the Same Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune, Thorsen; Fin, Biering-Sørensen; Hansen, Steffen Duus

    1996-01-01

    A device for enhancement of the grip in C5/6 spinal cord lesioned tetraplegics is under development. It uses the myoelectric signal from the paretic wrist extensor for control of electrical stimulation of the same muscle. The tetraplegics shall with the device be able to obtain a passive grip bet...... between the thumb an the index finger by extension of the wrist. Surface electrodes are used for myoelectric recording and stimulation. Main problems are filtering of the recorded signal and stimulation. Solutions to these problems are addressed and discussed....

  7. Intra-rater reliability of ultrasound imaging of wrist extensor muscles in patients with tetraplegia.

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    Gorgey, Ashraf S; Timmons, Mark K; Michener, Lori A; Ericksen, Jeffery J; Gater, David R

    2014-02-01

    (i) To determine the intra-rater reliability and precision of the ultrasound cross-sectional area (CSA) measurements of the wrist extensors in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI), and (ii) to determine whether tetraplegia has a negative influence on the reliability and precision for these measurements. A repeated-measures cross-sectional study. Clinical hospital and academic settings. The study was conducted with 20 men with SCI (9 paraplegia and 11 tetraplegia) and 10 able-bodied controls. Ultrasound images were captured of the right side extensor carpi radialis-longus (ECRL) and the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) were captured in 2 sessions separated by 48-72 hours. The intraclass correlation coefficients for the CSA measurements of the ECRL and EDC muscles were greater than 0.87 for all 3 groups. The standard error of the measure (SEM) ranged from 0.11-0.22 cm(2) for the ECRL and 0.13-0.27 cm(2) for the EDC. The minimal detectable change of ECL ranged from 0.16 to 0.31 cm(2) and of EDC from 0.19 to 0.38 cm(2). The group differences in muscle CSA of both muscles were found; these differences were greater than the calculated minimal detectable changes. The intraclass correlation coefficients were lower and the SEMs and minimal detectable changes were higher for the group with tetraplegia compared with the able-bodied controls and the group with paraplegia. This study documented substantial intra-rater reliability of measurements of the ECRL and ECD CSA by using ultrasound images, which support the use of this technique to effectively evaluate the musculoskeletal changes after SCI and during rehabilitation. Skeletal muscle atrophy in persons with tetraplegia might have a negative influence on the reliability and precision of these CSA measurements; however, these differences in reliability and precision are not of clinical significance. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. Tendon palpation during agonist contraction and antagonist co-contraction to assess wrist flexor and extensor muscle function.

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    Bertelli, J A

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to validate direct tendon palpation during agonist contraction and antagonist co-contraction as a method to assess wrist flexor and extensor muscle function in cases of upper limb paralysis. On one occasion, five doctors examined 17 patients with partial paralysis of the upper limb resulting from brachial plexus or cervical spinal cord injury. We asked examiners to determine if the extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL), extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB), extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU), flexor carpi radialis (FCR), flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and palmaris longus (PL) were paralyzed, weak or strong in each patient. Examiners tested flexion - extension and radial - ulnar deviation against resistance and palpated wrist motor tendons. While palpating tendons, co-contractions were encouraged by soliciting finger extension to evaluate the FCU, thumb extension to evaluate the ECU, and finger flexion to evaluate the ECRB. Kappa values were 0.8 for the ECRL, 0.7 for the ECRB, 0.5 for the ECU, 0.8 for the FCR, 0.6 for the PL, and 0.8 for the FCU, indicating moderate to almost perfect agreement between examiners. Tendon palpation during muscle examination was adequate to identify complete paralysis, as well as weak and strong muscle contractions. This assessment helps to identify muscles that could be used during nerve or tendon transfer for reconstruction of extensive upper limb paralysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. The influence of different non-articular proximal forearm orthoses (brace) widths in the wrist extensors muscle activity, range of motion and grip strength in healthy volunteers.

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    Marcolino, Alexandre Márcio; Fonseca, Marisa de Cássia Registro; Leonardi, Naiara Tais; Barbosa, Rafael Inácio; Neves, Lais Mara Siqueira das; de Jesus Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto

    2016-06-30

    The purpose this study was perform a biomechanical evaluation to compare the influence of commercial models of different non-articular proximal forearm orthoses widths (2.5 cm, 5.5 cm, 7.5 cm and 12.0 cm) in the extensor muscle activation, range of motion and grip strength in healthy subjects. Was analyzed data from extensor carpi radialis, extensor carpi ulnares and extensor digitorum comunis using surface electromyography, simultaneous with a wrist electrogoniometer MiotecTM and a hydraulic dynamometer JamarTM. The sequence of tests with all the commercial orthoses models was randomized. Statistics analyses were performed by linear model with mixed effects. According to our findings the non-articular proximal forearm orthoses (2.5 cm - narrowest) positioned close to lateral epicondyle provided lesser muscle activation on extensor carpi radialis brevis/longus and extensor digitorum comunis, decreased wrist extension and grip strength during submaximal grip task (p< 0.01). A narrow non-articular proximal forearm orthosis positioned close to the lateral epicondyle might decrease the extensor muscle activation and therefore could reduce mechanical stress on its insertion, based on this sample. Clinical studies must be conducted to confirm these findings.

  10. A prophylactic effect of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching on symptoms of muscle damage induced by eccentric exercise of the wrist extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamwong, Peanchai; Pirunsan, Ubon; Paungmali, Aatit

    2011-10-01

    Stretching with proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) is frequently used before exercise. The prophylactic effect of PNF on symptoms of muscle damage induced by eccentric exercise of the wrist extensors was examined in this study. Twenty-eight healthy males were randomly divided into the PNF group (n = 14) and the control group (n = 14). PNF was used before eccentric exercise induction in the wrist extensors. All subjects were tested to examine muscle damage characteristics including sensory-motor functions at baseline, immediately, and from 1st to 8th days after the exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). The results demonstrated that the PNF group showed a lesser deficit in some sensory-motor functions (p PNF stretching application could be useful for attenuating the signs and symptoms of muscle damage after eccentric exercise. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The immediate effects of tension of counterforce forearm brace on neuromuscular performance of wrist extensor muscles in subjects with lateral humeral epicondylosis.

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    Ng, G Y F; Chan, H L

    2004-02-01

    Within-subject repeated-measures study. To examine the immediate effects of counterforce forearm brace on isokinetic strenght stretch reflex, passive stretching pain threshold of the wrist extensors, and proprioception of the wrist in subjects with lateral humeral epicondylosis for different strap tensions of a forearm brace. Counterforce forearm bracing has been used for treating lateral humeral epicondylosis, but the effect of brace tension has not been well reported. Fifteen subjects diagnosed with lateral humeral epicondylosis on their dominant arm were tested under 4 randomized conditions: (1) no brace, (2) brace with minimal tension, (3) brace with 25-N tension, and (4) brace with 50-N tension. The tests included isokinetic wrist extensors strength, passive stretching force in wrist flexion to elicit pain in the wrist extensors, wrist proprioception, and stretch reflex latency of the extensor carpi ulnari. A repeated-measures MANOVA was used to analyze the data and significant results were further analyzed with post hoc linear contrasts (alpha = .05). Among the 4 conditions, significant differences were found in wrist proprioception P = .032) and pain threshold to passive stretching of the wrist extensors (P = .05), but were not found in wrist extension isokinetic strength and stretch reflex latency of the extensor carpi ulnaris. A forearm counterforce brace, as applied in this study, affects wrist joint proprioception and increases the pain threshold to passive stretching of the wrist extensors in subjects with lateral humeral epicondylosis, but it has no effect on wrist extensor strength and stretch reflex latency of the extensor carpi ulnaris.

  12. Accessory extensor digiti minimi muscle simulating a soft tissue mass during surgery: a case report.

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    Natsis, Konstantinos; Papathanasiou, Efthymia; Anastasopoulos, Nikolas

    2010-01-01

    During a wrist ganglion excision originating at the tendon sheath of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle, a soft tissue mass was observed just radial and distal to the surgical field. Dissection of the mass revealed an accessory extensor digiti minimi muscle belly which joined the radial extensor digiti minimi tendon. The surgical impact is discussed.

  13. Análise eletromiográfica e força do grupo muscular extensor do punho durante isquemia induzida Electromyographic analysis and strength of the wrist extensor muscle group during induced ischemia

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    CCA Bandeira

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito da isquemia induzida sobre os parâmetros do sinal eletromiográfico e a força do grupo muscular extensor do punho (GMEP em mulheres saudáveis. MÉTODOS: Participaram 13 voluntárias, destras, sedentárias, com idade de 23,38±2,32 anos e índice de massa corporal (IMC de 20,68±1,87kg/m². Para determinar a força do GMEP, foram realizadas 3 contrações isométricas voluntárias máximas (CIVM, utilizando-se uma célula de carga por 15 segundos, com intervalos de 2 minutos entre cada contração, sendo todo procedimento repetido por 3 dias não consecutivos. A isquemia foi realizada por 5 minutos, utilizando um esfigmomanômetro posicionado no braço dominante e inflado até a ausência do fluxo sanguíneo, confirmada pelo ultrassom Doppler. Para coleta do sinal eletromiográfico do GMEP, utilizou-se o equipamento EMG1000 (Lynx® com eletrodo de superfície diferencial (Lynx®. Foram coletadas 3 CIVM por 15 segundos, com intervalo de 30 segundos entre elas, nas situações de pré-isquemia; isquemia; pós-isquemia imediata (pós-1 e pós-isquemia tardia (pós-2 - após 10 minutos do início da isquemia. Para análise dos parâmetros do sinal eletromiográfico, root mean square (RMS, e frequência mediana do espectro de potência do sinal foi utilizado o software MATLAB 6.5.1. Para análise estatística, foram utilizados os testes de Friedman e ANOVA two-way. RESULTADOS: A isquemia promoveu redução significativa (pOBJECTIVE: To analyze the effect of induced ischemia on the parameters of electromyographic signals and the strength of the wrist extensor muscle group (WEMG in healthy women. METHODS: Thirteen right-handed sedentary subjects aged 23.38±2.32 years old, with body mass index (BMI of 20.68±1.87kg/m², took part. To determine WEMG strength, three maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC were performed using a load cell for 15 seconds, with 2 minutes intervals between contractions. The entire

  14. The effect of wrist orthoses on forearm muscle activity.

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    Johansson, Lena; Björing, Gunnar; Hägg, Göran M

    2004-03-01

    A general hypothesis is that a wrist orthosis reduces the wrist extensor muscle load. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a completely stiff wrist orthosis (SO) and a commercially available wrist orthosis (CO) on flexor and extensor electromyographic (EMG)-activity in a standardised intermittent gripping task and during standardised manual work tasks. Surface EMG from two forearm flexor and two extensor muscles was recorded. The target grip forces were 5%, 20% and 40% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). During the grip contraction phase CO had no effect on the EMG-readings. SO resulted in higher EMG activity than when gripping with CO and with no orthosis (NO), especially when gripping with 40% MVC. During the relaxation phase neither CO nor SO had any effect on the extensors. For the flexors the SO gave higher EMG-readings than when gripping with CO and NO, especially at 40% MVC. In conclusion the wrist orthoses tested did not reduce the EMG-activity from the flexors or the extensors during gripping or manual tasks.

  15. Effect of training on contractile and metabolic properties of wrist extensors in spinal cord-injured individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkopp, Andreas; Harridge, Stephen D R; Mizuno, Masao

    2003-01-01

    extensor muscles were stimulated for 30 min/day, 5 days/week, for 12 weeks, using either a high-resistance (Hr) or a low-resistance (Lr) protocol. Total work output was similar in both protocols. The nontrained arm was used as a control. Maximum voluntary torque increased in the Hr (P ....05) but not the Lr group. Electrically stimulated peak tetanic torque at 15 HZ, 30 HZ, and 50 HZ were unchanged in the Lr group and tended to increase only at 15 HZ (P Muscle metabolism was evaluated......Paretic human muscle rapidly loses strength and oxidative endurance, and electrical stimulation training may partly reverse this. We evaluated the effects of two training protocols on the contractile and metabolic properties of the wrist extensor in 12 C-5/6 tetraplegic individuals. The wrist...

  16. Hyperparathyroidism-related extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist: a general review of the literature.

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    Ichihara, Satoshi; Hidalgo-Diaz, Juan Jose; Prunières, Guillaume; Facca, Sybille; Bodin, Frédéric; Boucher, Stéphanie; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Extensor tenosynovitis often occurs accompanying with rheumatoid arthritis, gout, trauma, mycobacterium and dialysis-related amyloidosis. However, there is no recognition of extensor tenosynovitis accompanying with hyperparathyroidism. The purpose of this general review was to describe the clinical condition and to report the results of surgical intervention in the extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist related to hyperparathyroidism. Hyperparathyroidism is thought to be a rare disease in adult. Although renal symptoms are the commonest symptom, musculoskeletal complaints also occur in hyperparathyroidism. From our general review, hyperparathyroidism deserves consideration in the differential diagnosis of extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist.

  17. The effects of wrist motion and hand orientation on muscle forces: A physiologic wrist simulator study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Darshan S; Middleton, Claire; Gurdezi, Sabahat; Horwitz, Maxim D; Kedgley, Angela E

    2017-07-26

    Although the orientations of the hand and forearm vary for different wrist rehabilitation protocols, their effect on muscle forces has not been quantified. Physiologic simulators enable a biomechanical evaluation of the joint by recreating functional motions in cadaveric specimens. Control strategies used to actuate joints in physiologic simulators usually employ position or force feedback alone to achieve optimum load distribution across the muscles. After successful tests on a phantom limb, unique combinations of position and force feedback - hybrid control and cascade control - were used to simulate multiple cyclic wrist motions of flexion-extension, radioulnar deviation, dart thrower's motion, and circumduction using six muscles in ten cadaveric specimens. Low kinematic errors and coefficients of variation of muscle forces were observed for planar and complex wrist motions using both novel control strategies. The effect of gravity was most pronounced when the hand was in the horizontal orientation, resulting in higher extensor forces (pforces were also affected by the direction of rotation during circumduction. The peak force of flexor carpi radialis was higher in clockwise circumduction (p=0.017), while that of flexor carpi ulnaris was higher in anticlockwise circumduction (p=0.013). Thus, the physiologic wrist simulator accurately replicated cyclic planar and complex motions in cadaveric specimens. Moreover, the dependence of muscle forces on the hand orientation and the direction of circumduction could be vital in the specification of such parameters during wrist rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. WRIST SALVAGE PROCEDURES ALTER MOMENT ARMS OF THE PRIMARY WRIST MUSCLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jennifer A.; Bednar, Michael S.; Havey, Robert M.; Murray, Wendy M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Proximal row carpectomy and scaphoid-excision four-corner fusion are salvage procedures that relieve pain by removing arthritic joint surfaces. While numerous studies have examined how these procedures affect joint motion, few have examined how they influence muscle mechanical actions. This study examines whether muscle moment arms change after these procedures. Methods Moment arms of primary wrist muscles were measured in 8 cadaveric specimens using the tendon excursion method. In each specimen, moment arms were measured for two degrees of freedom (flexion-extension and radial-ulnar deviation) and three conditions (nonimpaired, scaphoid-excision four-corner fusion, and proximal row carpectomy). For each muscle and degree of freedom, moment arm versus joint angle curves for the three conditions were statistically compared. Findings Wrist salvage procedures significantly alter moment arms of the primary wrist muscles. Proximal row carpectomy primarily alters flexion-extension moment arms, while scaphoid-excision four-corner fusion primarily alters radial-ulnar deviation moment arms. Both procedures also alter the balance between agonist and antagonist wrist muscles. Following proximal row carpectomy, wrist extensors have smaller moment arms in extended postures. Following scaphoid-excision four-corner fusion, radial deviators have larger moment arms throughout radial-ulnar deviation. Interpretation Different moment arms indicate that different forces are required to complete the same tasks in nonimpaired and surgically altered wrists. The altered muscle moment arms likely contribute to post-operative impairments. Understanding how salvage procedures alter muscle mechanical actions is a critical first step toward identifying the cause of post-operative impairments and is necessary to develop effective interventions to augment deficient muscles and improve overall function. PMID:25843482

  19. Neuromechanical control of the forearm muscles during gripping with sudden flexion and extension wrist perturbations.

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    Holmes, Michael W R; Tat, Jimmy; Keir, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how gripping modulates forearm muscle co-contraction prior to and during sudden wrist perturbations. Ten males performed a sub-maximal gripping task (no grip, 5% and 10% of maximum) while a perturbation forced wrist flexion or extension. Wrist joint angles and activity from 11 muscles were used to determine forearm co-contraction and muscle contributions to wrist joint stiffness. Co-contraction increased in all pairs as grip force increased (from no grip to 10% grip), corresponding to a 36% increase in overall wrist joint stiffness. Inclusion of individual muscle contributions to wrist joint stiffness enhanced the understanding of forearm co-contraction. The extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) and brevis had the largest stiffness contributions (34.5 ± 1.3% and 20.5 ± 2.3%, respectively), yet muscle pairs including ECRL produced the lowest co-contraction. The muscles contributing most to wrist stiffness were consistent across conditions (ECRL for extensors; Flexor Digitorum Superficialis for flexors), suggesting enhanced contributions rather than muscular redistribution. This work provides investigation of the neuromuscular response to wrist perturbations and gripping demands by considering both co-contraction and muscle contributions to joint stiffness. Individual muscle stiffness contributions can be used to enhance the understanding of forearm muscle control during complex tasks.

  20. An anatomic and biomechanic study of the wrist extensor retinaculum septa and tendon compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Akira; Morris, Randal P; Andersen, Clark; Patterson, Rita M; Viegas, Steven F

    2006-01-01

    The anatomy of the extensor retinaculum of the wrist has been described previously; the purpose of this study was to describe the specific anatomy of the septal attachments on the radius and to investigate the mechanical strength of each septal attachment on the radius and each of the 6 compartments of the extensor retinaculum. Thirty-four wrists from 24 fresh-frozen and 10 embalmed cadavers were used. First, anatomic measurements of the individual extensor retinaculum septums were performed with calipers and a 3-dimensional digitizer. Next each extensor retinaculum septum was excised as a bone-retinaculum-bone autograft and was tested in tension to failure with a materials testing machine. Finally the 6 extensor retinaculum compartments were tested to failure. Septum 1/2 had the largest radial surface area and septum 3/4 had the smallest. Septum 1/2 also was found to have the highest failure strength at 51.3 +/- 15.3 N. In compartment testing, compartments 1 and 2 had the highest overall resistance to failure and compartment 5 had the lowest. Compartment 6, which was thought to be the weakest because of clinically observed subluxation of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon, had stronger failure data than expected. This study offers detailed analysis of the extensor retinaculum compartments and 3-dimensional anatomy of the septal attachments. Clinically this study lends insight to the strength of bone-retinaculum-bone autografts and the etiology of extensor carpi ulnaris subluxation.

  1. Wrist splint effects on muscle activity and force during a handgrip task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domizio, Jennifer Di; Mogk, Jeremy P M; Keir, Peter J

    2008-08-01

    Wrist splints are commonly prescribed to limit wrist motion and provide support at night and during inactive periods but are often used in the workplace. In theory, splinting the wrist should reduce wrist extensor muscle activity by stabilizing the joint and reducing the need for co-contraction to maintain posture. Ten healthy volunteers underwent a series of 24 10-s gripping trials with surface electromyography on 6 forearm muscles. Trials were randomized between splinted and nonsplinted conditions with three wrist postures (30 degrees flexion, neutral, and 30 degrees extension) and four grip efforts. Custom-made Plexiglas splints were taped to the dorsum of the hand and wrist. It was found that when simply holding the dynamometer, use of a splint led to a small (wrist against external loading, but appears counterproductive when exerting maximal forces. Wrist bracing should be limited to periods of no to light activity and avoided during tasks that require heavy efforts.

  2. Isometric measurement of wrist-extensor power following surgical treatment of displaced lateral condylar fracture of the humerus in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Po-Hsin; Feng, Chi-Kuang; Chiu, Fang-Yao; Chen, Tain-Hsiung

    2008-10-01

    Muscle disability is a common sequel after fracture management. Previous research has shown divergent results concerning muscle-power recovery after bone healing. This study has investigated the muscle function of wrist extensors after lateral condylar fracture in children, as evaluated by a hand-held dynamometer and compared with sex- and age-matched children. From 1999 to 2004, 20 patients (13 boys and seven girls; mean age: 9 years and 4 months) with displaced lateral condylar fracture of the humerus were treated by open reduction and internal fixation with Kirschner wires (K-wire). The duration of K-wire fixation was 35 days and the mean follow-up time was 50 months. A total of 180 healthy age-, sex- and weight-matched children were used as control groups. A paired Student's test was applied for the analysis of statistical significance. The range of motion of the elbow and radiographic findings were not significantly different between the injured limb and normal control groups. The maximum isometric power of wrist-extensor muscles after surgical treatment of lateral condylar fracture of the humerus in final follow-up was not statistically different from that in the normal control children. Muscle power therefore recovers to its normal status after the healing of lateral condylar fracture of the humerus in children.

  3. Trunk extensor muscle fatigue influences trunk muscle activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseinpoor, Tahere Seyed; Kahrizi, Sedighe; Mobini, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Trunk muscles fatigue is one of the risk factors in workplaces and daily activities. Loads would be redistributed among active and passive tissues in a non-optimal manner in fatigue conditions. Therefore, a single tissue might be overloaded with minimal loads and as a result the risk of injury would increase. The goal of this paper was to assess the electromyographic response of trunk extensor and abdominal muscles after trunk extensor muscles fatigue induced by cyclic lifting task. This was an experimental study that twenty healthy women participated. For assessing automatic response of trunk extensor and abdominal muscles before and after the fatigue task, electromyographic activities of 6 muscles: thorasic erector spine (TES), lumbar erector spine (LES), lumbar multifidus (LMF), transverse abdominis/ internal oblique (TrA/IO), rectus abdominis (RA) and external oblique (EO) were recorded in standing position with no load and symmetric axial loads equal to 25% of their body weights. Statistical analysis showed that all the abdominal muscles activity decreased with axial loads after performing fatigue task but trunk extensor activity remained constant. Results of the current study indicated that muscle recruitment strategies changed with muscle fatigue and load bearing, therefore risks of tissue injury may increase in fatigue conditions.

  4. Restoring wrist extension in obstetric palsy of the brachial plexus by transferring wrist flexors to wrist extensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alphen, N.A.; van Doorn-Loogman, M.H.; Maas, H.; van der Sluijs, J.A.; Ritt, M.J.P.F.

    2013-01-01

    Wrist extension is essential in the development of motor skills in young children. Adequate wrist extension is important for good grip function of the hand, as a slightly extended wrist Results in a better and stronger grip. This retrospective study reviews the transfer of the flexor carpi ulnaris

  5. Training wrist extensor function and detecting unwanted movement strategies in an EMG-controlled visuomotor task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Mingxing; Lambelet, Charles; Woolley, Daniel; Zhang, Xue; Chen, Weihai; Ding, Xilun; Gassert, Roger; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2017-07-01

    Stroke patients often suffer from severe upper limb paresis. Rehabilitation treatment typically targets motor impairments as early as possible, however, muscular contractions, particularly in the wrist and fingers, are often too weak to produce overt movements, making the initial phase of rehabilitation training difficult. Here we propose a new training tool whereby electromyographic (EMG) activity is measured in the wrist extensors and serves as a proxy of voluntary corticomotor drive. We used the Myo armband to develop a proportional EMG controller which allowed volunteers to perform a simple visuomotor task by modulating wrist extensor activity. In this preliminary study six healthy participants practiced the task for one session (144 trials), which resulted in a significant reduction of the average trial time required to move and hold a cursor in different target zones (p classifier to distinguish between the desired movement strategy and unwanted alternatives. Validation of the classifier indicated that accuracy for detecting rest, wrist extension and unwanted strategies was 92.5 + 6.9% (M + SD) across all participants. When performing the motor task the classification algorithm flagged 4.3 + 3.5% of the trials as 'unwanted strategies', even in healthy subjects. We also report initial feedback from a survey submitted to two chronic stroke patients to inquire about feasibility and acceptance of the general setup by patients.

  6. Effectiveness of 1% diclofenac gel in the treatment of wrist extensor tenosynovitis in long distance kayakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Judith J; Lovell, Greg; Hopkins, Will G

    2007-02-01

    Anecdotally many athletes use non-steroidal anti-inflammatory gels during competition to allow continued participation. To determine if this clinical practice is useful a randomised placebo-controlled study was conducted at the 5-day 2004 Red Cross Murray River Marathon. Forty-two kayakers presented with wrist extensor tenosynovitis while competing in the single and double kayak events. All subjects received standard treatment of ice, stretches and massage for wrist tenosynovitis before being randomised into a placebo or 1% diclofenac gel group. Evaluation was done by using a visual analogue scale (0-10) for pain and by clinical grading (0-3). The main outcome measurements were reduction in pain and clinical grading, the requirement for a rescue medication (paracetamol or diclofenac tablets) and effect on performance times. Both groups had similar pain scores and clinical grading on the first and fifth days of pain. On the second to fourth days of pain there was clearly no benefit and possibly a detrimental effect on pain with diclofenac gel relative to placebo. However, diclofenac tablets were possibly beneficial for pain relative to paracetamol tablets. The effects of pain and the various treatments on performance time were either trivial (<0.5%) or small, but none was particularly clear. We conclude that standard treatment appears to be sufficient for the management of wrist extensor tenosynovitis during competition.

  7. Pressure and tendon strain in the sixth extensor compartment of the wrist during simulated provocative maneuvers for diagnosing extensor carpi ulnaris tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Toshiyuki; Moritomo, Hisao; Omori, Shinsuke; Iida, Akio; Omokawa, Shohei; Suzuki, Daisuke; Fujimiya, Mineko; Wada, Takuro; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2015-11-01

    Various provocative maneuvers for diagnosing extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendinitis have been reported; however, it remains unclear which maneuver is the most sensitive to detect ECU tendinitis. To clarify this, we investigated and compared the extratendinous pressure and ECU tendon strain in the sixth extensor compartment of the wrist during various provocative maneuvers for diagnosing ECU tendinitis. Nine upper extremities from nine fresh-frozen cadavers were examined. We investigated extratendinous pressure in the ECU fibro-osseous tunnel of the distal ulna and ECU tendon strain during eight forearm positions-neutral rotation, pronation, supination, pronation with wrist flexion, supination with wrist flexion, supination with wrist extension, both hand and forearm supination, and supination with ECU full loading-to simulate provocative maneuvers reported to detect ECU tendinitis. Pressure was significantly higher during both hand and forearm supination (carpal supination test) and during supination with wrist extension (prayer's hand supination test) than during neutral rotation. The pressure during the carpal supination test was 3 times higher than that during the prayer's hand supination test and 27 times higher than that during the neutral position. Strain was significantly higher during the carpal supination test and during supination with ECU full loading (the ECU synergy test) than during other maneuvers. Both pressure and tendon strain increased most notably during the carpal supination test compared to the other maneuvers, which suggests that the carpal supination test is the most sensitive for the detection of ECU tendinitis.

  8. Intermuscular interaction via myofascial force transmission: Effects of tibialis anterior and extensor digitrum longus length on force transmission from rat extensor digitorum longus muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, H.; Baan, G.C.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2001-01-01

    Force transmission in rat anterior crural compartment, containing tibialis anterior (TA), extensor hallucis longus (EHL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, was investigated. These muscles together with the muscles of the peroneal compartment were excited maximally. Force was measured at

  9. Measurement of fatigue in knee flexor and extensor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Y; Senda, M; Oka, T; Yagata, Y; Takahara, Y; Nagashima, H; Inoue, H

    2000-04-01

    In order to examine fatigue of the knee flexor and extensor muscles and to investigate the characteristics of muscular fatigue in different sports, a Cybex machine was used to measure muscle fatigue and recovery during isokinetic knee flexion and extension. Eighteen baseball players, 12 soccer players and 13 marathon runners were studied. Each subject was tested in the sitting position and made to perform 50 consecutive right knee bends and stretches at maximum strength. This was done 3 times with an interval of 10 min between each series. The peak torque to body weight ratio and the fatigue rate were determined in each case. In all subjects, the peak torque to body weight ratio was higher for extensors than flexors. Over the 3 trials, the fatigue rate of extensors showed little change, while that of flexors had a tendency to increase. In each subject, knee extensors showed a high fatigue rate but a quick recovery, while knee flexors showed a low fatigue rate but a slow recovery. As the marathon runners had the smallest fatigue rates for both flexors and extensors, we concluded that marathon runners had more stamina than baseball players and soccer players.

  10. Distal intersection tenosynovitis of the wrist: a lesser-known extensor tendinopathy with characteristic MR imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parellada, Antoni J. [DII - Diagnostic Imaging, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Frankford Hospitals - Torresdale Campus, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gopez, Angela G.; Morrison, William B. [Thomas Jefferson University, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sweet, Stephanie [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia Hand Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leinberry, Charles F. [Thomas Jefferson University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery - Hand Surgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Reiter, Sean B.; Kohn, Mark [DII - Diagnostic Imaging, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2007-03-15

    To present the MRI imaging findings of extensor tenosynovitis at the distal intersection or crossover between the second (extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) and brevis (ECRB)) and third (extensor pollicis longus (EPL)) extensor compartment tendons, and the anatomical details that may play a role in the pathogenesis of this condition. The imaging studies and clinical records of five patients (three females and two males, with ages ranging between 22 and 78 years; mean age, 49 years) presenting with pain on the dorsal and radial aspect of the wrist were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus. Three cases were identified serendipitously during routine clinical reading sessions; a follow-up computerized database search for additional cases reported in the prior two years yielded two additional cases. The overall number of cases screened was 1,031. The diagnosis of tendinopathy affecting the second and third compartment extensor tendons was made on the basis of MRI findings and clinical follow-up, or synovectomy. All patients showed signs of tenosynovitis: in four patients both the tendons of the second and third extensor compartments were affected; the fifth patient showed signs of tenosynovitis of the EPL tendon, and tendinosis of the extensor carpi radialis tendons. Three patients showed tenosynovitis proximal and distal to the point of intersection; and in two of them, a discrete point of constriction was appreciated at the crossover site in relation to the extensor retinaculum. Two patients showed tenosynovitis limited to the segment distal to the point of decussation. Tendinosis tended to follow the presence of tenosynovitis. In one of the patients, subtendinous reactive marrow edema in Lister's tubercle was noted. Distal intersection tenosynovitis may be related to the biomechanical pulley effect exerted by Lister's tubercle on the EPL tendon as it leaves the third compartment and crosses over the extensor carpi radialis tendons

  11. Simultaneous Knee Extensor Muscle Action Induces an Increase in Voluntary Force Generation of Plantar Flexor Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takahito; Shioda, Kohei; Kinugasa, Ryuta; Fukashiro, Senshi

    2017-02-01

    Suzuki, T, Shioda, K, Kinugasa, R, and Fukashiro, S. Simultaneous knee extensor muscle action induces an increase in voluntary force generation of plantar flexor muscles. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 365-371, 2017-Maximum activation of the plantar flexor muscles is required for various sporting activities that involve simultaneous plantar flexion and knee extension. During a multi-joint movement, activation of the plantar flexor muscles is affected by the activity of the knee extensor muscles. We hypothesized that coactivation of the plantar flexor muscles and knee extensor muscles would result in a higher plantar flexion torque. To test this hypothesis, 8 male volunteers performed maximum voluntary isometric action of the plantar flexor muscles with and without isometric action of the knee extensor muscles. Surface electromyographic data were collected from 8 muscles of the right lower limb. Voluntary activation of the triceps surae muscles, evaluated using the interpolated twitch technique, significantly increased by 6.4 percentage points with intentional knee extensor action (p = 0.0491). This finding is in line with a significant increase in the average rectified value of the electromyographic activity of the vastus lateralis, fibularis longus, and soleus muscles (p = 0.013, 0.010, and 0.045, respectively). The resultant plantar flexion torque also significantly increased by 11.5% of the predetermined maximum (p = 0.031). These results suggest that higher plantar flexor activation coupled with knee extensor activation facilitates force generation during a multi-joint task.

  12. An anomalous accessory extensor proprius indicis muscle: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Kurklu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Variations related to tendon insertion and musculotendinous junction of the extensor proprius indicis muscle are commonly encountered. An anomalous extensor indicis proprius muscle (EIP tendon was detected in a fifty-year-old female cadaver during routine dissection of the right upper extremity. The body of tendon was initiated from the posterior ulna as a one muscle body, then continued as two separate muscle bodies and tendons and finally they were separated into two slips after passing the fourth dorsal compartment. As a radial part, it was divided into two slips at the level of the first metacarpophalangeal joint, and conjugated with the extensor pollicis longus (EPL muscle. Then, as an ulnar part, it was terminated at the radial side of the lateral band of the second metacarpophalangeal joint. Familiarity with the normal anatomy and variations of the tendons may help to prevent confusion and mistakes during tendon repairs, and tendon transfers. [Hand Microsurg 2013; 2(3.000: 122-124

  13. Wrist extensor torque production and discomfort associated with low-frequency and burst-modulated kilohertz-frequency currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Alex R; Oliver, Warwick G; Buccella, Danielle

    2006-10-01

    A randomized controlled trial to compare 2 forms of monophasic pulsed currents with 2 forms of burst-modulated, kilohertz-frequency alternating current ("Russian current" and "Aussie current") was conducted to establish whether different amounts of wrist extensor torque were produced and whether discomfort varied with stimulus type. The 32 subjects were adults who were healthy and were drawn from a population of staff and students at La Trobe University. Each subject received all 4 currents. Maximal electrically induced torque (MEIT) of the wrist extensors was measured for each stimulus type. Relative discomfort of stimulation also was assessed. Russian current elicited lower mean torque than those elicited by Aussie current and monophasic pulsed currents. The Russian and Aussie currents elicited significantly less discomfort than the 2 monophasic pulsed currents. When force production and relative discomfort were jointly used as the criteria, Aussie current was found to be more effective than either of the monophasic pulsed currents or Russian current stimulation.

  14. A comparison of wrist isokinetic muscle strength in wheelchair table tennis and wheelchair basketball players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akınoğlu, Bihter; Kocahan, Tuğba; Yıldırım, Necmiye Ün; Soylu, Çağlar; Apur, Ufuk; Hasanoğlu, Adnan

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare isokinetic muscle strength of wrist flexor and extensor muscles in paralympic athletes. Methods: This study was carried out with the participation of 9 (4 females and 5 males) wheelchair (WC) table tennis players aged 24+3 and 8 male WC basketball players aged 26+3, met the criteria and voluntarly participate in the study. Body weight, height, body mass index and dominant extremity of the study subjects were recorded. İsokinetic measurement were performed with Isomed 2000® device. İsokinetic testing protocol; before the test all players performed the wrist flexion and extension isokinetic test with the 5 repeating at 90º/sec as a warm-up and comprehending the test. Then, wrist flexion and extension concentric-concentric strength measurements were performed with the 5 repeating at 60º/sec and with the 15 repeating at 240º/sec with the angle between 50 degrees of wrist flexion and 60 degrees of wrist extension and peak torque, peak torque/kg values and flexion/extension ratios were recorded. Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare isokinetic muscle strength quantitative variables in athletes. Findings: Isokinetic muscle strength of wrist flexors and extensors was higher in both sides in WC table tennis players with 60º/sec speed (p0,05). Wrist flexion/extension peak torque ratios were similar in both groups. When examining the athletes flexion/extension ratios, wrist extensor muscles were weaker than flexor muscles and flexor muscles were average twice stronger than extensor muscles in both sports (Table1). Table 1. Comparison of wrist flexion and extension isokinetic muscle strength, peak torque/kg and agonist/antagonist ratio of wc basketball and wc table tennis players Wheelchair table tennis(N=9)X±SD Wheelchair basketball(N=9)X±SD p* Flexion 60°/sec Dominant side PT(Nm) 23.41±11.13 8.87±1.65 0.001 PT/Kg (Nm/Kg) 0.39±0.13 0.42±0.10 0.499 Non-dominant side PT(Nm) 20.26±9.26 8.26±3.11 0.001 PT/Kg (Nm/Kg) 0

  15. Metabolic demand and muscle damage induced by eccentric cycling of knee extensor and flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñailillo, Luis; Guzmán, Nicolás; Cangas, José; Reyes, Alvaro; Zbinden-Foncea, Hermann

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the metabolic demand and extent of muscle damage of eccentric cycling targeting knee flexor (FLEX) and knee extensor (EXT) muscles. Eight sedentary men (23.3 ± 0.7 y) underwent two eccentric cycling sessions (EXT and FLEX) of 30 min each, at 60% of the maximum power output. Oxygen consumption (VO 2 ), heart rate (HR) and rated perceived exertion (RPE) were measured during cycling. Countermovement and squat jumps (CMJ and SJ), muscle flexibility, muscle soreness and pain pressure threshold (PPT) of knee extensor and flexor muscles were measured before, immediately after and 1-4 days after cycling. FLEX showed greater VO 2 (+23%), HR (+14%) and RPE (+18%) than EXT. CMJ and SJ performance decreased similarly after cycling. Muscle soreness increased more after EXT than FLEX and PPT decreased in knee extensor muscles after EXT and decreased in knee flexor muscles after FLEX. Greater loss of muscle flexibility in knee flexor muscles after FLEX was observed. Eccentric cycling of knee flexor muscles is metabolically more demanding than that of knee extensors, however muscle damage induced is similar. Knee flexors experienced greater loss of muscle flexibility possibly due to increased muscle stiffness following eccentric contractions.

  16. The basis and functional role of the late EMG activity in human forearm muscles following wrist displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, D S; Aminoff, M J

    1992-08-28

    The present paper examines the hypothesis that the long latency EMG activity produced by muscle stretch is the result of long loop reflex pathways involved in the control of limb stiffness. We recorded the cerebral responses and late EMG activity in agonist and antagonist muscles following sudden stretch of the wrist extensor muscles under 4 experimental conditions in 11 subjects. In each experiment subjects held their right wrist extended isometrically against a constant force of 2.3 N and a trial was begun with a step increase in the force from 2.3 N to 18.4 N, to stretch the extensor muscle. In the first and second experiments the force change occurred unpredictably and subjects had to either oppose the perturbation (Unpredictable Oppose) or relax the forearm muscles once the increase in force was detected (Unpredictable Let-Go). In the third and fourth experiments the force change occurred predictably when subjects pressed a thumb switch with the left hand to cause it. As before, subjects were instructed to either oppose the perturbation (Predictable Oppose) or relax the forearm muscles (Predictable Let-Go). Responses were recorded from the flexor and extensor carpi radialis muscles and from the scalp. When the perturbing force occurred unpredictably, early latency EMG activity (the MI response) was seen in the stretched extensor muscle, and longer latency EMG activity was seen simultaneously in both extensor and flexor muscles. When the force change occurred predictably the late EMG activity was considerably attenuated, especially in the Predictable Let-Go condition. Cerebral responses similarly depended upon the predictability of the perturbation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Is the Sørensen test valid to assess muscle fatigue of the trunk extensor muscles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoulin, Christophe; Boyer, Mathieu; Duchateau, Jacques; Grosdent, Stéphanie; Jidovtseff, Boris; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Vanderthommen, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Very few studies have quantified the degree of fatigue characterized by the decline in the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force of the trunk extensors induced by the widely used Sørensen test. Measure the degree of fatigue of the trunk extensor muscles induced by the Sørensen test. Eighty young healthy subjects were randomly divided into a control group (CG) and an experimental group (EG), each including 50% of the two genders. The EG performed an isometric MVC of the trunk extensors (pre-fatigue test) followed by the Sørensen test, the latter being immediately followed by another MVC (post-fatigue test). The CG performed only the pre- and post-fatigue tests without any exertion in between. The comparison of the pre- and post-fatigue tests revealed a significant (Pmuscles to generate maximal force, and indicates that this test is valid for the assessment of fatigue in trunk extensor muscles.

  18. Variations of anatomy on MRI of the first extensor compartment of the wrist and association with DeQuervain tenosynovitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Connie Y.; Kheterpal, Arvin B.; Terneria Vicentini, Joao Rafael; Huang, Ambrose J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    To study anatomical variations on MRI of the first extensor compartment of the wrist in DeQuervain tenosynovitis (DQT). A retrospective search for DQT patients yielded 47 subjects (51 ± 15 years, 36 female, 11 male). The age-matched control group (normal first extensor compartment) was 49 ± 15 years (29 female, 18 male). Two independent readers reviewed: the number of abductor pollicis longus (APL) tendon slips, tendon sheath septations (compartmentalization), and APL and EPB cross-sectional area (CSA) at the radial styloid. A tendon slip was defined as a discrete structure for ≥5 contiguous slices with its own insertion. The distribution of APL tendon slips was different for the DQT and control groups (Reader 1/Reader 2: P = 0.0001 and 0.001). The most common arrangement for both groups was two APL tendon slips. One tendon slip was less common (P = 0.03 and 0.1) and compartmentalization was more common (P = 0.003; < 0.0001) for the DQT group than the control group. There was no difference in tendon slip insertions on one or multiple bones (P = 0.1; 0.7). APL and EPB compartment CSAs were also higher for the DQT group (combined first extensor compartment area: 21.3 ± 7.6 mm{sup 2}; 21.0 ± 7.1) than the control group (17.2 ± 3.8; 17.1 ± 3.9) (P = 0.002; 0.002). We found a statistically significantly increased proportion of supernumerary tendon slips and compartmentalization of the first extensor compartment in patients with DQT and greater CSA of the first extensor compartment at the radial styloid, consistent with previous anatomical, surgical, and ultrasound studies. (orig.)

  19. Directional tuning of human forearm muscle afferents during voluntary wrist movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kelvin E; Wessberg, Johan; Vallbo, Åke B

    2001-01-01

    Single unit activity was recorded with the microneurography technique from sixteen spindle afferents and one Golgi tendon organ afferent originating from the forearm extensor muscles. Impulse rates were studied while subjects performed unobstructed aiming movements at the wrist in eight different directions 45 deg apart. In addition, similar imposed movements were performed while the subject was instructed to remain relaxed. Movement amplitudes were about 5 deg and the speed 10–30 deg s−1. Joint movements were translated to movements of a cursor on a monitor to provide visual feedback. Individual spindle afferents modulated their activity over a number of targets, i.e. were broadly tuned, during these aiming movements. The preferred direction for a spindle afferent was the same during both passive and active movements, indicating that the fusimotor effects associated with active contractions had little or no effect on the direction of tuning. The direction of tuning of individual spindle afferents could be predicted from the biomechanically inferred length changes of the parent muscle. Thus spindle afferents responded as stretch receptors, i.e. impulse rates increased with lengthening and decreased with shortening, in active as well as passive movements. Spindles from muscles, which continuously counteracted gravity exhibited a stretch response and directional tuning during the phase of movement alone whereas their position sensitivity was poor. In contrast, spindle afferents from the muscles that had no or minimal antigravity role were directionally tuned during both the dynamic and the static phase of the aiming task and their position sensitivity was substantially higher. In spite of the limited data base from three extensor muscles it could be demonstrated that wrist joint position was remarkably well encoded in the ensemble muscle spindle data. In some cases the ensemble muscle spindle data encoded the instantaneous trajectory of movement as well. PMID

  20. Control of wrist position and muscle relaxation by shifting spatial frames of reference for motoneuronal recruitment: possible involvement of corticospinal pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raptis, Helli; Burtet, Liziane; Forget, Robert; Feldman, Anatol G

    2010-01-01

    It has previously been established that muscles become active in response to deviations from a threshold (referent) position of the body or its segments, and that intentional motor actions result from central shifts in the referent position. We tested the hypothesis that corticospinal pathways are involved in threshold position control during intentional changes in the wrist position in humans. Subjects moved the wrist from an initial extended to a final flexed position (and vice versa). Passive wrist muscle forces were compensated with a torque motor such that wrist muscle activity was equalized at the two positions. It appeared that motoneuronal excitability tested by brief muscle stretches was also similar at these positions. Responses to mechanical perturbations before and after movement showed that the wrist threshold position was reset when voluntary changes in the joint angle were made. Although the excitability of motoneurons was similar at the two positions, the same transcranial magnetic stimulus (TMS) elicited a wrist extensor jerk in the extension position and a flexor jerk in the flexion position. Extensor motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by TMS at the wrist extension position were substantially bigger compared to those at the flexion position and vice versa for flexor MEPs. MEPs were substantially reduced when subjects fully relaxed wrist muscles and the wrist was held passively in each position. Results suggest that the corticospinal pathway, possibly with other descending pathways, participates in threshold position control, a process that pre-determines the spatial frame of reference in which the neuromuscular periphery is constrained to work. This control strategy would underlie not only intentional changes in the joint position, but also muscle relaxation. The notion that the motor cortex may control motor actions by shifting spatial frames of reference opens a new avenue in the analysis and understanding of brain function. PMID:20231141

  1. Control of wrist position and muscle relaxation by shifting spatial frames of reference for motoneuronal recruitment: possible involvement of corticospinal pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raptis, Helli; Burtet, Liziane; Forget, Robert; Feldman, Anatol G

    2010-05-01

    It has previously been established that muscles become active in response to deviations from a threshold (referent) position of the body or its segments, and that intentional motor actions result from central shifts in the referent position. We tested the hypothesis that corticospinal pathways are involved in threshold position control during intentional changes in the wrist position in humans. Subjects moved the wrist from an initial extended to a final flexed position (and vice versa). Passive wrist muscle forces were compensated with a torque motor such that wrist muscle activity was equalized at the two positions. It appeared that motoneuronal excitability tested by brief muscle stretches was also similar at these positions. Responses to mechanical perturbations before and after movement showed that the wrist threshold position was reset when voluntary changes in the joint angle were made. Although the excitability of motoneurons was similar at the two positions, the same transcranial magnetic stimulus (TMS) elicited a wrist extensor jerk in the extension position and a flexor jerk in the flexion position. Extensor motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by TMS at the wrist extension position were substantially bigger compared to those at the flexion position and vice versa for flexor MEPs. MEPs were substantially reduced when subjects fully relaxed wrist muscles and the wrist was held passively in each position. Results suggest that the corticospinal pathway, possibly with other descending pathways, participates in threshold position control, a process that pre-determines the spatial frame of reference in which the neuromuscular periphery is constrained to work. This control strategy would underlie not only intentional changes in the joint position, but also muscle relaxation. The notion that the motor cortex may control motor actions by shifting spatial frames of reference opens a new avenue in the analysis and understanding of brain function.

  2. Effects of Temperature on Wrist Flexor Muscles Endurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsun Nodehi-Moghadam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is widely recognized that neuromuscular function is temperature sensitive. Changes in muscle temperature may affect muscle force development. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature on wrist flexor muscles endurance. Methods: Fifteen healthy subjects (mean age 21.13±1.30 years participated in the present study. The wrist flexor muscles endurance was measured before and after applying ice and hot packs over the forearm for 15 minutes. Paired t tests were used to compare differences between pre and post intervention endurance. Results: The results showed a significant increase in wrist flexor muscles endurance after heating. (P=0.04. We also found that, cooling the forearm muscles leaded to significant decrease of wrist flexor muscles endurance (P=0.01. Conclusion: These results suggest that hand function is temperature sensitive. Therefore, further studies are needed to evaluate the effects of cold on muscular function in people working in workplaces with extreme temperature.

  3. Walking and Running Require Greater Effort from the Ankle than the Knee Extensor Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmala, Juha-Pekka; Korhonen, Marko T; Ruggiero, Luca; Kuitunen, Sami; Suominen, Harri; Heinonen, Ari; Mikkola, Aki; Avela, Janne

    2016-11-01

    The knee and ankle extensors as human primary antigravity muscle groups are of utmost importance in a wide range of locomotor activities. Yet, we know surprisingly little about how these muscle groups work, and specifically, how close to their maximal capacities they function across different modes and intensity of locomotion. Therefore, to advance our understanding of locomotor constraints, we determined and compared relative operating efforts of the knee and ankle extensors during walking, running, and sprinting. Using an inverse dynamics biomechanical analysis, the muscle forces of the knee and ankle extensors during walking (1.6 m·s), running (4.1 m·s), and sprinting (9.3 m·s) were quantified and then related to maximum forces of the same muscle groups obtained from a reference hopping test that permitted natural elastic limb behavior. During walking, the relative effort of the ankle extensors was almost two times greater compared with the knee extensors (35% ± 6% vs 19% ± 5%, P muscle groups, but still, the ankle extensors operated at a 25% greater level than the knee extensors (84% ± 12% vs 63% ± 17%, P muscles. As a consequence, the great demand on ankle extensors may be a key biomechanical factor limiting our locomotor ability and influencing the way we locomote and adapt to accommodate compromised neuromuscular system function.

  4. A laboratory study of the effects of wrist splint orthoses on forearm muscle activity and upper extremity posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yu; Mirka, Gary A

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of wrist splint orthoses (WSOs) on forearm muscle activity and upper extremity/torso postures. WSOs are ubiquitous in industry, but the literature as to their biomechanical effects is limited. Study 1: Participants performed single-plane wrist exertions with or without a WSO while the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, and extensor carpi ulnaris was captured. Study 2: Participants performed simple computer jumper installation tasks with or without a WSO while upper extremity/torso postures were recorded. Study 1: A significant interaction between WSOs and wrist angle was observed in the response of forearm muscles (e.g., normalized EMG of the flexor carpi radialis increased from 4.2% to 15.9% as flexion increased from 0 degree to 36 degrees in the orthosis conditions, whereas in the no-orthosis condition it remained approximately 5% at all wrist flexion angles). Study 2: WSOs were found to effect wrist, torso, and shoulder postures, with the orthoses creating a 48% decrease (36 degrees vs. 18.6 degrees) in wrist flexion and 80% decrease (15 degrees vs. -3 degrees) in ulnar deviation but at a cost of increased shoulder abduction of 22% (36.5 degrees vs. 44.5 degrees) and increased lateral bend of torso of 30% (6 degrees vs. 7.8 degrees). WSOs increased forearm muscle activity at large wrist deviation angles and induced awkward shoulder postures in tasks requiring significant wrist deviation. Use of WSOs in occupational settings should be carefully considered relative to task requirements, as orthoses may do more harm than good.

  5. Longitudinal, lateral and transverse axes of forearm muscles influence the crosstalk in the mechanomyographic signals during isometric wrist postures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Anamul Islam

    Full Text Available In mechanomyography (MMG, crosstalk refers to the contamination of the signal from the muscle of interest by the signal from another muscle or muscle group that is in close proximity.The aim of the present study was two-fold: i to quantify the level of crosstalk in the mechanomyographic (MMG signals from the longitudinal (Lo, lateral (La and transverse (Tr axes of the extensor digitorum (ED, extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU and flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU muscles during isometric wrist flexion (WF and extension (WE, radial (RD and ulnar (UD deviations; and ii to analyze whether the three-directional MMG signals influence the level of crosstalk between the muscle groups during these wrist postures.Twenty, healthy right-handed men (mean ± SD: age = 26.7±3.83 y; height = 174.47±6.3 cm; mass = 72.79±14.36 kg participated in this study. During each wrist posture, the MMG signals propagated through the axes of the muscles were detected using three separate tri-axial accelerometers. The x-axis, y-axis, and z-axis of the sensor were placed in the Lo, La, and Tr directions with respect to muscle fibers. The peak cross-correlations were used to quantify the proportion of crosstalk between the different muscle groups.The average level of crosstalk in the MMG signals generated by the muscle groups ranged from: 34.28-69.69% for the Lo axis, 27.32-52.55% for the La axis and 11.38-25.55% for the Tr axis for all participants and their wrist postures. The Tr axes between the muscle groups showed significantly smaller crosstalk values for all wrist postures [F (2, 38 = 14-63, p<0.05, η2 = 0.416-0.769].The results may be applied in the field of human movement research, especially for the examination of muscle mechanics during various types of the wrist postures.

  6. Wrist and shoulder posture and muscle activity during touch-screen tablet use: effects of usage configuration, tablet type, and interacting hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Justin G; Trudeau, Matthieu B; Odell, Dan; Marinelli, Kim; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2013-01-01

    Due to its rapid growth in popularity, there is an imminent need for ergonomic evaluation of the touch-screen tablet computing form-factor. The aim of this study was to assess postures of the shoulders and wrists and their associated muscle activity during touch-screen tablet use. Fifteen experienced adult tablet users completed a set of simulated software tasks on two media tablets in a total of seven user configurations. Configurations consisted of a combination of a support condition (held with one hand, two hands or in a case), a location (on the lap or table surface), and a software task (web browsing, email, and game). Shoulder postures were measured by using an infra-red LED marker based motion analysis system, wrist postures by electro-goniometry, and shoulder (upper trapezius and anterior deltoid) and forearm (flexor carpi radialis, flexor carp ulnaris, and extensor radialis) muscle activity by surface electromyography. Postures and muscle activity for the wrist significantly varied across configurations and between hands, but not across the two tablets tested. Wrist extension was high for all configurations and particularly for the dominant hand when a tablet was placed on the lap (mean=38°). Software tasks involving the virtual keyboard (e-mailing) corresponded to higher wrist extensor muscle activity (50th percentile=9.5% MVC) and wrist flexion/extension acceleration (mean=322°/s2). High levels of wrist radial deviation were observed for the non-dominant hand when it was used to tilt and hold the tablet (mean=13°). Observed differences in posture and muscle activity of the shoulder were driven by tablet location. Touch-screen tablet users are exposed to extreme wrist postures that are less neutral than other computing technologies and may be at greater risk of developing musculoskeletal symptoms. Tablets should be placed in cases or stands that adjust the tilt of the screen rather than supporting and tilting the tablet with only one hand.

  7. Myostatin dysfunction impairs force generation in extensor digitorum longus muscle and increases exercise-induced protein efflux from extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltusnikas, Juozas; Kilikevicius, Audrius; Venckunas, Tomas; Fokin, Andrej; Bünger, Lutz; Lionikas, Arimantas; Ratkevicius, Aivaras

    2015-08-01

    Myostatin dysfunction promotes muscle hypertrophy, which can complicate assessment of muscle properties. We examined force generating capacity and creatine kinase (CK) efflux from skeletal muscles of young mice before they reach adult body and muscle size. Isolated soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of Berlin high (BEH) mice with dysfunctional myostatin, i.e., homozygous for inactivating myostatin mutation, and with a wild-type myostatin (BEH+/+) were studied. The muscles of BEH mice showed faster (P myostatin dysfunction leads to impairment in muscle force generating capacity in EDL and increases susceptibility of SOL and EDL to protein loss after exercise.

  8. Flexor carpi ulnaris tenotomy alone does not eliminate its contribution to wrist torque

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, Marije; Smeulders, Mark J. C.; Kreulen, Michiel

    2011-01-01

    Flexor carpi ulnaris muscle tenotomy and transfer to the extensor side of the wrist are common procedures used to improve wrist position and dexterity in patients with cerebral palsy. Our aim was to determine whether this muscle still influences wrist torque even after tenotomy of its distal tendon.

  9. Knee extensor muscle weakness is a risk factor for development of knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oiestad, B E; Juhl, C B; Eitzen, I

    2015-01-01

    extensor muscle strength were defined prior to data extraction. Meta-analysis was applied on the basis of the odds ratios (ORs) of developing symptomatic knee osteoarthritis or radiographic knee osteoarthritis in subjects with knee extensor muscle weakness. ORs for knee osteoarthritis and 95% confidence......The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the association between knee extensor muscle weakness and the risk of developing knee osteoarthritis. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted with literature searches in Medline, SPORTDiscus, EMBASE......, CINAHL, and AMED. Eligible studies had to include participants with no radiographic or symptomatic knee osteoarthritis at baseline; have a follow-up time of a minimum of 2 years, and include a measure of knee extensor muscle strength. Hierarchies for extracting data on knee osteoarthritis and knee...

  10. The influence of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue on lumbar-pelvic coordination during weightlifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Boyi; Ning, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar muscle fatigue is a potential risk factor for the development of low back pain. In this study, we investigated the influence of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue on lumbar-pelvic coordination patterns during weightlifting. Each of the 15 male subjects performed five repetitions of weightlifting tasks both before and after a lumbar extensor muscle fatiguing protocol. Lumbar muscle electromyography was collected to assess fatigue. Trunk kinematics was recorded to calculate lumbar-pelvic continuous relative phase (CRP) and CRP variability. Results showed that fatigue significantly reduced the average lumbar-pelvic CRP value (from 0.33 to 0.29 rad) during weightlifting. The average CRP variability reduced from 0.17 to 0.15 rad, yet this change ws statistically not significant. Further analyses also discovered elevated spinal loading during weightlifting after the development of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue. Our results suggest that frequently experienced lumbar extensor muscle fatigue should be avoided in an occupational environment. Lumbar extensor muscle fatigue generates more in-phase lumbar-pelvic coordination patterns and elevated spinal loading during lifting. Such increase in spinal loading may indicate higher risk of back injury. Our results suggest that frequently experienced lumbar muscle fatigue should be avoided to reduce the risk of LBP.

  11. Knee extensor muscle strength in middle-aged and older individuals undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Juhl, Carsten B; Lund, Hans

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: People with meniscal tears are at high risk to develop or progress knee osteoarthritis. Knee extensor weakness is considered a risk factor for osteoarthritis and is often reported in these individuals. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate knee...... extensor strength in people undergoing an arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM). METHODS: Six databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, SportDISCUS, EMBASE, PEDro and AMED) were searched up to June 22(nd) , 2014. Studies that measured knee extensor muscle strength in people aged 30 years and older undergoing APM...... for a meniscal tear and used either a healthy control group or the contralateral leg to compare knee extensor muscle strength were included. Methodological quality was assessed using guidelines from the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. RESULTS: Eleven studies, including predominately males were included (n...

  12. Muscle fibre types of the lumbrical, interossei, flexor, and extensor muscles moving the index finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Huan, Fan; Kim, Dae Joong

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the fibre types of the muscles moving the index fingers in humans. Fifteen forearms of eight adult cadavers were used. The sampled muscles were the first lumbrical (LM), first volar interosseous (VI), first dorsal interosseus (DI), second flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), second flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), and extensor digitorum (ED). Six micrometer thick sections were stained for fast muscle fibres. The procedure was performed by applying mouse monoclonal anti-skeletal myosin antibody (fast) and avidin-biotin peroxidase complex staining. Rectangular areas (0.38 mm × 0.38 mm) were photographed and the boundaries of the muscle areas were marked on the translucent film. The numbers and sizes of the muscle fibres in each part were evaluated by the image analyser program and calculated per unit area (1 mm(2)). The proportion of the fast fibres was significantly (p = 0.012) greater in the intrinsic muscles (55.7 ± 17.1%) than in the extrinsic muscles (45.9 ± 17.1%). Among the six muscles, the VI had a significantly higher portion (59.3%) of fast fibres than the FDS (40.6%) (p = 0.005) or the FDP (45.1%) (p = 0.023). The density of the non-fast fibres was significantly (p = 0.015) greater in the extrinsic muscles (539.2 ± 336.8/mm(2)) than in the intrinsic muscles (383.4 ± 230.4/mm2). Since the non-fast fibres represent less fatigable fibres, it is thought that the extrinsic muscles have higher durability against fatigue, and the intrinsic muscles, including the LM, should move faster than the FDS or FDP because the MP joint should be flexed before the IP joint to grip an object.

  13. Shear wave elastography reveals different degrees of passive and active stiffness of the neck extensor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Angela V; Andrade, Ricardo J; Le Sant, Guillaume; Falla, Deborah; Petzke, Frank; Hug, François; Nordez, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    The neck extensor muscles contribute to spinal support and posture while performing head and neck motion. Muscle stiffness relates to passive elasticity (support) and active tensioning (posture and movement) of muscle. It was hypothesized that support and motion requirements are reflected in the distribution of stiffness between superficial and deep neck extensor muscles. In ten healthy participants, shear modulus (stiffness) of five neck extensor muscles was determined in prone at rest and during isometric head lift at three intensities using shear wave elastography. Shear modulus differed between muscles (P muscles: (median (interquartile range)) trapezius 7.7 kPa (4.4), splenius capitis 6.5 kPa (2.5), semispinalis capitis 8.9 kPa (2.8), semispinalis cervicis 9.5 kPa (2.5), multifidus 14.9 kPa (1.4). Shear modulus differed between the resting condition and head lift (P muscles most close to the spine. The highest active increase of stiffness during the head lift was found in the semispinalis cervicis muscle. The non-invasive, clinically applicable estimates of muscle stiffness have potential for the assessment of muscular changes associated with neck pain/injury.

  14. Central and peripheral fatigue of the knee extensor muscles induced by electromyostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zory, R; Boërio, D; Jubeau, M; Maffiuletti, N A

    2005-12-01

    The main purpose of this study was to characterise neuromuscular fatigue induced by 30 contractions of the knee extensor muscles evoked by electromyostimulation (EMS). Twelve healthy subjects were tested before and after a typical EMS session (frequency: 75 Hz, on-off ratio: 6.25 s on-20 s off) used for quadriceps femoris muscle strengthening. Surface electromyographic (EMG) activity and torque obtained during maximal voluntary and electrically evoked contractions were analysed to distinguish peripheral from central fatigue. Maximal voluntary torque of the knee extensor muscles decreased approximately 20 % (p < 0.001) following EMS. In the same way, peak torque associated to single (p < 0.05) and paired (p < 0.001) stimuli as well as M-wave amplitude (p < 0.05) significantly decreased as a result of EMS. The raw EMG activity of both vastus lateralis and rectus femoris muscle recorded during maximal voluntary isometric contraction significantly decreased after the session (-17.3 and -14.5 %, respectively) whereas no changes were observed when EMG signals were normalised to respective M-wave amplitudes. Similarly, voluntary activation estimated by using the twitch interpolation technique was unchanged following EMS. In conclusion, a typical session of EMS of the knee extensor muscles mainly induced neuromuscular propagation failure while excitation-contraction coupling and neural mechanisms were not significantly affected. It is recommended to interpret surface EMG data together with the corresponding M wave, at least for the knee extensor muscles, in order to distinguish peripheral from central causes of fatigue.

  15. Relationships between explosive and maximal triple extensor muscle performance and vertical jump height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Eunwook; Norcross, Marc F; Johnson, Sam T; Kitagawa, Taichi; Hoffman, Mark

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between maximum vertical jump height and (a) rate of torque development (RTD) calculated during 2 time intervals, 0-50 milliseconds (RTD50) and 0-200 milliseconds (RTD200) after torque onset and (b) peak torque (PT) for each of the triple extensor muscle groups. Thirty recreationally active individuals performed maximal isometric voluntary contractions (MVIC) of the hip, knee and ankle extensors, and a countermovement vertical jump. Rate of torque development was calculated from 0 to 50 (RTD50) and 0 to 200 (RTD200) milliseconds after the onset of joint torque. Peak torque was identified and defined as the maximum torque value during each MVIC trial. Greater vertical jump height was associated with greater knee and ankle extension RTD50, RTD200, and PT (p ≤ 0.05). However, hip extension RTD50, RTD200, and PT were not significantly related to maximal vertical jump height (p > 0.05). The results indicate that 47.6 and 32.5% of the variability in vertical jump height was explained by knee and ankle extensor RTD50, respectively. Knee and ankle extensor RTD50 also seemed to be more closely related to vertical jump performance than RTD200 (knee extensor: 28.1% and ankle extensor: 28.1%) and PT (knee extensor: 31.4% and ankle extensor: 13.7%). Overall, these results suggest that training specifically targeted to improve knee and ankle extension RTD, especially during the early phases of muscle contraction, may be effective for increasing maximal vertical jump performance.

  16. Muscle oxygenation of superficial and deep regions in knee extensor and plantar flexor muscles during repeated isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, K

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in muscle oxygenation of knee extensor and plantar flexor muscles during repeated muscle contractions under the same condition. In addition, we compared changes in muscle oxygenation between superficial and deep regions of both muscles. Eleven healthy males participated in this study. During repeated knee extensions and plantar flexions (50 repetitions at 50% of the isometric maximum voluntary contraction for 3 s with 3 s relaxations), blood volume and oxygen saturation (StO₂) of the vastus lateralis and medial gastrocnemius muscles (superficial and deep region of each muscle) were measured using near infrared spectroscopy. The decrement of StO₂at the end of exercises was greater in plantar flexor muscle than in knee extensor muscle (Pmuscles, the decrement of StO₂at the end of exercises was greater in the deep region than in the superficial one (both Pmuscle and deep regions of each muscle were higher than that of knee extensor muscle and superficial regions of each muscle.

  17. Patients with temporomandibular disorders have increased fatigability of the cervical extensor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Silvestre, Rony A; Fuentes, Jorge P; da Costa, Bruno R; Major, Paul W; Warren, Sharon; Thie, Norman M R; Magee, David J

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether patients with myogenous and mixed temporomandibular disorders (TMD) have greater fatigability of the cervical extensor muscles while performing a neck extensor muscle endurance test (NEMET) when compared with healthy controls. A total of 151 individuals participated in this study. Of these 47 were healthy controls, 57 patients had myogenous TMD, and 47 patients had mixed TMD. All patients performed the NEMET. The patients were instructed to maintain a prone lying position with the neck unsupported as long as possible, stopping at signs of fatigue or any discomfort. Electromyographic activity of the cervical extensor muscles during the NEMET and the holding time were collected for all patients and were compared across groups. A 1-way analysis of variance was used to evaluate the differences in holding time between patients with TMD and healthy controls. A mixed model analysis was used to evaluate the differences in normalized median frequency at different times (fatigue index) for the cervical extensor muscles while performing the NEMET between patients with TMD and controls. There were statistically significant differences (Pcervical muscles could be implicated in the neck-shoulder disturbances presented in patients with TMD.

