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Sample records for wound infections case

  1. Combination of negative pressure wound therapy and acoustic pressure wound therapy for treatment of infected surgical wounds: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Paul A; Peters, Kim L; Bowers, Jolene M

    2008-05-01

    The optimal wound therapy for healing infected wounds post surgery or surgical debridement has not been established. Negative pressure wound therapy and acoustic pressure wound therapy are advanced wound-healing modalities that apply forms of mechanical pressure to wound tissue in an effort to promote healing by stimulating cellular proliferation. Using a combination of negative pressure wound therapy and acoustic pressure wound therapy was evaluated in a series of six patients with large, infected surgical wounds presenting with moderate to large amounts of serosanguineous drainage. After concurrent treatment with both modalities (range: 4 to 12 weeks), wound volume was reduced by 99% to 100% in all wounds except one wound for which depth at end of treatment was not measurable due to hypergranulation. Similarly, wound surface area was reduced by 82% to 100%, with the exception of the hypergranular wound, which decreased in size by 60%. Serosanguineous wound drainage was reduced in four wounds and remained unchanged in two wounds.

  2. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Infected Wound following Posterior Spinal Instrumentation using Simple Self-assembled System: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Chang CW; HZ Chan; SW Lim; EH Khoo; Zulkiflee O

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Postoperative wound infection in an instrumented spine patient is often disastrous. Management includes implant removal leading to spine instability. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) applied to the spine surgical wound is one of the wound care technique with successful results. We report a case of a man who sustained Chance fracture of Lumbar 1 (L1) vertebra treated with long segment posterior instrumentation, who unfortunately developed Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) ...

  3. The use of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of infected wounds. Case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel de Alcântara Jones

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results and benefits obtained from the topical use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT in patients with infected wounds. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 20 patients (17 males and three females, mean age 42 years with infected wounds treated using NPWT. The infected wounds were caused by trauma. The treatment system used was VAC.(r (Vacuum Assisted Closure, KCI, San Antonio, United States applied to the wound in continuous mode from 100 to 125 mmHg. The parameters related to the wounds (location, number of VAC changes, the size of the defects in the soft parts, and the evolution of the state of the wound, length of hospital stay, length of intravenous antibiotic therapy, and complications related to the use of this therapy were evaluated. RESULTS: The mean length of the hospital stay, use of NPWT, and antibacterial therapy were 41 days, 22.5 days, and 20 days respectively. The use of the VAC led to a mean reduction of 29% in the wound area (95.65-68.1 cm2; p < 0.05. Only one patient did not show any improvement in the final appearance of the wound with complete eradication of the infection. No complication directly caused by NPWT was observed. CONCLUSION: NPWT stimulates infection-free scar tissue formation in a short time, and is a quick and comfortable alternative to conventional infected wounds treatment methods.

  4. The use of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of infected wounds. Case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel de Alcântara; Neves Filho, Wilson Vasconcelos; Guimarães, Janice de Souza; Castro, Daniel de Araújo; Ferracini, Antonio Marcos

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the results and benefits obtained from the topical use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in patients with infected wounds. This was a retrospective study of 20 patients (17 males and three females, mean age 42 years) with infected wounds treated using NPWT. The infected wounds were caused by trauma. The treatment system used was VAC. ® (Vacuum Assisted Closure, KCI, San Antonio, United States) applied to the wound in continuous mode from 100 to 125 mmHg. The parameters related to the wounds (location, number of VAC changes, the size of the defects in the soft parts, and the evolution of the state of the wound), length of hospital stay, length of intravenous antibiotic therapy, and complications related to the use of this therapy were evaluated. The mean length of the hospital stay, use of NPWT, and antibacterial therapy were 41 days, 22.5 days, and 20 days respectively. The use of the VAC led to a mean reduction of 29% in the wound area (95.65-68.1 cm 2 ; p  wound with complete eradication of the infection. No complication directly caused by NPWT was observed. NPWT stimulates infection-free scar tissue formation in a short time, and is a quick and comfortable alternative to conventional infected wounds treatment methods.

  5. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Infected Wound following Posterior Spinal Instrumentation using Simple Self-assembled System: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CW Chang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative wound infection in an instrumented spine patient is often disastrous. Management includes implant removal leading to spine instability. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT applied to the spine surgical wound is one of the wound care technique with successful results. We report a case of a man who sustained Chance fracture of Lumbar 1 (L1 vertebra treated with long segment posterior instrumentation, who unfortunately developed Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL positive E. coli infection one month after the operation. After careful debridement of the wound, the implant became exposed. Three cycles of NPWT were applied and the wound healed with granulation tissue completely covering the implant, and thus negating the need to remove the implant. In conclusion, the NPWT is a good alternative in postoperative wound management especially in an instrumented spine patient.

  6. First case of Chlorella wound infection in a human in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hart

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old man developed an infected knee wound 2 days after jumping his bicycle into a freshwater dam. He required repeated debridement and tissue grew bright green colonies typical of the alga Chlorella plus Aeromonas hydrophila. This, and one previously reported case, responded to surgical debridement and careful wound management.

  7. Predictors of wound infection in elective colorectal surgery. Multicenter observational case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraccalvieri, Doménico; Kreisler Moreno, Esther; Flor Lorente, Blas; Torres García, Antonio; Muñoz Calero, Alberto; Mateo Vallejo, Francisco; Biondo, Sebastiano

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of Vicryl Plus(®) suture in reducing the rate of postoperative wound infection in elective colorectal surgery. A prospective case-control multicenter study with 480 patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery was performed between 2006 and 2007. Patients were divided in 2 groups of equal sample size: group 1, closure of the abdominal wall using Vicryl Plus(®) and group 2 where PDS II(®) was used. The study involved 5 hospitals in the Spanish State. Wound infection was classified into superficial and deep. All patients diagnosed of wound infection during the hospital stay and up to 30 days after discharge were studied. For the statistical analysis Chi-square test and Fisher exact were used for bivariate analysis and logistic regression model for multivariate analysis. Wound infection rates were significantly lower in group 1: 14.6 vs. 29.2. Multivariate analysis showed that risk of wound infection was higher in patients with cancer, lung disease, anemia, operative time greater than 2 h, lack of second dose intra-operative prophylactic antibiotic and laparotomy closure with PDS suture II(®). The use of suture coated with triclosan can be an effective prophylactic tool in reducing wound infection rate in patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Surgical wound infection - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007645.htm Surgical wound infection - treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... the organ and space where you had surgery Treatment Antibiotics are used to treat most wound infections. Sometimes, you also may need surgery to ...

  9. Well-promising outcomes with vacuum-assisted closure in an infected wound following laparotomy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Daskalaki

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: The simultaneous use of instillation and constant pressure seemed to be superior in comparison with NPWT alone. Compared to conventional methods, the use of VAC ends to better outcomes, in cases of infected wounds following laparotomy.

  10. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy With Instillation and Dwell Time Used to Treat Infected Orthopedic Implants: A 4-patient Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmers, Robert; Brekelmans, Wouter; Leijnen, Michiel; van der Burg, Boudewijn; Ritchie, Ewan

    2016-09-01

    Infection following orthopedic implants for bone fixation or joint replacement is always serious and may require removal of the osteosynthetic material. Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation and dwell time (NPWTi-d) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of complex wounds, including infected wounds with osteosynthetic material. The purpose of this case study was to evaluate the outcomes of 4 patients (1 man, 3 women; age range 49 to 71 years) with a postoperative wound infection (POWI) following fracture repair and internal fixation. All patients were at high risk for surgical complications, including infections. Standard infection treatments (antibiotics) had been unsuccessful. Based on the available literature, a NPWTi-d protocol was developed. Following surgical debridement, wounds were instilled with polyhexanide biguanide with a set dwell time of 15 minutes, followed by continuous NPWTi-d of -125 mm Hg for 4 hours. The system was changed every 3 to 4 days until sufficient granulation tissue was evident and negative pressure without instillation could be used. Systemic antibiotics were continued in all patients. Granulation tissue was found to be sufficient in 12 to 35 days in the 4 cases, no recurrence of infection was noted, and the osteosynthesis material remained in place. No adverse events were observed. Research is needed to compare the safety and effectiveness of this adjunct treatment in the management of challenging wounds to other patient and wound management approaches.

  11. Well-promising outcomes with vacuum-assisted closure in an infected wound following laparotomy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalaki, A; Xenaki, S; Venianaki, M; Topalidou, A; Athanasakis, E; Chrysos, E; Chalkiadakis, G

    2016-09-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) represents an alternative method to optimize conditions for wound healing. Delayed wound closure is a significant health problem, which is directly associated with pain and suffering from patient's aspect, as well with social and financial burden. We report a case of vacuum-assisted wound therapy with hypertonic solution distillation and continuous negative pressure application, in an infected wound after laparotomy for incisional hernia reconstruction with mesh placement. Negative pressure was initiated at the wound margins after failure of conventional treatment with great outcomes, achieving a total closure of the incision within two weeks. Each wound has particular characteristics which must be managed. Vacuum assisted closure (VAC) with continuous negative pressure and simultaneous wound instillation and cleanse can provide optimum results, reducing the cavity volume, by newly produced granulated tissue. The simultaneous use of instillation and constant pressure seemed to be superior in comparison with NPWT alone. Compared to conventional methods, the use of VAC ends to better outcomes, in cases of infected wounds following laparotomy.

  12. Wound Infections PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-10-25

    This 30 second public service announcement is about how to avoid a wound infection after a disaster.  Created: 10/25/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/25/2017.

  13. Fungal Wound Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-01-28

    Dr. David Tribble, acting director of the infectious disease clinical research program at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, discusses fungal wound infections after combat trauma.  Created: 1/28/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/28/2016.

  14. Fungal Burn Wound Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Aspergillus), Blasto- T he use of effective topical chemotherapeutic agents to myces (Candida), and Zygomycetes (Mucor, Rhizopus ).6 reduce...below the infected burn wound . If the infection was controlled by these measures and the patient’s condition permit- ted, the involved area was...species, 18%; Mucor species and Rhizopus species, acetate in the morning and silver sulfadiazine in the evening. Prophy- 9.1%; and Microspora species and

  15. Hypertonic Glucose Combined with Negative Pressure Wound Therapy to Prepare Wounds with Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection for Skin Grafting: A Report of 3 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing-Chun; Xian, Chun-Jing; Yu, Jia-Ao; Shi, Kai; Hong, Lei

    2015-06-01

    Soft tissue losses from acute or chronic trauma are a challenge for surgeons. To explore a method to expedite granulation tissue formation in preparation for a split-thickness skin graft (STSG), the medical records of 3 patients - 2 adult men with wounds related to trauma injury and 1 infant with necrotizing fasciitis, all infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa - were reviewed. All wounds were surgically debrided and managed by applying gauze soaked in 50% glucose followed by continuous negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) before definitive skin grafting. NPWT pressure was applied at -80 mm Hg for the 2 adult males (ages 39 and 25 years) and -50 mm Hg for the 7-month-old male infant. The dressings were changed every 2 to 3 days. No adverse events occurred, and wounds were successfully closed with a STSG after an average of 7 days. In 1 case, NPWT was able to help affix dressings in a difficult-to-dress area (genital region). The combination of hypertonic glucose and hand-made, gauze-based NPWT was found to be safe, well-tolerated, and effective in preparing the wound bed for grafting. Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical studies are needed to compare the safety, effectiveness, and efficacy of this method to other treatment approaches for P. aeruginosa-infected wounds.

  16. Burn Wound Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    generalized. Clinically, the like- controlled Pseudomonas burn wound infection in most lihood of septicemia appears to increase as the area of patients (2,4...31 patients, dida, Coccidiodes, Phycomyces, and Rhizopus . In 69 of pneumonia was the primary septic process in 27 (20 of these 75 patients (92%), the...carried out as described above and appropriate systemic anti- to which the invading organisms were sensitive and fungal agents are employed to control

  17. Biofilms and Persistent Wound Infections in United States Military Trauma Patients: a Case-control Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-08

    and maturation on medically-relevant abiotic surfaces (e.g., polypropylene, polystyrene , and titanium) has been suggested [42]. The bap gene carriage...implantation was the same site of in- fection. Nonetheless, in the absence of medical hardware, contamination of soft-tissue wounds by foreign bodies...biofilm-associated infections: a review of the available clinical evidence . Drugs 2009, 69(10):1351–1361. 29. Trampuz A, Piper KE, Jacobson MJ

  18. Biofilm-infected wounds in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Elizabeth A; Freeman, Lynetta J; Seleem, Mohamed N; Snyder, Paul W

    2014-03-15

    A 4-year-old spayed female Mastiff was evaluated for treatment of chronic nonhealing pressure wounds over both elbow regions resulting from attempts at hypertrophic callus excision. The wound bed granulation tissue was mottled red and yellow with hyperemic, rolled epithelial edges. The right wound communicated with a large fluid pocket along the thoracic wall. The dog had an inflammatory leukogram with a left shift. The wounds were debrided, and tissue specimens were collected for histologic evaluation, microbial culture, and bacterial identification by means of molecular diagnostic techniques. The left wound was closed immediately. Calcium alginate rope with silver was packed into the right wound. Vacuum-assisted closure was applied for 6 days. Debridement was repeated, and a thoracodorsal axial pattern flap was used to cover the wound. Systemic treatment with antimicrobials was initiated, and pressure over the elbow regions was relieved. Bacterial biofilms were identified histologically in tissue specimens from both wounds. Staphylococcus intermedius, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Streptococcus canis were cultured and identified by 16S rRNA fragment sequencing. Pyrosequencing identified multiple bacterial species and no fungal organisms. Both wounds healed successfully. Biofilms are implicated in infected orthopedic implants in veterinary patients; however, this is the first report of a bacterial biofilm in chronic wounds in a dog. In human wound care, extensive debridement is performed to disrupt the biofilm; a multimodal treatment approach is recommended to delay reformation and help clear the infection. In this case, biofilm reformation was prevented by systemic treatment with antimicrobials, by reducing local pressure on the wounds, and by wound closure.

  19. Intermittent negative pressure wound therapy with instillation for the treatment of persistent periprosthetic hip infections: a report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söylemez MS

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mehmet Salih Söylemez,1 Korhan Özkan,2 Bülent Kılıç,3 Samet Erinç41Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Bingöl State Hospital, Bingöl, 2Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, Medeniyet University, Istanbul, 3Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Orthopaedic Surgery Clinic, Istanbul Gelişim University, Tekirdağ, 4Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Istanbul Medeniyet University, Göztepe Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, TurkeyAbstract: Intermittent negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi is starting to be used successfully to treat early periprosthetic infections of endoprostheses. However, few articles have reported the outcome of treatment with intermittent NPWTi for late persistent periprosthetic infections of the hip. In this study, we report two cases who underwent several rounds of radical wound debridement for the treatment of a late persistent periprosthetic infection of the hip. Intermittent NPWTi was used in both cases. Patients were treated successfully and there was no recurrence after 3 and 1 years of follow-up, respectively.Keywords: negative pressure, vacuum-assisted, periprosthetic infection, hip

  20. AEROBIC BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM INFECTED WOUNDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    of wound infection will be helpful in the control of wound infection and selection of empiric antimicrobial therapy as an infection control ... the skin (1). The exposed subcutaneous tissues provides a favourable substratum for a wide variety of microorganisms to contaminate and colonize, and .... Ayton M. Wound care. Wounds ...

  1. MODERN WOUND DRESSING FOR WOUND INFECTION: AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Novida Rizani

    2012-01-01

    When the tissue of skin is break means a wound is happens. To seal it, many choices of wound healing are available. Moist wound dressing can be better optional than the conservative ones. A bioactive agent that being added at the dressing in fact can increase healing rate of wound, moreover can subjugate wound infection caused by the pathogens, and also capable to prevent it. In this review, there are summary of modern moist wound healing, the wound pathogens, and some of sturdy bioactive age...

  2. Topical silver for infected wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Joel W

    2009-01-01

    Vermeulen H, van Hattem JM, Storm-Versloot MN, Ubbink DT. Topical silver for treating infected wounds. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2007(1);CD005486. What is the clinical evidence base for silver dressings in the management of contaminated and infected acute and chronic wounds? Investigations were identified by Cochrane Wounds Group Specialized Register (2006), CENTRAL (2006), MEDLINE (2002-2006), EMBASE (2002-2006), CINAHL (2002-2006), and digital dissertations (2006) searches. Product manufacturers were contacted to identify additional eligible studies. The search terms included wound infection, surgical wound infection, ulcer, wound healing, and silver. Each study fulfilled the following criteria: (1) The study was a randomized controlled trial of human participants that compared dressings containing silver with any dressings without silver, dressings with other antiseptics, or dressings with different dosages of silver. (2) The participants were aged 18 years and older with contaminated and infected open wounds of any cause. (3) The study had to evaluate the effectiveness of the dressings using an objective measure of healing. No language or publication status restrictions were imposed, and participants could be recruited in any care setting. Studies were excluded if the wounds were ostomies (surgically formed passages). Study quality assessment was conducted independently by 3 authors using the Dutch Institute for Health Care Improvement and Dutch Cochrane Centre protocols. Characteristics of the study, participants, interventions, and outcome measures were extracted by one author and verified by a second using a standard form. The principal outcome measure was healing (time to complete healing, rate of change in wound area and volume, number and proportion of wounds healed within trial period). Secondary measures were adverse events (eg, pain, maceration, erythema), dressing leakage, and wound odor. Based on the unique comparisons in the studies, a meta

  3. Cobra bite wound infection caused by Shewanella algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Po-Yu; Shi, Zhi-Yuan; Shyu, Ching-Lin; Wu, Zong-Yen; Lai, Kuo-Lung; Chang, Chih-Yen; Chen, Ying-Ju; Huang, Jin-An; Mao, Yan-Chiao; Tung, Kwong-Chung

    2014-03-01

    Shewanella wound infections after snake bites are rare. We report the case of a Shewanella algae wound infection associated with a cobra bite in a 27-year-old woman. The isolate was confirmed by sequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene. This case expands the reported spectrum of infection caused by S. algae and raises the possibility that S. algae could be a causative pathogen in wound infections resulting from snake bites. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Automatic wound infection interpretation for postoperative wound image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jui-Tse; Ho, Te-Wei; Shih, Hsueh-Fu; Chang, Chun-Che; Lai, Feipei; Wu, Jin-Ming

    2017-02-01

    With the growing demand for more efficient wound care after surgery, there is a necessity to develop a machine learning based image analysis approach to reduce the burden for health care professionals. The aim of this study was to propose a novel approach to recognize wound infection on the postsurgical site. Firstly, we proposed an optimal clustering method based on unimodal-rosin threshold algorithm to extract the feature points from a potential wound area into clusters for regions of interest (ROI). Each ROI was regarded as a suture site of the wound area. The automatic infection interpretation based on the support vector machine is available to assist physicians doing decision-making in clinical practice. According to clinical physicians' judgment criteria and the international guidelines for wound infection interpretation, we defined infection detector modules as the following: (1) Swelling Detector, (2) Blood Region Detector, (3) Infected Detector, and (4) Tissue Necrosis Detector. To validate the capability of the proposed system, a retrospective study using the confirmation wound pictures that were used for diagnosis by surgical physicians as the gold standard was conducted to verify the classification models. Currently, through cross validation of 42 wound images, our classifiers achieved 95.23% accuracy, 93.33% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 100% positive predictive value. We believe this ability could help medical practitioners in decision making in clinical practice.

  5. Combat-Related Invasive Fungal Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribble, David R; Rodriguez, Carlos J

    2014-12-01

    Combat-related invasive fungal (mold) wound infections (IFIs) have emerged as an important and morbid complication following explosive blast injuries among military personnel. Similar to trauma-associated IFI cases among civilian populations, as in agricultural accidents and natural disasters, these infections occur in the setting of penetrating wounds contaminated by environmental debris. Specific risk factors for combat-related IFI include dismounted (patrolling on foot) blast injuries occurring mostly in southern Afghanistan, resulting in above knee amputations requiring resuscitation with large-volume blood transfusions. Diagnosis of IFI is based upon early identification of a recurrently necrotic wound following serial debridement and tissue-based histopathology examination with special stains to detect invasive disease. Fungal culture of affected tissue also provides supportive information. Aggressive surgical debridement of affected tissue is the primary therapy. Empiric antifungal therapy should be considered when there is a strong suspicion for IFI. Both liposomal amphotericin B and voriconazole should be considered initially for treatment since many of the cases involve not only Mucorales species but also Aspergillus or Fusarium spp., with narrowing of regimen based upon clinical mycology findings.

  6. PREPARATIVE SKIN PREPARATION AND SURGICAL WOUND INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjanappa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: It is an established fact now that the normal skin of healthy human beings harbours a rich bacterial fl ora. Normally considered non - pathogenic , these organisms way be a potential source of infection of the surgical wound. Approximately 20% of the resident flora is beyond the reach of surgical scrubs and antiseptics. The goal of surgical preparation of the skin with antiseptics is to remove transient and pathogenic microorganisms on the skin surface and to reduce the resident flora to a low level. Povidone iodine (I odophors and chlorhexidine are most often used antiseptics for pre - operative skin preparation. OBJECTIVES : To evaluate the efficacy of povidone iodine alone and in combination with antiseptic agent containing alcoholic chlorhexidine in preoperative skin p reparation by taking swab culture. (2 To compare the rate of postoperative wound infection in both the groups. METHODS: One hundred patients (fifty in each group undergoing clean elective surgery with no focus of infection on the body were included in th e study. The pre - operative skin preparation in each group is done with the respective antiseptic regimen. In both the groups after application of antiseptics , sterile saline swab culture was taken immediately from site of incision. In cases which showed gr owth of organisms , the bacteria isolated were identified by their morphological and cultural characteristics. Grams staining , coagulase test and antibiotic sensitivity test were done wherever necessary and difference in colonization rates was determined as a measure of efficacy of antiseptic regimen. RESULTS: The results of the study showed that when compared to povidone iodine alone , using a combination of povidone iodine and alcoholic solution of chlorhexidine , the colonization rates of the site of incisi on were reduced significantly. As for the rate of post - operative wound infection , it is also proven that wound infections are also

  7. Right Ventricular Perforation From a Floating Rib Following Deep Sternal Wound Infection Debridement and Application of a Vacuum-Assisted Closure Device: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Amanda J; Berry, Nada N

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Deep sternal wound infection following major cardiac surgery is a deleterious complication with sequelae that can be life threatening. The use of vacuum-assisted closure therapy in management of sternal wounds with resultant right ventricular rupture has been documented in the cardiothoracic and to a lesser extent in the reconstructive literature. Methods/Case Report: We present a case of a 67-year-old male patient who suffered from right ventricular perforation from a floating rib following debridement of a deep sternal wound infection and placement of a vacuum-assisted closure device. Results: Despite meticulous debridement and ensuring the release of all retrosternal adhesions, massive bleeding was encountered shortly after application of the vacuum-assisted closure device. Fortunately, quick identification of the complication and the application of direct manual pressure allowed for swift return to the operating room for repair of the defect. The patient secondarily underwent definitive closure of the mediastinal wound with an omental flap and bilateral pectoral advancement flaps. Discussion: Following the conclusion of this article, the reconstructive surgeon should be able to (1) identify patients at risk for ventricular perforation, (2) exhaust all means intraoperatively to prevent cardiac perforation when using vacuum-assisted closure therapy, (3) comprehend the physiology associated with vacuum-assisted closure use in this patient population, (4) have protocols in place for the management of patients with deep sternal wound infection with vacuum-assisted closure therapy postoperatively, and (5) understand basic tenets of ventricular rupture treatment should this occur to ensure prompt repair and survival.

  8. Venous flow-through flap reconstruction following severe finger wound infection: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Pravin; DeJesus, Ramon A

    2009-05-01

    We report a case of a 22-year-old patient who sustained a box-cutter injury to the index finger on her right hand complicated by severe felon. Extensive tissue debridement left the patient with a defect exposing the underlying flexor tendon. A venous flow-through flap from the right forearm was used to provide coverage, which survived completely without venous congestion. Excellent functional and cosmetic result was achieved with this approach. Because of its similarity in color and non-hair-bearing nature, the venous flow-through flap serves as an excellent approach for volar digital defect coverage in which the underlying flexor tendon is exposed.

  9. [Atypical agents of wound infection and targeted samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucisec-Tepes, Nastja

    2012-10-01

    All open wounds are primarily contaminated and subsequently colonized by microorganisms, predominantly bacteria. Only about 30% of chronic wounds are also infected. Factors which favor the development of infection are the following: large quantity of bacteria, presence of virulence factors, their quantity and number, predominantly the synergy of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, and formation of biofilm. Common agents of infection of acute and chronic wounds are Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, Streptococcus beta-haemolyticus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacteroides spp., and Candida albicans. Difference between acute and chronic wound is in the predominance of individual agents, with an observation that Staphylococcus aureus is predominant in both cases. Atypical agents of chronic wound infection are rare, unusual, not found in the area in which we live, not proven by standard microbiological methods, but molecular methods are needed instead. They are predominantly opportunists, varying in the expression of virulence factors, or they have changed their phenotype characteristics and are not the agents of primary wound infections. They are the agents of secondary infections. Atypical agents of the chronic wound infection are diverse, from the anaerobe group, Peptoniphilus spp., Anaerococcus spp., Bacteroides ureolyticus, Finegoldia magma, the group of gram positive rods of the Corynebacterium genus, the group of bacteria from aquatic environment Mycobacterium fortuitum complex, and Vibrio alginolyticus. The targeted samples are biopsy sample as the "gold standard" and/or aspirate, when a significant quantity of exudate is present. Targeted samples are obligatory when there is a progression and decomposition of the base of the wound, increase in the size or depth of the wound, isolation of multiresistant microbes, or absence of clinical response to empirical antimicrobial therapy. In the diagnosis of opportunistic pathogens or atypical agents of chronic wound infection, it is

  10. Microbial profile of canine persistent wound infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Padhy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyse the microbial profile of canine persistent wound infections. Materials and Methods: The total wound samples (n=172 taken from both traumatic (140 and post-surgical (32 persistent wounds in canines were processed for routine microbial isolation and identification during a period of 15 months. Results: Staphylococcus intermedius was found to be the predominant isolate from all types of wounds under study. It was followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, E. coli, Pasteurella spp., Corynaebacterium spp. and Bacillus spp. From different traumatic wounds of dogs, S. intermedius (92/140=65.7% and from surgical wounds, P. aeruginosa (24/32=75% were found to be the predominant isolates recovered whereas the most commonly isolated bacterial genus in both traumatic and surgical wounds of dogs was Staphylococcus spp. Conclusion: Canine wounds are polymicrobial in nature. Hence proper microbial laboratory diagnosis and presence of multiple organisms in a wound are to be taken into consideration for effective treatment of persistent wound infections in dogs.

  11. Topical silver for treating infected wounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, H.; van Hattem, J. M.; Storm-Versloot, M. N.; Ubbink, D. T.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Topical silver treatments and silver dressings are increasingly used for the local treatment of contaminated or infected wounds, however, there is a lack of clarity regarding the evidence for their effectiveness. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects on wound healing of topical silver and

  12. Multicultural understanding of infected wound care.

    OpenAIRE

    Rono, Ruth; Åstrand, Loise; Tatala, Sinthia

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to focus on the challenges nurses encounter while caring for multicultural patients with infected wounds. The purpose was to describe what sort of challenges nurses encounter with multicultural patients and how culture affects the patients’ care. The goal was to gain more knowledge/understanding on multicultural patients for the improvement of nursing practice in infected wound care. The study was done using a qualitative method and inductive analysis. The theoret...

  13. [Definition and management of wound infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, S; Körner, P; Diedrich, S; Kramer, A; Heidecke, C-D

    2011-03-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) in the postoperative period represent the sword of Damocles in surgery. In spite of the medical progress in recent years these infections cannot always be avoided and occur in 25% of all nosocomial infections in Germany. They also generate up to 50% of the required costs in this context. The consequences vary from extended duration of hospitalization to elevated mortality. The degree of contamination of surgical wounds is of great importance as well as the patient's immune status and comorbidities. Prevention of infected surgical wounds is essential and important measures should begin even prior to the surgical procedure. In addition, during and following the surgical procedure several standards have to be followed. Rapid confirmation of diagnosis and correct management of surgical site infections are essential for the course of the disease. This study provides information on development, prevention and therapy of surgically infected wounds.

  14. [Wound infections due to opportunistic corynebacterium species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olender, Alina; Łetowska, Iwona

    2010-01-01

    Wound infections are often due to endogenous bacterial flora which penetrates into a site of injury. The establishment of the etiologic agent can be problematic, especially when opportunistic bacteria are present, suggesting contamination of clinical material. Among bacteria that can cause such diagnostic problems are opportunistic Corynebacterium spp. and coryneforms colonizing skin. The aim of the study was to analyze the 24 clinical samples collected from wounds of different location, with Gram positive rods isolated in numbers suggesting the cause of infection. Bacterial identification was performed by API Coryne and additional biochemical tests (API ZYM, API NE). It was detected that the commonest species isolated were: C. amycolatum (29.2%), C. striatum (16.7%), C. group G (16.7%) and Brevibacterium spp., C. jeikeium, C. urealyticum, C. group F1. The drug susceptibility testing was performed by E-test method. Among isolated strains, 83.3% were simultaneously resistant to erythromycin and clindamycin. In 75% cases resistance to co-trimoxazole was noted, in 71.7% resistance to chloramphenicol and in 16.7% resistance to beta-lactams were detected. In presented study the high percentage of strains resistant to macrolids and linkosamids (MLSB) was noted. All strains were susceptible to vancomycin and teicoplanin.

  15. Bacterial isolates from infected wounds and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern: some remarks about wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessa, Lucinda J; Fazii, Paolo; Di Giulio, Mara; Cellini, Luigina

    2015-02-01

    Wound infection plays an important role in the development of chronicity, delaying wound healing. This study aimed to identify the bacterial pathogens present in infected wounds and characterise their resistance profile to the most common antibiotics used in therapy. Three hundred and twelve wound swab samples were collected from 213 patients and analysed for the identification of microorganisms and for the determination of their antibiotic susceptibility. Patients with diverse type of wounds were included in this retrospective study, carried out from March to September 2012. A total of 28 species were isolated from 217 infected wounds. The most common bacterial species detected was Staphylococcus aureus (37%), followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (17%), Proteus mirabilis (10%), Escherichia coli (6%) and Corynebacterium spp. (5%). Polymicrobial infection was found in 59 (27·1%) of the samples and was mainly constituted with two species. The most common association was S. aureus/P. aeruginosa. All Gram-positives were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid. Gram-negatives showed quite high resistance to the majority of antibiotics, being amikacin the most active against these bacteria. This study is mostly oriented to health care practitioners who deal with wound management, making them aware about the importance of wound infection and helping them to choose the adequate treatment options to control microbial infection in wounds. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Citric acid treatment of post operative wound infections in HIV/AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoba, Basavraj; Patil Dawale, Chandrakala; Raju, Reena; Wadher, Bharat; Chidrawar, Shruti; Selkar, Sohan; Suryawanshi, Namdev

    2014-02-01

    The normal cellular immunity is required for normal wound healing. The HIV infection affects wound healing adversely. Wound infections in HIV/AIDS patients are difficult to manage because of compromised immunity. The result is delayed wound healing and increased susceptibility to wound infection. Here we report two cases of HIV positive patients who had developed the post operative wound gape, not responding to the conventional treatment, treated simply by local application of three percent citric acid ointment. Copyright © 2013 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment of Decubitis Ulcer Stage IV in the Patient with Polytrauma and Vertical Share Pelvic Fracture, Diagnosed Entherocollitis and Deep Wound Infection with Clostridium Difficile with Combined Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) and Faecal Management System: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojmenski, Slavcho; Merdzanovski, Igor; Gavrilovski, Andrej; Pejkova, Sofija; Dzokic, Gjorge; Tudzarova, Smilja

    2017-06-15

    The aim of this paper was to present a case with the successful treatment of decubitis ulcer stage IV in the patient with polytrauma and vertical share pelvic fracture and diagnosed entherocollitis combined with deep wound infection with Clostridium difficile treated with combined Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) and faecal management system. Patient D.S.1967 treated on Traumatology Clinic after tentamen suicide on 9.2.2015 with diagnosis: brain contusion; contusion of thoracal space; vertical share pelvic fracture; open fracture type II of the right calcaneus; fracture of the left calcaneus; fracture on the typical place of the left radius; fracture of the right radius with dislocation. As a first step during the treatment in Intensive care unit we perform transcondylar extension of the left leg, and in that time we cannot operate because of the brain contusion. Four weeks after this treatment we intent to perform stabilisation of the pelvic ring, fixation of both arms, and fixation of both calcanear bones. But at the time before performing the saurgery, the patient got an intensive enterocollitis from Escherichia colli and Clostridium difficile, and during the inadequate treatment of enterocollitis she got a big decubitus on both gluteal regia Grade IV and deep muscular necrosis. Several times we perform a necrectomy of necrotic tissue but the wound become bigger and the infection have a progressive intention. In that time we used VAK system for 6 weeks combined with faecal management system and with local necrectomy and system application of Antibiotics and Flagyl for enterocollitis in doses prescripted from specialists from Infective clinic. This new device to manage faecal deep decubital infection and enterocollitis with Clostridium difficile are considered as adequate. 8Flexi-Seal® FMS has been also used. After two months we succeed to minimize the gluteal wound on quoter from the situation from the beginning and we used for next two months wound

  18. Anti-infective and wound healing properties of Flabellaria paniculata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The methanol leaf extract of Flabellaria paniculala was studied for its potency on normal wounds and infected wounds in rats. Wounds were inflicted on Wistar rats using excision model. Local infection was introduced into rat abdominal wounds using a 108 bacteria/ml inoculum. Two groups of infection were used: ...

  19. Gram-Negative Bacterial Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    approach, but also support the implementation of studies using a well-established wound infection model using mice and pigs that will be conducted in the...Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license, which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction

  20. AEROBIC BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM INFECTED WOUNDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    AEROBIC BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM INFECTED WOUNDS. Esebelahie, N. O.*1, 3 , Newton-Esebelahie, F. O.2,3& Omoregie R.3. 1. Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, College of Health Sciences,. NnamdiAzikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nnewi, Anambra State, ...

  1. Incidence of Proteus species in wound infections and their sensitivity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proteus species are frequently recovered from infected wounds. They contaminate wounds and thus cause infections. This study was carried out at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH) to determine the involvement of Proteus species as one of the major causative organisms in wound infections. The study also ...

  2. Treatment of Decubitis Ulcer Stage IV in the Patient with Polytrauma and Vertical Share Pelvic Fracture, Diagnosed Entherocollitis and Deep Wound Infection with Clostridium Difficile with Combined Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT and Faecal Management System: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavcho Stojmenski

    2017-06-01

    CONCLUSION: When faecal incontinence as a result of enterocollitis with Clostridium difficile does occur, a limiting contact with the patient’s skin is extremely important as breakdown can occur rapidly. In addition to tissue injury, faecal incontinence can have a major impact on the patient’s dignity and result in prolonged hospital stay. The main outcomes assested in the case studies were resolution of of decubital ulcers as a result of faecal incontinence, patient comfort and ease of application of the FMS and NPWT. The soft flexible catheter was easily inserted without discomfort to the patients. It gently conformed to the rectal vault, reducing significantly the risk of necrosis, and the risk for prolonged necrosis in cases with previously developed necrosis. FMS was successful in diverting faecal fluid away from the perineal tissue and resolved any decubitus ulcer developed previously in combination with use of NPWT. So, we can recommend this combination in those cases especially with polytraumatismus, vertical share pelvis fracture combined with diarrhea and deep wound infection of decubital ulcers Grade IV infected with Cl. difficile.

  3. Total and attributable costs of surgical-wound infections at a Canadian tertiary-care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoutman, D; McDonald, S; Vethanayagan, D

    1998-04-01

    To determine the total and attributable costs of surgical-wound infections in a Canadian teaching hospital. Retrospective incidence series study with chart review and examination of resource utilization attributable to wound infection. The charts of inpatients with wound infections were examined using the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP), a validated chart review instrument designed to determine appropriateness of care, modified for wound infections. A university referral center in Canada. Medical records were abstracted from patients with wound infections who underwent an inpatient clean or clean-contaminated procedure during 1991. During the wound-infection treatment period, the hospital costs associated with providing care were tabulated for all inpatient days and for outpatient and emergency visits. Costs taken into account included nursing salary and benefits, nonphysician professional services, operating room time, laboratory, pharmacy, supplies, ancillary tests, and hotel costs. We identified 108 wound infections. Twenty-two patients required 28 surgical procedures related to a wound infection. Inpatient days totalled 1,116, costing $394,337. Fifty-five emergency and 42 clinic visits occurred, costing $27,193. By applying the AEP to the inpatient days, 833 days, or 10.2 days per case, were directly attributable to the wound infection. The hospital costs for inpatient care attributable to wound infections were $321,533 in total, or $3,937 per infection. Costs were distributed as follows: nursing, 51%; hotel, 14%; pharmacy, 10%; laboratory, 9%; emergency and outpatient clinic, 6%; professional services, 5%; operating room, 3%; and ancillary tests, 2%. Wound infections contribute markedly to extra days of hospitalization and related costs. The AEP method is applied easily to determine attributable days of care and costs of wound infections, which are necessary to calculate the cost-benefit of infection control programs.

  4. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Prevention of Postoperative Infections Following Caesarean Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-30

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

  5. Study of Bacteriology of Post-Operative Wound Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Abdulrauf Bagwan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: While many patients are admitted to hospital for treatment of infections, some acquire infection during their stay in the hospital. These infections are called as nosocomial infections. Surgical site infection or post operative wound infection is one of them. It is defined as infection of previously sterile tissue incised to gain exposure for operating deeper spaces operatively exposed or organs manipulated by a surgeon. It is one of the feared complications of surgery as it increases morbidity as well as cost of medical care. Aims and Objectives: Study was conducted to find out incidence of surgical site infection rate in surgical ward, evaluate various factors contributing to infection and to identify causative pathogens and their antibiogram patterns. Material and Methods: All clean and clean contaminated operative cases admitted in surgery ward in study period of 18 months were included. Preoperative, operative and postoperative management protocols of the cases were recorded in detail. Results: A total of 1082 operated cases were studied among which 59 infected cases were found. Surgical Site Infection (SSI rate was 5.45%. E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus were the commonest pathogen isolated from the infected wound. 50 % were Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA among them and 50% of rd Enterobacteriaceae group were resistant to 3 generation Cephalosporins. Conclusion: Surgical site infection rate of a hospital can be reduced easily by following proper pre-operative protocol for the patients. Those patients with surgical site infection can be treated effectively by following the antibiotic policy as provided by the Department of Microbiology.

  6. Subeschar Treatment of Burn-Wound Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    patients (31.5%) had suffered inhalation in- burn wound, after the course of subeschar antibiotic infusion, jury, a diagnosis established by some...combination of history, All surviving patients were Infected with Pseudomonas physical examination, flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy, xenon Xe aeruglnosa... Inhalation Organism In Initial Posttreatment Age/Sex Trotl Full Injury Biopsy Specimen (No.)t Biopsy Results Outcome$ Autopsy 23 yr/M 83.0 67.5 Yes

  7. Mouse Model of Burn Wound and Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2017-01-01

    The immunosuppression induced by thermal injury renders the burned victim susceptible to infection. A mouse model was developed to examine the immunosuppression, which was possible to induce even at a minor thermal insult of 6% total body surface area. After induction of the burn (48 hr) a depres......The immunosuppression induced by thermal injury renders the burned victim susceptible to infection. A mouse model was developed to examine the immunosuppression, which was possible to induce even at a minor thermal insult of 6% total body surface area. After induction of the burn (48 hr......) a depression of leukocytes in the peripheral blood was found of the burned mice. This depression was due to a reduction in the polymorphonuclear cells. The burned mice were not able to clear a Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound infection, since the infection spread to the blood as compared to mice only infected...... with P. aeruginosa subcutaneously. The burn model offers an opportunity to study infections under these conditions. The present model can also be used to examine new antibiotics and immune therapy. Our animal model resembling the clinical situation is useful in developing new treatments of burn wound...

  8. Pattern of pathogens from surgical wound infections in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of isolates were resistant to erythromycin, fusidic acid and tobramycin. Conclusions:The infections were polymicrobic and multidrug resistant. The quinolones, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin, should be used as frontline drugs in the management of surgical wound infections at the hospital. Keywords: surgical wound infections, ...

  9. Bacteriology of Post Caesarean Wound Infection in a Specialist ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Post caesarean wound infection is a common cause of maternal morbidity and mortality especially in developing countries where strict adherence to infection control procedures is low. The aim of the present study is to establish the spectrum of microbes causing post caesarean wound infection and antibiotic sensitivity ...

  10. Innovations in Wound Infection Prevention and Management and Antimicrobial Countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    medical deaths 1162 surgical deaths of 132,996 admissionsArnold. Mil Med 1978;143:161 Wound Infection Prevention and Management - Epidemiology 2011 MHS...guidelines – Rapid evacuation to surgical care (irrigation/debridement) – Limit antibiotic spectrum/duration around wound management – Emphasize basic...Hospenthal. J Trauma 2008;64:S211 2011 MHS Conference Wound Infection Prevention and Management - Prevention  Infection control basics – Handwashing

  11. A case of wound dual infection with Pasteurella dagmatis and Pasteurella Canis resulting from a dog bite - limitations of Vitek-2 system in exact identification of Pasteurella species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akahane T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pasteurella species, widely known as indigenous orgganisms in the oral and gastrointestinal floras of many wild and domestic animals, are important pathogens in both animals and humans. Human infections due to Pasteurella species are in most cases associated with infected injuries following animal bites. We encountered a rare case of dual infections caused by different two Pasteurella species occurred in a previously healthy 25-year-old female sustaining injury by a dog-bite. Methodology Exudates from the open wound of her dog-bite site, together with the saliva of the dog were submitted for bacteriological examination. Predominantly appearing grayish-white smooth colonies with almost the same colonial properties but slightly different glistening grown on chocolate and sheep blood agar plates were characterized morphologically by Gram's stain, biochemically by automated instrument using Vitek 2 system using GN cards together with commercially available kit system, ID-Test HN-20 rapid panels, and genetically by sequencing the 16S rRNA genes of the organism using a Taq DyeDeoxy Terminator Cycle Sequencing and a model 3100 DNA sequencer instrument. Results The causative isolates from the dog-bite site were finally identified as P. canis and P. dagmatis from the findings of the morphological, cultural, and biochemical properties together with the comparative sequences of the 16S rRNA genes. Both the isolates were highly susceptible to many antibiotics and the patient was successfully treated with the administration of so-called the first generation cephalosporin, cefazolin followed by so-called the third generation cephalosporin, cefcapene pivoxil. The isolate from the dog was subsequently identified as P. canis, the same species as the isolate from the patient. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this was the second report of a dual infection with Pasteurella species consisting of P. dagmatis and P. canis resulting from a

  12. Evaluation of Mouse Wound Models for Probiotics-Based Wound Infection Prevention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    to aid in prevention of infection in both traumatic and surgical settings. We used established methods to produce typical wounds in a reproducible...highly desirable. The objectives of this study were to (1) establish reproducible, small animal models of infectious wounds and (2) assess if probiotics...been some interest in using these organisms in early wound care to aid in prevention of infection in both traumatic and surgical settings. Such a

  13. Treatment of equine leg wounds using skin grafts: Thirty-five cases, 1975-1988

    OpenAIRE

    French, Daniel A.; Fretz, Peter B.

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted on 35 equine patients with lower leg wounds that were managed utilizing skin graft procedures. Two pinch graft, five punch graft, seven tunnel graft, eight split-thickness mesh graft and thirteen full-thickness mesh expansion graft procedures were performed in the initial treatment. The average wound size was 188 cm2. Twentyfour cases had pregrafting complications: 10 wounds developed sequestra; three wounds were grossly contaminated and infected; and 11 ca...

  14. Post-operative wound infection in developing country - A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A prospective survey of post-operative wound infection rates was undertaken at the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi over a three-month period from April to June, 1985. The methods whereby wound sepsis data were obtained are presented. The results show an overall infection rate of 25.8% and that for ...

  15. Infected wound healing and antimicrobial effects of Chenopodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chenopodium ambrosioides Linn. (Chenopdiaceae) and Mitracarpus scaber Zucc. (Rubiaceae) are herbal medicinal plants. They are commonly used in Togolese folk medicine to treat skin infections such as infected wounds, dermatoses, and scabies. The aim of this work was to evaluate the wound healing and ...

  16. Bacteriology and antibiogram of pathogens from wound infections at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wound infections result in sepsis, limb loss, long hospital stays, higher costs, and are responsible for significant human mortality and morbidity worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the profile of pathogens cultured from wound infection and determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. A retrospective ...

  17. Aquatically acquired Aeromonas hydrophila wound infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-09-15

    Sep 15, 1990 ... in 2 cases of mixed infection associated with swimming acci- dents.l Recently focal Aeromonas infections .... from human sources as early as 19374and is being recognised increasingly in human/ocal and ... activity of the fIrst-generation cephalosporins and of ampicillin against this organism. Published ...

  18. Maggot therapy for repairing serious infective wound in a severely burned patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Jun-cheng

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】The larvae of musca domestica were put in use to discard the dead tissue of a case of severe burn. A total of 50 000 aseptic maggots were put onto the infective wound surface, and aseptic dressings overlaid the surface. Three days later, another 20 000 maggots were put onto the wound for the second therapy. After twice maggot debridement, most necrotic muscle tissues of the wound were cleaned up, and eventually fresh granulation tissue grew and later the wound was covered and healed by 3 times of skin grafting. The result demonstrates that maggot therapy is safe and effective with no adverse complications except pain. Key words: Biological therapy; Wound infection; Burns; Wound healing; Debridement

  19. Triclosan-coated sutures reduce wound infections after spinal surgery: a retrospective, nonrandomized, clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masaki; Saito, Wataru; Yamagata, Megumu; Imura, Takayuki; Inoue, Gen; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Takahira, Naonobu; Uchida, Kentaro; Fukahori, Nobuko; Shimomura, Kiyomi; Takaso, Masashi

    2015-05-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a serious postoperative complication. The incidence of SSIs is lower in clean orthopedic surgery than in other fields, but it is higher after spinal surgery, reaching 4.15% in high-risk patients. Several studies reported that triclosan-coated polyglactin 910 sutures (Vicryl Plus; Ethicon, Inc., Somerville, NJ, USA) significantly reduced the infection rate in the general surgical, neurosurgical, and thoracic surgical fields. However, there have been no studies on the effects of such coated sutures on the incidence of SSIs in orthopedics. To compare the incidence of wound infections after spinal surgery using triclosan-coated suture materials with that of noncoated ones. A retrospective, nonrandomized, and clinical study. From May 2010 to April 2012, 405 patients underwent a spinal surgical procedure in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery of two university hospitals. The primary outcome was the number of wound infections and dehiscences. Two hundred five patients had a conventional wound closure with polyglactin 910 suture (Vicryl) between May 2010 and April 2011 (Time Period 1 [TP1]), and 200 patients underwent wound closure with triclosan-coated polyglactin 910 suture (Vicryl Plus) between May 2011 and April 2012 (TP2). Statistical comparisons of wound infections, dehiscence, and risk factors for poor wound healing or infection were performed. None of the authors has any conflict of interest associated with this study. There were two cases of wound dehiscence in TP1 and one in TP2 (p=.509). Using noncoated sutures in TP1, eight patients (3.90%) had wound infections, whereas one patient (0.50%) had wound infections in TP2 (using triclosan-coated sutures); the difference was significant (p=.020). The use of triclosan-coated polyglactin 910 sutures instead of polyglactin 910 sutures may reduce the number of wound infections after spinal surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. operative wound infection in implant surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CUSTOMER

    Department of Surgery, Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos and * Department of Pathology, ... Orthopaedic Hospital, Lagos .... infection in one case with E. coli and Staphylococcus .... be sensitive to Gentamicin while essentially resistant.

  1. Comparison of surgical site infection rates in clean and clean-contaminated wounds in dogs and cats after minimally invasive versus open surgery: 179 cases (2007-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Philipp D; Freeman, Lynetta; Kwan, Toni; Brown, Dorothy C

    2012-01-15

    To report and compare the surgical site infection (SSI) rates for clean and clean-contaminated procedures performed by either a minimally invasive surgical or open surgical approach in a large population of dogs and cats. Prospective case series. 179 patients (dogs and cats) undergoing minimally invasive abdominal or thoracic surgery. Case information from all animals that underwent minimally invasive abdominal or thoracic surgery was prospectively collected and compared with an existing database of the same information collected from 379 patients undergoing laparotomy or thoracotomy via an open surgical approach. For both groups, an SSI was defined as any surgical wound in which purulent discharge was observed within 14 days after the procedure. Follow-up for all patients was obtained by direct examination or telephone interviews. Overall SSI rate in the minimally invasive surgery (MIS) group was 1.7% and in the open surgery (OS) group was 5.5%. On univariate analysis, there was a significantly lower SSI rate in the MIS group, compared with the SSI rate for the OS group. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, this difference appeared to be a result of the fact that surgery times were longer (median, 105 vs 75 minutes) and hair was clipped ≥ 4 hours prior to surgery for more animals (23% vs 11 %) in the OS group, compared with the MIS group. MIS may be associated with a lower SSI rate, compared with OS, but confounding factors such as differences in surgery time and preoperative preparation contributed in part to this finding. As such, surgical approach cannot be categorized as an independent risk factor for SSIs in small animals until further studies are performed.

  2. Effects of ketanserin on hypergranulation tissue formation, infection, and healing of equine lower limb wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, Marc; Besche, Béatrice; Lefay, Marie-Paul; Hare, Jonathan; Vlaminck, Kathleen

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this multicentre, randomized, controlled field study was to determine the efficacy of ketanserin gel in preventing exuberant granulation tissue formation (hypergranulation) and infection in equine lower limb wounds. Horses and ponies (n = 481) with naturally occurring wounds were randomized to either topical treatment with ketanserin gel (n = 242) or a positive control (Belgium, Germany: ethacridin lactate solution, n = 120; France, United Kingdom: malic, benzoic, and salicylic acid [MBS] cream, n = 119). Treatment continued until the wound healed (success), formed hypergranulation tissue (failure), or became infected (failure). Treatment was terminated after 6 months in all remaining animals. Ketanserin was successful in 88% of cases. Wounds treated with ketanserin were 2 and 5 times more likely to heal successfully than were those treated with MBS or ethacridin lactate, respectively. Ketanserin gel is thus more effective than these standard treatments in preventing hypergranulation tissue and infection of equine lower limb wounds.

  3. Omental Herniation: A Rare Complication of Vacuum-Assisted Closure of Infected Sternotomy Wound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philemon Gukop

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC has recently been adopted as an acceptable modality for management of sternotomy wound infections. Although generally efficacious, the use of negative pressure devices has been associated with complications such as bleeding, retention of sponge, and empyema. We report the first case of greater omental hernia as a rare complication of vacuum-assisted closure of sternal wound infection following coronary artery bypass grafting.

  4. Effect of chitosan acetate bandage on wound healing in infected and noninfected wounds in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkatovskaya, Marina; Castano, Ana P.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Tegos, George P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    HemCon® bandage is an engineered chitosan acetate preparation designed as a hemostatic dressing, and is under investigation as a topical antimicrobial dressing. We studied its effects on healing of excisional wounds that were or were not infected with Staphylococcus aureus, in normal mice or mice previously pretreated with cyclophosphamide (CY). CY significantly suppressed wound healing in both the early and later stages, while S. aureus alone significantly stimulated wound healing in the early stages by preventing the initial wound expansion. CY plus S. aureus showed an advantage in early stages by preventing expansion, but a significant slowing of wound healing in later stages. In order to study the conflicting clamping and stimulating effects of chitosan acetate bandage on normal wounds, we removed the bandage from wounds at times after application ranging from 1 hour to 9 days. Three days application gave the earliest wound closure, and all application times gave a faster healing slope after removal compared with control wounds. Chitosan acetate bandage reduced the number of inflammatory cells in the wound at days 2 and 4, and had an overall beneficial effect on wound healing especially during the early period where its antimicrobial effect is most important. PMID:18471261

  5. Innate Defense Regulator Peptide 1018 in Wound Healing and Wound Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Hirsch, Tobias; Schulte, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    -37 or HB-107. Furthermore, administration of IDR-1018 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in fibroblast cellular respiration. In vivo, IDR-1018 demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing in S. aureus infected porcine and non-diabetic but not in diabetic murine wounds. However...

  6. Surgical Wound Infection: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin Robert H

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Surgical wound infection remains a significant problem following an operation, although surveillance for such infections remains a challenge exacerbated by early discharge and outpatient surgery. The riskof such infections isdetermined by technical problems with the operation, particularly bleeding, the amount of devitalized tissue created, and the need for drains within the wound, as well as such metabolic factors as obesity and diabetes. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis can dec...

  7. Dermal wound transcriptomic responses to Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa versus Klebsiella pneumoniae in a rabbit ear wound model

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Kai P.; D’Arpa, Peter; Seth, Akhil K; Geringer, Matthew R.; Jett, Marti; Xu, Wei; Hong, Seok J; Galiano, Robert D.; Chen, Tsute; Mustoe, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial infections of wounds impair healing and worsen scarring. We hypothesized that transcriptome analysis of wounds infected with Klebsiella pneumoniae (K.p.) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.a.) would indicate host-responses associated with the worse healing of P.a.- than K.p.-infected wounds. Methods Wounds created on post-operative day (POD) 0 were infected during the inflammatory phase of healing on POD3 and were harvested on POD4 for microarray and transcriptome analysis. Oth...

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Post-operative Wound Infections in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of post-operative wound infections was studied over a period of five months in the University College Hospital, Ibadan between February to July, 2003. Two hundred Surgical wounds were collected and routinely processed by Gram staining and culture in the Microbiology Laboratory. Of the 200 samples ...

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infection in a dedicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    according to standard management protocols. The standard of care during the study period was to treat wounds infected with. P. aeruginosa (even if clinically suspected and not yet proven with a positive swab) with daily soaks with an unbuffered sodium hypochlorite solution,[13] after which the wounds were dressed with.

  10. Knowledge and Practice of Post-Operative Wound Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of sterile dressings to the surgical wound and strict adherence to asepsis were the most occurring precautionary measures adopted by nurses in the prevention of post operative wound infection. Excess work load and poor attitude featured most frequently among the respondents as factors that militate against ...

