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Sample records for wound regenerative function

  1. Age-associated changes in regenerative capabilities of mesenchymal stem cell: impact on chronic wounds repair.

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    Yao, Bin; Huang, Sha; Gao, Dongyun; Xie, Jiangfan; Liu, Nanbo; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent an ideal source of autologous cell-based therapy for chronic wounds. Functional characteristics of MSCs may benefit wound healing by exerting their multi-regenerative potential. However, cell ageing resulting from chronic degenerative diseases or donor age could cause inevitable effects on the regenerative abilities of MSCs. A variety of studies have shown the relationship between MSC ageing and age-related dysfunction, but few associate these age-related impacts on MSCs with their ability of repairing chronic wounds, which are common in the elderly population. Here, we discuss the age-associated changes of MSCs and describe the potential impacts on MSC-based therapy for chronic wounds. Furthermore, critical evaluation of the current literatures is necessary for understanding the underlying mechanisms of MSC ageing and raising the corresponding concerns on considering their possible use for chronic wound repair. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Development of regenerative and flexible fibroin-based wound dressings.

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    Panico, Angelica; Paladini, Federica; Pollini, Mauro

    2018-02-16

    Skin injuries represent a health problem with consequences in terms of morbidity, disability and life quality. Numerous strategies have been developed for the treatment of wounds, including skin substitutes, biomembranes, scaffolds, and smart dressings. The excellent properties of fibroin can be exploited for the development of advanced wound dressing biomaterials, aiming at promoting the wound healing process. In this work, silk fibroin films modified through the addition of glucose were developed to enhance flexibility of medical device without affecting the biocompatibility, to promote wound healing and to improve the patient well-being. The glucose/fibroin blend was characterized through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry to analyze the protein structure. Absorption capacity, mechanical properties, wettability and bacterial biofilm formation on silk fibroin films were also analyzed to study the effect of the addition of a plasticizer on the properties of the wound dressing. The stability of the films was analyzed through in vitro biodegradability tests. The biocompatibility and regenerative properties were demonstrated through appropriate cellular assays. The results demonstrated that the addition of glucose induced crystallization and provided good flexibility and absorption capacity of silk fibroin films. Glucose modified silk fibroin films were biocompatible and had a positive effect in promoting the wound closure. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Regenerative Skin Wound Healing in Mammals: State-of-the-Art on Growth Factor and Stem Cell Based Treatments

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    Bizunesh M. Borena

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammal skin has a crucial function in several life-preserving processes such as hydration, protection against chemicals and pathogens, initialization of vitamin D synthesis, excretion and heat regulation. Severe damage of the skin may therefore be life-threatening. Skin wound repair is a multiphased, yet well-orchestrated process including the interaction of various cell types, growth factors and cytokines aiming at closure of the skin and preferably resulting in tissue repair. Regardless various therapeutic modalities targeting at enhancing wound healing, the development of novel approaches for this pathology remains a clinical challenge. The time-consuming conservative wound management is mainly restricted to wound repair rather than restitution of the tissue integrity (the so-called “restitutio ad integrum”. Therefore, there is a continued search towards more efficacious wound therapies to reduce health care burden, provide patients with long-term relief and ultimately scarless wound healing. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies on the use of skin wound regenerative therapies provide encouraging results, but more protracted studies will have to determine whether the effect of observed effects are clinically significant and whether regeneration rather than repair can be achieved. For all the aforementioned reasons, this article reviews the emerging field of regenerative skin wound healing in mammals with particular emphasis on growth factor- and stem cell-based therapies.

  4. Regenerative Skin Wound Healing in Mammals: State-of-the-Art on Growth Factor and Stem Cell Based Treatments.

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    Borena, Bizunesh M; Martens, Ann; Broeckx, Sarah Y; Meyer, Evelyne; Chiers, Koen; Duchateau, Luc; Spaas, Jan H

    2015-01-01

    Mammal skin has a crucial function in several life-preserving processes such as hydration, protection against chemicals and pathogens, initialization of vitamin D synthesis, excretion and heat regulation. Severe damage of the skin may therefore be life-threatening. Skin wound repair is a multiphased, yet well-orchestrated process including the interaction of various cell types, growth factors and cytokines aiming at closure of the skin and preferably resulting in tissue repair. Regardless various therapeutic modalities targeting at enhancing wound healing, the development of novel approaches for this pathology remains a clinical challenge. The time-consuming conservative wound management is mainly restricted to wound repair rather than restitution of the tissue integrity (the so-called "restitutio ad integrum"). Therefore, there is a continued search towards more efficacious wound therapies to reduce health care burden, provide patients with long-term relief and ultimately scarless wound healing. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies on the use of skin wound regenerative therapies provide encouraging results, but more protracted studies will have to determine whether the effect of observed effects are clinically significant and whether regeneration rather than repair can be achieved. For all the aforementioned reasons, this article reviews the emerging field of regenerative skin wound healing in mammals with particular emphasis on growth factor- and stem cell-based therapies.

  5. Extracellular Wound Matrices:A Novel Regenerative Tissue Matrix (RTM) Technology for Connective Tissue Reconstruction.

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    Harper, John R; McQuillan, David J

    2007-06-01

    The restoration of structure, function, and physiology to damaged or missing tissue through the use of a regenerative tissue matrix (RTM) leads to regenerative healing rather than reparative scarring. While many processes exist to transform biologic materials into an extracellular matrix (ECM), only those that maintain the required structural and biochemical properties necessary to capture the intrinsic regenerative abilities of the body are suitable to produce an RTM. Histological examination using differential staining with hematoxylin and eosin stain or Verhoeff von Geisen stain of human biopsies of RTM obtained from 2 different abdominal surgery patients taken at 8- and 12 months were consistent with RTM remodeling into fascia-like tissue. A synopsis of recent studies on the use of the RTM GraftJacket® (Wright Medical Technologies, Memphis, Tenn) in successful closure of diabetic foot wounds is presented. Collectively, these reports indicate that LifeCell produced ECMs exemplified by GraftJacket exhibit the required clinical outcomes associated with an RTM.

  6. Functionalized Nanostructures with Application in Regenerative Medicine

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    Milán Bustamante

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, both regenerative medicine and nanotechnology have been broadly developed leading important advances in biomedical research as well as in clinical practice. The manipulation on the molecular level and the use of several functionalized nanoscaled materials has application in various fields of regenerative medicine including tissue engineering, cell therapy, diagnosis and drug and gene delivery. The themes covered in this review include nanoparticle systems for tracking transplanted stem cells, self-assembling peptides, nanoparticles for gene delivery into stem cells and biomimetic scaffolds useful for 2D and 3D tissue cell cultures, transplantation and clinical application.

  7. Fat Grafting and Adipose-Derived Regenerative Cells in Burn Wound Healing and Scarring: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

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    Condé-Green, Alexandra; Marano, Andrew A; Lee, Edward S; Reisler, Tom; Price, Leigh Ann; Milner, Stephen M; Granick, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    There is an abundance of literature supporting the efficacy of fat grafting in aesthetic and reconstructive cases. There has been a recent emphasis on the regenerative capacity of adipose-derived stem cells and their utility in the improvement of wound healing and scarring provided by their cytokine and growth factor profiles. Despite the wealth of evidence supporting their efficacy, little attention has been paid to their utility in burn treatment. The authors' purpose was to provide an analysis of the literature regarding the use of fat grafting and regenerative cells in the treatment of burn wounds to guide surgeons and scientists on their clinical use. A systematic review of the literature was performed by a thorough search of 12 terms using the PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane databases. Two hundred forty-one articles were subject to evaluation by predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Six murine and 12 human studies were selected, including case-control studies, case series, and case reports. They describe histologic and clinical effects of fat grafting and regenerative cell therapy, including improvements in burn scar size and texture, enhanced angiogenesis, decreased inflammation, alleviation of pain, and return of function. There is a dearth of randomized controlled trials and quantitative analysis supporting the efficacy of fat grafting and adipose regenerative cells in burns. However, the subjective improvements in scars are encouraging. The authors hope that this review will be a foundation for future studies and will highlight the breadth of knowledge yet to be explored by this therapy. Therapeutic, IV.

  8. L-PRP/L-PRF in esthetic plastic surgery, regenerative medicine of the skin and chronic wounds.

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    Cieslik-Bielecka, Agata; Choukroun, Joseph; Odin, Guillaume; Dohan Ehrenfest, David M

    2012-06-01

    The use of platelet concentrates for topical use is of particular interest for the promotion of skin wound healing. Fibrin-based surgical adjuvants are indeed widely used in plastic surgery since many years in order to improve scar healing and wound closure. However, the addition of platelets and their associated growth factors opened a new range of possibilities, particularly for the treatment of chronic skin ulcers and other applications of regenerative medicine on the covering tissues. In the 4 families of platelet concentrates available, 2 families were particularly used and tested in this clinical field: L-PRP (Leukocyte- and Platelet-rich Plasma) and L-PRF (Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Fibrin). These 2 families have in common the presence of significant concentrations of leukocytes, and these cells are important in the local cleaning and immune regulation of the wound healing process. The main difference between them is the fibrin architecture, and this parameter considerably influences the healing potential and the therapeutical protocol associated to each platelet concentrate technology. In this article, we describe the historical evolutions of these techniques from the fibrin glues to the current L-PRP and L-PRF, and discuss the important functions of the platelet growth factors, the leukocyte content and the fibrin architecture in order to optimize the numerous potential applications of these products in regenerative medicine of the skin. Many outstanding perspectives are appearing in this field and require further research.

  9. Wound healing following surgical and regenerative periodontal therapy.

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    Susin, Cristiano; Fiorini, Tiago; Lee, Jaebum; De Stefano, Jamie A; Dickinson, Douglas P; Wikesjö, Ulf M E

    2015-06-01

    Clinical studies have evaluated the effect of conventional periodontal surgical therapy. In general, although some clinical gain in tissue support may be attained, these therapies do not support regeneration of the periodontal attachment. Even though the biological possibility of periodontal regeneration has been demonstrated, the clinical application of this intrinsic potential appears difficult to harness; thus also conceptually most intriguing candidate protocols face clinical challenges. In this review, we explore the bioclinical principles, condiciones sine quibus non, that unleash the innate potential of the periodontium to achieve clinically meaningful periodontal regeneration (i.e. space-provision, wound stability and conditions for primary intention healing). Moreover, limiting factors and detrimental practices that may compromise clinical and biological outcomes are reviewed, as is tissue management in clinical settings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Wound trauma mediated inflammatory signaling attenuates a tissue regenerative response in MRL/MpJ mice

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    Elster Eric A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe trauma can induce pathophysiological responses that have marked inflammatory components. The development of systemic inflammation following severe thermal injury has been implicated in immune dysfunction, delayed wound healing, multi-system organ failure and increased mortality. Methods In this study, we examined the impact of thermal injury-induced systemic inflammation on the healing response of a secondary wound in the MRL/MpJ mouse model, which was anatomically remote from the primary site of trauma, a wound that typically undergoes scarless healing in this specific strain. Ear-hole wounds in MRL/MpJ mice have previously displayed accelerated healing and tissue regeneration in the absence of a secondary insult. Results Severe thermal injury in addition to distal ear-hole wounds induced marked local and systemic inflammatory responses in the lungs and significantly augmented the expression of inflammatory mediators in the ear tissue. By day 14, 61% of the ear-hole wounds from thermally injured mice demonstrated extensive inflammation with marked inflammatory cell infiltration, extensive ulceration, and various level of necrosis to the point where a large percentage (38% had to be euthanized early during the study due to extensive necrosis, inflammation and ear deformation. By day 35, ear-hole wounds in mice not subjected to thermal injury were completely closed, while the ear-hole wounds in thermally injured mice exhibited less inflammation and necrosis and only closed partially (62%. Thermal injury resulted in marked increases in serum levels of IL-6, TNFα, KC (CXCL1, and MIP-2α (CXCL2. Interestingly, attenuated early ear wound healing in the thermally injured mouse resulted in incomplete tissue regeneration in addition to a marked inflammatory response, as evidenced by the histological appearance of the wound and increased transcription of potent inflammatory mediators. Conclusion These findings suggest that the

  11. Transforming growth factor beta 1, a cytokine with regenerative functions

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    Wale Sulaiman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the biology and role of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1 in peripheral nerve injury and regeneration, as it relates to injuries to large nerve trunks (i.e., sciatic nerve, brachial plexus, which often leads to suboptimal functional recovery. Experimental studies have suggested that the reason for the lack of functional recovery resides in the lack of sufficient mature axons reaching their targets, which is a result of the loss of the growth-supportive environment provided by the Schwann cells in the distal stump of injured nerves. Using an established chronic nerve injury and delayed repair animal model that accurately mimics chronic nerve injuries in humans, we summarize our key findings as well as others to better understand the pathophysiology of poor functional recovery. We demonstrated that 6 month TGF-β1 treatment for chronic nerve injury significantly improved Schwann cell capacity to support axonal regeneration. When combined with forskolin, the effect was additive, as evidenced by a near doubling of regenerated axons proximal to the repair site. We showed that in vivo application of TGF-β1 and forskolin directly onto chronically injured nerves reactivated chronically denervated Schwann cells, induced their proliferation, and upregulated the expression of regeneration-associated proteins. The effect of TGF-β1 and forskolin on old nerve injuries is quite impressive and the treatment regiment appears to mediate a growth-supportive milieu in the injured peripheral nerves. In summary, TGF-β1 and forskolin treatment reactivates chronically denervated Schwann cells and could potentially be used to extend and prolong the regenerative responses to promote axonal regeneration.

  12. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs

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    Ayesha Bhatia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5–treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing.

  13. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs.

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    Bhatia, Ayesha; O'Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Wong, Alex; Garner, Warren; Woodley, David T; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5-treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing.

  14. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O’Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Wong, Alex; Garner, Warren; Woodley, David T.; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5–treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing. PMID:27382602

  15. Dental pulp stem cells: function, isolation and applications in regenerative medicine.

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    Tatullo, Marco; Marrelli, Massimo; Shakesheff, Kevin M; White, Lisa J

    2015-11-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are a promising source of cells for numerous and varied regenerative medicine applications. Their natural function in the production of odontoblasts to create reparative dentin support applications in dentistry in the regeneration of tooth structures. However, they are also being investigated for the repair of tissues outside of the tooth. The ease of isolation of DPSCs from discarded or removed teeth offers a promising source of autologous cells, and their similarities with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) suggest applications in musculoskeletal regenerative medicine. DPSCs are derived from the neural crest and, therefore, have a different developmental origin to BMSCs. These differences from BMSCs in origin and phenotype are being exploited in neurological and other applications. This review briefly highlights the source and functions of DPSCs and then focuses on in vivo applications across the breadth of regenerative medicine. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Regenerative endodontics.

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    Simon, S; Smith, A J

    2014-03-01

    Significant advances in our understanding of the biological processes involved in tooth development and repair at the cellular and molecular levels have underpinned the newly emerging area of regenerative endodontics. Development of treatment protocols based on exploiting the natural wound healing properties of the dental pulp and applying tissue engineering principles has allowed reporting of case series showing preservation of tissue vitality and apexogenesis. To review current case series reporting regenerative endodontics. Current treatment approaches tend to stimulate more reparative than regenerative responses in respect of the new tissue generated, which often does not closely resemble the physiological structure of dentine-pulp. However, despite these biological limitations, such techniques appear to offer significant promise for improved treatment outcomes. Improved biological outcomes will likely emerge from the many experimental studies being reported and will further contribute to improvements in clinical treatment protocols.

  17. Toll-Like Receptor Function in Acute Wounds.

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    Chen, Lin; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2017-10-01

    Significance: Inflammation is an integral part of immune response and supports optimal wound healing in adults. Inflammatory cells such as neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, lymphocytes, and mast cells produce important cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. These immune cells interact with keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells (ECs), as well as the extracellular matrix within a complicated network that promotes and regulates wound healing. Aberrant and persistent inflammation may result in delayed wound healing, scar formation, or chronic wounds. Targeting the molecules involved in the inflammatory response may have great potential therapeutic value. Recent Advances and Critical Issues: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns from microbes or danger-associated molecular patterns from damaged cells. The discovery of TLRs sheds new light on the mechanism by which the inflammatory or innate immune response is initiated in wound healing. Convincing evidence now shows that multiple types of cells, including infiltrating or resident inflammatory cells, keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and ECs, express specific types of TLRs. Experimental reduction of certain TLRs or treatment of wounds with TLR ligands has been shown to affect wound healing. A better understanding of the involvement of TLRs in the innate immune response during skin wound healing may suggest novel strategies to improve the quality of tissue repair. Future Directions: Despite the indisputable role of TLRs in regulating the immune response in acute wound healing, the functions of TLRs that are relevant to human wound healing and chronic wounds are poorly understood.

  18. Cell-based regenerative strategies for treatment of diabetic skin wounds, a comparative study between human umbilical cord blood-mononuclear cells and calves' blood haemodialysate.

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    Hala O El-Mesallamy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetes-related foot problems are bound to increase. However, medical therapies for wound care are limited; therefore, the need for development of new treatment modalities to improve wound healing in diabetic patients is essential and constitutes an emerging field of investigation. METHODS: Animals were randomly divided into 8 groups (I-VIII (32 rats/group, all were streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetics except groups III and VIII were non-diabetic controls. The study comprised two experiments; the first included 3 groups. Group I injected with mononuclear cells (MNCs derived from human umbilical cord blood (HUCB, group II a diabetic control group (PBS i.v. The second experiment included 5 groups, groups IV, V, and VI received topical HUCB-haemodialysate (HD, calves' blood HD, and solcoseryl, respectively. Group VII was the diabetic control group (topical saline. Standard circular wounds were created on the back of rats. A sample of each type of HD was analyzed using the high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS system. Wound area measurement and photography were carried out every 4 days. Plasma glucose, catalase (CAT, malondialdehyde (MDA, nitric oxide (NO and platelets count were assessed. Wound samples were excised for hydroxyproline (HP and histopathological study. RESULTS: Treatment with HUCB MNCs or HUCB-HD resulted in wound contraction, increased CAT, NO, platelets count, body weights, and HP content, and decreased MDA and glucose. CONCLUSION: Systemic administration of HUCB MNCs and topical application of the newly prepared HUCB-HD or calves' blood HD significantly accelerated the rate of diabetic wound healing and would open the possibility of their future use in regenerative medicine.

  19. Nature's Electric Potential: A Systematic Review of the Role of Bioelectricity in Wound Healing and Regenerative Processes in Animals, Humans, and Plants.

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    Tyler, Sheena E B

    2017-01-01

    Natural endogenous voltage gradients not only predict and correlate with growth and development but also drive wound healing and regeneration processes. This review summarizes the existing literature for the nature, sources, and transmission of information-bearing bioelectric signals involved in controlling wound healing and regeneration in animals, humans, and plants. It emerges that some bioelectric characteristics occur ubiquitously in a range of animal and plant species. However, the limits of similarities are probed to give a realistic assessment of future areas to be explored. Major gaps remain in our knowledge of the mechanistic basis for these processes, on which regenerative therapies ultimately depend. In relation to this, it is concluded that the mapping of voltage patterns and the processes generating them is a promising future research focus, to probe three aspects: the role of wound/regeneration currents in relation to morphology; the role of endogenous flux changes in driving wound healing and regeneration; and the mapping of patterns in organisms of extreme longevity, in contrast with the aberrant voltage patterns underlying impaired healing, to inform interventions aimed at restoring them.

  20. Nature's Electric Potential: A Systematic Review of the Role of Bioelectricity in Wound Healing and Regenerative Processes in Animals, Humans, and Plants

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    Sheena E. B. Tyler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural endogenous voltage gradients not only predict and correlate with growth and development but also drive wound healing and regeneration processes. This review summarizes the existing literature for the nature, sources, and transmission of information-bearing bioelectric signals involved in controlling wound healing and regeneration in animals, humans, and plants. It emerges that some bioelectric characteristics occur ubiquitously in a range of animal and plant species. However, the limits of similarities are probed to give a realistic assessment of future areas to be explored. Major gaps remain in our knowledge of the mechanistic basis for these processes, on which regenerative therapies ultimately depend. In relation to this, it is concluded that the mapping of voltage patterns and the processes generating them is a promising future research focus, to probe three aspects: the role of wound/regeneration currents in relation to morphology; the role of endogenous flux changes in driving wound healing and regeneration; and the mapping of patterns in organisms of extreme longevity, in contrast with the aberrant voltage patterns underlying impaired healing, to inform interventions aimed at restoring them.

  1. Functional tooth regenerative therapy: tooth tissue regeneration and whole-tooth replacement.

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    Oshima, Masamitsu; Tsuji, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Oral and general health is compromised by irreversible dental problems, including dental caries, periodontal disease and tooth injury. Regenerative therapy for tooth tissue repair and whole-tooth replacement is currently considered a novel therapeutic concept with the potential for the full recovery of tooth function. Several types of stem cells and cell-activating cytokines have been identified in oral tissues. These cells are thought to be candidate cell sources for tooth tissue regenerative therapies because they have the ability to differentiate into tooth tissues in vitro and in vivo. Whole-tooth replacement therapy is regarded as an important model for the development of an organ regenerative concept. A novel three-dimensional cell-manipulation method, designated the organ germ method, has been developed to recapitulate organogenesis. This method involves compartmentalisation of epithelial and mesenchymal cells at a high cell density to mimic multicellular assembly conditions and epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. A bioengineered tooth germ can generate a structurally correct tooth in vitro and erupt successfully with the correct tooth structure when transplanted into the oral cavity. We have ectopically generated a bioengineered tooth unit composed of a mature tooth, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, and that tooth unit was successfully engrafted into an adult jawbone through bone integration. Such bioengineered teeth were able to perform normal physiological tooth functions, such as developing a masticatory potential in response to mechanical stress and a perceptive potential for noxious stimuli. In this review, we describe recent findings and technologies underpinning tooth regenerative therapy.

  2. A novel cell-containing device for regenerative medicine: biodegradable nonwoven filters with peripheral blood cells promote wound healing.

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    Iwamoto, Ushio; Hori, Hideo; Takami, Yoshihiro; Tokushima, Yasuo; Shinzato, Masanori; Yasutake, Mikitomo; Kitaguchi, Nobuya

    2015-12-01

    The efficacy of skin regeneration devices consisting of nonwoven filters and peripheral blood cells was investigated for wound healing. We previously found that human peripheral blood cells enhanced their production of growth factors, such as transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and vascular endothelial growth factor, when they were captured on nonwoven filters. Cells on biodegradable filters were expected to serve as a local supply of growth factors and cell sources when they were placed in wounded skin. Nonwoven filters made of biodegradable polylactic acid (PLA) were cut out as 13-mm disks and placed into cell-capturing devices. Mouse peripheral blood was filtered, resulting in PLA filters with mouse peripheral blood cells (m-PBCs) at capture rates of 65.8 ± 5.2%. Then, the filters were attached to full-thickness surgical wounds in a diabetic db/db mouse skin for 14 days as a model of severe chronic wounds. The wound area treated with PLA nonwoven filters with m-PBCs (PLA/B+) was reduced to 8.5 ± 12.2% when compared with day 0, although the non-treated control wounds showed reduction only to 60.6 ± 27.8%. However, the PLA filters without m-PBCs increased the wound area to 162.9 ± 118.7%. By histopathological study, the PLA/B+ groups more effectively accelerated formation of epithelium. The m-PBCs captured on the PLA filters enhanced keratinocyte growth factor (FGF-7) and TGF-β1 productions in vitro, which may be related to wound healing. This device is useful for regeneration of wounded skin and may be adaptable for another application.

  3. A Current View of Functional Biomaterials for Wound Care, Molecular and Cellular Therapies

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    Francesco Piraino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The intricate process of wound healing involves activation of biological pathways that work in concert to regenerate a tissue microenvironment consisting of cells and external cellular matrix (ECM with enzymes, cytokines, and growth factors. Distinct stages characterize the mammalian response to tissue injury: hemostasis, inflammation, new tissue formation, and tissue remodeling. Hemostasis and inflammation start right after the injury, while the formation of new tissue, along with migration and proliferation of cells within the wound site, occurs during the first week to ten days after the injury. In this review paper, we discuss approaches in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine to address each of these processes through the application of biomaterials, either as support to the native microenvironment or as delivery vehicles for functional hemostatic, antibacterial, or anti-inflammatory agents. Molecular therapies are also discussed with particular attention to drug delivery methods and gene therapies. Finally, cellular treatments are reviewed, and an outlook on the future of drug delivery and wound care biomaterials is provided.

  4. Advanced functional polymers for regenerative and therapeutic dentistry.

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    Lai, W-F; Oka, K; Jung, H-S

    2015-07-01

    Use of ceramics and polymers continues to dominate clinical procedures in modern dentistry. Polymers have provided the basis for adhesives, tissue void fillers, and artificial replacements for whole teeth. They have been remarkably effective in the clinic at restoration of major dental functions after damage or loss of teeth. With the rapid development of polymer science, dental materials science has significantly lagged behind in harnessing these advanced polymer products. What they offer is new and unique properties superior to traditional polymers and crucially a range of properties that more closely match natural biomaterials. Therefore, we should pursue more vigorously the benefits of advanced polymers in dentistry. In this review, we highlight how the latest generation of advanced polymers will enhance the application of materials in the dental clinic using numerous promising examples. Polymers have a broad range of applications in modern dentistry. Some major applications are to construct frameworks that mimic the precise structure of tissues, to restore tooth organ function, and to deliver bioactive agents to influence cell behavior from the inside. The future of polymers in dentistry must include all these new enhancements to increase biological and clinical effectiveness beyond what can be achieved with traditional biomaterials. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Functional salivary gland regeneration as the next generation of organ replacement regenerative therapy.

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    Ogawa, Miho; Tsuji, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    Oral health is maintained by the coordinated function of many organs including the teeth and salivary glands. Dysfunction of these organs causes many problems, such as dental caries, swallowing dysfunction and periodontal disease. Regenerative therapy for salivary gland tissue repair and whole-salivary gland replacement is currently considered a novel therapeutic concept that may have potential for the full recovery of salivary gland function. Salivary gland tissue stem cells are thought to be candidate cell sources for salivary gland tissue repair therapies. In addition, whole-salivary gland replacement therapy may become a novel next-generation organ regenerative therapy. Almost all organs arise from reciprocal epithelial and mesenchymal interactions of the germ layers. We developed a novel bioengineering method, an organ germ method that can reproduce organogenesis through the epithelial-mesenchymal interaction. A bioengineered salivary gland germ can regenerate a structurally correct salivary gland in vitro, and bioengineered salivary glands successfully secrete saliva into the oral cavity from ducts in the recipient through the reestablishment of the afferent-efferent neural network. The bioengineered salivary gland can also improve the symptoms of xerostomia, such as bacterial infection and swallowing dysfunction. In this review, we describe recent findings and technological developments of salivary gland regenerative therapy.

  6. Regenerative and rehabilitative medicine: A necessary synergy for functional recovery from volumetric muscle loss injury

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    Greising, Sarah M.; Dearth, Christopher L.; Corona, Benjamin T.

    2017-01-01

    Volumetric muscle loss (VML) is a complex and heterogeneous problem due to significant traumatic or surgical loss of skeletal muscle tissue. The consequences of VML are substantial functional deficits in joint range of motion and skeletal muscle strength, resulting in life long dysfunction and disability. Traditional physical medicine and rehabilitation paradigms do not address the magnitude of force loss due to VML and related musculoskeletal co-morbidities. Recent advancements in regenerative medicine have set forth encouraging and emerging therapeutic options for VML injuries. There is significant potential that combined rehabilitative and regenerative therapies can restore limb and muscle function following VML injury in a synergistic manner. This review presents the current state of the VML field, spanning clinical and preclinical literature, with particular focus on rehabilitation and regenerative medicine in addition to their synergy. Moving forward, multidisciplinary collaboration between clinical and research fields is encouraged in order to continue to improve the treatment of VML injuries and specifically address the encompassing physiology, pathology, and specific needs of this patient population. PMID:27825146

  7. Effect of wound infiltration with bupivacaine on pulmonary function ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... Postoperative analgesia was provided with intramuscular morphine 0.15mg/kg 4hourly and 10mg/kg of intravenous paracetamol ... Conclusion: Bupivacaine wound infiltration produced statistically significant elevations in pulmonary function tests results ... (appendix IV), the Micro spirometer (Micro Medical.

  8. Effect of wound infiltration with bupivacaine on pulmonary function ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of wound infiltration with bupivacaine on pulmonary function after elective lower abdominal operations. ... Postoperative analgesia was provided with intramuscular morphine 0.15mg/kg 4hourly and 10mg/kg of intravenous paracetamol as rescue analgesia. Results: PEFR, FVC and FEV1 were reduced in both the ...

  9. The intelligent catalyst having the self-regenerative function of Pd, Rh and Pt for automotive emissions control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hirohisa; Uenishi, Mari; Taniguchi, Masashi; Tan, Isao [Materials Research and Development Division, Daihatsu Motor Co. Ltd., Ikeda, Osaka 563-8651 (Japan); Narita, Keiichi; Kimura, Mareo [Research and Development Division, Cataler Corporation, Kakegawa, Shizuoka 437-1492 (Japan); Kaneko, Kimiyoshi [Fine Chemical Research Laboratories, Hokko Chemical Industry Co. Ltd., Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0023 (Japan); Nishihata, Yasuo; Mizuki, Jun' ichiro [Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2006-09-30

    The self-regenerative function of precious metals in the intelligent catalyst is an epoch-making technology in the history of automotive catalysts after the 1970's. The mechanism of the self-regenerative function is studied by X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) analyses. The function was realized through a cyclic movement of Pd between the outside (as Pd nanoparticles) and the inside (as Pd cations in the lattice) of the perovskite crystal in synchronization with the inherent fluctuations between reductive and oxidative (redox) atmospheres that occur in real automotive exhaust gases. As the result, the growth of Pd particles can be suppressed during the entire lifetime of the vehicle. Moreover, the speed of this function was measured at the time resolution of a 10ms by in situ energy dispersive XAFS, and it is proved that the self-regenerative function occurs at an extremely high speed. Furthermore, the new perovskite catalysts which have the self-regenerative function of Rh and Pt, as well as Pd, are discussed here. This self-regenerative function provides a new and useful tool for designing the future catalyst technology. (author)

  10. Functional tooth regeneration using a bioengineered tooth unit as a mature organ replacement regenerative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Masamitsu; Mizuno, Mitsumasa; Imamura, Aya; Ogawa, Miho; Yasukawa, Masato; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Morita, Ritsuko; Ikeda, Etsuko; Nakao, Kazuhisa; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Kasugai, Shohei; Saito, Masahiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Donor organ transplantation is currently an essential therapeutic approach to the replacement of a dysfunctional organ as a result of disease, injury or aging in vivo. Recent progress in the area of regenerative therapy has the potential to lead to bioengineered mature organ replacement in the future. In this proof of concept study, we here report a further development in this regard in which a bioengineered tooth unit comprising mature tooth, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, was successfully transplanted into a properly-sized bony hole in the alveolar bone through bone integration by recipient bone remodeling in a murine transplantation model system. The bioengineered tooth unit restored enough the alveolar bone in a vertical direction into an extensive bone defect of murine lower jaw. Engrafted bioengineered tooth displayed physiological tooth functions such as mastication, periodontal ligament function for bone remodeling and responsiveness to noxious stimulations. This study thus represents a substantial advance and demonstrates the real potential for bioengineered mature organ replacement as a next generation regenerative therapy.

  11. Generation and Assessment of Functional Biomaterial Scaffolds for Applications in Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinderer, Svenja; Brauchle, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Current clinically applicable tissue and organ replacement therapies are limited in the field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine. The available options do not regenerate damaged tissues and organs, and, in the majority of the cases, show insufficient restoration of tissue function. To date, anticoagulant drug‐free heart valve replacements or growing valves for pediatric patients, hemocompatible and thrombus‐free vascular substitutes that are smaller than 6 mm, and stem cell‐recruiting delivery systems that induce myocardial regeneration are still only visions of researchers and medical professionals worldwide and far from being the standard of clinical treatment. The design of functional off‐the‐shelf biomaterials as well as automatable and up‐scalable biomaterial processing methods are the focus of current research endeavors and of great interest for fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here, various approaches that aim to overcome the current limitations are reviewed, focusing on biomaterials design and generation methods for myocardium, heart valves, and blood vessels. Furthermore, novel contact‐ and marker‐free biomaterial and extracellular matrix assessment methods are highlighted. PMID:25778713

  12. Late sensory function after intraoperative capsaicin wound instillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, E K; Hansen, J B; Kehlet, H

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intense capsaicin-induced C-fiber stimulation results in reversible lysis of the nerve soma, thereby making capsaicin wound instillation of potential interest for the treatment of post-operative pain. Clinical histological and short-term sensory studies suggest that the C-fiber function...... is partly re-established after skin injection of capsaicin. However, no study has evaluated the long-term effects of wound instillation of purified capsaicin on sensory functions. METHODS: Patients included in a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized study of the analgesic effect of capsaicin after...... treatment. RESULTS: Twenty (100%) capsaicin and 16 (76%) placebo-treated patients were seen at the 2 1/2 year follow-up. Hyperalgesia was seen in five capsaicin- vs. one placebo-treated patient (P=0.2). The mechanical detection threshold was significantly increased on the operated side in the capsaicin vs...

  13. Distinct Fibroblasts in the Papillary and Reticular Dermis: Implications for Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, David T

    2017-01-01

    Human skin wounds heal largely by reparative wound healing rather than regenerative wound healing. Human skin wounds heal with scarring and without pilosebaceous units or other appendages. Dermal fibroblasts come from 2 distinct lineages of cells that have distinct cell markers and, more importantly, distinct functional abilities. Human skin wound healing largely involves the dermal fibroblast lineage from the reticular dermis and not the papillary dermis. If scientists could find a way to stimulate the dermal fibroblast lineages from the papillary dermis in early wound healing, perhaps human skin wounds could heal without scarring and with skin appendages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Electrospun polymeric dressings functionalized with antimicrobial peptides and collagen type I for enhanced wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgueiras, H. P.; Amorim, M. T. P.

    2017-10-01

    Modern wound dressings combine medical textiles with active compounds that stimulate wound healing while protecting against infection. Electrospun wound dressings have been extensively studied and the electrospinning technique recognized as an efficient approach for the production of nanoscale fibrous mats. The unique diverse function and architecture of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) has attracted considerable attention as a tool for the design of new anti-infective drugs. Functionalizing electrospun wound dressings with these AMPs is nowadays being researched. In the present work, we explore these new systems by highlighting the most important characteristics of electropsun wound dressings, revealing the importance of AMPs to wound healing, and the methods available to functionalize the electrospun mats with these molecules. The combined therapeutic potential of collagen type I and these AMP functionalized dressings will be highlighted as well; the significance of these new strategies for the future of wound healing will be clarified.

  15. Influence of hydrophilic polymers on functional properties and wound healing efficacy of hydrocolloid based wound dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sung Giu; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Kim, Kyeong Soo; Kim, Dong Wuk; Kim, Dong Shik; Kim, Jin Ki; Yong, Chul Soon; Youn, Yu Seok; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Han-Gon

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of different hydrophilic polymers on the swelling, bioadhesion and mechanical strength of hydrocolloid wound dressings (HCDs) in order to provide an appropriate composition for a hydrocolloid wound dressing system. In this study, the HCDs were prepared with styrene-isoprene-styrene copolymer (SIS) and polyisobutylene (PIB) as the base using a hot melting method. Additionally, numerous SIS/PIB-based HCDs were prepared with six hydrophilic polymers, and their wound dressing properties were assessed. Finally, the wound healing efficacy of the selected formulations was compared to a commercial wound dressing. The swelling ratio, bioadhesive force and mechanical strengths of HCDs were increased in the order of sodium alginate>sodium CMC=poloxamer=HPMC>PVA=PVP, sodium alginate>sodium CMC=poloxamer>PVA>HPMC=PVP and sodium alginate≥PVA>PVP=HPMC=sodium CMC>poloxamer, respectively. Among the hydrophilic polymers tested, sodium alginate most enhanced the swelling capacity, bioadhesive force and mechanical strengths. Thus, the hydrophilic polymers played great role in the swelling, bioadhesion and mechanical strength of SIS/PIB-based HCDs. The HCD formulation composed of PIB, SIS, liquid paraffin and sodium alginate at the weight ratio of 20/25/12/43 gave better wound dressing properties and more excellent wound healing efficacy than the commercial wound dressing. Therefore, the novel HCD formulation could be a promising hydrocolloid system for wound dressings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Summary of: Regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Stephen J

    2014-03-01

    Significant advances in our understanding of the biological processes involved in tooth development and repair at the cellular and molecular levels have underpinned the newly emerging area of regenerative endodontics. Development of treatment protocols based on exploiting the natural wound healing properties of the dental pulp and applying tissue engineering principles has allowed reporting of case series showing preservation of tissue vitality and apexogenesis. To review current case series reporting regenerative endodontics. Current treatment approaches tend to stimulate more reparative than regenerative responses in respect of the new tissue generated, which often does not closely resemble the physiological structure of dentine-pulp. However, despite these biological limitations, such techniques appear to offer significant promise for improved treatment outcomes. Improved biological outcomes will likely emerge from the many experimental studies being reported and will further contribute to improvements in clinical treatment protocols.

  17. Developing a pro-regenerative biomaterial scaffold microenvironment requires T helper 2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadtler, Kaitlyn; Estrellas, Kenneth; Allen, Brian W; Wolf, Matthew T; Fan, Hongni; Tam, Ada J; Patel, Chirag H; Luber, Brandon S; Wang, Hao; Wagner, Kathryn R; Powell, Jonathan D; Housseau, Franck; Pardoll, Drew M; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2016-04-15

    Immune-mediated tissue regeneration driven by a biomaterial scaffold is emerging as an innovative regenerative strategy to repair damaged tissues. We investigated how biomaterial scaffolds shape the immune microenvironment in traumatic muscle wounds to improve tissue regeneration. The scaffolds induced a pro-regenerative response, characterized by an mTOR/Rictor-dependent T helper 2 pathway that guides interleukin-4-dependent macrophage polarization, which is critical for functional muscle recovery. Manipulating the adaptive immune system using biomaterials engineering may support the development of therapies that promote both systemic and local pro-regenerative immune responses, ultimately stimulating tissue repair. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Inhibition of IRF8 Negatively Regulates Macrophage Function and Impairs Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuanyuan; Yang, Zhiyin; Wu, Shan; Xu, Peng; Peng, Yinbo; Yao, Min

    2017-02-01

    The inflammatory response is essential for normal cutaneous wound healing. Macrophages, as critical inflammatory cells, coordinate inflammation and angiogenesis phases during wound healing. It has been reported that the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8), a member of the IRF family, plays a critical role in the development and function of macrophages and is associated with inflammation. However, the role of IRF8 in cutaneous wound healing and its underlying mechanism remain elusive. Through immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, we showed that IRF8 is involved in the wound repair process in mice and patients. Furthermore, we ascertain that the repression of IRF8 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) leads to delayed wound healing. To explore the mechanism by which IRF8 impacts wound healing, we observed its effect on macrophage-related mediators by IHC or real-time PCR. The results demonstrated that the inhibition of IRF8 decreases the mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators associated with M1 macrophage (il-1b, il-6, inos, and tnf-a) but no impact on M2 macrophage-related mediators (arg-1, mrc-1, and il-10) and the number of macrophages in the wounds. Furthermore, the inhibition of IRF8 induced apoptosis in the wounds. In summary, this study demonstrates that the down-regulation of IRF8 in the wound leads to impaired wound healing possibly through the regulation of macrophage function and apoptosis in skin wound.

  19. Xanthine Oxidoreductase Function Contributes to Normal Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, Michael C; McEnaney, Ryan M; Shukla, Ankur J; Hong, Guiying; Kelley, Eric E; Tarpey, Margaret M; Gladwin, Mark; Zuckerbraun, Brian S; Tzeng, Edith

    2015-01-01

    Chronic, nonhealing wounds result in patient morbidity and disability. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) are both required for normal wound repair, and derangements of these result in impaired healing. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) has the unique capacity to produce both ROS and NO. We hypothesize that XOR contributes to normal wound healing. Cutaneous wounds were created in C57Bl6 mice. XOR was inhibited with dietary tungsten or allopurinol. Topical hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 0.15%) or allopurinol (30 μg) was applied to wounds every other day. Wounds were monitored until closure or collected at d 5 to assess XOR expression and activity, cell proliferation and histology. The effects of XOR, nitrite, H2O2 and allopurinol on keratinocyte cell (KC) and endothelial cell (EC) behavior were assessed. We identified XOR expression and activity in the skin and wound edges as well as granulation tissue. Cultured human KCs also expressed XOR. Tungsten significantly inhibited XOR activity and impaired healing with reduced ROS production with reduced angiogenesis and KC proliferation. The expression and activity of other tungsten-sensitive enzymes were minimal in the wound tissues. Oral allopurinol did not reduce XOR activity or alter wound healing but topical allopurinol significantly reduced XOR activity and delayed healing. Topical H2O2 restored wound healing in tungsten-fed mice. In vitro, nitrite and H2O2 both stimulated KC and EC proliferation and EC migration. These studies demonstrate for the first time that XOR is abundant in wounds and participates in normal wound healing through effects on ROS production. PMID:25879627

  20. Preventive and Regenerative Foam Rolling are Equally Effective in Reducing Fatigue-Related Impairments of Muscle Function following Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Fleckenstein, Jan Wilke, Lutz Vogt, Winfried Banzer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives of the study were to compare the effects of a single bout of preventive or regenerative foam rolling (FR on exercise-induced neuromuscular exhaustion. Single-centre randomised-controlled study was designed. Forty-five healthy adults (22 female; 25±2 yrs were allocated to three groups: 1 FR of the lower limb muscles prior to induction of fatigue, 2 FR after induction of fatigue, 3 no-treatment control. Neuromuscular exhaustion was provoked using a standardized and validated functional agility short-term fatigue protocol. Main outcome measure was the maximal isometric voluntary force of the knee extensors (MIVF. Secondary outcomes included pain and reactive strength (RSI. Preventive (-16% and regenerative FR (-12% resulted in a decreased loss in MIVF compared to control (-21%; p 0.8, p < 0.1. Differences over time (p < 0.001 between groups regarding pain and RSI did not turn out to be clinically meaningful. A single bout of foam rolling reduces neuromuscular exhaustion with reference to maximal force production. Regenerative rather than preventive foam rolling seems sufficient to prevent further fatigue.

  1. Fibroblast function and wound breaking strength is impaired by acute ethanol intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzer, Matthew J; Chen, Lin; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol intoxication occurs in nearly half of all trauma patients and increases the morbidity, mortality, and healing complications of these patients. Prior studies in our laboratory and elsewhere have demonstrated impairments in re-epithelialization, angiogenesis, and inflammation in wounds following acute ethanol exposure. Clinically, acute ethanol exposure has been shown to cause an increased breakdown of wounds. To date, the mechanisms by which acute ethanol exposure modifies wound strength have received little experimental attention. To examine how ethanol influences functions critical to the development of wound strength, the effect of ethanol exposure on fibroblast proliferation and extracellular matrix production was examined. Normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) were exposed to ethanol (100 mg/dl) and then examined for proliferative capacity and mRNA production of collagen I, collagen III, and lysyl oxidase (LOX). In in vivo studies, the wound breaking strength, LOX activity, collagen, and hyaluronic acid (HA) contents of wounds of ethanol-exposed (100 mg/dl) mice were examined. At 24, 48, and 72 hours after acute ethanol exposure (8 hours duration), NHDF displayed a significant impairment in proliferative capacity (up to 50% at 24 hours p ethanol exposure, NHDF produced less collagen I and LOX mRNA, but more collagen III mRNA than control fibroblasts (p Ethanol exposure in vivo caused a reduction in wound breaking strength of up to 40% when compared to control mice (p ethanol-exposed mice were significantly reduced (p ethanol prior to injury can cause a significant decrease in wound breaking strength. Our studies suggest that ethanol directly impairs fibroblast function, leading to decreased collagen production. The results provide a possible explanation for how acute ethanol exposure might increase in wound complications and wound failure. Copyright © 2010 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  2. Expression and function of connexin 43 in human gingival wound healing and fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Tarzemany

    Full Text Available Connexins (C×s are a family of transmembrane proteins that form hemichannels and gap junctions (GJs on the cell membranes, and transfer small signaling molecules between the cytoplasm and extracellular space and between connecting cells, respectively. Among C×s, suppressing C×43 expression or function promotes skin wound closure and granulation tissue formation, and may alleviate scarring, but the mechanisms are not well understood. Oral mucosal gingiva is characterized by faster wound closure and scarless wound healing outcome as compared to skin wounds. Therefore, we hypothesized that C×43 function is down regulated during human gingival wound healing, which in fibroblasts promotes expression of genes conducive for fast and scarless wound healing. Cultured gingival fibroblasts expressed C×43 as their major connexin. Immunostaining of unwounded human gingiva showed that C×43 was abundantly present in the epithelium, and in connective tissue formed large C×43 plaques in fibroblasts. At the early stages of wound healing, C×43 was strongly down regulated in wound epithelial cells and fibroblasts, returning to the level of normal tissue by day 60 post-wounding. Blocking of C×43 function by C×43 mimetic peptide Gap27 suppressed GJ-mediated dye transfer, promoted migration, and caused significant changes in the expression of wound healing-associated genes in gingival fibroblasts. In particular, out of 54 genes analyzed, several MMPs and TGF-β1, involved in regulation of inflammation and extracellular matrix (ECM turnover, and VEGF-A, involved in angiogenesis, were significantly upregulated while pro-fibrotic ECM molecules, including Collagen type I, and cell contractility-related molecules were significantly down regulated. These responses involved MAPK, GSK3α/β and TGF-β signaling pathways, and AP1 and SP1 transcription factors. Thus, suppressed function of C×43 in fibroblasts promotes their migration, and regulates expression of

  3. Modeled Microgravity Affects Fibroblast Functions Related to Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cialdai, Francesca; Vignali, Leonardo; Morbidelli, Lucia; Colciago, Alessandra; Celotti, Fabio; Santi, Alice; Caselli, Anna; Cirri, Paolo; Monici, Monica

    2017-02-01

    Wound healing is crucial for the survival of an organism. Therefore, in the perspective of space exploration missions, it is important to understand if and how microgravity conditions affect the behavior of the cell populations involved in wound healing and the evolution of the process. Since fibroblasts are the major players in tissue repair, this study was focused on the behavior of fibroblasts in microgravity conditions, modeled by a RCCS. Cell cytoskeleton was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy, the ability to migrate was assessed by microchemotaxis and scratch assay, and the expression of markers of fibroblast activation, angiogenesis, and inflammation was assessed by western blot. Results revealed that after cell exposure to modeled microgravity conditions, a thorough rearrangement of microtubules occurred and α-SMA bundles were replaced by a tight network of faulty and disorganized filaments. Exposure to modeled microgravity induced a decrease in α-SMA and E-CAD expressions. Also, the expression of the pro-angiogenic protein VEGF decreased, while that of the inflammatory signal COX-2 increased. Fibroblast ability to adhere, migrate, and respond to chemoattractants (PRP), closely related to cytoskeleton integrity and membrane junctions, was significantly impaired. Nevertheless, PRP was able to partially restore fibroblast migration.

  4. Application of Nanomaterials in Stem Cell Regenerative Medicine of Orthopedic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Pan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine aims to achieve functional rehabilitation of tissue or cells injured through wound, disease, or aging. Recent findings suggest that nanotechnology provides advanced biomaterials with specified morphologies which can create a nanoscale extracellular environment capable of promoting the adhesion and proliferation of stem cells and accelerating stem cell differentiation in a controlled manner in tissue engineering. This review summarizes the biological effects of nanomaterials and their regenerative medicine applications in orthopedic surgery research, including bone, cartilage, tendons, and nerve tissue engineering.

  5. Active wound dressing with artificial capillaries for temporary wound irrigation and skin cell supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plettig, Jörn; Johnen, Christa M; Bräutigam, Kirsten; Zeilinger, Katrin; Borneman, Reinhard; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2012-04-01

    Medical treatment of burns and chronic wounds remains a challenge. We discussed a therapy concept that combines skin cell spray transplantation with a novel wound dressing based on artificial hollow fiber membrane capillaries. In skin cell-based therapy development, autologous skin progenitor cells are isolated from a healthy skin area and sprayed onto the wound. A medical device was introduced that uses perfused capillaries, known from clinical plasma separation, as a temporarily applied extracorporeal wound capillary bed. The functions of the dressing are comparable with those of dialysis; the capillaries, however, are applied externally onto the wound. Perfusion with a clinical peripheral nutrition and buffer solution can provide wound irrigation, wound debris removal, cell nutrition, pH regulation, and electrolyte balance while potentially serving to address delivery of regenerative factors and antibiosis. An innovative active skin wound dressing that provides cell support and stimulates regeneration by wound irrigation is discussed. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The Double-Edged Sword: Conserved Functions of Extracellular Hsp90 in Wound Healing and Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hance, Michael W.; Nolan, Krystal D.; Isaacs, Jennifer S., E-mail: isaacsj@musc.edu [Department of Cell and Molecular Pharmacology, Medical University of South Carolina, Hollings Cancer Center, Charleston, SC 29412 (United States)

    2014-05-06

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) represent a diverse group of chaperones that play a vital role in the protection of cells against numerous environmental stresses. Although our understanding of chaperone biology has deepened over the last decade, the “atypical” extracellular functions of Hsps have remained somewhat enigmatic and comparatively understudied. The heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) chaperone is a prototypic model for an Hsp family member exhibiting a duality of intracellular and extracellular functions. Intracellular Hsp90 is best known as a master regulator of protein folding. Cancers are particularly adept at exploiting this function of Hsp90, providing the impetus for the robust clinical development of small molecule Hsp90 inhibitors. However, in addition to its maintenance of protein homeostasis, Hsp90 has also been identified as an extracellular protein. Although early reports ascribed immunoregulatory functions to extracellular Hsp90 (eHsp90), recent studies have illuminated expanded functions for eHsp90 in wound healing and cancer. While the intended physiological role of eHsp90 remains enigmatic, its evolutionarily conserved functions in wound healing are easily co-opted during malignancy, a pathology sharing many properties of wounded tissue. This review will highlight the emerging functions of eHsp90 and shed light on its seemingly dichotomous roles as a benevolent facilitator of wound healing and as a sinister effector of tumor progression.

  7. The Double-Edged Sword: Conserved Functions of Extracellular Hsp90 in Wound Healing and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Hance

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (Hsps represent a diverse group of chaperones that play a vital role in the protection of cells against numerous environmental stresses. Although our understanding of chaperone biology has deepened over the last decade, the “atypical” extracellular functions of Hsps have remained somewhat enigmatic and comparatively understudied. The heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 chaperone is a prototypic model for an Hsp family member exhibiting a duality of intracellular and extracellular functions. Intracellular Hsp90 is best known as a master regulator of protein folding. Cancers are particularly adept at exploiting this function of Hsp90, providing the impetus for the robust clinical development of small molecule Hsp90 inhibitors. However, in addition to its maintenance of protein homeostasis, Hsp90 has also been identified as an extracellular protein. Although early reports ascribed immunoregulatory functions to extracellular Hsp90 (eHsp90, recent studies have illuminated expanded functions for eHsp90 in wound healing and cancer. While the intended physiological role of eHsp90 remains enigmatic, its evolutionarily conserved functions in wound healing are easily co-opted during malignancy, a pathology sharing many properties of wounded tissue. This review will highlight the emerging functions of eHsp90 and shed light on its seemingly dichotomous roles as a benevolent facilitator of wound healing and as a sinister effector of tumor progression.

  8. Biliary obstruction and wound healing, infection, renal function and bloodcoagulation : an experimental study in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Snellen

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of the study reported in this thesis, was to investigate the effects of biliary obstruction on wound healing, resistance to infection, renal function and blood coagulation. Disturbances in these processes are often reported in patients with obstructive jaundice, and may lead

  9. The Yin and Yang of Integrin Function in Re-Epithelialization During Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Green, Manuela

    2013-04-01

    Integrins are transmembrane proteins that are present in the plasma membrane of basal ketatinocytes and connect them to the underlying basement membrane and to the dermis. There are primarily two types of interactions between the epidermis and the dermis-via focal adhesion plaques and hemidesmosomes. It is critical that these interactions form properly to confer the skin strong mechanical properties. Integrins are also critical during wound healing, particularly in closure of the wound. Margadant et al. (2009) address proper closure of cutaneous wounds. They developed a conditional knockout mouse for integrin α3 and showed that the absence of the α3 integrin resulted in faster migration of the keratinocytes during wound healing. However, its absence also led to inflammation, hair loss, basement membrane duplication, and loss of dermal epidermal interactions with blister formation. The latter has important consequences for the ability of the skin to withstand mechanical challenges. Models such as the conditional model developed by Margadant et al. (2009) will provide the opportunity for making major advances in understanding the complex function of integrins during healing. The model and the findings provide an opportunity to decipher mechanisms of disease and for potential development of treatments for human skin disorders and impaired healing, including chronic ulcers. This work provides knowledge that leads to the understanding of delayed re-epithelialization during wound healing and dermal epidermal defects, blistering, and chronic skin diseases, hence providing the opportunity to understand the basic cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in these situations.

  10. Regenerative engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Laurencin, Cato T

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative Engineering: The Future of Medicine Saadiq F. El-Amin III , MD , PhD; Joylene W.L. Thomas, MD ; Ugonna N. Ihekweazu, MD ; Mia D. Woods, MS; and Ashim Gupta, MSCell Biology Gloria Gronowicz, PhD and Karen Sagomonyants, DMDStem Cells and Tissue Regeneration Kristen Martins-Taylor, PhD; Xiaofang Wang, MD , PhD; Xue-Jun Li, PhD; and Ren-He Xu, MD , PhDIntroduction to Materials Science Sangamesh G. Kumbar, PhD and Cato T. Laurencin, MD , PhDBiomaterials A. Jon Goldberg, PhD and Liisa T. Kuhn, PhDIn Vitro Assessment of Cell-Biomaterial Interactions Yong Wang, PhDHost Response to Biomate

  11. INFLUENCE OF LOCAL RONKOLEIKIN TREATMENT UPON CLINICAL COURSE OF PURULENT WOUNDS AND FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITY OF WOUND PHAGOCYTES IN PATIENTS WITH ODONTOGENIC PHLEGMONAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Dolgushin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the work was to evaluate clinical features of purulent wounds trend and functional activity of local wound phagocytes in the patients with odontogenic phlegmones in the course of local treatment with Ronkoleukin. A randomized clinical study was performed which included sixty-five patients with odontogenic phlegmones. Their age ranged from 18 to 74 years old. The group was divided in two parts, i.e., patients of a comparison group (n = 33 receiving a conventional combined drug therapy, and the persons from study group (n = 32 who were subject to local immunotherapy with Ronkoleukin, applied along with conventional therapy. It was established that the local therapy with Ronkoleikin exerts distinct positive effects, i.e., increase in wound-located lymphocytes and macrophages, acceleration of phasic dynamics of inflammatory events, augmentation of an lysosomal luminescence index (2.3-fold, enhancement of phagocytosis intensity in wound neutrophiles and macrophages (1.9-2-fold, strengthening the reserve abilities of wound neutrophils (1.3-fold. These effects create favorable conditions for elimination of pathogen and optimal healing of purulent wounds in the patients with odontogenic phlegmones.

  12. LXA{sub 4} actions direct fibroblast function and wound closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Bruno S. [Department of Applied Oral Sciences, Center for Periodontology, The Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States); Microbiology Branch, US Army Dental and Trauma Research Detachment, Institute of Surgical Research, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, TX (United States); Kantarci, Alpdogan; Zarrough, Ahmed; Hasturk, Hatice [Department of Applied Oral Sciences, Center for Periodontology, The Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States); Leung, Kai P., E-mail: kai.p.leung.civ@mail.mil [Microbiology Branch, US Army Dental and Trauma Research Detachment, Institute of Surgical Research, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, TX (United States); Van Dyke, Thomas E., E-mail: tvandyke@forsyth.org [Department of Applied Oral Sciences, Center for Periodontology, The Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-09-04

    Timely resolution of inflammation is crucial for normal wound healing. Resolution of inflammation is an active biological process regulated by specialized lipid mediators including the lipoxins and resolvins. Failure of resolution activity has a major negative impact on wound healing in chronic inflammatory diseases that is manifest as excess fibrosis and scarring. Lipoxins, including Lipoxin A{sub 4} (LXA{sub 4}), have known anti-fibrotic and anti-scarring properties. The goal of this study was to elucidate the impact of LXA{sub 4} on fibroblast function. Mouse fibroblasts (3T3 Mus musculus Swiss) were cultured for 72 h in the presence of TGF-β1, to induce fibroblast activation. The impact of exogenous TGF-β1 (1 ng/mL) on LXA{sub 4} receptor expression (ALX/FPR2) was determined by flow cytometry. Fibroblast proliferation was measured by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling and migration in a “scratch” assay wound model. Expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and collagen types I and III were measured by Western blot. We observed that TGF-β1 up-regulates LXA{sub 4} receptor expression, enhances fibroblast proliferation, migration and scratch wound closure. α-SMA levels and Collagen type I and III deposition were also enhanced. LXA{sub 4} slowed fibroblast migration and scratch wound closure at early time points (24 h), but wound closure was equal to TGF-β1 alone at 48 and 72 h. LXA{sub 4} tended to slow fibroblast proliferation at both concentrations, but had no impact on α-SMA or collagen production by TGF-β1 stimulated fibroblasts. The generalizability of the actions of resolution molecules was examined in experiments repeated with resolvin D2 (RvD2) as the agonist. The activity of RvD2 mimicked the actions of LXA{sub 4} in all assays, through an as yet unidentified receptor. The results suggest that mediators of resolution of inflammation enhance wound healing and limit fibrosis in part by modulating fibroblast function. - Highlights: • TGF

  13. Evaluation of cardiovascular toxicity of carbon nanotubes functionalized with sodium hyaluronate in oral regenerative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.V. Joviano-Santos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that carbon nanotubes (CNTs associated with sodium hyaluronate (HY-CNTs accelerate bone repair in the tooth sockets of rats. Before clinical application of HY-CNTs, it is important to assess their biocompatibility. Moreover, cardiac toxicity may be caused by the translocation of these particles to the blood stream. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible changes in cardiovascular function in male Wistar rats whose tooth sockets were treated with either CNTs or HY-CNTs (100 μg/mL, 0.1 mL. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored in conscious rats 7 days after treatment. Cardiac function was evaluated using the Langendorff perfusion technique. The data showed no changes in blood pressure or heart rate in rats treated with either CNTs or HY-CNTs, and no significant changes in cardiac function were found in any of the groups. To confirm these findings, experiments were conducted in rats injected intraperitoneally with a high concentration of either CNTs or HY-CNTs (0.75 mg/kg. The same parameters were analyzed and similar results were observed. The results obtained 7 days following injection indicate that the administration of low concentrations of CNTs or HY-CNTs directly into tooth sockets did not cause any significant change in cardiovascular function in the rats. The present findings support the possibility of using these biocomposites in humans.

  14. Evaluation of cardiovascular toxicity of carbon nanotubes functionalized with sodium hyaluronate in oral regenerative medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joviano-Santos, J.V.; Sá, M.A.; De Maria, M.L.A.; Almeida, T.C.S. [Departamento de Morfologia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Geraldo, V.; Oliveira, S.; Ladeira, L.O. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Ferreira, A.J. [Departamento de Morfologia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-05-23

    It has been demonstrated that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) associated with sodium hyaluronate (HY-CNTs) accelerate bone repair in the tooth sockets of rats. Before clinical application of HY-CNTs, it is important to assess their biocompatibility. Moreover, cardiac toxicity may be caused by the translocation of these particles to the blood stream. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible changes in cardiovascular function in male Wistar rats whose tooth sockets were treated with either CNTs or HY-CNTs (100 μg/mL, 0.1 mL). Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored in conscious rats 7 days after treatment. Cardiac function was evaluated using the Langendorff perfusion technique. The data showed no changes in blood pressure or heart rate in rats treated with either CNTs or HY-CNTs, and no significant changes in cardiac function were found in any of the groups. To confirm these findings, experiments were conducted in rats injected intraperitoneally with a high concentration of either CNTs or HY-CNTs (0.75 mg/kg). The same parameters were analyzed and similar results were observed. The results obtained 7 days following injection indicate that the administration of low concentrations of CNTs or HY-CNTs directly into tooth sockets did not cause any significant change in cardiovascular function in the rats. The present findings support the possibility of using these biocomposites in humans.

  15. Influence of acidic pH on keratinocyte function and re-epithelialisation of human in vitro wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnqvist, Susanna; Emanuelsson, Peter; Kratz, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wounds are one of the greatest challenges for the healthcare system. Today, a plethora of dressings are used in the treatment of these wounds, each with specific influence on the wound environment. Due to differences in the permeability of the dressings the use will result in differences in the pH balance in the wound bed. However, little is known about how changes in the pH in the wound environment affect the different phases of the healing process. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acidic pH on the regeneration phase by studying keratinocyte function in vitro and re-epithelialisation in an in vitro model of human skin. In vitro assays showed reduced viability and migration rates in human keratinocytes when pH was lowered. Real time PCR revealed differential expression of genes related to wound healing and environmental impairment. Tissue culture showed no re-epithelialisation of wounds subjected to pH 5.0 and moderate re-epithelialisation at pH 6.0, compared to controls at pH 7.4. The results indicate that lowering pH down to pH 5.0 in wounds is counterproductive in aspect of keratinocyte function which is crucial for successful wound healing.