  18. Effects of strength training and detraining on knee extensor strength, muscle volume and muscle quality in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Cleiton Silva; Baroni, Bruno Manfredini; Radaelli, Régis; Lanferdini, Fábio Juner; Cunha, Giovani dos Santos; Reischak-Oliveira, Álvaro; Vaz, Marco Aurélio; Pinto, Ronei Silveira

    2013-10-01

    Strength training seems to be an interesting approach to counteract decreases that affect knee extensor strength, muscle mass and muscle quality (force per unit of muscle mass) associated with ageing. However, there is no consensus regarding the changes in muscle mass and their contribution to strength during periods of training and detraining in the elderly. Therefore, this study aimed at verifying the behaviour of knee extensor muscle strength, muscle volume and muscle quality in elderly women in response to a 12-week strength training programme followed by a similar period of detraining. Statistical analysis showed no effect of time on muscle quality. However, strength and muscle volume increased from baseline to post-training (33 and 26 %, respectively). After detraining, the knee extensor strength remained 12 % superior to the baseline values, while the gains in muscle mass were almost completely lost. In conclusion, strength gains and losses due to strength training and detraining, respectively, could not be exclusively associated with muscle mass increases. Training-induced strength gains were partially maintained after 3 months of detraining in elderly subjects.

  19. Effects of fatigue of elbow extensor muscles voluntarily induced and induced by electromyostimulation on multi-joint movement organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffenus, Anne-Fabienne; Forestier, Nicolas

    2006-07-31

    To investigate the capacity of the central nervous system to integrate and differentiate two different muscular fatigue states, the present study examines the changes on multi-joint movement organization following muscular fatigue of elbow extensor muscles (triceps brachii) induced by voluntary versus electrically induced contractions. Twenty right-handed male volunteers performed throws in the horizontal plane before and after two fatiguing procedures. First, success rate of throws was not affected by fatigue neither after voluntary contractions, nor after electrically induced contractions. Despite similar reductions of the maximal voluntary isometric force and the median frequency of the electromyographic signal following both fatiguing protocols, voluntary contractions induced greater changes in muscle activation, kinematics and kinetics during throws than electrically induced contractions. The changes observed following voluntary contractions are interpreted as a compensatory strategy involving a greater contribution of the wrist. In contrast, the greater activation of the triceps brachii could compensate the weakness of this muscle induced by fatigue without any modification of the initial multi-joint movement organization.

  20. A computational model for optimal muscle activity considering muscle viscoelasticity in wrist movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Duk; Koike, Yasuharu

    2013-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of neural motor control, it is important to clarify how the central nervous system organizes the coordination of redundant muscles. Previous studies suggested that muscle activity for step-tracking wrist movements are optimized so as to reduce total effort or end-point variance under neural noise. However, since the muscle dynamics were assumed as a simple linear system, some characteristic patterns of experimental EMG were not seen in the simulated muscle activity of the previous studies. The biological muscle is known to have dynamic properties in which its elasticity and viscosity depend on activation level. The motor control system is supposed to consider the viscoelasticity of the muscles when generating motor command signals. In this study, we present a computational motor control model that can control a musculoskeletal system with nonlinear dynamics. We applied the model to step-tracking wrist movements actuated by five muscles with dynamic viscoelastic properties. To solve the motor redundancy, we designed the control model to generate motor commands that maximize end-point accuracy under signal-dependent noise, while minimizing the squared sum of them. Here, we demonstrate that the muscle activity simulated by our model exhibits spatiotemporal features of experimentally observed muscle activity of human and nonhuman primates. In addition, we show that the movement trajectories resulting from the simulated muscle activity resemble experimentally observed trajectories. These results suggest that, by utilizing inherent viscoelastic properties of the muscles, the neural system may optimize muscle activity to improve motor performance. PMID:23324321

  1. Athletic injuries of the extensor carpi ulnaris subsheath: MRI findings and utility of gadolinium-enhanced fat-saturated T1-weighted sequences with wrist pronation and supination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeantroux, Jeremy; Guerini, Henri; Drape, Jean-Luc [Universite Paris Descartes, Department of Radiology B, Hopital Cochin, AP-HP, Paris (France); Becce, Fabio [Universite Paris Descartes, Department of Radiology B, Hopital Cochin, AP-HP, Paris (France); University of Lausanne, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Montalvan, Bernard [French Tennis Federation, Paris (France); Viet, Dominique Le [Hand Institute, Clinique Jouvenet, Paris (France)

    2011-01-15

    To report the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in athletic injuries of the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) subsheath, assessing the utility of gadolinium-enhanced (Gd) fat-saturated (FS) T1-weighted sequences with wrist pronation and supination. Sixteen patients (13 male, three female; mean age 30.3 years) with athletic injuries of the ECU subsheath sustained between January 2003 and June 2009 were included in this retrospective study. Initial and follow-up 1.5-T wrist MRIs were performed with transverse T1-weighted and STIR sequences in pronation, and Gd FS T1-weighted sequences with wrist pronation and supination. Two radiologists assessed the type of injury (A to C), ECU tendon stability, associated lesions and rated pulse sequences using a three-point scale: 1 = poor, 2 = good and 3 = excellent. Gd-enhanced FS T1-weighted transverse sequences in supination (2.63) and pronation (2.56) were most valuable, compared with STIR (2.19) and T1-weighted (1.94). Nine type A, one type B and six type C injuries were found. There were trends towards diminution in size, signal intensity and enhancement of associated pouches on follow-up MRI and tendon stabilisation within the ulnar groove. Gd-enhanced FS T1-weighted sequences with wrist pronation and supination are most valuable in assessing and follow-up athletic injuries of the ECU subsheath on 1.5-T MRI. (orig.)

  2. Isokinetic Evaluation of Knee Extensor/Flexor Muscle Strength in Behcet’s Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir Durmus

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Behçet’s disease (BD is an idiopathic, multisystemic, progressive disease. The purpose of this study is to compare the knee flexor and extensor isokinetic muscle strengths of Behcet’s patients with that of healthy subjects. Methods: Twenty-five (13 male and 12 female patients with BD and 25 (15 male and 10 female healthy individuals were included in the study. Velocities of 90°/sec, 120°/sec, and 150°/sec were used for the isokinetic muscle strength testing. Patients with active inflammatory knee arthritis were excluded. Peak torque (Nm and peak torque adjusted to body weight (% were taken into consideration for comparison between study groups. Results: Compared to healthy controls, there was a statistically significant decrease in both the bilateral knee extensor and flexor muscle isokinetic peak torques(Nm as well as the peak torques adjusted to body weight (% at velocities of 90°/sec, 120°/sec and 150°/sec in patients with BD (p < 0.05. However, there was no significant difference in the agonist-antagonist ratio of the isokinetic peak torques of knee muscles between the two groups. Conclusion: In light of these findings, we have concluded that both knee flexor and extensor isokinetic muscle strengths are lower in BD. We therefore recommend careful monitoring of patients with BD in terms of muscle strength.

  3. Isokinetic Evaluation of the Hip Flexor and Extensor Muscles: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapparoli, Fabricio Yuri; Riberto, Marcelo

    2016-12-19

    Isokinetic dynamometry testing is a safe and reliable method accepted as the "gold standard" in the evaluation of muscle strength in the open kinetic chain. Isokinetic hip examinations face problems in the standardization of the position of the equipment axis; in the individual being examined; in the adjustment of the lever arm and in stabilization strategies for the patients during the tests. Identification of the methodologic procedures with best reproducibility is also needed. The objective of this study was to review the literature to evaluate the parameters used for the isokinetic evaluation of the hip flexor and extensor muscles and its reproducibility. This is a systematic literature review of the Cochrane, LILACS, PEDro, PubMed, and SciELO databases. The inclusion criteria were papers on the evaluation of hip flexor and/or extensor muscular strength with an isokinetic dynamometer and papers that analyzed the ICC or Pearson's reproducibility. The information extracted was: positioning of the patient; positioning of the dynamometer axis; positioning of the lever arm; angular speed; sample size, pathology; type of contraction and ICC and Pearson's results. On the databases 204 papers were found, from which 14 were selected that evaluated hip flexor and extensor muscles, involving 550 individuals who were submitted to an isokinetic hip evaluation. Five papers obtained the best result in reproducibility and had their methodology analyzed. In order to obtain better reproducibility of the isokinetic evaluation of the hip flexor and extensor muscles, the following recommendations must be followed: the individual must be positioned in the supine position and the dynamometer axis must be aligned with the greater trochanter of the femur. The positioning of the lever arm must be in the most distal region of the thigh possible. The angular speed used to analyze torque peak and muscle work was 60°/s, and to evaluate the muscle power it was 180°/s, with concentric and

  4. Electromyographic analysis of the vertebral extensor muscles during the Biering-Sorensen Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Moreira de Santana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to analyze the electromyographic signal of the multifidus, longissimus thoracis and the lumbar iliocostalis muscles during the Biering-Sorensen test in subjects without lower back pain. Twenty volunteers performed the test on three separate occasions. An analysis of variance detected a difference between the three test times (p = 0.0026. For the frequency domain, it was observed that there were differences between the multifidus and the lumbar erectors muscles; longissimus and iliocostalis muscles. However, in the time domain analysis, no difference was observed. As the values of the slope coefficients of median frequencies were higher for the multifidus muscle, compared to the longissimus and lumbar iliocostalis muscles, this may indicate a higher tendency toward muscle fatigue. Therefore, considering the applied methodology, the study of electromyographic signals in the frequency domain should be considered as an instrument to assess fatigue of the spinal extensor muscles in clinical situations.

  5. Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation and Resistance Training on Knee Extensor/Flexor Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantović, Milan; Popović, Boris; Madić, Dejan; Obradović, Jelena

    2015-07-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has recently drawn a lot of attention as means for strengthening of voluntary muscle contraction both in sport and rehabilitation. NMES training increases maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force output through neural adaptations. On the other hand, positive effects of resistance training (RT) on muscle strength are well known. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of a 5-week program of NMES compared to RT program of same duration. Sample of 15 students' of faculty of sport and physical education (age 22 ± 2) were randomized in two groups: NMES (N = 7) and RT (N = 8). NMES group performed NMES superimposed over voluntary muscle contraction, RT group performed resistance training with submaximal loads. Subjects were evaluated for knee isokinetic dynamometry on both sides (60° and 180° s). After intervention no significant difference between groups were observed in isokinetic dynamometry (p = 0.177). However, applying pair sample t test within each group revealed that peak torque increased in NMES-group (p = 0.002 for right knee extensors muscles, p = 0.003 for left, respectively, at 60° and p = 0.004 for left knee extensors muscles, at angular velocity 180°). In RT group (p = 0.033 for right knee extensors muscles, p = 0.029 for right knee flexor muscles, at angular velocity 60°). Our results indicate that NMES has equal potential if not in some way better than classical RT having in mind that overload on locomotor apparatus during NMES is minimal and force of muscle contraction is equal on both sides, for enhancement of knee muscles concentric peak torque.

  6. Early-onset dropped head syndrome after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: dose constraints for neck extensor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Koji; Nakamura, Satoshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Kashihara, Tairo; Kobayashi, Kazuma; Harada, Ken; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Murakami, Naoya; Ito, Yoshinori; Igaki, Hiroshi; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Dropped head syndrome (DHS) is a famous but unusual late complication of multimodality treatment for head and neck carcinoma. We reported this early-onset complication and analyzed the dose to the neck extensor muscles. We examined the records of three patients with DHS after radiotherapy. The doses to the neck extensor muscles were compared between three patients with DHS and nine patients without DHS. The mean dose to the neck extensor muscles of the three patients with DHS were 58.5 Gy, 42.3 Gy and 60.9 Gy, while the dose was muscles. The proposed dose to the neck extensor muscles might be <46 Gy (or at least <50 Gy). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  7. Finger dexterity and hand function: effect of three commercial wrist extensor orthoses on patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, E B; Ytterberg, S R; Krug, H E; Mahowald, M L

    1996-06-01

    To investigate the effect of 3 commercial wrist orthoses on finger dexterity and hand function of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Forty-two patients with definite RA participated in the cross-over study comparing 3 styles of commercial wrist orthoses. Finger dexterity and hand function of the dominant hand were assessed while splinted and unsplinted, at the initial session and after 1 week of intermittent orthosis use. Finger dexterity was assessed using two subtests from the Purdue Pegboard Test (Purdue) and hand function was assessed using the Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test (Jebsen-Taylor). Both finger dexterity and hand function were reduced by splinting; men and women were affected similarly. There was no difference in finger dexterity or hand function afforded by the 3 orthoses. Results on both the Purdue and Jebsen-Taylor tests showed a significant learning effect across time. The 3 commercial wrist orthoses studied reduce dexterity similarly and significantly. When commercial wrist orthoses are to be used during tasks that require maximum dexterity, this reduction should be weighed against the known benefits of splinting.

  8. Effect of temperature on skeletal muscle energy turnover during dynamic knee-extensor exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferguson, R.A.; Krustrup, Peter; Kjær, Michael

    2006-01-01

    . Total ATP production (aerobic + anaerobic) was the same between each temperature condition [505.0 mmol/kg (SD 107.2) vs. 527.1 mmol/kg (SD 117.6); C and HT, respectively]. In conclusion, within the range of temperatures studied, passively increasing muscle temperature before exercise has no effect......The present study examined the effect of elevated temperature on muscle energy turnover during dynamic exercise. Nine male subjects performed 10 min of dynamic knee-extensor exercise at an intensity of 43 W (SD 10) and a frequency of 60 contractions per minute. Exercise was performed under normal...... (C) and elevated muscle temperature (HT) through passive heating. Thigh oxygen uptake (V(O2)) was determined from measurements of thigh blood flow and femoral arterial-venous differences for oxygen content. Anaerobic energy turnover was estimated from measurements of lactate release as well as muscle...

  9. The effects of trunk extensor and abdominal muscle fatigue on postural control and trunk proprioception in young, healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Dennis J; Brown, Stephen H M

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to induce both trunk extensor and abdominal muscle fatigue, on separate occasions, and compare their effects on standing postural control and trunk proprioception, as well as look at the effects of a recovery period on these outcome measures. A total of 20 individuals participated, with 10 (5 males and 5 females) completing either a standing postural control or lumbar axial repositioning protocol. Participants completed their randomly assigned protocol on two occasions, separated by at least 4  days, with either their trunk extensor or abdominal muscles being fatigued on either day. Postural control centre of pressure variables and trunk proprioception errors were compared pre- and post-fatigue. Results showed that both trunk extensor and abdominal muscle fatigue significantly degraded standing postural control immediately post-fatigue, with recovery occurring within 2 min post-fatigue. In general, these degradative effects on postural control appeared to be greater when the trunk extensor muscles were fatigued compared to the abdominal muscles. No statistically significant changes in trunk proprioception were found after either fatigue protocol. The present findings demonstrate our body's ability to quickly adapt and reweight somatosensory information to maintain postural control and trunk proprioception, as well as illustrate the importance of considering the abdominal muscles, along with the trunk extensor muscles, when considering the impact of fatigue on trunk movement and postural control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The contribution of motor commands to position sense differs between elbow and wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Lee D; Proske, Uwe; Allen, Trevor J; Gandevia, Simon C

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that centrally generated motor commands contribute to the perception of position and movement at the wrist, but not at the elbow. Because the wrist and elbow experiments used different methods, this study was designed to resolve the discrepancy. Two methods were used to test both the elbow and wrist (20 subjects each). For the wrist, subjects sat with their right arm strapped to a device that restricted movement to the wrist. Before each test, voluntary contraction of wrist flexor or extensor muscles controlled for muscle spindle thixotropy. After relaxation, the wrist was moved to a test angle. Position was indicated either with a pointer, or by matching with the contralateral wrist, under two conditions: when the reference wrist was relaxed or when its muscles were contracted isometrically (30% maximum). The elbow experiment used the same design to measure position sense in the passive elbow and with elbow muscles contracting (30% maximum). At the wrist when using a pointer, muscle contraction altered significantly the perceived wrist angle in the direction of contraction by 7 deg [3 deg, 12 deg] (mean [95% confidence interval]) with a flexor contraction and 8 deg [4 deg, 12 deg] with an extensor contraction. Similarly, in the wrist matching task, there was a change of 13 deg [9 deg, 16 deg] with a flexor contraction and 4 deg [1 deg, 8 deg] with an extensor contraction. In contrast, contraction of elbow flexors or extensors did not alter significantly the perceived position of the elbow, compared with rest. The contribution of central commands to position sense differs between the elbow and the wrist. PMID:24099798

  11. Effect of submaximal isometric wrist extension training on grip strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimose, Ryota; Matsunaga, Atsuhiko; Muro, Masuo

    2011-03-01

    Gripping force is produced by co-contraction of forearm flexors and extensors. Activation of extensors is important for stabilizing the wrist during gripping. However, forearm muscle function is complicated and the neurophysiological mechanism responsible for the gain in gripping force is unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether increasing forearm extensor activation with isometric wrist extension training has an effect on gripping force. Thirteen healthy subjects participated in this study. Maximal voluntary contraction of gripping was measured using a piezosensor (MVC(grip)) and EMG of forearm muscles at every wrist angle (from 70° flexion to 80° extension with 10° intervals) were measured simultaneously at baseline, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks after training. Training consisted of 30 repetitions equal to 70% MVC of isometric wrist extension for 8 weeks (5/week) on the right side. Gripping force was measured on both sides using a grip dynamometer without wrist angle restriction. Gripping force, EMG, maximal wrist extension force, and wrist angle-gripping force curve were investigated after training. After training, maximal wrist extension force increased significantly. Gripping force on the trained side also increased significantly. The training changed wrist angle at peak of MVC(grip). EMG activation of forearm extensors increased and that of flexors decreased during gripping. These results suggest that wrist extension training leads to an increase in gripping force and changes the balance of EMG activation between forearm flexors and extensors during gripping. Therefore, this training method should be useful as a therapeutic strategy for increasing grip strength.

  12. Optimal vibration stimulation to the neck extensor muscles using hydraulic vibrators to shorten saccadic reaction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Katsuo; Kunita, Kenji; Furune, Naoe; Maeda, Kaoru; Asai, Hitoshi; Tomita, Hidehito

    2006-09-01

    Optimal vibration stimulation to the neck extensor muscles using hydraulic vibrators to shorten the saccadic reaction time was examined. Subjects were 14 healthy young adults. Visual targets (LEDs) were located 10 degrees left and right of a central point. The targets were alternately lit for random durations of 2-4 seconds in a resting neck condition and various vibration conditions, and saccadic reaction times were measured. Vibration amplitude was 0.5 mm in every condition. The upper trapezius muscles were vibrated at 40, 60, 80, and 100 Hz in a sub-maximum stretch condition in which the muscles were stretched at 70% of maximum stretch. In addition, the muscles were vibrated at 60 Hz with the muscles maximally stretched, with 70% vertical pressure without stretching, and with vibration applied to the skin in the same area as the muscle vibration. At 60, 80, and 100 Hz at 70% maximum stretch, saccadic reaction time shortened significantly compared with the resting neck condition. However, no significant difference in the reaction time was observed among the frequencies. The saccadic reaction times in the maximum stretch condition, muscle pressure condition, and skin contact condition did not differ significantly from that in the resting neck condition. Vibration stimulation to the trapezius with 60-100 Hz frequencies at 0.5 mm amplitude in the sub-maximum stretch condition was effective for shortening saccadic reaction time. The main mechanism appears to be Ia information originating from the muscle spindle.

  13. Catalase-positive microperoxisomes in rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscle fiber types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L. W.; Ellis, Stanley

    1988-01-01

    The size, distribution, and content of catalase-reactive microperoxisomes were investigated cytochemically in three types of muscle fibers from the soleus and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of male rats. Muscle fibers were classified on the basis of the mitochondrial content and distribution, the Z-band widths, and the size and shape of myofibrils as the slow-twitch oxidative (SO), the fast-twitch oxidative glycolytic (FOG), and the fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) fibers. It was found that both the EDL and soleus SO fibers possessed the largest microperoxisomes. A comparison of microperoxisome number per muscle fiber area or the microperoxisome area per fiber area revealed following ranking, starting from the largest number and the area-ratio values: soleus SO, EDL SO, EDL FOG, and EDL FG.

  14. Decreased task duration and unchanged trunk muscle activity in low-back pain patients during stair climbing after back extensor muscle fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Østergaard, Gert Værge; Brogner, Heidi Marie

    recording during 10 concurrent stair steps pre / post lumbar extensor muscle exhaustion. Duration of gait tasks were shorter in LBP patients generally and longer during load and shorter during transfer in descend stepping after back extensor fatigue. Back extensor fatigue resulted in higher back......- and abdominal muscle activity in healthy than in patients in most phases, but during descend transfer patients activity decreased. In LBP patients back extensor fatigue resulted in decreased muscular activity in the trunk muscles during stair stepping compared to healthy. Decreased duration of the motor tasks......Low-back pain (LBP) is a major problem. Spine control and stability mechanisms are important but the knowledge of these parameters in functions is sparse. 7 healthy / 5 recurrent mild-to-moderate LBP patients participated in assessment of abdominal, lumbar and gluteal muscles' surface EMG and video...

  15. Alterations in Leg Extensor Muscle-Tendon Unit Biomechanical Properties With Ageing and Mechanical Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher McCrum

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tendons transfer forces produced by muscle to the skeletal system and can therefore have a large influence on movement effectiveness and safety. Tendons are mechanosensitive, meaning that they adapt their material, morphological and hence their mechanical properties in response to mechanical loading. Therefore, unloading due to immobilization or inactivity could lead to changes in tendon mechanical properties. Additionally, ageing may influence tendon biomechanical properties directly, as a result of biological changes in the tendon, and indirectly, due to reduced muscle strength and physical activity. This review aimed to examine age-related differences in human leg extensor (triceps surae and quadriceps femoris muscle-tendon unit biomechanical properties. Additionally, this review aimed to assess if, and to what extent mechanical loading interventions could counteract these changes in older adults. There appear to be consistent reductions in human triceps surae and quadriceps femoris muscle strength, accompanied by similar reductions in tendon stiffness and elastic modulus with ageing, whereas the effect on tendon cross sectional area is unclear. Therefore, the observed age-related changes in tendon stiffness are predominantly due to changes in tendon material rather than size with age. However, human tendons appear to retain their mechanosensitivity with age, as intervention studies report alterations in tendon biomechanical properties in older adults of similar magnitudes to younger adults over 12–14 weeks of training. Interventions should implement tendon strains corresponding to high mechanical loads (i.e., 80–90% MVC with repetitive loading for up to 3–4 months to successfully counteract age-related changes in leg extensor muscle-tendon unit biomechanical properties.

  16. The Artificial Gravity Bed Rest Pilot Project: Effects on Knee Extensor and Plantar Flexor Muscle Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Haddad, F.; Lee, S.; Baker, M.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this project was to examine the effects of artificial gravity (2.5 g) on skeletal muscle strength and key anabolic/catabolic markers known to regulate muscle mass. Two groups of subjects were selected for study: 1) a 21 day-bed rest (BR) control (C) group (N=7); and 2) an AG group (N=8), which was exposed to 21 days of bed-rest plus daily 1 hr exposures to AG (2.5 g). This particular experiment was part of an integrated AG Pilot Project sponsored by NASA/Johnson Space Center. The in vivo torque-velocity relationships of the knee extensors and plantar flexors of the ankle were determined pre and post treatment. Also, pre- and post treatment biopsy samples were obtained from both the vastus lateralis and soleus muscles and were used, in part, for a series of analyses on gene expression (mRNA abundance) of key factors implicated in the anabolic versus catabolic state of the muscle. Post/Pre toque-velocity determinations revealed greater decrements in knee extensor performance in the C versus AG group (P less than 0.04). The plantar flexor muscle group of the AG subjects actually demonstrated a net gain in torque-velocity relationship; whereas, in the C group the overall post/pre responses declined (AG vs C; P less than 0.001). Measurements of muscle fiber cross-sectional area (for both muscles) demonstrated a loss of approx. 20% in the C group while no losses were evident in the AG group. RT-PCR analyses of muscle biopsy specimens demonstrated that markers of growth and cytoskeletal integrity (IGF-1, IGF-1 BP4, mechano growth factor, total RNA, and pro-collagen 3a) were higher in the AG group, whereas catabolic markers (myostatin and atrogen) were elevated in the C group. Importantly, these patterns were seen in both muscles. Based on these observations we conclude that paradigms of AG have the potential to maintain the functional, biochemical, and structural homeostasis of skeletal muscle in the face of chronic unloading states. These findings also

  17. Reliability of contractile properties of the knee extensor muscles in individuals with post-polio syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric L Voorn

    Full Text Available To assess the reliability of contractile properties of the knee extensor muscles in 23 individuals with post-polio syndrome (PPS and 18 age-matched healthy individuals.Contractile properties of the knee extensors were assessed from repeated electrically evoked contractions on 2 separate days, with the use of a fixed dynamometer. Reliability was determined for fatigue resistance, rate of torque development (MRTD, and early and late relaxation time (RT50 and RT25, using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and standard error of measurement (SEM, expressed as % of the mean.In both groups, reliability for fatigue resistance was good, with high ICCs (>0.90 and small SEM values (PPS: 7.1%, healthy individuals: 7.0%. Reliability for contractile speed indices varied, with the best values found for RT50 (ICCs>0.82, SEM values <2.8%. We found no systematic differences between test and retest occasions, except for RT50 in healthy subjects (p = 0.016.In PPS and healthy individuals, the reliability of fatigue resistance, as obtained from electrically evoked contractions is high. The reliability of contractile speed is only moderate, except for RT50 in PPS, demonstrating high reliability.This was the first study to examine the reliability of electrically evoked contractile properties in individuals with PPS. Our results demonstrate its potential to study mechanisms underlying muscle fatigue in PPS and to evaluate changes in contractile properties over time in response to interventions or from natural course.

  18. Diabetic Muscle Infarction of the Tibialis Anterior and Extensor Hallucis Longus Muscles Mimicking the Malignant Soft-Tissue Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimata, Yoshikuni; Sato, Kotaro; Tokunaga, Karen; Tsukimura, Itsuko; Tada, Hiroshi; Doita, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common causes of skeletal muscle infarction is diabetic muscle infarction (DMI), a rare complication associated with poorly controlled diabetes. We report an atypical case of DMI localized in the tibialis anterior (TA) and extensor hallucis longus (EHL) muscles of an elderly individual. A 64-year-old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus presented with a 6-month history of a palpable mass in his lower left leg. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that the mass exhibited heterogeneous signals on T1- and T2-weighted images and slight heterogeneous enhancement within the muscles on fat suppressed T1-weighted images. Because histopathological analysis revealed mostly necrotic muscle tissues but no neoplastic cells, we resected the affected muscles. A typical symptom of DMI is severe abrupt-onset pain in the region of the affected muscles, but the patient did not complain of pain. Therefore, the diagnosis and treatment for DMI were delayed, and widespread irreversible muscle necrosis developed. MRI findings of DMI can be similar to that of a malignant soft-tissue tumor. So, it is necessary to consider the malignant soft-tissue tumor as one of the differential diagnoses of DMI.

  19. Knee extensor muscle weakness is a risk factor for development of knee osteoarthritis. A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øiestad, B E; Juhl, C B; Eitzen, I; Thorlund, J B

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the association between knee extensor muscle weakness and the risk of developing knee osteoarthritis. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted with literature searches in Medline, SPORTDiscus, EMBASE, CINAHL, and AMED. Eligible studies had to include participants with no radiographic or symptomatic knee osteoarthritis at baseline; have a follow-up time of a minimum of 2 years, and include a measure of knee extensor muscle strength. Hierarchies for extracting data on knee osteoarthritis and knee extensor muscle strength were defined prior to data extraction. Meta-analysis was applied on the basis of the odds ratios (ORs) of developing symptomatic knee osteoarthritis or radiographic knee osteoarthritis in subjects with knee extensor muscle weakness. ORs for knee osteoarthritis and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated and combined using a random effects model. Twelve studies were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis after the initial searches. Five cohort studies with a follow-up time between 2.5 and 14 years, and a total number of 5707 participants (3553 males and 2154 females), were finally included. The meta-analysis showed an overall increased risk of developing symptomatic knee osteoarthritis in participants with knee extensor muscle weakness (OR 1.65 95% CI 1.23, 2.21; I(2) = 50.5%). This systematic review and meta-analysis showed that knee extensor muscle weakness was associated with an increased risk of developing knee osteoarthritis in both men and women. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Recombinant Uncarboxylated Osteocalcin Per Se Enhances Mouse Skeletal Muscle Glucose Uptake in both Extensor Digitorum Longus and Soleus Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuzhu Lin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that undercarboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC improves muscle glucose uptake in rodents. However, whether ucOC can directly increase glucose uptake in both glycolytic and oxidative muscles and the possible mechanisms of action still need further exploration. We tested the hypothesis that ucOC per se stimulates muscle glucose uptake via extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK, and/or the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2-protein kinase B (AKT-AKT substrate of 160 kDa (AS160 signaling cascade. Extensor digitorum longus (EDL and soleus muscles from male C57BL/6 mice were isolated, divided into halves, and then incubated with ucOC with or without the pretreatment of ERK inhibitor U0126. ucOC increased muscle glucose uptake in both EDL and soleus. It also enhanced phosphorylation of ERK2 (Thr202/Tyr204 and AS160 (Thr642 in both muscle types and increased mTOR phosphorylation (Ser2481 in EDL only. ucOC had no significant effect on the phosphorylation of AMPKα (Thr172. The inhibition of ucOC-induced ERK phosphorylation had limited effect on ucOC-stimulated glucose uptake and AS160 phosphorylation in both muscle types, but appeared to inhibit the elevation in AKT phosphorylation only in EDL. Taken together, ucOC at the physiological range directly increased glucose uptake in both EDL and soleus muscles in mouse. The molecular mechanisms behind this ucOC effect on muscle glucose uptake seem to be muscle type-specific, involving enhanced phosphorylation of AS160 but limitedly modulated by ERK phosphorylation. Our study suggests that, since ucOC increases muscle glucose uptake without insulin, it could be considered as a potential agent to improve muscle glucose uptake in insulin resistant conditions.

  1. Sex differences in muscle morphology of the knee flexors and knee extensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fearghal P Behan

    Full Text Available Females experience higher risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries; males experience higher risk of hamstring strain injuries. Differences in injury may be partially due to sex differences in knee flexor (KF to knee extensor (KE muscle size ratio and the proportional size of constituent muscles.To compare the absolute and proportional size, and mass distribution, of individual KE and KF muscles, as well as overall size and balance (size ratio of these muscle groups between the sexes.T1-weighted axial plane MR images (1.5T of healthy untrained young males and females (32 vs 34 were acquired to determine thigh muscle anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA. Maximal ACSA (ACSAmax of constituent muscles, summated for KF and KE muscle groups, and the KF:KE ratio were calculated.Females had 25.3% smaller KE ACSAmax (70.9±12.1 vs 93.6±10.3 cm2; P<0.001 and 29.6% smaller KF ACSAmax than males (38.8±7.3cm2 vs 55.1±7.3cm2; P<0.001. Consequently, females had lower KF:KE ACSA ratio (P = 0.031. There were sex differences in the proportional size of 2/4 KE and 5/6 KF. In females, vastus lateralis (VL, biceps femoris long-head (BFlh and semimembranosus (SM were a greater proportion and sartorius (SA, gracilis (GR and biceps femoris short-head (BFsh a smaller proportion of their respective muscle groups compared to males (All P<0.05.Sex differences in KF:KE ACSAmax ratio may contribute to increased risk of ACL injury in females. Sex discrepancies in absolute and proportional size of SA, GR, VL and BFlh may contribute further anatomical explanations for sex differences in injury incidence.

  2. Differential maturation of motoneurons innervating ankle flexor and extensor muscles in the neonatal rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinay, L; Brocard, F; Clarac, F

    2000-12-01

    The first postnatal week is a critical period for the development of posture in the rat. The use of ankle extensor muscles in postural reactions increases during this period. Changes in excitability of motoneurons are probably an important factor underlying this maturation. The aim of this study was to identify whether variations in the maturation exist between motor pools innervating antagonistic muscles. Intracellular recordings in the in vitro brain stem-spinal cord preparation of neonatal rats (from postnatal day 0-5) were used to examine the developmental changes in excitability of motoneurons innervating the ankle flexors (F-MNs) and the antigravity ankle extensors (E-MNs). No significant difference in resting potential, action potential threshold, input resistance or rheobase was observed at birth. The age-related increase in rheobase was more pronounced for F-MNs than for E-MNs. The development of discharge properties of E-MNs lagged behind that of F-MNs. More F-MNs than E-MNs were able to fire repetitively in response to current injection at birth. F-MNs discharged at a higher frequency than E-MNs at all ages. Differences in the duration of action potential afterhyperpolarization accounted, at least partly, for the differences in discharge frequency between E-MNs and F-MNs at birth, and for the age-related increase in firing rate. These results suggest that E-MNs are more immature at birth than F-MNs and that there is a differential development of motoneurons innervating antagonistic muscles. This may be a critical factor in the development of posture and locomotion.

  3. Isokinetic testing of flexor and extensor muscles in athletes suffering from low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzit, G P; Chisotti, L; Albertini, G; Martore, M; Gribaudo, C G

    1998-12-01

    The aim of the study was to verify the usefulness of isokinetic testing in athletes with chronic low back pain (LBP) to obtain quantitative information for rehabilitation purposes. a comparative study. Physiotherapy Department--Institute of Sports Medicine in Italy. 50 men, aged 25-65, practising running, cycling, triathlon, tennis, soccer, basketball, volleyball, skiing and golf. The patients were divided into two groups. Group A was treated for 3 months with postural exercises 2 or 3 times a week. Group B was treated for the same period of time with resistive exercises performed by resorting to specific machines. Before and after treatment, trunk muscle strength was evaluated by means of an isokinetic test carried out in a seated position. The isokinetic measurements used were peak torque (PT), work, power-in the best repetition and total work (TW) in four repetitions. Both the pain and the functional impairment during physical activity was evaluated by subjective visual analogic scale. The PT showed a parallel increase in flexor and extensor muscles in Group A. In Group B it increased by 32.2% at 60 degrees/s and 44.1% at 120 degrees/s as for the extensor muscles while the flexion-to-extension ratio decreased significantly. The TW registered a bigger percentage increase in both groups (+21% at 60 degrees/s and +20.4% at 120 degrees/s in Group A; +36.5% at 60 degrees/s and +50.3% at 120 degrees/s in Group B). The two rehabilitation programmes had the same effect on the course of LBP, but in Group B we observed a bigger increase in strength which could be potentially useful during a sports activity.

  4. Effects of ankle extensor muscle afferent inputs on hip abductor and adductor activity in the decerebrate walking cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, D A E; Misiaszek, J E

    2012-12-01

    Electrical stimulation of the lateral gastrocnemius-soleus (LGS) nerve at group I afferent strength leads to adaptations in the amplitude and timing of extensor muscle activity during walking in the decerebrate cat. Such afferent feedback in the stance leg might result from a delay in stance onset of the opposite leg. Concomitant adaptations in hip abductor and adductor activity would then be expected to maintain lateral stability and balance until the opposite leg is able to support the body. As many hip abductors and adductors are also hip extensors, we hypothesized that stimulation of the LGS nerve at group I afferent strength would produce increased activation and prolonged burst duration in hip abductor and adductor muscles in the premammillary decerebrate walking cat. LGS nerve stimulation during the extensor phase of the locomotor cycle consistently increased burst amplitude of the gluteus medius and adductor femoris muscles, but not pectineus or gracilis. In addition, LGS stimulation prolonged the burst duration of both gluteus medius and adductor femoris. Unexpectedly, long-duration LGS stimulus trains resulted in two distinct outcomes on the hip abductor and adductor bursting pattern: 1) a change of burst duration and timing similar to medial gastrocnemius; or 2) to continue rhythmically bursting uninterrupted. These results indicate that activation of muscle afferents from ankle extensors contributes to the regulation of activity of some hip abductor and adductor muscles, but not all. These results have implications for understanding the neural control of stability during locomotion, as well as the organization of spinal locomotor networks.

  5. DIFFERENCE IN THE MAGNITUDE OF MUSCLE DAMAGE BETWEEN ELBOW FLEXORS AND KNEE EXTENSORS ECCENTRIC EXERCISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Saka

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in the magnitude of muscle damage between maximal eccentric exercises of the elbow flexors (EF and knee extensors (KE. Twelve sedentary male volunteers participated in the study. Range of motion (ROM, isometric peak torque (IPT, delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS, creatine kinase activity (CK, and myoglobin concentration (Mb were evaluated before, immediately after, and on the 1st , 2nd, 3rd , and 7th days following exercise. Total work (TW during exercises was recorded and corrected by muscle volume (TWc. TWc was greater (p < 0.01 for EF [24 (2 joule·cm-3] than for KE [7 (0.4 joule·cm-3]. Increases in CK on the 2nd , 3rd , and 7th days (p < 0.01 and increases in Mb on the 1st , 2nd , 3rd , and 7th days were significantly (p<0.01 larger for EF than for KE. The decline in IPT was greater (p < 0.05- 0.01 for EF at all test occasions compared with KE. The results of this study demonstrate that the magnitude of muscle damage is greater and the recovery is slower following maximal eccentric exercise of the EF than of the KE for sedentary males

  6. Impairment of gradual muscle adjustment during wrist circumduction in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolien M Toxopeus

    Full Text Available Purposeful movements are attained by gradually adjusted activity of opposite muscles, or synergists. This requires a motor system that adequately modulates initiation and inhibition of movement and selectively activates the appropriate muscles. In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD initiation and inhibition of movements are impaired which may manifest itself in e.g. difficulty to start and stop walking. At single-joint level, impaired movement initiation is further accompanied by insufficient inhibition of antagonist muscle activity. As the motor symptoms in PD primarily result from cerebral dysfunction, quantitative investigation of gradually adjusted muscle activity during execution of purposeful movement is a first step to gain more insight in the link between impaired modulation of initiation and inhibition at the levels of (i cerebrally coded task performance and (ii final execution by the musculoskeletal system. To that end, the present study investigated changes in gradual adjustment of muscle synergists using a manipulandum that enabled standardized smooth movement by continuous wrist circumduction. Differences between PD patients (N = 15, off-medication and healthy subjects (N = 16 concerning the relation between muscle activity and movement performance in these groups were assessed using kinematic and electromyographic (EMG recordings. The variability in the extent to which a particular muscle was active during wrist circumduction--defined as muscle activity differentiation--was quantified by EMG. We demonstrated that more differentiated muscle activity indeed correlated positively with improved movement performance, i.e. higher movement speed and increased smoothness of movement. Additionally, patients employed a less differentiated muscle activity pattern than healthy subjects. These specific changes during wrist circumduction imply that patients have a decreased ability to gradually adjust muscles causing a decline in

  7. Isokinetic Performance of Knee Flexor and Extensor Muscles in American Football Players from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Severo-Silveira

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2017v19n4p426   The isokinetic performance of thigh muscles has been related to athletic performance and risk for non-contact injuries, such as anterior cruciate ligament ruptures and hamstring strains. Although isokinetic profile of American football players from United States (USA is widely described, there is a lack of studies comprising players acting outside the USA. The primary objective of this study was to describe the isokinetic performance of thigh muscles in elite American football players in Brazil. Secondarily, we aimed to compare the playing positions and compare the Brazilian players with high-level athletes from USA. Knee extensor (KE and flexor (KF muscles of 72 Brazilian players were assessed through isokinetic tests at 60°·s-1. KE concentric peak torque was 276±56 N·m, while KF had concentric and eccentric peak torques of 151±37 N·m and 220±40 N·m, respectively. Offensive linemen players presented greater peak torque values than defensive lineman, halfbacks, and wide receivers (all comparisons are provided in the article. Brazilian players had lower scores than USA athletes for KE and KF peak torque values. In addition, a conventional torque ratio (concentric/concentric lower than 0.6 was found in 76-83% of athletes, and a functional ratio (eccentric/eccentric below to 1.0 in 94%. Bilateral asymmetry greater than 10% was verified in 26% and 43% of athletes for KE and KF muscles, respectively. Elite players in Brazil present high incidence of strength imbalance in thigh muscles, and they are below USA players in relation to torque production capacity of KE and KF muscles.

  8. β-alanine supplementation improves isometric endurance of the knee extensor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sale, Craig; Hill, Chester A; Ponte, James; Harris, Roger C

    2012-06-14

    We examined the effect of four weeks of β-alanine supplementation on isometric endurance of the knee extensors at 45% maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Thirteen males (age 23 ± 6 y; height 1.80 ± 0.05 m; body mass 81.0 ± 10.5 kg), matched for pre-supplementation isometric endurance, were allocated to either a placebo (n = 6) or β-alanine (n = 7; 6.4 g·d-1 over 4 weeks) supplementation group. Participants completed an isometric knee extension test (IKET) to fatigue, at an intensity of 45% MVIC, before and after supplementation. In addition, two habituation tests were completed in the week prior to the pre-supplementation test and a further practice test was completed in the week prior to the post-supplementation test. MVIC force, IKET hold-time, and impulse generated were recorded. IKET hold-time increased by 9.7 ± 9.4 s (13.2%) and impulse by 3.7 ± 1.3 kN·s-1 (13.9%) following β-alanine supplementation. These changes were significantly greater than those in the placebo group (IKET: t(11) = 2.9, p ≤0.05; impulse: t(11) = 3.1, p ≤ 0.05). There were no significant changes in MVIC force in either group. Four weeks of β-alanine supplementation at 6.4 g·d-1 improved endurance capacity of the knee extensors at 45% MVIC, which most likely results from improved pH regulation within the muscle cell as a result of elevated muscle carnosine levels.

  9. β-alanine supplementation improves isometric endurance of the knee extensor muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sale Craig

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined the effect of four weeks of β-alanine supplementation on isometric endurance of the knee extensors at 45% maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC. Methods Thirteen males (age 23 ± 6 y; height 1.80 ± 0.05 m; body mass 81.0 ± 10.5 kg, matched for pre-supplementation isometric endurance, were allocated to either a placebo (n = 6 or β-alanine (n = 7; 6.4 g·d-1 over 4 weeks supplementation group. Participants completed an isometric knee extension test (IKET to fatigue, at an intensity of 45% MVIC, before and after supplementation. In addition, two habituation tests were completed in the week prior to the pre-supplementation test and a further practice test was completed in the week prior to the post-supplementation test. MVIC force, IKET hold-time, and impulse generated were recorded. Results IKET hold-time increased by 9.7 ± 9.4 s (13.2% and impulse by 3.7 ± 1.3 kN·s-1 (13.9% following β-alanine supplementation. These changes were significantly greater than those in the placebo group (IKET: t(11 = 2.9, p ≤0.05; impulse: t(11 = 3.1, p ≤ 0.05. There were no significant changes in MVIC force in either group. Conclusion Four weeks of β-alanine supplementation at 6.4 g·d-1 improved endurance capacity of the knee extensors at 45% MVIC, which most likely results from improved pH regulation within the muscle cell as a result of elevated muscle carnosine levels.

  10. Immediate effects of forearm elastic and nonelastic taping on wrist flexor muscle and grip strength of normal adults

    OpenAIRE

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Shin, Young-Jun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of forearm elastic taping on grip and wrist flexor muscle strength. [Subjects and Methods] This was a single-blind, crossover study. This study selected 40 healthy subjects with no history of orthopedic disorders and was conducted after consent to participate was obtained. Grip and wrist flexor muscle strength of subjects were assessed by a handheld dynamometer and a Commander Muscle Tester, respectively, with forearm elastic tapi...

  11. Humeral external rotation handling by using the Bobath concept approach affects trunk extensor muscles electromyography in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazziotin Dos Santos, C; Pagnussat, Aline S; Simon, A S; Py, Rodrigo; Pinho, Alexandre Severo do; Wagner, Mário B

    2014-10-20

    This study aimed to investigate the electromyographic activity of cervical and trunk extensors muscles in children with cerebral palsy during two handlings according to the Bobath concept. A crossover trial involving 40 spastic diplegic children was conducted. Electromyography (EMG) was used to measure muscular activity at sitting position (SP), during shoulder internal rotation (IR) and shoulder external rotation (ER) handlings, which were performed using the elbow joint as key point of control. Muscle recordings were performed at the fourth cervical (C4) and at the tenth thoracic (T10) vertebral levels. The Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) was used to assess whether muscle activity would vary according to different levels of severity. Humeral ER handling induced an increase on EMG signal of trunk extensor muscles at the C4 (P=0.007) and T10 (P<0.001) vertebral levels. No significant effects were observed between SP and humeral IR handling at C4 level; However at T10 region, humeral IR handling induced an increase of EMG signal (P=0.019). Humeral ER resulted in an increase of EMG signal at both levels, suggesting increase of extensor muscle activation. Furthermore, the humeral ER handling caused different responses on EMG signal at T10 vertebra level, according to the GMFCS classification (P=0.017). In summary, an increase of EMG signal was observed during ER handling in both evaluated levels, suggesting an increase of muscle activation. These results indicate that humeral ER handling can be used for diplegic CP children rehabilitation to facilitate cervical and trunk extensor muscles activity in a GMFCS level-dependent manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of Cervical Extensor Muscles Thickness in Females with Chronic Nonspecific Neck Pain and Healthy Individuals by Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raziyeh Baghi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Neck pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders. Structural and functional alteration of cervical muscles is a commonly-reported complication of chronic neck pain (CNP. Measurement of muscle thickness is an acceptable way to evaluate muscle morphological structure. Therefore, this study aimed to measure cervical extensor muscles thickness in individuals with chronic nonspecific neck pain and healthy controls using ultrasonography so as to evaluate structural differences between the 2 groups. Materials & Methods:  A total of 30 female volunteers (15 individuals with nonspecific CNP and 15 controls participated in this casual comparative  study. Thickness of cervical extensor muscles, including multifidus, semispinalis cervicis, semispinalis capitis, splenius capitis, and upper trapezius at the level of the forth cervical vertebrae were measured using ultrasonography in resting position. Independent t test was performed to analyze the data by using the spss 20 software. Results: The thicknesses of cervical multifidus and semispinalis cervicis muscles in patients with CNP were smaller than those of controls with P=0.03 and P=0.01, respectively. There were no significant differences between two groups regarding the thicknesses of semispinalis capitis, splenius capitis, and upper trapezius muscles (P>0.05. Conclusion: Reduced multifidus and semispinalis cervicis thickness seen in the present study indicates deep neck extensor muscles atrophy and weakness in patients with neck pain. However, there were no differences between two groups with regard to superficial muscles thicknesses. Accordingly, exercise therapy for deep muscles should be considered in the management of patients with nonspecific CNP.

  13. Coordination of intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscle activity as a function of wrist joint angle during two-digit grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jamie A; Bobich, Lisa R; Santello, Marco

    2010-04-26

    Fingertip forces result from the activation of muscles that cross the wrist and muscles whose origins and insertions reside within the hand (extrinsic and intrinsic hand muscles, respectively). Thus, tasks that involve changes in wrist angle affect the moment arm and length, hence the force-producing capabilities, of extrinsic muscles only. If a grasping task requires the exertion of constant fingertip forces, the Central Nervous System (CNS) may respond to changes in wrist angle by modulating the neural drive to extrinsic or intrinsic muscles only or by co-activating both sets of muscles. To distinguish between these scenarios, we recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles of the thumb and index finger as a function of wrist angle during a two-digit object hold task. We hypothesized that changes in wrist angle would elicit EMG amplitude modulation of the extrinsic and intrinsic hand muscles. In one experimental condition we asked subjects to exert the same digit forces at each wrist angle, whereas in a second condition subjects could choose digit forces for holding the object. EMG activity was significantly modulated in both extrinsic and intrinsic muscles as a function of wrist angle (both p<0.05) but only for the constant force condition. Furthermore, EMG modulation resulted from uniform scaling of EMG amplitude across all muscles. We conclude that the CNS controlled both extrinsic and intrinsic muscles as a muscle synergy. These findings are discussed within the theoretical frameworks of synergies and common neural input across motor nuclei of hand muscles. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Work and power of the knee flexor and extensor muscles in patients with osteoarthritis and after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiani, Denise; Ritzel, Cintia Helena; Bortoluzzi, Silvia Manfrin; Vaz, Marco Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    The inflammatory manifestations of knee osteoarthritis (OA) lead to muscle inhibition and hypotrophy, resulting in a reduction in total muscle work and muscle power. Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most adequate surgery for the treatment of advanced OA. However, its effects on muscle functional behavior have not been well understood. To compare the total work and power of the knee flexor and extensor muscles in patients with OA (20) and in patients post-TKA (12) at two angular velocities (60º/sec and 240º/sec). An isokinetic Biodex dynamometer was used to assess muscle power and total work during isokinetic contractions. Two-way ANOVA for repeated measures was used to compare total muscle work and muscle power between the groups (SPSS software, version 13.0; significance level, P 0.05). In addition, no difference was observed in the muscle power of the knee extensors and flexors (P > 0.05). Total work and power were similar in the OA and TKA groups, suggesting that TKA did not improve functional capacity, which was similar in both groups.

  15. Efficacy of kinesiology taping for recovery from occupational wrist disorders experienced by a physical therapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2014-06-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this paper was to report the efficacy of kinesiology taping for recovery from wrist pain and limited range of motion (ROM) in a physical therapist with repetitive strain injuries. [Subjects] A 32 year-old male physical therapist developed recurring severe pain in the dominant wrist and limited active ROM with extremely painful supination. [Methods] The kinesiology tape was applied to the lumbricals, musculi interossei dorsales, palmares, the wrist extensor and flexor muscles, and the wrist joint for 3 weeks for an average of 10 h/day. [Results] After application of the kinesiology tape, the Numeric Pain Rating Scale and Patient-rated Wrist Evaluation scores decreased, and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale score increased in comparison with the initial score. [Conclusion] Repeated kinesiology taping of the wrist muscles and joint could be an effective method for recovery from occupational wrist disorders experienced by physical therapists.

  16. Strength characterization of knee flexor and extensor muscles in Prader-Willi and obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baccalaro Gabriele

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background despite evidence of an obesity-related disability, there is a lack of objective muscle functional data in overweight subjects. Only few studies provide instrumental strength measurements in non-syndromal obesity, whereas no data about Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS are reported. The aim of our study was to characterize the lower limb muscle function of patients affected by PWS as compared to non-syndromal obesity and normal-weight subjects. Methods We enrolled 20 obese (O females (age: 29.1 ± 6.5 years; BMI: 38.1 ± 3.1, 6 PWS females (age: 27.2 ± 4.9 years; BMI: 45.8 ± 4.4 and 14 healthy normal-weight (H females (age: 30.1 ± 4.7 years; BMI: 21 ± 1.6. Isokinetic strength during knee flexion and extension in both lower limbs at the fixed angular velocities of 60°/s, 180°/s, 240°/s was measured with a Cybex Norm dynamometer. Results the H, O and PWS populations appear to be clearly stratified with regard to muscle strength.: PWS showed the lowest absolute peak torque (PT for knee flexor and extensor muscles as compared to O (-55% and H (-47% (P = 0.00001. O showed significantly higher strength values than H as regard to knee extension only (P = 0.0014. When strength data were normalised by body weight, PWS showed a 50% and a 70% reduction in PT as compared to O and H, respectively. Knee flexors strength values were on average half of those reported for extension in all of the three populations. Conclusion the novel aspect of our study is the determination of objective measures of muscle strength in PWS and the comparison with O and H patients. The objective characterization of muscle function performed in this study provides baseline and outcome measures that may quantify specific strength deficits amendable with tailored rehabilitation programs and monitor effectiveness of treatments.

  17. Biofeedback Signals for Robotic Rehabilitation: Assessment of Wrist Muscle Activation Patterns in Healthy Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semprini, Marianna; Cuppone, Anna Vera; Delis, Ioannis; Squeri, Valentina; Panzeri, Stefano; Konczak, Jurgen

    2017-07-01

    Electrophysiological recordings from human muscles can serve as control signals for robotic rehabilitation devices. Given that many diseases affecting the human sensorimotor system are associated with abnormal patterns of muscle activation, such biofeedback can optimize human-robot interaction and ultimately enhance motor recovery. To understand how mechanical constraints and forces imposed by a robot affect muscle synergies, we mapped the muscle activity of seven major arm muscles in healthy individuals performing goal-directed discrete wrist movements constrained by a wrist robot. We tested six movement directions and four force conditions typically experienced during robotic rehabilitation. We analyzed electromyographic (EMG) signals using a space-by-time decomposition and we identified a set of spatial and temporal modules that compactly described the EMG activity and were robust across subjects. For each trial, coefficients expressing the strength of each combination of modules and representing the underlying muscle recruitment, allowed for a highly reliable decoding of all experimental conditions. The decomposition provides compact representations of the observable muscle activation constrained by a robotic device. Results indicate that a low-dimensional control scheme incorporating EMG biofeedback could be an effective add-on for robotic rehabilitative protocols seeking to improve impaired motor function in humans.

  18. Heterogeneous recruitment of quadriceps muscle portions and fibre types during moderate intensity knee-extensor exercise: effect of thigh occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krustrup, Peter; Söderlund, Karin; Relu, Mihai U.

    2009-01-01

    The involvement of quadriceps femoris muscle portions and fibre type recruitment was studied during submaximal knee-extensor exercise without and with thigh occlusion (OCC) and compared with responses during intense exercise. Six healthy male subjects performed 90-s of moderate exercise without...... (MOD; 29+/-4 W) and with thigh OCC, and moderate exercise followed by 90-s of intense exercise (HI; 65+/-8 W). Temperatures were continuously measured in m. vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM) and rectus femoris (RF) and successive muscle biopsies were obtained from VL. During MOD, muscle...

  19. Immediate effects of forearm elastic and nonelastic taping on wrist flexor muscle and grip strength of normal adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Shin, Young-Jun

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of forearm elastic taping on grip and wrist flexor muscle strength. [Subjects and Methods] This was a single-blind, crossover study. This study selected 40 healthy subjects with no history of orthopedic disorders and was conducted after consent to participate was obtained. Grip and wrist flexor muscle strength of subjects were assessed by a handheld dynamometer and a Commander Muscle Tester, respectively, with forearm elastic taping or nonelastic taping. [Results] After application of forearm elastic taping, grip strength and wrist flexor muscle strength significantly increased compared with the nonelastic taping group. [Conclusion] Application of forearm elastic taping is considered to have positive effects on improving wrist and grip strength.

  20. The innervation of extensor hallucis longus muscle: an anatomical study for selective neurotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittoria, Nazzi; Giuseppe, Messina; Ivano, Dones; Giovanni, Broggi

    2009-10-01

    This study is aimed to describe the observable anatomical variants of the innervation of extensor hallucis longus muscle (EHLM) in order to have the surgical coordinates to perform neurotomy on the targeted branches of its innervation and to give a valuable alternative to the commonly used technique of fascicular subepineurial neurotomy in patients affected by toe hyperextension dystonia. In 15 fresh cadavers of adults, 29 lower limbs (14 right and 15 left) were studied. Anatomical dissections to isolate the innervating branches of EHLM were performed. Each branch from EHLM was analyzed by microscopical opening of the epineurium to observe the number of nerve fascicles. Various measurements were made to obtain anatomical coordinates for surgery. The distance between the most prominent point of the head of the fibula and the origin of the nervous branches innervating the EHLM is not proportional to the length of the leg. In 72.4% of the studied legs, the distance between the origin of the first branch innervating the EHLM and the origin of the deep peroneal nerve is 7 +/- 2 cm. In 80% of legs, the distance between the origin of the second branch and the origin of the deep peroneal nerve is 10 +/- 1.1 cm. In only one limb with double innervation, two fascicles were found, while in six limbs (25%) only one fascicle was found. This anatomical study traced some valuable surgical coordinates useful for the execution of a selective peripheral neurotomy on the nerve branch innervating the EHLM.

  1. The Potential Risk Factors Relevant to Lateral Epicondylitis by Wrist Coupling Posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Ya; Chieh, Hsiao-Feng; Lin, Chien-Ju; Jou, I-Ming; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Su, Fong-Chin

    2016-01-01

    The use of awkward wrist postures and unskilled techniques might induce lateral epicondylitis. This study thus investigated the effects of wrist deviation combined with extension and movement velocity on the dynamic performances of the wrist muscles during the coupling posture via a custom-made bi-planar isokinetic dynamometer. Thirty subjects were recruited to perform the isokinetic testing. We measured the muscle strengths and activities for the wrist extensors and flexors during concentric and eccentric contractions at three movement velocities, 30°s-1, 90°s-1, and 180°s-1, combined with three wrist postures, neutral position (NP), radial deviation (RD), and ulnar deviation (UD). The root mean square (RMS) of the electromyographic signal in the extensor digitorum communis (EDC), normalized peak torque of extensors, and ratio of normalized peak torque between wrist extensors and flexors, were all greater in the NP than RD and UD in both contractions. The ratio of RMS between EDC and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) had a significantly greater value in RD than UD during the concentric contraction. The EDC showed significantly higher activity at the fast velocity in both contractions. Nevertheless, a significantly higher RMS of the electromyographic signal between EDC and FDS and the ratio of strength between wrist extensors and flexors were found at slow velocity in both contractions. The wrist deviation combined with extension and movement velocity of the wrist joint should thus be considered as influential factors which might alter the dynamic performances, and may result in further injury of the elbow joint.

  2. The Potential Risk Factors Relevant to Lateral Epicondylitis by Wrist Coupling Posture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Ya Lee

    Full Text Available The use of awkward wrist postures and unskilled techniques might induce lateral epicondylitis. This study thus investigated the effects of wrist deviation combined with extension and movement velocity on the dynamic performances of the wrist muscles during the coupling posture via a custom-made bi-planar isokinetic dynamometer. Thirty subjects were recruited to perform the isokinetic testing. We measured the muscle strengths and activities for the wrist extensors and flexors during concentric and eccentric contractions at three movement velocities, 30°s-1, 90°s-1, and 180°s-1, combined with three wrist postures, neutral position (NP, radial deviation (RD, and ulnar deviation (UD. The root mean square (RMS of the electromyographic signal in the extensor digitorum communis (EDC, normalized peak torque of extensors, and ratio of normalized peak torque between wrist extensors and flexors, were all greater in the NP than RD and UD in both contractions. The ratio of RMS between EDC and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS had a significantly greater value in RD than UD during the concentric contraction. The EDC showed significantly higher activity at the fast velocity in both contractions. Nevertheless, a significantly higher RMS of the electromyographic signal between EDC and FDS and the ratio of strength between wrist extensors and flexors were found at slow velocity in both contractions. The wrist deviation combined with extension and movement velocity of the wrist joint should thus be considered as influential factors which might alter the dynamic performances, and may result in further injury of the elbow joint.

  3. Muscle fatigue changes cutaneous suppression of propriospinal drive to human upper limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P G; Gandevia, S C; Taylor, J L

    2007-04-01

    Some voluntary drive reaches human upper limb muscles via cervical propriospinal premotoneurones. Stimulation of the superficial radial nerve can inhibit these premotoneurones selectively and the resultant suppression of voluntary drive to motoneurones changes on-going electromyographic (EMG) activity. We investigated whether muscle fatigue changes this cutaneous-induced suppression of propriospinal drive to motoneurones of upper limb muscles. EMG was recorded from the extensors and flexors of the wrist and elbow. In the first study (n = 10 subjects), single stimuli (2 x perception threshold; 2PT) to the superficial radial nerve were delivered during contraction of the wrist extensors, before and after sustained fatiguing contractions of wrist extensors. In the second study (n = 10), similar stimuli were applied during elbow extension, before and during fatigue of elbow extensors. In the final study (n = 10), trains of three stimuli (2PT) were delivered during contractions of wrist extensors, before and while they were fatigued. With fatigue of either the wrist or elbow extensors, EMG suppression to single cutaneous stimuli increased significantly (by approximately 75%) for the fatigued muscle (P muscles, which were coactivated but not principally involved in the task, inhibition decreased or facilitation increased. Trains of stimuli produced greater suppression of on-going wrist extensor EMG than single stimuli and this difference persisted with fatigue. A control study of the H reflex in extensor carpi radialis showed that the mechanism responsible for the altered EMG suppression in fatigue was not at a motoneurone level. The findings suggest that the proportion of descending drive mediated via the disynaptic propriospinal pathway or the excitability of inhibitory interneurones projecting to propriospinal neurones increases substantially to fatigued muscles, but decreases to other active muscles. This pattern of changes may maintain coordination during

  4. Size and myosin heavy chain profiles of rat hindlimb extensor muscle fibers after 2 weeks at 2G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, R R; Roy, M E; Talmadge, R J; Mendoza, R; Grindeland, R E; Vasques, M

    1996-09-01

    The effects of 14 d of continuous centrifugation at approximately 2G on the hindlimb extensor musculature of male rats were studied. The mean body mass of centrifuged rats was 17% smaller than age-matched controls. In centrifuged rats, the mean absolute masses of the soleus and medial gastrocnemius (MG) were similar to control, while the mean relative masses (expressed as milligram muscle mass/gram of body mass) were larger than control. Based on a battery of monoclonal antibodies for specific myosin heavy chains (MHC), the soleus of centrifuged rats had a lower percentage (68 vs. 74%) of fibers expressing type I MHC only and a higher percentage (15 vs. 10%) that co-expressed type I and IIa MHC's. The MHC composition of fibers from the deep portion of the MG was unaffected by centrifugation. The MHC compositions based on SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis for each muscle were similar in the two groups. Mean fiber size of each fiber type in the soleus was unaffected by centrifugation. In the MG, the fibers, expressing only type IIb MHC were smaller in the centrifuge compared to control rats. Although 2 weeks of chronic centrifugation at 2G resulted in a cessation of body growth, there was essentially no effect on the muscle masses or fiber size in either a slow or fast extensor muscle. These data suggest that periods of centrifugation may be beneficial in maintaining extensor muscle mass in an animal that is not growing at a normal rate e.g., during chronic unloading.

  5. Comparison of recovery strategies on maximal force-generating capacity and electromyographic activity level of the knee extensor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrouk, Nidhal; Rebai, Haithem; Yahia, Abdelmoneem; Souissi, Nizar; Hug, François; Dogui, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    With regard to intermittent training exercise, the effects of the mode of recovery on subsequent performance are equivocal. To compare the effects of 3 types of recovery intervention on peak torque (PT) and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the knee extensor muscles after fatiguing isokinetic intermittent concentric exercise. Crossover study. Research laboratory. Eight elite judo players (age = 18.4 ± 1.4 years, height = 180 ± 3 cm, mass = 77.0 ± 4.2 kg). Participants completed 3 randomized sessions within 7 days. Each session consisted of 5 sets of 10 concentric knee extensions at 80% PT at 120°/s, with 3 minutes of recovery between sets. Recovery interventions were passive, active, and electromyostimulation. The PT and maximal EMG activity were recorded simultaneously while participants performed isokinetic dynamometer trials before and 3 minutes after the resistance exercise. The PT and maximal EMG activity from the knee extensors were quantified at isokinetic velocities of 60°/s, 120°/s, and 180°/s, with 5 repetitions at each velocity. The reduction in PT observed after electromyostimulation was less than that seen after passive (P electromyostimulation was higher than that seen after active recovery (P Electromyostimulation was an effective recovery tool in decreasing neuromuscular fatigue after high-intensity, intermittent isokinetic concentric exercise for the knee extensor muscles. Also, active recovery induced the greatest amount of neuromuscular fatigue.

  6. Comparison of Recovery Strategies on Maximal Force-Generating Capacity and Electromyographic Activity Level of the Knee Extensor Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrouk, Nidhal; Rebai, Haithem; Yahia, Abdelmoneem; Souissi, Nizar; Hug, François; Dogui, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Context: With regard to intermittent training exercise, the effects of the mode of recovery on subsequent performance are equivocal. Objective: To compare the effects of 3 types of recovery intervention on peak torque (PT) and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the knee extensor muscles after fatiguing isokinetic intermittent concentric exercise. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Eight elite judo players (age = 18.4 ± 1.4 years, height = 180 ± 3 cm, mass = 77.0 ± 4.2 kg). Interventions : Participants completed 3 randomized sessions within 7 days. Each session consisted of 5 sets of 10 concentric knee extensions at 80% PT at 120°/s, with 3 minutes of recovery between sets. Recovery interventions were passive, active, and electromyostimulation. The PT and maximal EMG activity were recorded simultaneously while participants performed isokinetic dynamometer trials before and 3 minutes after the resistance exercise. Main Outcome Measure(s): The PT and maximal EMG activity from the knee extensors were quantified at isokinetic velocities of 60°/s, 120°/s, and 180°/s, with 5 repetitions at each velocity. Results: The reduction in PT observed after electromyo-stimulation was less than that seen after passive (P electromyostimulation was higher than that seen after active recovery (P Electromyostimulation was an effective recovery tool in decreasing neuromuscular fatigue after high-intensity, intermittent isokinetic concentric exercise for the knee extensor muscles. Also, active recovery induced the greatest amount of neuromuscular fatigue. PMID:21944070

  7. The effects of isometric resistance training on stretch reflex induced tremor in the knee extensor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbaba, Rade; Cassidy, Angela; Budini, Francesco; Macaluso, Andrea

    2013-06-15

    This study examines the effect of 4 wk of high-intensity isometric resistance training on induced tremor in knee extensor muscles. Fourteen healthy volunteers were assigned to either the training group (n = 7) or the nontraining control group (n = 7). Induced tremor was assessed by measuring force fluctuations during anisometric contractions against spring loading, whose compliance was varied to allow for preferential activation of the short or long latency stretch reflex components. Effects of high-intensity isometric resistance training on induced tremor was assessed under two contraction conditions: relative force matching, where the relative level of activity was equal for both pre- and post-training sessions, set at 30% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and absolute force matching, where the level of activity was set to 30% pretrained MVC. The training group experienced a 26.5% increase in MVC in contrast to the 0.8% for the control group. For relative force-matching contractions, induced tremor amplitude and frequency did not change in either the training or control group. During absolute force-matching contractions, induced tremor amplitude was decreased by 37.5% and 31.6% for the short and long components, respectively, with no accompanying change in frequency, for the training group. No change in either measure was observed in the control group for absolute force-matching contractions. The results are consistent with high-intensity isometric resistance training induced neural changes leading to increased strength, coupled with realignment of stretch reflex automatic gain compensation to the new maximal force output. Also, previous reported reductions in anisometric tremor following strength training may partly be due to changed stretch reflex behavior.