  11. Evaluation of Punica granatum Peel Against Diabetic Wound Infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Foot infections are a common and serious problem in diabetic patients. Objectives: To investigate the antibacterial activity of some medicinal plants used by traditional healers for diabetic wounds and to examine in-vivo wound healing activity of active extracts. Materials and Methods: An experimental study in ...

  12. Spectroscopic Biomarkers for Monitoring Wound Healing and Infection in Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    collecting Raman spectra of wound effluent, and anticipate the completion of that task by the end of the grant cycle (September 30th, 2015...tomographic imaging of canine bone tissue. J Biomed Opt 2008; 13:020506. 69. Chrit L, Hadjur C, Morel S, Sockalingum G, Lebourdon G, Leroy F, Manfait M. In...C for 1 minute, followed by 35 cycles of96°C for 15 seconds, 60°C for 45 seconds, and 72°C for 45 seconds. Final extension at 72°C was clone for 2

  13. Burn Wound Infections and Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaiq, Muhammad; Ahmad, Shehzad; Zaib, Muhammad Salman

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROND Burn wound infections carry considerable mortality and morbidity amongst burn injury victims who have been successfully rescued through the initial resuscitation. This study assessed the prevalent microrganisms causing burn wound infections among hospitalized patients; their susceptibility pattern to commonly used antibiotics; and the frequency of infections with respect to the duration of the burn wounds. METHODS This study was carried out at Burn Care Centre, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS), Islamabad, Pakistan over a period of two years (i.e. from June 2010 to May 2012). The study included all wound-culture-positive patients of either gender and all ages, who had sustained deep burns and underwent definitive management with wound excisions and skin auto-grafting. Patients with negative cultures of the wounds were excluded. Tissue specimens for culture and sensitivity were collected from burn wounds using standard collection techniques and analyzed at microbiological laboratory. RESULTS Out of a total of 95 positive microbial growths, 36 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (35.29%) as the most frequent isolate found, followed by 21 Klebsiella pneumoniae (20.58%), 19 Staphylococcus aureaus (18.62%), 10 Proteus (9.80%), 7 E. coli (6.86%), 7 Acinetobacter (6.86%), and 4 Candida (3.92%). A variable antibiotic susceptibility pattern was observed among the grown microbes. Positive cultures were significantly more frequent among patients with over two weeks duration of burn wounds. CONCLUSION P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus constituted the most common bacterial microbes of burn wounds in our in-patients cases. Positive cultures were more frequent among patients with over two weeks duration of burn wounds. Early excision and skin grafting of deep burns and adherence to infection control measures can help to effectively reduce the burden of these infections. PMID:25606471

  14. Intraoperative contamination influences wound discharge and periprosthetic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knobben, Bas A. S.; Engelsma, Yde; Neut, Danielle

    2006-01-01

    Intraoperative bacterial contamination increases risk for postoperative wound-healing problems and periprosthetic infection, but to what extent remains unclear. We asked whether bacterial contamination of the instruments and bone during primary prosthesis insertion was associated with prolonged

  15. Postoperative wound infections after a proctectomy--Patient experiences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hassel, Karin; Andersson, Kristin; Koinberg, Inga-Lill; Wennström, Berith

    2016-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to describe patient experiences of perineal wound infections following proctectomy due to rectal cancer, and the importance of the communication with and the self-care...

  16. Bacterial pathogens associated with infected wounds in Ogun State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OSUTH) between August 1999 and July 2000 in the Orthopaedics, Obstetrics and Gynaecological units to identify the bacterial pathogens associated with infected wounds as well as their antibiotic sensitivity profile. A total of 1670 patients were ...

  17. Wound botulism presenting as a deep neck space infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Christopher; Mookherjee, Somnath; Russell, Matthew S

    2012-12-01

    Otolaryngologists commonly evaluate patients with findings suspicious for deep space soft tissue infections of the neck. In this case, a woman with a history of injection drug use (IDU) presented with dysphagia, odynophagia, and neck pain. Multiple neck abscesses, too small to drain, were seen on imaging. Despite broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics, she unexpectedly and rapidly developed respiratory failure requiring intubation. Further work-up diagnosed wound botulism (WB). To our knowledge, this is the first report of WB presenting as a deep neck space infection, and illustrates the importance of considering this deadly diagnosis in patients with IDU history and bulbar symptoms. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Risk factors for nosocomial burn wound infection caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Recep; Dal, Tuba; Bozkurt, Fatma; Deveci, Ozcan; Palanc, Ylmaz; Arslan, Eyüp; Selçuk, Caferi Tayyar; Hoşoğlu, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii infections in burn patients may lead to delays in wound healing, graft losses, and development of sepsis. Determining the risk factors for multidrug resistant A. baumannii (MDR-AB) infections is essential for infection control. In the present study, the authors aimed to evaluate risk factors for wound infections caused by A. baumannii in burn patients. The study was conducted at Dicle University Hospital Burn Center, from April 2011 to July 2012, to investigate the risk factors for MDR-AB infections. The data of both the case and control group patients and the result of wound cultures were recorded on a daily basis, on individual forms given for each patient, and analyzed. A total of 30 cases infected with MDR-AB, and 60 uninfected control patients, were included in the study. The mean age (±SD) was 7.7 ± 15.4 years in infected patients and 11.4 ± 16.5 years in uninfected patients. The mean total burn surface area was 13.5 ± 10.9% in uninfected patients and 34.7 ± 16.2% in infected patients. The mean total burn surface area, the abbreviated burn severity index, acute physiological and chronic health evaluation II score, day of admission to hospital, length of hospital stay, first excision day, prior usage of third-generation cephalosporins, and stay in intensive care unit of the infected patients were significantly higher (P infection. Univariate analysis found that high acute physiological and chronic health evaluation II score, first excision time of wound, invasive device usage, admission day to hospital, and prior usage of broad-spectrum antibiotics were risk factors for nosocomial infections. This study showed that multiple factors contribute to multidrug resistance in A. baumannii. A combination of an early diagnosis of wound infections, appropriate antimicrobial treatments, surgical debridement, and early wound closure may be effective in the management.

  19. Wound healing and infection in surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2012-01-01

    : The aim was to clarify how smoking and nicotine affects wound healing processes and to establish if smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy reverse the mechanisms involved.......: The aim was to clarify how smoking and nicotine affects wound healing processes and to establish if smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy reverse the mechanisms involved....

  20. Bioactive Antimicrobial Peptides as Therapeutics for Corneal Wounds and Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Gina L.; Kasus-Jacobi, Anne; Pereira, H. Anne

    2017-01-01

    Significance: More than 2 million eye injuries and infections occur each year in the United States that leave civilians and military members with reduced or complete vision loss due to the lack of effective therapeutics. Severe ocular injuries and infections occur in varied settings including the home, workplace, and battlefields. In this review, we discuss the potential of developing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as therapeutics for the treatment of corneal wounds and infections for which the current treatment options are inadequate. Recent Advances: Standard-of-care employs the use of fluorescein dye for the diagnosis of ocular defects and is followed by the use of antibiotics and/or steroids to treat the infection and reduce inflammation. Recent advances for treating corneal wounds include the development of amniotic membrane therapies, wound chambers, and drug-loaded hydrogels. In this review, we will discuss an innovative approach using AMPs with the dual effect of promoting corneal wound healing and clearing infections. Critical Issues: An important aspect of treating ocular injuries is that treatments need to be effective and administered expeditiously. This is especially important for injuries that occur during combat and in individuals who demonstrate delayed wound healing. To overcome gaps in current treatment modalities, bioactive peptides based on naturally occurring cationic antimicrobial proteins are being investigated as new therapeutics. Future Directions: The development of new therapeutics that can treat ocular infections and promote corneal wound healing, including the healing of persistent corneal epithelial defects, would be of great clinical benefit. PMID:28616359

  1. Bioactive Antimicrobial Peptides as Therapeutics for Corneal Wounds and Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Gina L; Kasus-Jacobi, Anne; Pereira, H Anne

    2017-06-01

    Significance: More than 2 million eye injuries and infections occur each year in the United States that leave civilians and military members with reduced or complete vision loss due to the lack of effective therapeutics. Severe ocular injuries and infections occur in varied settings including the home, workplace, and battlefields. In this review, we discuss the potential of developing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as therapeutics for the treatment of corneal wounds and infections for which the current treatment options are inadequate. Recent Advances: Standard-of-care employs the use of fluorescein dye for the diagnosis of ocular defects and is followed by the use of antibiotics and/or steroids to treat the infection and reduce inflammation. Recent advances for treating corneal wounds include the development of amniotic membrane therapies, wound chambers, and drug-loaded hydrogels. In this review, we will discuss an innovative approach using AMPs with the dual effect of promoting corneal wound healing and clearing infections. Critical Issues: An important aspect of treating ocular injuries is that treatments need to be effective and administered expeditiously. This is especially important for injuries that occur during combat and in individuals who demonstrate delayed wound healing. To overcome gaps in current treatment modalities, bioactive peptides based on naturally occurring cationic antimicrobial proteins are being investigated as new therapeutics. Future Directions: The development of new therapeutics that can treat ocular infections and promote corneal wound healing, including the healing of persistent corneal epithelial defects, would be of great clinical benefit.

  2. Surgical wound infection in urology. Analysis of risk factors and associated microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Isa, M; Medina-Polo, J; Lara-Isla, A; Pérez-Cadavid, S; Arrébola-Pajares, A; Sopeña-Sutil, R; Benítez-Sala, R; Justo-Quintas, J; Gil-Moradillo, J; Passas-Martínez, J B; Tejido-Sánchez, A

    2017-03-01

    Open surgery continues to have a fundamental role in urology, and one of its main complications is surgical wound infection. Our objective was to analyse surgical wound infection in patients who underwent surgery in our Department of Urology and to assess the risk factors, microorganisms and resistances by type of surgery. This was a prospective observational study that included 940 patients: 370 abdominal/open lumbar surgeries and 570 genitoperineal surgeries. We analysed age, sex, comorbidities, stay and type of surgery, as well as the causal microorganisms and antibiotic resistances. For genitoperineal surgery, we found 15 cases (2.6%) of surgical wound infection associated with previous urinary catheterisation. Most of the isolated microorganisms corresponded to enterobacteriaceae, highlighting the resistance to beta-lactam. In abdominal/lumbar surgery, we found 41 cases (11.1%) of surgical wound infection. The incidence rate was 3.3% in prostate surgery; 9.8% in renal surgery; and 45.0% in cystectomy. Heart disease was associated with a higher incidence rate of surgical wound infection. The most common microorganisms were Enterococcus spp. (27.1%), E.coli (22.9%) and Staphylococcus aureus (14.6%). Enterococcus and beta-lactamase-producing E.coli are resistant to ampicillin in 37.5% and 41.7% of cases, respectively. We found a low incidence rate of surgical wound infection in genitoperineal surgery, compared with renal surgery and cystectomy. The presence of heart disease and carrying a previous urinary catheter are factors associated with surgical wound infection. Enterococcus and E.coli are the most common pathogens, with high rates of resistance. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Surgical wound infection: epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubin Robert H

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surgical wound infection remains a significant problem following an operation, although surveillance for such infections remains a challenge exacerbated by early discharge and outpatient surgery. The riskof such infections isdetermined by technical problems with the operation, particularly bleeding, the amount of devitalized tissue created, and the need for drains within the wound, as well as such metabolic factors as obesity and diabetes. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis can decrease the incidence of such infections further, but a technically perfect operation is even more important.

  4. Post-surgical wound management of pilonidal cysts with a haemoglobin spray: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafi, N; Engels, P

    2016-04-01

    Painful acute cysts in the natal cleft or lower back, known as pilonidal sinus disease, are a severe burden to many younger patients. Although surgical intervention is the preferred first line treatment, postsurgical wound healing disturbances are frequently reported due to infection or other complications. Different treatment options of pilonidal cysts have been discussed in the literature, however, no standardised guideline for the postsurgical wound treatment is available. After surgery, a common recommended treatment to patients is rinsing the wound with clean water and dressing with a sterile compress. We present a case series of seven patients with wounds healing by secondary intention after surgical intervention of a pilonidal cyst. The average age of the patients was 40 years old. Of the seven patients, three had developed a wound healing disturbance, one wound had started to develop a fibrin coating and three were in a good condition. The applied wound care regimens comprised appropriate mechanical or autolytic debridement, rinsing with an antimicrobial solution, haemoglobin application, and primary and secondary dressings. In all seven cases a complete wound closure was achieved within an average of 76 days with six out of seven wounds achieving wound closure within 23-98 days. Aesthetic appearance was deemed excellent in five out of seven cases excellent and acceptable in one. Treatment of one case with a sustained healing disturbance did result in wound closure but with a poor aesthetic outcome and an extensive cicatrisation of the new tissue. Based on these results we recommend that to avoid healing disturbances of wounds healing by secondary intention after surgical pilonidal cyst intervention, an adequate wound care regime comprising appropriate wound debridement, rinsing, topically applied haemoglobin and adequate wound dressing is recommendable as early as possible after surgery.

  5. Innate defense regulator peptide 1018 in wound healing and wound infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Steinstraesser

    Full Text Available Innate defense regulators (IDRs are synthetic immunomodulatory versions of natural host defense peptides (HDP. IDRs mediate protection against bacterial challenge in the absence of direct antimicrobial activity, representing a novel approach to anti-infective and anti-inflammatory therapy. Previously, we reported that IDR-1018 selectively induced chemokine responses and suppressed pro-inflammatory responses. As there has been an increasing appreciation for the ability of HDPs to modulate complex immune processes, including wound healing, we characterized the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 in vitro. Further, we investigated the efficacy of IDR-1018 in diabetic and non-diabetic wound healing models. In all experiments, IDR-1018 was compared to the human HDP LL-37 and HDP-derived wound healing peptide HB-107. IDR-1018 was significantly less cytotoxic in vitro as compared to either LL-37 or HB-107. Furthermore, administration of IDR-1018 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in fibroblast cellular respiration. In vivo, IDR-1018 demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing in S. aureus infected porcine and non-diabetic but not in diabetic murine wounds. However, no significant differences in bacterial colonization were observed. Our investigation demonstrates that in addition to previously reported immunomodulatory activities IDR-1018 promotes wound healing independent of direct antibacterial activity. Interestingly, these effects were not observed in diabetic wounds. It is anticipated that the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 can be attributed to modulation of host immune pathways that are suppressed in diabetic wounds and provide further evidence of the multiple immunomodulatory activities of IDR-1018.

  6. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis and wound infection following breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, R; Zucker, J R; Zaleznik, D F; Hopkins, C C; Dellinger, E P; Karchmer, A W; Bryan, C S; Burke, J F; Wikler, M A; Marino, S K

    1993-02-01

    The effectiveness of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis against wound infections following breast surgery was investigated by meta-analysis of published data from a randomized clinical trial and an observational data set, which included a total of 2587 surgical procedures, including excisional biopsy, lumpectomy, mastectomy, reduction mammoplasty and axillary node dissection. There were 98 wound infections (3.8%). Prophylaxis was used for 44% (1141) of these procedures, cephalosporins accounted for 986 (86%) of these courses of antibiotics. Prophylaxis prevented 38% of infections, after controlling for operation type, duration of surgery and participation in the randomized trial (Mantel-Haenszel Odds Ratio = 0.62, 95% confidence interval = 0.40-0.95, P = 0.03). There was no significant variation in efficacy according to operation type or duration. We conclude that antibiotic prophylaxis significantly reduces the risk of postoperative wound infection following these commonly performed breast procedures.

  7. Role of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy in Deep Sternal Wound Infection After Open Heart Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemalettin Aydın

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mediastinitis is a devastating complication in open heart surgery. The most common treatments after debridement are rewiring with antibiotic irrigation. Vacuum assisted closure therapy is a recently introduced technique that promotes the healing of difficult wounds, including post-sternotomy mediastinitis.Patients and Methods: Forty one patients with deep sternal wound infection were divided into two groups based on the treatment method used. Twenty two patients with post-cardio to my deep sternal wound infection were treated primarily by vacuum assisted closure method (group A and 19 patients with deep sternal wound infection who received closed mediastinal irrigation were treated with antibiotics (group B between January 2006 and January 2010.Results: The two groups were compared. Three patients died during treatment in group B. The median healing time was significantly shorter in group A (mean, 13.5 ± 3.2 days compared to 18 days (mean, 21.2 ± 16.4 days in group B (p< 0.001. Deep sternal wound infection showed no recurrences after the vacuum treatment, while 7 (24% patients in group B suffered recurrences. Hospital stay was significantly shorter in group A (median, 30.5 days; mean, 32.2 ± 11.3 days vs. median, 45 days; mean, 49.2 ± 19.3 days (p= 0.001.Conclusion: A significantly shorter healing time was confirmed with vacuum assisted closure. Hospital stay remained significantly shorter in group A (35 vs. 46 days.

  8. Early Post-Operative Wound Infection in Austin Moore ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Early post operative wound infection is usually seen within four weeks of orthopaedic operations 1.Use of foreign implants, operating on the elderly, the obese, diabetic or patients with other chronic diseases increase the risk further 2.This study reveals the incidence of early infection and associated factors ...

  9. [Postoperative wound infections. Pathophysiology, risk factors and preventive concepts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachenberg, T; Sentürk, M; Jannasch, O; Lippert, H

    2010-09-01

    Postoperative wound infections are the third most common type of nosocomial infection in German emergency hospitals after pneumonia and urinary infections. They are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, prolonged hospital stay and increased costs. The most important risk factors include the microbiological state of the skin surrounding the incision, delayed or premature prophylaxis with antibiotics, duration of surgery, emergency surgery, poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, malignant disease, smoking and advanced age. Anesthesiological measures to decrease the incidence of wound infections are maintaining normothermia, strict indications for allogenic blood transfusions and timely prophylaxis with antibiotics. Blood glucose concentrations should be kept in the range of 8.3-10 mmol/l (150-180 mg/dl) as lower values are associated with increased complications. Intraoperative and postoperative hyperoxia with 80% O(2) has not been shown to effectively decrease wound infections. The application of local anesthetics into the surgical wound in clinically relevant doses for postoperative analgesia does not impair wound healing.

  10. Application of VitaVallis dressing for infected wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirilova, N. V., E-mail: n.kirilova@vitavallis.com; Fomenko, A. N., E-mail: alserova@ispms.tsc.ru; Korovin, M. S., E-mail: msk@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, 2/4 Akademicheskii pr., Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    Today there is a growing demand for safe and efficient antimicrobial dressings for infected wound treatment. The antimicrobial sorption material for VitaVallis dressings was produced by one-stage oxidation of aluminum nanopowder in water in the presence of fibrous acetylcellulose matrix. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the material is made up of fibers of diameter 1.5–3.0 µm with adhered agglomerated alumina nanosheets. An antimicrobial study revealed a high inhibitory effect of VitaVallis against the growth of gram-negative (E.coli, P. aeruginosa) and gram-positive (S. aureus) strains. The antimicrobial activity of the dressing against microbial pathogens on the wound surface was demonstrated in in vivo experiments on male rats. The dressing was also tested on volunteer patients. The testing showed reduction of the wound healing period, accelerated cleaning of the infected wound and enhanced tissue regeneration in the wound. The results demonstrate that the VitaVallis dressing can be used for the treatment of deep infected wounds.

  11. The effect of differing ambient oxygen tensions on wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, T K; Linsey, M; Grislis, H; Sonne, M; Jawetz, E

    1975-01-01

    Wound infections were studied in rabbits using two standard inocula (approximately equal to 10-4 and approximately equal to 10-6) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa injected into subcutaneous wound dead space made by implantation of standard wire mesh cylinders. The inoculation was done on the fourth day after implantation of the cylinders in animals kept from the day of implantation in atmospheres of 12%, 21%, or 45% oxygen content. Samples of wound fluid (0.2 ml) were removed for quantitative culture just before inoculation and 3, 7, 14, and 21 days later. No positive cultures resulted from samples taken before inoculation. One uninoculated wound served as a control in each animal. None of these control wounds became infected. Culture counts were significantly highest in the anoxic group and lowest in the hyperoxic group. Established infections were significantly lowest in the hyperoxics and highest in the hypoxics. The percent of wounds showing a significant culture count showed a similar trend. The mechanisms of this effect is not known, but a possible mechanism lies in the relative inability of leucocytes to kill this bacterium under hypoxic conditions.

  12. Application of VitaVallis dressing for infected wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilova, N. V.; Fomenko, A. N.; Korovin, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    Today there is a growing demand for safe and efficient antimicrobial dressings for infected wound treatment. The antimicrobial sorption material for VitaVallis dressings was produced by one-stage oxidation of aluminum nanopowder in water in the presence of fibrous acetylcellulose matrix. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the material is made up of fibers of diameter 1.5-3.0 µm with adhered agglomerated alumina nanosheets. An antimicrobial study revealed a high inhibitory effect of VitaVallis against the growth of gram-negative (E.coli, P. aeruginosa) and gram-positive (S. aureus) strains. The antimicrobial activity of the dressing against microbial pathogens on the wound surface was demonstrated in in vivo experiments on male rats. The dressing was also tested on volunteer patients. The testing showed reduction of the wound healing period, accelerated cleaning of the infected wound and enhanced tissue regeneration in the wound. The results demonstrate that the VitaVallis dressing can be used for the treatment of deep infected wounds.

  13. Aquatically acquired Aeromonas hydrophila wound infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-09-15

    Sep 15, 1990 ... venous penicillin, amikacin and metronidazole pending the microbiological results of a pus swab of the wound taken on admission. While his pyrexia settled over the next 3 days, the local inflammation and cellulitis worsened, necessitating opera- tive debridement. At operation no abnormalities other than.

  14. The wound that nearly got away: a case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kool, B

    2000-01-01

    Chronic cavity wounds are not commonly seen in pediatrics, and little literature is available on their management. A pediatric patient with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDMS) who had a chronic cavity surgical wound with an enterocutaneous fistula presented a nursing challenge. The patient had complex medical and surgical problems that greatly influenced her ability to heal. Nursing management of the wounds had to be innovative and flexible to adapt to these challenges. Factors affecting the patient's wound healing included JDMS; decreased mobility; persistently low serum magnesium, zinc and albumin; malnutrition; infection; and prolonged glucocorticosteroid therapy. Nursing management of her complex wounds included the following strategies: absorption of excessive exudate, wound support, debridement, wound irrigation, wound bagging, healing by secondary intention, and control of hypergranulation.

  15. Wound conditioning by vacuum assisted closure (V.A.C.) in postoperative infections after dorsal spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, Marius; Trentz, Otmar; Heinzelmann, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The use of vacuum assisted closure (V.A.C.) therapy in postoperative infections after dorsal spinal surgery was studied retrospectively. Successful treatment was defined as a stable healed wound that showed no signs of acute or chronic infection. The treatment of the infected back wounds consisted of repeated debridement, irrigation and open wound treatment with temporary closure by V.A.C. The instrumentation was exchanged or removed if necessary. Fifteen patients with deep subfascial infections after posterior spinal surgery were treated. The implants were exchanged in seven cases, removed completely in five cases and left without changing in one case. In two cases spinal surgery consisted of laminectomy without instrumentation. In two cases only the wound defects were closed by muscle flap, the remaining ones were closed by delayed suturing. Antibiotic treatment was necessary in all cases. Follow up was possible in 14 patients. One patient showed a new infection after treatment. The study illustrates the usefulness of V.A.C. therapy as a new alternative management for wound conditioning of complex back wounds after deep subfascial infection. PMID:16835734

  16. SUCROSE IN INFECTED WOUNDS: A SCIENTIFIC BASIS AND SPECULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Oliver Rossi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Sucrose use in wound treatment is a common practice that seems to promote tissue healing and reduce microbial load. The objective here was thus to analyze the scientific evidence through an integrative review to determinate indications and contraindications for use of sucrose in the form of granulated, brown (unrefined muscovado sugar and/or refined sugar in infected wounds and thus assist the professional in clinical decision-making. Ten studies published in full articles were selected, from the period 2002 to 2012 and indexed in the PubMed, Cinahl, Lilacs and Cochrane databases. Considering the analysis of studies, mostly experimental in the animal model, sugar’s effectiveness in tissue repair was verified, as was positive modulation in the inflammatory response. To elucidate the mechanisms or action of sucrose in the wound, further clinical trials are recommended in order to standardize the concentration, volume and frequency of sucrose in changes of wound dressings.

  17. NOSOCOMIAL WOUND INFECTION AMONGST POST OPERATIVE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nosocomial infection constitutes a major public health problem worldwide. Increasing antibiotic resistance of pathogens associated with nosocomial infections also becomes a major therapeutic challenge for physicians. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify post operative bacterial infections in the patients developing ...

  18. Prophylaxis against wound infection following herniorrhaphy or breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, R; Zucker, J R; Zaleznik, D F; Hopkins, C C; Dellinger, E P; Karchmer, A W; Bryan, C S; Burke, J F; Wikler, M A; Marino, S K

    1992-09-01

    The effect of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis on definite wound infections was assessed for 3202 herniorrhaphies or selected breast surgery procedures. Patients were identified preoperatively and monitored for greater than or equal to 4 weeks. Thirty-four percent of patients (1077/3202) received prophylaxis at the discretion of the surgeon; 86 definite wound infections (2.7%) were identified. Prophylaxis recipients were at higher risk for infection, with a higher proportion of mastectomies, longer procedures, and other factors. Patients who received prophylaxis experienced 41% fewer definite wound infections (odds ratio [OR], 0.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35-0.99; P = .04) and 65% fewer definite wound infections requiring parenteral antibiotic therapy (OR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.15-0.88; P = .02) after adjustment for duration of surgery and type of procedure. Additional adjustment for age, body mass index, the presence of drains, diabetes, and exposure to corticosteroids did not change the magnitude of this effect meaningfully. The effect of prophylaxis was similar for all procedures studied. In the absence of formal guidelines, surgeons at these institutions administered prophylaxis preferentially to patients at highest risk.

  19. Incidence of Proteus species in wound infections and their sensitivity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... ofloxacin and gentamycin while all were resistant to tetracycline and erythromycin. Knowledge of the microbial flora of an environment and the sensitivity pattern are important tools in the management of wound infections especially those caused by Proteus species, and are also useful in formulating rational antibiotic ...

  20. Microbiology of post-operative wound infection in implant surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of fractures with implants and prosthesis has become the first line in the management of fractures in most trauma centres. Incidentally, this is associated with post-operative wound infection which is accompanied by significant morbidity, cost and mortality.

  1. Risk Factors For Wound Infections After Implant Surgery | Onche ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVE: Post-operative wound infection (POWI) rates for implant surgery are in the range of 0.08 to 13% in spite of the many advances in surgery in the past decades. It is therefore imperative that we develop a system of predicting the occurrence of POWI as a key to effective prevention. One approach is for each ...

  2. a profile of wound infections in national hospital abuja

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    AFRICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY SEPTEMBER 2013 ISBN 1595-689X VOL14 No.3 ..... Bakare RA. Pattern of Bacterial Pathogensin Burn Wound infection in Ibadan, Nigeria.Annal of Burns and Fire disasters 2004;vol XVII(1):12-15. 7. Mohammed A, AdeshinaGO, Ibrahim YKE.

  3. Surgical wound infection in clean-contaminated and contaminated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Surgical wound (site) infection is the commonest complication following laparotomy for clean-contaminated and contaminated abdominal operations. Good surgical technique and perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in clean-contaminated and contaminated abdominal operations contribute to the low rate of ...

  4. EARLY POST-OPERATIVE WOUND INFECTION IN ORTHOPAEDIC IMPLANT SURGERY AND ITS COMPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh; Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Bone infections after implant surgery leading to non union and implant failure is one of the most challenging Ortho paedic complications. This study is done to find out relation of type of pathogens causing postope rative infection with that of fracture nonunion, chronic osteomylities and implant failure. METHODOLOGY: This is a retrograde study of 20 cases, in which post operative wound infe ction occurred after implant surgery from ...

  5. Surgical Burn Wound Infections and Their Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posluszny, Joseph A.; Conrad, Peggie; Halerz, Marcia; Shankar, Ravi; Gamelli, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Typically, burn wound infections are classified by the organisms present in the wound within the first several days following injury or later, by routine surveillance cultures. With universal acceptance of early excision and grafting, classification of burn wound colonization in unexcised burn wounds is less relevant shifting clinical significance to open burn-related surgical wound infections (SWI). To better characterize SWIs and their clinical relevance, we identified the pathogens responsible for SWIs, their impact on rates of regrafting, and the relationship between SWI and nosocomial infection (NI) pathogens. Epidemiologic and clinical data for 71 adult patients with ≥20% TBSA burn were collected. Following excision and grafting, if a grafted site had clinical characteristics of infection, a wound culture swab was obtained and organism identified. Surveillance cultures were not obtained. SWI pathogen, anatomic location, post-burn day of occurrence and need for regrafting were compiled. A positive culture obtained from an isolated anatomic location at any time point after excision and grafting of that location was considered a distinct infection. Pathogens responsible for NIs (urinary tract infections, pneumonia, bloodstream and catheter-related bloodstream infections, pseudomembranous colitis and donor site infections) and their post-burn day were identified. The profiles of SWI pathogens and NI pathogens were then compared. Of the 71 patients included, 2 withdrew, 6 had no excision or grafting performed and 1 had incomplete data. Of the 62 remaining, 24 (39%) developed a SWI. In these 24 patients, 70 distinct infections were identified of which 46% required regrafting. Candida species (24%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (22%), Serratia marcescens (11%) and Staphylococcus aureus (11%) comprised the majority of pathogens. The development of a SWI with the need for regrafting increased overall length of stay, area of autograft, number of operative events and was

  6. Negative pressure therapy (vacuum for wound bed preparation among diabetic patients: case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Castro Ferreira

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Complications from diabetes mellitus affecting the lower limbs occur in 40 to 70% of such patients. Neuropathy is the main cause of ulceration and may be associated with vascular impairment. The wound evolves with necrosis and infection, and if not properly treated, amputation may be the end result. Surgical treatment is preferred in complex wounds without spontaneous healing. After debridement of the necrotic tissue, the wound bed needs to be prepared to receive a transplant of either a graft or a flap. Dressings can be used to prepare the wound bed, but this usually leads to longer duration of hospitalization. Negative pressure using a vacuum system has been proposed for speeding up the treatment. This paper had the objective of analyzing the effects of this therapy on wound bed preparation among diabetic patients. CASE SERIES: Eighty-four diabetic patients with wounds in their lower limbs were studied. A commercially available vacuum system was used for all patients after adequate debridement of necrotic tissues. For 65 patients, skin grafts completed the treatment and for the other 19, skin flaps were used. Wound bed preparation was achieved over an average time of 7.51 days for 65 patients and 10 days for 12 patients, and in only one case was not achieved. CONCLUSIONS: This experience suggests that negative pressure therapy may have an important role in wound bed preparation and as part of the treatment for wounds in the lower limbs of diabetic patients.

  7. Suction-irrigation drainage: an underestimated therapeutic option for surgical treatment of deep sternal wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschka, Heinz; Erler, Stefan; El-Ayoubi, Lemir; Vogel, Cordula; Vöhringer, Luise; Wimmer-Greinecker, Gerhard

    2013-07-01

    Deep sternal wound infections are significant and severe complications following cardiac surgery and substantially influence perioperative morbidity and mortality. We present the experience of our department using two different surgical treatments over a three-year period. Between January 2009 and December 2011, a total of 3274 cardiac procedures with complete median sternotomy were performed in our department. In 94 patients (3%), a deep sternal wound infection occurred, including sternal instability with consecutive surgical treatment. The patients either received wound debridement with sternum refixation and suction-irrigation drainage (SID; n = 72) or sternum refixation only (RF; n = 22) if there was sternal instability with limited signs of infection. SID was routinely installed for 7 days: the irrigation solution contained neomycin. In all cases, swabs were taken and analysed. The different methods were evaluated in respect of their clinical outcomes. The success rate-defined as single, uncomplicated procedure-of the SID treatment was 74%, compared with 59% of the isolated sternum refixation. Complications included continuous infection, recurrence of sternal instability and wound necrosis. Eighty-eight percent of the swabs in the SID group were positive, compared with 32% in the sternal refixation only group. The dominating pathogenic germs were coagulase-negative staphylococci and staphylococcus aureus. Mortality was 10% for the SID group and 5% for the RF group. Contrary to accepted opinion, the suction-irrigation drainage is an appropriate therapy for deep sternal wound infections. Nevertheless, deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery remain severe complications and are related to increased morbidity and mortality.

  8. Betadine irrigation and post-craniotomy wound infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kunal S.; Goldenberg, Brandon; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2014-01-01

    Object The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of betadine irrigation in preventing postoperative wound infection in cranial neurosurgical procedures. Methods A total of 473 consecutive cranial neurosurgical procedures, including craniotomies and burr hole procedures were retrospectively reviewed. Patients had either antibiotic irrigation or dilute betadine plus antibiotic irrigation prior to skin closure. Infection was determined by purulence noted on reoperation and confirmed with bacterial growth culture. One and three month postoperative infection rates were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-squared tests. Results This study included 404 patients. Betadine was used in 117 (29.0%). At 1 month after surgery, there was no difference in the rate of wound infection between the two groups (1.7% each). However, at 90 days, the betadine group had a 2.6% infection rate compared with 3.8% in the antibiotic group, indicating a 33% decrease in infection rates with the addition of betadine (p=.527). The small sample size of the study produced a low power and high beta error. Conclusions In this small preliminary study, betadine decreased postoperative infection rates compared with antibiotic prophylaxis alone at 90 days but not 30 days. This was not statistically significant, but a larger sample size would lower the beta error and decrease confounding bias associated with group heterogeneity. The potential for betadine, a cheap, low toxicity antimicrobial, to decrease infection rates and reoperations for infection warrants a larger multicenter trial. PMID:24529229

  9. Management of wound infection after lumbar arthrodesis maintaining the instrumentation

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    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determinate whether a surgical protocol with immediate extensive debridement, closed irrigation system and antibiotic therapy would be effective to achieve healing of deep wound infection without removing the instrumentation.METHODS: Prospective cohort study with 19 patients presenting degenerative spinal stenosis or degenerative spondylolisthesis, who developed infection after posterior lumbar arthrodesis. The diagnosis was confirmed by a microbial culture from subfascial lumbar fluid and/or blood. Patients were treated with a protocol of wound exploration, extensive flushing and debridement, placement of a closed irrigation system that was maintained for five days and intravenous antibiotics. The instrumentation system was not removed.RESULTS: Mean age was 59.31 (±13.17 years old and most patients were female (94.7%; 18/19. The mean period for the identification of the infection was 2 weeks and 57.9% underwent a single wound exploration. White blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein showed a significant decrease post-treatment when compared to pre-treatment values. A significant reduction of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein was also observed at the final evaluation. No laboratory test was useful to predict the need for more than one debridement.CONCLUSION: Patients with wound infection after instrumentation can be treated without removal of the instrumentation through wound exploration, extensive flushing, debridement of necrotic tissue, closed irrigation system during 5 days and proper antibiotic therapy. The blood tests were not useful to predict surgical re-interventions.

  10. Vacuum-assisted closure of necrotic and infected cranial wound with loss of dura mater: A technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Osama; Storey, Christopher M; Zhang, Shihao; Chelly, Marjorie R; Yeoh, Melvin S; Nanda, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Complex cranial wounds can be a problematic occurrence for surgeons. Vacuum-assisted closure devices have a wide variety of applications and have recently been used in neurosurgical cases involving complex cranial wounds. There is only one report regarding the use of a vacuum-assisted closure device with loss of dura mater. We report a complicated case of a necrotic cranial wound with loss of dura mater. A 68-year-old female underwent an evacuation of a subdural hematoma. Postoperatively, the patient developed a wound infection that required removal of the bone flap. The wound developed a wedge-shaped necrosis of the scalp with exposure of brain tissue due to loss of dura mater from previous surgeries. She underwent debridement and excision of the necrotic tissue with placement of a synthetic dural graft (Durepair®, Medtronic, Inc.) and placement of a wound vac. The patient underwent a latissismus dorsi muscle flap reconstruction that subsequently failed. After the wound vac was replaced, the synthetic dural graft was replaced with a fascia lata graft and an anterolateral thigh free flap reconstruction. We describe the technical nuances of this complicated case, how the obstacles were handled, and the literature that discusses the utility. We describe a case of a complex cranial wound and technical nuances on how to utilize a wound-vac with loss of dura mater.

  11. U.S. Combat-related Invasive Fungal Wound Infection (IFI) Epidemiology and Wound Microbiology: Afghanistan Theater 2009–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Anuradha; Shaikh, Faraz; Peterson, Philip; Bradley, William P; Blyth, Dana M; Lu, Dan Z; Bennett, Denise; Schnaubelt, Elizabeth; Johnson, Brian; Merritt, Teresa; Flores, Nicole; Hawthorne, Virginia; Wells, Justin; Carson, Leigh; Tribble, David R

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Culturing combat-related wounds often yields both fungi and bacteria. It is difficult to differentiate fungal contamination from infection, and objective criteria that identify patients at risk for IFI are needed. This study was designed to characterize IFI among US combat casualties in the Afghanistan Theater. Methods This retrospective study includes subjects with any labortory evidence of fungi (either histopathology or cultures). Wounds with ongoing necrosis and labortory evidence of infection were classified as IFI). Wounds with labortory evidence of fungal infection, but without ongoing necrosis were classified as either highly suspicious wounds based on objective clinical criteria (i.e., presence of systemic and local signs of infection and use of antifungals for ≥10 days) or non-IFI wounds if they failed to meet clinical criteria. Results Of 1932 subjects, 246 (12.7%) had labortory evidence of fungal infection. There were a total of 143 IFI wounds (n = 94), 157 non-IFI wounds (n = 96), and 113 high suspicion wounds (n = 56). IFI subjects had significantly higher injury severity scores (ISS median: 39.5 vs. 33), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores (7 vs. 2) and were more likely to require mechanical ventilation (66 vs. 28%). IFI patients also had higher ISS (93 vs. 84% with ISS >25) and SOFA scores (7 vs. 4) compared with the subjects with high suspicion wounds. IFI wounds often grew molds belonging to the order Mucorales compared with high suspicion (19 vs. 10%, P = 0.04) and non-IFI wounds (19 vs. 7%, P = 0.02). About half of the IF wounds grew fungi of the order Mucorales either isolated alone or in conjunction with other fungi, in comparison, 25% of the high suspicion wounds and 11% of the non-IFI wounds grew fungi of the order Mucorales. Three groups of fungi belonging to the order Mucorales, genus Aspergillus and Fusarium accounted for 83% of the IFI wounds and 74% of the high suspicion wounds

  12. Managing burn wounds with SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Farrah-Hani; Karim, Rahamah; Maat, Noor Hidayah

    2016-05-12

    Successful wound healing depends on various factors, including exudate control, prevention of microbial contaminants, and moisture balance. We report two cases of managing burn wounds with SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam dressing. In Case 1, a 2-year-old Asian girl presented with a delayed (11 days) wound on her right leg. She sustained a thermal injury from a hot iron that was left idle on the floor. Clinical inspection revealed an infected wound with overlying eschar that traversed her knee joint. As her parents refused surgical debridement under general anesthesia, hydrotherapy and wound dressing using SMARTPORE Technology Polyurethane foam were used. Despite the delay in presentation of this linear thermal pediatric burn injury that crossed the knee joint, the patient's response to treatment and its outcome were highly encouraging. She was cooperative and tolerated each dressing change without the need of supplemental analgesia. Her wound was healed by 24 days post-admission. In Case 2, a 25-year-old Asian man presented with a mixed thickness thermal flame burn on his left leg. On examination, the injury was a mix of deep and superficial partial thickness burn, comprising approximately 3% of his total body surface area. SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam was used on his wound; his response to the treatment was very encouraging as the dressing facilitated physiotherapy and mobility. The patient rated the pain during dressing change as 2 on a scale of 10 and his pain score remained the same in every subsequent change. His wound showed evidence of epithelialization by day 7 post-burn. There were no adverse events reported. Managing burn wounds with SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam resulted in reduced pain during dressing changes and the successful healing of partial and mixed thickness wounds. The use of SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam dressings showed encouraging results and requires further research as a desirable management option in

  13. Postoperative wound infections after a proctectomy—Patient experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Hassel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Poor perineal wound healing and infections after proctectomy surgery cause a significant proportion of physical and psychological morbidities, such as pain, leakage, and abscesses. In the long run, some of these symptoms will lead to extended periods of hospitalization. These kinds of postoperative complications are also associated with delays in possible chemotherapy treatment. The aim of this study was to describe patient experiences of perineal wound infections following proctectomy due to rectal cancer, and the importance of the communication with and the self-care support from the nurse for these patients. Five women and five men (61–87 years, median age 71 years were included and interviewed. A qualitative content analysis of the interviews was carried out and the following main categories emerged: “Managing postoperative complications,” “Being independent,” “Feeling safe,” and “Accepting the situation.” A perineal wound infection after a proctectomy is devastating for the individual patient. The limitations and changes to the patients’ lives turn into new daily routines, which force them to find new ways to live and to accept the situation. For many of them, the infections remained for several months and, sometimes, for years. The ability to lead an independent life is drastically reduced, but through continuity in care it is possible to create a feeling of safety. Information, communication, and self-care support are all important and valuable factors for recovery. Specialized care containing an action plan is therefore needed in clinical practice to reduce the number of perineal wound infections postoperatively and should be initiated when the patient is discharged from the ward and continue until recovery.

  14. Wound botulism: clinical and microbiological findings of an Italian case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureli, P; Fenicia, L; Ferrini, A M; Martini, M; Beccia, G

    1992-09-01

    A case of wound botulism in a 41-year old man is reported. The patient had accidently been wounded when he fell on an iron bar. Some days later he developed typical clinical manifestations of botulism. Wound botulism was confirmed by detection and quantification of type B botulinal toxin in the serum. Ventilatory supportive care was necessary and botulinal antitoxin was not given. The patient was hospitalized for 30 days and recovery was complete.

  15. [Incidence of infected surgical wound and prophylaxis with cefotaxime in cesarean section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemus Rocha, Roberto; García Gutiérrez, Laura Bertilda; Basavilvazo Rodríguez, María Antonia; Cruz Avelar, Agles; Peralta Pedrero, María Luisa; Hernández Valencia, Marcelino

    2005-10-01

    Surgical wound infection after cesarean section varies from 2.5 to 16.1%, thus the utilization of antibiotic prophylaxis has increased routinely and irrationally. Despite this, we can still see cases of infections. To determine if the antibiotic prophylaxis with cefotaxime is associated with the decreased incidence of wound infection in patients submitted to cesarean section without risk factors. This study was carried out as a randomized clinical trial in patients submitted to cesarean section. Two groups were formed: in the first group we administered cefotaxime and the other one did not receive prophylaxis. The follow-up lasted 30 days to evaluate clinical data of infection. We performed 3,300 cesarean in the studied period; 1,000 patients had the inclusion criteria to participate in the study. A surgical wound infection was observed in 31 (0.96%) patients without risk factors. In 14 of these patients we administered cefotaxime, and in 17 patients we did not use prophylaxis. The highest frequency of infection was observed in the group of 24 to 30 years old, with 16 patients (51.6%). The clinical data of infection were: dehiscence in 29 patients (93.5%), pus secretion in 23 (74.2%), and fever in only 3 (9.7%) of them. The hospital stay after the infection was of five days in 75% of the cases. When the use of cefotaxime as prophylaxis was analyzed in both groups we had an odds ratio of 0.82, which was not significant. The use of cefotaxime in patients operated of cesarean does not have great transcendence since it does not reduce the infection incidence. The use of antibiotics in an irrational way implies a high cost, since the majority of the post-operation infections are not complicated, involving exclusively the skin and cellular subcutaneous tissue. Then, the cases with risk factors should be analyzed carefully for the cefotaxime administration.

  16. Application of NCRP 156 Wound Models for the Analysis of Bioassay Data from Plutonium Wound Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Deepesh; Guilmette, Raymond A; Klumpp, John A; Bertelli, Luiz; Waters, Tom L

    2017-09-01

    The NCRP 156 wound model was heavily based on data from animal experiments. The authors of the report acknowledged this limitation and encouraged validation of the models using data from human wound exposures. The objective of this paper was to apply the NCRP 156 wound models to the bioassay data from four plutonium-contaminated wound cases reported in the literature. Because a wide variety of forms of plutonium can be expected at a nuclear facility, a combination of the wound models-rather than a single model-was used to successfully explain both the urinary excretion data and wound retention data in three cases. The data for the fourth case could not be explained by any combination of the default wound models. While this may possibly be attributed to the existence of a category of plutonium whose solubility and chemistry are different than those described by the NCRP 156 default categories, the differences may also be the result of differences in systemic biokinetics. The concept of using a combination of biokinetic models may be extended to inhalation exposures as well, where more than one form of radionuclide-particles of different solubility or different sizes-may exist in a workplace.

  17. Dermal Wound Transcriptomic Responses to Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa versus Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Rabbit Ear Wound Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-02

    Dermal wound transcriptomic responses to Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa versus Klebsiella pneumoniae in a rabbit ear wound model Kai P Leung Pt...with Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp.) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.o.) would indicate host responses associated with the worse healing of P.o. than Kp...responses to injection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa versus Klebsiella pneumoniae in a rabbit ear wound model 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  18. Therapy of acute and delayed spinal infections after spinal surgery treated with negative pressure wound therapy in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Zwolak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the treatment of infected primary or delayed spine wounds after spinal surgery using negative pressure wound therapy. In our institution (University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland nine patients (three women and six men; mean age 68.6, range 43- 87 years were treated in the period between January to December 2011 for non-healing spinal wounds. The treatment consisted of repeated debridements, irrigation and temporary closure with negative pressure wound therapy system. Three patients were admitted with a spinal epidural abscess; two with osteoporotic lumbar fracture; two with pathologic vertebra fracture and spinal cord compression, and two with vertebra fracture after trauma. All nine patients have been treated with antibiotic therapy. In one case the hardware has been removed, in three patients laminectomy was performed without instrumentation, in five patients there was no need to remove the hardware. The average hospital stay was 16.6 days (range 11-30. The average follow-up was 3.8, range 0.5-14 months. The average number of negative pressure wound therapy procedures was three, with the range 1-11. Our retrospective study focuses on the clinical problems faced by the spinal surgeon, clinical outcomes after spinal surgery followed by wound infection, and negative pressure wound therapy. Moreover, we would like to emphasize the importance for the patients and their relatives to be fully informed about the increased complications of surgery and about the limitations of treatment of these wounds with negative pressure wound therapy.

  19. Komodo dragon-inspired synthetic peptide DRGN-1 promotes wound-healing of a mixed-biofilm infected wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M C Chung, Ezra; Dean, Scott N; Propst, Crystal N; Bishop, Barney M; van Hoek, Monique L

    2017-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are multifunctional molecules that have a high potential as therapeutic agents. We have identified a histone H1-derived peptide from the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis), called VK25. Using this peptide as inspiration, we designed a synthetic peptide called DRGN-1. We evaluated the antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity of both peptides against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. DRGN-1, more than VK25, exhibited potent antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity, and permeabilized bacterial membranes. Wound healing was significantly enhanced by DRGN-1 in both uninfected and mixed biofilm (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus)-infected murine wounds. In a scratch wound closure assay used to elucidate the wound healing mechanism, the peptide promoted the migration of HEKa keratinocyte cells, which was inhibited by mitomycin C (proliferation inhibitor) and AG1478 (epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor). DRGN-1 also activated the EGFR-STAT1/3 pathway. Thus, DRGN-1 is a candidate for use as a topical wound treatment. Wound infections are a major concern; made increasingly complicated by the emerging, rapid spread of bacterial resistance. The novel synthetic peptide DRGN-1 (inspired by a peptide identified from Komodo dragon) exhibits pathogen-directed and host-directed activities in promoting the clearance and healing of polymicrobial (Pseudomonas aeruginosa & Staphylococcus aureus) biofilm infected wounds. The effectiveness of this peptide cannot be attributed solely to its ability to act upon the bacteria and disrupt the biofilm, but also reflects the peptide's ability to promsote keratinocyte migration. When applied in a murine model, infected wounds treated with DRGN-1 healed significantly faster than did untreated wounds, or wounds treated with other peptides. The host-directed mechanism of action was determined to be via the EGFR-STAT1/3 pathway. The pathogen-directed mechanism of action was

  20. A 5 - year surveillance of wound infections at a rural tertiary hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Wound infections are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Objectives: To determine the prevalence, aetiology and susceptibility profile of bacterial agents of wound infection among in- and- out patients at a rural tertiary hospital in Nigeria, within a 5 year period. Methods: Wound swabs collected ...

  1. Prevalence of Post-operative Wound Infections in Rural area of Latur District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Rajput

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical site infection (SSI continues to be a major source of morbidity following operative procedures. The modern surgeon cannot escape the responsibility of dealing with infections, having the knowledge for the appropriate use of aseptic and antiseptic technique, proper use of prophylactic and therapeutic antibiotics, and adequate monitoring and support with novel surgical and pharmacologic as well as nonpharmacologic aids. Objective: To study the most common organisms encountered in postoperative wound infections and to find out the most effective Antibiotics in case of Post Operative Wound Infections. Methodology: It is an Observational study done on 50 operated cases of post operative wounds. Results: Most common microorganism encountered in present series was E. coli in 13 cases (26%. Least common micro organism was Proteus (2%. E. coli was also encountered in mixed culture with Kleibsiella, Pseudomonas and Citrobacter. Most effective antibiotic in present series was Imipenem. Other common effective antibiotics were Amikacin, Netillin, Piperacillin, Tetracycline and Gentamycin. Least effective antibiotics were Penicillin, Cefotaxime, Cefuroxime and Cefoxitin. Conclusion: E. coli was the most common organism cultured. Imipenem and Amikacin were the most effective antibiotics.

  2. Major bleeding during negative pressure wound/V.A.C.® - therapy for postsurgical deep sternal wound infection - a critical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segers Patrique

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Negative-pressure wound therapy, commercially known as vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.® therapy, has become one of the most popular (and efficacious interim (prior to flap reconstruction or definite methods of managing deep sternal wound infection. Complications such as profuse bleeding, which may occur during negative-pressure therapy but not necessarily due to it, are often attributed to a single factor and reported as such. However, despite the wealth of clinical experience internationally available, information regarding certain simple considerations is still lacking. Garnering information on all the factors that could possibly influence the outcome has become more difficult due to a (fortunate decrease in the incidence of deep sternal wound infection. If more insight is to be gained from fewer clinical cases, then various potentially confounding factors should be fully disclosed before complications can be attributed to the technique itself or improvements to negative-pressure wound therapy for deep sternal wound infection can be accepted as evidence-based and the guidelines for its use adapted. The authors propose the adoption of a simple checklist in such cases.

  3. Major bleeding during negative pressure wound/VAC (R) - therapy for postsurgical deep sternal wound infection - a critical appraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wingerden, J.J.; Segers, P.; Jekel, L.

    2011-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy, commercially known as vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.(R)) therapy, has become one of the most popular (and efficacious) interim (prior to flap reconstruction) or definite methods of managing deep sternal wound infection. Complications such as profuse bleeding, which

  4. Wound infections secondary to snakebite in central Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Wen Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are very few microbiological data on wound infections following snakebites. The objective of this study was to investigate the treatment of secondary infection following snakebites in central Taiwan. Microbiological data and antibiotic sensitivity of wound cultures were retrospectively analyzed from December 2005 to October 2007 in a medical center in central Taiwan. A total of 121 snakebite patients participated in the study. Forty-nine (40.5% subjects were bitten by cobra (Naja atra; 34 of them had secondary infection, and 24 of them (70.6% needed surgical intervention. Cobra bites caused more severe bacterial infection than other snakebites. Morganella morganii was the most common pathogen, followed by Aeromonas hydrophila and Enterococcus. Gram-negative bacteria were susceptible to amikacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, cefotaxime, cefepime, ciprofloxacin, and piperacillin/tazobactam. Enterococcus were susceptible to ampicillin, gentamicin, penicillin and vancomycin. It is reasonable to choose piperacillin/tazobactam, quinolone, second- or third-generation cephalosporin for empirical therapy following snakebite. Surgical intervention should be considered for invasive soft tissue infections.

  5. Impact of Mucorales and Other Invasive Molds on Clinical Outcomes of Polymicrobial Traumatic Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkentien, Tyler E; Shaikh, Faraz; Weintrob, Amy C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Murray, Clinton K; Lloyd, Bradley A; Ganesan, Anuradha; Aggarwal, Deepak; Carson, M Leigh; Tribble, David R

    2015-07-01

    Combat trauma wounds with invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are often polymicrobial with fungal and bacterial growth, but the impact of the wound microbiology on clinical outcomes is uncertain. Our objectives were to compare the microbiological features between IFI and non-IFI wounds and evaluate whether clinical outcomes differed among IFI wounds based upon mold type. Data from U.S. military personnel injured in Afghanistan with IFI wounds were examined. Controls were matched by the pattern/severity of injury, including blood transfusion requirements. Wound closure timing was compared between IFI and non-IFI control wounds (with/without bacterial infections). IFI wound closure was also assessed according to mold species isolation. Eighty-two IFI wounds and 136 non-IFI wounds (63 with skin and soft tissue infections [SSTIs] and 73 without) were examined. The time to wound closure was longer for the IFI wounds (median, 16 days) than for the non-IFI controls with/without SSTIs (medians, 12 and 9 days, respectively; P molds (predominant types: order Mucorales, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium spp.) significantly prolonged the time to wound closure. Overall, the times to wound closure were longest for the IFI wounds with Mucorales growth. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Wound healing and infection in nail matrix phenolization wounds. Does topical medication make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovison, R; Keenan, A M

    2001-05-01

    After nail matrix ablation using phenolization, a medicated wound dressing (10% povidone iodine), an amorphous hydrogel dressing (Intrasite Gel), and a control dressing (paraffin gauze) were evaluated. Forty-two participants, randomly divided into three dressing groups, were evaluated. Healing time did not differ between the 10% povidone iodine (33 days), amorphous hydrogel (33 days), and the control dressing (34 days). For all groups, the clinical infection rate was lower than in previous studies, and there was no clinical difference between groups (one infection in the povidone iodine and control groups; none in the amorphous hydrogel group). However, in the amorphous hydrogel group, other complications, such as hypergranulation, were more likely. This investigation indicated that medicated or hydrogel dressings did not enhance the rate of healing or decrease infection rates.