  16. Functional fabrication of recombinant human collagen-phosphorylcholine hydrogels for regenerative medicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirazul Islam, M; Cėpla, Vytautas; He, Chaoliang; Edin, Joel; Rakickas, Tomas; Kobuch, Karin; Ruželė, Živilė; Jackson, W Bruce; Rafat, Mehrdad; Lohmann, Chris P; Valiokas, Ramūnas; Griffith, May

    2015-01-01

    The implant-host interface is a critical element in guiding tissue or organ regeneration. We previously developed hydrogels comprising interpenetrating networks of recombinant human collagen type III and 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (RHCIII-MPC) as substitutes for the corneal extracellular matrix that promote endogenous regeneration of corneal tissue. To render them functional for clinical application, we have now optimized their composition and thereby enhanced their mechanical properties. We have demonstrated that such optimized RHCIII-MPC hydrogels are suitable for precision femtosecond laser cutting to produce complementing implants and host surgical beds for subsequent tissue welding. This avoids the tissue damage and inflammation associated with manual surgical techniques, thereby leading to more efficient healing. Although we previously demonstrated in clinical testing that RHCIII-based implants stimulated cornea regeneration in patients, the rate of epithelial cell coverage of the implants needs improvement, e.g. modification of the implant surface. We now show that our 500μm thick RHCIII-MPC constructs comprising over 85% water are suitable for microcontact printing with fibronectin. The resulting fibronectin micropatterns promote cell adhesion, unlike the bare RHCIII-MPC hydrogel. Interestingly, a pattern of 30μm wide fibronectin stripes enhanced cell attachment and showed the highest mitotic rates, an effect that potentially can be utilized for faster integration of the implant. We have therefore shown that laboratory-produced mimics of naturally occurring collagen and phospholipids can be fabricated into robust hydrogels that can be laser profiled and patterned to enhance their potential function as artificial substitutes of donor human corneas. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional recordings from awake, behaving rodents through a microchannel based regenerative neural interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Russell K.; Choi, Yoonsu; Bellamkonda, Ravi; English, Arthur

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Neural interface technologies could provide controlling connections between the nervous system and external technologies, such as limb prosthetics. The recording of efferent, motor potentials is a critical requirement for a peripheral neural interface, as these signals represent the user-generated neural output intended to drive external devices. Our objective was to evaluate structural and functional neural regeneration through a microchannel neural interface and to characterize potentials recorded from electrodes placed within the microchannels in awake and behaving animals. Approach. Female rats were implanted with muscle EMG electrodes and, following unilateral sciatic nerve transection, the cut nerve was repaired either across a microchannel neural interface or with end-to-end surgical repair. During a 13 week recovery period, direct muscle responses to nerve stimulation proximal to the transection were monitored weekly. In two rats repaired with the neural interface, four wire electrodes were embedded in the microchannels and recordings were obtained within microchannels during proximal stimulation experiments and treadmill locomotion. Main results. In these proof-of-principle experiments, we found that axons from cut nerves were capable of functional reinnervation of distal muscle targets, whether regenerating through a microchannel device or after direct end-to-end repair. Discrete stimulation-evoked and volitional potentials were recorded within interface microchannels in a small group of awake and behaving animals and their firing patterns correlated directly with intramuscular recordings during locomotion. Of 38 potentials extracted, 19 were identified as motor axons reinnervating tibialis anterior or soleus muscles using spike triggered averaging. Significance. These results are evidence for motor axon regeneration through microchannels and are the first report of in vivo recordings from regenerated motor axons within microchannels in a small

  18. The Pharmacology of Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, Justin M.; Furth, Mark E.; Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving multidisciplinary, translational research enterprise whose explicit purpose is to advance technologies for the repair and replacement of damaged cells, tissues, and organs. Scientific progress in the field has been steady and expectations for its robust clinical application continue to rise. The major thesis of this review is that the pharmacological sciences will contribute critically to the accelerated translational progress and clinical utility of regenerative medicine technologies. In 2007, we coined the phrase “regenerative pharmacology” to describe the enormous possibilities that could occur at the interface between pharmacology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. The operational definition of regenerative pharmacology is “the application of pharmacological sciences to accelerate, optimize, and characterize (either in vitro or in vivo) the development, maturation, and function of bioengineered and regenerating tissues.” As such, regenerative pharmacology seeks to cure disease through restoration of tissue/organ function. This strategy is distinct from standard pharmacotherapy, which is often limited to the amelioration of symptoms. Our goal here is to get pharmacologists more involved in this field of research by exposing them to the tools, opportunities, challenges, and interdisciplinary expertise that will be required to ensure awareness and galvanize involvement. To this end, we illustrate ways in which the pharmacological sciences can drive future innovations in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering and thus help to revolutionize the discovery of curative therapeutics. Hopefully, the broad foundational knowledge provided herein will spark sustained conversations among experts in diverse fields of scientific research to the benefit of all. PMID:23818131

  19. Saliva and wound healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Veerman, E.C.I.

    2014-01-01

    Oral wounds heal faster and with less scar formation than skin wounds. One of the key factors involved is saliva, which promotes wound healing in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, thus improving the survival and functioning of inflammatory cells that are crucial for wound healing. In

  20. Nanosensors for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, David C; Wiraja, Christian; Mantalaris, Athanasios; Xu, Chenjie

    2014-10-01

    Assessing biodistribution, fate, and function of implanted therapeutic cells in preclinical animal experiments is critical to realize safe, effective and efficient treatments for subsequent implementation within the clinic. Currently, tissue histology, the most prevalent analytical technique to meet this need, is limited by end-point analysis, high cost and long preparation time. Moreover, it is disadvantaged by an inability to monitor in real-time, qualitative interpretation and ethical issues arising from animal sacrifice. While genetic engineering techniques allow cells to express molecules with detectable signals (e.g., fluorescence, luminescence, T1 (spin-lattice)/T2 (spin-spin) contrast in magnetic resonance imaging, radionuclide), concerns arise regarding technical complexity, high-cost of genetic manipulation, as well as mutagenic cell dysfunction. Alternatively, cells can be labeled using nanoparticle-sensors-nanosensors that emit signals to identify cell location, status and function in a simple, cost-effective, and non-genetic manner. This review article provides the definition, classification, evolution, and applications of nanosensor technology and focuses on how they can be utilized in regenerative medicine. Several examples of direct applications include: (1) monitoring post-transplantation cell behavior, (2) revealing host response following foreign biomaterial implantation, and (3) optimization of cell bioprocess operating conditions. Incorporating nanosensors is expected to expedite the development of cell-based regenerative medicine therapeutics.

  1. CMD kinetics and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2016-01-01

    The author's theory of the cell memory disc (CMD) offers a radical and holistic picture of the cell from both functional and structural perspectives. Despite all of the attention that has been focused on different regenerative strategies, several serious CMD-based obstacles still remain that make current cell therapies inherently unethical, harmful, and largely ineffective from a clinical viewpoint. Accordingly, unless there is a real breakthrough in finding an alternative or complementary approach to overcome these barriers, all of the discussion regarding cell-based therapies may be fruitless. Hence, this paper focuses on the issue of CMD kinetics in an attempt to provide a fresh perspective on regenerative medicine.

  2. Platelet-rich fibrin: a boon in regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebentish, Priyanka D; Umashetty, Girish; Kaur, Harpreet; Doizode, Trupthi; Kaslekar, Mithun; Chowdhury, Shouvik

    2016-12-01

    Research into regenerative dentistry has contributed momentum to the field of molecular biology. Periapical surgery aims at removing periapical pathology to achieve complete wound healing and regeneration of bone and periodontal tissue. Regenerative endodontic procedures are widely being added to the current armamentarium of pulp therapy procedures. The regenerative potential of platelets has been deliberated. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is a wonderful tissue-engineering product and has recently gained much popularity due its promising results in wound healing bone induction. The features of this product are an attribute of platelets which, after cellular interactions, release growth factors and have shown application in diverse disciplines of dentistry. This paper is intended to shed light onto the various prospects of PRF and to provide clinical insight into regenerative endodontic therapy.

  3. Factor XII and uPAR upregulate neutrophil functions to influence wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrou, Evi X; Fang, Chao; Bane, Kara L; Long, Andy T; Naudin, Clément; Kucukal, Erdem; Gandhi, Agharnan; Brett-Morris, Adina; Mumaw, Michele M; Izadmehr, Sudeh; Merkulova, Alona; Reynolds, Cindy C; Alhalabi, Omar; Nayak, Lalitha; Yu, Wen-Mei; Qu, Cheng-Kui; Meyerson, Howard J; Dubyak, George R; Gurkan, Umut A; Nieman, Marvin T; Sen Gupta, Anirban; Renné, Thomas; Schmaier, Alvin H

    2018-01-29

    Coagulation factor XII (FXII) deficiency is associated with decreased neutrophil migration, but the mechanisms remain uncharacterized. Here, we examine how FXII contributes to the inflammatory response. In 2 models of sterile inflammation, FXII-deficient mice (F12-/-) had fewer neutrophils recruited than WT mice. We discovered that neutrophils produced a pool of FXII that is functionally distinct from hepatic-derived FXII and contributes to neutrophil trafficking at sites of inflammation. FXII signals in neutrophils through urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-mediated (uPAR-mediated) Akt2 phosphorylation at S474 (pAktS474). Downstream of pAkt2S474, FXII stimulation of neutrophils upregulated surface expression of αMβ2 integrin, increased intracellular calcium, and promoted extracellular DNA release. The sum of these activities contributed to neutrophil cell adhesion, migration, and release of neutrophil extracellular traps in a process called NETosis. Decreased neutrophil signaling in F12-/- mice resulted in less inflammation and faster wound healing. Targeting hepatic F12 with siRNA did not affect neutrophil migration, whereas WT BM transplanted into F12-/- hosts was sufficient to correct the neutrophil migration defect in F12-/- mice and restore wound inflammation. Importantly, these activities were a zymogen FXII function and independent of FXIIa and contact activation, highlighting that FXII has a sophisticated role in vivo that has not been previously appreciated.

  4. Fibronectin binding modulates CXCL11 activity and facilitates wound healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Tortelli

    Full Text Available Engineered biomatrices offer the potential to recapitulate the regenerative microenvironment, with important implications in tissue repair. In this context, investigation of the molecular interactions occurring between growth factors, cytokines and extracellular matrix (ECM has gained increasing interest. Here, we sought to investigate the possible interactions between the ECM proteins fibronectin (FN and fibrinogen (Fg with the CXCR3 ligands CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11, which are expressed during wound healing. New binding interactions were observed and characterized. Heparin-binding domains within Fg (residues 15-66 of the β chain, Fg β15-66 and FN (FNI1-5, but not FNIII12-14 were involved in binding to CXCL10 and CXCL11 but not CXCL9. To investigate a possible influence of FN and Fg interactions with CXCL11 in mediating its role during re-epithelialization, we investigated human keratinocyte migration in vitro and wound healing in vivo in diabetic db/db mice. A synergistic effect on CXCL11-induced keratinocyte migration was observed when cells were treated with CXCL11 in combination with FN in a transmigration assay. Moreover, wound healing was enhanced in full thickness excisional wounds treated with fibrin matrices functionalized with FN and containing CXCL11. These findings highlight the importance of the interactions occurring between cytokines and ECM and point to design concepts to develop functional matrices for regenerative medicine.

  5. Active Magnetic Regenerative Liquefier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barclay, John A. [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Oseen-Send, Kathryn [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Ferguson, Luke [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Pouresfandiary, Jamshid [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Cousins, Anand [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Ralph, Heather [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Hampto, Tom [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-01-12

    This final report for the DOE Project entitled Active Magnetic Regenerative Liquefier (AMRL) funded under Grant DE-FG36-08GO18064 to Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy (Heracles/Prometheus) describes an active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) prototype designed and built during the period from July 2008 through May 2011. The primary goal of this project was to make significant technical advances toward highly efficient liquefaction of hydrogen. Conventional hydrogen liquefiers at any scale have a maximum FOM of ~0.35 due primarily to the intrinsic difficulty of rapid, efficient compression of either hydrogen or helium working gases. Numerical simulation modeling of high performance AMRL designs indicates certain designs have promise to increase thermodynamic efficiency from a FOM of ~0.35 toward ~0.5 to ~0.6. The technical approach was the use of solid magnetic working refrigerants cycled in and out of high magnetic fields to build an efficient active regenerative magnetic refrigeration module providing cooling power for AMRL. A single-stage reciprocating AMRR with a design temperature span from ~290 K to ~120 K was built and tested with dual magnetic regenerators moving in and out of the conductively-cooled superconducting magnet subsystem. The heat transfer fluid (helium) was coupled to the process stream (refrigeration/liquefaction load) via high performance heat exchangers. In order to maximize AMRR efficiency a helium bypass loop with adjustable flow was incorporated in the design because the thermal mass of magnetic refrigerants is higher in low magnetic field than in high magnetic field. Heracles/Prometheus designed experiments to measure AMRR performance under a variety of different operational parameters such as cycle frequency, magnetic field strength, heat transfer fluid flow rate, amount of bypass flow of the heat transfer fluid while measuring work input, temperature span, cooling capability as a function of cold temperature

  6. Regenerative (Regen) ECLSS Operations Water Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Barry

    2010-01-01

    In November 2008, the Water Regenerative System racks were launched aboard Space Shuttle flight, STS-126 (ULF2) and installed and activated on the International Space Station (ISS). These racks, consisting of the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) and Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), completed the installation of the Regenerative (Regen) ECLSS systems which includes the Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA) that was launched 2 years prior. With the onset of active water management on the US segment of the ISS, a new operational concept was required, that of "water balance." Even more recently, in 2010 the Sabatier system came online which converts H2 and CO2 into water and methane. The Regen ECLSS systems accept condensation from the atmosphere, urine from crew, and processes that fluid via various means into potable water which is used for crew drinking, building up skip-cycle water inventory, and water for electrolysis to produce oxygen. Specification rates of crew urine output, condensate output, O2 requirements, toilet flush water and drinking needs are well documented and used as a general plan when Regen ECLSS came online. Spec rates are useful in long term planning, however, daily or weekly rates are dependent on a number of variables. The constantly changing rates created a new challenge for the ECLSS flight controllers, who are responsible for operating the ECLSS systems onboard ISS. This paper will review the various inputs to rate changes and inputs to planning events, including but not limited to; crew personnel makeup, Regen ECLSS system operability, vehicle traffic, water containment availability, and Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) capability. Along with the inputs that change the various rates, the paper will review the different systems, their constraints and finally the operational means by which flight controllers manage this new challenge of "water balance."

  7. Nodular Regenerative Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindy Lee MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nodular regenerative hyperplasia (NRH is a known etiology of noncirrhotic portal hypertension. Cases of biopsy-proven NRH in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV–positive patients have been described. While these patients often have normal synthetic liver function, several reports described disease progression to liver failure. Case: We here present a 26-year-old woman with history of congenital HIV on antiretroviral therapy complicated by Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia at age 14. CD4 counts have been >300 with undetectable viral load. She was referred to our Hepatology service for evaluation of splenomegaly, elevated liver tests, and thrombocytopenia. On initial presentation, she reported easy bruising and gingival bleeding, and abdominal imaging showed evidence of portal hypertension without associated cirrhosis. Upper endoscopy was significant for large esophageal varices without bleeding stigmata. Liver biopsy showed minimal fibrosis around the portal areas without significant inflammation. The lobules showed focal zones of thin hepatocyte plates on reticulin stain with adjacent areas showing mild regenerative changes. The diagnosis of NRH was made and patient was placed on propranolol for variceal bleeding prophylaxis. Two years later, the patient presented with bleeding gastric varices warranting transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. Postprocedure course was complicated by mild encephalopathy. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging showed a 1.7 × 1.3 cm lesion suggestive of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The patient was deemed to be a candidate for liver transplantation, and she is now delisted due to ongoing pregnancy. Conclusion: This report describes the first case of HCC in an HIV patient with NRH. The possible association of NRH with HCC warrants further investigation.

  8. Surgical sutures filled with adipose-derived stem cells promote wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckhenrich, Ann Katharin; Kirsch, Bianca Manuela; Wahl, Elizabeth Ann; Schenck, Thilo Ludwig; Rezaeian, Farid; Harder, Yves; Foehr, Peter; Machens, Hans-Günther; Egaña, José Tomás

    2014-01-01

    Delayed wound healing and scar formation are among the most frequent complications after surgical interventions. Although biodegradable surgical sutures present an excellent drug delivery opportunity, their primary function is tissue fixation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) act as trophic mediators and are successful in activating biomaterials. Here biodegradable sutures were filled with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC) to provide a pro-regenerative environment at the injured site. Results showed that after filling, ASCs attach to the suture material, distribute equally throughout the filaments, and remain viable in the suture. Among a broad panel of cytokines, cell-filled sutures constantly release vascular endothelial growth factor to supernatants. Such conditioned media was evaluated in an in vitro wound healing assay and showed a significant decrease in the open wound area compared to controls. After suturing in an ex vivo wound model, cells remained in the suture and maintained their metabolic activity. Furthermore, cell-filled sutures can be cryopreserved without losing their viability. This study presents an innovative approach to equip surgical sutures with pro-regenerative features and allows the treatment and fixation of wounds in one step, therefore representing a promising tool to promote wound healing after injury.

  9. Surgical sutures filled with adipose-derived stem cells promote wound healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Katharin Reckhenrich

    Full Text Available Delayed wound healing and scar formation are among the most frequent complications after surgical interventions. Although biodegradable surgical sutures present an excellent drug delivery opportunity, their primary function is tissue fixation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC act as trophic mediators and are successful in activating biomaterials. Here biodegradable sutures were filled with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC to provide a pro-regenerative environment at the injured site. Results showed that after filling, ASCs attach to the suture material, distribute equally throughout the filaments, and remain viable in the suture. Among a broad panel of cytokines, cell-filled sutures constantly release vascular endothelial growth factor to supernatants. Such conditioned media was evaluated in an in vitro wound healing assay and showed a significant decrease in the open wound area compared to controls. After suturing in an ex vivo wound model, cells remained in the suture and maintained their metabolic activity. Furthermore, cell-filled sutures can be cryopreserved without losing their viability. This study presents an innovative approach to equip surgical sutures with pro-regenerative features and allows the treatment and fixation of wounds in one step, therefore representing a promising tool to promote wound healing after injury.

  10. Biomimetic microenvironments for regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Sagar N; Kim, Bogeun; Walma, Alexander M Cruz; Choi, Sung Chul; Wu, Hui; Mao, Jeremy J; Jun, Ho-Wook; Cheon, Kyounga

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics has been proposed to replace damaged and underdeveloped tooth structures with normal pulp-dentin tissue by providing a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking environment; stem cells, signaling molecules, and scaffolds. In addition, clinical success of the regenerative endodontic treatments can be evidenced by absence of signs and symptoms; no bony pathology, a disinfected pulp, and the maturation of root dentin in length and thickness. In spite of the various approaches of regenerative endodontics, there are several major challenges that remain to be improved: a) the endodontic root canal is a strong harbor of the endodontic bacterial biofilm and the fundamental etiologic factors of recurrent endodontic diseases, (b) tooth discolorations are caused by antibiotics and filling materials, (c) cervical root fractures are caused by endodontic medicaments, (d) pulp tissue is not vascularized nor innervated, and (e) the dentin matrix is not developed with adequate root thickness and length. Generally, current clinical protocols and recent studies have shown a limited success of the pulp-dentin tissue regeneration. Throughout the various approaches, the construction of biomimetic microenvironments of pulp-dentin tissue is a key concept of the tissue engineering based regenerative endodontics. The biomimetic microenvironments are composed of a synthetic nano-scaled polymeric fiber structure that mimics native pulp ECM and functions as a scaffold of the pulp-dentin tissue complex. They will provide a framework of the pulp ECM, can deliver selective bioactive molecules, and may recruit pluripotent stem cells from the vicinity of the pulp apex. The polymeric nanofibers are produced by methods of self-assembly, electrospinning, and phase separation. In order to be applied to biomedical use, the polymeric nanofibers require biocompatibility, stability, and biodegradability. Therefore, this review focuses on the development and application of the

  11. PROTEIN METABOLISM IN REGENERATING WOUND TISSUE: FUNCTION OF THE SULFUR AMINO ACIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROTEINS, *TISSUES(BIOLOGY), METABOLISM, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), REGENERATION(ENGINEERING), WOUNDS AND INJURIES, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), TRACER STUDIES, METHIONINE, COLLAGEN, TYROSINE, BIOSYNTHESIS, AMINO ACIDS .

  12. Effects of Fibroin Microcarriers on Inflammation and Regeneration of Deep Skin Wounds in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipova, A Y; Nosenko, M A; Malyuchenko, N V; Zvartsev, R V; Moisenovich, A M; Zhdanova, A S; Vasil'eva, T V; Gorshkova, E A; Agapov, I I; Drutskaya, M S; Nedospasov, S A; Moisenovich, M M

    2016-11-01

    The process of tissue regeneration following damage takes place with direct participation of the immune system. The use of biomaterials as scaffolds to facilitate healing of skin wounds is a new and interesting area of regenerative medicine and biomedical research. In many ways, the regenerative potential of biological material is related to its ability to modulate the inflammatory response. At the same time, all foreign materials, once implanted into a living tissue, to varying degree cause an immune reaction. The modern approach to the development of bioengineered structures for applications in regenerative medicine should be directed toward using the properties of the inflammatory response that improve healing, but do not lead to negative chronic manifestations. In this work, we studied the effect of microcarriers comprised of either fibroin or fibroin supplemented with gelatin on the dynamics of the healing, as well as inflammation, during regeneration of deep skin wounds in mice. We found that subcutaneous administration of microcarriers to the wound area resulted in uniform contraction of the wounds in mice in our experimental model, and microcarrier particles induced the infiltration of immune cells. This was associated with increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines TNF, IL-6, IL-1β, and chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL2, which contributed to full functional recovery of the injured area and the absence of fibrosis as compared to the control group.

  13. Functional biopolymer-based matrices for modulation of chronic wound enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesko, Antonio; Soares da Costa, Diana; Reis, Rui L; Pashkuleva, Iva; Tzanov, Tzanko

    2013-02-01

    Collagen, collagen/hyaluronic acid (HA) and collagen/HA/chitosan (CS) sponges loaded with epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), catechin (CAT) and gallic acid (GA) were developed and evaluated as active chronic wound dressings. Their physico-mechanical properties, biostability, biocompatibility and ability to inhibit in vitro myeloperoxidase (MPO) and collagenase--major enzymes related with the persistent inflammation in chronic wounds--were investigated as a function of the biopolymer composition and the polyphenolic compound used. The results demonstrated that the molecular weight of HA influences significantly the bulk properties of the obtained materials: higher elastic modulus, swelling ability and biostability against collagenase were measured when HA with higher molecular weights (830 and 2000 kDa) were added to the collagen matrices. The addition of CS and the polyphenols increased further the biostability of the sponges. Preliminary in vitro tests with fibroblasts revealed that the cells were able to adhere to all sponges. Cell viability was not affected significantly by the addition of the polyphenols; however, the presence of CS or high molecular weight HA in the sponge composition was associated with lower cellular viability. Finally, all specimens containing polyphenols efficiently inhibited the MPO activity. The highest inhibition capacity was observed for EGCG (IC₅₀=15±1μM) and it was coupled to the highest extent of binding to the biopolymers (>80%) and optimal release profile from the sponges that allowed for prolonged (up to 3-5 days) effects. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Microbiome Composition and Function Drives Wound-Healing Impairment in the Female Genital Tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S Zevin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism(s by which bacterial communities impact susceptibility to infectious diseases, such as HIV, and maintain female genital tract (FGT health are poorly understood. Evaluation of FGT bacteria has predominantly been limited to studies of species abundance, but not bacterial function. We therefore sought to examine the relationship of bacterial community composition and function with mucosal epithelial barrier health in the context of bacterial vaginosis (BV using metaproteomic, metagenomic, and in vitro approaches. We found highly diverse bacterial communities dominated by Gardnerella vaginalis associated with host epithelial barrier disruption and enhanced immune activation, and low diversity communities dominated by Lactobacillus species that associated with lower Nugent scores, reduced pH, and expression of host mucosal proteins important for maintaining epithelial integrity. Importantly, proteomic signatures of disrupted epithelial integrity associated with G. vaginalis-dominated communities in the absence of clinical BV diagnosis. Because traditional clinical assessments did not capture this, it likely represents a larger underrepresented phenomenon in populations with high prevalence of G. vaginalis. We finally demonstrated that soluble products derived from G. vaginalis inhibited wound healing, while those derived from L. iners did not, providing insight into functional mechanisms by which FGT bacterial communities affect epithelial barrier integrity.

  15. Therapeutic Effects of Acupuncture through Enhancement of Functional Angiogenesis and Granulogenesis in Rat Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang In Park

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture regulates inflammation process and growth factors by increasing blood circulation in affected areas. In this study, we examined whether acupuncture has an effect on wound healing in injured rat. Rats were assigned randomly into two groups: control group and acupuncture group. Acupuncture treatment was carried out at 8 sites around the wounded area. We analyzed the wound area, inflammatory cytokines, proliferation of resident cells, and angiogenesis and induction of extracelluar matrix remodeling. At 7 days after-wounding the wound size in acupuncture-treat group was decreased more significantly compared to control group. In addition, the protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-1β (IL-1β were significantly decreased compared to the control at 2 and 7 days post-wounding. Also, we analyzed newly generated cells by performing immunostaining for PCNA and using several phenotype markers such as CD-31, α-SMA, and collagen type I. In acupuncture-treated group, PCNA-positive cell was increased and PCNA labeled CD-31-positive vessels, α-SMA- and collagen type I-positive fibroblastic cells, were increased compared to the control group at 7 days post-wounding. These results suggest that acupuncture may improve wound healing through decreasing pro-inflammatory response, increasing cell proliferation and angiogenesis, and inducing extracellular matrix remodeling.

  16. Regenerative Hydride Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Hydride heat pump features regenerative heating and single circulation loop. Counterflow heat exchangers accommodate different temperatures of FeTi and LaNi4.7Al0.3 subloops. Heating scheme increases efficiency.

  17. Applications of regenerative medicine in organ transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A worldwide shortage of organs for clinical implantation establishes the need to bring forward and test new technologies that will help in solving the problem. The concepts of regenerative medicine hold the potential for augmenting organ function or repairing damaged organ or allowing regeneration of deteriorated organs and tissue. Researchers are exploring possible regenerative medicine applications in organ transplantation so that coming together of the two fields can benefit each other. The present review discusses the strategies that are being implemented to regenerate or bio-engineer human organs for clinical purposes. It also highlights the limitations of the regenerative medicine that needs to be addressed to explore full potential of the field. A web-based research on MEDLINE was done using keywords "regenerative medicine," "tissue-engineering," "bio-engineered organs," "decellularized scaffold" and "three-dimensional printing." This review screened about 170 articles to get the desired knowledge update.

  18. Ozonated oils as functional dermatological matrices: effects on the wound healing process using SKH1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valacchi, G; Zanardi, I; Lim, Y; Belmonte, G; Miracco, C; Sticozzi, C; Bocci, V; Travagli, V

    2013-12-15

    Wound tissue repair is a complex and dynamic process of restoring cellular structures and tissue layers. Improvement of this process is crucial for several pathologies characterized by chronic delayed wound closure such as diabetes, and the investigation of new approaches aimed to ameliorate the wound healing process is under continuous evolution. Recently, the usage of vegetable matrices in the form of ozonated oils has been proposed and several researchers have shown a positive effect in the wound, based on their bactericidal, antiviral, and antifungal properties. The present study was undertaken to compare the effect that different ozonated oils (olive, sesame and linseed) with the same level of ozonation have on wound healing rate in SKH1 mice. Several histological parameters and the level of key proteins such as VEGF and PCNA have been analyzed. Only treatment with ozonated sesame oil shows a faster wound closure in the first 7 days. This effect paralleled with the increased VEGF and PCNA levels, NFκB nuclear translocation and 4-HNE formation. The present study shows that not only the ozonation grade is of importance for the improvement of wound healing process but also the typical composition of the oil. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dual-functional Polyurea Microcapsules for Chronic Wound Care Dressings: Sustained Drug Delivery and Non-leaching Infection Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei

    A new design of dual-functional polyurea microcapsules was proposed for chronic wound dressings to provide both non-leaching infection control and sustained topical drug delivery functionalities. Quaternary ammonium functionalized polyurea microcapsules (MCQs) were synthesized under mild conditions through an interfacial crosslinking reaction between branched polyethylenimine (PEI) and 2,4-toluene diisocyanate (TDI) in a dimethylformamide/cyclohexane emulsion. An in-situ modification method was developed to endow non-leaching surface antimicrobial properties to MCQs via bonding antimicrobial surfactants to surface isocyanate residues on the polyurea shells. The resultant robust MCQs with both non-leaching antimicrobial properties and sustained drug releasing properties have potential applications in medical textiles, such as chronic wound dressings, for infection control and drug delivery.

  20. Current overview on challenges in regenerative endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya; Mittal, Sunandan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Regenerative endodontics provides hope of converting the non-vital tooth into vital once again. It focuses on substituting traumatized and pathological pulp with functional pulp tissue. Current regenerative procedures successfully produce root development but still fail to re-establish real pulp tissue and give unpredictable results. There are several drawbacks that need to be addressed to improve the quality and efficiency of the treatment. Aim: The aim of this review article is to discuss major priorities that ought to be dealt before applications of regenerative endodontics flourish the clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A web-based research on MEDLINE was done using filter terms Review, published in the last 10 years and Dental journals. Keywords used for research were “regenerative endodontics,” “dental stem cells,” “growth factor regeneration,” “scaffolds,” and “challenges in regeneration.” This review article screened about 150 articles and then the relevant information was compiled. Results: Inspite of the impressive growth in regenerative endodontic field, there are certain loopholes in the existing treatment protocols that might sometimes result in undesired and unpredictable outcomes. Conclusion: Considerable research and development efforts are required to improve and update existing regenerative endodontic strategies to make it an effective, safe, and biological mode to save teeth. PMID:25657518

  1. First Insights into Human Fingertip Regeneration by Echo-Doppler Imaging and Wound Microenvironment Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Paris; Muller, Camillo; Grognuz, Anthony; Applegate, Lee Ann; Raffoul, Wassim; di Summa, Pietro G; Durand, Sébastien

    2017-05-13

    Fingertip response to trauma represents a fascinating example of tissue regeneration. Regeneration derives from proliferative mesenchymal cells (blastema) that subsequently differentiate into soft and skeletal tissues. Clinically, conservative treatment of the amputated fingertip under occlusive dressing can shift the response to tissue loss from a wound repair process towards regeneration. When analyzing by Immunoassay the wound exudate from occlusive dressings, the concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) were higher in fingertip exudates than in burn wounds (used as controls for wound repair versus regeneration). Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) were highly expressed in both samples in comparable levels. In our study, pro-inflammatory cytokines were relatively higher expressed in regenerative fingertips than in the burn wound exudates while chemokines were present in lower levels. Functional, vascular and mechanical properties of the regenerated fingertips were analyzed three months after trauma and the data were compared to the corresponding fingertip on the collateral uninjured side. While sensory recovery and morphology (pulp thickness and texture) were similar to uninjured sides, mechanical parameters (elasticity, vascularization) were increased in the regenerated fingertips. Further studies should be done to clarify the importance of inflammatory cells, immunity and growth factors in determining the outcome of the regenerative process and its influence on the clinical outcome.

  2. A Set of Grand Challenges for Veterinary Regenerative Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Barrett, Jennifer G.

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine” refers to therapies that aim to restore normal form and function using the body’s own biological machinery, such as stem cells and biologics. The use of regenerative medicine to treat injury and disease offers new hope to cure previously frustrating diseases and conditions. However, commercialization of biologic therapies in veterinary medicine has outpaced the speed of clinical research, and we are at risk of harming the reputation and standing of regenerative medicin...

  3. Determinants of midterm functional outcomes, wound healing, and resources used in a hospital-based limb preservation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanan, Bala; Ahmed, Ayman; Wu, Bian; Causey, Marlin W; Gasper, Warren J; Vartanian, Shant M; Reyzelman, Alexander M; Hiramoto, Jade S; Conte, Michael S

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess midterm functional status, wound healing, and in-hospital resource use among a prospective cohort of patients treated in a tertiary hospital, multidisciplinary Center for Limb Preservation. Data were prospectively gathered on all consecutive admissions to the Center for Limb Preservation from July 2013 to October 2014 with follow-up data collection through January 2016. Limbs were staged using the Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) threatened limb classification scheme at the time of hospital admission. Patients with nonatherosclerotic vascular disorders, acute limb ischemia, and trauma were excluded. The cohort included 128 patients with 157 threatened limbs; 8 limbs with unstageable disease were excluded. Mean age (±standard deviation [SD]) was 66 (±13) years, and median follow-up duration (interquartile range) was 395 (80-635) days. Fifty percent (n = 64/128) of patients were readmitted at least once, with a readmission rate of 20% within 30 days of the index admission. Mean total number of admissions per patient (±SD) was 1.9 ± 1.2, with mean (±SD) cumulative length of stay (cLOS) of 17.1 (±17.9) days. During follow-up, 25% of limbs required a vascular reintervention, and 45% developed recurrent wounds. There was no difference in the rate of readmission, vascular reintervention, or wound recurrence by initial WIfI stage (P > .05). At the end of the study period, 23 (26%) were alive and nonambulatory; in 20%, functional status was missing. On both univariate and multivariate analysis, end-stage renal disease and prior functional status predicted ability to ambulate independently (P healing. Direct hospital (inpatient) cost per limb saved was significantly higher in stage 4 patients (P healing, or wound recurrence. Patients presenting with limb-threatening conditions require significant inpatient care, have a high frequency of repeated hospitalizations, and are at significant

  4. Therapeutic potential of nanoceria in regenerative medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Soumen [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Chigurupati, Srinivasulu [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Dowding, Janet [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Munusamy, Prabhakaran [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baer, Donald R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McGinnis, James F. [Univ. of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Mattson, Mark P. [National Inst. on Aging Intramural Research Program, Bethesda, MD (United States); Self, William [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Seal, Sudipta [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine aim to achieve functional restoration of tissue or cells damaged through disease, aging or trauma. Advancement of tissue engineering requires innovation in the field of 3D scaffolding, and functionalization with bioactive molecules. Nanotechnology offers advanced materials with patterned nano-morphologies for cell growth and different molecular substrates which can support cell survival and functions. Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) can control intracellular as well as extracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Recent findings suggest that nanoceria can enhance long-term cell survival, enable cell migration and proliferation, and promote stem cell differentiation. Moreover, the self-regenerative property of nanoceria permits a small dose to remain catalytically active for extended time. This review summarizes the possibilities and applications of nanoceria in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  5. Regenerative similariton laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault North

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Self-pulsating lasers based on cascaded reshaping and reamplification (2R are capable of initiating ultrashort pulses despite the accumulation of large amounts of nonlinearities in all-fiber resonators. The spectral properties of pulses in self-similar propagation are compatible with cascaded 2R regeneration by offset filtering, making parabolic pulses suitable for the design of a laser of this recently introduced class. A new type of regenerative laser giving birth to similaritons is numerically investigated and shows that this laser is the analog of regenerative sources based solely on self-phase modulation and offset filtering. The regenerative similariton laser does not suffer from instabilities due to excessive nonlinearities and enables ultrashort pulse generation in a simple cavity configuration.

  6. Microscale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The device described herein is designed primarily for use as a regenerative heat exchanger in a miniature Stirling engine or Stirling-cycle heat pump. A regenerative heat exchanger (sometimes called, simply, a "regenerator" in the Stirling-engine art) is basically a thermal capacitor: Its role in the Stirling cycle is to alternately accept heat from, then deliver heat to, an oscillating flow of a working fluid between compression and expansion volumes, without introducing an excessive pressure drop. These volumes are at different temperatures, and conduction of heat between these volumes is undesirable because it reduces the energy-conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle.

  7. Cryogenic regenerative heat exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, Robert A

    1997-01-01

    An in-depth survey of regenerative heat exchangers, this book chronicles the development and recent commercialization of regenerative devices for cryogenic applications. Chapters cover historical background, concepts, practical applications, design data, and numerical solutions, providing the latest information for engineers to develop advanced cryogenic machines. The discussions include insights into the operation of a regenerator; descriptions of the cyclic and fluid temperature distributions in a regenerator; data for various matrix geometries and materials, including coarse and fine bronze, stainless steel-woven wire mesh screens, and lead spheres; and unique operating features of cryocoolers that produce deviations from ideal regenerator theory.

  8. Regenerative Engineering and Bionic Limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Roshan; Laurencin, Cato T

    2015-03-01

    Amputations of the upper extremity are severely debilitating, current treatments support very basic limb movement, and patients undergo extensive physiotherapy and psychological counselling. There is no prosthesis that allows the amputees near-normal function. With increasing number of amputees due to injuries sustained in accidents, natural calamities and international conflicts, there is a growing requirement for novel strategies and new discoveries. Advances have been made in technological, material and in prosthesis integration where researchers are now exploring artificial prosthesis that integrate with the residual tissues and function based on signal impulses received from the residual nerves. Efforts are focused on challenging experts in different disciplines to integrate ideas and technologies to allow for the regeneration of injured tissues, recording on tissue signals and feed-back to facilitate responsive movements and gradations of muscle force. A fully functional replacement and regenerative or integrated prosthesis will rely on interface of biological process with robotic systems to allow individual control of movement such as at the elbow, forearm, digits and thumb in the upper extremity. Regenerative engineering focused on the regeneration of complex tissue and organ systems will be realized by the cross-fertilization of advances over the past thirty years in the fields of tissue engineering, nanotechnology, stem cell science, and developmental biology. The convergence of toolboxes crated within each discipline will allow interdisciplinary teams from engineering, science, and medicine to realize new strategies, mergers of disparate technologies, such as biophysics, smart bionics, and the healing power of the mind. Tackling the clinical challenges, interfacing the biological process with bionic technologies, engineering biological control of the electronic systems, and feed-back will be the important goals in regenerative engineering over the next

  9. Activated Tissue-Resident Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Regulate Natural Killer Cell Immune and Tissue-Regenerative Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Robert Michael; Hackel, Alexander; Hahnel, Katrin; Dumitru, Claudia Alexandra; Bruderek, Kirsten; Flohe, Stefanie B; Paschen, Annette; Lang, Stephan; Brandau, Sven

    2017-09-12

    The interaction of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) with natural killer (NK) cells is traditionally thought of as a static inhibitory model, whereby resting MSCs inhibit NK cell effector function. Here, we use a dynamic in vitro system of poly(I:C) stimulation to model the interaction of NK cells and tissue-resident MSCs in the context of infection or tissue injury. The experiments suggest a time-dependent system of regulation and feedback, where, at early time points, activated MSCs secrete type I interferon to enhance NK cell effector function, while at later time points TGF-β and IL-6 limit NK cell effector function and terminate inflammatory responses by induction of a regulatory senescent-like NK cell phenotype. Importantly, feedback of these regulatory NK cells to MSCs promotes survival, proliferation, and pro-angiogenic properties. Our data provide additional insight into the interaction of stromal cells and innate immune cells and suggest a model of time-dependent MSC polarization and licensing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Activated Tissue-Resident Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Regulate Natural Killer Cell Immune and Tissue-Regenerative Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Michael Petri

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs with natural killer (NK cells is traditionally thought of as a static inhibitory model, whereby resting MSCs inhibit NK cell effector function. Here, we use a dynamic in vitro system of poly(I:C stimulation to model the interaction of NK cells and tissue-resident MSCs in the context of infection or tissue injury. The experiments suggest a time-dependent system of regulation and feedback, where, at early time points, activated MSCs secrete type I interferon to enhance NK cell effector function, while at later time points TGF-β and IL-6 limit NK cell effector function and terminate inflammatory responses by induction of a regulatory senescent-like NK cell phenotype. Importantly, feedback of these regulatory NK cells to MSCs promotes survival, proliferation, and pro-angiogenic properties. Our data provide additional insight into the interaction of stromal cells and innate immune cells and suggest a model of time-dependent MSC polarization and licensing.

  11. Regulatory effects of inflammatory and biomechanical signals on regenerative periodontal healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschner, James; Nokhbehsaim, Marjan

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with loss of periodontal attachment, collagen, and alveolar bone. Regeneration of periodontal tissues can be supported by the local application of enamel matrix derivative (EMD). However, periodontal regeneration remains a major and often unpredictable challenge as the result of a number of unknown factors. The authors' in vitro studies revealed that EMD stimulated the wound fill rate, proliferation, and adhesion of periodontal ligament (PDL) cells. However, in the presence of an inflammatory environment or biomechanical loading, the beneficial effects of EMD decreased significantly. EMD also stimulated the synthesis of growth factors and collagen, as well as calcium deposition, in PDL cell cultures. These beneficial effects of EMD on PDL cells were also significantly diminished by inflammation and biomechanical forces, respectively. The findings suggest that critical PDL cell functions pertinent to periodontal regeneration are reduced in an inflammatory environment and under biomechanical loading. Therefore, effective anti-infectious and anti-inflammatory periodontal treatment before the application of EMD may be critical to ensure the full regenerative capacity of the PDL tissue. Furthermore, occlusal loading of EMD-treated teeth, at least immediately following surgery, should be minimized to obtain optimal regenerative healing results. A better understanding of the interactions of growth factors and biomechanical signals will result in more powerful regenerative therapeutic strategies.

  12. Attenuated Innate Immunity in Embryonic Stem Cells and Its Implications in Developmental Biology and Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan-Lin; Carmichael, Gordon G; Wang, Ruoxing; Hong, Xiaoxiao; Acharya, Dhiraj; Huang, Faqing; Bai, Fengwei

    2015-11-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) represent a promising cell source for regenerative medicine. Intensive research over the past 2 decades has led to the feasibility of using ESC-differentiated cells (ESC-DCs) in regenerative medicine. However, increasing evidence indicates that ESC-DCs generated by current differentiation methods may not have equivalent cellular functions to their in vivo counterparts. Recent studies have revealed that both human and mouse ESCs as well as some types of ESC-DCs lack or have attenuated innate immune responses to a wide range of infectious agents. These findings raise important concerns for their therapeutic applications since ESC-DCs, when implanted to a wound site of a patient, where they would likely be exposed to pathogens and inflammatory cytokines. Understanding whether an attenuated immune response is beneficial or harmful to the interaction between host and grafted cells becomes an important issue for ESC-based therapy. A substantial amount of recent evidence has demonstrated that the lack of innate antiviral responses is a common feature to ESCs and other types of pluripotent cells. This has led to the hypothesis that mammals may have adapted different antiviral mechanisms at different stages of organismal development. The underdeveloped innate immunity represents a unique and uncharacterized property of ESCs that may have important implications in developmental biology, immunology, and in regenerative medicine. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  13. In situ functionalized nanobiocomposites dressings of bamboo cellulose nanocrystals and silver nanoparticles for accelerated wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Rubbel; Soni, Sourabh; Kulurkar, Pankaj Markand; Kumari, Avnesh; S, Mahesh; Patial, Vikram; Padwad, Yogendra S; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2017-01-02

    An innovative approach was adopted where in situ synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) from leaf extract mediated reduction of AgNO3 were simultaneously impregnated into the matrix of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) isolated from Dendrocalamus hamiltonii and Bambusa bambos leaves, for formation of nanobiocomposites (NCs) in film and ointment forms. Here, use of plant CNCs was chosen as an alternate to bacterial cellulose for wound dressings. NCs possessing water absorption capacity and strong antibacterial activity showed synergistic effect on in vivo skin wound healing and documented faster and significant wound closure in treated mice. NCs exhibited lesser inflammation and early vasculogenesis at day 3 coupled with increased fibroblasts and collagen content at day 8 leading to faster neo-epithelization by day 14. Highly effective, biocompatible, and easy to apply NCs wound dressings (ointment and films) containing low amounts of Ag (0.05±0.01wt%) are potential candidates for effective skin repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bioprinting in Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Monti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prof. Turksen is a very well known scientist in the stem cell biology field and he is also internationally known for his fundamental studies on claudin-6. In addition to his research activity he is editor for the Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine series (Humana Press and editor-in-chief of Stem Cell Reviews and Reports.....

  15. A review on endogenous regenerative technology in periodontal regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fa-Ming; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Min; An, Ying; Chen, Fang; Wu, Zhi-Fen

    2010-11-01

    Periodontitis is a globally prevalent inflammatory disease that causes the destruction of the tooth-supporting apparatus and potentially leads to tooth loss. Currently, the methods to reconstitute lost periodontal structures (i.e. alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, and root cementum) have relied on conventional mechanical, anti-infective modalities followed by a range of regenerative procedures such as guided tissue regeneration, the use of bone replacement grafts and exogenous growth factors (GFs), and recently developed tissue engineering technologies. However, all current or emerging paradigms have either been shown to have limited and variable outcomes or have yet to be developed for clinical use. To accelerate clinical translation, there is an ongoing need to develop therapeutics based on endogenous regenerative technology (ERT), which can stimulate latent self-repair mechanisms in patients and harness the host's innate capacity for regeneration. ERT in periodontics applies the patient's own regenerative 'tools', i.e. patient-derived GFs and fibrin scaffolds, sometimes in association with commercialized products (e.g. Emdogain and Bio-Oss), to create a material niche in an injured site where the progenitor/stem cells from neighboring tissues can be recruited for in situ periodontal regeneration. The choice of materials and the design of implantable devices influence therapeutic potential and the number and invasiveness of the associated clinical procedures. The interplay and optimization of each niche component involved in ERT are particularly important to comprehend how to make the desired cell response safe and effective for therapeutics. In this review, the emerging opportunities and challenges of ERT that avoid the ex vivo culture of autologous cells are addressed in the context of new approaches for engineering or regeneration of functional periodontal tissues by exploiting the use of platelet-rich products and its associated formulations as key

  16. Transnet regenerative braking concept definition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Giesler, Achmed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Transnet has shown an interest in the concept of regenerative braking on their freight trains. Regenerative braking is the capturing, storing and re-using energy currently being wasted during regenerative braking. Currently all the energy is dumped...

  17. Evaluation of carbon nanotubes functionalized with sodium hyaluronate in the inflammatory processes for oral regenerative medicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Júnior, Paulo Antônio; Sá, Marcos Augusto; Reis, Alesandra Corte; Queiroz-Junior, Celso Martins; Caliari, Marcelo Vidigal; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Ladeira, Luiz Orlando; Pinho, Vanessa; Ferreira, Anderson José

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the effects of hyaluronic acid (HY), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), and MWCNT functionalized with HY (HY-MWCNT) on the resolution of neutrophilic inflammation in the pleural cavity of LPS-challenged mice and to assess the influence of these materials in the inflammatory process of bone repair of tooth sockets of rats. C57Bl/6 mice were intra-pleurally injected with HY, MWCNT, HY-MWCNT, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), or LPS. The animals were euthanized after 8 and 24 h, and cells were harvested for total and differential cell counting. The tooth sockets of Wistar rats were filled with HY, MWCNT, HY-MWCNT, or blood clot (control). After 1, 3, and 7 days, histological and morphometric analyses evaluated the number of cell nuclei and blood vessels, and bone trabeculae formation in the sockets. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity quantified neutrophil accumulation in the sockets. HY, MWCNT, and HY-MWCNT increased neutrophilic recruitment at 8 h and reduced the inflammatory process at 24 h in the pleural cavity. Histological and morphometric analyses and MPO activity showed no significant differences in the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the tooth sockets. HY increased the number of blood vessels, and HY and HY-MWCNT increased bone trabeculae formation at 7 days of tooth extraction. HY, MWCNT, and HY-MWCNT resolved the neutrophilic inflammation in the pleural cavity of the mice. However, these materials did not modulate the inflammatory process in the early stages of bone repair of the tooth sockets, thereby excluding this action as a possible mechanism by which these biomaterials accelerate bone repair. HY-MWCNT is capable of accelerating bone repair/regeneration without affecting the inflammatory phase during the bone healing process.

  18. Diabetes and Wound Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzoagu A. Okonkwo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus Type II (DM2 is a growing international health concern with no end in sight. Complications of DM2 involve a myriad of comorbidities including the serious complications of poor wound healing, chronic ulceration, and resultant limb amputation. In skin wound healing, which has definite, orderly phases, diabetes leads to improper function at all stages. While the etiology of chronic, non-healing diabetic wounds is multi-faceted, the progression to a non-healing phenotype is closely linked to poor vascular networks. This review focuses on diabetic wound healing, paying special attention to the aberrations that have been described in the proliferative, remodeling, and maturation phases of wound angiogenesis. Additionally, this review considers therapeutics that may offer promise to better wound healing outcomes.

  19. Thermal injury induces impaired function in polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes and reduced control of burn wound infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, H.; Moser, C.; Jensen, P. O.

    2009-01-01

    with infected burn wound. Furthermore, the oxidative burst and the phagocytic capacity of the PMNs were reduced in the group of mice with burn wound. Using this novel mouse model of thermal injury a decline of peripheral leucocytes was observed, whereas the increased local inflammatory response at the site......Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6% third-degree burn...... injury was induced in mice with a hot-air blower. The third-degree burn was confirmed histologically. The mice were allocated into five groups: control, shave, burn, infection and burn infection group. At 48 h, a decline in the concentration of peripheral blood leucocytes was observed in the group...

  20. Regenerative electronic biosensors using supramolecular approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duan, X.; Rajan, N.; Routenberg, D.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Reed, M.

    2013-01-01

    A supramolecular interface for Si nanowire FETs has been developed with the aim of creating regenerative electronic biosensors. The key to the approach is Si-NWs functionalized with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), to which receptor moieties can be attached with an orthogonal supramolecular linker. Here we

  1. Regenerative photonic therapy: Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salansky, Natasha; Salansky, Norman

    2012-09-01

    After four decades of research of photobiomodulation phenomena in mammals in vitro and in vivo, a solid foundation is created for the use of photobiomodulation in regenerative medicine. Significant accomplishments are achieved in animal models that demonstrate opportunities for photo-regeneration of injured or pathological tissues: skin, muscles and nerves. However, the use of photobiomodulation in clinical studies leads to controversial results while negative or marginal clinical efficacy is reported along with positive findings. A thor ough analysis of requirements to the optical parameters (dosimetry) for high efficacy in photobimodulation led us to the conclusion that there are several misconceptions in the clinical applications of low level laser therapy (LLLT). We present a novel appr oach of regenerative photonic therapy (RPT) for tissue healing and regeneration that overcomes major drawbacks of LLLT. Encouraging clinical results on RPT efficacy are presented. Requirements for RPT approach and vision for its future development for tissue regeneration is discussed.

  2. Wound care centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... wound care center; Diabetic ulcer - wound care center; Surgical wound - wound center; Ischemic ulcer - wound center ... types of non-healing wounds include: Pressure sores Surgical wounds Radiation sores Foot ulcers due to diabetes , poor ...

  3. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  4. Nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics in plastic surgery: The next frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Aaron; Chawla, Reema; Natasha, G; Mahdibeiraghdar, Sara; Jeyaraj, Rebecca; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Hamblin, Michael R.; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The rapid ascent of nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics as applied to medicine and surgery has seen an exponential rise in the scale of research generated in this field. This is evidenced not only by the sheer volume of papers dedicated to nanotechnology but also in a large number of new journals dedicated to nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics specifically to medicine and surgery. Aspects of nanotechnology that have already brought benefits to these areas include advanced drug delivery platforms, molecular imaging and materials engineering for surgical implants. Particular areas of interest include nerve regeneration, burns and wound care, artificial skin with nanoelectronic sensors and head and neck surgery. This study presents a review of nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics, with focus on its applications and implications in plastic surgery. PMID:26422652

  5. Development of hydrogels for regenerative engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaofei; Avci-Adali, Meltem; Alarçin, Emine; Cheng, Hao; Kashaf, Sara Saheb; Li, Yuxiao; Chawla, Aditya; Jang, Hae Lin; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2017-05-01

    The aim of regenerative engineering is to restore complex tissues and biological systems through convergence in the fields of advanced biomaterials, stem cell science, and developmental biology. Hydrogels are one of the most attractive biomaterials for regenerative engineering, since they can be engineered into tissue mimetic 3D scaffolds to support cell growth due to their similarity to native extracellular matrix. Advanced nano- and micro-technologies have dramatically increased the ability to control properties and functionalities of hydrogel materials by facilitating biomimetic fabrication of more sophisticated compositions and architectures, thus extending our understanding of cell-matrix interactions at the nanoscale. With this perspective, this review discusses the most commonly used hydrogel materials and their fabrication strategies for regenerative engineering. We highlight the physical, chemical, and functional modulation of hydrogels to design and engineer biomimetic tissues based on recent achievements in nano- and micro-technologies. In addition, current hydrogel-based regenerative engineering strategies for treating multiple tissues, such as musculoskeletal, nervous and cardiac tissue, are also covered in this review. The interaction of multiple disciplines including materials science, cell biology, and chemistry, will further play an important role in the design of functional hydrogels for the regeneration of complex tissues. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Assessment of the intraoperative wound degree as well as postoperative immune function and ventilation function of plasma radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of adenoid hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the intraoperative wound degree as well as postoperative immune function and ventilation function of plasma radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of adenoid hypertrophy. Methods: A total of 118 children with adenoid hypertrophy who underwent surgical treatment in our hospital between May 2013 and April 2016 were selected and divided into the control group (n=59 who accepted conventional endoscopic cutting aspirator and the observation group (n=59 who accepted the plasma radiofrequency ablation according to the single-blind randomized controlled method. Before and after operation, the levels of peripheral blood trauma-related indexes, humoral immunity and complement indexes as well as nasal ventilation function indexes were determined. Results: Before operation, the differences in trauma-related indexes, humoral immunity and complement indexes as well as nasal ventilation function indexes were not statistically significant between two groups of children. Immediately after operation, the peripheral blood SP, PGE2 and CRP contents of observation group were lower than those of control group; 24 h after operation, peripheral blood IgG, IgM, IgA, C3 and C4 contents of observation group were lower than those of control group; 1 week after operation, TIR and TER levels of observation group were lower than those of control group while NPV and MCSA levels were higher than those of control group. Conclusion: Plasma radiofrequency ablation for treatment of adenoid hypertrophy causes smaller intraoperative wound and has more advantages in optimizing the body's immune function and ventilation function.

  7. Wound Healing Activity of a New Formulation from Platelet Lysate

    OpenAIRE

    Akram Jamshidzadeh; Omid Koohi Hosseinabadi; Reza Heidari; Soliman Mohammadi-Samani; Sara Rajabzadeh; Seyed Mojtaba Seyed Raoufi; Alireza Ahmadi Vadeghani

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an attractive preparation in regenerative medicine due to its potential role in the healing process in different experimental models. This study was designed to investigate the wound healing activity of a new formulation of PRP. Different gel-based formulations of PRP were prepared. Open excision wounds were made on the back of male Sprague-Dawley rats, and PRP gel was administered topically once daily until the wounds healed completely (12 days). The results rev...

  8. Mechanical cues in orofacial tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Katrien M; Lundvig, Ditte M S; Middelkoop, Esther; Wagener, Frank A D T G; Von den Hoff, Johannes W

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate patients suffer from functional, aesthetical, and psychosocial problems due to suboptimal regeneration of skin, mucosa, and skeletal muscle after restorative cleft surgery. The field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TE/RM) aims to restore the normal physiology of tissues and organs in conditions such as birth defects or after injury. A crucial factor in cell differentiation, tissue formation, and tissue function is mechanical strain. Regardless of this, mechanical cues are not yet widely used in TE/RM. The effects of mechanical stimulation on cells are not straight-forward in vitro as cellular responses may differ with cell type and loading regime, complicating the translation to a therapeutic protocol. We here give an overview of the different types of mechanical strain that act on cells and tissues and discuss the effects on muscle, and skin and mucosa. We conclude that presently, sufficient knowledge is lacking to reproducibly implement external mechanical loading in TE/RM approaches. Mechanical cues can be applied in TE/RM by fine-tuning the stiffness and architecture of the constructs to guide the differentiation of the seeded cells or the invading surrounding cells. This may already improve the treatment of orofacial clefts and other disorders affecting soft tissues. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  9. Puncture Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... particles of which can get trapped in the wound. Treatment A puncture wound must be cleaned properly and ... play a crucial role in preventing them. Puncture Wounds: What You Should Do Seek treatment right away. Get a tetanus shot if needed ( ...

  10. Center for Neuroscience & Regenerative Medicine

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (CNRM) was established as a collaborative intramural federal program involving the U.S. Department of Defense...

  11. Chemokine Involvement in Fetal and Adult Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Swathi; Watson, Carey L.; Ranjan, Rajeev; King, Alice; Bollyky, Paul L.; Keswani, Sundeep G.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Fetal wounds heal with a regenerative phenotype that is indistinguishable from surrounding skin with restored skin integrity. Compared to this benchmark, all postnatal wound healing is impaired and characterized by scar formation. The biologic basis of the fetal regenerative phenotype can serve as a roadmap to recapitulating regenerative repair in adult wounds. Reduced leukocyte infiltration, likely mediated, in part, through changes in the chemokine milieu, is a fundamental feature of fetal wound healing. Recent Advances: The contributions of chemokines to wound healing are a topic of active investigation. Recent discoveries have opened the possibility of targeting chemokines therapeutically to treat disease processes and improve healing capability, including the possibility of achieving a scarless phenotype in postnatal wounds. Critical Issues: Successful wound healing is a complex process, in which there is a significant interplay between multiple cell types, signaling molecules, growth factors, and extracellular matrix. Chemokines play a crucial role in this interplay and have been shown to have different effects in various stages of the healing process. Understanding how these chemokines are locally produced and regulated during wound healing and how the chemokine milieu differs in fetal versus postnatal wounds may help us identify ways in which we can target chemokine pathways. Future Directions: Further studies on the role of chemokines and their role in the healing process will greatly advance the potential for using these molecules as therapeutic targets. PMID:26543680

  12. Regenerative adsorption distillation system

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Kim Choon

    2013-12-26

    There is provided a regenerative adsorption distillation system comprising a train of distillation effects in fluid communication with each other. The train of distillation effects comprises at least one intermediate effect between the first and last distillation effects of the train, each effect comprising a vessel and a condensing tube for flow of a fluid therein. The system further comprises a pair of adsorption-desorption beds in vapour communication with the last effect and at least one intermediate effect, wherein the beds contain an adsorbent that adsorbs vapour from the last effect and transmits desorbed vapour into at least one of the intermediate effect.

  13. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  14. Events of wound healing/regeneration in the canine supraalveolar periodontal defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Douglas P; Coleman, Brandon G; Batrice, Nathan; Lee, Jaebum; Koli, Komal; Pennington, Cathy; Susin, Cristiano; Wikesjö, Ulf M E

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this research was to elucidate early events in periodontal wound healing/regeneration using histological and immunohistochemical techniques. Routine critical-size, supraalveolar, periodontal defects including a space-providing titanium mesh device were created in 12 dogs. Six animals received additional autologous blood into the defect prior to wound closure. One animal from each group was killed for analysis at 2, 5, 9, 14 days, and at 4 and 8 weeks. Both groups behaved similarly. Periodontal wound healing/regeneration progressed through three temporal phases. Early phase (2-5 days): heterogeneous clot consolidation and cell activation in the periodontal ligament (PDL) and trabecular bone was associated with PDL regeneration and formation of a pre-osteoblast population. Intermediate phase (9-14 days): cell proliferation (shown by PCNA immunostaining)/migration led to osteoid/bone, PDL and cementum formation. Late phase (4-8 weeks): primarily characterized by tissue remodelling/maturation. Fibrous connective tissue from the gingival mucosa entered the wound early, competing with regeneration. By day 14, the wound space was largely filled with regenerative and reparative tissues. Activation of cellular regenerative events in periodontal wound healing/regeneration is rapid; the general framework for tissue formation is broadly outlined within 14 days. Most bone formation apparently originates from endosteally derived pre-osteoblasts; the PDL possibly acting as a supplementary source, with a primary function likely being regulatory/homeostatic. Blood accumulation at the surgical site warrants exploration; supplementation may be beneficial. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Enterocyte loss of polarity and gut wound healing rely upon the F-actin–severing function of villin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubelmann, Florent; Chamaillard, Mathias; El-Marjou, Fatima; Simon, Anthony; Netter, Jeanne; Vignjevic, Danijela; Nichols, Buford L.; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Grandjean, Teddy; Louvard, Daniel; Revenu, Céline; Robine, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Efficient wound healing is required to maintain the integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier because of its constant exposure to a large variety of environmental stresses. This process implies a partial cell depolarization and the acquisition of a motile phenotype that involves rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Here we address how polarized enterocytes harboring actin-rich apical microvilli undergo extensive cell remodeling to drive injury repair. Using live imaging technologies, we demonstrate that enterocytes in vitro and in vivo rapidly depolarize their microvilli at the wound edge. Through its F-actin–severing activity, the microvillar actin-binding protein villin drives both apical microvilli disassembly in vitro and in vivo and promotes lamellipodial extension. Photoactivation experiments indicate that microvillar actin is mobilized at the lamellipodium, allowing optimal migration. Finally, efficient repair of colonic mechanical injuries requires villin severing of F-actin, emphasizing the importance of villin function in intestinal homeostasis. Thus, villin severs F-actin to ensure microvillus depolarization and enterocyte remodeling upon injury. This work highlights the importance of specialized apical pole disassembly for the repolarization of epithelial cells initiating migration. PMID:23520048

  16. Enterocyte loss of polarity and gut wound healing rely upon the F-actin-severing function of villin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubelmann, Florent; Chamaillard, Mathias; El-Marjou, Fatima; Simon, Anthony; Netter, Jeanne; Vignjevic, Danijela; Nichols, Buford L; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Grandjean, Teddy; Louvard, Daniel; Revenu, Céline; Robine, Sylvie

    2013-04-09

    Efficient wound healing is required to maintain the integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier because of its constant exposure to a large variety of environmental stresses. This process implies a partial cell depolarization and the acquisition of a motile phenotype that involves rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Here we address how polarized enterocytes harboring actin-rich apical microvilli undergo extensive cell remodeling to drive injury repair. Using live imaging technologies, we demonstrate that enterocytes in vitro and in vivo rapidly depolarize their microvilli at the wound edge. Through its F-actin-severing activity, the microvillar actin-binding protein villin drives both apical microvilli disassembly in vitro and in vivo and promotes lamellipodial extension. Photoactivation experiments indicate that microvillar actin is mobilized at the lamellipodium, allowing optimal migration. Finally, efficient repair of colonic mechanical injuries requires villin severing of F-actin, emphasizing the importance of villin function in intestinal homeostasis. Thus, villin severs F-actin to ensure microvillus depolarization and enterocyte remodeling upon injury. This work highlights the importance of specialized apical pole disassembly for the repolarization of epithelial cells initiating migration.

  17. Regenerative Medicine Build-Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfenning, Michael A.; Gores, Gregory J.; Harper, C. Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Regenerative technologies strive to boost innate repair processes and restitute normative impact. Deployment of regenerative principles into practice is poised to usher in a new era in health care, driving radical innovation in patient management to address the needs of an aging population challenged by escalating chronic diseases. There is urgency to design, execute, and validate viable paradigms for translating and implementing the science of regenerative medicine into tangible health benefits that provide value to stakeholders. A regenerative medicine model of care would entail scalable production and standardized application of clinical grade biotherapies supported by comprehensive supply chain capabilities that integrate sourcing and manufacturing with care delivery. Mayo Clinic has rolled out a blueprint for discovery, translation, and application of regenerative medicine therapies for accelerated adoption into the standard of care. To establish regenerative medical and surgical service lines, the Mayo Clinic model incorporates patient access, enabling platforms and delivery. Access is coordinated through a designated portal, the Regenerative Medicine Consult Service, serving to facilitate patient/provider education, procurement of biomaterials, referral to specialty services, and/or regenerative interventions, often in clinical trials. Platforms include the Regenerative Medicine Biotrust and Good Manufacturing Practice facilities for manufacture of clinical grade products for cell-based, acellular, and/or biomaterial applications. Care delivery leverages dedicated interventional suites for provision of regenerative services. Performance is tracked using a scorecard system to inform decision making. The Mayo Clinic roadmap exemplifies an integrated organization in the discovery, development, and delivery of regenerative medicine within a growing community of practice at the core of modern health care. Significance Regenerative medicine is at the

  18. Use of genes and cells in regenerative medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Simonson, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is a discipline that aims to achieve regeneration of cells, tissue or organs in order to restore or establish normal functions. There are several strategies that can be used to achieve this goal. Many of the strategies are based on use of genes or cells to regenerate organ functions. The present thesis aim to investigate different gene and cell based methods for the use in regenerative medicine. In paper I a novel peptide conjugate is described for the...