  8. Isokinetic evaluation of wrist muscle strength in patients of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ağırman, Mehmet; Kara, Adnan; Durmuş, Oğuz; Saral, İlknur; Çakar, Engin

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the isokinetic characteristics of wrist strength in flexion, extension, supination, pronation, radial, and ulnar deviation in patients with moderate or severe carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Thirteen patients (23 hands) (2 males, 11 females; mean age 45 years; range 29 to 60 years) with moderate or severe CTS were compared to six healthy control subjects (12 hands) (2 males, 4 females; mean age 41 years; range 27 to 63 years) in this study, which was conducted between January 2016 and April 2016. Wrist flexion, extension, supination, pronation, radial, and ulnar deviation muscle strengths were measured at 30°/second (5 sets) angular velocity with isokinetic dynamometer. Grip strength was measured with hand dynamometer (kilograms). Boston Questionnaire was used for clinical assessment. Grip strength (p=0.003); wrist flexion 30°/second (p=0.014); extension 30°/second (p=0.016); and ulnar deviation 30°/second (p=0.017) muscle strengths were lower in CTS patients compared with the control group. An evaluation according to symptom duration did not reveal any significant relationship in any of the isokinetic tests with the exception of pronation 30°/second (p=0.039, r= -0.432) and ulnar deviation 30°/second (p=0.034, r=0.443) in CTS patients. No significant relationship was found between Boston Questionnaire, grip strength, and isokinetic test results. Quantitative wrist strength measurements with isokinetic dynamometers are beneficial in conservative exercise treatments and motor assessments of CTS patients.

  9. Quantifying forearm muscle activity during wrist and finger movements by means of multi-channel electromyography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Gazzoni

    Full Text Available The study of hand and finger movement is an important topic with applications in prosthetics, rehabilitation, and ergonomics. Surface electromyography (sEMG is the gold standard for the analysis of muscle activation. Previous studies investigated the optimal electrode number and positioning on the forearm to obtain information representative of muscle activation and robust to movements. However, the sEMG spatial distribution on the forearm during hand and finger movements and its changes due to different hand positions has never been quantified. The aim of this work is to quantify 1 the spatial localization of surface EMG activity of distinct forearm muscles during dynamic free movements of wrist and single fingers and 2 the effect of hand position on sEMG activity distribution. The subjects performed cyclic dynamic tasks involving the wrist and the fingers. The wrist tasks and the hand opening/closing task were performed with the hand in prone and neutral positions. A sensorized glove was used for kinematics recording. sEMG signals were acquired from the forearm muscles using a grid of 112 electrodes integrated into a stretchable textile sleeve. The areas of sEMG activity have been identified by a segmentation technique after a data dimensionality reduction step based on Non Negative Matrix Factorization applied to the EMG envelopes. The results show that 1 it is possible to identify distinct areas of sEMG activity on the forearm for different fingers; 2 hand position influences sEMG activity level and spatial distribution. This work gives new quantitative information about sEMG activity distribution on the forearm in healthy subjects and provides a basis for future works on the identification of optimal electrode configuration for sEMG based control of prostheses, exoskeletons, or orthoses. An example of use of this information for the optimization of the detection system for the estimation of joint kinematics from sEMG is reported.

  10. Quantifying Forearm Muscle Activity during Wrist and Finger Movements by Means of Multi-Channel Electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzoni, Marco; Celadon, Nicolò; Mastrapasqua, Davide; Paleari, Marco; Margaria, Valentina; Ariano, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The study of hand and finger movement is an important topic with applications in prosthetics, rehabilitation, and ergonomics. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is the gold standard for the analysis of muscle activation. Previous studies investigated the optimal electrode number and positioning on the forearm to obtain information representative of muscle activation and robust to movements. However, the sEMG spatial distribution on the forearm during hand and finger movements and its changes due to different hand positions has never been quantified. The aim of this work is to quantify 1) the spatial localization of surface EMG activity of distinct forearm muscles during dynamic free movements of wrist and single fingers and 2) the effect of hand position on sEMG activity distribution. The subjects performed cyclic dynamic tasks involving the wrist and the fingers. The wrist tasks and the hand opening/closing task were performed with the hand in prone and neutral positions. A sensorized glove was used for kinematics recording. sEMG signals were acquired from the forearm muscles using a grid of 112 electrodes integrated into a stretchable textile sleeve. The areas of sEMG activity have been identified by a segmentation technique after a data dimensionality reduction step based on Non Negative Matrix Factorization applied to the EMG envelopes. The results show that 1) it is possible to identify distinct areas of sEMG activity on the forearm for different fingers; 2) hand position influences sEMG activity level and spatial distribution. This work gives new quantitative information about sEMG activity distribution on the forearm in healthy subjects and provides a basis for future works on the identification of optimal electrode configuration for sEMG based control of prostheses, exoskeletons, or orthoses. An example of use of this information for the optimization of the detection system for the estimation of joint kinematics from sEMG is reported. PMID:25289669

  11. Intertester reliability of the hand-held dynamometer for wrist flexion and extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheault, W; Beal, J L; Kubik, K R; Nowak, T A; Shepley, J A

    1989-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the intertester reliability of a hand-held dynamometer for the wrist flexor and extensor muscles. Using the break test on 20 healthy subjects, three testers obtained two measures of strength for each muscle group. The data were analyzed using the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients, intraclass correlations, and an analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures. Our Pearson product-moment correlations ranged from 0.89 to 0.95 for the intertester reliability of the wrist extensors and 0.90 to 0.93 for the wrist flexors, whereas the intraclass coefficients were 0.91 and 0.85, respectively. Although these correlations were high, ANOVA tests revealed that significant differences existed between testers for both the wrist flexion and extension data (p less than .05). From these results we concluded that although the correlations between testers were good, ANOVA tests suggested that there was limited reliability between testers.

  12. An electromyography study of wrist extension orthoses and upper-extremity function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulthaup, S; Cipriani, D J; Thomas, J J

    1999-01-01

    This study examined the effect of commonly used long and short styles of commercially produced wrist extension orthoses on the activity of the proximal muscles of the shoulder and elbow and on wrist flexor and extensor muscle activity. While 17 women between 22 and 40 years of age (M = 26.6) performed a specified movement wearing each of the two styles of orthosis and without an orthosis, their motor unit recruitment of five proximal joint muscle groups, wrist extensors, and wrist flexors was measured by surface electromyography. Motor unit recruitment was significantly greater in both orthosis conditions for four of five proximal muscles and for wrist flexors. There were no significant differences between the short and long orthosis conditions for proximal muscle groups. Wearing a wrist extension orthosis appears to place additional stress on the proximal joint musculature beyond that found without splint use. The study has implications for the prescription of wrist extension orthoses, especially for patients whose proximal joints are already compromised.

  13. Central and peripheral fatigue in knee and elbow extensor muscles after a long-distance cross-country ski race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, G; Dardanello, D; Zoppirolli, C; Bortolan, L; Cescon, C; Schneebeli, A; Vernillo, G; Schena, F; Rainoldi, A; Pellegrini, B

    2017-09-01

    Although elbow extensors (EE) have a great role in cross-country skiing (XC) propulsion, previous studies on neuromuscular fatigue in long-distance XC have investigated only knee extensor (KE) muscles. In order to investigate the origin and effects of fatigue induced by long-distance XC race, 16 well-trained XC skiers were tested before and after a 56-km classical technique race. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) and rate of force development (RFD) were measured for both KE and EE. Furthermore, electrically evoked double twitch during MVC and at rest were measured. MVC decreased more in KE (-13%) than in EE (-6%, P = 0.016), whereas the peak RFD decreased only in EE (-26%, P = 0.02) but not in KE. The two muscles showed similar decrease in voluntary activation (KE -5.0%, EE -4.8%, P = 0.61) and of double twitch amplitude (KE -5%, EE -6%, P = 0.44). A long-distance XC race differently affected the neuromuscular function of lower and upper limbs muscles. Specifically, although the strength loss was greater for lower limbs, the capacity to produce force in short time was more affected in the upper limbs. Nevertheless, both KE and EE showed central and peripheral fatigue, suggesting that the origins of the strength impairments were multifactorial for the two muscles. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome with Wrist Trigger Caused by Hypertrophied Lumbrical Muscle and Tenosynovitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayuko Shimizu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of carpal tunnel syndrome involving wrist trigger caused by a hypertrophied lumbrical muscle with flexor synovitis. The case was a 40-year-old male heavy manual worker complaining of numbness and pain in the median nerve area. On active flexion of the fingers, snapping was observed at the carpal area, and forceful full grip was impossible. Tinel’s sign was positive and an electromyographic study revealed conduction disturbance of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed edematous lumbrical muscle with synovial proliferation around the flexor tendons. Open carpal tunnel release was performed under local anesthesia. Synovial proliferation of the flexor tendons was found and when flexing the index and middle fingers, the lumbrical muscle was drawn into the carpal tunnel with a triggering phenomenon. After releasing the carpal tunnel, the triggering phenomenon and painful numbness improved.

  15. Sequential advancing flexion retention attachment: a locking device for the wrist-driven flexor hinge splint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, G; Olszewski, E

    1978-10-01

    The Sequential Advancing Flexion Retention Attachment (SAFRA) was developed for cervical spinal cord-injured patients with a muscle grade of poor to fair in the wrist extensors. It is used on a standard wrist-driven flexor hinge hand splint with adjustable tenodesis bar. Through the development of the SAFRA, maintained prehension can be obtained without externally powered devices such as CO2 or electrically powered orthoses. The patient's increased functional abilities are discussed and advantages summarized.

  16. Effects of chronic administration of clenbuterol on contractile properties and calcium homeostasis in rat extensor digitorum longus muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Sirvent

    Full Text Available Clenbuterol, a β2-agonist, induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy and a shift from slow-oxidative to fast-glycolytic muscle fiber type profile. However, the cellular mechanisms of the effects of chronic clenbuterol administration on skeletal muscle are not completely understood. As the intracellular Ca2+ concentration must be finely regulated in many cellular processes, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic clenbuterol treatment on force, fatigue, intracellular calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis and Ca2+-dependent proteolysis in fast-twitch skeletal muscles (the extensor digitorum longus, EDL, muscle, as they are more sensitive to clenbuterol-induced hypertrophy. Male Wistar rats were chronically treated with 4 mg.kg-1 clenbuterol or saline vehicle (controls for 21 days. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ load, Ca2+-transient amplitude and Ca2+ spark properties. EDL muscles from clenbuterol-treated animals displayed hypertrophy, a shift from slow to fast fiber type profile and increased absolute force, while the relative force remained unchanged and resistance to fatigue decreased compared to control muscles from rats treated with saline vehicle. Compared to control animals, clenbuterol treatment decreased Ca2+-transient amplitude, Ca2+ spark amplitude and frequency and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ load was markedly reduced. Conversely, calpain activity was increased by clenbuterol chronic treatment. These results indicate that chronic treatment with clenbuterol impairs Ca2+ homeostasis and this could contribute to the remodeling and functional impairment of fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

  17. Across-muscle coherence is modulated as a function of wrist posture during two-digit grasping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesunathadas, Mark; Laitano, Juan; Hamm, Thomas; Santello, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which correlated neural inputs, quantified as EMG-EMG coherence across intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles, varied as a function of wrist angle during a constant force precision grip task. Eight adults (5 males; mean age 29 years) participated in the experiment. Subjects held an object using a two-digit precision grip at a constant force at a flexed, neutral, and extended wrist posture, while the EMG activity from intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles was recorded through intramuscular fine-wire electrodes. The integral of z-transformed coherence computed across muscles pairs was greatest in the flexed wrist posture and significantly greater than EMG-EMG coherence measured in the neutral and extended wrist posture (P< 0.01 and 0.05, respectively). Furthermore, EMG-EMG coherence did not differ statistically between the extrinsic and intrinsic muscle pairs, even though it tended to be greater for the extrinsic muscle pair (P ≥ 0.063). These findings lend support to the notion of a functional role of correlated neural inputs to hand muscles for the task-dependent coordination of hand muscle activity that is likely mediated by somatosensory feedback. PMID:23958501

  18. The isometric torque at which knee-extensor muscle reoxygenation stops.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C.J.; Goudsmit, J.F.; Tricht, J.A.; de Haan, A.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: We investigated the knee-extensor torque at which reoxygenation (inflow of arterial blood) during an isometric contraction stopped, whether this torque depended on maximal torque capacity (MTC), and whether there were differences among the synergists. METHODS: Isometric knee-extension

  19. The effect of forearm posture on wrist flexion in computer workers with chronic upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson R Terry

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Occupational computer use has been associated with upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSDs, but the etiology and pathophysiology of some of these disorders are poorly understood. Various theories attribute the symptoms to biomechanical and/or psychosocial stressors. The results of several clinical studies suggest that elevated antagonist muscle tension may be a biomechanical stress factor. Affected computer users often exhibit limited wrist range of motion, particularly wrist flexion, which has been attributed to increased extensor muscle tension, rather than to pain symptoms. Recreational or domestic activities requiring extremes of wrist flexion may produce injurious stress on the wrist joint and muscles, the symptoms of which are then exacerbated by computer use. As these activities may involve a variety of forearm postures, we examined whether changes in forearm posture have an effect on pain reports during wrist flexion, or whether pain would have a limiting effect on flexion angle. Methods We measured maximum active wrist flexion using a goniometer with the forearm supported in the prone, neutral, and supine postures. Data was obtained from 5 subjects with UEMSDs attributed to computer use and from 13 control subjects. Results The UEMSD group exhibited significantly restricted wrist flexion compared to the control group in both wrists at all forearm postures with the exception of the non-dominant wrist with the forearm prone. In both groups, maximum active wrist flexion decreased at the supine forearm posture compared to the prone posture. No UEMSD subjects reported an increase in pain symptoms during testing. Conclusion The UEMSD group exhibited reduced wrist flexion compared to controls that did not appear to be pain related. A supine forearm posture reduced wrist flexion in both groups, but the reduction was approximately 100% greater in the UEMSD group. The effect of a supine forearm posture on wrist

  20. Alpha 7 integrin preserves the function of the extensor digitorum longus muscle in dystrophin-null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Chady H; Burkin, Dean J; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-11-01

    The dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC) and the α7β1-integrin complex are two independent protein complexes that link the extracellular matrix with the cytoskeleton in muscle cells. These associations stabilize the sarcolemma during force transmission. Loss of either one of these complexes leads to muscular dystrophy. Dystrophin is a major component of the DGC. Its absence results in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Because α7-integrin overexpression has been shown to ameliorate muscle histopathology in mouse models of DMD, we hypothesize that the α7β1-integrin complex can help preserve muscle function. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated muscle force, elasticity, and the viscous property of the extensor digitorum longus muscle in 19-day-old normal BL6, dystrophin-null mdx4cv, α7-integrin-null, and dystrophin/α7-integrin double knockout mice. While nominal changes were found in single knockout mice, contractility and passive properties were significantly compromised in α7-integrin double knockout mice. Our results suggest that DGC and α7β1-integrin complexes may compensate each other to maintain normal skeletal muscle function. α7β1-Integrin upregulation may hold promise to treat not only histological, but also physiological, defects in DMD.

  1. Knee extensor and flexor muscle power explains stair ascension time in patients with unilateral late-stage knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtonen, Anu M; Pöyhönen, Tapani; Manninen, Mikko; Heinonen, Ari; Sipilä, Sarianna

    2015-02-01

    To determine the extent of asymmetrical deficits in knee extensor and flexor muscles, and to examine whether asymmetrical muscle deficits are associated with mobility limitations in persons with late-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA). Cross-sectional. Research laboratory. A clinical sample (N=56; age range, 50-75y) of eligible persons with late-stage knee OA awaiting knee replacement. Not applicable. Knee extensor and flexor power and torque assessed isokinetically; thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) assessed by computed tomography; mobility limitation assessed by walking speed and stair ascension time; and pain assessed with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index questionnaire. The asymmetrical deficits in knee extensor and flexor power and torque were between 18% and 29% (Pmuscle CSA, the asymmetrical deficit was 4% (Ppower deficits and weaker knee extensor and flexor power on the contralateral side were associated with slower stair ascension times. Moreover, weaker knee extensor and flexor power on the ipsilateral side were associated with slower stair ascension times. Greater knee pain in the OA joint was independently associated with slower stair ascending time in both models. The knee extensor and flexor muscle power of both the ipsilateral and contralateral sides and the pain in the OA knee were independently associated with stair ascension times. These results highlight the importance of assessing muscle power on both sides and knee pain in the prevention of mobility limitations in patients with knee OA. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative proteomic profiling of soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carberry, Steven; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Zhang, Yaxin; Winkler, Claudia K; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is due to genetic abnormalities in the dystrophin gene and represents one of the most frequent genetic childhood diseases. In the X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mouse model of dystrophinopathy, different subtypes of skeletal muscles are affected to a varying degree albeit the same single base substitution within exon 23 of the dystrophin gene. Thus, to determine potential muscle subtype-specific differences in secondary alterations due to a deficiency in dystrophin, in this study, we carried out a comparative histological and proteomic survey of mdx muscles. We intentionally included the skeletal muscles that are often used for studying the pathomechanism of muscular dystrophy. Histological examinations revealed a significantly higher degree of central nucleation in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles compared with the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. Muscular hypertrophy of 20-25% was likewise only observed in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles from mdx mice, but not in the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. For proteomic analysis, muscle protein extracts were separated by fluorescence two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis. Proteins with a significant change in their expression were identified by mass spectrometry. Proteomic profiling established an altered abundance of 24, 17, 19 and 5 protein species in the dystrophin-deficient soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscle, respectively. The key proteomic findings were verified by immunoblot analysis. The identified proteins are involved in the contraction-relaxation cycle, metabolite transport, muscle metabolism and the cellular stress response. Thus, histological and proteomic profiling of muscle subtypes from mdx mice indicated that distinct skeletal muscles are differentially affected by the loss of the membrane cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. Varying degrees of perturbed protein

  3. EFFECT OF RESISTANCE TRAINING OF THE WRIST JOINT MUSCLES ON MULTI-DIGIT COORDINATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaebum; Han, Dong-Wook; Shim, Jae Kun

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of a specific regimen of resistance training on coordinated actions of human hand digits during grasping. Participants were instructed to hold a rectangular object with all five digits and to maintain the orientation of the object against transient perturbation. Indices of co-varied actions (i.e., synergies) among multi-digit grasping and rotational actions were quantified. The index of anticipatory changes of co-varied actions among digit forces (i.e., anticipatory synergy adjustment) was also quantified, which represents the controller's ability to predict an upcoming perturbation. The synergies of both grasping force and moment stabilization increased with the training. No change in the index of anticipatory synergy adjustment with training was observed. The current results suggest that the resistance training on the wrist could be an effective way to enhance both voluntary muscle force/torque production capability and ability to stabilize task performances during multi-digit prehensile tasks.

  4. Acute effects of whole-body vibration on peak isometric torque, muscle twitch torque and voluntary muscle activation of the knee extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, M; Norris, S; Smith, D; Herzog, W

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the acute effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) with a static squat on resting muscle twitch torque, peak isometric torque and voluntary muscle activation of the knee extensors during an isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Twenty-four healthy, strength-trained males were recruited for this randomized, cross-over design investigation. The WBV treatment consisted of three sets of 60 s of vibration (30 Hz, +/-4 mm) while standing in a semi-squat position. Voluntary muscle activation, peak isometric torque during MVC and resting muscle twitch torque (RTT) through percutaneous femoral nerve stimulation were obtained before and following the treatment. Change in peak isometric torque, voluntary muscle activation and the RTT were calculated as the difference between pre- and post-treatment values. There was no observable post-activation potentiation of muscle twitch torque or enhancement in voluntary muscle activation or peak isometric torque. However, decreases in the peak isometric torque (P=0.0094) and voluntary muscle activation (P=0.0252) were significantly smaller post WBV interventions compared with the control treatment. Based on the current data, it is unclear whether or not this was attributable to the effects of WBV but further research into this possibility is warranted.

  5. Coactivation of the flexor muscles as a synergist with the extensors during ballistic finger extension movement in trained kendo and karate athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J B; Matsumoto, T; Othman, T; Yamauchi, M; Taimura, A; Kaneda, E; Ohwatari, N; Kosaka, M

    1999-01-01

    To analyse the effects of ballistic property training on ballistic finger extension movement, surface electromyographic pattern (EMGs) of the finger extensor and flexor muscles and the acceleration signal of the middle finger were recorded in trained kendo and karate athletes, and sedentary non-athletic men. Ballistic finger extension did not show the characteristic triphasic EMG pattern reported in single joint, but a coactivation of flexor and extensor muscles. Reaction time (RT) in kendo (143 +/- 12 msec) and karate (146 +/- 11 msec) athletes were significantly shorter than that in the control (176 +/- 12 msec). The shortenings of the RT were attributed to both the shortenings of premotor time and motor time. The delay of the flexor muscles discharge after those of the extensors in kendo (0.8 +/- 7.0 msec) and karate (-0.2 +/- 5.0 msec) athletes was significantly shorter than in control (12.7 +/-5.6 msec). These results suggest that the RT is shortened through motor learning in the kendo and karate athletes who trained for momentary movements; and that the flexor muscles may play an important role as a synergist in heightening the efficiency of ballistic finger extension in coordination with the extensor muscles.

  6. Anatomía arterial de los colgajos musculares de extensor carpi radialis longus y extensor carpi radialis brevis para su uso en transferencia muscular funcional libre Arterial anatomy of the extensor carpi radialis longus and extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle flaps related to its use in free functioning muscle transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rodríguez Lorenzo

    2008-09-01

    ón anatómica del nervio radial con el pedículo del ECRL hace que no sea posible su transferencia como colgajo libre sin sacrificar la rama motora del nervio radial en la mayor parte de los casos.The arterial anatomy of the Extensor Carpi Radialis Longus and Brevis (ECRL, ECRB flaps is herein described in order to provide the vascular basis to be used as free muscle transfer for facial reanimation. We used 29 fresh above-elbow human arms injected by means of two diferent techniques.Latex-injection was performed in 18 arms and the modified lead oxide-gelatine injection technique was performed in 11 arms. The ECRL and ECRB with their pedicles were dissected, photodocumented and radiographied.The number, length and calibers of the muscle pedicles were recorded. The intramuscular vascular pattern and the relations of the main pedicles of the muscles with the radial nerve were also noted. Two vascular patterns were found following the Mathes and Nahai Classification of the Vascular Anatomy of the Muscles (number of pedicles and its dominance: Type I (37,9% of ECRL and 20,7% of ECRB dissections and Type II (62,1% of ECRL and 79,3% of ECRB dissections. The dominant pedicle for the ECRL (with an average caliber of 1,73 mm and an average length of pedicle of 32,32 mm is a branch of the radial recurrent artery in 100% of the dissections and the dominant pedicle for the ECRB (with an average caliber of 1,11 mm and an average length of pedicle of 27,77 mm a branch of the radial artery in 68,9% of the dissections and a branch of radial recurrent artery in 31,1% of the cases. As a conclusion, ECRL and ECRB muscle flaps present two types of vascular patterns: type I and type II.Type II pattern is the most common in our study. The anatomical features of both muscles (vascular basis,presence of an important fascial layer, contour and length of the muscle, make them reliable as free muscles flaps for facial reanimation, however, the relation between the dominant pedicle for the ECRL

  7. Trajectory of self-reported pain and function and knee extensor muscle strength in young patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Østengaard, Lasse; Cardy, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the trajectory of patient reported pain and function and knee extensor muscle strength over time in young individuals undergoing arthroscopic meniscal surgery. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis METHODS: Six databases were searched up to October 13th, 2016...... extensor muscle strength was impaired in the injured leg prior to surgery and was still reduced compared with control data up to 12 months after surgery (SMD: -1.16) (95% CI: -1.83; -0.49). All included studies were assessed to have a high risk of bias. CONCLUSIONS: No studies were found comparing....... PATIENTS AND INTERVENTION: People aged 30 years or younger undergoing surgery for a meniscal tear. OUTCOMES: and comparator: (1) Self-reported pain and function in patients undergoing meniscal surgery compared to a non-operative control group (2). Knee extensor strength in the leg undergoing surgery...

  8. Can a fatigue test of the isolated lumbar extensor muscles of untrained young men predict strength progression in a resistance exercise program?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmhout, P.; Staal, B.; Dijk, J. van; Harts, C.; Bertina, F.; Bie, R. de

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the predictive value of a fatigue test of the lumbar extensor muscles for training progression in a group of 28 healthy but predominantly sedentary male students, in an 8-week resistance exercise program. METHODS: A three-phased fatigue test

  9. Reduced rate of knee extensor torque development in older adults with knee osteoarthritis is associated with intrinsic muscle contractile deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Damien M; Tourville, Timothy W; Slauterbeck, James R; Ades, Philip A; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer; Beynnon, Bruce D; Toth, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    We examined the effect of knee osteoarthritis on the rate of torque development (RTD) of the knee extensors in older adults with advanced-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA; n=15) and recreationally-active controls (n=15) of similar age, sex and health status, as well as the relationship between RTD and the size and contractility of single muscle fibers. OA participants had lower RTD when expressed in absolute terms (Nm/ms). There were sex differences in peak RTD (Pmuscle, and was mitigated when RTD was normalized to peak torque (PT). In knee OA volunteers, we found strong correlations between the RTD expressed relative to PT and the velocity of contraction of single myosin heavy chain (MHC) I and IIA/X muscle fibers (r=0.652 and 0.862; both Pmuscle contractile kinetics in patients with advanced-stage knee osteoarthritis and healthy older adults is related, in part, to the size and function of single muscle fibers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A COMPARITIVE STUDY TO KNOW THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PRONE BACK EXTENSION EXRECISES AND SWISS BALL EXERCISES ON BACK EXTENSOR MUSCLES PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Subhanjan Das; C. K. Senthil Kumar; Abhijit Dutta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endurance of the back muscles is important for stability of the trunk and therefore essential for normal functioning of an individual. Prone back extension exercises are traditional measures to improve back endurance. More recently Swiss ball exercises have become popular as a means to improve back endurance. Purpose of this study is to compare Prone back extension exercises with back extension exercise on Swiss ball on the improvement of the back extensor muscles performance, and...

  11. Transseptal dorsal approaches to the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemirline, Ahmed; Hoël, Gérard; Naïto, Kiyohito; Uguen, Arnaud; Liverneaux, Philippe; Le Nen, Dominique

    2013-04-01

    The dorsal approach to the wrist is the exposure of choice for most of the surgical procedures on the radiocarpal and intercarpal joints. Contrary to the volar approach, it encounters neither the main arteries nor the motor nerve branch. However, the dorsal approach goes necessarily through the extensor retinaculum. We describe two transseptal dorsal approaches that pass through the extensor retinaculum in the thickness of a septum between two compartments. A virtual space was developed beneath the infratendinous retinaculum (which is a deep layer covering the floor of the extensor compartments) to expose the periosteum, the ligaments and the joint capsule without opening the extensor compartments. Twenty cadaveric wrists have been dissected to study the feasibility of the two transseptal approaches. Ten wrists were exposed through a 3-4 transseptal approach, passing through the extensor retinaculum in the thickness of the septum between the third and fourth compartments. Ten wrists were exposed through a 4-5 transseptal approach, passing through the extensor retinaculum in the thickness of the septum between the fourth and fifth compartments. The extent of violations of extensor compartments and joint capsule, and the exposed anatomical structures were noted. At the end of each dissection, the whole extensor system was outrightly removed for histological study. The feasibility of the transseptal approaches was demonstrated for all the dissected wrists. The dissection plane beneath the infratendinous retinaculum was macroscopically and microscopically highlighted. The transseptal approaches provide a good exposure to the dorsal side of the wrist joint, without opening the extensor tendon compartments.

  12. Efeitos do Tai Chi Chuan na força dos músculos extensores dos joelhos e no equilíbrio em idosas Effects of Tai Chi Chuan on knee extensor muscle strength and balance in elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Pereira

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: Alguns estudos têm indicado que o Tai Chi Chuan (TCC é capaz de melhorar o condicionamento físico, a força muscular e o equilíbrio entre os praticantes idosos, prevenindo quedas, fraturas e dependência física. OBJETIVO: Verificar os efeitos do TCC no equilíbrio (EQ e na força dos músculos extensores dos joelhos (F em mulheres idosas. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Participaram do estudo 77 mulheres saudáveis, não praticantes de atividade física orientada. No Grupo Experimental (G1 foram incluídas 38 voluntárias (68 ± 5 anos e no Grupo Controle (G2, 39 voluntárias (69 ± 7 anos. O G1 praticou o TCC estilo Yang de 24 movimentos durante 12 semanas, três vezes por semana, com duração de 50 minutos. O G2 não realizou atividades físicas orientadas. A força foi mensurada pelo teste de 1-RM na cadeira extensora e o equilíbrio foi avaliado utilizando o teste de apoio unipodal com os olhos fechados. Na análise estatística, utilizou-se teste de normalidade, split-plot análise de variância (ANOVA e correlação de Pearson. RESULTADOS: O Grupo Experimental apresentou incrementos de 17,83% na F e 26,10% no EQ. O Grupo Controle não apresentou alteração significativa em nenhuma variável. Não foi observada correlação significativa entre estas duas variáveis no G1 (r= 0,09; p= 0,554 e no G2 (r= 0,07; p= 0,660. CONCLUSÕES: Estes resultados sugerem que o TCC melhora F e EQ em mulheres idosas. Entretanto, a força dos músculos extensores dos joelhos não está necessariamente ligada ao equilíbrio nesta modalidade.BACKGROUND: Some studies have indicated that Tai Chi Chuan (TCC is capable of improving physical fitness, muscle strength and balance in elderly people. This improvement could prevent falls, fractures and physical dependence. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of TCC on balance and knee extensor muscle strength among elderly women. METHODS: Seventy-seven healthy women who were not engaged in any guided

  13. Influence of knee joint angle on muscle properties of paralyzed and nonparalyzed human knee extensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, K.H.L.; Maganaris, C.N.; Reeves, N.D.; Sargeant, A.J.; Jones, D.A.; de Haan, A.

    2005-01-01

    Muscles of individuals with a spinal cord injury (SCI) exhibit an unexpected leftward shift in the force (torque)-frequency relationship. We investigated whether differences in torque-angle relationships between SCI and able-bodied control muscles could explain this shift. Electrically stimulated

  14. Muscle protein degradation and amino acid metabolism during prolonged knee-extensor exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; Saltin, B; Wagenmakers, A J

    1999-01-01

    to a substantial increase in net muscle protein degradation, and that a lowering of the starting muscle glycogen content leads to a further increase. The carbon atoms of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), glutamate, aspartate and asparagine, liberated by protein degradation, and the BCAA and glutamate...

  15. Wrist arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrist surgery; Arthroscopy - wrist; Surgery - wrist - arthroscopy; Surgery - wrist - arthroscopic; Carpal tunnel release ... you will have regional anesthesia. Your arm and wrist area will be numbed so that you do ...

  16. Spinal reflexes in ankle flexor and extensor muscles after chronic central nervous system lesions and functional electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Aiko K; Estabrooks, Kristen L; Chong, Suling; Stein, Richard B

    2009-02-01

    Spinal reciprocal inhibitory and excitatory reflexes of ankle extensor and flexor muscles were investigated in ambulatory participants with chronic central nervous system (CNS) lesions causing foot drop as a function of time after lesion and stimulator use. Thirty-nine participants with progressive (eg, secondary progressive MS) and 36 with generally nonprogressive (eg, stroke) conditions were studied. The tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus maximum H-reflex/M-wave (Hmax/Mmax) ratios and maximum voluntary contractions (MVC) were measured and compared with those in age-matched control participants. Reciprocal inhibition was measured as a depression of the ongoing electromyographic (EMG) activity produced by antagonist muscle-nerve stimulation. Participants with CNS lesions had significantly higher soleus Hmax/Mmax ratios than control participants, and reduced voluntary modulation of the reflexes occurred in both muscles. Reciprocal inhibition of soleus from common peroneal (CP) nerve stimulation was not significantly different from controls in either group. Inhibition of the TA by tibial nerve stimulation decreased and was eventually replaced by excitation in participants with nonprogressive disorders. No significant change occurred in progressive disorders. Use of a foot drop stimulator increased the TA, but not the soleus MVC overall. H-reflexes only showed small changes. Reciprocal inhibition of the TA increased considerably, while that of the soleus muscle decreased toward control values. Disorders that produce foot drop also produce reflex changes, some of which only develop over a period of years or even decades. Regular use of a foot drop stimulator strengthens voluntary pathways and changes some reflexes toward control values. Thus, stimulators may provide multiple benefits to people with foot drop.

  17. Probabilistic multi-shape segmentation of knee extensor and flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Shawn; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Yazdanpanah, Azadeh; HajGhanbari, Bahareh; Reid, W Darlene

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often exhibit skeletal muscle weakness in lower limbs. Analysis of the shapes and sizes of these muscles can lead to more effective therapy. Unfortunately, segmenting these muscles from one another is a challenging task due to a lack of image information in many areas. We present a fully automatic segmentation method that overcomes the inherent difficulties of this problem to accurately segment the different muscles. Our method enforces a multi-region shape prior on the segmentation to ensure feasibility and provides an energy minimizing probabilistic segmentation that indicates areas of uncertainty. Our experiments on 3D MRI datasets yield an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.92 +/- 0.03 with the ground truth.

  18. ALTERATION OF MUSCLE FUNCTION AFTER ELECTRICAL STIMULATION BOUT OF KNEE EXTENSORS AND FLEXORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Vanderthommen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to study the effects on muscle function of an electrical stimulation bout applied unilaterally on thigh muscles in healthy male volunteers. One group (ES group, n = 10 received consecutively 100 isometric contractions of quadriceps and 100 isometric contractions of hamstrings (on-off ratio 6-6 s induced by neuromuscular electrical stimulations (NMES. Changes in muscle torque, muscle soreness (0-10 VAS, muscle stiffness and serum creatine kinase (CK activity were assessed before the NMES exercise (pre-ex as well as 24h (d+1, 48h (d+2 and 120h (d+5 after the bout. A second group (control group, n = 10 were submitted to the same test battery than the ES group and with the same time-frame. The between-group comparison indicated a significant increase in VAS scores and in serum levels of CK only in the ES group. In the ES group, changes were more pronounced in hamstrings than in quadriceps and peaked at d+2 (quadriceps VAS scores = 2.20 ± 1.55 a.u. (0 at pre-ex; hamstrings VAS scores = 3.15 ± 2.14 a.u. (0 at pre-ex; hip flexion angle = 62 ± 5° (75 ± 6° at pre-ex; CK activity = 3021 ± 2693 IU·l-1 (136 ± 50 IU·l-1 at pre-ex. The results of the present study suggested the occurrence of muscle damage that could have been induced by the peculiar muscle recruitment in NMES and the resulting overrated mechanical stress. The sensitivity to the damaging effects of NMES appeared higher in the hamstrings than in quadriceps muscles

  19. Back extensor muscle endurance test scores in coal miners in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, M.; Latimer, J.; Jamieson, M. [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Faculty of Health and Science, School of Physiotherapy

    2003-06-01

    Low back pain is a common complaint among those working in the Australian coal mining industry. One test that may be predictive of first-time episodes of low back pain is the Biering-Sorensen test of back extensor endurance strength. While this test has been evaluated in overseas sedentary populations, normative data and the discriminative ability of the test have not been evaluated with coal miners. Eighty-eight coal miners completed a questionnaire for known risk factors for low back pain, performed the Biering-Sorensen test, and undertook a test of aerobic fitness. Data analysis was performed to describe the groups and to determine whether any significant difference existed between those with a past history of low back pain and those without. Significantly lower than expected holding times were found in this group of coal miners (mean 113 s). This result was significantly lower than demonstrated in previous studies. When holding times for those with a past history of low back pain were compared with times for those with no history of low back pain, the difference was not statistically significant, nor was there a significant difference in fitness between those with a past history of low back pain and those without. It is concluded that coal miners in Australia have lower than normal Biering-Sorensen holding times. This lower back holding time does not differ between coal miners with a past history of low back pain and those without.

  20. The effects of Kinesio Taping on the trajectory of the forelimb and the muscle activity of the Musculus brachiocephalicus and the Musculus extensor carpi radialis in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner, Antonia; Bockstahler, Barbara; Peham, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of Kinesio Taping on the trajectory of the forelimb and the muscle activity of the M. brachiocephalicus and the M. extensor carpi radialis in horses. 19 horses and ponies of different breeds (body weight: 496±117 kg), gender (8 mares, 10 geldings and 3 stallions) and ages (14.9±6.9 years old) were analysed without Kinesio Tape ("no tape"), with Kinesio Tape (muscle facilitation application on both muscles of both sides, "with tape") and immediately after Kinesio Taping ("post tape") through kinematic motion analysis and surface electromyography on a treadmill at the walk (speed: 1.5±0.1 m/s) and trot (speed: 3.1±0.3 m/s). The results of the surface electromyography (maximum muscle activity at the walk and trot) and the kinematic motion analysis (maximum stride length and maximum height of the forelimbs flight arc at the walk and trot) showed that there were no significant differences between "no tape", "with tape" and "post tape". To sum up, Kinesio Taping on the M. brachiocephalicus and the M. extensor carpi radialis does not affect (in a positive or negative manner) the trajectory of the forelimb or the muscle activity of the M. brachiocephalicus and the M. extensor carpi radialis in horses.

  1. The effects of Kinesio Taping on the trajectory of the forelimb and the muscle activity of the Musculus brachiocephalicus and the Musculus extensor carpi radialis in horses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Zellner

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the effects of Kinesio Taping on the trajectory of the forelimb and the muscle activity of the M. brachiocephalicus and the M. extensor carpi radialis in horses. 19 horses and ponies of different breeds (body weight: 496±117 kg, gender (8 mares, 10 geldings and 3 stallions and ages (14.9±6.9 years old were analysed without Kinesio Tape ("no tape", with Kinesio Tape (muscle facilitation application on both muscles of both sides, "with tape" and immediately after Kinesio Taping ("post tape" through kinematic motion analysis and surface electromyography on a treadmill at the walk (speed: 1.5±0.1 m/s and trot (speed: 3.1±0.3 m/s.The results of the surface electromyography (maximum muscle activity at the walk and trot and the kinematic motion analysis (maximum stride length and maximum height of the forelimbs flight arc at the walk and trot showed that there were no significant differences between "no tape", "with tape" and "post tape".To sum up, Kinesio Taping on the M. brachiocephalicus and the M. extensor carpi radialis does not affect (in a positive or negative manner the trajectory of the forelimb or the muscle activity of the M. brachiocephalicus and the M. extensor carpi radialis in horses.

  2. The effects of Kinesio Taping on the trajectory of the forelimb and the muscle activity of the Musculus brachiocephalicus and the Musculus extensor carpi radialis in horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner, Antonia; Bockstahler, Barbara; Peham, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Background information The present study aimed to investigate the effects of Kinesio Taping on the trajectory of the forelimb and the muscle activity of the M. brachiocephalicus and the M. extensor carpi radialis in horses. 19 horses and ponies of different breeds (body weight: 496±117 kg), gender (8 mares, 10 geldings and 3 stallions) and ages (14.9±6.9 years old) were analysed without Kinesio Tape (“no tape”), with Kinesio Tape (muscle facilitation application on both muscles of both sides, “with tape”) and immediately after Kinesio Taping (“post tape”) through kinematic motion analysis and surface electromyography on a treadmill at the walk (speed: 1.5±0.1 m/s) and trot (speed: 3.1±0.3 m/s). Results The results of the surface electromyography (maximum muscle activity at the walk and trot) and the kinematic motion analysis (maximum stride length and maximum height of the forelimbs flight arc at the walk and trot) showed that there were no significant differences between "no tape", "with tape" and "post tape". Conclusion To sum up, Kinesio Taping on the M. brachiocephalicus and the M. extensor carpi radialis does not affect (in a positive or negative manner) the trajectory of the forelimb or the muscle activity of the M. brachiocephalicus and the M. extensor carpi radialis in horses. PMID:29166657

  3. Botulinum toxin injection into the forearm muscles for wrist and fingers spastic overactivity in adults with chronic stroke: a randomized controlled trial comparing three injection techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picelli, Alessandro; Lobba, Davide; Midiri, Alessandro; Prandi, Paolo; Melotti, Camilla; Baldessarelli, Silvia; Smania, Nicola

    2014-03-01

    To compare the outcome of manual needle placement, electrical stimulation and ultrasonography-guided techniques for botulinum toxin injection into the forearm muscles of adults with arm spasticity. Randomized controlled trial. University hospital. Sixty chronic stroke patients with wrist and fingers spasticity. After randomization into three groups, each patient received botulinum toxin type A in at least two of these muscles: flexor carpi radialis and ulnaris, flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus (no fascicles selection). The manual needle placement group underwent injections using palpation; the electrical stimulation group received injections with electrical stimulation guidance; the ultrasonography group was injected under sonographic guidance. A sole injector was used. All patients were evaluated at baseline and four weeks after injection. Modified Ashworth Scale; Tardieu Scale; wrist and fingers passive range of motion. One month after injection, Modified Ashworth Scale scores improved more in the electrical stimulation group than the manual needle placement group (wrist: P = 0.014; fingers: P = 0.011), as well as the Tardieu angle (wrist: P = 0.008; fingers: P = 0.015) and passive range of motion (wrist: P = 0.004). Furthermore, Modified Ashworth Scale scores improved more in the ultrasonography group than in the manual needle placement group (wrist: P = 0.001; fingers: P = 0.003), as well as the Tardieu angle (wrist: P = 0.010; fingers: P = 0.001) and passive range of motion (wrist: P muscles of stroke patients.

  4. Knee extensors neuromuscular fatigue changes the corticospinal pathway excitability in biceps brachii muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboodarda, Saied Jalal; Šambaher, Nemanja; Millet, Guillaume Y; Behm, David G

    2017-01-06

    Equivocal evidence indicates that high-intensity muscle contractions can affect the corticospinal responses in muscles not directly involved in the task. In the present study, the responsiveness of corticomotor pathway innervating non-dominant biceps brachii was measured in eleven healthy participants before and after: (i) two 100-s isometric unilateral knee extension maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) on dominant leg (FATIGUE) and (ii) rest (CONTROL). Transcranial magnetic stimulation, transmastoid electrical and brachial plexus electrical stimulation were used to evoke motor evoked potential (MEP), cervicomedullary motor evoked potential (CMEP) and compound muscle action potential (Mmax) in biceps brachii muscle. The three stimuli were elicited at 2, 3.5 and 5s while participants were performing 6-s elbow flexion contractions at 100, 50, and 5% of MVC interspersed with 10-s rest. The results demonstrated opposing behaviors of MEP responses at 100% (23% higher, p=0.08) and 5% MVC (34% lower, p=0.019) following FATIGUE compared to CONTROL. Similarly, MEP·CMEP -1 ratio changes indicated that the supraspinal motor response was significantly higher during 100% (42%, p=0.027) but lower during 5% MVC (28%, p=0.009) following FATIGUE. Yet, the elbow flexor MVC force did not exhibit any difference between FATIGUE and CONTROL conditions. These results suggest that the upper limb muscles' corticomotor pathway responsiveness recorded during voluntary contractions were modulated by lower limbs fatiguing contractions and this modulation depends on the force produced during testing, i.e. level of central motor drive. However, these changes have little effect on upper limb muscle maximal performance. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. All rights reserved.

  5. Electromyographic activity patterns of ankle flexor and extensor muscles during spontaneous and L-DOPA-induced locomotion in freely moving neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Roberto; Slawińska, Urszula; Vrbová, Gerta

    2002-02-01

    In rats, hindlimb postural and locomotor functions mature during the first 3 postnatal weeks. Previous evidence indicates that maturation of descending monoaminergic pathways is important for the postnatal emergence of locomotion with adequate antigravity postural support. Here we have studied the effect of the monoamine precursor L-DOPA on locomotor activity in freely moving postnatal rats (7-9 days old) using electromyographic recordings from ankle extensor (soleus) and flexor (tibialis anterior or extensor digitorum longus) muscles. Before pharmacological treatment, both muscles were usually silent at rest, and during spontaneous movements there was a high degree of coactivation between the two antagonists. This was due to a longer electromyographic (EMG) burst duration in flexors, which partly overlapped with the extensor burst. L-DOPA administration (150 mg/kg) resulted in a marked increase in postural tonic EMG activity in extensors which appeared gradually within 10 min after injection and was sufficient for the pups to maintain a standing posture with the pelvis raised above ground. Thereafter, episodes of locomotion characterized by rhythmic reciprocal bursts of EMG activity in flexor and extensor muscles were seen. The L-DOPA-induced rhythmic EMG pattern was also seen in postnatal rats subjected to a midthoracic spinal cord transection, indicating that the effect of L-DOPA on motor coordination is exerted primarily at the level of the spinal pattern generator. Analysis of EMG burst characteristics showed that the pattern of L-DOPA-induced locomotion in both intact and spinalized postnatal rats resembled in some respects that observed in adults during spontaneous locomotion. The appearance of reciprocal activation during L-DOPA-induced locomotion in neonates was primarily due to a shortening of the EMG burst duration in flexors, which reduced the degree of antagonist coactivation. These results show that the spinal cord has the potential to produce

  6. Efeito do uso de órtese de punho na ativação da musculatura flexora e extensora do punho Effect of the use of wrist orthosis on forearm muscle activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Maria Valladão Novais Van Petten

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar o efeito do uso de órtese de imobilização do punho, confeccionada com diferentes materiais, na ativação da musculatura flexora e extensora do antebraço durante a realização de tarefas específicas. MÉTODOS: Vinte e seis adultos, com média de idade de 26,2 anos, foram submetidos aos Testes Funcional da Mão de Jebsen-Taylor e de Força de Preensão (dinamômetro Jamar® em três condições: com a mão livre, com o uso de órtese de compósito e com a órtese de termomoldável. Os testes foram realizados apenas com a mão dominante. Durante a realização dos testes, eletrodos de superfície foram afixados nos grupos musculares flexores e extensores do antebraço para registro da atividade elétrica muscular. Os resultados obtidos nas três condições foram comparados e analisados utilizando o teste estatístico de Wilcoxon. RESULTADOS: Foram encontradas diferenças significativas quando comparadas a ativação muscular na condição livre e com o uso de qualquer das órteses. Não foram encontradas diferenças significativas quando comparada a ativação muscular com o uso dos dois tipos de órtese. Observou-se redução da ativação dos músculos extensores do antebraço durante a realização de todas as tarefas e aumento da ativação dos músculos flexores com o uso das órteses. CONCLUSÃO: Esse é um resultado importante para a definição da indicação, ou não, do uso de órteses no processo de reabilitação de várias desordens - entre outras, a tendinite de flexores e extensores do punho e dos dedos -, bem como para a previsão do tempo de uso desses dispositivos.OBJECTIVE: to investigate the effect of wrist immobilization orthoses, made from different materials, on activation of the flexor and extensor musculature of the forearm while performing specific tasks. METHODS: Twenty-six adults, with an average age of 26.2 years, performed the Jebsen-Taylor functional hand test and the Grip Strength test

  7. Features interference EMG leg extensor muscles of skilled players in the context of the special exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirenko P.A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the problems of improvement of physical training of skilled players. The main instrumental method of the research is electromyography. The aim of the research is determination of the optimal angle of the provisions of legs on her hips for the appearance of a maximum of bioelectric activity of the muscles of the front panel hips in exercise unbending legs sitting on the mechanical simulator. In the course of research we have worked for electromyography 10 players of FC Metalist at the age of 19 – 30 years during the five-second of the submaximum contraction of these muscles as: musculus rectus femoris, musculus vastus medialis, musculus vastus lateralis. The results of the analysis of segments of electromyography allowed to make a conclusion, that we investigated the provisions of the angle of 140 degrees has the lowest preconditions for the appearance of muscle strength. We have obtained data testify to the fact that the angle of 90 degrees is the position of the greatest preconditions for the appearance of muscle strength.

  8. Stretch reflex excitability of the anti-gravity ankle extensor muscle in elderly humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, N; Nakazawa, K; Yamamoto, S-I; Nozaki, D; Akai, M; Yano, H

    2004-01-01

    To examine whether the stretch reflex excitability of the soleus muscle changes with age, stretch reflexes at rest (REST) and during weak voluntary contractions (ACT) were elicited in 18 older and 14 younger subjects. The amplitude of the stretch reflex responses and gain, defined as the gradient of the regression line for the relation between stretch reflex responses against the angular velocity of the applied perturbation, were evaluated in each short-latency (M1) and two long-latency components (M2 and M3). It was found that in the older group, both the amplitude and gain of the M1 component did not change from the REST to the ACT conditions, whereas in the younger group both variables significantly increased from the REST to ACT conditions. The latency of the M1 component was significantly shorter under the REST condition (older vs. younger: 51.8 +/- 7.37 vs. 55.1 +/- 8.69 ms), while no group differences were found in those variables under the ACT condition, suggesting that the muscle-tendon complexes of SOL muscles of the older subjects were less elastic and had less slack, probably due to age-related histochemical alterations. Further, the Hoffman reflex (H-reflex), elicited during the REST condition in 10 older and 11 younger subjects showed no significant differences, suggesting that the soleus motoneuron response to the Ia input was comparable between the two subject groups. The histochemical alterations occurring with the ageing process might augment the short-latency stretch reflex in the SOL muscle without enhancement of motoneuronal excitability, and this effect might be masked when the muscle is voluntarily activated.

  9. Corticospinal excitability of the ankle extensor muscles is enhanced in ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Sakiko; Obata, Hiroki; Endoh, Takashi; Kuno-Mizumura, Mayumi; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2014-09-01

    We tested the corticospinal excitability of the soleus muscle in ballet dancers to clarify whether the presumed long-term repetition of the specific plantarflexion results in changes of excitability in this neural pathway. We compared motor evoked potentials of the soleus muscle at rest and during isometric contraction of the plantar flexors in dancers and non-dancers. The amplitudes of motor evoked potentials elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation during contraction were examined against the background electromyographic activity. A regression line was calculated for each subject. Results showed that the slope of the regression line is significantly greater in the dancer group than in the control group, suggesting that the corticospinal tract of ballet dancers has adapted to long-term repetition of plantarflexion in daily ballet training.

  10. Task-dependent activity of motor unit populations in feline ankle extensor muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Hodson-Tole, E.F.; Pantall, A.; Maas, H; Farrell, B.J.; Gregor, R.J.; Prilutsky, B.I.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the functional significance of the morphological diversity of mammalian skeletal muscles is limited by technical difficulties of estimating the contribution of motor units with different properties to unconstrained motor behaviours. Recently developed wavelet and principal components analysis of intramuscular myoelectric signals has linked signals with lower and higher frequency contents to the use of slower and faster motor unit populations. In this study we estimated the relat...

  11. The relationship between knee joint angle and knee flexor and extensor muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Misook; Han, Dongwook

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine a relationship between joint angle and muscular strength. In particular, this research investigated the differences in maximum muscular strength and average muscular strength at the knee-joint posture. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects comprised eight female students in their 20s attending S University in Busan. None of the subjects had functional disabilities or had experienced damage to the lower extremities in terms of measurement of muscular strength. A BIODEX system III model (Biodex medical system, USA) was used to measure joint angles and muscular strength. The axis of the dynamometer was consistent with the axis of motion, and measurements were made at 25° and 67° to examine differences in maximum muscular strength according to joint angle. [Results] The maximum muscular strength both knee-joint extension value, at 67° and flexion value, at 25° the value was larger. The average muscular strength both knee-joint extension value, at 67° and flexion value, at 25° the value was larger. [Conclusion] The results of this study reveal that muscular strength does not reach maximum at particular range angles, such as the knee-joint resting posture angle or the knee-joint middle range angle. Rather, a stretched muscle is stronger than a contracted muscle. Therefore, it is considered that it will be necessary to study the effects of the joint change ratio on muscular strength on the basis of the maximum stretched muscle.

  12. Treatment with Riluzole Restores Normal Control of Soleus and Extensor Digitorum Longus Muscles during Locomotion in Adult Rats after Sciatic Nerve Crush at Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaj, Anna M.; Sławińska, Urszula

    2017-01-01

    The effects of sciatic nerve crush (SNC) and treatment with Riluzole on muscle activity during unrestrained locomotion were identified in an animal model by analysis of the EMG activity recorded from soleus (Sol) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of both hindlimbs; in intact rats (IN) and in groups of rats treated for 14 days with saline (S) or Riluzole (R) after right limb nerve crush at the 1st (1S and 1R) or 2nd (2S and 2R) day after birth. Changes in the locomotor pattern of EMG activity were correlated with the numbers of survived motor units (MUs) identified in investigated muscles. S rats with 2–8 and 10–28 MUs that survived in Sol and EDL muscles respectively showed increases in the duration and duty factor of muscle EMG activity and a loss of correlation between the duty factors of muscle activity, and abnormal flexor-extensor co-activation 3 months after SNC. R rats with 5, 6 (Sol) and 15–29 MUs (EDL) developed almost normal EMG activity of both Sol and control EDL muscles, whereas EDL muscles with SNC showed a lack of recovery. R rats with 8 (Sol) and 23–33 (EDL) MUs developed almost normal EMG activities of all four muscles. A subgroup of S rats with a lack of recovery and R rats with almost complete recovery that had similar number of MUs (8 and 24–28 vs 8 and 23–26), showed that the number of MUs was not the only determinant of treatment effectiveness. The results demonstrated that rats with SNC failed to develop normal muscle activity due to malfunction of neuronal circuits attenuating EDL muscle activity during the stance phase, whereas treatment with Riluzole enabled almost normal EMG activity of Sol and EDL muscles during locomotor movement. PMID:28095499

  13. Effect of wrist hand splints on grip, pinch, manual dexterity, and muscle activation in children with spastic hemiplegia: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtner, Patricia A; Poole, Janet L; Torres, Theresa; Medora, Amanda Manhke; Abeyta, Rose; Keene, Joanne; Qualls, Clifford

    2008-01-01

    The effect of wrist/hand orthoses on force production, dexterity, and upper extremity muscle recruitment was investigated in children with and without cerebral palsy (CP) to determine if splint design affects 1) hand function and 2) muscle activation. Ten children with hemiplegic CP used hands with spasticity (n=10) and five age-matched control children used dominant and nondominant hands (n=10) in three splint conditions (no, dynamic, static) during grip, pinch, and peg-board tests while electromyography (EMG) recorded muscle activation. Children with spasticity increased their grip (p=0.008) and dexterity (p=0.02) when wearing dynamic splints and pinch (p=0.04) with no splints. All children had significantly less wrist EMG activity during grip with static splints; only children with CP had greater compensatory shoulder activation. Preliminary findings suggest that dynamic splints increased function of children with CP while static splints decreased muscle activation at wrist and increased compensatory shoulder muscle recruitment.

  14. Nonlinear coupling between cortical oscillations and muscle activity during isotonic wrist flexion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Coupling between cortical oscillations and muscle activity facilitates neuronal communication during motor control. The linear part of this coupling, known as corticomuscular coherence, has received substantial attention, even though neuronal communication underlying motor control has been demonstrated to be highly nonlinear. A full assessment of corticomuscular coupling, including the nonlinear part, is essential to understand the neuronal communication within the sensorimotor system. In this study, we applied the recently developed n:m coherence method to assess nonlinear corticomuscular coupling during isotonic wrist flexion. The n:m coherence is a generalized metric for quantifying nonlinear cross-frequency coupling as well as linear iso-frequency coupling. By using independent component analysis and equivalent current dipole source localization, we identify four sensorimotor related brain areas based on the locations of the dipoles, i.e. the contralateral primary sensorimotor areas, supplementary motor area, prefrontal area and posterior parietal cortex. For all these areas, linear coupling between EEG and EMG is present with peaks in the beta band (15-35 Hz, while nonlinear coupling is detected with both integer (1:2, 1:3, 1:4 and non-integer (2:3 harmonics. Significant differences between brain areas is shown in linear coupling with stronger coherence for the primary sensorimotor areas and motor association cortices (supplementary motor area, prefrontal area compared to the sensory association area (posterior parietal cortex; but not for the nonlinear coupling. Moreover, the detected nonlinear coupling is similar to previously reported nonlinear coupling of cortical activity to somatosensory stimuli. We suggest that the descending motor pathways mainly contribute to linear corticomuscular coupling, while nonlinear coupling likely originates from sensory feedback.

  15. Analysis of the morphometry and variations in the extensor digitorum brevis muscle: an anatomic guide for muscle flap and tendon transfer surgical dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirasanagandla, Srinivasa Rao; Swamy, Ravindra S; Nayak, Satheesha B; Somayaji, Nagabhooshana S; Rao, Mohandas K G; Bhat, Kumar M R

    2013-09-01

    The extensor digitorum brevis muscle (EDB) is a practical option for use as an island flap or free flap when reconstructing soft tissue defects in the ankle as well as in the entire lower limb. It is frequently used to correct crossover toe deformity and other painful toe disorders. We evaluated the morphometry of the EDB in 44 formalin-fixed limbs. Length and width of the muscles were measured. Surface area was calculated as the product of length and width of the muscle. The length of each tendon was also measured from its origin to the point of distal attachment. Presence of any additional tendons was noted. Mean length, width, and surface area of the muscle were 7.39±0.71 cm, 4.1±0.37 cm, and 30.5±4.78 cm(2) on the right side and 7.2±0.84 cm, 3.9±0.37 cm, and 28.4±5.35 cm(2) on the left side, respectively. Morphometry of the tendons revealed that the tendon of the great toe had the highest mean length (9.5 cm) and the tendon of the fourth toe had the lowest mean length (6.3 cm). Four of the limbs studied (9.09%) had only three tendons. Three of the limbs studied (6.81%) had five tendons, and in one exceptional case (2.27%), six tendons were detected. These observations have significant value and are applicable to plastic and orthopedic surgery.

  16. EFFECT OF RESTRICTED HIP FLEXOR MUSCLE LENGTH ON HIP EXTENSOR MUSCLE ACTIVITY AND LOWER EXTREMITY BIOMECHANICS IN COLLEGE-AGED FEMALE SOCCER PLAYERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Matthew; Frank, Barnett; Goto, Shiho; Blackburn, Troy; Cates, Samantha; Clark, Michael; Aguilar, Alain; Fava, Nicole; Padua, Darin

    2015-12-01

    Hip flexor tightness is theorized to alter antagonist muscle function through reciprocal inhibition and synergistic dominance mechanisms. Synergistic dominance may result in altered movement patterns and increased risk of lower extremity injury. To compare hip extensor muscle activation, internal hip and knee extension moments during double-leg squatting, and gluteus maximus strength in those with and without clinically restricted hip flexor muscle length. Causal-comparative cross-sectional laboratory study. Using a modified Thomas Test, female soccer athletes were assigned to a restricted (>0 ° of sagittal plane hip motion above the horizontal; n=20, age=19.9 ± 1 years, ht=167.1 ± 6.4 cm, mass=64.7 ± 8.2kg) or normal (>15 ° of sagittal plane hip motion below horizontal; n=20, age=19.4 ± 1 years, ht=167.2 ± 5.5 cm, mass=61.2 ± 8.6 kg) hip flexor muscle length group. Surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity of the gluteus maximus and biceps femoris, and net internal hip and knee extension moments were measured between groups during a double-leg squat. Isometric gluteus maximus strength was assessed using handheld dynamometry. Individuals with restricted hip flexor muscle length demonstrated less gluteus maximus activation (p=0.008) and a lower gluteus maximus : biceps femoris co-activation ratio (p=0.004). There were no significant differences (p>0.05) in hip or knee extension moments, isometric gluteus maximus strength, or biceps femoris activation between groups. Female soccer athletes with hip flexor muscle tightness exhibit less gluteus maximus activation and lower gluteus maximus : biceps femoris co-activation while producing similar net hip and knee extension moments. Thus, individuals with hip flexor muscle tightness appear to utilize different neuromuscular strategies to control lower extremity motion. 3.

  17. Muscle weakness and lack of reflex gain adaptation predominate during post-stroke posture control of the wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Helm Frans CT

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Instead of hyper-reflexia as sole paradigm, post-stroke movement disorders are currently considered the result of a complex interplay between neuronal and muscular properties, modified by level of activity. We used a closed loop system identification technique to quantify individual contributors to wrist joint stiffness during an active posture task. Methods Continuous random torque perturbations applied to the wrist joint by a haptic manipulator had to be resisted maximally. Reflex provoking conditions were applied i.e. additional viscous loads and reduced perturbation signal bandwidth. Linear system identification and neuromuscular modeling were used to separate joint stiffness into the intrinsic resistance of the muscles including co-contraction and the reflex mediated contribution. Results Compared to an age and sex matched control group, patients showed an overall 50% drop in intrinsic elasticity while their reflexive contribution did not respond to provoking conditions. Patients showed an increased mechanical stability compared to control subjects. Conclusion Post stroke, we found active posture tasking to be dominated by: 1 muscle weakness and 2 lack of reflex adaptation. This adds to existing doubts on reflex blocking therapy as the sole paradigm to improve active task performance and draws attention to muscle strength and power recovery and the role of the inability to modulate reflexes in post stroke movement disorders.

  18. Loss of knee extensor torque complexity during fatiguing isometric muscle contractions occurs exclusively above the critical torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethick, Jamie; Winter, Samantha L; Burnley, Mark

    2016-06-01

    The complexity of knee extensor torque time series decreases during fatiguing isometric muscle contractions. We hypothesized that because of peripheral fatigue, this loss of torque complexity would occur exclusively during contractions above the critical torque (CT). Nine healthy participants performed isometric knee extension exercise (6 s of contraction, 4 s of rest) on six occasions for 30 min or to task failure, whichever occurred sooner. Four trials were performed above CT (trials S1-S4, S1 being the lowest intensity), and two were performed below CT (at 50% and 90% of CT). Global, central, and peripheral fatigue were quantified using maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) with femoral nerve stimulation. The complexity of torque output was determined using approximate entropy (ApEn) and the detrended fluctuation analysis-α scaling exponent (DFA-α). The MVC torque was reduced in trials below CT [by 19 ± 4% (means ± SE) in 90%CT], but complexity did not decrease [ApEn for 90%CT: from 0.82 ± 0.03 to 0.75 ± 0.06, 95% paired-samples confidence intervals (CIs), 95% CI = -0.23, 0.10; DFA-α from 1.36 ± 0.01 to 1.32 ± 0.03, 95% CI -0.12, 0.04]. Above CT, substantial reductions in MVC torque occurred (of 49 ± 8% in S1), and torque complexity was reduced (ApEn for S1: from 0.67 ± 0.06 to 0.14 ± 0.01, 95% CI = -0.72, -0.33; DFA-α from 1.38 ± 0.03 to 1.58 ± 0.01, 95% CI 0.12, 0.29). Thus, in these experiments, the fatigue-induced loss of torque complexity occurred exclusively during contractions performed above the CT. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Cross-education of muscle strength: cross-training effects are not confined to untrained contralateral homologous muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariyildiz, M; Karacan, I; Rezvani, A; Ergin, O; Cidem, M

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) on dominant wrist flexors causes an increase in the muscle strength of the contralateral wrist extensors. Twenty-three healthy, young, adult men were included in this prospective, double-blind, controlled study. Participants were randomly allocated to the EMS group or Control group. Electrodes were placed over the flexor aspect of the right forearm in both groups. In the EMS group, passive wrist extension and (EMS) that caused powerful muscle contraction were simultaneously applied. In the Control group, a conventional mode of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was applied without causing any contraction. A group effect (P=0.0001) and group-by-time interaction were found (P=0.0001) for both the wrist flexor and extensor muscles, but not group-by-time-by-arm interactions. This implies that the effect of the interventions was similar in both arms, but that the response was significantly larger in the EMS than in the Control group. The results of the current study suggest that cross-education is not confined to the untrained contralateral wrist flexors and that the strength increase may also be observed in the contralateral wrist extensors. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Bilateral movements increase sustained extensor force in the paretic arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nyeonju; Cauraugh, James H

    2018-04-01

    Muscle weakness in the extensors poststroke is a common motor impairment. Unfortunately, research is unclear on whether bilateral movements increase extensor force production in the paretic arm. This study investigated sustained force production while stroke individuals maximally extended their wrist and fingers on their paretic arm. Specifically, we determined isometric force production in three conditions: (a) unilateral paretic arm, (b) unilateral nonparetic arm, and (c) bilateral (both arms executing the same movement simultaneously). Seventeen chronic stroke patients produced isometric sustained force by executing wrist and fingers extension in unilateral and bilateral contraction conditions. Mean force, force variability (coefficient of variation), and signal-to-noise ratio were calculated for each contraction condition. Analysis of two-way (Arm × Type of Condition: 2 × 2; Paretic or Nonparetic Arm × Unilateral or Bilateral Conditions) within-subjects ANOVAs revealed that the bilateral condition increased sustained force in the paretic arm, but reduced sustained force in the nonparetic arm. Further, although the paretic arm exhibited more force variability and less signal-to-noise ratio than the nonparetic arm during a unilateral condition, there were no differences when participants simultaneously executed isometric contractions with both arms. Our unique findings indicate that bilateral contractions transiently increased extensor force in the paretic arm. Implications for Rehabilitation Bilateral movements increased isometric wrsit extensor force in paretic arms and redcued force in nonparetic arms versus unilateral movements. Both paretic and nonparetic arms produced similar force variability and signal-to-noise ratio during bilateral movements. Increased sustained force in the paretic arm during the bilateral condition indicates that rehabilitation protocols based on bilateral movements may be beneficial for functional recovery.