  7. Antiseptic wick: does it reduce the incidence of wound infection following appendectomy?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGreal, Gerald T

    2012-02-03

    The role of prophylactic antibiotics is well established for contaminated wounds, but the use of antiseptic wound wicks is controversial. The aim of this work was to study the potential use of wound wicks to reduce the rate of infection following appendectomy. This prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at a university hospital in the department of surgery. The subjects were patients undergoing appendectomy for definite acute appendicitis. They were randomized by computer to primary subcuticular wound closure or use of an antiseptic wound wick. For the latter, ribbon gauze soaked in povidone-iodine was placed between interrupted nylon skin sutures. Wicks were soaked daily and removed on the fourth postoperative day. All patients received antibiotic prophylaxis. They were reviewed while in hospital and 4 weeks following operation for evidence of wound infection. The main outcome measures were wound infection, wound discomfort, and cosmetic result. The overall wound infection rate was 8.6% (15\\/174). In patients with wound wicks it was 11.6% (10\\/86) compared to 5.6% (5\\/88) in those whose wounds were closed by subcuticular sutures (p = NS). We concluded that the use of wound wicks was not associated with decreased wound infection rates following appendectomy. Subcuticular closure is therefore appropriate in view of its greater convenience and safety.

  8. The surgical team as a source of postoperative wound infections caused by Streptococcus pyogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, H J; Svendsen, R N; Nielsen, S V

    1997-01-01

    Postoperative wound infection, caused by Streptococcus pyogenes transmitted during the operation from members of the surgical team, is a rare but serious complication of surgery. This study describes three cases, which could be traced to an orthopaedic surgeon, who carried the epidemic strain...... to be the most efficient treatment for anal and vaginal carriage. Relapse of carriage could occur several months after apparent eradication, and was often associated with a carrier in the family household....

  9. Collagen-Nanoparticles Composites for Wound Healing and Infection Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mădălina Elena Grigore

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the world is facing a serious crisis represented by the rapid emergence of resistant bacteria, which jeopardizes the efficacy of antibiotics. This crisis has been attributed to the overuse and misuse of antibiotics, as well as the cessation of new drug production by the pharmaceutical industry. Therefore, bacterial strains with resistance to multiple antibiotic classes have appeared, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review aims to provide an updated summary of the current approach to the treatment of infections due to resistant microorganisms, with a focus on the application of the antimicrobial effects of inorganic nanoparticles in combination with collagen to promote wound healing. In addition, the paper describes the current approaches in the field of functionalized collagen hydrogels capable of wound healing and inhibiting microbial biofilm production.

  10. In diabetic foot infections antibiotics are to treat infection, not to heal wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mohamed; Uçkay, Ilker; Lipsky, Benjamin A

    2015-04-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers, especially when they become infected, are a leading cause of morbidity and may lead to severe consequences, such as amputation. Optimal treatment of these diabetic foot problems usually requires a multidisciplinary approach, typically including wound debridement, pressure off-loading, glycemic control, surgical interventions and occasionally other adjunctive measures. Antibiotic therapy is required for most clinically infected wounds, but not for uninfected ulcers. Unfortunately, clinicians often prescribe antibiotics when they are not indicated, and even when indicated the regimen is frequently broader spectrum than needed and given for longer than necessary. Many agents are available for intravenous, oral or topical therapy, but no single antibiotic or combination is optimal. Overuse of antibiotics has negative effects for the patient, the health care system and society. Unnecessary antibiotic therapy further promotes the problem of antibiotic resistance. The rationale for prescribing topical, oral or parenteral antibiotics for patients with a diabetic foot wound is to treat clinically evident infection. Available published evidence suggests that there is no reason to prescribe antibiotic therapy for an uninfected foot wound as either prophylaxis against infection or in the hope that it will hasten healing of the wound.

  11. Platelet-Rich Plasma Combined With Skin Substitute for Chronic Wound Healing: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Rebecca L.; Hunt, Allen R.; Collins, John C.; DeSmet, Marie; Barnes, Sara

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Contemporary management of chronic wounds focuses on improving natural healing and individualization of treatment. Incorporating multiple therapies has become increasingly common. Of interest are autologous growth factors, which are especially important in chronic wound healing and may contribute to tissue formation and epithelialization. Autologous platelet concentrate or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a concentration of at least five autologous growth factors and has been shown to accelerate wound healing and may have infection-fighting properties. Chronic wound healing is complicated by both decreased growth factor availability and infection, making PRP use valuable in these types of wounds. In this report, the use of PRP therapy alone and in combination with a bioengineered skin substitute as a platelet-rich tissue graft in a chronic, non-healing wound is detailed. Over 27 weeks, the patient received multiple therapies in attempts to heal a severe decubitus ulcer of the sacrum. The introduction of PRP therapy at Week 14 led to a 26% reduction in wound depth over 4 weeks. At Week 19, PRP therapy was combined with a powdered skin substitute to create a platelet-rich tissue graft. The combination brought dramatic results, eliminating wound tunneling and reducing the wound dimensions from 6.2 cm long × 6.7 cm wide × 2.7 cm deep to 5.0 cm long × 6.0 cm wide × 1.4 cm deep. The promising observations from this case report indicate that further study on the combining of PRP therapy and skin substitutes is necessary. PMID:17089514

  12. Risk analysis and outcome of mediastinal wound and deep mediastinal wound infections with specific emphasis to omental transposition

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Parissis, Haralabos

    2011-09-19

    Abstract Background To report our experience, with Deep mediastinal wound infections (DMWI). Emphasis was given to the management of deep infections with omental flaps Methods From February 2000 to October 2007, out of 3896 cardiac surgery patients (prospective data collection) 120 pts (3.02%) developed sternal wound infections. There were 104 males & 16 females; (73.7%) CABG, (13.5%) Valves & (9.32%) CABG and Valve. Results Superficial sternal wound infection detected in 68 patients (1.75%) and fifty-two patients (1.34%) developed DMWI. The incremental risk factors for development of DMWI were: Diabetes (OR = 3.62, CI = 1.2-10.98), Pre Op Creatinine > 200 μmol\\/l (OR = 3.33, CI = 1.14-9.7) and Prolong ventilation (OR = 4.16, CI = 1.73-9.98). Overall mortality for the DMWI was 9.3% and the specific mortality of the omental flap group was 8.3%. 19% of the "DMWI group", developed complications: hematoma 6%, partial flap loss 3.0%, wound dehiscence 5.3%. Mean Hospital Stay: 59 ± 21.5 days. Conclusion Post cardiac surgery sternal wound complications remain challenging. The role of multidisciplinary approach is fundamental, as is the importance of an aggressive early wound exploration especially for deep sternal infections.

  13. Infections in traumatic wounds sutured at a Norwegian Accident and Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudvik, Christina; Tariq, Hina; Bernardshaw, Soosaipillai V; Steen, Knut

    2015-05-05

    Different countries have different wound treatment traditions. We have studied the incidence and different factors related to infections in wound injuries sutured at a Norwegian A&E department. In this prospective study, clinical data were collected on 102 patients with traumatic wound injuries treated with sutures at Bergen Accident and Emergency Department between 30 February 2011 and 30 June 2011. Any wound infections in 97 of these patients at the time of suture removal were assessed and classified according to severity on a scale of grade 0 to grade 4. There were no serious infections, but mild clinical wound infections occurred in 15% of patients: 11% grade 1 and 4% grade 2 infections. Patients less than 65 years old had often cut themselves with knives (n = 33, 37%), and on their hands (n = 60, 67%), Men were most frequently injured at work (n = 38, 54%) and women most often at home (n = 18, 56%). No statistically significant correlation was found between the incidence of wound infections and the length of the wound, the time elapsed before suturing, the wound's location on the body, contamination or underlying chronic diseases. Two of the three self-inflictors in our study had clinical wound infections. Half of the bacteriological samples from ten of 15 wounds with clinical infection had plentiful growth of Staphylococcus aureus. One patient received oral antibiotic treatment for wound infection, and two had local antibiotic treatment. Mild clinical infections were found in almost one of six wounds sutured at a Norwegian A&E department. More studies are necessary to provide basic data to enable targeted improvements in wound treatment in the primary healthcare service.

  14. Triclosan-coated sutures do not reduce leg wound infections after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Bjørn Edvard; Tønnessen, Theis; Woldbaek, Per Reidar

    2012-09-01

    Leg wound infection is a common complication after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Suture contamination has been suggested as a mechanism of surgical site infections. Vicryl Plus(®) is a polyglacitin suture coated with the antiseptic chemical substance Triclosan, which has been shown to inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus in vitro. The first aim of the present study was to compare Vicryl Plus with conventional Vicryl(®) sutures with regard to leg wound infections following CABG. The second aim was to examine patient- and operative characteristics, which are assumed to predict leg wound infections. After statistical calculations a priori, 328 CABG patients were prospectively randomized to leg wound closure with Vicryl Plus (164 patients) or conventional Vicryl sutures (164 patients). Incidences of leg wound infection and predictors of infection related to patient- and operative characteristics were examined. The incidence of leg wound infections was 10.4% (17/163) in the Vicryl group, and 10.0% (16/160) in the Vicryl Plus group (P = 1.00). Patients with leg wound infections had increased body mass index and prolonged extracorporeal circulation and aortic clamping time compared with patients without infections. In the present study, we report for the first time that Vicryl Plus did not reduce the incidence of leg wound infections in patients undergoing CABG. Obesity and prolonged time of extracorporeal circulation were both associated with the increased risk of infections. Currently, the clinical role and indication for the use of Vicryl Plus have yet to be defined.

  15. Wound-Healing Peptides for Treatment of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Other Infected Skin Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gomes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available As the incidence of diabetes continues to increase in the western world, the prevalence of chronic wounds related to this condition continues to be a major focus of wound care research. Additionally, over 50% of chronic wounds exhibit signs and symptoms that are consistent with localized bacterial biofilms underlying severe infections that contribute to tissue destruction, delayed wound-healing and other serious complications. Most current biomedical approaches for advanced wound care aim at providing antimicrobial protection to the open wound together with a matrix scaffold (often collagen-based to boost reestablishment of the skin tissue. Therefore, the present review is focused on the efforts that have been made over the past years to find peptides possessing wound-healing properties, towards the development of new and effective wound care treatments for diabetic foot ulcers and other skin and soft tissue infections.

  16. Mono- and combined antimicrobial agents efficiency in experimental wound infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Ігорівна Філімонова

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern problems of antibiotic therapy are shown by wide range of side effects, both on organism and microbiological levels: the spread of allergies, toxic for organ systems reactions, dysbiosis development, and resistant pathogens formation and dissemination. Therefore the necessity of search for new effective drugs with significant antimicrobial activity applied for the wounds treatment arises. Development of combined remedies on the background of different origin antimicrobial agents’ derivatives is one of the fight directions against infectious diseases in the skin pathology. Recently among the existing antimicrobial agents one should focus on antiseptic drugs, due to degenerative and dysfunctional effect on microbial cell.Aim of research. The comparison of mono- and combined antimicrobial agents chemotherapeutic efficiency in the treatment of localized purulent infection under experimental conditions.Metods. The study of chemotherapeutic efficiency was carried out on the model of localized purulent Staphylococcus infection on albino mice weighting 14 – 16 g. S.aureus ATCC 25923 strains were used as infectious agents. The contamination was performed subcutaneously to the right side of mice’s skin after depilation. The animals were randomly divided into 4 groups: the 1st group – infected mice without treatment (control; the 2nd group – infected mice treated with a ciprofloxacin; the 3rd group – infected mice treated with a Ciprofloxacin and Decamethoxin combination; the 4th group – infected mice treated with a combined drug on the base of mutual prodrugs (Hexamethylenetetramine and Phenyl salicylate.Results. The efficiency of mono- and combined antimicrobial agents under experimental Staphylococcus wound infection conditions was studied. It was found that localized purulent staph center was formed more slowly in comparison with control and mono preparation use (2nd group of animals. The average index of skin lesions in comparison

  17. Nurse-managed wound clinic. A case study in success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumbley, D R; Ice, R C; Cassidy, R

    1999-01-01

    The wound Care Clinic at Naval Hospital Charleston is a nurse-managed ambulatory clinic that has demonstrated the successful application of nursing case management in caring for patients with chronic and complex wounds. Nursing case management is an outcomes-based system of assessment, planning, provision of nursing services, coordination of interdisciplinary efforts, education, and referral. Nursing case management has been shown, in the literature and at Naval Hospital Charleston, to be an extension of role of professional nursing practice and results in decreased costs, improved quality of care, faster wound healing times, decreased complications, and greater coordination of care between specialty disciplines. These positive results are illustrated in several case studies. Nursing case management has many implications for the successful implementation of any healthcare delivery system where decreased costs and improved quality of care are valued, and it has special benefit in the complex management of chronically ill patients.

  18. Antibiotic prophylaxis adequacy in knee arthroplasty and surgical wound infection: Prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del-Moral-Luque, J A; Checa-García, A; López-Hualda, Á; Villar-Del-Campo, M C; Martínez-Martín, J; Moreno-Coronas, F J; Montejo-Sancho, J; Rodríguez-Caravaca, G

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is the most suitable tool for preventing surgical wound infection. This study evaluated adequacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery for knee arthroplasty and its effect on surgical site infection. Prospective cohort study. We assessed the degree of adequacy of antibiotic prophylaxis, the causes of non-adequacy, and the effect of non-adequacy on surgical site infection. Incidence of surgical site infection was studied after a maximum incubation period of a year. To assess the effect of prophylaxis non-adequacy on surgical site infection we used the relative risk adjusted with the aid of a logistic regression model. The study covered a total of 1749 patients. Antibiotic prophylaxis was indicated in all patients and administered in 99.8% of cases, with an overall protocol adequacy of 77.6%. The principal cause of non-compliance was the duration of prescription of the antibiotics (46.5%). Cumulative incidence of surgical site infection was 1.43%. No relationship was found between prophylaxis adequacy and surgical infection (RR=1.15; 95% CI: .31-2.99) (P>.05). Surveillance and infection control programs enable risk factors of infection and improvement measures to be assessed. Monitoring infection rates enables us to reduce their incidence. Adequacy of antibiotic prophylaxis was high but could be improved. We did not find a relationship between prophylaxis adequacy and surgical site infection rate. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Avascular Necrosis of Acetabulum: The Hidden Culprit of Resistant Deep Wound Infection and Failed Fixation of Fracture Acetabulum ? A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    K, Kandhari V; M, Desai M; S, Bava S; N, Wade R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Chances of avascular necrosis of acetabulum are rare as it enjoys a rich blood supply. But cases of post - traumatic avascular necrosis of acetabulum following fracture of posterior column have been well documented. Importance of identifying and suspecting the avascular necrosis of acetabulum is essential in cases of failed fixation of fracture acetabulum, previously operated using extensile approach to acetabulum; either extended anterior ilio - femoral or tri - radiate approac...

  20. Penile lesion from gunshot wound: a 43-case experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavalcanti Andre G.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the main aspects of diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of 43 patients with gunshot wounds to the penis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The location of the lesion, the presence of associated lesions, the performance of complementary exams, surgical treatment, postoperative complications and long term follow-up of 43 patients with penile lesions from gunshot wounds were retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS: Of 43 cases assessed, 41 were submitted to surgical exploration (95.3% and 2 were submitted to conservative treatment (4.7%. We found penile lesions involving the corpus cavernosum in 37 cases; the remaining 4 patients presented no lesions involving the corpus cavernosum, urethra or testicles but did in the superficial structures. Ten cases presented an association with testicular lesions and 14 cases association with anterior urethral lesions. CONCLUSION: Penile lesions from gunshot wounds should be treated with immediate surgical intervention. In exceptional situations featuring superficial lesions only conservative treatment may be applied.

  1. Severe complications after negative pressure wound therapy in burned wounds: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren H

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Haitao Ren,1 Yuan Li21Department of Burns and Wound Center, the Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Ultrasound, Women's Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: We present two typical cases of severe complications (sepsis and hemorrhage after negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT in burned patients. Necrotic tissues in some deep burn wounds are difficult to judge correctly and remove thoroughly. An electrically burned blood vessel looks “intact” but can easily break. Necrotic tissue or injured blood vessels when using NPWT are dangerous, both for causing sepsis and hemorrhage. This is the first article that reports the severe complications of NPWT in burned patients. It is imperative to heed indications and avoid contraindications. Proper preparation of wound beds, close observation, and sufficient irrigation are also crucial to avoid these severe complications, and there is an urgent need to substitute the central vacuum system with the low-pressure system.Keywords: negative pressure wound therapy, complication, burn sepsis, bleeding, drainage

  2. Prevention of surgical wound infection in obese women undergoing cesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, Nana; Vinter, Christina Anne; Kruse, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Obese women undergoing caesarean section are at increased risk of surgical wound infection, which may lead to reduced quality of life, and increased health care cost. The aim is to evaluate the effect of incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy applied prophylactically in obese women under......: The study is on-going. We expect to find a 50% reduction of wound infection when using iNPWT compared to standard dressings in this high-risk subpopulation....

  3. Treatment in an outpatient setting for a patient with an infected, surgical wound with hypergranulation tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Nicole M; Shultz, Terry; Mizner, Ryan L; Gersh, Meryl

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a multifaceted approach to wound care in an outpatient setting for a patient with an infected, nonhealing surgical wound with hypergranulation tissue following fasciotomy for acute compartment syndrome. A 44-year-old male underwent an anterior and lateral lower extremity compartment fasciotomy and developed a persistent right anterolateral lower leg wound. Thirty-six days after fasciotomy he came to the authors' clinic after 2 failed skin grafts with an infected wound covered in hypergranulation tissue. Treatment included sharp debridement, saline irrigation, patient education, and dressing changes during 9 treatment sessions. The patient's total wound surface area decreased from 5.2 cm x 17.3 cm to 4 cm x 15 cm with increased epithelialization from approximately 40% to 85% after 29 days of treatment. This article demonstrates the positive effect of a multifaceted approach for facilitation of wound healing in a lower extremity wound following fasciotomy.

  4. Biofilm Production in Carbapenem Resistant Isolates from Chronic Wound Infections

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    Swarna SR

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are communities of microorganisms covered with extracellular polymeric substances. Such biofilm phenotype makes the microorganism resistant to antibiotics and plays a role in wound chronicity. This results in prolonged hospital stays in ICU, greater cost, and increased mortality. Methods: Pus swabs (59 were collected from a tertiary care hospital near Chennai were processed and identified using standard procedure followed by antibiotic susceptibility testing and identification of carbapenem resistance by Modified Hodge test as per CLSI guidelines. The biofilm formation was tested using plastic microtiter plate method. Results: Out of 59 pus swabs, 51 yielded growth with 69 isolates and 8 yielded no growth. Among the 69 isolates, 51 were GNB and 18 were GPC. Biofilm detection was noted in 84.31% (43/51 GNB isolates with 0.1% crystal violet whereas 100% (51/51 showed biofilm positive with 0.1% safranin. About 74.50% (38/51 isolates of GNB were carbapenem resistant by screening with disk diffusion method. Only 24% (6/25 of GNB isolates among Enterobacteriaceae were positive by Modified Hodge test method. Conclusion: The result shows the association of biofilm production among carbapenem resistant isolates obtained from chronic wound infections.

  5. Antimicrobial Activity of Artemisia absinthium Against Surgical Wounds Infected by Staphylococcus aureus in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslemi, Hamid Reza; Hoseinzadeh, Hesamoddin; Badouei, Mahdi Askari; Kafshdouzan, Khatereh; Fard, Ramin Mazaheri Nezhad

    2012-12-01

    The wound infection is one of the frequent complications in patients undergoing surgical operations. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of surgical wounds. Artemisia absinthium has been shown to bear strong antimicrobial activity, especially against Gram-positive pathogens. This study was designed to investigate the antimicrobial effects of A. absinthium against surgical wounds infected by S. aureus in a rat model. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into two equal groups of treated and control rats. A circular incision was created on the dorsal inter-scapular region of each rat. After skin wounding, rats were inoculated locally with 1 × 10(4) CFU of S. aureus at sites of skin wounds. The extract was applied topically twice a day throughout the experiment. Animals of the control group were left untreated. Results have revealed that topical application of A. absinthium extract on the infected wound sites produced significant antibacterial activity against S. aureus.

  6. Electromagnetic radiation influence on clinical course of experimental wound infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pronina Е.А.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The article gives close attention to the study of electromagnetic radiation influence (EMR at the frequency of molecular spectrum absorption and radiation (MSAR of nitric oxide (150 GHz and atmospheric oxygen (129 GHz on the clinical course of experimental wound infection caused by antibiotic-sensitive and antibiotic-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The panoramic spectrometric measuring complex, developed in Saratov Scientific Research Institute of Measuring Equipment was used while carrying out the research. Electromagnetic vibrations of extremely high frequencies were stimulated in this complex imitating the atmospheric oxygen and nitric oxide absorption and radiation molecular spectrum structure. The experiments proved the fact that exposure to radiation at the frequency of molecular spectrum absorption and radiation (MSAR of nitric oxide and atmospheric oxygen had positive impact on the course of traumatic process

  7. Local medicamentous treatment of wound infection in patients with diabetic foot syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugaeva I.O.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the parameters and comparison of wound healing in patients with diabetic foot syndrome using modern dressings and traditional scheme of local treatment of chronic wounds. Materials and methods: Clinical part of the work has been based on the results of a comprehensive investigation of the parameters of wound healing in 154 diabetic foot patients. Results: Optimum results are obtained by treatment of wound infection in patients with neuropathic diabetic foot shape using highly technological dressings. Conclusion: The modern interactive dressings may actively interfere to all phases of wound healing in patients with purulent-necrotic complications of diabetes mellitus

  8. Randomized clinical trial of intestinal ostomy takedown comparing pursestring wound closure vs conventional closure to eliminate the risk of wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Mauries, Daniel; Rodriguez-Díaz, José Luis; Salgado-Nesme, Noel; González, Quintín H; Vergara-Fernández, Omar

    2013-02-01

    The use of temporary stomas has been demonstrated to reduce septic complications, especially in high-risk anastomosis; therefore, it is necessary to reduce the number of complications secondary to ostomy takedowns, namely wound infection, anastomotic leaks, and intestinal obstruction. To compare the rates of superficial wound infection and patient satisfaction after pursestring closure of ostomy wound vs conventional linear closure. Patients undergoing colostomy or ileostomy closure between January 2010 and February 2011 were randomly assigned to linear closure (n = 30) or pursestring closure (n = 31) of their ostomy wound. Wound infection within 30 days of surgery was defined as the presence of purulent discharge, pain, erythema, warmth, or positive culture for bacteria. Patient satisfaction, healing time, difficulty managing the wound, and limitation of activities were analyzed with the Likert questionnaire. The infection rate for the control group was 36.6% (n = 11) vs 0% in the pursestring closure group (p ostomy wound closure (shorter healing time and improved patient satisfaction).

  9. [Teicoplanin in the prevention of wound infections in major ambulatory surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazzi, C; Licheri, S; Sias, F; Secci, L; Daniele, G M

    1994-01-01

    Wound infection is a frequent complication and is related to various parameters: type of surgery, patient's age, nutritional status, associated diseases, length of surgery and hospital stay, use of prosthesis and drainage and finally surgeon's ability. The frequency of wound infection is reported between 1.5%-5.1% after "clean surgery" and the greatest source of microbial contamination is due to GRAM positive cocci either aerobic or anaerobic. The Authors present their experience of ultra short-term prophylaxis with Teicoplanin in 375 patients undergoing major ambulatory surgery. Median age was 49 years (15-87 ys); patients over 65 years were 22%. Hernias of the abdominal wall and varicose veins represent the diseases most commonly operated on. In 30% of the cases the patients selected for major ambulatory surgery were in II and III classes according to the standards of the American Society of Anaesthesiologists (A.S.A.). The ultra short-term prophylaxis with Teicoplanin was administered as follows: 400 mg, i.v., thirty minutes pre-operatively. The operations were performed under local or loco-regional anaesthesia. The choice of Teicoplanin was based on the strong bactericidal activity on GRAM positive cocci, including the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, and on the long activity of the drug. The results were considered according to the American College of Surgeons scheme: no wound infection was observed and excellent local and general drug's tolerance were noticed. Ultra short-term prophylaxis in ambulatory surgery was chosen for the following reasons: large use of prosthesis, major risk of sepsis in older patients and at last for a badly accepted infective complications in outpatient surgery.

  10. Superficially, longer, intermittent ozone theraphy in the treatment of the chronic, infected wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białoszewski, Dariusz; Kowalewski, Michał

    2003-10-30

    Background. Ozone therapy - i.e. the treatment of patients by a mixture of oxygen and ozone - has been used for many years as a method ancillary to basic treatment, especially in those cases in which traditional treatment methods do not give satisfactory results, e.g. skin loss in non-healing wounds, ulcers, pressure sores, fistulae, etc. Material and methods. In the Department of Phisiotherapy of the Medical Faculty and the Department of the Orthopedics and Traumatology of the Locomotor System at the Medical University of Warsaw in the period from January 2001 until November 2002, 23 patients with heavy,chronic, antibiotic resistants septic complications after trauma, surgical procedures and secundary skin infetions were treated with ozone. The ozone therapy was administered using an authorial technique of superficially, longer, intermittent ozone application. Results. In the wounds of the all experienced patients the inhibition of septic processes and wound healing was much faster than normal. Conclusions. Our data confirm the advantages wich result from the technique of superficially, longer, intermittent ozone theraphy in combined treatment for septic complications in the soft tissue, especially in the locomotor system. These technique makes posttraumatic infections and promotes quicker healing of post-surgical and post-traumal complications - chronic septic infections. This method also lowers the cost of antibiotic therapy and is sometimes the only available auxiliary technique to support surgical procedures.

  11. Tilapia Piscidin 4 (TP4 Stimulates Cell Proliferation and Wound Closure in MRSA-Infected Wounds in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang-Ning Huang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are endogenous antibiotics that directly affect microorganisms, and also have a variety of receptor-mediated functions. One such AMP, Tilapia piscidin 4 (TP4, was isolated from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus; TP4 has antibacterial effects and regulates the innate immune system. The aim of the present study was to characterize the role of TP4 in the regulation of wound closure in mice and proliferation of a keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT and fibroblast cell line (Hs-68. In vitro, TP4 stimulated cell proliferation and activated collagen I, collagen III, and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF gene expression in Hs-68 cells, which induces keratin production by HaCaT cells. This effect was detectable at TP4 concentrations of 6.25 µg/mL in both cell lines. In vivo, TP4 was found to be highly effective at combating peritonitis and wound infection caused by MRSA in mouse models, without inducing adverse behavioral effects or liver or kidney toxicity. Taken together, our results indicate that TP4 enhances the survival rate of mice infected with the bacterial pathogen MRSA through both antimicrobial and wound closure activities mediated by epidermal growth factor (EGF, transforming growth factor (TGF, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. The peptide is likely involved in antibacterial processes and regulation of tissue homeostasis in infected wounds in mice. Overall, these results suggest that TP4 may be suitable for development as a novel topical agent for wound dressing.

  12. Reduction in Surgical Wound Infection Rates Associated with Reporting Data to Surgeons

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    GD Taylor

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that wound infection (surgical site infection [ ssi ] rates fall when surgeons are provided with data on their performance. Since 1987, the authors have been performing concurrent surveillance of surgical patients and confidentially reporting surgeon-specific ssi rates to individual surgeons and their clinical directors, and providing surgeons with the mean rates of their peers. The program has been gradually refined and expanded. Data are now collected on wound infection risk and report risk adjusted rates compared with the mean for hospitals in the United States National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (nnis data bank. Since inception through to December 1993, ssi rates have fallen 68% in clean contaminated general surgery cases (relative risk [rr] 0.36, 95% ci 0.2 to 0.6, P=0.0001, 64% in clean plastic surgery cases (rr 0.35, 95% ci 0.06 to 1.8, 72% in caesarean section cases (rr 0.23, 95% ci 0.03 to 1.96 and 42% in clean cardiovascular surgery cases (rr 0.59, 95% ci 0.34 to 1.0. In clean orthopedic surgery the ssi rate remained stable from 1987 through 1992. In 1993 a marked increase was experienced. Reasons for this are being explored. Overall there was a 32% decrease in ssi rate between the index year and 1993 or, in percentage terms, 2.8% to 1.9% (rr 0.65, 95% ci 0.51 to 0.86, P=0.002. ssi surveillance should become standard in Canadian hospitals interested in improving the quality of surgical care and reducing the clinical impact and cost associated with nosocomial infection.

  13. A Study of Post-Caesarean Section Wound Infections in a Regional Referral Hospital, Oman

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    Hansa Dhar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of surgical site infections (SSI in patients undergoing a Caesarean section (CS and to identify risk factors, common bacterial pathogens and antibiotic sensitivity. SSI significantly affect the patient’s quality of life by increasing morbidity and extending hospital stays. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted in Nizwa Hospital, Oman, to determine the incidence of post-Caesarean (PCS SSI from 2001 to 2012. This was followed by a case-control study of 211 PCS cases with SSI. Controls (220 were randomly selected cases, at the same hospital in the same time period, who had undergone CS without any SSI. Data was collected on CS type, risk factors, demographic profile, type of organism, drug sensitivity and date of infection. Results: The total number of PCS wound infections was 211 (2.66%. There was a four-fold higher incidence of premature rupture of the membranes (37, 17.53% and a three-fold higher incidence of diabetes (32, 15.16% in the PCS cases compared with controls. The most common organisms responsible for SSI were Staphylococcus aureus (66, 31.27% and the Gram-negative Escherichia coli group (40, 18.95%. The most sensitive antibiotics were aminoglycoside and cephalosporin. Polymicrobial infections were noted in 42 (19.90%, while 47 (22.27% yielded no growth. A high incidence of associated risk factors like obesity, hypertension, anaemia and wound haematoma was noted. Conclusion: Measures are recommended to reduce the incidence of SSI, including the implementation of infection prevention practices and the administration of antibiotic prophylaxis with rigorous surgical techniques.

  14. Rapid enzyme analysis as a diagnostic tool for wound infection: Comparison between clinical judgment, microbiological analysis, and enzyme analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arkes, Miriam; Haalboom, Marieke; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Heinzle, Andrea; Sigi, Eva; Guebitz, Georg; Beuk, Roland

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, diagnosis of wound infection is based on the classical clinical signs of infection. When infection is suspected, wounds are often swabbed for microbiological culturing. These methods are not accurate (clinical judgment in chronic wounds) or provide results after several days

  15. Use of wireless microcurrent stimulation for the treatment of diabetes-related wounds: 2 case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhinara, Adisaputra; Poulas, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Wireless microcurrent stimulation (WMCS) is a new method in wound healing that may have advantages compared with conventional electrical stimulation (ES) devices. Although ES has been widely known as an effective method to promote the wound-healing process in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, to the authors' knowledge, there are still no data about the ability of WMCS to match the desired effect. In this article, the authors report the results of 2 cases of diabetes-related wounds (1 acute and 1 chronic) that have been treated successfully using WMCS. Neither patient reported discomfort during treatment, and the risk of infection was minimized because there was no direct contact from the device during the treatment course.

  16. Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall of a Chronically Infected Postoperative Wound with a Rectus Abdominis Myofascial Splitting Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kyu Bae

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIf a chronically infected abdominal wound develops, complications such as peritonitis and an abdominal wall defect could occur. This could prolong the patient's hospital stay and increase the possibility of re-operation or another infection as well. For this reason, a solution for infection control is necessary. In this study, surgery using a rectus abdominis muscle myofascial splitting flap was performed on an abdominal wall defect.MethodsFrom 2009 to 2012, 5 patients who underwent surgery due to ovarian rupture, cesarean section, or uterine myoma were chosen. In each case, during the first week after operation, the wound showed signs of infection. Surgery was chosen because the wounds did not resolve with dressing. Debridement was performed along the previous operation wound and dissection of the skin was performed to separate the skin and subcutaneous tissue from the attenuated rectus muscle and Scarpa's fascial layers. Once the anterior rectus sheath and muscle were adequately mobilized, the fascia and muscle flap were advanced medially so that the skin defect could be covered for reconstruction.ResultsUpon 3-week follow-up after a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap operation, no major complication occurred. In addition, all of the patients showed satisfaction in terms of function and esthetics at 3 to 6 months post-surgery.ConclusionsUsing a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap has many esthetic and functional benefits over previous methods of abdominal defect treatment, and notably, it enabled infection control by reconstruction using muscle.

  17. Wound infections following open reduction and internal fixation of calcaneal fractures with an extended lateral approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Manouk; Schepers, Tim; Beerekamp, M Suzan H; Luitse, Jan S K; Goslings, J Carel; Schep, Niels W L

    2014-04-01

    Post-operative wound infections (PWI) following calcaneal fracture surgery can lead to prolonged hospital stay and additional treatment with antibiotics, surgical debridement or implant removal. Our aim was to determine the incidence of superficial and deep PWI and to identify risk factors (RF). This study is a retrospective case series. All consecutive patients from 2000 to 2010 with a closed unilateral calcaneal fracture treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) by an extended lateral approach were included. Patient, fracture, trauma and peri-operative characteristics were collected, including RF such as smoking, diabetes mellitus, time to operation, pre-operative in- or outpatient management and wound closure technique. The primary end point was a PWI as defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A total of 191 patients were included of which 47 patients (24.6%) had a PWI; 21 (11.0%) and 26 (13.6%) patients had a superficial and deep wound infection, respectively. American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification higher than ASA 1 was associated with an increased risk. Placement of a closed suction drain at the end of surgery was associated with less PWI (35% vs 15%, p = 0.002). In this study, none of the previously reported RF were associated with an increased risk for PWI. ORIF of displaced calcaneal fractures is associated with a high rate of PWI of 25%. Factors that were associated with an increased risk were ASA classification other than 1 and absence of a closed suction drain placement. A closed suction drain may be a protective measure to avoid wound complications.

  18. [Efficacy of photodynamic antimicrobial therapy for wound flora and wound healing of pressure sore with pathogen infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaoliang; Huang, Sufang; Zhu, Tao; Sun, Xuesheng; Zou, Yong; Wang, Yingzhen

    2014-08-19

    To explore the efficacy of photodynamic antimicrobial therapy in the treatment of pressure sore with pathogen infection. A total of 42 pressure sore patients with pathogen infection were divided randomly into experimental and control groups (n = 21 each). Fufanghuangbai liquid was used for external application with control group. In the experimental group, wound was treated with Fufanghuangbai liquid wet dressing and irradiated by semiconductor laser 30 min late. The distance from semiconductor laser probe to wound site was 10-15 cm, 20 min twice daily, continuous exposure to 7 days for 1 course. The results of bacterial culture and epidermal growth factor (EGF) expression of wound granulation tissue were observed before and after treatment. And the changes of healing rate of pressure sore were measured at post-treatment in each group. The positive rates of bacterial culture, rates of change around wound inflammation, healing rate of days 7 and 14, the high expression of EGF on healing wound granulation tissue was 9.75%, (32.2% ± 5.8%), (89.1% ± 5.6%), (12.4% ± 2.9%), (34.7% ± 3.6%), 14/21 in the treatment group versus 51.2%, (17.8% ± 2.0%), (57.3% ± 2.6%), (5.1% ± 1.1%), (10.5% ± 2.4%), 2/21 in the control group respectively. The inter-group differences were statistically significant (P Photodynamic antimicrobial therapy is an effective method for pressure sore with pathogen infection. Wound healing is promoted through an up-regulation of EGF.

  19. Cervical spondylodiscitis with epidural abscess after knife stab wounds to the neck: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, Anna; von der Hoeh, Nicolas H; Gulow, Jens; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard

    2015-08-01

    Cervical spondylodiscitis is usually caused by pyogenic infections, associated with retropharyngeal abscesses, or due to the swallowing of foreign bodies. No cases of cervical spondylodiscitis caused by a penetrating neck injury have been published in the literature. We describe a case of cervical spondylodiscitis after multiple knife stab wounds to the lateral soft tissue of the neck. Case report and review of the literature. A 54-year-old patient was brought to our clinic with destructive spondylodiscitis C3/4 with paravertebral and epidural abscesses. He had been involved in a fight and had suffered multiple stab wounds to his neck with a knife 1 month prior. The initial CT scan had revealed one deeper wound canal behind the sternocleidomastoid muscle on the left side without any injury to the vessels. The wound was cleaned and an antibiotic therapy with cefuroxime was given for 1 week. After an uneventful and complete healing of the wound the patient developed severe neck pain. Inflammatory laboratory parameters were elevated, and a MRI of the neck revealed a distinct spondylodiscitis C3/4 with paravertebral and epidural abscess formations. Surgery was performed and included debridement, abscess drainage, decompression of the spinal canal, fusion of the C3/4 segment using an autologous iliac crest bone graft and a plate osteosynthesis. A course of calculated antibiotic therapy was administered for 8 weeks. Normal laboratory parameters and no radiological signs of an ongoing inflammatory process were observed during follow-up examinations. The C3/4 segment was consolidated. Stab wound injuries to the neck not only bear the risk of injuries to the nerves, vessels and organs of the neck but also increase the risk of developing secondary spondylodiscitis. Specifically, cervical spondylodiscitis can result in distinct neurological symptoms, and surgical intervention should be performed in a timely manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Rapid enzyme analysis as a diagnostic tool for wound infection: Comparison between clinical judgment, microbiological analysis, and enzyme analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokhuis-Arkes, Miriam H E; Haalboom, Marieke; van der Palen, Job; Heinzle, Andrea; Sigl, Eva; Guebitz, Georg; Beuk, Roland

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, diagnosis of wound infection is based on the classical clinical signs of infection. When infection is suspected, wounds are often swabbed for microbiological culturing. These methods are not accurate (clinical judgment in chronic wounds) or provide results after several days (wound swab). Therefore, there is an urgent need for an easy-to-use diagnostic tool for fast detection of wound infection, especially in chronic wounds. This study determined the diagnostic properties of the enzymes myeloperoxidase, human neutrophil elastase (HNE), lysozyme and cathepsin-G in detecting wound infection when compared to wound swabs. Both chronic and acute wounds of 81 patients were assessed through clinical judgment, enzyme analysis and wound swab. Three promising enzyme models for detecting wound infection were identified. A positive test was defined as: at least one enzyme positive after 30 minutes (model 1), lysozyme and HNE positive after 30 minutes (model 2), myeloperoxidase positive after 5 minutes, and HNE or lysozyme positive after 30 minutes (model 3). All models were significant (p≤0.001). There was no correlation between clinical judgment and wound swab, indicating the need for novel diagnostic systems. Enzyme analysis is fast, easy to use and superior to clinical judgment when compared to wound swabs. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  1. A study of wound infections in two health institutions in Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The microbiological analysis of wound infection in 102 patients was undertaken in the outpatient departments of the University Teaching Hospital and the Health Centre in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The location and type of wound was considered and identification of bacterial isolates was determined by standard microbiological ...

  2. Negative pressure wound therapy with Bio-Dome dressing technology in the treatment of complex wounds: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, H L; Spinazzola, J; Green, A; Rifkah, M; Faretta, M; Youshaw, D; Weaver, A; Zaki, P

    2014-04-01

    The treatment of complex wounds is difficult and not always effective. Various treatment options are used with varying degrees of success. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a cost-efficient and effective way to help treat these wounds. The use of a vacuum device applies the negative pressure to the site of the wound and promotes waste removal and increases circulation and tissue formation. While various NPWT systems are currently on the market, we utilised the ConvaTec Engenex® system with Bio-DomeTM technology; however, our case study is not intended to advocate the specific use of this system, but instead focuses on the use of NPWT as a viable option for wound healing. Each of the following case study patients presented with difficult-to-heal wounds that failed traditional therapeutic approaches. Through the use of NPWT, our patients saw major wound size reductions. Each patient exhibited at least a 94% reduction in wound area, wound volume or both.

  3. Intralesional epidermal growth factor for diabetic foot wounds: the first cases in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulent M. Ertugrul

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intralesional recombinant epidermal growth factor (EGF was produced in the Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (CIGB, Cuba, in 1988 and licensed in 2006. Because it may accelerate wound healing, it is a potential new treatment option in patients with a diabetic foot wound (whether infected or not as an adjunct to standard treatment (i.e. debridement, antibiotics. We conducted the initial evaluation of EGF for diabetic foot wounds in Turkey. Methods: We enrolled 17 patients who were hospitalized in various medical centers for a foot ulcer and/or infection and for whom below the knee amputation was suggested to all except one. All patients received 75 μg intralesional EGF three times per week on alternate days. Results: The appearance of new granulation tissue on the wound site (≥75% was observed in 13 patients (76%, and complete wound closure was observed in 3 patients (18%, yielding a ‘complete recovery’ rate of 94%. The most common side effects were tremor (n=10, 59% and nausea (n=6, 35%. In only one case,a serious side effect requiring cessation of EGF treatment was noted. That patient experienced severe hypotension at the 16th application session, and treatment was discontinued. At baseline, a total of 21 causative bacteria were isolated from 15 patients, whereascultures were sterile in two patients. The most frequently isolated species was Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusion: Thus, this preliminary study suggests that EGF seems to be a potential adjunctive treatment option in patients with limb-threatening diabetic foot wounds.

  4. The pH of wound fluid in diabetic foot ulcers -- the way forward in detecting clinical infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, Carla; Lagan, Katie M; McDowell, David A

    2014-05-01

    Infections within diabetic foot ulcers are often hard to detect and extremely difficult to treat. The normal signs and symptoms of infection including purulence, erythema, pain, tenderness, warmth and induration are frequently absent in such wounds necessitating exploration of other ways of rapidly and accurately detecting infection. This study considers diabetic wound fluid pH as a possible alternative means of monitoring infection status. CINAHL, Ovid SP and MEDLINE were searched for papers in English published between January 2004 to May 2014. Key search terms included wound fluid, exudate, wound, ulcer, diabetes, pH, healing, infection, bacteria. This paper considers the potential benefits of augmenting and supporting current clinical practice in the early determination of wound healing trajectory and infection status, by monitoring wound fluid pH. The evidence collected highlights the need for further research and suggests the potential of wound fluid analysis as a possible surrogate marker for detecting infection in diabetic foot ulcers.

  5. Methods for identifying surgical wound infection after discharge from hospital: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Peter J

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wound infections are a common complication of surgery that add significantly to the morbidity of patients and costs of treatment. The global trend towards reducing length of hospital stay post-surgery and the increase in day case surgery means that surgical site infections (SSI will increasingly occur after hospital discharge. Surveillance of SSIs is important because rates of SSI are viewed as a measure of hospital performance, however accurate detection of SSIs post-hospital discharge is not straightforward. Methods We conducted a systematic review of methods of post discharge surveillance for surgical wound infection and undertook a national audit of methods of post-discharge surveillance for surgical site infection currently used within United Kingdom NHS Trusts. Results Seven reports of six comparative studies which examined the validity of post-discharge surveillance methods were located; these involved different comparisons and some had methodological limitations, making it difficult to identify an optimal method. Several studies evaluated automated screening of electronic records and found this to be a useful strategy for the identification of SSIs that occurred post discharge. The audit identified a wide range of relevant post-discharge surveillance programmes in England, Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; however, these programmes used varying approaches for which there is little supporting evidence of validity and/or reliability. Conclusion In order to establish robust methods of surveillance for those surgical site infections that occur post discharge, there is a need to develop a method of case ascertainment that is valid and reliable post discharge. Existing research has not identified a valid and reliable method. A standardised definition of wound infection (e.g. that of the Centres for Disease Control should be used as a basis for developing a feasible, valid and reliable approach to defining post

  6. Surgical Site Infection Rate Drops to 0% Using a Vacuum-Assisted Closure in Contaminated/Dirty Infected Laparotomy Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Balderas, Gerardo; Ruiz-Velasco-Santacruz, Alejandro; Díaz-Elizondo, José Antonio; Gómez-Navarro, Juan Antonio; Flores-Villalba, Eduardo

    2017-05-01

    Wound site infections increase costs, hospital stay, morbidity, and mortality. Techniques used for wounds management after laparotomy are primary, delayed primary, and vacuum-assisted closures. The objective of this study is to compare infection rates between those techniques in contaminated and dirty/infected wounds. Eighty-one laparotomized patients with Class III or IV surgical wounds were enrolled in a three-arm randomized prospective study. Patients were allocated to each group with the software Research Randomizer® (Urbaniak, G. C., & Plous, S., Version 4.0). Presence of infection was determined by a certified board physician according to Centers for Disease Control's Criteria for Defining a Surgical Site Infection. Twenty-seven patients received primary closure, 29 delayed primary closure, and 25 vacuum-assisted closure, with no exclusions for analysis. Surgical site infection was present in 10 (37%) patients treated with primary closure, 5 (17%) with primary delayed closure, and 0 (0%) patients receiving vacuum-assisted closure. Statistical significance was found between infection rates of the vacuum-assisted group and the other two groups. No significant difference was found between the primary and primary delayed closure groups. The infection rate in contaminated/dirty-infected laparotomy wounds decreases from 37 and 17 per cent with a primary and delayed primary closures, respectively, to 0 per cent with vacuum-assisted systems.

  7. Personalized Therapeutic Cocktail of Wild Environmental Phages Rescues Mice from Acinetobacter baumannii Wound Infections

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Regeimbal, James M; Jacobs, Anna C; Corey, Brendan W; Henry, Matthew S; Thompson, Mitchell G; Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Quinones, Javier; Hannah, Ryan M; Ghebremedhin, Meron; Crane, Nicole J; Zurawski, Daniel V; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa C; Biswas, Biswajit; Hall, Eric R

    2016-01-01

    .... In this work, we isolated and assembled a five-member cocktail of wild phages against Acinetobacter baumannii and demonstrated therapeutic efficacy in a mouse full-thickness dorsal infected wound model...

  8. Antiseptic compounds still active against bacterial strains isolated from surgical wound infections despite increasing antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, A; Cirioni, O; Greganti, G; Fineo, A; Ghiselli, R; Del Prete, M S; Mocchegiani, F; Fileni, B; Caselli, F; Petrelli, E; Saba, V; Scalise, G

    2002-07-01

    The in vitro activities of povidone iodine, potassium peroxymonosulfate, and dimethyldidecylammonium chloride were investigated against 379 nosocomial isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa responsible for surgical wound infections in patients operated on between July 1995 and June 2001. Overall, the isolates were inhibited by the antiseptics at concentrations below those used routinely. In spite of increasing resistance to the various antibiotics used to treat surgical wound infections, no significant variation in the susceptibility to antiseptics was demonstrated during this 6-year study.

  9. Treatment of multiple wounds of aplasia cutis congenita on the lower limb: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubino, M; Maggiulli, F; Dibartolo, R; Valdatta, L

    2016-12-02

    Aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) is a rare congenital disease, characterised by absence of skin, that can affect different parts of the body. ACC is more frequent on the scalp, but can involve limbs, with partial-or total-thickness loss of skin, with a functional impairment of the joint affected. There is no clear indication for surgical or conservative treatment, therefore, it would be helpful to find scientific support for the optimal treatment strategies. We present a case of a newborn female, with six wounds on the inferior limbs, treated with conservative therapy. To prevent infection and promote healing, the defects were kept moist and covered with non-adherent/antimicrobical dressings. Complete wound healing occurred in eight weeks. The duration of follow-up was three years. In this kind of ACC with superficial partial-thickness wounds of the lower limbs, conservative treatment was successful. The same conservative treatment can be proposed for larger or deeper wounds of lower limbs with no involvement of underlying structures, with delayed scar excision after the complete growth of the patient. ACC scar excision could require complex tissue rearrangement, tissue expansion, or skin grafting. In the evaluation for treatment of ACC of inferior limbs, even in cases of total-thickness skin loss, even on joints, the conservative approach could be considered as the first choice. None of the authors has a financial interest in any of the products, devices, or drugs mentioned in this manuscript.

  10. Kluyvera species soft tissue infection: case report and review.

    OpenAIRE

    Luttrell, R E; Rannick, G A; Soto-Hernandez, J L; Verghese, A

    1988-01-01

    A soft tissue infection caused by Kluyvera species in a previously healthy woman is described. Successful treatment required incision and drainage of the wound in addition to administration of antibiotics. Kluyvera species are indole positive, Voges-Proskauer negative members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Previous reports of infection due to Kluyvera species suggest that the organism is never more than an opportunistic pathogen; however, we report the first case of infection in a previous...

  11. Kluyvera species soft tissue infection: case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, R E; Rannick, G A; Soto-Hernandez, J L; Verghese, A

    1988-12-01

    A soft tissue infection caused by Kluyvera species in a previously healthy woman is described. Successful treatment required incision and drainage of the wound in addition to administration of antibiotics. Kluyvera species are indole positive, Voges-Proskauer negative members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Previous reports of infection due to Kluyvera species suggest that the organism is never more than an opportunistic pathogen; however, we report the first case of infection in a previously healthy host.

  12. Interactions of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in polymicrobial wound infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Pastar

    Full Text Available Understanding the pathology resulting from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa polymicrobial wound infections is of great importance due to their ubiquitous nature, increasing prevalence, growing resistance to antimicrobial agents, and ability to delay healing. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 is the leading cause of community-associated bacterial infections resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. We utilized a well-established porcine partial thickness wound healing model to study the synergistic effects of USA300 and P. aeruginosa on wound healing. Wound re-epithelialization was significantly delayed by mixed-species biofilms through suppression of keratinocyte growth factor 1. Pseudomonas showed an inhibitory effect on USA300 growth in vitro while both species co-existed in cutaneous wounds in vivo. Polymicrobial wound infection in the presence of P. aeruginosa resulted in induced expression of USA300 virulence factors Panton-Valentine leukocidin and α-hemolysin. These results provide evidence for the interaction of bacterial species within mixed-species biofilms in vivo and for the first time, the contribution of virulence factors to the severity of polymicrobial wound infections.

  13. Vacuum-assisted closure versus closure without vacuum assistance for preventing surgical site infections and infections of chronic wounds: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansarli, Giannoula S; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z; Stratoulias, Constantinos; Peppas, George; Kapaskelis, Anastasios; Falagas, Matthew E

    2014-08-01

    We sought to examine whether vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is associated with fewer surgical site infections (SSIs) or infections of chronic wounds than other management procedures for surgical wounds. The PubMed and Scopus databases were searched systematically. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the development of SSIs or infections of chronic wounds between patients treated with VAC for acute or chronic wounds and those whose wounds were treated without VAC were considered eligible for inclusion in the study. Eight RCTs met the inclusion criteria for the study. Four of the studies included chronic or diabetic lower extremity wounds and four included fractures. In three of four studies reporting on fractures, the wounds were not closed post-operatively, whereas in one study primary closure of the wound was performed. With regard to wounds left open after the stabilization of fractures, patients whose wounds were treated with VAC developed fewer SSIs than those whose wounds were treated without VAC ([367 patients (196 with VAC; 171 without VAC) relative risk [RR], 0.47; 95% CI 0.28-0.81]). On the contrary, no difference in the development of SSIs occurred among patients with chronic or diabetic lower-extremity wounds treated with VAC and those whose wounds were treated without VAC ([638 patients (320 with VAC; 318 without VAC) RR 1.67; 95% CI: 0.71-3.94]). The available evidence suggests that the development of infections in wounds treated with VAC depends on the type of wound being treated.

  14. Surgical wound infection rates in Spain: data summary, January 1997 through June 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Agero Pérez, Cristina; Robustillo Rodela, Ana; Pita López, María José; López Fresneña, Nieves; Monge Jodrá, Vicente

    2014-05-01

    The Indicadores Clínicos de Mejora Continua de la Calidad (INCLIMECC) program was established in Spain in 1997. INCLIMECC is a prospective system of health care-associated infection (HAI) surveillance that collects incidence data in surgical and intensive care unit patients. The protocol is based on the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) surveillance system, formerly known as the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) system, and uses standard infection definitions from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Each hospital takes part voluntarily and selects the units and surgical procedures to be surveyed. This report is a summary of the data collected between January 1997 and June 2012. A total of 370,015 patients were included, and the overall incidence of surgical wound infection (SWI) was 4.51%. SWI rates are provided by NHSN operating procedure category and NNIS risk index category. More than 27% of the patients received inadequate antibiotic prophylaxis, the main reason being unsuitable duration (57.05% of cases). Today, the INCLIMECC network includes 64 Spanish hospitals. We believe that an HAI surveillance system with trained personnel external to the surveyed unit is a key component not only in infection control and prevention, but also in a quality improvement system. Copyright © 2014. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  15. Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae uses proteasome inhibitor syringolin A to colonize from wound infection sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johana C Misas-Villamil

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of plants by bacterial leaf pathogens at wound sites is common in nature. Plants defend wound sites to prevent pathogen invasion, but several pathogens can overcome spatial restriction and enter leaf tissues. The molecular mechanisms used by pathogens to suppress containment at wound infection sites are poorly understood. Here, we studied Pseudomonas syringae strains causing brown spot on bean and blossom blight on pear. These strains exist as epiphytes that can cause disease upon wounding caused by hail, sand storms and frost. We demonstrate that these strains overcome spatial restriction at wound sites by producing syringolin A (SylA, a small molecule proteasome inhibitor. Consequently, SylA-producing strains are able to escape from primary infection sites and colonize adjacent tissues along the vasculature. We found that SylA diffuses from the primary infection site and suppresses acquired resistance in adjacent tissues by blocking signaling by the stress hormone salicylic acid (SA. Thus, SylA diffusion creates a zone of SA-insensitive tissue that is prepared for subsequent colonization. In addition, SylA promotes bacterial motility and suppresses immune responses at the primary infection site. These local immune responses do not affect bacterial growth and were weak compared to effector-triggered immunity. Thus, SylA facilitates colonization from wounding sites by increasing bacterial motility and suppressing SA signaling in adjacent tissues.

  16. Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall of a Chronically Infected Postoperative Wound with a Rectus Abdominis Myofascial Splitting Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kyu Bae

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background If a chronically infected abdominal wound develops, complications such asperitonitis and an abdominal wall defect could occur. This could prolong the patient’s hospitalstay and increase the possibility of re-operation or another infection as well. For this reason,a solution for infection control is necessary. In this study, surgery using a rectus abdominismuscle myofascial splitting flap was performed on an abdominal wall defect.Methods From 2009 to 2012, 5 patients who underwent surgery due to ovarian rupture,cesarean section, or uterine myoma were chosen. In each case, during the first week afteroperation, the wound showed signs of infection. Surgery was chosen because the wounds didnot resolve with dressing. Debridement was performed along the previous operation woundand dissection of the skin was performed to separate the skin and subcutaneous tissue fromthe attenuated rectus muscle and Scarpa’s fascial layers. Once the anterior rectus sheath andmuscle were adequately mobilized, the fascia and muscle flap were advanced medially sothat the skin defect could be covered for reconstruction.Results Upon 3-week follow-up after a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap operation,no major complication occurred. In addition, all of the patients showed satisfaction in termsof function and esthetics at 3 to 6 months post-surgery.Conclusions Using a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap has many esthetic andfunctional benefits over previous methods of abdominal defect treatment, and notably, itenabled infection control by reconstruction using muscle.