  19. Tissue Engineering in Regenerative Dental Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiral Jhaveri-Desai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is amongst the latest exciting technologies having impacted the field of dentistry. Initially considered as a futuristic approach, tissue engineering is now being successfully applied in regenerative surgery. This article reviews the important determinants of tissue engineering and how they contribute to the improvement of wound healing and surgical outcomes in the oral region. Furthermore, we shall address the clinical applications of engineering involving oral and maxillofacial surgical and periodontal procedures along with other concepts that are still in experimental phase of development. This knowledge will aid the surgical and engineering researchers to comprehend the collaboration between these fields leading to extounding dental applications and to ever-continuing man-made miracles in the field of human science.

  20. Epidermal Stem Cells in Orthopaedic Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Zhen, Gehua; Tsai, Shin-Yi; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, great advances have been made in epidermal stem cell studies at the cellular and molecular level. These studies reported various subpopulations and differentiations existing in the epidermal stem cell. Although controversies and unknown issues remain, epidermal stem cells possess an immune-privileged property in transplantation together with easy accessibility, which is favorable for future clinical application. In this review, we will summarize the biological characteristics of epidermal stem cells, and their potential in orthopedic regenerative medicine. Epidermal stem cells play a critical role via cell replacement, and demonstrate significant translational potential in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and diseases, including treatment for wound healing, peripheral nerve and spinal cord injury, and even muscle and bone remodeling. PMID:23727934

  1. Role of receptors to fibroblast growth factor (FGF) on mesenchymal precursor cells in the realization of regenerative effects of alkaloid songorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyuz'kov, G N; Chaikovskii, A V; Ligacheva, A A; Zhdanov, V V; Udut, E V; Danilets, M G; Miroshnichenko, L A; Simanina, E V; Suslov, N I; Losev, E A; Trofimova, E S; Povet'eva, T N; Nesterova, Yu V; Fomina, T I; Minakova, M Yu; Dygai, A M

    2014-05-01

    We studied the mechanisms of regenerative (wound healing) effects of songorine associated with functional activation of mesenchymal progenitor cells. The key role of FGF receptors on these progenitor cells in the stimulation of realization of their growth potential under the effect of the alkaloid was demonstrated. Under in vitro conditions, the antibodies to FGF receptor abolished the songorine-induced increase in the number of fibroblast colony-forming units in bone marrow cell culture. The intensity of differentiation of mesenchymal precursors remained unchanged.

  2. Anti-aging pharmacology in cutaneous wound healing: effects of metformin, resveratrol, and rapamycin by local application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pan; Sui, Bing-Dong; Liu, Nu; Lv, Ya-Jie; Zheng, Chen-Xi; Lu, Yong-Bo; Huang, Wen-Tao; Zhou, Cui-Hong; Chen, Ji; Pang, Dan-Lin; Fei, Dong-Dong; Xuan, Kun; Hu, Cheng-Hu; Jin, Yan

    2017-10-01

    Cutaneous wounds are among the most common soft tissue injuries and are particularly hard to heal in aging. Caloric restriction (CR) is well documented to extend longevity; pharmacologically, profound rejuvenative effects of CR mimetics have been uncovered, especially metformin (MET), resveratrol (RSV), and rapamycin (RAPA). However, locally applied impacts and functional differences of these agents on wound healing remain to be established. Here, we discovered that chronic topical administration of MET and RSV, but not RAPA, accelerated wound healing with improved epidermis, hair follicles, and collagen deposition in young rodents, and MET exerted more profound effects. Furthermore, locally applied MET and RSV improved vascularization of the wound beds, which were attributed to stimulation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway, the key mediator of wound healing. Notably, in aged skin, AMPK pathway was inhibited, correlated with impaired vasculature and reduced healing ability. As therapeutic approaches, local treatments of MET and RSV prevented age-related AMPK suppression and angiogenic inhibition in wound beds. Moreover, in aged rats, rejuvenative effects of topically applied MET and RSV on cell viability of wound beds were confirmed, of which MET showed more prominent anti-aging effects. We further verified that only MET promoted wound healing and cutaneous integrity in aged skin. These findings clarified differential effects of CR-based anti-aging pharmacology in wound healing, identified critical angiogenic and rejuvenative mechanisms through AMPK pathway in both young and aged skin, and unraveled chronic local application of MET as the optimal and promising regenerative agent in treating cutaneous wound defects. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Regenerative Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Age-Related Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Flavia; Contador, David; Conget, Paulette; Erranz, Benjamín; Sossa, Claudia L; Arango-Rodríguez, Martha L

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that a therapeutic effect results from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) transplant. No systematic information is currently available regarding whether donor age modifies MSC regenerative potential on cutaneous wound healing. Here, we evaluate whether donor age influences this potential. Two different doses of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) from young, adult, or old mouse donors or two doses of their acellular derivatives mesenchymal stromal cells (acd-MSCs) were intradermally injected around wounds in the midline of C57BL/6 mice. Every two days, wound healing was macroscopically assessed (wound closure) and microscopically assessed (reepithelialization, dermal-epidermal junction, skin appendage regeneration, granulation tissue, leukocyte infiltration, and density dermal collagen fibers) after 12 days from MSC transplant. Significant differences in the wound closure kinetic, quality, and healing of skin regenerated were observed in lesions which received BM-MSCs from different ages or their acd-MSCs compared to lesions which received vehicle. Nevertheless, our data shows that adult's BM-MSCs or their acd-MSCs were the most efficient for recovery of most parameters analyzed. Our data suggest that MSC efficacy was negatively affected by donor age, where the treatment with adult's BM-MSCs or their acd-MSCs in cutaneous wound promotes a better tissue repair/regeneration. This is due to their paracrine factors secretion.

  4. Regenerative Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Age-Related Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Flavia; Contador, David; Conget, Paulette; Erranz, Benjamín; Sossa, Claudia L.; Arango-Rodríguez, Martha L.

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that a therapeutic effect results from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) transplant. No systematic information is currently available regarding whether donor age modifies MSC regenerative potential on cutaneous wound healing. Here, we evaluate whether donor age influences this potential. Two different doses of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) from young, adult, or old mouse donors or two doses of their acellular derivatives mesenchymal stromal cells (acd-MSCs) were intradermally injected around wounds in the midline of C57BL/6 mice. Every two days, wound healing was macroscopically assessed (wound closure) and microscopically assessed (reepithelialization, dermal-epidermal junction, skin appendage regeneration, granulation tissue, leukocyte infiltration, and density dermal collagen fibers) after 12 days from MSC transplant. Significant differences in the wound closure kinetic, quality, and healing of skin regenerated were observed in lesions which received BM-MSCs from different ages or their acd-MSCs compared to lesions which received vehicle. Nevertheless, our data shows that adult's BM-MSCs or their acd-MSCs were the most efficient for recovery of most parameters analyzed. Our data suggest that MSC efficacy was negatively affected by donor age, where the treatment with adult's BM-MSCs or their acd-MSCs in cutaneous wound promotes a better tissue repair/regeneration. This is due to their paracrine factors secretion. PMID:27247575

  5. A review of the regenerative endodontic treatment procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bin-Na; Moon, Jong-Wook; Chang, Hoon-Sang; Hwang, In-Nam; Oh, Won-Mann; Hwang, Yun-Chan

    2015-08-01

    Traditionally, apexification has been used to treat immature permanent teeth that have lost pulp vitality. This technique promotes the formation of an apical barrier to close the open apex so that the filling materials can be confined to the root canal. Because tissue regeneration cannot be achieved with apexification, a new technique called regenerative endodontic treatment was presented recently to treat immature permanent teeth. Regenerative endodontic treatment is a treatment procedure designed to replace damaged pulp tissue with viable tissue which restores the normal function of the pulp-dentin structure. After regenerative endodontic treatment, continued root development and hard tissue deposition on the dentinal wall can occur under ideal circumstances. However, it is difficult to predict the result of regenerative endodontic treatment. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to summarize multiple factors effects on the result of regenerative endodontic treatment in order to achieve more predictable results. In this study, we investigated the features of regenerative endodontic treatment in comparison with those of other pulp treatment procedures and analyzed the factors that have an effect on regenerative endodontic treatment.

  6. A review of the regenerative endodontic treatment procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-Na Lee,

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, apexification has been used to treat immature permanent teeth that have lost pulp vitality. This technique promotes the formation of an apical barrier to close the open apex so that the filling materials can be confined to the root canal. Because tissue regeneration cannot be achieved with apexification, a new technique called regenerative endodontic treatment was presented recently to treat immature permanent teeth. Regenerative endodontic treatment is a treatment procedure designed to replace damaged pulp tissue with viable tissue which restores the normal function of the pulp-dentin structure. After regenerative endodontic treatment, continued root development and hard tissue deposition on the dentinal wall can occur under ideal circumstances. However, it is difficult to predict the result of regenerative endodontic treatment. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to summarize multiple factors effects on the result of regenerative endodontic treatment in order to achieve more predictable results. In this study, we investigated the features of regenerative endodontic treatment in comparison with those of other pulp treatment procedures and analyzed the factors that have an effect on regenerative endodontic treatment.

  7. Experimental study of fat grafting under negative pressure for wounds with exposed bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, H-K; Hsu, H-H; Chuang, W-Y; Chang, K-P; Chen, B; Guo, L

    2015-07-01

    The combination of fat grafting and negative pressure (VAC) therapy represents a synergistic interaction of all essential components for wound healing. The aim of this experimental study was to determine whether it could promote healing of wounds with exposed bone. Full-thickness wounds with denuded bone in Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with either polyurethane foam dressing, fat grafting alone, polyurethane foam dressing with VAC, or polyurethane foam dressing with VAC combined with a single, or two administrations of fat graft. Wound healing kinetics, tissue growth, cell proliferation (Ki-67) and angiogenesis (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 and α-smooth muscle actin) were investigated. Messenger RNA levels related to angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF)), profibrosis (platelet-derived growth factor A and transforming growth factor β), adipocyte expression (fatty acid-binding protein (FABP) 4 and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ), and extracellular matrix remodelling (collagen I) were measured in wound tissues. Wounds treated by VAC combined with fat grafting were characterized by cell proliferation, neoangiogenesis and maturation of functional blood vessels; they showed accelerated granulation tissue growth over the denuded bone compared with VAC- or foam dressing-treated wounds. Fat grafting alone over denuded bone resulted in complete necrosis. Expression of angiogenesis markers (VEGF and b-FGF) and adipocyte expression factors (FABP-4) was upregulated in wounds treated with VAC combined with fat grafting. Fat grafting with VAC therapy may represent a simple but effective clinical solution for a number of complex tissue defects, and warrants testing in clinical models. The combination of fat grafting and vacuum therapy represents a synergistic interaction of regenerative cells, hospitable wound matrix and stimulating micromechanical forces. It could accelerate complex

  8. Ex vivo regenerative effects of a spring water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Giovanni; Saler, Marco; Pellegatta, Tommaso; Tresoldi, Marco Mario; Bonfanti, Viola; Malovini, Alberto; Faga, Angela; Riva, Federica

    2017-12-01

    Previous experiments by our group have indicated the regenerative effects of a spring water (Comano), which was possibly associated with the native non-pathogenic bacterial flora. The present study aimed to confirm these regenerative properties in a human ex vivo experimental model in the context of physiological wound healing. Human 6-mm punch skin biopsies harvested during plastic surgery sessions were injured in their central portion to induce skin loss and were cultured in either conventional medium (controls) or medium powder reconstituted with filtered Comano spring water (treated samples). At 24, 48 and 72 h the specimens were observed following staining with hematoxylin and eosin, Picrosirius Red, orcein and anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Compared with the controls, the treated samples exhibited reduced overall cell infiltration, evidence of fibroblasts, stimulation of cell proliferation and collagen and elastic fiber regeneration. In the spring water, in addition to 12 resident non-pathogenic bacterial strains exhibiting favorable metabolic activities, more unknown non-pathogenic species are being identified by genomic analysis. In the present study, the efficacy of this 'germ-free', filtered spring water in wound regeneration was indicated. Thus, the Comano spring water microbiota should be acknowledged for its regenerative properties.

  9. Regenerative Therapy for Retinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narsis Daftarian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major advances in various disciplines of basic sciences including embryology, molecular and cell biology, genetics, and nanotechnology, as well as stem cell biology have opened new horizons for regenerative therapy. The unique characteristics of stem cells prompt a sound understanding for their use in modern regenerative therapies. This review article discusses stem cells, developmental stages of the eye field, eye field transcriptional factors, and endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. Recent studies and challenges in the application of stem cells for retinal pigment epithelial degeneration models will be summarized followed by obstacles facing regenerative therapy.

  10. The short musculoskeletal functional assessment (SMFA) score amongst surgical patients with reconstructive lower limb injuries in war wounded civilians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teicher, Carrie; Foote, Nancy L; Al Ani, Ali M K; Alras, Majd S; Alqassab, Sufyan I; Baron, Emmanuel; Ahmed, Khalid; Herard, Patrick; Fakhri, Rasheed M

    2014-12-01

    The MSF programme in Jordan provides specialized reconstructive surgical care to war-wounded civilians in the region. The short musculoskeletal functional assessment score (SMFA) provides a method for quantitatively assessing functional status following orthopaedic trauma. In June 2010 the Amman team established SMFA as the standard for measuring patients’ functional status. The objective of this retrospective study is to evaluate whether the SMFA scores can be useful for patients with chronic war injuries. All patients with lower limb injuries requiring reconstruction were enrolled in the study. Each patient's SMFA was assessed at admission, at discharge from Amman and during follow-up in home country. In the analysis we compared patients with infected versus non-infected injuries as well as with both high and low admissions dysfunctional index (ADI). Among infected patients, higher ADI correlated with more surgeries and longer hospital stay. Infected patients with ADI >50 required an average of 2.7 surgeries while those with ADI 50 required an average of 1.6 operations compared to 1.5 for those with ADI surgical reconstruction of lower limb injuries would be enormously useful.

  11. The application of an enamel matrix protein derivative (Emdogain) in regenerative periodontal therapy: a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sculean, A.; Schwarz, F.; Becker, J.; Brecx, M.

    2007-01-01

    Regenerative periodontal therapy aims at reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures such as new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Findings from basic research indicate that enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) has a key role in periodontal wound healing.

  12. Cooperative Regulation of Substrate Stiffness and Extracellular Matrix Proteins in Skin Wound Healing of Axolotls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Yu Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urodele amphibians (Ambystoma mexicanum, unique among vertebrates, can regenerate appendages and other body parts entirely and functionally through a scar-free healing process. The wound epithelium covering the amputated or damaged site forms early and is essential for initiating the subsequent regenerative steps. However, the molecular mechanism through which the wound reepithelializes during regeneration remains unclear. In this study, we developed an in vitro culture system that mimics an in vivo wound healing process; the biomechanical properties in the system were precisely defined and manipulated. Skin explants that were cultured on 2 to 50 kPa collagen-coated substrates rapidly reepithelialized within 10 to 15 h; however, in harder (1 GPa and other extracellular matrices (tenascin-, fibronectin-, and laminin-coated environments, the wound epithelium moved slowly. Furthermore, the reepithelialization rate of skin explants from metamorphic axolotls cultured on a polystyrene plate (1 GPa increased substantially. These findings afford new insights and can facilitate investigating wound epithelium formation during early regeneration using biochemical and mechanical techniques.

  13. Regenerative endodontics: A state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific advances in the creation of restorative biomaterials, in vitro cell culture technology, tissue grafting, tissue engineering, molecular biology and the human genome project provide the basis for the introduction of new technologies into dentistry. Non-vital infected teeth have long been treated with root canal therapy (for mature root apex and apexification (for immature root apex, or doomed to extraction. Although successful, current treatments fail to re-establish healthy pulp tissue in these teeth. But, what if the non-vital tooth could be made vital once again? That is the hope offered by regenerative endodontics, an emerging field focused on replacing traumatized and diseased pulp with functional pulp tissue. Restoration of vitality of non-vital tooth is based on tissue engineering and revascularization procedures. The purpose of this article is to review these biological procedures and the hurdles that must be overcome to develop regenerative endodontic procedures.

  14. Regenerative endodontics: a state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Rashmi; Bansal, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Scientific advances in the creation of restorative biomaterials, in vitro cell culture technology, tissue grafting, tissue engineering, molecular biology and the human genome project provide the basis for the introduction of new technologies into dentistry. Non-vital infected teeth have long been treated with root canal therapy (for mature root apex) and apexification (for immature root apex), or doomed to extraction. Although successful, current treatments fail to re-establish healthy pulp tissue in these teeth. But, what if the non-vital tooth could be made vital once again? That is the hope offered by regenerative endodontics, an emerging field focused on replacing traumatized and diseased pulp with functional pulp tissue. Restoration of vitality of non-vital tooth is based on tissue engineering and revascularization procedures. The purpose of this article is to review these biological procedures and the hurdles that must be overcome to develop regenerative endodontic procedures.

  15. Perivascular cells for regenerative medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Crisan (Mihaela); M. Corselli (Mirko); W.C. Chen (William); B. Péault (Bruno)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) are currently the best candidate therapeutic cells for regenerative medicine related to osteoarticular, muscular, vascular and inflammatory diseases, although these cells remain heterogeneous and necessitate a better biological characterization. We

  16. Biomimetic microenvironments for regenerative endodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushik, Sagar N.; Kim, Bogeun; Walma, Alexander M. Cruz; Choi, Sung Chul; Wu, Hui; Mao, Jeremy J.; Jun, Ho-Wook; Cheon, Kyounga

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics has been proposed to replace damaged and underdeveloped tooth structures with normal pulp-dentin tissue by providing a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking environment; stem cells, signaling molecules, and scaffolds. In addition, clinical success of the regenerative endodontic treatments can be evidenced by absence of signs and symptoms; no bony pathology, a disinfected pulp, and the maturation of root dentin in length and thickness. In spite of the various ap...

  17. Smart Dressings Based on Nanostructured Fibers Containing Natural Origin Antimicrobial, Anti-Inflammatory, and Regenerative Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Vanesa; Mendoza, Gracia; Arruebo, Manuel; Irusta, Silvia

    2015-08-11

    A fast and effective wound healing process would substantially decrease medical costs, wound care supplies, and hospitalization significantly improving the patients' quality of life. The search for effective therapeutic approaches seems to be imperative in order to avoid the aggravation of chronic wounds. In spite of all the efforts that have been made during the recent years towards the development of artificial wound dressings, none of the currently available options combine all the requirements necessary for quick and optimal cutaneous regeneration. Therefore, technological advances in the area of temporary and permanent smart dressings for wound care are required. The development of nanoscience and nanotechnology can improve the materials and designs used in topical wound care in order to efficiently release antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and regenerative compounds speeding up the endogenous healing process. Nanostructured dressings can overcome the limitations of the current coverings and, separately, natural origin components can also overcome the drawbacks of current antibiotics and antiseptics (mainly cytotoxicity, antibiotic resistance, and allergies). The combination of natural origin components with demonstrated antibiotic, regenerative, or anti-inflammatory properties together with nanostructured materials is a promising approach to fulfil all the requirements needed for the next generation of bioactive wound dressings. Microbially compromised wounds have been treated with different essential oils, honey, cationic peptides, aloe vera, plant extracts, and other natural origin occurring antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and regenerative components but the available evidence is limited and insufficient to be able to draw reliable conclusions and to extrapolate those findings to the clinical practice. The evidence and some promising preliminary results indicate that future comparative studies are justified but instead of talking about the beneficial or

  18. Smart Dressings Based on Nanostructured Fibers Containing Natural Origin Antimicrobial, Anti-Inflammatory, and Regenerative Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Andreu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A fast and effective wound healing process would substantially decrease medical costs, wound care supplies, and hospitalization significantly improving the patients’ quality of life. The search for effective therapeutic approaches seems to be imperative in order to avoid the aggravation of chronic wounds. In spite of all the efforts that have been made during the recent years towards the development of artificial wound dressings, none of the currently available options combine all the requirements necessary for quick and optimal cutaneous regeneration. Therefore, technological advances in the area of temporary and permanent smart dressings for wound care are required. The development of nanoscience and nanotechnology can improve the materials and designs used in topical wound care in order to efficiently release antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and regenerative compounds speeding up the endogenous healing process. Nanostructured dressings can overcome the limitations of the current coverings and, separately, natural origin components can also overcome the drawbacks of current antibiotics and antiseptics (mainly cytotoxicity, antibiotic resistance, and allergies. The combination of natural origin components with demonstrated antibiotic, regenerative, or anti-inflammatory properties together with nanostructured materials is a promising approach to fulfil all the requirements needed for the next generation of bioactive wound dressings. Microbially compromised wounds have been treated with different essential oils, honey, cationic peptides, aloe vera, plant extracts, and other natural origin occurring antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and regenerative components but the available evidence is limited and insufficient to be able to draw reliable conclusions and to extrapolate those findings to the clinical practice. The evidence and some promising preliminary results indicate that future comparative studies are justified but instead of talking about

  19. Regenerative healing, scar-free healing and scar formation across the species: current concepts and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ud-Din, Sara; Volk, Susan W; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2014-09-01

    All species have evolved mechanisms of repair to restore tissue function following injury. Skin scarring is an inevitable and permanent endpoint for many postnatal organisms except for non-amniote vertebrates such as amphibians, which are capable of tissue regeneration. Furthermore, mammalian foetuses through mid-gestation are capable of rapid wound repair in the absence of scar formation. Notably, excessive cutaneous scar formation, such as hypertrophic and keloid scars, is a species limited clinical entity as it occurs only in humans, although wounds on the distal limbs of horses are also prone to heal with fibroproliferative pathology known as equine exuberant granulation tissue. Currently, there are no reliable treatment options to eradicate or prevent scarring in humans and vertebrates. The limited number of vertebrate models for either hypertrophic or keloid scarring has been an impediment to mechanistic studies of these diseases and the development of therapies. In this viewpoint essay, we highlight the current concepts of regenerative, scar-free and scar-forming healing compared across a number of species and speculate on areas for future research. Furthermore, in-depth investigative research into the mechanisms of scarless repair may allow for the development of improved animal models and novel targets for scar prevention. As the ability to heal in both a scarless manner and propensity for healing with excessive scar formation is highly species dependent, understanding similarities and differences in healing across species as it relates to the regenerative process may hold the key to improve scarring and guide translational wound-healing studies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Bioprinting is changing regenerative medicine forever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Scott Forrest

    2014-12-01

    3D printing, or solid freeform fabrication, applied to regenerative medicine brings technologies from several industries together to help solve unique challenges in both basic science and tissue engineering. By more finely organizing cells and supporting structures precisely in 3D space, we will gain critical knowledge of cell-cell communications and cell-environment interactions. As we increase the scale, we will move toward complex tissue and organ structures where several cell phenotypes will functionally and structurally interact, thus recapitulating the form and function of native tissues and organs.

  1. The essential materials paradigms for regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David

    2011-04-01

    Medical technology is changing rapidly. Several disease states can now be treated very effectively by implantable devices that restore mechanical and physical functionality, such as replacement of hip joints or restoration of heart rhythms by pacemakers. These techniques, however, are rather limited, and no biological functionality can be restored through the use of inert materials and devices. This paper explores the role of new types of biomaterials within the emerging area of regenerative medicine, where they are able to play a powerful role in persuading the human body to regenerate itself.

  2. Genome-wide expression profile of the response to spinal cord injury in Xenopus laevis reveals extensive differences between regenerative and non-regenerative stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Xenopus laevis has regenerative and non-regenerative stages. As a tadpole, it is fully capable of functional recovery after a spinal cord injury, while its juvenile form (froglet) loses this capability during metamorphosis. We envision that comparative studies between regenerative and non-regenerative stages in Xenopus could aid in understanding why spinal cord regeneration fails in human beings. Results To identify the mechanisms that allow the tadpole to regenerate and inhibit regeneration in the froglet, we obtained a transcriptome-wide profile of the response to spinal cord injury in Xenopus regenerative and non-regenerative stages. We found extensive transcriptome changes in regenerative tadpoles at 1 day after injury, while this was only observed by 6 days after injury in non-regenerative froglets. In addition, when comparing both stages, we found that they deployed a very different repertoire of transcripts, with more than 80% of them regulated in only one stage, including previously unannotated transcripts. This was supported by gene ontology enrichment analysis and validated by RT-qPCR, which showed that transcripts involved in metabolism, response to stress, cell cycle, development, immune response and inflammation, neurogenesis, and axonal regeneration were regulated differentially between regenerative and non-regenerative stages. Conclusions We identified differences in the timing of the transcriptional response and in the inventory of regulated transcripts and biological processes activated in response to spinal cord injury when comparing regenerative and non-regenerative stages. These genes and biological processes provide an entry point to understand why regeneration fails in mammals. Furthermore, our results introduce Xenopus laevis as a genetic model organism to study spinal cord regeneration. PMID:24885550

  3. Regenerative Endodontics for Adult Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ling; Kim, Sahng G; Gong, Qimei; Zhong, Juan; Wang, Sainan; Zhou, Xuedong; Ye, Ling; Ling, Junqi; Mao, Jeremy J

    2017-09-01

    The goal of endodontics is to save teeth. Since inception, endodontic treatments are performed to obturate disinfected root canals with inert materials such as gutta-percha. Although teeth can be saved after successful endodontic treatments, they are devitalized and therefore susceptible to reinfections and fractures. The American Association of Endodontists (AAE) has made a tremendous effort to revitalize disinfected immature permanent teeth in children and adolescents with diagnoses including pulp necrosis or apical periodontitis. The American Dental Association (ADA) in 2011 issued several clinical codes for regenerative endodontic procedures or apical revascularization in necrotic immature permanent teeth in children and adolescents. These AAE and ADA initiatives have stimulated robust interest in devising a multitude of tissue engineering approaches for dental pulp and dentin regeneration. Can the concept of regenerative endodontics be extended to revitalize mature permanent teeth with diagnoses including irreversible pulpitis and/or pulp necrosis in adults? The present article was written not only to summarize emerging findings to revitalize mature permanent teeth in adult patients but also to identify challenges and strategies that focus on realizing the goal of regenerative endodontics in adults. We further present clinical cases and describe the biological basis of potential regenerative endodontic procedures in adults. This article explores the frequently asked question if regenerative endodontic therapies should be developed for dental pulp and/or dentin regeneration in adults, who consist of the great majority of endodontic patients. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Wound Healing Angiogenesis: Innovations and Challenges in Acute and Chronic Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Durham, Jennifer T.; Herman, Ira M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Formation of new blood vessels, by either angiogenesis or vasculogenesis, is critical for normal wound healing. Major processes in neovascularization include (i) growth-promoting or survival factors, (ii) proteolytic enzymes, (iii) activators of multiple differentiated and progenitor cell types, and (iv) permissible microenvironments. A central aim of wound healing research is to “convert” chronic, disease-impaired wounds into those that will heal. The problem Reduced ability to re-establish a blood supply to the injury site can ultimately lead to wound chronicity. Basic/Clinical Science Advances (1) Human fetal endothelial progenitor cells can stimulate wound revascularization and repair following injury, as demonstrated in a novel mouse model of diabetic ischemic healing. (2) Advances in bioengineering reveal exciting alternatives by which wound repair may be facilitated via the creation of vascularized microfluidic networks within organ constructs created ex vivo for wound implantation. (3) A “personalized” approach to regenerative medicine may be enabled by the identification of protein components present within individual wound beds, both chronic and acute. Clinical Care Relevance Despite the development of numerous therapies, impaired angiogenesis and wound chronicity remain significant healthcare problems. As such, innovations in enhancing wound revascularization would lead to significant advances in wound healing therapeutics and patient care. Conclusion Insights into endothelial progenitor cell biology together with developments in the field of tissue engineering and molecular diagnostics should not only further advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating wound repair but also offer innovative solutions to promote the healing of chronic and acute wounds in vivo. PMID:24527273

  5. Regenerative healing following foetal myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdrich, Benjamin J; Danzer, Enrico; Davey, Marcus G; Allukian, Myron; Englefield, Virginia; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C; Liechty, Kenneth W

    2010-12-01

    The adult response to myocardial infarction results in inflammation, scar formation, left ventricular dilatation, and loss of regional and global function. Regenerative scarless healing has been demonstrated in foetal dermis and tendon and is associated with diminished inflammation. We hypothesised that following foetal myocardial infarction, there would be minimal inflammation, regenerative healing, and preservation of function. Anteroapical myocardial infarction encompassing 20% of the left ventricle was created in adult or early gestation foetal sheep. Myocardial function was serially assessed using quantitative echocardiography. Infarct architecture was examined histologically for evidence of scar formation. Cellular inflammation, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis were assessed using immunohistochemistry. In the adult sheep 4 weeks following myocardial infarction, there was a significant decline in ejection fraction (EF) (41±7.4% to 26±7.4%, p<0.05), and the akinetic myocardial segment increased in size (6.9±0.8 cm to 7.9±1.1 cm, p<0.05). By contrast, there was no decline in the foetal EF (53±8.1% to 55±8.8%) and no akinetic foetal myocardial segment 4 weeks post-infarction. The foetal infarcts lacked an inflammatory cell infiltrate and healed with minimal fibrosis, compared with the adults. Foetal infarcts also demonstrated 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)+ proliferating cells, including cardiomyocytes, within the infarct. These data demonstrate that the foetal response to myocardial infarction is dramatically different from the adult and is characterised by minimal inflammation, lack of fibrosis, myocardial proliferation and restoration of cardiac function. Diminished inflammation is associated with foetal regenerative cardiac healing following injury. Understanding the mechanisms involved in foetal myocardial regeneration may lead to applications to alter the adult response following myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2010 European Association for

  6. Regenerative healing following fetal myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdrich, Benjamin J.; Danzer, Enrico; Davey, Marcus G.; Allukian, Myron; Englefield, Virginia; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.; Liechty, Kenneth W.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The adult response to myocardial infarction results in inflammation, scar formation, left ventricular dilatation, and loss of regional and global function. Regenerative scarless healing has been demonstrated in fetal dermis and tendon and is associated with diminished inflammation. We hypothesized that following fetal myocardial infarction there would be minimal inflammation, regenerative healing, and preservation of function. Methods Anteroapical myocardial infarction encompassing 20% of the left ventricle were created in adult or early gestation fetal sheep. Myocardial function was serially assessed using quantitative echocardiography. Infarct architecture was examined histologically for evidence of scar formation. Cellular inflammation, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis were assessed using immunohistochemistry. Results In the adult sheep 4 weeks following myocardial infarction, there was a significant decline in ejection fraction (41±7.4% to 26±7.4%, p<0.05), and the akinetic myocardial segment increased in size (6.9±0.8 cm to 7.9±1.1 cm, p<0.05). In contrast, there was no decline in the fetal ejection fraction (53±8.1% to 55±8.8%) and no akinetic fetal myocardial segment 4 weeks post-infarction. The fetal infarcts lacked an inflammatory cell infiltrate and healed with minimal fibrosis, compared to the adults. Fetal infarcts also demonstrated BrdU+ proliferating cells, including cardiomyocytes, within the infarct. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the fetal response to myocardial infarction is dramatically different than the adult and is characterized by minimal inflammation, lack of fibrosis, myocardial proliferation, and restoration of cardiac function. Diminished inflammation is associated with fetal regenerative cardiac healing following injury. Understanding the mechanisms involved in fetal myocardial regeneration may lead to applications to alter the adult response following myocardial infarction. PMID:20452780

  7. How the brain heals emotional wounds: the functional neuroanatomy of forgiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano eRicciardi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In life, everyone goes through hurtful events caused by significant others: a deceiving friend, a betraying partner, or an unjustly blaming parent. In response to painful emotions, individuals may react with anger, hostility, and the desire for revenge. As an alternative, they may decide to forgive the wrongdoer and relinquish resentment. In the present study, we examined the brain correlates of forgiveness using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI. Healthy participants were induced to imagine social scenarios that described emotionally hurtful events followed by the indication to either forgive the imagined offenders, or harbor a grudge towards them. Subjects rated their imaginative skills, levels of anger, frustration and/or relief when imagining negative events as well as following forgiveness. Forgiveness was associated with positive emotional states as compared to unforgiveness. Granting forgiveness was associated with activations in a brain network involved in theory of mind, empathy and the regulation of affect through cognition, which comprised the precuneus, right inferior parietal regions and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Our results uncovered the neuronal basis of reappraisal-driven forgiveness, and extend extant data on emotional regulation to the resolution of anger and resentment following negative interpersonal events.

  8. Biomaterials for Bone Regenerative Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaohua; Tang, Xiaoyan; Gohil, Shalini V; Laurencin, Cato T

    2015-06-24

    Strategies for bone tissue regeneration have been continuously evolving for the last 25 years since the introduction of the "tissue engineering" concept. The convergence of the life, physical, and engineering sciences has brought in several advanced technologies available to tissue engineers and scientists. This resulted in the creation of a new multidisciplinary field termed as "regenerative engineering". In this article, the role of biomaterials in bone regenerative engineering is systematically reviewed to elucidate the new design criteria for the next generation of biomaterials for bone regenerative engineering. The exemplary design of biomaterials harnessing various materials characteristics towards successful bone defect repair and regeneration is highlighted. Particular attention is given to the attempts of incorporating advanced materials science, stem cell technologies, and developmental biology into biomaterials design to engineer and develop the next generation bone grafts. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Rethinking Regenerative Medicine: A Macrophage-Centered Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan N Brown

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine, a multi-disciplinary approach that seeks to restore form and function to damaged or diseased tissues and organs, has evolved significantly during the past decade. By adapting and integrating fundamental knowledge from cell biology, polymer science, and engineering, coupled with an increasing understanding of the mechanisms which underlie the pathogenesis of specific diseases, regenerative medicine has the potential for innovative and transformative therapies for heretofore unmet medical needs. However, the translation of novel technologies from the benchtop to animal models and clinical settings is non-trivial and requires an understanding of the mechanisms by which the host will respond to these novel therapeutic approaches. The role of the innate immune system, especially the role of macrophages, in the host response to regenerative medicine based strategies has recently received considerable attention. Macrophage phenotype and function have been suggested as critical and determinant factors in downstream functional outcomes. The constructive and regulatory, and in fact essential, role of macrophages in positive outcomes represents a significant departure from the classical paradigms of host-biomaterial interactions, which typically consider activation of the host immune system as undesirable. It appears desirable that emerging regenerative medicine approaches should not only accommodate, but promote, the involvement of the immune system to facilitate positive outcomes. Herein, we describe the current understanding of macrophage phenotype as it pertains to regenerative medicine and suggest that improvement of our understanding of context-dependent macrophage polarization will lead to concurrent improvement in outcomes.

  10. A Novel Unitized Regenerative Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, O. J.; Cisar, A. J.; Gonzalez-Martin, A.; Salinas, C. E.; Simpson, S. F.

    1996-01-01

    A difficulty encountered in designing a unitized regenerative proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell lies in the incompatibility of electrode structures and electrocatalyst materials optimized for either of the two functions (fuel cell or electrolyzer) with the needs of the other function. This difficulty is compounded in previous regenerative fuel cell designs by the fact that water, which is needed for proton conduction in the PEM during both modes of operation, is the reactant supplied to the anode in the electrolyzer mode of operation and the product formed at the cathode in the fuel cell mode. Drawbacks associated with existing regenerative fuel cells have been addressed. In a first innovation, electrodes function either as oxidation electrodes (hydrogen ionization or oxygen evolution) or as reduction electrodes (oxygen reduction or hydrogen evolution) in the fuel cell and electrolyzer modes, respectively. Control of liquid water within the regenerative fuel cell has been brought about by a second innovation. A novel PEM has been developed with internal channels that permit the direct access of water along the length of the membrane. Lateral diffusion of water along the polymer chains of the PEM provides the water needed at electrode/PEM interfaces. Fabrication of the novel single cell unitized regenerative fuel cell and results obtained on testing it are presented.

  11. In situ sequestration of endogenous PDGF-BB with an ECM-mimetic sponge for accelerated wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiu; Niu, Yiming; Diao, Huajia; Wang, Lintao; Chen, Xiuping; Wang, Yitao; Dong, Lei; Wang, Chunming

    2017-12-01

    Recapitulating the typical features of extracellular matrix (ECM) in engineered biomaterials is crucial for preparing a suitable niche to activate endogenous tissue repair. Here, we report the design and evaluation of an ECM-mimetic scaffold that successfully accelerated wound healing through enriching endogenous platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB). Specifically, we prepared a electrospun hydrogel sponge (EGS) comprising a PDGF-BB-binding polysaccharide (EUP3) and gelatin. The two polymers in concert exerted a 'retention-and-release' function: upon the application of EGS in vivo, EUP3 started to bind and sequester endogenous PDGF-BB at the wound site; gradually, gelatin was degraded to free the PDGF-BB/EUP3 complex that acted on the cells in situ. Our serial in vitro and in vivo tests validated the efficacy of EGS in retaining PDGF-BB, releasing PDGF-BB/EUP3 in response to collagenase, and promoting various PDGF-BB-mediated regenerative activities. Particularly, EGS accelerated the repair of a full-thickness skin wound in mice and induced optimal neo-tissue formation, without the addition of any exogenous GFs, cells or genes. Collectively, our results suggest that, by mimicking the distinctive GF-affinitive feature of ECM, EGS as an engineered biomaterial can effectively harness the endogenous regenerative power of the native tissue. Our investigation may inspire the design of new, effective and safer approaches for tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional luminal imaging probe geometric and histomorphologic analysis of abdominal wall wound induced by different trocars in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; McMahon, Barry P; O'Donovan, Deidre; Schiretz, Rich; Heninrich, Russell; Gregersen, Hans

    2009-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate wound geometry and tissue damage caused by several different trocar types using a quantitative functional luminal imaging probe (FLIP) geometric profile and histomorphologic analysis. Four pigs were used in this study. After general anesthesia, six different trocars were randomly inserted at preselected locations in the porcine abdominal wall. The hydration status of the animals was monitored and maintained. A bag mounted on a FLIP was used to profile the geometry of the trocar holes during distension. After the FLIP study, the abdominal wall surrounding the trocar holes was harvested. The tissue was fixed in neutral 10% buffered formalin solution for more than 24 h. The samples contained control tissue (undamaged) and test tissue (damaged) through the entire rectangular tissue block. Approximately four to seven slides were cut parallel to the surface from each sample. Each slide was photographed, and the morphometry of the hole and damaged areas were measured and displayed three-dimensionally. The histologic sections were analyzed with regard to acute damage, bleeding, and acute inflammation of the skin, muscle, and fascia. The FLIP study demonstrated differences between the six trocars. These were mainly due to differences between the Versaport Plus V2 bladed trocar with the smooth cannula, the Applied Medical Separator nonbladed access system with threaded cannula, and the VersaStep Plus trocar. The morphometry data showed the smallest hole and damage areas for the Versaport Plus V2 bladed trocar with the smooth cannula. The damaged area divided by the trocar hole area was smallest for the VersaStep plus trocar and the Ethicon Endopath bladed trocar with a stability cannula (p < 0.05). The histologic analysis showed that the VersaStep Plus trocar and the Ethicon Endopath bladed trocar with a stability cannula gave the least bleeding and inflammation (p < 0.05). An agreement was found between the geometric data obtained by FLIP

  13. Phosphorous-Containing Polymers for Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Brendan M.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2014-01-01

    Disease and injury have resulted in a large, unmet need for functional tissue replacements. Polymeric scaffolds can be used to deliver cells and bioactive signals to address this need for regenerating damaged tissue. Phosphorous-containing polymers have been implemented to improve and accelerate the formation of native tissue both by mimicking the native role of phosphorous groups in the body and by attachment of other bioactive molecules. This manuscript reviews the synthesis, properties, and performance of phosphorous-containing polymers that can be useful in regenerative medicine applications. PMID:24565855

  14. RNA Interference-based Investigation of the Function of Heat Shock Protein 27 during Corneal Epithelial Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Aeri; Park, Hyun-Min; Kang, Soon-Suk; Kim, Eun-Soon; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Jae Yong

    2016-09-27

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is among the most widely used RNA interference methods for the short-term silencing of protein-coding genes. siRNA is a synthetic RNA duplex created to specifically target a mRNA transcript to induce its degradation and it has been used to identify novel pathways in various cellular processes. Few reports exist regarding the role of phosphorylated heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) in corneal epithelial wound healing. Herein, cultured human corneal epithelial cells were divided into a scrambled control-siRNA transfected group and a HSP27-specific siRNA-transfected group. Scratch-induced directional wounding assays, and western blotting, and flow cytometry were then performed. We conclude that HSP27 has roles in corneal epithelial wound healing that may involve epithelial cell apoptosis and migration. Here, step-by-step descriptions of sample preparation and the study protocol are provided.

  15. Hydroxypropyltrimethyl Ammonium Chloride Chitosan Functionalized-PLGA Electrospun Fibrous Membranes as Antibacterial Wound Dressing: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengbing Yang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA-hydroxypropyltrimethyl ammonium chloride chitosan (HACC composite nanofiber wound dressing was prepared through electrospinning and the entrapment-graft technique as an antibacterial dressing for cutaneous wound healing. HACC with 30% degrees of substitution (DS was immobilized onto the surface of PLGA membranes via the reaction between carboxyl groups in PLGA after alkali treatment and the reactive groups (–NH2 in HACC molecules. The naked PLGA and chitosan graft PLGA (PLGA-CS membranes served as controls. The surface immobilization was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX. The morphology studies showed that the membranes remain uniform after the immobilization process. The effects of the surface modification by HACC and CS on the biological properties of the membranes were also investigated. Compared with PLGA and PLGA-CS, PLGA-HACC exhibited more effective antibacterial activity towards both Gram-positive (S. aureus and Gram-negative (P. aeruginosa bacteria. The newly developed fibrous membranes were evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxicity using human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs and human keratinocytes (HaCaTs and in vivo using a wound healing mice model. It was revealed that PLGA-HACC fibrous membranes exhibited favorable cytocompatibility and significantly stimulated adhesion, spreading and proliferation of HDFs and HaCaTs. PLGA-HACC exhibited excellent wound healing efficacy, which was confirmed using a full thickness excision wound model in S. aureus-infected mice. The experimental results in this work suggest that PLGA-HACC is a strong candidate for use as a therapeutic biomaterial in the treatment of infected wounds.

  16. Bacterial Wound Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  17. Wound Healing and Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arrhythmias Abuse Love and Romance Understanding Other People Wound Healing and Care KidsHealth > For Teens > Wound Healing ... stitches or a hospital stay? Different Types of Wounds Most of us think of wounds happening because ...

  18. Advanced biomatrix designs for regenerative therapy of periodontal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Park, C H; Perez, R A; Lee, H Y; Jang, J H; Lee, H H; Wall, I B; Shi, S; Kim, H W

    2014-12-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that causes loss of the tooth-supporting apparatus, including periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. A broad range of treatment options is currently available to restore the structure and function of the periodontal tissues. A regenerative approach, among others, is now considered the most promising paradigm for this purpose, harnessing the unique properties of stem cells. How to make full use of the body's innate regenerative capacity is thus a key issue. While stem cells and bioactive factors are essential components in the regenerative processes, matrices play pivotal roles in recapitulating stem cell functions and potentiating therapeutic actions of bioactive molecules. Moreover, the positions of appropriate bioactive matrices relative to the injury site may stimulate the innate regenerative stem cell populations, removing the need to deliver cells that have been manipulated outside of the body. In this topical review, we update views on advanced designs of biomatrices-including mimicking of the native extracellular matrix, providing mechanical stimulation, activating cell-driven matrices, and delivering bioactive factors in a controllable manner-which are ultimately useful for the regenerative therapy of periodontal tissues. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  19. Effects of enamel matrix derivative on periodontal wound healing in an inflammatory environment in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokhbehsaim, Marjan; Winter, Jochen; Rath, Birgit; Jäger, Andreas; Jepsen, Søren; Deschner, James

    2011-05-01

    This in vitro study was established to investigate whether the regenerative capacity of periodontal ligament (PDL) cells in the presence of enamel matrix derivative (EMD) is modulated by inflammation. PDL cells were grown in the presence or absence of EMD under normal and inflammatory conditions for up to 14 days. In order to mimic an inflammatory environment, cells were incubated with interleukin (IL)-1β. Cells were also exposed to transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 under both conditions. For analysis of wound healing, an in vitro wound fill assay was used. The synthesis of growth factors, markers of proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation, as well as collagen was studied by real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunoassay, and immunoblotting. Mineralization was assessed by alizarine red S and von Kossa staining. EMD stimulated significantly the in vitro wound fill rate, cell proliferation and adhesion, synthesis of growth factors, and collagen, as well as mineralization. In the presence of IL-1β, these EMD effects were significantly reduced. IL-1β also inhibited significantly the wound fill rate induced by TGF-β1 and IGF-1. Critical PDL cell functions that are associated with periodontal regeneration are reduced in an inflammatory environment. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Regenerative Perspective in Modern Dentistry

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    Mihnea Ioan Nicolescu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to trace the contour lines of regenerative dentistry, to offer an introductory overview on this emerging field to both dental students and practitioners. The crystallized depiction of the concept is a translational approach, connecting dental academics to scientific research and clinical utility. Therefore, this review begins by presenting the general features of regenerative medicine, and then gradually introduces the specific aspects of major dental subdomains, highlighting the progress achieved during the last years by scientific research and, in some cases, which has already been translated into clinical results. The distinct characteristics of stem cells and their microenvironment, together with their diversity in the oral cavity, are put into the context of research and clinical use. Examples of regenerative studies regarding endodontic and periodontal compartments, as well as hard (alveolar bone and soft (salivary glands related tissues, are presented to make the reader further acquainted with the topic. Instead of providing a conclusion, we will emphasize the importance for all dental community members, from young students to experienced dentists, of an early awareness rising regarding biomedical research progress in general and regenerative dentistry in particular.

  1. Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Cell Therapies Artificial and Biohybrid Organs Regenerative Medicine / Tissue Engineering Based on the field of cell transplantation (started in...potential Amniocentesis: amniotic fluid that bathes the fetus in the womb during pregnancy Placenta: the tissue in the womb that houses the baby

  2. Functional genomics unique to week 20 post wounding in the deep cone/fat dome of the Duroc/Yorkshire porcine model of fibroproliferative scarring.

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    Loren H Engrav

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypertrophic scar was first described over 100 years ago; PubMed has more than 1,000 references on the topic. Nevertheless prevention and treatment remains poor, because 1 there has been no validated animal model; 2 human scar tissue, which is impossible to obtain in a controlled manner, has been the only source for study; 3 tissues typically have been homogenized, mixing cell populations; and 4 gene-by-gene studies are incomplete. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have assembled a system that overcomes these barriers and permits the study of genome-wide gene expression in microanatomical locations, in shallow and deep partial-thickness wounds, and pigmented and non-pigmented skin, using the Duroc(pigmented fibroproliferative/Yorkshire(non-pigmented non-fibroproliferative porcine model. We used this system to obtain the differential transcriptome at 1, 2, 3, 12 and 20 weeks post wounding. It is not clear when fibroproliferation begins, but it is fully developed in humans and the Duroc breed at 20 weeks. Therefore we obtained the derivative functional genomics unique to 20 weeks post wounding. We also obtained long-term, forty-six week follow-up with the model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: 1 The scars are still thick at forty-six weeks post wounding further validating the model. 2 The differential transcriptome provides new insights into the fibroproliferative process as several genes thought fundamental to fibroproliferation are absent and others differentially expressed are newly implicated. 3 The findings in the derivative functional genomics support old concepts, which further validates the model, and suggests new avenues for reductionist exploration. In the future, these findings will be searched for directed networks likely involved in cutaneous fibroproliferation. These clues may lead to a better understanding of the systems biology of cutaneous fibroproliferation, and ultimately prevention and treatment of hypertrophic scarring.

  3. MicroRNA miR-27b rescues bone marrow-derived angiogenic cell function and accelerates wound healing in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie-Mei; Tao, Jun; Chen, Dan-Dan; Cai, Jing-Jing; Irani, Kaikobad; Wang, Qinde; Yuan, Hong; Chen, Alex F

    2014-01-01

    Vascular precursor cells with angiogenic potentials are important for tissue repair, which is impaired in diabetes mellitus. MicroRNAs are recently discovered key regulators of gene expression, but their role in vascular precursor cell-mediated angiogenesis in diabetes mellitus is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the microRNA miR-27b rescues impaired bone marrow-derived angiogenic cell (BMAC) function in vitro and in vivo in type 2 diabetic mice. BMACs from adult male type 2 diabetic db/db and from normal littermate db/+ mice were used. miR-27b expression was decreased in db/db BMACs. miR-27b mimic improved db/db BMAC function, including proliferation, adhesion, tube formation, and delayed apoptosis, but it did not affect migration. Elevated thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) protein in db/db BMACs was suppressed on miR-27b mimic transfection. Inhibition of miR-27b in db/+ BMACs reduced angiogenesis, which was reversed by TSP-1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). miR-27b suppressed the pro-oxidant protein p66(shc) and mitochondrial oxidative stress, contributing to its protection of BMAC function. miR-27b also suppressed semaphorin 6A to improve BMAC function in diabetes mellitus. Luciferase binding assay suggested that miR-27b directly targeted TSP-1, TSP-2, p66(shc), and semaphorin 6A. miR-27b improved topical cell therapy of diabetic BMACs on diabetic skin wound closure, with a concomitant augmentation of wound perfusion and capillary formation. Normal BMAC therapy with miR-27b inhibition demonstrated reduced efficacy in wound closure, perfusion, and capillary formation. Local miR-27b delivery partly improved wound healing in diabetic mice. miR-27b rescues impaired BMAC angiogenesis via TSP-1 suppression, semaphorin 6A expression, and p66shc-dependent mitochondrial oxidative stress and improves BMAC therapy in wound healing in type 2 diabetic mice.

  4. Use of Multiple Adjunctive Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Modalities to Manage Diabetic Lower-Extremity Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Windy E

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Various treatment options exist for wound healing; however, clinical assessment of the patient and the wound environment must be considered before determining an optimal wound treatment plan. Negative pressure wound therapy alone and/or with an instilled topical solution can be effective in adjunctive management of acute and chronic wounds. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has also been shown to contribute to the wound-healing process. A pilot evaluation using a multistep approach of adjunctive negative pressure wound therapy with instillation and a dwell time, standard negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy was explored to manage postsurgical, diabetic lower-extremity wounds with a significant bioburden. Methods: Three diabetic patients with lower-extremity ulcers were treated after surgical intervention. Multistep wound therapy consisted of (1) negative pressure wound therapy with instillation of normal saline with a 20-minute dwell time, followed by 2 hours of negative pressure at -150 mm Hg for 3 to 4 days; (2) 1 to 3 weeks of continuous negative pressure at -150 mm Hg; and (3) multiple treatments of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Results: After surgery, wound closure was achieved within 4 weeks postinitiation of multistep wound therapy. All patients regained limb function and recovered with no long-term sequelae. Conclusions: In these 3 cases, a multistep wound therapy approach after surgery resulted in successful outcomes; however, larger prospective studies are needed to demonstrate the potential efficacy of this approach in the postsurgical management of complex, diabetic lower-extremity wounds.

  5. Vacuum-assisted closure for complex cranial wounds involving the loss of dura mater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Alexander K; Neal, Matthew T; Argenta, Louis C; Wilson, John A; DeFranzo, Anthony J; Tatter, Stephen B

    2013-02-01

    The aim in this study was to describe the safety and efficacy of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) in patients with complex cranial wounds with extensive scalp, bone, and dural defects who were not candidates for immediate free tissue transfer. Five patients (4 men and 1 woman) ages 24-73 years with complex cranial wounds were treated with VAC at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. Etiologies included trauma, squamous cell carcinoma, and malignant meningioma. Cutaneous wound defects measured as large as 15 cm in diameter. Four of the 5 patients had open skull defects with concomitant dural defects, and 1 patient had dural dehiscence. After surgical debridement, all 5 patients were treated with the direct application of a VAC device to a reapproximated dura mater (1 patient), to a pericranial flap (1 patient), or to a regenerative tissue matrix overlying CNS tissue (3 patients). In all cases involving open cranial wounds, the VAC device promoted granulation tissue formation over the dural substitute, prevented CSF leakage, and kept the wounds free from local infection. The duration of VAC therapy ranged from 16 to 91 days. Although VAC therapy was intended as a temporary measure until these patients could be stabilized for larger tissue transfer procedures or they succumbed to their primary pathology, 1 patient had a successful skin graft following VAC therapy. Hydrocephalus requiring shunt placement developed in 2 patients during VAC therapy. The VAC dressings applied to a tissue matrix or other barrier over brain tissue in extensive cranial wounds are safe and well tolerated, providing a functional barrier and preventing infection.

  6. Induction of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation in the absence of soluble inducer for cutaneous wound regeneration by a chitin nanofiber-based hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Kangquan; Huang, Yao; Qi, Baiwen; Hu, Xiang; Ma, Zhanjun; Lu, Ang; Jian, Chao; Zhang, Lina; Yu, Aixi

    2017-01-12

    Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) has been considered to be a promising strategy for wound healing. However, poor viability of engrafted BMSCs and limited capabilities of differentiation into the desired cell types in wounds often hinder its application. Few studies report the induction of BMSC differentiation into the skin regeneration-related cell types using natural biopolymer, e.g. chitin and its derivative. Here we utilized a chitin nanofiber (CNF) hydrogel as a directive cue to induce BMSC differentiation for enhancing cutaneous wound regeneration in the absence of cell-differentiating factors. First, a 'green' fabrication of CNF hydrogels encapsulating green fluorescence protein (GFP)-transfected rat BMSCs was performed via in-situ physical gelation without chemical cross-linking. Without soluble differentiation inducers, CNF hydrogels decreased the expression of BMSC transcription factors (Oct4 and Klf4) and concomitantly induced their differentiation into the angiogenic cells and fibroblasts, which are indispensable for wound regeneration. In vivo, rat full-thickness cutaneous wounds treated with BMSC hydrogel exhibited better viability of the cells than did local BMSC injection-treated wounds. Similar to that of the in vitro result, CNF hydrogels induced BMSCs to differentiate into beneficial cell types, resulting in accelerated wound repair characterized by granulation tissue formation. Our data suggest that three-dimensional CNF hydrogel may not only serve as a 'protection' to improve the viability of exogenous BMSCs, but also provide a functional scaffold capable of enhancing BMSC regenerative potential to promote wound healing. This may help to overcome the current limitations to stem cell therapy that are faced in the field of wound regeneration. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Stem Cells Applications in Regenerative Medicine and Disease Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjeet Singh Mahla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine, the most recent and emerging branch of medical science, deals with functional restoration of tissues or organs for the patient suffering from severe injuries or chronic disease. The spectacular progress in the field of stem cell research has laid the foundation for cell based therapies of disease which cannot be cured by conventional medicines. The indefinite self-renewal and potential to differentiate into other types of cells represent stem cells as frontiers of regenerative medicine. The transdifferentiating potential of stem cells varies with source and according to that regenerative applications also change. Advancements in gene editing and tissue engineering technology have endorsed the ex vivo remodelling of stem cells grown into 3D organoids and tissue structures for personalized applications. This review outlines the most recent advancement in transplantation and tissue engineering technologies of ESCs, TSPSCs, MSCs, UCSCs, BMSCs, and iPSCs in regenerative medicine. Additionally, this review also discusses stem cells regenerative application in wildlife conservation.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate impaired wound healing through enhancing keratinocyte functions in diabetic foot ulcerations on the plantar skin of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Jiro; Kamiya, Hideki; Himeno, Tatsuhito; Shibata, Taiga; Kondo, Masaki; Okawa, Tetsuji; Fujiya, Atsushi; Fukami, Ayako; Uenishi, Eita; Seino, Yusuke; Tsunekawa, Shin; Hamada, Yoji; Naruse, Keiko; Oiso, Yutaka; Nakamura, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    Although the initial healing stage involves a re-epithelialization in humans, diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) has been investigated using rodent models with wounds on the thigh skin, in which a wound contraction is initiated. In this study, we established a rodent model of DFU on the plantar skin and evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) in this model. The wounds made on the hind paws or thighs of streptozotocin induced diabetic or control rats were treated with BM-MSCs. Expression levels of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (pFAK), matrix metaroprotease (MMP)-2, EGF, and IGF-1, were evaluated in human keratinocytes, which were cultured in conditioned media of BM-MSCs (MSC-CM) with high glucose levels. Re-epithelialization initiated the healing process on the plantar, but not on the thigh, skin. The therapy utilizing BM-MSCs ameliorated the delayed healing in diabetic rats. In the keratinocytes cultured with MSC-CM, the decreased pFAK levels in the high glucose condition were restored, and the MMP2, EGF, and IGF-1 levels increased. Our study established a novel rat DFU model. The impaired healing process in diabetic rats was ameliorated by transplantation of BM-MSCs. This amelioration might be accounted for by the modification of keratinocyte functions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Wound healing in animal models: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Jaffary

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing and reduction of its recovery time is one of the most important issues in medicine. Wound is defined as disruption of anatomy and function of normal skin. This injury could be the result of physical elements such as  surgical incision, hit or pressure cut of the skin and gunshot wound. Chemical or caustic burn is another category of wound causes that can be induced by acid or base contact irritation. Healing is a process of cellular and extracellular matrix interactions that occur in the damaged tissue. Wound healing consists of several stages including hemostasis, inflammatory phase, proliferative phase and new tissue formation which reconstructs by new collagen formation. Wounds are divided into acute and chronic types based on their healing time. Acute wounds have sudden onset and in normal individuals usually have healing process of less than 4 weeks without any residual side effects. In contrast, chronic wounds have gradual onset. Their inflammatory phase is prolonged and the healing process is stopped due to some background factors like diabetes, ischemia or local pressure. If the healing process lasts more than 4 weeks it will be classified as chronic wound. Despite major advances in the treatment of wounds, still finding effective modalities for healing wounds in the shortest possible time with the fewest side effects is a current challenge. In this review different phases of wound healing and clinical types of wound such as venous leg ulcer, diabetic foot ulcer and pressure ulcer are discussed. Also acute wound models (i.e burn wounds or incisional wound and chronic wound models (such as venous leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcer, pressure ulcers or bedsore in laboratory animals are presented. This summary can be considered as a preliminary step to facilitate designing of more targeted and applied research in this area.

  10. The mechanical fingerprint of murine excisional wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensalfini, Marco; Haertel, Eric; Hopf, Raoul; Wietecha, Mateusz; Werner, Sabine; Mazza, Edoardo

    2018-01-01

    A multiscale mechanics approach to the characterization of murine excisional wounds subjected to uniaxial tensile loading is presented. Local strain analysis at a physiological level of tension uncovers the presence of two distinct regions within the wound: i) a very compliant peripheral cushion and ii) a core area undergoing modest deformation. Microstructural visualizations of stretched wound specimens show negligible engagement of the collagen located in the center of a 7-day old wound; fibers remain coiled despite the applied tension, confirming the existence of a mechanically isolated wound core. The compliant cushion located at the wound periphery appears to protect the newly-formed tissue from excessive deformation during the phase of new tissue formation. The early remodeling phase (day 14) is characterized by a restored mechanical connection between far field and wound center. The latter remains less deformable, a characteristic possibly required for cell activities during tissue remodeling. The distribution of fibrillary collagens at these two time points corresponds well to the identified heterogeneity of mechanical properties of the wound region. This novel approach provides new insight into the mechanical properties of wounded skin and will be applicable to the analysis of compound-treated wounds or wounds in genetically modified tissue. Biophysical characterization of healing wounds is crucial to assess the recovery of the skin barrier function and the associated mechanobiological processes. For the first time, we performed highly resolved local deformation analysis to identify mechanical characteristics of the wound and its periphery. Our results reveal the presence of a compliant cushion surrounding a stiffer wound core; we refer to this heterogeneous mechanical behavior as "mechanical fingerprint" of the wound. The mechanical response is shown to progress towards that of the intact skin as healing takes place. Histology and multiphoton microscopy

  11. Nanotechnology for regenerative medicine: nanomaterials for stem cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Aniruddh; Kim, John D; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2008-08-01

    Although stem cells hold great potential for the treatment of many injuries and degenerative diseases, several obstacles must be overcome before their therapeutic application can be realized. These include the development of advanced techniques to understand and control functions of microenvironmental signals and novel methods to track and guide transplanted stem cells. The application of nanotechnology to stem cell biology would be able to address those challenges. This review details the current challenges in regenerative medicine, the current applications of nanoparticles in stem cell biology and further potential of nanotechnology approaches towards regenerative medicine, focusing mainly on magnetic nanoparticle- and quantum dot-based applications in stem cell research.

  12. Clinical Outcomes after Regenerative Periodontal Therapy with Emdogain

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    Beresescu Gabriela Felicia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Regeneration is defined as a reconstruction of a lost part of the body in such a way that the structure and function of the lost tissue are completely restored. The aim of this study is to compare the clinical outcomes of intrabony defects treatment using regenerative periodontal therapy with enamel matrix proteins (Emdogain, EMD with a control group.

  13. Electrospun Nanofibers for Regenerative Medicine**

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wenying; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Xia, Younan

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews recent progress in applying electrospun nanofibers to the emerging field of regenerative medicine. We begin with a brief introduction to electrospinning and nanofibers, with a focus on issues related to the selection of materials, incorporation of bioactive molecules, degradation characteristics, control of mechanical properties, and facilitation of cell infiltration. We then discuss a number of approaches to fabrication of scaffolds from electrospun nanofibers, including...