  1. The eWrist - A wearable wrist exoskeleton with sEMG-based force control for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambelet, Charles; Lyu, Mingxing; Woolley, Daniel; Gassert, Roger; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2017-07-01

    Chronic wrist impairment is frequent following stroke and negatively impacts everyday life. Rehabilitation of the dysfunctional limb is possible but requires extensive training and motivation. Wearable training devices might offer new opportunities for rehabilitation. However, few devices are available to train wrist extension even though this movement is highly relevant for many upper limb activities of daily living. As a proof of concept, we developed the eWrist, a wearable one degree-of-freedom powered exoskeleton which supports wrist extension training. Conceptually one might think of an electric bike which provides mechanical support only when the rider moves the pedals, i.e. it enhances motor activity but does not replace it. Stroke patients may not have the ability to produce overt movements, but they might still be able to produce weak muscle activation that can be measured via surface electromyography (sEMG). By combining force and sEMG-based control in an assist-as-needed support strategy, we aim at providing a training device which enhances activity of the wrist extensor muscles in the context of daily life activities, thereby, driving cortical reorganization and recovery. Preliminary results show that the integration of sEMG signals in the control strategy allow for adjustable assistance with respect to a proxy measurement of corticomotor drive.

  2. Relationship between the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale and the Biomechanical Measure in Assessing Knee Extensor Muscle Spasticity in Patients with Post-Stroke Hemiparesia:A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Nakhostin Ansari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS is a clinical meas-ure that has been recently developed for the assessment of muscle spasticity. There is a dearth of research on the validity of the MMAS. The aim of the present study was to investi-gate the relationship between the MMAS and the biomechanical measure of work-velocity slope in assessing knee extensor muscle spasticity in patients with hemiparesia. Materials & Methods: Fourteen patients with post-stroke hemiparesia were included in this cross sectional study. Knee extensor spasticity was assessed with MMAS. An isokinetic dy-namometer was used to impose knee passive flexion with the angular velocity of 10, 30, 60, and 90 °/Sec to measure Torque-angle data. Work (Joule was calculated at each velocity to determine the slope of the work-velocity curves as the biomechanical measure of muscle spasticity. Results: The mean work decreased as the velocity increased but was not statistically signifi-cant (P = 0.07. The mean slope was – 0.35 [J /(°/Sec]. There was no significant correlation between the MMAS and the work-velocity slope (r =0.31, P = 0.28. Conclusion: There was no significant relationship between the MMAS and the biomechanical measure of work-velocity slope. Further studies with larger sample size are suggested. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (2: 131-136

  3. Prediction of the Wrist Joint Position During a Postural Tremor Using Neural Oscillators and an Adaptive Controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobravi, Hamid Reza; Ali, Sara Hemmati; Vatandoust, Masood; Marvi, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of the joint angle position, especially during tremor bursts, can be useful for detecting, tracking, and forecasting tremors. Thus, this research proposes a new model for predicting the wrist joint position during rhythmic bursts and inter-burst intervals. Since a tremor is an approximately rhythmic and roughly sinusoidal movement, neural oscillators have been selected to underlie the proposed model. Two neural oscillators were adopted. Electromyogram (EMG) signals were recorded from the extensor carpi radialis and flexor carpi radialis muscles concurrent with the joint angle signals of a stroke subject in an arm constant-posture. The output frequency of each oscillator was equal to the frequency corresponding to the maximum value of power spectrum related to the rhythmic wrist joint angle signals which had been recorded during a postural tremor. The phase shift between the outputs of the two oscillators was equal to the phase shift between the muscle activation of the wrist flexor and extensor muscles. The difference between the two oscillators' output signals was considered the main pattern. Along with a proportional compensator, an adaptive neural controller has adjusted the amplitude of the main pattern in such a way so as to minimize the wrist joint prediction error during a stroke patient's tremor burst and a healthy subject's generated artificial tremor. In regard to the range of wrist joint movement during the observed rhythmic motions, a calculated prediction error is deemed acceptable.

  4. Extensor Pollicis Brevis tendon damage presenting as de Quervain's disease following kettlebell training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, Karuppaiah; Carter-Esdale, Charles William; Vijayanathan, Sanjay; Kochhar, Tony

    2013-06-03

    Kettlebell exercises are more efficient for an athlete to increase his or her muscle strength. However it carries the risk of injury especially in the beginners. A 39 year old gentleman came to our clinic with radial sided wrist pain following kettlebell exercises. Clinically patient had swelling and tenderness over the tendons in the first dorsal wrist compartment, besides Finklesten test was positive. Patient had a decreased excursion of the thumb when compared to the opposite side. Ultrasound/MRI scan revealed asymmetric thickening of the 1st compartment extensors extending from the base of the thumb to the wrist joint. Besides injury to the Extensor Pollicis Brevis (EPB) tendon by repetitive impact from kettlebell, leading to its split was identified. Detailed history showed that the injury might be due to off-centre handle holding during triceps strengthening exercises. Our report stresses the fact that kettlebell users should be taught about problems of off-center handle holding to avoid wrist injuries. Also, in Kettlebell users with De Quervains disease clinical and radiological evaluation should be done before steroid injection as this might lead to complete tendon rupture.

  5. Extensor Pollicis Brevis tendon damage presenting as de Quervain’s disease following kettlebell training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Kettlebell exercises are more efficient for an athlete to increase his or her muscle strength. However it carries the risk of injury especially in the beginners. A 39 year old gentleman came to our clinic with radial sided wrist pain following kettlebell exercises. Clinically patient had swelling and tenderness over the tendons in the first dorsal wrist compartment, besides Finklesten test was positive. Patient had a decreased excursion of the thumb when compared to the opposite side. Ultrasound/MRI scan revealed asymmetric thickening of the 1st compartment extensors extending from the base of the thumb to the wrist joint. Besides injury to the Extensor Pollicis Brevis (EPB) tendon by repetitive impact from kettlebell, leading to its split was identified. Detailed history showed that the injury might be due to off-centre handle holding during triceps strengthening exercises. Our report stresses the fact that kettlebell users should be taught about problems of off-center handle holding to avoid wrist injuries. Also, in Kettlebell users with De Quervains disease clinical and radiological evaluation should be done before steroid injection as this might lead to complete tendon rupture. PMID:23731737

  6. Accuracy of botulinum toxin type A injection into the forearm muscles of chronic stroke patients with spastic flexed wrist and clenched fist: manual needle placement evaluated using ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picelli, Alessandro; Roncari, Laura; Baldessarelli, Silvia; Berto, Giulia; Lobba, Davide; Santamato, Andrea; Fiore, Pietro; Smania, Nicola

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the accuracy of manual needle placement for injection of botulinum toxin type A into the forearm muscles of adults with spastic flexed wrist and clenched fist as a consequence of stroke. Prospective clinical study. A total of 41 adults with chronic stroke who were scheduled to receive botulinum toxin type A injection into the following forearm muscles: flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, flexor digitorum superficialis and flexor digitorum profundus. According to Huber & Heck's atlas suggestions on treatment of spasticity with botulinum toxin, surface identification of muscles to inject was performed by means of palpation and anatomical landmarks. Accuracy of needle placement and muscle thickness at the site of needle insertion were assessed using ultrasonography. Overall accuracy of manual needle placement evaluated using ultrasonography was 51.2%. Accuracy was significantly higher for the finger flexors than for the wrist flexors (63.4% vs 39.0%). The finger flexors were significantly thicker than the wrist flexors (mean 1.58 vs 0.49 cm). Instrumental guidance should be used in order to achieve an acceptable accuracy of needle placement when performing botulinum toxin type A injections into the forearm muscles of chronic stroke patients with spastic flexed wrist and clenched fist.

  7. Fatty infiltrate in the cervical extensor muscles is not a feature of chronic, insidious-onset neck pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, J. [Division of Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Department of Physical Therapy, Rueckert-Hartman School for Health Professions, Regis University, Denver, Colorado (United States); Centre for Magnetic Resonance, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)], E-mail: jelltt@regis.edu; Sterling, M. [Division of Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Noteboom, J.T. [Department of Physical Therapy, Rueckert-Hartman School for Health Professions, Regis University, Denver, Colorado (United States); Darnell, R. [Division of Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Galloway, G. [Centre for Magnetic Resonance, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Jull, G. [Division of Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)

    2008-06-15

    Aim: To investigate the presence of fatty infiltrate in the cervical extensor musculature in patients with insidious-onset neck pain to better understand the possible pathophysiology underlying such changes in chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). Materials and methods: A sample of convenience of 23 women with persistent insidious-onset neck pain (mean age 29.2 {+-} 6.9 years) was recruited for the study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify fatty infiltration in the cervical extensor musculature. Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST; pressure and thermal pain thresholds) was performed as sensory features are present in chronic whiplash. Self-reported pain and disability, as well as psychological distress, were measured using the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and the General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28), respectively. Results: Measures were compared with those of a previous dataset of chronic whiplash patients (n = 79, mean age 29.7 {+-} 7.8 years). Using a classification tree, insidious-onset neck pain was clearly identified from whiplash (p < 0.001), based on the presence of MRI fatty infiltrate in the cervical extensor musculature (0/102 individuals) and altered temperature thresholds (cold; 3/102 individuals). Conclusion: Fatty infiltrates in the cervical extensor musculature and widespread hyperalgesia were not features of the insidious-onset neck pain group in this study; whereas these features have been identified in patients with chronic WAD. This novel finding may enable a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiological processes in patients with chronic whiplash.

  8. Wrist ultrasound examination – scanning technique and ultrasound anatomy. Part 1: Dorsal wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyprian Olchowy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound imaging of the musculoskeletal system is superior to other imaging methods in many aspects, such as multidimensional character of imaging, possibility of dynamic evaluation and precise assessment of soft tissues. Moreover, it is a safe and relatively inexpensive method, broadly available and well-tolerated by patients. A correctly conducted ultrasound examination of the wrist delivers detailed information concerning the condition of tendons, muscles, ligaments, nerves and vessels. However, the knowledge of anatomy is crucial to establish a correct ultrasound diagnosis, also in wrist assessment. An ultrasound examination of the wrist is one of the most common US examinations conducted in patients with rheumatological diseases. Ultrasonographic signs depend on the advancement of the disease. The examination is equally frequently conducted in patients with pain or swelling of the wrist due to non-rheumatological causes. The aim of this publication was to present ultrasound images and anatomic schemes corresponding to them. The correct scanning technique of the dorsal part of the wrist was discussed and some practical tips, thanks to which highly diagnostic images can be obtained, were presented. The f ollowing anatomical structures should be visualized in an ultrasound examination of the dorsal wrist: distal radio-ulnar joint, radiocarpal joint, midcarpal joint, carpometacarpal joints, dorsal radiocarpal ligament, compartments of extensor tendons, radial artery, cephalic vein, two small branches of the radial nerve: superfi cial and deep, as well as certain midcarpal ligaments, particularly the scapholunate ligament and lunotriquetral ligament. The paper was distinguished in 2014 as the “poster of the month” (poster number C-1896 during the poster session of the European Congress of Radiology in Vienna.

  9. Risk factors for hand-wrist disorders in repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, J. F.; Mikkelsen, S.; Andersen, JH

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify the risk of hand-wrist disorders related to repetitive movements, use of hand force and wrist position in repetitive monotonous work. METHODS: Using questionnaires and physical examinations, the prevalence and incidence of hand-wrist pain and possible extensor tendonitis (...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging analysis of the upper cervical spine extensor musculature in an asymptomatic cohort: an index of fat within muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, J.M. [Division of Physiotherapy, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Australia)]. E-mail: jimelliott@plbb.net; Galloway, G.J. [Center for Magnetic Resonance, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Jull, G.A. [Division of Physiotherapy, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Noteboom, J.T. [Department of Physical Therapy, Regis University, Denver, CO, USA (United States); Centeno, C.J. [Centeno Clinic, Westminster, CO, USA (United States); Gibbon, W.W. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Australia)

    2005-03-01

    AIM: To establish a simple method to quantify muscle/fat constituents in cervical muscles of asymptomatic women using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to determine whether there is an age effect within a defined age range. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MRI of the upper cervical spine was performed for 42 asymptomatic women aged 18-45 years. The muscle and fat signal intensities on axial spin echo T1-weighted images were quantitatively classified by taking a ratio of the pixel intensity profiles of muscle against those of intermuscular fat for the rectus capitis posterior major and minor and inferior obliquus capitis muscles bilaterally. Inter- and intra-examiner agreement was scrutinized. RESULTS: The average relative values of fat within the upper cervical musculature compared with intermuscular fat indicated that there were only slight variations in indices between the three sets of muscles. There was no significant correlation between age and fat indices. There were significant differences for the relative fat within the muscle compared with intermuscular fat and body mass index for the right rectus capitis posterior major and right and left inferior obliquus capitis muscles (p=0.032). Intraclass correlation coefficients for intraobserver agreement ranged from 0.94 to 0.98. Inter-rater agreement of the measurements ranged from 0.75 to 0.97. CONCLUSION: A quantitative measure of muscle/fat constituents has been developed, and results of this study indicate that relative fatty infiltration is not a feature of age in the upper cervical extensor muscles of women aged 18-45 years.

  11. Assessment of isokinetic peak torque reliability of the hip flexor, extensor, adductors and abductors muscles in female soccer players from 14 to 25 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Andrade, Marilia; Mascarin, Naryana C; Benedito-Silva, Ana A; Carderelli Minozzo, Fabio; Vancini, Rodrigo L; Barbosa DE Lira, Claudio A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate test-retest reliability of concentric flexor, extensor, abductor and adductor muscular isokinetic hip torques in female soccer players. Sixteen highly-trained female soccer players were evaluated. Isokinetic dynamometer assessment was performed at 30°/s and 150°/s concentrically. The muscles tested were hip flexor (Fl), extensor (Ext), adductor (Add) and abductor (Abd). The reproducibility of the measured peak torque (PT) was analyzed by using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The difference in PT between the first and second tests was tested using Student's t-test. The ICC for the observed PT values revealed moderate to high reproducibility (ranging from 0.55 to 0.76) for the hip Fl and Ext measurements at 150º/s and for Add and Abd measurements at 30 and 150º/s. For the hip Fl and Ext measurements at 30º/s the ICC was poor. The isokinetic assessment of the concentric PT values generated by the hip Fl and Ext and Add and Abd is moderate to highly reproducible, when assessed at the highest test velocity (150º/s). The test-retest reliability of hip isokinetic strength measures seems to be affected by the type muscle and test velocity.

  12. Myoelectrically controlled wrist robot for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rong; Tong, Kai-yu; Hu, Xiaoling; Zhou, Wei

    2013-06-10

    Robot-assisted rehabilitation is an advanced new technology in stroke rehabilitation to provide intensive training. Post-stroke motor recovery depends on active rehabilitation by voluntary participation of patient's paretic motor system as early as possible in order to promote reorganization of brain. However, voluntary residual motor efforts to the affected limb have not been involved enough in most robot-assisted rehabilitation for patients after stroke. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of robot-assisted rehabilitation using myoelectric control on upper limb motor recovery. In the present study, an exoskeleton-type rehabilitation robotic system was designed to provide voluntarily controlled assisted torque to the affected wrist. Voluntary intention was involved by using the residual surface electromyography (EMG) from flexor carpi radialis(FCR) and extensor carpi radialis (ECR)on the affected limb to control the mechanical assistance provided by the robotic system during wrist flexion and extension in a 20-session training. The system also applied constant resistant torque to the affected wrist during the training. Sixteen subjects after stroke had been recruited for evaluating the tracking performance and therapeutical effects of myoelectrically controlled robotic system. With the myoelectrically-controlled assistive torque, stroke survivors could reach a larger range of motion with a significant decrease in the EMG signal from the agonist muscles. The stroke survivors could be trained in the unreached range with their voluntary residual EMG on the paretic side. After 20-session rehabilitation training, there was a non-significant increase in the range of motion and a significant decrease in the root mean square error (RMSE) between the actual wrist angle and target angle. Significant improvements also could be found in muscle strength and clinical scales. These results indicate that robot-aided therapy with voluntary participation of

  13. A COMPARITIVE STUDY TO KNOW THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PRONE BACK EXTENSION EXRECISES AND SWISS BALL EXERCISES ON BACK EXTENSOR MUSCLES PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhanjan Das

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endurance of the back muscles is important for stability of the trunk and therefore essential for normal functioning of an individual. Prone back extension exercises are traditional measures to improve back endurance. More recently Swiss ball exercises have become popular as a means to improve back endurance. Purpose of this study is to compare Prone back extension exercises with back extension exercise on Swiss ball on the improvement of the back extensor muscles performance, and thereby to find out which one is more appropriate for the prevention of back pain resulting from low extensor endurance. Back endurance can be measured by Bierring Sorensen endurance test. A low Sorensen score indicates low back endurance, which is associated with incidence of back pain. Methods: This study included 60 undergraduate students aged 18 to 23 years. The subjects were randomly divided into 2 equal groups. Pretest assessment was done by measurement of endurance of back extensors using Sorensen test. One group was given a series of prone back extension exercises on floor consisting of 5 levels. The second group was given a series of 5 exercises on Swiss ball. Each subject was assessed at the end of six weeks of intervention and after two weeks of finishing the regime (follow up to compare the effectiveness of Prone back extension exercises with Swiss ball exercises. Results: The results indicated that both the groups showed improvement in Sorensen score after 6 weeks of exercise. The average improvements of Prone back extension exercises and Swiss ball groups were 60.83 seconds and 66 seconds respectively. At two weeks follow up there is a slight change in the Sorensen score, with an average reduction of 1.34% and 0.95% for Prone back extension exercises and Swiss ball group respectively. However comparison of improvements in Sorensen score of Prone back extension exercises with Swiss ball exercises showed there is no significant difference

  14. Acute effects of maximal isometric muscle action of the elbow extensors on contralateral dynamic task of the elbow flexors: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cauê V La Scala Teixeira

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Aim the aim was to investigate the influence of a maximal isometric muscle action of the elbow extensors on the contralateral dynamic task of the elbow flexors. Methods Seventeen recreationally trained men (23.3 ± 4.9 yrs, BMI: 24.8 ± 2.2 Kg/m² underwent two randomized different testing sessions separated by one week. In the control session (CON all subjects performed a maximum number of repetitions test (RMs at 75%1RM using the right elbow flexors. The experimental session (EXP was similar to the CON; however, all subjects were instructed to perform RMs at 75%1RM by using the right elbow flexors and maintaining the maximal voluntary contraction of the left elbow extensors during the test. RMs, rating of perceived exertion (RPE, and training volume (TV were measured and compared between sessions. Results The EXP showed a significant 10.4% increase on the RMs (13.8 vs. 12.5, p < 0.001, d = 0.44 and 12.1% increase in TV (238.0 vs. 212.4 kg, p < 0.001, d = 0.43 than CON. No differences were observed for RPE between sessions. Conclusion The maximum voluntary contraction of the left elbow extensors increased the RMs of the contralateral elbow flexors, reflecting a higher TV, and no differences in the RPE. Our results suggest that the investigated method may be a viable and practical alternative to increase the acute strength performance of elbow flexors when using submaximal loads.

  15. Electromyographic feedback to improve ankle dorsiflexion, wrist extension, and hand grasp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafpliotis, H

    1976-07-01

    Electromyographic feedback was used to train a patient with hemiplegia in the functional use of the muscles of his right upper and lower limbs. The patient trained with the therapist over a period of two and one-half months, engaging in exercises for ankle dorsiflexion, wrist extension, and hand grasp twice a week for one to one and one-half hours. Feedback was recorded with surface electrodes placed over the extensor surface of the forearm and the tibialis anterior; the electromyographic activity was displayed on a meter. After training, muscle control proved functional for walking, handwriting, and daily self-care activities.

  16. Nonlinear coupling between cortical oscillations and muscle activity during isotonic wrist flexion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Y.; Solis Escalante, T.; van de Ruit, M.L.; van der Helm, F.C.T.; Schouten, A.C.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling between cortical oscillations and muscle activity facilitates neuronal communication during motor control. The linear part of this coupling, known as corticomuscular coherence, has received substantial attention, even though neuronal communication underlying motor control has been

  17. Wrist Sprains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Wrist Sprains Email to a friend * required fields From * ... most common ligament to be injured in the wrist is the scapho-lunate ligament (see Figure 2). ...

  18. Comparative Evaluation of Core and Knee Extensor Mechanism Muscle Activation Patterns in a Stair Stepping Task in Healthy Controls and Patellofemoral Pain Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Motealleh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patellofemoral pain (PFP is a common affliction and complex clinical entity. Deficit in neuromotor control of the core may be a remote contributing factor to the development of PFPS. Comparative evaluation of core and extensor mechanism muscle activation patterns between healthy group and patients involved by patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS in a stair stepping task is the aim of this study. Methods: In this non-randomized interventional study fifteen males with PFPS and fifteen asymptomatic controls participated. Electromyographic (EMG activity of Vastusmedialisobliquus (VMO, Vastuslateralis (VL, Gluteus medius (GMED, Gluteus Maximus (GMAX, Internal oblique (IO and Erector spinae (ES were recorded and EMG onsets were assessed in both stepping up (SU and down (SD. The time of foot contact determined by a foot switch. Results: During SU: Onset times of all muscles except, VL and ES in the controls were significantly less than PFPS group (P<0.05. In PFPS group the temporal sequence of ES, VL and VMO were different from control groups. During SD: Onset times of all muscles except, GMAX and ES in the control group were significantly less than PFP group (P<0.05. The sequence of muscle activity in both healthy and PFP groups were the same. Conclusion: Our findings are in line with previous researches about the effects of core on function and control of lower extremity. Activation patterns of core and vasti muscles are different between control and PFPS group during stair stepping task. Designing exercises to correct inappropriate timing of core muscles may have a role in management of PFPS and it needs more future researches.

  19. Determination of the relationship between the wrist isokinetic muscle strenght and the grip strength in tennis players aged between 12-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akınoğlu, Bihter; Kocahan, Tuğba; Yıldırım, Necmiye Ün; Soylu, Çağlar; Hasanoğlu, Adnan

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between isokinetic wrist muscle strenght and grip strength in tennis players aged between 12-14. Methods: This study was carried out with the participation of 9 (3 female and 6 male) tennis players aged between 12-14 (means 13,22±0,83). Weight, height, body mass index and dominant extremity of the players were recorded. İsokinetic measurement was performed with Isomed 2000® device. İsokinetic testing protocol; before the test all players performed the wrist flexion and extension isokinetic test with the 5 repeating at 90 º/sec as a warm-up and for comprehenting the test. Then, wrist flexion and extension concentric-concentric strength measurements were performed with the 5 repeating at 60 º/sec and with the 15 repeating at 240 º/sec with the angle between 50 degrees of wrist flexion and 60 degrees of wrist extension and peak torque values were recorded. Standard Jamar® Dynamometer was used for grip strength measurements. Grip strenght was performed firstly in sitting position, which is the position of standard measurement. Secondly, in standing position, the elbow was in full ekstansion and the forearm was in neutral position. Thirdly, in standing position the wrist was positioned approximately 30° extension and 10° ulnar deviation. This test was repeated 3 times in all test position and the mean of three scores were recorded. Firstly, the dominant hand, then the non-dominant hand was evoluated. They were allowed to rest for 30 seconds between each grip measurement. Correlation between peak tork of isokinetic muscle strenght and grip strength was done having been used Spearman correlation test. Findings: It was determined that there was a significant positive relation between wrist flexion-extension isokinetic muscle strength and grip strenght in tennis players aged between 12-14. Clinically, grip strength measured in the standard sitting position was found more as compared to the other

  20. Cross-sectional area of the posterior extensor muscles of the cervical spine in whiplash injury patients versus healthy volunteers--10 year follow-up MR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Morio; Ichihara, Daisuke; Okada, Eijiro; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Fujiwara, Hirokazu; Momoshima, Suketaka; Nishiwaki, Yuji; Takahata, Takeshi

    2012-06-01

    Long-term follow-up studies focusing on the posterior extensor muscles in patients suffering from whiplash injury are scarce. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the changes in the posterior extensor muscles 10 years after whiplash injury. Twenty-three patients who had suffered from whiplash injury in 1994-1996 and had undergone MRI using a 1.5-T superconductive imager participated in this follow-up study (13 males, 10 females, mean age 51.8 years, mean follow-up 11.5 years). In addition, 60 healthy volunteers who had undergone MRI in the same period were included as controls (36 males, 24 females, mean age 47.8 years, mean follow-up 11.1 years). All participants underwent follow-up MRI. The cross-sectional areas of the deep posterior muscles (CSA) including the multifidus, semispinalis cervicis, semispinalis capitis, and splenius capitis were digitally measured at C3-4, C4-5, and C5-6 using NIH image. The long-term changes in the CSA were compared between the two groups. In addition, correlations between the CSA and cervical spine-related symptoms were evaluated. The mean total CSA per patient (the sum of the area from C3-4 to C5-6) was 4811.6±878.4 mm(2) in the whiplash patients and 4494.9±1032.7 mm(2) in the controls at the initial investigation (p=0.20), and 5173.4±946.1 mm(2) and 4713.0±1065.3 mm(2) at the follow-up (p=0.07). The mean change in CSA over time was 361.8±804.9 mm(2) in the whiplash patients and 218.1±520.7 mm(2) in the controls (p=0.34). Ten whiplash patients (43.5%) had neck pain and 11 (47.8%) had shoulder stiffness. However, there was no difference in the change in CSA over time between the symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. There was no significant difference in the change in CSA between whiplash patients and healthy volunteers after a 10-year follow-up period. In both groups, the cross-sectional area slightly increased at follow-up. In addition, there was no association between the change in CSA and clinical symptoms such as

  1. The effect of elastic therapeutic taping on back extensor muscle endurance in patients with low back pain: a randomized, controlled, crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Lindsey; Hebert, Jeffrey J; Dekanich, Joel; Koppenhaver, Shane

    2015-03-01

    Randomized, controlled, crossover trial. To examine the effects of elastic therapeutic taping (ETT) applied to the lumbar paraspinal region on back muscle endurance (BME) compared to no tape or a rigid therapeutic taping (RTT) procedure in individuals with nonspecific low back pain. Elastic therapeutic taping is an increasingly popular intervention for clinicians who treat patients with low back pain. However, no studies have investigated the effect of ETT on back extensor muscle performance in a symptomatic population. We measured BME in 16 patients (mean ± SD age, 44.8 ± 10.4 years; 44% female) with nonspecific low back pain. Back muscle endurance was measured using the Biering-Sørensen test under 3 different conditions: ETT, no tape, and RTT. For the ETT condition, the tape was applied over the paraspinal muscles according to the Kinesio Tex taping protocol. The RTT condition consisted of the same tape configuration but using nonelastic athletic tape. All participants received each testing condition in random order, with 1 to 3 days between each condition. Differences in BME between the 3 testing conditions were explored with repeated-measures analyses of variance. There were no differences in BME between ETT and RTT, or between the RTT and no-tape conditions. The difference in BME between the ETT and no-tape conditions was statistically significant (mean difference, 20.7 seconds; 95% confidence interval: 6.8, 34.5; P = .006) but within the threshold of measurement error. Back muscle endurance was higher with ETT applied over the paraspinal musculature when compared to a no-tape condition. However, the magnitude of difference did not exceed measurement error. There was no difference in BME when using elastic or rigid therapeutic tape.

  2. [Tremor Suppression on Multi-DoF Wrist Joint Based on Functional Electrical Stimulation: A Simulation Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Dingguo; Liu, Jianrong

    2015-04-01

    An automatic control system was designed to suppress pathological tremor on wrist joint with two degrees of freedom (DoF) using functional electrical stimulation (FES). The tremor occurring in the wrist flexion-extension and adduction-abduction was expected to be suppressed. A musculoskeletal model of wrist joint was developed to serve as the control plant, which covered four main muscles (extensor carpi radialis longus, extensor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radialis, and flexor carpi ulnaris). A second-order mechanical impedance model was used to describe the wrist skeletal dynamics. The core work was to design the controller and a hybrid control strategy was proposed, which combined inverse model based on feed forward control and linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control. Performance of the system was tested under different input conditions (step signal, sinusoidal signal, and real data of a patient)., The results indicated that the proposed hybrid controller could attenuate over 94% of the tremor amplitude on multi-DoF wrist joint.

  3. Control of wrist movement in deafferented man: evidence for a mixed strategy of position and amplitude control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miall, R Chris; Haggard, P; Cole, J D

    2017-11-01

    There is a continuing debate about control of voluntary movement, with conflicted evidence about the balance between control of movement vectors (amplitude control) that implies knowledge of the starting position for accuracy, and equilibrium point or final position control, that is independent of the starting conditions. We tested wrist flexion and extension movements in a man with a chronic peripheral neuronopathy that deprived him of proprioceptive knowledge of his wrist angles. In a series of experiments, we demonstrate that he could scale the amplitude of his wrist movements in flexion/extension, even without visual feedback, and appeared to adopt a strategy of moving via a central wrist position when asked to reach target angles from unknown start locations. When examining the relationship between positional error at the start and end of each movement in long sequences of movements, we report that he appears to have three canonical positions that he can reach relatively successfully, in flexion, in extension and in the centre. These are consistent with end-point or position control. Other positions were reached with errors that suggest amplitude control. Recording wrist flexor and extensor EMG confirmed that the flexion and extension canonical positions were reached by strong flexor and extensor activity, without antagonist activity, and other positions were reached with graded muscle activation levels. The central canonical position does not appear to be reached by either maximal co-contraction or by complete relaxation, but may have been reached by matched low-level co-contraction.

  4. Physical therapy management of the subluxated wrist in children with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, W; Brooks, D; Ayling-Campos, A

    1995-10-01

    Arthritis commonly affects the hand and wrist in children and may contribute to loss of range of motion and force of the muscles surrounding the involved joints. The purpose of this case report is to describe a physical therapy protocol for managing a subluxated wrist in children with arthritis. Measures of range of motion and force of the wrist observed in two patients up to 2 years after the implementation of this protocol are also reported. The initial phase of the physical therapy program focused on realigning the subluxated wrist. Heat was used to manage flexor muscle tightness and increase tissue extensibility. The carpal bones were then realigned manually and supported in position with a cast for a period of 72 hours. Once alignment of the wrist was achieved, the emphasis of physical therapy was placed on increasing range of motion and force at the wrist joint through visits to the physical therapist and an extensive home program. Measurements of passive range of motion and active range of motion using a goniometer, grip forces using a modified sphygmomanometer, and peak torque of the wrist extensors using a dynamometer (measured in one patient) were recorded before and up to 2 years following the implementation of the protocol. There was an increase in wrist extension passive range of motion (35 degrees in both patients) and active range of motion (15 degrees in patient 1 and 25 degrees in patient 2) between the measurements obtained before and 1 to 2 years following the implementation of the protocol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Bilateral anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome variant secondary to extensor hallucis brevis muscle hypertrophy in a ballet dancer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Joshua N; Rungprai, Chamnanni; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2014-12-01

    We present a case of bilateral anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome secondary EHB hypertrophy in a dancer, with successful treatment with bilateral EHB muscle excisions for decompression. The bilateral presentation of this case with the treatment of EHB muscle excision is the first of its type reported in the literature. Copyright © 2014 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Adhesive taping vs. daily manual muscle stretching and splinting after botulinum toxin type A injection for wrist and fingers spastic overactivity in stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamato, Andrea; Micello, Maria Francesca; Panza, Francesco; Fortunato, Francesca; Picelli, Alessandro; Smania, Nicola; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Fiore, Pietro; Ranieri, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of two procedures increasing the botulinum toxin type A effect for wrist and finger flexor spasticity after stroke. A single-blind randomized trial. Seventy patients with upper limb post-stroke spasticity. Adults with wrist and finger flexor muscles spasticity after stroke were submitted to botulinum toxin type A therapy. After the treatment, the subjects injected were randomly divided into two groups and submitted to adhesive taping (Group A) or daily muscle manual stretching, passive articular mobilization of wrist and fingers, and palmar splint (Group B) for 10 days. We measured spasticity with Modified Ashworth Scale, related disability with Disability Assessment Scale, and fingers position at rest. The measurements were done at baseline, after two weeks, and after one month from the treatment session. After two weeks, subjects in Group A reported a significantly greater decrease in spasticity scores (Modified Ashworth Scale fingers: mean (standard deviation) 1.3±0.6 vs. 2.1±0.6; Modified Ashworth Scale wrist: 1.7 ±0.6 vs. 2.3 ±0.8), and after one month in spasticity and disability scores (Modified Ashworth Scale fingers: mean (standard deviation) 1.9 ±0.7 vs. 2.5 ±0.6; Modified Ashworth Scale wrist: 2.0 ±0.7 vs. 2.6 ±0.6; Disability Assessment Scale: 1.6 ±0.7 vs. 2.1 ±0.7) compared with Group B subjects. Subjects in Group A reported also a significantly improved fingers position at rest compared with Group B subjects after two weeks (2.8 ±0.9 vs. 2.1 ±0.7) and one month (2.3 ±0.7 vs. 1.5 ±0.6). Adhesive taping of wrist and finger flexor muscles appeared to enhance the effect of botulinum toxin type A therapy more than daily manual muscle stretching combined with passive articular mobilization and palmar splint. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Electromyography of the upper limbs during computer work: a comparison of 2 wrist orthoses in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrigno, Iracema Serrat Vergotti; Cliquet, Alberto; Magna, Luis Alberto; Zoppi Filho, Américo

    2009-07-01

    To examine the effect of wrist orthoses on the electromyography activities of the extensor carpi ulnaris, flexor digitorum superficialis, and fibers of the upper trapezius muscles during computer work. A randomized, 3 x 2 factorial design: orthoses (no orthosis, wearing a custom-made orthosis, wearing a commercial orthosis) and tasks (typing, using the mouse). Laboratory for biomechanics and rehabilitation. Healthy university students (N=23), ranging from 18 to 26 years of age. Study volunteers performed standardized tasks such as typing and using the mouse while wearing 1 of 2 types of wrist orthoses or no orthosis. We used surface electromyography and considered 100% maximum voluntary contraction to represent the amplitude of electromyographic activity. We observed a significant increase in the electromyographic activity of the trapezius (Porthoses. No significant difference was observed in the activities of the flexor digitorum superficialis or extensor carpi ulnaris in participants who typed with or without orthoses (P>.05). However, when the participants used the mouse, the extensor muscle presented an increase in activity with both orthoses, and the same pattern was observed in the flexor muscle when the volunteers used the custom-made orthosis. Wrist orthoses affected the muscle activities in the upper limbs of healthy adults who were using a computer. Electromyographic activity increased in the trapezius when the subjects used either type of orthosis, and the same pattern was observed in the extensor carpi ulnaris when the subjects used the mouse. The flexor digitorum superficialis presented an increase in activity only when the subjects worked with the mouse and used a custom-made splint.

  8. Development of wrist rehabilitation robot and interface system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Ikuo; Matsui, Miki; Inagawa, Naohiro; Hachisuka, Kenji; Wada, Futoshi; Hachisuka, Akiko; Saeki, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    The authors have developed a practical wrist rehabilitation robot for hemiplegic patients. It consists of a mechanical rotation unit, sensor, grip, and computer system. A myoelectric sensor is used to monitor the extensor carpi radialis longus/brevis muscle and flexor carpi radialis muscle activity during training. The training robot can provoke training through myoelectric sensors, a biological signal detector and processor in advance, so that patients can undergo effective training of extention and flexion in an excited condition. In addition, both-wrist system has been developed for mirror effect training, which is the most effective function of the system, so that autonomous training using both wrists is possible. Furthermore, a user-friendly screen interface with easily recognizable touch panels has been developed to give effective training for patients. The developed robot is small size and easy to carry. The developed aspiring interface system is effective to motivate the training of patients. The effectiveness of the robot system has been verified in hospital trails.

  9. Effect of pillow size preference on extensor digitorum communis muscle strength and electromyographic activity during maximal contraction in healthy individuals: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia-Chi; Chan, Rai-Chi; Wu, Han-Lin; Lai, Chih-Jou

    2015-03-01

    Cervical pillow height is an important factor that affects the perception of pillow comfort. However, few studies have addressed methods for predicting a patient's preferred cervical pillow size. We studied the effect of pillow size preference on the strength and electromyographic (EMG) signals of the upper extremity muscle. If the response of the upper extremity muscle is affected by pillow size preference, this would aid in devising an alternate strategy for selecting the optimal pillow size. Twenty-nine healthy individuals (mean age: 28.6 years, range: 24-55 years) participated in this study. The participants performed isometric maximal finger extension in the supine position with their heads supported on four different size preferences of cervical pillow (the most comfortable, next most comfortable, worst, and next worst). Maximal contraction force and peak-to-peak EMG amplitude of the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) during contraction were measured. One-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to evaluate the effect of pillow size preference. We also explored the relationship between anthropometric parameters and the individual's cervical pillow height preference. The two most comfortable pillows were associated with significantly larger maximal EDC force than the two worst pillows. However, no significant differences in EMG were observed between pillows. No statistically significant correlation was found between anthropometric parameters and pillow height preference. The results suggest that anatomical body measurements are not good predictors of optimal pillow height. As EDC muscle strength is affected by pillow height preference, maximal EDC muscle strength may be a useful complement for selecting the optimal pillow size. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  10. Effect of exercise-induced enhancement of the leg-extensor muscle-tendon unit capacities on ambulatory mechanics and knee osteoarthritis markers in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanidis, Kiros; Oberländer, Kai Daniel; Niehoff, Anja; Epro, Gaspar; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Leg-extensor muscle weakness could be a key component in knee joint degeneration in the elderly because it may result in altered muscular control during locomotion influencing the mechanical environment within the joint. This work aimed to examine whether an exercise-induced enhancement of the triceps surae (TS) and quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle-tendon unit (MTU) capacities would affect mechanical and biological markers for knee osteoarthritis in the elderly. Twelve older women completed a 14-week TS and QF MTU exercise intervention, which had already been established as increasing muscle strength and tendon stiffness. Locomotion mechanics and serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) levels were examined during incline walking. MTU mechanical properties were assessed using simultaneously ultrasonography and dynamometry. Post exercise intervention, the elderly had higher TS and QF contractile strength and tendon-aponeurosis stiffness. Regarding the incline gait task, the subjects demonstrated a lower external knee adduction moment and lower knee adduction angular impulse during the stance phase post-intervention. Furthermore, post-intervention compared to pre-intervention, the elderly showed lower external hip adduction moment, but revealed higher plantarflexion pushoff moment. The changes in the external knee adduction moment were significantly correlated with the improvement in ankle pushoff function. Serum COMP concentration increased in response to the 0.5-h incline walking exercise with no differences in the magnitude of increment between pre- and post-intervention. This work emphasizes the important role played by the ankle pushoff function in knee joint mechanical loading during locomotion, and may justify the inclusion of the TS MTU in prevention programs aiming to positively influence specific mechanical markers for knee osteoarthritis in the elderly. However, the study was unable to show that COMP is amenable to change in the elderly following a

  11. Tennis in hot and cool conditions decreases the rapid muscle torque production capacity of the knee extensors but not of the plantar flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Olivier; Racinais, Sébastien; Périard, Julien D

    2014-04-01

    To assess the time course of changes in rapid muscle force/torque production capacity and neuromuscular activity of lower limb muscles in response to prolonged (∼2 h) match-play tennis under heat stress. The rates of torque development (RTD) and electromyographic activity (EMG; ie, root mean square) rise were recorded from 0 to 30, -50, -100 and -200 ms during brief (3-5 s) explosive maximal isometric voluntary contractions (MVC) of the knee extensors (KE) and plantar flexors (PF), along with the peak RTD within the entirety of the torque-time curve. These values were recorded in 12 male tennis players before (prematch) and after (postmatch, 24 and 48 h) match-play in HOT (∼37°C) and COOL (∼22°C) conditions. The postmatch core temperature was greater in the HOT (∼39.4°C) vs COOL (∼38.7°C) condition (ptorque. Furthermore, the rate of KE EMG activity rise remained unchanged. Conversely, the PF contractile RTD and rate of EMG activity rise were unaffected by the exercise or environmental conditions. In the KE, a reduction in maximal torque production capacity following prolonged match-play tennis appears to account for the decrease in the rate of torque development, independent of environmental conditions, while remaining unchanged in the PF.

  12. Muscle fatigue in relation to forearm pain and tenderness among professional computer users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kryger Ann I

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the hypothesis that forearm pain with palpation tenderness in computer users is associated with increased extensor muscle fatigue. Methods Eighteen persons with pain and moderate to severe palpation tenderness in the extensor muscle group of the right forearm and twenty gender and age matched referents without such complaints were enrolled from the Danish NUDATA study of neck and upper extremity disorders among technical assistants and machine technicians. Fatigue of the right forearm extensor muscles was assessed by muscle twitch forces in response to low frequency (2 Hz percutaneous electrical stimulation. Twitch forces were measured before, immediately after and 15 minutes into recovery of an extensor isometric wrist extension for ten minutes at 15 % Maximal Voluntary Contraction (MVC. Results The average MVC wrist extension force and baseline stimulated twitch forces were equal in the case and the referent group. After the fatiguing contraction, a decrease in muscle average twitch force was seen in both groups, but the decrease was largest in the referent group: 27% (95% CI 17–37 versus 9% (95% CI -2 to 20. This difference in twitch force response was not explained by differences in the MVC or body mass index. Conclusion Computer users with forearm pain and moderate to severe palpation tenderness had diminished forearm extensor muscle fatigue response. Additional studies are necessary to determine whether this result reflects an adaptive response to exposure without any pathophysiological significance, or represents a part of a causal pathway leading to pain.

  13. Wrist osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulan, J; Marteau, E; Bacle, G

    2015-02-01

    Painful wrist osteoarthritis can result in major functional impairment. Most cases are related to posttraumatic sequel, metabolic arthropathies, or inflammatory joint disease, although wrist osteoarthritis occurs as an idiopathic condition in a small minority of cases. Surgery is indicated only when conservative treatment fails. The main objective is to ensure pain relief while restoring strength. Motion-preserving procedures are usually preferred, although residual wrist mobility is not crucial to good function. The vast array of available surgical techniques includes excisional arthroplasty, limited and total fusion, total wrist denervation, partial and total arthroplasty, and rib-cartilage graft implantation. Surgical decisions rest on the cause and extent of the degenerative wrist lesions, degree of residual mobility, and patient's wishes and functional demand. Proximal row carpectomy and four-corner fusion with scaphoid bone excision are the most widely used surgical procedures for stage II wrist osteoarthritis secondary to scapho-lunate advanced collapse (SLAC) or scaphoid non-union advanced collapse (SNAC) wrist. Proximal row carpectomy is not indicated in patients with stage III disease. Total wrist denervation is a satisfactory treatment option in patients of any age who have good range of motion and low functional demands; furthermore, the low morbidity associated with this procedure makes it a good option for elderly patients regardless of their range of motion. Total wrist fusion can be used not only as a revision procedure, but also as the primary surgical treatment in heavy manual labourers with wrist stiffness or generalised wrist-joint involvement. The role for pyrocarbon implants, rib-cartilage graft implantation, and total wrist arthroplasty remains to be determined, given the short follow-ups in available studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Force variability during isometric wrist flexion in highly skilled and sedentary individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonikidis, Konstantinos; Amiridis, Ioannis G; Oxyzoglou, Nikolaos; de Villareal, Eduardo Saez Saez; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2009-12-01

    The association of expertness in specific motor activities with a higher ability to sustain a constant application of force, regardless of muscle length, has been hypothesized. Ten highly skilled (HS group) young tennis and handball athletes and 10 sedentary (S group) individuals performed maximal and submaximal (5, 10, 20, 50, and 75% of the MVC) isometric wrist flexions on an isokinetic dynamometer (Kin-Com, Chattanooga). The wrist joint was fixed at five different angles (230, 210, 180, 150, and 1300). For each position the percentages of the maximal isometric force were calculated and participants were asked to maintain the respective force level for 5 s. Electromyographic (EMG) activation of the Flexor Carpi Ulnaris and Extensor Digitorum muscles was recorded using bipolar surface electrodes. No significant differences were observed in maximal isometric strength between HS and S groups. Participants of HS group showed significantly (P wrist angles. The CV and SD values remained unaltered regardless of wrist angle. No difference in normalized agonist and antagonist EMG activity was observed between the two groups. It is concluded that long-term practice could be associated with decreased isometric force variability independently from muscular length and coactivation of the antagonist muscles.

  15. Newly-discovered muscle in the larva of Patella coerulea (Mollusca, Gastropoda) suggests the presence of a larval extensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, Peter; Dictus, Wim J.A.G.

    2002-01-01

    The development of the muscular system of the gastropod mollusc Patella has been thoroughly studied. As a result, two larval retractors, the main and accessory larval retractor, had been described in the larva of Patella. These muscles were supposed to be responsible for the retraction of the larval

  16. Effects of β₂-agonists on force during and following anoxia in rat extensor digitorum longus muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsted, A; Gissel, H; Ortenblad, N

    2012-01-01

    of salbutamol on force recovery were prevented by blocking the Na(+),K(+)- pumps with ouabain or by blocking glycolysis with 2-deoxyglucose. Dibutyryl cAMP (1 mM) or theophylline (1 mM) also improved force recovery remarkably. In anoxic muscles, salbutamol decreased intracellular Na(+), increased (86)Rb uptake...

  17. Input-output properties of motor unit responses in muscles stretched by imposed displacements of the monkey wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatton, W G; Bawa, P

    1979-01-01

    Reflex responses are "servo-like" where the output is graded with the input or are "triggered" where the output is independent of input once an input threshold is exceeded. Imposed displacements of monkey or human upper limb joints result in prolonged EMG output in the muscles stretched by the displacements. The longer-latency portions of the prolonged output have been variously reported to be servo-like or to be triggered in nature. In monkeys and humans, angular wrist displacements imposed by step loads result in three peaks (M1, M2 and M3) in the gross EMG recorded from the stretched muscles. Each gross EMG peak largely results from the firing of a separately-responding subpopulation of single motor units (SMUs). We studied the responses of SMUs to loads that were presented to the monkeys in a random order as to magnitude, duration and onset time. Average response histograms were constructed for the SMU responses for individual step load magnitudes. Averages were also constructed for the simultaneously-recorded gross EMG responses for each step load magnitude. The input parameters used were the initial velocity of displacement or the magnitude of step load, while the output was taken as the probability of firing/millisecond/presentation above baseline for the SMUs or the area under the response peaks above baseline for gross EMG. The results establish: 1) That it is not possible to unambiguously determine the input-output properties of the responses to imposed displacements utilizing the analysis of gress EMG activity due to the response characteristics of the various subpopulations of motor units contributing to the gross response. 2) That the SMU activity during all of the peak intervals is monotonically graded with increases in magnitude of the step load or the initial velocity of displacement. Hence, the long-latency portions of the EMG responses are servo-like in nature and are not preprogrammed or triggered responses. 3) That the gain (output/input) of the

  18. Can a wearable strain sensor based on a carbon nanotube network be an alternative to an isokinetic dynamometer for the measurement of knee-extensor muscle strength?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlikaya, Ruhan; Ege, Yavuz; Pündük, Zekine; Slobodian, Petr; Meriç, Gökhan

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to find out whether a wearable strain sensor including thermoplastic polyurethane composite with a multi-walled carbon nanotube network could be a viable alternative to an isokinetic dynamometer for the measurement of knee-extensor muscle strength. For the first time, the voltage-torque and angle-time relations of the sensor were determined to allow a comparison between the angle-dependent torque changes of the dynamometer and the sensor. This comparison suggested that the torque-angle relations of the dynamometer and the sensor did not have the same characteristics. In this regard, the sensor may be used in the torque measurements due to the moderate correlation between the torque values determined via the isokinetic dynamometer and the sensor and due to the significant difference between low and high torque values of the sensor. By the same token, the torque-angle graph of the sensor may be more informative than that of the dynamometer in evaluation of knee problems.

  19. Baseline Mechanical and Neuromuscular Profile of Knee Extensor and Flexor Muscles in Professional Soccer Players at the Start of the Pre-Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-García Oscar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the mechanical and neuromuscular profile of knee extensor and flexor muscles in professional soccer players at the start of the pre-season, and to calculate percentages for symmetry, as well as examine differences according to the player’s positional role. The vastus medialis (VM, vastus lateralis (VL, rectus femoris (RF and biceps femoris (BF of 16 professional soccer players were evaluated by means of tensiomyography (TMG on the first day of the pre-season. A paired-samples t test (p < .05 was used to compare the dominant and non-dominant lower limb. One-way ANOVA was applied, with the positional role as an independent factor. No differences were observed between the dominant and non-dominant leg. The highest degree of symmetry corresponded to the VM (92.5 ± 2.7%, and the lowest to the BF (80.7 ± 10.9%. The positional role was associated with significant differences in some of the variables for the BF, RF and VM, although only the half-relaxation time in the BF and the time to sustain force in the VM differed across all the playing positions considered. TMG was shown to be a useful way of evaluating the neuromuscular characteristics of soccer players at the start of the pre-season, and of establishing baseline values for individual players.

  20. Effect of myofascial release technique on pain, disability, maximum isometric contraction of the extensor muscles, and pressure pain threshold in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain: Double blinded randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan Namvar; Gholamreza olyaei; Behrouz Attarbashi Moghadam; Mohammad Hosseinifar

    2016-01-01

    The impact of myofascial release technique alone has not been investigated in the patients with non-specific chronic neck pain. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the impacts of myofascial release technique on pain, disability, the maximum contraction of isometric extensor muscles of neck and pressure pain threshold in the patient with non-specific chronic neck pain compared with control group. In this clinical, randomized, double-blind trial, the patients with non-specific chr...

  1. Measurement of intraarticular wrist joint biomechanics with a force controlled system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Stefanie; Lutz, Martin; Arora, Rohit; Schmoelz, Werner

    2012-09-01

    Pathologies of the wrist, such as fractures or instabilities, can lead to alterations in joint biomechanics. Accurate treatment of these pathologies is a frequent challenge for the surgeon. For biomechanical investigations, a test-setup that applies physiological loading of the wrist joint is necessary. A force controlled test-bench with agonistic and antagonistic muscle forces was built to move six fresh frozen human upper extremities through flexion and extension of the wrist joint. Tendon forces, range of motion, intraarticular contact area and contact pressure of the lunate and scaphoid facet as well as tendon excursion were investigated and compared with the current literature. During wrist motion the extensors exerted double the force of the flexors. Capsulotomy and sensor insertion decreased the range of motion from 63.4° (SD 14.1) to 45.9° (SD 23.7). The ratio of force transmitted through the radius and ulna was 77:23 and pressure distribution between the scaphoid and lunate facet showed a 70:30 relationship. The obtained data indicate a good agreement with the available literature. Therefore, the force controlled test-bench in combination with intraarticular radiocarpal measurements can be used to investigate the influence of wrist pathologies on joint biomechanics. Copyright © 2011 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The effects of a muscle resistance program on the functional capacity, knee extensor muscle strength and plasma levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in pre-frail elderly women: a randomized crossover clinical trial - a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias João MD

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increase in the elderly population, a growing number of chronic degenerative diseases and a greater dependency on caregivers have been observed. Elderly persons in states of frailty remain more susceptible to significant health complications. There is evidence of an inverse relationship between plasma levels of inflammatory mediators and levels of functionality and muscle strength, suggesting that muscle-strengthening measures can aid in inflammatory conditions. The purpose of this study will be verified the effect of a muscle-strengthening program with load during a ten-week period in pre-frail elderly women with attention to the following outcomes: (1 plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, (2 functional capacity and (3 knee extensor muscle strength. Methods/Design The study design is a randomized crossover clinical trial evaluating 26 elderly women (regardless of their race and/or social condition who are community residents, older than 65, and classified as pre-frail according to the criteria previously described by Fried et al. (2004. All subjects will be assessed using the Timed up and go and 10-Meter Walk Test functional tests. The plasma levels of IL-6 and TNF-α will be assessed by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with high sensitivity kits (Quantikine®HS, R&D Systems Minneapolis, MN, U.S.. Knee extensor muscle strength will be assessed using the Byodex System 3 Pro® isokinetic dynamometer at angular speeds of 60 and 180°/s. The intervention will consist of strengthening exercises of the lower extremities at 50 to 70% of 1RM (maximal resistance three times per week for ten weeks. The volunteers will be randomized into two groups: group E, the intervention group, and group C, the control group that did not initiate any new activities during the initial study period (ten weeks. After the initial period, group C will begin the intervention and group E will

  3. High-intensity, unilateral resistance training of a non-paretic muscle group increases active range of motion in a severely paretic upper extremity muscle group after stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Urbin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Limited rehabilitation strategies are available for movement restoration when paresis is too severe following stroke. Previous research has shown that high-intensity resistance training of one muscle group enhances strength of the homologous, contralateral muscle group in neurologically-intact adults. How this cross education phenomenon might be exploited to moderate severe weakness in an upper extremity muscle group after stroke is not well understood. The primary aim of this study was to examine adaptations in force-generating capacity of severely paretic wrist extensors resulting from high-intensity, dynamic contractions of the non-paretic wrist extensors. A secondary, exploratory aim was to probe neural adaptations in a subset of participants from each sample using a single-pulse, transcranial magnetic stimulation protocol. Separate samples of neurologically-intact controls (n=7 and individuals > 4 months post stroke (n=6 underwent 16 sessions of training. Following training, one-repetition maximum of the untrained wrist extensors in the control group and active range of motion of the untrained, paretic wrist extensors in the stroke group were significantly increased. No changes in corticospinal excitability, intracortical inhibition or interhemispheric inhibition were observed in control participants. Both stroke participants who underwent TMS testing, however, exhibited increased voluntary muscle activation following the intervention. In addition, motor-evoked potentials that were unobtainable prior to the intervention were readily elicited afterwards in a stroke participant. Results of this study demonstrate that high-intensity resistance training of a non-paretic upper extremity muscle group can enhance voluntary muscle activation and force-generating capacity of a severely paretic muscle group after stroke. There is also preliminary evidence that corticospinal adaptations may accompany these gains.

  4. Wrist Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... wrist. These can include football, bowling, golf, gymnastics, snowboarding and tennis. Repetitive work. Almost any activity that ... guards for high-risk activities, such as football, snowboarding and rollerblading. Pay attention to ergonomics. If you ...

  5. Comparison of the Effects of Massage and Cryotherapy on the Knee Extensor Muscles Fatigue and Isokinetic Parameters in Soccer Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Razeghi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fatigue can cause a significant effect on the mechanics of complex motor skills and reduce physical and mental efficiency. One of the common ways to reduce fatigue is passive recovering or using massage and cryotherapy after exercise. The present study aimed to compare the effects of massage and cryotherapy on muscles fatigue and isokinetic parameters. Methods: This study was conducted on 54 healthy athletes aged 20-30 years who were randomly divided into three groups: cooling (ice therapy, massage, and control (resting. Each of the volunteers was evaluated in two sessions. The first session was to familiarize the participants with isokinetic contraction. The second session started with a brief warm up subsequently, using Biodex Isokinetic System Average Peak Torque (APTQ, Average Power (AP, and Total Work (TW were measured. Then, the fatigue protocol was applied. Afterwards, interventions were performed for 15 minutes. After the intervention, isokinetic parameters were evaluated again. Also, perceived fatigue and Fatigue Index (FI were recorded before and after the intervention. Results: APTQ, AP, and TW significantly increased in massage and cryotherapy groups after the intervention, while perceived fatigue and FI decreased significantly in both conditions (P0.05, but perceived fatigue and FI decreased significantly (P0.05. Conclusion: Massage and cryotherapy could increase isokinetic parameters and decrease FI and perceived fatigue. Therefore, massage and cryotherapy have been more effective than rest as a strategy to return to normal state and no significant difference was observed between these two groups.

  6. Wrist Actigraphy

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Jennifer L.; Hakim, Alex D.

    2011-01-01

    To record sleep, actigraph devices are worn on the wrist and record movements that can be used to estimate sleep parameters with specialized algorithms in computer software programs. With the recent establishment of a Current Procedural Terminology code for wrist actigraphy, this technology is being used increasingly in clinical settings as actigraphy has the advantage of providing objective information on sleep habits in the patient’s natural sleep environment. Actigraphy has been well valid...

  7. De quervain tenosynovitis of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, Asif M; Ilyas, Asif; Ast, Michael; Schaffer, Alyssa A; Thoder, Joseph

    2007-12-01

    De quervain disease, or stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist, is a common wrist pathology. Pain results from resisted gliding of the abductor pollicis longus and the extensor pollicis brevis tendons in the fibro-osseus canal. de Quervain tenosynovitis of the wrist is more common in women than men. Diagnosis may be made on physical examination. Radiographs are helpful in ruling out offending bony pathology. Nonsurgical management, consisting of corticosteroid injections and supportive thumb spica splinting, is usually successful. In resistant cases, surgical release of the first dorsal compartment is done, taking care to protect the radial sensory nerve and identify all accessory compartments. Repair of the extensor retinaculum by step-cut lengthening or other techniques is rarely required.

  8. Empleo del colgajo muscular extensor digitorum brevis con flujo retrógrado para defectos distales en el pie Use of reverse flow extensor digitorum brevis muscle flap for distal foot defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. De Lope Falcón

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Los colgajos en isla con vascularización distal y, entre ellos, el colgajo muscular Extensor Digitorum Brevis, son en la actualidad una opción excelente para conseguir la cobertura satisfactoria de los defectos de tejidos blandos a nivel del dorso del pie y de los dedos. En este artículo revisamos casos publicados por otros autores de defectos distales del pie, resueltos mediante este colgajo muscular, así como estudios anatómicos sobre la vascularización del mismo y presentamos 2 casos intervenidos en nuestro Servicio en los que obtuvimos una cobertura satisfactoria y una pronta recuperación, sin complicaciones vasculares, morbilidad de la zona donante o limitación funcional; solo una hipoestesia persistente a nivel del dorso del pie.Island flaps with distal vascularization, including Extensor Digitorum Brevis flap, are an excellent choice for achieving satisfactory coverage of soft tissues defects at the back of the feet and fingers. In this article we review the use of this flap by other authors in distal foot defect and the anatomical studies about its vascularization. We report 2 cases operated on our Department of Plastic Surgery with distal foot defects solved with this flap. We obtained a satisfactory coverage and a speedy recovery. No vascular complications, morbidity of the donor site or functional limitation were noticed. The only complaint was persistent hypoaesthesia on the back foot.

  9. Traumatic Extensor Tendon Injuries to the Hand: Clinical Anatomy, Biomechanics, and Surgical Procedure Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colzani, Giulia; Tos, Pierluigi; Battiston, Bruno; Merolla, Giovanni; Porcellini, Giuseppe; Artiaco, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The extensor apparatus is a complex muscle-tendon system that requires integrity or optimal reconstruction to preserve hand function. Anatomical knowledge and the understanding of physiopathology of extensor tendons are essential for an accurate diagnosis of extensor tendon injuries (ETIs) of the hand and wrist, because these lesions are complex and commonly observed in clinical practice. A careful clinical history and assessment still remain the first step for the diagnosis, followed by US and MR to confirm the suspect of ETI or to investigate some doubtful conditions and rule out associate lesions. During last decades the evolution of surgical techniques and rehabilitative treatment protocol led to gradual improvement in clinical results of ETI treatment and surgical repair. Injury classification into anatomical zones and the evaluation of the characteristics of the lesions are considered key points to select the appropriate treatment for ETI. Both conservative and surgical management can be indicated in ETI, depending on the anatomical zone and on the characteristics of the injuries. As a general rule, an attempt of conservative treatment should be performed when the lesion is expected to have favorable result with nonoperative procedure. Many surgical techniques have been proposed over the time and with favorable results if the tendon injury is not underestimated and adequately treated. Despite recent research findings, a lack of evidence-based knowledge is still observed in surgical treatment and postoperative management of ETI. Further clinical and biomechanical investigations would be advisable to clarify this complex issue. PMID:27616821

  10. Decreased task duration and unchanged trunk muscle activity in low-back pain patients during stair climbing after back extensor muscle fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Østergaard, Gert Værge; Brogner, Heidi Marie

    2014-01-01

    Low-back pain (LBP) is a major problem. Spine control and stability mechanisms are important but the knowledge of these parameters in functions is sparse. 7 healthy / 5 recurrent mild-to-moderate LBP patients participated in assessment of abdominal, lumbar and gluteal muscles' surface EMG and vid...

  11. Assessment of muscle endurance of the knee extensor muscles in adolescents with spastic cerebral palsy using a submaximal repetitions-to-fatigue protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eken, Maaike M; Dallmeijer, Annet J; Doorenbosch, Caroline A; Dekkers, Hurnet; Becher, Jules G; Houdijk, Han

    2014-10-01

    To compare muscle endurance in adolescents with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) with typically developing (TD) peers using a submaximal repetitions-to-fatigue (RTF) protocol. Cross sectional. Human motion laboratory. Adolescents with spastic CP (n=16; Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I or II) and TD adolescents (n=18) within the age range of 12 to 19 years old. Not applicable. Each participant performed 3 RTF tests at different submaximal loads, ranging from 50% to 90% of their maximal voluntary knee extension torque. The relation between the number of repetitions (repetition maximum [RM]) and imposed submaximal relative (percent of maximal voluntary torque [%MVT]) and absolute (Nm/kg) torque was quantified. To compare adolescents with CP with TD adolescents, a mixed linear model was used to construct load endurance curves. Surface electromyography of quadriceps muscles was measured to assess changes in normalized amplitude and median frequency (MF) as physiological indicators of muscle fatigue. Adolescents with CP showed a larger decrease in %MVT per RM than TD adolescents (Pmuscles in all tests for both groups. Electromyographic MF decreased significantly (Pmuscle fatigue were reached. Adolescents with CP show slightly lower muscle endurance compared with TD adolescents on a submaximal RTF protocol, which is in contrast with earlier findings in a maximal voluntary fatigue protocol. Accordingly, adolescents with CP have a reduced capacity to endure activities at similar relative loads compared with TD adolescents. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Trabalho e potência dos músculos extensores e flexores do joelho de pacientes com osteoartrite e com artroplastia total de joelho Work and power of the knee flexor and extensor muscles in patients with osteoarthritis and after total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Bastiani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: As manifestações inflamatórias decorrentes da osteoartrite (OA de joelho provocam inibição muscular, levando à hipotrofia muscular e à consequente diminuição do trabalho e da potência musculares. A artroplastia total de joelho (ATJ é a cirurgia mais adequada para o tratamento da OA em graus avançados. Entretanto, seus efeitos sobre o comportamento funcional dos músculos ainda não foram bem esclarecidos. OBJETIVO: Comparar o trabalho total e a potência dos extensores e flexores do joelho de indivíduos com OA (20 e ATJ (12 em duas velocidades angulares de flexo-extensão de joelho (60º/s e 240º/s. MÉTODOS: O dinamômetro isocinético Biodex foi utilizado para avaliar a potência e o trabalho musculares em contrações isocinéticas. A ANOVA Two-Way para medidas repetidas foi utilizada para comparar os dados de trabalho total e potência entre os grupos (SPSS versão 13.0; nível de significância P 0,05. Também não houve diferença para a potência entre os grupos (extensores e flexores (P > 0,05. Conclusão: O trabalho total e a potência não diferiram entre os grupos com OA e com ATJ, sugerindo que a ATJ não produziu melhora na capacidade funcional, que foi semelhante entre os dois grupos.INTRODUCTION: The inflammatory manifestations of knee osteoarthritis (OA lead to muscle inhibition and hypotrophy, resulting in a reduction in total muscle work and muscle power. Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is the most adequate surgery for the treatment of advanced OA. However, its effects on muscle functional behavior have not been well understood. OBJECTIVE: To compare the total work and power of the knee flexor and extensor muscles in patients with OA (20 and in patients post-TKA (12 at two angular velocities (60º/sec and 240º/sec. Methods: An isokinetic Biodex dynamometer was used to assess muscle power and total work during isokinetic contractions. Two-way ANOVA for repeated measures was used to compare total muscle

  13. The addition of electrical stimulation to progressive resistance training does not enhance the wrist strength of people with tetraplegia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinsky, Joanne; Harvey, Lisa; van Es, Pauline; Chee, Shane; Gandevia, Simon C

    2009-08-01

    To determine whether the addition of electrical stimulation to progressive resistance training increases the voluntary strength of the wrist muscles in people with tetraplegia. Assessor-blind within-subject randomised controlled trial. Two Australian spinal cord injury units and the community. Sixty-four wrists of 32 people with tetraplegia and bilateral weakness of the wrist extensor or flexor muscles (grade 2 - 4 Medical Research Council grades). Participants' wrists were randomly allocated to one of two conditions. Wrist muscles of the experimental arm received electrical stimulation superimposed on progressive resistance training. The wrist muscles of the contralateral arm received sham electrical stimulation superimposed on progressive resistance training. Both arms received 6 sets of 10 contractions three times a week for eight weeks such that the only difference between arms was the application of electrical stimulation. The primary outcome was maximal voluntary isometric strength. Secondary outcomes were a fatigue resistance ratio representing voluntary and electrically-stimulated endurance. Measurements were taken at the start and end of the eight-week treatment period. The mean treatment effect (95% Confidence Interval) of electrical stimulation for voluntary strength was 0.04 Nm (95% CI, -0.5 to 0.6; p =0.89). The mean treatment effect (95% CI) for fatigue ratio representing voluntary endurance and electrically-stimulated endurance was -0.01 (95% CI, -0.1 to 0.1; p =0.78) and -0.07 (95% CI, -0.3 to 0.1; p =0.47), respectively. Voluntary strength of the wrist is not enhanced by the addition of electrical stimulation to progressive resistance training programs in people with tetraplegia.