  17. The Wound Healing and Antibacterial Activity of Five Ethnomedical Calophyllum inophyllum Oils: An Alternative Therapeutic Strategy to Treat Infected Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léguillier, Teddy; Lecsö-Bornet, Marylin; Lémus, Christelle; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Lebouvier, Nicolas; Hnawia, Edouard; Nour, Mohammed; Aalbersberg, William; Ghazi, Kamelia; Raharivelomanana, Phila; Rat, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Background Calophyllum inophyllum L. (Calophyllaceae) is an evergreen tree ethno-medically used along the seashores and islands of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, especially in Polynesia. Oil extracted from the seeds is traditionally used topically to treat a wide range of skin injuries from burn, scar and infected wounds to skin diseases such as dermatosis, urticaria and eczema. However, very few scientific studies reported and quantified the therapeutic properties of Calophyllum inophyllum oil (CIO). In this work, five CIO from Indonesia (CIO1), Tahiti (CIO2, 3), Fiji islands (CIO4) and New Caledonia (CIO5) were studied and their cytotoxic, wound healing, and antibacterial properties were presented in order to provide a scientific support to their traditional use and verify their safety. Methods The safety of the five CIO was ascertained using the Alamar blue assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO wound healing properties were determined using the scratch test assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO-stimulated antibacterial innate immune response was evaluated using ELISA by measuring β defensin-2 release in human derivative macrophage cells. CIO antibacterial activity was tested using oilogramme against twenty aerobic Gram- bacteria species, twenty aerobic Gram+ bacteria species, including a multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and two anaerobic Gram+ bacteria species e.g. Propionibacterium acnes and Propionibacterium granulosum. To detect polarity profile of the components responsible of the antibacterial activity, we performed bioautography against a Staphylococcus aureus strain. Results Based on Alamar Blue assay, we showed that CIO can be safely used on keratinocyte cells between 2.7% and 11.2% depending on CIO origin. Concerning the healing activity, all the CIO tested accelerated in vitro wound closure, the healing factor being 1.3 to 2.1 higher compared to control when keratinocytes were incubated after scratch with CIO at 0.1%. Furthermore

  18. The Wound Healing and Antibacterial Activity of Five Ethnomedical Calophyllum inophyllum Oils: An Alternative Therapeutic Strategy to Treat Infected Wounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teddy Léguillier

    Full Text Available Calophyllum inophyllum L. (Calophyllaceae is an evergreen tree ethno-medically used along the seashores and islands of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, especially in Polynesia. Oil extracted from the seeds is traditionally used topically to treat a wide range of skin injuries from burn, scar and infected wounds to skin diseases such as dermatosis, urticaria and eczema. However, very few scientific studies reported and quantified the therapeutic properties of Calophyllum inophyllum oil (CIO. In this work, five CIO from Indonesia (CIO1, Tahiti (CIO2, 3, Fiji islands (CIO4 and New Caledonia (CIO5 were studied and their cytotoxic, wound healing, and antibacterial properties were presented in order to provide a scientific support to their traditional use and verify their safety.The safety of the five CIO was ascertained using the Alamar blue assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO wound healing properties were determined using the scratch test assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO-stimulated antibacterial innate immune response was evaluated using ELISA by measuring β defensin-2 release in human derivative macrophage cells. CIO antibacterial activity was tested using oilogramme against twenty aerobic Gram- bacteria species, twenty aerobic Gram+ bacteria species, including a multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and two anaerobic Gram+ bacteria species e.g. Propionibacterium acnes and Propionibacterium granulosum. To detect polarity profile of the components responsible of the antibacterial activity, we performed bioautography against a Staphylococcus aureus strain.Based on Alamar Blue assay, we showed that CIO can be safely used on keratinocyte cells between 2.7% and 11.2% depending on CIO origin. Concerning the healing activity, all the CIO tested accelerated in vitro wound closure, the healing factor being 1.3 to 2.1 higher compared to control when keratinocytes were incubated after scratch with CIO at 0.1%. Furthermore, our results

  19. The Wound Healing and Antibacterial Activity of Five Ethnomedical Calophyllum inophyllum Oils: An Alternative Therapeutic Strategy to Treat Infected Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léguillier, Teddy; Lecsö-Bornet, Marylin; Lémus, Christelle; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Lebouvier, Nicolas; Hnawia, Edouard; Nour, Mohammed; Aalbersberg, William; Ghazi, Kamelia; Raharivelomanana, Phila; Rat, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Calophyllum inophyllum L. (Calophyllaceae) is an evergreen tree ethno-medically used along the seashores and islands of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, especially in Polynesia. Oil extracted from the seeds is traditionally used topically to treat a wide range of skin injuries from burn, scar and infected wounds to skin diseases such as dermatosis, urticaria and eczema. However, very few scientific studies reported and quantified the therapeutic properties of Calophyllum inophyllum oil (CIO). In this work, five CIO from Indonesia (CIO1), Tahiti (CIO2, 3), Fiji islands (CIO4) and New Caledonia (CIO5) were studied and their cytotoxic, wound healing, and antibacterial properties were presented in order to provide a scientific support to their traditional use and verify their safety. The safety of the five CIO was ascertained using the Alamar blue assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO wound healing properties were determined using the scratch test assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO-stimulated antibacterial innate immune response was evaluated using ELISA by measuring β defensin-2 release in human derivative macrophage cells. CIO antibacterial activity was tested using oilogramme against twenty aerobic Gram- bacteria species, twenty aerobic Gram+ bacteria species, including a multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and two anaerobic Gram+ bacteria species e.g. Propionibacterium acnes and Propionibacterium granulosum. To detect polarity profile of the components responsible of the antibacterial activity, we performed bioautography against a Staphylococcus aureus strain. Based on Alamar Blue assay, we showed that CIO can be safely used on keratinocyte cells between 2.7% and 11.2% depending on CIO origin. Concerning the healing activity, all the CIO tested accelerated in vitro wound closure, the healing factor being 1.3 to 2.1 higher compared to control when keratinocytes were incubated after scratch with CIO at 0.1%. Furthermore, our results showed that CIO

  20. Staphylococcus intermedius infections: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus intermedius is part of the normal skin and oral flora of dogs. Case reports of human infections are rare, but the true incidence is unknown because the pathogen is frequently misidentified as Staphylococcus aureus. Reported cases range from soft tissue infections to brain abscess. Most reported cases in humans have been related to dog exposure. We report a case of a 73 year old female with S. intermedius surgical wound infection one month following a left elbow total arthroplasty. This is the first reported human case of S. intermedius infection of a mechanical prosthesis. The presumed source of infection was the patient’s dog. The patient was treated with vancomycin, then switched to cefazolin and rifampin once susceptibilities were known. Case reports suggest that patients generally respond well to tailored antibiotics with complete or near-complete recovery. S. intermedius should be included in the differential diagnosis of invasive infection amongst patients with close contact with dogs.

  1. Chromobacterium violaceum Isolated from a Wound Sepsis: A Case Study from Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamshul Ansari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromobacterium violaceum is a facultative anaerobic, Gram-negative rod, prevalent in tropical and subtropical regions. It enters through the skin injury and is capable of causing severe systemic infections leading to septic shock and multiorgan failure. It has been reported by few authors across the world but this is probably the first case of Chromobacterium violaceum isolated from wound sepsis from Nepal. In this study, a pus sample from the infection of a prick injury in the left middle finger was collected from the patient admitted to the intensive care unit. Bacteriological investigations of the pus sample revealed the causative organism to be Chromobacterium violaceum. This case study indicates that Chromobacterium violaceum can act as a potential cause of wound sepsis that may lead to the septic shock and if not treated timely, the mortality rate can be high as was in this study. Although this organism is very rare, the infection caused requires prompt treatment to minimize the mortality rate. Therefore, we recommend the timely diagnosis and antimicrobial therapy of this infection to combat the consequences led.

  2. Spectroscopic Biomarkers for Monitoring Wound Healing and Infection in Combat Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    MRSA , Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter). For Acinetobacter, we have collected Raman spectra of 30 unique strains. For preliminary...combat wounds ( MRSA , Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter). For Acinetobacter, we have collected Raman spectra of 30 unique strains. - We...images ensure orthogonality of factors and a unique basis set. 2.5 Statistical Analysis Differences in band area ratios were assessed using a

  3. A Case of Systemic Infection Caused by Streptococcus pyogenes Oral Infection in an Edentulous Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Yumi; Abe, Masanobu; Inaki, Ryoko; Zong, Liang; Suenaga, Hideyuki; Abe, Takahiro; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2017-08-18

    Infections in the oral and maxillofacial region can sometimes extend beyond the oral cavity, with serious consequences. Most oral infections are odontogenic, occurring through the root apex of the tooth or the periodontal pocket. It thus makes sense that edentulous patients have a much lower risk of oral bacterial infection. For this reason, while there are many reports on systemic infections caused by oral infections, few of these describe such infections in edentulous patients. We present a case of oral and maxillofacial cellulitis followed by sepsis due to Streptococcus pyogenes infection in an 89-year-old Japanese edentulous woman. S. pyogenes was detected in the wound of left maxilla and the blood sample. S. pyogenes has been reported to be one of the most common and influential aerobic bacteria associated with deep neck infection and subsequent systemic infection. Left maxillary sinusitis was observed, and this could be the origin of the S. pyogenes infection. S. pyogenes derived from the sinusitis and leaked to the oral cavity might have caused systemic infection through wounding of the oral mucosa. Fortunately, intensive antibiotic therapy was effective, and the patient recovered without any surgical procedures. We experienced a rare case of oral and maxillofacial cellulitis followed by sepsis due to a Streptococcus pyogenes infection in an old edentulous woman. This result indicated that, while edentulous patients are considered to have no risk of odontogenic infection, they still carry a risk of bacterial infection.

  4. Polypragmasia in the therapy of infected wounds - conclusions drawn from the perspectives of low temperature plasma technology for plasma wound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Axel; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lademann, Jürgen; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Hinz, Peter; Assadian, Ojan

    2008-11-03

    As long as a wound is infected, the healing process cannot begin. The indication for wound antiseptic is dependent on the interaction between the wound, the causative micro-organisms, and the host immune system. An uncritical colonisation is a condition whereby micro-organisms on a wound will proliferate, yet the immune system will not react excessively. Wound antiseptic is most often not necessary unless for epidemiologic reasons like colonisation with multi-resistant organisms. In most instances of a microbial contamination of the wound and colonisation, thorough cleaning will be sufficient.Bacterial counts above 10(5) to 10(6) cfu per gram tissue (critical colonisation) might decrease wound healing due to release of toxins, particularly in chronic wounds. Traumatic and heavily contaminated wounds therefore will require anti-infective measures, in particular wound antiseptic. In such situations, even a single application of an antiseptic compound will significantly reduce the number of pathogens, and hence, the risk of infection. If a wound infection is clinically manifest, local antiseptics and systemic antibiotics are therapeutically indicated.The prophylactic and therapeutic techniques for treatment of acute and chronic wounds (chemical antiseptics using xenobiotics or antibiotics, biological antiseptic applying maggots, medical honey or chitosan, physical antiseptic using water-filtered infrared A, UV, or electric current) mostly have been empirically developed without establishing a fundamental working hypothesis for their effectiveness.The most important aspect in controlling a wound infection and achieving healing of a wound is meticulous debridement of necrotic material. This is achieved by surgical, enzymatic or biological means e.g. using maggots. However, none of these methods (with some exception for maggots) is totally gentle to vital tissue and particularly chemical methods possess cytotoxicity effects.DERIVED FROM THE GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF

  5. Polypragmasia in the therapy of infected wounds – conclusions drawn from the perspectives of low temperature plasma technology for plasma wound therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Axel; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lademann, Jürgen; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Hinz, Peter; Assadian, Ojan

    2008-01-01

    As long as a wound is infected, the healing process cannot begin. The indication for wound antiseptic is dependent on the interaction between the wound, the causative micro-organisms, and the host immune system. An uncritical colonisation is a condition whereby micro-organisms on a wound will proliferate, yet the immune system will not react excessively. Wound antiseptic is most often not necessary unless for epidemiologic reasons like colonisation with multi-resistant organisms. In most instances of a microbial contamination of the wound and colonisation, thorough cleaning will be sufficient. Bacterial counts above 105 to 106 cfu per gram tissue (critical colonisation) might decrease wound healing due to release of toxins, particularly in chronic wounds. Traumatic and heavily contaminated wounds therefore will require anti-infective measures, in particular wound antiseptic. In such situations, even a single application of an antiseptic compound will significantly reduce the number of pathogens, and hence, the risk of infection. If a wound infection is clinically manifest, local antiseptics and systemic antibiotics are therapeutically indicated. The prophylactic and therapeutic techniques for treatment of acute and chronic wounds (chemical antiseptics using xenobiotics or antibiotics, biological antiseptic applying maggots, medical honey or chitosan, physical antiseptic using water-filtered infrared A, UV, or electric current) mostly have been empirically developed without establishing a fundamental working hypothesis for their effectiveness. The most important aspect in controlling a wound infection and achieving healing of a wound is meticulous debridement of necrotic material. This is achieved by surgical, enzymatic or biological means e.g. using maggots. However, none of these methods (with some exception for maggots) is totally gentle to vital tissue and particularly chemical methods possess cytotoxicity effects. Derived from the general principles of

  6. [How do I prevent caesarean wound infections in obese patients in 2017?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, B; Raia-Barjat, T; Chauleur, C; Mathevet, P

    2017-11-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor of cesarean section and is associated with an increased risk of wound complications such as infections. This review focuses on the available strategies to limit complications in this population. Choice of antiseptic solution, appropriate dose and type of antibiotic prophylaxy, suture closure of subcutaneous fat, suture skin closure and closed incision negative pressure wound therapy may reduce the risk of wound infections associated with cesarean section in obese patients. Vaginal desinfection, plastic adhesive draps, high-concentration supplemental perioperative oxygen, use of a barrier retractor, wound drainage and type of skin incision are discussed in this review. Clinical trials of good quality are needed to improve our clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of irrigation with different solution on Incidence of Wound Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Zamani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Management of acute and chronic wounds has significantly altered in the last decade but little attention has been paid to the solution used for cleansing the wounds. Therefore, the present study aimed to compare the effects of tap water, distilled water, and normal saline for wound cleansing in emergency department. Methods: This is a double-blind randomized clinical trial with a 10-day follow up. Patients who had superficial wounds were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups: normal saline, distilled water, and tap water. The wounds were cleansed using a 20 - 60 milliliter syringe with an 18 gauge needle. All the patients were discharged with the same antibiotic and were followed 48 hours and 10-day to determine the presence or absence of infection symptoms. The evaluated outcomes were infection incidence in the first 48 hours and 10 days after being discharged. Results: 1200 patients were included in the present study (57% male, average age 25.5 ± 11.0 years. 43 (3.5% patients showed infection symptoms in the first 48 hours. Ten (2.5% patients were in normal saline treated group, 15 (3.7% patients were in distilled water group, and 18 (4.4% patients were in tap water treated group (p=0.32. 13 (3.2% patients in normal saline group, 20 (4.9% patients in distilled water group and 23 (5.6% in the tap water group did not take their antibiotics. Prevalence of infection were higher in patients who did not take antibiotics (p < 0.001. The 10-day follow-up revealed that all the patients were recovered and showed no infection symptoms. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that the prevalence of infection in using the 3 agents (normal saline, distilled water and tap water for cleansing wounds was similar. Therefore, drinking water could be considered as an alternative for cleansing wounds.

  8. Microbiology and management of post-surgical wounds infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Itzhak

    2002-01-01

    The recent increased recovery of anaerobic bacteria from children has led to greater appreciation of their role in paediatric infections at all body sites, including post-surgical wounds (PSW). In studies that employed adequate method for recovery of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria polymicrobial, aerobic and anaerobes were isolated from over half of the patients with PSW. The wounds studied were those that developed following these surgical procedures: head and neck surgery for malignancies, post-thoracotomy, spinal fusion and gastrostomy tube insertion. Staphylococcus aureus and aerobic gram-negative bacilli were found at all sites. However, a correlation was generally found between the site of the wounds and microbial flora recovered from the wound. Organisms that resided in the mucous membranes close to the surgical site predominated in the wound next to these areas. Enteric Gram-negative rods, Group D enterococcus and Bacteroides fragilis group predominated in wounds relating to the gut flora, while Streptococcus spp., pigmented Prevotella and Porphyromonas spp. and Fusobacterium spp. were most frequently recovered in wounds proximal to the oral area. Management of PSW should include administration of antimicrobials effective against the polymicrobial bacterial flora adjacent to the anatomic site of the wound.

  9. Effects of ketanserin on hypergranulation tissue formation, infection, and healing of equine lower limb wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Engelen, Marc; Besche, Béatrice; Lefay, Marie-Paul; Hare, Jonathan; Vlaminck, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this multicentre, randomized, controlled field study was to determine the efficacy of ketanserin gel in preventing exuberant granulation tissue formation (hypergranulation) and infection in equine lower limb wounds. Horses and ponies (n = 481) with naturally occurring wounds were randomized to either topical treatment with ketanserin gel (n = 242) or a positive control (Belgium, Germany: ethacridin lactate solution, n = 120; France, United Kingdom: malic, benzoic, and salicyl...

  10. The Healing Effect of Licorice on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infected Burn Wounds in Experimental Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Tanideh, Nader; Rokhsari, Pedram; Mehrabani, Davood; Mohammadi Samani, Soleiman; Sabet Sarvestani, Fatemeh; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad; Koohi Hosseinabadi, Omid; Shamsian, Shahram; AHMADI, Nasrollah

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Burn is still one of the most devastating injuries in emergency medicine while improvements in wound healing knowledge and technology have resulted into development of new dressings. This study was undertaken to evaluate the healing effect of licorice in Pseudomonas aeruginosa infected burn wounds of experimental rat model. METHODS One hundred and twenty female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to 4 equal groups. Group A received silver sulfadiazine ointment, Group B rece...

  11. Locking plate external fixation and negative pressure wound therapy for treatment of a primary infection in a closed clavicle fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Robert M; Morrissey, David I; Molony, Diarmuid C; Quinlan, John Francis

    2016-11-28

    Infection in a clavicle fracture is uncommon, but remains a challenging problem. A paucity of soft tissue coverage often combined with significant displacement and interfragmentary movement add complexity to an already difficult situation for effective infection treatment. External fixation in principle offers a means of achieving fracture stability, while the infection is being eradicated. We present the case of a closed clavicle fracture, initially treated conservatively, that presented 5 weeks later with infection. The fracture was definitively treated with external fixation using a locking plate positioned superficially to the skin, plus negative pressure wound therapy and subsequent secondary closure and antibiotic therapy. This case illustrates a novel method of treatment in this unusual presentation that was well tolerated by the patient and resulted in a good clinical outcome. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. Effects of low intensity laser in in vitro bacterial culture and in vivo infected wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pâmela Rosa Pereira

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to compare the effects of low intensity laser therapy on in vitro bacterial growth and in vivo in infected wounds, and to analyze the effectiveness of the AsGa Laser technology in in vivo wound infections. METHODS: in vitro: Staphylococcus aureus were incubated on blood agar plates, half of them being irradiated with 904 nm wavelength laser and dose of 3J/cm2 daily for seven days. In vivo: 32 male Wistar rats were divided into control group (uninfected and Experimental Group (Infected. Half of the animals had their wounds irradiated. RESULTS: in vitro: there was no statistically significant variation between the experimental groups as for the source plates and the derived ones (p>0.05. In vivo: there was a significant increase in the deposition of type I and III collagen in the wounds of the infected and irradiated animals when assessed on the fourth day of the experiment (p=0.034. CONCLUSION: low-intensity Laser Therapy applied with a wavelength of 904nm and dose 3J/cm2 did not alter the in vitro growth of S. aureus in experimental groups; in vivo, however, it showed significant increase in the deposition of type I and III collagen in the wound of infected and irradiated animals on the fourth day of the experiment.

  13. A CLINICAL STUDY ON POSTOPERATIVE WOUND INFECTIONS IN RIMS, KADAPA- 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ramanaiah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Surgical wound infections continue to consume a considerable portion of healthcare finance. Even though, the complete elimination of wound infections is not possible, a reduction of the observed wound infection rate to a minimum level could have marked benefits in terms of both patient comfort and resources used. 1 MATERIALS AND METHODS The clinical study of postoperative wound infection conducted at RIMS General Hospital, Kadapa, during the period of 2013 to 2016. RESULTS In this clinical study, 150 patients were clinically diagnosed of having SSIs out of 925 patients who underwent major surgeries in Department of General Surgery, an incidence of 16.2%. Dirty type of surgeries have high incidence of SSI at 63.6%. SSI occurred more in patients who didn’t receive preoperative antibiotic within 2 hrs. prior to surgery, i.e. 32.1%. Most of the patients presented with discharge through the wound (81.3%. The most common type of discharge was purulent (52.5%. CONCLUSION Preoperative preparation <24 hrs., preoperative bathing and preoperative antibiotic within 2 hrs. before surgery help in reducing surgical site infections. Early diagnosis of SSI and prompt management by isolation of organism causing SSI using sensitive antibiotics and regular dressing help in reducing morbidity for the patients.

  14. [Effect of wound healing of orthopedic surgery in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients with perioperative adjuvant treatments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Sheng; Zhang, Yaoshen; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Xin; Wan, Gang; Zhao, Changsong; Cai, Juan; Yuan, Zheng

    2014-08-05

    To observe the early wound healing of orthopedic surgery in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) carrier patients treated with optimized auxiliary treatments. During a period of 48 months, according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria plus CD4⁺ T lymphocyte count, the patients scheduled for orthopedic surgery (including HIV positive and negative) were divided into group A (HIV positive, CD4HIV positive, CD4 ≥ 500/ml) and group C (HIV negative) on prophylactic antibiotic therapy alone. Wound healing of 3 groups were observed postoperatively. The rates of clinical wound infection were compared among 3 groups. A total of 471 cases (n = 79, HIV+; n = 392, HIV-) were selected due to fresh fracture (n = 544, 77.28%), fracture of spine (n = 57, 12.31%), mal-union (n = 13, 2.76%), aseptic necrosis (n = 15, 3.18%) and osteoarthritis (n = 21, 4.46%). During surgery, early open reduction and plate screw internal fixation (group A, n = 23; group B, n = 21; group C, n = 274); pedicle screw internal fixation (group A, n = 5; group B, n = 6; group C, n = 47); total joint replacement (group A, n = 3; group B, n = 4; group C, n = 8); interlocking intramedullary nail fixation (group A, n = 7; group B, n = 4; group C, n = 35) and other operations (group A, n = 3; group B, n = 3; group C, n = 28). For infections, 2 cases (4.88%) were observed in group A, 3 (5.26%) in group B and 26 (6.63%) in group C. The differences were statistically insignificant. Reasonable perioperative adjuvant treatments, including use of antibiotic, nutritional supports, immunomodulators and anti-retroviral drugs, are offered to HIV infected patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. Their risks of postoperative wound infection may be controlled.

  15. [Abdominal gunshot wound: description of 86 cases in Cameroon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahebeck, J; Masso-Misse, P; Essomba, A; Takongmo, S; Ngo-Nonga, B; Ngo-Nyeki, A R; Sosso, M; Malong, E

    2005-11-01

    Abdominal gunshot wound (AGSW) is a trauma emergency. The purpose of this report is to describe our experience with managing AGSW largely without modem investigational modalities. Data was collected retrospectively by reviewing the surgical reports and clinical charts of patients admitted to live hospitals dealing with AGSW over a 5-year period. Incomplete files and wounds not involving the abdomen were not included. A total of 86 files were analyzed. Patients ranged in age from 10 to 63 years ivith mean age of 32 years and a sex ratio of 5.5. Most patients (87%) underwent surgical exploration. Laboratory revealed no lesions in 22.5% of cases, minor lesions in 9.5% and major lesions justifying surgical repair in 68%. A total of 86 visceral lesions were found in the patients who underwent surgical exploration. The lesion involved the small intestine in 31.5% of case, colon in 24.5%, liver in 23.5%, spleen in 7%, stomach in 6%, and uterus in 2%. The kidney, pancreas, mesenteries, large momentum, and transverse mescaline each accounted for 1% of lesions. Conventional operative techniques were used with a mortality of 5.5% and morbidity of 4%. Based on our findings we conclude that when investigational tools (CT-scan, peritoneal lavage and laparoscopy) are unavailable prolonged watchful waiting increases the risk of mortality and morbidity in patients presenting AGSW associated with suspicious clinical signs. Prompt surgical treatment improves prognosis but is associated with a high rate of cases showing no lesions.

  16. Isolates from wound infections at federal medical centre, bida ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 589 wound swabs from 334 patients in Federal Medical Centre, Bida were studied. Samples were collected between Jan 2002 to Dec. 2003. Swabs were plated within one hour after collection unto blood, chocolate and Mac Conkey after plate, and incubated aerobically for 24hrs. The chocolate plated swabs were ...

  17. Nanoparticle-Based Therapies for Wound Biofilm Infection: Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Clinical data from human chronic wounds implicates biofilm formation with the onset of wound chronicity. Despite the development of novel antimicrobial agents, the cost and complexity of treating chronic wound infections associated with biofilms remain a serious challenge, which necessitates the development of new and alternative approaches for effective anti-biofilm treatment. Recent advancement in nanotechnology for developing a new class of nanoparticles that exhibit unique chemical and physical properties holds promise for the treatment of biofilm infections. Over the last decade, nanoparticle-based approaches against wound biofilm infection have been directed toward developing nanoparticles with intrinsic antimicrobial properties, utilizing nanoparticles for controlled antimicrobials delivery, and applying nanoparticles for antibacterial hyperthermia therapy. In addition, a strategy to functionalize nanoparticles towards enhanced penetration through the biofilm matrix has been receiving considerable interest recently by means of achieving an efficient targeting to the bacterial cells within biofilm matrix. This review summarizes and highlights the recent development of these nanoparticle-based approaches as potential therapeutics for controlling wound biofilm infection, along with current challenges that need to be overcome for their successful clinical translation.

  18. Interventions for wound healing among diabetic patients infected with Staphylococcus aureus: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anacássia Fonseca Lima

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequent agent isolated in diabetic foot infections and may be associated with changes to wound healing times. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of the literature, including studies that assessed the efficacy of any clinical or surgical intervention, as well as oral or topical therapy for diabetic ulcers infected with S. aureus. DESIGN AND SETTING: Systematic review with a search conducted in databases. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review with a comprehensive search in the Lilacs, SciELO, PubMed/Medline, Old Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library databases, for articles published from 1966 to 2010. The articles selected were limited to studies on diabetic patients with wounds infected with S. aureus for whom their healing was followed up, with the use of either antibiotics or experimental treatments. Animal studies and those that did not report the wound healing, as well as review articles, were excluded. RESULTS: Five studies that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were analyzed. CONCLUSIONS: There are few studies reporting the healing of wounds infected with S. aureus in diabetic patients, although this is the most commonly found pathogen in this type of wound and it frequently consists of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. There is insufficient evidence to support early use of broad-spectrum antibiotics against MRSA to promote healing of diabetic ulcers, since antibiotic resistance may develop from such treatment. This highlights the need for further studies on the subject.

  19. An outbreak of wound infection in cardiac surgery patients caused by Enterobacter cloacae arising from cardioplegia ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breathnach, A S; Riley, P A; Shad, S; Jownally, S M; Law, R; Chin, P C; Kaufmann, M E; Smith, E J

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes an outbreak of postoperative sternal wound infections. A cardiac surgeon noted a cluster of serious infections leading to wound dehiscence, despite the fact that none of his colleagues had noticed a rise in infection rates. The infections were predominantly with Enterobacter cloacae, and molecular typing and serotyping showed these isolates to be indistinguishable. Observation of the surgeon's practice revealed nothing untoward, and there were no infections among his patients operated on in another hospital. There appeared to be no significant difference between the modes of operation of the different surgeons. The operating theatres were screened to exclude an environmental source, with samples cultured on CHROMagar Orientation, a selective/differential medium designed for urine samples. Further questioning revealed one difference between the practices of the different surgeons; this surgeon used semi-frozen Hartmann's solution to achieve cardioplegia. The freezer used for this was swabbed and yielded E. cloacae, indistinguishable from the clinical isolates. It is hypothesized that this organism contaminated the freezer, and that the contamination was passed on to the ice/slush solution, thus infecting the patients. There have been no more cases since the freezer was replaced, a rigorous cleaning schedule instituted, and steps taken to reduce the possibility of any further contamination.

  20. Use of gentamicin–collagen sponges in closure of sternal wounds in cardiothoracic surgery to reduce wound infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Gauri; Pai, Vasudev; Kolvekar, Shyam; Wilson, Andrew P.R.

    2012-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: Are antibiotic implants like gentamicin–collagen implants useful in preventing sternal wound infections (SWIs)? Altogether, more than 484 papers were found using the reported search; of these, 7 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We conclude that most randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been performed with gentamicin–collagen sponges for sternal closure. Two out of four RCTs showed a significant benefit of the implant in a reduction in superficial and deep SWIs in routine and emergency cardiac surgery. One RCT showed a significant reduction in superficial infections in 2005, a follow-up trial by the same group in 2009 showed a reduction in deep infections as well. Another group has shown a reduction in deep and superficial SWI with gentamicin implant, in an RCT on 800 patients, however have not published details of the complete trial. The third trial on 542 patients showed no benefit of the implant, but was not adequately powered. However, the most recent multicentre RCT conducted on 1052 patients showed no benefit of gentamicin–collagen sponges in elective surgery (coronary artery bypass grafting and/or valve surgery) in high-risk patients with diabetes, obesity or both. Concerns were raised that gentamicin sponges dipped in saline 1–2 s prior to application may have lost the gentamicin into the saline, thereby reducing their efficacy and that some surgeons may have been unfamiliar with wound closure with sponges. However, these were robustly refuted by the authors. One RCT showed that gentamicin sponges may cause increased sternal rebleeding if used in double layers. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were predominantly isolated from infected wounds in all the

  1. Use of gentamicin-collagen sponges in closure of sternal wounds in cardiothoracic surgery to reduce wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Gauri; Pai, Vasudev; Kolvekar, Shyam; Wilson, Andrew P R

    2012-04-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: Are antibiotic implants like gentamicin-collagen implants useful in preventing sternal wound infections (SWIs)? Altogether, more than 484 papers were found using the reported search; of these, 7 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We conclude that most randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been performed with gentamicin-collagen sponges for sternal closure. Two out of four RCTs showed a significant benefit of the implant in a reduction in superficial and deep SWIs in routine and emergency cardiac surgery. One RCT showed a significant reduction in superficial infections in 2005, a follow-up trial by the same group in 2009 showed a reduction in deep infections as well. Another group has shown a reduction in deep and superficial SWI with gentamicin implant, in an RCT on 800 patients, however have not published details of the complete trial. The third trial on 542 patients showed no benefit of the implant, but was not adequately powered. However, the most recent multicentre RCT conducted on 1052 patients showed no benefit of gentamicin-collagen sponges in elective surgery (coronary artery bypass grafting and/or valve surgery) in high-risk patients with diabetes, obesity or both. Concerns were raised that gentamicin sponges dipped in saline 1-2 s prior to application may have lost the gentamicin into the saline, thereby reducing their efficacy and that some surgeons may have been unfamiliar with wound closure with sponges. However, these were robustly refuted by the authors. One RCT showed that gentamicin sponges may cause increased sternal rebleeding if used in double layers. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were predominantly isolated from infected wounds in all the trials

  2. Wound management with vacuum assisted closure in surgical site infection after ankle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Ya-Ke; Chen, Hong-Lin; Liu, Fan

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) with standard moist wound care (SMWC) in surgical site infection after ankle surgery. A prospective cohort was performed among patients with surgical site infection after ankle surgery between 2012 and 2013. The follow-up period was three month, and the efficacy end point was complete wound closure rate. Ninety-four patients were analyzed, with 61 patients in the VAC group and 33 in the SMWC group. The complete wound closure rate in the VAC group was higher than that in the SMWC group at 3 month follow up (90.2% Vs. 72.7%, p = 0.028). The median time to complete wound closure was 31 days (95% CI 20.2-41.8) for VAC, and 63 days (95% CI 46.9-79.1) for SMWC (χ(2) = 4.023, p = 0.045). In the superficial infection subgroup, the median times to complete wound closure were 20 days (95% CI 14.2-35.1) in the VAC group and 42 days (95% CI 35.4-69.4) in SMWC group (χ(2) = 4.331, p = 0.041). In the deep subgroup, the median times to complete wound closure were 46 days (95% CI 28.2-65.9) in the VAC group and 75 days (95% CI 43.2-79.6) in SMWC group (χ(2) = 6.475, p = 0.026). Our result showed that vacuum assisted closure was more effective than standard moist wound care in surgical site infection after ankle surgery. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Murine model imitating chronic wound infections for evaluation of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Fila

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available It is generally acknowledged that the age of antibiotics could come to an end, due to their widespread and inappropriate use. Particularly for chronic wounds alternatives are being thought. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy is a potential candidate, and while approved for some indications, such as periodontitis, chronic sinusitis and other niche indications, its use in chronic wounds is not established. To further facilitate the development of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy in chronic wounds we present an easy to use animal model exhibiting the key hallmarks of chronic wounds, based on full-thickness skin wounds paired with an optically transparent cover. The moisture-retaining wound exhibited rapid expansion of pathogen colonies up to 8 days while not jeopardizing the host survival. Use of two bioluminescent pathogens; methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa permits real time monitoring of the pathogens.The murine model was employed to evaluate the performance of four different photosensitizers as mediators in Photodynamic Therapy. While all four photosensitizers, Rose Bengal, porphyrin TMPyP, New Methylene Blue and TLD1411 demonstrated good to excellent antimicrobial efficacy in planktonic solutions at 1 to 50 µM concentrations, whereas in in vivo the growth delay was limited with 24-48 hr delay in pathogen expansion for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and we noticed longer growth suppression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with TLD1411 mediated Photodynamic Therapy. The murine model will enable developing new strategies for enhancement of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy for chronic wound infections.

  4. In Vivo Modeling of Biofilm-Infected Wounds: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-15

    difficult to faithfully model wound biofilms. Human studies are logisti cally and ethically prohibitive, leaving animal models as the sole practical...alternative for systematic investigation and modulation of clinically relevant biofilms. The use of an animal model allows for multiple iterations of...Effectiveness of acupuncture , special dressings and simple, low adherence dressings for healing venous leg ulcers in primary healthcare: study protocol for

  5. Topical "soft candle" applications for infected diabetic foot wounds: a cause for concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawich, Shamir O; Harnarayan, Patrick; Islam, Shariful; Nahmorah J, Bobb; Budhooram, Steve; Ramsewak, Shivaa; Ramdass, Michael J; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2014-06-01

    There is a cultural barrier to early medical intervention for diabetic foot infections in Trinidad & Tobago, stemming from the strong cultural belief in "soft candle" as effective treatment. We carried out a case-control study to evaluate the outcomes of "soft candle" to treat diabetic foot infections. ALL CONSECUTIVE PATIENTS ADMITTED WITH DIABETIC FOOT INFECTIONS WERE INTERVIEWED TO COLLECT DATA ON: demographics, medical history, unhealthy lifestyle markers (exposure to risk factors for chronic diseases), chosen treatment and details of "soft candle" use. The hospital records were accessed on discharge to records the main outcome measures: HbA1c readings, duration of hospitalization, amputation and in-hospital mortality. Two groups were defined: The control group included patients who sought medical attention after detecting a foot infection. The study group included patients who recognized their infection but voluntarily chose to utilize "soft candle" regimens. We excluded patients who voluntarily chose to use other forms of non-traditional treatment or sought no treatment at all. Outcomes were compared using SPSS ver 19. A two-tailed P value was calculated for variables of interest in each group using Fisher's exact test. The duration of hospitalization between the groups was compared using paired T-Test. A P value 7.0% at presentation and 95% had unhealthy lifestyle habits. There were 382 patients in the control group at an average age of 59.1 years (SD ± 12.6, Range 37-89): 74% with HBA1c readings >7.0% at presentation and 48% with unhealthy lifestyle habits. Patients who used "soft candle" had significantly longer duration of hospitalization (15.5 ± 10.2 vs 9.2 ± 3.9 days; Ptopical "soft candle" application to diabetic foot wounds may be potentially harmful. Persons with diabetes should be warned about these effects. We have identified the target population for educational campaigns.

  6. The use of papain gel cream and sunflower oil in promoting healing in a wound in dogs: three case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Y.H. Porsani

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Papain is a proteolytic enzyme removed from the leaves of green papaya and/or latex. This enzyme is widely known as a medicinal fruit used extensively in human medicine for the treatment of wounds of various etiologies. However, studies and reports in veterinary medicine are scarce. Another herbal drug widely used in wound healing is Sunflower oil (Helianthus annus. It has inflammatory and antimicrobial properties which stimulate the local neovascularization, promoting tissue granulation, cell migration, fibroblast proliferation, and differentiation. Three dogs were treated with infected necrosis wounds, considered large, extent, and severe, with varied etiology. All cases were treated with papain gel with the exception of one dog, which was given the sunflower oil at the end of the treatment. Papain gel shows effectiveness in the treatment of wounds especially with wound debridement and removal of necrotic tissue. In addition, the healing time was shorter when compared to the treatment with sunflower oil. Finally, the herbal drugs have a low cost and high accessibility. This study contributes to create a new research regarding the use of this drug in animal wound healing.

  7. Nosocomial Wound Infection amongst Post Operative Patients and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nosocomial infection constitutes a major public health problem worldwide. Increasing antibiotic resistance of pathogens associated with nosocomial infections also becomes a major therapeutic challenge for physicians. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify post operative bacterial infections in the patients developing ...

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infection in a dedicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a major cause of morbidity in burns patients. There is a paucity of publications dealing with this infection in the paediatric population. We describe the incidence, microbiology and impact of P. aeruginosa infection in a dedicated paediatric burns unit. Methods.

  9. Daptomycin as a possible new treatment option for surgical management of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmert Alexander

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of a 77-year old female who had undergone a coronary artery bypass grafting with an aortic valve replacement and developed three month later a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA sternal wound infection which was successful treated with Daptomycin combined with vacuum-assisted closure (VAC.

  10. Microbiology of equine wounds and evidence of bacterial biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Westgate, S.J.; Percival, S.L.; Knottenbelt, D.C.; Clegg, P.D.; Cochrane, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Horse wounds have a high risk of becoming infected due to their environment. Infected wounds harbour diverse populations of microorganisms, however in some cases these microorganisms can be difficult to identify and fail to respond to antibiotic treatment, resulting in chronic non-healing wounds. In human wounds this has been attributed to the ability of bacteria to survive in a biofilm phenotypic state. Biofilms are known to delay wound healing, principally due to their r...

  11. Clinical relevance and effect of surgical wound classification in appendicitis: Retrospective evaluation of wound classification discrepancies between surgeons, Swissnoso-trained infection control nurse, and histology as well as surgical site infection rates by wound class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang-Chan, Anastasija; Gingert, Christian; Angst, Eliane; Hetzer, Franc Heinrich

    2017-07-01

    Surgical wound classification (SWC) is used for risk stratification of surgical site infection (SSI) and serves as the basis for measuring quality of care. The objective was to examine the accuracy and reliability of SWC. This study was purposed to evaluate the discrepancies in SWC as assessed by three groups: surgeons, an infection control nurse, and histopathologic evaluation. The secondary aim was to compare the risk-stratified SSI rates using the different SWC methods for 30 d postoperatively. An analysis was performed of the appendectomies from January 2013 to June 2014 in the Cantonal Hospital of Schaffhausen. SWC was assigned by the operating surgeon at the end of the procedure and retrospectively reviewed by a Swissnoso-trained infection control nurse after reading the operative and pathology report. The level of agreement among the three different SWC assessment groups was determined using kappa statistic. SSI rates were analyzed using a chi-square test. In 246 evaluated cases, the kappa scores for interrater reliability among the SWC assessments across the three groups ranged from 0.05 to 0.2 signifying slight agreement between the groups. SSIs were more frequently associated with trained infection control nurse-assigned SWC than with surgeons based SWC. Our study demonstrated a considerable discordance in the SWC assessments performed by the three groups. Unfortunately, the currently practiced SWC system suffers from ambiguity in definition and/or implementation of these definitions is not clearly stated. This lack of reliability is problematic and may lead to inappropriate comparisons within and between hospitals and surgeons. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fast Blue RR-Siloxane Derivatized Materials Indicate Wound Infection Due to a Deep Blue Color Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Doris; Tegl, Gregor; Vielnascher, Robert; Weber, Hansjoerg; Schoeftner, Rainer; Wiesbauer, Herfried; Sigl, Eva; Heinzle, Andrea; Guebitz, Georg M

    2015-09-25

    There is a strong need for simple and fast methods for wound infection determination. Myeloperoxidase, an immune system-derived enzyme was found to be a suitable biomarker for wound infection. Hence, alkoxysilane-derivatized Fast Blue RR was immobilized via simple hydrolytic polymerization. The resulting enzyme-responsive siloxane layers were incubated with myeloperoxidase, wound fluid or hemoglobin. The reaction was monitored via HPLC measurements and the color development quantified spectrophotometrically. Myeloperoxidase was indeed able to oxidize immobilized Fast Blue RR leading to a blue colored product. No conversion was detected in non-infected wound fluids. The visible color changes of these novel materials towards blue enable an easy distinction between infected and non-infected wound fluids.

  13. Fast Blue RR—Siloxane Derivatized Materials Indicate Wound Infection Due to a Deep Blue Color Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Schiffer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a strong need for simple and fast methods for wound infection determination. Myeloperoxidase, an immune system-derived enzyme was found to be a suitable biomarker for wound infection. Hence, alkoxysilane-derivatized Fast Blue RR was immobilized via simple hydrolytic polymerization. The resulting enzyme-responsive siloxane layers were incubated with myeloperoxidase, wound fluid or hemoglobin. The reaction was monitored via HPLC measurements and the color development quantified spectrophotometrically. Myeloperoxidase was indeed able to oxidize immobilized Fast Blue RR leading to a blue colored product. No conversion was detected in non-infected wound fluids. The visible color changes of these novel materials towards blue enable an easy distinction between infected and non-infected wound fluids.

  14. Spectroscopic Biomarkers for Monitoring Wound Healing and Infection in Combat Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Additionally, substantial potential for impaired renal function, bleeding, and stress gastritis have precluded widespread use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory...include age, stress, nutrition , tissue perfusion and oxygenation, infection, and other comorbidities, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus

  15. Epidermal Grafting for Chronic Complex Wounds in India: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, T V; Chaudhary, Dr Ajay; Purushothaman, Shyam; K V, Smitha; Arvind K, Varada

    2016-03-01

    BACKGROUND : In India, the high cost of medical treatments and limited resources can deter patients from receiving available care, leading to the development of chronic wounds. We evaluated the use of epidermal grafting in patients with complex, long-term chronic wounds. Eighteen patients with complex wounds were treated with epidermal micrografts between September 2014 and March 2015 at a state-run, community health center in Mahe, Puducherry, India. Wound re-epithelialization was monitored for up to 14 weeks. RESULTS : Comorbidities in the patient group (nine females and nine males; mean age 54.1 ± 10.8 years, range 32-70 years) included diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity (body mass index (BMI) >30 kg/m(2)), and peripheral vascular disease. The wound types included diabetic and nondiabetic foot, pressure, and venous leg ulcers. The average wound age prior to treatment was 36.8 ± 48.5 months (range 2-180 months) in the majority of patients. All wounds measured less than 7 cm × 7 cm. The mean time to wound epithelialization was 3.7 ± 1.8 weeks (range 2-9 weeks). The majority of wounds healed following epidermal grafting (n=16, 88.9%). One patient developed infection following removal of the dressing under non-sterile conditions against the advice of the healthcare providers. Another patient developed wound hypergranulation after grafting. Both wounds healed completely after treatment with antibiotic therapy and tissue resection, respectively. All donor sites healed without complications. CONCLUSION : In patients with small- to medium-sized chronic wounds, epidermal grafting offered a viable wound closure option for wounds requiring only the epidermal layer. Additionally, epidermal grafting was performed in the clinic without anesthesia or a surgeon, making the procedure more accessible in resource-challenged regions.

  16. CONTAMINATED PROBLEMATIC SKIN WOUNDS IN DIABETIC PATIENTS TREATED WITH AUTOLOGOUS PLATELET-RICH PLASMA (PRP: A case series study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetan Sokolov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP on contaminated problematic skin ulcers in patients with diabetes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 6 patients had been treated within the period from 2012 to 2014; they had various types of problematic wounds and diabetes type 2. Patients’ distribution by sex was as follows: 1 man and 5 women; mean age- 68 years. Ulcer types: acute (2 patients, hard-to-heal (2 patients and chronic (2 patients ulcers. The mean size of the skin and soft tissue defect was 9,5 cm2. Pathogenic microflora was isolated in 4 patients - S. aureus in three and Е. Coli in one. Based on a scheme developed by us, all cases were treated by administering platelet-rich plasma, derived by PRGF Endoret system. Follow-up period was within 4 – 6 months (4,5 on average. We used platelet rich plasma derived by PRGF Endoret system, applied on the wound bed on a weekly basis. RESULTS: Application of PRP allowed successful closure of all wounds. There were no complications associated with treatment of PRP. Epithelialization of the wound took 15 weeks on average for all patients. One patient presented with hyperkeratosis. Initial score of followed wounds, based on the scales are as follows: Total wound score – 10 p. Total anatomic score – 8 p. Total score – 15 p. at the initial stage. At the end of the treatment period scores were as follows - 0 p., which means excellent results CONCLUSION: We believe that the application of PRP may become optimal therapy in the treatment of contaminated problematic wounds in diabetic patients. PRP not only stimulates wound healing, but also has antimicrobial properties, which may contribute to the prevention of infections.

  17. RNA-Seq Transcriptomic Responses of Full-Thickness Dermal Excision Wounds to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acute and Biofilm Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S L Rajasekhar Karna

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of wounds in clinical settings are major complications whose outcomes are influenced by host responses that are not completely understood. Herein we evaluated transcriptomic changes of wounds as they counter P. aeruginosa infection-first active infection, and then chronic biofilm infection. We used the dermal full-thickness, rabbit ear excisional wound model. We studied the wound response: towards acute infection at 2, 6, and 24 hrs after inoculating 106 bacteria into day-3 wounds; and, towards more chronic biofilm infection of wounds similarly infected for 24 hrs but then treated with topical antibiotic to coerce biofilm growth and evaluated at day 5 and 9 post-infection. The wounds were analyzed for bacterial counts, expression of P. aeruginosa virulence and biofilm-synthesis genes, biofilm morphology, infiltrating immune cells, re-epithelialization, and genome-wide gene expression (RNA-Seq transcriptome. This analysis revealed that 2 hrs after bacterial inoculation into day-3 wounds, the down-regulated genes (infected vs. non-infected of the wound edge were nearly all non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs, comprised of snoRNA, miRNA, and RNU6 pseudogenes, and their down-regulation preceded a general down-regulation of skin-enriched coding gene expression. As the active infection intensified, ncRNAs remained overrepresented among down-regulated genes; however, at 6 and 24 hrs they changed to a different set, which overlapped between these times, and excluded RNU6 pseudogenes but included snRNA components of the major and minor spliceosomes. Additionally, the raw counts of multiple types of differentially-expressed ncRNAs increased on post-wounding day 3 in control wounds, but infection suppressed this increase. After 5 and 9 days, these ncRNA counts in control wounds decreased, whereas they increased in the infected, healing-impaired wounds. These data suggest a sequential and coordinated change in the levels of transcripts

  18. RNA-Seq Transcriptomic Responses of Full-Thickness Dermal Excision Wounds to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acute and Biofilm Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karna, S L Rajasekhar; D'Arpa, Peter; Chen, Tsute; Qian, Li-Wu; Fourcaudot, Andrea B; Yamane, Kazuyoshi; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J; You, Tao; Leung, Kai P

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of wounds in clinical settings are major complications whose outcomes are influenced by host responses that are not completely understood. Herein we evaluated transcriptomic changes of wounds as they counter P. aeruginosa infection-first active infection, and then chronic biofilm infection. We used the dermal full-thickness, rabbit ear excisional wound model. We studied the wound response: towards acute infection at 2, 6, and 24 hrs after inoculating 106 bacteria into day-3 wounds; and, towards more chronic biofilm infection of wounds similarly infected for 24 hrs but then treated with topical antibiotic to coerce biofilm growth and evaluated at day 5 and 9 post-infection. The wounds were analyzed for bacterial counts, expression of P. aeruginosa virulence and biofilm-synthesis genes, biofilm morphology, infiltrating immune cells, re-epithelialization, and genome-wide gene expression (RNA-Seq transcriptome). This analysis revealed that 2 hrs after bacterial inoculation into day-3 wounds, the down-regulated genes (infected vs. non-infected) of the wound edge were nearly all non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), comprised of snoRNA, miRNA, and RNU6 pseudogenes, and their down-regulation preceded a general down-regulation of skin-enriched coding gene expression. As the active infection intensified, ncRNAs remained overrepresented among down-regulated genes; however, at 6 and 24 hrs they changed to a different set, which overlapped between these times, and excluded RNU6 pseudogenes but included snRNA components of the major and minor spliceosomes. Additionally, the raw counts of multiple types of differentially-expressed ncRNAs increased on post-wounding day 3 in control wounds, but infection suppressed this increase. After 5 and 9 days, these ncRNA counts in control wounds decreased, whereas they increased in the infected, healing-impaired wounds. These data suggest a sequential and coordinated change in the levels of transcripts of multiple

  19. [Surgical wound infection in patients undergoing extra-anatomical arterial surgery. A retrospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monreal, M; Callejas, J M; Lisbona, C; Martorell, A; Lerma, R; Boabaid, R; Mejía, S

    1993-01-01

    We present a retrospective review of a series of patients from our Service submitted to surgical extra-anatomical grafts. Correlation between diverse variants and ulterior obliteration by thrombosis or infection of the surgical wounds is analyzed. The series included 133 patients surgically treated between 1986 and 1991. The studied variants were: sex, age, type of graft, the material used, length and type of anesthesia, presentation of hypotension during the surgical intervention, diabetes, platelet recount. Fourteen patients (11%) presented early graft obliteration and 15 (11%) presented an infection of their surgical wound. Only the platelet variant showed statistical differences in patients presenting infection. A high recount of platelets could be a factor risk of infection.

  20. Antioxidant, antibacterial and phytochemical properties of two medicinal plants against the wound infecting bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idowu Jonas Sagbo

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: These results indicated that the ethanol leaf extracts of these plants have antioxidant and antibacterial activity against the tested bacteria possibly due to the presence of bioactive compounds and therefore could be used as alternative therapy against wound infection caused by these bacteria in diabetic patients.

  1. Biliary obstruction and wound healing, infection, renal function and bloodcoagulation : an experimental study in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Snellen

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of the study reported in this thesis, was to investigate the effects of biliary obstruction on wound healing, resistance to infection, renal function and blood coagulation. Disturbances in these processes are often reported in patients with obstructive jaundice, and may lead

  2. Wound infections following open reduction and internal fixation of calcaneal fractures with an extended lateral approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backes, Manouk; Schepers, Tim; Beerekamp, M. Suzan H.; Luitse, Jan S. K.; Goslings, J. Carel; Schep, Niels W. L.

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative wound infections (PWI) following calcaneal fracture surgery can lead to prolonged hospital stay and additional treatment with antibiotics, surgical debridement or implant removal. Our aim was to determine the incidence of superficial and deep PWI and to identify risk factors (RF).

  3. The SNaP Wound Care System: a case series using a novel ultraportable negative pressure wound therapy device for the treatment of diabetic lower extremity wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Bruce; Oldenbrook, Leslie; Ryu, Justin; Fong, Kenton D; Schubart, Peter J

    2010-07-01

    Although there is significant evidence supporting the use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for the treatment of lower extremity diabetic ulcers, currently available electrically powered NPWT systems are not ideally suited for treating smaller diabetic foot ulcers. The Smart Negative Pressure (SNaP) Wound Care System is a novel, ultraportable device that delivers NPWT without the use of an electrically powered pump. It was specifically designed to meet the wound care needs of patients with diabetes. The SNaP System is compact, silent, mobile, easy-to-use, and available off-the-shelf. It is fully disposable and may offer other important benefits over electrically powered systems to both the clinician and patient. We review the evidence for use of NPWT for the treatment of diabetic wounds and discuss the potential benefits of this new NPWT technology for patients with diabetes. We also present a case series of four difficult lower extremity diabetic ulcers that were successfully treated with the SNaP System. This study suggests that the SNaP System may be a useful addition to the armamentarium of the diabetic wound care clinician. 2010 Diabetes Technology Society.

  4. Review of Subcutaneous Wound Drainage in Reducing Surgical Site Infections after Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Manzoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Surgical site infections (SSIs remain a significant problem after laparotomies. The aim of this review was to assess the evidence on the efficacy of subcutaneous wound drainage in reducing SSI. Methods. MEDLINE database was searched. Studies were identified and screened according to criteria to determine their eligibility for meta-analysis. Meta-analysis was performed using the Mantel-Haenszel method and a fixed effects model. Results. Eleven studies were included with two thousand eight hundred and sixty-four patients. One thousand four hundred and fifty patients were in the control group and one thousand four hundred and fourteen patients were in the drain group. Wound drainage in all patients shows no statistically significant benefit in reducing SSI incidence. Use of drainage in high risk patients, contaminated wound types, and obese patients appears beneficial. Conclusion. Using subcutaneous wound drainage after laparotomy in all patients is unnecessary as it does not reduce SSI risk. Similarly, there seems to be no benefit in using it in clean and clean contaminated wounds. However, there may be benefit in using drains in patients who are at high risk, including patients who are obese and/or have contaminated wound types. A well designed trial is needed which examines these factors.