  14. Regenerative Medicine Strategies for Esophageal Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londono, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Pathologies that involve the structure and/or function of the esophagus can be life-threatening. The esophagus is a complex organ comprising nonredundant tissue that does not have the ability to regenerate. Currently available interventions for esophageal pathology have limited success and are typically associated with significant morbidity. Hence, there is currently an unmet clinical need for effective methods of esophageal repair. The present article presents a review of esophageal disease along with the anatomic and functional consequences of each pathologic process, the shortcomings associated with currently available therapies, and the latest advancements in the field of regenerative medicine with respect to strategies for esophageal repair from benchtop to bedside. PMID:25813694

  15. Accelerated Wound Closure - Differently Organized Nanofibers Affect Cell Migration and Hence the Closure of Artificial Wounds in a Cell Based In Vitro Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Ottosson

    Full Text Available Nanofiber meshes holds great promise in wound healing applications by mimicking the topography of extracellular matrix, hence providing guidance for crucial cells involved in the regenerative processes. Here we explored the influence of nanofiber alignment on fibroblast behavior in a novel in vitro wound model. The model included electrospun poly-ε-caprolactone scaffolds with different nanofiber orientation. Fibroblasts were cultured to confluency for 24h before custom-made inserts were removed, creating cell-free zones serving as artificial wounds. Cell migration into these wounds was evaluated at 0-, 48- and 96h. Cell morphological analysis was performed using nuclei- and cytoskeleton stainings. Cell viability was assessed using a biochemical assay. This study demonstrates a novel in vitro wound assay, for exploring of the impact of nanofibers on wound healing. Additionally we show that it's possible to affect the process of wound closure in a spatial manner using nanotopographies, resulting in faster closure on aligned fiber substrates.

  16. Regenerative potential and functional composition of soil seed banks in remnant evergreen broad-leaved forests under urbanization in South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Wang; L. Huang; H. Ren; Z. Sun; Q. Guo

    2015-01-01

    Soil seed banks can act as an important source in forest regeneration, and the information on the seed bank composition is vital for determining the resilience of plant communities under severe environments such as urban settings. In this study, we examined the seed bank density and functional composition, and their relationships with aboveground vegetation in three...

  17. Scaffold-based transplantation of vascular endothelial growth factor-overexpressing stem cells leads to neovascularization in ischemic myocardium but did not show a functional regenerative effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wattenwyl, Robert; Blumenthal, Britta; Heilmann, Claudia; Golsong, Peter; Poppe, Annika; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Siepe, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    The transplantation of skeletal myoblasts (SkM) might improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction via paracrine action. We used scaffold-based cell transfer by using vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-overexpressing myoblasts. Skeletal myoblasts were isolated and expanded from newborn Lewis rats. Cells were transfected with pCINeo-VEGF(121) and seeded on polyurethane (PU) scaffolds. The seeded scaffolds were epicardially implanted in rats 2 weeks after myocardial infarction (group: PU-VEGF-SkM). Before this intervention and 6 weeks later, pressure/volume loops were analyzed followed by histology. Additional study groups (n = 10 per group) were injected with VEGF-overexpressing myoblasts (Inj-VEGF-SkM) or unmodified myoblasts (Inj-SkM) or underwent a sham operation. Overexpression of VEGF was verified in vitro. The transplantation of growth factor producing myoblast-seeded scaffolds resulted in enhanced angiogenesis of ischemically damaged myocardium in vivo. However, the infarction size was not reduced. In group Inj-SkM, hemodynamics remained unchanged. Systolic function as measured by dP/dt(max) was not significantly altered in PU-VEGF-SkM (preinterventionally 2,156 ± 1,222 mmHg vs. postinterventionally 2,134 ± 850 mmHg). Other systolic function and diastolic function parameters as measured by dP/dt(min), tau, and pressure half-time were not restored in groups PU-VEGF-SkM and Inj-VEGF-SkM either. Transplantation of VEGF-overexpressing skeletal myoblasts leads to neovascularization in infarcted hearts. No functional myocardial recovery was observed. Scaffold-based transfer of genetically-modified cells remains a useful tool to study paracrine stem cell action.

  18. Trade-offs between seed and leaf size (seed-phytomer-leaf theory): functional glue linking regenerative with life history strategies … and taxonomy with ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, John G; Santini, Bianca A; Montserrat Marti, Gabriel; Royo Pla, Ferran; Jones, Glynis; Bogaard, Amy; Charles, Mike; Font, Xavier; Ater, Mohammed; Taleb, Abdelkader; Poschlod, Peter; Hmimsa, Younes; Palmer, Carol; Wilson, Peter J; Band, Stuart R; Styring, Amy; Diffey, Charlotte; Green, Laura; Nitsch, Erika; Stroud, Elizabeth; Romo-Díez, Angel; de Torres Espuny, Lluis; Warham, Gemma

    2017-11-10

    While the 'worldwide leaf economics spectrum' (Wright IJ, Reich PB, Westoby M, et al. 2004. The worldwide leaf economics spectrum. Nature : 821-827) defines mineral nutrient relationships in plants, no unifying functional consensus links size attributes. Here, the focus is upon leaf size, a much-studied plant trait that scales positively with habitat quality and components of plant size. The objective is to show that this wide range of relationships is explicable in terms of a seed-phytomer-leaf (SPL) theoretical model defining leaf size in terms of trade-offs involving the size, growth rate and number of the building blocks (phytomers) of which the young shoot is constructed. Functional data for 2400+ species and English and Spanish vegetation surveys were used to explore interrelationships between leaf area, leaf width, canopy height, seed mass and leaf dry matter content (LDMC). Leaf area was a consistent function of canopy height, LDMC and seed mass. Additionally, size traits are partially uncoupled. First, broad laminas help confer competitive exclusion while morphologically large leaves can, through dissection, be functionally small. Secondly, leaf size scales positively with plant size but many of the largest-leaved species are of medium height with basally supported leaves. Thirdly, photosynthetic stems may represent a functionally viable alternative to 'small seeds + large leaves' in disturbed, fertile habitats and 'large seeds + small leaves' in infertile ones. Although key elements defining the juvenile growth phase remain unmeasured, our results broadly support SPL theory in that phytometer and leaf size are a product of the size of the initial shoot meristem (≅ seed mass) and the duration and quality of juvenile growth. These allometrically constrained traits combine to confer ecological specialization on individual species. Equally, they appear conservatively expressed within major taxa. Thus, 'evolutionary canalization' sensu Stebbins (Stebbins GL

  19. Equine distal limb wounds: new and emerging treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Christopher G; Caldwell, Fred J; Hanson, Reid

    2012-07-01

    Distal limb wounds occur commonly in horses, and treatment can be frustrating for owners and veterinarians. Caring for these wounds is often very expensive, labor intensive, and prolonged. Many commercial products and clinical techniques have been developed to help treat these wounds. Healing of these wounds depends on many factors. With proper wound evaluation and treatment, affected horses can return to function sooner than in the past.

  20. Comparing the Antibacterial and Functional Properties of Cameroonian and Manuka Honeys for Potential Wound Healing-Have We Come Full Cycle in Dealing with Antibiotic Resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boateng, Joshua; Diunase, Keshu Nso

    2015-09-02

    The increased incidence of bacterial resistance to antibiotics has generated renewed interest in "traditional" antimicrobials, such as honey. This paper reports on a study comparing physico-chemical, antioxidant and antibacterial characteristics (that potentially contribute in part, to the functional wound healing activity) of Cameroonian honeys with those of Manuka honey. Agar well diffusion was used to generate zones of inhibition against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus while broth dilutions were used to study the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). Non-peroxide activity was investigated by catalase for hydrogen peroxide reduction. The Cameroonian honeys demonstrated functional properties similar to Manuka honey, with strong correlations between the antioxidant activity and total phenol content of each honey. They were also as effective as Manuka honey in reducing bacteria load with an MIC of 10% w/v against all three bacteria and exhibited non-peroxide antimicrobial activity. These Cameroon honeys have potential therapeutic activity and may contain compounds with activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. Antibacterial agents from such natural sources present a potential affordable treatment of wound infections caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria, which are a leading cause of amputations and deaths in many African countries.

  1. Comparing the Antibacterial and Functional Properties of Cameroonian and Manuka Honeys for Potential Wound Healing—Have We Come Full Cycle in Dealing with Antibiotic Resistance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Boateng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The increased incidence of bacterial resistance to antibiotics has generated renewed interest in “traditional” antimicrobials, such as honey. This paper reports on a study comparing physico-chemical, antioxidant and antibacterial characteristics (that potentially contribute in part, to the functional wound healing activity of Cameroonian honeys with those of Manuka honey. Agar well diffusion was used to generate zones of inhibition against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus while broth dilutions were used to study the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs. Non-peroxide activity was investigated by catalase for hydrogen peroxide reduction. The Cameroonian honeys demonstrated functional properties similar to Manuka honey, with strong correlations between the antioxidant activity and total phenol content of each honey. They were also as effective as Manuka honey in reducing bacteria load with an MIC of 10% w/v against all three bacteria and exhibited non-peroxide antimicrobial activity. These Cameroon honeys have potential therapeutic activity and may contain compounds with activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. Antibacterial agents from such natural sources present a potential affordable treatment of wound infections caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria, which are a leading cause of amputations and deaths in many African countries.

  2. Antimicrobial, anthelmintic activities and characterisation of functional phenolic acids of Achyranthes aspera Linn.: A medicinal plant used for the treatment of wounds and ringworm in East Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwell Rungano Ndhlala

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Achyranthes aspera Linn. (Amaranthaceae commonly known as Prickly Chaff flower (English is traditionally used for treating a number of ailments. Different parts of the plant are used in treating wounds and ringworm in East Africa and elsewhere for a number of ailments. In this study, leaf extracts of A. aspera collected from two different geographical locations (Ciaat, Eritrea and Ukulinga, South Africa were evaluated for antibacterial, antifungal, anthelmintic activities and the plant characterised for functional phenolic acids as well as protein binding capacity. The pathogens used in the tests were, two Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, two Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, a filamentus yeast-like fungus (Candida albicans and a free-living nematode (Caenorhabditis elegans. The water and acetone extracts of the samples collected from Ciaat exhibited good antibacterial, antifungal and anthelmintic activity (MIC < 1 mg/ml except the water extract against E. coli which showed moderate activity. In contrast, the extracts collected from Ukulinga exhibited moderate to weak activities except for the acetone (aq. extracts which had good activity against some of the tested organisms. UHPLC-MS/MS revealed variation in the levels of some functional phenolic compounds, with rutin, chlorogenic acid and genistein not being detected in the extracts from Ukulinga. The variation was also observed in the protein binding capacity, which could offer a predictive wound healing model. All extracts from plant samples collected at Ciaat expressed significant dominant potency compared to similar extracts from Ukulinga.

  3. Wound healing potential of adipose tissue stem cell extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, You Kyung; Ban, Jae-Jun; Lee, Mijung; Im, Wooseok; Kim, Manho

    2017-03-25

    Adipose tissue stem cells (ATSCs) are considered as a promising source in the field of cell therapy and regenerative medicine. In addition to direct cell replacement using stem cells, intercellular molecule exchange by stem cell secretory factors showed beneficial effects by reducing tissue damage and augmentation of endogenous repair. Delayed cutaneous wound healing is implicated in many conditions such as diabetes, aging, stress and alcohol consumption. However, the effects of cell-free extract of ATSCs (ATSC-Ex) containing secretome on wound healing process have not been investigated. In this study, ATSC-Ex was topically applied on the cutaneous wound and healing speed was examined. As a result, wound closure was much faster in the cell-free extract treated wound than control wound at 4, 6, 8 days after application of ATSC-Ex. Dermal fibroblast proliferation, migration and extracellular matrix (ECM) production are critical aspects of wound healing, and the effects of ATSC-Ex on human dermal fibroblast (HDF) was examined. ATSC-Ex augmented HDF proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and migration ability was enhanced by extract treatment. Representative ECM proteins, collagen type I and matrix metalloproteinase-1, are significantly up-regulated by treatment of ATSC-Ex. Our results suggest that the ATSC-Ex have improving effect of wound healing and can be the potential therapeutic candidate for cutaneous wound healing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Regenerative medicine and cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapies are clinical practices already by decades in fields like blood tumors and severe burns but the term itself when associated with regenerative medicine switch on a cascade of imaginery thoughts that risk to create false hopes; in other words, the imaginary idea that physicians can cure all of the diseases since each day the media report of some very important advance in stem cell biology. This is a mistake, mirrored by the downbeat idea that speculators are pledging false possibilities selling illusions of miracle cures...

  5. The imperative for regenerative agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christopher J

    2017-03-01

    A review is made of the current state of agriculture, emphasising issues of soil erosion and dependence on fossil fuels, in regard to achieving food security for a relentlessly enlarging global population. Soil has been described as "the fragile, living skin of the Earth", and yet both its aliveness and fragility have all too often been ignored in the expansion of agriculture across the face of the globe. Since it is a pivotal component in a global nexus of soil-water-air-energy, how we treat the soil can impact massively on climate change - with either beneficial or detrimental consequences, depending on whether the soil is preserved or degraded. Regenerative agriculture has at its core the intention to improve the health of soil or to restore highly degraded soil, which symbiotically enhances the quality of water, vegetation and land-productivity. By using methods of regenerative agriculture, it is possible not only to increase the amount of soil organic carbon (SOC) in existing soils, but to build new soil. This has the effect of drawing down carbon from the atmosphere, while simultaneously improving soil structure and soil health, soil fertility and crop yields, water retention and aquifer recharge - thus ameliorating both flooding and drought, and also the erosion of further soil, since runoff is reduced. Since food production on a more local scale is found to preserve the soil and its quality, urban food production should be seen as a significant potential contributor to regenerative agriculture in the future, so long as the methods employed are themselves 'regenerative'. If localisation is to become a dominant strategy for dealing with a vastly reduced use of fossil fuels, and preserving soil quality - with increased food production in towns and cities - it will be necessary to incorporate integrated ('systems') design approaches such as permaculture and the circular economy (which minimise and repurpose 'waste') within the existing urban infrastructure. In

  6. Lipid-colloid dressing shows improved reepithelialization, pain relief, and corneal barrier function in split-thickness skin-graft donor wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Katsuya; Akita, Sadanori; Yoshimoto, Hiroshi; Houbara, Seiji; Hirano, Akiyoshi

    2014-09-01

    Donor-site wound healing was tested with a nonadherent petrolatum- and hydrocolloid-impregnated polyester, a lipid-colloid dressing, and a nonadherent polyester dressing, supplemented with petrolatum manually by a physician onsite. Ten patients, 1 woman and 9 men (22 to 79 years old; average 58.4 ± 17.54 years), were enrolled in this prospective comparison study. The split-thickness skin graft was 14.5 ± 7.49 cm long × 8.2 ± 4.07 cm wide (5.5-27 cm long and 4.0-14.0 wide) and 14/1000 inches (0.356 mm) deep. The degree of reepithelialization in lipid-colloid dressing was significantly better than that in polyester mesh dressing, with 1.7 ± 1.00 and 2.8 ± 0.83 for the lipid-colloid dressing and polyester mesh dressing, respectively (P colloid dressing than that in polyester dressing, 1.7 ± 1.11 and 2.9 ± 1.12 for the lipid-colloid dressing and polyester mesh dressing, respectively (P colloid at wound healing was significantly smaller than those in polyester mesh (effective contact coefficient: 11.7 ± 1.87% and 15.6 ± 3.09% for lipid-colloid and polyester mesh, respectively, P colloid and polyester mesh, respectively, P colloid polyester dressing has superior wound healing and pain relief and demonstrates better corneal barrier function delineated by effective contact coefficient and corneal thickness at healing in split-thickness donors. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition delays wound healing and blocks the latent transforming growth factor-beta1-promoted myofibroblast formation and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirastschijski, Ursula; Schnabel, Reinhild; Claes, Juliane

    2010-01-01

    The ability to regulate wound contraction is critical for wound healing as well as for pathological contractures. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been demonstrated to be obligatory for normal wound healing. This study examined the effect that the broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor BB-94 has when...

  8. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Synergistically Acting Natural Product Enhancing the Performance of Biomaterial Based Wound Healing

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    Srinivasan Sivasubramanian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The potential of multifunctional wound heal biomaterial relies on the optimal content of therapeutic constituents as well as the desirable physical, chemical, and biological properties to accelerate the healing process. Formulating biomaterials such as amnion or collagen based scaffolds with natural products offer an affordable strategy to develop dressing material with high efficiency in healing wounds. Using image based phenotyping and quantification, we screened natural product derived bioactive compounds for modulators of types I and III collagen production from human foreskin derived fibroblast cells. The identified hit was then formulated with amnion to develop a biomaterial, and its biophysical properties, in vitro and in vivo effects were characterized. In addition, we performed functional profiling analyses by PCR array to understand the effect of individual components of these materials on various genes such as inflammatory mediators including chemokines and cytokines, growth factors, fibroblast stimulating markers for collagen secretion, matrix metalloproteinases, etc., associated with wound healing. FACS based cell cycle analyses were carried out to evaluate the potential of biomaterials for induction of proliferation of fibroblasts. Western blot analyses was done to examine the effect of biomaterial on collagen synthesis by cells and compared to cells grown in the presence of growth factors. This work demonstrated an uncomplicated way of identifying components that synergistically promote healing. Besides, we demonstrated that modulating local wound environment using biomaterials with bioactive compounds could enhance healing. This study finds that the developed biomaterials offer immense scope for healing wounds by means of their skin regenerative features such as anti-inflammatory, fibroblast stimulation for collagen secretion as well as inhibition of enzymes and markers impeding the healing, hydrodynamic properties complemented

  9. Chronic Wound Healing: A Review of Current Management and Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, George; Ceilley, Roger

    2017-03-01

    Wound healing is a complex, highly regulated process that is critical in maintaining the barrier function of skin. With numerous disease processes, the cascade of events involved in wound healing can be affected, resulting in chronic, non-healing wounds that subject the patient to significant discomfort and distress while draining the medical system of an enormous amount of resources. The healing of a superficial wound requires many factors to work in concert, and wound dressings and treatments have evolved considerably to address possible barriers to wound healing, ranging from infection to hypoxia. Even optimally, wound tissue never reaches its pre-injured strength and multiple aberrant healing states can result in chronic non-healing wounds. This article will review wound healing physiology and discuss current approaches for treating a wound.

  10. Effects of the nephrilin peptide on post-burn glycemic control, renal function, fat and lean body mass, and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Desmond D; Ayadi, Amina El; Wetzel, Michael; Prasai, Anesh; Mifflin, Randy; Jay, Jayson; Herndon, David N; Finnerty, Celeste C

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the effects of severe burn trauma are not well understood. We previously demonstrated the ability of nephrilin peptide (an iron-binding peptide believed to enter cells through iron-uptake pathways) to suppress aspects of the neuroinflammatory response in a rat scald model, as well as sepsis mortality in a mouse model. This study explores the effect of nephrilin on other clinically relevant outcomes in the rat scald model. In a rat scald model, animals were treated with nephrilin either in week 1 or week 2 post-burn. Measurements were made of serum glucose and creatinine as well as wound area by planimetry and body composition by DEXA. Given the potential role of iron, results were analyzed both for the entire cohort of animals and for the normoferremic (>100 ug/dL serum iron) subset of animals. Nephrilin improved body composition, wound healing, kidney function, and glycemic control. The first two effects were significant in normoferremic but not in hypoferremic animals suggesting an effect of iron status on burn injury outcomes. Nephrilin treatment modulates a number of relevant variables in the rat scald model.

  11. Short Hairpin RNA Silencing of PHD-2 Improves Neovascularization and Functional Outcomes in Diabetic Wounds and Ischemic Limbs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J Paik

    Full Text Available The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α is responsible for the downstream expression of over 60 genes that regulate cell survival and metabolism in hypoxic conditions as well as those that enhance angiogenesis to alleviate hypoxia. However, under normoxic conditions, HIF-1α is hydroxylated by prolyl hydroxylase 2, and subsequently degraded, with a biological half-life of less than five minutes. Here we investigated the therapeutic potential of inhibiting HIF-1α degradation through short hairpin RNA silencing of PHD-2 in the setting of diabetic wounds and limb ischemia. Treatment of diabetic mouse fibroblasts with shPHD-2 in vitro resulted in decreased levels of PHD-2 transcript demonstrated by qRT-PCR, higher levels of HIF-1α as measured by western blot, and higher expression of the downstream angiogenic genes SDF-1 and VEGFα, as measured by qRT-PCR. In vivo, shPHD-2 accelerated healing of full thickness excisional wounds in diabetic mice compared to shScr control, (14.33 ± 0.45 days vs. 19 ± 0.33 days and was associated with an increased vascular density. Delivery of shPHD-2 also resulted in improved perfusion of ischemic hind limbs compared to shScr, prevention of distal digit tip necrosis, and increased survival of muscle tissue. Knockdown of PHD-2 through shRNA treatment has the potential to stimulate angiogenesis through overexpression of HIF-1α and upregulation of pro-angiogenic genes downstream of HIF-1α, and may represent a viable, non-viral approach to gene therapy for ischemia related applications.

  12. Emdogain in regenerative periodontal therapy. A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sculean, Anton; Windisch, Péter; Döri, Ferenc; Keglevich, Tibor; Molnár, Balint; Gera, István

    2007-10-01

    The goal of regenerative periodontal therapy is the reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures (i.e. the new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone). Results from basic research have pointed to the important role of the enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) in the periodontal wound healing. Histological results from animal and human studies have shown that treatment with EMD promotes periodontal regeneration. Moreover, clinical studies have indicated that treatment with EMD positively influences periodontal wound healing in humans. The goal of the current overview is to present, based on the existing evidence, the clinical indications for regenerative therapy with EMD. Surgical periodontal treatment of deep intrabony defects with EMD promotes periodontal regeneration. The application of EMD in the context of non-surgical periodontal therapy has failed to result in periodontal regeneration. Surgical periodontal therapy of deep intrabony defects with EMD may lead to significantly higher improvements of the clinical parameters than open flap debridement alone. The results obtained following treatment with EMD are comparable to those following treatment with GTR and can be maintained over a longer period. Treatment of intrabony defects with a combination of EMD + GTR does not seem to additionally improve the results compared to treatment with EMD alone or GTR alone. The combination of EMD and some types of bone grafts/bone substitutes may result in certain improvements in the soft and hard tissue parameters compared to treatment with EMD alone. Treatment of recession-type defects with coronally repositioned flaps and EMD may promote formation of cementum, periodontal ligament and bone, and may significantly increase the width of the keratinized tissue. Application of EMD seems to provide better long-term results than coronally repositioned flaps alone. Application of EMD may enhance periodontal regeneration in mandibular Class II

  13. Beneficial Effects of Adiponectin on Periodontal Ligament Cells under Normal and Regenerative Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Nokhbehsaim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes and obesity are increasing worldwide and linked to periodontitis, a chronic disease which is characterized by the irreversible destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues, that is, periodontium. The mechanisms underlying the association of diabetes mellitus and obesity with periodontal destruction and compromised periodontal healing are not well understood, but decreased plasma levels of adiponectin, as found in diabetic and obese individuals, might be a critical mechanistic link. The aim of this in vitro study was to examine the effects of adiponectin on periodontal ligament (PDL cells under normal and regenerative conditions, and to study the regulation of adiponectin and its receptors in these cells. Adiponectin stimulated significantly the expression of growth factors and extracellular matrix, proliferation, and in vitro wound healing, reduced significantly the constitutive tumor necrosis factor-α expression, and caused a significant upregulation of its own expression. The beneficial actions of enamel matrix derivative on a number of PDL cell functions critical for periodontal regeneration were partially enhanced by adiponectin. The periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis inhibited the adiponectin expression and stimulated the expression of its receptors. In conclusion, reduced levels of adiponectin, as found in type 2 diabetes and obesity, may compromise periodontal health and healing.

  14. Dextran-based hydrogel containing chitosan microparticles loaded with growth factors to be used in wound healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, M.P. [CICS-UBI, Health Sciences Research Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal); UDI-IPG, Research Unit for Inland Development, Polytechnic Institute of Guarda, Guarda (Portugal); Morgado, P.I.; Miguel, S.P. [CICS-UBI, Health Sciences Research Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal); Coutinho, P. [CICS-UBI, Health Sciences Research Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal); UDI-IPG, Research Unit for Inland Development, Polytechnic Institute of Guarda, Guarda (Portugal); Correia, I.J., E-mail: icorreia@ubi.pt [CICS-UBI, Health Sciences Research Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal)

    2013-07-01

    Skin injuries are traumatic events, which are seldom accompanied by complete structural and functional restoration of the original tissue. Different strategies have been developed in order to make the wound healing process faster and less painful. In the present study in vitro and in vivo assays were carried out to evaluate the applicability of a dextran hydrogel loaded with chitosan microparticles containing epidermal and vascular endothelial growth factors, for the improvement of the wound healing process. The carriers' morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Their cytotoxicity profile and degradation by-products were evaluated through in vitro assays. In vivo experiments were also performed to evaluate their applicability for the treatment of skin burns. The wound healing process was monitored through macroscopic and histological analysis. The macroscopic analysis showed that the period for wound healing occurs in animals treated with microparticle loaded hydrogels containing growth factors that were considerably smaller than that of control groups. Moreover, the histological analysis revealed the absence of reactive or granulomatous inflammatory reaction in skin lesions. The results obtained both in vitro and in vivo disclosed that these systems and its degradation by-products are biocompatible, contributed to the re-establishment of skin architecture and can be used in a near future for the controlled delivery of other bioactive agents used in regenerative medicine. - Highlights: • Evaluation of a hydrogel loaded with microparticles containing growth factors for wound healing • In vitro and in vivo assays were performed to characterize the properties of the skin substitute. • The monitoring of the wound healing process was done by macroscopic and histological analysis.

  15. Regenerative Medicine Therapies for Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J Koudy; Dean, Ashley; Badlani, Gopal; Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2016-12-01

    We summarize the current state of knowledge regarding cell therapy for stress urinary incontinence and introduce new approaches of using regenerative pharmacology as an adjunct or replacement for cell therapy. We reviewed the literature by searching PubMed®, Ovid and Biological Abstracts. The period searched was 1975 to December 2015. The inclusion terms separately or in combination were stress urinary incontinence, cell therapy, chemokine, vascularization, innervation, secretome and/or animal models. Epublished articles were not included. We did not exclude articles based on impact factor. Cell therapy is currently proposed to restore functional muscle cells and aid in closure of the sphincter in women with sphincter associated incontinence. Clinical trials have included small numbers of patients and results have varied depending on the patient cohorts and the cells used. Results of preclinical studies have also varied but show a more favorable outcome. This difference was most likely explained by the fact that animal modeling is not directly translatable to the human condition. However, preclinical studies have identified an exciting new approach to regeneration of the urinary sphincter using the components of cells (secretomes) or chemokines that home reparative cells to sites of injury. Cell therapy will continue to be explored. However, a regenerative pharmacological approach to the treatment of stress urinary incontinence holds the promise of bypassing the lengthy and expensive process of cell isolation and also increasing the availability of treatment in many clinical settings. This approach requires careful preclinical modeling and attention to its health benefit-to-risk ratio. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Regenerative Medicine and Restoration of Joint Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Miyamoto, M., Ito, H., Mukai, S., Kobayashi, T., Yama- moto , H., Kobayashi, M., et al. Simultaneous stimulation of EP2 and EP4 is essential to the effect...Ogasawara, T., Asawa, Y., Kishi- moto , J., Takahashi, T., et al. Optimal combination of soluble 10 TAYLOR ET AL. factors for tissue engineering of...electron microscope (SEM; JSM-6460, Jeol, Akishima, Tokyo) at 20 kV accelerating voltage. To make the sample electrically conductive, they were sputter

  17. Regenerative Medicine and Restoration of Joint Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

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  18. Regenerative Medicine and Restoration of Joint Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    in trypsin (trypsin/protein ratio 1:50; 120 µL 50 mmol/L ammonium bicarbonate, 100 µL methanol , 150 µL water) overnight at 37 °C. Samples were...210x353mm (300 x 300 DPI) John Wiley & Sons Sox9 5’-ACG CCG AGC TCA GCA AGA-3’ 3’-CAC GAA CGG CCG CTT CT-5’ Aggrecan 5’-TGA GTC CTC AAG CCT CCT GT-3...3’-TC TCC CTG TGC AGT ATA CGG-5’ Versican 5’-AGA GAA GGT GAT GGT GAA GAT AG-3’ 3’-C AGT CAG AGG CGT AGT TGC-5’ COMP 5’-TGC CTG TGA CAA CTG TCC TCA

  19. Wound debridement optimisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågren, Sven Per Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Wound debridement, the removal of contaminated tissue and senescent cells, is the cornerstone in the care of patients with chronic wounds.......Wound debridement, the removal of contaminated tissue and senescent cells, is the cornerstone in the care of patients with chronic wounds....

  20. Wound Healing Activity of a New Formulation from Platelet Lysate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Jamshidzadeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is an attractive preparation in regenerative medicine due to its potential role in the healing process in different experimental models. This study was designed to investigate the wound healing activity of a new formulation of PRP. Different gel-based formulations of PRP were prepared. Open excision wounds were made on the back of male Sprague-Dawley rats, and PRP gel was administered topically once daily until the wounds healed completely (12 days. The results revealed that the tested PRP formulation significantly accelerated the wound healing process by increasing the wound contraction, tissue granulization, vascularization, and collagen regeneration. Interestingly, this study showed that there were no significant differences between the PRP and its gel-based formulation in all the above mentioned parameters. Although this investigation showed that PRP formulation had significant wound healing effects, the PRP gel-based formulation also had significant wound healing properties. This might indicate the wound healing properties of the PRP gel ingredients in the current investigation.

  1. Rigenera protocol in the treatment of surgical wound dehiscence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcarelli, Marco; Trovato, Letizia; Novarese, Elvio; Riccio, Michele; Graziano, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    The effective management of post-operative wounds is important to prevent potential complications such as surgical-site infections and wound dehiscence. The purpose of this study was to treat wound dehiscence in elderly patients who were subjected to orthopaedic surgical interventions. The dehisced wounds were treated with autologous micro-grafts obtained using a promising CE-certified medical device called Rigeneracons. This instrument is a biological disruptor of human tissues able to specifically select progenitor cells that, as already reported in previous studies, maintain high cell viability but mainly have a high regenerative potential, allowing the repair of damaged tissues. Autologous micro-grafts obtained by Rigeneracons are ready to use and can be applied alone or in combination with biological scaffolds directly on the injured area. We observed in our patients a complete remission of dehisced wounds, on average, after 30 days from micro-grafts application and a total wound re-epithelialisation after 1 year from the surgical intervention. In conclusion, although we reported only three patients, autologous micro-grafts can be considered a promising approach for the treatment of dehisced wounds, improving the wound-healing process and in general the patient's quality of life without using other dressings. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. A regenerative elastocaloric heat pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrecht, Kurt; Eriksen, Dan; Dallolio, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    A large fraction of global energy use is for refrigeration and air-conditioning, which could be decarbonized if efficient renewable energy technologies could be found. Vapour-compression technology remains the most widely used system to move heat up the temperature scale after more than 100 years...... a regenerative elastocaloric heat pump that exhibits a temperature span of 15.3 K on the water side with a corresponding specific heating power up to 800 W kg−1 and maximum COP (coefficient-of-performance) values of up to 7. The efficiency and specific heating power of this device exceeds those of other devices...... based on caloric effects. These results open up the possibility of using the elastocaloric effect in various cooling and heat-pumping applications....

  3. Regenerative Therapies for Diabetic Microangiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bassi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycaemia occurring in diabetes is responsible for accelerated arterial remodeling and atherosclerosis, affecting the macro- and the microcirculatory system. Vessel injury is mainly related to deregulation of glucose homeostasis and insulin/insulin-precursors production, generation of advanced glycation end-products, reduction in nitric oxide synthesis, and oxidative and reductive stress. It occurs both at extracellular level with increased calcium and matrix proteins deposition and at intracellular level, with abnormalities of intracellular pathways and increased cell death. Peripheral arterial disease, coronary heart disease, and ischemic stroke are the main causes of morbidity/mortality in diabetic patients representing a major clinical and economic issue. Pharmacological therapies, administration of growth factors, and stem cellular strategies are the most effective approaches and will be discussed in depth in this comprehensive review covering the regenerative therapies of diabetic microangiopathy.

  4. Unitized regenerative fuel cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell system uses heat pipes to convey waste heat from the fuel cell stack to the reactant storage tanks. The storage tanks act as heat sinks/sources and as passive radiators of the waste heat from the fuel cell stack. During charge up, i.e., the electrolytic process, gases are conveyed to the reactant storage tanks by way of tubes that include dryers. Reactant gases moving through the dryers give up energy to the cold tanks, causing water vapor in with the gases to condense and freeze on the internal surfaces of the dryer. During operation in its fuel cell mode, the heat pipes convey waste heat from the fuel cell stack to the respective reactant storage tanks, thereby heating them such that the reactant gases, as they pass though the respective dryers on their way to the fuel cell stacks retrieve the water previously removed.

  5. Perivascular cells for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Mihaela; Corselli, Mirko; Chen, William C W; Péault, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) are currently the best candidate therapeutic cells for regenerative medicine related to osteoarticular, muscular, vascular and inflammatory diseases, although these cells remain heterogeneous and necessitate a better biological characterization. We and others recently described that MSC originate from two types of perivascular cells, namely pericytes and adventitial cells and contain the in situ counterpart of MSC in developing and adult human organs, which can be prospectively purified using well defined cell surface markers. Pericytes encircle endothelial cells of capillaries and microvessels and express the adhesion molecule CD146 and the PDGFRβ, but lack endothelial and haematopoietic markers such as CD34, CD31, vWF (von Willebrand factor), the ligand for Ulex europaeus 1 (UEA1) and CD45 respectively. The proteoglycan NG2 is a pericyte marker exclusively associated with the arterial system. Besides its expression in smooth muscle cells, smooth muscle actin (αSMA) is also detected in subsets of pericytes. Adventitial cells surround the largest vessels and, opposite to pericytes, are not closely associated to endothelial cells. Adventitial cells express CD34 and lack αSMA and all endothelial and haematopoietic cell markers, as for pericytes. Altogether, pericytes and adventitial perivascular cells express in situ and in culture markers of MSC and display capacities to differentiate towards osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic cell lineages. Importantly, adventitial cells can differentiate into pericyte-like cells under inductive conditions in vitro. Altogether, using purified perivascular cells instead of MSC may bring higher benefits to regenerative medicine, including the possibility, for the first time, to use these cells uncultured. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2012 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. The Impact of Biomechanics in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, David L.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Guo, X. Edward; Kamm, Roger; Laurencin, Cato T.; McIntire, Larry V.; Mow, Van C.; Nerem, Robert M.; Sah, Robert L.; Soslowsky, Louis J.; Spilker, Robert L.; Tranquillo, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Biomechanical factors profoundly influence the processes of tissue growth, development, maintenance, degeneration, and repair. Regenerative strategies to restore damaged or diseased tissues in vivo and create living tissue replacements in vitro have recently begun to harness advances in understanding of how cells and tissues sense and adapt to their mechanical environment. It is clear that biomechanical considerations will be fundamental to the successful development of clinical therapies based on principles of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine for a broad range of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, craniofacial, skin, urinary, and neural tissues. Biomechanical stimuli may in fact hold the key to producing regenerated tissues with high strength and endurance. However, many challenges remain, particularly for tissues that function within complex and demanding mechanical environments in vivo. This paper reviews the present role and potential impact of experimental and computational biomechanics in engineering functional tissues using several illustrative examples of past successes and future grand challenges. PMID:19583462

  7. Injectable Polyurethane Composite Scaffolds Delay Wound Contraction and Support Cellular Infiltration and Remodeling in Rat Excisional Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Elizabeth J.; Hafeman, Andrea E.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Injectable scaffolds present compelling opportunities for wound repair and regeneration due to their ability to fill irregularly shaped defects and deliver biologics such as growth factors. In this study, we investigated the properties of injectable polyurethane biocomposite scaffolds and their application in cutaneous wound repair using a rat excisional model. The scaffolds have a minimal reaction exotherm and clinically relevant working and setting times. Moreover, the biocomposites have mechanical and thermal properties consistent with rubbery elastomers. In the rat excisional wound model, injection of settable biocomposite scaffolds stented the wounds at early time points, resulting in a regenerative rather than a scarring phenotype at later time points. Measurements of wound width and thickness revealed that the treated wounds were less contracted at day 7 compared to blank wounds. Analysis of cell proliferation and apoptosis showed that the scaffolds were biocompatible and supported tissue ingrowth. Myofibroblast formation and collagen fiber organization provided evidence that the scaffolds have a positive effect on extracellular matrix remodeling by disrupting the formation of an aligned matrix under elevated tension. In summary, we have developed an injectable biodegradable polyurethane biocomposite scaffold that enhances cutaneous wound healing in a rat model. PMID:22105887

  8. Effects of a topically applied wound ointment on epidermal wound healing studied by in vivo fluorescence laser scanning microscopy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard; Alborova, Alena; Krüger-Corcoran, Daniela; Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Sterry, Wolfram; Kramer, Axel; Stockfleth, Eggert; Lademann, Jürgen

    2009-09-01

    Epidermal wound healing is a complex and dynamic regenerative process necessary to reestablish skin integrity. Fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (FLSM) is a noninvasive imaging technique that has previously been used for evaluation of inflammatory and neoplastic skin disorders in vivo and at high resolution. We employed FLSM to investigate the evolution of epidermal wound healing noninvasively over time and in vivo. Two suction blisters were induced on the volar forearms of the study participants, followed by removal of the epidermis. To study the impact of wound ointment on the process of reepithelization, test sites were divided into two groups, of which one test site was left untreated as a negative control. FLSM was used for serial/consecutive evaluations up to 8 days. FLSM was able to visualize the development of thin keratinocyte layers developing near the wound edge and around hair follicles until the entire epidermis has been reestablished. Wounds treated with the wound ointment were found to heal significantly faster than untreated wounds. This technique allows monitoring of the kinetics of wound healing noninvasively and over time, while offering new insights into the potential effects of topically applied drugs on the process of tissue repair.

  9. Regenerative Therapies for Equine Degenerative Joint Disease: A Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Broeckx; Marieke Zimmerman; Sara Crocetti; Marc Suls; Tom Mariën; Stephen J Ferguson; Koen Chiers; Luc Duchateau; Alfredo Franco-Obregón; Karin Wuertz; Spaas, Jan H.

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative joint disease (DJD) is a major cause of reduced athletic function and retirement in equine performers. For this reason, regenerative therapies for DJD have gained increasing interest. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were isolated from a 6-year-old donor horse. MSCs were either used in their native state or after chondrogenic induction. In an initial study, 20 horses with naturally occurring DJD in the fetlock joint were divided in 4 groups and injecte...

  10. Specific sizes of hyaluronan oligosaccharides stimulate fibroblast migration and excisional wound repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Tolg

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA plays a key role in both fibrotic and regenerative tissue repair. Accumulation of high molecular weight HA is typical of regenerative repair, which is associated with minimal inflammation and fibrosis, while fragmentation of HA is typical of postnatal wounds, which heal in the presence of inflammation and transient fibrosis. It is generally considered that HA oligosaccharides and fragments of a wide size range support these processes of adult, fibrotic wound repair yet the consequences of sized HA fragments/oligosaccharides to each repair stage is not well characterized. Here, we compared the effects of native HA, HA oligosaccharide mixtures and individual sizes (4-10 mer oligosaccharides, 5 and, 40 kDa of HA oligosaccharides and fragments, on fibroblast migration in scratch wound assays and on excisional skin wound repair in vivo. We confirm that 4-10 mer mixtures significantly stimulated scratch wound repair and further report that only the 6 and 8 mer oligosaccharides in this mixture are responsible for this effect. The HA 6 mer promoted wound closure, accumulation of wound M1 and M2 macrophages and the M2 cytokine TGFβ1, but did not increase myofibroblast differentiation. The effect of 6 mer HA on wound closure required both RHAMM and CD44 expression. In contrast, The 40 kDa HA fragment inhibited wound closure, increased the number of wound macrophages but had no effect on TGFβ1 accumulation or subsequent fibrosis. These results show that specific sizes of HA polymer have unique effects on postnatal wound repair. The ability of 6 mer HA to promote wound closure and inflammation resolution without increased myofibroblast differentiation suggests that this HA oligosaccharide could be useful for treatment of delayed or inefficient wound repair where minimal fibrosis is advantageous.

  11. Regenerative Capacity of Macrophages for Remyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil eRawji

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available White matter injury, consisting of loss of axons, myelin and oligodendrocytes, is common in many neurological disorders and is believed to underlie several motor and sensory deficits. Remyelination is the process in which the insulative myelin sheath is restored to axons, thereby facilitating recovery from functional loss. Remyelination proceeds with oligodendrocyte precursor cells that differentiate into oligodendrocytes to synthesize the new myelin sheath after demyelination. This process is influenced by several factors, including trophic factors, inhibitory molecules in the lesion microenvironment, age of the subject, as well as the inflammatory response. Currently studied strategies that enhance remyelination consist of pharmacological approaches that directly induce oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation or using agents to neutralize the inhibitory microenvironment. Another strategy is to harness a reparative inflammatory response. This response, coordinated by central nervous system resident microglia and peripherally-derived infiltrating macrophages, has been shown to be important in the remyelination process. These innate immune cells perform important functions in remyelination, including the proteolysis and phagocytosis of inhibitory molecules present in the lesion microenvironment, the provision of trophic and metabolic factors to oligodendrocyte precursor cells, in addition to iron handling capacity. Additionally, an initial pro-inflammatory phase followed by a regulatory/anti-inflammatory phase has been shown to be important for oligodendrocyte precursor cell proliferation and differentiation, respectively. This review will discuss the beneficial roles of macrophages/microglia in remyelination and discuss therapeutic strategies to obtain the optimal regenerative macrophage phenotype for enhanced remyelination.

  12. Designing biomaterials with immunomodulatory properties for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andorko, James I.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Recent research in the vaccine and immunotherapy fields has revealed that biomaterials have the ability to activate immune pathways, even in the absence of other immune‐stimulating signals. Intriguingly, new studies reveal these responses are influenced by the physicochemical properties of the material. Nearly all of this work has been done in the vaccine and immunotherapy fields, but there is tremendous opportunity to apply this same knowledge to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This review discusses recent findings that reveal how material properties—size, shape, chemical functionality—impact immune response, and links these changes to emerging opportunities in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. We begin by discussing what has been learned from studies conducted in the contexts of vaccines and immunotherapies. Next, research is highlighted that elucidates the properties of materials that polarize innate immune cells, including macrophages and dendritic cells, toward either inflammatory or wound healing phenotypes. We also discuss recent studies demonstrating that scaffolds used in tissue engineering applications can influence cells of the adaptive immune system—B and T cell lymphocytes—to promote regenerative tissue microenvironments. Through greater study of the intrinsic immunogenic features of implantable materials and scaffolds, new translational opportunities will arise to better control tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:28932817

  13. Trauma and wound management: gunshot wounds in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsterman, Amelia S; Hanson, R Reid

    2014-08-01

    Bullet wounds in horses can cause a wide array of injuries, determined by the type of projectile, the energy of the bullet on entry, and the type of tissue the bullet encounters. Treatment includes identification of all structures involved, debridement of the permanent cavity, and establishing adequate drainage. Bullet wounds should be treated as contaminated, and broad-spectrum antibiotics, including those with an anaerobic spectrum, are indicated. Although musculoskeletal injuries resulting from gunshots are most common in horses, they carry a good prognosis for survival and return to function. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Multifunctional nanodiamonds in regenerative medicine: Recent advances and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlow, Jonathan; Pacelli, Settimio; Paul, Arghya

    2017-09-10

    With recent advances in the field of nanomedicine, many new strategies have emerged for diagnosing and treating diseases. At the forefront of this multidisciplinary research, carbon nanomaterials have demonstrated unprecedented potential for a variety of regenerative medicine applications including novel drug delivery platforms that facilitate the localized and sustained release of therapeutics. Nanodiamonds (NDs) are a unique class of carbon nanoparticles that are gaining increasing attention for their biocompatibility, highly functional surfaces, optical properties, and robust physical properties. Their remarkable features have established NDs as an invaluable regenerative medicine platform, with a broad range of clinically relevant applications ranging from targeted delivery systems for insoluble drugs, bioactive substrates for stem cells, and fluorescent probes for long-term tracking of cells and biomolecules in vitro and in vivo. This review introduces the synthesis techniques and the various routes of surface functionalization that allow for precise control over the properties of NDs. It also provides an in-depth overview of the current progress made toward the use of NDs in the fields of drug delivery, tissue engineering, and bioimaging. Their future outlook in regenerative medicine including the current clinical significance of NDs, as well as the challenges that must be overcome to successfully translate the reviewed technologies from research platforms to clinical therapies will also be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Lattice Regenerative Cooling Methods (LRCM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate a novel cooling concept called Lattice Regenerative Cooling Methods (LRCM) for future high thrust in-space propulsion...

  16. Regenerative Medicine for Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hyuk Park

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The annual meeting of the American Society for Neural Therapy and Repair (ASNTR has always introduced us to top-notch and up-to-date approaches for regenerative medicine related to neuroscience, ranging from stem cell–based therapy to novel drugs. The 16th ASNTR meeting focused on a variety of different topics, including the unknown pathogenesis or mechanisms of specific neurodegenerative diseases, stem cell biology, and development of novel alternative medicines or devices. Newly developed stem cells, such as amniotic epithelial stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as well-known traditional stem cells, such as neural, embryonic, bone marrow mesenchymal, and human umbilical cord blood–derived stem cells, were reported. A number of commercialized stem cells were also covered at this meeting. Fetal neural tissues, such as ventral mesencephalon, striatum, and Schwann cells, were investigated for neurodegenerative diseases or spinal cord injury. A number of studies focused on novel methods for drug monitoring or graft tracking, and combination therapy with stem cells and medicine, such as cytokines or trophic factors. Finally, the National Institutes of Health guidelines for human stem cell research, clinical trials of commercialized stem cells without larger animal testing, and prohibition of medical tourism were big controversial issues that led to heated discussion.

  17. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John L.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.; Zapata, Luis E.

    1994-01-01

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse.

  18. Staged regenerative sorption heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system for cooling and heating a space. A sorbent is confined in a plurality of compressors of which at least four are first stage and at least four are second stage. The first stage operates over a first pressure region and the second stage over a second pressure region which is higher than the first. Sorbate from the first stage enters the second stage. The sorbate loop includes a condenser, expansion valve, evaporator and the compressors. A single sorbate loop can be employed for single-temperature-control such as air conditioning and heating. Two sorbate loops can be used for two-temperature-control as in a refrigerator and freezer. The evaporator temperatures control the freezer and refrigerator temperatures. Alternatively the refrigerator temperature can be cooled by the freezer with one sorbate loop. A heat transfer fluid is circulated in a closed loop which includes a radiator and the compressors. Low temperature heat is exhausted by the radiator. High temperature heat is added to the heat transfer fluid entering the compressors which are desorbing vapor. Heat is transferred from compressors which are sorbing vapor to the heat transfer fluid, and from the heat transfer fluid to the compressors which are desorbing vapor. Each compressor is subjected to the following phases, heating to its highest temperature, cooling down from its highest temperature, cooling to its lowest temperature, and warming up from its lowest temperature. The phases are repeated to complete a cycle and regenerate heat.

  19. A regenerative elastocaloric heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tušek, Jaka; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Eriksen, Dan; Dall'Olio, Stefano; Tušek, Janez; Pryds, Nini

    2016-10-01

    A large fraction of global energy use is for refrigeration and air-conditioning, which could be decarbonized if efficient renewable energy technologies could be found. Vapour-compression technology remains the most widely used system to move heat up the temperature scale after more than 100 years; however, caloric-based technologies (those using the magnetocaloric, electrocaloric, barocaloric or elastocaloric effect) have recently shown a significant potential as alternatives to replace this technology due to high efficiency and the use of green solid-state refrigerants. Here, we report a regenerative elastocaloric heat pump that exhibits a temperature span of 15.3 K on the water side with a corresponding specific heating power up to 800 W kg-1 and maximum COP (coefficient-of-performance) values of up to 7. The efficiency and specific heating power of this device exceeds those of other devices based on caloric effects. These results open up the possibility of using the elastocaloric effect in various cooling and heat-pumping applications.

  20. Shock wave therapy in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Ali A; Ross, Kimberly M; Ogawa, Rei; Orgill, Dennis P

    2011-12-01

    Recently, shock wave therapy has been investigated as an adjuvant therapy in the treatment of acute and chronic wounds. There are several devices with focused and unfocused shock waves that have been administered to a heterogenous group of wounds. Encouraging preclinical and clinical studies suggest that shock wave therapy may promote wound healing with little or no adverse events, prompting investigations into the mechanism of action and additional clinical trials. The peer-reviewed literature within the past 10 years was studied using an evidence-based approach. Preclinical studies demonstrate that shock wave therapy affects cellular function and leads to the expression of several genes and elaboration of growth factors known to promote wound healing. Limited clinical trials are encouraging for the use of shock wave therapy in the treatment of acute and chronic wounds. Serious complications, including wound infections, bleeding, hematomas, seromas, and petechiae, have not been reported in the largest of these studies. Shock wave therapy is an intriguing physical modality that may play an important role as an adjuvant therapy in wound healing. To date, there is no consensus on which wounds are most likely to benefit from shock wave therapy and what the optimal power, degree of focus, and frequency or number of cycles should be. Well-designed preclinical and clinical studies are necessary to better understand shock wave therapy in wound healing.

  1. SEE SAW BASED REGENERATIVE POWER SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Tribhuwan Singh; Shahzad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Research related to electrical vehicles is gaining importance due to the energy crisis. Using regenerative braking when braking, improves the efficiency of an electric vehicle as it recovers energy that could go to waste if mechanical brakes were used. A novel regenerative braking system for neighborhood electric vehicles was designed, prototyped and tested. The proposed system utilizes a seesaw system to capture energy whereas the conventional systems regenerate to the batteries. The user ha...

  2. Recent considerations in regenerative endodontic treatment approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Aksel

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Although the regenerative treatment approaches have good clinical outcomes in the majority of case reports, the outcomes are unpredictable. Since the current clinical protocols for regenerative endodontics do not fully fulfill the triad of tissue engineering ((growth factors, scaffold and stem cells, further translational studies are required to achieve more pulp- and dentin-like tissue in the root canal system to achieve pulp regeneration.

  3. Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy in the Military: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    infection , preserve function, and save limbs and lives through early, aggressive wound care (Fig. 6). Background The most common surgical procedure per...administered intravenously before wound explo- ration along with tetanus prophylaxis. Military surgeons must employ multiple re- constructive...protection to the wound in the pres- ence of polymicrobial contamination or infection has improved. This was enabled following the in- troduction and

  4. How wounds heal

    Science.gov (United States)

    How cuts heal; How scrapes heal; How puncture wounds heal; How burns heal; How pressure sores heal; How lacerations heal ... For major wounds, follow your doctor's instructions on how to care for your injury. Avoid picking at ...

  5. Surgical wound care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... closing before the wound underneath fills in. Proper Handwashing It is important to clean your hands before ... 5°F (38°C) or higher. Alternative Names Surgical incision care; Open wound care Images Proper hand ...

  6. Surgical wound care -- closed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000738.htm Surgical wound care - closed To use the sharing features on ... made during surgery. It is also called a "surgical wound." Some incisions are small. Others are very long. ...

  7. Regenerative cell imaging in cardiac repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moudgil, Rohit; Dick, Alexander J

    2014-11-01

    Heart disease continues to be a leading cause of death in the Western world. Although strides have been made in prevention and management of coronary artery disease, lost myocardium after an ischemic event remains at the core of the morbidity and the mortality. Poor regenerative capacity of the myocardium has led to the study of cell-based therapies to restore anatomical, functional, and viable myocardium. To that end, stem cells are undifferentiated cells that are self-renewing, clonogenic, and pluripotent and therefore ideal for the restorative job. However, to refine the technique of cell-based therapy, in vivo molecular assessment is imperative to monitor cell survival and their effect on myocardial restoration. Direct imaging of the behaviour of cells after implantation into living subjects can offer great insight into their mechanisms of action, and their therapeutic efficacy. In this article we explore current knowledge of various imaging modalities that have been used to assess in vivo cellular and molecular events after administration of stem cells in injured myocardium. The goal of the article is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature, highlight various imaging modalities, and suggest some of the key concepts on the horizon in cardiac stem cell imaging. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Recent advancements in regenerative dentistry: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrollahi, Pouya; Shah, Brinda; Seifi, Amir; Tayebi, Lobat

    2016-12-01

    Although human mouth benefits from remarkable mechanical properties, it is very susceptible to traumatic damages, exposure to microbial attacks, and congenital maladies. Since the human dentition plays a crucial role in mastication, phonation and esthetics, finding promising and more efficient strategies to reestablish its functionality in the event of disruption has been important. Dating back to antiquity, conventional dentistry has been offering evacuation, restoration, and replacement of the diseased dental tissue. However, due to the limited ability and short lifespan of traditional restorative solutions, scientists have taken advantage of current advancements in medicine to create better solutions for the oral health field and have coined it "regenerative dentistry." This new field takes advantage of the recent innovations in stem cell research, cellular and molecular biology, tissue engineering, and materials science etc. In this review, the recently known resources and approaches used for regeneration of dental and oral tissues were evaluated using the databases of Scopus and Web of Science. Scientists have used a wide range of biomaterials and scaffolds (artificial and natural), genes (with viral and non-viral vectors), stem cells (isolated from deciduous teeth, dental pulp, periodontal ligament, adipose tissue, salivary glands, and dental follicle) and growth factors (used for stimulating cell differentiation) in order to apply tissue engineering approaches to dentistry. Although they have been successful in preclinical and clinical partial regeneration of dental tissues, whole-tooth engineering still seems to be far-fetched, unless certain shortcomings are addressed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. WOUND CARE IN ORTHOPAEDICS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Going hand in hand with training personnel is the need to establish wound care protocols which are totally lacking in developing countries. Negative- pressure wound therapy. This is also known as vacuum dressing, Negative. Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT). It has turned out to be very useful in burn and extensive skin ...

  10. Saliva and wound healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Veerman, E.C.I.

    2013-01-01

    Wounds in the oral cavity heal faster and with less scarring than wounds in other parts of the body. One of the factors implicated in this phenomenon is the presence of saliva, which promotes the healing of oral wounds in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, which improves the survival

  11. Improved wound care product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention pertains to use of sodium diacetate (NaHAc 2) as an antimicrobial agent against bacteria growing in biofilms. The aspects of the invention include a wound care product comprising sodium diacetate, a kit comprising a wound care product,and a methodof treating an infected wound....

  12. Combining xanthan and chitosan membranes to multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells as bioactive dressings for dermo-epidermal wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Márcia Z; Caliari-Oliveira, Carolina; Mizukami, Amanda; Swiech, Kamilla; Covas, Dimas T; Donadi, Eduardo A; Oliva-Neto, Pedro; Moraes, Ângela M

    2015-03-01

    The association between tridimensional scaffolds to cells of interest has provided excellent perspectives for obtaining viable complex tissues in vitro, such as skin, resulting in impressive advances in the field of tissue engineering applied to regenerative therapies. The use of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the treatment of dermo-epidermal wounds is particularly promising due to several relevant properties of these cells, such as high capacity of proliferation in culture, potential of differentiation in multiple skin cell types, important paracrine and immunomodulatory effects, among others. Membranes of chitosan complexed with xanthan may be potentially useful as scaffolds for multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells, given that they present suitable physico-chemical characteristics and have adequate tridimensional structure for the adhesion, growth, and maintenance of cell function. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to assess the applicability of bioactive dressings associating dense and porous chitosan-xanthan membranes to multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells for the treatment of skin wounds. The membranes showed to be non-mutagenic and allowed efficient adhesion and proliferation of the mesenchymal stromal cells in vitro. In vivo assays performed with mesenchymal stromal cells grown on the surface of the dense membranes showed acceleration of wound healing in Wistar rats, thus indicating that the use of this cell-scaffold association for tissue engineering purposes is feasible and attractive. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. The role of gene therapy in regenerative surgery: updated insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giatsidis, Giorgio; Dalla Venezia, Erica; Bassetto, Franco

    2013-06-01

    In the past two decades, regenerative surgeons have focused increasing attention on the potential of gene therapy for treatment of local disorders and injuries. Gene transfer techniques may provide an effective local and short-term induction of growth factors without the limits of other topical therapies. In 2002, Tepper and Mehrara accurately reviewed the topic: given the substantial advancement of research on this issue, an updated review is provided. Literature indexed in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database (PubMed) has been reviewed using variable combinations of keywords ("gene therapy," "regenerative medicine," "tissue regeneration," and "gene medicine"). Articles investigating the association between gene therapies and local pathologic conditions have been considered. Attention has been focused on articles published after 2002. Further literature has been obtained by analysis of references listed in reviewed articles. Gene therapy approaches have been successfully adopted in preclinical models for treatment of a large variety of local diseases affecting almost every type of tissue. Experiences in abnormalities involving skin (e.g., chronic wounds, burn injuries, pathologic scars), bone, cartilage, endothelia, and nerves have been reviewed. In addition, the supporting role of gene therapies to other tissue-engineering approaches has been discussed. Despite initial reports, clinical evidence has been provided only for treatment of diabetic ulcers, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis. Translation of gene therapy strategies into human clinical trials is still a lengthy, difficult, and expensive process. Even so, cutting-edge gene therapy-based strategies in reconstructive procedures could soon set valuable milestones for development of efficient treatments in a growing number of local diseases and injuries.

  14. Operative Versus Nonoperative Management of Civilian Gunshot Wounds to the Spinal Cord: Novel Use of the Functional Independence Measure for Validated Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCunniff, Peter T; Ramey, James S; Scott, Meredith L; Roach, Mary J; Vallier, Heather A; Moore, Timothy A; Kelly, Michael L

    2017-10-01

    Surgery for patients with gunshot wound spinal cord injury (GSCI) remains controversial. Few recent studies provide standardized follow-up and detailed functional outcomes. To our knowledge, the research we present in this study is unique in that we are the first to incorporate Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores as an outcomes measure for neurologic recovery in patients with GSCI. Patients with GSCI were divided into surgical and nonsurgical groups. Neurologic function was measured according to the American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale and defined as either complete or incomplete injury. Outcomes were then analyzed separately for complete and incomplete GSCI groups during hospitalization and rehabilitation. Baseline admissions characteristics were similar between surgical and nonsurgical groups except for a greater median injury severity score in the nonsurgical group (34 vs. 27; P = 0.02). For complete GSCI, total length of stay (LOS) was significantly longer in the surgical group (52 vs. 42 days; P = 0.04), and no difference was observed in overall FIM scores (58 vs. 54; P = 0.7). For incomplete GSCI, rehabilitation LOS was longer (35 vs. 21; P = 0.02) and a trend towards longer total LOS was observed in the surgical group (40 vs. 32; P = 0.07). No difference was observed in overall FIM scores (61 vs. 62; P = 0.9). Surgery for patients with GSCI is associated with increased LOS and is not associated with improved FIM scores for patients with either complete or incomplete spinal cord injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of pH on cell viability, cell migration, cell proliferation, wound closure, and wound reepithelialization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Carla R; Singh, Mansher; Targosinski, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    have investigated the role of pH in relation to pathogens but studies concentrating on the effects of pH on wound healing itself are inconclusive. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively and in a controlled fashion investigate the effect of pH on wound healing by studying its effect on human......Wound microenvironment plays a major role in the process of wound healing. It contains various external and internal factors that participate in wound pathophysiology. The pH is an important factor that influences wound healing by changing throughout the healing process. Several previous studies...... primary keratinocyte and fibroblast function in vitro and on wound healing in vivo. In vitro, primary human keratinocytes and fibroblasts were cultured in different levels of pH (5.5-12.5) and the effect on cell viability, proliferation, and migration was studied. A rat full-thickness wound model was used...

  16. Management of gunshot wounds to the mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Michael; Sawatari, Yoh

    2010-07-01

    The gunshot wound to the mandible is a unique traumatic injury. The resultant injury from the gunshot wound is diverse because of the variability of the projectile, motion, velocity, and tissue characteristics. When a high-velocity projectile strikes the mandible, often times the wound will consist of a severely comminuted mandible surrounded by nonvital soft tissues and the implantation of multiple foreign bodies. This represents a challenge for the treating surgeon. The anatomy and function of the mandible make it such that the care of the gunshot wound requires a combination of trauma and reconstructive surgeries. There are varying techniques advocated for the management of gunshot wound to the face. However, for the comminuted mandible fracture sustained from a gunshot wound, an approach involving the fabrication of an occlusal splint, intermaxillary fixation, aggressive debridement of hard and soft tissues, and immediate reconstruction with a titanium plate is a comprehensive approach that can restore the appropriate function and contour of the patient. At the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Miami, this approach to the comminuted mandible fracture secondary to the gunshot wound has led to the effective management of this specific subset of injury. The complication rate is comparable with the current literature and provides an advantage as a 1-stage management to restore appropriate function and cosmesis to the patient.

  17. Coacervate delivery of HB-EGF accelerates healing of type 2 diabetic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wounds such as diabetic ulcers pose a significant challenge as a number of underlying deficiencies prevent natural healing. In pursuit of a regenerative wound therapy, we developed a heparin-based coacervate delivery system that provides controlled release of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like growth factor (HB-EGF) within the wound bed. In this study, we used a polygenic type 2 diabetic mouse model to evaluate the capacity of HB-EGF coacervate to overcome the deficiencies of diabetic wound healing. In full-thickness excisional wounds on NONcNZO10 diabetic mice, HB-EGF coacervate enhanced the proliferation and migration of epidermal keratinocytes, leading to accelerated epithelialization. Furthermore, increased collagen deposition within the wound bed led to faster wound contraction and greater wound vascularization. Additionally, in vitro assays demonstrated that HB-EGF released from the coacervate successfully increased migration of diabetic human keratinocytes. The multifunctional role of HB-EGF in the healing process and its enhanced efficacy when delivered by the coacervate make it a promising therapy for diabetic wounds. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  18. Regulation of regenerative periodontal healing by NAMPT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokhbehsaim, Marjan; Keser, Sema; Jäger, Andreas; Jepsen, Søren; Deschner, James

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues. Obese individuals have an increased risk of periodontitis, and elevated circulating levels of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) may be a pathomechanistic link between both diseases. Recently, increased levels of NAMPT have also been found in patients with periodontitis, irrespective of the presence of obesity. This in vitro study sought to examine the effects of NAMPT on the regenerative capacity of human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells and, thereby, periodontal healing. PDL cells treated with enamel matrix derivative (EMD), which was used to mimic regenerative healing conditions in vitro, were grown in the presence and absence of NAMPT for up to 14 d. EMD stimulated significantly (P periodontal regeneration are counteracted by NAMPT. Enhanced levels of NAMPT, as found in obesity and periodontal inflammation, may compromise the regenerative capacity of PDL cells and, thereby, periodontal healing in the presence of EMD.