  14. A cross-sectional study comparing strength profile of dorsal and palmar flexor muscles of the wrist in epicondylitis and healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unyó, C; Chaler, J; Rojas-Martínez, M; Pujol, E; Müller, B; Garreta, R; Mañanas, M A

    2013-08-01

    Strength training has been proposed by several authors to treat Lateral Epicondylitis. However, there is still a lack of information concerning muscle weakness and its relationship to imbalances and fatigability of forearm muscles during dynamic conditions in subjects after epicondylitis recovery. To analyze the relationship between lateral humeral epicondylitis, and forearm muscle strength and fatigue. Rehabilitation specialized center Cross-sectional study in eight former epicondylitis men free of symptoms and actively working at the moment of the evaluation and eight healthy men volunteers. Isokinetic tests were performed at different velocities in order to assess strength in concentric and eccentric contractions. Additionally, a long-term concentric test was carried out in order to analyze strength during endurance. The following variables were analyzed: Average torque of dorsal and palmar flexors of the wrist and ratio of agonist/antagonist for non-endurance contractions; length of initial and final plateaus and the slope of average torque decay during the endurance test. In both groups, average torque produced by palmar flexor muscles was higher than that produced by dorsal flexor muscles. Patients showed higher strength in palmar flexor muscles, whereas dorsal flexor strength was similar for both populations. Palmar flexor vs. dorsal flexor ratio was significantly higher in patients for eccentric contractions. Regarding fatigue, results showed that torque decreased earlier in patients. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: Both palmar flexor force and palmar/dorsal ratio in eccentric exercise were significantly higher in patients. This finding indicates a muscular imbalance in patients underlying the epicondylitis condition. Additionally, former patients fatigued earlier. Findings indicate that muscle imbalances and fatigability might be related to lateral epicondylitis. This information may be useful in the design and monitoring of programs

  15. REHABILITATATION FOR EXTENSOR HALLUCIS LONGUS AND EXTENSOR DIGITORUM LONGUS TENDINOPATHY – AN EXERCISE PACKAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Oskar, Sten

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to create an exercise package containing research proven evidence based exercises for Extensor Hallucis Longus and Extensor Digitorum Longus muscles for strengthening purposes. The exercise package consists of eccen-tric exercises that have been proven to be beneficial in treating tendon problems. The exercise package will be provided to be implemented by the players and coaches of the co-operating bandy team. The thesis was done in collaboration with Pori N...

  16. Effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on the wrist and finger flexor spasticity and hand functions in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldızgören, Mustafa Turgut; Nakipoğlu Yüzer, Güldal Funda; Ekiz, Timur; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on wrist range of motion, wrist and finger flexor spasticity, and hand functions in patients with unilateral cerebral palsy. Twenty-four children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (14 boys and 10 girls) between the ages of 5 and 14 years were randomized into neuromuscular electrical stimulation and control groups. Conventional exercises were applied, and static volar wrist-hand orthosis was administered to all patients 5 days a week for 6 weeks. Additionally, 30-minute neuromuscular electrical stimulation sessions were applied to the wrist extensor muscles in the neuromuscular electrical stimulation group. Patients were evaluated by Zancolli Classification System, Manual Ability Classification System, and Abilhand-Kids Test. Compared with baseline, a significant increase was evident in active wrist extension angle at the fourth and sixth weeks in both groups (all P spasticity values in the neuromuscular electrical stimulation group at the fourth and sixth weeks (P = 0.002 and P = 0.001, respectively) and in the control group only at the sixth week (P = 0.008). Abilhand-Kids values improved only in the neuromuscular electrical stimulation group (P spasticity, and hand functions in cerebral palsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of postural muscle fatigue on the relation between segmental posture and movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabran, E; Maton, B; Fourment, A

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether fatigue of postural muscles might influence the coordination between segmental posture and movement. Seven healthy adults performed series of fifteen fast wrist flexions and extensions while being instructed to keep a dominant upper limb posture as constant as possible. These series of voluntary movements were performed before and after a fatiguing submaximal isometric elbow flexion, and also with or without the help of an elbow support. Surface EMG from muscles Deltoïdeus anterior, Biceps brachii, Triceps brachii, Flexor carpi ulnaris, Extensor carpi radialis were recorded simultaneously with wrist, elbow and shoulder accelerations and wrist and elbow displacements. Fatigue was evidenced by a shift of the elbow and shoulder muscles EMG spectra towards low frequencies. Kinematics of wrist movements and corresponding activations of wrist prime-movers, as well as the background of postural muscle activation before wrist movement were not modified. There were only slight changes in timing of postural muscle activations. These data indicate that postural fatigue induced by a low-level isometric contraction has no effect on voluntary movement and requires no dramatic adaptation in postural control.

  18. Surgical correction of ulnar deviation deformity of the wrist in patients with birth brachial plexus palsy sequelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Praveen; Parekh, Harshil; Venkatramani, Hari; Raja Sabapathy, S

    2015-01-01

    Ulnar deviation deformity of the wrist in patients with birth brachial plexus palsy is an important cosmetic concern among the patients and their relatives; especially in the patients who have recovered the basic limb functions. Though there is ample literature available regarding the management of the shoulder deformity there is paucity of literature regarding management of wrist ulnar deviation deformity. We report our experience with correction of this deformity in five cases with isolated ulnar deviation deformity without forearm rotational deformity or weakness of the wrist muscles. All the patients underwent extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) to extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) tendon transfer. At a minimum of 18 months follow-up all the patients and their families were satisfied with the cosmetic appearance of the limb. Correction of the deformity improves the appearance of the limb, improves self-confidence of the child, and allows them to integrate well into the society. Interestingly, the patients expressed improvement in their grip strength and overall hand function after this surgery. The notable functions which improved were easy reach of the hand-to-mouth for feeding and easy handling of the things requiring bimanual activities. Although the main aim of this operation was to correct the appearance of the hand it was found to be also functionally useful by the patients and hence we are encouraged to report it for wider use. The results were maintained during the follow-up period of as long as 47 months.

  19. Tuberculous Tenosynovitis Presenting as Ganglion of Wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahaji Chavan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is still endemic in many developed countries. Involvement of the hand and wrist at presentation is extremely rare, and the diagnosis is often missed. A 57 years old male presented with swelling over the left wrist since 3 years Three swellings over dorsal aspect of the left wrist Soft in consistency Non tender Non compressible Mobile at right angles to the plane of the wrist joint. ESR: 45 mm in 1 hr and rest blood investigations were normal. Ultrsonography showed giant cell tumor of Extensor Digitorum sheath. X-ray: soft tissue swelling and MRI was suggestive of extensor tendon sheath extraskeletal synovial Koch’s, or giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Excision of swelling was planned and intraoperatively, rice bodies were seen inside it. Histopathological examination showed caseous necrosis with granuloma formation. Patient was put on DOT1 therapy. Tuberculous tenosynovitis was first described by Acrel in 1777. Rice bodies occurring in joints affected by tuberculosis were first described in 1895 by Reise. Rice bodies will be diagnosed on plain radiographs when mineralization occurs. More than 50% of cases recur within 1 year of treatment. The currently recommended 6-month course is often adequate with extensive curettage lavage and synovectomy should be performed. Surgery is essential, but the extent of surgical debridement is still debatable. The surgeon has to be aware of the significance of loose bodies when performing routine excision of innocuous looking wrist ganglia.

  20. Effect of myofascial release technique on pain, disability, maximum isometric contraction of the extensor muscles, and pressure pain threshold in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain: Double blinded randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Namvar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The impact of myofascial release technique alone has not been investigated in the patients with non-specific chronic neck pain. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the impacts of myofascial release technique on pain, disability, the maximum contraction of isometric extensor muscles of neck and pressure pain threshold in the patient with non-specific chronic neck pain compared with control group. In this clinical, randomized, double-blind trial, the patients with non-specific chronic neck pain have been entered the study by the available sampling method and have been located randomly into two groups of myofascial release therapy group, and control group. Pressure pain threshold, pain intensity, disability and isometric power of neck extensor muscles before and after intervention were registered through pressure algometer, visual analogue scale, neck disability index, and pressure biofeedback. The treatment was performed for 4 sessions and each session for 20 minutes. The paired t-tests and independent t-test were used for within group and between group comparison respectively. Comparing the mean of pain intensity, pressure pain threshold, neck disability index in the intervention group compared with control group showed significant reduction (P0.05. Myofascial Release is one of the effective manual therapy techniques in reducing pain, disability, improving the isometric extension strength of neck in patients with nonspecific chronic neck pain.

  1. Hazards of steroid injection: Suppurative extensor tendon rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woon Colin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Local steroid injections are often administered in the office setting for treatment of trigger finger, carpal tunnel syndrome, de Quervain′s tenosynovitis, and basal joint arthritis. If attention is paid to sterile technique, infectious complications are rare. We present a case of suppurative extensor tenosynovitis arising after local steroid injection for vague symptoms of dorsal hand and wrist pain. The progression of signs and symptoms following injection suggests a natural history involving bacterial superinfection leading to tendon rupture. We discuss the pitfalls of local steroid injection and the appropriate management of infectious extensor tenosynovitis arising in such situations.

  2. Placebo effect of facilitatory Kinesio tape on muscle activity and muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Dominic Ngo-Tung; Au, Ivan Pui-Hung; Chan, Mavis; Chan, Zoe Yau-Shan; An, Winko Wenkang; Zhang, Janet Hanwen; Draper, David; Cheung, Roy Tsz-Hei

    2018-02-20

    Kinesio tape (KT) is claimed to be able to facilitate muscle activation and promote muscle strength. Previous studies have proposed that placebo effect could be a major attributing factor. This study sought to compare the effects of facilitatory KT on muscle activity and performance between regular KT-users and non-users. Sixty participants, including 27 regular KT-users and 33 non-users, performed maximal grip assessment with and without facilitatory KT, which was applied to their wrist extensor muscles of the dominant forearm from the direction of origin to insertion at 75% of its maximal tension. Within-subject comparisons of normalized root mean square of the wrist extensors electromyographic activity, maximal grip strength, and perceived performance were conducted. KT-users showed an increase in grip strength with application of facilitatory KT, when compared to tapeless condition (p = 0.030, Cohen's d = 0.16). Non-users demonstrated similar grip strength with and with KT application (p = 0.232). No significant differences were found in the muscle activity (p > 0.198) and perceived performance (p > 0.400) in both groups. Facilitatory KT promotes maximal grip strength only among regular KT users, but its effect is trivial. Interestingly, such effect is not related to any electrophysiological change in the KT applying muscle, which may indicate an indirect working mechanism leading to the increased grip strength.

  3. Research and development of compact wrist rehabilitation robot system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Ikuo; Inagawa, Naohiro; Matsui, Miki; Hachisuka, Kenji; Wada, Futoshi; Hachisuka, Akiko

    2014-01-01

    Compact rehabilitation robot system which can support movement of the wrist of patients has been developed. The robot system can detect and analyze the patient's intention to move the wrist by such a biological signal as muscle potential, then, assist the wrist exercise of patients. Also, both-wrist rehabilitation robot system by mirror effect has been successfully developed for practical use in the hospital and at home.

  4. Comparison of EMG during passive stretching and shortening phases of each muscle for the investigation of parkinsonian rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yuri; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Ji-Sun; Koh, Seong-Beom; Eom, Gwang-Moon; Lim, Tae-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis in the literature that torque resistance of parkinsonian rigidity is the difference between the independent contributions of stretched and shortened muscles. The hypothesis was tested using muscle-specific stretch-shortening (MSSS) EMG ratio in this study. Nineteen patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and 18 healthy subjects (the mean age comparable to that of patients) participated in this study. The EMG activity was measured in the four muscles involved in wrist joint movement, i.e. flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis and extensor carpi ulnaris. The passive flexion-extension movement with a range of ±30∘ was applied at wrist joint. Root mean squared (RMS) mean was calculated from the envelope of the EMG for each of stretching and shortening phases. MSSS EMG ratio was defined as the ratio of RMS EMG of stretching phase and RMS EMG of shortening phase of a single muscle, and it was calculated for each muscle. MSSS EMG ratios were smaller than one in all muscles. These results indicate that all wrist muscles generate greater mean EMG during shortening than during stretching. Therefore, the torque resistance of parkinsonian rigidity cannot be explained as the simple summation of independent antagonistic torque pair.

  5. de Quervain disease: US identification of anatomic variations in the first extensor compartment with an emphasis on subcompartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Jung; Ahn, Jae Hong; Lee, Young-Jun; Ryu, Dae Sik; Lee, Jong Hyeog; Jung, Seung Moon; Park, Man Soo; Lee, Ki Won

    2011-08-01

    To demonstrate the usefulness of ultrasonography (US) in the detection of anatomic variations in the first extensor compartment of the wrist in patients with de Quervain disease. The institutional review board approved this study protocol and waived the informed consent requirement. Fifteen wrists in 13 women (age range, 41-62 years) in whom de Quervain disease was clinically diagnosed and who underwent surgery for intractable pain were included. A musculoskeletal radiologist performed US before surgery. The absence or presence and extent of subcompartmentalization within the first extensor compartment and the number of abductor pollicis longus (APL) and extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) tendon slips were evaluated and recorded. Preoperative US findings were compared with surgical records and photographs. Subcompartmentalization within the first extensor compartment was observed during surgery in 11 of the 15 wrists (73%), including four (27%) that had subcompartmentalization only in the distal portion of this compartment. US was used to identify all 11 wrists showing subcompartmentalization within this compartment (sensitivity, 100%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 74%, 100%), as well as three of the four wrists with distal incomplete subcompartmentalization. There was one wrist with false-positive distal incomplete subcompartmentalization. US had a positive predictive value in the detection of subcompartmentalization of 73% (95% CI: 47%, 91%). The number of tendon slips in this compartment detected with US was identical to that identified at surgery with one exception. US can be used to depict various types of anatomic variations in the first extensor compartment in patients with de Quervain disease. © RSNA, 2011.

  6. Dissociation between behavior and motor cortical excitability before and during ballistic wrist flexion and extension in young and old adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Hortobágyi

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with slow reactive movement generation and poor termination.We examined the hypothesis that the build-up of excitability in the primary motor cortex in the agonist muscle to generate ballistic wrist flexion and extension and in the antagonist to stop the movement, is lower and slower in old compared with young adults.We measured the size of the motor potentials evoked (MEP produced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, background integrated EMG (iEMG, and the MEP:iEMG ratio in healthy young (23 y, n = 14 and old adults' (73 y, n = 14 wrist flexors and extensors as they rapidly flexed or extended the wrist in response to an auditory cue. TMS was delivered at 80% of resting motor threshold randomly in 20 ms increments between 130 and 430 ms after the tone.Even though old compared to young adults executed the two wrist movements with ~23% longer movement duration and ~15% longer reaction time (both p < 0.05, the rise in MEP:iEMG ratio before the main similar in the two age groups.These data suggest that an adjustment of current models might be needed to better understand how and if age affects the build-up excitability accompanying movement generation and termination.

  7. Efficacy of Kinesiology Taping for Recovery from Occupational Wrist Disorders Experienced by a Physical Therapist

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this paper was to report the efficacy of kinesiology taping for recovery from wrist pain and limited range of motion (ROM) in a physical therapist with repetitive strain injuries. [Subjects] A 32 year-old male physical therapist developed recurring severe pain in the dominant wrist and limited active ROM with extremely painful supination. [Methods] The kinesiology tape was applied to the lumbricals, musculi interossei dorsales, palmares, the wrist extensor and flexor musc...

  8. Wrist Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome, he or she might order an electromyogram (EMG). This test measures the tiny electrical discharges produced in your muscles. A needle-thin electrode is inserted into the muscle, and its electrical ... as part of an EMG to assess if the electrical impulses are slowed ...

  9. Mobile input device type, texting style and screen size influence upper extremity and trapezius muscle activity, and cervical posture while texting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietrys, David M; Gerg, Michael J; Dropkin, Jonathan; Gold, Judith E

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of input device type, texting style, and screen size on upper extremity and trapezius muscle activity and cervical posture during a short texting task in college students. Users of a physical keypad produced greater thumb, finger flexor, and wrist extensor muscle activity than when texting with a touch screen device of similar dimensions. Texting on either device produced greater wrist extensor muscle activity when texting with 1 hand/thumb compared with both hands/thumbs. As touch screen size increased, more participants held the device on their lap, and chose to use both thumbs less. There was also a trend for greater finger flexor, wrist extensor, and trapezius muscle activity as touch screen size increased, and for greater cervical flexion, although mean differences for cervical flexion were small. Future research can help inform whether the ergonomic stressors observed during texting are associated with musculoskeletal disorder risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Efeitos da crioterapia e facilitação neuromuscular proprioceptiva sobre a força muscular nas musculaturas flexora e extensora de joelho Effects of cryotherapy and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation on muscle strength at the flexor and extensor muscles of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana Moreira Mortari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available As musculaturas flexora e extensora do joelho são freqüentemente lesionadas devido a um desequilíbrio entre esses grupos. Recursos térmicos, como a crioterapia, e técnicas de alongamento, como a técnica mantém-relaxa da facilitação neuromuscular proprioceptiva (FNP, influenciam a flexibilidade e força muscular, proporcionando maior homogeneidade entre essas musculaturas e diminuindo a incidência de lesões. Este estudo objetivou verificar os efeitos da crioterapia e da FNP sobre a força das musculaturas flexora e extensora de joelho. A amostra foi composta por 18 mulheres com idade entre 18 e 24 anos, não-praticantes de atividade física regular, divididas em dois grupos: um submetido a crioterapia e o outro à técnica mantém-relaxa da FNP. Antes e após uma sessão de aplicação das técnicas foi feita avaliação isocinética. A aplicação da técnica mantém-relaxa provocou aumento da força em ambas as musculaturas em ambos os membros, atingindo nível de significância nos flexores do membro inferior direito (p=0,04. A crioterapia diminuiu a força dos extensores e exerceu efeito contrário sobre os flexores, tendo gerado aumento significativo nos flexores do membro inferior direito (p=0,035. Quando comparadas as técnicas, a técnica mantém-relaxa gerou maiores valores de pico de torque, principalmente nos extensores do membro inferior esquerdo (p=0,042. Conclui-se que a técnica mantém-relaxa da FNP gerou maiores valores no pico de torque em relação à crioterapia.Knee extensor and flexor muscles are often injured due to an imbalance between these groups, which may lead to a deficit in muscle performance. Thermal resources, such as cryotherapy, and stretching techniques, such as the "hold-relax" of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF, influence flexibility and muscle strength and may reduce the chances of muscle tendon injuries. The aim of the study was to verify the effects of cryotherapy and of the PNF

  11. Effect of pillow size preference on extensor digitorum communis muscle strength and electromyographic activity during maximal contraction in healthy individuals: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Chi Wang

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: The results suggest that anatomical body measurements are not good predictors of optimal pillow height. As EDC muscle strength is affected by pillow height preference, maximal EDC muscle strength may be a useful complement for selecting the optimal pillow size.

  12. Muscle Recruitment and Coordination following Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy with Electrical Stimulation on Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaishou Xu

    Full Text Available To investigate changes of muscle recruitment and coordination following constraint-induced movement therapy, constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation, and traditional occupational therapy in treating hand dysfunction.In a randomized, single-blind, controlled trial, children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy were randomly assigned to receive constraint-induced movement therapy (n = 22, constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation (n = 23, or traditional occupational therapy (n = 23. Three groups received a 2-week hospital-based intervention and a 6-month home-based exercise program following hospital-based intervention. Constraint-induced movement therapy involved intensive functional training of the involved hand during which the uninvolved hand was constrained. Electrical stimulation was applied on wrist extensors of the involved hand. Traditional occupational therapy involved functional unimanual and bimanual training. All children underwent clinical assessments and surface electromyography (EMG at baseline, 2 weeks, 3 and 6 months after treatment. Surface myoelectric signals were integrated EMG, root mean square and cocontraction ratio. Clinical measures were grip strength and upper extremity functional test.Constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation group showed both a greater rate of improvement in integrated EMG of the involved wrist extensors and cocontraction ratio compared to the other two groups at 3 and 6 months, as well as improving in root mean square of the involved wrist extensors than traditional occupational therapy group (p<0.05. Positive correlations were found between both upper extremity functional test scores and integrated EMG of the involved wrist as well as grip strength and integrated EMG of the involved wrist extensors (p<0.05.Constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation is likely to produce the best outcome in improving muscle recruitment

  13. Acute effects of Kinesio taping on muscle strength and fatigue in the forearm of tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shen; Fu, Weijie; Pan, Jiahao; Wang, Lin; Xia, Rui; Liu, Yu

    2016-06-01

    To explore the immediate effects of Kinesio taping applied over the wrist extensors and flexors on muscle strength and endurance during isometric and isokinetic muscle actions. The study had a single-blinded, placebo control, and randomized design. Fourteen trained male volunteers were required to complete 5s isometric maximal voluntary contractions and 50 consecutive maximal concentric wrist extension and flexion repetitions at each of two angular speeds (60°/s and 210°/s) in three taping conditions: Kinesio taping (KT), placebo taping (PT), and no taping (NT). KT did not improve peak moment, peak power, average power, and total work for wrist extensors and flexors in the isometric and isokinetic contractions. However, KT showed a 13% decrease in work fatigue of the wrist flexors compare to NT (p=0.014) at 60°/s. Furthermore, a 20% decrease was also observed in the rate of decline of moment (k) of the wrist flexors in KT compared to NT (p=0.007), and the k in PT was also significantly lower in magnitude compared to NT (p=0.035). Moreover, there was also a trend in terms of magnitudes for kKTtaping may not be able to modulate strength production in healthy athletes immediately, but does have a significant positive effect on reducing muscle fatigue during repeated concentric muscle actions. Additionally, the potential beneficial effects of placebo taping on muscle endurance should not be ignored either. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A comparative evaluation of sonomyography, electromyography, force, and wrist angle in a discrete tracking task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing-Yi; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Kenney, Laurence P J; Bowen, Audrey; Howard, David; Canderle, Jiri J

    2011-06-01

    We have previously used the real-time change of muscle thickness detected using ultrasound, namely sonomyography (SMG), for prosthesis motor control purposes. In the present study, we further compared subjects' performance using SMG and surface electromyography (EMG) in a series of discrete tracking tasks, both with and without a concurrent auditory attention task. Sixteen healthy subjects used different signals in a random order to control the cursor on a personal computer screen to cancel the letter "E" in a sequence of vertically arranged letters. Subjects' performance was evaluated under isometric contraction and wrist extension using the extensor carpi radiali muscle. The percentage of successfully cancelled Es using SMG decreased by 21 ± 16% and 17 ± 11% in isometric contraction and wrist extension tests, respectively, compared with the corresponding performances using force and angle signals. The corresponding reduction recorded by using EMG was 40 ± 29% and 41 ± 25%. In addition, there was a significant decrease by using EMG compared with that by SMG (p 0.99). Furthermore, the SMG control provided more consistent performances under the single and dual tasks compared with EMG control. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An electromyography study of wrist extension orthoses and upper-extremity function

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bulthaup, S; Cipriani, 3rd, D J; Thomas, J J

    1999-01-01

    This study examined the effect of commonly used long and short styles of commercially produced wrist extension orthoses on the activity of the proximal muscles of the shoulder and elbow and on wrist...

  16. Hand and Wrist Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Hand Tumors and Wrist Tumors Email to a friend * ... are seen commonly. CAUSES Common Types of Wrist Hand Tumors Ganglion Cysts (Figure 1): This is the ...

  17. Wrist sprain - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000568.htm Wrist sprain - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... that hold bones together. When you sprain your wrist, you have pulled or torn one or more ...

  18. Wrist anatomy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a compartment called the carpal tunnel in the wrist. The ligaments that transverse the nerve are not ... flexible. If there is any swelling within the wrist compartment excessive pressure can be put on structures ...

  19. Muscle activation patterns of knee flexors and extensors during passive and active movement of the spastic lower limb in chronic stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleuren, J.F.M.; Fleuren, J.F.M.; Snoek, G.J.; Voerman, Gerlienke; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of spasticity, quantified as muscle activity during stretch, during passive and active movement. For this cross sectional study 19 stroke patients with spasticity in the lower limb were recruited. Reflex activity was studied with surface

  20. Wrist arthrodesis: review of current techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebson, P J; Adams, B D

    2001-01-01

    Wrist arthrodesis is a well-established procedure that predictably relieves pain and provides a stable wrist for power grip. Although a variety of techniques for achieving a solid fusion have been described, the combination of rigid stabilization with a dorsal plate and autogenous cancellous bone grafting results in a high fusion rate and obviates the need for prolonged postoperative cast immobilization. Successful results with dorsal plating with or without local bone graft have recently been reported for patients with posttraumatic conditions. Rod or pin fixation is an established procedure for patients with inflammatory arthritis or a connective tissue disorder; however, plate fixation for these conditions is becoming a more acceptable alternative. Complications are relatively common and range from minor transient problems to major problems, such as wound dehiscence, infection, extensor tendon adhesions, and plate tenderness, which may require implant removal. Preoperatively, patients should be assessed for the presence of carpal tunnel syndrome, distal radioulnar joint arthritis, or ulnocarpal impaction syndrome, which may become or remain symptomatic after arthrodesis. Wrist arthrodesis results in a high degree of patient satisfaction with respect to pain relief and correction of deformity. Patients are able to accomplish most daily tasks and activities by learning to adapt to, and compensate for, the loss of wrist motion.

  1. Variations in abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis tendons in the Quervain syndrome: a surgical and anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulthanan, Teerawat; Chareonwat, Boonsong

    2007-01-01

    Eighty-two wrists of Thai cadavers and the wrists of 66 patients with de Quervain syndrome were studied, and the variation in the number of tendons and the fibro-osseous tunnel in the first extensor compartment were recorded. The abductor pollicis longus had more than one tendon in 73 of the cadavers (89%) and in 32 of the patients (49%) (p Quervain syndrome (p = 0.01). The results indicate that the number of fibro-osseous tunnels and multiple compartments in the first extensor compartment may be associated with a predisposition to de Quervain syndrome.

  2. 3D motion analysis of the wrist splint effect to wrist joint movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Joong-Il; Park, Soo-Hee

    2017-06-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the degree of straightness of the wrist joint, depending on the use of a wrist splint while opening a bottle cap. Its results may provide data for later studies on preventing accidents at workplaces and improving efficiency. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty Male and Female in their twenties who did not have hand-related diseases, fractures, or history that included neurological impairments associated with the hand were selected as subjects of the study. Wrist splints were made to fit the hand and lower arm of each subject. Evaluation assignments were carried out without and with the splints after 10 minutes of rest. To analyze the wrist movement in opening the bottle cap, a three-dimensional movement analyzing system by Zebris was used. [Results] Wrist angle decreased while opening caps of four different diameters while wearing splints, but not when splints were not worn. This means that wearing a splint may aid weakened wrist muscles. [Conclusion] Future studies should be conducted among subjects with damaged wrist muscles and evaluate the subjects in actual workplaces to obtain more objective and more valid data.

  3. The effect of overcommitment and reward on muscle activity, posture, and forces in the arm-wrist-hand region – a field study among computer workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijckelhof, B.H.W.; Bruno Garza, J.L.; Huysmans, M.A.; Blatter, B.M.; Johnson, P.W.; Dieën, J.H. van; Beek, A.J. van der; Dennerlein, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Office workers with high levels of overcommitment and low levels of reward are thought to be more prone to arm-wrist-hand symptoms, possibly through a higher internal physical exposure. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of high overcommitment and low reward on (i) forearm

  4. Three-dimensional Doppler ultrasound findings in healthy wrist and finger tendon sheaths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzboll-Danielsen, Mads; Janta, Iustina; Torp-Pedersen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim was to investigate the presence of feeding vessels in or in close proximity to extensor and flexor tendon sheaths at the wrists level and in finger flexor tendon sheaths in healthy controls, using 3D ultrasound (US), which may cause pitfalls, in order to ensure correct interpre......Background The aim was to investigate the presence of feeding vessels in or in close proximity to extensor and flexor tendon sheaths at the wrists level and in finger flexor tendon sheaths in healthy controls, using 3D ultrasound (US), which may cause pitfalls, in order to ensure correct...

  5. MRI features in de Quervain`s tenosynovitis of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glajchen, N. [Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Schweitzer, M. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-01-01

    De Quervain`s stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal extensor component is traditionally diagnosed clinically but may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. A retrospective review of wrist MR images was performed in cases where the diagnosis of de Quervain`s synovitis was suggested (n=5). Imaging findings were correlated with clinical findings in four cases and with wrist arthroscopy in one case. Increased thickness of the extensor pollicus brevis and abductor pollicis longus tendons was the most reliable finding on MRI, being present in all cases. Peritendinous edema was also a reliable finding. Surrounding subcutaneous edema and increased intratendinous signal were less reliable findings in confirmed cases of de Quervain`s disease. De Quervain`s tenosynovitis may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. Increased tendon thickness and peritendinous edema are the most reliable imaging findings. (orig.)

  6. Wasting of Extensor Digitorum Brevis as a Decisive Preoperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This study appraises the clinical implication of observing for the wasting of EDB muscle so as to aid in the diagnosis of lumbar canal stenosis. This simple bedside clinical pearl can help us in predicting the need of further imaging studies and also in taking right therapeutic decision. Keywords: Extensor digitorum ...

  7. Electrical activity in muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, C R; deVries, H A; Urban, R T; Luekens, C A; Bagg, R J

    1975-04-01

    The concept of muscle pain-spasm-pain vicious cycle has been challenged on the basis of inability to find electrical activity in the presence of palpable changes in fibrositic muscle. We produced muscle pain in the wrist extensor and paravertebral muscle groups of seven healthy subjects by injection of hypertonic saline (0.3 ml of 6% NaCl solution). The time course of the integrated muscle action potentials, roughly paralleled the time course of the developed pain in all but one subject for each muscle group. EMG recordings were made on one subject using both surface electrodes with amplifier sensitivity of 10 muV/cm and needle electrodes with an amplifier sensitivity of 100 muV/cm. Sequential recording showed clear evidence of electrical activity from the surface electrode and high sensitivity whereas the combination of the needle electrode with lower sensitivity showed no electrical activity whatever. We conclude that even mild muscle spasm is accompanied by muscular hyperactivity which can be evaluated by appropriate EMG techniques. There appears to be no reason to challenge the widely accepted concept of pain-spasm-pain as stated by Travell, Rinzler and Herman.

  8. Effects of short-term isokinetic training with reciprocal knee extensors agonist and antagonist muscle actions: A controlled and randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Cunha

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that preloading an antagonist muscle may increase the acute agonist neuromuscular performance. In addition, studies have suggested that very short-term resistance exercise (RE programs may also be useful to increase strength and muscular performance. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of three days of RE using a reciprocal action method on the muscular performance of healthy men and to compare these effects with those of a traditional RE group. METHOD: Thirty-three men (21.1 ± 2.3 years were randomly assigned to one of three groups: 1 reciprocal (REC; knee flexion immediately followed by a knee extension exercise; 2 traditional (TRA; non-preload; a concentric knee extension exercise; and 3 control (CON; no exercise. The REC and TRA subjects performed four sets of 10 repetitions at 60º/s with one minute of rest. The pre- and post-RE tests included two sets of four maximal concentric repetitions at 60º/s and 180º/s. A 3x2 ANOVA with Tukey post-hoc was used to analyze the differences in peak torque (PT, rating of acceleration development (RAD and time to peak torque (TIMEtorque. RESULTS: A significant PT increase was found for REC and TRA (p CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: Estudos demonstraram que a pré-ativação de músculos antagonistas pode aumentar o desempenho neuromuscular agonista. Além disso, estudos sugerem que programas de exercício resistido (ER de curta duração podem ser úteis para aumentar a força muscular e o desempenho. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar os efeitos de três sessões de ER por meio do método de ações recíprocas no desempenho muscular de homens sadios e comparar com um grupo de ER tradicional. MÉTODO: Trinta e três homens (21,1 ± 2,3 anos foram randomicamente alocados em três grupos: Recíproco (REC: uma repetição de flexão do joelho imediatamente seguida por uma de extensão do joelho; Tradicional (TRA: exercício concêntrico de extensão do joelho e Controle (CON: não realizaram

  9. Education in wrist arthroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obdeijn, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is an initiative for improving the education of residents in surgical skills and knowledge by using the current technical possibilities. The choice of wrist arthroscopy was driven by the fact that novel techniques have recently been developed within hand and wrist surgery

  10. Unilateral strength training leads to muscle-specific sparing effects during opposite homologous limb immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrushko, Justin W; Lanovaz, Joel L; Björkman, Kelsey M; Kontulainen, Saija A; Farthing, Jonathan Peter

    2017-12-14

    Cross-education (CE) occurs after unilateral training whereby performance of the untrained contralateral limb is enhanced. A handful of studies have shown that CE can spare the strength and size of an opposite immobilized limb, but specificity (i.e., trained homologous muscle and contraction type) of these effects is unknown. The purpose was to investigate specificity of CE "sparing" effects with immobilization. The non-dominant forearm of 16 participants was immobilized with a cast and participants were randomly assigned to a resistance training (eccentric wrist flexion, 3 times/week) or control group for four weeks. Pre- and post-testing involved wrist flexors and extensors muscle thickness (via ultrasound), eccentric, concentric and isometric maximal voluntary contractions (via dynamometer), and forearm muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA, via peripheral quantitative computed tomography). Only the training group showed strength preservation across all contractions in the wrist flexors of the immobilized limb (Training: -2.4% vs. -21.6%; P =0.04), and increased wrist flexors strength of the non-immobilized limb (Training: 30.8% vs. -7.4%; P =0.04). Immobilized arm MCSA was preserved for the training group only (Training: 1.3% vs. -2.3%; P =0.01). Muscle thickness differed between groups for the immobilized (Training: 2.8% vs. -3.2%; P =0.01) and non-immobilized wrist flexors (Training: 7.1% vs. -3.7%; P =0.02). Strength preservation was non-specific to contraction type (P =0.69, η p 2 =0.03), yet specific to the trained flexors muscle. These findings suggest that eccentric training of the non-immobilized limb can preserve size of the immobilized contralateral homologous muscle and strength across multiple contraction types.

  11. Wrist ultrasound examination – scanning technique and ultrasound anatomy. Part 2: Ventral wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyprian Olchowy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound imaging of the musculoskeletal system is an important element of the diagnostic and therapeutic protocol. Clinical decisions, including those regarding surgical procedures, are often based solely on ultrasound imaging. However, detailed knowledge on the anatomy and a correct scanning technique are crucial for an accurate diagnosis. Modern ultrasonographic equipment allows obtaining detailed anatomical images of muscle tendons, ligaments, nerves and vessels of the carpal area. Ventral wrist ultrasound is one of the most common diagnostic procedures in patients with suspected carpal tunnel syndrome. Ventral wrist evaluation is also often performed in patients with wrist pain of unclear etiology, rheumatic diseases, wrist injuries or symptoms of ulnar neuropathy. The aim of this paper is to present ultrasound images with corresponding anatomical schemes. The technique of ultrasound examination of the ventral wrist along with practical guidance to help obtain highly diagnostic images is also discussed. The present paper is the second part of an article devoted to ultrasound anatomy and wrist ultrasound technique – the part discussing the dorsal side of the wrist was published in the Journal of Ultrasonography, Vol. 15, No 61. The following anatomical structures should be visualized during an ultrasound examination of the ventral wrist, both in the carpal tunnel as well as proximally and distally to it: four flexor digitorum superficialis tendons, four flexor digitorum profundus tendons, flexor pollicis longus, flexor carpi radialis tendon, median nerve and flexor retinaculum; in the carpal tunnel as well as proximally and distally to it: the ulnar nerve, ulnar artery and veins; the tendon of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle; carpal joints.

  12. Avulsion Fracture of the Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Due to Roller Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yin Lee

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Avulsion fractures of the radial wrist extensor from the metacarpal base are rare injuries, and have previously been reported in only a few papers. Although 2 cases of closed rupture of the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU were mentioned in 1 report, no case of avulsion fracture of the ECU from its insertion was found in the literature. We recently encountered such a case. The patient, a machine operator, suffered multiple fractures of his forearm, wrist and hand when his left hand was caught in a machine roller. He immediately underwent emergency operation, during which we found the avulsed bone fragment from the ECU insertion. This fragment was retracted to the ECU groove of the ulna, and was located beside the fracture fragment of the ulnar styloid on X-ray. The avulsed fragment was reattached to the base of the fifth metacarpal with Kirschner wires and wire loop, and the patient returned to work 4 months after the operation.

  13. Wrist joint assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, L.; Johnson, J. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A wrist joint assembly is provided for use with a mechanical manipulator arm for finely positioning an end-effector carried by the wrist joint on the terminal end of the manipulator arm. The wrist joint assembly is pivotable about a first axis to produce a yaw motion, a second axis is to produce a pitch motion, and a third axis to produce a roll motion. The wrist joint assembly includes a disk segment affixed to the terminal end of the manipulator arm and a first housing member, a second housing member, and a third housing member. The third housing member and the mechanical end-effector are moved in the yaw, pitch, and roll motion. Drive means are provided for rotating each of the housings about their respective axis which includes a cluster of miniature motors having spur gears carried on the output drive shaft which mesh with a center drive gear affixed on the housing to be rotated.

  14. Dexterous Humanoid Robotic Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Nguyen, Vienny (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a torso, a pair of arms, a neck, a head, a wrist joint assembly, and a control system. The arms and the neck movably extend from the torso. Each of the arms includes a lower arm and a hand that is rotatable relative to the lower arm. The wrist joint assembly is operatively defined between the lower arm and the hand. The wrist joint assembly includes a yaw axis and a pitch axis. The pitch axis is disposed in a spaced relationship to the yaw axis such that the axes are generally perpendicular. The pitch axis extends between the yaw axis and the lower arm. The hand is rotatable relative to the lower arm about each of the yaw axis and the pitch axis. The control system is configured for determining a yaw angle and a pitch angle of the wrist joint assembly.

  15. Robo-Wrist Controller

    OpenAIRE

    Faraquddin Ahamed, Mohamed Athiq

    2015-01-01

    Robo-wrist controller is a Graphical User Interface (GUI) based application designed and developed to control, and monitor a wrist exoskeleton driven by micro-controllers. The software application is developed to better assist a physiotherapist in administering physical therapy to stroke patients with the help of the exoskeleton. Since the micro-controller device that directly controls the exoskeleton is not very intuitive to use and lacks visual feedback, a software application fills these g...

  16. MRI of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, Elizabeth A. [Department of MRI, St Mary' s Hospital, Praed St, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom)], E-mail: dickelizabeth@hotmail.com; Burnett, Carole; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw M.W. [Department of MRI, St Mary' s Hospital, Praed St, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist is increasingly recognised as the imaging modality of choice in wrist disorders as image resolution improves and clinicians realise its potential. Consequently the ability to confidently interpret such imaging will become more important to both general and musculoskeletal radiologists. This article reviews current optimal imaging protocols and describes common abnormalities with a particular emphasis on less well understood topics such as intercalated segment instability, the triangular fibrocartilage complex and carpal tunnel syndrome.

  17. A comparison of muscle activity in using touchscreen smartphone among young people with and without chronic neck-shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yanfei; Szeto, Grace P Y; Dai, Jie; Madeleine, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine differences in muscle activity between young people with and without neck-shoulder pain (n = 20 in each group), when they performed texting on a smartphone. Texting was compared between using both hands ('bilateral texting') and with only one hand ('unilateral texting'). Texting tasks were also compared with computer typing. Surface electromyography from three proximal postural muscles and four distal hand/thumb muscles on the right side was recorded. Compared with healthy controls, young people with neck-shoulder pain showed altered motor control consisting of higher muscle activity in the cervical erector spinae and upper trapezius when performing texting and typing tasks. Generally, unilateral texting was associated with higher muscle loading compared with bilateral texting especially in the forearm muscles. Compared with computer typing, smartphone texting was associated with higher activity in neck extensor and thumb muscles but lower activity in upper and lower trapezius as well as wrist extensors. This study demonstrated that symptomatic individuals had increased muscle activity in the neck–shoulder region when texting on a smartphone. Contemporary ergonomic guidelines should include advice on how to interact with handheld electronic devices to achieve a relaxed posture and reduced muscle load in order to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal disorders.

  18. Spontaneous Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Compartment Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sarah K; Singleton, James A G

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of isolated compartment syndrome within the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) compartment in the forearm of a 40-year-old diabetic man. Magnetic resonance imaging of his forearm showed isolated changes in the ECU muscle belly; compartment syndrome was confirmed on manometry. In view of the short history of symptoms and his diabetic status, the patient was managed conservatively. Twenty-four hours after onset of the symptoms, the pain and swelling resolved and he was able to be discharged. To date, 3 cases of ECU compartment syndrome secondary to trauma have been reported. This report illustrates a case of confirmed compartment syndrome without antecedent trauma, highly unusual in terms of both its etiology and its anatomical location. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The patellar extensor apparatus of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwek, Jerry R. [University of California at San Diego, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital and Health Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Chung, Christine B. [University of California at San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); VA Healthcare, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2008-09-15

    The patellar extensor apparatus is composed of the quadriceps muscles that converge to a central tendon that inserts on and invests the patella. It continues by the patellar tendon to act on the tibial tuberosity and thereby extends the leg at the knee. The structure can be thought of as a chain with pathology able to occur at each level. Pathological processes are generally caused by the great force experienced at each level both chronically and acutely. The forces are, however, greatly modified by the particular geometries present at each level. The various pathological processes and factors that modify them are reviewed at each level, beginning with the quadriceps musculature and ending at the terminal point of action, the tibial tuberosity. (orig.)

  20. Standard versus over-tensioning in the transfer of extensor indicis proprius to extensor pollicis longus for chronic rupture of the thumb extensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung-Weon; Kim, Chong-Kwan; Ahn, Byung-Woo; Kim, Dong-Hee; Kang, Seung-Hoon; Kang, Sang-Soo

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcomes of the over-tensioning technique compared with those of the standard tensioning technique in the transfer of extensor indicis proprius (EIP) to extensor pollicis longus (EPL) for the chronic rupture of the thumb extensor. Data were collected from patients who underwent tendon transfer using EIP between March 2003 and August 2011. 23 were treated with the standard tensioning technique and 25 patients (Group B) with the over-tensioning technique. While standard tension was maintained with the thumb in full extension and the wrist in 30° of flexion, over-tension was maintained with the thumb in full extension and the wrist in the neutral position. All patients were assessed for total range of motion, elevation and flexion deficit, the thumb grip and pinch strength, and the thumb and the index extension strength compared to the unaffected side, EIP-EPL evaluation as suggested by Lemmen et al. and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire (DASH). Group A: total range of motion 115°, elevation deficit 2.0 cm, combined flexion deficit 1.0 cm, thumb extension strength 75%, thumb grip strength 91%, and pinch strength 87%. Functional outcomes were 13 excellent, 6 good, 3 fair, and 1 poor. Median DASH score was 21.3 points. Group B: total range of motion 125°, elevation deficit 1.0 cm, combined flexion deficit 1.5 cm, thumb extension strength 85%, thumb grip strength 88%, and pinch strength 83%. Functional outcomes were 16 excellent, 7 good, 2 fair, and 0 poor. Median DASH score was 19.8 points. There are significant differences in the range of motion, elevation deficit, and extension strength of thumb between the two groups (p=.001, p=.001, and p=.028, respectively). While the functional outcomes of both groups were favorably acceptable in a majority of the patients, there were significant differences in aspects of range of motion, elevation deficit, and strength of the thumb between both

  1. Design and fuzzy logic control of an active wrist orthosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Ergin; Dogan, Erdi

    2017-08-01

    People who perform excessive wrist movements throughout the day because of their professions have a higher risk of developing lateral and medial epicondylitis. If proper precautions are not taken against these diseases, serious consequences such as job loss and early retirement can occur. In this study, the design and control of an active wrist orthosis that is mobile, powerful and lightweight is presented as a means to avoid the occurrence and/or for the treatment of repetitive strain injuries in an effective manner. The device has an electromyography-based control strategy so that the user's intention always comes first. In fact, the device-user interaction is mainly activated by the electromyography signals measured from the forearm muscles that are responsible for the extension and flexion wrist movements. Contractions of the muscles are detected using surface electromyography sensors, and the desired quantity of the velocity value of the wrist is extracted from a fuzzy logic controller. Then, the actuator system of the device comes into play by conveying the necessary motion support to the wrist. Experimental studies show that the presented device actually reduces the demand on the muscles involved in repetitive strain injuries while performing challenging daily life activities including extension and flexion wrist motions.

  2. Representation of individual forelimb muscles in primary motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Heather M; Park, Michael C; Belhaj-Saïf, Abderraouf; Cheney, Paul D

    2017-07-01

    Stimulus-triggered averaging (StTA) of forelimb muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity was used to investigate individual forelimb muscle representation within the primary motor cortex (M1) of rhesus macaques with the objective of determining the extent of intra-areal somatotopic organization. Two monkeys were trained to perform a reach-to-grasp task requiring multijoint coordination of the forelimb. EMG activity was simultaneously recorded from 24 forelimb muscles including 5 shoulder, 7 elbow, 5 wrist, 5 digit, and 2 intrinsic hand muscles. Microstimulation (15 µA at 15 Hz) was delivered throughout the movement task and individual stimuli were used as triggers for generating StTAs of EMG activity. StTAs were used to map the cortical representations of individual forelimb muscles. As reported previously (Park et al. 2001), cortical maps revealed a central core of distal muscle (wrist, digit, and intrinsic hand) representation surrounded by a horseshoe-shaped proximal (shoulder and elbow) muscle representation. In the present study, we found that shoulder and elbow flexor muscles were predominantly represented in the lateral branch of the horseshoe whereas extensors were predominantly represented in the medial branch. Distal muscles were represented within the core distal forelimb representation and showed extensive overlap. For the first time, we also show maps of inhibitory output from motor cortex, which follow many of the same organizational features as the maps of excitatory output. NEW & NOTEWORTHY While the orderly representation of major body parts along the precentral gyrus has been known for decades, questions have been raised about the possible existence of additional more detailed aspects of somatotopy. In this study, we have investigated this question with respect to muscles of the arm and show consistent features of within-arm (intra-areal) somatotopic organization. For the first time we also show maps of how inhibitory output from motor cortex is

  3. Effect of wrist position on distal radioulnar joint stability: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Akio; Omokawa, Shohei; Moritomo, Hisao; Omori, Shinsuke; Kataoka, Toshiyuki; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Wada, Takuro; Fujimiya, Mineko; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2014-10-01

    We investigated distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) stability in different wrist positions and examined the relative contribution of each ligamentous component of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) to DRUJ stability. We used nine fresh-frozen cadavers. The humerus and ulna were fixed at 90° elbow flexion. The radiocarpal unit was translated relative to the ulna in dorsopalmar directions with the wrist in five positions. Displacement of the unit was measured by an electromagnetic tracking device. Magnitudes of displacement were compared between different wrist positions in various sectioning stages: ulnocarpal ligament (UCL) sectioning, radioulnar ligaments (RUL) sectioning, and extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) floor sectioning. Wrist position and sectioning stage significantly influenced the displacement. In intact wrists, the displacement in wrist extension was significantly lower than that in neutral. However, after UCL sectioning, there were no longer any significant differences. After RUL sectioning, the displacement in radial deviation was significantly lower than that in neutral. Following ECU floor sectioning, there were no longer any significant differences. Thus, in intact wrists, DRUJ stability in wrist extension is likely due to tightening of the UCL. After complete RUL sectioning, DRUJ is stabilized in radial deviation due to tightening of the ECU floor. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Isometric knee-extensor torque development and jump height in volleyball players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C.J.; Vermeulen, G.; Toussaint, H.M.; de Haan, A.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: The goal of the present study was to determine the contribution of the intrinsic muscle properties and muscle activation of the knee extensors to the maximal rate of unilateral isometric torque development and to relate both factors to maximal bilateral jumping performance in experienced

  5. Efficacy of pre-operative quadriceps strength training on knee-extensor strength before and shortly following total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Rasmus Skov; Troelsen, Anders; Thorborg, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    -surgical treatment to be tried prior to surgical procedures. Patients with knee OA are characterized by decreased muscle strength, particularly in the knee-extensor muscles. Correspondingly, decreased knee-extensor strength is found to be associated with an increased risk of development, progression and severity...... of knee OA symptoms. Recent trials suggest a positive effect of pre-operative exercise on pre- and post-operative outcome; however, the most effective pre-operative knee-extensor strength exercise dosage is not known. The purpose of the present trial is to investigate the efficacy of three different...... exercise dosages of pre-operative, home-based, knee-extensor strength exercise on knee-extensor strength before and shortly after surgery in patients eligible for TKA due to end-stage knee OA. METHODS: In this randomized dose-response trial with a three-arm parallel design, 140 patients with end-stage knee...

  6. Extramuscular myofascial force transmission within the rat anterior tibial compartment: Proximodistal differences in muscle force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.; Baan, G.C.

    2001-01-01

    Intramuscular connective tissues are continuous to extramuscular connective tissues. If force is transmitted there, differences should be present between force at proximal and distal attachments of muscles. Extensor digitorum longus (EDL), tibialis anterior (TA), and extensor hallucis longus muscles

  7. Colles wrist fracture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    The initial recovery from a wrist fracture can take 3 to 4 months or more. You may need physical therapy. You should start working with a physical therapist as soon as your provider recommends. The work may seem hard and at times ...

  8. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during active wrist motion--initial observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Robert D; Buonocore, Michael H; Immerman, Igor; Ashwell, Zachary; Sonico, Gerald J; Szabo, Robert M; Chaudhari, Abhijit J

    2013-01-01

    Non-invasive imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide the ability to evaluate the complex anatomy of bone and soft tissues of the wrist without the use of ionizing radiation. Dynamic instability of wrist--occurring during joint motion--is a complex condition that has assumed increased importance in musculoskeletal medicine. The objective of this study was to develop an MRI protocol for evaluating the wrist during continuous active motion, to show that dynamic imaging of the wrist is realizable, and to demonstrate that the resulting anatomical images enable the measurement of metrics commonly evaluated for dynamic wrist instability. A 3-Tesla "active-MRI" protocol was developed using a bSSFP sequence with 475 ms temporal resolution for continuous imaging of the moving wrist. Fifteen wrists of 10 asymptomatic volunteers were scanned during active supination/pronation, radial/ulnar deviation, "clenched-fist", and volarflexion/dorsiflexion maneuvers. Two physicians evaluated distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) congruity, extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendon translation, the scapholunate (SL) interval, and the SL, radiolunate (RL) and capitolunate (CL) angles from the resulting images. The mean DRUJ subluxation ratio was 0.04 in supination, 0.10 in neutral, and 0.14 in pronation. The ECU tendon was subluxated or translated out of its groove in 3 wrists in pronation, 9 wrists in neutral, and 11 wrists in supination. The mean SL interval was 1.43 mm for neutral, ulnar deviation, radial deviation positions, and increased to 1.64 mm during the clenched-fist maneuver. Measurement of SL, RL and CL angles in neutral and dorsiflexion was also accomplished. This study demonstrates the initial performance of active-MRI, which may be useful in the investigation of dynamic wrist instability in vivo.

  9. Real-Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) during Active Wrist Motion—Initial Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Robert D.; Buonocore, Michael H.; Immerman, Igor; Ashwell, Zachary; Sonico, Gerald J.; Szabo, Robert M.; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-invasive imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide the ability to evaluate the complex anatomy of bone and soft tissues of the wrist without the use of ionizing radiation. Dynamic instability of wrist – occurring during joint motion – is a complex condition that has assumed increased importance in musculoskeletal medicine. The objective of this study was to develop an MRI protocol for evaluating the wrist during continuous active motion, to show that dynamic imaging of the wrist is realizable, and to demonstrate that the resulting anatomical images enable the measurement of metrics commonly evaluated for dynamic wrist instability. Methods A 3-Tesla “active-MRI” protocol was developed using a bSSFP sequence with 475 ms temporal resolution for continuous imaging of the moving wrist. Fifteen wrists of 10 asymptomatic volunteers were scanned during active supination/pronation, radial/ulnar deviation, “clenched-fist”, and volarflexion/dorsiflexion maneuvers. Two physicians evaluated distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) congruity, extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendon translation, the scapholunate (SL) interval, and the SL, radiolunate (RL) and capitolunate (CL) angles from the resulting images. Results The mean DRUJ subluxation ratio was 0.04 in supination, 0.10 in neutral, and 0.14 in pronation. The ECU tendon was subluxated or translated out of its groove in 3 wrists in pronation, 9 wrists in neutral, and 11 wrists in supination. The mean SL interval was 1.43 mm for neutral, ulnar deviation, radial deviation positions, and increased to 1.64 mm during the clenched-fist maneuver. Measurement of SL, RL and CL angles in neutral and dorsiflexion was also accomplished. Conclusion This study demonstrates the initial performance of active-MRI, which may be useful in the investigation of dynamic wrist instability in vivo. PMID:24391865

  10. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI during active wrist motion--initial observations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D Boutin

    Full Text Available Non-invasive imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provide the ability to evaluate the complex anatomy of bone and soft tissues of the wrist without the use of ionizing radiation. Dynamic instability of wrist--occurring during joint motion--is a complex condition that has assumed increased importance in musculoskeletal medicine. The objective of this study was to develop an MRI protocol for evaluating the wrist during continuous active motion, to show that dynamic imaging of the wrist is realizable, and to demonstrate that the resulting anatomical images enable the measurement of metrics commonly evaluated for dynamic wrist instability.A 3-Tesla "active-MRI" protocol was developed using a bSSFP sequence with 475 ms temporal resolution for continuous imaging of the moving wrist. Fifteen wrists of 10 asymptomatic volunteers were scanned during active supination/pronation, radial/ulnar deviation, "clenched-fist", and volarflexion/dorsiflexion maneuvers. Two physicians evaluated distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ congruity, extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU tendon translation, the scapholunate (SL interval, and the SL, radiolunate (RL and capitolunate (CL angles from the resulting images.The mean DRUJ subluxation ratio was 0.04 in supination, 0.10 in neutral, and 0.14 in pronation. The ECU tendon was subluxated or translated out of its groove in 3 wrists in pronation, 9 wrists in neutral, and 11 wrists in supination. The mean SL interval was 1.43 mm for neutral, ulnar deviation, radial deviation positions, and increased to 1.64 mm during the clenched-fist maneuver. Measurement of SL, RL and CL angles in neutral and dorsiflexion was also accomplished.This study demonstrates the initial performance of active-MRI, which may be useful in the investigation of dynamic wrist instability in vivo.

  11. Myofascial force transmisison between antagonistic rat lower limb muscles: effects of single muscle or muscle group lengthening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Hanneke J.M; Rijkelijkhuizen, Josina M.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of lengthening of the whole group of anterior crural muscles (tibialis anterior and extensor hallucis longus muscles (TA + EHL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL)) on myofascial interaction between synergistic EDL and TA + EHL muscles, and on myofascial force transmission between anterior

  12. Myofascial force transmission between antagonistic rat lower limb muscles: Effects of single muscle or muscle group lengthening.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, H.J.M.; Rijkelijkhuizen, J.M.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of lengthening of the whole group of anterior crural muscles (tibialis anterior and extensor hallucis longus muscles (TA + EHL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL)) on myofascial interaction between synergistic EDL and TA + EHL muscles, and on myofascial force transmission between anterior

  13. Control of a wrist joint motion simulator: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Darshan S; Kedgley, Angela E

    2016-09-06

    The presence of muscle redundancy and co-activation of agonist-antagonist pairs in vivo makes the optimization of the load distribution between muscles in physiologic joint simulators vital. This optimization is usually achieved by employing different control strategies based on position and/or force feedback. A muscle activated physiologic wrist simulator was developed to test and iteratively refine such control strategies on a functional replica of a human arm. Motions of the wrist were recreated by applying tensile loads using electromechanical actuators. Load cells were used to monitor the force applied by each muscle and an optical motion capture system was used to track joint angles of the wrist in real-time. Four control strategies were evaluated based on their kinematic error, repeatability and ability to vary co-contraction. With kinematic errors of less than 1.5°, the ability to vary co-contraction, and without the need for predefined antagonistic forces or muscle force ratios, novel control strategies - hybrid control and cascade control - were preferred over standard control strategies - position control and force control. Muscle forces obtained from hybrid and cascade control corresponded well with in vivo EMG data and muscle force data from other wrist simulators in the literature. The decoupling of the wrist axes combined with the robustness of the control strategies resulted in complex motions, like dart thrower׳s motion and circumduction, being accurate and repeatable. Thus, two novel strategies with repeatable kinematics and physiologically relevant muscle forces are introduced for the control of joint simulators. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment of wrist deformities in children with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya A Kochenova

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Patients with segmental lesions of the spinal cord at the С6-С7 and С5-С8 level were associated with restoration of active wrist extension up to the neutral position or more and were expected to achieve significant improvement of hand function. Patients with spinal cord lesions at the C5-Th1 level exhibited significant lesions of the muscles, along with bone deformities. Consequently, surgical treatment could only achieve functional wrist position with minimal improvement of hand function. Using differential approaches in the treatment of wrist contracture that are selected by determining the level of spinal cord lesion will enable physicians to predict the outcome and improve the function and appearance of the wrist.

  15. The effects of 16 months of angle-specific isometric strengthening exercises in midrange on torque of the knee extensor muscles in osteoarthritis of the knee: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, R

    1994-08-01

    Although often advocated for arthritis rehabilitation, several studies conducted on healthy subjects have demonstrated conflicting results as to whether isometric strengthening exercises performed at one joint angle can result in strength gains at other angles. The objective of this study was to determine whether midrange strength training of the quadriceps surrounding an osteoarthritic knee would increase strength in this part of the range of motion as well at other knee angles. The midrange position was chosen because the subject, a 57-year-old female with a 2-year history of moderately severe osteoarthritis of the left knee, had greatest weakness in this position. The training occurred three times per week for 16 months using a resistance training program of three sets of two maximal isometric contractions at a knee angle of 60 degrees. The dependent variable of maximal isometric knee extensor torque was recorded on an isokinetic dynamometer at knee angles of 90, 60, and 30 degrees at 6 weeks, 1 year, and 16 months. These data demonstrated a progressive torque increase at all angles over the 16-month period, with a steeper slope at the training angle. Contrary to the specificity of training concept, angle-specific strengthening in midrange may be sufficient to strengthen the extensors surrounding an osteoarthritic knee through a wide range of motion. Mid-range isometric strengthening exercises might thus prove useful in the rehabilitation of patients with knee osteoarthritis who are unable to exercise their weakened quadriceps at other angles due to pain or swelling.

  16. Changes of reflex size in upper limbs using wrist splint in hemiplegic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiba, J; Masakado, Y; Komune, Y; Muraoka, Y; Chino, N; Tomita, Y

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of prolonged wrist extension on H reflex in the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle and tendon jerk (T) reflex in the biceps brachii (BB) muscle of 17 chronic hemiplegic patients. H reflex of the FCR and T reflex of the BB were assessed every 5 minutes within 20 minutes during prolonged wrist extension and post-20 minutes after the extension. As a result, H reflex in the FCR was reduced by passive wrist stretch in 82% of the spastic limbs. The effect was larger in the higher spastic group. In 45% of the spastic limbs, T reflex in the BB also was reduced by passive wrist stretch. The inhibitory effects had a tendency to strengthen in accordance with the grade of muscle tone. We considered from these results, prolonged wrist extension generated inhibitory projections via probably group II afferents of the FCR in the homonym and in the transjoint in spastic limbs.

  17. Compliant Robot Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voellmer, George

    1992-01-01

    Compliant element for robot wrist accepts small displacements in one direction only (to first approximation). Three such elements combined to obtain translational compliance along three orthogonal directions, without rotational compliance along any of them. Element is double-blade flexure joint in which two sheets of spring steel attached between opposing blocks, forming rectangle. Blocks moved parallel to each other in one direction only. Sheets act as double cantilever beams deforming in S-shape, keeping blocks parallel.

  18. Phoenix Deploying its Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This animated gif shows a series of images taken by Phoenix's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) on Sol 3. It illustrates the actions that Phoenix's Robotic Arm took to deploy its wrist. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Isolated Acute Exertional Compartment Syndrome (AECS) of the Extensor Carpi Ulnaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Joerg; Brinkmann, Olaf; Clanton, Thomas O; Szalay, Gabor; Kinne, Raimund W

    2016-01-01

    Only two cases of an isolated compartment syndrome of the extensor carpi ulnaris have been described previously [1,2]. In both cases, the onset was acute. In the first case, histological examination revealed no necrosis. The second case was regarded to be due to a previously unknown anatomic variation and no necrotic tissue was recognized upon gross examination. This case report describes a third case of an isolated acute exertional compartment syndrome (AECS) of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle with focal areas of necrotic tissue. We report the third case of an isolated AECS of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle. A 35 year-old left-handed man, a motor mechanic by profession, presented to the emergency department with excruciating pain at the ulnar side of the left dorsal forearm. The previous day, he had repetitively used a sliding hammer with his left arm. Since then he had experienced severe pain despite the use of over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Here, in contrast to the previously reported cases, the histological examination revealed focal areas of necrotic tissue. No anatomic variations were found during surgical decompression. Postoperatively, the patient had complete pain relief and return of function. This report again indicates that the extensor carpi ulnaris is especially prone to develop the AECS syndrome and raises the question whether involvement of the other extensor muscles may rather be secondary to the excessive swelling of the extensor carpi ulnaris and not to strenuous exercise. This should be taken into consideration when humans load their forearm repeatedly during heavy labor or sports. In addition, we are showing that even with histologically confirmed areas of partial muscle necrosis the patient can return to normal muscle function.

  20. Measuring Sleep by Wrist Actigraph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    noweeas ebb a -a" neeem ideotify by block nbo~hr) Using a piezo-electric transducer, wrist activity was recorded simultaneousll with EEG, EOG, and EKG to...wrist activity alone was used to estimate Sleep Time. Blind inde- pendent scoring of the EEG-EOG- EKG records was also done for Sleep and Wakeful- ness...recordings for estimating sleep, parietal-occipital EEG, submental electromyogram (EMG), *and electro - occulogram (EOG) were recorded with wrist activity. A

  1. Animation of Phoenix's Wrist Unlatching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This animation shows what happened underneath Phoenix's Robotic Arm wrist on Sol 3. The pin that goes through the loop is what holds the wrist in place. The rotation of the wrist pops the pin free. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  2. Enhanced MR imaging of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Ashilyan, O.; Anavim, A.; Tramma, S. [Univ. of California, Orange (United States). Dept. of Radiological Sciences

    2006-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to describe the appearance of tenosynovitis in various tendon groups in the wrist and hand and to compare MR enhanced and non-enhanced imaging evaluation of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis. We reviewed 72 MRI studies of hands and wrists, including coronal, axial and sagittal images in 30 consecutive patients with inflammatory arthritis and tenosynovitis. We compared the degree of synovitis on T2-weighted vs contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, using a predetermined scale. We also measured the extent of tenosynovitis in three dimensions. The tendons were assigned to volar, dorsal, ulnar and radial groups in the wrist and to extensor, flexor and thumb groups in the hand. Degree of tenosynovitis (graded 0-3), cross-sectional area and volume of the inflamed synovium in various tendon groups were then compared by statistical analysis. Review of the medical records revealed the following diagnoses in our patient population: rheumatoid arthritis (n=16), unspecified inflammatory polyarthritis (n=9), psoriatic arthritis (n=2), CREST syndrome (n=1), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=1), paraneoplastic syndrome with arthritis (n=1). The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 1.0 and 1.7 respectively (P<0.001) in the wrist studies. The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 0.7 and 1.4, respectively (P<0.001) in the hand studies. The average sensitivity of T2-weighted imaging for detection of tenosynovitis was 40% in the hand and 67% in the wrist tendons, when contrast-enhanced images were used as a reference. Carpal tunnel flexor tendons were the most frequently affected tendons of the wrist. The most frequently affected tendons of the hand were second and third flexor tendons. The hand flexors demonstrated higher degrees of enhancement and larger volumes of the inflamed tenosynovium than did the hand extensors and tendons of the thumb.

  3. Injury patterns of finger extensor tendons in population of Ivanovo region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Vashetsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute injury of finger extensor tendons constitute a significant part in overall causes for hospital admission.Purpose of the study: to evaluate injury patterns of finger extensor tendons in population of Ivanovo region.Material and methods. The authors performed the retrospective statistical analysis of 163 medical histories of patients who underwent hospital treatment in the period from January 2011 till December 2014 at department of wrist reconstructive surgery and microsurgery of Ivanovo regional clinical hospital of war veterans. The study was carried out in full compliance with medical ethics. Excel 7.0 was applied for statistical analysis.Results. Injury patterns of patients with finger extensor tendons demonstrated prevalence of males aging from 21 to 40 years old. Most frequent is the left hand trauma at home while handling devices with high-speed rotation mechanism. Most lesions occur in time interval from noon till 6 p.m. Patients with combined injuries prevailed. The authors observed hospital admittance within first 6 hours after trauma.Conclusion. A typical patient with finger extensor tendons trauma is an active age male injured in everyday life and often in a state of alcoholic intoxication.

  4. Effects of Taping on Pain, Grip Strength and Wrist Extension Force in Patients with Tennis Elbow

    OpenAIRE

    Shamsoddini, Alireza; Hollisaz, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tennis elbow (TE) is a common musculotendinous degenerative disorder of the extensor origin at the lateral humeral epicondyle. Different modes of treatment are used for management of tennis elbow.Objectives: This study investigated the effect of the taping technique (TT) on pain, grip strength and wrist extension force in treatment of tennis elbow.Patients and Methods: Thirty patients (16 men /14 women with a mean age of 32.2 years) with tennis elbow of their dominant arm particip...

  5. Tendon transfer or tendon graft for ruptured finger extensor tendons in rheumatoid hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, U S; Kim, J H; Seo, W S; Lee, K H

    2010-05-01

    We evaluated the clinical outcome of tendon reconstruction using tendon graft or tendon transfer and the parameters related to clinical outcome in 51 wrists of 46 patients with rheumatoid arthritis with finger extensor tendon ruptures. At a mean follow-up of 5.6 years, the mean metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint extension lag was 8 degrees (range, 0-45) and the mean visual analogue satisfaction scale was 74 (range, 10-100). Clinical outcome did not differ significantly between tendon grafting and tendon transfer. The MP joint extension lag correlated with the patient's satisfaction score, but the pulp-to-palm distance did not correlate with patient satisfaction. We conclude that both tendon grafting and tendon transfer are reliable reconstruction methods for ruptured finger extensor tendons in rheumatoid hands.