  5. RNA-Seq Transcriptomic Responses of Full-Thickness Dermal Excision Wounds to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acute and Biofilm Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsute; Qian, Li-Wu; Fourcaudot, Andrea B.; Yamane, Kazuyoshi; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J.; You, Tao; Leung, Kai P.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of wounds in clinical settings are major complications whose outcomes are influenced by host responses that are not completely understood. Herein we evaluated transcriptomic changes of wounds as they counter P. aeruginosa infection—first active infection, and then chronic biofilm infection. We used the dermal full-thickness, rabbit ear excisional wound model. We studied the wound response: towards acute infection at 2, 6, and 24 hrs after inoculating 106 bacteria into day-3 wounds; and, towards more chronic biofilm infection of wounds similarly infected for 24 hrs but then treated with topical antibiotic to coerce biofilm growth and evaluated at day 5 and 9 post-infection. The wounds were analyzed for bacterial counts, expression of P. aeruginosa virulence and biofilm-synthesis genes, biofilm morphology, infiltrating immune cells, re-epithelialization, and genome-wide gene expression (RNA-Seq transcriptome). This analysis revealed that 2 hrs after bacterial inoculation into day-3 wounds, the down-regulated genes (infected vs. non-infected) of the wound edge were nearly all non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), comprised of snoRNA, miRNA, and RNU6 pseudogenes, and their down-regulation preceded a general down-regulation of skin-enriched coding gene expression. As the active infection intensified, ncRNAs remained overrepresented among down-regulated genes; however, at 6 and 24 hrs they changed to a different set, which overlapped between these times, and excluded RNU6 pseudogenes but included snRNA components of the major and minor spliceosomes. Additionally, the raw counts of multiple types of differentially-expressed ncRNAs increased on post-wounding day 3 in control wounds, but infection suppressed this increase. After 5 and 9 days, these ncRNA counts in control wounds decreased, whereas they increased in the infected, healing-impaired wounds. These data suggest a sequential and coordinated change in the levels of transcripts of multiple

  6. A Comparison of Tissue versus Swab Culturing of Infected Diabetic Foot Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the efficacy of swabbing versus tissue biopsy for microbiological diagnosis of diabetic foot infection. Methods. This was a prospective trial. Fifty-six patients with diabetic foot infection were divided into the following 3 groups according to the PEDIS grading system: grade 2 (n=10, grade 3 (n=29, and grade 4 (n=17. Two specimens were collected from each wound for microbial culturing after debridement, including a superficial swab and a deep tissue punch biopsy specimen. Results. Swab culturing identified all of the microorganisms isolated from the corresponding deep tissue specimens in 9/10 of grade 2 wounds (90.0%, and this proportion decreased to 12/29 (41.4% and 7/17 (41.2% for grades 3 and 4 wounds, respectively (p=0.02. Moreover, the sensitivity for identifying Gram-negative bacteria, such as E. coli and Citrobacter, by swabbing was low (33.3%. In addition, some Gram-negative bacteria, such as Serratia and Ralstonia pickettii, were isolated from deep tissues but not from swabs. Conclusions. Swab culturing may be reliable for identification of pathogens in diabetic foot wounds classified as grade 2. However, it is advisable to culture deep tissue specimens for wounds of grade ≥3 because swab culturing is associated with a high risk of missing pathogens, especially Gram-negative bacteria.

  7. Spectroscopic Biomarkers for Monitoring Wound Healing and Infection in Combat Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    Case 7 Case 5 Case 4 Case 6 Case 9 Impaired healing Normal healing 24 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 COL18A1 COL1A1 COL3A1 COL4A1 COL4A3...Normal Impaired FIRST DEBRIDEMENT LAST DEBRIDEMENT 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 COL18A1 COL1A1 COL3A1 COL4A1 COL4A3 Normal Impaired

  8. Nitrosoglutathione generating nitric oxide nanoparticles as an improved strategy for combating Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouake, Jason; Schairer, David; Kutner, Allison; Sanchez, David A; Makdisi, Joy; Blecher-Paz, Karin; Nacharaju, Parimala; Tuckman-Vernon, Chaim; Gialanella, Phil; Friedman, Joel M; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Friedman, Adam J

    2012-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a community-acquired, nosocomial pathogen that is an important cause of human morbidity and mortality; it is intrinsically resistant to several antibiotics and is capable of developing resistance to newly developed drugs via a variety of mechanisms. P aeruginosa's ubiquity and multidrug resistance (MDR) warrants the development of innovative methods that overcome its ability to develop resistance. We have previously described a nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticle (NO-np) platform that effectively kills gram-positive and gram-negative organisms in vitro and accelerates clinical recovery in vivo in murine wound and abscess infection models. We have also demonstrated that when glutathione (GSH) is added to NO-np, the nitroso intermediate S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is formed, which has greater activity against P aeruginosa and other gram-negative organisms compared with NO-np alone. In the current study, we evaluate the potential of NO-np to generate GSNO both in vitro and in vivo in a murine excisional wound model infected with an MDR clinical isolate of P aeruginosa. Whereas NO-np alone inhibited P aeruginosa growth in vitro for up to 8 hours, NO-np+GSH completely inhibited P aeruginosa growth for 24 hours. Percent survival in the NO-np+GSH-treated isolates was significantly lower than in the NO-np (36.1% vs 8.3%; P=.004). In addition, NO-np+GSH accelerated wound closure in P aeruginosa-infected wounds, and NO-np+GSH-treated wounds had significantly lower bacterial burden when compared to NO-np-treated wounds (P<.001). We conclude that GSNO is easily generated from our NO-np platform and has the potential to be used as an antimicrobial agent against MDR organisms such as P aeruginosa.

  9. Evaluation of Epidermal Skin Grafts for the Treatment of Complex Wounds in a Wound Care Center: A 94-Patient Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Katherine; Hyde, Jessica

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, a new technology for autologous epidermal harvesting has been developed to produce epidermal skin grafts (ESGs) for use over wounds. This technology employs negative pressure and heat to raise the epidermal skin layer, allowing for consistent and reproducible epidermal harvesting. The aim of this case series is to present the authors' experience using an automated, epidermal harvesting system to produce ESGs to treat wounds of patients with multiple comorbidities. This case series was conducted between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2014. Patients with wounds (≤ 25 cm2) that failed to heal were treated with ESGs by a group of 3 wound care physicians in 2 outpatient wound care centers in a community health center setting. A total of 94 patients with 102 wounds were identified. Of the 94 patients, 3 were noncompliant and 9 were lost to follow-up. Therefore, 82 patients with 90 wounds were included in the analysis. The majority of wounds demonstrated epithelialization (83/90, 92.2%). Of the 90 wounds, 75 (83.3%) healed following epidermal grafting, 4 (4.4%) wounds displayed improvement, and 11 (12.2%) did not heal. Minimal or no pain at the donor site was reported by the patients, and all donor sites healed without complications. This case series provides additional evidence for the use of ESGs for the treatment of wounds that fail to heal.

  10. Development and Preclinical Testing of Laser-Generated Shockwave Therapy for Infected Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Nathan Craig

    or wound area. As a result, LGS also showed no deleterious effects on the tissue which would hinder wound healing. With these results, LGS therapy shows promise as an alternative infected wound treatment, and a system capable of completing thorough animal trials is available for future researchers.

  11. A Case of Extensive Wound Myiasis Caused by Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in a Patient with Maxillary Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma, in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel-Kaya, Filiz; Orkun, Ömer; Çakmak, Ayşe; İnkaya, A Çağkan; Öcal, Murat; Erguven, Sibel

    2016-06-01

    The larvae causing myiasis can lead extensive tissue destruction, invasion into deep tissues and secondary infections. Poor hygiene, low socioeconomic condition and presence of open wounds are the most important predisposing factors. This case report describes destructive wound myiasis in a 58-year-old male patient diagnosed with maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma who lives in a rural area in Ankara, Turkey. Approximately 200 larvae were collected and identified as Lucilia sericata by morphological examination. Myiasis should be considered especially when the patient has open extensive lesions such as malignant wounds.

  12. A Hydrogel-Based Localized Release of Colistin for Antimicrobial Treatment of Burn Wound Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chongyu; Zhao, Jinxin; Kempe, Kristian; Wilson, Paul; Wang, Jiping; Velkov, Tony; Li, Jian; Davis, Thomas P; Whittaker, Michael R; Haddleton, David M

    2017-02-01

    There is an urgent unmet medical need for new treatments for wound and burn infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative "superbugs," especially the problematic Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, the incorporation of colistin, a potent lipopeptide into a self-healable hydrogel (via dynamic imine bond formation) following the chemical reaction between the amine groups present in glycol chitosan and an aldehyde-modified poly(ethylene glycol), is reported. The storage module (G') of the colistin-loaded hydrogel ranges from 1.3 to 5.3 kPa by varying the amount of the cross-linker and colistin loading providing different options for topical wound healing. The majority of the colistin is released from the hydrogel within 24 h and remains active as demonstrated by both antibacterial in vitro disk diffusion and time-kill assays. Moreover and pleasingly, the colistin-loaded hydrogel performs almost equally well as native colistin against both the colistin-sensitive and also colistin-resistant P. aeruginosa strain in the in vivo animal "burn" infection model despite exhibiting a slower killing profile in vitro. Based on this antibiotic performance along with the biodegradability of the product, it is believed the colistin-loaded hydrogel to be a potential localized wound-healing formulation to treat burn wounds against microbial infection. © 2016 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The Development and Content Validation of a Multidisciplinary, Evidence-based Wound Infection Prevention and Treatment Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhary, Sammy A; Davey, Chris; Bari, Rebecca; Bean, Jordan; Reber, Tyler; Gallagher, Kathy; Couch, Kara; Hurlow, Jennifer; Laforet, Karen; McIssac, Corrine; Napier, Karen; Vilar-Compte, Diana; Zakhary, Emily; Hermans, Michel; Bolton, Laura

    2017-11-01

    Acute and chronic wound infections create clinical, economic, and patient-centered challenges best met by multidisciplinary wound care teams providing consistent, valid, clinically relevant, safe, evidence-based management across settings. To develop an evidence-based wound infection guideline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases were searched from inception through August 1, 2017 using the terms (or synonyms) wound infection and risk factor, significant, diagnosis, prevention, treatment, or surveillance. Studies on parasitic infections, in vitro studies, and non-English publications were excluded. The 19-member International Consolidated Wound Infection Guideline Task Force (ICWIG TF), hosted by the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC), reviewed publications/assessed levels of evidence, developed recommendations, and verified representation of all major recommendations from 27 multidisciplinary wound infection documents. Using a web-based survey, practitioners were invited to assess the clinical relevance and strength of each recommendation using standardized scores. Survey responses from 42 practitioners, including registered nurses (RNs), Wound Care Certified and advanced practice RNs, physical therapists, physicians, podiatrists, and scientists from 6 countries were returned to AAWC staff, tabulated in a spreadsheet, and analyzed for content validity. Respondents had a median of >15 years of military or civilian practice and managed an average of 15.9 ± 23 patients with infected wounds per week. Recommendations supported by strong evidence and/or content validated as relevant by at least 75% of respondents qualified for guideline inclusion. Most (159, 88.8%) of the 179 ICWIG recommendations met these criteria and were summarized as a checklist to harmonize team wound infection management across specialties and settings. Most of the 20 recommendations found not to be valid were related

  14. Bacteriophage Therapy for Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm-Infected Wounds: A New Approach to Chronic Wound Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    durability and virulence of biofilm in the face of host defenses, a continued effort toward innovative treatment principles and solutions is needed. There...in tryptic soy broth at 37°C until log-phase was achieved. Bacteria were harvested and washed in phosphate-buffered sa- line three times by...biofilm- dominant infection, an antimicrobial , absorbent dressing containing polyhexamethylene bigua- nide (Telfa AMD; Tyco Healthcare Group, Mans

  15. Ultraviolet C Light for Acinetobacter baumannii Wound Infections in Mice: Potential Use for Battlefield Wound Decontamination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    access to food and water ad libitum. They were maintained on a 12-hour light and dark cycle at room temperature. For skin abrasion infections, 19 mice...deparaffinized, and rehydrated with distilled water . Skin sections were incubated for 30 minutes at room temperature with antithymine dimer monoclonal anti...by in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Photochem Photobiol. 2002;75:51 57. 15. Jett BD, Hatter KL, Huycke MM, et al. Simplified agar plate method for

  16. Thermal injury induces impaired function in polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes and reduced control of burn wound infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, H.; Moser, C.; Jensen, P. O.

    2009-01-01

    with infected burn wound. Furthermore, the oxidative burst and the phagocytic capacity of the PMNs were reduced in the group of mice with burn wound. Using this novel mouse model of thermal injury a decline of peripheral leucocytes was observed, whereas the increased local inflammatory response at the site......Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6% third-degree burn...... injury was induced in mice with a hot-air blower. The third-degree burn was confirmed histologically. The mice were allocated into five groups: control, shave, burn, infection and burn infection group. At 48 h, a decline in the concentration of peripheral blood leucocytes was observed in the group...

  17. Biodegradable polymer nanofiber membrane for the repair of cutaneous wounds in dogs - two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Gomes Amaral

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of wound healing and its treatment is extremely important in veterinary medicine due to the high frequency of wounds and the difficulty in treating wounds by second intention. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the use of a nanofiber membrane made of biodegradable polymers as a method of wound treatment in dogs. This study comprised two dogs with bite wounds. Debridement and cleaning was performed followed by the application of the membrane. In one dog, the wound was in the left proximal calcaneal region with clinical signs of infection, necrotic tissue, and muscle and the gastrocnemius tendon were exposed. The wound displayed rapid formation of granulation tissue which became excessive, so it was necessary to debride several times. However, with the suspension of the use of the membrane, formation of this tissue was not observed, and the wound evolved to epithelialization and fast contraction. In the second dog, there was a deep wound on the medial aspect of the proximal right hind limb, with clinical signs of infection, with muscle exposure. Once the membrane was placed, granulation tissue formed, and the membrane was used until the level of this tissue reached the skin. The wound underwent rapid epithelialization and contraction, without developing exuberant granulation tissue. Efficient wound repair was observed and the dogs exhibited greater comfort during application and use of the membrane. More studies should be conducted in dogs focusing on the application of this membrane until the appearance of healthy granulation tissue, as continued use seems to stimulate the formation of exuberant granulation tissue.

  18. Evaluating effectiveness of antibiotic polymethylmethacrylate beads in achieving wound sterilization and graft preservation in patients with early and late vascular graft infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poi, Mun Jye; Pisimisis, George; Barshes, Neal R; Darouiche, Rabih O; Lin, Peter H; Kougias, Panagiotis; Bechara, Carlos Fares

    2013-05-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of antibiotic-based polymethylmethacrylate (ab-PMMA) beads in achieving wound sterilization and graft preservation in patients with vascular graft infections. We reviewed 31 patients treated for 37 graft infections over the past 5 years using ab-PMMA beads in a single institution. All patients were started on broad-spectrum antibiotics and later switched to targeted therapy based on intraoperative cultures for at least 6 weeks. All patients underwent multiple planned wound explorations, debridements and washouts. Cultures were obtained each time. Decision to do formal closure depended on culture results and wound appearance. All wounds were closed with a muscle flap. The endpoints included wound sterilization, limb salvage, recurrence of infection, and graft preservation. A total of 19 different organisms were cultured, and 48.6% of cases were polymicrobial, thereby accounting for a total of 60 isolates. The majority (n = 27) received a mix of tobramycin/vancomycin PMMA beads; vancomycin beads (n = 5); tobramycin beads (n = 1); and gentamicin/vancomycin beads (n = 4). Wound sterilization based on cultures was achieved in 32 of 34 wounds (94.1%). Of the cases, 5 underwent early graft removal, 3 with immediate reconstruction, and 1 case underwent a major amputation (2.7 %). Graft preservation was attempted in 32 cases (86.5%). No death occurred within 30 days. Limb salvage was achieved in 28 of the 32 preserved graft cases (87.5%) at a mean follow-up of 26 months (6 to 51 months). The long-term limb salvage rate for the cohort was 86.5%. Of the patients, 4 presented with recurrent graft infection and occlusion, causing acute limb ischemia and resulting in major amputation. The reinfection rate was 12.5% in the graft-preservation group and 11.4% in both the graft-preserved and the in situ replacement groups. Sterilization of graft infection can be achieved with ab-PMMA beads followed by closure with muscle

  19. Does Fine Needle Aspiration Microbiology Offer Any Benefit Over Wound Swab in Detecting the Causative Organisms in Surgical Site Infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudharsanan, Sundaramurthi; Gs, Sreenath; Sureshkumar, Sathasivam; Vijayakumar, Chellappa; Sujatha, Sistla; Kate, Vikram

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the role of ne needle aspiration microbiology (FNAM) in detecting the causative organisms of postoperative surgical site infections (SSIs) in comparison with the standard technique of surface swabbing. Ma- terials and Methods. In this study, 150 patients with SSIs following elective and emergency operations were included. In all patients, FNAM was performed along with conventional surface swabbing to identify the causative microorganism. Sensitivity of surface swab and FNAM was calculated as the number of samples collected from the diagnosed case of SSI. A total of 115 positive cultures were obtained from the 150 patients with SSIs; surface swab was positive in 110 cases and FNAM was positive in 94 cases. The mean number of organisms isolated by surface swab, and FNAM was 0.95 and 0.8, respectively. The sensitivity of surface swab was 94.3% in elective cases and 96.25% in emergency cases. The sensitivity of FNAM was 82.8% in elective cases and 82.5% in emergency cases. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of FNAM and surface swab did not signi cantly differ in clean elective cases. The overall sensitivity of surface swab and FNAM was 95.65% and 81.7%, respectively. Comparing the antibiotic suscep- tibility pattern, no difference was observed when the same organ- ism was isolated by both methods, indicating that FNAM does not offer bene t over the conventional wound surface swab in detecting microorganisms in SSI in both elective and emergency surgeries. In certain cases with unexplained wound infections, FNAM can be used as an investigation to identify speci c pathogens not detected by conventional surface swab.

  20. Variations in Wounding by Relationship Intimacy in Homicide Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojan, Carrie; Krull, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    There are numerous examples in the homicide literature of a presumed connection between the victim-offender relationship and the manner, extent, and body location of wounds inflicted in homicides. The current study examined variations in wounding patterns according to the intimacy of the victim-offender relationship in a sample of urban homicides…

  1. Fatal multifocal Pasteurella multocida infection: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbart, Mathieu; Zogheib, Elie; Hchikat, Abdel Hakim; Kirat, Kahina; Ferraz, Linda; Guerin-Robardey, Anne-Marie; Trojette, Faouzi; Moubarak-Daher, Mona; Dupont, Hervé

    2015-07-02

    In humans, Pasteurella multocida infections are usually limited to the soft tissues surrounding a lesion. However, P. multocida can also cause systemic infections (such as pneumonia, lung abscess, peritonitis, endocarditis, meningitis and sepsis)-especially in patients with other underlying medical conditions. We report on a case of fulminant P. multocida bacteremia at several sites (soft tissues, endocarditis and joints) on a white European man. Despite surgery and intensive medical care, the patient died. The present case emphasizes the importance of appropriate initial treatment of skin wounds. Patients at risk should be aware of the possible consequences of being bitten, scratched or licked by their pet.

  2. [Significance of bacteria detection with filter paper method on diagnosis of diabetic foot wound infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, X H; Zhu, Y P; Ren, G Q; Li, G C; Zhang, J; Zou, L J; Feng, Z B; Li, B H

    2017-02-20

    Objective: To evaluate the significance of bacteria detection with filter paper method on diagnosis of diabetic foot wound infection. Methods: Eighteen patients with diabetic foot ulcer conforming to the study criteria were hospitalized in Liyuan Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology from July 2014 to July 2015. Diabetic foot ulcer wounds were classified according to the University of Texas diabetic foot classification (hereinafter referred to as Texas grade) system, and general condition of patients with wounds in different Texas grade was compared. Exudate and tissue of wounds were obtained, and filter paper method and biopsy method were adopted to detect the bacteria of wounds of patients respectively. Filter paper method was regarded as the evaluation method, and biopsy method was regarded as the control method. The relevance, difference, and consistency of the detection results of two methods were tested. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of filter paper method in bacteria detection were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn based on the specificity and sensitivity of filter paper method in bacteria detection of 18 patients to predict the detection effect of the method. Data were processed with one-way analysis of variance and Fisher's exact test. In patients tested positive for bacteria by biopsy method, the correlation between bacteria number detected by biopsy method and that by filter paper method was analyzed with Pearson correlation analysis. Results: (1) There were no statistically significant differences among patients with wounds in Texas grade 1, 2, and 3 in age, duration of diabetes, duration of wound, wound area, ankle brachial index, glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting blood sugar, blood platelet count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, aspartate aminotransferase, serum creatinine, and

  3. Kluyvera cryocrescens finger infection: case report and review of eighteen Kluyvera infections in human beings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, B C; Vijayan, H; Shekar, R

    1998-11-01

    We report a case of soft tissue infection with Kluyvera cryocrescens and a critical review of Kluyvera infections. A 31-year-old diabetic man used a new chemical for stripping the floor with his bare hands. Two days later he developed a blister on a finger which progressed to tenosynovitis in spite of intravenous nafcillin therapy. After 11 days culture and sensitivity results dictated treatment with intravenous ticarcillin/clavulanic acid. The wound was debrided twice, and later a skin flap was done. Wound cultures became sterile after 7 days of treatment with ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, and he recovered. This case represents the fourth clinical infection with K. cryocrescens and the eighteenth of Kluyvera to be reported. Four others were K. ascorbata, and the remaining ten Kluyvera infections in humans were not identified beyond genus. Our case and review of the 17 previous cases emphasize that while Kluyvera rarely cause disease, these opportunistic Gram-negative bacilli may be virulent in a variety of sites under as yet poorly defined host conditions. Sites of infection varied, but the brain and meninges were not among them. Two patients had diabetes mellitus, none had AIDS, and four died. Once shown clinically to be the cause of an infection, Kluyvera deserve aggressive treatment which acknowledges their ampicillin resistance.

  4. Photodynamic therapy for Staphylococcus aureus infected burn wounds in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambrechts, Saskia A. G.; Demidova, Tatiana N.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    The rise of multiply antibiotic resistant bacteria has led to searches for novel antimicrobial therapies to treat infections. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential candidate; it uses the combination of a photosensitizer with visible light to produce reactive oxygen species that lead to cell

  5. Risk factors for abdominal wound dehiscence in children: A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ramshorst, G.H.; Salu, N.E.; Bax, N.M.A.; Hop, W.C.J.; van Heurn, E.; Aronson, D.C.; Lange, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    Background: In the limited literature concerning abdominal wound dehiscence after laparotomy in children, reported incidences range between 0.2-1.2% with associated mortality rates of 8-45%. The goal of this retrospective case-control study was to identify major risk factors for abdominal wound

  6. Risk Factors for Abdominal Wound Dehiscence in Children: A Case-Control Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ramshorst, Gabriëlle H.; Salu, Nathalie E.; Bax, Nikolaas M. A.; Hop, Wim C. J.; van Heurn, Ernst; Aronson, Daniel C.; Lange, Johan F.

    2009-01-01

    In the limited literature concerning abdominal wound dehiscence after laparotomy in children, reported incidences range between 0.2-1.2% with associated mortality rates of 8-45%. The goal of this retrospective case-control study was to identify major risk factors for abdominal wound dehiscence in

  7. A Case Report of Sanguis Draconis for Treating a Patient With Refractory Wound Dehiscence After Breast Cancer Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guizhen; Hua, Yafang; Jin, Xueqin; Yan, Chunmei

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common female malignant tumors. According to data statistics, the incidence of breast cancer was 7% to 10% for a variety of malignant tumors, being only lower than that of uterine cancer. The methods of treating breast cancer are given priority over operative treatment and combined with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, exosmosis of chemotherapeutic drugs is a common complication of chemotherapy. Exosmosis of drugs can stimulate local organs to induce acute inflammatory reaction and necrosis, which finally lead to wound infection and difficulty in healing. In December 2013, a patient with full-thickness wound (an area of 5 × 3 cm) dehiscence at the completion of the second phase of chemotherapy for left breast cancer after radical operation was admitted to our department. Her wound had healed after radical operation. The patient followed an integrative therapy treatment protocol that consisted of an external application of a phytomedicine called Sanguis Draconis and combined with a series of conventional treatments, including 3M Transparent Dressing moist therapy, increase in nutrition, and prevention therapies for infection. The patient's integrative treatment program resulted in complete wound healing, and the successful completion of the late 6 courses of chemotherapy. The article describes the nursing experiences associated with this case study.

  8. The use of liposomal solutions of antibiotics in treatment of infected and festering wounds in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олег Владимирович Спахи

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of research. To study the use of liposomal solutions of antibiotics in the complex treatment of infected and festering wounds in children.Materials and methods of research: The results of clinical and laboratory examinations of 77 children 3-18 years old with infected and festering wounds were analyzed. All children were distributed into groups of observation by the character of the treatment: in 37 sick children (the main group liposomal preparations were used in the complex treatment. Patients of the control group (40 children get the generally accepted complex treatment. The groups of comparison were statistically similar by the character and localization of pathological process, age, prescription of disease. In the main group an antibacterial-liposomal mixture was injected into the wound alongside with the generally accepted methods. The dynamics of the clinical, laboratory, cytological, bacteriological and morphological indicators was defined using the generally accepted technics. The general condition of patient’s organism was assessed with a help of laboratory methods of research (general clinical and biochemical analyses.Results. In the main group it was observed a persistent tendency to normalization of leukocytal formula and of the number of leukocytes in peripheral blood that reached normal values (p < 0,05 on 7th day. In 36 patients of the control group leukocytosis remained for 7 days. Evident differences of indicators of leukocytal index of intoxication and of an index of the shift of leukocytal formula in the main and the control groups were observed on 3-4th day. In addition its decrease was combined with diminution of an intensity of clinical symptoms and with decrease of manifestations of the local pathological process.Bacteriological examination of the nidus of inflammation in patients of examined groups revealed that in the main group the diminution of the degree of infectious contamination passed faster (p<0,05 – on

  9. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy as a point-of-care diagnostic for infection in wound effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghebremedhin, Meron; Yesupriya, Shubha; Crane, Nicole J.

    2016-03-01

    In military medicine, one of the challenges in dealing with large combat-related injuries is the prevalence of bacterial infection, including multidrug resistant organisms. This can prolong the wound healing process and lead to wound dehiscence. Current methods of identifying bacterial infection rely on culturing microbes from patient material and performing biochemical tests, which together can take 2-3 days to complete. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful vibrational spectroscopy technique that allows for highly sensitive structural detection of analytes adsorbed onto specially prepared metal surfaces. In the past, we have been able to discriminate between bacterial isolates grown on solid culture media using standard Raman spectroscopic methods. Here, SERS is utilized to assess the presence of bacteria in wound effluent samples taken directly from patients. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt for the application of SERS directly to wound effluent. The utilization of SERS as a point-of-care diagnostic tool would enable physicians to determine course of treatment and drug administration in a matter of hours.

  10. Efficacy of Nano Germicidal Light Therapy on Wound Related Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    al., eds. Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine . 16th ed. New York: McGraw Hill; 2004. 24. Evans HL, Lefrak SN, Lyman J, et al. Cost of Gram...Hospital Acquired Infections. In: Kasper D, Braunwald E, Fauci A, et al., eds. Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine . 16th ed. New York...Laboratory Animal Care (AAALAC). During the initial acclimation period of six days, the rats received a comprehensive veterinary health inspection to

  11. Rhinovirus infection induces cytotoxicity and delays wound healing in bronchial epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantopoulos Andreas G

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human rhinoviruses (RV, the most common triggers of acute asthma exacerbations, are considered not cytotoxic to the bronchial epithelium. Recent observations, however, have questioned this knowledge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of RV to induce epithelial cytotoxicity and affect epithelial repair in-vitro. Methods Monolayers of BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells, seeded at different densities were exposed to RV serotypes 1b, 5, 7, 9, 14, 16. Cytotoxicity was assessed chromatometrically. Epithelial monolayers were mechanically wounded, exposed or not to RV and the repopulation of the damaged area was assessed by image analysis. Finally epithelial cell proliferation was assessed by quantitation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA by flow cytometry. Results RV1b, RV5, RV7, RV14 and RV16 were able to induce considerable epithelial cytotoxicity, more pronounced in less dense cultures, in a cell-density and dose-dependent manner. RV9 was not cytotoxic. Furthermore, RV infection diminished the self-repair capacity of bronchial epithelial cells and reduced cell proliferation. Conclusion RV-induced epithelial cytotoxicity may become considerable in already compromised epithelium, such as in the case of asthma. The RV-induced impairment on epithelial proliferation and self-repair capacity may contribute to the development of airway remodeling.

  12. Clinical safety and effectiveness evaluation of a new antimicrobial wound dressing designed to manage exudate, infection and biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Daniel G; Parsons, David; Bowler, Philip G

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a next-generation antimicrobial wound dressing (NGAD; AQUACEL ® Ag+ Extra™ dressing) designed to manage exudate, infection and biofilm. Clinicians were requested to evaluate the NGAD within their standard protocol of care for up to 4 weeks, or as long as deemed clinically appropriate, in challenging wounds that were considered to be impeded by suspected biofilm or infection. Baseline information and post-evaluation dressing safety and effectiveness data were recorded using standardised evaluation forms. This data included wound exudate levels, wound bed appearance including suspected biofilm, wound progression, skin health and dressing usage. A total of 112 wounds from 111 patients were included in the evaluations, with a median duration of 12 months, and biofilm was suspected in over half of all wounds (54%). After the introduction of the NGAD, exudate levels had shifted from predominantly high or moderate to low or moderate levels, while biofilm suspicion fell from 54% to 27% of wounds. Wound bed coverage by tissue type was generally shifted from sloughy or suspected biofilm towards predominantly granulation tissue after the inclusion of the NGAD. Stagnant (65%) and deteriorating wounds (27%) were shifted to improved (65%) or healed wounds (13%), while skin health was also reported to have improved in 63% of wounds. High levels of clinician satisfaction with the dressing effectiveness and change frequency were accompanied by a low number of dressing-related adverse events (n = 3; 2·7%) and other negative observations or comments. This clinical user evaluation supports the growing body of evidence that the anti-biofilm technology in the NGAD results in a safe and effective dressing for the management of a variety of challenging wound types. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Healing Potentials of Oral Moringa Oleifera Leaves Extract and Tetracycline on Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infected Wounds of Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyarefe, Oghenemega D; Idowu, Aderayo; Afolabi, Jeremiah M

    2015-12-20

    The effects of oral dose of aqueous extract of Moringa oleifera and tetracycline antibiotics on cutaneous wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus were studied in eighteen adult wistar rats (159±31.5g) randomized into three groups: Group A, n = 6, Moringa oleifera-(300 mg/kg). Group B, n = 6, tetracycline (9.4 mg/kg) and Group C, n = 6, Sterile water (control). Six millimetres diameter nape wound, created on each rat under 2% xylazine (5 mg/kg) and 5% ketamine (35 mg/kg), was contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus (108 Colony Forming Unit (CFU). Following infection, treatment was commenced with daily oral dose of test preparations and the wounds were evaluated every other day i.e., day 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 and 15 for wetness (wound exudation), wound edge oedema, hyperaemia, granulation tissues and contraction (diameter). Severe wound exudation existed in all the groups between days 0-3 (p = 1.00). A significantly less wound exudation was observed at days 3-5 (p = 0.000) and 5-9 (p = 0.003) (ControlMoringa). Wound edge oedema was significantly less on days 5-9 (p = 0.000) and 9-15 (p = 0.001) (ControlMoringaMoringa Moringa> Tetracycline). Differences in wound diameter was not significant except at days 5-9 (p = 0.013) (Control> Moringa >Tetracycline). Oral doses of Moringa oleifera extract (300mg/kg) and tetracycline (9.4mg/kg) are not effective as antimicrobial or immune-boosting agents to enhance healing of wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus and hence not recommended for rapid clearance of Staphylococcus aureus infected wounds.

  14. Surgical Management of Chronic Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Benjamin R; Ha, Austin Y; Kwan, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we outline the important role the surgeon plays in the management of chronic wounds. Debridement and washout are required for grossly infected wounds and necrotizing soft tissue infections. Cutaneous cancers such as squamous cell carcinomas may contribute to chronic wounds and vice versa; if diagnosed, these should be treated with wide local excision. Arterial, venous, and even lymphatic flows can be restored in select cases to enhance delivery of nutrients and removal of metabolic waste and promote wound healing. In cases where vital structures, such as bones, joints, tendons, and nerves, are exposed, vascularized tissue transfers are often required. These tissue transfers can be local or remote, the latter of which necessitates anastomoses of arteries and veins. Pressure sores are managed by relieving pressure, treating acute trauma or infection, and using rotation fasciocutaneous flaps. Lastly, the surgeon must always consider the possibility of osteomyelitis and retained foreign body as etiology for chronic wounds.

  15. Improved Surgical Site Infection (SSI) rate through accurately assessed surgical wounds

    OpenAIRE

    John, Honeymol; Nimeri, Abdelrahman; Ellahham, Samer

    2015-01-01

    Sheikh Khalifa Medical City's (SKMC) Surgery Institute was identified as a high outlier in Surgical Site Infections (SSI) based on the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) - Semi-Annual Report (SAR) in January 2012. The aim of this project was to improve SSI rates through accurate wound classification. We identified SSI rate reduction as a performance improvement and safety priority at SKMC, a tertiary referral center. We used the American Col...

  16. Intracavity lavage and wound irrigation for prevention of surgical site infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Gill; Atkinson, Ross A; Smith, Tanya A; Rowlands, Ceri; Rithalia, Amber D; Crosbie, Emma J; Dumville, Jo C

    2017-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSIs) are wound infections that occur after an operative procedure. A preventable complication, they are costly and associated with poorer patient outcomes, increased mortality, morbidity and reoperation rates. Surgical wound irrigation is an intraoperative technique, which may reduce the rate of SSIs through removal of dead or damaged tissue, metabolic waste, and wound exudate. Irrigation can be undertaken prior to wound closure or postoperatively. Intracavity lavage is a similar technique used in operations that expose a bodily cavity; such as procedures on the abdominal cavity and during joint replacement surgery. Objectives To assess the effects of wound irrigation and intracavity lavage on the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI). Search methods In February 2017 we searched the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid Embase and EBSCO CINAHL Plus. We also searched three clinical trials registries and references of included studies and relevant systematic reviews. There were no restrictions on language, date of publication or study setting. Selection criteria We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of participants undergoing surgical procedures in which the use of a particular type of intraoperative washout (irrigation or lavage) was the only systematic difference between groups, and in which wounds underwent primary closure. The primary outcomes were SSI and wound dehiscence. Secondary outcomes were mortality, use of systemic antibiotics, antibiotic resistance, adverse events, re-intervention, length of hospital stay, and readmissions. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion at each stage. Two review authors also undertook data extraction, assessment of risk of bias and GRADE assessment. We calculated risk ratios or differences in means with 95% confidence intervals where

  17. Efficacy of 1% acetic acid in the treatment of chronic wounds infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa: prospective randomised controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhan, V L

    2016-12-01

    Chronic wounds are those wounds that are persistent and do not respond to any sort of treatment. The concept of using topical antiseptics on open wounds is to prevent and treat infections. They also help to shorten the time taken to heal the wounds. The use of topical agents on wounds to prevent infection is a minimal ability to develop resistance to the microorganisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen with innate resistance to many antibiotics. In places that are economically backward, these problems get compounded by the inability of patients to afford newer expensive drugs. Topically applied dilute acetic acid, which is cheap and easily available, has been found to be effective in such chronic wounds. In the present study, an attempt has been made to use 1% acetic acid as the sole antimicrobial agent for the treatment of pseudomonal wound infections. A control limb was used in which the wounds were treated with normal saline. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of acetic acid in low concentration of 1% in chronic wounds infected with P. aeruginosa. This was a prospective study conducted over a period of 6 months. All patients with chronic wounds infected with P. aeruginosa. Wounds due to massive burns, suspected malignancy, immunocompromised individuals and individuals with sepsis. A total of 32 patients enrolled in the study. Subjects were randomised equally to the 1% acetic acid group and saline dressing group. None of the patients received any systemic antibiotics during the study period and received twice daily dressings. The endpoint of the treatment was wounds free of P. aeruginosa. The duration of treatment required to eliminate the Pseudomonas from the wounds in the acetic acid group was on an average 7 days less than that required by the saline group. P value was acetic acid group irrespective of the sensitivity of the organism to antibiotics, Pseudomonas organisms were eliminated within the same time period - 4·5

  18. Honey as an antimicrobial agent against Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds

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    Vishnu Prasad Shenoy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As natural products garner attention in the medical field due to emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria, honey is valued for its antibacterial activity. Objective: Fifty strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds were evaluated for their antibacterial action using honey in comparison with different antibiotics and Dettol. Methodology and Results: All the strains were found to be sensitive to honey at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 20% in comparison with Dettol at 10% using agar dilution method. In the second step, the time kill assay was performed on five isolates of P. aeruginosa to demonstrate the bactericidal activity of honey at different dilutions of honey ranging from 20% to 100% at regular time intervals. All the isolates of P. aeruginosa tested were killed in 12-24 h depending on the dilutions of the honey tested. Thus, honey could prevent the growth of P. aeruginosa even if it was diluted by deionized water by fivefolds in vitro. Honey had almost uniform bactericidal activity against P. aeruginosa irrespective of their susceptibility to different classes of antibiotics. Conclusion: Honey which is a natural, non-toxic, and an inexpensive product has activity against the P. aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds may make it an alternative topical choice in the treatment of wound infections.

  19. Honey as an antimicrobial agent against pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Vishnu Prasad; Ballal, Mamatha; Shivananda, Pg; Bairy, Indira

    2012-04-01

    As natural products garner attention in the medical field due to emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria, honey is valued for its antibacterial activity. Fifty strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds were evaluated for their antibacterial action using honey in comparison with different antibiotics and Dettol. All the strains were found to be sensitive to honey at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 20% in comparison with Dettol at 10% using agar dilution method. In the second step, the time kill assay was performed on five isolates of P. aeruginosa to demonstrate the bactericidal activity of honey at different dilutions of honey ranging from 20% to 100% at regular time intervals. All the isolates of P. aeruginosa tested were killed in 12-24 h depending on the dilutions of the honey tested. Thus, honey could prevent the growth of P. aeruginosa even if it was diluted by deionized water by fivefolds in vitro. Honey had almost uniform bactericidal activity against P. aeruginosa irrespective of their susceptibility to different classes of antibiotics. Honey which is a natural, non-toxic, and an inexpensive product has activity against the P. aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds may make it an alternative topical choice in the treatment of wound infections.

  20. Effectiveness of Natural Antifungal Compounds in Controlling Infection by Grapevine Trunk Disease Pathogens through Pruning Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos, Rebeca; Mateos, Rosa María; Álvarez-Pérez, José Manuel; Olego, Miguel Angel; Sevillano, Silvia; González-García, Sandra; Garzón-Jimeno, Enrique; Coque, Juan José R

    2015-09-01

    Grapevine trunk fungal pathogens, such as Diplodia seriata and Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, can infect plants through pruning wounds. They cause grapevine trunk diseases and are involved in grapevine decline. Accordingly, the protection of pruning wounds is crucial for the management of grapevine trunk diseases. The efficacy of different natural antifungals in inhibiting the growth of several fungi causing grapevine trunk diseases was evaluated in vitro. The fungi showing greater in vitro efficacy were tested on autoclaved grape wood assays against D. seriata and P. chlamydospora. Based on results from these assays, chitosan oligosaccharide, vanillin, and garlic extract were selected for further evaluation on pruning wounds inoculated with D. seriata and P. chlamydospora in field trials. A significant decrease in plant mortality was observed after 2 years of growth in the plants treated with the different natural antifungals compared to the mortality rate observed in infected plants that were not treated with antifungals. Also, the infection rate for the inoculated pathogens was significantly reduced in plants treated with the selected natural antifungals. Therefore, natural antifungals represent a promising alternative for disease control and could provide significant economic benefits for the grape-growing industry. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Diagnosing Surgical Site Infection Using Wound Photography: A Scenario-Based Study.

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    Sanger, Patrick C; Simianu, Vlad V; Gaskill, Cameron E; Armstrong, Cheryl A L; Hartzler, Andrea L; Lordon, Ross J; Lober, William B; Evans, Heather L

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative surgical site infections (SSI) are common and costly. Most occur post discharge, and can result in potentially preventable readmission or unnecessary urgent evaluation. Mobile health approaches incorporating patient-generated wound photos are being implemented in an attempt to optimize triage and management. We assessed how adding wound photos to existing data sources modifies provider decision making. We used a web-based simulation survey using a convenience sample of providers with expertise in surgical infections. Participants viewed a range of scenarios, including surgical history, physical exam, and description of wound appearance. All participants reported SSI diagnosis, diagnostic confidence, and management recommendations (main outcomes) first without, and then with, accompanying wound photos. At each step, participants ranked the most important features contributing to their decision. Eighty-three participants completed a median of 5 scenarios (interquartile range 4 to 7). Most participants were physicians in academic surgical specialties (n = 70 [84%]). The addition of photos improved overall diagnostic accuracy from 67% to 76% (p < 0.001), and increased specificity from 77% to 92% (p < 0.001), but did not significantly increase sensitivity (55% to 65%; p = 0.16). Photos increased mean confidence in diagnosis from 5.9 of 10 to 7.4 of 10 (p < 0.001). Overtreatment recommendations decreased from 48% to 16% (p < 0.001), and undertreatment did not change (28% to 23%; p = 0.20) with the addition of photos. The addition of wound photos to existing data as available via chart review and telephone consultation with patients significantly improved diagnostic accuracy and confidence, and prevented proposed overtreatment in scenarios without SSI. Post-discharge mobile health technologies have the potential to facilitate patient-centered care, decrease costs, and improve clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by

  2. Treatment of hypergranulation tissue in burn wounds with topical steroid dressings: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Marie; Harats, Moti; Kornhaber, Rachel; Aviv, Uri; Zerach, Amir; Haik, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Hypergranulation tissue (or also known as overgranulation) may negatively influence burn wound healing time and contribute to recurrence of contractures in burn wounds and grafts. Subsequently, the treatment of hypergranulation tissue remains controversial and problematic. In this case series, we aimed to examine the feasibility and document the use of topical hydrocortisone in the treatment of hypergranulation tissue formation resulting from burn wounds. We report five cases where hypergranulation tissue developed following deep dermal/full-thickness burns. Initial burn wound treatment included necrotic tissue debridement, wound cleansing, and Flaminal(®). All five cases underwent surgical debridement and split-skin grafting. Upon identification of hypergranulation tissue, hydrocortisone acetate 0.25% was applied topically as usual care for the treatment of hypergranulation tissue. All five patients had deep dermal/full-thickness burns with a total body surface area ranging from 22% to 61% and were aged from 3-41 years. All five cases developed hypergranulation tissue during their admission after debridement and split-thickness skin grafts. All patients showed an improvement in the treated areas with a complete regression of hypergranulation tissue and closure of the burn wounds. No clinically apparent local or systemic side effects of the treatment were observed. Topical hydrocortisone can be utilized as an effective, inexpensive, and noninvasive practical option in the treatment of hypergranulation tissue resulting from burn wounds.

  3. Soft tissue and wound infections due to Enterococcus spp. among hospitalized trauma patients in a developing country

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    Nonika Rajkumari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue and wound infections due to Enterococcus spp. are increasing worldwide with current need to understand the epidemiology of the Enterococcal infections of wounds. Hence, we have looked into the distribution of Enterococcus spp. responsible for causing wound and soft tissue infections among trauma patients, its antibiotic resistance pattern and how it affects the length of hospital stay and mortality. A laboratory cum clinical-based study was performed over a period of 3 years at a level I trauma center in New Delhi, India. Patients with Enterococcal wound and soft tissue infections were identified using the hospital data base, their incidence of soft tissue/wound infections calculated, drug resistance pattern and their possible risk factors as well as outcomes analyzed. A total of 86 non-repetitive Enterococcus spp. was isolated of which E. faecium were maximally isolated 48 (56%. High level of resistance was seen to gentamicin HLAR in all the species of Enterococcus causing infections whereas a low level resistance to vancomycin and teicoplanin was observed among the isolates. Longer hospital stay, repeated surgical procedure, prior antibiotic therapy and ICU stay were observed to associate with increased morbidity (P < 0.05 and hence, more chances of infections with VRE among the trauma patients. The overall rate of wound and soft tissue infections with Enterococcus sp. was 8.6 per 1,000 admissions during the study period. Enterococcal wound infection is much prevalent in trauma care facilities especially in the ICUs. Here, a microbiologist can act as a sentinel, help in empirical therapeutic decisions and also in preventing such infections.

  4. Recurrent sternal infection following treatment with negative pressure wound therapy and titanium transverse plate fixation.

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    Gaudreau, Geneviève; Costache, Victor; Houde, Chanel; Cloutier, Daniel; Montalin, Livia; Voisine, Pierre; Baillot, Richard

    2010-04-01

    To provide a definition for recurrent sternal infection (RSI), analyse the risk factors and describe the management of this complication following treatment of deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) with horizontal titanium sternal osteosynthesis and coverage with pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps. Between 2002 and 2007, 10665 patients were submitted to open-heart surgery (OHS) in our institution, of whom 149 (1.4%) developed a DSWI. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) followed by sternal osteosynthesis with musculocutaneous coverage was used in 92 (61.7%) patients. A retrospective review was done using a prospectively maintained database to identify risk factors for recurrent infection in this group of patients. Of the 92 patients who underwent sternal osteosynthesis, nine (9.8%) developed recurrent sternal infection requiring hardware removal. Univariate analysis showed that preoperative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) status (33.3% vs 6.1%; p=0.03) and prolonged intubation time in ICU (44.4% vs 14.6%; pplate removal. To lower the rate of RSI in patients treated with transverse sternal ostheosynthesis along with myocutaneous coverage for DSWI, surgeons must consider the MRSA preoperative status as a significant predictor of RSI and/or persistent infection. Chest-wall integrity in patients with RSI can be maintained after hardware removal, even after only a few weeks following initial plating. Copyright (c) 2009 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. Disposable surgical face masks for preventing surgical wound infection in clean surgery

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    Allyson Lipp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surgical face masks were originally developed to contain and filter droplets containing microorganisms expelled from the mouth and nasopharynx of healthcare workers during surgery, thereby providing protection for the patient. However, there are several ways in which surgical face masks could potentially contribute to contamination of the surgical wound, e.g. by incorrect wear or by leaking air from the side of the mask due to poor string tension. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether disposable surgical face masks worn by the surgical team during clean surgery prevent postoperative surgical wound infection. SEARCH METHODS: We searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 14 September 2011; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 3; Ovid MEDLINE (2008 to August Week 5 2011; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process &Other Non-Indexed Citations September 13, 2011; Ovid EMBASE (2008 to 2011 Week 35; and EBSCO CINAHL (2008 to 9 September 2011. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs and quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing the use of disposable surgical masks with the use of no mask. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors extracted data independently. MAIN RESULTS: Three trials were included, involving a total of 2113 participants. There was no statistically significant difference in infection rates between the masked and unmasked group in any of the trials. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: From the limited results it is unclear whether the wearing of surgical face masks by members of the surgical team has any impact on surgical wound infection rates for patients undergoing clean surgery.

  6. Accelerated wound healing with combined NPWT and IPC: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvesen, Kristian; Nielsen, Camilla Bak; Fogh, Karsten

    2017-03-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) have traditionally been used in patients with chronic complicated non-healing wounds. The aim of this study (retrospective case series) was to describe the use of NPWT in combination with IPC in patients with a relatively short history (2-6 months) of ulcers. All wounds showed improved healing during the treatment period with marked or moderate reduction in ulcer size, and granulation tissue formation was markedly stimulated. Oedema was markedly reduced due to IPC. Treatment was generally well tolerated. The results of this study indicate that combined NPWT and IPC can accelerate wound healing and reduce oedema, thus shortening the treatment period. Therefore, patients may have a shorter healing period and may avoid entering a chronic wound phase. However, controlled studies of longer duration are needed in order to show the long-term effect of a more accelerated treatment course.

  7. Temporal induction of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) in odontoblasts by lipopolysaccharide and wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Baik-Dong; Jeong, Soon-Jeong; Wang, Guanlin; Kim, Heung-Joong; Kim, Byung-Ock; Hwang, Ho-Keel; Lim, Do-Seun; Kim, Sook-Hyang; Jeong, Moon-Jin

    2009-07-01

    The secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is a bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced product of macrophages that antagonizes the LPS-induced activation of a number of proinflammatory signaling factors. From our previous experiments, it was found that SLPI was expressed slightly in odontoblast-like cells (MDPC-23). Therefore, these experiments were designed to determine the function of SLPI in MDPC-23 and odontoblasts during the inflammatory response caused by infections and wounds. MDPC-23 cells were exposed to 100 ng/mL Escherichia coli LPS, and artificial wounds were induced in the right first molar of the maxillary of rats. In addition, a morphological change in the MDPC-23 cells was observed after LPS treatment. MDPC-23 cells were transfected transiently with the nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kappaB) promoter binding vector. The level of SLPI expression increased strongly 30 minutes after the LPS treatment. Scanning electron microscopy revealed many extensions of the cytoplasmic processes after LPS stimulation. SLPI was expressed along the dentinal tubules and odontoblasts layer in rat teeth after an artificial wound. SLPI also inhibited the LPS-induced activation of NF-kappaB in MDPC-23. We report for the first time that SLPI is expressed temporally in infected odontoblasts and may participate in the anti-inflammatory response through NF-kappaB signaling in odontoblast-like cells.

  8. Henoch-Schönlein purpura (IgA vasculitis developing after postoperative wound infection by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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    Masataka Satoh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP is an acute small-vessel leukocytoclastic vasculitis, affecting the skin, joints, gastrointestinal tract and kidneys. Its prognosis depends on the severity of nephritis. A wide variety of pathogens, drugs, and other environmental exposures have been associated with HSP. Although group A β-haemolytic streptococcus has been the most studied, the majority of cases showed no direct link to streptococcal infection. Here we report a case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection-associated HSP. A 68-year-old woman underwent a coronary artery bypass surgery. After the surgery, a postoperative chest wound was infected by MRSA and sternal osteomyelitis developed. Palpable purpura then appeared on the extremities, followed by hematuria, proteinuria and increased serum creatine. Treatments with antibiotics and debridement of the infected wound and sequestrum resulted in rapid improvement of skin symptoms. Renal function partially recovered, however mild hematuria and proteinuria remained. Published work review and the present case suggest that Staphylococcal infection-associated HSP frequently involves kidney disease and its prognosis is likely to be poor compared to a common type of HSP. Further studies are needed to establish an appropriate treatment strategy for Staphylococcal infection-associated HSP.

  9. Isolation and in vitro evaluation of bacteriophages against MDR-bacterial isolates from septic wound infections.

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    Roja Rani Pallavali

    Full Text Available Multi-drug resistance has become a major problem for the treatment of pathogenic bacterial infections. The use of bacteriophages is an attractive approach to overcome the problem of drug resistance in several pathogens that cause fatal diseases. Our study aimed to isolate multi drug resistant bacteria from patients with septic wounds and then isolate and apply bacteriophages in vitro as alternative therapeutic agents. Pus samples were aseptically collected from Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Medical Science (RIMS, Kadapa, A.P., and samples were analyzed by gram staining, evaluating morphological characteristics, and biochemical methods. MDR-bacterial strains were collected using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method against a variety of antibiotics. Bacteriophages were collected and tested in vitro for lytic activity against MDR-bacterial isolates. Analysis of the pus swab samples revealed that the most of the isolates detected had Pseudomonas aeruginosa as the predominant bacterium, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Our results suggested that gram-negative bacteria were more predominant than gram-positive bacteria in septic wounds; most of these isolates were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin, vancomycin and tetracycline. All the gram-positive isolates (100% were multi-drug resistant, whereas 86% of the gram-negative isolates had a drug resistant nature. Further bacteriophages isolated from sewage demonstrated perfect lytic activity against the multi-drug resistant bacteria causing septic wounds. In vitro analysis of the isolated bacteriophages demonstrated perfect lysis against the corresponding MDR-bacteria, and these isolated phages may be promising as a first choice for prophylaxis against wound sepsis, Moreover, phage therapy does not enhance multi-drug resistance in bacteria and could work simultaneously on a wide variety of MDR-bacteria when used in a bacteriophage cocktail. Hence

  10. Secondary omental and pectoralis major double flap reconstruction following aggressive sternectomy for deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery

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    Shirasawa Bungo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery carries high morbidity and mortality. Our strategy for deep sternal wound infection is aggressive strenal debridement followed by vacuum-assisted closure (VAC therapy and omental-muscle flap reconstrucion. We describe this strategy and examine the outcome and long-term quality of life (QOL it achieves. Methods We retrospectively examined 16 patients treated for deep sternal wound infection between 2001 and 2007. The most recent nine patients were treated with total sternal resection followed by VAC therapy and secondary closure with omental-muscle flap reconstruction (recent group; whereas the former seven patients were treated with sternal preservation if possible, without VAC therapy, and four of these patients underwent primary closure (former group. We assessed long-term quality of life after DSWI by using the Short Form 36-Item Health Survey, Version 2 (SF36v2. Results One patient died and four required further surgery for recurrence of deep sternal wound infection in the former group. The duration of treatment for deep sternal wound infection in the recent group was significantly shorter than that in previous group (63.4 ± 54.1 days vs. 120.0 ± 31.8 days, respectively; p = 0.039. Despite aggressive sternal resection, the QOL of patients treated for DSWI was only minimally compromised compared with age-, sex-, surgical procedures-matched patients without deep sternal wound infection. Conclusions Aggressive sternal debridement followed by VAC therapy and secondary closure with an omental-muscle flap is effective for deep sternal wound infection. In this series, it resulted in a lower incidence of recurrent infection, shorter hospitalization, and it did not compromise long-term QOL greatly.

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Acinetobacter species isolated from infected wounds at a tertiary care hospital

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    Rosić Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the genus Acinetobacter, especially species Acinetobacter baumanii, is one of the most important causes of infection in immunocompromised patients in hospital. The aim of this study was to determine susceptibility of Acinetobacter species isolated from swabs of inflamed wounds to antibiotics. The study was conducted in several departments of the Clinical Centre 'Kragujevac' through retrospective analysis of 220 Acinetobacter species isolates from surgical wounds in 2011. The isolates of Acinetobaster species were mostly sensitive to ampicillin-sulbactam, colistin and tigecycline in all hospital departments that were surveyed. Only minority of the isolated Acinetobacter species were susceptible to cotrimoxazole, amikacin, imipenem and/or meropenem. Antibiotics with the highest in vitro efficacy against Acinetobacter species were ampicillinsulbactam, colistin and tigecycline. Highly resistant Acinetobacter species were more frequently isolated from patients in Intensive Care Unit.