  19. Wound care in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caston, Stephanie S

    2012-04-01

    Care of equine wounds in the field can be a challenging endeavor. Many times, wound care is complicated by chronicity or by prior inappropriate care in addition to the great degree of tissue trauma that occurred when the horse was wounded. Recognizing involvement of synovial structures, loss of skin, and damage to bone are critical in the initial examination of wounds and will guide future care. Education of clients is also important in that preparing them for possible outcomes during healing may help improve compliance and proper treatment of wound. Owners and trainers often perform much of the daily care and monitoring of equine wounds and thus can greatly assist or impede the progress. Bandaging is important to management of equine wounds-especially on the limbs-and is sometimes overlooked because of its labor-intensive nature and the desire for a spray, ointment, or salve that will heal the wound. The practitioner that improves and utilizes his or her understanding of the wound-healing process in concert with his or her knowledge of local anatomy will be the one who is best equipped to care for wounds in ambulatory practice.

  20. Circadian rhythms accelerate wound healing in female Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Erin J; Onishi, Kenneth G; Prendergast, Brian J

    2017-03-15

    Circadian rhythms (CRs) provide temporal regulation and coordination of numerous physiological traits, including immune function. CRs in multiple aspects of immune function are impaired in rodents that have been rendered circadian-arrhythmic through various methods. In Siberian hamsters, circadian arrhythmia can be induced by disruptive light treatments (DPS). Here we examined CRs in wound healing, and the effects of circadian disruption on wound healing in DPS-arrhythmic hamsters. Circadian entrained/rhythmic (RHYTH) and behaviorally-arrhythmic (ARR) female hamsters were administered a cutaneous wound either 3h after light onset (ZT03) or 2h after dark onset (ZT18); wound size was quantified daily using image analyses. Among RHYTH hamsters, ZT03 wounds healed faster than ZT18 wounds, whereas in ARR hamsters, circadian phase did not affect wound healing. In addition, wounds healed slower in ARR hamsters. The results document a clear CR in wound healing, and indicate that the mere presence of organismal circadian organization enhances this aspect of immune function. Faster wound healing in CR-competent hamsters may be mediated by CR-driven coordination of the temporal order of mechanisms (inflammation, leukocyte trafficking, tissue remodeling) underlying cutaneous wound healing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Anterior gradient 2 is induced in cutaneous wound and promotes wound healing through its adhesion domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qi; Mangukiya, Hitesh Bhagavanbhai; Mashausi, Dhahiri Saidi; Guo, Hao; Negi, Hema; Merugu, Siva Bharath; Wu, Zhenghua; Li, Dawei

    2017-09-01

    Anterior gradient 2 (AGR2), a member of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family, is both located in cytoplasm and secreted into extracellular matrix. The orthologs of AGR2 have been linked to limb regeneration in newt and wound healing in zebrafish. In mammals, AGR2 influences multiple cell signaling pathways in tumor formation and in normal cell functions related to new tissue formation like angiogenesis. However, the function of AGR2 in mammalian wound healing remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate AGR2 expression and its function during skin wound healing and the possible application of external AGR2 in cutaneous wound to accelerate the healing process. Our results showed that AGR2 expression was induced in the migrating epidermal tongue and hyperplastic epidermis after skin excision. Topical application of recombinant AGR2 significantly accelerated wound-healing process by increasing the migration of keratinocytes (Kera.) and the recruitment of fibroblasts (Fibro.) near the wounded area. External AGR2 also promoted the migration of Kera. and Fibro. in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. The adhesion domain of AGR2 was required for the formation of focal adhesions in migrating Fibro., leading to the directional migration along AGR2 gradient. These results indicate that recombinant AGR2 accelerates skin wound healing through regulation of Kera. and Fibro. migration, thus demonstrating its potential utility as an alternative strategy of the therapeutics to accelerate the healing of acute or chronic skin wounds. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. A note on skewness in regenerative simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, Søren; Rydén, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to show, empirically and theoretically, that performance evaluation by means of regenerative simulation often involves random variables with distributions that are heavy tailed and heavily skewed. This, in turn, leads to the variance of estimators being poorly...... estimated, and confidence intervals having actual coverage quite different from (typically lower than) the nominal one. We illustrate these general ideas by estimating the mean occupancy and tail probabilities in M/G/1 queues, comparing confidence intervals computed from batch means to various intervals...... computed from regenerative cycles. In addition, we provide theoretical results on skewness to support the empirical findings....

  3. Platelet-rich plasma in regenerative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guhta Ra Hara and Thaha Basu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP contains at least seven growth factors including epidermal, plateletderived, transforming, vascular endothelial, fibroblast, insulin-like and keratinocyte growth factor. The therapeutic effect of PRP occurs because of the high concentration of these growth factors compared with those found in normal plasma. In recent years, PRP is widely used across many clinical fields, especially in regenerative medicine. This review aimed at presenting an overview of the applications of PRP in regenerative medicine. The mechanisms of PRP effects on healing are also stated in this review. [Biomed Res Ther 2014; 1(1.000: 25-31

  4. New state of nanofibers in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian, Farideh; Abhari, Alireza; Nejati-Koshki, Kazem; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2017-03-01

    Regenerative medicine has discovered engineered nanofiber scaffolds enhancing regeneration process. These agents have an attractive property to mimic the native environment. They are excellent agents in binding the extracellular matrix of a cell to another cell. They help in the growth and multiplication of the cell and help in the differentiation of the cells which are required before the regeneration process. Regenerative medicine focuses on cellular therapies, origins of stem and progenitor cells, and on explaining how they persevere (or do not) in adult organisms and improvement of biomaterials. The focus of this review is on the application of nanofiber scaffolds.

  5. Regenerative cooling for liquid rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Feng

    1995-01-01

    Heat transfer in the thrust chamber is of great importance in the design of liquid propellant rocket engines. Regenerative cooling is an advanced method which can ensure not only the proper running but also higher performance of a rocket engine. The theoretical model is complicated, it relates to fluid dynamics, heat transfer, combustion, etc... In this paper, a regenerative cooling model is presented. Effects such as radiation, heat transfer to environment, variable thermal properties and coking are included in the model. This model can be applied to all kinds of liquid propellant rocket engines as well as similar constructions. The modularized computer code is completed in the work.

  6. Wound repair in Pocillopora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Villalobos, Jenny Carolina; Work, Thierry M.; Calderon-Aguileraa, Luis Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Corals routinely lose tissue due to causes ranging from predation to disease. Tissue healing and regeneration are fundamental to the normal functioning of corals, yet we know little about this process. We described the microscopic morphology of wound repair in Pocillopora damicornis. Tissue was removed by airbrushing fragments from three healthy colonies, and these were monitored daily at the gross and microscopic level for 40 days. Grossly, corals healed by Day 30, but repigmentation was not evident at the end of the study (40 d). On histology, from Day 8 onwards, tissues at the lesion site were microscopically indistinguishable from adjacent normal tissues with evidence of zooxanthellae in gastrodermis. Inflammation was not evident. P. damicornis manifested a unique mode of regeneration involving projections of cell-covered mesoglea from the surface body wall that anastomosed to form gastrovascular canals.

  7. Regenerative potential and healing dynamics of the periodontium: a critical-size supra-alveolar periodontal defect study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimeni, Giuseppe; Susin, Cristiano; Wikesjö, Ulf M E

    2009-03-01

    The nature and characteristics of the newly formed periodontium obtained following regenerative procedures remain a matter of controversy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the regenerative potential of the periodontal attachment and healing dynamics as observed from the spatial distribution of newly formed cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone following optimal circumstances for wound healing/regeneration in a discriminating animal model. Critical-size, 6-mm, supra-alveolar, periodontal defects were surgically created in six young adult Beagle dogs. Space-providing ePTFE devices with 300-microm laser-drilled pores were implanted to support wound stability and space provision in one jaw quadrant/animal. Treatments were alternated between left and right jaw quadrants in subsequent animals. The gingival flaps were advanced to submerge the defect sites for primary intention healing. Histometric analysis followed an 8-week healing interval. Healing was uneventful in all animals. The histometric analysis showed that cementum regeneration (2.99 +/- 0.22 mm) was significantly greater than PDL (2.54 +/- 0.18 mm, p=0.03) and bone regeneration (2.46 +/- 0.26 mm, p=0.03). The wound area showed significant positive non-linear effect on cementum (log beta=1.25, pperiodontal wound healing/regeneration. Moreover, space provision positively influences the extent of periodontal regeneration.

  8. Equine epidermis: a source of epithelial-like stem/progenitor cells with in vitro and in vivo regenerative capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeckx, Sarah Y; Maes, Sofie; Martinello, Tiziana; Aerts, Désirée; Chiers, Koen; Mariën, Tom; Patruno, Marco; Franco-Obregón, Alfredo; Spaas, Jan H

    2014-05-15

    Besides the presence of somatic stem cells in hair follicles and dermis, the epidermis also contains a subpopulation of stem cells, reflecting its high regenerative capacity. However, only limited information concerning epidermis-derived epithelial-like stem/progenitor cells (EpSCs) is available to date. Nonetheless, this stem cell type could prove itself useful in skin reconstitution after injury. After harvesting from equine epidermis, the purified cells were characterized as EpSCs by means of positive expression for CD29, CD44, CD49f, CD90, Casein Kinase 2β, p63, and Ki67, low expression for cytokeratin (CK)14 and negative expression for CD105, CK18, Wide CK, and Pan CK. Furthermore, their self-renewal capacity was assessed in adhesion as well as in suspension. Moreover, the isolated cells were differentiated toward keratinocytes and adipocytes. To assess the regenerative capacities of EpSCs, six full-thickness skin wounds were made: three were treated with EpSCs and platelet-rich-plasma (EpSC/PRP-treated), while the remaining three were administered carrier fluid alone (PRP-treated). The dermis of EpSC/PRP-treated wounds was significantly thinner and exhibited more restricted granulation tissue than did the PRP-treated wounds. The EpSC/PRP-treated wounds also exhibited increases in EpSCs, vascularization, elastin content, and follicle-like structures. In addition, combining EpSCs with a PRP treatment enhanced tissue repair after clinical application.

  9. Wound scabs protect regenerating tissue against harmful ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pol, E; Mudde, Y D; Coumans, F A W; van Leeuwen, T G; Sturk, A; Nieuwland, R

    2016-11-01

    Benefits attributed to wound scabs include prevention of blood loss and protection against infection. However, when formation of a wound scab is prevented, the risk of infection is reduced. Moreover, in the absence of a wound scab, wounds heal faster and scar formation is reduced. The question arises why we develop a wound scab. Here we show that wound scabs inhibit transmission of ultraviolet radiation (UVR). We compared the UVR transmittance of human wound scabs to sunscreen by measuring the sun protection factor (SPF) with diffuse transmittance spectroscopy. Three wound scabs showed SPFs of 70, 84, and 300, which is more effective than the most protective commercially available sun block. Because our results demonstrate that a wound scab offers natural protection against UVR, and because no beneficial trait is attributed to wound scabs, we hypothesize that the main function of wound scabs is to limit DNA damage in underlying cells during regeneration of wound tissue exposed to sunlight, thereby reducing the risk of developing skin cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biofilms in wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, R A; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, M

    2014-01-01

    Following confirmation of the presence of biofilms in chronic wounds, the term biofilm became a buzzword within the wound healing community. For more than a century pathogens have been successfully isolated and identified from wound specimens using techniques that were devised in the nineteenth...... extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Cells within such aggregations (or biofilms) display varying physiological and metabolic properties that are distinct from those of planktonic cells, and which contribute to their persistence. There are many factors that influence healing in wounds and the discovery...... of biofilms in chronic wounds has provided new insight into the reasons why. Increased tolerance of biofilms to antimicrobial agents explains the limited efficacy of antimicrobial agents in chronic wounds and illustrates the need to develop new management strategies. This review aims to explain the nature...

  11. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S.; DiPietro, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutaneous wound healing and the potential cellular and/or molecular mechanisms involved. The factors discussed include oxygenation, infection, age and sex hormones, stress, diabetes, obesity, medications, alcoholism, smoking, and nutrition. A better understanding of the influence of these factors on repair may lead to therapeutics that improve wound healing and resolve impaired wounds. PMID:20139336

  12. Extracellular matrix and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquart, F X; Monboisse, J C

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular matrix has been known for a long time as an architectural support for the tissues. Many recent data, however, have shown that extracellular matrix macromolecules (collagens, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and connective tissue glycoproteins) are able to regulate many important cell functions, such as proliferation, migration, protein synthesis or degradation, apoptosis, etc., making them able to play an important role in the wound repair process. Not only the intact macromolecules but some of their specific domains, that we called "Matrikines", are also able to regulate many cell activities. In this article, we will summarize main findings showing the effects of extracellular matrix macromolecules and matrikines on connective tissue and epithelial cells, particularly in skin, and their potential implication in the wound healing process. These examples show that extracellular matrix macromolecules or some of their specific domains may play a major role in wound healing. Better knowledge of these interactions may suggest new therapeutic targets in wound healing defects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Wound Assessment: Made Easy

    OpenAIRE

    Ousey, Karen; Cook, Leanne

    2012-01-01

    A structured approach to wound assessment is required to maintain a good standard of care. This involves a thorough patient assessment, which should be carried out by skilled and competent practitioners, adhering to local and national guidelines (Harding et al, 2008). Inappropriate or inaccurate assessment can lead to delayed wound healing, pain, increased risk of infection, inappropriate use of wound dressings and a reduction in the quality of life for patients.

  14. Development of a human cardiac organoid injury model reveals innate regenerative potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voges, Holly K; Mills, Richard J; Elliott, David A; Parton, Robert G; Porrello, Enzo R; Hudson, James E

    2017-03-15

    The adult human heart possesses a limited regenerative potential following an ischemic event, and undergoes a number of pathological changes in response to injury. Although cardiac regeneration has been documented in zebrafish and neonatal mouse hearts, it is currently unknown whether the immature human heart is capable of undergoing complete regeneration. Combined progress in pluripotent stem cell differentiation and tissue engineering has facilitated the development of human cardiac organoids (hCOs), which resemble fetal heart tissue and can be used to address this important knowledge gap. This study aimed to characterize the regenerative capacity of immature human heart tissue in response to injury. Following cryoinjury with a dry ice probe, hCOs exhibited an endogenous regenerative response with full functional recovery 2 weeks after acute injury. Cardiac functional recovery occurred in the absence of pathological fibrosis or cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Consistent with regenerative organisms and neonatal human hearts, there was a high basal level of cardiomyocyte proliferation, which may be responsible for the regenerative capacity of the hCOs. This study suggests that immature human heart tissue has an intrinsic capacity to regenerate. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Notch Regulates Macrophage-Mediated Inflammation in Diabetic Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Kimball

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are essential immune cells necessary for regulated inflammation during wound healing. Recent studies have identified that Notch plays a role in macrophage-mediated inflammation. Thus, we investigated the role of Notch signaling on wound macrophage phenotype and function during normal and diabetic wound healing. We found that Notch receptor and ligand expression are dynamic in wound macrophages during normal healing. Mice with a myeloid-specific Notch signaling defect (DNMAMLfloxedLyz2Cre+ demonstrated delayed early healing (days 1–3 and wound macrophages had decreased inflammatory gene expression. In our physiologic murine model of type 2 diabetes (T2D, Notch receptor expression was significantly increased in wound macrophages on day 6, following the initial inflammatory phase of wound healing, corresponding to increased inflammatory cytokine expression. This increase in Notch1 and Notch2 was also observed in human monocytes from patients with T2D. Further, in prediabetic mice with a genetic Notch signaling defect (DNMAMLfloxedLyz2Cre+ on a high-fat diet, improved wound healing was seen at late time points (days 6–7. These findings suggest that Notch is critical for the early inflammatory phase of wound healing and directs production of macrophage-dependent inflammatory mediators. These results identify that canonical Notch signaling is important in directing macrophage function in wound repair and define a translational target for the treatment of non-healing diabetic wounds.

  16. Innovation and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Keith

    2015-04-01

    Innovation in medicine requires unique partnerships between academic research, biotech or pharmaceutical companies, and health-care providers. While innovation in medicine has greatly increased over the past 100 years, innovation in wound care has been slow, despite the fact that chronic wounds are a global health challenge where there is a need for technical, process and social innovation. While novel partnerships between research and the health-care system have been created, we still have much to learn about wound care and the wound-healing processes.

  17. Telemedicine for wound management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi K Chittoria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The escalating physiological, psychological, social and financial burdens of wounds and wound care on patients, families and society demand the immediate attention of the health care sector. Many forces are affecting the changes in health care provision for patients with chronic wounds, including managed care, the limited number of wound care therapists, an increasingly ageing and disabled population, regulatory and malpractice issues, and compromised care. The physician is also faced with a number of difficult issues when caring for chronic wound patients because their conditions are time consuming and high risk, represent an unprofitable part of care practice and raise issues of liability. Telemedicine enhances communication with the surgical wound care specialist. Digital image for skin lesions is a safe, accurate and cost-effective referral pathway. The two basic modes of telemedicine applications, store and forward (asynchronous transfer and real-time transmission (synchronous transfer, e.g. video conference, are utilized in the wound care setting. Telemedicine technology in the hands of an experienced physician can streamline management of a problem wound. Although there is always an element of anxiety related to technical change, the evolution of wound care telemedicine technology has demonstrated a predictable maturation process.

  18. Inflammation in Chronic Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruilong; Liang, Helena; Clarke, Elizabeth; Jackson, Christopher; Xue, Meilang

    2016-12-11

    Non-healing chronic wounds present a major biological, psychological, social, and financial burden on both individual patients and the broader health system. Pathologically extensive inflammation plays a major role in the disruption of the normal healing cascade. The causes of chronic wounds (venous, arterial, pressure, and diabetic ulcers) can be examined through a juxtaposition of normal healing and the rogue inflammatory response created by the common components within chronic wounds (ageing, hypoxia, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, and bacterial colonisation). Wound bed care through debridement, dressings, and antibiotics currently form the basic mode of treatment. Despite recent setbacks, pharmaceutical adjuncts form an interesting area of research.

  19. Use of elastomers in regenerative braking systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The storage of potential energy as strain energy in elastomers was investigated. The evolution of the preferred stressing scheme is described, and test results on full-size elastomeric energy storage units sized for an automotive regenerative braking system application are presented. The need for elastomeric material improvements is also discussed.

  20. Methylene Blue Assay for Estimation of Regenerative Re-Epithelialization In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyavsky, Maresha; Dickie, Renee

    2017-02-01

    The rapidity with which epithelial cells cover a wound surface helps determine whether scarring or scar-less healing results. As methylene blue is a vital dye that is absorbed by damaged tissue but not undamaged epidermis, it can be used to assess wound closure. We sought to develop a quantitative methylene blue exclusion assay to estimate the timeframe for re-epithelialization in regenerating appendages in zebrafish and axolotls, two classic model systems of regeneration. Following application of methylene blue to the amputation plane and extensive washing, the regenerating tail was imaged in vivo until staining was no longer visible. The percent area of the amputation plane positive for methylene blue, representing the area of the amputation plane not yet re-epithelialized, was measured for each time point. The loss of methylene blue occurred rapidly, within ~2.5 h in larval and juvenile axolotls and <1 h in adult zebrafish, consistent with high rates of re-epithelialization in these models of regeneration. The assay allows simple, rapid estimation of the time course for regenerative re-epithelialization without affecting subsequent regenerative ability. This technique will permit comparison of re-epithelialization across different strains and stages, as well as under the influence of various pharmacological inhibitors that affect regeneration.

  1. Giant hepatic regenerative nodules in Alagille syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Jordan B. [Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, Department of Radiology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bellah, Richard D.; Anupindi, Sudha A. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Maya, Carolina [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pawel, Bruce R. [University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Children with Alagille syndrome undergo surveillance radiologic examinations as they are at risk for developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. There is limited literature on the imaging of liver masses in Alagille syndrome. We report the ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of incidental benign giant hepatic regenerative nodules in this population. To describe the imaging findings of giant regenerative nodules in patients with Alagille syndrome. A retrospective search of the hospital database was performed to find all cases of hepatic masses in patients with Alagille syndrome during a 10-year period. Imaging, clinical charts, laboratory data and available pathology were reviewed and analyzed and summarized for each patient. Twenty of 45 patients with confirmed Alagille syndrome had imaging studies. Of those, we identified six with giant focal liver masses. All six patients had large central hepatic masses that were remarkably similar on US and MRI, in addition to having features of cirrhosis. In each case, the mass was located in hepatic segment VIII and imaging showed the mass splaying the main portal venous branches at the hepatic hilum, as well as smaller portal and hepatic venous branches coursing through them. On MRI, signal intensity of the mass was isointense to liver on T1-weighted sequences in four of six patients, but hyperintense on T1 in two of six patients. In all six cases, the mass was hypointense on T2- weighted sequences. The mass post-contrast was isointense to adjacent liver in all phases in five the cases. Five out of six patients had pathological correlation demonstrating preserved ductal architecture confirming the final diagnosis of a regenerative nodule. Giant hepatic regenerative nodules with characteristic US and MR features can occur in patients with Alagille syndrome with underlying cirrhosis. Recognizing these lesions as benign giant hepatic regenerative nodules should, thereby, mitigate any need for

  2. Non-healing wounds: the geriatric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaul, Efraim

    2009-01-01

    The most common types of non-healing wounds are four types: pressure ulcers, diabetic ulcers, ischemic ulcers and venous ulcers. Many of those wounds develop among the elderly, becoming non-healing to the extent that the patient may live with them all of his life, or even die because of them. Not enough attention is paid to the underlying contributing problems specific to the elderly patient. Those factors are physiologic (aging skin, immune state and atherosclerosis) and pathologic situation (diabetic disease, ischemia of leg). Therefore, the geriatric approach to a non-healing wound is comprehensive and multidisciplinary. Those including: patient's co-morbidities, functional state as measured by the activities of daily living (ADL) scale, nutritional status, social support, ethical beliefs and quality of life and not only the wound itself. Each discipline (the nursing staff, physician, dietitian, occupational, physical therapists and social worker) has its own task in preventing and treating such wounds. The ultimate goal therefore has been altered from healing of the wounds to symptom control, prevention of complications and to contribute to the patient's overall wellbeing. This review discusses all those items in a geriatric point of view, and how to deal with the non-healing wounds as a geriatric syndrome.

  3. Wound care matrices for chronic leg ulcers: role in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sano H

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hitomi Sano,1 Sachio Kouraba,2 Rei Ogawa11Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan; 2Sapporo Wound Care and Anti-Aging Laboratory, Sapporo, JapanAbstract: Chronic leg ulcers are a significant health care concern. Although deep wounds are usually treated by flap transfers, the operation is invasive and associates with serious complications. Skin grafts may be a less invasive means of covering wounds. However, skin grafts cannot survive on deep defects unless high-quality granulation tissue can first be generated in the defects. Technologies that generate high-quality granulation tissue are needed. One possibility is to use wound care matrices, which are bioengineered skin and soft tissue substitutes. Because they all support the healing process by providing a premade extracellular matrix material, these matrices can be termed “extracellular matrix replacement therapies”. The matrix promotes wound healing by acting as a scaffold for regeneration, attracting host cytokines to the wound, stimulating wound epithelialization and angiogenesis, and providing the wound bed with bioactive components. This therapy has lasting benefits as it not only helps large skin defects to be closed with thin skin grafts or patch grafts but also restores cosmetic appearance and proper function. In particular, since it acts as a layer that slides over the subcutaneous fascia, it provides skin elasticity, tear resistance, and texture. Several therapies and products employing wound care matrices for wound management have been developed recently. Some of these can be applied in combination with negative pressure wound therapy or beneficial materials that promote wound healing and can be incorporated into the matrix. To date, the clinical studies on these approaches suggest that wound care matrices promote spontaneous wound healing or can be used to facilitate skin grafting, thereby avoiding the need to use

  4. Sexual function and tunica albuginea wound healing following penile fracture: An 18-year follow-up study of 352 patients from Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargooshi, Javaad

    2009-04-01

    We present a study on the experiences of penile fracture in an Iranian population. Aim. To determine the long-term outcome of penile fracture. Between April 1990 and May 2008, 373 patients presented with clinical features suggestive of penile fracture. Of these, 11 declined surgery. The remaining 362 were operated upon using a degloving incision. Ten patients had venous injury and 352 had penile fracture. At follow-up visits, in addition to answering our questionnaire, the patients completed the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), Erection Hardness Grading Scale (EHGS), and global self-assessment of potency (GSAP). To enhance documentation and to promote transparency, with the patients' permission, their full name and hospital chart number was sent to the journal. Clinical findings and IIEF and EHGS scores. Mean patients' age was 29.6 years. Mean duration of follow-up was 93.6 months. Diagnosis was solely clinical. At presentation, 278 (78.9%) reported no pain. Cavernosography, ultrasonography, or magnetic resonance imaging was not used in any of the patients. Penile fracture was due to taqaandan in 269 patients (76.4%). Patients were treated with surgical exploration and repair within 24 hours of admission, regardless of delay in presentation. A nodule was found at follow-up in 330 patients (93.7%). The painless, mostly proximal nodule was palpated at the floor of the corpora cavernosa, in a deep midline position above the corpus spongiosum. The non-expansive nodule was not associated with erectile dysfunction (ED) or Peyronie's disease. Postoperative complications included mild penile pain in cold weather (two patients), transient wound edema (one patient), mild chordee (four patients), and occasional instability of the erect penis (one patient). Postoperatively, of the 217 patients who had partners, 214 (98.6%) were potent. Mean IIEF ED domain score was 29.8 +/- 1.1. The EHGS score was 4 in 203 and 3 in 11. The GSAP score was 0 in 204, 1 in 8, and 2

  5. Sugar for wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, J

    2000-07-01

    Sugar in its pure form, or incorporated into a paste containing an adhesive hydropolymer (gum), is a non-toxic treatment for a variety of wounds. Not only does it provide a suitable clean environment for angiogenesis to take place, but it will debride the wound surface and reduce odour. The presence of an adhesive hydropolymer seems to prevent hypergranulation, scarring and contraction.

  6. Surgical wound infection - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007645.htm Surgical wound infection - treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... the organ and space where you had surgery Treatment Antibiotics are used to treat most wound infections. Sometimes, you also may need surgery to ...

  7. Variation in human dental pulp stem cell ageing profiles reflect contrasting proliferative and regenerative capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alraies, Amr; Alaidaroos, Nadia Y A; Waddington, Rachel J; Moseley, Ryan; Sloan, Alastair J

    2017-02-02

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are increasingly being recognized as a viable cell source for regenerative medicine. Although significant variations in their ex vivo expansion are well-established, DPSC proliferative heterogeneity remains poorly understood, despite such characteristics influencing their regenerative and therapeutic potential. This study assessed clonal human DPSC regenerative potential and the impact of cellular senescence on these responses, to better understand DPSC functional behaviour. All DPSCs were negative for hTERT. Whilst one DPSC population reached >80 PDs before senescence, other populations only achieved high proliferative capacities possessing longer telomeres (18.9 kb) than less proliferative populations (5-13 kb). High proliferative capacity DPSCs exhibited prolonged stem cell marker expression, but lacked CD271. Early-onset senescence, stem cell marker loss and positive CD271 expression in DPSCs with low proliferative capacities were associated with impaired osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation, favouring adipogenesis. DPSCs with high proliferative capacities only demonstrated impaired differentiation following prolonged expansion (>60 PDs). This study has identified that proliferative and regenerative heterogeneity is related to contrasting telomere lengths and CD271 expression between DPSC populations. These characteristics may ultimately be used to selectively screen and isolate high proliferative capacity/multi-potent DPSCs for regenerative medicine exploitation.

  8. Are bone marrow regenerative cells ideal seed cells for the treatment of cerebral ischemia?★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Hua, Xuming; Hua, Fang; Mao, Wenwei; Wan, Liang; Li, Shiting

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow cells for the treatment of ischemic brain injury may depend on the secretion of a large number of neurotrophic factors. Bone marrow regenerative cells are capable of increasing the secretion of neurotrophic factors. In this study, after tail vein injection of 5-fluorouracil for 7 days, bone marrow cells and bone marrow regenerative cells were isolated from the tibias and femurs of rats, and then administered intravenously via the tail vein after focal cerebral ischemia. Immunohistological staining and reverse transcription-PCR detection showed that transplanted bone marrow cells and bone marrow regenerative cells could migrate and survive in the ischemic regions, such as the cortical and striatal infarction zone. These cells promote vascular endothelial cell growth factor mRNA expression in the ischemic marginal zone surrounding the ischemic penumbra of the cortical and striatal infarction zone, and have great advantages in promoting the recovery of neurological function, reducing infarct size and promoting angiogenesis. Bone marrow regenerative cells exhibited stronger neuroprotective effects than bone marrow cells. Our experimental findings indicate that bone marrow regenerative cells are preferable over bone marrow cells for cell therapy for neural regeneration after cerebral ischemia. Their neuroprotective effect is largely due to their ability to induce the secretion of factors that promote vascular regeneration, such as vascular endothelial growth factor. PMID:25206414

  9. Development of a cell sheet transportation technique for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oie, Yoshinori; Nozaki, Takayuki; Takayanagi, Hiroshi; Hara, Susumu; Hayashi, Ryuhei; Takeda, Shizu; Mori, Keisuke; Moriya, Noboru; Soma, Takeshi; Tsujikawa, Motokazu; Saito, Kazuo; Nishida, Kohji

    2014-05-01

    A transportation technique for cell sheets is necessary to standardize regenerative medicine. The aim of this article is to develop and evaluate a new transportation technique for cell sheets. We developed a transportation container with three basic functions: the maintenance of interior temperature, air pressure, and sterility. The interior temperature and air pressure were monitored by a recorder. Human oral mucosal epithelial cells obtained from two healthy volunteers were cultured on temperature-responsive culture dishes. The epithelial cell sheets were transported via an airplane between the Osaka University and Tohoku University using the developed cell transportation container. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses and flow cytometric analyses for cell viability and cell purity were performed for the cell sheets before and 12 h after transportation to assess the influence of transportation on the cell sheets. Sterility tests and screening for endotoxin and mycoplasma in the cell sheets were performed before and after transportation. During transportation via an airplane, the temperature inside the container was maintained above 32°C, and the changes in air pressure remained within 10 hPa. The cell sheets were well stratified and successfully harvested before and after transportation. The expression patterns of keratin 3/76, p63, and MUC16 were equivalent before and after transportation. However, the expression of ZO-1 in the cell sheet after transportation was slightly weaker than that before transportation. The cell viability was 72.0% before transportation and 77.3% after transportation. The epithelial purity was 94.6% before transportation and 87.9% after transportation. Sterility tests and screening for endotoxin and mycoplasma were negative for all cell sheets. The newly developed transportation technique for air travel is essential technology for regenerative medicine and promotes the standardization and spread of regenerative therapies.

  10. Cardiovascular disease: primary prevention, disease modulation and regenerative therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, Sherif

    2012-10-01

    Cardiovascular primary prevention and regeneration programs are the contemporary frontiers in functional metabolic vascular medicine. This novel science perspective harnesses our inherent ability to modulate the interface between specialized gene receptors and bioavailable nutrients in what is labeled as the nutrient-gene interaction. By mimicking a natural process through the conveyance of highly absorbable receptor specific nutrients, it is feasible to accelerate cell repair and optimize mitochondrial function, thereby achieving cardiovascular cure. We performed a comprehensive review of PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Review databases for articles relating to cardiovascular regenerative medicine, nutrigenomics and primary prevention, with the aim of harmonizing their roles within contemporary clinical practice. We searched in particular for large-scale randomized controlled trials on contemporary cardiovascular pharmacotherapies and their specific adverse effects on metabolic pathways which feature prominently in cardiovascular regenerative programs, such as nitric oxide and glucose metabolism. Scientific research on \\'cardiovascular-free\\' centenarians delineated that low sugar and low insulin are consistent findings. As we age, our insulin level increases. Those who can decelerate the rapidity of this process are prompting their cardiovascular rejuvenation. It is beginning to dawn on some clinicians that contemporary treatments are not only failing to impact on our most prevalent diseases, but they may be causing more damage than good. Primary prevention programs are crucial elements for a better outcome. Cardiovascular primary prevention and regeneration programs have enhanced clinical efficacy and quality of life and complement our conventional endovascular practice.

  11. Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sheng; Ding, Fei; Gong, Leiiei; Gu, Xiaosong

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is produced by the resident cells in tissues and organs, and secreted into the surrounding medium to provide biophysical and biochemical support to the surrounding cells due to its content of diverse bioactive molecules. Recently, the extracellular matrix has been used as a promising approach for tissue engineering. Emerging studies demonstrate that extracellular matrix scaffolds are able to create a favorable regenerative microenvironment, promote tissue-specific remodeling, and act as an inductive template for the repair and functional reconstruction of skin, bone, nerve, heart, lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, and other organs. In the current review, we will provide a critical overview of the structure and function of various types of extracellular matrix, the construction of three-dimensional extracellular matrix scaffolds, and their tissue engineering applications, with a focus on translation of these novel tissue engineered products to the clinic. We will also present an outlook on future perspectives of the extracellular matrix in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Removal of the basement membrane enhances corneal wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal-Ghosh, Sonali; Pajoohesh-Ganji, Ahdeah; Tadvalkar, Gauri; Stepp, Mary Ann

    2011-12-01

    Recurrent corneal erosions are painful and put patients' vision at risk. Treatment typically begins with debridement of the area around the erosion site followed by more aggressive treatments. An in vivo mouse model has been developed that reproducibly induces recurrent epithelial erosions in wild-type mice spontaneously within two weeks after a single 1.5 mm corneal debridement wound created using a dulled-blade. This study was conducted to determine whether 1) inhibiting MMP9 function during healing after dulled-blade wounding impacts erosion development and 2) wounds made with a rotating-burr heal without erosions. Oral or topical inhibition of MMPs after dulled-blade wounding does not improve healing. Wounds made by rotating-burr heal with significantly fewer erosions than dulled-blade wounds. The localization of MMP9, β4 integrin and basement membrane proteins (LN332 and type VII collagen), immune cell influx, and reinnervation of the corneal nerves were compared after both wound types. Rotating-burr wounds remove the anterior basement membrane centrally but not at the periphery near the wound margin, induce more apoptosis of corneal stromal cells, and damage more stromal nerve fibers. Despite the fact that rotating-burr wounds do more damage to the cornea, fewer immune cells are recruited and significantly more wounds resolve completely. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Outpatient wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, M

    1996-06-01

    As patients are discharged from the acute care setting to the home care setting at a much earlier time in their recovery, surgical wound care will be delivered by patients, family members, and home health care providers rather than by the hospital nurse in a traditional in-patient setting. This trend, which began in the mid-1980s, is expanding to include not just surgical wounds but also surgical complications such as wound dehiscence and traumatic wounds healing by secondary intention. Intensive care nurses are involved in discharge planning from the time the patient is admitted to the ICU. Early planning and teaching regarding wound care, universal precautions, and medical waste disposal have become a vital component of preparing the patient for optimal continuity of care as the transition is made into the community.

  14. Design, clinical translation and immunological response of biomaterials in regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadtler, Kaitlyn; Singh, Anirudha; Wolf, Matthew T.; Wang, Xiaokun; Pardoll, Drew M.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2016-07-01

    The field of regenerative medicine aims to replace tissues lost as a consequence of disease, trauma or congenital abnormalities. Biomaterials serve as scaffolds for regenerative medicine to deliver cells, provide biological signals and physical support, and mobilize endogenous cells to repair tissues. Sophisticated chemistries are used to synthesize materials that mimic and modulate native tissue microenvironments, to replace form and to elucidate structure-function relationships of cell-material interactions. The therapeutic relevance of these biomaterial properties can only be studied after clinical translation, whereby key parameters for efficacy can be defined and then used for future design. In this Review, we present the development and translation of biomaterials for two tissue engineering targets, cartilage and cornea, both of which lack the ability to self-repair. Finally, looking to the future, we discuss the role of the immune system in regeneration and the potential for biomaterial scaffolds to modulate immune signalling to create a pro-regenerative environment.

  15. A small peptide with potential ability to promote wound healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Tang

    Full Text Available Wound-healing represents a major health burden, such as diabetes-induced skin ulcers and burning. Many works are being tried to find ideal clinical wound-healing biomaterials. Especially, small molecules with low cost and function to promote production of endogenous wound healing agents (i.e. transforming growth factor beta, TGF-β are excellent candidates. In this study, a small peptide (tiger17, c[WCKPKPKPRCH-NH2] containing only 11 amino acid residues was designed and proved to be a potent wound healer. It showed strong wound healing-promoting activity in a murine model of full thickness dermal wound. Tiger17 exerted significant effects on three stages of wound healing progresses including (1 the induction of macrophages recruitment to wound site at inflammatory reaction stage; (2 the promotion of the migration and proliferation both keratinocytes and fibroblasts, leading to reepithelialization and granulation tissue formation; and (3 tissue remodeling phase, by promoting the release of transforming TGF-β1 and interleukin 6 (IL-6 in murine macrophages and activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK signaling pathways. Considering its easy production, store and transfer and function to promote production of endogenous wound healing agents (TGF-β, tiger17 might be an exciting biomaterial or template for the development of novel wound-healing agents.

  16. Does Fetal antigen 1 (FA1) identify cells with regenerative, endocrine and neuroendocrine potentials?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte Floridon; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Thorsen, Poul

    2000-01-01

    in the subcellular localisation indicating differential post-translational/post-transcriptional modifications during fetal development. FA1 may be a new marker of cellular subtypes with a regenerative potential and of specific cells with endocrine or neuroendocrine functions. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Aug...

  17. Regenerative Medicine for the Respiratory System: Distant Future or Tomorrow's Treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, K.M.; Hoogenkamp, H.R.; Daamen, W.F.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative medicine (RM) is a new field of biomedical science that focuses on the regeneration of tissues and organs and the restoration of organ function. Although regeneration of organ systems such as bone, cartilage, and heart has attracted intense scientific research over recent decades, RM

  18. Vascularization regenerative medicine and tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brey, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    A Complex and Growing Field The study of vascularization in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) and its applications is an emerging field that could revolutionize medical approaches for organ and tissue replacement, reconstruction, and regeneration. Designed specifically for researchers in TERM fields, Vascularization: Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering provides a broad overview of vascularization in TERM applications. This text summarizes research in several areas, and includes contributions from leading experts in the field. It defines the difficulties associated with multicellular processes in vascularization and cell-source issues. It presents advanced biomaterial design strategies for control of vascular network formation and in silico models designed to provide insight not possible in experimental systems. It also examines imaging methods that are critical to understanding vascularization in engineered tissues, and addresses vascularization issues within the context of specific...

  19. Regenerative Medicine from Protocol to Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav Steinhoff

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The essentials of the upcoming and rapidly changing specialty of regenerative medicine, which has kindled high hopes among the clinical and scientific community as well as the society, are presented concisely in this book. Considering the multivariate sub-specialties within regenerative medicine, starting with cell biology and allied basic sciences through translational research to clinical application in various specialties of medicine, enormous efforts are mandatory to bring a comprehensive text book of this nature. The authors deserve kudos for this. This book comprehensively describes and reviews the current progress in stem cell research and regenerative medicine, in five main parts: (I Biology of Tissue Regeneration; (II Stem Cell Science and Technology; (III Tissue Engineering, Biomaterials and Nanotechnology; (IV Regenerative Therapies; and (V Regulation and Ethics. It fully covers all the major components in the field. Each chapter, written by the experts in the respective areas of work, throws light on the intricacies in detail, making this book immensely useful for students, clinicians and scientists interested in regenerative medicine. However, there is still scope for further refinement of some chapters. In Part II Stem Cell Science and Technology, three important stem cell types- muscle stem cells (satellite cells, stem cells from the skin and hair follicles, and stem cells from the gut epithelium-may be added as three individual chapters which probably the authors could consider for the next edition, as these cell types represent unique stem cells that have distinct properties and replenish specifically muscle, skin, hair, and gut epithelium respectively. In the chapter on cardiac stem cells, a table summarizing the properties of the four different types of cardiac stem cells described in the text may give readers more clear comparison of the pros and cons on these cells and know their properties better. The future direction

  20. Micro-Scale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2004-01-01

    A micro-scale regenerative heat exchanger has been designed, optimized and fabricated for use in a micro-Stirling device. Novel design and fabrication techniques enabled the minimization of axial heat conduction losses and pressure drop, while maximizing thermal regenerative performance. The fabricated prototype is comprised of ten separate assembled layers of alternating metal-dielectric composite. Each layer is offset to minimize conduction losses and maximize heat transfer by boundary layer disruption. A grating pattern of 100 micron square non-contiguous flow passages were formed with a nominal 20 micron wall thickness, and an overall assembled ten-layer thickness of 900 microns. Application of the micro heat exchanger is envisioned in the areas of micro-refrigerators/coolers, micropower devices, and micro-fluidic devices.

  1. Regenerative Endodontics: A Road Less Travelled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ramta; Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun; Kaur, Dilpreet

    2014-01-01

    Although traditional approaches like root canal therapy and apexification procedures have been successful in treating diseased or infected root canals, but these modalities fail to re-establish healthy pulp tissue in treated teeth. Regeneration-based approaches aims to offer high levels of success by replacing diseased or necrotic pulp tissues with healthy pulp tissue to revitalize teeth. The applications of regenerative approaches in dental clinics have potential to dramatically improve patients’ quality of life. This review article offers a detailed overview of present regenerative endodontic approaches aiming to revitalize teeth and also outlines the problems to be dealt before this emerging field contributes to clinical treatment protocols. It conjointly covers the basic trilogy elements of tissue engineering. PMID:25478476

  2. Enhanced wound contraction in fresh wounds dressed with honey in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Due to reports that honey accelerates wound healing, an investigation on its role in wound contraction in fresh wounds inflicted on wistar rats was carried out. Method: Twenty adult male wistar rats had 2cm by 2cm square wound inflicted on their right dorsolateral trunk. They were divided into two groups.

  3. Porcine Ischemic Wound-Healing Model for Preclinical Testing of Degradable Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Prarthana; Martin, John R; Sarett, Samantha M; Pollins, Alonda C; Cardwell, Nancy L; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Guelcher, Scott A; Nanney, Lillian B; Duvall, Craig L

    2017-11-01

    Impaired wound healing that mimics chronic human skin pathologies is difficult to achieve in current animal models, hindering testing and development of new therapeutic biomaterials that promote wound healing. In this article, we describe a refinement and simplification of the porcine ischemic wound model that increases the size and number of experimental sites per animal. By comparing three flap geometries, we adopted a superior configuration (15 × 10 cm) that enabled testing of twenty 1 cm 2 wounds in each animal: 8 total ischemic wounds within 4 bipedicle flaps and 12 nonischemic wounds. The ischemic wounds exhibited impaired skin perfusion for ∼1 week. To demonstrate the utility of the model for comparative testing of tissue regenerative biomaterials, we evaluated the healing process in wounds implanted with highly porous poly (thioketal) urethane (PTK-UR) scaffolds that were fabricated through reaction of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-cleavable PTK macrodiols with isocyanates. PTK-lysine triisocyanate (LTI) scaffolds degraded significantly in vitro under both oxidative and hydrolytic conditions whereas PTK-hexamethylene diisocyanate trimer (HDIt) scaffolds were resistant to hydrolytic breakdown and degraded exclusively through an ROS-dependent mechanism. Upon placement into porcine wounds, both types of PTK-UR materials fostered new tissue ingrowth over 10 days in both ischemic and nonischemic tissue. However, wound perfusion, tissue infiltration and the abundance of pro-regenerative, M2-polarized macrophages were markedly lower in ischemic wounds independent of scaffold type. The PTK-LTI implants significantly improved tissue infiltration and perfusion compared with analogous PTK-HDIt scaffolds in ischemic wounds. Both LTI and HDIt-based PTK-UR implants enhanced M2 macrophage activity, and these cells were selectively localized at the scaffold/tissue interface. In sum, this modified porcine wound-healing model decreased animal usage, simplified

  4. Regenerative Intelligent Brake Control for Electric Motorcycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Jesús Castillo Aguilar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle models whose propulsion system is based on electric motors are increasing in number within the automobile industry. They will soon become a reliable alternative to vehicles with conventional propulsion systems. The main advantages of this type of vehicles are the non-emission of polluting gases and noise and the effectiveness of electric motors compared to combustion engines. Some of the disadvantages that electric vehicle manufacturers still have to solve are their low autonomy due to inefficient energy storage systems, vehicle cost, which is still too high, and reducing the recharging time. Current regenerative systems in motorcycles are designed with a low fixed maximum regeneration rate in order not to cause the rear wheel to slip when braking with the regenerative brake no matter what the road condition is. These types of systems do not make use of all the available regeneration power, since more importance is placed on safety when braking. An optimized regenerative braking strategy for two-wheeled vehicles is described is this work. This system is designed to recover the maximum energy in braking processes while maintaining the vehicle’s stability. In order to develop the previously described regenerative control, tyre forces, vehicle speed and road adhesion are obtained by means of an estimation algorithm. A based-on-fuzzy-logic algorithm is programmed to carry out an optimized control with this information. This system recuperates maximum braking power without compromising the rear wheel slip and safety. Simulations show that the system optimizes energy regeneration on every surface compared to a constant regeneration strategy.

  5. Application of Regenerative Medicine for Kidney Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoo, Takashi; Fukui, Akira; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2007-01-01

    Following recent advancements of stem cell research, the potential for organ regeneration using somatic stem cells as an ultimate therapy for organ failure has increased. However, anatomically complicated organs such as the kidney and liver have proven more refractory to stem cell-based regenerative techniques. At present, kidney regeneration is considered to require one of two approaches depending on the type of renal failure, namely acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic renal failure (CRF).

  6. Introduction to regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, J-F; Decot, V; Huseltein, C; He, X; Zhang, L; Magdalou, J; Li, Y P; Menu, P; Li, N; Wang, Y Y; de Isla, N; Bensoussan, D

    2012-01-01

    Human tissues don't regenerate spontaneously, explaining why regenerative medicine and cell therapy represent a promising alternative treatment (autologous cells or stem cells of different origins). The principle is simple: cells are collected, expanded and introduced with or without modification into injured tissues or organs. Among middle-term therapeutic applications, cartilage defects, bone repair, cardiac insufficiency, burns, liver or bladder, neurodegenerative disorders could be considered.

  7. Reflective Self-Regenerative Systems Architecture Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    replicas from a computation in order to either increase robustness or free up resources from a given task. The final piece that needs to be...niques and tools in military situations. These discussions are in the context of an SRS Phase II program (Self-Regenerative Systems, Phase II...that verifies and preserves invariants of program data structures. Pro- grammers specify the invariants that data structures should maintain during

  8. Mesenchymal dental stem cells in regenerative dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Lozano, Francisco Javier; Insausti, Carmen Luisa; Iniesta, Francisca; Blanquer, Miguel; Ramírez, María del Carmen; Meseguer, Luis; Meseguer Henarejos, Ana Belén; Marín Atucha, Noemi Teresa; Martínez, Salvador; Moraleda Jiménez, José María

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, tissue engineering is a field that has been suffering an enormous expansion in the regenerative medicine and dentistry. The use of cells as mesenchymal dental stem cells of easy access for dentist and oral surgeon, immunosuppressive properties, high proliferation and capacity to differentiate into odontoblasts, cementoblasts, osteoblasts and other cells implicated in the teeth, suppose a good perspective of future in the clinical dentistry. However, is necessary advance in...

  9. MODERN WOUND DRESSING FOR WOUND INFECTION: AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Novida Rizani

    2012-01-01

    When the tissue of skin is break means a wound is happens. To seal it, many choices of wound healing are available. Moist wound dressing can be better optional than the conservative ones. A bioactive agent that being added at the dressing in fact can increase healing rate of wound, moreover can subjugate wound infection caused by the pathogens, and also capable to prevent it. In this review, there are summary of modern moist wound healing, the wound pathogens, and some of sturdy bioactive age...

  10. Upconversion Nanoparticles for Bioimaging and Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Béjar, María; Francés-Soriano, Laura; Pérez-Prieto, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are proving useful for regenerative medicine in combination with stem cell therapy. Nanoparticles (NPs) can be administrated and targeted to desired tissues or organs and subsequently be used in non-invasive real-time visualization and tracking of cells by means of different imaging techniques, can act as therapeutic agent nanocarriers, and can also serve as scaffolds to guide the growth of new tissue. NPs can be of different chemical nature, such as gold, iron oxide, cadmium selenide, and carbon, and have the potential to be used in regenerative medicine. However, there are still many issues to be solved, such as toxicity, stability, and resident time. Upconversion NPs have relevant properties such as (i) low toxicity, (ii) capability to absorb light in an optical region where absorption in tissues is minimal and penetration is optimal (note they can also be designed to emit in the near-infrared region), and (iii) they can be used in multiplexing and multimodal imaging. An overview on the potentiality of upconversion materials in regenerative medicine is given. PMID:27379231

  11. Regenerative endodontics--Creating new horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Harnoor; Kaushik, Mamta; Sharma, Roshni

    2016-05-01

    Trauma to the dental pulp, physical or microbiologic, can lead to inflammation of the pulp followed by necrosis. The current treatment modality for such cases is non-surgical root canal treatment. The damaged tissue is extirpated and the root canal system prepared. It is then obturated with an inert material such a gutta percha. In spite of advances in techniques and materials, 10%-15% of the cases may end in failure of treatment. Regenerative endodontics combines principles of endodontics, cell biology, and tissue engineering to provide an ideal treatment for inflamed and necrotic pulp. It utilizes mesenchymal stem cells, growth factors, and organ tissue culture to provide treatment. Potential treatment modalities include induction of blood clot for pulp revascularization, scaffold aided regeneration, and pulp implantation. Although in its infancy, successful treatment of damaged pulp tissue has been performed using principles of regenerative endodontics. This field is dynamic and exciting with the ability to shape the future of endodontics. This article highlights the fundamental concepts, protocol for treatment, and possible avenues for research in regenerative endodontics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. An animal model to study regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabinejad, Mahmoud; Corr, Robert; Buhrley, Matthew; Wright, Kenneth; Shabahang, Shahrokh

    2011-02-01

    A growing body of evidence is demonstrating the possibility for regeneration of tissues within the pulp space and continued root development in teeth with necrotic pulps and open apices. There are areas of research related to regenerative endodontics that need to be investigated in an animal model. The purpose of this study was to investigate ferret cuspid teeth as a model to investigate factors involved in regenerative endodontics. Six young male ferrets between the ages of 36-133 days were used in this investigation. Each animal was anesthetized and perfused with 10% buffered formalin. Block sections including the mandibular and maxillary cuspid teeth and their surrounding periapical tissues were obtained, radiographed, decalcified, sectioned, and stained with hematoxylin-eosin to determine various stages of apical closure in these teeth. The permanent mandibular and maxillary cuspid teeth with open apices erupted approximately 50 days after birth. Initial signs of closure of the apical foramen in these teeth were observed between 90-110 days. Complete apical closure was observed in the cuspid teeth when the animals were 133 days old. Based on the experiment, ferret cuspid teeth can be used to investigate various factors involved in regenerative endodontics that cannot be tested in human subjects. The most appropriate time to conduct the experiments would be when the ferrets are between the ages of 50 and 90 days. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Pixel Grafting: An Evolution of Mincing for Transplantation of Full-Thickness Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mansher; Nuutila, Kristo; Kruse, Carla; Dermietzel, Alexander; Caterson, E J; Eriksson, Elof

    2016-01-01

    Split-thickness skin grafting is the gold standard for treatment of major skin loss. This technique is limited by donor-site availability in large burn injuries. With micrografting, a technique where split-thickness skin graft is minced into 0.8 × 0.8-mm pieces, the authors have demonstrated an expansion ratio of 1:100 and healing comparable to that achieved with split-thickness skin grafting. In this study, the authors explore the regenerative potential of a skin graft by cutting split-thickness skin grafts to pixel size (0.3 × 0.3 mm) grafts. Wound healing was studied in full-thickness wounds in a porcine model by creating an incubator-like microenvironment using polyurethane wound chambers. Multiple wound healing parameters were used to study the outcome of pixel grafting and compare it to micrografting and nontransplanted wounds. The authors' results show that 0.3 × 0.3-mm pixel grafts remain viable and contribute to skin regeneration. The pixel graft-transplanted wounds demonstrated a faster reepithelialization rate, decreased wound contraction, and increased mechanical stability compared with nontransplanted wounds. The reepithelialization rates of the wounds were significantly increased with pixel grafting at day 6 after wounding compared with micrografting. Among the other wound healing parameters, there were no significant differences between wounds transplanted with pixel grafts and micrografts. Pixel grafting technique would address the most commonly encountered limitations of the split-thickness skin graft with the possibility of an even larger expansion ratio than micrografting. This technique is simple and fast and can be conducted in the operating room or in the clinic.

  14. Management of complicated wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Sam M; Baxter, Gary M

    2005-04-01

    Most injuries, including those with significant tissue loss, can be successfully managed with proper therapy. With delayed healing, potential causes for the delay, such as sequestra, foreign bodies, and excessive motion,should be determined and treated to permit complete wound resolution. Horses have the innate ability to heal rapidly; however, minor injuries can quickly turn into complicated wounds, given the severity of the inciting trauma and the less than ideal environment in which the horses are housed. Wound management must focus on a combination of timely surgical and medical intervention to ensure the best potential outcome.

  15. Wording the Wound Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Hartnell

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the image of the Wound Man, a graphic drawing of a violently wounded figure repeated across a series of European surgical treatises from 1400 onwards. Focusing on the only known English example, preserved in the back of a late fifteenth-century medical miscellany now in the Wellcome Collection, London, this article seeks to unravel the origins and scope of this picture. Considering both the image’s diagrammatic and metaphorical qualities, it presents the Wound Man as a particularly potent site not just of surgical knowledge but of a broader medico-artistic entanglement.

  16. Synthetic Biology: Rational Pathway Design for Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jamie A

    2016-01-01

    Rational pathway design is the invention of an optimally efficient route from one state (e.g. chemical structure, state of differentiation, physiological state) to another, based on knowledge of biological processes: it contrasts with the use of natural pathways that have evolved by natural selection. Synthetic biology is a hybrid discipline of biology and engineering that offers a means for rationally designed pathways to be realized in living cells. Several areas of regenerative medicine could benefit from rational pathway design, including derivation of patient-specific stem cells, directed differentiation of stem cells, replicating physiological function in an alternative cell type, construction of custom interface tissues and building fail-safe systems into transplanted tissues. Synthetic biological approaches offer the potential for construction of these, for example controllable ex vivo stem cell niches, genetic networks for direct transdifferentiation from adult fibroblast to restricted stem cell without going via induced pluripotent stem cells, signalling pathways for realizing physiological regulation in alternative cell types, morphological modules for producing self-constructing novel 'tissues' and 'kill-switches' for therapeutically applied stem cells. Given the potential of this approach, a closer convergence of the regenerative medicine and synthetic biology research fields seems timely. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Regenerative Medicine for Periodontal and Peri-implant Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, L; Decker, A M; Nibali, L; Pilipchuk, S P; Berglundh, T; Giannobile, W V

    2016-03-01

    The balance between bone resorption and bone formation is vital for maintenance and regeneration of alveolar bone and supporting structures around teeth and dental implants. Tissue regeneration in the oral cavity is regulated by multiple cell types, signaling mechanisms, and matrix interactions. A goal for periodontal tissue engineering/regenerative medicine is to restore oral soft and hard tissues through cell, scaffold, and/or signaling approaches to functional and aesthetic oral tissues. Bony defects in the oral cavity can vary significantly, ranging from smaller intrabony lesions resulting from periodontal or peri-implant diseases to large osseous defects that extend through the jaws as a result of trauma, tumor resection, or congenital defects. The disparity in size and location of these alveolar defects is compounded further by patient-specific and environmental factors that contribute to the challenges in periodontal regeneration, peri-implant tissue regeneration, and alveolar ridge reconstruction. Efforts have been made over the last few decades to produce reliable and predictable methods to stimulate bone regeneration in alveolar bone defects. Tissue engineering/regenerative medicine provide new avenues to enhance tissue regeneration by introducing bioactive models or constructing patient-specific substitutes. This review presents an overview of therapies (e.g., protein, gene, and cell based) and biomaterials (e.g., resorbable, nonresorbable, and 3-dimensionally printed) used for alveolar bone engineering around teeth and implants and for implant site development, with emphasis on most recent findings and future directions. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  18. Design Analysis And Applications Of A Regenerative Bicycle Ergometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chukwuneke J. L.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Man needs to do some form of physical work in other to remain healthy this work is similar to the work done by any machine or equipment and thus should be channeled to give useful output but rather it is usually dissipated into the environment in form of heat. The regenerative bicycle ergometer takes advantage of the greater power generated by the limbs and arms thus conserves converts and stores the energy dissipated by the rider with an ideal mechanical advantage of 7.6 it strategically uses simple mechanisms to magnify its work and then converts this mechanical energy into electrical energy by the use of a dynamo with a speed ratio of 108.5 and a transmission efficiency of 89 the rider pedals 27rpm to obtain the dynamos rated input of 2600rpm giving an output of 12.6volts. The regenerative bicycle ergometer is designed and constructed to perform all the core functions of a bicycle ergometer having an allowable load of 116.5kg and a maximum resistance of 65.33N which is equivalent to a mass of 6.66kg. The energy converted is stored in a 12volts battery making its use flexible clean and meeting the energy demands of man.

  19. Polypragmasia in the therapy of infected wounds - conclusions drawn from the perspectives of low temperature plasma technology for plasma wound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Axel; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lademann, Jürgen; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Hinz, Peter; Assadian, Ojan

    2008-11-03

    ANTISEPTIC WOUND TREATMENT, THE FOLLOWING WORKING HYPOTHESIS IS POSTULATED: the most ideal constellation for treatment of wounds is the superficial destruction of microbial layers without deep tissue alteration, like it is caused by antiseptics, in order not to endanger the regenerative granulation tissue. At the same time, it is desirable to support and increase cell proliferation and granulation capacities. These two aspects might be achieved by using low temperature plasma technology.

  20. Polypragmasia in the therapy of infected wounds – conclusions drawn from the perspectives of low temperature plasma technology for plasma wound therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Axel; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lademann, Jürgen; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Hinz, Peter; Assadian, Ojan

    2008-01-01

    antiseptic wound treatment, the following working hypothesis is postulated: the most ideal constellation for treatment of wounds is the superficial destruction of microbial layers without deep tissue alteration, like it is caused by antiseptics, in order not to endanger the regenerative granulation tissue. At the same time, it is desirable to support and increase cell proliferation and granulation capacities. These two aspects might be achieved by using low temperature plasma technology. PMID:20204115

  1. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH promotes wound re-epithelialisation in frog and human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia T Meier

    Full Text Available There remains a critical need for new therapeutics that promote wound healing in patients suffering from chronic skin wounds. This is, in part, due to a shortage of simple, physiologically and clinically relevant test systems for investigating candidate agents. The skin of amphibians possesses a remarkable regenerative capacity, which remains insufficiently explored for clinical purposes. Combining comparative biology with a translational medicine approach, we report the development and application of a simple ex vivo frog (Xenopus tropicalis skin organ culture system that permits exploration of the effects of amphibian skin-derived agents on re-epithelialisation in both frog and human skin. Using this amphibian model, we identify thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH as a novel stimulant of epidermal regeneration. Moving to a complementary human ex vivo wounded skin assay, we demonstrate that the effects of TRH are conserved across the amphibian-mammalian divide: TRH stimulates wound closure and formation of neo-epidermis in organ-cultured human skin, accompanied by increased keratinocyte proliferation and wound healing-associated differentiation (cytokeratin 6 expression. Thus, TRH represents a novel, clinically relevant neuroendocrine wound repair promoter that deserves further exploration. These complementary frog and human skin ex vivo assays encourage a comparative biology approach in future wound healing research so as to facilitate the rapid identification and preclinical testing of novel, evolutionarily conserved, and clinically relevant wound healing promoters.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells: potential for therapy and treatment of chronic non-healing skin wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfia, Giovanni; Navone, Stefania Elena; Di Vito, Clara; Ughi, Nicola; Tabano, Silvia; Miozzo, Monica; Tremolada, Carlo; Bolla, Gianni; Crotti, Chiara; Ingegnoli, Francesca; Rampini, Paolo; Riboni, Laura; Gualtierotti, Roberta; Campanella, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex physiological process including overlapping phases (hemostatic/inflammatory, proliferating and remodeling phases). Every alteration in this mechanism might lead to pathological conditions of different medical relevance. Treatments for chronic non-healing wounds are expensive because reiterative treatments are needed. Regenerative medicine and in particular mesenchymal stem cells approach is emerging as new potential clinical application in wound healing. In the past decades, advance in the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying wound healing process has led to extensive topical administration of growth factors as part of wound care. Currently, no definitive treatment is available and the research on optimal wound care depends upon the efficacy and cost-benefit of emerging therapies. Here we provide an overview on the novel approaches through stem cell therapy to improve cutaneous wound healing, with a focus on diabetic wounds and Systemic Sclerosis-associated ulcers, which are particularly challenging. Current and future treatment approaches are discussed with an emphasis on recent advances.

  3. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) promotes wound re-epithelialisation in frog and human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Natalia T; Haslam, Iain S; Pattwell, David M; Zhang, Guo-You; Emelianov, Vladimir; Paredes, Roberto; Debus, Sebastian; Augustin, Matthias; Funk, Wolfgang; Amaya, Enrique; Kloepper, Jennifer E; Hardman, Matthew J; Paus, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    There remains a critical need for new therapeutics that promote wound healing in patients suffering from chronic skin wounds. This is, in part, due to a shortage of simple, physiologically and clinically relevant test systems for investigating candidate agents. The skin of amphibians possesses a remarkable regenerative capacity, which remains insufficiently explored for clinical purposes. Combining comparative biology with a translational medicine approach, we report the development and application of a simple ex vivo frog (Xenopus tropicalis) skin organ culture system that permits exploration of the effects of amphibian skin-derived agents on re-epithelialisation in both frog and human skin. Using this amphibian model, we identify thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) as a novel stimulant of epidermal regeneration. Moving to a complementary human ex vivo wounded skin assay, we demonstrate that the effects of TRH are conserved across the amphibian-mammalian divide: TRH stimulates wound closure and formation of neo-epidermis in organ-cultured human skin, accompanied by increased keratinocyte proliferation and wound healing-associated differentiation (cytokeratin 6 expression). Thus, TRH represents a novel, clinically relevant neuroendocrine wound repair promoter that deserves further exploration. These complementary frog and human skin ex vivo assays encourage a comparative biology approach in future wound healing research so as to facilitate the rapid identification and preclinical testing of novel, evolutionarily conserved, and clinically relevant wound healing promoters.