  6. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3810 Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis...

  7. The effects of electromechanical wrist robot assistive system with neuromuscular electrical stimulation for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X L; Tong, K Y; Li, R; Xue, J J; Ho, S K; Chen, P

    2012-06-01

    An electromyography (EMG)-driven electromechanical robot system integrated with neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) was developed for wrist training after stroke. The performance of the system in assisting wrist flexion/extension tracking was evaluated on five chronic stroke subjects, when the system provided five different schemes with or without NMES and robot assistance. The tracking performances were measured by range of motion (ROM) of the wrist and root mean squared error (RMSE). The performance is better when both NMES and robot assisted in the tracking than those with either NMES or robot only (Probot helped improve the movement accuracy; and the NMES helped increase the muscle activation for the wrist joint and suppress the excessive muscular activities from the elbow joint. The NMES-robot assisted wrist training could improve the hand, wrist, and elbow functions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of a low-intensity strength-training program on knee-extensor strength and functional ability of frail older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westhoff, M.H.; Stemmerik, L.; Boshuizen, H.C.

    2000-01-01

    This study's purpose was to investigate whether a 10-week low-intensity strength-training program could improve strength of the knee extensors and functional ability. Participants 65 years and older with low knee-extensor muscle strength were randomized into an exercise (n = 11) and a control group

  9. Wrist rhythm during wrist joint motion evaluated by dynamic radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Hiroki; Tada, Kaoru; Suganuma, Seigo; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Sanada, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that wrist joint motion involves a "wrist rhythm" similar to the scapulohumeral rhythm. Therefore, we used a flat-panel detector to evaluate the ratio of radiolunate and capitolunate joint motions during wrist joint motion by dynamic radiography. The subjects were 20 healthy men. Dynamic imaging of the wrist joint was performed during active exercise for a total of ten seconds. In this study, we defined the radiocarpal (RL angle) and midcarpal joint angle (CL angle) as the wrist joint angle in the obtained images and measured the variation of these angles. The average curve was plotted and regression lines calculated from the average curve. The ratio was calculated from the slopes of the regression lines of the RL CL angles. These findings indicated that the ratio of the RL and CL angle motions was approximately 1:4 during palmar flexion and approximately 2:1 during dorsiflexion.

  10. Knee extensor strength is associated with pressure pain thresholds in adults with fibromyalgia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Michael Hooten

    Full Text Available Individuals with fibromyalgia (FM have lower muscle strength and lower pressure pain thresholds (PPT. The primary aim of this study was to determine the associations between muscle strength and PPT in adults with FM to test the hypothesis that greater measures of muscle strength would be associated with greater values of PPT. Secondary aims included determining the effects of pain severity and the peak uptake of oxygen (VO2 on the associations between muscle strength and PPT.Knee extensor and flexor strength (N = 69 was measured in the dominant leg using a dynamometer, and PPT was assessed using an electronic algometer. Pain severity was determined using the Multidimensional Pain Inventory, and peak VO2 uptake was quantified using an electronically braked cycle ergometer.Univariable linear regression analysis demonstrated a significant association between PPT (dependent variable and isometric knee extensor (P<.001, isokinetic (60°/s knee extensor (P = .002, and isokinetic (60°/s knee flexor strength (P = .043. In a multiple variable linear regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, pain severity, body mass index and peak VO2 uptake, a significant association was found between PPT and isometric knee extensor strength (P = .008. In a similar multiple variable analysis, a significant association was found between PPT and isokinetic knee extensor strength (P = .044.Greater measures of isometric and isokinetic knee extensor strength were significantly associated with greater values of PPT in both univariable and multiple variable linear regression models.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01253395.

  11. Effects of extensor synovectomy and excision of the distal ulna in rheumatoid arthritis on long-term function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Abhilash; Ball, Cathy; Freidin, Andrew J; Nanchahal, Jagdeep

    2010-09-01

    Objective outcomes data after excision of the distal ulna in rheumatoid arthritis are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional results of this surgery in the long term. We prospectively collected data on range of motion (22 wrists), visual analog pain scores (14 wrists), and grip strength measured using a Jamar dynamometer (20 hands) in a group of 23 patients (26 wrists) preoperatively and at 3 months, 12 months, and a minimum of 5 years postoperatively (range, 5.3-10.4 y). The Jebsen-Taylor hand function test was administered to 9 patients at the same time points. A subgroup of patients also underwent extensor carpi radialis longus to extensor carpi ulnaris tendon transfer (11 wrists). At one year, there were improvements in wrist pronation and supination, which were maintained at final follow-up. Active radial deviation decreased significantly at 3 months (p = .01) and one year (p = .02); this remained reduced at final follow-up (not significant). Wrist extension and active ulnar deviation showed slight improvements by one year, but reduced to levels below that measured preoperatively by final follow-up. Wrist flexion was significantly reduced at all time points postoperatively. Grip strength showed improvement from 10.0 kg (standard deviation [SD] 4.1 kg) preoperatively to 12.5 kg (SD 4.6 kg) 1 year after surgery and returned to preoperative levels (9.5 kg, SD 5.6 kg) by final follow-up. Wrist pain was significantly reduced from a mean score of 5 (SD 4) preoperatively to 2 (SD 2) postoperatively (p = .01). The Jebsen-Taylor hand function test showed improvements in writing and card turning. In the long term, excision of the distal ulna in rheumatoid patients results in an improvement in some aspects of hand function. There is a significant (p = .01) reduction in wrist pain but a reduction of wrist flexion. Therapeutic IV. Copyright 2010 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tubercular monoarthritis of wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Joshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB has been a major health concern since decades, and millions continue to be afflicted with this disease. Extrapulmonary sites of TB must not be neglected as there is paucity of systemic manifestations and absence of distinct clinical features which delay its diagnosis and can lead to functional disability and severe infirmities. Osteoarticular TB is an infrequent form of the disease and monoarthritis of the wrist accounts for 1% of all cases of skeletal involvement. Hereby, we report a 45-year-old female patient with history of progressive pain and swelling of right wrist joint which is refractory to analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs. She was diagnosed to have tubercular monoarthritis after synovial fluid analysis and radiographic findings. Standard antitubercular treatment for 6 months was given. The joint was salvaged after 9 months from the start of the treatment. Pain and swelling of joint were subsided and joint was rehabilitated with full range of motion and weight bearing.

  13. Extracting Extensor Digitorum Communis Activation Patterns using High-Density Surface Electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang eHu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The extensor digitorum communis muscle plays an important role in hand dexterity during object manipulations. This multi-tendinous muscle is believed to be controlled through separate motoneuron pools, thereby forming different compartments that control individual digits. However, due to the complex anatomical variations across individuals and the flexibility of neural control strategies, the spatial activation patterns of the extensor digitorum communis compartments during individual finger extension have not been fully tracked under different task conditions.The objective of this study was to quantify the global spatial activation patterns of the extensor digitorum communis using high-density (7×9 surface electromyogram (EMG recordings. The muscle activation map (based on the root mean square of the EMG was constructed when subjects performed individual four finger extensions at the metacarpophalangeal joint, at different effort levels and under different finger constraints (static and dynamic. Our results revealed distinct activation patterns during individual finger extensions, especially between index and middle finger extensions, although the activation between ring and little finger extensions showed strong covariance. The activation map was relatively consistent at different muscle contraction levels and for different finger constraint conditions. We also found that distinct activation patterns were more discernible in the proximal-distal direction than in the radial-ulnar direction. The global spatial activation map utilizing surface grid EMG of the extensor digitorum communis muscle provides information for localizing individual compartments of the extensor muscle during finger extensions. This is of potential value for identifying more selective control input for assistive devices. Such information can also provide a basis for understanding hand impairment in individuals with neural disorders.

  14. Muscle power is an important measure to detect deficits in muscle function in hip osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieler, Theresa; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Christensen, Helle Elisabeth; Kjaer, Michael; Beyer, Nina

    2017-07-01

    To investigate between-leg differences in hip and thigh muscle strength and leg extensor power in patients with unilateral hip osteoarthritis. Further, to compare between-leg differences in knee extensor strength and leg extensor power between patients and healthy peers. Seventy-two patients (60-87 years) with radiographic and symptomatic hip osteoarthritis not awaiting hip replacement and 35 healthy peers (63-82 years) were included. Hip and thigh muscle strength and leg extensor power were measured in patients and knee extensor strength and leg extensor power in healthy. The symptomatic extremity in patients was significantly (p muscles (8-17%), knee extensors (11%) and leg extensor power (19%). Healthy older adults had asymmetry in knee extensor strength (6%, p osteoarthritis. Implications for Rehabilitation Even in patients with mild symptoms not awaiting hip replacement a generalized muscle weakening of the symptomatic lower extremity seems to be present. Between-leg differences in leg extensor power (force × velocity) appears to be relatively large (19%) in patients with unilateral hip osteoarthritis in contrast to healthy peers who show no asymmetry. Compared to muscle strength the relationship between functional performance and leg extensor power seems to be stronger, and more strongly related to power of the symptomatic lower extremity. Our results indicate that exercise interventions focusing on improving leg extensor power of the symptomatic lower extremity and reducing asymmetry may be beneficial for patients with mild symptoms not awaiting hip replacement.

  15. Epidemiology of acute wrist trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C F; Lauritsen, Jens

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological data on wrist injuries in a population can be used for planning by applying them to criteria for care and thus deriving estimates of provisions for care according to currently desirable standards. In a 1-year study all patients > or = 15 years with acute wrist trauma and treated...... in the emergency room were examined according to an algorithm until a diagnosis was established. The overall incidence of wrist trauma was 69 per 10,000 inhabitants per year. Incidence of wrist trauma requiring x-ray examination was 58 per 10,000 per year. The incidence of distal radius fractures was 27 per 10...... using data from a population-based study. A completeness rate of 0.56 (95% confidence interval: 0.31-0.78) was found. An x-ray had been taken for all patients reporting a fracture thus justifying the use of fractures as an incidence measure when comparing groups of patients with wrist trauma....

  16. Effect of trunk inclination on isometric extensor and flexor torque of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Cybex 6000, dynamometer Trunk extension / flexion unit was used to measure maximal voluntary isometric strength of the lumbar flexor and extensor muscles at 0, 23, 46, 69 and 92 degrees of trunk flexion. ANOVA with post-hoc testing was applied to the flexion and extension data. Alpha was set at p < 0.05. Significant ...

  17. Knee extensor fatigue threshold is related to whole-body VO2max.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C.J.; Maas, E.A; Wesseling, M.G.H.; de Haan, A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Above a given exercise intensity, rapid muscle fatigue will occur. We explored the possibility of assessing torque threshold for peripheral fatigue during single-legged repetitive isometric knee extensor exercise. We hypothesized this fatigue threshold to be related to the general aerobic

  18. Three-dimensional Doppler ultrasound findings in healthy wrist and finger tendon sheaths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzboll-Danielsen, Mads; Janta, Iustina; Torp-Pedersen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to investigate the presence of feeding vessels in or in close proximity to extensor and flexor tendon sheaths at the wrists level and in finger flexor tendon sheaths in healthy controls, using 3D ultrasound (US), which may cause pitfalls, in order to ensure correct...... and twenty of the right wrist. US was carried out using a GE Logiq E9 unit with a 3D US probe. The colour Doppler settings were to published recommendation. RESULTS: The feeding vessels in or in close proximity to the tendon sheaths were found in the flexor and extensor tendons sheaths at least once in each...... participant. No significant difference in feeding vessels was seen between the radial and carpal level in the wrist (p = 0.06) or between the second and third flexor tendon sheath (p = 0.84). CONCLUSION: Doppler findings in or in close proximity to the tendon sheaths were common in wrists and fingers...

  19. Sonography of Non-neoplastic Disorders of the Hand and Wrist Tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitto, Salvatore; Draghi, Anna Guja; Draghi, Ferdinando

    2017-07-14

    Tendon disorders commonly cause hand and wrist disability and curtail the performance of work-related duties or routine tasks. Imaging is often needed for diagnosis, but it requires knowledge of the complex anatomic structures of the tendons of the hand and wrist as well as familiarity with related disorders. This review article aims to provide medical professionals with guidelines for the sonographic assessment of the tendons of hand and wrist and related disorders. Sonographic features of tendon disorders affecting the hand and wrist are described here, specifically: infectious tenosynovitis; tendon rupture or tearing; stenosing forms of tenosynovitis such as De Quervain disease and trigger finger; intersection syndrome; insertional tendinopathy; several forms of tendinous instability such as extensor carpi ulnaris instability, climber finger, and boxer knuckle; and tendinopathy in inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Postsurgical evaluation of the hand and wrist tendons is also discussed, including the healthy and pathologic appearances of operated tendons as well as impingement from orthopedic hardware. In conclusion, sonography is effective in assessing the tendons of the hand and wrist and related disorders and represents a valuable tool for diagnosis. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  20. Effect of acupuncture depth on muscle pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitakoji Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While evidence supports efficacy of acupuncture and/or dry needling in treating musculoskeletal pain, it is unclear which needling method is most effective. This study aims to determine the effects of depth of needle penetration on muscle pain. Methods A total of 22 healthy volunteers performed repeated eccentric contractions to induce muscle soreness in their extensor digital muscle. Subjects were assigned randomly to four groups, namely control group, skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle, muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle and non-segmental group (depth of 10 mm: the anterior tibial muscle. Pressure pain threshold and electrical pain threshold of the skin, fascia and muscle were measured at a point 20 mm distal to the maximum tender point on the second day after the exercise. Results Pressure pain thresholds of skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle and muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle were significantly higher than the control group, whereas the electrical pain threshold at fascia of muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle was a significantly higher than control group; however, there was no significant difference between the control and other groups. Conclusion The present study shows that acupuncture stimulation of muscle increases the PPT and EPT of fascia. The depth of needle penetration is important for the relief of muscle pain.

  1. The instability of wrist joint and total wrist replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jin-Xing; Xu, Yong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Total wrist arthroplasty are not used as widely as total knee and hip replacement. The functional hands are requiring surgeons to design a durable and functional satisfying prosthesis. This article will list the main reasons that cause the failure of the prosthesis. Some remarkable and representative prostheses are listed to show the devolvement of total wrist prosthesis and their individual special innovations to fix the problems. And the second part we will discuss the part that biomechanical elements act in the total wrist replacement (TWA). Summarize and find out what the real problem is and how we can find a way to fix it.

  2. Ultrasound-guided methotrexate injection for De Quervain disease of the wrist: what lies beyond the horizon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, Abdallah El-Sayed; Al-Ashkar, Doaa Shawky; Negm, Ahmed A; Eltawab, Basma Aly; Wu, Wei-Ting; Chang, Ke-Vin

    2017-01-01

    De Quervain disease (DQVD) is one of the most common causes of lateral wrist pain and can lead to significant disability. The current case involves a right-handed, middle-aged, female patient with severe lateral wrist pain due to DQVD. Her pain was not responsive to oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, rehabilitation, and repeated corticosteroid injections. Because she refused surgical intervention, we performed ultrasound-guided methotrexate injections (four times). After the injections, dramatic pain relief, functional improvement, and reduction of the thickness of the retinaculum and tendons in the first dorsal extensor compartment of the wrist were noted. This case report highlights the potential usefulness of ultrasound-guided methotrexate injection for recalcitrant DQVD of the wrist.

  3. Utilização do esfigmomanômetro na avaliação da força dos músculos extensores e flexores da articulação do joelho em militares Utilización del esfigmomanómetro en la evaluación de la fuerza de los músculos extensores y flexores de la articulación de la rodilla en militares Use of the sphygmomanometer in the evaluation of the knee joint flexor and extensor muscle strength in militaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudionor Delgado

    2004-10-01

    ón se obtuvieron en la prueba de ejecución (Make test, en la mesa flexo-extensora Inbaf y registradas por EM Tycos. El análisis de los datos fue descriptiva, aplicándose la prueba "t" de Student para comparar los valores promedios, adoptándose un nivel de significancia de p 0,05. En los ángulos de 90 grados para la extensión y 30 grados para la flexión de la rodilla, no se observaron diferencias significativas intragrupos (p BASES AND OBJECTIVE: This is a comparative and descriptive study that aims at analyzing the strength for the different angles of the knee flexion and extension in militaries. The objective of this study was to evaluate the extensor and flexor muscles of the knee joint for different angles by means of the Modified Sphygmomanometer (MS in healthy militaries. METHODS: The sample was composed of 31 militaries as follows: 19 male and 12 female with average age of 26.5 ± 5.8 years; respective average height of 162.00 ± 0.06 (cm and 175.00 ± 0.06 (cm and average body mass of 56.83 ± 5.85 (kg and 73.25 ± 10.46 (kg. The evaluation methodology was the one proposed by Helewa, Goldsmith and Smithe (1981 using Modified Sphygmomanometer (MS. The maximal isometric contractions at 30º of flexion and 30º/90º of extension were obtained in the Make test, in the Inbaf flexion-extension table and recorded by the MS Tycos. The data was analyzed using the "t" Student-test to compare the averages, and the significance level adopted was p > 0.05. RESULTS: In both the female and the male groups, significant difference was only observed between angles of 30 and 90 degrees of the right knee extension (p > 0.05. At angles of 90 degrees for the knee extension and of 30 degrees for knee flexion, no intra-groups significant differences were observed (p > 0.05. CONCLUSION: Militaries present strength differences between knee joint anterior and posterior muscular groups at the different angles studied. The methodology used showed to be satisfactory for the strength

  4. Motorcycle racer with unilateral forearm flexor and extensor chronic exertional compartment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkes, Michiel B; Teijink, Joep A; Scheltinga, Marc R

    2016-04-14

    We discuss a case of a 26-year-old man, a motorcycle racer, who presented with progressive pain, weakness and swelling of his right forearm and loss of power in his index finger, experienced during motor racing. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) of both flexor and extensor compartments of his forearm was diagnosed by dynamic intracompartmental muscle pressure measurements. After fasciotomies, all symptoms were resolved and the patient was able to improve on his preinjury racing skills, without any limitations. A literature review and a surgical 'how-to' for correct release of the extensor and deep flexor compartments of the forearm are provided. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  5. Identified ankle extensor and flexor motoneurons display different firing profiles in the neonatal rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cotel, Florence; Antri, Myriam; Barthe, Jean-Yves

    2009-01-01

    synaptically isolated and identified by antidromic stimulations of the central stump of flexor or extensor muscle nerves: tibialis anterior (ankle flexor) and gastrocnemius medialis or lateralis (ankle extensors). Two protocols were applied to establish the four firing profiles previously described (type I...... motoneurons; a linear F-I relationship (type I profile), a self-sustained discharge pattern together with a linear F-I relationship (type III profile) and a self-sustained firing pattern together with an F-I relationship showing a counter-clockwise hysteresis (type IV profile). Thus, during the early...

  6. Reversal of TMS-induced motor twitch by training is associated with a reduction in excitability of the antagonist muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fregni Felipe

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A single session of isolated repetitive movements of the thumb can alter the response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, such that the related muscle twitch measured post-training occurs in the trained direction. This response is attributed to transient excitability changes in primary motor cortex (M1 that form the early part of learning. We investigated; (1 whether this phenomenon might occur for movements at the wrist, and (2 how specific TMS activation patterns of opposing muscles underlie the practice-induced change in direction. Methods We used single-pulse suprathreshold TMS over the M1 forearm area, to evoke wrist movements in 20 healthy subjects. We measured the preferential direction of the TMS-induced twitch in both the sagittal and coronal plane using an optical goniometer fixed to the dorsum of the wrist, and recorded electromyographic (EMG activity from the flexor carpi radialis (FCR and extensor carpi radialis (ECR muscles. Subjects performed gentle voluntary movements, in the direction opposite to the initial twitch for 5 minutes at 0.2 Hz. We collected motor evoked potentials (MEPs elicited by TMS at baseline and for 10 minutes after training. Results Repetitive motor training was sufficient for TMS to evoke movements in the practiced direction opposite to the original twitch. For most subjects the effect of the newly-acquired direction was retained for at least 10 minutes before reverting to the original. Importantly, the direction change of the movement was associated with a significant decrease in MEP amplitude of the antagonist to the trained muscle, rather than an increase in MEP amplitude of the trained muscle. Conclusions These results demonstrate for the first time that a TMS-twitch direction change following a simple practice paradigm may result from reduced corticospinal drive to muscles antagonizing the trained direction. Such findings may have implications for training paradigms in

  7. "An Investigation Into The Interrater Reliability Of The Modified Ashworth Scale In The Assessment Of Muscle Spasticity In Hemiplegic Patients "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Nokhostin-Ansari

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Spasticity is a velocity-dependent increase in tonic stretch reflexes (muscle tone with exaggerated tendon jerks, resulting from hyperexcitability of the stretch reflex. The measurement of spasticity is necessary to determine the effect of treatments. The Modified Ashworth Scale is the most widely used method for assessing muscle spasticity in clinical practice and research. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interrater reliability of Modified Ashworth Scale in hemiplegic patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty subjects (16 males, 14 females with a mean age of 59.40 (SD =14.013 recruited. Shoulder adductor , elbow flexor , wrist dorsiflexor , hip adductor , knee extensor and ankle plantarflexor on the hemiplegic side were tested by two physiotherapists. Results: In the upper limb, the interrater reliability for shoulder adductor and elbow flexor muscles was fair (0.372 and 0.369, respectively. The reliability for the wrist flexors was good (0.612. The difference in Kappa value for the proximal muscle (shoulder adductor; 0.372 and the distal muscle (wrist flexor; 0.612 was significant (²X=33.87, df=1, p0.05. The mean value for the upper limb (0.505 and the lower limb (0,.516 was not significantly different (²X=0.1407, df=1, p>0.05. Conclusion: The interrater reliability of Modified Ashworth Scale was not good . The limb, upper or lower, had no significant effect on the reliability. In the upper limb, the reliability for the proximal and distal muscle was significantly different. However. The difference in the lower limb was not significant.When using the scale, one should consider it's limitation.

  8. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... done, you'll be asked to wear a lead apron to protect certain parts of your body. Your child's reproductive organs will also be protected with a lead shield. The technician will position your child's wrist, ...

  9. Inibição muscular dos extensores do joelho em sujeitos acometidos por condromalácia patelar e osteoartrite do joelho - um estudo de revisão sistemática Knee extensor muscle inhibition in subjects with chondromalacia patellae and knee osteoarthritis - a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klauber Dalcero Pompeo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A inibição muscular (IM tem sido reportada como um dos fatores associados à fraqueza muscular presente na osteoartrite (OA e condromalácia patelar (CP, sendo inclusive associada com a etiologia e a progressão. Entretanto, parece existir uma lacuna na literatura em relação a estudos de revisão que avaliaram o grau de IM de sujeitos acometidos por CP e OA. O objetivo do estudo foi reunir os resultados de estudos que investigaram o grau de IM na OA e CP e identificar possíveis diferenças na IM que estejam associadas aos estágios do processo degenerativo. Foram incluídos nesta revisão sistemática estudos transversais e/ou experimentais publicados nas bases de dados PubMed, Scopus, SciELO e Cochrane entre 1990 e 2010 que avaliaram a IM por meio da técnica de interpolação de abalo publicados. Os dados referentes à população, protocolo de IM, qualidade dos estudos e resultados de IM foram sumariados e apresentados em Tabelas. Para análise da qualidade, utilizou-se a escala de PEDro. Após a aplicação dos critérios de inclusão, 13 artigos foram incluídos na revisão sistemática (OA=9 e CP=4. A partir da análise dos dados, observou-se uma IM maior na CP em comparação à OA. Contudo, a variabilidade metodológica e a falta de informações sobre os protocolos de IM indicam a necessidade de novos estudos experimentais a fim de que se possa determinar com maior precisão a relação entre a IM e as doenças degenerativas articulares.Muscle inhibition (MI has been reported as one of the factors associated with muscle weakness present in osteoarthritis (OA and chondromalacia patellae (CP, including being associated with the etiology and progression. However, there seems to be a gap in the literature regarding the review studies that assessed the degree of IM subjects affected by CP and OA. The main objective of study was bringing together the results of studies that investigated the degree of OA in the MI and CP and to identify

  10. The Effect of Dry Needling of the Trigger Points of Shoulder Muscles on Pain and Grip Strength in Patients with Lateral Epicondylitis: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Kheradmandi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lateral epicondylitis, also known as tennis elbow, is the most common overuse syndrome of the elbow. The severity of pain may not be directly caused by tendinopathy of wrist extensors since trigger points of the shoulder muscles have a referral zone in the arm and elbow. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dry needling of shoulder myofascial trigger points on wrist extensors muscles pain and function. Methods: Fourteen female patients with tennis elbow (aged 20 - 45 years old were recruited after primary evaluation by an orthopedist. They entered the study if they had pain in the lateral aspect of elbow of the dominant hand for more than 3 months along with the presence of myofascial trigger points in any muscles of supra spinatus, infra spinatus, sub scapularis or scalenes. Pain pressure threshold, maximal grip force and pain intensity of the hand extensors on lateral epicondyle of elbow were measured before and after treatment. Pain intensity was measured on a one to ten scale of visual analogue scale (VAS. A hand dynamometer used to measure the maximal grip force value of the affected hand in 0˚shoulder flexion/ abduction, 90˚ elbow extension and mid-poison of forearm in sitting position. A pressure algometer was applied on hand extensor muscles to define their trigger point sensitivity. For the control group, treatment regimens consisted of routine physical therapy of tennis elbow. This regime was accompanied by dry needling of mentioned muscles for the intervention group. Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney non-parametric tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: Comparison of the results after intervention showed that the patients’ pain significantly decreased in both groups (P<0.001; but the patient’s PPT and grip force significantly increased solely in the intervention group (P<0.05. Mann Whitney test showed significant pain differences in both groups (P=0.001. The comparison of differences

  11. Small Business Innovations (Robotic Wrist)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Under a Langley Research Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Ross-Hime Designs, Inc. Minneapolis, MN, developed the Omni-Wrist actuator, which has a 25-pound capacity, 180 degrees of pitch/yaw, and 360 degrees of roll. Company literature calls it "the first successful singularity-free high-precision (robotic) wrist." Applications include spray painting, sealing, ultrasonic testing, welding and a variety of nuclear industry, aerospace and military uses.

  12. Degree of thoracic kyphosis and peak torque of trunk flexors and extensors among healthy women,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Neves Granito

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of aging on the degree of thoracic kyphosis and peak torque of the trunk flexor and extensor muscles among women without a densitometric diagnosis of osteoporosis.METHODS: Thirty women were selected to make up three groups: young women (n = 10; 24.60 ± 2.27 years of age; adults (n = 10; 43.50 ± 2.88; and elderly women (n= 10; 62.40 ± 2.67. Bone mineral density (BMD, degree of thoracic kyphosis and peak torque of the trunk flexors and extensors were evaluated. Differences between the groups were evaluated using the Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U tests. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to assess correlations between the variables. The significance level was taken to be 5% (p < 0.05.RESULTS: The elderly group presented a greater degree of thoracic kyphosis (p = 0.009 and lower peak torque of the trunk flexors and extensors than the young group. The adult group presented lower peak torque of the trunk than the young group. A negative correlation was observed between age and peak torque of the trunk flexors and extensors (p < 0.001, and a positive correlation between age and the degree of thoracic kyphosis (r = 0.58; p < 0.001. The elderly group presented higher values for the eccentric/concentric ratio of the peak torque for flexors (p = 0.03 and extensors (p = 0.02.CONCLUSION: This study suggests that physiological aging may be associated with a greater degree of thoracic kyphosis and lower muscle strength of the trunk flexors and extensors. Moreover, the elderly women showed a relative capacity for preservation of eccentric strength.

  13. Effect of Superimposed Electromyostimulation on Back Extensor Strengthening: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hyeon; Seo, Kwan Sik; Lee, Shi-Uk

    2016-09-01

    Park, JH, Seo, KS, and Lee, S-U. Effect of superimposed electromyostimulation on back extensor strengthening: a pilot study. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2470-2475, 2016-Electromyostimulation (EMS) superimposed on voluntary contraction (VC) can increase muscle strength. However, no study has examined the effect of superimposing EMS on back extensor strengthening. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of superimposed EMS on back extensor strengthening in healthy adults. Twenty healthy men, 20-29 years of age, without low-back pain were recruited. In the EMS group, electrodes were attached to bilateral L2 and L4 paraspinal muscles. Stimulation intensity was set for maximally tolerable intensity. With VC, EMS was superimposed for 10 seconds followed by a 20-second rest period. The same protocol was used in the sham stimulation (SS) group, except that the stimulation intensity was set at the lowest intensity (5 mA). All subjects performed back extension exercise using a Swiss ball, with 10 repetitions per set, 2 sets each day, 5 times a week for 2 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the change in isokinetic strength of the back extensor using an isokinetic dynamometer. Additionally, endurance was measured using the Sorensen test. After 2 weeks of back extension exercise, the peak torque and endurance increased significantly in both groups (p ≤ 0.05). Effect size between the EMS group and the SS group was medium in strength and endurance. However, there was no statistically significant difference between 2 groups. In conclusion, 2 weeks of back extensor strengthening exercise was effective for strength and endurance. Superimposing EMS on back extensor strengthening exercise could provide an additional effect on increasing strength.

  14. Soreness-related changes in three-dimensional running biomechanics following eccentric knee extensor exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Max R; Peel, Shelby A; Schilling, Brian K; Melcher, Dan A; Bloomer, Richard J

    2017-06-01

    Runners often experience delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), especially of the knee extensors, following prolonged running. Sagittal knee joint biomechanics are altered in the presence of knee extensor DOMS but it is unclear how muscle soreness affects lower limb biomechanics in other planes of motion. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of knee extensor DOMS on three-dimensional (3D) lower limb biomechanics during running. Thirty-three healthy men (25.8 ± 6.8 years; 84.1 ± 9.2 kg; 1.77 ± 0.07 m) completed an isolated eccentric knee extensor damaging protocol to elicit DOMS. Biomechanics of over-ground running at a set speed of 3.35 m s-1±5% were measured before eccentric exercise (baseline) and, 24 h and 48 h following exercise in the presence of knee extensor DOMS. Knee flexion ROM was reduced at 48 h (P = 0.01; d = 0.26), and peak knee extensor moment was reduced at 24 h (P = 0.001; d = 0.49) and 48 h (P biomechanics were unaffected by the presence of DOMS (P > 0.05). Peak positive ankle and knee joint powers and, peak negative knee joint power were all reduced from baseline to 24 h and 48 h (P biomechanics during running.

  15. Compartmental fasciotomy and isolating a muscle from neighbouring muscles interfere with extramuscular myofascial force transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.; Maas, Huub; Baan, Guus C.

    2003-01-01

    Muscles within the anterior crural compartment (extensor digitorum longus, EDL; tibialis anterior, TA; and extensor hallucis longus, EHL) and within the peroneal compartment were excited simultaneously and maximally. All muscles were kept at constant length with the exception of EDL, for which

  16. Muscle force is determined also by muscle relative position: isolated effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, Huub; Baan, Guus C.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Effects on force of changes of the position of extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) relative to surrounding tissues were investigated in rat. Connective tissue at the muscle bellies of tibialis anterior (TA), extensor hallucis longus (EHL) and EDL was left intact, to allow myofascial force

  17. The effect of arm and wrist supports on the load of he upper extrimity during VDU work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, B.; de Korte, E.; van der Kraan, I.; Kuijer, P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of arm and wrist supports in reducing the workload during computer work. Design. Female subjects (n=10) performed computer work in conditions with arm or wrist supports and in a condition without supports. Background. Sustained muscle tension in the trapezius

  18. Effects of taping on pain, grip strength and wrist extension force in patients with tennis elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsoddini, Alireza; Hollisaz, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-09-01

    Tennis elbow (TE) is a common musculotendinous degenerative disorder of the extensor origin at the lateral humeral epicondyle. Different modes of treatment are used for management of tennis elbow. This study investigated the effect of the taping technique (TT) on pain, grip strength and wrist extension force in treatment of tennis elbow. Thirty patients (16 men /14 women with a mean age of 32.2 years) with tennis elbow of their dominant arm participated in this study. Outcome measures were assessment of pain at the lateral aspect of the elbow, grip strength and wrist extension force before and five to ten minutes after application of elbow tape on the affected and unaffected arms. A Visual Analog Scale was used to assess pain. A dynamometer and a hand-held dynamometer were used for evaluation of grip strength and wrist extension force, respectively. Among the variables, significant differences were found in wrist extension forces between effected and unaffected arms (P = 0.02). Changes in grip strength showed statically significant improvements in the affected arm compared to the unaffected arm (P = 0.03). Also, in assessment of pain at the lateral epicondyle, the mean change between affected and unaffected arms was significant, with P = 0.001. The taping technique, as applied in this study demonstrates an impressive effect on wrist extension force and grip strength of patients with TE. Elbow taping also reduces pain at the lateral aspect of the elbow in these patients.

  19. Changes in the cross-sectional area of deep posterior extensor muscles of the cervical spine after anterior decompression and fusion: 10-year follow-up study using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Morio; Okada, Eijiro; Ichihara, Daisuke; Watanabe, Kota; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Fujiwara, Hirokazu; Momoshima, Suketaka; Nishiwaki, Yuji; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Iwanami, Akio; Ikegami, Takeshi; Takahata, Takeshi

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate changes in the transverse area of deep posterior muscles of the cervical spine 10 years after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF), in comparison with healthy volunteers. Thirty-one patients (22 males, 9 females, mean age at follow-up 59.3 years, mean follow-up 12.1 years) who had undergone preoperative MRI and non-instrumented ACDF within levels C3-4 to C5-6 were enrolled. 32 asymptomatic volunteers (17 males, 15 females; mean age, 54.7 years; mean follow-up, 11.7 years) who underwent MRI between 1993 and 1996 served as controls. Follow-up MRI was performed on both patients and control subjects, and the cross-sectional areas of deep posterior muscles were measured digitally at levels C3-4, 4-5, and 5-6. The mean total cross-sectional area in the ACDF and control groups was 4,693.6 ± 1,140.9 and 4,825.8 ± 1,048.2 mm(2) in the first MR study (P = 0.63), and 4,616.7 ± 1,086.0 and 5,036.7 ± 1,105.6 mm(2) at follow-up (P = 0.13). The total cross-sectional area in the ACDF group slightly decreased, while that in the control group increased (-77.1 ± 889.7 vs. 210.9 ± 622.0 mm(2), P = 0.14). The mean change in the cross-sectional area had no significant correlation with clinical symptoms, including neck pain or JOA score. ACDF patients did not show a marked decrease in the cross-sectional area of the deep posterior cervical muscles, but as compared with control subjects there was a slight decrease. A decrease in the cross-sectional area of these muscles after ACDF may not result in the axial symptoms as seen in patients treated by posterior surgery.

  20. Acute effects of Kinesio taping on pain, disability and back extensor muscle endurance in patients with low back pain caused by magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed lumbar disc degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nai-Jen; Chou, Willy; Hsiao, Pei-Chi; Chang, Wen-Dien; Lo, Yi-Ming

    2018-02-06

    Individuals with disc degeneration experience associated pain and disability. Considering its safety and affordability, Kinesio tape (KT) may be a viable treatment. However, most KT studies have demonstrated its effects in healthy adults and patients with nonspecific low back pain. The efficacy of KT in patients with disc degeneration is yet to be investigated. To examine the acute effects of KT on patients with lumbar disc degeneration confirmed through magnetic resonance imaging. A total of 31 eligible patients (aged 25-64 years) with low back pain caused by lumbar disc degeneration were divided into mild and moderate-to-severe pain groups. KT was applied to the painful lumbar region in a lumbar brace-like pattern for 1 day. A visual analogue scale for pain and the Oswestry disability index were analysed before and after 1 day of taping. The Biering-Sorensen test for trunk muscle endurance was performed before, immediately after, and 1 day after taping as well as immediately after tape removal. After taping, both groups showed significant pain reduction (ptape removal. KT may be adopted as an assistive aid for immediate pain reduction, particularly in lumbar disc degeneration patients with moderate-to-severe pain; however, its effects on disability and trunk muscle endurance are not clinically worthwhile. The long-term effects of KT, with or without active exercise, warrant further assessment.

  1. Development of an Underactuated 2-DOF Wrist Joint using McKibben PAMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, S. P.; Jain, S.; Ramasubramanian, S. N.; Johnson, B. V.; Dwivedy, S. K.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, model of an underactuated 2-DOF wrist joint with pneumatically actuated muscles is proposed. For the joint, McKibben-type artificial muscles are used in parallel configuration for the actuation. For each Degree of Freedom (DOF) one agonist-antagonist pair arrangement is usually used with a pulley mechanism. A mathematical model of wrist joint is derived using conventional forward kinematic analysis. The static model relating pressure in the muscle with the orientation of the wrist joint is obtained by combining the experimental data and mathematical model. Regulation of pressure can be achieved by pulse width modulation control of on/off solenoid valves. A set of free vibration experiments are done for the dynamic identification of the muscle characteristics.

  2. Central Factors Contribute to Knee Extensor Strength Loss after 2000-m Rowing in Elite Male and Female Rowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husmann, Florian; Gube, Martin; Felser, Sabine; Weippert, Matthias; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Bruhn, Sven; Behrens, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Despite growing interest in task-dependent alterations of central and peripheral fatigue after endurance exercise, little is known about the effect of rowing on quadriceps muscle fatigue. This study aimed to investigate central and peripheral mechanisms of fatigue after a 2000-m rowing time trial. Eight competitive rowers (four males and four females, 20 ± 4 yr) performed a 2000-m time trial on an indoor rower and a control condition (sitting). The neuromuscular function of the knee extensors was analyzed before and 3 min after each experimental condition. Maximal voluntary torque, voluntary activation, and normalized root-mean-square of the EMG signal were measured during isometric and concentric contractions. Furthermore, knee extensor twitch torque and maximal M-wave amplitudes in response to electrical nerve stimulation were assessed. After the 2000-m rowing, there were significant reductions in isometric and concentric maximal voluntary torque of the knee extensors (-20% ± 9% and -18% ± 7%, respectively, P rowing (P = 0.007), whereas vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscle activities did not significantly differ from baseline values. No significant change was observed for knee extensor twitch torque in response to paired electrical stimuli after rowing. The 2000-m rowing time trial resulted in significant knee extensor strength loss. Quadriceps muscle fatigue after high-intensity rowing exercise was explained primarily by central factors that lead to large reductions in voluntary drive.

  3. Gouty wrist arthritis causing carpal tunnel syndrome--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkandar, M F; Sapuan, J; Singh, R; Abdullah, S

    2012-06-01

    A 63 year old male with a history of gout and hypertension presented with carpal tunnel syndrome. He gave history of bilateral wrist pain associated with numbness over the median nerve distribution of the hand. Tinels sign and Phalens test were positive with no obvious thenar muscle wasting on examination. Tophaceous deposits in the flexor tendons and within the synovium of the wrist joint was seen during surgery and this established gout as the cause of median nerve entrapment in this patient.

  4. Management of extensor mechanism rupture after TKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, A G

    2012-11-01

    Disruption of the extensor mechanism in total knee arthroplasty may occur by tubercle avulsion, patellar or quadriceps tendon rupture, or patella fracture, and whether occurring intra-operatively or post-operatively can be difficult to manage and is associated with a significant rate of failure and associated complications. This surgery is frequently performed in compromised tissues, and repairs must frequently be protected with cerclage wiring and/or augmentation with local tendon (semi-tendinosis, gracilis) which may also be used to treat soft-tissue loss in the face of chronic disruption. Quadriceps rupture may be treated with conservative therapy if the patient retains active extension. Component loosening or loss of active extension of 20° or greater are clear indications for surgical treatment of patellar fracture. Acute patellar tendon disruption may be treated by primary repair. Chronic extensor failure is often complicated by tissue loss and retraction can be treated with medial gastrocnemius flaps, achilles tendon allografts, and complete extensor mechanism allografts. Attention to fixing the graft in full extension is mandatory to prevent severe extensor lag as the graft stretches out over time.

  5. Dynamic extensor brace for lateral epicondylitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faes, M.; Akker, B. van den; Lint, J.A. de; Kooloos, J.G.M.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2006-01-01

    Lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow) is a common, often disabling ailment. Based on the failure of current therapies, a new dynamic extensor brace has been developed. In this study, the effects of application of this brace for 3 months on the most important and disabling symptoms of patients with

  6. Immediate effects of different treatments for the wrist joints of subdominant hands, using electromechanical reaction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Cui, Yao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the immediate effects of muscle strength training and neuromuscular joint facilitation distal resistance training on wrist joints by using electromechanical reaction time. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 12 healthy young people (24.2 ± 3.1 years, 169.7 ± 6.5 cm, 65.3 ± 12.6 kg). Two kinds of isotonic contraction techniques were applied on the wrist joint: the wrist joint extension muscle strength training and the wrist joint extension pattern of neuromuscular joint facilitation. The electromechanical reaction time, premotor time, and motor time of the left upper limb were measured before and after each intervention session of muscle strength training and neuromuscular joint facilitation. [Results] The neuromuscular joint facilitation group showed significant shortening of the electromechanical reaction time and motor time after the intervention. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the electromechanical reaction time and motor time of the wrist joint can be improved by neuromuscular joint facilitation together with proximal resistance training, which can be used as a new form of exercise for improving the functions of subdominant hand wrist joints.

  7. Functional results of dynamic splinting after transmetacarpal, wrist, and distal forearm replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheker, L R; Chesher, S P; Netscher, D T; Julliard, K N; O'Neill, W L

    1995-10-01

    The results of replantation at the wrist and distal forearm are reported to be better than at the metacarpal level, in part because the latter involve direct injury to the intrinsic muscles. This study evaluates a new post-operative protocol for replantation at the metacarpal, wrist and distal forearm levels. 3 days after replantation, the patient was placed in a dynamic crane outrigger splint with MP joint control, compensating for intrinsic muscle function loss. From 4 to 12 weeks, an anticlaw splint alternated with the outrigger splint. After 12 weeks, a dynamic wrist extension orthosis was added to the anti-claw splint. 11 patients (four replantations at the transmetacarpal level, three at the wrist and four in the distal forearm) had this protocol between 1988 and 1993. For distal forearm replantation, TAM of fingers averaged 216 degrees, grip strength 42 lb, and pinch strength 7.2 lb with 75% good or excellent results. For wrist replantations, TAM of fingers averaged 243 degrees, grip strength 37 lb and pinch strength 10.6 lb with 100% good or excellent results. For transmetacarpal replantations, TAM of fingers averaged 189 degrees, grip strength 37 lb and pinch strength 5.6 lb, with 75% good and excellent results. Early protected mobilization, as described here, preserves tendon gliding, muscle strength and excursion. Our results support this protocol for wrist and distal forearm replantation and especially for transmetacarpal replantation, the results of which tend to be poor according to the medical literature.

  8. MR Imaging of Wrist Ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringler, Michael D; Murthy, Naveen S

    2015-08-01

    This article discusses the normal anatomy and pathologic appearances of the intrinsic and extrinsic wrist ligaments using MR Imaging. Technological advances in surface coil design and higher magnetic field strengths have improved radiologists' ability to consistently visualize these small ligaments in their entirety. Wrist ligament anatomy, in the context of proper physiologic function, is emphasized, including common normal variants, and their appearances on MR imaging. The spectrum of disorders, incorporating overlapping appearances of senescent degenerative changes, and destabilizing ligament tears, is outlined. The diagnostic performance of MR imaging to date for various ligament abnormalities is discussed, along with significant limitations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Surgical anatomy of the first extensor compartment: A systematic review and comparison of normal cadavers vs. De Quervain syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Z-Hye; Stranix, J T; Anzai, Lavinia; Sharma, Sheel

    2017-01-01

    De Quervain syndrome or tenosynovitis is a common wrist pathology caused by stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment. Multiple studies have demonstrated significant anatomic variation within the first extensor compartment. The terms "De Quervain's tenosynovitis" and "first extensor compartment anatomy" were comprehensively searched using the PubMed, MEDLINE, and Cochrane database. The presence of a septum within the first dorsal compartment, the number of APL (abductor pollicis longus), and EPB (extensor pollicis brevis) tendon slips were identified. A total of 574 articles were identified on initial search, of which 21 met inclusion criteria. There were 1901 normal cadaver specimens and 470 surgically treated De Quervain disease patients, whose data were available. A septum was present in 43.7% of normal cadavers versus 62.2% De Quervain patients with 58.5% (327 of 559) of the septi characterized as incomplete. There was a difference in the number of APL tendons with a single APL tendon slip noted in 18.3% of normal cadavers (200/1096) versus 27.2% of De Quervain patients (87/230). There was a difference in the number of EPB tendons between the normal cadavers and De Quervain's wrists with 2 or more EPB tendinous slips observed in 5.9% of normal cadavers compared with 2.9% of De Quervain patients. Significant anatomic variability exists within the first extensor compartment. Patients with De Quervain disease were more likely to have a septum dividing the compartment and a single slip of APL. These variations are clinically relevant in the pathophysiology and treatment of De Quervain's tenosynovitis. Prognostic studies. Level III. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Estudo anatômico das inserções distais do tendão extensor longo do polegar Anatomical studies of the distal insertion of the extensor pollicis longus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Benedito Ferreira Caetano

    2004-06-01

    . During its passage through metacarpophalangeal joint we recorded its insertion in the joint capsule in 14 observations (23,3%, however the bone insertion there was not observed in this place.. The most common pattern about this (EPL extensor pollicis longus muscle was the presence of a tendon, passing through the osteofibroses dorsal of wrist compartment with a bone insertion at the base of distal pollicis phalanx.

  11. Computational Biomechanics of the Wrist Joint

    CERN Document Server

    Nazri Bajuri, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    This book presents an analysis of the stress distribution and contact stresses in severe rheumatoid wrist after total wrist arthroplasty. It assesses and compares the load transfer throughout the joint and contact pressure at the articulations. The data obtained from this study is of importance as this provide greater evidence to the benefits of total wrist arthroplasty in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  12. Constrained Registration of the Wrist Joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Giessen, M.; Streekstra, G.J.; Strackee, S.D.; Maas, M.; Grimbergen, K.A.; Van Vliet, L.J.; Vos, F.M.

    2009-01-01

    Comparing wrist shapes of different individuals requires alignment of these wrists into the same pose. Unconstrained registration of the carpal bones results in anatomically nonfeasible wrists. In this paper, we propose to constrain the registration using the shapes of adjacent bones, by keeping the

  13. Constrained registration of the wrist joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Giessen, M.; Streekstra, G.J.; Strackee, S.D.; Maas, M.; Grimbergen, K.A.; van Vliet, L.J.; Vos, F.M.

    2009-01-01

    Comparing wrist shapes of different individuals requires alignment of these wrists into the same pose. Unconstrained registration of the carpal bones results in anatomically nonfeasible wrists. In this paper, we propose to constrain the registration using the shapes of adjacent bones, by keeping the

  14. Wrist motion in handrim wheelchair propulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veeger, H E J; Meershoek, L S; van der Woude, L H; Langenhoff, J M

    Prevalence rates of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in the wheelchair user population are high. One of the possible causes of CTS in this population is the movement pattern of the wrist during handrim wheelchair propulsion, which could include large wrist joint angles and wrist/finger flexor activity.

  15. Wrist Injuries in Elderly Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrange, Erik Kristian Maurice; Brix, Lau

    Keywords Extremities, Musculoskeletal bone, Trauma, Conventional radiography, MR, Outcomes analysis, Acute, Osteoporosis Aims and objectives The purpose of this study was to compare diagnostic X-rays and MRI of the injured wrist in female patients aged 50 years or more. Methods and materials Fift...

  16. The Femoral Neck Mechanoresponse to Hip Extensors Exercise: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Martelli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity is recommended to prevent age-related bone loss. However, the proximal femur mechanoresponse is variable, possibly because of a muscle-dependant mechanoresponse. We compared the proximal femur response with the femoral strain pattern generated by the hip extensor muscles. A healthy participant underwent a six-month unilateral training of the hip extensor muscles using a resistance weight regularly adjusted to the 80% of the one-repetition maximum weight. DXA-based measurements of the areal Bone Mineral Density (aBMD in the exercise leg were adjusted for changes in the control leg. The biomechanical stimulus for bone adaptation (BS was calculated using published models of the musculoskeletal system and the average hip extension moment in elderly participants. Volumetric (ΔvBMD and areal (ΔaBMD BMD changes were calculated. The measured and calculated BMD changes consistently showed a positive and negative effect of exercise in the femoral neck (ΔaBMD = +0.7%; ΔvBMD = +0.8% and the trochanter region (ΔaBMD = −4.1%; ΔvBMD = −0.5%, respectively. The 17% of the femoral neck exceeded the 75th percentile of the spatially heterogeneous BS distribution. Hip extensor exercises may be beneficial in the proximal femoral neck but not in the trochanteric region. DXA-based measurements may not capture significant aBMD local changes.

  17. Does muscle inhibition after knee injury increase the risk of osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, E; Herzog, W

    2000-01-01

    Knee pathologies are commonly associated with muscle inhibition, an inability to fully activate the knee extensors during voluntary contractions. This inhibition results in knee extensor weakness, and is thought to limit the functional recovery of the knee joint structures. The possible contribution of persistent knee extensor inhibition to osteoarthritis is discussed.

  18. Knee extensor torque of men with early degrees of osteoarthritis is associated with pain, stiffness and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrão, Paula R M S; Gramani-Say, Karina; Lessi, Giovanna C; Mattiello, Stela M

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic-degenerative disease. The knee is the most commonly affected joint and the symptoms are generally attributed to quadriceps muscle weakness. However, few studies have evaluated this relationship in a population with early stages of knee OA. To investigate whether a correlation among the knee extensor torque and the three subscales of the WOMAC questionnaire in men with early stages of knee OA exists. Twenty-one men with knee OA grades I or II (according to Kellgren and Lawrence criteria) participated in this study. The concentric and eccentric knee extensor torque were assessed using a Biodex System 3 Pro® isokinetic dynamometer, at a speed of 90º/s. Self-reported symptoms and disability were assessed using the WOMAC questionnaire. Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to test the relationship between the dependent variables (three subscales of WOMAC questionnaire) and the independent variables (average knee extensor peak torque). We found a strong negative correlation between the concentric extensor torque and pain (r=-0.7, pknee extensor torque is significantly correlated with self-report symptoms of patients in initial stages of knee OA. Therefore, the strengthening of the quadriceps muscles, through concentric and eccentric exercise is indicated for these patients in order to minimize these symptoms.

  19. Muscle mass, muscle strength, and muscle fat infiltration as predictors of incident mobility limitations in well-functioning older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.; Goodpaster, B.H.; Kritchevsky, S.B.; Newman, A.B.; Nevitt, M.C.; Rubin, S.M.; Simonsick, E.M.; Harris, T.B.

    2005-01-01

    .05). Among men and women, associations were similar for blacks and whites. CONCLUSION: Lower muscle mass (smaller cross-sectional thigh muscle area), greater fat infiltration into the muscle, and lower knee extensor muscle strength are associated with increased risk of mobility loss in older men

  20. Recovery Kinetics of Knee Flexor and Extensor Strength after a Football Match

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draganidis, Dimitrios; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Avloniti, Alexandra; Barbero-Álvarez, José C.; Mohr, Magni; Malliou, Paraskevi; Gourgoulis, Vassilios; Deli, Chariklia K.; Douroudos, Ioannis I.; Margonis, Konstantinos; Gioftsidou, Asimenia; Fouris, Andreas D.; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Fatouros, Ioannis G.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the temporal changes of isokinetic strength performance of knee flexor (KF) and extensor (KE) strength after a football match. Players were randomly assigned to a control (N = 14, participated only in measurements and practices) or an experimental group (N = 20, participated also in a football match). Participants trained daily during the two days after the match. Match and training overload was monitored with GPS devices. Venous blood was sampled and muscle damage was assessed pre-match, post-match and at 12h, 36h and 60h post-match. Isometric strength as well as eccentric and concentric peak torque of knee flexors and extensors in both limbs (dominant and non-dominant) were measured on an isokinetic dynamometer at baseline and at 12h, 36h and 60h after the match. Functional (KFecc/KEcon) and conventional (KFcon/KEcon) ratios were then calculated. Only eccentric peak torque of knee flexors declined at 60h after the match in the control group. In the experimental group: a) isometric strength of knee extensors and knee flexors declined (Pfootball-specific conditioning. Our data suggest that recovery kinetics of knee flexor and extensor strength after a football match demonstrate strength, limb and velocity specificity and may depend on match physical overload and players' physical conditioning level. PMID:26043222

  1. Isometric elbow extensors strength in supine- and prone-lying positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelzaher, Ibrahim E; Ababneh, Anas F; Alzyoud, Jehad M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare isometric strength of elbow extensors measured in supine- and prone-lying positions at elbow flexion angles of 45 and 90 degrees. Twenty-two male subjects under single-blind procedures participated in the study. Each subject participated in both supine-lying and prone-lying measuring protocols. Calibrated cable tensiometer was used to measure isometric strength of the right elbow extensors and a biofeedback electromyography was used to assure no substitution movements from shoulder girdle muscles. The mean values of isometric strength of elbow extensors measured from supine-lying position at elbow flexion angles of 45 and 90 degrees were 11.1  ±  4.2 kg and 13.1  ±  4.6 kg, while those measured from prone-lying position were 9.9  ±  3.6 kg and 12  ±  4.2 kg, respectively. There is statistical significant difference between the isometric strength of elbow extensors measured from supine-lying position at elbow flexion angles of 45 and 90 degrees compared to that measured from prone-lying position (p  lying starting position is better than prone-lying starting position.

  2. Recovery kinetics of knee flexor and extensor strength after a football match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draganidis, Dimitrios; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Avloniti, Alexandra; Barbero-Álvarez, José C; Mohr, Magni; Malliou, Paraskevi; Gourgoulis, Vassilios; Deli, Chariklia K; Douroudos, Ioannis I; Margonis, Konstantinos; Gioftsidou, Asimenia; Flouris, Andreas D; Fouris, Andreas D; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Fatouros, Ioannis G

    2015-01-01

    We examined the temporal changes of isokinetic strength performance of knee flexor (KF) and extensor (KE) strength after a football match. Players were randomly assigned to a control (N = 14, participated only in measurements and practices) or an experimental group (N = 20, participated also in a football match). Participants trained daily during the two days after the match. Match and training overload was monitored with GPS devices. Venous blood was sampled and muscle damage was assessed pre-match, post-match and at 12 h, 36 h and 60 h post-match. Isometric strength as well as eccentric and concentric peak torque of knee flexors and extensors in both limbs (dominant and non-dominant) were measured on an isokinetic dynamometer at baseline and at 12 h, 36 h and 60 h after the match. Functional (KFecc/KEcon) and conventional (KFcon/KEcon) ratios were then calculated. Only eccentric peak torque of knee flexors declined at 60 h after the match in the control group. In the experimental group: a) isometric strength of knee extensors and knee flexors declined (Pfootball-specific conditioning. Our data suggest that recovery kinetics of knee flexor and extensor strength after a football match demonstrate strength, limb and velocity specificity and may depend on match physical overload and players' physical conditioning level.

  3. A repeated-measures analysis of the effects of soft tissues on wrist range of motion in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs: Implications for the functional origins of an automatic wrist folding mechanism in Crocodilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Joel David; Hutson, Kelda Nadine

    2014-07-01

    A recent study hypothesized that avian-like wrist folding in quadrupedal dinosaurs could have aided their distinctive style of locomotion with semi-pronated and therefore medially facing palms. However, soft tissues that automatically guide avian wrist folding rarely fossilize, and automatic wrist folding of unknown function in extant crocodilians has not been used to test this hypothesis. Therefore, an investigation of the relative contributions of soft tissues to wrist range of motion (ROM) in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs, and the quadrupedal function of crocodilian wrist folding, could inform these questions. Here, we repeatedly measured wrist ROM in degrees through fully fleshed, skinned, minus muscles/tendons, minus ligaments, and skeletonized stages in the American alligator Alligator mississippiensis and the ostrich Struthio camelus. The effects of dissection treatment and observer were statistically significant for alligator wrist folding and ostrich wrist flexion, but not ostrich wrist folding. Final skeletonized wrist folding ROM was higher than (ostrich) or equivalent to (alligator) initial fully fleshed ROM, while final ROM was lower than initial ROM for ostrich wrist flexion. These findings suggest that, unlike the hinge/ball and socket-type elbow and shoulder joints in these archosaurs, ROM within gliding/planar diarthrotic joints is more restricted to the extent of articular surfaces. The alligator data indicate that the crocodilian wrist mechanism functions to automatically lock their semi-pronated palms into a rigid column, which supports the hypothesis that this palmar orientation necessitated soft tissue stiffening mechanisms in certain dinosaurs, although ROM-restricted articulations argue against the presence of an extensive automatic mechanism. Anat Rec, 297:1228-1249, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Acute Effects of Kinesio Taping on Knee Extensor Peak Torque and Stretch Reflex in Healthy Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Simon S.; Yeung, Ella W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Kinesio Tex tape (KT) is used to prevent and treat sports-related injuries and to enhance muscle performance. It has been proposed that the direction of taping may either facilitate or inhibit the muscle by having different effects on cutaneous receptors that modulate excitability of the motor neurons. This study had 2 goals. First, we wished to determine if KT application affects muscle performance and if the method of application facilitates or inhibits muscle performance. This was assessed by measuring isokinetic knee extension peak torque in the knee extensor. Second, we assessed neurological effects of taping on the excitability of the motor neurons by measuring the reflex latency and action potential by electromyography (EMG) in the patellar reflex. The study was a single-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial with 28 healthy volunteers with no history of knee injuries. Participants received facilitative KT treatment, inhibitory KT treatment, or Hypafix taping of the knee extensor. There were significant differences in the peak torque between 3 treatments (F(2,54) = 4.873, P < 0.01). Post hoc analysis revealed that facilitative KT treatment resulted in higher knee extensor peak torque performance than inhibitory KT treatment (P = 0.036, effect size 0.26). There were, however, no significant differences in the reflex latency (F(2,54) = 2.84, P = 0.067) nor in the EMG values (F(2,54) = 0.18, P = 0.837) in the patellar reflex between the 3 taping applications. The findings suggest that the direction of KT application over the muscle has specific effects on muscle performance. Given the magnitude of effect is small, interpretation of clinical significance should be considered with caution. The underlying mechanism warrants further investigation. PMID:26825916

  5. Dynamic Causal Modeling of the Cortical Responses to Wrist Perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical perturbations applied to the wrist joint typically evoke a stereotypical sequence of cortical and muscle responses. The early cortical responses (<100 ms are thought be involved in the “rapid” transcortical reaction to the perturbation while the late cortical responses (>100 ms are related to the “slow” transcortical reaction. Although previous studies indicated that both responses involve the primary motor cortex, it remains unclear if both responses are engaged by the same effective connectivity in the cortical network. To answer this question, we investigated the effective connectivity cortical network after a “ramp-and-hold” mechanical perturbation, in both the early (<100 ms and late (>100 ms periods, using dynamic causal modeling. Ramp-and-hold perturbations were applied to the wrist joint while the subject maintained an isometric wrist flexion. Cortical activity was recorded using a 128-channel electroencephalogram (EEG. We investigated how the perturbation modulated the effective connectivity for the early and late periods. Bayesian model comparisons suggested that different effective connectivity networks are engaged in these two periods. For the early period, we found that only a few cortico-cortical connections were modulated, while more complicated connectivity was identified in the cortical network during the late period with multiple modulated cortico-cortical connections. The limited early cortical network likely allows for a rapid muscle response without involving high-level cognitive processes, while the complexity of the late network may facilitate coordinated responses.

  6. Dynamic assessment of the wrist after total wrist arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H P; Bhattacharjee, D; Dias, J J; Trail, I

    2017-07-01

    Our aim was to assess the outcome in patients with total wrist arthroplasty performed for end stage wrist osteoarthritis. We analysed the ranges of motion of operated and un-operated wrists using a flexible electrogoniometer during the Sollerman hand function test. We assessed grip strength with a digital dynamometer and completed patient reported outcome scores more than one year post-operatively. We reviewed 12 patients with a mean age of 64 (range 48-82) years. The flexion-extension arc was 72% and radioulnar deviation arc was 53% of the un-operated side but the total range of motion (area of circumduction) was 43% of the un-operated side and only 20% of the circumduction in age and gender-matched normal volunteers. Peak grip strength was 68% of the un-operated side. The patients reported good outcome with mean Michigan Hand Questionnaire (MHQ) scores of 56 (range 25-84) and mean Patient Evaluation Measure (PEM) scores of 39 (range 20-68). Patients completed the activities of Sollerman hand function test in twice the time (6 min) as required for a normal volunteer (2.8 min). The circumduction ellipses were narrow and central with limited radio-ulnar deviation and small mean areas of motion during activities of daily living.

  7. The extensor carpi ulnaris pseudolesion: evaluation with microCT, histology, and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Sayed; Cunningham, Ryan; Mohamed, Feroze [Temple University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Amin, Mamta; Popoff, Steven N.; Barbe, Mary F. [Temple University School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    To determine if magic angle plays a role in apparent central increased signal intensity of the distal extensor carpi ulnaris tendon (ECU) on MRI, to see if histologic findings of tendon degeneration are associated with increased T1 or T2 tendon signal on MR imaging, and to determine the prevalence of the ECU ''pseudolesion''. A standard 3 Tesla protocol was utilized to scan ten cadaveric wrists. A 40 mm length of 10 ECU and four extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) tendons were immersion fixed before microCT scanning. Staining with Alcian blue, Masson's trichrome and Safranin O was performed before light microscopy. Fifty clinical wrist MRIs were also reviewed for the presence of increased T1 and/or T2 signal. Central increased T1 and/or T2 signal was observed in 9 of 10 cadaveric ECU tendons, but not in ECRB tendons. MicroCT and histology showed inter-tendinous matrix between the two distal heads of the ECU. Increased mucoid degeneration correlated with increased MRI signal intensity. The tendon fibers were at a maximum of 8.39 to the longitudinal axis on microCT. Clinical MRIs showed increased T1 signal in 6 %, increased T2 signal in 8 %, increased T1 and T2 signal in 80 %, and 6 % showing no increased signal. Central increased T1 and/or T2 signal in the ECU tendon indicates the presence of normal inter-tendinous ground substance, with increased proteoglycan content (mucoid degeneration) responsible for increased signal intensity. None of the fibers were shown on microCT to approach the magic angle. (orig.)

  8. Scaling of Primate Forearm Muscle Architecture as It Relates to Locomotion and Posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leischner, Carissa L; Crouch, Michael; Allen, Kari L; Marchi, Damiano; Pastor, Francisco; Hartstone-Rose, Adam

    2018-03-01

    It has been previously proposed that distal humerus morphology may reflect the locomotor pattern and substrate preferred by different primates. However, relationships between these behaviors and the morphological capabilities of muscles originating on these osteological structures have not been fully explored. Here, we present data about forearm muscle architecture in a sample of 44 primate species (N = 55 specimens): 9 strepsirrhines, 15 platyrrhines, and 20 catarrhines. The sample includes all major locomotor and substrate use groups. We isolated each antebrachial muscle and categorized them into functional groups: wrist and digital extensors and flexors, antebrachial mm. that do not cross the wrist, and functional combinations thereof. Muscle mass, physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), reduced PCSA (RPCSA), and fiber length (FL) are examined in the context of higher taxonomic group, as well as locomotor/postural and substrate preferences. Results show that muscle masses, PCSA, and RPCSA scale with positive allometry while FL scales with isometry indicating that larger primates have relatively stronger, but neither faster nor more flexible, forearms across the sample. When accounting for variation in body size, we found no statistically significant difference in architecture among higher taxonomic groups or locomotor/postural groups. However, we found that arboreal primates have significantly greater FL than terrestrial ones, suggesting that these species are adapted for greater speed and/or flexibility in the trees. These data may affect our interpretation of the mechanisms for variation in humeral morphology and provide information for refining biomechanical models of joint stress and movement in extant and fossil primates. Anat Rec, 301:484-495, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The use of surface EMG in knee extensor moment prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C K; Hsiung, H S; Lai, J S

    1994-10-01

    A systematic method of EMG quantification is developed to estimate the isometric muscle moment directly from quantified surface EMG. This method includes the EMG Signals acquired from an acupuncture point Fu-Tu located on the quadriceps muscle group, an EMG smoothing scheme, an electromechanical time lag estimation, and a mathematical model with the polynomial regression function to quantify the EMG. Three subjects were asked to be tested on the CYBEX II dynamometer with a knee joint angle of 90 degree flexion and hip joint angle of also 90 degrees. They were asked to perform "two" trials of maximal voluntary contraction and "three" trials of free voluntary contraction of the isometric exercise. The first two trials were used to build up the quantification model, and the latter three trials served as data for the validation of the method. A Medelec MS92 EMG system with surface EMG electrodes was used to acquire the EMG Signals. In the determination of the regression order of the polynomial equations, the threshold value 0.0001 of the difference of the coefficient of determination values was used. The results of the polynomial regression orders are all 6 for three subjects, which reflects a tendency of nonlinear behavior of the EMG/moment relationship. A validation scheme was proposed to calculate the root mean square difference (RMSD) of the measured knee extensor moments from the CYBEX II dynamometer and estimated moments from the EMG quantification. The mean values of the RMSD of the three subjects were 0.0597, 0.0679 and 0.1080. These results demonstrate that the present approach can estimate the isometric muscle moment exerted by the quadriceps muscle group.