  12. Personalized Therapeutic Cocktail of Wild Environmental Phages Rescues Mice from Acinetobacter baumannii Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regeimbal, James M; Jacobs, Anna C; Corey, Brendan W; Henry, Matthew S; Thompson, Mitchell G; Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Quinones, Javier; Hannah, Ryan M; Ghebremedhin, Meron; Crane, Nicole J; Zurawski, Daniel V; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa C; Biswas, Biswajit; Hall, Eric R

    2016-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens are an increasing threat to public health, and lytic bacteriophages have reemerged as a potential therapeutic option. In this work, we isolated and assembled a five-member cocktail of wild phages against Acinetobacter baumannii and demonstrated therapeutic efficacy in a mouse full-thickness dorsal infected wound model. The cocktail lowers the bioburden in the wound, prevents the spread of infection and necrosis to surrounding tissue, and decreases infection-associated morbidity. Interestingly, this effective cocktail is composed of four phages that do not kill the parent strain of the infection and one phage that simply delays bacterial growth in vitro via a strong but incomplete selection event. The cocktail here appears to function in a combinatorial manner, as one constituent phage targets capsulated A. baumannii bacteria and selects for loss of receptor, shifting the population to an uncapsulated state that is then sensitized to the remaining four phages in the cocktail. Additionally, capsule is a known virulence factor for A. baumannii, and we demonstrated that the emergent uncapsulated bacteria are avirulent in a Galleria mellonella model. These results highlight the importance of anticipating population changes during phage therapy and designing intelligent cocktails to control emergent strains, as well as the benefits of using phages that target virulence factors. Because of the efficacy of this cocktail isolated from a limited environmental pool, we have established a pipeline for developing new phage therapeutics against additional clinically relevant multidrug-resistant pathogens by using environmental phages sourced from around the globe.

  13. HIV shedding from male circumcision wounds in HIV-infected men: a prospective cohort study.

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    Tobian, Aaron A R; Kigozi, Godfrey; Manucci, Jordyn; Grabowski, Mary K; Serwadda, David; Musoke, Richard; Redd, Andrew D; Nalugoda, Fred; Reynolds, Steven J; Kighoma, Nehemiah; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Lessler, Justin; Gray, Ronald H; Quinn, Thomas C; Wawer, Maria J

    2015-04-01

    A randomized trial of voluntary medical male circumcision (MC) of HIV-infected men reported increased HIV transmission to female partners among men who resumed sexual intercourse prior to wound healing. We conducted a prospective observational study to assess penile HIV shedding after MC. HIV shedding was evaluated among 223 HIV-infected men (183 self-reported not receiving antiretroviral therapy [ART], 11 self-reported receiving ART and had a detectable plasma viral load [VL], and 29 self-reported receiving ART and had an undetectable plasma VL [HIV shedding and VL using a real-time quantitative PCR assay. Unadjusted prevalence risk ratios (PRRs) and adjusted PRRs (adjPRRs) of HIV shedding were estimated using modified Poisson regression with robust variance. HIV shedding was detected in 9.3% (17/183) of men not on ART prior to surgery and 39.3% (72/183) of these men during the entire study. Relative to baseline, the proportion shedding was significantly increased after MC at 1 wk (PRR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.12-3.14, p = 0.012), 2 wk (PRR = 3.16, 95% CI = 1.94-5.13, p HIV shedding was decreased by 6 wk after MC (PRR = 0.27, 95% CI = 0.09-0.83, p = 0.023) and remained suppressed at 12 wk after MC (PRR = 0.19, 95% CI = 0.06-0.64, p = 0.008). Detectable HIV shedding from MC wounds occurred in more study visits among men with an HIV plasma VL > 50,000 copies/ml than among those with an HIV plasma VL HIV shedding was less common in visits from men with healed MC wounds compared to visits from men without healed wounds (adjPRR = 0.12, 95% CI = 0.07-0.23, p HIV shedding, the median log10 HIV copies/milliliter of lavage fluid was significantly lower in men with ART-induced undetectable plasma VL (1.93, interquartile range [IQR] = 1.83-2.14) than in men not on ART (2.63, IQR = 2.28-3.22, p HIV shedding is significantly reduced after healing of MC wounds. Lower plasma VL is associated with decreased frequency and quantity of HIV shedding from MC wounds. Starting ART prior to MC

  14. Reducing Surgical Site Infection in Spinal Surgery with Betadine Irrigation and Intra-Wound Vancomycin Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Marko; Mitsunaga, Lance; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Nallur, Deepak; Roberto, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a surgical site infection (SSI) prevention protocol instituted in the Orthopaedic Spine Department at our institution. Summary of Background Data SSI is an undesired complication of orthopaedic spine surgeries. It poses a significant risk to the patient, as well as a financial toll on the healthcare system. A wide range of prophylactic measures have been used to attempt to reduce SSI rates. Methods A protocol consisting of a combination of 0.3% Betadine wound irrigation and 1 gram of intra-wound Vancomycin powder application was developed at our institution. Multiple data sources were consolidated for thorough evaluation of changes in SSI rates, patient risk factors, and changes in bacteriology. Identification of risk factors that predispose patients to SSI was performed using mixed effects logistic regression in a univariate fashion. Risk factors with p-values of ≤ 0.05 in univariate analysis were included together in a multivariate mixed effects logistic regression model. Results SSI rates were reduced by 50% following the intervention; Chi square analysis comparing the SSI rates between the pre- and post-intervention periods yielded a p-value of 0.042. Rates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus dropped from 30% to 7% and the rates of multi-bacterial infections dropped from 37% to 27%. The risk factors that were statistically significant in multivariate analysis were the following: age (OR 0.93), anemia (OR 30.73), prior operation (OR 27.45), and vertebral fracture (OR 22.22). Conclusion The combination of Betadine wound irrigation and intra-wound vancomycin powder application led to both a clinically and statistically significant decrease in SSI rates by 50%. Bacteriology analysis and risk factor assessment proved to be valuable tools in assessing the efficacy of a new prophylactic measure and in the planning of future protocols. PMID:25608241

  15. [Severe Lower Extremity Infections Treated with Hip Disarticulation - Case Series].

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    Patera, M; Mizera, R

    2017-01-01

    Hip disarticulation is a major ablative procedure with serious risks as well as consequences for the patient, performed rarely for a lower extremity infection. According to literature, the mortality rate in these procedures reaches up to 60%. Unfavourable prognostic factors are emergency surgeries without adequate preparation of the patient and surgeries indicated for an ischemic terrain infection. The authors present four cases of hip disarticulation for severe lower extremity infection. In one patient, the procedure was performed urgently for necrotising fasciitis in the lower extremity extending up to the groin area, in the other three patients for non-healing femoral stump infection following the lower extremity amputation for vascular causes, of which two cases got complicated by the presence of TKA. Two of the patients treated surgically for stump infection died two months after the surgery due to respiratory complications. The two surviving patients underwent the last check one year following the surgery, they are both capable of independent locomotion with two underarm crutches and use the prosthesis only rarely. In the discussion, the factors influencing the mortality rate of the procedure, the principles of surgical and antimicrobial therapy, and the use of the negative-pressure wound therapy are analysed. The underlying principles of the care for patients with severe infections of the musculoskeletal system are infection focus debridement with the removal of foreign material, antibiotic (anti-infective) therapy targeted based on the cultivation results, wound management aimed to prevent contamination with nosocomial strains, and multidisciplinary cooperation - orthopaedist/surgeon, infectious disease physician, intensive care specialist, nutrition and rehabilitation specialist, nursing and prosthetic care providers. Key words: hip disarticulation, infection, necrotizing fasciitis.

  16. Use of Vacuum-assisted closure in management of open abdominal wound with multiple enterocutaneous fistulae during chemotherapy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Shiki; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Ohue, Masayuki; Noura, Shingo; Fukata, Tadafumi; Yagi, Toshiya; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is useful for treating complex wounds because it promotes granulation. In the present report, a successful case of VAC used for an open abdominal wound with enterocutaneous fistulae after multiple intestinal perforations during chemotherapy is described. A 73-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with severe abdominal pain. He underwent surgical resection for ascending colon cancer 4 years ago and was administered chemotherapy with bevacizumab for recurrence. Physical examination and computed tomography revealed perforation of the intestine, and an emergency operation was performed. Following this procedure, other intestinal perforations occurred, resulting in an open abdominal wound at postoperative day (POD) 10. To isolate enteric contents and promote granulation, VAC was applied to the abdominal wound with enterocutaneous fistulae. Oral intake started at POD 21 and the wound size became smaller. Further, an ostomy bag was directly attached to the most oral perforation site. The patient recovered from life-threatening events without severe infection and was transferred to another hospital close to his home at POD 180. Gastrointestinal perforation is known to be one of the fatal adverse events of bevacizumab. In this case four gastrointestinal perforations were observed. Isolation of enteric contents is important to heal the wound and VAC is an effective therapy for the management of open abdominal wounds even with enterocutaneous fistulae. Innovative VAC use for the management of open abdominal wounds can improve the nutritional status and overall wound healing of the patient. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. A Prognostic Model of Surgical Site Infection Using Daily Clinical Wound Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Patrick C; van Ramshorst, Gabrielle H; Mercan, Ezgi; Huang, Shuai; Hartzler, Andrea L; Armstrong, Cheryl A L; Lordon, Ross J; Lober, William B; Evans, Heather L

    2016-08-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains a common, costly, and morbid health care-associated infection. Early detection can improve outcomes, yet previous risk models consider only baseline risk factors (BF) not incorporating a proximate and timely data source-the wound itself. We hypothesize that incorporation of daily wound assessment improves the accuracy of SSI identification compared with traditional BF alone. A prospective cohort of 1,000 post open abdominal surgery patients at an academic teaching hospital were examined daily for serial features (SF), for example, wound characteristics and vital signs, in addition to standard BF, for example, wound class. Using supervised machine learning, we trained 3 Naïve Bayes classifiers (BF, SF, and BF+SF) using patient data from 1 to 5 days before diagnosis to classify SSI on the following day. For comparison, we also created a simplified SF model that used logistic regression. Control patients without SSI were matched on 5 similar consecutive postoperative days to avoid confounding by length of stay. Accuracy, sensitivity/specificity, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve were calculated on a training and hold-out testing set. Of 851 patients, 19.4% had inpatient SSIs. Univariate analysis showed differences in C-reactive protein, surgery duration, and contamination, but no differences in American Society of Anesthesiologists scores, diabetes, or emergency surgery. The BF, SF, and BF+SF classifiers had area under the receiver operating characteristic curves of 0.67, 0.76, and 0.76, respectively. The best-performing classifier (SF) had optimal sensitivity of 0.80, specificity of 0.64, positive predictive value of 0.35, and negative predictive value of 0.93. Features most associated with subsequent SSI diagnosis were granulation degree, exudate amount, nasogastric tube presence, and heart rate. Serial features provided moderate positive predictive value and high negative predictive value for early

  18. ALEXIS O-Ring wound retractor vs conventional wound protection for the prevention of surgical site infections in colorectal resections(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, K P; Roslani, A C; Sehha, N; Kueh, J H; Law, C W; Chong, H Y; Arumugam, K

    2012-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains a common postoperative morbidity, particularly in colorectal resections, and poses a significant financial burden to the healthcare system. The omission of mechanical bowel preparation, as is performed in enhanced recovery after surgery programmes, appears to further increase the incidence. Various wound protection methods have been devised to reduce the incidence of SSIs. However, there are few randomized controlled trials assessing their efficacy. The aim of this study is to investigate whether ALEXIS wound retractors with reinforced O-rings are superior to conventional wound protection methods in preventing SSIs in colorectal resections. Patients undergoing elective open colorectal resections via a standardized midline laparotomy were prospectively randomized to either ALEXIS or conventional wound protection in a double-blinded manner. A sample size of 30 in each arm was determined to detect a reduction of SSI from 20% to 1% with a power of 80%. Secondary outcomes included postoperative pain. The operative wound was inspected daily by a specialist wound nurse during admission, and again 30 days postoperatively. Statistical analysis was performed using spss version 13 with P < 0.05 considered significant. Seventy-two patients were recruited into the study but eight were excluded. There were no SSIs in the ALEXIS study arm (n = 34) but six superficial incisional SSIs (20%) were diagnosed in the control arm (P = 0.006). Postoperative pain score analysis did not demonstrate any difference between the two groups (P = 0.664). The ALEXIS wound retractor is more effective in preventing SSI in elective colorectal resections compared with conventional methods. © 2012 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2012 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. Treatment of hardware infection after osteosynthesis of lower leg using negative pressure wound therapy and transforming powder dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinović, Marin; Ivandcić, Aldo; Spanjol, Josip; Pina, Maja; Bakota, Bore; Bandalović, Ante; Cukeljs, Fabijan

    2014-12-01

    Fractures of the distal part of the lower leg are more common in everyday practice and traumatology. In young and active patients these injuries are mainly caused by high energy trauma. They are treated with external fixator in first step, and in second step, after sanation of the soft tissue, with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). It is very safe and effective method of treatment. Treatment of the infections that occur in the early postoperative period after open reduction and internal fixation represents a great problem and challenge for surgeons. It is widely accepted that the presence of deep infection can't be cured in the presence of hardware. However, removal of hardware in the presence of unhealed fractures significantly complicates sanation of infection and fracture itself We have decided to present a 35-years-old patient with a hardware infection with present chronic wound with hardware exposed eight months after the first operation and six months after second operation. The wound measured one centimeter in diameter with cell detritus and bad granulations tissue inside the wound. Hardwre was exposed in the depth of the wound.The secretion was minimal. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) was applicated after debridemet and lavage performed in ambulatory conditions. The starting therapy was continuously -125 mm Hg of vacuum. After five days of NPWT the defect was partially filled with granula- tion tissue. For another five days we continue with NPWT with the same values of-125 mm Hg pressure but in the inter- mitent mode. After that period we used transforming powder dressing for covering and protection of the wound with was filled with granulation tissue. Five days later, wound was completely healed with epithelisation. After four months of patient follow-up, we found the wound is completely repaired. The patient denies pain and has continued orderly flow of fracture healing, with no signs of infection.

  20. Treatment of hypergranulation tissue in burn wounds with topical steroid dressings: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeger M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Marie Jaeger,1,* Moti Harats,1,* Rachel Kornhaber,2 Uri Aviv,1 Amir Zerach,1 Josef Haik1,3 1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel; 2School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Tasmania, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel *These authors contributed equally to this work. Abstract: Hypergranulation tissue (or also known as overgranulation may negatively influence burn wound healing time and contribute to recurrence of contractures in burn wounds and grafts. Subsequently, the treatment of hypergranulation tissue remains controversial and problematic. In this case series, we aimed to examine the feasibility and document the use of topical hydrocortisone in the treatment of hypergranulation tissue formation resulting from burn wounds. We report five cases where hypergranulation tissue developed following deep dermal/full-thickness burns. Initial burn wound treatment included necrotic tissue debridement, wound cleansing, and Flaminal®. All five cases underwent surgical debridement and split-skin ­grafting. Upon identification of hypergranulation tissue, hydrocortisone acetate 0.25% was applied ­topically as usual care for the treatment of hypergranulation tissue. All five patients had deep dermal/full-thickness burns with a total body surface area ranging from 22% to 61% and were aged from 3–41 years. All five cases developed hypergranulation tissue during their admission after debridement and split-thickness skin grafts. All patients showed an improvement in the treated areas with a complete regression of hypergranulation tissue and closure of the burn wounds. No clinically apparent local or systemic side effects of the treatment were observed. Topical hydrocortisone can be utilized as an effective, inexpensive, and noninvasive practical option in the treatment of hypergranulation tissue resulting from burn wounds

  1. Postoperative infection of an abdominal mesh due to methicillin resistant Staphylococcus Aureus - A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok R

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin resistant Stephylococcus aureus (MRSA infection has now become a major problem in hospitals. We present a case of postoperative infection MRSA where the primary source of the infection was found to be an abdominal mesh that was used to reinforce the abdominal wall. After one year of surgery, the patient developed wound dehiscence and discharge. MRSA was isolated from the wound, mesh, external nares, throat and axilla. Initially she was started on clindamycin and discharged from the hospital. After 5 months, patient came back to the hospital with infection at the same site. The patient was then treated with vancomycin and MRSA clearance. She responded to the treatment with complete healing of the wound and clearance of MRSA.

  2. Theatre Shoes — A Link in the Common Pathway of Postoperative Wound Infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirfeyz, Rouin; Tasker, Andrew; Ali, Sami; Bowker, Karen; Blom, Ashley

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Operating department staff are usually required to wear dedicated theatre shoes whilst in the theatre area but there is little evidence to support the beneficial use of theatre shoes. PATIENTS AND METHODS We performed a study to assess the level of bacterial contamination of theatre shoes at the beginning and end of a working day, and compared the results with outdoor footwear. RESULTS We found the presence of pathogenic bacterial species responsible for postoperative wound infection on all shoe groups, with outdoor shoes being the most heavily contaminated. Samples taken from theatre shoes at the end of duty were less contaminated than those taken at the beginning of the day with the greatest reduction being in the number of coagulase-negative staphylococcal species grown. Studies have demonstrated that floor bacteria may contribute up to 15% of airborne bacterial colony forming units in operating rooms. The pathogenic bacteria we isolated have also been demonstrated as contaminants in water droplets spilt onto sterile gloves after surgical scrubbing. CONCLUSIONS Theatre shoes and floors present a potential source for postoperative infection. A combination of dedicated theatre shoe use and a good floor washing protocol controls the level of shoe contamination by coagulase-negative staphylococci in particular. This finding is significant given the importance of staphylococcal species in postoperative wound infection. PMID:18201476

  3. Prevention of abdominal wound infection (PROUD trial, DRKS00000390: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heger Ulrike

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wound infection affects a considerable portion of patients after abdominal operations, increasing health care costs and postoperative morbidity and affecting quality of life. Antibacterial coating has been suggested as an effective measure to decrease postoperative wound infections after laparotomies. The INLINE metaanalysis has recently shown the superiority of a slowly absorbable continuous suture for abdominal closure; with PDS plus® such a suture has now been made available with triclosan antibacterial coating. Methods/Design The PROUD trial is designed as a randomised, controlled, observer, surgeon and patient blinded multicenter superiority trial with two parallel groups and a primary endpoint of wound infection during 30 days after surgery. The intervention group will receive triclosan coated polydioxanone sutures, whereas the control group will receive the standard polydioxanone sutures; abdominal closure will otherwise be standardized in both groups. Statistical analysis is based on intention-to-treat population via binary logistic regression analysis, the total sample size of n = 750 is sufficient to ensure alpha = 5% and power = 80%, an interim analysis will be carried out after data of 375 patients are available. Discussion The PROUD trial will yield robust data to determine the effectiveness of antibacterial coating in one of the standard sutures for abdominal closure and potentially lead to amendment of current guidelines. The exploration of clinically objective parameters as well as quality of life holds immediate relevance for clinical management and the pragmatic trial design ensures high external validity. Trial Registration The trial protocol has been registered with the German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS00000390.

  4. Gunshot-like wound caused by sling shot injury – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinuthinee N

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Naidu Vinuthinee,1,2 Anuar Azreen-Redzal,1 Jaafar Juanarita,1 Embong Zunaina2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Sultanah Bahiyah, Alor Setar, Kedah, Malaysia; 2Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia Abstract: We report a rare case of sling shot injury that presented with a gunshot-like wound with preseptal cellulitis, in a toddler. An 11-month-old Malay child presented with a gunshot-like wound over the forehead following sling shot injury. On examination, he had a deep circular laceration wound over the forehead, measuring 2.0 cm in diameter, with minimal bleeding. There was no obvious foreign body seen inside the wound and no palpable foreign body surrounding the wound. The gunshot-like wound was associated with left preseptal cellulitis. A skull X-ray showed a white opaque foreign body in the left frontal bone. Computed tomography (CT scan of orbit and brain revealed a left comminuted fracture of the left orbital roof, and left frontal brain contusion with prelesional edema. Wound exploration was performed and revealed a 0.5 cm unshattered marble embedded in the left frontal bone. The marble and bone fragments were removed. The left preseptal cellulitis responded well to intravenous antibiotic and topical antibiotic. Keywords: preseptal cellulitis, orbital roof fracture, pediatric trauma

  5. Evaluation of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug-Resistant Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    acid is a highly promising topical agent to enhance healing of wounds infected with drug-resistant pathogens” on the Journal of Trauma and Acute Care...Drug- Resistant Wound Infections PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David S. Perlin, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey...of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad- Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug-Resistant Wound Infections 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  6. A rapid and systematic review of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of debriding agents in treating surgical wounds healing by secondary intention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis, R.; Whiting, P.; ter Riet, G.; O'Meara, S.; Glanville, J.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most surgically sutured wounds heal without any complication. However, in some cases wound healing can be delayed due to the presence of infection or wound breakdown. This can result in the wounds becoming cavity wounds and thus necessitate healing by secondary intention. Other surgical

  7. A prospective randomized study for evaluation of wound retractors in the prevention of incision site infections after cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoridis, T D; Chatzigeorgiou, K N; Zepiridis, L; Papanicolaou, A; Vavilis, D; Tzevelekis, F; Tarlatzis, B C

    2011-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) after cesarean section appear to be more common than generally believed. We prospectively evaluated 231 consecutive pregnant women who underwent elective or emergency cesarean section, and were assigned to have either the Alexis wound retractor (study group) or a conventional Doyen retractor (control group) during the operation. There was no evidence of SSI, defined as wound dehiscence, pain or tenderness in the lower abdomen, localized swelling, redness, heat or purulent discharge from the wound in any woman in the study group. Moreover, no endometritis occurred in this patient collective. There were three SSI in the control group, but no endometritis. Our preliminary data show excellent protection of wound infections with an additive protective effect to that given by antibiotic cover. After a short learning curve, the handling of the Alexis device became easier and the median insertion time was 18 sec.

  8. Preliminary results from 28 cases of pilonidal cyst treated by excision and primary closure of the wound, reinforced with support suturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson de Souza Liboni

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the results of the surgical technique of pilonidalcyst excision with margins and primary closure of the operative woundwith support suturing. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with pilonidaldisease admitted to a private clinic between 1999 and 2006 underwentsurgical treatment by means of an elliptical longitudinal medial incisionproportional to the palpable tumor size and excision of cyst with 2-cmmargins above, below and laterally, and primary closure of the wound.To reduce the tension in the operative wound, suturing was performed,with a single support stitch of horizontal U-shape. The patients werefollowed up for periods ranging from 6 months to 3 years. Results:Two patients developed abscesses at the surgical site (7.1%, andone required complete opening of the operative wound for drainage.Both underwent excision and primary closure again. The pathologicalexamination demonstrated that these were not cases of relapse, butof recurrent abscess. No cases of non-infected collection (seroma andhematoma, spontaneous dehiscence of the operative wound or diseaserecurrence were recorded. Conclusions: The technique of pilonidal cystexcision with margins and primary closure of the wound reinforcedwith support suturing seems to be attractive, since it is characterizedby low complexity and low infection rate. Studies with larger samplesare needed to validate this surgical technique.

  9. Effect of apple cider vinegar on the healing of experimentally–induced wounds infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Alawi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard wounds were made in the backs of 18 rabbits. The rabbits were then divided into 6 equal groups. Rabbits of group (1, constituted a control group and their wounds were treated with physiological saline solution. In group (2, the wounds were treated with Cefotaxime at a concentration of 500 mg. Wounds of the third, fourth, and fifth groups were treated with 5%, 3.75%, and 2.5% apple cider vinegar respectively. Wounds of the sixth groups of rabbits were treated with a combination of equal amounts of Cefotaxime and apple cider vinegar 3.75%. All of the wounds were infected with various isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the time of infected. Wound treatment was done each 48 hours until complete healing. Results of this study indicated that using apple cider vinegar 3.75% gave results similar to those obtained by using the antibiotic (same rates of bacterial reduction. However, using a combination of equal amounts of apple cider vinegar and the antibiotic lead to more rapid and more better healing than using each one of them alone.

  10. Human wound infections caused by Neisseria animaloris and Neisseria zoodegmatis, former CDC Group EF-4a and EF-4b

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    Anna Heydecke

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background : Neisseria animaloris and Neisseria zoodegmatis, former CDC Group EF-4a and -4b, are considered to be rare zoonotic pathogens, usually associated with dog or cat bites. The aim of the study was to phenotypicaly characterize 13 EF-4 isolates from wound infections, determine their antibiotic susceptibility and to follow the clinical outcome of the patients. Methods : 13 of the EF-4 isolates were cultured on agar plates. Conventional biochemical tests and the Biolog system were used for phenotypical identification. An arbitrary primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR was carried out to determine the genetic profiles. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values were determined for different antibiotics were determined. According to this, clinical data for the patients were recorded. Results : 11 isolates were identified as N. animaloris and 2 as N. zoodegmatis due to the production of arginine dihydrolase. A majority of the patients had a history of dog bite. In 6 cases only grewth of N. animaloris or zoodegmatis was registered. When a patient received antibiotic treatment the most common drug of choice was penicillin V. Only 3 patients received treatment for which the isolated EF-4 bacterium was fully susceptible. Conclusion : Human infections involving N. animaloris and N. zoodegmatis usually present themselves as local wound infection, but severe complications can occur. Despite their pathogenic potentia, l N. animaloris and N. zoodegmatis are often misidentified, dismissed as skin contaminants or not recognized at all. Due to the fact that N. animaloris and N. zoodegmatis are significant pathogens in animal bites, physicians should keep these bacteria in mind when choosing antibiotic therapy.

  11. [Further improvement of apparatuses for the hemostasis, processing and treatment of the infected wounds using high-temperature stream].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudets'kyĭ, I Iu; Kryvtsun, I V; Terekhov, H V; Petukhov, V O; Novhorods'ka, L O

    2010-07-01

    The bleeding stoppage and the wound sanitation constitute an important problem of modern surgery. There is information presented concerning the apparatuses elaboration for the bleeding stoppage, processing of the soft living tissues wounds, including the infected, during surgical operations conduction, using high-temperature stream of air. The data adduced about the apparatuses trial and preclinical investigations of the method, realized with their help, had confirmed a high efficacy of hemostasis and sanation effects as well as significant reduction of the wounds processing time.

  12. Regeneration of Skin Surface by Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cells of Adipose Tissue in Laboratory Animals with Infected Wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Sahab, A. Haydar; S. Tretyak; Nedzved, M K; Baranov, E.V.; Nadyrov, E; Lobanok, H.H.; Vasilevich, I.B.; Welcome, M.O.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents results of experimental studies in laboratory animals with a simulated infected wound, for which mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from adipose tissue were used in its treatment. The following peculiarities of MSCs for regeneration of skin defects are established: faster arrest of inflammation, accelerated wound healing processes, as well as observed stimulation of growth of skin appendages. The results of this study may serve the basis for further research from develo...

  13. The case for evidence in wound care: investigating advanced treatment modalities in healing chronic diabetic lower extremity wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Karen C

    2008-01-01

    Major complications of diabetes mellitus include lower leg and foot ulcers, which can result in amputation. Further study is needed to determine optimal treatments for these challenging wounds. Growth factor therapy and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatments are 2 advanced therapeutic modalities that hold promise. This descriptive, retrospective review investigated healing rates of patients with diabetes mellitus and lower- extremity ulcers managed by growth factor therapy and HBO as compared to standard wound care. Retrospective review of medical records. We reviewed medical records of 89 patients with diabetes and lower-extremity wounds treated at a major outpatient wound care program in the southwestern United States. Patients were categorized according to 4 treatment modalities: (1) standard wound care, (2) growth factor therapy, (3) standard wound care plus HBO, and (4) growth factor therapy plus HBO. Wounds were measured at the start of the analysis and then weekly for a total of 8 weeks. The change in wound volume from the first to the eighth week was recorded. All patient groups demonstrated healing with the patients who received growth factor therapy alone and those who received growth factor therapy and the HBO treatments demonstrating the greatest decrease in wound volume over the 8 weeks. A 2-by-2 factorial analysis of covariance demonstrated that patients who received HBO as part of their wound care regimen demonstrated significantly greater healing than patients who received only standard wound care or growth factor therapy (P wound healing in this study, it should be noted that the mean size of the wounds in this group was 2.8 times larger than the mean size of the wounds in the other groups. Patients managed in a state-of-the-art wound care center experienced progress toward wound healing, regardless of the treatment modality selected. Those who received HBO as part of their wound care regimen healed faster than those who received standard treatment or

  14. Outbreak investigation for toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae wound infections in refugees from Northeast Africa and Syria in Switzerland and Germany by whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinel, D M; Kuehl, R; Zbinden, R; Boskova, V; Garzoni, C; Fadini, D; Dolina, M; Blümel, B; Weibel, T; Tschudin-Sutter, S; Widmer, A F; Bielicki, J A; Dierig, A; Heininger, U; Konrad, R; Berger, A; Hinic, V; Goldenberger, D; Blaich, A; Stadler, T; Battegay, M; Sing, A; Egli, A

    2016-12-01

    Toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae is an important and potentially fatal threat to patients and public health. During the current dramatic influx of refugees into Europe, our objective was to use whole genome sequencing for the characterization of a suspected outbreak of C. diphtheriae wound infections among refugees. After conventional culture, we identified C. diphtheriae using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) and investigated toxigenicity by PCR. Whole genome sequencing was performed on a MiSeq Illumina with >70×coverage, 2×250 bp read length, and mapping against a reference genome. Twenty cases of cutaneous C. diphtheriae in refugees from East African countries and Syria identified between April and August 2015 were included. Patients presented with wound infections shortly after arrival in Switzerland and Germany. Toxin production was detected in 9/20 (45%) isolates. Whole genome sequencing-based typing revealed relatedness between isolates using neighbour-joining algorithms. We detected three separate clusters among epidemiologically related refugees. Although the isolates within a cluster showed strong relatedness, isolates differed by >50 nucleotide polymorphisms. Toxigenic C. diphtheriae associated wound infections are currently observed more frequently in Europe, due to refugees travelling under poor hygienic conditions. Close genetic relatedness of C. diphtheriae isolates from 20 refugees with wound infections indicates likely transmission between patients. However, the diversity within each cluster and phylogenetic time-tree analysis suggest that transmissions happened several months ago, most likely outside Europe. Whole genome sequencing offers the potential to describe outbreaks at very high resolution and is a helpful tool in infection tracking and identification of transmission routes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. The management of perineal wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh k Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of perineal wounds can be very frustrating as these invariably get contaminated from the ano-genital tracts. Moreover, the apparent skin defect may be associated with a significant three dimensional dead space in the pelvic region. Such wounds are likely to become chronic and recalcitrant if appropriate wound management is not instituted in a timely manner. These wounds usually result after tumor excision, following trauma or as a result of infective pathologies like hideradenitis suppurativa or following thermal burns. Many options are available for management of perineal wounds and these have been discussed with illustrative case examples. A review of literature has been done for listing commonly instituted options for management of the wounds in perineum.

  16. Prospective study of healing time after hemorrhoidectomy: influence of HIV infection, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and anal wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, E; Merlini, D; Salvaggio, A; Foschi, D; Trabucchi, E

    1999-09-01

    Hemorrhoids and rectal diseases are very frequent in HIV-positive patients, especially in those with homosexual habits. This study was designed to compare posthemorrhoidectomy healing time in such patients, and evaluate the role of various factors related to their HIV-positive status. The study involved a prospective series of 48 male patients (32 HIV-seropositive and 16 with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) who underwent hemorrhoidectomy between 1992 and 1996; 20 age-matched and gender-matched seronegative patients were retrospectively identified as controls. Healing times, postoperative complications, and wound infections were recorded, and the delaying effect of CD4+, Karnofsky Index scores, and HIV-ribonucleic acid were evaluated. Between-group differences were analyzed using Cox's model, Student's t-test, chi-squared test, and Fisher's exact probability test. P values of HIV positivity and the presence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome significantly delayed wound healing, which also correlated with the presence of infection. The healing rate in HIV-positive patients was 66 percent after 14 weeks and 100 percent after 32 weeks; the corresponding figures for patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were 0 and 50 percent. All of the controls were healed after 14 weeks (P HIV+ patients). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention HIV-positive status (including CD4+ counts) and the performance status proved to be of prognostic value. Our data suggest that the indications for hemorrhoidectomy in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome need to be considered extremely carefully because of the high incidence of delayed wound healing.

  17. Bacteria isolated from conspecific bite wounds in Norway and black rats: implications for rat bite-associated infections in people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Zabek, Erin; Tang, Patrick; Parsons, Kirbee L; Koehn, Martha; Jardine, Claire M; Patrick, David M

    2014-02-01

    Bites associated with wild and domestic Norway and black rats (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus) may have a variety of health consequences in people. Bite-related infections are among the most significant of these consequences; however, there is little data on the infectious agents that can be transmitted from rats to people through biting. This is problematic because without an accurate understanding of bite-related infection risks, it is difficult for health professionals to evaluate the adequacy of existing guidelines for empirical therapy. The objectives of this study were to increase our knowledge of the bacterial species associated with rat bites by studying bite wounds that wild rats inflict upon one another and to review the literature regarding rat bites and bite wound management. Wild Norway and black rats (n=725) were trapped in Vancouver, Canada, and examined for bite wounds in the skin. All apparently infected wounds underwent aerobic and anaerobic culture, and isolated bacteria were identified. Thirty-six rats had bite wound-related infections, and approximately 22 different species of bacteria belonging to 18 genera were identified. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common isolate; however, the majority of infections (72.5%) were polymicrobial. Rat bites can result in infection with a number of aerobic and anaerobic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In humans, these wounds are best managed through early recognition and cleansing. The benefit of prophylactic antimicrobial treatment is debatable, but given the deep puncturing nature of rodent bites, we suggest that they should be considered a high risk for infection. Antibiotics selected should include coverage for a broad range of bacterial species.

  18. Post mortem computed tomography: useful or unnecessary in gunshot wounds deaths? Two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Aniello; Gitto, Lorenzo; De Matteis, Alessandra; Panebianco, Valeria; Bolino, Giorgio

    2014-11-01

    Post-mortem computer tomography (PMCT) is currently an useful procedure that can elucidate patterns of injuries, providing strong medical evidence that is very useful during litigation and at trial. This technique is especially useful in gunshot wounds cases, allowing an easier location and retrieval of the bullet and/or its fragments inside the body. In such cases, the use of 3D rendering can be very useful in order to obtain essential information, such as: accurate depict of the wound track, discerning between entrance and exit wounds, show bone's fracture and its fragments course inside the body. The authors performed analysis on two cases of death by gunshot wounds, and a PMCT before the postmortem examination was made. The obtained CT scans were evaluated using the open-source software OsiriX on a Mac OS X computer, performing 3D rendering of the DICOM images. The crime scene reconstruction was performed using the software Poser Debut® on a Mac OS X computer. In both cases, PMCT showed multiple advantages: objectivity, reproducibility, ease visualization of the wound paths, easy localization of bullet and their fragments, allowing us to clarify the cause of death before the traditional autopsy. PMCT should became a standard in forensic practice as an aid to the tradition postmortem examination to obtain as much information as possible in order to clarify the cause and manner of death. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of an insect metalloproteinase inhibitor drug carrier system for application in chronic wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhardt, Michaela; Dobler, Dorota; Schlupp, Peggy; Schmidts, Thomas; Salzig, Mark; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Salzig, Denise; Czermak, Peter; Keusgen, Michael; Runkel, Frank

    2015-11-01

    The insect metalloproteinase inhibitor (IMPI) represents the first peptide capable of inhibiting virulence-mediating microbial M4-metalloproteinases and is promising as a therapeutic. The purpose of this study was to develop a suitable drug carrier system for the IMPI drug to enable treatment of chronic wound infections. Specifically, we studied on poloxamer 407 hydrogels, examining the influence of several additives and preservatives on the rheological parameters of the hydrogels, the bioactivity and release of IMPI. The rheological characterisation of the hydrogel was performed by oscillatory measurements. The bioactivity of IMPI was evaluated in a Casein fluoresence quenching assay. In this study, a suitable application form for the dermal treatment of chronic wound infections with IMPI was designed. The influences of poloxamer 407 concentration and various additives on the viscoelastic properties and preservation of a thermosensitive hydrogel were investigated. The incorporation of the precursor drug IMPI-gluthathione-s-transferase (GST) in the hydrogel had no influence on the rheological characteristics and will be released. The bioactivity of IMPI-GST is not influenced by the hydrogel and remains constant over 4 weeks of storage. This study reports the development of a poloxamer hydrogel as a suitable carrier system for the application of IMPI. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  20. Evaluation of fungicides to protect pruning wounds from Botryosphaeriaceae species infections on almond trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego OLMO

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In vitro efficacy of ten fungicides was evaluated against four Botryosphaeriaceae spp. (Diplodia seriata, Neofusicoccum luteum, N. mediterraneum and N. parvum associated with branch cankers on almond trees. Cyproconazole, pyraclostrobin, tebuconazole, and thiophanate-methyl were effective for the inhibition of mycelial growth of most of these fungi. An experiment on 3-year-old almond trees evaluated boscalid, mancozeb, thiophanate-methyl, pyraclostrobin and tebuconazole for preventative ability against infections caused by the four pathogens. Five months after pruning and fungicide application, lesion length measurements and isolation percentages showed no significant differences among the four pathogens after they were inoculated onto the trees, and also between the two inoculation times tested (1 or 7 d after fungicide application. Thiophanate-methyl was the most effective fungicide, resulting in the shortest lesion lengths and the lowest isolation percentages from artificially inoculated pruning wounds. This chemical is therefore a candidate for inclusion in integrated disease management, to protect pruning wounds from infections caused by species of Botryosphaeriaceae. This study represents the first approach to development of chemical control strategies for the management of canker diseases caused by Botryosphaeriaceae fungi on almond trees. 

  1. The effect of clary sage oil on staphylococci responsible for wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz, Monika; Głowacka, Anna; Poznańska-Kurowska, Katarzyna; Kaszuba, Andrzej; Urbaniak, Anna; Kowalczyk, Edward

    2015-02-01

    The spreading of bacterial antibiotic resistance among clinical strains of pathogenic bacteria has made investigators to search for other active antibacterial agents which could provide a valuable complement to the existing therapies. To determine the antibacterial activity of clary sage oil (Salvia sclarea L.) against Staphylococcus clinical strains which were isolated from patients with wound infections. A comprehensive evaluation of Staphylococcus clinical strain resistance to antibiotics was performed. The constituents of clary sage oil were assayed by GC-FID-MS analysis. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the tested essential oil against staphylococci by the micro-dilution broth method was determined. The clary sage oil was active against Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis and S. xylosus with MIC values ranging from 3.75 to 7.00 µl/ml. The results of the in vitro tests encourage to use formulations containing sage oil as the active natural antimicrobial agent. Because of its antimicrobial properties clary sage oil may be applied to treat wounds and skin infections.

  2. Factors influencing treatment success of negative pressure wound therapy in patients with postoperative infections after Osteosynthetic fracture fixation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Izadpanah, Kaywan; Hansen, Stephanie; Six-Merker, Julia

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) is being increasingly used to treat postoperative infections after osteosynthetic fracture fixation. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of epidemiological and microbiological parameters on outcome. METHODS: Infections...... logistic regression models based on data from 106 patients. RESULTS: Staged wound lavage in combination with NPWT allowed implant preservation in 44% and led to successful healing in 73% of patients. Fermentation characteristics, load and behavior after gram staining revealed no statistically significant...... 3 (OR 10.2 [CI 1.88-55.28]). Wounds were less likely to heal in conjunction with high CRP blood levels (>20 mg/l) at the time of discharge (OR 3.6 [95% CI 1.31-10.08]) or following a change of the infecting bacterial species under therapy (OR 3.2 [95% CI, 1.13-8.99]). CONCLUSIONS: These results...

  3. Recent advances in topical wound care

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    Sujata Sarabahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a wide variety of dressing techniques and materials available for management of both acute wounds and chronic non-healing wounds. The primary objective in both the cases is to achieve a healed closed wound. However, in a chronic wound the dressing may be required for preparing the wound bed for further operative procedures such as skin grafting. An ideal dressing material should not only accelerate wound healing but also reduce loss of protein, electrolytes and fluid from the wound, and help to minimize pain and infection. The present dictum is to promote the concept of moist wound healing. This is in sharp contrast to the earlier practice of exposure method of wound management wherein the wound was allowed to dry. It can be quite a challenge for any physician to choose an appropriate dressing material when faced with a wound. Since wound care is undergoing a constant change and new products are being introduced into the market frequently, one needs to keep abreast of their effect on wound healing. This article emphasizes on the importance of assessment of the wound bed, the amount of drainage, depth of damage, presence of infection and location of wound. These characteristics will help any clinician decide on which product to use and where,in order to get optimal wound healing. However, there are no ′magical dressings′. Dressings are one important aspect that promotes wound healing apart from treating the underlying cause and other supportive measures like nutrition and systemic antibiotics need to be given equal attention.

  4. Assessment of bacterial infection in chronic wounds in the elderly: biopsy versus VERSAJET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattera, Edi; Iovene, Maria Rosaria; Rispoli, Corrado; Falco, Giuseppe; Rocco, Nicola; Accurso, Antonello

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hydro-surgery VERSAJET system as a suitable alternative to the traditional invasive tissue sampling technique in detecting bacteria and their load in chronic wounds in the elderly. To investigate and evaluate bacterial incidence and load in chronic wounds, we simultaneously performed on 19 affected patients a deep tissue biopsy and tissue collections by the VERSAJET hydro-surgical system. After local cleaning and anesthesia, a deep biopsy was performed with a punch of 3-4 mm in diameter. Subsequently, three tissue samples were collected by the VERSAJET system: one from the first washing in order to investigate the superficial contamination; one from the second washing to investigate deep tissue infection investigation and one from the third washing as a control procedure. After treatment, all tissue samples were cultured in vitro for diagnostic and micro-biological assessment. Nineteen patients with chronic wounds of the lower limbs were enrolled from February 2010 to May 2013. Concordance between deep tissue biopsy cultures and tissue cultures collected by the VERSAJET system was examined. The deep tissue biopsy cultures showed complete concordance with the VERSAJET as follows: 2 patients (11%) for the first washing sample; 10 patients (53%) for the second washing sample; 4 patients (21%) for the third washing sample. However, with reference to only aerobic isolated strains, the concordance of the VERSAJET second washing samples cultures with a biopsy of the deep tissue cultures was very high (84%) and fairly high (63%) in the anaerobic isolated strains. The second VERSAJET washing sample cultures seem to have the highest concordance with the biopsy of the deep tissue cultures. Tissue biopsy remains the leading technique for detecting bacteria and their load in chronic wounds. However, this study shows that the hydro-surgery VERSAJET system is sufficiently effective in detecting bacteria and their load in chronic wounds

  5. Cutaneous Nocardia brasiliensis infection in an immunocompetent host after ovarian cystectomy: A case study

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    Manideepa SenGupta

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Nocardia brasiliensis is a rare human pathogen that is usually associated with localised cutaneous infections. We report a case of primary cutaneous Nocardia brasiliensis infection causing delayed wound healing that developed after ovarian cystectomy in an otherwise healthy 32-year-old woman. The patient was initially treated with cotrimoxazole, however due to intolerance intravenous amikacin was given and gradually the wound healed. The diagnosis was confirmed by demonstrating the causative organism in exudates, and cultures. Early diagnosis as well as early institution of chemotherapy is effective in most patients, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the isolate should be performed to identify the best treatment options.

  6. Cutaneous Nocardia brasiliensis infection in an immunocompetent host after ovarian cystectomy: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, Sarkar; Saha, Puranjay; Sengupta, Manideepa

    2011-01-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is a rare human pathogen that is usually associated with localised cutaneous infections. We report a case of primary cutaneous Nocardia brasiliensis infection causing delayed wound healing that developed after ovarian cystectomy in an otherwise healthy 32-year-old woman. The patient was initially treated with cotrimoxazole, however due to intolerance intravenous amikacin was given and gradually the wound healed. The diagnosis was confirmed by demonstrating the causative organism in exudates, and cultures. Early diagnosis as well as early institution of chemotherapy is effective in most patients, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the isolate should be performed to identify the best treatment options.

  7. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy for infected perineal wounds after abdominoperineal resection. A retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walma, M S; Burbach, J P M; Verheijen, P M; Pronk, A; van Grevenstein, W M U

    INTRODUCTION: Perineal wound complications are a main problem after abdominoperineal resection (APR). There is little evidence concerning perineal wound management. This study describes and evaluates the role of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in wound management strategies of perineal wound

  8. Risk factors for surgical site infection and delayed wound healing after orthopedic surgery in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Yasutaka; Nishida, Keiichiro; Hashizume, Kenzo; Nasu, Yoshihisa; Nakahara, Ryuichi; Kanazawa, Tomoko; Ozawa, Masatsugu; Harada, Ryozo; Machida, Takahiro; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and the risk factors of surgical-site infection (SSI) and delayed wound healing (DWH) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) underwent orthopedic surgery. We reviewed the records of 1036 elective orthopedic procedures undertaken in RA patients. Risk factors for SSI and DWH were assessed by logistic regression analysis using age, body mass index, disease duration, pre-operative laboratory data, surgical procedure, corticosteroid use, co-morbidity, and use of conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (csDMARDs) and biological DMARDs (bDMARDs) as variables. SSI and DWH were identified in 19 cases and 15 cases, respectively. One case of SSI and three cases of DWH were recorded among 196 procedures in patients using bDMARDs. Foot and ankle surgery was associated with an increased risk of SSI (odds ratio (OR), 3.167; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.256-7.986; p = 0.015). Total knee arthroplasty (TKA; OR, 4.044; 95% CI, 1.436-11.389; p = 0.008) and disease duration (OR, 1.004; 95% CI, 1.000-1.007; p = 0.029) were associated with an increased risk of DWH. Our results indicated foot and ankle surgery, and TKA and disease duration as risk factors for SSI and DWH, respectively. bDMARDs was not associated with an increased risk of SSI and DWH.

  9. Therapy options in deep sternal wound infection: Sternal plating versus muscle flap.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Grapow

    Full Text Available Management of deep sternal wound infection (DSWI in cardiac surgical patients still remains challenging. A variety of treatment strategies has been described. Aim of this cohort study was to analyse two different treatment strategies for DSWI: titanium sternal plating system (TSFS and muscle flap coverage (MFC.Between January 2007 and December 2011, from 3122 patients undergoing cardiac surgery 42 were identified with DSWI and treated with one of the above mentioned strategies. In-hospital data were collected, follow-up performed by telephone and assessment of Quality of Life (QoL using the SF-12 Health Survey Questionnaire.20 patients with deep sternal wound infection were stabilized with TSFS and 22 patients treated with MFC. Preoperative demographics and risk factors did not reveal any significant differences. Patients treated with TSFS had a significantly shorter operation time (p<0.05 and shorter hospitalization (p<0.05. A tendency towards lower mortality rate (p = n.s. and less re-interventions were also noted (plating 0.6 vs. flap 1.17 per patient, n.s.. Quality of Life in the TSFS group for the physical-summary-score was significantly elevated compared to the MFC group (p<0.05. Relating to chest stability and cosmetic result the treatment with TSFS showed superior results, but the usage of MFC gave the patients more freedom in breathing and less chest pain.Our results demonstrate that the use of TSFS is a feasible and safe alternative in DSWI. However, MFC remains an absolutely essential option for complicated DSWI since the amount of perfused tissue can be the key for infection control.

  10. Postoperative abdominal wound infection – epidemiology, risk factors, identification, and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azoury SC

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Saïd C Azoury,1 Norma Elizabeth Farrow,2 Qing L Hu,2 Kevin C Soares,1 Caitlin W Hicks,1 Faris Azar,1 Nelson Rodriguez-Unda,3 Katherine E Poruk,1 Peter Cornell,1 Karen K Burce,1 Carisa M Cooney,3 Hien T Nguyen,1 Frederic E Eckhauser1 1Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Surgical site infections (SSIs complicate the postoperative course of a significant proportion of general abdominal surgical patients and are associated with excessive health care costs. SSIs increase postoperative morbidity and mortality, and may require hospital admission, intravenous antibiotics, and even surgical reintervention. Risks associated with SSIs are related to both host and perioperative factors. However, a vast majority of these infections are preventable. More recently, quality initiative programs such as American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program are expanding their roles to help better monitor adherence to improvement measures. Indeed, standardizing preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis timing is perhaps the most persuasive example and this has been integral to reducing postoperative SSI rates. Herein, the authors provide an update on the epidemiology, risk factors, identification, and management of wound infections following abdominal surgery. Keywords: surgical site infection, diagnosis, treatment, prevention

  11. Wound infections due to Mycobacterium fortuitum after polypropylene mesh inguinal hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celdrán, A; Esteban, J; Mañas, J; Granizo, J-J

    2007-08-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum complex is a group of rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM). These opportunistic pathogens are frequently associated with infections related to surgical procedures involving biomaterials. Two cases of Mycobacterium fortuitum infection occurred in a prospective study of inguinal hernia prosthesis repairs. These infections differed from those caused by other bacteria in terms of pathogenic mechanisms, clinical manifestation and resistance to both prophylactic and therapeutic antibiotics.

  12. Horizontal transmission of Streptococcus pneumoniae in the surgical ward: a rare source of nosocomial wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillet, Marlène; Zahar, Jean-Ralph; Timsit, Marc-Olivier; Grandin, Laure; Carbonnelle, Etienne; Join-Lambert, Olivier; Quesne, Gilles; Nassif, Xavier; Mejean, Arnaud; Carbonne, Anne

    2012-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is rarely isolated from nosocomial infections. We report an outbreak of 4 nosocomial-acquired surgical site infections due to S pneumoniae after retropubic simple prostatectomy. The likely source was detected in the rhinopharynx of the surgeon. After the implementation of recommendations, no new cases have been recorded. Copyright © 2012 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of bacterial isolates from surgical wound infections in Tertiary Care Hospital in Allahabad, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Kapoor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study to analyze the occurrence and in-vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial pathogens isolated from surgical wound infections. Specimens from a total of 129 patients undergoing either emergency or elective surgery were collected from infected sites or stitch lines and inoculated onto appropriate media. The bacterial cultures were identified utilizing standard microbiological and biochemical methods. Isolates were tested for susceptibility to antimicrobials using the Kirby Bauer disk diffusion method. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test. Of 129 patients investigated (62 emergency and 67 elective surgery cases, bacterial isolates were isolated with almost equal frequency both from emergency and elective surgery cases. Of 108 (83.72% culture positive samples, 62 (57.41% were Gram negative, 39 (36.11% Gram positive, and 7 (6.48% showed multiple organisms. Of total 115 bacteria isolated (101 single and 7 double organisms culture positive, 33 (28.69% were Escherichia coli and were also the commonest; followed by Staphylococcus aureus, 30 (26.09% cases. S. aureus and Streptococcus spp. showed maximum susceptibility (100% to linezolid and vancomycin. Maximum susceptibility of E. coli was observed to ciprofloxacin (75.7%, followed by gentamicin (54.5%; of Klebsiella spp. to ceftriaxone and gentamicin (66.6% each, of Proteus spp. to gentamicin (70% followed by ciprofloxacin (60%, and of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to piperacillin (100% and tobramycin (71.4%. E. coli and S. aureus were the most common and Salmonella spp. and Acinetobacter spp. were the least common organism causing surgical site infections. The definitive therapy included ciprofloxacin and gentamicin for E. coli; linezolid and vancomycin for S. aureus and Streptococcus spp; ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin for Klebsiella spp., Citrobacter spp., acinetobacter spp and Salmonella spp.

  14. Reduction of wound infections in laparoscopic-assisted colorectal resections by plastic wound ring drapes (REDWIL)?--A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauscher, J C; Grittner, F; Stroux, A; Zimmermann, M; le Claire, M; Buhr, H J; Ritz, J P

    2012-10-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are frequent complications in colorectal surgery and may lead to burst abdomen, incisional hernia, and increased perioperative costs. Plastic wound ring drapes (RD) were introduced some decades ago to protect the abdominal wound from bacteria and reduce SSIs. There have been no controlled trials examining the benefit of RD in laparoscopic colorectal surgery. The Reduction of wound infections in laparoscopic assisted colorectal resections by plastic wound ring drapes (REDWIL) trial was thus designed to assess their effectiveness in preventing SSIs after elective laparoscopic colorectal resections. REDWIL is a randomized controlled monocenter trial with two parallel groups (experimental group with RD and control group without RD). Patients undergoing elective laparoscopic colorectal resection were included. The primary endpoint was SSIs. Secondary outcomes were colonization of the abdominal wall with bacteria, reoperations/readmissions, early/late postoperative complications, and cost of hospital stay. The duration of follow-up was 6 months. Between January 2008 and October 2010, 109 patients were randomly assigned to the experimental or control group (with or without RD). Forty-six patients in the RD group and 47 patients in the control group completed follow-up. SSIs developed in ten patients with RD (21.7 %) and six patients without RD (12.8 %) (p = 0.28). An intraoperative swab taken from the abdominal wall was positive in 66.7 % of patients with RD and 57.5 % without RD (p = 0.46). The number of species cultured within one swab was significantly higher in those without RD (p = 0.03). The median total inpatient costs including emergency readmissions were 3,402 ± 4,038 in the RD group and 3,563 ± 1,735 in the control group (p = 0.869). RD do not reduce the rate of SSIs in laparoscopic colorectal surgery. The inpatient costs are similar with and without RD.

  15. Bacterial isolates from burn wound infections and their antibiograms: A eight-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Manjula

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection is an important cause of mortality in burns. Rapidly emerging nosocomial pathogens and the problem of multi-drug resistance necessitates periodic review of isolation patterns and antibiogram in the burn ward. Aim: Keeping this in mind, the present retrospective study from wounds of patients admitted to burns unit was undertaken to determine the bacteriological profile and the resistance pattern from the burn ward over a period of three years (June 2002 to May 2005 and was compared with the results obtained during the previous five years (June 1997-May 2002, to ascertain any change in the bacteriological profile and antimicrobial resistance pattern. Materials and Methods: Bacterial isolates from 268 wound swabs taken from burn patients were identified by conventional biochemical methods and antimicrobial susceptibility was performed. Statistical comparison of bacterial isolates and their resistance pattern with previous five years data was done using c2 test. Results and Conclusions: During the period from 2002 to 2005 Pseudomonas species was the commonest pathogen isolated (51.5% followed by Acinetobacter species (14.28%, Staph. aureus (11.15%, Klebsiella species (9.23% and Proteus species (2.3%. When compared with the results of the previous five years i.e., 1997 to 2002, Pseudomonas species was still the commonest pathogen in the burns unit. However, the isolation of this organism and other gram-negative organisms had decreased in comparison to previous years. Newer drugs were found to be effective.