  4. STATISTIC, PROBABILISTIC, CORRELATION AND SPECTRAL ANALYSES OF REGENERATIVE BRAKING CURRENT OF DC ELECTRIC ROLLING STOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Nikitenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Defining and analysis of the probabilistic and spectral characteristics of random current in regenerative braking mode of DC electric rolling stock are observed in this paper. Methodology. The elements and methods of the probability theory (particularly the theory of stationary and non-stationary processes and methods of the sampling theory are used for processing of the regenerated current data arrays by PC. Findings. The regenerated current records are obtained from the locomotives and trains in Ukraine railways and trams in Poland. It was established that the current has uninterrupted and the jumping variations in time (especially in trams. For the random current in the regenerative braking mode the functions of mathematical expectation, dispersion and standard deviation are calculated. Histograms, probabilistic characteristics and correlation functions are calculated and plotted down for this current too. It was established that the current of the regenerative braking mode can be considered like the stationary and non-ergodic process. The spectral analysis of these records and “tail part” of the correlation function found weak periodical (or low-frequency components which are known like an interharmonic. Originality. Firstly, the theory of non-stationary random processes was adapted for the analysis of the recuperated current which has uninterrupted and the jumping variations in time. Secondly, the presence of interharmonics in the stochastic process of regenerated current was defined for the first time. And finally, the patterns of temporal changes of the correlation current function are defined too. This allows to reasonably apply the correlation functions method in the identification of the electric traction system devices. Practical value. The results of probabilistic and statistic analysis of the recuperated current allow to estimate the quality of recovered energy and energy quality indices of electric rolling stock in the

  5. Response of human limbal epithelial cells to wounding on 3D RAFT tissue equivalents: effect of airlifting and human limbal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massie, Isobel; Levis, Hannah J; Daniels, Julie T

    2014-10-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cell deficiency can cause blindness but may be treated by human limbal epithelial cell (hLE) transplantation, normally on human amniotic membrane. Clinical outcomes using amnion can be unreliable and so we have developed an alternative tissue equivalent (TE), RAFT (Real Architecture for 3D Tissue), which supports hLE expansion, and stratification when airlifted. Human limbal fibroblasts (hLF) may be incorporated into RAFT TEs, where they support overlying hLE and improve phenotype. However, the impact of neither airlifting nor hLF on hLE function has been investigated. hLE on RAFT TEs (±hLF and airlifting) were wounded using heptanol and re-epithelialisation (fluorescein diacetate staining), and percentage putative stem cell marker p63α and proliferative marker Ki67 expression (wholemount immunohistochemistry), measured. Airlifted, hLF- RAFT TEs were unable to close the wound and p63α expression was 7 ± 0.2% after wounding. Conversely, non-airlifted, hLF- RAFT TEs closed the wound within 9 days and p63α expression was higher at 22 ± 5% (p < 0.01). hLE on both hLF- and hLF+ RAFT TEs (non-airlifted) closed the wound and p63α expression was 26 ± 8% and 36 ± 3% respectively (ns). Ki67 expression by hLE increased from 1.3 ± 0.5% before wounding to 7.89 ± 2.53% post-wounding for hLF- RAFT TEs (p < 0.01), and 0.8 ± 0.08% to 17.68 ± 10.88% for hLF+ RAFT TEs (p < 0.05), suggesting that re-epithelialisation was a result of proliferation. These data suggest that neither airlifting nor hLF are necessarily required to maintain a functional epithelium on RAFT TEs, thus simplifying and shortening the production process. This is important when working towards clinical application of regenerative medicine products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cuts and puncture wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2009:chap 39. Simon BC, Hern HG. Wound management principles. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al., eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  7. Prevent Bite Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Prevent Bite Wounds Page Content Article Body Each year, ... bite Swollen glands that occur above the bite Prevention of Bites and Infections To prevent bites and ...

  8. Ferrets: wound healing and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilny, Anthony A; Hess, Laurie

    2004-01-01

    In all species of mammals, the stages of wound healing are the same, and both host factors and wound characteristics affect how wounds heal. The basic principles of wound care in ferrets, such as lavage, bandaging, and surgical closure, are similar to those in other species; however, knowledge of ferrets' anatomy and pathophysiology, as well as skin conditions commonly seen in ferrets, will help ensure proper wound healing.

  9. Combat Wound Initiative program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojadinovic, Alexander; Elster, Eric; Potter, Benjamin K; Davis, Thomas A; Tadaki, Doug K; Brown, Trevor S; Ahlers, Stephen; Attinger, Christopher E; Andersen, Romney C; Burris, David; Centeno, Jose; Champion, Hunter; Crumbley, David R; Denobile, John; Duga, Michael; Dunne, James R; Eberhardt, John; Ennis, William J; Forsberg, Jonathan A; Hawksworth, Jason; Helling, Thomas S; Lazarus, Gerald S; Milner, Stephen M; Mullick, Florabel G; Owner, Christopher R; Pasquina, Paul F; Patel, Chirag R; Peoples, George E; Nissan, Aviram; Ring, Michael; Sandberg, Glenn D; Schaden, Wolfgang; Schultz, Gregory S; Scofield, Tom; Shawen, Scott B; Sheppard, Forest R; Stannard, James P; Weina, Peter J; Zenilman, Jonathan M

    2010-07-01

    The Combat Wound Initiative (CWI) program is a collaborative, multidisciplinary, and interservice public-private partnership that provides personalized, state-of-the-art, and complex wound care via targeted clinical and translational research. The CWI uses a bench-to-bedside approach to translational research, including the rapid development of a human extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) study in complex wounds after establishing the potential efficacy, biologic mechanisms, and safety of this treatment modality in a murine model. Additional clinical trials include the prospective use of clinical data, serum and wound biomarkers, and wound gene expression profiles to predict wound healing/failure and additional clinical patient outcomes following combat-related trauma. These clinical research data are analyzed using machine-based learning algorithms to develop predictive treatment models to guide clinical decision-making. Future CWI directions include additional clinical trials and study centers and the refinement and deployment of our genetically driven, personalized medicine initiative to provide patient-specific care across multiple medical disciplines, with an emphasis on combat casualty care.

  10. Impaired cutaneous wound healing in mice lacking tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iba, Kousuke; Hatakeyama, Naoko; Kojima, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    . However, those of tetranectin-null mice never showed complete reepithelialization at 14 days. At 21 days after the injury, the wound healed and was covered with an epidermis. These results supported the fact that tetranectin may play a role in the wound healing process....... disruption of the tetranectin gene to elucidate the biological function of tetranectin. In this study, we showed that wound healing was markedly delayed in tetranectin-null mice compared with wild-type mice. A single full-thickness incision was made in the dorsal skin. By 14 days after the incision......, the wounds fully healed in all wild-type mice based on the macroscopic closure; in contrast, the progress of wound healing in the tetranectin null mice appeared to be impaired. In histological analysis, wounds of wild-type mice showed complete reepithelialization and healed by 14 days after the incision...

  11. Managing painful chronic wounds: the Wound Pain Management Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Patricia; Fogh, Karsten; Glynn, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Chronic wound pain is not well understood and the literature is limited. Six of 10 patients venous leg ulcer experience pain with their ulcer, and similar trends are observed for other chronic wounds. Chronic wound pain can lead to depression and the feeling of constant tiredness. Pain related...... to the wound should be handled as one of the main priorities in chronic wound management together with addressing the cause. Management of pain in chronic wounds depends on proper assessment, reporting and documenting patient experiences of pain. Assessment should be based on six critical dimensions...... document persistent wound pain and not to develop a treatment and monitoring strategy to improve the lives of persons with chronic wounds. Unless wound pain is optimally managed, patient suffering and costs to health care systems will increase. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Apr...

  12. Combination of negative pressure wound therapy and acoustic pressure wound therapy for treatment of infected surgical wounds: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Paul A; Peters, Kim L; Bowers, Jolene M

    2008-05-01

    The optimal wound therapy for healing infected wounds post surgery or surgical debridement has not been established. Negative pressure wound therapy and acoustic pressure wound therapy are advanced wound-healing modalities that apply forms of mechanical pressure to wound tissue in an effort to promote healing by stimulating cellular proliferation. Using a combination of negative pressure wound therapy and acoustic pressure wound therapy was evaluated in a series of six patients with large, infected surgical wounds presenting with moderate to large amounts of serosanguineous drainage. After concurrent treatment with both modalities (range: 4 to 12 weeks), wound volume was reduced by 99% to 100% in all wounds except one wound for which depth at end of treatment was not measurable due to hypergranulation. Similarly, wound surface area was reduced by 82% to 100%, with the exception of the hypergranular wound, which decreased in size by 60%. Serosanguineous wound drainage was reduced in four wounds and remained unchanged in two wounds.

  13. Cytological characterization of wound healing in diabetic patients on the background of the VAC-therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besedin A.M.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently the vacuum therapy of wounds (Vacuum-assisted closure, VAC is traditionally used method of treatment of wound complications in patients with diabetes in the majority of surgical departments of relevant profile in Ukraine. Due to publications of Ukrainian authors including the popularization of this treatment method, its therapeutic effects and significant advantages as compared with the traditionally used method of treating wounds by dressing in a moist environment (Moist Wound Healing has led to a number of unresolved issues relating to the application VAC-therapy. One of those is the way of assessment of wound process course on a background of the VAC-therapy. One of the most accessible and easy means of diagnostics of wound healing course is the cytological smear of wounds. Despite the long-term use of cytological method of diagnosis of wounds, peculiarities of phase course of wound process in diabetic patients on the background of VAC-therapy remain poorly studied. As a result of our research it was determined that a statistically significant difference between the basic cytological indices in the vacuum group and conventional treatment are revealed by 9-10 days of treatment. A more favorable course of wound healing on the background of vacuum therapy of wounds was reflected in the reduction of neutrophils number from 186,2±10,13 in the first cytogram to 87,3±6,12 in the fourth, presence of fibroblasts on an average of 0.8 in the field of vision on 9-10 days of treatment, absence of a smear microflora print on 7-8 days of treatment. At the end of the treatment in the conventional treatment group degenerative-regenerative index was 0,65±0,37, in the vacuum group – 1,31±0,63.

  14. A Cooperative Copper Metal-Organic Framework-Hydrogel System Improves Wound Healing in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jisheng; Chen, Siyu; Yi, Ji; Zhang, Hao; Ameer, Guillermo A

    2017-01-05

    Chronic non-healing wounds remain a major clinical challenge that would benefit from the development of advanced, regenerative dressings that promote wound closure within a clinically relevant time frame. The use of copper ions has shown promise in wound healing applications possibly by promoting angiogenesis. However, reported treatments that use copper ions require multiple applications of copper salts or oxides to the wound bed, exposing the patient to potentially toxic levels of copper ions and resulting in variable outcomes. Herein we set out to assess whether copper metal organic framework nanoparticles (HKUST-1 NPs) embedded within an antioxidant thermoresponsive citrate-based hydrogel would decrease copper ion toxicity and accelerate wound healing in diabetic mice. HKUST-1 and poly-(polyethyleneglycol citrate-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) (PPCN) were synthesized and characterized. HKUST-1 NP stability in a protein solution with and without embedding them in PPCN hydrogel was determined. Copper ion release, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and in vitro migration processes were measured. Wound closure rates and wound blood perfusion were assessed in vivo using the splinted excisional dermal wound diabetic mouse model. HKUST-1 NP disintegrated in protein solution while HKUST-1 NPs embedded in PPCN (H-HKUST-1) were protected from degradation and copper ions were slowly released. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis due to copper ion release were significantly reduced while dermal cell migration in vitro and wound closure rates in vivo were significantly enhanced. In vivo, H-HKUST-1 induced angiogenesis, collagen deposition, and re-epithelialization during wound healing in diabetic mice. These results suggest that a cooperatively stabilized, copper ion-releasing H-HKUST-1 hydrogel is a promising innovative dressing for the treatment of chronic wounds.

  15. Wound Models for Periodontal and Bone Regeneration: the role of biological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sculean, Anton; Chapple, Iain L.C.; Giannobile, William V.

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy remains the complete regeneration of those periodontal tissues lost to the destructive inflammatory-immune response, or to trauma, with tissues that possess the same structure and function, and to reestablish and sustain a heath promoting biofilm from one characterised by dysbiosis. This volume discusses the multiple facets of a transition during the late 1960’s to the present day, towards regenerative therapies founded upon a clearer understanding of the biophysiology of normal structure and function, rather than empiricism. This introductory manuscript provides an overview on the requirements of appropriate in-vitro laboratory models (e.g. cell culture), of pre-clinical (i.e. animal) models and human studies for periodontal wound and bone repair. Laboratory studies may provide valuable fundamental insights into basic mechanisms involved in wound repair and regeneration, but also suffer from a uni-dimensional and simplistic approach that does not account for the complexities of the in vivo situation, where multiple cell types and interactions all contribute to definitive outcomes. Therefore, such laboratory studies require validatory research employing preclinical models specifically designed to demonstrate proof-of-concept efficacy, preliminary safety and adaptation to human disease scenarios. Small animal models provide the most economic and logistically feasible preliminary approaches, but outcomes do not necessarily translate to larger animal or human models. The advantages and limitations of all periodontal regeneration models need to be carefully considered when planning investigations to ensure that the optimal design is adopted to answer the specific research question posed. Future challenges lie in the areas of stem cell research, scaffold designs, cell delivery and choice of growth factors, along with research to ensure appropriate gingival coverage in order to prevent gingival recession during the healing phase

  16. Wound models for periodontal and bone regeneration: the role of biologic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sculean, Anton; Chapple, Iain L C; Giannobile, William V

    2015-06-01

    The ultimate goals of periodontal therapy remain the complete regeneration of those periodontal tissues lost to the destructive inflammatory-immune response, or to trauma, with tissues that possess the same structure and function, and the re-establishment of a sustainable health-promoting biofilm from one characterized by dysbiosis. This volume of Periodontology 2000 discusses the multiple facets of a transition from therapeutic empiricism during the late 1960s, toward regenerative therapies, which is founded on a clearer understanding of the biophysiology of normal structure and function. This introductory article provides an overview on the requirements of appropriate in vitro laboratory models (e.g. cell culture), of preclinical (i.e. animal) models and of human studies for periodontal wound and bone repair. Laboratory studies may provide valuable fundamental insights into basic mechanisms involved in wound repair and regeneration but also suffer from a unidimensional and simplistic approach that does not account for the complexities of the in vivo situation, in which multiple cell types and interactions all contribute to definitive outcomes. Therefore, such laboratory studies require validatory research, employing preclinical models specifically designed to demonstrate proof-of-concept efficacy, preliminary safety and adaptation to human disease scenarios. Small animal models provide the most economic and logistically feasible preliminary approaches but the outcomes do not necessarily translate to larger animal or human models. The advantages and limitations of all periodontal-regeneration models need to be carefully considered when planning investigations to ensure that the optimal design is adopted to answer the specific research question posed. Future challenges lie in the areas of stem cell research, scaffold designs, cell delivery and choice of growth factors, along with research to ensure appropriate gingival coverage in order to prevent gingival

  17. Wound pH depends on actual wound size

    CERN Document Server

    Sirkka, T; Apell, S P

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is an intricate process that involves many types of cells, reaction pathways as well as chemical, physical and electrical cues. Since biochemical reactions and physiological events are pH-dependent we study here pH as an important major characteristic of the wound healing process in the presence of endogenous and exogenous electric fields. Our model gives the spatial pH distribution in a wound. In particular we isolate a number of dimensionless quantities which sets the length, energy and time scales governing the wound healing process and which can be experimentally tested. Most interesting finding is that wound pH depends on actual wound size.

  18. Writing Wounded: Trauma, Testimony, and Critical Witness in Literacy Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutro, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of acknowledging the "hard stuff" of life in literacy classrooms. She considers how difficult experiences--exposed wounds and the "exposing" of wounds--function in literacy classrooms. She is particularly interested in how such experiences, as they enter the public spaces of schools and…

  19. Open-wound treatment for gunshot to the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Geukers, Vincent G.; Bleeker, Fonnet E.; Allison, Celia E.; Vandertop, W. Peter

    2012-01-01

    The authors report a case of a gunshot wound to the brain in a 2.5-year-old girl. To treat the uncontrollably elevated intracranial pressure, the patient underwent bilateral decompressive craniectomy and experimental open-wound treatment. She recovered to a good functional level.

  20. Laboratory Scale Testing of Thermoelectric Regenerative Braking System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    P Sevvel; I S Stephan Thangaiah; S Mars Mukesh; G Mohammed Anif

    2015-01-01

      Thermoelectric Regenerative Braking System (TERBS) employs an energy recovery mechanism by utilizing the energy conversion at the time of braking in an automobile to generate electricity accordingly...

  1. Could we also be regenerative superheroes, like salamanders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Agnese, Alessandra; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    Development of methods to reawaken the semi-dormant regenerative potential that lies within adult human tissues would hold promise for the restoration of diseased or damaged organs and tissues. While most of the regeneration potential is suppressed in many vertebrates, including humans, during adult life, urodele amphibians (salamanders) retain their regenerative ability throughout adulthood. Studies in newts and axolotls, two salamander models, have provided significant knowledge about adult limb regeneration. In this review, we present a comparative analysis of salamander and mammalian regeneration and discuss how evolutionarily altered properties of the regenerative environment can be exploited to restore full regenerative potential in the human body. © 2016 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Compressorless Gas Storage and Regenerative Hydrogen Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microwave regenerative sorption media gas storage/delivery techniques are proposed to address both compressed gas management and hydrogen purification requirements...

  3. EVALUATION OF WOUND HEALING ACTIVITY OF FLAVONOIDS FROM IPOMOEA CARNEA Jacq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambiga, S; Narayanan, R; Gowri, Durga; Sukumar, D; Madhavan, S

    2007-01-01

    Natural products have numerous medicinal applications and play important roles in the biology of the organisms that accumulate them. Flavonoids are one large group of natural products with a diverse number of functions in plants and in human health. The isolates of the flowers of Ipomoea carnea (Family: Convolvulaceae) was screened for wound-healing activity on the male wistar rats by Excision wound model and Incision wound model respectively. The studies on excision wound model reveals significant wound healing activity of the extract, which is comparable with the reference control sulphathiazole. The isolates of Ipomoea carnea show significant activity on all wound models.

  4. Biodegradable Polyphosphazene-Based Blends for Regenerative Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogueri, Kenneth S; Escobar Ivirico, Jorge L; Nair, Lakshmi S; Allcock, Harry R; Laurencin, Cato T

    2017-03-01

    The occurrence of musculoskeletal tissue injury or disease and the subsequent functional impairment is at an alarming rate. It continues to be one of the most challenging problems in the human health care. Regenerative engineering offers a promising transdisciplinary strategy for tissues regeneration based on the convergence of tissue engineering, advanced materials science, stem cell science, developmental biology and clinical translation. Biomaterials are emerging as extracellular-mimicking matrices designed to provide instructive cues to control cell behavior and ultimately, be applied as therapies to regenerate damaged tissues. Biodegradable polymers constitute an attractive class of biomaterials for the development of scaffolds due to their flexibility in chemistry and the ability to be excreted or resorbed by the body. Herein, the focus will be on biodegradable polyphosphazene-based blend systems. The synthetic flexibility of polyphosphazene, combined with the unique inorganic backbone, has provided a springboard for more research and subsequent development of numerous novel materials that are capable of forming miscible blends with poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA). Laurencin and co-workers has demonstrated the exploitation of the synthetic flexibility of Polyphosphazene that will allow the design of novel polymers, which can form miscible blends with PLAGA for biomedical applications. These novel blends, due to their well-tuned biodegradability, and mechanical and biological properties coupled with the buffering capacity of the degradation products, constitute ideal materials for regeneration of various musculoskeletal tissues. Regenerative engineering aims to regenerate complex tissues to address the clinical challenge of organ damage. Tissue engineering has largely focused on the restoration and repair of individual tissues and organs, but over the past 25 years, scientific, engineering, and medical advances have led to the introduction of this new

  5. Regenerative nanotechnology in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakib, Kaveh; Tan, Aaron; Soskic, Vukic; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-12-01

    Regenerative nanotechnology is at the forefront of medical research, and translational medicine is a challenge to both scientists and clinicians. Although there has been an exponential rise in the volume of research generated about it for both medical and surgical uses, key questions remain about its actual benefits. Nevertheless, some people think that therapeutics based on its principles may form the core of applied research for the future. Here we give an account of its current use in oral and maxillofacial surgery, and implications and challenges for the future. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 3D Biomaterial Microarrays for Regenerative Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) biomaterial microarrays hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine because of their ability to accelerate the design and fabrication of biomimetic materials. Such tissue-like biomaterials can provide an appropriate microenvironment for stimulating and controlling stem...... cell differentiation into tissue-specifi c lineages. The use of 3D biomaterial microarrays can, if optimized correctly, result in a more than 1000-fold reduction in biomaterials and cells consumption when engineering optimal materials combinations, which makes these miniaturized systems very attractive...

  7. The strong financial case for regenerative medicine and the regen industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Chris; Dunnill, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Although the therapeutic promise of regenerative medicine is immensely exciting, the cost of product development, and particularly of clinical trials, for the more demanding applications will be high. For this reason it is vital for scientists and start-ups who wish to see their ideas implemented to be able to convince established major pharmaceutical or device companies with the necessary 'deep pockets' that the expenditure can yield an appropriate return. It also means that governments and health insurance companies must see a gain in funding regenerative medicine for patients. To address this issue the costs of five major medical conditions that could benefit from regenerative medicine have been defined for the USA as an illustration. This choice of country was made as potentially the largest initial market and one where the billing system for healthcare allows access to individual direct and some indirect costs. The data are complemented by a number of relevant examples of costs per quality-adjusted life year to indicate where current treatment methods are weak or strong. Finally, the relationship of the nascent regen* industry to the pharma and medical device sectors is summarized to assess the challenge of encouraging their involvement.

  8. Regenerative surgery: tissue engineering in general surgical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Victor W; Wan, Derrick C; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Longaker, Michael T

    2012-10-01

    Tissue engineering is a broad interdisciplinary field that aims to develop complex tissue and organ constructs through a combination of cell-, biomaterial-, and molecular-based approaches. This approach has the potential to transform the surgical treatment for diseases including trauma, cancer, and congenital malformations. A fundamental knowledge of key concepts in regenerative medicine is imperative for surgeons to maintain a leading role in developing and implementing these technologies. Researchers have started to elucidate the biologic mechanisms that maintain organ homeostasis throughout life, indicating that humans may have the latent capacity to regenerate complex tissues. By exploiting this intrinsic potential of the body, we can move even closer to developing functional, autologous replacement parts for a wide range of surgical diseases.

  9. Error-rate performance analysis of opportunistic regenerative relaying

    KAUST Repository

    Tourki, Kamel

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate an opportunistic relaying scheme where the selected relay assists the source-destination (direct) communication. In our study, we consider a regenerative opportunistic relaying scheme in which the direct path can be considered unusable, and takes into account the effect of the possible erroneously detected and transmitted data at the best relay. We first derive the exact statistics of each hop, in terms of probability density function (PDF). Then, the PDFs are used to determine accurate closed form expressions for end-to-end bit-error rate (BER) of binary phase-shift keying (BPSK) modulation where the detector may use maximum ration combining (MRC) or selection combining (SC). Finally, we validate our analysis by showing that performance simulation results coincide with our analytical results over linear network (LN) architecture and considering Rayleigh fading channels. © 2011 IEEE.

  10. Toward a convergence of regenerative medicine, rehabilitation, and neuroprosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravamudhan, Shyam; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2011-11-01

    No effective therapeutic interventions exist for severe neural pathologies, despite significant advances in regenerative medicine, rehabilitation, and neuroprosthetics. Our current hypothesis is that a specific combination of tissue engineering, pharmacology, cell replacement, drug delivery, and electrical stimulation, together with plasticity-promoting and locomotor training (neurorehabilitation) is necessary to interact synergistically in order to activate and enable all damaged circuits. We postulate that various convergent themes exist among the different therapeutic fields. Therefore, the objective of this review is to highlight the convergent themes, which we believe have a common goal of restoring function after neural damage. The convergent themes discussed in this review include modulation of inflammation and secondary damage, encouraging endogenous repair/regeneration (using scaffolds, cell transplantation, and drug delivery), application of electrical fields to modulate healing and/or activity, and finally modulation of plasticity.

  11. Evaluating the effectiveness of a self-management exercise intervention on wound healing, functional ability and health-related quality of life outcomes in adults with venous leg ulcers: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jane; Finlayson, Kathleen; Kerr, Graham; Edwards, Helen

    2017-02-01

    Exercise that targets ankle joint mobility may lead to improvement in calf muscle pump function and subsequent healing. The objectives of this research were to assess the impact of an exercise intervention in addition to routine evidence-based care on the healing rates, functional ability and health-related quality of life for adults with venous leg ulcers (VLUs). This study included 63 patients with VLUs. Patients were randomised to receive either a 12-week exercise intervention with a telephone coaching component or usual care plus telephone calls at the same timepoints. The primary outcome evaluated the effectiveness of the intervention in relation to wound healing. The secondary outcomes evaluated physical activity, functional ability and health-related quality of life measures between groups at the end of the 12 weeks. A per protocol analysis complemented the effectiveness (intention-to-treat) analysis to highlight the importance of adherence to an exercise intervention. Intention-to-treat analyses for the primary outcome showed 77% of those in the intervention group healed by 12 weeks compared to 53% of those in the usual care group. Although this difference was not statistically significant due to a smaller than expected sample size, a 24% difference in healing rates could be considered clinically significant. The per protocol analysis for wound healing, however, showed that those in the intervention group who adhered to the exercise protocol 75% or more of the time were significantly more likely to heal and showed higher rates for wound healing than the control group (P = 0·01), that is, 95% of those who adhered in the intervention group healed in 12 weeks. The secondary outcomes of physical activity, functional ability and health-related quality of life were not significantly altered by the intervention. Among the secondary outcomes (physical activity, functional ability and health-related quality of life), intention-to-treat analyses did not support the

  12. Current concepts: tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications in the ankle joint

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, S. I.; Pereira, H.; Silva-Correia, J.; Van Dijk, C. N.; Espregueira-Mendes, J.; Oliveira, J. M.; Reis, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) has caused a revolution in present and future trends of medicine and surgery. In different tissues, advanced TERM approaches bring new therapeutic possibilities in either general population as in young patients and high-level athletes, improving restoration of biological functions and rehabilitation. The mainstream components required to obtain a functional regeneration of tissues may include biodegradable scaffolds, drugs or growth factors ...

  13. Towards biologically relevant synthetic designer matrices in 3D bioprinting for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    KAUST Repository

    Costa, Rúben M.

    2017-05-12

    3D bioprinting is one of the most promising technologies in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. As new printing techniques and bioinks are getting developed, new cellular constructs with high resolution and functionality arise. Different to bioinks of animal, algal or plant origin, synthesized bioinks are proposed as superior biomaterials because their characteristics are fully under control. In this review, we will highlight the potential of synthetic biomaterials to be used as bioinks in 3D bioprinting to produce functionally enhanced matrices.

  14. Multiscale Inorganic Hierarchically Materials: Towards an Improved Orthopaedic Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruso, Juan M; Sartuqui, Javier; Messina, Paula V

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a biologically and structurally sophisticated multifunctional tissue. It dynamically responds to biochemical, mechanical and electrical clues by remodelling itself and accordingly the maximum strength and toughness are along the lines of the greatest applied stress. The challenge is to develop an orthopaedic biomaterial that imitates the micro- and nano-structural elements and compositions of bone to locally match the properties of the host tissue resulting in a biologically fixed implant. Looking for the ideal implant, the convergence of life and materials sciences occurs. Researchers in many different fields apply their expertise to improve implantable devices and regenerative medicine. Materials of all kinds, but especially hierarchical nano-materials, are being exploited. The application of nano-materials with hierarchical design to calcified tissue reconstructive medicine involve intricate systems including scaffolds with multifaceted shapes that provides temporary mechanical function; materials with nano-topography modifications that guarantee their integration to tissues and that possesses functionalized surfaces to transport biologic factors to stimulate tissue growth in a controlled, safe, and rapid manner. Furthermore materials that should degrade on a timeline coordinated to the time that takes the tissues regrow, are prepared. These implantable devices are multifunctional and for its construction they involve the use of precise strategically techniques together with specific material manufacturing processes that can be integrated to achieve in the design, the required multifunctionality. For such reasons, even though the idea of displacement from synthetic implants and tissue grafts to regenerative-medicine-based tissue reconstruction has been guaranteed for well over a decade, the reality has yet to emerge. In this paper, we examine the recent approaches to create enhanced bioactive materials. Their design and manufacturing procedures as well

  15. [DYNAMICS OF BACTERIOLOGICAL AND PLANIMETRIC INDICES OF THE WOUND UNDER THE ACTION OF THE SILVER NANOPARTICLES, STABILIZED BY MEXIDOL AND POLYVINYLPYRROLIDONE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhovskyi, V I; Lobahn, G A; Gancho, O V; Vazhnycha, O M; Kolomiyets, S V; Jaber, V Kh O

    2016-04-01

    Changes in bacteriological indices through the square of the wound of chemical origin under local impact of the silver nanoparticles (NP), stabilized by 2-ethyl-6-methyl-3-hydroxypyridine succinate (mexidol) and polyvinylpyrrolidone were studied. The wounds of submandibular region were simulated in white rats, using injection of 10% solution of calcium chloride with further opening of necrotic foci and open management of the wound. Beginning from the fifth day, every day the wound was irrigated with liquid, which have contented the stabilized NP of the silver, 0.05% water solution of chlorhexidine or isotonic solution of the the sodium chloride (control). There was established, that the silver NP impact antiseptically and regenerative while the wound treatment, and reduce during 10 days microbial contamination of exudate in 24 times, the wound square--in three times in comparison with original indices. These changes were identical to those while application of chlorhexidine.

  16. The molecular biology in wound healing & non-healing wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Chun

    2017-08-01

    The development of molecular biology and other new biotechnologies helps us to recognize the wound healing and non-healing wound of skin in the past 30 years. This review mainly focuses on the molecular biology of many cytokines (including growth factors) and other molecular factors such as extracellular matrix (ECM) on wound healing. The molecular biology in cell movement such as epidermal cells in wound healing was also discussed. Moreover many common chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers, leg ulcers, diabetic foot wounds, venous stasis ulcers, etc. usually deteriorate into non-healing wounds. Therefore the molecular biology such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and other molecular factors in diabetes non-healing wounds were also reviewed. Copyright © 2017 Daping Hospital and the Research Institute of Surgery of the Third Military Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Geoengineering in the Anthropocene through Regenerative Urbanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giles Thomson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Human consumption patterns exceed planetary boundaries and stress on the biosphere can be expected to worsen. The recent “Paris Agreement” (COP21 represents a major international attempt to address risk associated with climate change through rapid decarbonisation. The mechanisms for implementation are yet to be determined and, while various large-scale geoengineering projects have been proposed, we argue a better solution may lie in cities. Large-scale green urbanism in cities and their bioregions would offer benefits commensurate to alternative geoengineering proposals, but this integrated approach carries less risk and has additional, multiple, social and economic benefits in addition to a reduction of urban ecological footprint. However, the key to success will require policy writers and city makers to deliver at scale and to high urban sustainability performance benchmarks. To better define urban sustainability performance, we describe three horizons of green urbanism: green design, that seeks to improve upon conventional development; sustainable development, that is the first step toward a net zero impact; and the emerging concept of regenerative urbanism, that enables biosphere repair. Examples of green urbanism exist that utilize technology and design to optimize urban metabolism and deliver net positive sustainability performance. If mainstreamed, regenerative approaches can make urban development a major urban geoengineering force, while simultaneously introducing life-affirming co-benefits to burgeoning cities.

  18. Engineering growth factors for regenerative medicine applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Aaron C.; Briquez, Priscilla S.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Cochran, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-15

    Growth factors are important morphogenetic proteins that instruct cell behavior and guide tissue repair and renewal. Although their therapeutic potential holds great promise in regenerative medicine applications, translation of growth factors into clinical treatments has been hindered by limitations including poor protein stability, low recombinant expression yield, and suboptimal efficacy. This review highlights current tools, technologies, and approaches to design integrated and effective growth factor-based therapies for regenerative medicine applications. The first section describes rational and combinatorial protein engineering approaches that have been utilized to improve growth factor stability, expression yield, biodistribution, and serum half-life, or alter their cell trafficking behavior or receptor binding affinity. The second section highlights elegant biomaterial-based systems, inspired by the natural extracellular matrix milieu, that have been developed for effective spatial and temporal delivery of growth factors to cell surface receptors. Although appearing distinct, these two approaches are highly complementary and involve principles of molecular design and engineering to be considered in parallel when developing optimal materials for clinical applications.

  19. Regenerative fuel cell systems R and D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Weisberg, A.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Regenerative fuel cell (RFC) systems produce power and electrolytically regenerate their reactants using stacks of electrochemical cells. Energy storage systems with extremely high specific energy (> 400 Wh/kg) have been designed that use lightweight pressure vessels to contain the gases generated by reversible (unitized) regenerative fuel cells (URFCs). Progress is reported on the development, integration, and operation of rechargeable energy storage systems with such high specific energy. Lightweight pressure vessels that enable high specific energies have been designed with performance factors (burst pressure/internal volume/tank weight) > 50 km (2.0 million inches), and a vessel with performance factor of 40 km (1.6 million inches) was fabricated. New generations of both advanced and industry-supplied hydrogen tankage are under development. A primary fuel cell test rig with a single cell (46 cm{sup 2} active area) has been modified and operated reversibly as a URFC (for up to 2010 cycles on a single cell). This URFC uses bifunctional electrodes (oxidation and reduction electrodes reverse roles when switching from charge to discharge, as with a rechargeable battery) and cathode feed electrolysis (water is fed from the hydrogen side of the cell). Recent modifications also enable anode feed electrolysis (water is fed from the oxygen side of the cell). Hydrogen/halogen URFCs, capable of higher round-trip efficiency than hydrogen/oxygen URFCs, have been considered, and will be significantly heavier. Progress is reported on higher performance hydrogen/oxygen URFC operation with reduced catalyst loading.

  20. Scaffolds in regenerative endodontics: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathani, Kinjal M.; Raghavendra, Srinidhi Surya

    2016-01-01

    Root canal therapy has enabled us to save numerous teeth over the years. The most desired outcome of endodontic treatment would be when diseased or nonvital pulp is replaced with healthy pulp tissue that would revitalize the teeth through regenerative endodontics. ‘A search was conducted using the Pubmed and MEDLINE databases for articles with the criteria ‘Platelet rich plasma’, ‘Platelet rich fibrin’, ‘Stem cells’, ‘Natural and artificial scaffolds’ from 1982–2015’. Tissues are organized as three-dimensional structures, and appropriate scaffolding is necessary to provide a spatially correct position of cell location and regulate differentiation, proliferation, or metabolism of the stem cells. Extracellular matrix molecules control the differentiation of stem cells, and an appropriate scaffold might selectively bind and localize cells, contain growth factors, and undergo biodegradation over time. Different scaffolds facilitate the regeneration of different tissues. To ensure a successful regenerative procedure, it is essential to have a thorough and precise knowledge about the suitable scaffold for the required tissue. This article gives a review on the different scaffolds providing an insight into the new developmental approaches on the horizon. PMID:27857762

  1. Matrix metalloproteinases: The sculptors of chronic cutaneous wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Venkat Raghavan; Mintz, Dvir; Sagi, Irit

    2017-11-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a complex mechanism with multiple processes orchestrating harmoniously for structural and functional restoration of the damaged tissue. Chronic non-healing wounds plagued with infection create a major healthcare burden and is one of the most frustrating clinical problems. Chronic wounds are manifested by prolonged inflammation, defective re-epithelialization and haphazard remodeling. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc dependent enzymes that play cardinal functions in wound healing. Understanding the pathological events mediated by MMPs during wound healing may pave way in identifying novel drug targets for chronic wounds. Here, we discuss the functions and skewed regulation of different MMPs during infection and chronic tissue repair. This review also points out the potential of MMPs and their inhibitors as therapeutic agents in treating chronic wounds during distinct phases of the wound healing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteolysis as a Regulatory Event in Pathophysiology edited by Stefan Rose-John. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A regenerative biology view on artificial tissue construction and 3D bioprinting: what may we learn from natural regenerative phenomena?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    organ structures by decellularisation/recellularisation procedures and recently with three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting show promising results in obtaining anatomically accurate constructs, however, the function of these artificial tissues is still lacking compared to natural tissues. This review......), that display distinct tissue regeneration after injury. An important goal of biomedical engineering is the construction of artificial tissue that can ultimately be transplanted into patients, however, such constructs are still in their infancy for more complex structures. Approaches of constructing artificial...... will highlight how the relatively mature fields of regenerative biology and medicine can have potential usage in the younger bioengineering field of artificial tissue construction by drawing on the knowledge of how intrinsic tissue regeneration takes place in nature...

  3. Bone Marrow Stem Cell Derived Paracrine Factors for Regenerative Medicine: Current Perspectives and Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom J. Burdon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past several years, there has been intense research in the field of bone marrow-derived stem cell (BMSC therapy to facilitate its translation into clinical setting. Although a lot has been accomplished, plenty of challenges lie ahead. Furthermore, there is a growing body of evidence showing that administration of BMSC-derived conditioned media (BMSC-CM can recapitulate the beneficial effects observed after stem cell therapy. BMSCs produce a wide range of cytokines and chemokines that have, until now, shown extensive therapeutic potential. These paracrine mechanisms could be as diverse as stimulating receptor-mediated survival pathways, inducing stem cell homing and differentiation or regulating the anti-inflammatory effects in wounded areas. The current review reflects the rapid shift of interest from BMSC to BMSC-CM to alleviate many logistical and technical issues regarding cell therapy and evaluates its future potential as an effective regenerative therapy.

  4. Effect of apricot tree resin hydroethanolic extract on skin wound healing in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Javadabadi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background : Impairment of wound healing in chronic diseases is a therapeutic challenge. In terms of anti-inflammatory and regenerative effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of apricot gum tree this extract used on skin wound healing in rats. Materials and Methods: 28 Wistar male rats were divided into four groups: group I, normal without surgery, group II, control group without treatment, group III, a wound treatment with Vaseline, and group I˅, wound care therapy apricot tree resin extract. In the treated and placebo groups after anesthesia applied induction circular wound area of 280 square millimeters behind rats, but treated groups continued treatment for 21 days. Daily treatment was done with hydro-alcoholic extract of apricot tree gum. Wound size is measured every day by analyzing digital images for 21 days and then rats killed and samples were fixed in formalin. Slices were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Tissue sections were studied qualitatively and quantitatively, to check regeneration of cells, the collagen fibers, angiogenesis, and distribution of inflammatory cells. Normal data analyzed using Tukey test and data with non-normal distribution were compared between groups by Mann-Whitney test. Results: Use of apricot tree resin, reduces the blood vessels from the second week onwards, reduction of inflammatory cells and increased collagen fibers and tissue epithelialization. Conclusion: Apricot tree resin extract can promote wound healing faster made substantial improvements.

  5. 3D printed PLA-based scaffolds: a versatile tool in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Tiziano; Mateos-Timoneda, Miguel A; Planell, Josep A; Navarro, Melba

    2013-10-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP), also known as additive manufacturing (AM), has been well received and adopted in the biomedical field. The capacity of this family of techniques to fabricate customized 3D structures with complex geometries and excellent reproducibility has revolutionized implantology and regenerative medicine. In particular, nozzle-based systems allow the fabrication of high-resolution polylactic acid (PLA) structures that are of interest in regenerative medicine. These 3D structures find interesting applications in the regenerative medicine field where promising applications including biodegradable templates for tissue regeneration purposes, 3D in vitro platforms for studying cell response to different scaffolds conditions and for drug screening are considered among others. Scaffolds functionality depends not only on the fabrication technique, but also on the material used to build the 3D structure, the geometry and inner architecture of the structure, and the final surface properties. All being crucial parameters affecting scaffolds success. This Commentary emphasizes the importance of these parameters in scaffolds' fabrication and also draws the attention toward the versatility of these PLA scaffolds as a potential tool in regenerative medicine and other medical fields.

  6. Regenerative medicine for the treatment of spinal cord injury: more than just promises?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pêgo, Ana Paula; Kubinova, Sarka; Cizkova, Dasa; Vanicky, Ivo; Mar, Fernando Milhazes; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Sykova, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury triggers a complex set of events that lead to tissue healing without the restoration of normal function due to the poor regenerative capacity of the spinal cord. Nevertheless, current knowledge about the intrinsic regenerative ability of central nervous system axons, when in a supportive environment, has made the prospect of treating spinal cord injury a reality. Among the range of strategies under investigation, cell-based therapies offer the most promising results, due to the multifactorial roles that these cells can fulfil. However, the best cell source is still a matter of debate, as are clinical issues that include the optimal cell dose as well as the timing and route of administration. In this context, the role of biomaterials is gaining importance. These can not only act as vehicles for the administered cells but also, in the case of chronic lesions, can be used to fill the permanent cyst, thus creating a more favourable and conducive environment for axonal regeneration in addition to serving as local delivery systems of therapeutic agents to improve the regenerative milieu. Some of the candidate molecules for the future are discussed in view of the knowledge derived from studying the mechanisms that facilitate the intrinsic regenerative capacity of central nervous system neurons. The future challenge for the multidisciplinary teams working in the field is to translate the knowledge acquired in basic research into effective combinatorial therapies to be applied in the clinic. PMID:22805417

  7. Cooperative Control of Regenerative Braking and Antilock Braking for a Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Yin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new cooperative braking control strategy (CBCS is proposed for a parallel hybrid electric vehicle (HEV with both a regenerative braking system and an antilock braking system (ABS to achieve improved braking performance and energy regeneration. The braking system of the vehicle is based on a new method of HEV braking torque distribution that makes the antilock braking system work together with the regenerative braking system harmoniously. In the cooperative braking control strategy, a sliding mode controller (SMC for ABS is designed to maintain the wheel slip within an optimal range by adjusting the hydraulic braking torque continuously; to reduce the chattering in SMC, a boundary-layer method with moderate tuning of a saturation function is also investigated; based on the wheel slip ratio, battery state of charge (SOC, and the motor speed, a fuzzy logic control strategy (FLC is applied to adjust the regenerative braking torque dynamically. In order to evaluate the performance of the cooperative braking control strategy, the braking system model of a hybrid electric vehicle is built in MATLAB/SIMULINK. It is found from the simulation that the cooperative braking control strategy suggested in this paper provides satisfactory braking performance, passenger comfort, and high regenerative efficiency.

  8. Wnt signaling induces epithelial differentiation during cutaneous wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hocking Anne

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cutaneous wound repair in adult mammals does not regenerate the original epithelial architecture and results in altered skin function. We propose that lack of regeneration may be due to the absence of appropriate molecular signals to promote regeneration. In this study, we investigated the regulation of Wnt signaling during cutaneous wound healing and the consequence of activating either the beta-catenin-dependent or beta-catenin-independent Wnt signaling on epidermal architecture during wound repair. Results We determined that the expression of Wnt ligands that typically signal via the beta-catenin-independent pathway is up-regulated in the wound while the beta-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling is activated in the hair follicles adjacent to the wound edge. Ectopic activation of beta-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling with lithium chloride in the wound resulted in epithelial cysts and occasional rudimentary hair follicle structures within the epidermis. In contrast, forced expression of Wnt-5a in the deeper wound induced changes in the interfollicular epithelium mimicking regeneration, including formation of epithelia-lined cysts in the wound dermis, rudimentary hair follicles and sebaceous glands, without formation of tumors. Conclusion These findings suggest that adult interfollicular epithelium is capable of responding to Wnt morphogenic signals necessary for restoring epithelial tissue patterning in the skin during wound repair.

  9. Review: African medicinal plants with wound healing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyare, Christian; Boakye, Yaw Duah; Bekoe, Emelia Oppong; Hensel, Andreas; Dapaah, Susana Oteng; Appiah, Theresa

    2016-01-11

    Wounds of various types including injuries, cuts, pressure, burns, diabetic, gastric and duodenal ulcers continue to have severe socio-economic impact on the cost of health care to patients, family and health care institutions in both developing and developed countries. However, most people in the developing countries, especially Africa, depend on herbal remedies for effective treatment of wounds. Various in vitro and in vivo parameters are used for the evaluation of the functional activity of medicinal plants by using extracts, fractions and isolated compounds. The aim of the review is to identify African medicinal plants with wound healing properties within the last two decades. Electronic databases such as PubMed, Scifinder(®) and Google Scholar were used to search and filter for African medicinal plants with wound healing activity. The methods employed in the evaluation of wound healing activity of these African medicinal plants comprise both in vivo and in vitro models. In vivo wound models such as excision, incision, dead space and burn wound model are commonly employed in assessing the rate of wound closure (contraction), tensile strength or breaking strength determination, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities, hydroxyproline content assay and histological investigations including epithelialisation, collagen synthesis, and granulation tissue formation. In in vitro studies, single cell systems are mostly used to study proliferation and differentiation of dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes by monitoring typical differentiation markers like collagen and keratin. In this study, 61 plants belonging to 36 families with scientifically demonstrated or reported wound healing properties were reviewed. Various plant parts including leaves, fruits, stem bark and root extracts of the plants are used in the evaluation of plants for wound healing activities. Although, a variety of medicinal plants for wound healing can be found in literature, there is a need for the

  10. Chitosan Dermal Substitute and Chitosan Skin Substitute Contribute to Accelerated Full-Thickness Wound Healing in Irradiated Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Bakar Mohd Hilmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wounds with full-thickness skin loss are commonly managed by skin grafting. In the absence of a graft, reepithelialization is imperfect and leads to increased scar formation. Biomaterials can alter wound healing so that it produces more regenerative tissue and fewer scars. This current study use the new chitosan based biomaterial in full-thickness wound with impaired healing on rat model. Wounds were evaluated after being treated with a chitosan dermal substitute, a chitosan skin substitute, or duoderm CGF. Wounds treated with the chitosan skin substitute showed the most re-epithelialization (33.2 ± 2.8%, longest epithelial tongue (1.62 ± 0.13 mm, and shortest migratory tongue distance (7.11 ± 0.25 mm. The scar size of wounds treated with the chitosan dermal substitute (0.13 ± 0.02 cm and chitosan skin substitute (0.16 ± 0.05 cm were significantly decreased (P<0.05 compared with duoderm (0.45 ± 0.11 cm. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA expression on days 7, 14, and 21 revealed the presence of human hair follicle stem cells and fibroblasts that were incorporated into and surviving in the irradiated wound. We have proven that a chitosan dermal substitute and chitosan skin substitute are suitable for wound healing in full-thickness wounds that are impaired due to radiation.

  11. Regenerative wound healing in acute degree III mandibular defects in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardas, Nikos; Kraehenmann, Michael; Dard, Michel

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the healing events in degree III furcation defects in dogs following the application of the combination of an enamel matrix derivative with a biphasic calcium phosphate (Emdogain Plus). Seventeen degree III furcation defects, 5 mm high and 4 mm wide, were created in 9 dogs. In both groups, the defects were conditioned with EDTA. One defect was treated with Emdogain Plus (n = 9), while the contralateral defect serving as control remained empty (n = 8). The defects in both groups were fully covered by coronally repositioned flaps. After 5 months of healing, histologic and histometric analysis was preformed. A significant amount of new attachment and bone formation was observed in both control and test specimens. However, in a number of control specimens, ankylosis was also observed. In the control and test groups, respectively, the mean new cementum length was 10.8 ± 2.1 mm and 8.6 ± 3.2 mm; the mean periodontal ligament length was 7.6 ± 3.8 mm and 8.1 ± 4.0 mm. The mean new bone height was 4.4 ± 1.3 mm and 4.3 ± 1.6 mm in the control and test groups, respectively. No statistical differences were found between the two groups in terms of amount of cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone regeneration. The present study failed to show higher amounts of newly formed cementum and bone following treatment of acute degree III mandibular furcation defects following use of Emdogain Plus compared with a coronally advanced flap. Emdogain Plus seems to have a protective role against ankylosis in this type of defect.

  12. Wound healing following regenerative procedures in furcation degree III defects: histomorphometric outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkranias, Nikolaos D; Graziani, Filippo; Sculean, Anton; Donos, Nikolaos

    2012-02-01

    Degree III furcation involvements were surgically created at four first molars in each of three monkeys. Following 6 weeks of healing, full-thickness flaps were elevated. Following 24% EDTA gel conditioning, the defects were treated with one of the following: (1) enamel matrix proteins (EMD), (2) guided tissue regeneration (GTR) or (3) a combination EMD and GTR. The control defects did not receive any treatment. After 5 months of healing, the animals were sacrificed. Three 8 μm thick histological central sections, 100 μm apart, were used for histomorphometric analysis in six zones of each tooth either within the furcation area or on the pristine external surface of the root. In all specimens, new cementum with inserting collagen fibres was formed. Following GTR or GTR + EMD, cementum was formed up to and including the furcation fornix indicating complete regeneration on the defect periphery. Periodontal ligament fibres were less in all four modalities compared to pristine tissues. In the teeth treated with GTR and GTR + EMD a higher volume of bone and periodontal ligament tissues was observed compared to EMD. After 5 months of healing, regenerated tissues presented quantitative differences from the pristine tissues. In the two modalities where GTR alone or combined with EMD was used, the regenerated tissues differed in quantity from the EMD-treated sites.

  13. Wound healing and treating wounds: Differential diagnosis and evaluation of chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Laurel M; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    Wounds are an excellent example of how the field of dermatology represents a cross-section of many medical disciplines. For instance, wounds may be caused by trauma, vascular insufficiency, and underlying medical conditions, such as diabetes, hypertension, and rheumatologic and inflammatory disease. This continuing medical education article provides an overview of wound healing and the pathophysiology of chronic wounds and reviews the broad differential diagnosis of chronic wounds. It also describes the initial steps necessary in evaluating a chronic wound and determining its underlying etiology. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Burn wound: How it differs from other wounds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Tiwari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of burn injury has always been the domain of burn specialists. Since ancient time, local and systemic remedies have been advised for burn wound dressing and burn scar prevention. Management of burn wound inflicted by the different physical and chemical agents require different regimes which are poles apart from the regimes used for any of the other traumatic wounds. In extensive burn, because of increased capillary permeability, there is extensive loss of plasma leading to shock while whole blood loss is the cause of shock in other acute wounds. Even though the burn wounds are sterile in the beginning in comparison to most of other wounds, yet, the death in extensive burns is mainly because of wound infection and septicemia, because of the immunocompromised status of the burn patients. Eschar and blister are specific for burn wounds requiring a specific treatment protocol. Antimicrobial creams and other dressing agents used for traumatic wounds are ineffective in deep burns with eschar. The subeschar plane harbours the micro-organisms and many of these agents are not able to penetrate the eschar. Even after complete epithelisation of burn wound, remodelling phase is prolonged. It may take years for scar maturation in burns. This article emphasizes on how the pathophysiology, healing and management of a burn wound is different from that of other wounds.

  15. The wound/burn guidelines - 1: Wounds in general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuji; Hasegawa, Minoru; Maekawa, Takeo; Le Pavoux, Andres; Asano, Yoshihide; Abe, Masatoshi; Ishii, Takayuki; Ito, Takaaki; Isei, Taiki; Imafuku, Shinichi; Irisawa, Ryokichi; Ohtsuka, Masaki; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Ogawa, Fumihide; Kadono, Takafumi; Kodera, Masanari; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kukino, Ryuichi; Kono, Takeshi; Sakai, Keisuke; Takahara, Masakazu; Tanioka, Miki; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Akira; Hayashi, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Manabu; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Koma; Madokoro, Naoki; Yamasaki, Osamu; Yoshino, Yuichiro; Tachibana, Takao; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-04-01

    The Japanese Dermatological Association determined to prepare the Wound/Burn Guidelines focusing on treatments, catering to needs for the clinical practice of dermatology. Among these guidelines, "Wounds in General" was intended to explain knowledge necessary "to heal wounds" without specifying particular disorders. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  16. An improved freeze-dried PRP-coated biodegradable material suitable for connective tissue regenerative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horimizu, Makoto; Kawase, Tomoyuki; Nakajima, Yu; Okuda, Kazuhiro; Nagata, Masaki; Wolff, Larry F; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2013-06-01

    We previously published an investigation indicating freeze-dried platelet-rich plasma (PRP)-coated polyglactin mesh was a promising wound-dressing material. However, one of its disadvantages was the inflammatory nature due to degradation of the polyglactin. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the use of a collagen sponge as the carrier for PRP. When implanted subcutaneously in nude mice, the PRP-coated sponge alone rapidly induced angiogenesis and infiltration of surrounding connective tissue without inducing appreciable inflammation. Moreover, addition of periosteal fibroblastic cells substantially augmented the angiogenic response. With in vitro studies, the PRP-coated sponge provided various major growth factors at high levels to stimulate the proliferation of cells cultured on plastic dishes, but did not stimulate the proliferation of cells inoculated into the PRP-coated sponge. Cells were embedded in the fibrin mesh and maintained their spherical shape without stretching. The atomic force microscopic analysis demonstrated that the fibrin gel formed on the PRP-coated sponge was much softer (approx. 22 kPa) than the cross-linked collagen that formed the sponge base (appox. 1.9 MPa). Because insoluble matrices have recently and increasingly been considered important regulatory factors of cellular behavior, as are soluble growth factors, it is suggested that this soft fibrin mesh possibly suppresses cell survival. Overall, our investigation has successfully demonstrated improved wound-healing and regenerative potential of the PRP-coated mesh by combining it with the collagen sponge. In the clinical setting, this PRP-coated collagen sponge is a promising material for connective tissue regenerative therapy, such as periodontal therapy, burn victim treatment and in cosmetic or plastic surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Injectable chitosan-based scaffolds in regenerative medicine and their clinical translatability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekhail, Mina; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2014-10-01

    Injectable scaffolds (IS) are polymeric solutions that are injected in vivo and undergo gelation in response to physiological or non-physiological stimuli. Interest in using IS in regenerative medicine has been increasing this past decade. IS are administered in vivo using minimally invasive surgery, which reduces hospitalization time and risk of surgical wound infection. Here, chitosan is explored as an excellent candidate for developing IS. A literature search reveals that 27% of IS publications in the past decade investigated injectable chitosan scaffolds (ICS). This increasing interest in chitosan stems from its many desirable physicochemical properties. The first section of this Progress Report is a comprehensive study of all physical, chemical, and biological stimuli that have been explored to induce ICS gelation in vivo. Second, the use of ICS is investigated in four major regenerative medicine applications, namely bone, cartilage, cardiovascular, and neural regeneration. Finally, an overall critique of the ICS literature in light of clinical translatability is presented. Even though ICS have been widely explored in the literature, very few have progressed to clinical trials. The authors discuss the current barriers to moving ICS into the clinic and provide suggestions regarding what is needed to overcome those challenges. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. NEGATIVE PRESSURE WOUND THERAPY (NPWT) FOR THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NEGATIVE PRESSURE WOUND THERAPY (NPWT) FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF LAPAROSTOMY WOUNDS: ... Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is one of the new additions to the armamentarium of laparostomy wound management to achieve the above (8). ... However, second day post operatively she.

  19. Wound morbidity after kidney transplant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fockens, M. Matthijs; Alberts, Victor P.; Bemelman, Frederike J.; van der Pant, Karlijn A. M. I.; Idu, Mirza M.

    2015-01-01

    Wound morbidity is an important surgical complication after kidney transplant. To assess risk factors for postoperative wound complications and the impact of such complications on outcomes of kidney transplant. Retrospectively, 108 consecutive kidney transplant patients between January 2010 and

  20. State of the art: stem cells in equine regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, M J; Jarazo, J

    2015-03-01

    According to Greek mythology, Prometheus' liver grew back nightly after it was removed each day by an eagle as punishment for giving mankind fire. Hence, contrary to popular belief, the concept of tissue and organ regeneration is not new. In the early 20th century, cell culture and ex vivo organ preservation studies by Alexis Carrel, some with famed aviator Charles Lindbergh, established a foundation for much of modern regenerative medicine. While early beliefs and discoveries foreshadowed significant accomplishments in regenerative medicine, advances in knowledge within numerous scientific disciplines, as well as nano- and micromolecular level imaging and detection technologies, have contributed to explosive advances over the last 20 years. Virtually limitless preparations, combinations and applications of the 3 major components of regenerative medicine, namely cells, biomaterials and bioactive molecules, have created a new paradigm of future therapeutic options for most species. It is increasingly clear, however, that despite significant parallels among and within species, there is no 'one-size-fits-all' regenerative therapy. Likewise, a panacea has yet to be discovered that completely reverses the consequences of time, trauma and disease. Nonetheless, there is no question that the promise and potential of regenerative medicine have forever altered medical practices. The horse is a relative newcomer to regenerative medicine applications, yet there is already a large body of work to incorporate novel regenerative therapies into standard care. This review focuses on the current state and potential future of stem cells in equine regenerative medicine. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  1. Electrolyte for batteries with regenerative solid electrolyte interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Jie; Lu, Dongping; Shao, Yuyan; Bennett, Wendy D.; Graff, Gordon L.; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2017-08-01

    An energy storage device comprising: an anode; and a solute-containing electrolyte composition wherein the solute concentration in the electrolyte composition is sufficiently high to form a regenerative solid electrolyte interface layer on a surface of the anode only during charging of the energy storage device, wherein the regenerative layer comprises at least one solute or solvated solute from the electrolyte composition.

  2. Use of Vacuum Therapy in the Treatment of Wounds in Patients with Diabetic Foot Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.O. Herasymchuk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute and chronic wound defects of the lower extremities occurs in 15–25 % of patients with diabetes mellitus, serving as the direct cause of frequent amputations of lower extremities in 12 % of patients. One of the current and promising directions of wound healing is vacuum therapy. Objective. To study the effect of vacuum therapy on the course of acute and chronic wound process in patients with diabetic foot syndrome, depending on the pathogenic form of the injury, and on the basis of the findings to improve the outcomes of surgical treatment of the above-mentioned pathology. Materials and methods. The study involved 239 patients with complicated forms of diabetic foot syndrome. Monitoring of the wound progress is complemented by clinical, cytological, microbiological and morphological criteria. In the treatment of patients, we have used vacuum therapy device by Agat-Dnepr company. Vacuum therapy of wounds was carried out in the modes of negative pressure within 80–125 mmHg. Results. On the 2nd — 3rd day of vacuum treatment, there was a significant decrease of local manifestations of acute inflammation. At the same time, we have noted a significantly reduction in the amount of wound defects. There were positive changes from the side of wound microbial contamination defects. Application of continuous vacuum therapy in the treatment of wound defects greatly improved the performance of local microcirculation. Conclusions. Use of vacuum therapy in the combination treatment of acute and chronic wounds in patients with diabetic foot syndrome has a local and systemic action that enables to stabilize the course of wound process, to stimulate regenerative processes, to eliminate manifestations of endogenous intoxication and violations of immunological reactivity.

  3. Tissue-engineering-based Strategies for Regenerative Endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, M.T.P.; Valera, M.C.; Nakashima, M.; Nör, J.E.; Bottino, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Stemming from in vitro and in vivo pre-clinical and human models, tissue-engineering-based strategies continue to demonstrate great potential for the regeneration of the pulp-dentin complex, particularly in necrotic, immature permanent teeth. Nanofibrous scaffolds, which closely resemble the native extracellular matrix, have been successfully synthesized by various techniques, including but not limited to electrospinning. A common goal in scaffold synthesis has been the notion of promoting cell guidance through the careful design and use of a collection of biochemical and physical cues capable of governing and stimulating specific events at the cellular and tissue levels. The latest advances in processing technologies allow for the fabrication of scaffolds where selected bioactive molecules can be delivered locally, thus increasing the possibilities for clinical success. Though electrospun scaffolds have not yet been tested in vivo in either human or animal pulpless models in immature permanent teeth, recent studies have highlighted their regenerative potential both from an in vitro and in vivo (i.e., subcutaneous model) standpoint. Possible applications for these bioactive scaffolds continue to evolve, with significant prospects related to the regeneration of both dentin and pulp tissue and, more recently, to root canal disinfection. Nonetheless, no single implantable scaffold can consistently guide the coordinated growth and development of the multiple tissue types involved in the functional regeneration of the pulp-dentin complex. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive perspective on the latest discoveries related to the use of scaffolds and/or stem cells in regenerative endodontics. The authors focused this review on bioactive nanofibrous scaffolds, injectable scaffolds and stem cells, and pre-clinical findings using stem-cell-based strategies. These topics are discussed in detail in an attempt to provide future direction and to shed light on

  4. Initial Management of Traumatic Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devriendt, Nausikaa; de Rooster, Hilde

    2017-11-01

    When traumatic wounds are quickly and accurately treated, morbidity and costs can be significantly decreased. Several factors, such as time delay between injury and treatment, the degree of contamination, extension and depth of the wound, and the mechanism of injury, influence the treatment and prognosis and stress the importance of a patient-specific approach. Although all traumatic wounds are contaminated, antibiotic therapy is seldom required if correct wound management is installed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Wound healing activity of Ipomoea batatas tubers (sweet potato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav Sonkamble

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam. from the family Convolvulaceae is the world’s sixth largest food crop. The tubers of Ipomoea batatas commonly known as sweet potato are consumed as a vegetable globally. The tubers contain high levels of polyphenols such as anthocyanins and phenolic acids and vitamins A, B and C, which impart a potent antioxidant activity that can translate well to show wound healing effects. To check their effects on wound healing, the peels and peel bandage were tested on various injury models in rats in the present study.Methods: The methanolic extracts of the peels and peel bandage of Ipomoea batatas tubers (sweet potato were screened for wound healing by excision and incision wound models on Wistar rats. Three types of gel formulations were prepared, viz., gel containing 3.0% (w/w peel extract, gel containing 6.0% (w/w peel extract and gel containing 10% (w/w peel extract. Betadine (5% w/w povidone iodine cream was used as a reference standard. In the incision wound model, Tensile strength of the skin was measured. Epithelization time, wound contraction, hydroxyproline content of the scab, and ascorbic acid and malondialdehyde content of the plasma were determined in the excision wound model.Results: In the incision wound model, high tensile strength of the wounded skin was observed in animals treated with the peel extract gels and the peel bandage when compared with wounded control animals. The increase in tensile strength indicates the promotion of collagen fibers and that the disrupted wound surfaces are being firmly knit by collagen. In the excision wound model, significant wound closure was observed on the 4th day in rats treated with all three gel formulations when compared with the wounded control rats. A significant increase inFunctional Foods in Health and Disease 2011; 10:403-415hydroxyproline and ascorbic acid content in the gel-treated animals and a significant decrease in malondialdehyde content in the

  6. Solar Airplanes and Regenerative Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.

    2007-01-01

    A solar electric aircraft with the potential to "fly forever" has captured NASA's interest, and the concept for such an aircraft was pursued under Aeronautics Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Feasibility of this aircraft happens to depend on the successful development of solar power technologies critical to NASA's Exploration Initiatives; hence, there was widespread interest throughout NASA to bring these technologies to a flight demonstration. The most critical is an energy storage system to sustain mission power during night periods. For the solar airplane, whose flight capability is already limited by the diffuse nature of solar flux and subject to latitude and time of year constraints, the feasibility of long endurance flight depends on a storage density figure of merit better than 400-600 watt-hr per kilogram. This figure of merit is beyond the capability of present day storage technologies (other than nuclear) but may be achievable in the hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell (RFC). This potential has led NASA to undertake the practical development of a hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell, initially as solar energy storage for a high altitude UAV science platform but eventually to serve as the primary power source for NASAs lunar base and other planet surface installations. Potentially the highest storage capacity and lowest weight of any non-nuclear device, a flight-weight RFC aboard a solar-electric aircraft that is flown continuously through several successive day-night cycles will provide the most convincing demonstration that this technology's widespread potential has been realized. In 1998 NASA began development of a closed cycle hydrogen oxygen PEM RFC under the Aeronautics Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project and continued its development, originally for a solar electric airplane flight, through FY2005 under the Low Emissions Alternative Power (LEAP) project. Construction of

  7. Wound Drainage Culture (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Voice in Health Care Decisions Wound Drainage Culture KidsHealth > For Parents > Wound Drainage Culture Print A A A What's in this article? ... Have Questions What It Is A wound drainage culture is a test to detect germs such as ...