  10. Goal-dependent modulation of the long-latency stretch response at the shoulder, elbow, and wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Paul L.; Pruszynski, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that muscle activity 50–100 ms after a mechanical perturbation (i.e., the long-latency stretch response) can be modulated in a manner that reflects voluntary motor control. These previous studies typically assessed modulation of the long-latency stretch response from individual muscles rather than how this response is concurrently modulated across multiple muscles. Here we investigated such concurrent modulation by having participants execute goal-directed reaches to visual targets after mechanical perturbations of the shoulder, elbow, or wrist while measuring activity from six muscles that articulate these joints. We found that shoulder, elbow, and wrist muscles displayed goal-dependent modulation of the long-latency stretch response, that the relative magnitude of participants' goal-dependent activity was similar across muscles, that the temporal onset of goal-dependent muscle activity was not reliably different across the three joints, and that shoulder muscles displayed goal-dependent activity appropriate for counteracting intersegmental dynamics. We also observed that the long-latency stretch response of wrist muscles displayed goal-dependent modulation after elbow perturbations and that the long-latency stretch response of elbow muscles displayed goal-dependent modulation after wrist perturbations. This pattern likely arises because motion at either joint could bring the hand to the visual target and suggests that the nervous system rapidly exploits such simple kinematic redundancy when processing sensory feedback to support goal-directed actions. PMID:26445871

  11. Muscle power is an important measure to detect deficits in muscle function in hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bieler, Theresa; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Christensen, Helle Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    that exercise interventions focusing on improving leg extensor power of the symptomatic lower extremity and reducing asymmetry may be beneficial for patients with hip osteoarthritis. Implications for Rehabilitation Even in patients with mild symptoms not awaiting hip replacement a generalized muscle weakening...... of the symptomatic lower extremity seems to be present. Between-leg differences in leg extensor power (force × velocity) appears to be relatively large (19%) in patients with unilateral hip osteoarthritis in contrast to healthy peers who show no asymmetry. Compared to muscle strength the relationship between......PURPOSE: To investigate between-leg differences in hip and thigh muscle strength and leg extensor power in patients with unilateral hip osteoarthritis. Further, to compare between-leg differences in knee extensor strength and leg extensor power between patients and healthy peers. METHODS: Seventy...

  12. Locked intramedullary total wrist arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbay, Jorge L; Feliciano, Eric; Orbay, Carolina

    2012-11-01

    Total wrist arthrodesis is commonly performed using fixation plates, which can produce soft tissue irritation, often require removal, and limit the ability to position the hand in space. The Skeletal Dynamics IMPLATE is an intramedullary total wrist fusion device designed to provide stable fixation while avoiding the problems associated with plates. Radial and metacarpal locked intramedullary nails are inserted and joined by a connector. Desired hand placement is achieved by selecting the proper connector length and angle, then orienting it appropriately. Fusion mass compression is obtained by virtue of longitudinal threads on the radial nail that allow for length adjustment. Seven wrists in three men and four women were treated with this device and followed for a minimum of 24 weeks. In all cases, local cancellous bone graft was used and the third carpometacarpal (CMC) joint incorporated into the fusion. The median age was 49 (range, 28-71) years. Indications for fusion were two posttraumatic arthritides, three rheumatoid arthritides, one spastic deformity, and one infection. Patients were evaluated before surgery and at final follow-up using the Fernandez pain score and grip strength measurements using a hand-held dynamometer. All patients improved their grip strength and decreased their pain scores. All fusions united, and none of the patients presented dorsal soft tissue problems or required implant removal. One rheumatoid patient required secondary surgery for removal of a retained palmar osteophyte. This device delivers stable fixation, facilitates hand placement, and does not require removal.

  13. [Biomechanic considerations in wrist prostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapandji, A I

    1992-01-01

    At the present time, in disorders of the wrist, avulsion of the first carpal row is the most commonly used technique as a last resort. However, there are many wrist prostheses, which are reviewed here. Roughly, they belong to two families: the three axis prostheses (spherical) that cannot transmit to the hand the pronation supination torque, because of their geometrical characteristics, and the two axis prostheses (universal joint) that are able to transmit this movement. The characteristics of future prostheses must include: based on the "universal joint" principle, occupy minimum space, isometric, maintain tendon tension, an axis identical to the true axis of the wrist, to maintain the hand in line with the forearm, fixed without cement but, not shortened with time, possibilities of mechanical flexibility immediately and lastingly stable, to be easily replaced modularly. This ideal prosthesis will certainly exist one day and will take the place of the first carpal row avulsion. In the meantime, this technique will still have a long use.

  14. Repair and rehabilitation of extensor hallucis longus and brevis tendon lacerations in a professional dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, Shaw; Ojofeitimi, Sheyi; Rose, Donald

    2008-06-01

    Case report. Tendon lacerations of the hallux are potentially devastating to a dancer. Strength of the hallux musculature is necessary to attain and maintain balance, push-off in multiple turns, and decelerate in jumps and hops. The purpose of this paper is to report on the repair and rehabilitation of extensor hallucis longus and extensor hallucis brevis tendon lacerations in a professional dancer. A 30-year-old dancer sustained complete laceration of her extensor hallucis longus and extensor hallucis brevis tendons, and partial laceration of the dorsal aspect of the hallux metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint capsule. Following primary repair, at 9 weeks postsurgery, hallux MTP joint active dorsiflexion was limited to 5 degrees and passive dorsiflexion to 70 degrees . First toe dorsiflexion and plantar flexion strength was 4/5 at the MTP and 3+/5 at the interphalangeal joint. Rehabilitation included functional electrical stimulation to address considerable calf atrophy, strengthening exercises, functional retraining, and progressive return to dance. The dancer returned to her previous level of dancing in 18 weeks, with 73 degrees and 85 degrees of hallux MTP joint active and passive dorsiflexion, and 30 degrees and 35 degrees of active and passive plantar flexion, respectively. Hallux MTP and interphalangeal joint muscle strength were 5/5 and 4+/5, respectively. Improvement, manifested in her SF-36 and Dance Functional Outcome System scores, accompanied her full functional recovery. Hallux stability provided by coactivation of the great toe extensors and flexors is crucial to accomplish the demands of bipedal and unipedal balances and activities in dance. This report demonstrates the success of primary surgical repair and rehabilitation in a dancer/athlete experiencing this injury.

  15. A Simulation Model for Extensor Tendon Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Aronstam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This simulation model is designed for use by emergency medicine residents. Although we have instituted this at the PGY-2 level of our residency curriculum, it is appropriate for any level of emergency medicine residency training. It might also be adapted for use for a variety of other learners, such as practicing emergency physicians, orthopedic surgery residents, or hand surgery trainees. Introduction: Tendon injuries commonly present to the emergency department, so it is essential that emergency physicians be competent in evaluating such injuries. Indeed, extensor tendon repair is included as an ACGME Emergency Medicine Milestone (Milestone 13, Wound Management, Level 5 – “Performs advanced wound repairs, such as tendon repairs…”.1 However, emergency medicine residents may have limited opportunity to develop these skills due to a lack of patients, competition from other trainees, or preexisting referral patterns. Simulation may provide an alternative means to effectively teach these skills in such settings. Previously described tendon repair simulation models that were designed for surgical trainees have used rubber worms4, licorice5, feeding tubes, catheters6,7, drinking straws8, microfoam tape9, sheep forelimbs10 and cadavers.11 These models all suffer a variety of limitations, including high cost, lack of ready availability, or lack of realism. Objectives: We sought to develop an extensor tendon repair simulation model for emergency medicine residents, designed to meet ACGME Emergency Medicine Milestone 13, Level 5. We wished this model to be simple, inexpensive, and realistic. Methods: The learner responsible content/educational handout component of our innovation teaches residents about emergency department extensor tendon repair, and includes: 1 relevant anatomy 2 indications and contraindications for emergency department extensor tendon repair 3 physical exam findings 4 tendon suture techniques and 5 aftercare. During

  16. Hip extensor muscle strength in elite female field hockey players ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With regard to the gross motor development, deficits were found with regard to running speed and agility, bilateral coordination and strength. Fine motor deficits were found in upper limb speed and dexterity, response speed and visual motor control. The neuromotor development of street children also showed deficits, ...

  17. Grip-force modulation in multi-finger prehension during wrist flexion and extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambike, Satyajit S.; Paclet, Florent; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2013-01-01

    Extrinsic digit muscles contribute to both fingertip forces and wrist movements (FDP and FPL – flexion, EDC - extension). Hence it is expected that finger forces depend on the wrist movement and position. We investigated the relation between grip force and wrist kinematics to examine whether and how the force: (1) scales with wrist flexion-extension (FE) angle; (2) can be predicted from accelerations induced during FE movement. In one experiment subjects naturally held an instrumented handle using a prismatic grasp and performed very slow FE movements. In another experiment, the same movement was performed cyclically at three prescribed frequencies. In quasistatic conditions, the grip force remained constant over the majority of the wrist range of motion. During the cyclic movements, the grip force changed. The changes were described with a linear regression model that represents the thumb and virtual finger (VF = four fingers combined) normal forces as the sum of the effects of the object’s tangential and radial accelerations and an object-weight-dependent constant term. The model explained 99% of the variability in the data. The independence of the grip force from wrist position agrees with the theory that that the thumb and VF forces are controlled with two neural variables that encode referent coordinates for each digit while accounting for changes in the position dependence of muscle forces, rather than a single neural variable like referent aperture. The results of the cyclical movement study extend the principle of superposition (some complex actions can be decomposed into independently controlled elemental actions) for a motor task involving simultaneous grip force exertion and wrist motion with significant length changes of the grip-force producing muscles. PMID:23625077

  18. Physical Rehabilitation Improves Muscle Function Following Volumetric Muscle Loss Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-19

    tibialis anterior muscle torque . Maximal isometric torque (@ 150Hz) of the tibialis anterior muscle was assessed in vivo following distal extensor...digitorum longus muscle (EDL) tenotomy (see Methods). Average maximal isometric torque normalized to body weight is shown for the uninjured and injured...wheel running promotes ~ 17% improvement in maximal isometric torque , and a ~ 13% increase in weight of the injured muscle , but it did so without

  19. Arthroscopic Synovectomy of Wrist in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jae Woo; Park, Min Jong

    2017-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting multiple joints. Wrist involvement is common. Patients with persistent symptoms despite medical management are candidates for surgery. Synovectomy can provide pain relief and functional improvement for rheumatoid wrist. Arthroscopic synovectomy is a safe and reliable method, with minimal postoperative morbidity. This article reviews the role, technique, and results of arthroscopic synovectomy in the rheumatoid wrist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Current European Practice in Wrist Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Herzberg, Guillaume

    2017-08-01

    The results of wrist arthroplasty for severely destroyed and painful wrists are generally good in pain reduction, increased grip strength, and upper limb function. The wrist range of motion is usually preserved but not improved. Implant survival seems better than it was with earlier implant designs; however, there are problems of carpal component loosening. Patient selection plays an important role, requiring experience, careful patient information, and discussing the pros and cons of arthroplasty and partial or total wrist arthrodesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Post-stroke wrist rehabilitation assisted with an intention-driven functional electrical stimulation (FES)-robot system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X L; Tong, K Y; Li, R; Chen, M; Xue, J J; Ho, S K; Chen, P N

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a novel FES-robot system was developed for wrist rehabilitation training after stroke. The FES-robot system could be continuously controlled by electromyography (EMG) from the residual wrist muscles to facilitate wrist flexion and extension tracking tasks on a horizontal plane by providing assistance from both FES and robot parts. The system performance with five different assistive combinations from the FES and robot parts was evaluated by subjects with chronic stroke (n=5). The results suggested that the assistance from the robot part mainly improved the movement accuracy in the tracking tasks; and the assistance from the FES part mainly suppressed the excessive muscular activities from the elbow joint. The best combination was when the assistances from FES and robot was 1:1, and the results showed better wrist tracking performance with less muscle co-contraction from the elbow joint. © 2011 IEEE

  2. Total wrist arthrodesis with wrist fusion rod in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuma, Kenji; Shintani, Ryosuke; Fujimaki, Hisako; Sukegawa, Koji; Kenmoku, Tomonori; Uchida, Kentaro; Takahira, Naonobu; Takaso, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to retrospectively review the short-term surgical outcome of wrist fusion using wrist fusion rod (WFR). Six wrists of four female patients (mean age 56 years; range 51 to 62 years) with advanced stage rheumatoid arthritis of Larsen IV or V were performed total wrist fusion using WFR. Clinical outcome was assessed using a numeric rating scale of pain satisfaction level. Bony fusion, correction of palmar subluxation and ulnar deviation, rod bending angle, wrist fusion angle, and complications were assessed from radiographs. All wrists achieved painless wrist stability with bony fusion of the radiocarpal joint. Both the palmar subluxation and ulnar deviation were corrected in all patients. Two radiographic complications were observed: rod fracture in one patient and a radiolucent line in proximal metacarpal bone in another patient. Both complications might have occurred as a result of instability of the third carpometacarpal joint, but neither influenced clinical outcome. Wrist fusion angle was smaller than rod bending angle at final observation. Wrist fusion using WFR is an option for the treatment of advanced stage rheumatoid arthritis of wrist. According to our experience, the stability of third carpometacarpal joint should be assessed before surgery, and this joint should be fused if required. The bending angle of the intramedullary rod does not directly form the wrist fusion angle in contrast to the case with a dorsal wrist fusion plate.

  3. The effect of common wrist orthoses on the stiffness of wrist rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegmiller, Daniel B; Eggett, Dennis L; Charles, Steven K

    2016-01-01

    Wrist orthoses (also known as splints, braces, or supports) are commonly used to support or restrict the motion of a weak or injured wrist. These orthoses generally function by stiffening the wrist joint. Therefore, choosing the proper orthosis (or improving orthoses) requires that we understand their stiffness properties. In this study, we present a method for measuring the stiffness of wrist orthoses, and we apply this method to 12 of the most common wrist orthoses. We found similarities and differences between these orthoses, indicating that different orthoses have different effects on the wrist joint and, presumably, on wrist behavior. In particular, all six orthoses with a stay on the volar side or the volar and dorsal sides added a significant amount of stiffness to the wrist joint. In contrast, only one of three orthoses with a stay on the dorsal side and none of the three orthoses without stays exhibited a significant amount of stiffness, calling into question their ability to support the wrist joint. This work lays a foundation for future studies investigating the effect of wrist orthosis stiffness on wrist behavior and how wrist orthosis stiffness can be designed to produce behavior that facilitates healing.

  4. A descriptive study on wrist and hand sensori-motor impairment and function following distal radius fracture intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannopoulos, Christos; Sitler, Michael; Michlovitz, Susan; Tierney, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Descriptive cross-sectional design. Wrist and hand sensori-motor impairment have been observed after distal radius fracture (DRF) treatment. This impairment and its relationship to function lack research. The primary aim of this exploratory study was to determine the magnitude of wrist and hand sensori-motor impairment following surgical and non-surgical treatment among older patients following DRF. Secondary aims were to determine the relationship between wrist and hand sensori-motor impairment with function and pain as well as the relationships among wrist and hand sensori-motor impairment and function and age following DRF. Ten Test (TT), active joint position sense (JPS), electromyography (EMG), computerized hand-grip dynamometer (CHD), and the Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) were used to assess twenty-four female participants 8 weeks following DRF treatment and their 24 matched-control healthy counterparts on wrist and hand sensibility, proprioception, muscle recruitment, grip force, muscle fatigue, and functional status. Participants following DRF demonstrated significantly (p wrist and hand sensori-motor impairment and functional deficits among older females 8 weeks following DRF surgical and non-surgical interventions were revealed. JPS and total grip force were the most clinically meaningful tests for assessing the sensori-motor status as well as explaining functional disability and pain levels for these patients. 2c. Copyright © 2013 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dissection of a Single Rat Muscle-Tendon Complex Changes Joint Moments Exerted by Neighboring Muscles: Implications for Invasive Surgical Interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, H.; Baan, G.C.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate mechanical functioning of a single skeletal muscle, active within a group of (previously) synergistic muscles. For this purpose, we assessed wrist angle-active moment characteristics exerted by a group of wrist flexion muscles in the rat for three conditions:

  6. Eccentric activation and muscle damage: biomechanical and physiological considerations during downhill running.

    OpenAIRE

    Eston, R. G.; Mickleborough, J; Baltzopoulos, V

    1995-01-01

    An eccentric muscle activation is the controlled lengthening of the muscle under tension. Functionally, most leg muscles work eccentrically for some part of a normal gait cycle, to support the weight of the body against gravity and to absorb shock. During downhill running the role of eccentric work of the 'anti-gravity' muscles--knee extensors, muscles of the anterior and posterior tibial compartments and hip extensors--is accentuated. The purpose of this paper is to review the relationship b...

  7. A simulation analysis of the combined effects of muscle strength and surgical tensioning on lateral pinch force following brachioradialis to flexor pollicis longus transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogk, Jeremy P M; Johanson, M Elise; Hentz, Vincent R; Saul, Katherine R; Murray, Wendy M

    2011-02-24

    Biomechanical simulations of tendon transfers performed following tetraplegia suggest that surgical tensioning influences clinical outcomes. However, previous studies have focused on the biomechanical properties of only the transferred muscle. We developed simulations of the tetraplegic upper limb following transfer of the brachioradialis (BR) to the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) to examine the influence of residual upper limb strength on predictions of post-operative transferred muscle function. Our simulations included the transfer, ECRB, ECRL, the three heads of the triceps, brachialis, and both heads of the biceps. Simulations were integrated with experimental data, including EMG and joint posture data collected from five individuals with tetraplegia and BR-FPL tendon transfers during maximal lateral pinch force exertions. Given a measured co-activation pattern for the non-paralyzed muscles in the tetraplegic upper limb, we computed the highest activation for the transferred BR for which neither the elbow nor the wrist flexor moment was larger than the respective joint extensor moment. In this context, the effects of surgical tensioning were evaluated by comparing the resulting pinch force produced at different muscle strength levels, including patient-specific scaling. Our simulations suggest that extensor muscle weakness in the tetraplegic limb limits the potential to augment total pinch force through surgical tensioning. Incorporating patient-specific muscle volume, EMG activity, joint posture, and strength measurements generated simulation results that were comparable to experimental results. Our study suggests that scaling models to the population of interest facilitates accurate simulation of post-operative outcomes, and carries utility for guiding and developing rehabilitation training protocols. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Wrist flexion and extension torques measured by highly sensitive dynamometer in healthy subjects from 5 to 80 years

    OpenAIRE

    Decostre, Val?rie; Canal, Aur?lie; Ollivier, Gwenn; Ledoux, Isabelle; Moraux, Am?lie; Doppler, Val?rie; Payan, Christine Anne Mary; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Background Wrist movements become impaired with disease progression in various neuromuscular disorders. With the development of new therapies, thorough measurement of muscle strength is crucial to document natural disease progression and to assess treatment efficacy. We developed a new dynamometer enabling wrist flexion and extension torque measurement with high sensitivity. The aims of the present study were to collect norms for healthy children and adults, to compute predictive equations, t...

  9. Influence of visual feedback on knee extensor isokinetic concentric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of VF on concentric and eccentric knee extensor peak torque. Twenty-two sedentary, college-aged male and female volunteers were assigned to either Group 1 (n = 11) or Group 2 (n = 11) to either perform knee extensor concentric-eccentric (con-ecc) isokinetic testing with ...

  10. Knee extensor torque and perceived discomfort during symmetrical biphasic electromyostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, B C; Martin, D T; Wilkinson, J G

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of simultaneously delivering 2 channels of electromyostimulation (EMS) current using 2 different electrode arrangements. Ten men and 10 women university students had 4 reusable electrodes placed (2 proximal, 2 distal) medial and lateral on the quadriceps muscle group. Isokinetic voluntary peak torque (VPT) of the quadriceps was determined at 60 degrees x s(-1). A symmetrical biphasic square wave current was applied using 2 independent channels in either a parallel (P) or a crossed (X) electrode arrangement. Subjects increased the current until maximal tolerance was achieved. No significant differences in percent VPT or perceived discomfort (PD) were observed between men and women. Percent VPT was significantly greater using the X (57.2 +/- 11.3%) vs. the P (46.5 +/- 10.7%) pad placement; however, pad placement did not affect peak PD. Data from this study suggest that a 2-channel application of EMS using a crossed electrode arrangement provides greater knee extensor force without greater discomfort.

  11. Congenital extensor tendon dislocation causing pseudotriggering of the little finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriç Çırpar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The main complaints in extensor tendon dislocations are pain, swelling, sense of discomfort, snapping and difficulty in writing and forceful flexion. However, congenital extensor tendon subluxations may present with triggering of the fingers due to tendon dislocations. Unnecessary A1 pulley release may be performed for pseudotriggerring with unsuccessful results. Here, we report an unusual case of congenital extensor tendon subluxation of multiple digits with triggering of the left little finger and aim to attract notice to pseudotriggering of the digits due to tendon dislocations. An extensor hood reconstruction performed by an extensor digitorum communis tendon slip which is passed beneath the deep intermetacarpal ligament is a successful choice of treatment for these patients.

  12. Extensor mechanism injuries in tibiofemoral dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissman, Robert D; Verma, Sadhna; Kreeger, Michael; Robertson, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the incidence, location, and associated findings of extensor mechanism injuries in the setting of tibiofemoral knee dislocations. A retrospective search for patients with previous knee dislocation and MRI of the knee was made during a 5-year period. Images were evaluated for abnormalities commonly seen in patellar instability. Patellar and quadriceps tendon integrity were also evaluated. A total of 14 patients were included in the study. Medial patellofemoral ligament injuries were identified in 10 patients (71%) with tibiofemoral dislocation. As in patients with previous patellar dislocation, medial patellofemoral ligament injuries commonly occurred at the femoral attachment of the ligament. Medial patellofemoral ligament injuries correlated well with vastus medialis oblique elevation. Patellar tendon injuries were less common identified in only 5 patients (36%). Medial patellofemoral ligament injuries can be associated with tibiofemoral knee dislocations. In addition, patellar tendon injuries can also occur, although these are usually partial tears.

  13. Favorable results after total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E. H.; Herzberg, G.; Merser, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose During the past 40 years, several attempts have been made with total wrist arthroplasty to avoid fusion in severely destroyed wrists. The results have often been disappointing. There is only modest clinical documentation due to the small number of patients (especially non......-rheumatoid cases) and short follow-up times. Here we report a multicenter series using a third-generation implant with a minimum follow-up time of 5 years. Methods In 2012, data were retrieved from a registry of consecutive wrist operations at 7 centers with units specialized in hand surgery, between 2003 and 2007....... The wrists had been reviewed annually and analysis was done on the latest follow-up data. Results 60 patients had been operated (5 bilaterally), 5 wrists had been revised, and 52 were available for follow-up (with the revised cases excluded). The pain scores, QuickDASH scores, ulnar flexion, and supination...

  14. Physical equilibrium of the normal wrist and its relation to clinically defined "instability".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdravkovic, V; Jacob, H A; Sennwald, G R

    1995-04-01

    The rotational stability of the proximal carpal row was tested on six unembalmed human cadaver hand specimens. The physiological load conditions were stimulated by loading the wrist flexor and extensor tendons. Pure torque was introduced to the lunate, scaphoid and triquetrum, one at a time, by means of a dynamometer wrench, forcing the bones loaded to perform a flexion-extension motion. A truly stable state of equilibrium could be found in the normal wrist only under axial load. A uni-directional coupling was observed through the scapho-lunate ligament as a counteraction to a tendency for the lunate to extend and the scaphoid to flex. The triquetrum and lunate moved together, showing close coupling in both directions. As conclusion: a stable wrist can be defined as one which, while being loaded within a physiological range of stress, does not deviate from a stable state of equilibrium (the ability to return to a single position when disturbed) at any point within the whole physiological range of motion.

  15. Skeletal Muscles With Antagonistic Muscular Actions: Morphological, Contractile And Metabolic Characteristics [músculo Esquelético Con Acción Muscular Antogonista:características Metabólicas, Contratiles Y Morfológicas

    OpenAIRE

    de Freitas C.E.A.; Freitas S.B.Z.; Lopes F.S.; dal Pai-Silva M.; Picarro I.C.

    2009-01-01

    The muscles can perform the same function in a specific segment (muscles of fast and slow contraction), and at the same time be antagonistic in relation to muscular action (flexors or extensors). The present research aimed to study the morphology, frequency and metabolism of fiber types and the contractile characteristics of extensor and flexors muscles of rabbit. We studied muscles anterior tibialis (AT), flexor digitorum supeficialis (FDS), extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and posterior tibi...

  16. Wrist flexion and extension torques measured by highly sensitive dynamometer in healthy subjects from 5 to 80 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decostre, Valérie; Canal, Aurélie; Ollivier, Gwenn; Ledoux, Isabelle; Moraux, Amélie; Doppler, Valérie; Payan, Christine Anne Mary; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-31

    Wrist movements become impaired with disease progression in various neuromuscular disorders. With the development of new therapies, thorough measurement of muscle strength is crucial to document natural disease progression and to assess treatment efficacy. We developed a new dynamometer enabling wrist flexion and extension torque measurement with high sensitivity. The aims of the present study were to collect norms for healthy children and adults, to compute predictive equations, to assess the reliability of the measurements and to test the feasibility of using the device in patients with a neuromuscular disease. The peak isometric torque of wrist flexion and extension was measured with the MyoWrist dynamometer in 345 healthy subjects aged between 5 and 80 years old and in 9 patients with limb girdle muscle dystrophy type 2 C (LGMD2C) aged between 16 and 38 years old. Predictive equations are proposed for the wrist flexion and extension strength in children and adults. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability was good with ICCs higher than 0.9 for both wrist flexion and extension. However, retest values were significantly higher by 4% than test results. The dynamometer was applied with no difficulty to patients with LGMD2C and was sensitive enough to detect strength as weak as 0.82 N.m. From our models, we quantified the mean strength of wrist extension in LGMD2C patients to 39 ± 17% of their predicted values. The MyoWrist dynamometer provides reliable and sensitive measurement of both wrist flexion and extension torques. However, a training session is recommended before starting a study as a small but significant learning effect was observed. Strength deficit can be quantified from predictive equations that were computed from norms of healthy children and adults.

  17. Efeitos da estimulação elétrica funcional nos músculos do punho e dedos em indivíduos hemiparéticos: uma revisão sistemática da literatura Effects of functional electrical stimulation applied to the wrist and finger muscles of hemiparetic subjects: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NF Arantes

    2007-12-01

    conduct a systematic review of the literature related to the effects of functional electrical stimulation for the wrist and finger muscles of adult hemiplegic patients. METHOD: a search for studies documenting the effects of electrical stimulation on neuromuscular, musculoskeletal and functional characteristics was carried out in Medline, Lilacs and PEDro databases between February and March 2006. Data were extracted in a standardized manner from each study, and methodological quality was assessed using the PEDro scale. RESULTS: Eight randomized studies were reviewed. The scores on the methodological quality of revised studies were between 3/10 and 7/10 in the PEDro scale. Although the diversity of protocols, participants' characteristics and instrumentation prevented pooling of results, a synthesis in levels of evidence demonstrated strong evidence for positive effects of electrical stimulation on muscle strength, tonus, motor function and use of the upper limb in daily life. Moderate evidence was found for effects on dexterity and limited evidence for effects on motor coordination and independence in self-care activities. There was no evidence for gains in range of active wrist extension. CONCLUSION: Despite methodological limitations, randomized studies reported positive effects of electrical stimulation on wrist and fingers, suggesting that this therapy might be effective for promoting function of the affected upper limb of hemiplegic individuals.

  18. The effect of elastic therapeutic taping on lumbar extensor isokinetic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapman, Harry J; Fallon, Tom; O'Connor, Matthew; Titmus, Lee A; Choy, Sherrie T; Hornsby, Claire; Marsden, Jon F; Shum, Gary L

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effects of elastic therapeutic tape when applied overlaying the lumbar extensors on different measures of muscle performance, compared to a placebo taping technique and a no-tape control. A cross-sectional experimental study. A biomechanics laboratory. Twenty one participants received three taping conditions in a randomised order: elastic therapeutic tape, a placebo tape and a no-tape control. Peak torque, the time taken to reach peak torque and peak velocity were measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Concentric lumbar extension peak torque at 60°/s, time taken to reach peak torque and peak velocity was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Friedman's test and post-hoc Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to determine the statistical differences between the three taping conditions. Level of signicance was set at 0.05.fi. A statistically significant improvement in peak lumbar extensor torque was observed when comparing elastic therapeutic tape with the no-tape control (p  0.05). Results demonstrate that the application of elastic therapeutic tape overlaying the primary lumbar extensors significantly improves the maximal lumbar extension peak torque in healthy, asymptomatic adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Autologous Blood Injection and Wrist Immobilisation for Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Massy-Westropp

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study explored the effect of autologous blood injection (with ultrasound guidance to the elbows of patients who had radiologically assessed degeneration of the origin of extensor carpi radialis brevis and failed cortisone injection/s to the lateral epicondylitis. Methods. This prospective longitudinal series involved preinjection assessment of pain, grip strength, and function, using the patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation. Patients were injected with blood from the contralateral limb and then wore a customised wrist support for five days, after which they commenced a stretching, strengthening, and massage programme with an occupational therapist. These patients were assessed after six months and then finally between 18 months and five years after injection, using the patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation. Results. Thirty-eight of 40 patients completed the study, showing significant improvement in pain; the worst pain decreased by two to five points out of a 10-point visual analogue for pain. Self-perceived function improved by 11–25 points out of 100. Women showed significant increase in grip, but men did not. Conclusions. Autologous blood injection improved pain and function in a worker’s compensation cohort of patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis, who had not had relief with cortisone injection.

  20. Design and characterization of the OpenWrist: A robotic wrist exoskeleton for coordinated hand-wrist rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezent, Evan; Rose, Chad G; Deshpande, Ashish D; O'Malley, Marcia K

    2017-07-01

    Robotic devices have been clinically verified for use in long duration and high intensity rehabilitation needed for motor recovery after neurological injury. Targeted and coordinated hand and wrist therapy, often overlooked in rehabilitation robotics, is required to regain the ability to perform activities of daily living. To this end, a new coupled hand-wrist exoskeleton has been designed. This paper details the design of the wrist module and several human-related considerations made to maximize its potential as a coordinated hand-wrist device. The serial wrist mechanism has been engineered to facilitate donning and doffing for impaired subjects and to insure compatibility with the hand module in virtual and assisted grasping tasks. Several other practical requirements have also been addressed, including device ergonomics, clinician-friendliness, and ambidextrous reconfigurability. The wrist module's capabilities as a rehabilitation device are quantified experimentally in terms of functional workspace and dynamic properties. Specifically, the device possesses favorable performance in terms of range of motion, torque output, friction, and closed-loop position bandwidth when compared with existing devices. The presented wrist module's performance and operational considerations support its use in a wide range of future clinical investigations.

  1. Electrophysiological appraisal of relative segmental motoneurone pool excitability in flexor and extensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M A

    1978-01-01

    F responses recorded from flexor and extensor muscles were analysed in 18 normal subjects and in 16 patients with motor system abnormalities. The prominence of the F responses was evaluated quantitatively by determining the persistence--that is, the fraction of measurable F responses which actually occur after a series of supramaximal stimuli--and average amplitude of the F responses. In the normal resting state, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that the "central excitatory states" of motoneurones is greater in the antigravity muscles than in those muscles not stretched by gravity. This pattern was disrupted in eight of the 16 patients with motor system abnormalities caused by central nervous system lesions. These changes reflect a clinically testable aspect of the pathophysiology of certain motor system disorders. PMID:690640

  2. The effectiveness of lumbar extensor training: local stabilization or dynamic strengthening exercises. A review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadała, Michał; Gryckiewicz, Szymon

    2014-01-01

    Deconditioning of the lumbar extensor musculature (lumbar erector spinae and multifidus) is a risk factor for low back injury and pain. The article presents various aspects of scientific reports which confirm the effectiveness of lumbar extensor exercises. The articles to be reviewed were extracted from the MedLine and PubMed data - bases. The following key words were used as search terms: lumbar multifidus muscle exercises, low back global exercise, motor control exercise in chronic low back pain, low back stabilization exercise. A number of prior investigations have described lumbar multifidus atrophy and replacement by fat after low back injury. Restoration of the tonic activity of the multifidus muscle is an essential condition in regaining health and spine functions. On the other hand, conditioning and strengthening exercises are considered valuable in effectively 'pre-habilitating' and reducing injury risk for athletes. 1. The lumbar low load specific stabilization exercises would be more efficient than muscle strengthening in the improvement of chronic low back pain. 2. Conditioning and strengthening exercises are considered valuable in effectively 'pre-habilitating' and reducing injury risk for athletes.

  3. Knee extensor strength and body weight in adolescent men and the risk of knee osteoarthritis by middle age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkiewicz, Aleksandra; Timpka, Simon; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Ageberg, Eva; Englund, Martin

    2017-10-01

    To assess the extent to which knee extensor strength and weight in adolescence are associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) by middle age. We studied a cohort of 40 121 men who at age 18 years in 1969/1970 underwent mandatory conscription in Sweden. We retrieved data on isometric knee extensor strength, weight, height, smoking, alcohol consumption, parental education and adult occupation from Swedish registries. We identified participants diagnosed with knee OA or knee injury from 1987 to 2010 through the National Patient Register. We estimated the HR of knee OA using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional regression model. To assess the influence of adult knee injury and occupation, we performed a formal mediation analysis. The mean (SD) knee extensor strength was 234 (47) Nm, the mean (SD) weight was 66 (9.3) kg. During 24 years (median) of follow-up starting at the age of 35 years, 2049 persons were diagnosed with knee OA. The adjusted HR (95% CI) of incident knee OA was 1.12 (1.06 to 1.18) for each SD of knee extensor strength and 1.18 (1.15 to 1.21) per 5 kg of body weight. Fifteen per cent of the increase in OA risk due to higher knee extensor strength could be attributed to knee injury and adult occupation. Higher knee extensor strength in adolescent men was associated with increased risk of knee OA by middle age, challenging the current tenet of low muscle strength being a risk factor for OA. We confirmed higher weight to be a strong risk factor for knee OA. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Speed-related spinal excitation from ankle dorsiflexors to knee extensors during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias, Caroline; Nielsen, Jens Bo; Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique

    2008-01-01

    Automatic adjustments of muscle activity throughout the body are required for the maintenance of balance during human walking. One mechanism that is likely to contribute to this control is the heteronymous spinal excitation between human ankle dorsiflexors and knee extensors (CPQ-reflex). Here, we....../h, then increased with walking speeds about 3-4 km/h, and reached a plateau without any further change at walking speeds from 4 to 6 km/h. The reflex showed no modulation when the stride cycle was varied at constant speed (4 km/h; short steps versus long steps). These changes were unlikely to be only caused...

  5. Knee extensor torque of men with early degrees of osteoarthritis is associated with pain, stiffness and function

    OpenAIRE

    Serrão,Paula R. M. S.; Gramani-Say,Karina; Giovanna C. Lessi; Mattiello,Stela M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic-degenerative disease. The knee is the most commonly affected joint and the symptoms are generally attributed to quadriceps muscle weakness. However, few studies have evaluated this relationship in a population with early stages of knee OA. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether a correlation among the knee extensor torque and the three subscales of the WOMAC questionnaire in men with early stages of knee OA exists. METHOD: Twenty-one men with knee OA gr...

  6. Design and Kinematic Evaluation of a Novel Joint-Specific Play Controller: Application for Wrist and Forearm Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisco, Joseph J; Schwartz, Joel B; Wilcox, Bethany; Costa, Laura; Kerman, Karen

    2015-07-01

    The wrist extensors and flexors are profoundly affected in most children with hemiparetic cerebral palsy (CP) and are the major target of physical therapists' and occupational therapists' efforts to restore useful hand functions. A limitation of any therapeutic or exercise program can be the level of the child's engagement or adherence. The proposed approach capitalizes on the primary learning avenue for children: toy play. This study aimed to develop and evaluate the measurement accuracy of innovative, motion-specific play controllers that are engaging rehabilitative devices for enhancing therapy and promoting neural plasticity and functional recovery in children with CP. Design objectives of the play controller included a cost-effective, home-based supplement to physical therapy, the ability to calibrate the controller so that play can be accomplished with any active range of motion, and the capability of logging play activity and wrist motion over week-long periods. Accuracy of the play controller in measuring wrist flexion-extension was evaluated in 6 children who were developing in a typical manner, using optical motion capture of the wrist and forearm as the gold standard. The error of the play controller was estimated at approximately 5 degrees in both maximum wrist flexion and extension. Measurements were taken during a laboratory session, with children without CP, and no toy or computer game was interfaced with the play controller. Therefore, the potential engagement of the proposed approach for therapy remains to be evaluated. This study presented the concept, development, and wrist tracking accuracy of an inexpensive approach to extremity therapy that may have a health benefit for children with hemiparesis, and potentially for patients of any age with a wide range of extremity neuromotor impairments. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  7. Morphology of peroneus tertius muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S D; Joshi, S S; Athavale, S A

    2006-10-01

    Peroneus tertius (PT) muscle is peculiar to man, and man is the only member among the primates in whom this muscle occurs. The muscle is variable in its development and attachment. Because of functional demands of bipedal gait and plantigrade foot, part of extensor digitorum brevis (EDB) has migrated upwards into the leg from the dorsum of foot. PT is a muscle that evolution is rendering more important. In a total of 110 cadavers, extensor compartment of leg and dorsum of foot were dissected in both the lower limbs and extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and PT muscles were dissected and displayed. PT was found to be absent in 10.5% limbs, the incidence being greater on the right side. The remaining limbs in which the PT muscle was present had a very extensive origin from lower 3/4th of extensor surface of fibula (20% on right and in 17% on left), and the EDL was very much reduced in size. In approximately 12%, the tendon of PT was thick or even thicker than the tendon of EDL. In 4%, the tendon extended beyond fifth metatarsal up to metatarsophalangeal joint of fifth toe, and in 1.5%, it extended up to the proximal phalanx of little toe. In two cases (both on the right side), where PT was absent, it was replaced by a slip from lateral margin of EDL. We conclude that PT, which is preeminently human, is extending its purchase both proximally and distally. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Ultrasound-guided methotrexate injection for De Quervain disease of the wrist: what lies beyond the horizon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allam AE

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abdallah El-Sayed Allam,1 Doaa Shawky Al-Ashkar,1 Ahmed A Negm,2 Basma Aly Eltawab,3 Wei-Ting Wu,4 Ke-Vin Chang4 1Department of Physical Medicine, Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Tanta University Hospitals, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt; 2Department of Physical Medicine, Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt; 3Department of Radiology, Tanta University Hospitals, Tanta, Egypt; 4Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, Bei-Hu Branch, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: De Quervain disease (DQVD is one of the most common causes of lateral wrist pain and can lead to significant disability. The current case involves a right-handed, middle-aged, female patient with severe lateral wrist pain due to DQVD. Her pain was not responsive to oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, rehabilitation, and repeated corticosteroid injections. Because she refused surgical intervention, we performed ultrasound-guided methotrexate injections (four times. After the injections, dramatic pain relief, functional improvement, and reduction of the thickness of the retinaculum and tendons in the first dorsal extensor compartment of the wrist were noted. This case report highlights the potential usefulness of ultrasound-guided methotrexate injection for recalcitrant DQVD of the wrist. Keywords: hand, pain, sonography, rehabilitation

  9. A Randomized Controlled Study: Effectiveness of Functional Electrical Stimulation on Wrist and Finger Flexor Spasticity in Hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakipoğlu Yuzer, Güldal Funda; Köse Dönmez, Burcu; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of functional electrical stimulation (FES) applied to the wrist and finger extensors for wrist flexor spasticity in hemiplegic patients. Thirty stroke patients treated as inpatients were included in the study. Patients were randomly divided into study and control groups. FES was applied to the study group. Wrist range of movement, the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), Rivermead Motor Assessment (RMA), Brunnstrom (BS) hand neurophysiological staging, Barthel Index (BI), and Upper Extremity Function Test (UEFT) are outcome measures. There was no significant difference regarding range of motion (ROM) and BI values on admission between the groups. A significant difference was found in favor of the study group for these values at discharge. In the assessment within groups, there was no significant difference between admission and discharge RMA, BS hand, and UEFT scores in the control group, but there was a significant difference between the admission and discharge values for these parameters in the study group. Both groups showed improvement in MAS values on internal assessment. It was determined that FES application is an effective method to reduce spasticity and to improve ROM, motor, and functional outcomes in hemiplegic wrist flexor spasticity. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Electromyographic response to manual passive stretch of the hemiplegic wrist: accuracy, reliability, and correlation with clinical spasticity assessment and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorinola, Isaac O; White, Claire M; Rushton, David N; Newham, Dianne J

    2009-01-01

    The management of spasticity is important in neurorehabilitation and needs to be assessed accurately. The commonly used clinical tools have been criticized for lack of validity and sensitivity. To investigate the reliability of electromyographic (EMG) response to manual stretches of the hemiplegic wrist and its correlation with clinical assessments of spasticity and physical function. EMG activity was measured in 10 stroke patients and control participants (53.7 +/- 10 and 32 +/- 9.1 years respectively, mean +/- SEM) during 3 cycles of 10 seconds passive manual movements of the wrist at 60 to 360 degrees * s(-1). Isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) strength, range of movement (ROM) of the wrist flexors and extensors, spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale [MAS]) and hand function (Block and Box Test [BBT]) were also assessed. EMG activity of the stroke patients increased with velocity from 4% to 40% MVC (P spasticity except at the lowest velocity (r = .72). Consistent and accurate stretch velocities and EMG responses can be achieved with manual wrist stretches for the assessment of the neural component of spasticity. These objective tests did not correlate well with the standard clinical assessment of spasticity. They showed significant negative relationships with function, indicating that increased reflex excitability contributes to hand disability after stroke.

  11. Forward and inverse kinematics of double universal joint robot wrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert L., II

    1991-01-01

    A robot wrist consisting of two universal joints can eliminate the wrist singularity problem found on many individual robots. Forward and inverse position and velocity kinematics are presented for such a wrist having three degrees of freedom. Denavit-Hartenberg parameters are derived to find the transforms required for the kinematic equations. The Omni-Wrist, a commercial double universal joint robot wrist, is studied in detail. There are four levels of kinematic parameters identified for this wrist; three forward and three inverse maps are presented for both position and velocity. These equations relate the hand coordinate frame to the wrist base frame. They are sufficient for control of the wrist standing alone. When the wrist is attached to a manipulator arm; the offset between the two universal joints complicates the solution of the overall kinematics problem. All wrist coordinate frame origins are not coincident, which prevents decoupling of position and orientation for manipulator inverse kinematics.

  12. Changes in the pressure distribution by wrist angle and hand position in a wrist splint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Y J

    2017-12-07

    The study was conducted to provide basic data to develop a system that distributes pressure over a broader area by measuring and analyzing pressures in various wrist angles and hand positions while wearing a wrist splint. With 0, 15, 30, and 45 degrees of wrist extension, full-finger extension and finger flexion, pressure distribution changes were measured three times. Average peak pressure was analyzed and mean value picture (MVP) in zones 3-5 was calculated. A one-way Anova was conducted to identify changes in pressure distribution by wrist angle and hand position. Mean peak pressure values (kPa) in zones 3-5 changed depending on the wrist angle. Peak pressures (kPa) changed significantly in 15, 30, and 45 degrees wrist extension, depending on the hand position. Since pressure distributions differ depending the wrist angle and hand position (finger flexion), it is necessary to consider how pressure varies in each wrist position and to provide information on postures that should be avoided during tasks and occupational activities based on various wrist angles or hand positions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Knee extensor strength and body weight in adolescent men and the risk of knee osteoarthritis by middle age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turkiewicz, Aleksandra; Timpka, Simon; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the extent to which knee extensor strength and weight in adolescence are associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) by middle age. METHODS: We studied a cohort of 40 121 men who at age 18 years in 1969/1970 underwent mandatory conscription in Sweden. We retrieved data on isome......OBJECTIVES: To assess the extent to which knee extensor strength and weight in adolescence are associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) by middle age. METHODS: We studied a cohort of 40 121 men who at age 18 years in 1969/1970 underwent mandatory conscription in Sweden. We retrieved data...... on isometric knee extensor strength, weight, height, smoking, alcohol consumption, parental education and adult occupation from Swedish registries. We identified participants diagnosed with knee OA or knee injury from 1987 to 2010 through the National Patient Register. We estimated the HR of knee OA using...... be attributed to knee injury and adult occupation. CONCLUSION: Higher knee extensor strength in adolescent men was associated with increased risk of knee OA by middle age, challenging the current tenet of low muscle strength being a risk factor for OA. We confirmed higher weight to be a strong risk factor...

  14. V1 and V2b interneurons secure the alternating flexor-extensor motor activity mice require for limbed locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingming; Lanuza, Guillermo M.; Britz, Olivier; Wang, Zhi; Siembab, Valerie C.; Zhang, Ying; Velasquez, Tomoko; Alvarez, Francisco J.; Frank, Eric; Goulding, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The reciprocal activation of flexor and extensor muscles constitutes the fundamental mechanism that tetrapod vertebrates use for locomotion and limb-driven reflex behaviors. This aspect of motor coordination is controlled by inhibitory neurons in the spinal cord; however, the identity of the spinal interneurons that serve this function is not known. Here we show that the production of an alternating flexor-extensor motor rhythm depends on the composite activities of two classes of ventrally-located inhibitory neurons, V1 and V2b interneurons (INs). Abrogating V1 and V2b IN-derived neurotransmission in the isolated spinal cord results in a synchronous pattern of L2 flexor-related and L5 extensor-related locomotor activity. Mice lacking V1 and V2b inhibition are unable to articulate their limb joints and display marked deficits in limb-driven reflex movements. Taken together, these findings identify V1- and V2b-derived neurons as the core interneuronal components of the limb central pattern generator (CPG) that coordinate flexor-extensor motor activity. PMID:24698273

  15. A submaximal test for the assessment of knee extensor endurance capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ruiter, Cornelis J; Mallee, Max I P; Leloup, Lara E C; De Haan, Arnold

    2014-02-01

    We aimed to develop an undemanding test for endurance capacity of the knee extensor muscles, which can also be applied to frail participants. We hypothesized 1) that the first objective indications for peripheral fatigue during incremental unilateral repetitive isometric knee extensor contractions could be used to assess a fatigue threshold (FT), 2) that torque at FT would depend on training status, and 3) that this torque could easily be sustained for 30 min. Five trained and five untrained participants performed 5-min bouts of 60 repetitive contractions (3-s on and 2-s off). Torque, set at 25% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), was increased by 5% MVC in subsequent bouts. The highest torque for which rectified surface EMG remained stable during the bout was defined as the FT. On separate occasions, 30-min bouts were performed at and above the FT to assess sustainable torque. Changes in gas exchange parameters, HR, and RPE were monitored to corroborate FT. At FT (RPE = 5.7 ± 1.7), torque was higher (P MVC) than in untrained participants (30.5% ± 1.8% MVC). Sustainable torque was ∼4% higher than (P MVC, significant increases in rectified surface EMG and V˙O2 were found. During incremental knee extensor contractions, FT could be assessed at a submaximal exercise intensity. FT was higher in trained than in untrained participants and was related to exercise sustainability. With the use of FT, changes in endurance capacity of single muscle groups can potentially also be determined in frail participants for whom exercise performed until exhaustion is unwarranted.

  16. Tolerance and effectiveness of a new dynamic hand-wrist orthosis in chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andringa, Aukje S; Van de Port, Ingrid G L; Meijer, Jan-Willem G

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate tolerance of a new dynamic hand-wrist orthosis and effectiveness on the prevention of progressive wrist contracture and spasticity after stroke. Chronic stroke patients (N = 6) with upper limb spasticity, who had not been able to endure a static orthosis, were provided with a custom-made dynamic orthosis. Tolerance of the orthosis was evaluated by the daily wearing time, and self-reported pain and spasticity. Effectiveness was measured by contracture of wrist and finger flexor muscles, upper limb spasticity and use of spasticity treatment. Outcome measures were collected at time of fitting of the dynamic orthosis (baseline) and after three and six months. Five patients could endure the dynamic orthosis without discomfort for 6 hours daily during the 6-month period. Self-reported spasticity and pain decreased significantly (p orthosis. In comparison to baseline, the maximum passive wrist extension increased significantly from -29° to -12° (p spasticity was measured, the use of Botulinum Toxin injections decreased for two patients. The majority of the included chronic stroke patients tolerated the new dynamic orthosis for at least 6 hours daily and the use significantly reduced wrist contractures in a 6-month period.

  17. Dynamics of wrist and forearm rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peaden, Allan W; Charles, Steven K

    2014-08-22

    Human movement generally involves multiple degrees of freedom (DOF) coordinated in a graceful and seemingly effortless manner even though the underlying dynamics are generally complex. Understanding these dynamics is important because it exposes the challenges that the neuromuscular system faces in controlling movement. Despite the importance of wrist and forearm rotations in everyday life, the dynamics of movements involving wrist and forearm rotations are currently unknown. Here we present equations of motion describing the torques required to produce movements combining flexion-extension (FE) and radial-ulnar deviation (RUD) of the wrist and pronation-supination (PS) of the forearm. The total torque is comprised of components required to overcome the effects of inertia, damping, stiffness, and gravity. Using experimentally measured kinematic data and subject-specific impedance parameters (inertia, damping, and stiffness), we evaluated movement torques to test the following hypotheses: the dynamics of wrist and forearm rotations are (1) dominated by stiffness, not inertial or damping effects, (2) significantly coupled through interaction torques due to stiffness and damping (but not inertia), and (3) too complex to be well approximated by a simple, linear model. We found that (1) the dynamics of movements combining the wrist and forearm are similar to wrist rotations in that stiffness dominates over inertial and damping effects (pwrist and forearm are significantly coupled through stiffness, while interactions due to inertia and damping are small, and (3) despite the complexity of the exact equations of motion, the dynamics of wrist and forearm rotations are well approximated by a simple, linear (but still coupled) model (the mean error in predicting torque was less than 1% of the maximum torque). The exact and approximate models are presented for modeling wrist and forearm rotations in future studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute partial rupture of the common extensor tendon

    OpenAIRE

    Kachrimanis, G.; Papadopoulou, O.

    2010-01-01

    Rupture of the common extensor tendon is the most common acute tendon injury of the elbow. The authors describe a case of a patient with a clinical history of tendinopathy caused by functional overload of the common extensor tendon, treated also with infiltrations of steroids, and subsequent partial rupture of the tendon during sport activity. The diagnosis was made clinically and at ultrasound (US) examination; US follow-up after some time showed the healing of the lesion. This case confirms...

  19. [Biomechanical modelling of the wrist joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschweiler, J; Allmendinger, F; Stromps, J P; Nick, H E; Pallua, N; Radermacher, K

    2014-04-01

    The hand represents one of the most complex joint mechanisms of the human body. The hand is also an important communication medium. The spectrum of today's hand injuries reaches from minor damage up to complex traumata with loss of several functional aspects. Enormous subsequent economic costs result. The therapeutic re-establishment of the equilibrium between maximum stress and the actual applied stress is the condition for a lifelong joint function. A literature review about biomechanical wrist models was realised. The previous models found in the literature were systematically analysed as well as verifying their suitability for clinical use regarding pathological changes, therapy approaches and modelling/simulation approaches, respectively, of wrist injuries. The return of the wrist joint biomechanics to the normal condition is a key factor for a successful therapy. Furthermore, it is important for the re-establishment of an unimpaired joint function. Currently, there exist only simplified descriptions and models of the wrist joint, approximated by technical joints and furthermore, they are partially contradictory. Therefore, no uniform validated biomechanical wrist model exists as yet. Regarding the arising complex clinical problems, however, a valid biomechanical wrist joint model would be necessary as assistance, in order to improve the success of systematised therapies on the basis of computer-aided model-based planning and intervention. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. [Operative differential therapy of rheumatic wrists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinges, H; Fürst, M; Rüther, H; Schill, S

    2007-09-01

    The wrists are affected in the long-term in 90% of people with rheumatism and are often (42%) the first manifestation of a destructive disease. The functionality of the wrist and the whole hand is of great importance because in many cases loss of function of the wrists leads to severe limitations. Local and operative treatment of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the main duties in rheuma-orthopaedics. For operative treatment there is a finely tuned differential therapeutic spectrum available. The diagnostic indications take the local and total pattern of affection, the current systemic therapy as well as patient wishes and patient compliance into consideration. In the early stages according to LDE (Larsen, Dale, Eek), soft tissues operations such as articulo-tenosynovectomy (ATS) are most commonly carried out. In further advanced stages osseus stabilisation must often be performed. At this point a smooth transition from partial arthrodesis to complete fixation is possible. After initial euphoria, arthroplasty of the wrist is being increasingly less used for operative treatment due to the unconvincing long-term results and high complication rate. With reference to the good long-term results of all operative procedures, in particular early ATS with respect to pain, function and protection of tendons, after failure of medicinal treatment and persistence of inflammatory activity in the wrist, patients should be transferred to an experienced rheuma-orthopaedic surgeon.

  1. Is poststroke complex regional pain syndrome the combination of shoulder pain and soft tissue injury of the wrist?: A prospective observational study: STROBE of ultrasonographic findings in complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Wook; Kim, Yoon; Kim, Jong Moon; Hong, Ji Seong; Lim, Hyun Sun; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-08-01

    Patients with poststroke complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) show different symptoms compared to other types of CRPS, as they usually complain of shoulder and wrist pain with the elbow relatively spared. It is thus also known by the term "shoulder-hand syndrome."The aim of this study is to present a possible pathophysiology of poststroke CRPS through ultrasonographic observation of the affected wrist before and after steroid injection at the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) tendon in patients suspected with poststroke CRPS.Prospective evaluation and observation, the STROBE guideline checklist was used.Twenty-three patients diagnosed as poststroke CRPS in accordance to clinical criteria were enrolled. They had a Three Phase Bone Scan (TPBS) done and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of EDC tendon was measured by using ultrasonography. They were then injected with steroid at the EDC tendon. The CSA of EDC tendon, visual analogue scale (VAS), and degree of swelling of the wrist were followed up 1 week after the injection.TPBS was interpreted as normal for 4 patients, suspected CRPS for 10 patients, and CRPS for 9 patients. Ultrasonographic findings of the affected wrist included swelling of the EDC tendon. After the injection of steroid to the wrist, CSA and swelling of the affected wrist compared to that before the treatment was significantly decreased (P shoulder or rotator cuff tear of shoulder and soft tissue injury of the wrist caused by the hemiplegic nature of patients with stroke.

  2. Validity of trunk extensor and flexor torque measurements using isokinetic dynamometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhem, Gaël; Giroux, Caroline; Couturier, Antoine; Maffiuletti, Nicola A

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the validity and test-retest reliability of trunk muscle strength testing performed with a latest-generation isokinetic dynamometer. Eccentric, isometric, and concentric peak torque of the trunk flexor and extensor muscles was measured in 15 healthy subjects. Muscle cross sectional area (CSA) and surface electromyographic (EMG) activity were respectively correlated to peak torque and submaximal isometric torque for erector spinae and rectus abdominis muscles. Reliability of peak torque measurements was determined during test and retest sessions. Significant correlations were consistently observed between muscle CSA and peak torque for all contraction types (r=0.74-0.85; Ptorque (r ⩾ 0.99; Pmuscles. Intraclass correlation coefficients were comprised between 0.87 and 0.95, and standard errors of measurement were lower than 9% for all contraction modes. The mean difference in peak torque between test and retest ranged from -3.7% to 3.7% with no significant mean directional bias. Overall, our findings establish the validity of torque measurements using the tested trunk module. Also considering the excellent test-retest reliability of peak torque measurements, we conclude that this latest-generation isokinetic dynamometer could be used with confidence to evaluate trunk muscle function for clinical or athletic purposes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sex Differences in Neuromuscular Fatigability of the Knee Extensors Post-Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan Kirking

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Despite the implications of optimizing strength training post-stroke, little is known about the differences in fatigability between men and women with chronic stroke. The purpose of this study was to determine the sex differences in knee extensor muscle fatigability and potential mechanisms in individuals with stroke. Methods: Eighteen participants (10 men, eight women with chronic stroke (≥6 months and 23 (12 men, 11 women nonstroke controls participated in the study. Participants performed an intermittent isometric contraction task (6 s contraction, 3 s rest at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC torque until failure to maintain the target torque. Electromyography was used to determine muscle activation and contractile properties were assessed with electrical stimulation of the quadriceps muscles. Results: Individuals with stroke had a briefer task duration (greater fatigability than nonstroke individuals (24.1 ± 17 min vs. 34.9 ± 16 min. Men were more fatigable than women for both nonstroke controls and individuals with stroke (17.9 ± 9 min vs. 41.6 ± 15 min. Individuals with stroke had less fatigue-related changes in muscle contractile properties and women with stroke differed in their muscle activation strategy during the fatiguing contractions. Conclusions: Men and women fatigue differently post-stroke and this may be due to the way they neurally activate muscle groups.

  4. Tendon transfer to restore the extension of the thumb using the extensor carpi radialis brevis: A long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shusen; Yang, Guang; Li, Qiang; Wu, Guangzhi; Wang, Zhenxing; Zhang, Ju; Yu, Wei

    2017-11-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the long-term functional and clinical outcomes of a tendon transfer to restore the extension of the thumb using the extensor carpi radialis brevis. From June 2005 to September 2012, eight patients (six males; two females) with a mean age of 30 years (range, 16-52 years) who suffered rupture or division of extensor pollicis longus underwent a tendon transfer to restore the extension of the thumb using the extensor carpi radialis brevis. The range of motion, pinch, and grip strength of thumb were compared with the nonoperated hand and evaluated for all the study patients using the Geldmacher scoring system. At an average follow-up of 56 months, all eight patients could extend their thumbs fully and were assessed as good or excellent according to the Geldmacher scoring system. Average grip and tip pinch strengths of the operated hand were 95% (34.9 kg ± 14.0 kg vs. 36.6 kg ± 14.6 kg) and 92% (9.2 kg ± 4.8 kg vs. 9.9 kg ± 4.7 kg) of the nonoperative side, respectively. There was no marked loss of extension motion or strength of the wrist nor any other postoperative complications. The procedure of transferring the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon to the extensor pollicis longus provides excellent long-term clinical results for restoring the extension of the thumb. The procedure is safe, with few complications, and it can be an alternate procedure of restoring the extension of the thumb. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bilateral knee extensor fatigue modulates force and responsiveness of the corticospinal pathway in thenon-fatigued, dominant elbow flexors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemanja eŠambaher

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Exercise-induced fatigue affects muscle performance and modulates corticospinal excitability in non-exercised muscles. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of bilateral knee extensor fatigue on dominant elbow flexor (EF maximal voluntary force production and corticospinal excitability. Transcranial magnetic, transmastoid electrical and brachial plexus electrical stimulation were used to investigate corticospinal, spinal, and muscle excitability of the dominant EF before and after a bilateral knee extensor fatiguing protocol or time matched rest period (control. For both sessions three stimuli were delivered every 1.5s during the three pre-test time points and during the 1st, 3rd, 6th, 9th and 12th post-test 5s EF isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC. In both conditions, Overall, EF MVC force (p< 0.001 decreased progressively from repetition #1 to #12 during the post-test MVC protocol. EF MVC force (p < 0.001, ES = 0.9, ∆ 10.3% decrements were more pronounced in the knee extensor fatigue intervention condition. In addition, there were no significant differences between conditions for biceps brachii electromyographic (EMG activity (p = 0.43, motor evoked potentials (MEP amplitude (p=0.908 or MEP silent period (p=0.776. However, the fatigue condition exhibited a lower MEP/ cervico-medullary MEP (CMEP ratio (p=0.042, ES=2.5, ∆25% and a trend toward higher CMEP values (p=0.08, ES=0.5, ∆20.4%. These findings suggest that bilateral knee extensor fatigue can impair performance and modulate corticospinal excitability of the EF.

  6. Recovery kinetics of knee flexor and extensor strength after a football match.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Draganidis

    Full Text Available We examined the temporal changes of isokinetic strength performance of knee flexor (KF and extensor (KE strength after a football match. Players were randomly assigned to a control (N = 14, participated only in measurements and practices or an experimental group (N = 20, participated also in a football match. Participants trained daily during the two days after the match. Match and training overload was monitored with GPS devices. Venous blood was sampled and muscle damage was assessed pre-match, post-match and at 12 h, 36 h and 60 h post-match. Isometric strength as well as eccentric and concentric peak torque of knee flexors and extensors in both limbs (dominant and non-dominant were measured on an isokinetic dynamometer at baseline and at 12 h, 36 h and 60 h after the match. Functional (KFecc/KEcon and conventional (KFcon/KEcon ratios were then calculated. Only eccentric peak torque of knee flexors declined at 60 h after the match in the control group. In the experimental group: a isometric strength of knee extensors and knee flexors declined (P<0.05 at 12 h (both limbs and 36 h (dominant limb only, b eccentric and concentric peak torque of knee extensors and flexors declined (P<0.05 in both limbs for 36 h at 60°/s and for 60 h at 180°/s with eccentric peak torque of knee flexors demonstrating a greater (P<0.05 reduction than concentric peak torque, c strength deterioration was greater (P<0.05 at 180°/s and in dominant limb, d the functional ratio was more sensitive to match-induced fatigue demonstrating a more prolonged decline. Discriminant and regression analysis revealed that strength deterioration and recovery may be related to the amount of eccentric actions performed during the match and athletes' football-specific conditioning. Our data suggest that recovery kinetics of knee flexor and extensor strength after a football match demonstrate strength, limb and velocity specificity and may depend on match physical overload and players

  7. Skeletal muscle glucose uptake during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Kiens, Bente; Saltin, Bengt

    1988-01-01

    To study the role of muscle mass in glucoregulation, six subjects worked with the knee extensors of one leg on a specially constructed cycle ergometer. The knee extensors of one leg worked either alone or in combination with the knee extensors of the other leg and/or with the arms. Substrate usage...... was measured across both knee extensors by femoral arterial and venous catheterization and measurement of femoral venous blood flow. Glucose uptake by the working knee extensors was absolutely (by approximately 20%) or relatively decreased when arm cranking was added to knee extensions. The decrease in glucose...... uptake was not compensated for by increased uptake of free fatty acids but was accompanied by decreases in plasma insulin and increases in plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine. During work with large muscle masses, arterial lactate increased to approximately 6 mM, and net leg lactate release reverted...

  8. The effects of knee extensor eccentric training on functional tests in healthy subjects Os efeitos do treino isocinético excêntrico dos extensores do joelho nos testes funcionais em sujeitos saudáveis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heleodório H. Santos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is well known that eccentric training increases muscle strength and promotes greater neural activation, and therefore has been used in the recovery of knee extensors. The hypothesis of this study was that there would be a strong correlation between knee extensor torque and functional tests. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relationship between knee extensor peak torque and functional tests of agility (runs and propulsion (hop for distance after short-term isokinetic eccentric training. METHODS: Twenty healthy and active male undergraduate students (age 22.5±2.1 years; height 1.72±0.10 m; weight 67.8±9.5 kg; body mass index: 22.5±2.0 kg/m², with no abnormalities or history of injury of the limbs, performed an isokinetic assessment of the knee extensors and flexors and also functional tests before and after isokinetic training, which consisted of 3 sets of 10 MVECs at 30º/s, with 3 minutes of rest between sets, twice a week for 6 weeks. RESULTS: The eccentric training increased the extensor peak torque (16, 27 and 17%; PCONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: Sabe-se que o treino excêntrico aumenta a força muscular, promovendo uma maior ativação neural e, portanto, tem sido usado na recuperação do torque extensor. A hipótese deste estudo foi a de que possa existir uma forte correlação entre o torque extensor do joelho e os testes funcionais. OBJETIVOS: Correlacionar o torque extensor do joelho com os testes funcionais de agilidade (corridas e impulsão (saltos em distância após o treino isocinético excêntrico de curta duração. MÉTODOS: Vinte homens universitários, ativos e saudáveis (22,5±2,1 anos; 1,72±0,10 m; 67,8±9,5 kg; IMC 22,5±2,0 kg/m², sem reportar anormalidades ou história de lesão no membro inferior, realizaram avaliação isocinética do torque extensor e flexor do joelho e testes funcionais antes e depois do treino isocinético que consistiu em três séries de 10 CEVM a 30º/s, com 3 minutos de repouso entre as

  9. Wrist Rehabilitation Assisted by an Electromyography-Driven Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Robot After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Ling; Tong, Raymond Kai-yu; Ho, Newmen S K; Xue, Jing-jing; Rong, Wei; Li, Leonard S W

    2015-09-01

    Augmented physical training with assistance from robot and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) may introduce intensive motor improvement in chronic stroke. To compare the rehabilitation effectiveness achieved by NMES robot-assisted wrist training and that by robot-assisted training. This study was a single-blinded randomized controlled trial with a 3-month follow-up. Twenty-six hemiplegic subjects with chronic stroke were randomly assigned to receive 20-session wrist training with an electromyography (EMG)-driven NMES robot (NMES robot group, n = 11) and with an EMG-driven robot (robot group, n = 15), completed within 7 consecutive weeks. Clinical scores, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), Modified Ashworth Score (MAS), and Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) were used to evaluate the training effects before and after the training, as well as 3 months later. An EMG parameter, muscle co-contraction index, was also applied to investigate the session-by-session variation in muscular coordination patterns during the training. The improvement in FMA (shoulder/elbow, wrist/hand) obtained in the NMES robot group was more significant than the robot group (P robot group (P robot group. NMES robot-assisted training showed better performance in releasing muscle co-contraction than the robot-assisted across the training sessions (P robot-assisted wrist training was more effective than the pure robot. The additional NMES application in the treatment could bring more improvements in the distal motor functions and faster rehabilitation progress. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Placebo effects of caffeine on maximal voluntary concentric force of the knee flexors and extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallis, Jason; Muhammad, Bilal; Islam, Mohammed; Duncan, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    We examined the placebo effect of caffeine and the combined effect of caffeine and caffeine expectancy on maximal voluntary strength. Fourteen men completed 4 randomized, single-blind experimental trials: (1) told caffeine, given caffeine (5 mg/kg) (CC); (2) told caffeine, given placebo (CP); (3) told placebo, given placebo (PP); and (4) told placebo, given caffeine (PC). Maximal voluntary concentric force and fatigue resistance of the knee flexors and extensors were measured using isokinetic dynamometry. A significant and equal improvement in peak concentric force was found in the CC and PC trials. Despite participants believing caffeine would evoke a performance benefit, there was no effect of CP. Caffeine caused an improvement in some aspects of muscle strength, but there was no additional effect of expectancy. Performance was poorer in participants who believed caffeine would have the greatest benefit, which highlights a link between expected ergogenicity, motivation, and personality characteristics. Muscle Nerve 54: 479-486, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Modulation of recurrent inhibition from knee extensors to ankle motoneurones during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamy, Jean-Charles; Iglesias, Caroline; Lackmy, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    The neural control for muscle coordination during human locomotion involves spinal and supraspinal networks, but little is known about the exact mechanisms implicated. The present study focused on modulation of heteronymous recurrent inhibition from knee extensors to ankle motoneurones at different...... times in the gait cycle, when quadriceps (Quad) muscle activity overlaps that in tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (Sol). The effects of femoral nerve stimulation on ankle motoneurones were investigated during treadmill walking and during tonic co-contraction of Quad and TA/Sol while standing. Recurrent...... could be implicated in the transition phases, from swing to stance to assist Sol activation during the stance phase, and from stance to swing, for its deactivation....