  16. Risk factors for abdominal wound dehiscence in children: A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.H. van Ramshorst (Gabrielle); N.E. Salu (Nathalie); N.M.A. Bax (Klaas); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); E. van Heurn (Ernst); D.C. Aronson (Daniel); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In the limited literature concerning abdominal wound dehiscence after laparotomy in children, reported incidences range between 0.2-1.2% with associated mortality rates of 8-45%. The goal of this retrospective case-control study was to identify major risk factors for

  17. Intracavity lavage and wound irrigation for prevention of surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Gill; Atkinson, Ross A; Smith, Tanya A; Rowlands, Ceri; Rithalia, Amber D; Crosbie, Emma J; Dumville, Jo C

    2017-10-30

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are wound infections that occur after an operative procedure. A preventable complication, they are costly and associated with poorer patient outcomes, increased mortality, morbidity and reoperation rates. Surgical wound irrigation is an intraoperative technique, which may reduce the rate of SSIs through removal of dead or damaged tissue, metabolic waste, and wound exudate. Irrigation can be undertaken prior to wound closure or postoperatively. Intracavity lavage is a similar technique used in operations that expose a bodily cavity; such as procedures on the abdominal cavity and during joint replacement surgery. To assess the effects of wound irrigation and intracavity lavage on the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI). In February 2017 we searched the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid Embase and EBSCO CINAHL Plus. We also searched three clinical trials registries and references of included studies and relevant systematic reviews. There were no restrictions on language, date of publication or study setting. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of participants undergoing surgical procedures in which the use of a particular type of intraoperative washout (irrigation or lavage) was the only systematic difference between groups, and in which wounds underwent primary closure. The primary outcomes were SSI and wound dehiscence. Secondary outcomes were mortality, use of systemic antibiotics, antibiotic resistance, adverse events, re-intervention, length of hospital stay, and readmissions. Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion at each stage. Two review authors also undertook data extraction, assessment of risk of bias and GRADE assessment. We calculated risk ratios or differences in means with 95% confidence intervals where possible. We included 59 RCTs with 14,738 participants. Studies assessed comparisons

  18. High Burden of Antimicrobial Resistance among Bacteria Causing Pyogenic Wound Infections at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal

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    Basista Prasad Rijal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic wound infections are one of the most common clinical entities caused and aggravated by the invasion of pathogenic organisms. Prompt and aggressive antimicrobial therapy is needed to reduce the burden and complications associated with these infections. In this study, we intended to investigate the common pathogens and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns from the pyogenic wound infections at a tertiary care hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal. A laboratory based cross-sectional study was carried out among the pyogenic clinical specimens of the patients visiting Manmohan Memorial Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal. Processing of clinical specimens and isolation and identification of bacterial pathogens were carried out using standard microbiological methods. Antimicrobial susceptibilities and resistant profiles were determined by following the standard guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. About 65% of the clinical specimens were positive for the bacterial growth and Gram positive bacteria (57.4% were the leading pathogens among pyogenic wound infections. Staphylococcus aureus (412, 49.28%, Escherichia coli (136, 16.27%, Klebsiella spp. (88, 10.53%, and Pseudomonas spp. (44, 5.26% were the common pathogens isolated. High level of drug resistance was observed among both Gram positive bacteria (51.9% and Gram negative bacteria (48.7%. Gram positive isolates were resistant to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, cotrimoxazole, erythromycin, and cloxacillin. Gram negative isolates were resistant to cephalosporins but were well susceptible to amikacin and imipenem. Pyogenic wound infections are common in our hospital and majority of them were associated with multidrug resistant bacteria. The detailed workup of the prevalent pathogens present in infected wounds and their resistance pattern is clearly pertinent to choosing the adequate treatment.

  19. Using vacuum-assisted suspension to manage residual limb wounds in persons with transtibial amputation: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Robert D; Sutton, Erin E; Kinor, Deborah; Schaeffer, Julia M; Fatone, Stefania

    2014-02-01

    Persons with amputation and residual limb wounds would benefit from the ability to continue wearing a prosthesis while healing. Sockets with vacuum-assisted suspension may reduce intra-socket motion and be less disruptive to wound healing. The purpose of this case series was to measure residual limb wound size over time in persons with transtibial amputation while using prostheses with vacuum-assisted suspension. Six subjects with residual limb wounds were fit with vacuum-assisted suspension sockets. Wound surface area was calculated using ImageJ software at the time of fit and each subsequent visit until closure. FINDINGS AND OUTCOME: Average wound surface area at initial measurement was 2.17 ± 0.65 cm(2). All subjects were instructed to continue their normal activity level while wounds healed, with a mean of 177.6 ± 113 days to wound closure. Results suggest that well-fitting sockets with vacuum-assisted suspension in compliant individuals did not preclude wound healing. Further research is required to substantiate these case-based observations. Residual limb wounds are typically treated by suspension of prosthetic use until healing occurs, increasing the risk of long-term prosthesis nonuse. Our results suggest that vacuum-assisted suspension sockets may be used while healing occurs.

  20. Carbohydrate-derived fulvic acid is a highly promising topical agent to enhance healing of wounds infected with drug-resistant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanan; Paderu, Padmaja; Delmas, Guillaume; Dolgov, Enriko; Lee, Min Hee; Senter, Meredith; Park, Steven; Leivers, Stephen; Perlin, David S

    2015-10-01

    This work was intended as a proof-of-principle study to help establish carbohydrate-derived fulvic acid (CHD-FA) as a safe and effective agent that can be deployed to prevent the onset of drug-resistant bacterial and fungal infections in military and civilian personnel experiencing traumatic wound. Minimum inhibitory concentrations for CHD-FA were established on a total of 500 clinical isolates representing wound-associated drug-sensitive and drug-resistant bacterial and fungal pathogens. The efficacy of early use of CHD-FA to enhance healing of wounds infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa was evaluated in an in vivo rat model. CHD-FA showed strong activity against a variety of bacterial and fungal pathogens with minimum inhibitory concentration values equal or less than 0.5%. Compared with infected but untreated wounds, improved wound healing upon CHD-FA treatment was observed in both infection models, demonstrated by wound surface area measurement, histopathologic examination, and expression profiling of wound healing genes. Up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6) at Day 3 after infection was significantly dampened at Days 6 and 10 in the CHD-FA-treated wounds in both infection models, displaying an improved and accelerated wound healing. CHD-FA is a promising topical remedy for drug-resistant wound infections. It accelerated the healing process of wounds infected with methicillin-resistant S. aureus and multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa in rats, which is linked to both its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties.

  1. The Potential Application and Risks Associated With the Use of Predatory Bacteria as a Biocontrol Agent Against Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Associated With the Use of Predatory Bacteria as a Biocontrol Agent Against Wound Infections PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Daniel E Kadouri, Ph.D...W81XWH-12-2-0067 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Potential Application and Risks Associated With the Use of Predatory Bacteria as a Biocontrol Agent

  2. Porous CS based membranes with improved antimicrobial properties for the treatment of infected wound in veterinary applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonda-Turo, C., E-mail: chiara.tondaturo@polito.it [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Turin (Italy); Ruini, F. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Turin (Italy); Argentati, M. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Turin (Italy); Clinic for Exotic Animals, CVS, Via Sandro Giovannini 53, 00137 Rome (Italy); Di Girolamo, N. [Clinic for Exotic Animals, CVS, Via Sandro Giovannini 53, 00137 Rome (Italy); Robino, P.; Nebbia, P. [Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Turin, Largo Braccini 2, 10095 Grugliasco, Turin (Italy); Ciardelli, G. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Turin (Italy)

    2016-03-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to the use of innovative solution for the treatment of infected wounds in animals. Current applied treatments are often un-effective leading to infection propagation and animal death. Novel engineered membranes based on chitosan (CS) can be prepared to combine local antimicrobial effect, high flexibility and easy manipulation. In this work, CS crosslinked porous membranes with improved antimicrobial properties were prepared via freeze-drying technique to promote wound healing and to reduce the bacterial proliferation in infected injuries. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gentamicin sulfate (GS) were incorporated into the CS matrices to impart antibacterial properties on a wild range of strains. CS based porous membranes were tested for their physicochemical, thermal, mechanical as well as swelling and degradation behavior at physiological condition. Additionally, GS release profile was investigated, showing a moderate burst effect in the first days followed by a decreasing release rate which it was maintained for at least 56 days. Moreover, porous membranes loaded with GS or AgNPs showed good bactericidal activity against both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The bacterial strains used in this work were collected in chelonians after carapace injuries to better mimic the environment after trauma. - Highlights: • Innovative scaffolds for wound healing in veterinary applications • Novel engineered membranes based on chitosan with improved antibacterial properties • Highly flexible and versatile membranes for infected wounds.

  3. ‘This wound has spoilt everything’: emotional capital and the experience of surgical site infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Brian; Tanner, Judith; Padley, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In this article we explore the experience of suffering from a surgical site infection, a common complication of surgery affecting around 5 per cent of surgical patients, via an interview study of 17 patients in the Midlands in the UK. Despite their prevalence, the experience of surgical site infections has received little attention so far. In spite of the impairment resulting from these iatrogenic problems, participants expressed considerable stoicism and we interpret this via the notion of emotional capital. This idea derives from the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Helga Nowotny and Diane Reay and helps us conceptualise the emotional resources accumulated and expended in managing illness and in gaining the most from healthcare services. Participants were frequently at pains not to blame healthcare personnel or hospitals, often discounting the infection's severity, and attributing it to chance, to ‘germs’ or to their own failure to buy and apply wound care products. The participants' stoicism was thus partly afforded by their refusal to blame healthcare institutions or personnel. Where anger was described, this was either defused or expressed on behalf of another person. Emotional capital is associated with deflecting the possibility of complaint and sustaining a deferential and grateful position in relation to the healthcare system. PMID:25470322

  4. 'This wound has spoilt everything': emotional capital and the experience of surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Brian; Tanner, Judith; Padley, Wendy

    2014-11-01

    In this article we explore the experience of suffering from a surgical site infection, a common complication of surgery affecting around 5 per cent of surgical patients, via an interview study of 17 patients in the Midlands in the UK. Despite their prevalence, the experience of surgical site infections has received little attention so far. In spite of the impairment resulting from these iatrogenic problems, participants expressed considerable stoicism and we interpret this via the notion of emotional capital. This idea derives from the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Helga Nowotny and Diane Reay and helps us conceptualise the emotional resources accumulated and expended in managing illness and in gaining the most from healthcare services. Participants were frequently at pains not to blame healthcare personnel or hospitals, often discounting the infection's severity, and attributing it to chance, to 'germs' or to their own failure to buy and apply wound care products. The participants' stoicism was thus partly afforded by their refusal to blame healthcare institutions or personnel. Where anger was described, this was either defused or expressed on behalf of another person. Emotional capital is associated with deflecting the possibility of complaint and sustaining a deferential and grateful position in relation to the healthcare system. © 2014 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2014 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Evidence-based management of deep wound infection after spinal instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, Rishi R; Wong, Albert P; Lall, Rohan R; Lawton, Cort D; Smith, Zachary A; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2015-02-01

    In this study, evidence-based medicine is used to assess optimal surgical and medical management of patients with post-operative deep wound infection following spinal instrumentation. A computerized literature search of the PubMed database was performed. Twenty pertinent studies were identified. Studies were separated into publications addressing instrumentation retention versus removal and publications addressing antibiotic therapy regimen. The findings were classified based on level of evidence (I-III) and findings were summarized into evidentiary tables. No level I or II evidence was identified. With regards to surgical management, five studies support instrumentation retention in the setting of early deep infection. In contrast, for delayed infection, the evidence favors removal of instrumentation at the time of initial debridement. Surgeons should be aware that for deformity patients, even if solid fusion is observed, removal of instrumentation may be associated with significant loss of correction. A course of intravenous antibiotics followed by long-term oral suppressive therapy should be pursued if instrumentation is retained. A shorter treatment course may be appropriate if hardware is removed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Vacuum-Assisted Closure in Patients with Post-operative Infections after Instrumented Spine Surgery: A Series of 12 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Maya; Padalkar, Pravin; Mehta, Varshil

    2017-01-01

    Post-operative wound infections after spinal surgery is a very serious problem, leading to a risk of significant morbidity which may even lead to prolonged hospitalization. Various treatment protocols have been recommended for debridement, antibiotic, and soft-tissue management, but with mixed results. However, the risk of morbidity is still high with these treatment options. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) system has been gaining popularity recently in the management of subacute, acute, and chronic wounds. This study aims to review the use of the indigenous VAC in the management of deep infections after spinal instrumentation surgery. Between 2010 and 2015, 12 out of 514 patients who developed a deep infection after spinal surgery, were selected and reviewed retrospectively at multiple centers (MGM Hospital, Kamothe and Center for Orthopaedic & Spine Surgery, New Panvel, Navi Mumbai, India). Out of 12 patients, one of the patients needed a partial implant exchange although none of the cases needed complete implant removal. All patients had achieved clean closed wounds along with a retention of the instrumentation. There was no need for flap surgery to cover wound defect in any case. However, antibiotic treatment was necessary in all cases. None of the patients showed a new infection after the treatment. The study demonstrates the usefulness of VAC therapy as an alternative management for wound conditioning of a back wound with the high complexity in nature after instrumented spine surgeries as it eliminates complex secondary surgeries, prolong use of antibiotics and removal of the implants.

  7. Epidermal keratinocytes initiate wound healing and pro-inflammatory immune responses following percutaneous schistosome infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Claire D; Prendergast, Catriona T; Sanin, David E; Oulton, Tate E; Hall, Rebecca J; Mountford, Adrian P

    2015-03-01

    Keratinocytes constitute the majority of cells in the skin's epidermis, the first line of defence against percutaneous pathogens. Schistosome larvae (cercariae) actively penetrate the epidermis to establish infection, however the response of keratinocytes to invading cercariae has not been investigated. Here we address the hypothesis that cercariae activate epidermal keratinocytes to promote the development of a pro-inflammatory immune response in the skin. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to Schistosoma mansoni cercariae via each pinna and non-haematopoietic cells isolated from epidermal tissue were characterised for the presence of different keratinocyte sub-sets at 6, 24 and 96 h p.i. We identified an expansion of epidermal keratinocyte precursors (CD45(-), CD326(-), CD34(+)) within 24 h of infection relative to naïve animals. Following infection, cells within the precursor population displayed a more differentiated phenotype (α6integrin(-)) than in uninfected skin. Parallel immunohistochemical analysis of pinnae cryosections showed that this expansion corresponded to an increase in the intensity of CD34 staining, specifically in the basal bulge region of hair follicles of infected mice, and a higher frequency of keratinocyte Ki67(+) nuclei in both the hair follicle and interfollicular epidermis. Expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine and stress-associated keratin 6b genes was also transiently upregulated in the epidermal tissue of infected mice. In vitro exposure of keratinocyte precursors isolated from neonatal mouse skin to excretory/secretory antigens released by penetrating cercariae elicited IL-1α and IL-1β production, supporting a role for keratinocyte precursors in initiating cutaneous inflammatory immune responses. Together, these observations indicate that S.mansoni cercariae and their excretory/secretory products act directly upon epidermal keratinocytes, which respond by initiating barrier repair and pro-inflammatory mechanisms similar to those

  8. Assessment of bacterial infection in chronic wounds in the elderly: biopsy versus VERSAJET

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mattera, Edi; Iovene, Maria Rosaria; Rispoli, Corrado; Falco, Giuseppe; Rocco, Nicola; Accurso, Antonello

    2014-01-01

    ... wounds in the elderly. To investigate and evaluate bacterial incidence and load in chronic wounds, we simultaneously performed on 19 affected patients a deep tissue biopsy and tissue collections by the VERSAJET hydro-surgical system...

  9. The Incorporation of Radionuclides After Wounding by a "Dirty Bomb": The Impact of Time for Decorporation Efficacy and a Model for Cases of Disseminated Fragmentation Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rump, Alexis; Stricklin, Daniela; Lamkowski, Andreas; Eder, Stefan; Abend, Michael; Port, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In the case of a terrorist attack by a "dirty bomb" there is a risk of internal contamination with radionuclides through inhalation and wounds. We studied the efficacy of a decorporation treatment depending on the initiation time and duration. Approach: Based on biokinetic models, we simulated the impact of different diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid treatments on the committed effective dose after the incorporation of plutonium-239. Results: For the same level of radioactivity, the dose was higher after the fast absorption from the wound than after a slow invasion following inhalation. The impact of the treatment initiation time was particularly important in the case of the internal contamination through the wound. Ending the treatment at an early point in time was followed by an augmentation of radioactivity in the blood compartment, reflecting insufficient treatment duration. Treatment efficacy increased only marginally if extended over 90 days. Innovation and Conclusion: For plutonium-239, the committed effective dose and the impact of the treatment initiation time on therapeutic efficacy predominantly depend on the speed of invasion, i.e., the pathway and the physicochemical properties of the compounds involved. Thus, it is prudent to start decorporation therapy as soon as possible, as a loss of efficacy resulting from a delay in treatment initiation cannot be compensated later on. In the case of plutonium-239 incorporation, the treatment must be continued for several months. Multiple fragmentation wounds might be aggregated to a single wound model suited for internal dosimetry calculations by using the "rule of nine."

  10. Pursestring closure of the stoma site leads to fewer wound infections: results from a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Janet T; Marquez, Thao T; Clerc, Daniel; Gie, Olivier; Demartines, Nicolas; Madoff, Robert D; Rothenberger, David A; Christoforidis, Dimitrios

    2014-11-01

    Surgical site infection after stoma reversal is common. The optimal skin closure technique after stoma reversal has been widely debated in the literature. We hypothesized that pursestring near-complete closure of the stoma site would lead to fewer surgical site infections compared with conventional primary closure. This study was a parallel prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial. This study was conducted at 2 university medical centers. Patients (N = 122) presenting for elective colostomy or ileostomy reversal were selected. Pursestring versus conventional primary closure of stoma sites were compared. Stoma site surgical site infection within 30 days of surgery, overall surgical site infection, delayed healing (open wound for >30 days), time to wound epithelialization, and patient satisfaction were the primary outcomes measured. The pursestring group had a significantly lower stoma site infection rate (2% vs 15%, p = 0.01). There was no difference in delayed healing or patient satisfaction between groups. Time to epithelialization was measured in only 51 patients but was significantly longer in the pursestring group (34.6 ± 20 days vs 24.1 ± 17 days, p = 0.02). This study was limited by the variability in procedures and surgeons, the limited follow-up after 30 days, and the inability to perform blinding. Pursestring closure after stoma reversal has a lower risk of stoma site surgical site infection than conventional primary closure, although wounds may take longer to heal with the use of this approach. NCT01713452 (www.clinicaltrials.gov).

  11. [Wound myiasis due to Wohlfahrtia magnifica. First human case in Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lmimouni, B E; Baba, N E; Yahyaoui, A; Khallaayoune, K; Dakkak, A; Sedrati, O; El Mellouki, W

    2004-11-01

    Wohlfahrtia magnifica is a frequent fly in countries with high breeding activity: Australia, South Africa or Arab country The parasitological infestation occurred essentially during the summer, favourable period to the biological evolution of the flies. In this work, we report one case of wound myiasis that complicates a cutaneous lesion caused by larvae of Wohlfahrtia magnifica. This observation constitutes the first human case in our country.

  12. [Gunshot wounds of the abdomen studied by computed tomography. The authors' personal experience in 30 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzano, A; De Rosa, A; Scialpi, M; Rossi, E; Ammaturo, C; Filidoro, L; Gesuè, G; Carbone, M

    1999-09-01

    CT plays an important role in depicting gunshot wounds in parenchymal and hollow organs in the abdomen. Relative to other techniques and to emergency laparotomy, CT permits good assessment of abdominal content, major injuries and changes in other districts, such as chest, pelvis and skull. We investigated the yield and role of CT in diagnosing abdominal gunshot wounds, with their rich and varied radiological signs and associated injuries. We retrospectively reviewed the findings of 30 patients with abdominal gunshot wounds examined in 4 years at Loreto-Mare Hospital, Naples. All patients were men, age ranging 19-54 years (mean: 35); 6 of them were not from the European Union. Examinations were carried out from diaphragm to pubis with i.v. contrast injection and the CT angiography technique. CT was integrated with chest studies in 6 cases and with skull studies in 5. Subsequent CT follow-ups were necessary in 12 cases submitted to conservative treatment. Liver was the most damaged parenchyma, with hemorrhage and lacerocontusion in 7 cases and mashed in 1 case; spleen was involved in 4 cases; hemoperitoneum was found in 18 cases. Diaphragm was involved in 5 cases and pancreas in 2; gallbladder, stomach and duodenum were involved in 1 case each and jejunum-ileum and colon in 3 and 6 cases, respectively. CT showed renal injury in 3 cases and bladder injury in 2. Eight patients had vertebral gunshot damage. Pneumothorax, hemothorax and lacerocontusion were found in 7 cases; brain was injured in 4 cases and limbs in 16. Tissue damage extent depends on the speed and kinetic energy the bullet carries into the abdomen. Abdominal radiography shows the bullet and its site, pneumoperitoneum from gastrointestinal perforation, crash bone injuries, vertebral trauma and subcutaneous emphysema. Instead, CT depicts early parenchymal damage and vascular injury and thus becomes a complete and necessary tool for imaging gunshot wounds. CT provides early diagnostic information which

  13. Patients experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home for the treatment of deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsen, Christina; Acosta, Stefan; Kumlien, Christine

    2017-05-01

    To explore experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home, in patients with deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery and management in daily life. Deep surgical site infection after vascular surgery with exposed vessels often requires long-term treatment with negative pressure wound therapy, and continued therapy at home has become routine. An explorative qualitative study. Nine men and six women with a deep surgical site infection in the groin after vascular surgery, treated in their home with negative pressure wound therapy, were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using manifest and latent content analysis. Undergoing negative pressure wound therapy at home meant a transition from being a dependent patient to a person who must have self-care competence and be involved in their own care. A need to feel prepared for this before discharge from hospital was expressed. Lack of information and feelings of uncertainty prolonged the time before feeling confident in managing the treatment. The informants gradually accepted the need to be tied up to a machine, became competent in its management and found solutions to perform everyday tasks. Overall, it was a relief to be treated at home. Several benefits of negative pressure wound therapy at home were expressed. However, unnecessary stress and anxiety were experienced due to a lack of information on the treatment and instruction concerning the equipment. Adequate information and education must therefore be provided to facilitate the transition from a patient to a person with self-care competence and ability to manage this treatment at home. The findings revealed a need for more support and knowledge in their transition from hospital care to home care with negative pressure wound therapy. Routines must be established that ensure patient safety and security in treatment at home. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Streptococcus uberis and Staphylococcus aureus forefoot and blood stream co-infection in a haemodialysis patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentiny, Christine; Dirschmid, Harald; Lhotta, Karl

    2015-05-28

    Streptococcus uberis, the most frequent cause of mastitis in lactating cows, is considered non-pathogenic for humans. Only a few case reports have described human infections with this microorganism, which is notoriously difficult to identify. We report the case of a 75-year-old male haemodialysis patient, who developed a severe foot infection with osteomyelitis and bacteraemia. Both Streptococcus uberis and Staphylococcus aureus were identified in wound secretion and blood samples using mass spectrometry. The presence of Streptococcus uberis was confirmed by superoxide dismutase A sequencing. The patient recovered after amputation of the forefoot and antibiotic treatment with ampicillin/sulbactam. He had probably acquired the infection while walking barefoot on cattle pasture land. This is the first case report of a human infection with Streptococcus uberis with identification of the microorganism using modern molecular technology. We propose that Staphylococcus aureus co-infection was a prerequisite for deep wound and bloodstream infection with Streptococcus uberis.

  15. Effect of technique on postoperative perineal wound infections in abdominoperineal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Shayna L; Kelz, Rachel R; Mahmoud, Najjia N

    2013-07-01

    Perineal wound infection (PWI) after abdominoperineal resection causes a burden for patients and health systems. We sought to determine the effect of patient positioning on the incidence of postoperative surgical site infection. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent APR in our hospital system over a 10-year period. Univariate analysis was performed to identify characteristics associated with position and PWI. A logistic model was developed to assess the relationship of position and PWI, with adjustment for confounders. Patient characteristics were similar for the prone and lithotomy positions. Operative time was less for the prone than for the lithotomy position. The prone position was associated with a reduced risk of PWI. After adjustment for potential confounders, the prone position remained significantly associated with a reduction in PWI. Positioning patients in the prone position results in a lower occurrence of postoperative PWI and shorter operative time. We advocate this technique for most indications of APR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Postoperative wound infection after posterior spinal instrumentation: analysis of long-term treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Hsieh, Pang-Hsin; Tsai, Shan-Yin

    2015-03-01

    Postoperative spinal implant infection (PSII) places patients at risk for pseudarthrosis, correction loss, spondylodiscitis, adverse neurological sequelae, and even death; however, prognostic factors that predict long-term treatment outcomes have not been clearly investigated. In addition, few studies concerning the feasibility of reconstructing the failed spinal events have been published. We performed a cohort study of 51 patients who contracted PSII in the posterolateral thoracolumbar region at a single tertiary center between March 1997 and May 2007. Forty-seven patients (92.2 %) had one or more medical problems. Isolated bacterial species, infection severity, treatment timing, and hosts' defense response were evaluated to assess their relationship with management outcomes. The use of implant salvage, or removal subsequent with a revision strategy depended on the patient's general conditions, infection control, and implant status for fusion. The most common infective culprit was Staphylococcus spp. found in 35 of 60 (58.3 %) isolates, including 20 methicillin-resistant species. Gram-negative bacilli and polymicrobial infection were found significantly in patients presenting early-onset, deep-site infection and myonecrosis. Prompt diagnosis and aggressive therapy were responsible for implant preservation in 41 of 51 cases (80.4 %), while implant removal noted in 10 cases (19.6 %) was attributed to delayed treatment and uncontrolled infection with implant loosening, correction loss, or late infection with spondylodesis. The number of employed debridements alone was not significantly correlated with successful implant preservation. Delayed treatment for infection >3 months significantly led to implant removal (p screws cause peridiscal erosion and incapacitating motion pain, premature implant removal possibly results in failed fusion and correction loss. Reconstruction for a failed spinal event is feasible following infection control.

  17. Enzyme-responsive nanocomposites for wound infection prophylaxis in burn management: in vitro evaluation of their compatibility with healing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grützner, Verena; Unger, Ronald E; Baier, Grit; Choritz, Lars; Freese, Christian; Böse, Thomas; Landfester, Katharina; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2015-01-01

    Responsive, theranostic nanosystems, capable of both signaling and treating wound infections, is a sophisticated approach to reduce the most common and potentially traumatizing side effects of burn wound treatment: slowed wound healing due to prophylactic anti-infective drug exposure as well as frequent painful dressing changes. Antimicrobials as well as dye molecules have been incorporated into biodegradable nanosystems that release their content only in the presence of pathogens. Following nanocarrier degradation by bacterial enzymes, any infection will thus emit a visible signal and be effectively treated at its source. In this study, we investigated the effect of fluorescent-labeled hyaluronan nanocapsules containing polyhexanide biguanide and poly-L-lactic acid nanoparticles loaded with octenidine on primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells, which play a major role in cutaneous wound healing. Microscopic and flow cytometric analysis indicated a time-dependent uptake of both the nanocapsules and the nanoparticles. However, enzyme immunoassays showed no significant influence on the expression of pro-inflammatory cell adhesion molecules and cytokines by the endothelial cells. Under angiogenic-stimulating conditions, the potential to form capillary-like structures in co-culture with dermal fibroblasts was not inhibited. Furthermore, cytotoxicity studies (the MTS and crystal violet assay) after short- and long-term exposure to the materials demonstrated that both systems exhibited less toxicity than solutions of the antiseptic agents alone in comparable concentrations. The results indicate that responsive antimicrobial nanocomposites could be used as an advanced drug delivery system and a promising addition to current best practice wound infection prophylaxis with few side effects.

  18. [Gunshot wounds of the cranium studied with computerized tomography. Personal experience in 23 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzano, A; De Rosa, A; Scialpi, M; Rossi, E; Carbone, M; Brunese, L; Nocera, V; Muto, M

    2000-01-01

    Gunshot wounds to the head are usually mortal injuries. Their frequency has been increasing in the last years because of increasing crime rates. Gunshot wounds to the head require close clinical and diagnostic cooperation of the neurosurgeon and radiologist, detailed assessment of skull and brain damage, and finally prompt treatment. Emergency Computed Tomography (CT) makes a useful tool for depicting bullet course and brain damage, and thus helps plan treatment. We investigated the CT signs of subdural hematoma, lacerocontusive focus, subarachnoid hemorrhage, hemoencephalus, skull bone fracture and thecal hollow and report them as an aid to the neurosurgeon and the radiologist, for best treatment planning, and in an attempt to establish useful prognostic criteria. We retrospectively reviewed 23 cases of gunshot injuries to the head studied with CT at the Emergency Unit of Loreto Mare Hospital in Naples, Italy. Twenty patients were men and 3 women; their mean age was 31 years (range: 18-49). Three women and 2 men had been injured accidentally by wandering bullets, and one case was an attempted suicide; all the other cases resulted from shootings. CT slices were 10 mm thick, with 8 mm gap (5 mm in complex injuries and when posterior cranial fossa was involved); all scans were unenhanced. We found 22 penetrating gunshot wounds: 13 of them with thecal entry hole and intracranial bullet retention and 9 with an entry and an exit hole. One case was a superficial wound. Crash skull fractures were seen in 22 cases and they were fragmented in 12, with overlapping thecal fragments in 4, and with deep fragments in 2 cases. There were scattered bone splinters in 3 cases and the bullet was retained in the mastoid bone in one case. Lacerocontusive foci were assessed in 22 cases, brain swelling in 20, subarachnoid hemorrhage in 19, brain hematoma in 15, blood in the ventricular system in 9, pneumoencephalus in 7, air bubbles along the bullet course in 7, impression on ventricula

  19. Gunshot wound to the pregnant uterus: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osnaya-Moreno, Humberto; Zaragoza Salas, Tahitiana Abelina; Escoto Gomez, Jorge Armando; Mondragon Chimal, Marco Antonio; Torres Castaneda, Maria De Lourdes; Jimenez Flores, Mauro

    2013-09-01

    Crime and violence have become a public health problem. Pregnant women have not been the exception and gunshot injuries occupy an important place as a cause of trauma. An important fact is that pregnant women, who suffer trauma, are special patients because pregnancy causes physiological and anatomical changes. Management of these patients should be multidisciplinary, by the general surgeon, the obstetrician and the neonatologist. However, even trauma referral centers could neither have the staff nor the ideal training for these specific cases. In this context we present the following case.

  20. Treatment of open upper limb injuries with infection prevention and negative pressure wound therapy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, E; Raghuvanshi, M

    2017-12-02

    Open upper limb injuries requiring soft reconstruction can pose a dilemma for trauma surgeons when considering the treatment options. The British Orthopaedic Association and British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons Standard for Trauma (BOAST) have addressed the management of severe open lower limb fractures with the creation of the BOAST 4 guidelines. However, no such gold standard exists for the treatment of open injuries of the upper limb. Furthermore, treatment of these injuries is often more difficult and requires complicated strategies. Since the advent of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), there has been an improvement in wound care, though a focused review of its use in wound closure and infection prevention in the upper limb has not been published. We examine wound care management for open upper limb injuries with regard to the dressings applied, NPWT, wound closure and infection prevention. A systematic search of Medline, Cochrane and Google Scholar was performed using the key words. The key word searches were performed by two independent reviewers and 8,792 papers were found. Manuscripts between 1990 and 2010 were included, with the addition of key manuscripts before this date. Each manuscript was assessed by the two authors independently for methodology and validity Results: Approximately 120 manuscripts fulfilled selection criteria examining the influence of NPWT on open upper and lower limb injuries, and those examining infection risk in the same injuries. Of these 120 manuscripts, 28 were suitable for inclusion in the review. The systematic review is presented, allied to the BOAST 4 principles, examining the use of NPWT and the tools available for infection prevention for wounds of the upper and lower limb. The use of NPWT in conjunction with antibiotic-bead therapy improved the way in which open fractures of both the upper and lower limb are treated. Production of guidelines is warranted for the treatment of upper

  1. A CLINICAL STUDY OF ABDOMINAL WOUND DEHISCENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahir Hussain

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Abdominal wound dehiscence is a preventable complication, but is still seen. When present, it poses problem in the management of the case, increases the morbidity and mortality of the patient. The present study is a prospective study done from January 2010-May 2016 with an objective to find out the incidence of wound dehiscence, the most common pathologies associated with dehiscence and to find out the statistical significance of the difference risk factors causing wound dehiscence and to evaluate the role of tension sutures in prevention of wound dehiscence. MATERIALS AND METHODS 291 major laparotomies were followed from January 2010-September 2016. There were 21 cases of dehiscence and from the remaining 270 cases, 58 patients were chosen as controls who underwent the same procedure, but without dehiscence. 15 factors were analysed and compared between the dehiscence and control groups. RESULTS The incidence was found to be 7.2%. Peritonitis was the most common pathology. The significant factors were age more than 50, wound infection. Tension suture application has shown to reduce the incidence of wound dehiscence. CONCLUSIONS  Intra-abdominal sepsis (peritonitis increases the incidence of wound dehiscence.  Age >50, Uraemic, Jaundiced, Obesity, Malnutrition increases the incidence of wound dehiscence.  Wound infection was a highly significant factor having 8 times more risk of dehiscence.

  2. Vacuum-assisted closure for open perineal wound after abdominoperineal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Shiki; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Ohue, Masayuki; Noura, Shingo; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Masahiko; Higashiyama, Masahiko; Sakon, Masato

    2015-01-01

    In colorectal cancer surgery, surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication, and especially, perineal wound complications after abdominoperineal resection (APR) remain to be serious clinical problems. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy was first reported in another surgical field in 1997, and it is useful for treating complex wounds because it promotes granulation. VAC therapy has been recently used for open abdominal wounds. We introduced VAC for treating open perineal wound of APR and report the usefulness of it. We treated four patients. Firstly, in cases 1 and 2, we introduced VAC therapy to the management of SSI of the perineal wound after APR, and it was useful to control postoperative perineal wound infection. And also, in cases 3 and 4, we introduced VAC therapy to prevent perineal wound infection. Perineal wound infection did not happen. A vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap has been reported to decrease perineal wound complications including pelvic abscess and open perineal wound; however it results in significant operative blood loss, increased operative time, and additional surgical complications. In our cases, there were no complications relating to VAC therapy and it promoted rapid wound healing. Our results suggested that it is an effective treatment for APR in a high-risk case of an open perineal wound. VAC therapy is a less invasive method and a useful treatment for open perineal wound of APR. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Factors influencing treatment success of negative pressure wound therapy in patients with postoperative infections after Osteosynthetic fracture fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadpanah, Kaywan; Hansen, Stephanie; Six-Merker, Julia; Helwig, Peter; Südkamp, Norbert P; Schmal, Hagen

    2017-06-07

    Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) is being increasingly used to treat postoperative infections after osteosynthetic fracture fixation. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of epidemiological and microbiological parameters on outcome. Infections following operative fracture fixation were registered in a comprehensive Critical Incidence Reporting System and subsequently analyzed retrospectively for characteristics of patients including comorbidity, bacteria, and clinical factors. The influence of the investigated parameters was analyzed using logistic regression models based on data from 106 patients. Staged wound lavage in combination with NPWT allowed implant preservation in 44% and led to successful healing in 73% of patients. Fermentation characteristics, load and behavior after gram staining revealed no statistically significant correlation with either healing or implant preservation. Infecting bacteria were successfully isolated in 87% of patients. 20% of all infections were caused by bacterial combinations. We observed a change in the infecting bacterial species under therapy in 23%. Age, gender, metabolic diseases or comorbidities did not influence the probability of implant preservation or healing. The delayed manifestation of infection (>4 weeks) correlated with a higher risk for implant loss (OR 5.1 [95% CI 1.41-17.92]) as did the presence of bacterial mixture (OR 5.0 [95% CI 1.41-17.92]) and open soft-tissue damage ≥ grade 3 (OR 10.2 [CI 1.88-55.28]). Wounds were less likely to heal in conjunction with high CRP blood levels (>20 mg/l) at the time of discharge (OR 3.6 [95% CI 1.31-10.08]) or following a change of the infecting bacterial species under therapy (OR 3.2 [95% CI, 1.13-8.99]). These results indicate that the delayed manifestation of infection, high CRP blood levels at discharge, and alterations in the infecting bacterial species under therapy raise the risk of NPWT failure.

  4. When wounds do not heal: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, C T; Mach, M S

    1994-12-01

    The maintenance of skin integrity is a potentially challenging problem for critical care nurses. A multidisciplinary approach with creative thinking often is required. This article presents a case study illustrating the nursing interventions used in managing a patient's multisystem disorder that had been complicated by poor skin integrity. Nursing approaches to the psychosocial issues encountered by the patient, family, and health care professionals are also described.

  5. Twenty-four Years of Follow-Up for a Hanford Plutonium Wound Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Lynch, Timothy P.; Antonio, Cheryl L.; Medina-Del Valle, Fernando

    2010-10-01

    A 1985 plutonium puncture wound resulted in the initial deposition of 48 kBq of transuranic alpha activity, primarily 239Pu and 241Am, in a worker’s right index finger. Surgical excisions in the week following reduced the long-term residual wound activity to 5.4 kBq, and 164 DTPA chelation therapy administrations over a 17-month period resulted in urinary excretion of about 7 kBq. The case was published in 1988, but now 20 additional years of follow-up data are available. Annual bioassay measurements have included wound counts, skeleton counts, liver counts, lung counts, axillary lymph node counts, and urinalyses for plutonium and 241Am. These measurements have shown relatively stable levels of 241Am at the wound site, with gradually increasing amounts of 241Am detected in the skeleton. Liver counts has shown erratic detection of 241Am, and lung counts indicate 241Am as shine from the axillary lymph nodes and skeleton. Urine excretion of 239Pu since termination of chelation therapy has typically ranged from 10 to 20 mBq d-1, with 241Am excretion being about 10% of that for 239Pu. In addition, the worker has undergone annual routine medical exams, which have not identified any adverse health effects associated with the intake.

  6. They had me in stitches: a Grand Canyon river guide's case report and a review of wilderness wound management literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spano, Susanne J; Dimock, Brad

    2014-06-01

    We present a case of failed conservative management of a traumatic wound sustained in a wilderness setting. The patient was initially treated with a povidone-iodine scrub, suture closure, and expectant management by 2 physicians who were paying clients on a multiday river rafting expedition. Empiric antibiotic coverage and irrigation of the dehisced wound were initiated several days after initial treatment. The patient arranged his own evacuation 8 days after injury. Hospitalization, intravenous (IV) antibiotics, and surgical debridement with wound vacuum placement led to a full recovery. This case presents several common wound care pitfalls. The sequelae to these pitfalls are more dramatic in a wilderness setting and underscore the importance of early aggressive management and considering prompt evacuation when treating wounds sustained in the wilderness. © 2013 Wilderness Medical Society Published by Wilderness Medical Society All rights reserved.

  7. 0.1% Polyhexanide-Betaine Solution as an Adjuvant in a Case-Series of Chronic Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael; Dobson, Nanci; Cetnarowski, Wes

    2016-10-26

    The application of 0.1% polyhexanide-betaine gel and irrigating solution was used in place of saline during standard of care wound treatment for 70 chronic wounds of various etiologies. Our goal in this study sample was to investigate the number of days to wound closure, change in absolute wound size, and antimicrobial initiation from baseline visit, following application of polyhexanide-betaine in standard of care wound treatment. Results suggested a benefit of Prontosan® (Polyhexanide-betaine, B. Braun Medical Inc., Allentown, Pennsylvania), with very few patients being administered supplemental antibiotic treatment. A retrospective chart analysis evaluated 0.1% polyhexanide-betaine as an adjuvant in the management of chronic non-healing wounds. Over a two-year period at a single wound center, 0.1% polyhexanide-betaine gel and irrigating solution were applied in place of saline during standard of care wound treatment for 70 chronic wounds of various etiologies. Standard weekly wound protocols and debridement were performed. All wounds were evaluated for days to closure, change in wound dimensions, and number of patients requiring antibiotic therapy after initial consultation at the study site. A case series of 49 patients presented 70 wounds for analysis. Antimicrobial therapy was initiated in five of 49 patients. Days to wound closure revealed that venous wounds showed the shortest number of days to closure (29 days) with diabetic ulcers the longest (92 days). Significant comorbid conditions and concomitant medications were present in all groups and did not appear associated with closure rates. The use of 0.1% polyhexanide-betaine gel and solution in treating chronic non-healing wounds provided a moist wound healing environment facilitating closure. Of particular note was the fact that with polyhexanide-betaine, antimicrobial therapy was not initiated in nearly 90% of patients. It is theorized that the antimicrobial effect of 0.1% polyhexanide-betaine gel and

  8. Clinico-microbiological study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in wound infections and the detection of metallo-β-lactamase production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangera, Divya; Shenoy, Suchitra M; Saldanha, Dominic Rm

    2016-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common opportunistic pathogen of humans among the Gram-negative bacilli. Clinically, it is associated with nosocomial infections like burns and surgical-site wound infections and remains a major health concern, especially among critically ill and immunocompromised patients. This is a prospective laboratory-based 2 year study conducted to isolate P. aeruginosa from wound specimens and the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern with reference to metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) production. Two hundred and twenty-four samples of P. aeruginosa isolated from wound specimens were included in the study. Antimicrobial susceptibility was done as per Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) guidelines. MBL-producing P. aeruginosa was detected using the EDTA disk diffusion synergy test. Statistical analysis was done using the SPSS 11 package (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). Out of the 224 P. aeruginosa isolates, 100% were susceptible to polymyxin B and colistin, 92·8% were sensitive to imipenem, 38% showed resistance to gentamicin followed by ceftazidime (31·69%) and meropenem (33·03). Sixteen (7·14%) isolates showed MBL production. Infection caused by drug-resistant P. aeruginosa is important to identify as it poses a therapeutic problem and is also a serious concern for infection control management. The acquired resistance genes can be horizontally transferred to other pathogens or commensals if aseptic procedures are not followed. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Sternal wound infection caused by Gordonia bronchialis: identification by MALDI-TOF MS

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Lozano, Jes?s; P?rez-Llantada, Enrique; Ag?ero, Jes?s; Rodr?guez-Fern?ndez, Ana; Ruiz de Alegria, Carlos; Martinez-Martinez, Luis; Calvo, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Gordonia spp. infections are uncommon. However, a few clinical cases have been reported in the literature, particularly those involving immunocompromised hosts. Advanced microbiology diagnosis techniques, such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight MS (MALDI-TOF MS), have been recently introduced in clinical microbiology laboratories in order to improve microbial identification, resulting in better patient management. Case presentation: Here...

  10. Evaluation of the Larval Therapy in the Healing Process of Infected Wounds with Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Rey

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. During the last two decadesthe larval therapy has reemerged as a safe andreliable alternative for the healing of cutaneousulcers that do not respond to the conventionaltreatments.Objective. To evaluate the use of the larvaeof Lucilia sericata as a treatment for infectedwounds with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in ananimal model.Materials and methods. Twelve rabbits wererandomly distributed in 3 groups: the firstgroup was treated with larval therapy; the secondwas treated with antibiotics therapy and to thethird no treatment was applied, therefore wasestablished as a control group. To each animala wound was artificially induced, and then asuspension of P. aeruginosa was inoculated intothe lesion. Finally, every rabbit was evaluateduntil the infection development was recognizedand treatment was set up for the first twogroups according with the protocols mentionedabove. Macroscopic evaluation of the woundswas based on the presence of edema, exudates,bad odor, inflammation around the wound andthe presence of granulation tissue. The healingprocess was evaluated by monitoring histologicalchanges in the dermal tissue.Results. Differences in the time requiredfor wound healing were observed between thefirst group treated with larval therapy (10 daysand the second group treated with conventionalantibiotics therapy (20 days.Conclusion. The L. sericata larva is and efficienttool as a therapy for infected wounds withP. aeruginosa.

  11. Ability of bacteriophage in resolving wound infection caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in uncontrolled diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaswamy, VinodKumar Chickmangalure; Kalasuramath, Suneeta Basavaraj; Sadanand, Chethan Kumar; Basavaraju, Abhishek Kilagere; Ginnavaram, Varsha; Bille, Sumanth; Ukken, Sanjay Saju; Pushparaj, Usha Nandini

    2015-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, a substantial nosocomial pathogen, has developed resistance to almost all available antimicrobial drugs. Bacteriophage therapy is a possible alternative treatment for multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections. In this study, we have successfully isolated bacteriophage active against clinical strains of A. baumannii by enrichment from hospital sewage sludge using representatives of those strains. The bacteriophage isolated against A. baumannii formed plaques against beta-lactamases producing strains of A. baumannii. The utility of bacteriophage specific for A. baumannii to resolve wound infection in uncontrolled diabetic rats was evaluated. Five groups of uncontrolled diabetic rats were used. Group I was noninfected (Control), Group II was infected with MDR A. baumannii and challenged with bacteriophage, Group III was infected with MDR A. baumannii, Group IV was infected with MDR A. baumannii and challenged with antibiotic colistin, and Group V consisted of noninfected rats and sprayed with phage (Phage control). A significant decrease in infection, period of epithelization, and wound contraction was observed in the phage-challenged group when compared with antibiotic-treated uncontrolled diabetic rats and the control group. To conclude the study, new insights are provided into the biology of the broad host range of A. baumannii phage, demonstrating that A. baumannii phage has prospects for the treatment of infections caused by the MDR A. baumannii.

  12. Treatment of Non-healing, Post-traumatic Wound with High Frequency Ultrasound of 10 MHz: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Gohla, Thomas; Kruglikova, Ekaterina; Kruglikov, Ilja L.

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of a non-healing, post-traumatic wound, which as an alternative to reconstructive surgical intervention, was successfully treated with a non-invasive, highfrequency ultrasound of 10 MHz.

  13. Postoperative wound infection in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery: A prospective study with evaluation of risk factors

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    Bhatia J

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Wound infection is an important cause of morbidity and occasional mortality after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG. The aim of this study was to report postoperative wound infection in CABG surgery patients. METHODS: Consecutive patients undergoing CABG surgery between January 1998 and October 1999 have been studied. The exclusion criteria included, age less than 30 years, penicillin / cephalosporin allergy and associated other cardiac pathologies. The parameters studied were age, sex, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, myocardial infarction, chronic renal failure, previous surgeries, alcohol consumption, smoking, length of pre and postoperative hospital stay, antibiotic prophylaxis, MRSA screening, and duration of surgery. Wounds were classified as per modified CDC′s NNIS criteria. Suspected sites of infection were cultured and antibiotic susceptibility of cultured organisms was tested. Postoperative follow up was for two months. RESULTS: Six hundred and fifteen patients were studied. Of these 116 (18.86% developed SSI, involving sternum 75%, leg 21.3%, and forearm sites 3.44%. Organisms isolated at sternum site were MSSE, MRSA, and MRSE, at leg site E. coli and MSSE, and at forearm site MSSE and MSSA. Sternal site, obesity, diabetes mellitus and female sex were associated with significantly higher infection rates (p= 0.001. No antibiotic protocol proved more effective. SSI increased the postoperative hospital stay and the total treatment cost. CONCLUSIONS: Post CABG surgery SSI rate is high. Sternum and leg are the common infection sites. Obesity, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and female sex are associated with higher infection rates. "Higher" antibiotics do not lower postoperative infection rates.

  14. Study of two techniques for midline laparotomy fascial wound closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjar, Vipul; Halvadia, B M; Bharaney, R P; Ajwani, Vicky; Shah, S M; Rai, Samir; Trivedi, Mitesh

    2014-04-01

    To study the results of two techniques, simple interrupted closure and continuous with intermittent Aberdeen knot technique for midline laparotomy fascial wound closure. A random selection of 200 midline laparotomy cases was done. In one group (group A) of 100 cases, midline fascial wound closure was done with continuous sutures with intermittent Aberdeen knot technique using Prolene No. 1 suture material. In the other group (group B) of 100 cases, closure was done with the technique of simple interrupted sutures with Prolene No.1 suture material. Comparison of both the techniques regarding preoperative status and postoperative complication such as incisional hernia, wound dehiscence, suture sinus formation, stitch granuloma, and chronic wound pain was done according to clinical examination and recorded in the pro forma prepared. In group A, postoperative complications were incisional hernia 3 %, wound dehiscence 4 %, and suture sinus formation 1 %. In group B, postoperative complication were incisional hernia 5 %, wound dehiscence 4 %, and suture sinus formation 1 %. All these complications were statistically insignificant, in both group comparisons. While the complication such as stitch granuloma 3 %, chronic wound pain 3 %, and wound infection 4 % in group A was significantly less than in group B where the complication of stitch granuloma was 12 %, chronic wound pain 13 %, and wound infection 13 % (P value 0.03, P value 0.018, and P value 0.048, respectively). Both the techniques, simple interrupted suture closure and continuous with intermittent Aberdeen knot closure for midline laparotomy fascial wounds, show a similar rate of postoperative complication such as incisional hernia, wound dehiscence, and suture sinus formation. But the continuous suturing with intermittent Aberdeen knot technique is a better option to prevent complications such as stitch granuloma, chronic wound pain, and wound infection, which are higher in the simple interrupted

  15. Dual-functional Polyurea Microcapsules for Chronic Wound Care Dressings: Sustained Drug Delivery and Non-leaching Infection Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei

    A new design of dual-functional polyurea microcapsules was proposed for chronic wound dressings to provide both non-leaching infection control and sustained topical drug delivery functionalities. Quaternary ammonium functionalized polyurea microcapsules (MCQs) were synthesized under mild conditions through an interfacial crosslinking reaction between branched polyethylenimine (PEI) and 2,4-toluene diisocyanate (TDI) in a dimethylformamide/cyclohexane emulsion. An in-situ modification method was developed to endow non-leaching surface antimicrobial properties to MCQs via bonding antimicrobial surfactants to surface isocyanate residues on the polyurea shells. The resultant robust MCQs with both non-leaching antimicrobial properties and sustained drug releasing properties have potential applications in medical textiles, such as chronic wound dressings, for infection control and drug delivery.

  16. Superficial and deep sternal wound infection after more than 9000 coronary artery bypass graft (CABG: incidence, risk factors and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasi Kyomars

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sternal wound infection (SWI is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening complication of cardiac surgery. Predisposing factors for SWI are multiple with varied frequencies in different studies. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence, risk factors, and mortality of SWI after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG at Tehran Heart Center. Methods This study prospectively evaluated multiple risk factors for SWI in 9201 patients who underwent CABG at Tehran Heart Center between January 2002 and February 2006. Cases of SWI were confirmed based on the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Deep SWI (bone and mediastinitis was categorized according to the Oakley classification. Results In the study period, 9201 CABGs were performed with a total SWI rate of 0.47 percent (44 cases and deep SWI of 0.22 percent (21 cases. Perioperative (in-hospital mortality was 9.1% for total SWI and about 14% for deep SWI versus 1.1% for non-SWI CABG patients. Female gender, preoperative hypertension, high functional class, diabetes mellitus, obesity, prolonged intubation time (more than 48 h, and re-exploration for bleeding were significant risk factors for developing SWI (p = 0.05 in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, hypertension (OR = 10.7, re-exploration (OR = 13.4, and female gender (OR = 2.7 were identified as significant predictors of SWI (p Conclusion Rarely reported previously, the two risk factors of hypertension and the female gender were significant risk factors in our study. Conversely, some other risk factors such as cigarette smoking and age mentioned as significant in other reports were not significant in our study. Further studies are needed for better documentation.

  17. Biobased silver nanocolloid coating on silk fibers for prevention of post-surgical wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhas, Sindhu Priya; Anbarasan, Suruthi; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Bombyx mori silk fibers are an important biomaterial and are used in surgical sutures due to their remarkable biocompatibility. The major drawback to the application of biomaterials is the risk of bacterial invasion, leading to clinical complications. We have developed an easy and cost-effective method for fabrication of antibacterial silk fibers loaded with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by an in situ and ex situ process using an aqueous extract of Rhizophora apiculata leaf. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that well dispersed nanoparticles impregnated the silk fibers both in situ and ex situ. The crystalline nature of the AgNPs in the silk fibers was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction. The thermal and mechanical properties of the silk fibers were enhanced after they were impregnated with AgNPs. The silver-coated silk fibers fabricated by the in situ and ex situ method exhibited more than 90% inhibition against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Silk fibers doped with AgNPs were found to be biocompatible with 3T3 fibroblasts. The results obtained represent an important advance towards the clinical application of biocompatible AgNP-loaded silk fibers for prevention of surgical wound infections.

  18. Calmodulin Gene Expression in Response to Mechanical Wounding and Botrytis cinerea Infection in Tomato Fruit

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    Hui Peng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium sensor, plays an important role in decoding stress-triggered intracellular calcium changes and regulates the functions of numerous target proteins involved in various plant physiological responses. To determine the functions of calmodulin in fleshy fruit, expression studies were performed on a family of six calmodulin genes (SlCaMs in mature-green stage tomato fruit in response to mechanical injury and Botrytis cinerea infection. Both wounding and pathogen inoculation triggered expression of all those genes, with SlCaM2 being the most responsive one to both treatments. Furthermore, all calmodulin genes were upregulated by salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate, two signaling molecules involved in plant immunity. In addition to SlCaM2, SlCaM1 was highly responsive to salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate. However, SlCaM2 exhibited a more rapid and stronger response than SlCaM1. Overexpression of SlCaM2 in tomato fruit enhanced resistance to Botrytis-induced decay, whereas reducing its expression resulted in increased lesion development. These results indicate that calmodulin is a positive regulator of plant defense in fruit by activating defense pathways including salicylate- and jasmonate-signaling pathways, and SlCaM2 is the major calmodulin gene responsible for this event.