  8. Trends in Surgical Wound Healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, F.

    2008-01-01

    The understanding of acute and chronic wound pathophysiology has progressed considerably over the past decades. Unfortunately, improvement in clinical practice has not followed suit, although new trends and developments have improved the outcome of wound treatment in many ways. This review focuses...... on promising clinical development in major wound problems in general and on postoperative infections in particular Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  9. Utilizing the planarian voltage-gated ion channel transcriptome to resolve a role for a Ca(2+) channel in neuromuscular function and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, John D; Zhang, Dan; Liu, Xiaolong; Zarowiecki, Magdalena; Berriman, Matthew; Marchant, Jonathan S

    2017-06-01

    The robust regenerative capacity of planarian flatworms depends on the orchestration of signaling events from early wounding responses through the stem cell enacted differentiative outcomes that restore appropriate tissue types. Acute signaling events in excitable cells play an important role in determining regenerative polarity, rationalized by the discovery that sub-epidermal muscle cells express critical patterning genes known to control regenerative outcomes. These data imply a dual conductive (neuromuscular signaling) and instructive (anterior-posterior patterning) role for Ca(2+) signaling in planarian regeneration. Here, to facilitate study of acute signaling events in the excitable cell niche, we provide a de novo transcriptome assembly from the planarian Dugesia japonica allowing characterization of the diverse ionotropic portfolio of this model organism. We demonstrate the utility of this resource by proceeding to characterize the individual role of each of the planarian voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels during regeneration, and demonstrate that knockdown of a specific voltage operated Ca(2+) channel (Cav1B) that impairs muscle function uniquely creates an environment permissive for anteriorization. Provision of the full transcriptomic dataset should facilitate further investigations of molecules within the planarian voltage-gated channel portfolio to explore the role of excitable cell physiology on regenerative outcomes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: ECS Meeting edited by Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs and Jacques Haiech. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Gunshot wounds -- aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clean towel. Let the wound air dry. After Effects Being shot by a gun is traumatic. You may feel shock, fear for your safety, depression, or anger as a result. These are completely normal feelings for someone who has been through a traumatic event . These feelings are not signs of weakness. You ...

  11. Healing Invisible Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Erica J.

    2010-01-01

    As many as 9 in 10 justice-involved youth are affected by traumatic childhood experiences. According to "Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense," between 75 and 93 percent of youth currently incarcerated in the justice system have had at least one traumatic experience, including sexual…

  12. Wound Infections PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-10-25

    This 30 second public service announcement is about how to avoid a wound infection after a disaster.  Created: 10/25/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/25/2017.

  13. Fungal Wound Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-01-28

    Dr. David Tribble, acting director of the infectious disease clinical research program at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, discusses fungal wound infections after combat trauma.  Created: 1/28/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/28/2016.

  14. Satellite cells from dystrophic muscle retain regenerative capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrin, Luisa; Zammit, Peter S; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an inherited disorder that is characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting, with a failure of muscle maintenance/repair mediated by satellite cells (muscle stem cells). The function of skeletal muscle stem cells resident in dystrophic muscle may be perturbed by being in an increasing pathogenic environment, coupled with constant demands for repairing muscle. To investigate the contribution of satellite cell exhaustion to this process, we tested the functionality of satellite cells isolated from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We found that satellite cells derived from young mdx mice contributed efficiently to muscle regeneration within our in vivo mouse model. To then test the effects of long-term residence in a dystrophic environment, satellite cells were isolated from aged mdx muscle. Surprisingly, they were as functional as those derived from young or aged wild type donors. Removing satellite cells from a dystrophic milieu reveals that their regenerative capacity remains both intact and similar to satellite cells derived from healthy muscle, indicating that the host environment is critical for controlling satellite cell function. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Genetic engineering for skeletal regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersbach, Charles A; Phillips, Jennifer E; García, Andrés J

    2007-01-01

    The clinical challenges of skeletal regenerative medicine have motivated significant advances in cellular and tissue engineering in recent years. In particular, advances in molecular biology have provided the tools necessary for the design of gene-based strategies for skeletal tissue repair. Consequently, genetic engineering has emerged as a promising method to address the need for sustained and robust cellular differentiation and extracellular matrix production. As a result, gene therapy has been established as a conventional approach to enhance cellular activities for skeletal tissue repair. Recent literature clearly demonstrates that genetic engineering is a principal factor in constructing effective methods for tissue engineering approaches to bone, cartilage, and connective tissue regeneration. This review highlights this literature, including advances in the development of efficacious gene carriers, novel cell sources, successful delivery strategies, and optimal target genes. The current status of the field and the challenges impeding the clinical realization of these approaches are also discussed.

  16. Nanomodified polymer materials for regenerative heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchegolkov, Alexander; Shchegolkov, Alexey; Dyachkova, Tatyana

    2017-11-01

    The paper presents thermophysical properties of nanomodified paraffin mixed with polymers as polyethylene or fluoroplastic, which may be effectively used for the development of heat exchange elements of personal protective equipment. It has been experimentally shown that the heat exchangers based on the nanomodified polymer composites have twofold mass compared to the standard regenerative heat exchanger with comparable dimensions. The best result has been obtained on the basis of composite containing polyethylene and paraffin modified with CNTs, which thermal conductivity is 1.6 times higher than forconventional paraffin. The application of carbon nanostructures as the modifiers of heat storage materials improves cooling efficiency by 14.9-17.9 °C by creating more comfortable conditions for breathing via personal protective equipment.

  17. Skeletal callus formation is a nerve‐independent regenerative response to limb amputation in mice and Xenopus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Shinichirou; Takahashi, Yumiko; Satoh, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To clarify the mechanism of limb regeneration that differs between mammals (non‐regenerative) and amphibians (regenerative), responses to limb amputation and the accessory limb inducible surgery (accessory limb model, ALM) were compared between mice and Xenopus, focusing on the events leading to blastema formation. In both animals, cartilaginous calluses were formed around the cut edge of bones after limb amputation. They not only are morphologically similar but show other similarities, such as growth driven by undifferentiated cell proliferation and macrophage‐dependent and nerve‐independent induction. It appears that amputation callus formation is a common nerve‐independent regenerative response in mice and Xenopus. In contrast, the ALM revealed that the wound epithelium (WE) in Xenopus was innervated by many regenerating axons when a severed nerve ending was placed underneath it, whereas only a few axons were found within the WE in mice. Since nerves are involved in induction of the regeneration‐permissive WE in amphibians, whether or not nerves can interact with the WE might be one of the key processes separating successful nerve‐dependent blastema formation in Xenopus and failure in mice. PMID:27499875

  18. Complex wounds Feridas complexas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Castro Ferreira

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex wound is the term used more recently to group those well-known difficult wounds, either chronic or acute, that challenge medical and nursing teams. They defy cure using conventional and simple "dressings" therapy and currently have a major socioeconomic impact. The purpose of this review is to bring these wounds to the attention of the health-care community, suggesting that they should be treated by multidisciplinary teams in specialized hospital centers. In most cases, surgical treatment is unavoidable, because the extent of skin and subcutaneous tissue loss requires reconstruction with grafts and flaps. New technologies, such as the negative pressure device, should be introduced. A brief review is provided of the major groups of complex wounds-diabetic wounds, pressure sores, chronic venous ulcers, post-infection soft-tissue gangrenes, and ulcers resulting from vasculitis.Ferida complexa é uma nova definição para identificar aquelas feridas crônicas e algumas agudas já bem conhecidas e que desafiam equipes médicas e de enfermagem. São difíceis de serem resolvidas usando tratamentos convencionais e simples curativos. Têm atualmente grande impacto sócio-econômico. Esta revisão procura atrair atenção da comunidade de profissionais de saúde para estas feridas, sugerindo que devam ser tratadas por equipe multidisciplinar em centro hospitalar especializado. Na maioria dos casos o tratamento cirúrgico deve ser indicado, uma vez que a perda de pele e tecido subcutâneo é extensa, necessitando de reconstrução com enxertos e retalhos. Nova tecnologia, como uso da terapia por pressão negativa foi introduzido. Breves comentários sobre os principais grupos de feridas complexas: pé diabético, úlceras por pressão, úlceras venosas, síndrome de Fournier e vasculites.

  19. Heat cascading regenerative sorption heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A simple heat cascading regenerative sorption heat pump process with rejected or waste heat from a higher temperature chemisorption circuit (HTCC) powering a lower temperature physisorption circuit (LTPC) which provides a 30% total improvement over simple regenerative physisorption compression heat pumps when ammonia is both the chemisorbate and physisorbate, and a total improvement of 50% or more for LTPC having two pressure stages. The HTCC contains ammonia and a chemisorbent therefor contained in a plurality of canisters, a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, and a heater, operatively connected together. The LTPC contains ammonia and a physisorbent therefor contained in a plurality of compressors, a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, operatively connected together. A closed heat transfer circuit (CHTC) is provided which contains a flowing heat transfer liquid (FHTL) in thermal communication with each canister and each compressor for cascading heat from the HTCC to the LTPC. Heat is regenerated within the LTPC by transferring heat from one compressor to another. In one embodiment the regeneration is performed by another CHTC containing another FHTL in thermal communication with each compressor. In another embodiment the HTCC powers a lower temperature ammonia water absorption circuit (LTAWAC) which contains a generator-absorber system containing the absorbent, and a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, operatively connected together. The absorbent is water or an absorbent aqueous solution. A CHTC is provided which contains a FHTL in thermal communication with the generator for cascading heat from the HTCC to the LTAWAC. Heat is regenerated within the LTAWAC by transferring heat from the generator to the absorber. The chemical composition of the chemisorbent is different than the chemical composition of the physisorbent, and the absorbent. The chemical composition of the FHTL is different than the chemisorbent, the physisorbent, the absorbent, and ammonia.

  20. Design and testing of a regenerative magnetorheological actuator for assistive knee braces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hao; Chen, Bing; Qin, Ling; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a multifunctional magneto-rheological actuator with power regeneration capability, named regenerative magnetorheological actuator (RMRA), is designed for gait assistance in the knee joint. RMRA has motor and magnetorheological (MR) brake parts working in parallel that can harvest energy through regenerative braking. This novel design provides multiple functions with good energy efficiency. The configuration and basic design of the RMRA are first introduced. Then geometrical optimization of the MR brake is conducted based on a parameterized model, and multiple factors are considered in the design objectives: braking torque, weight, and power consumption. After the optimal design is obtained, an RMRA prototype is fabricated and associated driver circuits are designed. Finally, multiple functions of the RMRA, especially three different braking modes, are modeled and tested. Experimental results of RMRA output performances in all working modes match the modeling and simulation. Assistive knee braces with the developed RMRA are promising for future applications in gait assistance and rehabilitation.

  1. Clay nanoparticles for regenerative medicine and biomaterial design: A review of clay bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Mohamed; Evans, Nicholas D; Oreffo, Richard O C; Dawson, Jonathan I

    2018-03-01

    Clay nanoparticles, composites and hydrogels are emerging as a new class of biomaterial with exciting potential for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Clay particles have been extensively explored in polymeric nanocomposites for self-assembly and enhanced mechanical properties as well as for their potential as drug delivery modifiers. In recent years, a cluster of studies have explored cellular interactions with clay nanoparticles alone or in combination with polymeric matrices. These pioneering studies have suggested new and unforeseen utility for certain clays as bioactive additives able to enhance cellular functions including adhesion, proliferation and differentiation, most notably for osteogenesis. This review examines the recent literature describing the potential effects of clay-based nanomaterials on cell function and examines the potential role of key clay physicochemical properties in influencing such interactions and their exciting possibilities for regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Wound geometry as it relates to tunnel valvular competence in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MSICS) in relation to anatomy, physiologic functioning and challenges of sclerocorneal tunnel. Methods: The author's method of wound construction during MSICS was explored in a lucid prose. Where relevant, information obtained from major ...

  3. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, Nana; Birke-Sorensen, Hanne; Kruse, Marie

    Aim: Postoperative wound complications make many surgical procedures unnecessarily complex, particularly in high-risk patients. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy is well recognized in the management of open wounds. In recent years, it has been introduced as well in the management of closed surgical...... incisions to reduce postoperative wound complications, though the evidence base to support this intervention is limited. The aim of this study was to assess if Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) reduces postoperative complications when applied on closed surgical incisions. Method: A systematic review...

  4. Dimensioning of automated regenerative cooling: Setting of high-end experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Taddeo, L; Gascoin, Nicolas; Fedioun, I; Chetehouna, K; Lamoot, L; Fau, G

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Regenerative cooling is a hot topic as it contributes to energy saving and energy conversion, for example within high speed propulsion or chemical plants frameworks. Considering the use of this technology in fuel-cooled hypersonic structures, the propellant duality in terms of functions (coolant and fuel) makes the thermal and combustion management to be quite challenging. Dynamics of the system must be studied in order to develop regulation and control strategies whic...

  5. A survey of dental residents' expectations for regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manguno, Christine; Murray, Peter E; Howard, Cameron; Madras, Jonathan; Mangan, Stephen; Namerow, Kenneth N

    2012-02-01

    The objective was to survey a group of dental residents regarding their expectations for using regenerative endodontic procedures as part of future dental treatments. After institutional review board approval, the opinions of 32 dentists who were having postgraduate residency training to become specialists in a dental school were surveyed. The survey had 40 questions about professional status, ethical beliefs, judgment, and clinical practice. It was found that 83.9% of dentists had no continuing education or training in stem cells or regenerative endodontic procedures. Results showed that 96.8% of dentists are willing to receive training to be able to provide regenerative endodontic procedures for their patients. Of the total group, 49.1% of dentists already use membranes, scaffolds, or bioactive materials to provide dental treatment. It was determined that 47.3% of dentists agree that the costs of regenerative procedures should be comparable with current treatments. It was also found that 55.1% of dentists were unsure whether regenerative procedures would be successful. Dentists are supportive of using regenerative endodontic procedures in their dental practice, and they are willing to undergo extra training and to buy new technology to provide new procedures. Nevertheless, dentists also need more evidence for the effectiveness and safety of regenerative treatments before they will be recommended for most patients. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Chitosan dermal substitute and chitosan skin substitute contribute to accelerated full-thickness wound healing in irradiated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Hilmi, Abu Bakar; Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Jaafar, Hasnan; Asiah, Abu Bakar; Hassan, Asma

    2013-01-01

    Wounds with full-thickness skin loss are commonly managed by skin grafting. In the absence of a graft, reepithelialization is imperfect and leads to increased scar formation. Biomaterials can alter wound healing so that it produces more regenerative tissue and fewer scars. This current study use the new chitosan based biomaterial in full-thickness wound with impaired healing on rat model. Wounds were evaluated after being treated with a chitosan dermal substitute, a chitosan skin substitute, or duoderm CGF. Wounds treated with the chitosan skin substitute showed the most re-epithelialization (33.2 ± 2.8%), longest epithelial tongue (1.62 ± 0.13 mm), and shortest migratory tongue distance (7.11 ± 0.25 mm). The scar size of wounds treated with the chitosan dermal substitute (0.13 ± 0.02 cm) and chitosan skin substitute (0.16 ± 0.05 cm) were significantly decreased (P substitute and chitosan skin substitute are suitable for wound healing in full-thickness wounds that are impaired due to radiation.

  7. Bioinspired porous membranes containing polymer nanoparticles for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ana M; Mattu, Clara; Ranzato, Elia; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2014-12-01

    Skin damages covering a surface larger than 4 cm(2) require a regenerative strategy based on the use of appropriate wound dressing supports to facilitate the rapid tissue replacement and efficient self-healing of the lost or damaged tissue. In the present work, A novel biomimetic approach is proposed for the design of a therapeutic porous construct made of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) fabricated by thermally induced phase separation (TIPS). Biomimicry of ECM was achieved by immobilization of type I collagen through a two-step plasma treatment for wound healing. Anti-inflammatory (indomethacin)-containing polymeric nanoparticles (nps) were loaded within the porous membranes in order to minimize undesired cell response caused by post-operative inflammation. The biological response to the scaffold was analyzed by using human keratinocytes cell cultures. In this work, a promising biomimetic construct for wound healing and soft tissue regeneration with drug-release properties was fabricated since it shows (i) proper porosity, pore size, and mechanical properties, (ii) biomimicry of ECM, and (iii) therapeutic potential. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Regenerative endodontics: barriers and strategies for clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jeremy J; Kim, Sahng G; Zhou, Jian; Ye, Ling; Cho, Shoko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Fu, Susan Y; Yang, Rujing; Zhou, Xuedong

    2012-07-01

    Regenerative endodontics has encountered substantial challenges toward clinical translation. The adoption by the American Dental Association of evoked pulp bleeding in immature permanent teeth is an important step for regenerative endodontics. However, there is no regenerative therapy for most endodontic diseases. Simple recapitulation of cell therapy and tissue engineering strategies that are under development for other organ systems has not led to clinical translation in regeneration endodontics. Recent work using novel biomaterial scaffolds and growth factors that orchestrate the homing of host endogenous cells represents a departure from traditional cell transplantation approaches and may accelerate clinical translation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Melting graft wound syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiou-Mei Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Melting graft wound syndrome is characterized by progressive epidermal loss from a previously well-taken skin graft, healed burn, or donor site. It may result in considerable morbidity and require prolonged treatment. We report a 23-year-old flame-burned patient with second- to third-degree burns involving more than 70% of the total body surface area, whose condition was complicated with septic shock. The patient presented with erosions and ulcers occurring on previously well-taken skin graft recipient sites over both legs and progressive epidermal loss on donor sites over the back. The patient's presentation was compatible with the diagnosis of melting graft wound syndrome, and we successfully treated the patient with debridement and supportive treatment.

  10. Regenerative braking strategies, vehicle safety and stability control systems: critical use-case proposals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleksowicz, Selim A.; Burnham, Keith J.; Southgate, Adam; McCoy, Chris; Waite, Gary; Hardwick, Graham; Harrington, Cian; McMurran, Ross

    2013-05-01

    The sustainable development of vehicle propulsion systems that have mainly focused on reduction of fuel consumption (i.e. CO2 emission) has led, not only to the development of systems connected with combustion processes but also to legislation and testing procedures. In recent years, the low carbon policy has made hybrid vehicles and fully electric vehicles (H/EVs) popular. The main virtue of these propulsion systems is their ability to restore some of the expended energy from kinetic movement, e.g. the braking process. Consequently new research and testing methods for H/EVs are currently being developed. This especially concerns the critical 'use-cases' for functionality tests within dynamic events for both virtual simulations, as well as real-time road tests. The use-case for conventional vehicles for numerical simulations and road tests are well established. However, the wide variety of tests and their great number (close to a thousand) creates a need for selection, in the first place, and the creation of critical use-cases suitable for testing H/EVs in both virtual and real-world environments. It is known that a marginal improvement in the regenerative braking ratio can significantly improve the vehicle range and, therefore, the economic cost of its operation. In modern vehicles, vehicle dynamics control systems play the principal role in safety, comfort and economic operation. Unfortunately, however, the existing standard road test scenarios are insufficient for H/EVs. Sector knowledge suggests that there are currently no agreed tests scenarios to fully investigate the effects of brake blending between conventional and regenerative braking as well as the regenerative braking interaction with active driving safety systems (ADSS). The paper presents seven manoeuvres, which are considered to be suitable and highly informative for the development and examination of H/EVs with regenerative braking capability. The critical manoeuvres presented are considered to be

  11. Burn Wound Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    generalized. Clinically, the like- controlled Pseudomonas burn wound infection in most lihood of septicemia appears to increase as the area of patients (2,4...31 patients, dida, Coccidiodes, Phycomyces, and Rhizopus . In 69 of pneumonia was the primary septic process in 27 (20 of these 75 patients (92%), the...carried out as described above and appropriate systemic anti- to which the invading organisms were sensitive and fungal agents are employed to control

  12. Fungal Burn Wound Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Aspergillus), Blasto- T he use of effective topical chemotherapeutic agents to myces (Candida), and Zygomycetes (Mucor, Rhizopus ).6 reduce...below the infected burn wound . If the infection was controlled by these measures and the patient’s condition permit- ted, the involved area was...species, 18%; Mucor species and Rhizopus species, acetate in the morning and silver sulfadiazine in the evening. Prophy- 9.1%; and Microspora species and

  13. Metalloproteinases and Their Inhibitors: Regulators of Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Sean E.; Parks, William C.

    2008-01-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic process that involves a coordinated response of many cell types representing distinct tissue compartments and is fundamentally similar among tissue types. Among the many gene products that are essential for restoration normal tissue architecture, several members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) function as positive and, at times, negative regulators of repair processes. MMPs were initially thought to only function in the resolution phase of wound healing, particularly during scar resorption; however, recent evidence suggests that they also influence other wound-healing responses, such as inflammation and re-epithelialization. In this review, we discuss what is currently known about the function of MMPs in wound healing and will provide suggestions for future research directions. PMID:18083622

  14. The modified Meek technique as a novel method for skin grafting in horses: evaluation of acceptance, wound contraction and closure in chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmink, J M; van den Boom, R; van Weeren, P R; Barneveld, A

    2006-07-01

    The acceptance of skin grafts in horses is unpredictable and the final cosmetic result can be disappointing. Besides movement and infection, graft failure is often caused by chronic inflammation, inherently present during second intention healing of limb wounds in horses. In human burns affected by infection and inflammation, the acceptance of the island skin grafts of the modified Meek technique appeared to be better than meshed sheet skin grafts. The percentage take of Meek micrografts is higher than of other techniques; and rates of both wound contraction and epithelialisation are increased. Large traumatic limb wounds of 13 horses healing by second intention were grafted using the modified Meek technique. Photographs of the wounds were taken at set intervals. Wound areas, and areas of acceptance and rejection were determined using a digital image post processor (Scion Image). The percentages of take, wound contraction and epithelialisation were calculated. The initial mean wound area was 7500 mm2. Graft acceptance was mean +/- s.d. 93.7 +/- 5.9%. Wound closure was due to contraction (55.2 +/- 11.1%) and epithelialisation (44.8 +/- 11.1%) and resulted in a 96.7 +/- 3.6% reduction of the initial wound area 29.1 +/- 6 days after grafting. All wounds showed functional and cosmetic healing. The method for skin grafting in horses achieved higher percentages of take than reported previously and consistent cosmetic and functional results. The grafts increased not only the rate of epithelialisation but also had a strong positive effect on wound contraction, resulting in rapid closure and smaller scars. The modified Meek technique proved to be a novel technique for skin grafting equine wounds in clinical practice, which can be performed easily. The molecular background of the increase of wound contraction by the grafts may provide a clue in the search for medicinal stimulation of wound contraction during second intention healing.

  15. Telemedicine in wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanussot-Deprez, Caroline; Contreras-Ruiz, José

    2008-12-01

    Telemedical wound care is one of the applications of teledermatology. We present our experience using telemedicine in the successful assessment and treatment of three patients with hard-to-heal ulcers. Three patients were seen at the PEMEX General Hospital in Veracruz, Mexico. The first patient was a 53-year-old man with hypertension, morbid obesity, chronic venous insufficiency, recurrent erysipelas, leg ulcers and lymphoedema. There was one ulcer on his left lower leg (20 x 10 cm) and one on his right leg (9 x 7 cm). The second patient was a 73-year-old woman with class III obesity and ulcers in her right leg, secondary to surgical debridement of bullous erysipelas. The third patient was a 51-year-old female with rheumatoid arthritis with one ulcer on each leg and chronic lymphostasis. Photographs with a digital camera were taken and sent weekly via email to a wound care specialist in Mexico City. The photographs allowed the expert to diagnose and evaluate the chronic wounds periodically. In the present cases, telemedicine allowed us to have a rapid evaluation, diagnosis and treatment. The images were of enough quality to be useful and small enough to be sent via regular email to the remote physician who immediately gave his feedback. The expert was confident to give therapeutic recommendations in this way, and we considered this method to be very cost-effective, saving the patient and the health care system, especially in transportation.

  16. New Regenerative Cycle for Vapor Compression Refrigeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark J. Bergander

    2005-08-29

    The main objective of this project is to confirm on a well-instrumented prototype the theoretically derived claims of higher efficiency and coefficient of performance for geothermal heat pumps based on a new regenerative thermodynamic cycle as comparing to existing technology. In order to demonstrate the improved performance of the prototype, it will be compared to published parameters of commercially available geothermal heat pumps manufactured by US and foreign companies. Other objectives are to optimize the design parameters and to determine the economic viability of the new technology. Background (as stated in the proposal): The proposed technology closely relates to EERE mission by improving energy efficiency, bringing clean, reliable and affordable heating and cooling to the residential and commercial buildings and reducing greenhouse gases emission. It can provide the same amount of heating and cooling with considerably less use of electrical energy and consequently has a potential of reducing our nations dependence on foreign oil. The theoretical basis for the proposed thermodynamic cycle was previously developed and was originally called a dynamic equilibrium method. This theory considers the dynamic equations of state of the working fluid and proposes the methods for modification of T-S trajectories of adiabatic transformation by changing dynamic properties of gas, such as flow rate, speed and acceleration. The substance of this proposal is a thermodynamic cycle characterized by the regenerative use of the potential energy of two-phase flow expansion, which in traditional systems is lost in expansion valves. The essential new features of the process are: (1) The application of two-step throttling of the working fluid and two-step compression of its vapor phase. (2) Use of a compressor as the initial step compression and a jet device as a second step, where throttling and compression are combined. (3) Controlled ratio of a working fluid at the first and

  17. Regenerative Injection Therapy with Whole Bone Marrow Aspirate for Degenerative Joint Disease: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross A. Hauser MD

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative therapeutic strategies for joint diseases usually employ either enriched concentrates of bone marrow-derived stem cells, chondrogenic preparations such as platelet-rich plasma, or irritant solutions such as hyperosmotic dextrose. In this case series, we describe our experience with a simple, cost-effective regenerative treatment using direct injection of unfractionated whole bone marrow (WBM into osteoarthritic joints in combination with hyperosmotic dextrose. Seven patients with hip, knee or ankle osteoarthritis (OA received two to seven treatments over a period of two to twelve months. Patient-reported assessments were collected in interviews and by questionnaire. All patients reported improvements with respect to pain, as well as gains in functionality and quality of life. Three patients, including two whose progress under other therapy had plateaued or reversed, achieved complete or near-complete symptomatic relief, and two additional patients achieved resumption of vigorous exercise. These preliminary findings suggest that OA treatment with WBM injection merits further investigation.

  18. Regenerative Applications Using Tooth Derived Stem Cells in Other Than Tooth Regeneration: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yun-Jong; Cha, Seunghee; Park, Young-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Tooth derived stem cells or dental stem cells are categorized according to the location from which they are isolated and represent a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine. Originally, as one kind of mesenchymal stem cells, they are considered an alternative of bone marrow stromal cells. They share many commonalties but maintain differences. Considering their original function in development and the homeostasis of tooth structures, many applications of these cells in dentistry have aimed at tooth structure regeneration; however, the application in other than tooth structures has been attempted extensively. The availability from discarded or removed teeth can be an innate benefit as a source of autologous cells. Their origin from the neural crest results in exploitation of neurological and numerous other applications. This review briefly highlights current and future perspectives of the regenerative applications of tooth derived stem cells in areas beyond tooth regeneration.

  19. Advanced textile materials and biopolymers in wound management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrulyte, Salvinija

    2008-02-01

    New generation medical textiles are an important growing field with great expansion in wound management products. Virtually new products are coming but also well known materials with significantly improved properties using advanced technologies and new methods are in the centre of research which are highly technical, technological, functional, and effective oriented. The key qualities of fibres and dressings as wound care products include that they are bacteriostatic, anti-viral, fungistatic, non-toxic, high absorbent, non-allergic, breathable, haemostatic, biocompatible, and manipulatable to incorporate medications, also provide reasonable mechanical properties. Many advantages over traditional materials have products modified or blended with also based on alginate, chitin/chitosan, collagen, branan ferulate, carbon fibres. Textile structures used for modern wound dressings are of large variety: sliver, yarn, woven, non-woven, knitted, crochet, braided, embroidered, composite materials. Wound care also applies to materials like hydrogels, matrix (tissue engineering), films, hydrocolloids, foams. Specialized additives with special functions can be introduced in advanced wound dressings with the aim to absorb odours, provide strong antibacterial properties, smooth pain and relieve irritation. Because of unique properties as high surface area to volume ratio, film thinness, nano scale fibre diameter, porosity, light weight, nanofibres are used in wound care. The aim of this study is to outline and review the latest developments and advance in medical textiles and biopolymers for wound management providing the overview with generalized scope about novelties in products and properties.

  20. Advanced Space Power Systems (ASPS): Regenerative Fuel Cells (RFC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the regenerative fuel cell project element is to develop power and energy storage technologies that enable new capabilities for future human space...

  1. Electrolyzer for NASA Lunar Regenerative Fuel Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Water electrolyzer stacks are a key component of regenerative fuel cells, designed to replace batteries as a means of storing electric energy on the lunar surface....

  2. Ultralightweight, Regeneratively Cooled Combustion Chamber for Mars Ascent Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a high-pressure, regeneratively-cooled combustion chamber that uses novel material selection for extreme reductions in mass. These materials are...

  3. The economic value of investing in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Aftab; Rivers, Patrick A

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the science of regenerative medicine and presents evidence that investments towards the development of this technology will reduce total health care output. Use of regenerative medicine will also be an important factor in eliminating chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and Parkinson's disease. Investment in regenerative medicine is a sound strategy for several reasons: human suffering will be reduced, if not eliminated; and the economy will be stimulated by creating employment opportunities, generating additional income and tax revenues, increasing worker productivity, creating new conglomerates, and reducing insurance costs. This article discusses some of the latest advances in regenerative medicine as well as the progress that has been made in the development of new stem cell therapies.

  4. Advancing pig cloning technologies towards application in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, H; Matsunari, H; Nakano, K; Watanabe, M; Umeyama, K; Nagaya, M

    2012-08-01

    Regenerative medicine is expected to make a significant contribution by development of novel therapeutic treatments for intractable diseases and for improving the quality of life of patients. Many advances in regenerative medicine, including basic and translational research, have been developed and tested in experimental animals; pigs have played an important role in various aspects of this work. The value of pigs as a model species is being enhanced by the generation of specially designed animals through cloning and genetic modifications, enabling more sophisticated research to be performed and thus accelerating the clinical application of regenerative medicine. This article reviews the significant aspects of the creation and application of cloned and genetically modified pigs in regenerative medicine research and considers the possible future directions of the technology. We also discuss the importance of reproductive biology as an interface between basic science and clinical medicine. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Novel Regenerative Carbon Analyzer for Water Quality Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — One of the highest priorities of a regenerative life support system for manned space missions (to the Moon, Mars, and other remote locations) is to recover and...

  6. Regenerative medicine: A ray of light for medical science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Supekar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The perimeters of medical science have expanded to include regenerative medicine as a translational science, which has the potential to revolutionize the treatment of incapacitating diseases and chronic disorders.

  7. LOX/Methane Regeneratively-Cooled Rocket Engine Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Design, build, and test a 5,000 lbf thrust regeneratively cooled combustion chamber at JSC for a low pressure liquid oxygen/methane engine. The engine demonstrates...

  8. Non-linear finite element simulations of injuries with free boundaries: application to surgical wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, C.; Javierre, E.; García-Aznar, J. M.; Gómez-Benito, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Wound healing is a process driven by biochemical and mechanical variables in which new tissue is synthesised to recover original tissue functionality. Wound morphology plays a crucial role in this process, as the skin behaviour is not uniform along different directions. In this work we simulate the contraction of surgical wounds, which can be characterised as elongated and deep wounds. Due to the regularity of this morphology, we approximate the evolution of the wound through its cross-section, adopting a plane strain hypothesis. This simplification reduces the complexity of the computational problem while maintaining allows for a thorough analysis of the role of wound depth in the healing process, an aspect of medical and computational relevance that has not yet been addressed. To reproduce wound contraction we consider the role of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, collagen and a generic growth factor. The contraction phenomenon is driven by cell-generated forces. We postulate that these forces are adjusted to the mechanical environment of the tissue where cells are embedded through a mechanosensing and mechanotransduction mechanism. To solve the non-linear problem we use the Finite Element Method and an updated Lagrangian approach to represent the change in the geometry. To elucidate the role of wound depth and width on the contraction pattern and evolution of the involved species, we analyse different wound geometries with the same wound area. We find that deeper wounds contract less and reach a maximum contraction rate earlier than superficial wounds. PMID:24443355

  9. Nonlinear finite element simulations of injuries with free boundaries: application to surgical wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, C; Javierre, E; García-Aznar, J M; Gómez-Benito, M J

    2014-06-01

    Wound healing is a process driven by biochemical and mechanical variables in which a new tissue is synthesised to recover original tissue functionality. Wound morphology plays a crucial role in this process, as the skin behaviour is not uniform along different directions. In this work, we simulate the contraction of surgical wounds, which can be characterised as elongated and deep wounds. Because of the regularity of this morphology, we approximate the evolution of the wound through its cross section, adopting a plane strain hypothesis. This simplification reduces the complexity of the computational problem; while allows for a thorough analysis of the role of wound depth in the healing process, an aspect of medical and computational relevance that has not yet been addressed. To reproduce wound contraction, we consider the role of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, collagen and a generic growth factor. The contraction phenomenon is driven by cell-generated forces. We postulate that these forces are adjusted to the mechanical environment of the tissue where cells are embedded through a mechanosensing and mechanotransduction mechanism. To solve the nonlinear problem, we use the finite element method (FEM) and an updated Lagrangian approach to represent the change in the geometry. To elucidate the role of wound depth and width on the contraction pattern and evolution of the involved species, we analyse different wound geometries with the same wound area. We find that deeper wounds contract less and reach a maximum contraction rate earlier than superficial wounds. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. From regenerative dentistry to regenerative medicine: progress, challenges, and potential applications of oral stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Li Xiao,1 Masanori Nasu2 1Department of Pharmacology, 2Research Center, The Nippon Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and epithelial stem cells play essential roles in tissue repair and self-healing. Oral MSCs and epithelial stem cells can be isolated from adult human oral tissues, for example, teeth, periodontal ligament, and gingiva. Cocultivated adult oral epithelial stem cells and MSCs could represent some developmental events, such as epithelial invagination and tubular structure formation, signifying their potentials for tissue regeneration. Oral epithelial stem cells have been used in regenerative medicine over 1 decade. They are able to form a stratified cell sheet under three-dimensional culture conditions. Both experimental and clinical data indicate that the cell sheets can not only safely and effectively reconstruct the damaged cornea in humans, but also repair esophageal ulcer in animal models. Oral MSCs include dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED, stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP, periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs, and mesenchymal stem cells from gingiva (GMSCs. They are widely applied in both regenerative dentistry and medicine. DPSCs, SHED, and SCAP are able to form dentin–pulp complex when being transplanted into immunodeficient animals. They have been experimentally used for the regeneration of dental pulp, neuron, bone muscle and blood vessels in animal models and have shown promising results. PDLSCs and GMSCs are demonstrated to be ideal cell sources for repairing the damaged tissues of periodontal, muscle, and tendon. Despite the abovementioned applications of oral stem cells, only a few human clinical trials are now underway to use them for the treatment of certain diseases. Since clinical use is the end goal, their true regenerative power and safety need to be further examined.Keywords: oral mesenchymal stem cells, oral

  11. Alkaline Materials and Regenerative Endodontics: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Kahler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Periapical health is the primary goal of endodontic treatment in mature and immature teeth. In addition, the goals of treatment of immature teeth with arrested root development include root growth to length and maturation of the apex, as well as thickening of the canal wall. These goals are valid for immature teeth that have been subjected to trauma and dental caries or that are the result of developmental anomalies that expose the tooth to the risk of pulp necrosis and consequently result in the cessation of root maturation. Regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs have been described as a “paradigm shift” in the treatment of immature teeth with pulp necrosis and underdeveloped roots, as there is the potential for further root maturation and return of vitality. Treatment with REPs is advocated as the treatment of choice for immature teeth with pulp necrosis. REP protocols involve the use of alkaline biomaterials, primarily sodium hypochlorite, calcium hydroxide, mineral trioxide aggregates and Biodentine, and are the essential components of a successful treatment regimen.

  12. Regenerative life support system research and concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Life support systems that involve recycling of atmospheres, water, food and waste are so complex that models incorporating all the interactions and relationships are vital to design, development, simulations, and ultimately to control of space qualified systems. During early modeling studies, FORTRAN and BASIC programs were used to obtain numerical comparisons of the performance of different regenerative concepts. Recently, models were made by combining existing capabilities with expert systems to establish an Intelligent Design Support Environment for simpliflying user interfaces and to address the need for the engineering aspects. Progress was also made toward modeling and evaluating the operational aspects of closed loop life support systems using Time-step and Dynamic simulations over a period of time. Example models are presented which show the status and potential of developed modeling techniques. For instance, closed loop systems involving algae systeMs for atmospheric purification and food supply augmentation, plus models employing high plants and solid waste electrolysis are described and results of initial evaluations are presented.

  13. Dental pulp stem cells in regenerative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagrande, Luciano; Cordeiro, Mabel M; Nör, Silvia A; Nör, Jacques E

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells constitute the source of differentiated cells for the generation of tissues during development, and for regeneration of tissues that are diseased or injured postnatally. In recent years, stem cell research has grown exponentially owing to the recognition that stem cell-based therapies have the potential to improve the life of patients with conditions that span from Alzheimer's disease to cardiac ischemia to bone or tooth loss. Growing evidence demonstrates that stem cells are primarily found in niches and that certain tissues contain more stem cells than others. Among these tissues, the dental pulp is considered a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells that are suitable for tissue engineering applications. It is known that dental pulp stem cells have the potential to differentiate into several cell types, including odontoblasts, neural progenitors, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. The dental pulp stem cells are highly proliferative. This characteristic facilitates ex vivo expansion and enhances the translational potential of these cells. Notably, the dental pulp is arguably the most accessible source of postnatal stem cells. Collectively, the multipotency, high proliferation rates, and accessibility make the dental pulp an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue regeneration. This review discusses fundamental concepts of stem cell biology and tissue engineering within the context of regenerative dentistry.

  14. Alkaline Materials and Regenerative Endodontics: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Bill; Chugal, Nadia; Lin, Louis M

    2017-12-05

    Periapical health is the primary goal of endodontic treatment in mature and immature teeth. In addition, the goals of treatment of immature teeth with arrested root development include root growth to length and maturation of the apex, as well as thickening of the canal wall. These goals are valid for immature teeth that have been subjected to trauma and dental caries or that are the result of developmental anomalies that expose the tooth to the risk of pulp necrosis and consequently result in the cessation of root maturation. Regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs) have been described as a "paradigm shift" in the treatment of immature teeth with pulp necrosis and underdeveloped roots, as there is the potential for further root maturation and return of vitality. Treatment with REPs is advocated as the treatment of choice for immature teeth with pulp necrosis. REP protocols involve the use of alkaline biomaterials, primarily sodium hypochlorite, calcium hydroxide, mineral trioxide aggregates and Biodentine, and are the essential components of a successful treatment regimen.

  15. Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.

    2003-01-01

    Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cells (URFC) have recently been developed by several fuel cell manufacturers. These manufacturers have concentrated their efforts on the development of the cell stack technology itself, and have not up to this point devoted much effort to the design and development of the balance of plant. A fuel cell technology program at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) that has as its goal the definition and feasibility testing of the URFC system balance of plant. Besides testing the feasibility, the program also intends to minimize the system weight, volume, and parasitic power as its goal. The design concept currently being developed uses no pumps to circulate coolant or reactants, and minimizes the ancillary components to only the oxygen and hydrogen gas storage tanks, a water storage tank, a loop heat pipe to control the temperature and two pressure control devices to control the cell stack pressures during operation. The information contained in this paper describes the design and operational concepts employed in this concept. The paper also describes the NASA Glenn research program to develop this concept and test its feasibility.

  16. Biofilms and Wounds: An Identification Algorithm and Potential Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Steven L.; Vuotto, Claudia; Donelli, Gianfranco; Lipsky, Benjamin A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: The presence of a “pathogenic” or “highly virulent” biofilm is a fundamental risk factor that prevents a chronic wound from healing and increases the risk of the wound becoming clinically infected. There is presently no unequivocal gold standard method available for clinicians to confirm the presence of biofilms in a wound. Thus, to help support clinician practice, we devised an algorithm intended to demonstrate evidence of the presence of a biofilm in a wound to assist with wound management. Recent Advances: A variety of histological and microscopic methods applied to tissue biopsies are currently the most informative techniques available for demonstrating the presence of generic (not classified as pathogenic or commensal) biofilms and the effect they are having in promoting inflammation and downregulating cellular functions. Critical Issues: Even as we rely on microscopic techniques to visualize biofilms, they are entities which are patchy and dispersed rather than confluent, particularly on biotic surfaces. Consequently, detection of biofilms by microscopic techniques alone can lead to frequent false-negative results. Furthermore, visual identification using the naked eye of a pathogenic biofilm on a macroscopic level on the wound will not be possible, unlike with biofilms on abiotic surfaces. Future Direction: Lacking specific biomarkers to demonstrate microscopic, nonconfluent, virulent biofilms in wounds, the present focus on biofilm research should be placed on changing clinical practice. This is best done by utilizing an anti-biofilm toolbox approach, rather than speculating on unscientific approaches to identifying biofilms, with or without staining, in wounds with the naked eye. The approach to controlling biofilm should include initial wound cleansing, periodic debridement, followed by the application of appropriate antimicrobial wound dressings. This approach appears to be effective in removing pathogenic biofilms. PMID:26155381

  17. Fully regenerative braking and improved acceleration for electrical vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Melis, Wim J.C.; Chishty, Owais

    2013-01-01

    Generally, car brake systems use hydraulic brake technology, which converts the excess of kinetic energy into heat, effectively resulting in an energy loss. Regenerative braking technology focuses on converting this kinetic energy of the decelerating vehicle back into electrical energy that can then be reused for example during acceleration. Current hybrid vehicles are equipped with such regenerative braking technology, which makes them particularly interesting for situations with frequent de...

  18. Biodegradable Gelatin Microcarriers Facilitate Re-Epithelialization of Human Cutaneous Wounds - An In Vitro Study in Human Skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Lönnqvist

    Full Text Available The possibility to use a suspended tridimensional matrix as scaffolding for re-epithelialization of in vitro cutaneous wounds was investigated with the aid of a human in vitro wound healing model based on viable full thickness skin. Macroporous gelatin microcarriers, CultiSpher-S, were applied to in vitro wounds and cultured for 21 days. Tissue sections showed incorporation of wound edge keratinocytes into the microcarriers and thicker neoepidermis in wounds treated with microcarriers. Thickness of the neoepidermis was measured digitally, using immunohistochemical staining of keratins as epithelial demarcation. Air-lifting of wounds enhanced stratification in control wounds as well as wounds with CultiSpher-S. Immunohistochemical staining revealed expression of keratin 5, keratin 10, and laminin 5 in the neoepidermal component. We conclude that the CultiSpher-S microcarriers can function as tissue guiding scaffold for re-epithelialization of cutaneous wounds.

  19. Biodegradable Gelatin Microcarriers Facilitate Re-Epithelialization of Human Cutaneous Wounds - An In Vitro Study in Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnqvist, Susanna; Rakar, Jonathan; Briheim, Kristina; Kratz, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to use a suspended tridimensional matrix as scaffolding for re-epithelialization of in vitro cutaneous wounds was investigated with the aid of a human in vitro wound healing model based on viable full thickness skin. Macroporous gelatin microcarriers, CultiSpher-S, were applied to in vitro wounds and cultured for 21 days. Tissue sections showed incorporation of wound edge keratinocytes into the microcarriers and thicker neoepidermis in wounds treated with microcarriers. Thickness of the neoepidermis was measured digitally, using immunohistochemical staining of keratins as epithelial demarcation. Air-lifting of wounds enhanced stratification in control wounds as well as wounds with CultiSpher-S. Immunohistochemical staining revealed expression of keratin 5, keratin 10, and laminin 5 in the neoepidermal component. We conclude that the CultiSpher-S microcarriers can function as tissue guiding scaffold for re-epithelialization of cutaneous wounds. PMID:26061630

  20. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, Nana

    the rate of surgical wound infection and wound exudate post-caesarean and that wound infection had a negative impact on quality of life one month after surgery. Alongside the clinical trial, a trial-based cost-effectiveness analysis demonstrated that the treatment is cost-effective in a high......Women with a pre-gestational body mass index (BMI) above 30 kg/m2 giving birth by caesarean section are at high risk of surgical wound infection compared with women with a BMI below 30 kg/m2. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (iNPWT) is one strategy to reduce the rate of surgical wound...... infection. However, the treatment is relatively costly compared to standard postoperative dressings and thus it was important to consider the rationale for using iNPWT before introducing the treatment in a clinical setting. This thesis assesses the current evidence of whether iNPWT reduces post...

  1. The management of perineal wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh k Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of perineal wounds can be very frustrating as these invariably get contaminated from the ano-genital tracts. Moreover, the apparent skin defect may be associated with a significant three dimensional dead space in the pelvic region. Such wounds are likely to become chronic and recalcitrant if appropriate wound management is not instituted in a timely manner. These wounds usually result after tumor excision, following trauma or as a result of infective pathologies like hideradenitis suppurativa or following thermal burns. Many options are available for management of perineal wounds and these have been discussed with illustrative case examples. A review of literature has been done for listing commonly instituted options for management of the wounds in perineum.

  2. Firearms, bullets, and wound ballistics: an imaging primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Tarek N; Shuaib, Waqas; Han, Tatiana; Mehta, Ajeet; Khosa, Faisal

    2015-07-01

    Based on its intrinsic mass and velocity, a bullet has an upper limit of wounding potential. Actual wound severity is a function of the bullet construction and trajectory, as well as the properties of the tissues traversed. Interpreting physicians must evaluate the bullet trajectory and describe patterns of injury resulting from the effect of energy transfer from the projectile into living tissue. A basic understanding of firearms, projectiles, and wound ballistics can help the interpreting physicians in conceptualizing these injuries and interpreting these cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [PERSONALIZED APPROACH TO PATIENT WITH CHRONIC WOUND IN FAMILY MEDICINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinožić, T; Katić, M; Kovačević, J

    2016-01-01

    It can be said that the occurrence and development of wounds, healing, delayed healing, and the notion of chronic wound are some of the basic characteristics of all living beings. When it comes to people, there are a number of processes that take place during wound healing, and even under ideal circumstances, they create a functionally less valuable skin tissue, along with structural and functional changes. Fibrosis in the form of hypertrophic scars and keloids, contractures and adhesions are examples of excessive healing. Microcirculation is significantly different from healthy skin circulation with consequential formation of local hypoxia and stagnation in lymph flow with edema. Poor functionality of the scar tissue, particularly in the areas exposed to stronger forces, can cause forming of wounds. Such wounds are hard to heal despite the inexistence of other possible reasons for delayed healing, precisely because of their poor functionality and placement. The presence of wound requiring long-term treatment affects all areas of patient life and leads to decline in the quality of life. Exemplified by case presentation of a patient with post-traumatic wound in the scar area, in our office we showed a model of care based on the principle of overall personalized care with the biopsychosocial approach. Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures included wound assessment, biofilm and lymphedema detection, assessment of the patient’s psychosocial status, risk factors for wound healing, vascular ultrasound diagnostics, carboxytherapy as specialized adjuvant therapy, use of modern wound dressings, and compression therapy. Supportive psychotherapy was conducted in positive communication environment during treatment. In this way, in an atmosphere of cooperation with the patient, it was possible not only to influence the process of wound healing as the primary objective, but also to improve the quality of the patient’s life, as well as to influence our professional

  4. Autologous adipose-derived regenerative cell therapy modulates development of hypertrophic scarring in a red Duroc porcine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Foubert

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective prevention and treatment of hypertrophic scars (HTSs, a common consequence of deep-partial thickness injury, remain a significant clinical challenge. Previous studies from our group have shown that autologous adipose-derived regenerative cells (ADRCs represent a promising approach to improve wound healing and, thereby, impact HTS development. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of local delivery of ADRCs immediately following deep-partial thickness cutaneous injury on HTS development in the red Duroc (RD porcine model. Methods Bilateral pairs of deep-partial thickness excisional wounds (2 mm depth; 58 cm2 area were created using an electric dermatome on RD pigs (n = 12. Autologous ADRCs were isolated from the inguinal fat pad and then sprayed directly onto the wound at a dose of 0.25 × 106 viable cells/cm2. The paired contralateral wound received vehicle control. Wound healing and development of HTS were assessed over 6 months using digital imaging, quantitative measurement of skin hardness and pigmentation, and histology. Results Data showed that ADRC treatment led to reduced scar hyperpigmentation compared to control (p < 0.05. Using the Durometer, at 2 and 6 months post-injury, skin hardness was 10–20% lower in ADRCs-treated wounds compared to control vehicle (p < 0.05. A similar trend was observed with the skin fibrometer. ADRC treatment promoted more normal collagen organization, improvement in the number of rete ridges (p < 0.01, longer elastic fiber length (p < 0.01, and reduced hypervascularity (blood vessel density; p < 0.05. ADRC treatment was associated with modulation of IL-6 expression within the wound/scar with upregulation 2 weeks after injury (wound healing phase and downregulation at 2 months (early scarring phase post-treatment compared to control Conclusions These findings support the potential therapeutic value of autologous ADRC

  5. Manufacturing road map for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsberger, Joshua; Harrysson, Ola; Shirwaiker, Rohan; Starly, Binil; Wysk, Richard; Cohen, Paul; Allickson, Julie; Yoo, James; Atala, Anthony

    2015-02-01

    The Regenerative Medicine Foundation Annual Conference held on May 6 and 7, 2014, had a vision of assisting with translating tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM)-based technologies closer to the clinic. This vision was achieved by assembling leaders in the field to cover critical areas. Some of these critical areas included regulatory pathways for regenerative medicine therapies, strategic partnerships, coordination of resources, developing standards for the field, government support, priorities for industry, biobanking, and new technologies. The final day of this conference featured focused sessions on manufacturing, during which expert speakers were invited from industry, government, and academia. The speakers identified and accessed roadblocks plaguing the field where improvements in advanced manufacturing offered many solutions. The manufacturing sessions included (a) product development toward commercialization in regenerative medicine, (b) process challenges to scale up manufacturing in regenerative medicine, and (c) infrastructure needs for manufacturing in regenerative medicine. Subsequent to this, industry was invited to participate in a survey to further elucidate the challenges to translation and scale-up. This perspective article will cover the lessons learned from these manufacturing sessions and early results from the survey. We also outline a road map for developing the manufacturing infrastructure, resources, standards, capabilities, education, training, and workforce development to realize the promise of TERM. ©AlphaMed Press.

  6. Reconstructive challenges in war wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Bhandari, Prem Singh; Maurya, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Mrinal Kanti

    2012-01-01

    War wounds are devastating with extensive soft tissue and osseous destruction and heavy contamination. War casualties generally reach the reconstructive surgery centre after a delayed period due to additional injuries to the vital organs. This delay in their transfer to a tertiary care centre is responsible for progressive deterioration in wound conditions. In the prevailing circumstances, a majority of war wounds undergo delayed reconstruction, after a series of debridements. In the recent m...

  7. [Interobserver variation in wound assessments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzen, H F; Gottrup, F

    1998-05-25

    Agreement in describing a chronic leg ulcer is pivotal in identifying and treating impediments to the healing process. Six nurses and one doctor without special experience with wound healing registered wound related diagnoses for a five month period. On average each patient was seen by three observers yielding 270 registrations. Agreement beyond chance (global kappa) showed poor to moderate agreement. Agreement was best for the yellow or malodorous wound and lowest for cellulitis, hypergranulation and peripheral pulses. This emphasizes the importance of allocating wound treatment to specialist departments with access to paraclinical investigations.

  8. Advanced imaging approaches for regenerative medicine: Emerging technologies for monitoring stem cell fate in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupfer, Molly E; Ogle, Brenda M

    2015-10-01

    The future of regenerative medicine relies on our ability to control stem cell fate in order to produce functional tissues. Stem cells are the preferred cell source for tissue engineering endeavors and regenerative medicine therapies due to their high potency and capacity for expansion. However, their potency also makes them very difficult to control, as they are in a constant state of flux. Therefore, in order to advance research in regenerative medicine, it is necessary to be able to monitor cell state and phenotype both in vitro and in vivo. This review will detail the imaging technologies currently in use to monitor stem cell phenotype, migration, and differentiation. In addition to providing examples of the most recent work in this area, we will also discuss the future of imaging technologies for regenerative medicine, and how current imaging modalities might be utilized to image specific cell functionality in order to track stem cell fate. The research area of imaging stem cells is progressing toward identifying mature and differentiating cells not only by phenotypic markers, but also by visualizing cell function. Many of the cutting-edge modalities detailed in this review have the potential to be harnessed toward this goal. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Soy Protein Scaffold Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Karen B.

    Developing functional biomaterials using highly processable materials with tailorable physical and bioactive properties is an ongoing challenge in tissue engineering. Soy protein is an abundant, natural resource with potential use for regenerative medicine applications. Preliminary studies show that soy protein can be physically modified and fabricated into various biocompatible constructs. However, optimized soy protein structures for tissue regeneration (i.e. 3D porous scaffolds) have not yet been designed. Furthermore, little work has established the in vivo biocompatibility of implanted soy protein and the benefit of using soy over other proteins including FDA-approved bovine collagen. In this work, freeze-drying and 3D printing fabrication processes were developed using commercially available soy protein to create porous scaffolds that improve cell growth and infiltration compared to other soy biomaterials previously reported. Characterization of scaffold structure, porosity, and mechanical/degradation properties was performed. In addition, the behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells seeded on various designed soy scaffolds was analyzed. Biological characterization of the cell-seeded scaffolds was performed to assess feasibility for use in liver tissue regeneration. The acute and humoral response of soy scaffolds implanted in an in vivo mouse subcutaneous model was also investigated. All fabricated soy scaffolds were modified using thermal, chemical, and enzymatic crosslinking to change properties and cell growth behavior. 3D printing allowed for control of scaffold pore size and geometry. Scaffold structure, porosity, and degradation rate significantly altered the in vivo response. Freeze-dried soy scaffolds had similar biocompatibility as freeze-dried collagen scaffolds of the same protein content. However, the soy scaffolds degraded at a much faster rate, minimizing immunogenicity. Interestingly, subcutaneously implanted soy scaffolds affected blood

  10. Distinguishing clinical and imaging features of nodular regenerative hyperplasia and large regenerative nodules of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, J.T. [Departments of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Federle, M.P., E-mail: federle@stanford.ed [Departments of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chopra, K. [Departments of Gastroenterology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Aim: Nodular regenerative hyperplasia (NRH) and large regenerative nodules (LRN) are distinct types of hepatocellular nodules that have been confused in the radiology literature. However, distinction is critical because their clinical significance is quite different. Our purpose was to review the clinical and imaging findings in a series of patients with NRH and LRN in order to identify distinguishing clinical and imaging features. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective case series. The clinical and imaging features were compared in 36 patients with pathological proof of NRH and 23 patients with pathological evidence of LRN. Results: NRH and LRN have different predisposing factors and imaging findings. NRH is often associated with organ transplantation, myeloproliferative disease, or autoimmune processes. Livers with NRH typically do not have enhancing nodules; none of the present patients with NRH had enhancing liver masses. In contrast, LRN are often associated with Budd-Chiari syndrome. Enhancing liver masses were noted in 19 (83%) of the 23 patients with LRN. The p values for the comparisons were less than 0.001 for both enhancing liver masses and hepatic vein thrombosis. Conclusion: NRH and LRN can have distinct clinical presentations and imaging appearances. LRN often result in enhancing liver nodules, whereas NRH usually does not. Clinical and imaging information enables the distinction of LRN and NRH in many cases.

  11. Biomechanical Skin Property Evaluation for Wounds Treated With Synthetic and Biosynthetic Wound Dressings and a Newly Developed Collagen Matrix During Healing of Superficial Skin Defects in a Rat Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Manuel; Engelke, Anne-Sophie; Tolzmann, Dascha Sophie; Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Rothenberger, Jens

    2016-09-01

    There is a high prevalence of superficial wounds such as partial-thickness burns. Treatment of these wounds frequently includes temporary application of wound dressings. The aim of this study was to compare a newly developed collagen matrix with commonly used temporary skin dressings for treatment of partial-thickness skin defects. Through a skin dermatome, 42 standardized superficial skin defects were generated on the back of 28 adult male Lewis rats. The wounds were treated with a synthetic wound dressing (Suprathel, Polymedics Innovations Inc, Woodstock, GA) (n = 14), a biosynthetic skin dressing (Biobrane, Smith & Nephew, Hull, UK) (n = 14), or a newly developed bovine collagen matrix, Collagen Cell Carrier (Viscofan BioEngineering, Weinheim, Germany) (n = 14). Biomechanical properties of the skin were determined and compared every 10 days over a 3-month period of using the Cutometer MPA 580 (Courage + Khazaka Electronic GmbH, Cologne, Germany). As opposed to healthy skin, statistically significant differences were detected between days 10 and 30, and between days 60 and 80, for calculated elasticity (Ue), firmness of skin (R0), and overall elasticity (R8). After 3 months, no statistically significant differences in skin elasticity were detected between the different wound dressings. The presented results give an opportunity to compare the wound dressings used for treatment with respect to skin elasticity and reveal the potential of the bovine collagen matrix in the treatment of superficial skin defects; therefore the results facilitate further evaluation of collagen matrix in surgical applications and regenerative medicine.

  12. Outage analysis for underlay cognitive networks using incremental regenerative relaying

    KAUST Repository

    Tourki, Kamel

    2013-02-01

    Cooperative relay technology has recently been introduced into cognitive radio (CR) networks to enhance the network capacity, scalability, and reliability of end-to-end communication. In this paper, we investigate an underlay cognitive network where the quality of service (QoS) of the secondary link is maintained by triggering an opportunistic regenerative relaying once it falls under an unacceptable level. Analysis is conducted for two schemes, referred to as the channel-state information (CSI)-based and fault-tolerant schemes, respectively, where different amounts of CSI were considered. We first provide the exact cumulative distribution function (cdf) of the received signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over each hop with colocated relays. Then, the cdf\\'s are used to determine a very accurate closed-form expression for the outage probability for a transmission rate $R$. In a high-SNR region, a floor of the secondary outage probability occurs, and we derive its corresponding expression. We validate our analysis by showing that the simulation results coincide with our analytical results in Rayleigh fading channels. © 1967-2012 IEEE.

  13. Liquid Crystalline Networks toward Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martella, Daniele; Paoli, Paolo; Pioner, Josè M; Sacconi, Leonardo; Coppini, Raffaele; Santini, Lorenzo; Lulli, Matteo; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Wiersma, Diederik S; Poggesi, Corrado; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Parmeggiani, Camilla

    2017-12-01

    The communication reports the use of liquid crystalline networks (LCNs) for engineering tissue cultures with human cells. Their ability as cell scaffolds for different cell lines is demonstrated. Preliminary assessments of the material biocompatibility are performed on human dermal fibroblasts and murine muscle cells (C2C12), demonstrating that coatings or other treatments are not needed to use the acrylate-based materials as support. Moreover, it is found that adherent C2C12 cells undergo differentiation, forming multinucleated myotubes, which show the typical elongated shape, and contain bundles of stress fibers. Once biocompatibility is demonstrated, the same LCN films are used as a substrate for culturing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocites (hiPSC-CMs) proving that LCNs are capable to develop adult-like dimensions and a more mature cell function in a short period of culture in respect to standard supports. The demonstrated biocompatibility together with the extraordinary features of LCNs opens to preparation of complex cell scaffolds, both patterned and stimulated, for dynamic cell culturing. The ability of these materials to improve cell maturation and differentiation will be developed toward engineered heart and skeletal muscular tissues exploring regenerative medicine toward bioartificial muscles for injured sites replacement. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Gene network underlying the glial regenerative response to central nervous system injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kentaro; Losada-Perez, Maria; Hidalgo, Alicia

    2018-01-01

    Although the central nervous system does not regenerate, injury induces repair and regenerative responses in glial cells. In mammals, activated microglia clear up apoptotic cells and debris resulting from the injury, astrocytes form a scar that contains the lesion, and NG2-glia elicit a prominent regenerative response. NG2-glia regenerate themselves and differentiate into oligodendrocytes, which remyelinate axons leading to some recovery of locomotion. The regenerative response of glial cells is evolutionarily conserved across the animals and Drosophila genetics revealed an underlying gene network. This involves the genes Notch, kon-tiki, eiger, dorsal, and prospero, homologues of mammalian Notch1, ng2, TNF, NFκB, and prox1, respectively. Feedback loops between these genes enable a surge in proliferation in response to injury and ensuing differentiation. Negative feedback sets a timer for proliferation, and prevents uncontrolled growth that could lead to glioma. Remarkable parallels are found in these genetic relationships between fruit flies and mammals. Drosophila findings provide insights into gene functions that could be manipulated in stem cells and progenitors for therapeutic repair. Developmental Dynamics 247:85-93, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Veterinary applications of induced pluripotent stem cells: regenerative medicine and models for disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrian-Serrano, Alberto; Stout, Tom; Dinnyes, Andras

    2013-10-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can now be derived from a tissue biopsy and represent a promising new platform for disease modelling, drug and toxicity testing, biomarker development and cell-based therapies for regenerative medicine. In regenerative medicine, large animals may represent the best models for man, and thereby provide invaluable systems in which to test the safety and the potential of iPSCs. Hence, testing iPSCs in veterinary species may serve a double function, namely, developing therapeutic products for regenerative medicine in veterinary patients while providing valuable background information for human clinical trials. The production of iPSCs from livestock or wild species is attractive because it could improve efficiency and reduce costs in various fields, such as transgenic animal generation and drug development, preservation of biological diversity, and because it also offers an alternative to xenotransplantation for in vivo generation of organs. Although the technology of cellular reprogramming using the so-called 'Yamanaka factors' is in its peak expectation phase and many concerns still need to be addressed, the rapid technical progress suggests that iPSCs could contribute significantly to novel therapies in veterinary and biomedical practice in the near future. This review provides an overview of the potential applications of iPSCs in veterinary medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Challenges and Strategies for Improving the Regenerative Effects of Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Based Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Baldari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based therapies have the potential to revolutionize current treatments for diseases with high prevalence and related economic and social burden. Unfortunately, clinical trials have made only modest improvements in restoring normal function to degenerating tissues. This limitation is due, at least in part, to the death of transplanted cells within a few hours after transplant due to a combination of mechanical, cellular, and host factors. In particular, mechanical stress during implantation, extracellular matrix loss upon delivery, nutrient and oxygen deprivation at the recipient site, and host inflammatory response are detrimental factors limiting long-term transplanted cell survival. The beneficial effect of cell therapy for regenerative medicine ultimately depends on the number of administered cells reaching the target tissue, their viability, and their promotion of tissue regeneration. Therefore, strategies aiming at improving viable cell engraftment are crucial for regenerative medicine. Here we review the major factors that hamper successful cell engraftment and the strategies that have been studied to enhance the beneficial effects of cell therapy. Moreover, we provide a perspective on whether mesenchymal stromal cell-derived extracellular vesicle delivery, as a cell-free regenerative approach, may circumvent current cell therapy limitations.