  12. [Wrist joint arthroplasty: results after 41 prostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, S; Bracker, W

    2009-06-01

    The advantage of wrist arthroplasty remains controversial, primarily due to the high complication rate. For this reason it seems sensible to monitor the results of different types of prostheses even with small numbers of cases. We were particularly interested to see if wrist joint arthroplasty is a useful alternative for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and which of the types we used shows the best results. In our hospital, 41 wrist joint prostheses (15 Meuli, 16 BIAX and 10 Universal 2) were implanted in 36 patients from 1992 until 2005 (follow-up 1 to 14 years, mean 5.3 years). 33 patients had rheumatic destruction of the wrist, two had osteoarthritis following fracture of the scaphoid, and one pseudarthrosis after failed arthroplasty and arthrodesis for Kienböck's disease. Mean age was 54 years, ranging from 34 to 73 years. 14 patients had had surgery on this wrist before. The patients were sent a questionnaire including the DASH score, and a clinical evaluation and X-rays were performed. 33 patients with 38 wrist arthroplasties answered the questionnaire, 34 wrist joint prosthesis of 29 patients could be evaluated. 6 prostheses had to be removed because of complications (3 arthrodeses were performed after removal, 3 prostheses were exchanged). There were 4 dislocations (3 times with the Meuli type, once with the BIAX type). There was one case of CRPS type I. But subjectively, in answering our questionnaire, 31 of 38 patients claimed to be very satisfied or satisfied with the result of the operation, only 6 were less satisfied or not satisfied at all. An improvement of pain was found by all but one patient. An increase in strength or range of movement was found more rarely. The mean postoperative DASH score was 61 points. Mean wrist joint mobility was 50 degrees for extension/flexion, and 20 degrees for radial- and ulnar abduction. The result of total wrist joint arthroplasty depends very much on a careful patient selection. A preoperative bony malposition

  13. Congenital hypertrophy of multiple intrinsic muscles of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Tomohiro; Park, Susam; Niu, Atushi; Hasegawa, Hiromi

    2014-12-01

    Congenital hypertrophy of a single intrinsic muscle of the foot is rare, and as far as we know, only six cases have been reported. We describe a case of congenital anomaly that showed hypertrophy of multiple intrinsic muscles of the foot; the affected muscles were all the intrinsic muscles of the foot except the extensor digitorum brevis or extensor hallucis. Other tissues such as adipose tissue, nervous tissue, or osseous tissue showed no abnormalities. To reduce the volume of the foot we removed parts of the enlarged muscles.

  14. Functional significance of extent and timing of muscle activation during double poling on-snow with increasing speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoppirolli, Chiara; Boccia, Gennaro; Bortolan, Lorenzo; Schena, Federico; Pellegrini, Barbara

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the level of activation and timing of upper- and lower-body muscles during double poling at different speeds on snow. Nineteen well-trained cross-country skiers volunteered to double pole on a flat snowy track at different speeds (15, 18, 21 km h -1 ). The target speeds could be maintained by the skiers thanks to the use of an audio-pace system in combination with cones spaced equally alongside the track. Only 11 subjects were finally included in the analysis, since their actual speeds, calculated through a photocell system, were within ±0.5 km h -1 from those requested. Cycle and poling durations were measured from the recordings of an accelerometer attached to a wrist, while the pattern and the level of muscle activation were evaluated from electromyographyc signals. Double poling speed did not alter the sequence of muscle activation that started with hip flexors, continued with trunk flexors, shoulder, elbow and trunk extensors and ended with ankle plantar-flexors. However, higher speeds required an increasing involvement of thigh, trunk and shoulder muscles (P < 0.05) as well as an anticipation of their activation before pole plant (P < 0.05). A progressively earlier activation of trunk and lower limb muscles is a coordinative strategy that allows rapid achievement of optimal body posture prior to the exertion of poling phase. Moreover, earlier activation of these muscles as the speed increases provides adequate muscle stiffness in the shoulder and core regions for the acceptance of the poling load.

  15. The Association Between Knee Extensor Force Steadiness, Force Accuracy, and Mobility in Older Adults Who Have Fallen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Hoon, Kaiwi; Tracy, Brian L; Dibble, Leland E; Marcus, Robin L; Burgess, Paul; LaStayo, Paul C

    2016-01-01

    Older adults often experience limited mobility, lower extremity muscle weakness, and increased fall risk. Furthermore, when older adults perform tasks that require control of submaximal force, impairments in their ability to maintain steady and accurate force output have been reported. Such problems may be related to deteriorating levels of mobility, particularly in older adults who have fallen. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an association exists between muscle force steadiness (MFS) or muscle force accuracy (MFA) of the knee extensors and mobility in older adults who have fallen. Twenty older adults ((Equation is included in full-text article.)= 77.5 ± 7 years, 5 males and 15 females) with 2 or more comorbid conditions and who experienced a fall in the past year underwent assessment of maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the knee extensors. A submaximal target force of 50% of their maximal voluntary isometric contraction was used to determine concentric and eccentric (ECC) steadiness (the fluctuations in force production) and accuracy (the average distance of the mean force from the target force) measures. Mobility was indicated by the 6-minute walk test, the Timed Up and Go, stair ascent, and stair descent tests. Correlation analysis was used to assess the relationship between measures of muscle force control and mobility. The correlations between muscle force steadiness and mobility were not significant (P > .05) for either contraction type. However, MFA during ECC contractions only was correlated significantly with all measures of mobility-6 minute walk test (r = -0.48; P = .03), Timed Up and Go (r = 0.68; P = .01), stair ascent (r = 0.60; P = .01), and stair descent (r = 0.75; P fallen is novel. Although the correlations are not causal, these relationships suggest that inaccurate force output during ECC contractions of the knee extensors is linked to impaired mobility.

  16. Work-Related Pain in Extrinsic Finger Extensor Musculature of Instrumentalists Is Associated with Intracellular pH Compartmentation during Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Torres, Angel; Rosset-Llobet, Jaume; Pujol, Jesus; Fàbregas, Sílvia; Gonzalez-de-Suso, Jose-Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Background Although non-specific pain in the upper limb muscles of workers engaged in mild repetitive tasks is a common occupational health problem, much is unknown about the associated structural and biochemical changes. In this study, we compared the muscle energy metabolism of the extrinsic finger extensor musculature in instrumentalists suffering from work-related pain with that of healthy control instrumentalists using non-invasive phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). We hypothesize that the affected muscles will show alterations related with an impaired energy metabolism. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied 19 volunteer instrumentalists (11 subjects with work-related pain affecting the extrinsic finger extensor musculature and 8 healthy controls). We used 31P-MRS to find deviations from the expected metabolic response to exercise in phosphocreatine (PCr), inorganic phosphate (Pi), Pi/PCr ratio and intracellular pH kinetics. We observed a reduced finger extensor exercise tolerance in instrumentalists with myalgia, an intracellular pH compartmentation in the form of neutral and acid compartments, as detected by Pi peak splitting in 31P-MRS spectra, predominantly in myalgic muscles, and a strong association of this pattern with the condition. Conclusions/Significance Work-related pain in the finger extrinsic extensor muscles is associated with intracellular pH compartmentation during exercise, non-invasively detectable by 31P-MRS and consistent with the simultaneous energy production by oxidative metabolism and glycolysis. We speculate that a deficit in energy production by oxidative pathways may exist in the affected muscles. Two possible explanations for this would be the partial and/or local reduction of blood supply and the reduction of the muscle oxidative capacity itself. PMID:20161738

  17. Work-related pain in extrinsic finger extensor musculature of instrumentalists is associated with intracellular pH compartmentation during exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Moreno-Torres

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although non-specific pain in the upper limb muscles of workers engaged in mild repetitive tasks is a common occupational health problem, much is unknown about the associated structural and biochemical changes. In this study, we compared the muscle energy metabolism of the extrinsic finger extensor musculature in instrumentalists suffering from work-related pain with that of healthy control instrumentalists using non-invasive phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31P-MRS. We hypothesize that the affected muscles will show alterations related with an impaired energy metabolism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied 19 volunteer instrumentalists (11 subjects with work-related pain affecting the extrinsic finger extensor musculature and 8 healthy controls. We used (31P-MRS to find deviations from the expected metabolic response to exercise in phosphocreatine (PCr, inorganic phosphate (Pi, Pi/PCr ratio and intracellular pH kinetics. We observed a reduced finger extensor exercise tolerance in instrumentalists with myalgia, an intracellular pH compartmentation in the form of neutral and acid compartments, as detected by Pi peak splitting in (31P-MRS spectra, predominantly in myalgic muscles, and a strong association of this pattern with the condition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Work-related pain in the finger extrinsic extensor muscles is associated with intracellular pH compartmentation during exercise, non-invasively detectable by (31P-MRS and consistent with the simultaneous energy production by oxidative metabolism and glycolysis. We speculate that a deficit in energy production by oxidative pathways may exist in the affected muscles. Two possible explanations for this would be the partial and/or local reduction of blood supply and the reduction of the muscle oxidative capacity itself.

  18. An Exoskeleton Robot for Human Forearm and Wrist Motion Assist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranathunga Arachchilage Ruwan Chandra Gopura; Kiguchi, Kazuo

    The exoskeleton robot is worn by the human operator as an orthotic device. Its joints and links correspond to those of the human body. The same system operated in different modes can be used for different fundamental applications; a human-amplifier, haptic interface, rehabilitation device and assistive device sharing a portion of the external load with the operator. We have been developing exoskeleton robots for assisting the motion of physically weak individuals such as elderly or slightly disabled in daily life. In this paper, we propose a three degree of freedom (3DOF) exoskeleton robot (W-EXOS) for the forearm pronation/ supination motion, wrist flexion/extension motion and ulnar/radial deviation. The paper describes the wrist anatomy toward the development of the exoskeleton robot, the hardware design of the exoskeleton robot and EMG-based control method. The skin surface electromyographic (EMG) signals of muscles in forearm of the exoskeletons' user and the hand force/forearm torque are used as input information for the controller. By applying the skin surface EMG signals as main input signals to the controller, automatic control of the robot can be realized without manipulating any other equipment. Fuzzy control method has been applied to realize the natural and flexible motion assist. Experiments have been performed to evaluate the proposed exoskeleton robot and its control method.

  19. Use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation and [corrected] dorsal wrist splint to improve the hand function of a child with spastic hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmick, J

    1997-06-01

    This case report describes a program for a child with spastic hemiparesis who had previously received physical therapy with neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). After a year without physical therapy, he returned to continue to receive NMES to strengthen muscles, increase sensory awareness, and improve hand function. The child quickly regained his previous level of functioning and made additional progress. After 38 sessions, he still lacked adequate wrist stability for independent hand function. A dorsal wrist splint was used to stabilize the wrist while NMES facilitated muscle activity of the hand and wrist. While wearing the splint, the child could use his hand independently without adult interference or "assistance," thus allowing motor learning to occur. After 24 additional sessions (i.e., 9 months of using the splint), the child could use the hand for activities such as tying his shoelaces without the splint. No increase in spasticity was seen in spite of strengthening the spastic finger flexors.

  20. Isometric knee-extensor torque development and jump height in volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, C J; Vermeulen, Gido; Toussaint, Huub M; de Haan, Arnold

    2007-08-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine the contribution of the intrinsic muscle properties and muscle activation of the knee extensors to the maximal rate of unilateral isometric torque development and to relate both factors to maximal bilateral jumping performance in experienced jumpers. On the basis of previous studies, we hypothesized that maximal rate of torque development during maximal effort isometric contractions and jump height would depend on the subjects' ability for maximal muscle activation rather than on the muscle's contractile properties. Eleven male elite volleyball players (20 +/- 2 yr, means +/- SD) performed squat jumps starting from a 120 degrees knee angle (SJ120; full extension = 180 degrees ) and countermovement jumps. In addition, maximal voluntary and electrically evoked unilateral isometric knee-extension torque development (120 degrees angle) was obtained. Torque time integral for the first 40 ms after torque onset (TTI40) and (time to) maximal rate of torque development (MRTD) were calculated. Muscle activation was quantified using surface EMG. Voluntary TTI40 was significantly related to the preceding EMG (r2 = 0.83) and negatively related to the time to MRTD (r2 = 0.64). Voluntary MRTD and TTI40 were not related to their respective values obtained during electrical stimulation (r2 speed. However, unexpectedly, only the latter could predict jump performance in skilled jumpers.

  1. Dissociation between behavior and motor cortical excitability before and during ballistic wrist flexion and extension in young and old adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hortobágyi, Tibor; Mieras, Adinda; Rothwell, John; Fernandez del Olmo, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Aging is associated with slow reactive movement generation and poor termination. Objective: We examined the hypothesis that the build-up of excitability in the primary motor cortex in the agonist muscle to generate ballistic wrist flexion and extension and in the antagonist to stop the

  2. MUSCLE POWER, SITTING UNSUPPORTED AND TRUNK ROTATION IN PRETERM INFANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEGROOT, L; HOPKINS, B; TOUWEN, B

    1995-01-01

    Discrepancies between active and passive muscle power are often seen in pre-term infants over the first year. Generally of a transient nature, they are most obvious in the extensor muscles of the trunk where there is a high active muscle power relative to the passive component. While high active

  3. Favorable results after total wrist arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Herzberg, Guillaume; Merser, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose During the past 40 years, several attempts have been made with total wrist arthroplasty to avoid fusion in severely destroyed wrists. The results have often been disappointing. There is only modest clinical documentation due to the small number of patients (especially non-rheumatoid cases) and short follow-up times. Here we report a multicenter series using a third-generation implant with a minimum follow-up time of 5 years. Methods In 2012, data were retrieved from a registry of consecutive wrist operations at 7 centers with units specialized in hand surgery, between 2003 and 2007. The wrists had been reviewed annually and analysis was done on the latest follow-up data. Results 60 patients had been operated (5 bilaterally), 5 wrists had been revised, and 52 were available for follow-up (with the revised cases excluded). The pain scores, QuickDASH scores, ulnar flexion, and supination for the whole group were statistically significantly better at follow-up. There were no statistically significant differences between the rheumatoid and the non-rheumatoid patients except for motion, which was better in the non-rheumatoid group. The motion obtained depended on the preoperative motion. Implant survival was 0.9 at 5–9 years. Interpretation The clinical results in terms of pain, motion, strength, and function were similar to those in previous reports. The implant survival was 0.9 at 9 years, both in rheumatoid and non-rheumatoid cases, which is an important improvement compared to the earlier generations of total wrist arthroplasty. PMID:23848216

  4. The radial approach to the wrist with styloidectomy: A cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoq, F-A; Sébilo, A; Bellemère, P

    2017-09-01

    The radial approach to the wrist is already used in several surgical techniques such as radial styloidectomy and Zaidemberg's vascularized radial graft. The aim of our work was to describe the surgical anatomy of that approach and to determine the acceptable limits of radial oblique styloidectomy that does not damage the anterior and posterior radiocarpal ligaments. This radial approach was performed on 11 cadaver specimens. The superficial branches of the radial nerve and the antebrachial cephalic vein were carefully located in the superficial plane. The radiocarpal articular capsule was opened longitudinally between the first and second compartments of the extensor tendons. We drew the oblique radial styloidectomy line at 3, 6 and 9mm from the apex of radial styloid process on the articular surface and then measured the width of ligaments theoretically taken away by the styloidectomy. An oblique radial styloidectomy of less than 6mm preserved the anterior and posterior radiocarpal ligaments. There was one case of radial artery damage while opening the joint capsule. The radial approach to the wrist as described in this work provided good access to the radial styloid process, the radioscaphoid joint and the proximal pole of the scaphoid, if the approach is done carefully to preserve the superficial branches of the radial nerve, the antebrachial cephalic vein and the radial artery. Radial styloidectomy can be performed up to 6mm from the apex without significantly damaging the radiocarpal ligaments, particularly the volar ones. Copyright © 2017 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Fatigue-related firing of muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of ipsilateral but not contralateral lower limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David S; Fitzpatrick, Siobhan C; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2015-02-15

    During fatiguing upper limb exercise, maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents can limit voluntary drive to muscles within the same limb. It is not known if this effect occurs in the lower limb. We investigated the effects of group III/IV muscle afferent firing from fatigued ipsilateral and contralateral extensor muscles and ipsilateral flexor muscles of the knee on voluntary activation of the knee extensors. In three experiments, we examined voluntary activation of the knee extensors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by femoral nerve stimulation. Subjects attended on 2 days for each experiment. On one day a sphygmomanometer cuff occluded blood flow of the fatigued muscles to maintain firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min extensor contraction (experiment 1; n = 9), mean voluntary activation was lower with than without maintained ischemia (47 ± 19% vs. 87 ± 8%, respectively; P fatiguing exercise, activity in group III/IV muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation of the fatigued muscle and nonfatigued antagonist muscles in the same leg. However, group III/IV muscle afferents from the fatigued left leg had no effect on the unfatigued right leg. This suggests that any "crossover" of central fatigue in the lower limbs is not mediated by group III/IV muscle afferents. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Grip strength measurements at two different wrist extension positions in chronic lateral epicondylitis-comparison of involved vs. uninvolved side in athletes and non athletes: a case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Bhargava Arti S; Eapen Charu; Kumar Senthil P

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Lateral epicondylitis is a common sports injury of the elbow caused due to altered muscle activation during repetitive wrist extension in many athletic and non-athletic endeavours. The amount of muscle activity and timing of contraction eventually is directly dependent upon joint position during the activity. The purpose of our study was to compare the grip strength in athletes with lateral epicondylalgia in two different wrist extension positions and compare them between ...

  7. Smartphone photography utilized to measure wrist range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Eric R; Conti Mica, Megan; Shin, Alexander Y

    2018-02-01

    The purpose was to determine if smartphone photography is a reliable tool in measuring wrist movement. Smartphones were used to take digital photos of both wrists in 32 normal participants (64 wrists) at extremes of wrist motion. The smartphone measurements were compared with clinical goniometry measurements. There was a very high correlation between the clinical goniometry and smartphone measurements, as the concordance coefficients were high for radial deviation, ulnar deviation, wrist extension and wrist flexion. The Pearson coefficients also demonstrated the high precision of the smartphone measurements. The Bland-Altman plots demonstrated 29-31 of 32 smartphone measurements were within the 95% confidence interval of the clinical measurements for all positions of the wrists. There was high reliability between the photography taken by the volunteer and researcher, as well as high inter-observer reliability. Smartphone digital photography is a reliable and accurate tool for measuring wrist range of motion. II.

  8. [Four-Corner Arthrodesis of the Wrist with Dorsal Circular Plate - a Retrospective Monocentric Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatrapa, T; Veigl, D; Pech, J; Landor, I; Šimková, M

    2017-01-01

    -union occurred. In the first case the extraction of implant and re-arthrodesis was performed due to severe pain and screw migration. The patient is now 22 months after the surgery and the radiographs show that the arthrodesis has healed and the patient has no clinical difficulties. The second patient did not report any difficulties, therefore he is only subject to follow-up. No cases of screw or plate breakage were reported. In one case, the patient reported pain in the region of radial styloid process. A revision was indicated with radial styloidectomy and decompression of tendons of m. extensor pollicis brevis and m. abductor pollicis longus. As a result the patient had no clinical difficulty. One case of wrist radial deviation was recorded. It was managed by corrective wedge osteotomy and reosteosynthesis using a circular dorsal plate. In one patient dorsal impingement occurred, accompanied by limited range of motion and pain. Extraction of OS material was indicated and the patient was relieved of any difficulties. We have recorded aseptic necrosis of lunate bone in one case. DISCUSSION When comparing the functional results such as the range of motion and grip strength, our results are fully comparable to previously published papers. In papers where DASH was referred to, its value ranges from 13 to 29.82, which is fully consistent with our observations with the final value of 20.5. The incidence of non-union and the degree of complications is not deviating from the values included in other publications either. In all the mentioned publications the authors refer to routine use of bone grafts. The publications evaluating the use of locking plates do not report different results either. CONCLUSIONS In case of correct indication, the four-corner arthrodesis of the wrist represents a very good solution. In our group of patients, we confirmed the hypothesis that equally good results as with the use of locking plates can be achieved when using a non-locking plate system. Essential

  9. Performance Demands in Softball Pitching: A Comprehensive Muscle Fatigue Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corben, Jeffrey S; Cerrone, Sara A; Soviero, Julie E; Kwiecien, Susan Y; Nicholas, Stephen J; McHugh, Malachy P

    2015-08-01

    Monitoring pitch count is standard practice in minor league baseball but not in softball because of the perception that fast-pitch softball pitching is a less stressful motion. To examine muscle fatigue after fast-pitch softball performances to provide an assessment of performance demand. Descriptive laboratory study. Bilateral strength measurements (handheld dynamometer) were made on 19 female softball pitchers (mean age [±SD], 15.2 ± 1.2 years) before and after pitching a game (mean number of pitches, 99 ± 21; mean innings pitched, 5 ± 1). A total of 20 tests were performed on the dominant and nondominant sides: forearm (grip, wrist flexion/extension, pronation/supination, elbow flexion/extension), shoulder (flexion, abduction/adduction, external/internal rotation, empty can test), scapula (middle/lower trapezius, rhomboid), and hip (hip flexion/extension, abduction/adduction). Fatigue (percentage strength loss) was categorized based on bilateral versus unilateral presentation using paired t tests: bilateral symmetric (significant on dominant and nondominant and not different between sides), bilateral asymmetric (significant on dominant and nondominant but significantly greater on dominant), unilateral asymmetric (significant on dominant only and significantly greater than nondominant), or unilateral equivocal (significant on dominant only but not different from nondominant). Bilateral symmetric fatigue was evident for all hip (dominant, 19.3%; nondominant, 15.2%) and scapular tests (dominant, 19.2%; nondominant, 19.3%). In general, shoulder tests exhibited bilateral asymmetric fatigue (dominant, 16.9%; nondominant, 11.6%). Forearm tests were more variable, with bilateral symmetric fatigue in the elbow flexors (dominant, 22.5%; nondominant, 19.2%), and wrist flexors (dominant, 21.6%; nondominant, 19.0%), bilateral asymmetric fatigue in the supinators (dominant, 21.8%; nondominant, 15.5%), unilateral asymmetric fatigue in the elbow extensors (dominant, 22

  10. Autologous Minced Muscle Grafts: A Tissue Engineering Therapy for the Volumetric Loss of Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    cated nuclei in 30% of fibers observed in nonrepaired muscles ); and 3) significantly improves net torque production (i.e., 55% of the functional deficit...contractions; 150 Hz, 0.1-ms pulse width, 400-ms train). Maximal isometric torque of the anterior crural muscle unit [TA, extensor digitorum longus (EDL...the tenotomized EDL muscle was negligible in this testing system (e.g., TA muscle torque with EDL distally tenotomized vs. EDL ablation, 23.1 0.8 vs

  11. Strength asymmetry of the knee extensors and physical activity in middle-aged women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Lehnert

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Differences between muscle strength and power of lower limbs is one of the factors associated with falls in the elderly population. Muscle strength asymmetry of lower limbs increases with age. Objective: The aim of the study is to assess differences in the volume and intensity of physical activity (PA in the subgroups of women being at higher and lower risk of falls (with and without strength asymmetry of the knee extensors of dominant and non-dominant lower limb. Methods: Data from 42 women (age 56.3 ± 4.4 years; weight 76.5 ± 16.1 kg; body height 164.3 ± 5.2 cm; body mass index 28.1 ± 5.3 kg . m-2 were used for the purpose of the presented analysis. Furthermore the sample was divided into subgroups with lower and higher strength asymmetry of quadriceps muscle (as a criterion the asymmetry greater than 15% was chosen. Absolute concentric peak torque of the knee extensors was evaluated by an isokinetic dynamometer IsoMed 2000 in a sitting position at angular velocity of 180° . s-1. PA was monitored using Yamax SW-700 pedometers throughout 7 consecutive days and using the Czech version of standardized International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Results: Statistically significant differences between groups with lower and higher strength asymmetry were found in the amount of self-reported vigorous PA (p = .04; d = 0.6 only. Differences between the observed groups were not significant in self-reported moderate PA and walking. There were also no significant differences in the daily numbers of steps measured objectively. Conclusions: The results of the study indicate that from the point of view of strength asymmetry of knee extensors as a factor associated with falls in middle-aged women, intensity of PA could be an important characteristic of PA. This suggestion should be taken into account in habitual PA and training programs in middle-aged population.

  12. [Arthroscopically assisted transcapsular refixation of the triangular fibrocartilage complex of the wrist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillukat, T; Fuhrmann, R A; Windolf, J; van Schoonhoven, J

    2016-08-01

    Refixation of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) to the ulnar capsule of the wrist. Distal TFCC tears without instability, proximal TFCC intact. Loose ulnar TFCC attachment without tear or instability. Peripheral TFCC tears with instability of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). Complex or proximal tears of the TFCC. Isolated, central degenerative tears without healing potential. Arthroscopically guided, minimally invasive suture of the TFCC to the base of the sixth extensor compartment. Above elbow plaster splint, 70° flexion of the elbow joint, 45° supination for 6 weeks. Skin suture removal after 2 weeks. No physiotherapy to extend pronation and supination during the first 3 months. In an ongoing long-term study, 7 of 31 patients who underwent transcapsular refixation of the TFCC between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2010 were evaluated after an average follow-up interval of 116 ± 34 months (range 68-152 months). All patients demonstrated an almost nearly unrestricted range of wrist motion and grip strength compared to the unaffected side. All distal radioulnar joints were stable. On the visual analogue scale (VAS 0-10), pain at rest was 1 ± 1 (range 0-2) and pain during exercise 2 ± 2 (range 0-5); the DASH score averaged 10 ± 14 points (range 0-39 points). All patients were satisfied. The modified Mayo wrist score showed four excellent, two good, and one fair result. These results correspond to the results of other series. Transcapsular refixation is a reliable, technically simple procedure in cases with ulnar-sided TFCC tears without instability leading to good results.

  13. The passive stiffness of the wrist and forearm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Steven K.; Zollo, Loredana; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Hogan, Neville; Krebs, Hermano I.

    2012-01-01

    Because wrist rotation dynamics are dominated by stiffness (Charles SK, Hogan N. J Biomech 44: 614–621, 2011), understanding how humans plan and execute coordinated wrist rotations requires knowledge of the stiffness characteristics of the wrist joint. In the past, the passive stiffness of the wrist joint has been measured in 1 degree of freedom (DOF). Although these 1-DOF measurements inform us of the dynamics the neuromuscular system must overcome to rotate the wrist in pure flexion-extension (FE) or pure radial-ulnar deviation (RUD), the wrist rarely rotates in pure FE or RUD. Instead, understanding natural wrist rotations requires knowledge of wrist stiffness in combinations of FE and RUD. The purpose of this report is to present measurements of passive wrist stiffness throughout the space spanned by FE and RUD. Using a rehabilitation robot designed for the wrist and forearm, we measured the passive stiffness of the wrist joint in 10 subjects in FE, RUD, and combinations. For comparison, we measured the passive stiffness of the forearm (in pronation-supination), as well. Our measurements in pure FE and RUD agreed well with previous 1-DOF measurements. We have linearized the 2-DOF stiffness measurements and present them in the form of stiffness ellipses and as stiffness matrices useful for modeling wrist rotation dynamics. We found that passive wrist stiffness was anisotropic, with greater stiffness in RUD than in FE. We also found that passive wrist stiffness did not align with the anatomical axes of the wrist; the major and minor axes of the stiffness ellipse were rotated with respect to the FE and RUD axes by ∼20°. The direction of least stiffness was between ulnar flexion and radial extension, a direction used in many natural movements (known as the “dart-thrower's motion”), suggesting that the nervous system may take advantage of the direction of least stiffness for common wrist rotations. PMID:22649208

  14. Relationship between lower extremity isometric muscle strength and standing balance in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citaker, Seyit; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Yazici, Gokhan; Bayraktar, Deniz; Nazliel, Bijen; Irkec, Ceyla

    2013-01-01

    Muscle strength and standing balance decrease in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between the lower extremity isometric muscle strength and standing balance in patients with MS. Forty-seven patients with MS and 10 healthy volunteers were included. Neurological disability level was assessed using Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Isometric strength of seven lower extremity muscles (hip flexor-extensor-abductor-adductor, knee flexor-extensor, and ankle dorsal flexor) was assessed using hand-held dynamometer. Duration of static one-leg standing balance was measured using digital chronometer. Hip flexor-extensor-abductor-adductor, knee flexor-extensor, and ankle dorsal flexor isometric muscle strength, and duration of one-leg standing balance were decreased in patients with MS when compared with controls (p leg standing balance in patients with MS. All assessed lower extremity isometric muscle strength (except ankle dorsal flexor) was related with EDSS. Hip flexor-extensor-abductor-adductor, knee flexor-extensor, and ankle dorsal flexor isometric muscle strength decreases in ambulatory MS patients. Lower extremity muscle weakness and neurological disability level are related with imbalance in MS population. Hip and knee region muscles weakness increases the neurological disability level. For the better balance and decrease neurological disability level whole lower extremity muscle strengthening should be included in rehabilitation programs.

  15. Evaluation of Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Post-Stroke Wrist and Finger Spasticity after Ultrasonography-Guided BTX-A Injection and Rehabilitation Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eJiang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Using ultrasonography (US to guide botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A injection in patients with post-stroke wrist and finger flexor muscle spasticity and assessing clinical outcomes after the injection and rehabilitation intervention. Methods: Twenty-three patients with wrist and finger spasticity after stroke were recruited in this study from May 2012 to May 2013. Under US guidance, the proper dose (250U of BTX-A was injected into each spastic muscle at two injection sites. Then, conventional rehabilitation training started next day after BTX-A injection. The degree of spasticity was assessed by modified Ashworth scale (MAS and wrist and finger motor function by active rang of movement (AROM, and Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA at the baseline, 1, 2, 4 and 12 weeks after BTX-A injection. Results: Significant decreases (p < 0.02 in the MAS scores of both the finger flexor muscle tone and wrist flexor muscle tone measured at 1, 2, 4, and 12 weeks after the BTX-A injection were found in comparison with the baseline scores. Compared with the baseline, the AROM values of the wrist and finger extensions and the FMA scores of the wrist and hand significantly increased (p < 0.02 at 2, 4 and 12 weeks after the BTX-A injection. Conclusions: US-guided BTX-A injection combined with rehabilitation exercise decrease spasticity of the wrist and finger flexor muscles and improve their motor function in stroke patients up to 12 weeks following BTX-A injection.

  16. Does mental exertion alter maximal muscle activation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vianney eRozand

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mental exertion is known to impair endurance performance, but its effects on neuromuscular function remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mental exertion reduces torque and muscle activation during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors. Ten subjects performed in a randomized order three separate mental exertion conditions lasting 27 minutes each: i high mental exertion (incongruent Stroop task, ii moderate mental exertion (congruent Stroop task, iii low mental exertion (watching a movie. In each condition, mental exertion was combined with ten intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensor muscles (one maximal voluntary contraction every 3 minutes. Neuromuscular function was assessed using electrical nerve stimulation. Maximal voluntary torque, maximal muscle activation and other neuromuscular parameters were similar across mental exertion conditions and did not change over time. These findings suggest that mental exertion does not affect neuromuscular function during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors.

  17. Fiber size and myosin phenotypes of selected rhesus lower limb muscles after a 14-day spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Bodine, S. C.; Pierotti, D. J.; Talmadge, R. J.; Barkhoudarian, G.; Kim, J.; Fanton, J. W.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle biopsies were taken from the rhesus (Macaca mulatta) soleus (Sol, a slow ankle extensor), medial gastrocnemius (MG, a fast ankle extensor), tibialis anterior (TA, a fast ankle flexor), and vastus lateralis (VL, a fast knee extensor) muscles in vivarium controls (n=5) before and after either a 14-day spaceflight (Bion 11, n=2) or a 14-day ground-based flight simulation (n=3). Myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition (gel electrophoresis), fiber type distribution (immunohistochemistry), and fiber size were determined. Although there were no significant changes, each muscle showed trends towards adaptation.

  18. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3780 Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made of...

  19. Estimation of instantaneous moment arms of lower-leg muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoor, C W; van Leeuwen, J L; Meskers, C G; Titulaer, A F; Huson, A

    1990-01-01

    Muscle moment arms at the human knee and ankle were estimated from muscle length changes measured as a function of joint flexion angle in cadaver specimens. Nearly all lower-leg muscles were studied: extensor digitorum longus, extensor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, flexor hallucis longus, gastrocnemius lateralis, gastrocnemius medialis, peroneus brevis, peroneus longus, peroneus tertius, plantaris, soleus, tibialis anterior, and tibialis posterior. Noise in measured muscle length was filtered by means of quintic splines. Moment arms of the mm. gastrocnemii appear to be much more dependent on joint flexion angles than was generally assumed by other investigators. Some consequences for earlier analyses are mentioned.

  20. Role of scaphoid in the abduction and adduction movements of wrist joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Pitbaran; Majumdar, Sudeshna; Baral, Karabi; Dasgupta, Hasi; Gupta, Indrajit; Ghosh, Santanu

    2011-08-01

    Being a carpal bone scaphoid has an important role in wrist movements. Wrist joint is a synovial modified ellipsoid joint where movements like flexion, extension and adduction, abduction take place around two axes (transverse and anteroposterior). These movements at the wrist joint are associated with considerable range of movements at the midcarpal joint, as same group of muscles act on both of these joints. A study has been done amongst 120 persons at the Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal during the period from 1998-2000 to detect the important movements of scaphoid bone specially during the abduction and adduction of wrist joint (which occur in association with the intercarpal joints) and also to detect whether such movements have any speciality in the population of eastern part of India. It was found in this study that the scaphoid acts as a link bone between the two rows of carpal bones and prevents the buckling of midcarpal joint specially of the capitato-lunate joint interface.

  1. The effect of electro-acupuncture on spasticity of the wrist joint in chronic stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Mukul; McPeak, Lisa K; Redford, John B; Sun, Chao; Liu, Wen

    2007-02-01

    To quantitatively assess the change in spasticity of the impaired wrist joint in chronic stroke patients after electro-acupuncture treatment. Crossover design. University medical center research laboratory. Seven chronic stroke subjects (age, 63.14+/-7.01y). Participants received two 6-week treatment regimens: combined electro-acupuncture and strengthening twice a week, and strengthening twice a week only. Muscle strength and spasticity of the wrist joint were quantified by using the Biodex multijoint System 3 Pro. Electro-acupuncture was given through a commercial electro-acupuncture device. Velocity sensitivity of averaged speed-dependent reflex torque (VASRT); segmented averaged speed-dependent reflex torque (SASRT); Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) scores; and integrated electromyographic activity of the affected wrist flexors during passive stretch of the affected wrist joint. VASRT was reduced significantly in the combined treatment group (P=.02) after the 6-week period, but not in the strengthening-only group (P=.23); however, no significant immediate effect of electro-acupuncture was observed (P>.05). MAS scores also showed a significant reduction (Pexercise for 6 weeks significantly reduced spasticity. The effect of spasticity reduction was consistent across different joint positions and different velocities of passive stretch.

  2. Design of Wrist Gimbal: a forearm and wrist exoskeleton for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, John A; Ng, Paul; Lu, Son; Campagna, McKenzie S; Celik, Ozkan

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present design, implementation and specifications of the Wrist Gimbal, a three degree-of-freedom (DOF) exoskeleton developed for forearm and wrist rehabilitation. Wrist Gimbal has three active DOF, corresponding to pronation/supination, flexion/extension and adduction/abduction joints. We mainly focused on a robust, safe and practical device design to facilitate clinical implementation, testing and acceptance. Robustness and mechanical rigidity was achieved by implementing two bearing supports for each of the pronation/supination and adduction/abduction axes. Rubber hard stops for each axis, an emergency stop button and software measures ensured safe operation. An arm rest with padding and straps, a handle with adjustable distal distance and height and a large inner volume contribute to ease of use, of patient attachment and to comfort. We present the specifications of Wrist Gimbal in comparison with similar devices in the literature and example data collected from a healthy subject.

  3. Revision of a failed Swanson arthroplasty to a total wrist replacement restores wrist function and movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Yasmin; Konan, Sujith; Sorene, Elliot

    2014-04-01

    This study reports a case of revision of a failed Swanson silastic interpositional wrist replacement to a Universal 2 (KMI Medical Inc., San Diego, CA, Jan 2009) total wrist arthroplasty, in a 68-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis and pyrophosphate arthropathy. At the 2-year follow-up, the patient was pain-free and was able to perform all activities of daily living, documented by subjective assessment and objective scores. The disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) scores improved from 98.3 preoperatively to 55.1 postoperatively. A failed Swanson silastic interpositional wrist replacement may be successfully revised to an uncemented primary wrist replacement with good functional results at early follow-up.

  4. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  5. PERIMENOPAUSAL WRIST FRACTURE - AN OPPORTUNITY FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bone mass by means of calcium and vitamin D intake, exercise and maintenance of ... therefore develop reliable and appropriate methods for screening patients to determine their risk and need for a bone density test.'o In determining such risk, clinical guidelines .... history of wrist fracture, and bone mineral density in those.

  6. Periprosthetic osteolysis after total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Herzberg, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Background and Literature Review Periprosthetic osteolysis (PPO) after second- or third-generation total wrist arthroplasty (TWA), with or without evident loosening of the implant components, has previously been reported in the literature, but rarely in a systematic way. Purpose The purpose...

  7. PERIMENOPAUSAL WRIST FRACTURE - AN OPPORTUNITY FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MANAGEMENT OF OSTEOPOROSIS. Alan D Rothberg, Patrick K Matshidze. Objective. Review of Medscheme's administrative databases to study the relationship between hip fracture and previous wrist fracture in peri- and postmenopausal women. Design. Retrospective analysis of 1995 - 1998 data for women aged 50 ...

  8. Extensor mechanism of the knee: MR imaging of tendon injuries; Sistema extensor do joelho: ressonancia magnetica das lesoes tendinosas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torriani, Martin; Maeda, Lucimara; Cerqueira, Elza M.F.P.; Montandon, Cristiano; Zanardi, Veronica A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Radiologia

    2000-04-01

    The authors describe the normal MR imaging appearance of the extensor tendons of the knee and the lesions that may affect these structures. MR imaging was performed in patients presenting with a variety of injuries of the extensor mechanism of the knee. MR imaging is the method of choice to evaluate tendon injuries, due to its high anatomic resolution. The knowledge of the normal anatomy and the recognition of the spectrum of the injuries that involve these structures are important for an early diagnosis and appropriate management of these patients. (author)

  9. Muscle intrusion as a potential cause of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Michael S; Walker, Francis O; Newman, Jill C; Arcury, Thomas A; Mora, Dana C; Haiying, Chen; Quandt, Sara A

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between flexor digitorum and lumbrical muscle intrusion into the carpal tunnel and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Five hundred thirteen manual laborers (1026 wrists) were evaluated with ultrasound to determine whether those with CTS had more muscle intrusion into the carpal tunnel than those without CTS. One hundred ninety of the participants without CTS at baseline (363 wrists) were followed over 1 year to determine whether muscle intrusion at baseline predicted the development of CTS. Participants with CTS had more muscle within the carpal tunnel with the wrist in the neutral (P=0.026) and flexed (P=0.018) positions than those without CTS. Baseline muscle intrusion did not predict development of CTS at 1 year. Muscle intrusion into the carpal tunnel is associated with CTS, but muscle intrusion alone does not predict the development of CTS over the course of a year. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Pre‐ and post‐impact muscle activation in the tennis volley: effects of ball speed, ball size and side of the body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, John W; Knudson, Duane V; Tillman, Mark D; Andrew, Damon P S

    2007-01-01

    Aim To examine the pre‐ and post‐impact activation of five upper extremity muscles in the tennis volley across conditions of ball speed, ball type and side of the body. Methods A repeated measures design in a biomechanics laboratory setting was used. A total of 24 recreational tennis players (mean (SD) age 24 (5) years, height 176 (10) cm, mass 76 (13) kg) were recruited from a university. Participants performed tennis volleys under 18 ball conditions: three ball speeds (slow, medium and fast), with three ball types (two oversize and one regular size) each from two sides (forehand and backhand). Average normalised electromyographic levels of the flexor carpi radialis, extensor carpi radialis, triceps brachii, anterior/middle deltoid and posterior/middle deltoid of the hitting arm during pre‐ and post‐impact phases (200 ms before and after ball–racquet impact, respectively) were assessed. Results For the pre‐impact phase, a significant muscle and side interaction (ptennis balls do not significantly increase upper extremity muscle activation compared to regular size balls during a tennis volley. The highest post‐impact activation was observed in the ECR indicating a vigorous wrist stabilisation role that could irritate players with lateral epicondylalgia. PMID:17957013

  11. Pre- and post-impact muscle activation in the tennis volley: effects of ball speed, ball size and side of the body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, John W; Knudson, Duane V; Tillman, Mark D; Andrew, Damon P S

    2007-11-01

    To examine the pre- and post-impact activation of five upper extremity muscles in the tennis volley across conditions of ball speed, ball type and side of the body. A repeated measures design in a biomechanics laboratory setting was used. A total of 24 recreational tennis players (mean (SD) age 24 (5) years, height 176 (10) cm, mass 76 (13) kg) were recruited from a university. Participants performed tennis volleys under 18 ball conditions: three ball speeds (slow, medium and fast), with three ball types (two oversize and one regular size) each from two sides (forehand and backhand). Average normalised electromyographic levels of the flexor carpi radialis, extensor carpi radialis, triceps brachii, anterior/middle deltoid and posterior/middle deltoid of the hitting arm during pre- and post-impact phases (200 ms before and after ball-racquet impact, respectively) were assessed. For the pre-impact phase, a significant muscle and side interaction (ptennis balls do not significantly increase upper extremity muscle activation compared to regular size balls during a tennis volley. The highest post-impact activation was observed in the ECR indicating a vigorous wrist stabilisation role that could irritate players with lateral epicondylalgia.

  12. Intratendinous Ganglion of the Extensor Tendon of the Hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Poong-Taek; Chang, Hyo-Won

    2015-01-01

    Ganglion is a common benign lesion that usually arises adjacent to the joints or tendons of the hand. However, an intratendinous ganglion is a rare condition. We report two cases of intratendinous ganglion of the extensor tendon of the hand which were treated with excision.

  13. Low Incidence Of Extensor Plantar Reflex In Newborns In An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background The plantar reflex has been reported to be predominantly flexor in African infants and in African subjects with lesions of the corticospinal tracts. This study was done to determine the incidence of extensor plantar reflex in healthy full-term newborns in an indigenous African population. Methods Healthy term ...

  14. Complications involving the extensor mechanism after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Rocco; Vasta, Sebastiano; D'Adamio, Stefano; Albo, Erika; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2015-12-01

    To overview the complications involving extensor apparatus of the knee following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and to summarize which are the lines of treatment available and their reported outcomes in literature. A comprehensive search of several databases was performed using as basic keywords "complications after TKA", "extensor mechanism disruption", "periprosthetic patellar fracture", "quadriceps tendon rupture", "quadriceps tendon rupture" isolated or combined with other terms by using Boolean operators. The methodological quality of each article was also evaluated using the Coleman methodology score (CMS). Twenty-nine studies were evaluated. The mean CMS of the studies selected was 33.1/100. Patellar fractures, requiring surgical treatment when there is rupture of the extensor mechanism or loosening of the patellar component, were treated surgically in 28.1 % of patients. The patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures were surgically treated with reconstruction or augmented repair, respectively, in 98.6 and 76.5 %. Complications involving the extensor apparatus of the knee following a TKA need early and appropriate management to avoid their devastating influence on joint functionality. Management has to be evaluated very carefully based on the site of the lesion, integrity of the prosthetic components and surrounding tissue to restore, and the patients' individual characteristics. The surgical approach for comminuted periprosthetic fractures and reconstruction of torn tendons of the extensor apparatus are needed to restore function and decrease pain, but, given the poor methodological quality of the studies published so far, it is not clear which surgical technique or graft leads to better outcomes. Therefore, there is an absolute need for better designed comparative trials producing clearer and stronger evidence on this critical matter. IV.

  15. Surgical technique: vastus medialis and vastus lateralis as flap transfer for knee extensor mechanism deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Leo A

    2013-01-01

    Loss of the quadriceps tendon, patella, and patellar tendon leaves a major anterior defect that is difficult to close and compromises knee extension strength. Gastrocnemius muscle transfer does not sufficiently cover such major defects. This paper describes a new surgical technique that addresses these defects and the results of eight cases of revision TKA managed with this new technique. The new procedure transfers the vastus medialis or the vastus lateralis and their tibial attachments or both muscles and their distal expansions combined with gastrocnemius and soleus flaps to cover major deficiencies in the anterior knee. Nine cadaver knee specimens were dissected to determine the effect of the transfer on nerve and blood supply of the muscles. Eight patients underwent the new procedure between 2005 and 2009. Four knees had vastus medialis transfer, two vastus medialis and vastus lateralis transfer, two vastus medialis and medial gastrocnemius transfer, and two medial gastrocnemius and medial ½ of the soleus muscle transfer. Minimum followup was 15 months (mean, 43 months; range, 15-74 months). Patients were evaluated for anterior knee pain, quality of knee closure, ROM, extensor lag, walking ability, use of assistive devices, and ability to climb stairs with the operated extremity. All patients achieved closure of the knee without synovial leaks by 10 days postoperatively. Mean flexion contracture at last followup was 3° (range, 0°-7°). Mean extension lag was 22° (range, 5°-65°). Extension lag was less in those knees that included gastrocnemius or soleus muscle transfer. None of the flaps developed necrosis. The vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles provide adequate coverage for anterior soft tissue deficits of the knee.

  16. Application of the Blobo bluetooth ball in wrist rehabilitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wei-Min; Hwang, Yuh-Shyan; Chen, Shih-Ching; Tan, Sun-Yen; Chen, Chih-Chen; Chen, Yu-Luen

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The introduction of emerging technologies such as the wireless Blobo bluetooth ball with multimedia features can enhance wrist physical therapy training, making it more fun and enhancing its effects. [Methods] Wrist injuries caused by fatigue at work, improper exercise, and other conditions are very common. Therefore, the reconstruction of wrist joint function is an important issue. The efficacy of a newly developed integrated wrist joint rehabilitation game using a Blobo bluetooth ball with C# software installed was tested in wrist rehabilitation (Flexion, Extension, Ulnar Deviation, Radial Deviation). [Results] Eight subjects with normal wrist function participated in a test of the system's stability and repeatability. After performing the Blobo bluetooth ball wrist physical therapy training, eight patients with wrist dysfunction experienced approximately 10° improvements in range of motion (ROM) of flexion extension, and ulnar deviation and about 6° ROM improvement in radial deviation. The subjects showed progress in important indicators of wrist function. [Conclusion] This study used the Blobo bluetooth ball in wrist physical therapy training and the preliminary results were encouraging. In the future, more diverse wrist or limb rehabilitation games should be developed to meet the needs of physical therapy training.

  17. Scapholunate kinematics of asymptomatic wrists in comparison with symptomatic contralateral wrists using four-dimensional CT examinations: initial clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demehri, Shadpour; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Morelli, John N.; Thakur, Uma; Eng, John [Johns Hopkins University, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lifchez, Scott D.; Shores, Jaimie T. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Means, Kenneth R. [MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, The Curtis National Hand Center, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Using four-dimensional CT scan (4DCT), we aimed at showing the kinematics of scapholunate (SL) interval in asymptomatic wrists in comparison with symptomatic contralateral wrists with inconclusive radiographic findings. This is an IRB approved, HIPPA compliant, retrospective study. Patients suspected of SL interosseous ligament (SLIL) injuries were referred for further evaluation of chronic wrist pain (>3 months). Twelve wrists (11 subjects) with chronic symptoms and inconclusive plain radiographs and 10 asymptomatic wrists (in 10 different subjects) were scanned using 4DCT. The minimum SL interval was measured during three wrist motions: relaxed-to-clenched fist, flexion-to-extension, and radial-to-ulnar-deviation. Changes were recorded using double-oblique multiplanar reformation technique. We extracted the normal limits of the SL interval as measured by dynamic CT scanning during active motion in asymptomatic wrists. In asymptomatic wrists, the average SL interval was observed to be smaller than 1 mm during all motions. In symptomatic wrists, during exams performed with clenched fist (SL interval (mean ± SD) = 2.53 ± 1.19 mm), extension (2.54 ± 1.48 mm) or ulnar deviation (2.06 ± 1.12 mm), the average SL interval was more than 2 mm. In contrast to symptomatic wrists, no significant change in SL interval measurements was detected during wrist motions in asymptomatic wrists. There was a mild to moderate correlation between SL interval change and presence/absence of symptoms (point-biserial correlation coefficients: 0.29-0.55). In patients with wrist pain suspicious for SLIL injury and inconclusive radiographs, SL interval increase can be detected with 4DCT in the symptomatic wrist compared to the asymptomatic wrist. (orig.)

  18. The effects of two different frequencies of whole-body vibration on knee extensors strength in healthy young volunteers: a randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, S.; Akpinar, M.; Polat, S.; Yildiz, A.; Oral, A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two different frequencies of whole-body vibration (WBV) training on knee extensors muscle strength in healthy young volunteers. Twenty-two eligible healthy untrained young women aged 22-31 years were allocated randomly to the 30-Hz (n=11) and 50-Hz (n=11) groups. They participated in a supervised WBV training program that consisted of 24 sessions on a synchronous vertical vibration platform (peak-to-peak displacement: 2-4 mm; type of exercises: semi-squat, one-legged squat, and lunge positions on right leg; set numbers: 2-24) three times per week for 8 weeks. Isometric and dynamic strength of the knee extensors were measured prior to and at the end of the 8-week training. In the 30-Hz group, there was a significant increase in the maximal voluntary isometric contraction (p=0.039) and the concentric peak torque (p=0.018) of knee extensors and these changes were significant (p<0.05) compared with the 50-Hz group. In addition, the eccentric peak torque of knee extensors was increased significantly in both groups (p<0.05); however, there was no significant difference between the two groups (p=0.873). We concluded that 8 weeks WBV training in 30 Hz was more effective than 50 Hz to increase the isometric contraction and dynamic strength of knee extensors as measured using peak concentric torque and equally effective with 50 Hz in improving eccentric torque of knee extensors in healthy young untrained women. PMID:26636279

  19. The interaction between the vastus medialis and vastus intermedius and its influence on the extensor apparatus of the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Karl; Manestar, Mirjana; Filgueira, Luis; Kuster, Markus S; Gilbey, Helen; Ackland, Timothy

    2018-03-01

    Although the vastus medialis (VM) is closely associated with the vastus intermedius (VI), there is a lack of data regarding their functional relationship. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anatomical interaction between the VM and VI with regard to their origins, insertions, innervation and function within the extensor apparatus of the knee joint. Eighteen human cadaveric lower limbs were investigated using macro-dissection techniques. Six limbs were cut transversely in the middle third of the thigh. The mode of origin, insertion and nerve supply of the extensor apparatus of the knee joint were studied. The architecture of the VM and VI was examined in detail, as was their anatomical interaction and connective tissue linkage to the adjacent anatomical structures. The VM originated medially from a broad hammock-like structure. The attachment site of the VM always spanned over a long distance between: (1) patella, (2) rectus femoris tendon and (3) aponeurosis of the VI, with the insertion into the VI being the largest. VM units were inserted twice-once on the anterior and once on the posterior side of the VI. The VI consists of a complex multi-layered structure. The layers of the medial VI aponeurosis fused with the aponeuroses of the tensor vastus intermedius and vastus lateralis. Together, they form the two-layered intermediate layer of the quadriceps tendon. The VM and medial parts of the VI were innervated by the same medial division of the femoral nerve. The VM consists of multiple muscle units inserting into the entire VI. Together, they build a potential functional muscular complex. Therefore, the VM acts as an indirect extensor of the knee joint regulating and adjusting the length of the extensor apparatus throughout the entire range of motion. It is of clinical importance that, besides the VM, substantial parts of the VI directly contribute to the medial pull on the patella and help to maintain medial tracking of the patella during knee

  20. Robot-aided assessment of wrist proprioception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo eCappello

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Impaired proprioception severely affects the control of gross and fine motor function. However, clinical assessment of proprioceptive deficits and its impact on motor function has been difficult to elucidate. Recent advances in haptic robotic interfaces designed for sensorimotor rehabilitation enabled the use of such devices for the assessment of proprioceptive function.Purpose. This study evaluated the feasibility of a wrist robot system to determine proprioceptive discrimination thresholds for two different DoFs of the wrist. Specifically, we sought to accomplish three aims: first, to establish data validity; second, to show that the system is sensitive to detect small differences in acuity; third, to establish test-retest reliability over repeated testing.Methodology. Eleven healthy adult subjects experienced two passive wrist movements and had to verbally indicate which movement had the larger amplitude. Based on a subject’s response data a psychometric function was fitted and the wrist acuity threshold was established at the 75% correct response level. A subset of five subjects repeated the experimentation three times (T1, T2 and T3 to determine the test-retest reliability.Results. Mean threshold for wrist flexion was 2.15°± 0.43° and 1.52°± 0.36° for abduction. Encoder resolutions were 0.0075° (flexion-extension and 0.0032° (abduction-adduction. Motor resolutions were 0.2° (flexion-extension and 0.3° (abduction-adduction. Reliability coefficients were rT2-T1=0.986 and rT3-T2=0.971.Conclusions. We currently lack established norm data on the proprioceptive acuity of the wrist to establish direct validity. However, the magnitude of our reported thresholds are physiological plausible and well in line with available threshold data obtained at the elbow joint. Moreover, system has high resolution and is sensitive enough to detect small differences in acuity. Finally, the system produces reliable data over repeated

  1. Effect of mental fatigue on induced tremor in human knee extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budini, Francesco; Lowery, Madeleine; Durbaba, Rade; De Vito, Giuseppe

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the effects of mental fatigue on mechanically induced tremor at both a low (3-6Hz) and high (8-12Hz) frequency were investigated. The two distinct tremor frequencies were evoked using two springs of different stiffness, during 20s sustained contractions of the knee extensor muscles at 30% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) before and after 100min of a mental fatigue task, in 12 healthy (29±3.7years) participants. Mental fatigue resulted in a 6.9% decrease in MVC and in a 9.4% decrease in the amplitude of the agonist muscle EMG during sustained 30% MVC contractions in the induced high frequency only. Following the mental fatigue task, the coefficient of variation and standard deviation of the force signal decreased at 8-12Hz induced tremor by 31.7% and 35.2% respectively, but not at 3-6Hz induced tremor. Similarly, the maximum value and area underneath the peak in the power spectrum of the force signal decreased by 55.5% and 53.1% respectively in the 8-12Hz range only. In conclusion, mental fatigue decreased mechanically induced 8-12Hz tremor and had no effect on induced 3-6Hz tremor. We suggest that the reduction could be attributed to the decreased activation of the agonist muscles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Wearable Stretch Sensors for Motion Measurement of the Wrist Joint Based on Dielectric Elastomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Huang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Motion capture of the human body potentially holds great significance for exoskeleton robots, human-computer interaction, sports analysis, rehabilitation research, and many other areas. Dielectric elastomer sensors (DESs are excellent candidates for wearable human motion capture systems because of their intrinsic characteristics of softness, light weight, and compliance. In this paper, DESs were applied to measure all component motions of the wrist joints. Five sensors were mounted to different positions on the wrist, and each one is for one component motion. To find the best position to mount the sensors, the distribution of the muscles is analyzed. Even so, the component motions and the deformation of the sensors are coupled; therefore, a decoupling method was developed. By the decoupling algorithm, all component motions can be measured with a precision of 5°, which meets the requirements of general motion capture systems.

  3. Monte Carlo modeling of spatially complex wrist tissue for the optimization of optical pulse oximeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mitchell; Butcher, Ryan; Coté, Gerard L.

    2017-02-01

    Monte Carlo modeling of photon propagation has been used in the examination of particular areas of the body to further enhance the understanding of light propagation through tissue. This work seeks to improve upon the established simulation methods through more accurate representations of the simulated tissues in the wrist as well as the characteristics of the light source. The Monte Carlo simulation program was developed using Matlab. Generation of different tissue domains, such as muscle, vasculature, and bone, was performed in Solidworks, where each domain was saved as a separate .stl file that was read into the program. The light source was altered to give considerations to both viewing angle of the simulated LED as well as the nominal diameter of the source. It is believed that the use of these more accurate models generates results that more closely match those seen in-vivo, and can be used to better guide the design of optical wrist-worn measurement devices.

  4. Validity of Modified Ashworth Scale as a Measure of Wrist Spasticity in Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Heidari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There are some controversies about the value of modified Ashworth Scale (MAS for assessing spasticity. The goal of this study was to investigate if there is any correlation between scores obtained from MAS for wrist spasticity and electrophysiological recordings as the objective measure of spasticity. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 34 stroke patients were employed. Wrist spasticity was clinically measured by means of MAS. Also, an electromyogram (EMG machine was used to elicit Hmax and Mmax from the flexor carpi radialis muscle. Spearman’s correlation coefficient test was used to investigate potential correlation between clinically and electrophysiologically measures of spasticity. Results: The observed relation between MAS and EMG recordings was not statistically significant (rho=0.183, P>0.05. Discussion: Our findings suggest that MAS may be a useful tool for grading hypertonia, but it is not a valid measure of spasticity in selected patients.

  5. Wearable Stretch Sensors for Motion Measurement of the Wrist Joint Based on Dielectric Elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Li, Mingyu; Mei, Tao; McCoul, David; Qin, Shihao; Zhao, Zhanfeng; Zhao, Jianwen

    2017-11-23

    Motion capture of the human body potentially holds great significance for exoskeleton robots, human-computer interaction, sports analysis, rehabilitation research, and many other areas. Dielectric elastomer sensors (DESs) are excellent candidates for wearable human motion capture systems because of their intrinsic characteristics of softness, light weight, and compliance. In this paper, DESs were applied to measure all component motions of the wrist joints. Five sensors were mounted to different positions on the wrist, and each one is for one component motion. To find the best position to mount the sensors, the distribution of the muscles is analyzed. Even so, the component motions and the deformation of the sensors are coupled; therefore, a decoupling method was developed. By the decoupling algorithm, all component motions can be measured with a precision of 5°, which meets the requirements of general motion capture systems.

  6. Radiological intervention of the hand and wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Annu; Rowbotham, Emma L

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiological guided intervention is integral in the management of patients with musculoskeletal pathologies. The key to image-guided procedures is to achieve an accurately placed intervention with minimal invasion. This review article specifically concentrates on radiological procedures of the hand and wrist using ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance. A systematic literature review of the most recent publications relevant to image-guided intervention of the hand and wrist was conducted. During this search, it became clear that there is little consensus regarding all aspects of image-guided intervention, from the technique adopted to the dosage of injectate and the specific drugs used. The aim of this article is to formulate an evidence-based reference point which can be utilized by radiologists and to describe the most commonly employed techniques. PMID:26313500

  7. Viability of Hand and Wrist Photogoniometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meals, Clifton G; Saunders, Rebecca J; Desale, Sameer; Means, Kenneth R

    2017-04-01

    No goniometric technique is both maximally convenient and completely accurate, although photogoniometry (ie, picture taking to facilitate digital angle measurement) shows promise in this regard. Our purpose was to test the feasibility and reliability of a photogoniometric protocol designed to measure wrist and digit range of motion in general. Two independent observers examined a sample of joints in both normal and abnormal hands according to a photogoniometric protocol. Interrater and intrarater correlation were calculated, and these measurements were compared with measurements made by a third independent examiner with a manual goniometer. The photo-based measurements were reliable within and between observers; however, only a minority of these measurements were in agreement with manually collected values. At present, photogoniometry is not an acceptable alternative to manual goniometry for determining wrist and digit range of motion in general. Joint-specific photogoniometry should be the subject of future study, as should relevant imaging and software technology.

  8. Tubercular tenosynovitis of extensor tendons of foot--a rare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis of soft tissues as a result of spread from adjacent bone or joint is a well recognized entity. However isolated tuberculous pyomyositis, bursitis and tenosynovitis are rare, constituting about 1% of skeletal tuberculosis. Tubercular tenosynovitis commonly involves tendon sheaths of wrist and hand. Cases of ...

  9. Dry Arthroscopic Excision of Dorsal Wrist Ganglion

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Jason; Zuhlke, Todd; Eizember, Shane; Srinivasan, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    Ganglions are common soft tissue masses of the hand. High recurrence rates are associated with nonsurgical treatment; thus, excision is often indicated. Arthroscopic excision and open excision have similar recurrence rates; however, the latter is associated with prolonged healing time and increased scarring. Recently, dry wrist arthroscopic techniques have been used. This technique allows easier confirmation of complete ganglion removal, easier conversion to open surgery, earlier return of mo...

  10. Activation of individual extrinsic thumb muscles and compartments of extrinsic finger muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Levi J.; Kuiken, Todd A.; Weir, Richard F. ff.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical and neurological couplings exist between musculotendon units of the human hand and digits. Studies have begun to understand how these muscles interact when accomplishing everyday tasks, but there are still unanswered questions regarding the control limitations of individual muscles. Using intramuscular electromyographic (EMG) electrodes, this study examined subjects' ability to individually initiate and sustain three levels of normalized muscular activity in the index and middle finger muscle compartments of extensor digitorum communis (EDC), flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), as well as the extrinsic thumb muscles abductor pollicis longus (APL), extensor pollicis brevis (EPB), extensor pollicis longus (EPL), and flexor pollicis longus (FPL). The index and middle finger compartments each sustained activations with significantly different levels of coactivity from the other finger muscle compartments. The middle finger compartment of EDC was the exception. Only two extrinsic thumb muscles, EPL and FPL, were capable of sustaining individual activations from the other thumb muscles, at all tested activity levels. Activation of APL was achieved at 20 and 30% MVC activity levels with significantly different levels of coactivity. Activation of EPB elicited coactivity levels from EPL and APL that were not significantly different. These results suggest that most finger muscle compartments receive unique motor commands, but of the four thumb muscles, only EPL and FPL were capable of individually activating. This work is encouraging for the neural control of prosthetic limbs because these muscles and compartments may potentially serve as additional user inputs to command prostheses. PMID:23803329

  11. Decoupling the Wrist: A Cadaveric Experiment Examining Wrist Kinematics Following Midcarpal Fusion and Scaphoid Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jennifer A; Bednar, Michael S; Havey, Robert M; Murray, Wendy M

    2017-02-01

    At the wrist, kinematic coupling (the relationship between flexion-extension and radial-ulnar deviation) facilitates function. Although the midcarpal joint is critical for kinematic coupling, many surgeries, such as 4-corner fusion (4CF) and scaphoidexcision 4-corner fusion (SE4CF), modify the midcarpal joint. This study examines how 4CF and SE4CF influence kinematic coupling by quantifying wrist axes of rotation. Wrist axes of rotation were quantified in 8 cadaveric specimens using an optimization algorithm, which fit a 2-revolute joint model to experimental data. In each specimen, data measuring the motion of the third metacarpal relative to the radius was collected for 3 conditions (nonimpaired, 4CF, SE4CF). The calculated axes of rotation were compared using spherical statistics. The angle between the axes of rotation was used to assess coupling, as the nonimpaired wrist has skew axes (ie, angle between axes approximately 60°). Following 4CF and SE4CF, the axes are closer to orthogonal than those of the nonimpaired wrist. The mean angle (±95% confidence interval) between the axes was 92.6° ± 25.2° and 99.8° ± 22.0° for 4CF and SE4CF, respectively. The axes of rotation defined in this study can be used to define joint models, which will facilitate more accurate computational and experimental studies of these procedures.

  12. Comparison of static wrist splint with static wrist and metacarpophalangeal splint in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Gul Tugba; Caglar, Nil Sayiner; Aytekin, Ebru; Ozgonenel, Levent; Tutun, Sule; Demir, Saliha Eroglu

    2015-01-01

    The position of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints may be an important factor affecting the efficacy of splinting in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of a neutral volar static wrist splint with a neutral volar static wrist and MCP splint in patients with CTS. Fifty-four hands were included into the study. A neutral volar static wrist splint was given to the symptomatic hands of the patients in group 1 while a neutral volar static wrist and MCP splint was given to the symptomatic hands of the patients in group 2. Evaluation parameters were Visual Analog Scale for pain severity (VASp), grip strength, pinch strength, electrophysiologic tests and CTS Questionnaire (CTSQ) at baseline and four weeks later. At baseline there was no difference between groups. The intergroup comparison of the improvement showed significant differences in VASp at rest, grip strength, pinch strength and CTSQ functional capacity scores between groups in favor of wrist MCP splint. Although there were significant improvements with regard to sensory amplitude and motor latency in both groups after therapy, the differences between groups were not at the level of significance. The position of MCP joints seems to be an important factor for the treatment of CTS and should be considered while prescribing a splint to the patients with CTS.