  17. Mice lacking MKP-1 and MKP-5 Reveal Hierarchical Regulation of Regenerative Myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hao; Gatzke, Florian; Molle, Julia M; Lee, Han Bin; Helm, Emma T; Oldham, Jessie J; Zhang, Lei; Gerrard, David E; Bennett, Anton M

    2015-11-12

    The relative contribution of the MAP kinase phosphatases (MKPs) in the integration of MAP kinase-dependent signaling during regenerative myogenesis has yet to be fully investigated. MKP-1 and MKP-5 maintain skeletal muscle homeostasis by providing positive and negative effects on regenerative myogenesis, respectively. In order to define the hierarchical contributions of MKP-1 and MKP-5 in the regulation of regenerative myogenesis we genetically ablated both MKPs in mice. MKP-1/MKP 5-deficient double-knockout (MKP1/5- DKO) mice were viable, and upon skeletal muscle injury, were severely impaired in their capacity to regenerate skeletal muscle. Satellite cells were fewer in number in MKP1/5-DKO mice and displayed a reduced proliferative capacity as compared with those derived from wild-type mice. MKP1/5-DKO mice exhibited increased inflammation and the macrophage M1 to M2 transition during the resolution of inflammation was impaired following injury. These results demonstrate that the actions of MKP-1 to positively regulate myogenesis predominate over those of MKP-5, which negatively regulates myogenesis. Hence, MKP-1 and MKP-5 function to maintain skeletal muscle homeostasis through non-overlapping and opposing signaling pathways.

  18. Emerging regenerative approaches for periodontal reconstruction: a systematic review from the AAP Regeneration Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhao; Rios, Hector F; Cochran, David L

    2015-02-01

    More than 30 years have passed since the first successful application of regenerative therapy for treatment of periodontal diseases. Despite being feasible, periodontal regeneration still faces numerous challenges, and complete restoration of structure and function of the diseased periodontium is often considered an unpredictable task. This review highlights developing basic science and technologies for potential application to achieve reconstruction of the periodontium. A comprehensive search of the electronic bibliographic database PubMed was conducted to identify different emerging therapeutic approaches reported to influence either biologic pathways and/or tissues involved in periodontal regeneration. Each citation was assessed based on its abstract, and the full text of potentially eligible reports was retrieved. Based on the review of the full papers, their suitability for inclusion in this report was determined. In principle, only reports from scientifically well-designed studies that presented preclinical in vivo (animal studies) or clinical (human studies) evidence for successful periodontal regeneration were included. Hence, in vitro studies, namely those conducted in laboratories without any live animals, were excluded. In case of especially recent and relevant reviews with a narrow focus on specific regenerative approaches, they were identified as such, and thereby the option of referring to them to summarize the status of a specific approach, in addition to or instead of listing each separately, was preserved. Admittedly, the presence of subjectivity in the selection of studies to include in this overview cannot be excluded. However, it is believed that the contemporary approaches described in this review collectively represent the current efforts that have reported preclinical or clinical methods to successfully enhance regeneration of the periodontium. Today's challenges facing periodontal regenerative therapy continue to stimulate important research

  19. Understanding positional cues in salamander limb regeneration: implications for optimizing cell-based regenerative therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine D. McCusker

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine has reached the point where we are performing clinical trials with stem-cell-derived cell populations in an effort to treat numerous human pathologies. However, many of these efforts have been challenged by the inability of the engrafted populations to properly integrate into the host environment to make a functional biological unit. It is apparent that we must understand the basic biology of tissue integration in order to apply these principles to the development of regenerative therapies in humans. Studying tissue integration in model organisms, where the process of integration between the newly regenerated tissues and the ‘old’ existing structures can be observed and manipulated, can provide valuable insights. Embryonic and adult cells have a memory of their original position, and this positional information can modify surrounding tissues and drive the formation of new structures. In this Review, we discuss the positional interactions that control the ability of grafted cells to integrate into existing tissues during the process of salamander limb regeneration, and discuss how these insights could explain the integration defects observed in current cell-based regenerative therapies. Additionally, we describe potential molecular tools that can be used to manipulate the positional information in grafted cell populations, and to promote the communication of positional cues in the host environment to facilitate the integration of engrafted cells. Lastly, we explain how studying positional information in current cell-based therapies and in regenerating limbs could provide key insights to improve the integration of cell-based regenerative therapies in the future.

  20. Printing of Three-Dimensional Tissue Analogs for Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vivian K.; Dai, Guohao

    2016-01-01

    3-D cell printing, which can accurately deposit cells, biomaterial scaffolds and growth factors in precisely defined spatial patterns to form biomimetic tissue structures, has emerged as a powerful enabling technology to create live tissue and organ structures for drug discovery and tissue engineering applications. Unlike traditional 3-D printing that uses metals, plastics and polymers as the printing materials, cell printing has to be compatible with living cells and biological matrix. It is also required that the printing process preserves the biological functions of the cells and extracellular matrix, and to mimic the cell-matrix architectures and mechanical properties of the native tissues. Therefore, there are significant challenges in order to translate the technologies of traditional 3-D printing to cell printing, and ultimately achieve functional outcomes in the printed tissues. So it is essential to develop new technologies specially designed for cell printing and in-depth basic research in the bioprinted tissues, such as developing novel biomaterials specifically for cell printing applications, understanding the complex cell-matrix remodeling for the desired mechanical properties and functional outcomes, establishing proper vascular perfusion in bioprinted tissues, etc. In recent years, many exciting research progresses have been made in the 3-D cell printing technology and its application in engineering live tissue constructs. This review paper summarized the current development in 3-D cell printing technologies; focus on the outcomes of the live printed tissues and their potential applications in drug discovery and regenerative medicine. Current challenges and limitations are highlighted, and future directions of 3-D cell printing technology are also discussed. PMID:27066784

  1. Dose-dependent onset of regenerative program in neutron irradiated mouse skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Fratini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tissue response to irradiation is not easily recapitulated by cell culture studies. The objective of this investigation was to characterize, the transcriptional response and the onset of regenerative processes in mouse skin irradiated with different doses of fast neutrons. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To monitor general response to irradiation and individual animal to animal variation, we performed gene and protein expression analysis with both pooled and individual mouse samples. A high-throughput gene expression analysis, by DNA oligonucleotide microarray was done with three months old C57Bl/6 mice irradiated with 0.2 and 1 Gy of mono-energetic 14 MeV neutron compared to sham irradiated controls. The results on 440 irradiation modulated genes, partially validated by quantitative real time RT-PCR, showed a dose-dependent up-regulation of a sub-class of keratin and keratin associated proteins, and members of the S100 family of Ca(2+-binding proteins. Immunohistochemistry confirmed mRNA expression data enabled mapping of protein expression. Interestingly, proteins up-regulated in thickening epidermis: keratin 6 and S100A8 showed the most significant up-regulation and the least mouse-to-mouse variation following 0.2 Gy irradiation, in a concerted effort toward skin tissue regeneration. Conversely, mice irradiated at 1 Gy showed most evidence of apoptosis (Caspase-3 and TUNEL staining and most 8-oxo-G accumulation at 24 h post-irradiation. Moreover, no cell proliferation accompanied 1 Gy exposure as shown by Ki67 immunohistochemistry. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The dose-dependent differential gene expression at the tissue level following in vivo exposure to neutron radiation is reminiscent of the onset of re-epithelialization and wound healing and depends on the proportion of cells carrying multiple chromosomal lesions in the entire tissue. Thus, this study presents in vivo evidence of a skin regenerative program exerted independently

  2. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, Nana; Vinter, Christina Anne; Bille, Camilla

    Background: Obese women undergoing caesarean section are at increased risk of surgical wound complications, which may lead to delayed recovery, pain, reduced quality of life, and increased health care cost. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of incisional Negative Pressure Wound...

  3. Critical Advances in Wound Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    Nutritionist  Infectious disease specialist  Administrator  Physical and occupational therapist  Nurse practitioner Wound clinic manager...of high AKA amputations with accompanying fungal infections – Need for local therapy • Wound VAC™ Instill® therapy • Dakin’s irrigation solution

  4. Biological activity of propolis-honey balm in the treatment of experimentally-evoked burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzębska-Stojko, Zaneta; Stojko, Rafał; Rzepecka-Stojko, Anna; Kabała-Dzik, Agata; Stojko, Jerzy

    2013-11-21

    Medicines of biogenic origin with micro-organic, regenerative and analgesic properties are becoming more and more significant in the treatment of burn wounds. These properties are found in apitherapeutics such as propolis and honey--products collected and processed by a honey bee. Their effect on the course of the healing processes is multidirectional. The aim of the study was a histopathological and biochemical analysis of the processes of scar formation in experimentally evoked burn wounds in white pigs treated with the 1% and 3% Sepropol balms containing standardized extracts of propolis and honey. The results were compared with the therapeutic effects obtained with dermazin cream (1% silver sulfadiazine). The level of collagen was determined in the wounds treated with 1% and 3% Sepropol and compared with the collagen level in healthy skin and wounds treated with dermazin. Granulation and regenerated epithelium formation times were compared, with the 3% Sepropol being by far the most effective. The 3% Sepropol also increased the collagen level to 116% with the control sub-groups scoring between 80% and 98%. The results show the healing process of burn wounds in pigs treated with the Sepropol balm starts earlier and has a faster course than the standard dermazin therapy.

  5. Biological Activity of Propolis-Honey Balm in the Treatment of Experimentally-Evoked Burn Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żaneta Jastrzębska-Stojko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Medicines of biogenic origin with micro-organic, regenerative and analgesic properties are becoming more and more significant in the treatment of burn wounds. These properties are found in apitherapeutics such as propolis and honey—products collected and processed by a honey bee. Their effect on the course of the healing processes is multidirectional. The aim of the study was a histopathological and biochemical analysis of the processes of scar formation in experimentally evoked burn wounds in white pigs treated with the 1% and 3% Sepropol balms containing standardized extracts of propolis and honey. The results were compared with the therapeutic effects obtained with dermazin cream (1% silver sulfadiazine. The level of collagen was determined in the wounds treated with 1% and 3% Sepropol and compared with the collagen level in healthy skin and wounds treated with dermazin. Granulation and regenerated epithelium formation times were compared, with the 3% Sepropol being by far the most effective. The 3% Sepropol also increased the collagen level to 116% with the control sub-groups scoring between 80% and 98%. The results show the healing process of burn wounds in pigs treated with the Sepropol balm starts earlier and has a faster course than the standard dermazin therapy.

  6. Antimicrobial stewardship in wound care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipsky, Benjamin A; Dryden, Matthew; Gottrup, Finn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With the growing global problem of antibiotic resistance it is crucial that clinicians use antibiotics wisely, which largely means following the principles of antimicrobial stewardship (AMS). Treatment of various types of wounds is one of the more common reasons for prescribing...... antibiotics. OBJECTIVES: This guidance document is aimed at providing clinicians an understanding of: the basic principles of why AMS is important in caring for patients with infected wounds; who should be involved in AMS; and how to conduct AMS for patients with infected wounds. METHODS: We assembled a group...... of experts in infectious diseases/clinical microbiology (from the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy) and wound management (from the European Wound Management Association) who, after thoroughly reviewing the available literature and holding teleconferences, jointly produced this guidance document...

  7. Surgical Management of Chronic Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Benjamin R; Ha, Austin Y; Kwan, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we outline the important role the surgeon plays in the management of chronic wounds. Debridement and washout are required for grossly infected wounds and necrotizing soft tissue infections. Cutaneous cancers such as squamous cell carcinomas may contribute to chronic wounds and vice versa; if diagnosed, these should be treated with wide local excision. Arterial, venous, and even lymphatic flows can be restored in select cases to enhance delivery of nutrients and removal of metabolic waste and promote wound healing. In cases where vital structures, such as bones, joints, tendons, and nerves, are exposed, vascularized tissue transfers are often required. These tissue transfers can be local or remote, the latter of which necessitates anastomoses of arteries and veins. Pressure sores are managed by relieving pressure, treating acute trauma or infection, and using rotation fasciocutaneous flaps. Lastly, the surgeon must always consider the possibility of osteomyelitis and retained foreign body as etiology for chronic wounds.

  8. Automatic wound infection interpretation for postoperative wound image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jui-Tse; Ho, Te-Wei; Shih, Hsueh-Fu; Chang, Chun-Che; Lai, Feipei; Wu, Jin-Ming

    2017-02-01

    With the growing demand for more efficient wound care after surgery, there is a necessity to develop a machine learning based image analysis approach to reduce the burden for health care professionals. The aim of this study was to propose a novel approach to recognize wound infection on the postsurgical site. Firstly, we proposed an optimal clustering method based on unimodal-rosin threshold algorithm to extract the feature points from a potential wound area into clusters for regions of interest (ROI). Each ROI was regarded as a suture site of the wound area. The automatic infection interpretation based on the support vector machine is available to assist physicians doing decision-making in clinical practice. According to clinical physicians' judgment criteria and the international guidelines for wound infection interpretation, we defined infection detector modules as the following: (1) Swelling Detector, (2) Blood Region Detector, (3) Infected Detector, and (4) Tissue Necrosis Detector. To validate the capability of the proposed system, a retrospective study using the confirmation wound pictures that were used for diagnosis by surgical physicians as the gold standard was conducted to verify the classification models. Currently, through cross validation of 42 wound images, our classifiers achieved 95.23% accuracy, 93.33% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 100% positive predictive value. We believe this ability could help medical practitioners in decision making in clinical practice.

  9. Collecting and measuring wound exudate biochemical mediators in surgical wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Brendan; Clark, David J; Yeomans, David; Angst, Martin S

    2012-10-20

    We describe a methodology by which we are able to collect and measure biochemical inflammatory and nociceptive mediators at the surgical wound site. Collecting site-specific biochemical markers is important to understand the relationship between levels in serum and surgical wound, determine any associations between mediator release, pain, analgesic use and other outcomes of interest, and evaluate the effect of systemic and peripheral drug administration on surgical wound biochemistry. This methodology has been applied to healthy women undergoing elective cesarean delivery with spinal anesthesia. We have measured wound exudate and serum mediators at the same time intervals as patient's pain scores and analgesics consumption for up to 48 hours post-cesarean delivery. Using this methodology we have been able to detect various biochemical mediators including nerve growth factor (NGF), prostaglandin E2 (PG-E2) substance P, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, TNFα, INFγ, G-CSF, GM-CSF, MCP-1 and MIP-1β. Studies applying this human surgical wound bioassay have found no correlations between wound and serum cytokine concentrations or their time-release profile (J Pain. 2008; 9(7):650-7).(1) We also documented the utility of the technique to identify drug-mediated changes in wound cytokine content.

  10. Evaluation strategy of regenerative braking energy for supercapacitor vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhongyue; Cao, Junyi; Cao, Binggang; Chen, Wen

    2015-03-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of energy conversion and increase the driving range of electric vehicles, the regenerative energy captured during braking process is stored in the energy storage devices and then will be re-used. Due to the high power density of supercapacitors, they are employed to withstand high current in the short time and essentially capture more regenerative energy. The measuring methods for regenerative energy should be investigated to estimate the energy conversion efficiency and performance of electric vehicles. Based on the analysis of the regenerative braking energy system of a supercapacitor vehicle, an evaluation system for energy recovery in the braking process is established using USB portable data-acquisition devices. Experiments under various braking conditions are carried out. The results verify the higher efficiency of energy regeneration system using supercapacitors and the effectiveness of the proposed measurement method. It is also demonstrated that the maximum regenerative energy conversion efficiency can reach to 88%. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An Intelligent Regenerative Braking Strategy for Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Song

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative braking is an effective approach for electric vehicles (EVs to extend their driving range. A fuzzy-logic-based regenerative braking strategy (RBS integrated with series regenerative braking is developed in this paper to advance the level of energy-savings. From the viewpoint of securing car stability in braking operations, the braking force distribution between the front and rear wheels so as to accord with the ideal distribution curve are considered to prevent vehicles from experiencing wheel lock and slip phenomena during braking. Then, a fuzzy RBS using the driver’s braking force command, vehicle speed, battery SOC, battery temperature are designed to determine the distribution between friction braking force and regenerative braking force to improve the energy recuperation efficiency. The experimental results on an “LF620” prototype EV validated the feasibility and effectiveness of regenerative braking and showed that the proposed fuzzy RBS was endowed with good control performance. The maximum driving range of LF620 EV was improved by 25.7% compared with non-RBS conditions.

  12. Stem Cell Lineage Infidelity Drives Wound Repair and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yejing; Gomez, Nicholas C; Adam, Rene C; Nikolova, Maria; Yang, Hanseul; Verma, Akanksha; Lu, Catherine Pei-Ju; Polak, Lisa; Yuan, Shaopeng; Elemento, Olivier; Fuchs, Elaine

    2017-05-04

    Tissue stem cells contribute to tissue regeneration and wound repair through cellular programs that can be hijacked by cancer cells. Here, we investigate such a phenomenon in skin, where during homeostasis, stem cells of the epidermis and hair follicle fuel their respective tissues. We find that breakdown of stem cell lineage confinement-granting privileges associated with both fates-is not only hallmark but also functional in cancer development. We show that lineage plasticity is critical in wound repair, where it operates transiently to redirect fates. Investigating mechanism, we discover that irrespective of cellular origin, lineage infidelity occurs in wounding when stress-responsive enhancers become activated and override homeostatic enhancers that govern lineage specificity. In cancer, stress-responsive transcription factor levels rise, causing lineage commanders to reach excess. When lineage and stress factors collaborate, they activate oncogenic enhancers that distinguish cancers from wounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [The surgical procedure in gunshot wounds of the liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubarev, P N; Arustamov, A G

    1992-01-01

    An experience with treatment of 133 patients with gunshot wounds of the liver has shown that the optimum method of completing the surgical treatment of the gunshot wound of the liver is tamponade of it with the omentum on the pedicle and drainage of the subhepatic space, for extensive injuries of the liver the external decompression of bile ducts is necessary. Reinfusion of blood is safe in patients with injuries of the liver and is considered to be the most effective method to fill up the blood loss. The use of radionuclide methods and rheohepatography can give a sufficiently objective picture of the functional state of the liver in dynamics of the wound process. Long-term results of treatment of gunshot wounds of the liver are not considered to be satisfactory.

  14. Regenerative Therapies for Equine Degenerative Joint Disease: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeckx, Sarah; Zimmerman, Marieke; Crocetti, Sara; Suls, Marc; Mariën, Tom; Ferguson, Stephen J.; Chiers, Koen; Duchateau, Luc; Franco-Obregón, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative joint disease (DJD) is a major cause of reduced athletic function and retirement in equine performers. For this reason, regenerative therapies for DJD have gained increasing interest. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were isolated from a 6-year-old donor horse. MSCs were either used in their native state or after chondrogenic induction. In an initial study, 20 horses with naturally occurring DJD in the fetlock joint were divided in 4 groups and injected with the following: 1) PRP; 2) MSCs; 3) MSCs and PRP; or 4) chondrogenic induced MSCs and PRP. The horses were then evaluated by means of a clinical scoring system after 6 weeks (T1), 12 weeks (T2), 6 months (T3) and 12 months (T4) post injection. In a second study, 30 horses with the same medical background were randomly assigned to one of the two combination therapies and evaluated at T1. The protein expression profile of native MSCs was found to be negative for major histocompatibility (MHC) II and p63, low in MHC I and positive for Ki67, collagen type II (Col II) and Vimentin. Chondrogenic induction resulted in increased mRNA expression of aggrecan, Col II and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) as well as in increased protein expression of p63 and glycosaminoglycan, but in decreased protein expression of Ki67. The combined use of PRP and MSCs significantly improved the functionality and sustainability of damaged joints from 6 weeks until 12 months after treatment, compared to PRP treatment alone. The highest short-term clinical evolution scores were obtained with chondrogenic induced MSCs and PRP. This study reports successful in vitro chondrogenic induction of equine MSCs. In vivo application of (induced) MSCs together with PRP in horses suffering from DJD in the fetlock joint resulted in a significant clinical improvement until 12 months after treatment. PMID:24465787

  15. Regenerative therapies for equine degenerative joint disease: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeckx, Sarah; Zimmerman, Marieke; Crocetti, Sara; Suls, Marc; Mariën, Tom; Ferguson, Stephen J; Chiers, Koen; Duchateau, Luc; Franco-Obregón, Alfredo; Wuertz, Karin; Spaas, Jan H

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative joint disease (DJD) is a major cause of reduced athletic function and retirement in equine performers. For this reason, regenerative therapies for DJD have gained increasing interest. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were isolated from a 6-year-old donor horse. MSCs were either used in their native state or after chondrogenic induction. In an initial study, 20 horses with naturally occurring DJD in the fetlock joint were divided in 4 groups and injected with the following: 1) PRP; 2) MSCs; 3) MSCs and PRP; or 4) chondrogenic induced MSCs and PRP. The horses were then evaluated by means of a clinical scoring system after 6 weeks (T1), 12 weeks (T2), 6 months (T3) and 12 months (T4) post injection. In a second study, 30 horses with the same medical background were randomly assigned to one of the two combination therapies and evaluated at T1. The protein expression profile of native MSCs was found to be negative for major histocompatibility (MHC) II and p63, low in MHC I and positive for Ki67, collagen type II (Col II) and Vimentin. Chondrogenic induction resulted in increased mRNA expression of aggrecan, Col II and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) as well as in increased protein expression of p63 and glycosaminoglycan, but in decreased protein expression of Ki67. The combined use of PRP and MSCs significantly improved the functionality and sustainability of damaged joints from 6 weeks until 12 months after treatment, compared to PRP treatment alone. The highest short-term clinical evolution scores were obtained with chondrogenic induced MSCs and PRP. This study reports successful in vitro chondrogenic induction of equine MSCs. In vivo application of (induced) MSCs together with PRP in horses suffering from DJD in the fetlock joint resulted in a significant clinical improvement until 12 months after treatment.

  16. Regenerative therapies for equine degenerative joint disease: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Broeckx

    Full Text Available Degenerative joint disease (DJD is a major cause of reduced athletic function and retirement in equine performers. For this reason, regenerative therapies for DJD have gained increasing interest. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs were isolated from a 6-year-old donor horse. MSCs were either used in their native state or after chondrogenic induction. In an initial study, 20 horses with naturally occurring DJD in the fetlock joint were divided in 4 groups and injected with the following: 1 PRP; 2 MSCs; 3 MSCs and PRP; or 4 chondrogenic induced MSCs and PRP. The horses were then evaluated by means of a clinical scoring system after 6 weeks (T1, 12 weeks (T2, 6 months (T3 and 12 months (T4 post injection. In a second study, 30 horses with the same medical background were randomly assigned to one of the two combination therapies and evaluated at T1. The protein expression profile of native MSCs was found to be negative for major histocompatibility (MHC II and p63, low in MHC I and positive for Ki67, collagen type II (Col II and Vimentin. Chondrogenic induction resulted in increased mRNA expression of aggrecan, Col II and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP as well as in increased protein expression of p63 and glycosaminoglycan, but in decreased protein expression of Ki67. The combined use of PRP and MSCs significantly improved the functionality and sustainability of damaged joints from 6 weeks until 12 months after treatment, compared to PRP treatment alone. The highest short-term clinical evolution scores were obtained with chondrogenic induced MSCs and PRP. This study reports successful in vitro chondrogenic induction of equine MSCs. In vivo application of (induced MSCs together with PRP in horses suffering from DJD in the fetlock joint resulted in a significant clinical improvement until 12 months after treatment.

  17. Obstacles in Renal Regenerative Medicine: Metabolic and Epigenetic Parallels Between Cellular Reprogramming and Kidney Cancer Oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichner, Zsuzsanna; Mac-Way, Fabrice; Yousef, George M

    2017-08-25

    Regenerative medicine has recently presented a revolutionary solution to end-stage kidney disease. Reprogramming patients' own cells generates induced pluripotent stem cells that are subsequently differentiated to "kidney organoid," a structure that is anatomically and functionally similar to the kidney. This approach holds the promise of a transplantable, immunocompetent, and functional kidney that could be produced in vitro. However, caution must be taken due to the molecular-level similarities between induced pluripotent stem cells and renal cell carcinomas. As such, if cell reprogramming is not tightly controlled, it can lead to carcinogenic changes. Based on recent next-generation sequencing results and other supporting data, we identified three major molecular attributes of renal cell carcinoma: metabolic alterations, epigenetic changes, and miRNA-based alterations. Strikingly, these variations are mirrored in induced pluripotent stem cells, which are the main cell source of renal regenerative medicine. Our objective was to discuss the shared metabolic, epigenetic and miRNA-regulated characteristics and to abridge their significance in renal regenerative medicine. English-language literature was retrieved through PubMed. Authors collected the published evidence and evaluated the content based on independent literature findings. Articles were filtered to include only highly relevant, recent publications that presented reproducible results by authorities of the field. The kidney represents a unique metabolic environment that could be hijacked by induced pluripotent stem cells or by partially differentiated cells for oncogenic transformation. Future differentiation protocols must produce kidney organoids that are fully engaged in filtration function. A new technology can produce mini-kidneys or kidney organoids. This review discusses some of the challenges this technology has to face, including its high oncogenic potential. Understanding these similarities will

  18. Electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikanek, Susan R.

    1995-01-01

    An antiskid braking and traction control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes one or more sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensors and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydrualic braking control, or requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs a control strategy based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control the operation of the electric traction motor and to a brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative antiskid braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control.

  19. Regenerative strategies for the treatment of knee joint disabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Reis, Rui

    2017-01-01

    This book presents regenerative strategies for the treatment of knee joint disabilities. The book is composed of four main sections totaling 19 chapters which review the current knowledge on the clinical management and preclinical regenerative strategies. It examines the role of different natural-based biomaterials as scaffolds and implants for addressing different tissue lesions in the knee joint. Section one provides an updated and comprehensive discussion on articular cartilage tissue regeneration. Section two focuses on the important contributions for bone and osteochondral tissue engineering. Section three overview the recent advances on meniscus repair/regeneration strategies. Finally, section four further discusses the current strategies for treatment of ligament lesions. Each chapter is prepared by world know expert on their fields, so we do firmly believe that the proposed book will be a reference in the area of biomaterials for regenerative medicine.

  20. Accelerating regenerative medicine: the Japanese experiment in ethics and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaght, Tamra

    2017-09-01

    In 2014, the Japanese National Diet introduced new laws aimed at promoting the clinical translation of stem cells and regenerative medicine. The basic action of these laws is to allow the early introduction of regenerative medicine products into the Japanese market through an accelerated approval process, while providing patients with access to certain types of stem cell and cell-based therapies in the context of private clinical practice. While this framework appears to offer enormous opportunities for the translation of stem cell science, it raises ethical challenges that have not yet been fully explored. This paper critically analyzes this framework with respect to the prioritization of safety over clinical benefit, distributive justice and public trust in science and medicine. It is argued that the framework unfairly burdens patients and strained healthcare systems without any clear benefits, and may undermine the credibility of the regenerative medicine field as it emerges.

  1. Characterization of regenerative stabilized actively mode-locked fiber laser incorporating a saturated amplifier in feed-back chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekal, Anish; Vijayan, Kovendhan; Srinivasan, Balaji

    2015-04-01

    An actively mode-locked fiber laser with regenerative stabilization established through a feed-back electronic amplifier operated in the saturation regime is reported in this paper. Compared to the regenerative stabilization schemes that employ phase-locked loops (PLL), a saturated amplifier has been used for inhibiting the transmission of amplitude noise through the feed-back chain. Such a laser system has been constructed, studied and characterized as a function of its design variables. Specifically, the electronic phase shift in the feed-back circuit and the RF power applied to the modulator have been varied to study their effect on the mode-locked pulse train. The influence of these parameters on super-mode noise is studied and the optimum values of phase shift and RF power of the recovered carrier at which the noise is found to be a minimum (-48 dB) has been determined. A comparison of systems with and without regenerative mode-locking under controlled conditions reveals that a regenerative system has at-least an order of magnitude better noise performance compared to a system without regeneration.

  2. Gunshot wounds: epidemiology, wound ballistics, and soft-tissue treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Paul J; Najibi, Soheil; Silverton, Craig; Vaidya, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    The extremities are the most common anatomic location for gunshot wounds. Because of the prevalence of gunshot injuries, it is important that orthopaedic surgeons are knowledgeable about caring for them. The most common injuries seen with gunshot wounds are those of the soft tissues. Nonsurgical management of patients who have gunshot wounds with minimal soft-tissue disruption has been successfully accomplished in emergency departments for several years; this includes extremity wounds without nerve, intra-articular, or vascular injury. Stable, nonarticular fractures of an extremity have also been successfully treated with either minimal surgical or nonsurgical methods in the emergency department. Indications for surgical treatment include unstable fractures, intra-articular injuries, a significant soft-tissue injury (especially with skin loss), vascular injury, and/or a large or expanding hematoma.

  3. Regenerative technologies to bed side: Evolving the regulatory framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Sakai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available There are high expectations for the clinical application of regenerative medicine technologies to treat musculoskeletal disorders. However, there are still big hurdles in bringing cell-based products to the market, mainly due to strict regulatory frameworks to approve these. Recently, the Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency adopted new regulations under legislature. The translational potential of this article is to inform on the regulations to bring experimental phase regenerative concepts to market approval in the United States and Europe, and highlight the opportunities granted by Japanese regulatory framework. Furthermore, we discuss the perspectives on the quickly evolving regulatory environment.

  4. Regenerative endodontics and tissue engineering: what the future holds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodis, Harold E; Kinaia, Bassam Michael; Kinaia, Atheel M; Chogle, Sami M A

    2012-07-01

    The work performed by researchers in regenerative endodontics and tissue engineering over the last decades has been superb; however, many questions remain to be answered. The basic biologic mechanisms must be elucidated that will allow the development of dental pulp and dentin in situ. Stress must be placed on the many questions that will lead to the design of effective, safe treatment options and therapies. This article discusses those questions, the answers to which may become the future of regenerative endodontics. The future remains bright, but proper support and patience are required. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. From hepatocytes to stem and progenitor cells for liver regenerative medicine: advances and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, E M

    2011-04-01

    The parenchymal liver cell is a unique fully functional metabolic unit that can be used for liver regenerative medicine to restore function of the diseased organ; the aim of the procedure is to prevent progression of end-stage disease. The alternative, orthotopic liver transplantation, is highly intrusive, irreversible and limited by general organ shortage. Mature liver cell - hepatocyte - transplantation has been shown to have short- to medium-term efficacy for correction of miscellaneous inborn errors of metabolism. However, although proof of concept has been established, the procedure has not yet achieved full success, due to limited durability of functional benefit. Hepatocyte procurement is also restricted by organ shortage, and their storage is difficult due to poor tolerance of cryopreservation. Alternative cell sources are therefore needed for development and wider accessibility of cell-based liver regenerative medicine. Besides safety, the main challenge for these alternative cells is to acquire similar levels of functionality once implanted into the target organ. In this respect, liver derived progenitor cells may have some advantages over stem cells derived from other tissues. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. AEROBIC BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM INFECTED WOUNDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    of wound infection will be helpful in the control of wound infection and selection of empiric antimicrobial therapy as an infection control ... the skin (1). The exposed subcutaneous tissues provides a favourable substratum for a wide variety of microorganisms to contaminate and colonize, and .... Ayton M. Wound care. Wounds ...

  7. Decellularized Human Dental Pulp as a Scaffold for Regenerative Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J S; Takimoto, K; Jeon, M; Vadakekalam, J; Ruparel, N B; Diogenes, A

    2017-06-01

    Teeth undergo postnatal organogenesis relatively late in life and only complete full maturation a few years after the crown first erupts in the oral cavity. At this stage, development can be arrested if the tooth organ is damaged by either trauma or caries. Regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs) are a treatment alternative to conventional root canal treatment for immature teeth. These procedures rely on the transfer of apically positioned stem cells, including stem cells of the apical papilla (SCAP), into the root canal system. Although clinical success has been reported for these procedures, the predictability of expected outcomes and the organization of the newly formed tissues are affected by the lack of an available suitable scaffold that mimics the complexity of the dental pulp extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we evaluated 3 methods of decellularization of human dental pulp to be used as a potential autograft scaffold. Tooth slices of human healthy extracted third molars were decellularized by 3 different methods. One of the methods generated the maximum observed decellularization with minimal impact on the ECM composition and organization. Furthermore, recellularization of the scaffold supported the proliferation of SCAP throughout the scaffold with differentiation into odontoblast-like cells near the dentinal walls. Thus, this study reports that human dental pulp from healthy extracted teeth can be successfully decellularized, and the resulting scaffold supports the proliferation and differentiation of SCAP. The future application of this form of an autograft in REPs can fulfill a yet unmet need for a suitable scaffold, potentially improving clinical outcomes and ultimately promoting the survival and function of teeth with otherwise poor prognosis.

  8. [Advances in the research of negative-pressure wound therapy inducing the vascularization of dermal substitute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, H W; Wang, X G; You, Z G; Han, C M

    2017-08-20

    In clinical practice, skin defects resulted from various acute and chronic diseases occur frequently. Dermal substitute (DS), known as dermal regenerative template, is used more and more widely, but the slow process of vascularization limits its clinical application. At present, there are many strategies developed to enhance the process of vascularization, such as modifying the structure of dermal scaffolds, prevascularization by seeding stem cells and/or endothelial cells. Recently, negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) emerged and rapidly became popular in promoting wound healing due to its intrinsic advantages. Furthermore, some researchers introduced this technique to accelerate the vascularization process of DS. This paper represents a comprehensive overview on the efficiency of NPWT in different combination models, and the related mechanism.

  9. Recipient Wound Bed Characteristics Affect Scarring and Skin Graft Contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-13

    The use of autograft skin is essential in the treatment of full thickness burns and large cutaneous defects. Both autograft thickness and condition...of the wound bed modulate aesthetic and functional outcomes. Thicker autografts contract less and maintain greater functionality as the scar matures

  10. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Maxillofacial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Mellott

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Negative pressure wound therapy has greatly advanced the field of wound healing for nearly two decades, by providing a robust surgical adjunct technique for accelerating wound closure in acute and chronic wounds. However, the application of negative pressure wound therapy in maxillofacial applications has been relatively under utilized as a result of the physical articulations and contours of the head and neck that make it challenging to obtain an airtight seal for different negative pressure wound therapy systems. Adapting negative pressure wound therapies for maxillofacial applications could yield significant enhancement of wound closure in maxillofacial applications. The current review summarizes the basic science underlying negative pressure wound therapy, as well as specific maxillofacial procedures that could benefit from negative pressure wound therapy.

  11. The external microenvironment of healing skin wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Carla R; Nuutila, Kristo; Lee, Cameron Cy

    2015-01-01

    The skin wound microenvironment can be divided into two main components that influence healing: the external wound microenvironment, which is outside the wound surface; and the internal wound microenvironment, underneath the surface, to which the cells within the wound are exposed. Treatment...... and carbon dioxide), pH, and anti-microbial treatment on the wound. These factors are well described in the literature and can be modified with treatment methods available in the clinic. Understanding the roles of these factors in wound pathophysiology is of central importance in wound treatment...... methods that directly alter the features of the external wound microenvironment indirectly affect the internal wound microenvironment due to the exchange between the two compartments. In this review, we focus on the effects of temperature, pressure (positive and negative), hydration, gases (oxygen...

  12. Smad2 decelerates re-epithelialization during gingival wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomikawa, K; Yamamoto, T; Shiomi, N; Shimoe, M; Hongo, S; Yamashiro, K; Yamaguchi, T; Maeda, H; Takashiba, S

    2012-08-01

    During periodontal regeneration, inhibition of gingival downgrowth is necessary to promote migration of mesenchymal cells into the defects. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β is a pleiotropic cytokine that has numerous cell functions, including regulation of epithelial growth. Recent studies have shown that Smad2, a downstream transcription factor of TGF-β, plays crucial roles in wound healing in the epithelia. Therefore, we investigated the effects of Smad2 overexpression on re-epithelialization of gingival wounds. Transgenic mice overexpressing smad2 driven by the keratin 14 promoter (k14-smad2) were confirmed to have significant Smad2 phosphorylation in gingival basal epithelia. Punch wounds were made in the palatal gingiva, and wound healing was assessed histologically for 7 days. Re-epithelialization was significantly retarded on day 2, while collagen deposition was enhanced on day 7 in k14-smad2 compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, expression of keratin 16 (K16), an indicator of keratinocyte migration, was significantly inhibited in wound-edge keratinocytes in k14-smad2. The inhibition of K16 coincided with the induction of Smad2 in the corresponding epithelia, while BrdU incorporation was unaffected. These results indicated that Smad2 has inhibitory effects in regulating keratinocyte migration during gingival wound healing. TGF-β/Smad2 signaling mediating alteration of K16 expression must be tightly regulated during periodontal regeneration.

  13. Postoperative washing of sutured wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad Harrison

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A best evidence topic was written according to the structured protocol. The three part question addressed was: [In patients undergoing closure of surgical wounds with sutures] does [keeping the wound dry for the first 48 h after closure] [reduce the incidence of surgical site infections (SSIs]? 4 relevant papers were culled from the literature and appraised. The authors, date, country, population, study type, main outcomes, key results and study weaknesses were tabulated. Current NICE guidelines recommend cleaning surgical wounds with sterile saline only for the first 48 h following skin closure. We found no evidence that washing wounds with tap water during this period increases the incidence of SSIs compared to keeping them dry. Further randomised controlled trials will enable the construction of conclusive systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

  14. Wound repair in mice as influenced by age and antimacrophage serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B J; Danon, D; Roth, G S

    1987-05-01

    The closure of bilateral, full-thickness cutaneous wounds made over the back with a sharp paper punch was measured with calipers and assessed histologically in C57BL/6J male mice for 10 days after wounding. Young (6 months) mice exhibited a significantly more rapid rate of wound closure and repair than did mature (15 months) or aged (26 or 27 months) mice. The repair rate in mature and aged mice did not differ. Young mice, injected subcutaneously at the wound sites with rabbit antimouse macrophage serum (RAMMS) 5 min before wounding and on days 1 and 3 after wounding, exhibited slow delayed closure of cutaneous wounds during days 1 to 4 after wounding, similar to that of untreated aged mice. The early closure rate of mice injected with normal rabbit serum or physiological saline was rapid, resembling that of untreated young mice. The results suggest that cutaneous wound repair in mice is another physiological phenomenon whose rate of change is age related, but not necessarily progressive to senescence. The results also imply that macrophage functional decline may contribute to the slowing of wound repair in middle-aged and aged mice compared to young mice.

  15. Tight Junction Proteins Claudin-1 and Occludin Are Important for Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volksdorf, Thomas; Heilmann, Janina; Eming, Sabine A; Schawjinski, Kathrin; Zorn-Kruppa, Michaela; Ueck, Christopher; Vidal-Y-Sy, Sabine; Windhorst, Sabine; Jücker, Manfred; Moll, Ingrid; Brandner, Johanna M

    2017-06-01

    Tight junction (TJ) proteins are known to be involved in proliferation and differentiation. These processes are essential for normal skin wound healing. Here, we investigated the TJ proteins claudin-1 and occludin in ex vivo skin wound healing models and tissue samples of acute and chronic human wounds and observed major differences in localization/expression of these proteins, with chronic wounds often showing a loss of the proteins at the wound margins and/or in the regenerating epidermis. Knockdown experiments in primary human keratinocytes showed that decreased claudin-1 expression resulted in significantly impaired scratch wound healing, with delayed migration and reduced proliferation. Activation of AKT pathway was significantly attenuated after claudin-1 knockdown, and protein levels of extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 were reduced. For occludin, down-regulation had no impact on wound healing in normal scratch assays, but after subjecting the cells to mechanical stress, which is normally present in wounds, wound healing was impaired. For both proteins we show that most of these actions are independent from the formation of barrier-forming TJ structures, thus demonstrating nonbarrier-related functions of TJ proteins in the skin. However, for claudin-1 effects on scratch wound healing were more pronounced when TJs could form. Together, our findings provide evidence for a role of claudin-1 and occludin in epidermal regeneration with potential clinical importance. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Exosome production and its regulation of EGFR during wound healing in renal tubular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiangjun; Zhang, Wei; Yao, Qisheng; Zhang, Hao; Dong, Guie; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Yutao; Chen, Jian-Kang; Dong, Zheng

    2017-06-01

    Kidney repair following injury involves the reconstitution of a structurally and functionally intact tubular epithelium. Growth factors and their receptors, such as EGFR, are important in the repair of renal tubules. Exosomes are cell-produced small (~100 nm in diameter) vesicles that contain and transfer proteins, lipids, RNAs, and DNAs between cells. In this study, we examined the relationship between exosome production and EGFR activation and the potential role of exosome in wound healing. EGFR activation occurred shortly after scratch wounding in renal tubular cells. Wound repair after scratching was significantly promoted by EGF and suppressed by EGFR inhibitor gefitinib. Interestingly, scratch wounding induced a significant increase of exosome production. The exosome production was decreased by EGF and increased by gefitinib, suggesting a suppressive role of EGFR signaling in exosome production. Conversely, inhibition of exosome release by GW4869 and manumycin A markedly increased EGFR activation and promoted wound healing. Moreover, exosomes derived from scratch-wounding cells could inhibit wound healing. Collectively, the results indicate that wound healing in renal tubular cells is associated with EGFR activation and exosome production. Although EGFR activation promotes wound healing, released exosomes may antagonize EGFR activation and wound healing. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Manganese superoxide dismutase expression in endothelial progenitor cells accelerates wound healing in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrotte, Eric J; Chen, Dan-Dan; Hakim, Jeffrey S; Chen, Alex F

    2010-12-01

    Amputation as a result of impaired wound healing is a serious complication of diabetes. Inadequate angiogenesis contributes to poor wound healing in diabetic patients. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) normally augment angiogenesis and wound repair but are functionally impaired in diabetics. Here we report that decreased expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in EPCs contributes to impaired would healing in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes. A decreased frequency of circulating EPCs was detected in type 2 diabetic (db/db) mice, and when isolated, these cells exhibited decreased expression and activity of MnSOD. Wound healing and angiogenesis were markedly delayed in diabetic mice compared with normal controls. For cell therapy, topical transplantation of EPCs onto excisional wounds in diabetic mice demonstrated that diabetic EPCs were less effective than normal EPCs at accelerating wound closure. Transplantation of diabetic EPCs after MnSOD gene therapy restored their ability to mediate angiogenesis and wound repair. Conversely, siRNA-mediated knockdown of MnSOD in normal EPCs reduced their activity in diabetic wound healing assays. Increasing the number of transplanted diabetic EPCs also improved the rate of wound closure. Our findings demonstrate that cell therapy using diabetic EPCs after ex vivo MnSOD gene transfer accelerates their ability to heal wounds in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes.

  18. New trends in healing chronic wounds

    OpenAIRE

    KREJSKOVÁ, Kamila

    2013-01-01

    Basic theoretical bases As a chronic wound is called a secondarily healing wound which despite adequate therapy does not tend to heal for a period of 6-9 weeks. The cause of the chronic wound occurrence and its transformation into an acute wound can be infection, influence of associated diseases, skin top layer microtraumatization or skin necrosis cavity. Among the most frequent types of chronic wounds there are aligned venous ulcerations, arterial rodent ulcers, decubitus ulcers and neuropat...

  19. Wound bed preparation from a clinical perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Halim, A. S.; Khoo, T L; Mat Saad, A. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Wound bed preparation has been performed for over two decades, and the concept is well accepted. The ′TIME′ acronym, consisting of tissue debridement, i nfection or inflammation, moisture balance and edge effect, has assisted clinicians systematically in wound assessment and management. While the focus has usually been concentrated around the wound, the evolving concept of wound bed preparation promotes the treatment of the patient as a whole. This article discusses wound bed preparation and ...

  20. Complications associated with bacitracin powder in surgical wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Joshua M; Amankwah, Ernest K; Tetreault, Lisa L; Perlman, Sharon A; Tuite, Gerald F

    2015-12-01

    There has been renewed interest in the application of concentrated antibiotic powder to surgical wounds as a method to decrease infection rates. While there is substantial medical literature describing the effectiveness and complications associated with vancomycin and gentamycin powders, very little has been reported regarding the safety and effectiveness of bacitracin powder in surgical wounds. In this paper the authors report their detailed analysis of potential bacitracin powder-related complications in a population of pediatric patients who underwent shunt surgery. A detailed retrospective analysis was completed of all CSF shunt surgeries performed by the corresponding author at a large children's hospital between 2001 and 2013. This cohort consisted of many patients who were the subject of a previous report that showed the use of bacitracin powder in shunt wounds potentially decreased infection rates. Data were collected regarding the most common known complications of bacitracin, i.e., anaphylaxis, wound healing difficulties, and renal dysfunction. Data were stratified by typical demographic, medical, and surgical variables, including whether bacitracin powder was applied to wounds prior to closure. A total of 597 patients were reviewed in the analysis: 389 underwent surgery without bacitracin powder and 208 had concentrated bacitracin powder applied to the wounds prior to closure. The application of bacitracin powder was not associated with anaphylaxis (n = 0 both groups) or with an increase in wound breakdown (n = 5 in the control group, n = 0 in the bacitracin powder group) or renal dysfunction (creatinine/estimated glomerular filtration rate) using both comparative and multivariate analyses between the 2 groups. The sample size evaluating renal function was significantly lower (range 6-320) than that of anaphylaxis and wound breakdown analysis because only clinical values acquired during the routine care of these patients were available for analysis. The

  1. Cryptomphalus aspersa Mollusc Egg Extract Promotes Regenerative Effects in Human Dermal Papilla Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Alameda

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test, by an in vitro approach, whether a natural extract derived from eggs of the mollusc Cryptomphalus aspersa (e-CAF that seems to present regenerative properties, can enhance the mobilization of human hair dermal papilla cells (HHDPCs and play a role on tissue repair and regeneration. We have tested HHDPCs proliferation by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium-bromide (MTT assay; cell migration by using a wound healing assay, as well as the modulation of the expression of cytoskeletal (F-actin and vimentin and cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM (vinculin and P-FAK proteins. We also explored whether e-CAF could lead HHDPCs to keratinocytes and/or fibroblasts by evaluating the expression of specific markers. We have compared these e-CAF effects with those induced by TGFβ1, implicated in regulation of cell proliferation and migration. e-CAF promotes proliferation and migration of HDDPCs cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner; it also increases the migratory behavior and the expression of adhesion molecules. These results support the fact that e-CAF could play a role on skin regeneration and be used for the prevention or repair of damaged tissue, either due to external causes or as a result of cutaneous aging.

  2. Dressing wounds with potato peel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patange Vidya

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of boiled potato peel (PP in dressing of various skin conditions was studied. A total of 11 patients were selected, which included resistant wounds of pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid and leg ulcers. An autoclaved PP dressing with a thin layer of antiseptic cream was applied at 25 sites. It was covered with multilayered gauze and the dressing was secured firmly with either a roller bandage or with an adhesive tape. Complete epithelization was seen at 20 sites (80%, near complete epithelization at one site. There was no satisfactory response at three sites and at one site the result could not be evaluated. The mean duration of healing was one week for superficial wounds and three weeks for deep wounds. The PP dressing facilitates the wound and three weeks for deep wounds. The PP dressing facilitates the wound healing process by providing and maintaining a moist environment. The PP dressing is easy to prepare, apply as well as remove. It is a comfortable dressing and is also cost effective.

  3. Lumican binds ALK5 to promote epithelium wound healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Yamanaka

    Full Text Available Lumican (Lum, a small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP family member, has multiple matricellular functions both as an extracellular matrix component and as a matrikine regulating cell proliferation, gene expression and wound healing. To date, no cell surface receptor has been identified to mediate the matrikine functions of Lum. This study aimed to identify a perspective receptor that mediates Lum effects on promoting wound healing. Transforming growth factor-β receptor 1 (ALK5 was identified as a potential Lum-interacting protein through in silico molecular docking and molecular dynamics. This finding was verified by biochemical pull-down assays. Moreover, the Lum function on wound healing was abrogated by an ALK5-specific chemical inhibitor as well as by ALK5 shRNAi. Finally, we demonstrated that eukaryote-specific post-translational modifications are not required for the wound healing activity of Lum, as recombinant GST-Lum fusion proteins purified from E. coli and a chemically synthesized LumC13 peptide (the last C-terminal 13 amino acids of Lum have similar effects on wound healing in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Low Intensity Laser Therapy Applied in the Healing of Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Fred; Matthews, Jeffrey

    2009-06-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the outcomes of Low Intensity Laser Therapy (LILT) on wound healing for patients presenting with pain, compromised neurological and physical function and tissue damage associated with vascular/diabetic ulcerations of the lower extremity. Methods: A retrospective case review of six patients treated with LILT (GaAlAs SLD, 660 nm, 750 mW, 3.6 J/cm2; GaAlAs SLD, 840 nm, 1,500 mW, 6.48 J/cm2; GaAlAs laser, 830 nm, 75 mW, 270 J/cm2) was conducted of clinical features including pain, measured by visual analogue scale (VAS), motor function, measured by range of motion (ROM) and visual outcome, measured by wound dimensions for six patients (n = 6; 5 males, 1 female; age = 67.83 years). Results: Significant progress with regard to alleviation of pain (ΔVAS = -5), improvements in motor function (ΔROM = +40%), epithelialization (wound closure rate = 3%/week) and complete wound closure was achieved. No recurrence of pathology at least one month post cessation of therapy was evident (x¯% reduction in wound area = 100%). Conclusions: LILT achieved consistent, effective and clear endpoints, was cost effective, created no adverse effects and ultimately led to the salvage of extremities.

  5. Imperative Role of Dental Pulp Stem Cells in Regenerative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The knowledge of stem cell technology is increasing quickly in all medical specialties and in dental field too. Stem cells of dental origin appears to hold the key to various cell‑based therapies in regenerative medicine, but most avenues are in experimental stages and many procedures are undergoing standardization and ...

  6. Formation of human cementum following different modalities of regenerative therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sculean, A.; Stavropoulos, A.; Berakdar, M.; Windisch, P.; Karring, T.; Brecx, M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare newly formed cementum following different types of regenerative therapy in humans. Eighteen patients, each displaying one advanced intrabony defect around teeth scheduled for extraction, were included in this study. The defects were treated with either

  7. Stem cell behavior and biomaterials : Implications for oral regenerative medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esterik, F.A.S.

    2017-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering has become a promising alternative for the use of autologous bone in the reconstruction of bone defects in oral regenerative medicine. The main goal of this thesis was to investigate behavior of human adipose stem cells (hASCs) and fibroblasts in/on resin-based composites,

  8. Maximum Safety Regenerative Power Tracking for DC Traction Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guifu Du

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Direct current (DC traction power systems are widely used in metro transport systems, with running rails usually being used as return conductors. When traction current flows through the running rails, a potential voltage known as “rail potential” is generated between the rails and ground. Currently, abnormal rises of rail potential exist in many railway lines during the operation of railway systems. Excessively high rail potentials pose a threat to human life and to devices connected to the rails. In this paper, the effect of regenerative power distribution on rail potential is analyzed. Maximum safety regenerative power tracking is proposed for the control of maximum absolute rail potential and energy consumption during the operation of DC traction power systems. The dwell time of multiple trains at each station and the trigger voltage of the regenerative energy absorbing device (READ are optimized based on an improved particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm to manage the distribution of regenerative power. In this way, the maximum absolute rail potential and energy consumption of DC traction power systems can be reduced. The operation data of Guangzhou Metro Line 2 are used in the simulations, and the results show that the scheme can reduce the maximum absolute rail potential and energy consumption effectively and guarantee the safety in energy saving of DC traction power systems.

  9. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Future Regenerative System Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Lina

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The potential use of stem cell-based therapies for repair and regeneration of various tissues and organs offers a paradigm shift that may provide alternative therapeutic solutions for a number of disease. Despite the advances, the availability of stem cells remaining a challenge for both scientist and clinicians in pursuing regenerative medicine. CONTENT: Subcutaneous human adipose tissue is an abundant and accessible cell source for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Routinely, the adipose issue is digested with collagenase or related lytic enzymes to release a heterogeneous population for stromal vascular fraction (SVF cells. The SVF cells can be used directly or can be cultured in plastic ware for selection and expansion of an adherent population known as adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs. Their potential in the ability to differentiate into adipogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic and other mesenchymal lineages, as well in their other clinically useful properties, includes stimulation of angiogenesis and suppression of inflammation. SUMMARY: Adipose tissue is now recognized as an accessible, abundant and reliable site for the isolation of adult stem cels suitable for the application of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. The past decade has witnessed an explosion of preclinical data relating to the isolation, characterization, cryopreservation, differentiation, and transplantation of freshly isolated stromal vascular fraction cells and adherent, culture-expanded, adipose-derived stromal/stem cells in vitro and in animal models. KEYWORDS: adipose tissue, adult stem cells, regenerative medicine, mesenchymal stem cells.

  10. Commercialization of regenerative medicine: learning from spin-outs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Anna; Buckler, R Lee; Brindley, David A

    2013-04-01

    Abstract The meeting "Commercialization of Your Regenerative Medicine Research: Lessons from Spin Out Successes" was hosted by the Oxbridge Biotech Roundtable (OBR) (Oxford, UK) at the University of Oxford in February, 2013, and attracted a multi-stakeholder audience spanning academia and industry. The event featured case studies from Gregg Sando, CEO, Cell Medica (London, UK), John Sinden, CSO, Reneuron (Guilford, UK), and Paul Kemp, CEO and CSO, Intercytex (Manchester, UK). OBR is a student-led initiative with over 7000 members across eight different UK and US locations with a mission to foster a conversation about the healthcare and life sciences industry. Here we review the main themes of the meeting and the major questions facing the regenerative medicine industry and its rapidly emerging subsets of cellular and gene therapies. Notably, we discuss the compatibility of regenerative therapies to the existing healthcare infrastructure, biomanufacturing challenges (including scalability and comparability), and the amenability of regenerative therapies to existing reimbursement and investment models. Furthermore, we reiterate key words of advice from seasoned industry leaders intended to accelerate the translation path from lab bench to the marketplace.

  11. Adipose-derived regenerative cells in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perin, Emerson C; Sanz-Ruiz, Ricardo; Sánchez, Pedro L

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Adipose-derived regenerative cells (ADRCs) can be isolated from liposuction aspirates and prepared as fresh cells for immediate administration in cell therapy. We performed the first randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial to examine the safety and feasibility of the transendocar...

  12. Regenerative Snubber For GTO-Commutated SCR Inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippel, Wally E.; Edwards, Dean B.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed regenerative snubbing circuit substituted for dissipative snubbing circuit in inverter based on silicon controlled rectifiers (SCR's) commutated by gate-turn-off thyristor (GTO). Intended to reduce loss of power that occurs in dissipative snubber. Principal criteria in design: low cost, simplicity, and reliability.

  13. Emdogain in regenerative periodontal therapy. A review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sculean, A.; Windisch, P.; Dori, F.; Keglevich, T.; Molnar, B.; Gera, I.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of regenerative periodontal therapy is the reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures (i.e. the new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone). Results from basic research have pointed to the important role of the enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) in the

  14. Topical oxygen wound therapies for chronic wounds: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemond, J; Kröger, K; Storck, M; Risse, A; Engels, P

    2015-02-01

    Chronic wounds are an increasing problem in our ageing population and can arise in many different ways. Over the past decades it has become evident that sufficient oxygen supply is an essential factor of appropriate wound healing. Sustained oxygen deficit has a detrimental impact on wound healing, especially for patients with chronic wounds. This has been proven for wounds associated with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and diabetic foot ulcers (particularly in combination with PAOD). However, this is still under debate for other primary diseases. In the past few years several different new therapeutic approaches for topical oxygen therapies have been developed to support wound healing. These tend to fall into one of four categories: (1) delivery of pure oxygen either under pressurised or (2) ambient condition, (3) chemical release of oxygen via an enzymatic reaction or (4) increase of oxygen by facilitated diffusion using oxygen binding and releasing molecules. In this review article, the available therapeutic topical oxygen-delivering approaches and their impact on wound healing are presented and critically discussed. A summary of clinical data, daily treatment recommendations and practicability is provided. J. Dissemond received an honorarium for lectures, advisory boards and/or clinical studies from the following companies: 3M, B. Braun, BSN, Coloplast, Convatec, Draco, Hartmann, KCI, Lohmann&Rauscher, Medoderm, Merz, Sastomed, Systagenix, UCB-Pharma, Urgo. K. Kröger received an honorarium for lectures, advisory boards and/or clinical studies from the following companies: Bayer, Sanofi, GSK, Hartmann, Sastomed, UCB-Pharma, Urgo. M. Storck received an honorarium for lectures for the following companies: KCI, Systagenix, and UCB-Pharma. A. Risse received an honorarium for lectures, advisory boards and/or clinical studies from the following companies: Bracco, Coloplast, Draco, Lilly Deutschland, NovoNordisk, Sastomed, Urgo. P. Engels received an

  15. Nanotechnology-Driven Therapeutic Interventions in Wound Healing: Potential Uses and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Suzana; Pastar, Irena; Drakulich, Stefan; Dikici, Emre; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Deo, Sapna; Daunert, Sylvia

    2017-03-22

    The chronic nature and associated complications of nonhealing wounds have led to the emergence of nanotechnology-based therapies that aim at facilitating the healing process and ultimately repairing the injured tissue. A number of engineered nanotechnologies have been proposed demonstrating unique properties and multiple functions that address specific problems associated with wound repair mechanisms. In this outlook, we highlight the most recently developed nanotechnology-based therapeutic agents and assess the viability and efficacy of each treatment, with emphasis on chronic cutaneous wounds. Herein we explore the unmet needs and future directions of current technologies, while discussing promising strategies that can advance the wound-healing field.

  16. Nanotechnology-Driven Therapeutic Interventions in Wound Healing: Potential Uses and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The chronic nature and associated complications of nonhealing wounds have led to the emergence of nanotechnology-based therapies that aim at facilitating the healing process and ultimately repairing the injured tissue. A number of engineered nanotechnologies have been proposed demonstrating unique properties and multiple functions that address specific problems associated with wound repair mechanisms. In this outlook, we highlight the most recently developed nanotechnology-based therapeutic agents and assess the viability and efficacy of each treatment, with emphasis on chronic cutaneous wounds. Herein we explore the unmet needs and future directions of current technologies, while discussing promising strategies that can advance the wound-healing field. PMID:28386594

  17. Surgical wound segmentation based on adaptive threshold edge detection and genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hsueh-Fu; Ho, Te-Wei; Hsu, Jui-Tse; Chang, Chun-Che; Lai, Feipei; Wu, Jin-Ming

    2017-02-01

    Postsurgical wound care has a great impact on patients' prognosis. It often takes few days, even few weeks, for the wound to stabilize, which incurs a great cost of health care and nursing resources. To assess the wound condition and diagnosis, it is important to segment out the wound region for further analysis. However, the scenario of this strategy often consists of complicated background and noise. In this study, we propose a wound segmentation algorithm based on Canny edge detector and genetic algorithm with an unsupervised evaluation function. The results were evaluated by the 112 clinical images, and 94.3% of images were correctly segmented. The judgment was based on the evaluation of experimented medical doctors. This capability to extract complete wound regions, makes it possible to conduct further image analysis such as intelligent recovery evaluation and automatic infection requirements.

  18. Skin wound healing in MMP2-deficient and MMP2 / plasminogen double-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøssing, Signe; Rønø, Birgitte; Hald, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    activation (PA) system and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family. Treatment with the broad spectrum MMP inhibitor, galardin, delays wound healing in wildtype mice and completely arrest wound healing in plasminogen (Plg)-deficient mice, indicating a functional overlap between plasmin- and galardin......During healing of incisional skin wounds, migrating keratinocytes dissect their way under the crust to re-epithelialize the wounded area. The efficiency of this tissue remodelling process depends on the concomitant activity of several extracellular proteases, including members of the plasminogen......-sensitive MMPs during wound healing. To address whether MMP2 is accountable for the galardin-induced healing deficiency in wildtype and Plg-deficient mice, incisional skin wounds were generated in MMP2 single-deficient mice and in MMP2/Plg double-deficient mice and followed until healed. Alternatively, tissue...

  19. SPE (tm) regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells for extraterrestrial surface and microgravity applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcelroy, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on SPE regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells for extraterrestrial surface and microgravity applications are presented. Topics covered include: hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell energy storage system; electrochemical cell reactions; SPE cell voltage stability; passive water removal SPE fuel cell; fuel cell performance; SPE water electrolyzers; hydrophobic oxygen phase separator; hydrophilic/electrochemical hydrogen phase separator; and unitized regenerative fuel cell.

  20. Use of Multiple Adjunctive Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Modalities to Manage Diabetic Lower-Extremity Wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Windy?E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Various treatment options exist for wound healing; however, clinical assessment of the patient and the wound environment must be considered before determining an optimal wound treatment plan. Negative pressure wound therapy alone and/or with an instilled topical solution can be effective in adjunctive management of acute and chronic wounds. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has also been shown to contribute to the wound-healing process. A pilot evaluation using a multistep approach of adju...