  19. Nasal Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Associated Post-surgical Wounds Infections

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    Ikpeme, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization is an important risk factor for developing a wide range of infections in clinical setting. This study was aimed at determining the extent of staphylococcal carriages including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in post-surgical patients and employees in a tertiary health facility. Methodology and Results: Between April and July 2010, 240 post-surgical patients and 80 hospital personnel at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar were enrolled in the present study. All subjects consented to participation in the study and those who had previous medical history or treatment on antibiotic in the last six months prior to enrolment were noted. Nasal specimens collected from carrier and post-surgical sites in individuals (15-63 years who were hospitalized for at least 21 days were immediately placed in Staurts’ transport medium and kept at 4 °C before being analyzed accordingly and screened for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Out of a total number of 320 subjects examined within a period of 4 months 144 (45% were carriers of Staphylococcus aureus and 55 (38% of these were MRSA. Demographic and clinical data of subjects indicated more male carriers (60.7% confined to older age groups above 35 years. There was a significant difference (p> 0.05 in Staphylococcus aureus carriage for subjects with recent medical history of hospitalization or treatment with antibiotics. There also appears to be a considerable association (50.9% between nasal carriage status and autoinfection of post-surgical wounds. A good proportion of all strains tested were resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Approximately 89% of MRSA were resistant to penicillin. Resistant rate against other antibiotics was largely below 30%. Conclusion, significance and impact of study: An improved understanding of nasal carriage is needed to foster development of new strategies to reduce colonization and

  20. Update and validation of the Society for Vascular Surgery wound, ischemia, and foot infection threatened limb classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Joseph L

    2014-03-01

    The diagnosis of critical limb ischemia, first defined in 1982, was intended to delineate a patient cohort with a threatened limb and at risk for amputation due to severe peripheral arterial disease. The influence of diabetes and its associated neuropathy on the pathogenesis-threatened limb was an excluded comorbidity, despite its known contribution to amputation risk. The Fontaine and Rutherford classifications of limb ischemia severity have also been used to predict amputation risk and the likelihood of tissue healing. The dramatic increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and the expanding techniques of arterial revascularization has prompted modification of peripheral arterial disease classification schemes to improve outcomes analysis for patients with threatened limbs. The diabetic patient with foot ulceration and infection is at risk for limb loss, with abnormal arterial perfusion as only one determinant of outcome. The wound extent and severity of infection also impact the likelihood of limb loss. To better predict amputation risk, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Guidelines Committee developed a classification of the threatened lower extremity that reflects these important clinical considerations. Risk stratification is based on three major factors that impact amputation risk and clinical management: wound, ischemia, and foot infection. This classification scheme is relevant to the patient with critical limb ischemia because many are also diabetic. Implementation of the wound, ischemia, and foot infection classification system in critical limb ischemia patients is recommended and should assist the clinician in more meaningful analysis of outcomes for various forms of wound and arterial revascularizations procedures required in this challenging, patient population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern of bacterial isolates from wound infection in Chitwan Medical College Teaching Hospital, Chitwan , Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Gautam, Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of various pathogens causing wound infection was evaluated in Bharatpur, Chitwan, Nepal. A total of 200 pus specimens were cultured, of which 75% showed bacterial growth. Ten different species of bacteria were isolated. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common organism [65.3%] followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae [8%], Escherichia coli [7.3%], Coagulase negative staphylococci [6%], Pseudomonas aeruginosa  [5.3%],  Enterococcus species [3.3%], Enterobacter species [2%], Acinetob...

  2. Wound healing potential of Elaeis guineensis Jacq leaves in an infected albino rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidharan, Sreenivasan; Nilawatyi, Rajoo; Xavier, Rathinam; Latha, Lachimanan Yoga; Amala, Rajoo

    2010-04-30

    Elaeis guineensis Jacq (Arecaceae) is one of the plants that are central to the lives of traditional societies in West Africa. It has been reported as a traditional folkloric medicine for a variety of ailments. The plant leaves are also used in some parts of Africa for wound healing, but there are no scientific reports on any wound healing activity of the plant. To investigate the effects of E. guineensis leaf on wound healing activity in rats. A phytochemical screening was done to determine the major phytochemicals in the extract. The antimicrobial activity of the extract was examined using the disk diffusion technique and broth dilution method. The wound healing activity of leaves of E. guineensiswas studied by incorporating the methanolic extract in yellow soft paraffin in concentration of 10% (w/w). Wound healing activity was studied by determining the percentage of wound closure, microbial examination of granulated skin tissue and histological analysis in the control and extract treated groups. Phytochemical screening reveals the presence of tannins, alkaloids, steroids, saponins, terpenoids, and flavonoids in the extract. The extract showed significant activity against Candida albicans with an MIC value of 6.25 mg/mL. The results show that the E. guineensis extract has potent wound healing capacity, as evident from better wound closure, improved tissue regeneration at the wound site, and supporting histopathological parameters pertaining to wound healing. Assessment of granulation tissue every fourth day showed a significant reduction in microbial count. E. guineensis accelerated wound healing in rats, thus supporting this traditional use.

  3. Extracellular Wound Matrix (OASIS®): Exploring the Contraindications. Results of Its Use in 32 Consecutive Outpatient Clinic Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barendse-Hofmann, Minke G; Steenvoorde, Pascal; van Doorn, Louk; Jacobi, Cathrien E; Oskam, Jacques; Hedeman, Paul P

    2007-10-01

    Background. In the authors' experience re-epithelialization after successful debridement and granulation can be the most difficult part of the wound closure process. Extracellular matrix products represent a possible solution. However, in studies discussing the effectiveness of extracellular wound matrix (porcine-derived small intestine submucosa [SIS], [OASIS® Wound Matrix, Healthpoint Ltd, Fort Worth, Tex]), a long list of exclusion criteria has been presented. The present study was designed to explore the contraindications of OASIS Wound Matrix. In this study, 32 patients in whom the wounds were fully debrided and granulated were treated with weekly applications of the wound matrix. The exclusion criteria formulated in the reported literature were followed. Seven different outcomes were defined. Various patient and wound characteristics that might influence outcome were recorded. Beneficial outcomes were seen in 80.6 % (n = 25) of the patients. The two main complications seen were infection and hypergranulation tissue. Infection was seen in 7 patients (22.6%). Four patients (57.1%) had an unsuccessful outcome. Hypergranulation tissue occurred in another 7 patients (22.6%) after a couple of applications. They all had a beneficial outcome. Much of the exclusion criteria used in previous reports are too strict. Infection should be the only absolute contraindication for starting treatment with OASIS, and it is a good reason to discontinue treatment with an ECM. Hypergranulation tissue (22.6%) is an easily treatable complication that has no negative influence on outcome. Some wounds (77.4%) had no complications, or had easily treatable complications that did not negatively influence the outcome.

  4. Utilizing the VeraFlo™ Instillation Negative Pressure Wound Therapy System with Advanced Care for a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Rita K

    2016-11-30

     Mankind has always suffered wounds throughout time due to trauma, disease, and lifestyles. Many wounds are non-healing and have continued to be challenging. However, utilizing advanced wound care treatments, such as negative pressure wound treatment with instillation and dwell time (NPWTi-d), has proven beneficial. NPWTi-d is indicated in a variety of wounds, such as trauma, surgical, acute, pressure injuries, diabetic foot ulcers, and venous leg ulcers. Bacteria and bioburden interrupts wound healing by increasing the metabolic needs, ingesting, and robbing the necessary nutrients and oxygen. Instillation therapy is the technique of intermittently washing out a wound with a liquid solution. The mechanism of action is instilling fluid into the wound bed, soaking for a determined time, loosening and cleaning of exudate, contaminants, and/or infection, removing fluid via negative pressure, thus promoting tissue growth.  The patient was diagnosed with a large lymphedema mass on the right upper thigh. Surgical removal of the lymphedema mass was indicated due to interference with quality of life. After a failed flap and surgical debridement, NPWTi-d with normal saline was implemented.  The patient had excellent results, with obvious forming of red, beefy granulation, epithelization tissue development, and a cleaner, healthier wound bed. Settings for the NPWTi-d was 18 minutes dwell time, every 2.5 hours with a constant pressure of 125 mm/hg pressure.  The NPWTi-d demonstrated to be an instrumental treatment in supporting and stimulating healing. Early application of the treatment with normal saline as the instillation fluid prepared the previously failed wound for quicker healing.

  5. Inhaled methoxyflurane for pain and anxiety relief during burn wound care procedures: an Australian case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasiak, Jason; Mahar, Patrick D; Paul, Eldho; Menezes, Hana; Spinks, Anneliese B; Cleland, Heather

    2014-02-01

    Pain is a common and significant feature of burn injury. The use of intravenous opioids forms the mainstay of procedural burn pain management, but in an outpatient setting, the demand for novel agents that do not require parenteral access, are easy to administer and have a rapid onset are urgently needed. One such agent is the inhaled anaesthetic agent, methoxyflurane (MF). The aim of this study was to conduct a pilot investigation into the clinical effectiveness of MF inhaler on pain and anxiety scores in patients undergoing burn wound care procedures in an outpatient setting. A prospective case series involved recruiting patients undergoing a burn wound care procedure in an ambulatory burn care setting. Pain and anxiety were assessed using numerical rating scales. Overall, median numerical pain rating score was significantly higher post-dressing [pre-dressing: 2; interquartile range (IQR): 1-3 versus post-dressing: 3; IQR 1·5-4; P = 0·01], whereas median numerical anxiety score significantly reduced following the dressing (pre-dressing: 5; IQR 4-7 versus post-dressing: 2; IQR 1-2; P burn care procedures in the ambulatory care setting. However, there is an urgent need for larger case series and randomised controlled trials to determine its overall clinical effectiveness. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A Genetic Approach to the Development of New Therapeutic Phages to Fight Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, Victor; Shaburova, Olga; Krylov, Sergey; Pleteneva, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT) has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent (“lytic”) and temperate (“lysogenic”) bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate) phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine. PMID:23344559

  7. A Genetic Approach to the Development of New Therapeutic Phages to Fight Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Wound Infections

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    Elena Pleteneva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent (“lytic” and temperate (“lysogenic” bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT, and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine.

  8. Label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of systemic responses to local wounding and virus infection in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehl, Annette; Zhang, Zhe Jenny; Kuiper, Martin; Peck, Scott C; Heinlein, Manfred

    2013-06-07

    Plants are continuously exposed to changing environmental conditions and must, as sessile organisms, possess sophisticated acclimative mechanisms. To gain insight into systemic responses to local virus infection or wounding, we performed comparative LC-MS/MS protein profiling of distal, virus-free leaves four and five days after local inoculation of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with either Oilseed rape mosaic virus (ORMV) or inoculation buffer alone. Our study revealed biomarkers for systemic signaling in response to wounding and compatible virus infection in Arabidopsis, which should prove useful in further addressing the trigger-specific systemic response network and the elusive systemic signals. We observed responses common to ORMV and mock treatment as well as protein profile changes that are specific to local virus infection or mechanical wounding (mock treatment) alone, which provides evidence for the existence of more than one systemic signal to induce these distinct changes. Comparison of the systemic responses between time points indicated that the responses build up over time. Our data indicate stress-specific changes in proteins involved in jasmonic and abscisic acid signaling, intracellular transport, compartmentalization of enzyme activities, protein folding and synthesis, and energy and carbohydrate metabolism. In addition, a virus-triggered systemic signal appears to suppress antiviral host defense.

  9. The Incorporation of Radionuclides After Wounding by a “Dirty Bomb”: The Impact of Time for Decorporation Efficacy and a Model for Cases of Disseminated Fragmentation Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rump, Alexis; Stricklin, Daniela; Lamkowski, Andreas; Eder, Stefan; Abend, Michael; Port, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In the case of a terrorist attack by a “dirty bomb” there is a risk of internal contamination with radionuclides through inhalation and wounds. We studied the efficacy of a decorporation treatment depending on the initiation time and duration. Approach: Based on biokinetic models, we simulated the impact of different diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid treatments on the committed effective dose after the incorporation of plutonium-239. Results: For the same level of radioactivity, the dose was higher after the fast absorption from the wound than after a slow invasion following inhalation. The impact of the treatment initiation time was particularly important in the case of the internal contamination through the wound. Ending the treatment at an early point in time was followed by an augmentation of radioactivity in the blood compartment, reflecting insufficient treatment duration. Treatment efficacy increased only marginally if extended over 90 days. Innovation and Conclusion: For plutonium-239, the committed effective dose and the impact of the treatment initiation time on therapeutic efficacy predominantly depend on the speed of invasion, i.e., the pathway and the physicochemical properties of the compounds involved. Thus, it is prudent to start decorporation therapy as soon as possible, as a loss of efficacy resulting from a delay in treatment initiation cannot be compensated later on. In the case of plutonium-239 incorporation, the treatment must be continued for several months. Multiple fragmentation wounds might be aggregated to a single wound model suited for internal dosimetry calculations by using the “rule of nine.” PMID:28116223

  10. Brown recluse spider bites: a complex problem wound. A brief review and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Judy R; Hagood, Clyde O; Prather, Irvine D

    2005-03-01

    Brown recluse spiders (Loxosceles reclusa) are responsible for virtually all documented cases of spider bites leading to significant necrosis. The actual spider bite often goes unnoticed for as long as 4 to 6 hours, which makes diagnosis and, therefore, appropriate treatment, difficult. The spider bite generally results in either a necrotic wound or systemic symptoms that can lead to hemolysis. The patient described in this article experienced both complications. Dapsone and hyperbaric oxygen therapy brought the adverse response to the bite under control. The patient was hospitalized for 7 days during treatment for hemolysis and an extensive, necrotic wound. Efforts are underway to develop an assay to provide a definitive diagnosis for the brown recluse spider bite, but none is yet commercially available. Antivenom is scarce; capture of the offending spider appears to be most helpful in the diagnosis and proper treatment of spider bites.

  11. Tangential low-velocity missile wound of the head with acute subdural hematoma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadas, N; Schiffer, J; Rogev, M; Shperber, Y

    1990-03-01

    Tangential missile wounds of the head without skull fracture are a known entity. Usually, references in the literature indicate that this type of injury results from a high-velocity missile impact. We present a case of a tangential missile head wound caused by a low-velocity missile. As the range of fire was short, the quantity of energy that might be released could be equated with that released by a high-velocity missile fired from a much longer range. This possibility should be brought to the attention of clinicians as an essential element in this pre-treatment clinical evaluation. We propose a pathomechanical explanation for the development of the clinical state.

  12. In Vitro Assessment of the Antibacterial Potential of Silver Nano-Coatings on Cotton Gauzes for Prevention of Wound Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Paladini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant organisms are increasingly implicated in acute and chronic wound infections, thus compromising the chance of therapeutic options. The resistance to conventional antibiotics demonstrated by some bacterial strains has encouraged new approaches for the prevention of infections in wounds and burns, among them the use of silver compounds and nanocrystalline silver. Recently, silver wound dressings have become widely accepted in wound healing centers and are commercially available. In this work, novel antibacterial wound dressings have been developed through a silver deposition technology based on the photochemical synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The devices obtained are completely natural and the silver coatings are characterized by an excellent adhesion without the use of any binder. The silver-treated cotton gauzes were characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA in order to verify the distribution and the dimension of the silver particles on the cotton fibers. The effectiveness of the silver-treated gauzes in reducing the bacterial growth and biofilm proliferation has been demonstrated through agar diffusion tests, bacterial enumeration test, biofilm quantification tests, fluorescence and SEM microscopy. Moreover, potential cytotoxicity of the silver coating was evaluated through 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay (MTT and the extract method on fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS was performed in order to determine the silver release in different media and to relate the results to the biological characterization. All the results obtained were compared with plain gauzes as a negative control, as well as gauzes treated with a higher silver percentage as a positive control.

  13. In Vitro Assessment of the Antibacterial Potential of Silver Nano-Coatings on Cotton Gauzes for Prevention of Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladini, Federica; Di Franco, Cinzia; Panico, Angelica; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Sannino, Alessandro; Pollini, Mauro

    2016-05-25

    Multidrug-resistant organisms are increasingly implicated in acute and chronic wound infections, thus compromising the chance of therapeutic options. The resistance to conventional antibiotics demonstrated by some bacterial strains has encouraged new approaches for the prevention of infections in wounds and burns, among them the use of silver compounds and nanocrystalline silver. Recently, silver wound dressings have become widely accepted in wound healing centers and are commercially available. In this work, novel antibacterial wound dressings have been developed through a silver deposition technology based on the photochemical synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The devices obtained are completely natural and the silver coatings are characterized by an excellent adhesion without the use of any binder. The silver-treated cotton gauzes were characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in order to verify the distribution and the dimension of the silver particles on the cotton fibers. The effectiveness of the silver-treated gauzes in reducing the bacterial growth and biofilm proliferation has been demonstrated through agar diffusion tests, bacterial enumeration test, biofilm quantification tests, fluorescence and SEM microscopy. Moreover, potential cytotoxicity of the silver coating was evaluated through 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay (MTT) and the extract method on fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was performed in order to determine the silver release in different media and to relate the results to the biological characterization. All the results obtained were compared with plain gauzes as a negative control, as well as gauzes treated with a higher silver percentage as a positive control.

  14. Methylene Blue-Loaded Dissolving Microneedles: Potential Use in Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy of Infected Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffarel-Salvador, Ester; Kearney, Mary-Carmel; Mairs, Rachel; Gallo, Luigi; Stewart, Sarah A.; Brady, Aaron J.; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy involves delivery of a photosensitising drug that is activated by light of a specific wavelength, resulting in generation of highly reactive radicals. This activated species can cause destruction of targeted cells. Application of this process for treatment of microbial infections has been termed “photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy” (PACT). In the treatment of chronic wounds, the delivery of photosensitising agents is often impeded by the presence of a thick hyperkeratotic/necrotic tissue layer, reducing their therapeutic efficacy. Microneedles (MNs) are an emerging drug delivery technology that have been demonstrated to successfully penetrate the outer layers of the skin, whilst minimising damage to skin barrier function. Delivering photosensitising drugs using this platform has been demonstrated to have several advantages over conventional photodynamic therapy, such as, painless application, reduced erythema, enhanced cosmetic results and improved intradermal delivery. The aim of this study was to physically characterise dissolving MNs loaded with the photosensitising agent, methylene blue and assess their photodynamic antimicrobial activity. Dissolving MNs were fabricated from aqueous blends of Gantrez® AN-139 co-polymer containing varying loadings of methylene blue. A height reduction of 29.8% was observed for MNs prepared from blends containing 0.5% w/w methylene blue following application of a total force of 70.56 N/array. A previously validated insertion test was used to assess the effect of drug loading on MN insertion into a wound model. Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans biofilms were incubated with various methylene blue concentrations within the range delivered by MNs in vitro (0.1–2.5 mg/mL) and either irradiated at 635 nm using a Paterson Lamp or subjected to a dark period. Microbial susceptibility to PACT was determined by assessing the total viable count. Kill rates of >96%, were achieved for

  15. Methylene Blue-Loaded Dissolving Microneedles: Potential Use in Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy of Infected Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Caffarel-Salvador

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy involves delivery of a photosensitising drug that is activated by light of a specific wavelength, resulting in generation of highly reactive radicals. This activated species can cause destruction of targeted cells. Application of this process for treatment of microbial infections has been termed “photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy” (PACT. In the treatment of chronic wounds, the delivery of photosensitising agents is often impeded by the presence of a thick hyperkeratotic/necrotic tissue layer, reducing their therapeutic efficacy. Microneedles (MNs are an emerging drug delivery technology that have been demonstrated to successfully penetrate the outer layers of the skin, whilst minimising damage to skin barrier function. Delivering photosensitising drugs using this platform has been demonstrated to have several advantages over conventional photodynamic therapy, such as, painless application, reduced erythema, enhanced cosmetic results and improved intradermal delivery. The aim of this study was to physically characterise dissolving MNs loaded with the photosensitising agent, methylene blue and assess their photodynamic antimicrobial activity. Dissolving MNs were fabricated from aqueous blends of Gantrez® AN-139 co-polymer containing varying loadings of methylene blue. A height reduction of 29.8% was observed for MNs prepared from blends containing 0.5% w/w methylene blue following application of a total force of 70.56 N/array. A previously validated insertion test was used to assess the effect of drug loading on MN insertion into a wound model. Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans biofilms were incubated with various methylene blue concentrations within the range delivered by MNs in vitro (0.1–2.5 mg/mL and either irradiated at 635 nm using a Paterson Lamp or subjected to a dark period. Microbial susceptibility to PACT was determined by assessing the total viable count. Kill rates of >96

  16. Evaluation of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug-Resistant Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug- Resistant Wound Infections. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David S. Perlin...Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug- Resistant Wound Infections. 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-2-0076 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) David S...Manchester, UK , and the Perlin Pfizer Reference Center for molecular characterization of echinocandin resistance in yeasts and molds and from the

  17. Morphological characteristics of tissues of anterior abdominal wall of rats after implantation of alloplastic material, processed with collagen, in the initially infected wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Svisenko O.V.

    2010-01-01

    A research purpose was to investigate the tissue reactions on implantation of polypropylene mesh, processed with collagen, after the plastic of experimental defect at rats at underaponevrotic localization of prosthesis in the initially infected wounds. Research was performed in two experimental groups. Group 1 – at 27 rats in the conditions of the infected wound the monofilamentous polypropylene mesh of size 1×1,5 sm was fixed under aponevrosis. Group 2 – at 27 rats at analogous conditions wi...

  18. Wounds of the pastern and foot region managed with phalangeal casts: 50 cases in 49 horses (1995-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketzner, K M; Stewart, A A; Byron, C R; Stewart, M; Gaughan, E M; Vanharreveld, P D; Lillich, J D

    2009-09-01

    Describe the use of a phalangeal cast as treatment for wounds in the pastern and foot region of horses. Secondly, to evaluate the healing and soundness of horses treated with phalangeal casts. Retrospective study of 49 horses. Procedures Medical records of 49 horses that were treated with a phalangeal cast for 50 cases of wounds in the pastern and foot region at equine referral hospitals from 1995 to 2006 were reviewed and follow-up information was obtained. Treatment consisted of wound debridement, lavage, wound closure (28 wounds), cast application and antibiotics (84%). At follow-up, the majority of horses were sound (42 of 47 wounds, 89.4%), three horses were still lame and one horse was euthanased because of persistent lameness. Three horses were lost to follow-up. There was no statistical difference between the outcomes of horses treated acutely (wound did not significantly influence outcome. In this study, wounds involving the pastern and foot that were treated with a phalangeal cast carried a good prognosis for soundness (89.4%) and cosmetic healing (89.5%). The phalangeal casts were well-tolerated and effective.

  19. Prophylactic negative-pressure wound therapy after cesarean is associated with reduced risk of surgical site infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lulu; Kronen, Ryan J; Simon, Laura E; Stoll, Carolyn R T; Colditz, Graham A; Tuuli, Methodius G

    2017-09-23

    The objective of the study was to assess the effect of prophylactic negative-pressure wound therapy on surgical site infections and other wound complications in women after cesarean delivery. We searched Ovid Medline, Embase, SCOPUS, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We included randomized controlled trials and observational studies comparing prophylactic negative-pressure wound therapy with standard wound dressing for cesarean delivery. The primary outcome was surgical site infection after cesarean delivery. Secondary outcomes were composite wound complications, wound dehiscence, wound seroma, endometritis, and hospital readmission. Heterogeneity was assessed using Higgin's I2. Relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were calculated using random-effects models. Six randomized controlled trials and 3 cohort studies in high-risk mostly obese women met inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Six were full-text articles, 2 published abstracts, and 1 report of trial results in ClinicalTrials.gov. Studies were also heterogeneous in the patients included and type of negative-pressure wound therapy device. The risk of surgical site infection was significantly lower with the use of prophylactic negative-pressure wound therapy compared with standard wound dressing (7 studies: pooled risk ratio, 0.45; 95% confidence interval, 0.31-0.66; adjusted risk ratio, -6.0%, 95% confidence interval, -10.0% to -3.0%; number needed to treat, 17, 95% confidence interval, 10-34). There was no evidence of significant statistical heterogeneity (I2 = 9.9%) or publication bias (Egger P = .532). Of the secondary outcomes, only composite wound complications were significantly reduced in patients receiving prophylactic negative-pressure wound therapy compared with standard dressing (9 studies: pooled risk ratio, 0.68, 95% confidence interval, 0.49-0.94). Studies on the effectiveness of prophylactic negative-pressure wound therapy at

  20. CASE REPORT Rotational Vascularized Tibiaplasty After Oncologic Resection and Major Wound Healing Problems: A Novel Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Cornelius Dieter; Frassica, Frank J.; Attar, Samer; Deune, E. Gene

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe a novel method to reconstruct, with a vascularized rotational tibiaplasty, a complex femoral defect in an adolescent. Methods: After a femoral osteosarcoma resection, allograft reconstruction, and chemotherapy, an 11-year-old girl developed recurrent thigh wound infections and femoral allograft osteomyelitis despite multiple operative interventions. At the age of 13, she presented to our center with a complex right thigh wound and an unstable lower extremity secondary to a segmental femoral loss. To reestablish thigh stability and function and to avoid amputation at the hip, the authors performed a rotational vascularized tibiaplasty. The tibia was rotated 180° with the pivot at the knee. The distal tibia was internally stabilized to the residual proximal femur. Results: Ten years later, the patient had a stable thigh, a functional hip, no evidence of infection or sarcoma, and a Toronto Extremity Salvage Score of 92.5 (minimal disability). Conclusions: In this patient, the tibial rotationplasty provided a vascularized bone strut mimicking the resected femur; saved the hip; obviated an allograft bone; and created a functional, biologic, stable, and durable thigh that allowed full weight bearing on a prosthesis, with a low physical disability level. We conclude that, for patients with complex femoral defects, a vascularized rotational tibiaplasty should be considered a feasible option before amputation. PMID:24015322

  1. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Surgical Site Infections in Women Undergoing Elective Caesarean Sections: A Pilot RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Chaboyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Obese women undergoing caesarean section (CS are at increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT is growing in use as a prophylactic approach to prevent wound complications such as SSI, yet there is little evidence of its benefits. This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT assessed the effect of NPWT on SSI and other wound complications in obese women undergoing elective caesarean sections (CS and also the feasibility of conducting a definitive trial. Ninety-two obese women undergoing elective CS were randomized in theatre via a central web based system using a parallel 1:1 process to two groups i.e., 46 women received the intervention (NPWT PICO™ dressing and 46 women received standard care (Comfeel Plus® dressing. All women received the intended dressing following wound closure. The relative risk of SSI in the intervention group was 0.81 (95% CI 0.38–1.68; for the number of complications excluding SSI it was 0.98 (95% CI 0.34–2.79. A sample size of 784 (392 per group would be required to find a statistically significant difference in SSI between the two groups with 90% power. These results demonstrate that a larger definitive trial is feasible and that careful planning and site selection is critical to the success of the overall study.

  2. Can Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Silently Travel From the Gut to the Wound and Cause Postoperative Infection? Modeling the "Trojan Horse Hypothesis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezalek, Monika A; Hyoju, Sanjiv; Zaborin, Alexander; Okafor, Emeka; Chandrasekar, Laxmi; Bindokas, Vitas; Guyton, Kristina; Montgomery, Christopher P; Daum, Robert S; Zaborina, Olga; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Alverdy, John C

    2017-02-09

    To determine whether intestinal colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can be the source of surgical site infections (SSIs). We hypothesized that gut-derived MRSA may cause SSIs via mechanisms in which circulating immune cells scavenge MRSA from the gut, home to surgical wounds, and cause infection (Trojan Horse Hypothesis). MRSA gut colonization was achieved by disrupting the microbiota with antibiotics, imposing a period of starvation and introducing MRSA via gavage. Next, mice were subjected to a surgical injury (30% hepatectomy) and rectus muscle injury and ischemia before skin closure. All wounds were cultured before skin closure. To control for postoperative wound contamination, reiterative experiments were performed in mice in which the closed wound was painted with live MRSA for 2 consecutive postoperative days. To rule out extracellular bacteremia as a cause of wound infection, MRSA was injected intravenously in mice subjected to rectus muscle ischemia and injury. All wound cultures were negative before skin closure, ruling out intraoperative contamination. Out of 40 mice, 4 (10%) developed visible abscesses. Nine mice (22.5%) had MRSA positive cultures of the rectus muscle without visible abscesses. No SSIs were observed in mice injected intravenously with MRSA. Wounds painted with MRSA after closure did not develop infections. Circulating neutrophils from mice captured by flow cytometry demonstrated MRSA in their cytoplasm. Immune cells as Trojan horses carrying gut-derived MRSA may be a plausible mechanism of SSIs in the absence of direct contamination.

  3. The incidence and consequences of early wound infection after internal fixation for trauma in HIV-positive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, J; Mkandawire, N; Harrison, W J

    2012-09-01

    We report a prospective single-blind controlled study of the incidence of early wound infection after internal fixation for trauma in 609 patients, of whom 132 were HIV-positive. Wounds were assessed for healing using the ASEPSIS score. There was no significant difference in the rate of infection between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients undergoing clean surgery (4.2% vs 6%, respectively; p = 0.65). HIV-positive patients did not receive additional antibiotic prophylaxis or antiretroviral therapy as part of their management. The difference in the rate of infection between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients with an open fracture or other contamination was not significant (33% vs 15%, respectively; p = 0.064). There was no relationship between CD4 count and infection rate. HIV status did not significantly influence the number of secondary surgical procedures (p = 0.183) or the likelihood of developing chronic osteomyelitis (p = 0.131). Although previous contamination from the time of injury was a risk factor for infection in mal- and nonunions, it was not significantly increased in HIV-positive patients (p = 0.144). We conclude that clean implant surgery in HIV-positive patients is safe, with no need for additional prophylaxis.

  4. Infection Agents Detected with Wound Culture in Patients with Diabetic Foot who will Undergo Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurkan Mert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: We aimed to obtain the knowledge of appropriate antibiotic therapy and to make a contribution to improving treatment efficacy by conducting a microbiological study of diabetic foot ulcers. METHOD: 30 patients (18 male and 12 female with diabetic foot ulcer applying to our center for hyperbaric oxygen (HBO treatment in 2010 were enrolled in this study. The wounds were graded according to Meggitt-Wagner classification system. Wound cultures were obtained before starting antibiotic therapy and HBO treatment. Phoenix system (Becton Dickinson, USA and Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion antibiotic sensitivity testing were used in order to detect the antimicrobial susceptibility of the infection agents. The number of HBO sessions, glycemic control and treatment results were assessed. RESULTS: Mean age of the patients was 61.3 years (range: 35-83. 24 patients had a good glycemic control and 6 patients had not. The patients were given 5 to 55 HBO sessions (mean: 20. Of the 30 patients 19 (63.33% recovered from the infection but 11 (36.67% have not responded to the treatment. 14 different infectious agents were detected in diabetic foot ulcers we examined. Gram-positive agents were isolated in 12 (40% out of 30 wound cultures and gram-negative agents were isolated in 18 (60% wound culture. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was predominantly isolated and the other agents isolated were enterococcus faecalis, klebsiella pneumoniae, staphylococcus aureus and escherichia coli. CONCLUSION: The outcomes can not represent the general population rates due to the restriction factors. They give only an idea about the probability of infectious agent spectrum in diabetic foot ulcers and their antibiotic susceptibility. We want to attract attention to the fact that although pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are mostly encountered in hospital, they can also be acquired from the community and it will be useful to develop appropriate antibiotic policies and treatment protocols. [TAF

  5. Primary vs secondary wound reconstruction in Gustilo type III open tibial shaft fractures: follow-up study of 35 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalekar, Hrvoje; Fuckar, Zeljko; Ekl, Darko; Sustić, Alan; Loncarek, Karmen; Ledić, Darko

    2003-12-01

    To compare primary and secondary wound reconstruction as a treatment method for Gustilo type III open tibial fractures. Thirty-five consecutive patients with a Gustilo type III open tibial shaft fracture were treated and followed up for 3 years. The patients were divided into two groups depending on the treatment protocol and timing of wound reconstruction: primary wound reconstruction (n=15) and secondary wound reconstruction (n=20). After determining median value, the variability was expressed with the 25th and 75th percentiles. In the primary wound reconstruction group, healing was achieved in 13 out of 15 patients. The median time to recovery was 68 (25th-75th percentile=32-86) weeks, median number of operations was 4 (25th-75th percentile=3-5), and median Johner and Wruhs score was 4 (25th-75th percentile=3-5). There were 9 cases with a bone defect and 2 tibial amputations were performed. In the secondary wound reconstruction group, complete recovery was achieved in 18 out of 20 patients. The median time to recovery was 115.5 (25th-75th percentile=70.0-128.5) weeks, median number of operations 7.5 (25th-75th percentile=6.5-8.5), and median score according to Johner and Wruhs' criteria 3 (25th-75th percentile=2-4). There were 19 cases with a bone defect and 1 tibial amputation was performed. Chronic osteomyelitis persisted only in a single patient. Median time to recovery and number of operations were significantly smaller in patients undergoing primary wound reconstruction. Primary wound reconstruction required smaller number of operations and shorter time to recovery than secondary wound reconstruction, mostly due to a significantly smaller proportion of cases with a bone defect.

  6. Lipid, phenol and carotenoid changes in 'Bianca' grapevine leaves after mechanical wounding: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitarrini, Giulia; Zulini, Luca; Masuero, Domenico; Vrhovsek, Urska

    2017-11-01

    Metabolic changes can occur in plants in response to abiotic stress. Extensive use of leaf discs (mechanical wounding) in studies regarding the effect on the biochemical response of the grapevine to different types of biotic stress makes it necessary to understand metabolic perturbation after injury. In this study, we investigate how mechanical wounding can affect the metabolism of grapevine leaf tissue using Bianca variety as case study. Two sizes of leaf discs (1.1 and 2.8 cm in diameter) were excised from leaves, and phenol, lipid and carotenoid perturbation were investigated 0, 6, 12, 24, 48, 96 and 120 h post cutting. In our study, we found an accumulation of molecules belonging to stilbenoid and stilbene classes such as trans-resveratrol, trans-piceide, Z-miyabenol C, E-cis-miyabenol C and ampelopsin D + quadrangularin A after abiotic stress. The increase in fatty acids such as linoleic acid, linolenic acid and oleic + cis-vaccenic acid during the first 12 h after injury, followed by a return to basal level, allowed us to surmise their role in response to abiotic stress, in particular to mechanical wounding in grapevine leaves. Different-sized discs caused a different response to the tissue, with a higher accumulation in 1.1-cm-diameter discs, especially of phenol compounds. The results of this work can be used to better understand metabolic changes due to biotic stress, having previous knowledge about the perturbation caused by abiotic stress.

  7. Studies on the susceptibility of pruning wounds to infection by fungi involved in grapevine wood diseases in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Serra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility of grapevine annual pruning wounds to Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, Phaeoacremonium aleophilum and Diplodia seriata was investigated over three years (2005–2007 in a 15 year-old vineyard, cv. Sauvignon blanc. Vines were pruned each year in January, February and March and the wounds were inoculated weekly with conidial suspensions, and with sterile water as a control. Penetration of the fungi into the wood was assessed after 4 weeks by plating pieces of host tissue on agar medium. The susceptibility of annual pruning wounds, expressed as the infection percentages of inoculated spurs, varied with both the trial year and the fungus inoculated. Average infection percentages of inoculated spurs in the three years were respectively 14.7, 38.5 and 50.9% for Pa. chlamydospora, 31.7, 32.2 and 49.4% for Pm. aleophilum and 84.2, 43.8 and 40.9% for D. seriata. The period of pruning was significant for the infection percentages of all fungi in 2005, and for D. seriata in 2006. Natural infection of control spurs by Pa. chlamydospora (2, 4.4, and 11.7% of spurs in the three years respectively and by Pm. aleophilum (0.3, 1.8, and 6.4% began when average weekly temperatures stabilized around 10°C, while infection by D. seriata (12.2, 12 and 18.3% in the same period occurred even below that threshold. Higher infection percentages of both artificially and naturally infected spurs in 2007 were probably due to the higher temperatures recorded in February and March (besides the use of a more efficient selective medium for the isolation of Pa. chlamydospora and Pm. aleophilum. Only artificial infections with D. seriata showed an opposite trend that cannot be explained by the weather data. Infection of one-year-old wood appeared to be an important factor in disease spread. Spurs remained liable to infections with any of the fungi for up to 4 months after pruning, and isolation percentages could be fairly high also in late spring. As a consequence

  8. Understanding the Host Inflammatory Response to Wound Infection: An In Vivo Study of Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Rabbit Ear Wound Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    punched out and immediately snap -frozen in liquid nitrogen. Wound samples were homogenized using a Mini-bead beater-8 equipment (Biospec Products, Inc...regulation of wound healing. Int J Low Extrem Wounds 2004; 3: 201–8. 13. Bernard JJ, Gallo RL. Protecting the boundary: the sentinel role of host defense

  9. A comparative study of histopathological effects of aqueous extract of cinnamon and honey with sulfadiazine on skin burn wound healing in rats infected with Pseudomonas aeuroginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Valilou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous opportunistic pathogen, is the most common infective agent of burn wounds. The aim of this study was to compare the histopathological effect of a mixture of aqueous extract of cinnamon and honey with silver sulfadiazine on the healing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infected second grade skin burn wounds in rats. To this end, 60 male rats were randomly assigned to four experimental groups (15 rats in each group. After inducing anesthesia, second grade burn wound with the diameter of 12 mm was created in the dorsal region of rats. Then, 1.5×108 cfu/ml P. aeruginosa PA01was equally bestrewed on the wound of all rats. Every 12 hours, silver sulfadiazine (group 1, honey (group 2 and aqueous extract of cinnamon and honey (group 3 were applied to the wounds and group 4 was kept as control. On days 7, 14, and 21, five rats were selected from each group at each time point and after inducing anesthesia and measuring the diameter of the wound by coliseum, microbial and histopathological samples were taken from the wounds. Microbial studies showed that in all groups except the control group, the growth of the microbe was stopped. Histopathological observations regarding wound healing and diameter showed that there was a significant difference between treatment groups and the control group on days 7, 14 and 21 (p

  10. Randomized Controlled Trial of Prophylactic Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy at Ostomy Closure for the Prevention of Delayed Wound Healing and Surgical Site Infection in Patients with Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Motoi; Hirose, Kei; Bando, Toshihiro; Chohno, Teruhiro; Takesue, Yoshio; Ikeuchi, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Although negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is likely advantageous for wound healing, the efficacy and safety of its prophylactic use remain unclear for digestive surgery. We performed a prospective randomized controlled study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this procedure during ileostomy closure. We conducted a prospective, randomized study between November 2014 and September 2015. Patients with ulcerative colitis scheduled to undergo ileostomy closure with purse-string suture (PSS) were randomly divided into groups with or without NPWT. The primary endpoint was complete wound healing. The secondary endpoints were incidences of wound complications. A total of 31 patients with PSS alone and 28 patients with PSS + NPWT were enrolled. Wound infection was observed in 1 patient in the PSS-alone condition and 3 patients in the PSS + NPWT condition (p = 0.76). The mean duration of complete wound healing was 37.6 ± 11.7 days in the PSS-alone condition and 33.5 ± 10.0 days in the PSS + NPWT condition (p = 0.18). Although no adverse effects were observed in this series, the efficacy of PSS + NPWT was not confirmed. Further clarification of the indication of prophylactic NPWT and its efficacy must be obtained, and the efficacy and safety of NPWT in different dirty/infected surgeries should be evaluated. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Soft tissue infections from fish spike wounds: normal commensal bacteria are more common than marine pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Hannah; Lee, Kin Mun; Cheng, Paul T-Y; Hulme, Sarah

    2017-03-20

    A fish spike injury can be sustained by anyone handling fish; during fishing, meal preparation or in retail. Case reports of fish spikes inoculating victims with virulent marine-specific pathogens and causing systemic illness led us to question whether empirical treatment of these injuries with amoxicillin and clavulanic acid is adequate. This 2-year prospective observational study was conducted at Middlemore Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. Wound swabs and tissue samples belonging to patients presenting to the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery with an upper limb fish spike injury were sent to the laboratory (n = 60). A series of stains and cultures were performed to look specifically for marine bacteria not typically isolated in other soft tissue injuries. Patient demographic data and injury details were collected. Of the patients with adequate microbiology samples, 12% (6/50) grew clinically relevant bacteria resistant to amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. These included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (8%, 4/50), Enterobacter cloacae (2%, 1/50) and an anaerobic sporing bacillus (2%, 1/50). Only one patient grew a true marine-specific bacteria, Photobacterium damselae, which was susceptible to amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. The authors concluded that amoxicillin and clavulanic acid is an adequate first-line antibiotic for fish spike injuries but that flucloxacillin may be more appropriate given most bacteria were from patients' own skin flora. The authors suggest that clinicians consider the presence of resistant marine-specific bacteria in cases where there is sepsis or inadequate response to initial therapy. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  12. Antibacterial activities of Manuka and Honeydew honey-based membranes against bacteria that cause wound infections in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramuta, C; Nebbia, P; Robino, P; Giusto, G; Gandini, M; Chiadò-Cutin, S; Grego, E

    2017-02-01

    In this study, membranes composed of honey (Manuka or Honeydew) and pectin were developed, and the ISO 22196 method was used to evaluate their antibacterial activities against multidrug-resistant bacteria (i.e., Staphylococcus pseudointermedius, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) that cause wound infection in animals. The results demonstrated that both Manuka and Honeydew honey-based membranes had strong antibacterial activities against the strain of methicillin-resistant S. pseudointermedius tested. Specifically, membranes composed of Manuka honey were effective in inhibiting the growth of Gram-negative bacteria within 3 h, whereas those composed of Honeydew honey needed 24 h to neutralise bacterial growth. The antimicrobial activities of both membranes developed in this study suggest that they can be effectively used as wound dressing in veterinary clinical medicine.

  13. Improved wound care product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention pertains to use of sodium diacetate (NaHAc 2) as an antimicrobial agent against bacteria growing in biofilms. The aspects of the invention include a wound care product comprising sodium diacetate, a kit comprising a wound care product,and a methodof treating an infected wound....

  14. Early MRI findings in stab wound of the cervical spine: two case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkan, A.; Baysal, T.; Sarac, K.; Sigirci, A.; Kutlu, R. [Inonu Universitesi Turgut Ozal Tip Merkezi, Radyoloji Anabilim Dali, Malatya (Turkey)

    2002-01-01

    MR imaging was found to be the most sensitive modality for the detection of spinal cord abnormalities in the acutely injured spine. Although it is reported that traumatic pneumomyelogram indicates a base-of-skull or middle cranial fossa fracture and is almost certainly associated with intracranial subarachnoid air, early MR imaging may demonstrate subarachnoid air in penetrating trauma of the spinal cord without head injury. We report two cervical-spine stab-wound cases, one of which had subarachnoid air on early MR findings. (orig.)

  15. The development, implementation and evaluation of a cross organisational clinical guideline for the management and prevention of wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Nikki; Sandoe, Jonathan; Mc Ginnis, Elizabeth; Edmunds, Heather

    2012-11-01

    The Tissue Viability services in acute and primary care in Leeds had concerns about the increasing inappropriate use of topical antiseptic dressings for wound management and were aware that the use was disproportionate to the evidence supporting their prescribing. A scoping exercise of the use of topical antiseptics and systemic antibiotic usage in Leeds led to the identification of heterogeneous prescribing of systemic antibiotics and an almost £500,000 spend on topical antiseptics across Leeds community. The project involved the following stages. 1- Local scoping of topical antiseptics and systemic antibiotic prescribing. 2- A cross organisational working group to develop and implement a clinical best practice guideline for the prevention, diagnosis and management of wound infection. 3- Development of a revised local dressings formulary. 4- The establishment of a new referral process to Tissue Viability for wounds requiring topical antiseptic treatments. 5- Evaluation of the new guideline through- monitoring prescribing- monitoring wound sampling- monitoring A & E admissions- collecting patient feedback through the ‘Tell Tissue Viability’ process. *Expenditure on topical antiseptic dressings for the period Oct 2009-Dec 2009 was £128,864 and this reduced to £65,604 for the period Nov 2011-Jan 2012. This demonstrates an overall saving of £63,260 with a projected annual saving of £237,584 within the community trust alone. *A reduction in the number of wound swabs sent to microbiology from inpatient locations by 1500/year comparing 2008/9 with 2010/11. *An increase in wound swabs sent from GPs by 100/year comparing 2008/9 with 2010/11. *A reduction in penicillin V and co-fluampicil prescriptions and an increase in flucloxacillin prescriptions in general practise suggesting greater concordance with local antibiotic prescribing recommendations. The implementation of a clinical guideline in association with support from the specialist team, for patients

  16. Prosthetic joint infection caused by Pasteurella multocida: a case series and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnorat, Estelle; Seng, Piseth; Savini, Hélène; Pinelli, Pierre-Olivier; Simon, Fabrice; Stein, Andreas

    2016-08-20

    Pasteurella multocida is a well-recognized zoonotic agent following dog or cat bites or scratches. Nevertheless, prosthetic joint infection caused by P. multocida are rarely reported. We report here a series of six cases of prosthetic joint infection caused by P. multocida managed at a referral centre for the treatment of bone and joint infection in southern France. We also reviewed the 26 cases reported in literature. The mean age of our cases was 74 years [±8.2, range 63-85]. In majority of our cases (5 cases) were associated with knee prostheses and one case with a hip prosthesis. Most of cases occurred after cat or dog scratches or licks or contact. Diagnoses of prosthetic joint infection caused by P. multocida were made by positive cultures of surgical biopsies or needle aspiration. Mean time delay between prosthetic joint implantation and infection onset was 7.6 years (±5.12 years, range 2-17). Local inflammation, which occurred in all six cases, was the most frequent clinical symptom, followed by pain in five cases, fever and swollen joints in four cases, and a fistula with purulent discharge inside the wound in two cases. The mean time of antibiotic therapy was 8 months. Surgical treatment with prosthesis removal was performed in three cases. Six of our cases were in remission without apparent relapse at 3 years after end of treatment. Prosthetic joint infections caused by P. multocida usually occur after animal scratches or bites, but can occasionally occur after a short animal lick. These infections are usually resulting from a contiguous infection and localized in the knee. An early antibiotic therapy after surgical debridement could avoid prosthetic withdrawal, notably in elderly patients. Patients with prosthetic joints should be warned that animals are potential sources of serious infection and urgent medical advice should be sought if they are bitten or scratched.

  17. Incidence of sternal wound infection after reexploration in the intensive care unit and the use of local gentamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reser, Diana; Rodriguez Cetina Biefer, Hector; Plass, André; Ruef, Christian; Seifert, Burkhardt; Bettex, Dominique; Biaggi, Patric; Falk, Volkmar; Salzberg, Sacha P

    2012-12-01

    Reoperation for bleeding is a known emergency complication after cardiac operations. When performed in the intensive care unit (ICU), sterility issues arise. Our aim was to examine the incidence of sternal wound infection (SWI) after reexploration in the ICU for bleeding with routine use of local gentamycin. From January 2003 until December 2009, 4,863 patients underwent cardiac operations through a median sternotomy at our institution. We conducted a retrospective database review identifying all patients who required reoperations. The occurrence of SWI in this group was compared with the general cardiac surgical population. Reoperations for bleeding during this period were conducted routinely in the ICU with prophylactic application of a gentamycin sponge between the sternal halves before closure in all cases. Reexploration for bleeding was necessary in 302 patients (6.2%), and SWI occurred in 11, for a rate of 3.6%. SWI occurred in 174 of the 4,561 non-reexplored patients, for a similar rate of 3.8% (p>0.9). These values are similar to our overall rate of SWI of 3.8% (n=185) in the total cohort of 4,863 patients. The incidence of SWI was not increased in our study group after emergency reoperation for bleeding in the ICU after the local use of gentamycin. Our data suggest that reexploration in an ICU setting for bleeding does not pose a sterility challenge and that life-threatening delays due to transfer to the operating theater may be avoided. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Subcutaneous gentamycin implant to reduce wound infections after loop-ileostomy closure: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, O; Raue, W; Böhm, B; Neuss, H; Scharfenberg, M; Schwenk, W

    2005-11-01

    After loop-ileostomy closure subcutaneous wound infection is the most frequent postoperative complication. Implantation of local antibiotics has been shown to reduce the incidence of wound infection after different surgical procedures, therefore, a subcutaneous application of a gentamycin implant may also decrease infection rate after ileostomy-closure. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a subcutaneous gentamycin-collagen implant to reduce wound infection after loop-ileostomy closure. Patients had the same perioperative treatment and standardized anastomotic and closure technique. A collagen sponge with gentamycin was used in the treatment group and an identical collagen implant without antibiotics was used in the placebo group. Eighty patients (40 per group) were included. There was no difference between the groups with respect to demographics or in the postoperative course. The total wound infection rate was 10 percent with no difference between the gentamycin (n=4) and the collagen group (n=4) (P = 1.0). Subcutaneous implantation of a gentamycin sponge yields no clinically relevant reduction of the wound infection rate after loop-ileostomy closure so that routine use is not recommended in this procedure.

  19. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection impairs murine S100A8/A9 and neutrophil effector cytokines—implications for delayed wound closure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Hannah; Lerche, Christian Johann; Christophersen, Lars Jackie

    2017-01-01

    The impact of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections in chronic wounds and clinical implication for healing is receiving increased attention. However, the pathophysiology of host/pathogen interplay is not fully understood. By further revealing the mechanisms, necessary new treatment strategies...... may be identified. Since the background for chronic wounds is diverse, representative animal models are important. We assessed host response and spontaneous wound closure in the relatively resistant C3H/HeN and the susceptible BALB/c mouse strain. Full-thickness burn wounds were inflicted in 108 mice....... P. aeruginosa biofilm (106 colony forming units) was injected subcutaneously in 72 mice, euthanized day 4, 7 or 10 days postinfection. Wounds were analysed for neutrophil host response markers: S100A8/A9, keratinocyte-derived chemokine and Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor. Total peripheral...

  20. ROLE OF VACUUM ASSISTED CLOSURE (VAC - IN WOUND HEALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Lokanadha Rao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Large, complicated wounds pose a significant surgical problem. Negative pressure wound therapy is one of several methods enabling to obtain better treatment results in case of open infected wounds.1,2 The use of negative pressure therapy enables to obtain a reduction in the number of bacteria which significantly reduces the number of complications.3,4,5 AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To review the Role of VAC in wound healing in Orthopaedics. MATERIALS AND METHODS The cases presented in this study are those who were admitted in King George Hospital in the time period from January 2014 to August 2015. This is a prospective interventional study. In this study, 15 patients were assigned to the study group (Negative Pressure Wound Therapy- NPWT based on their willingness for undergoing treatment. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS 12 males and 3 females are involved in the study. There is decrease in the mean wound area from 64 cm2 to 38 cm2 . There is decrease in the duration of hospital stay. Finally, wound is closed by SSG or secondary suturing. DISCUSSION NPWT is known to reduce bacterial counts, although they remain colonised with organisms. Wounds covered with NPW dressing are completely isolated from the environment, thereby reduces cross infection. In our series, we had 73.3% (11 cases excellent results and 26.7% (4 cases good results and no poor results. As interpretation with results, VAC therapy is effective mode of adjuvant therapy for the management of infected wounds. CONCLUSION VAC has been proven to be a reliable method of treating a variety of infected wounds. It greatly increases the rate of granulation tissue formation and lowers bacterial counts to accelerate wound healing. It can be used as a temporary dressing to prepare wounds optimally prior to closure or as a definitive treatment for nonsurgical and surgical wounds. VAC is now being used in a multitude of clinical settings, including the treatment of surgical wounds, infected wounds

  1. An in vitro model of bacterial infections in wounds and other soft tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werthen, M.; Henriksson, L.; Jensen, P.O.

    2010-01-01

    There is growing evidence that bacteria play a crucial role in the persistence of chronic wounds. These bacteria are most probably present in polymer-embedded aggregates that represent the biofilm mode of growth. Much work has been carried out to study the development of biofilms in vitro, in par...... development in chronic wounds and to develop novel diagnostic tools as well as treatment strategies.......There is growing evidence that bacteria play a crucial role in the persistence of chronic wounds. These bacteria are most probably present in polymer-embedded aggregates that represent the biofilm mode of growth. Much work has been carried out to study the development of biofilms in vitro......, in particular in attachment to solid surfaces. The observations from the chronic wounds indicate that the bacteria are not attached to a solid surface. Consequently, a new in vitro model is required to investigate biofilms in more wound-like settings. This study describes such a novel in vitro model...

  2. Case Report: Diabetic Foot Ulcer Infection Treated with Topical Compounded Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbi, Kelechi E; Carvalho, Maria; Phan, Ha; Tuma, Cristiane

    2017-01-01

    An adult diabetic male with three toes amputated on his right foot presented with an ulcer infection on his left foot, unresponsive to conventional antifungal oral medication for over two months. The ulcerated foot wound had a large impairment on the patient's quality of life, as determined by the Wound-QoL questionnaire. The compounding pharmacist recommended and the physician prescribed two topical compounded medicines, which were applied twice a day, free of charge at the compounding pharmacy. The foot ulcer infection was completely resolved following 13 days of treatment, with no longer any impairment on the patient's quality of life. This scientific case study highlights the value of pharmaceutical compounding in current therapeutics, the importance of the triad relationship, and the key role of the compounding pharmacist in diabetes care. Copyright© by International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding, Inc.

  3. The antimicrobial screening of a Barbadian medicinal plant with indications for use in the treatment of diabetic wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, S; Cohall, D H; Gossell-Williams, M; Lindo, J F

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic non-communicable disease with high prevalence in the North American and Caribbean region. Diabetic Foot Syndrome which is an associated complication can lead to the development of wounds and ulcers which can become infected. Justicia secunda, a plant known locally in Barbados as Bloodroot used in folklore for wound healing, was selected to test its ability to aid diabetic wound healing by antimicrobial activity. It was therefore tested against the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, and Enterococcus feacalis (clincal strain) which are commonly found in diabetic wounds. The plant was collected by local users. Methanol and acetone extracts of the plant were prepared with use of soxhlet extraction. The antimicrobial activity was assessed with the use of a modified Kirby-Baurer method. Concentrations of 200 mg/ml, 100 mg/ml, 10 mg/ml, and 1 mg/ml of the extract were used, with a standard ciprofloxacin 5 microg positive control, and a 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution negative control. The J secunda methanol and acetone extracts with an extraction yield of 15.3% and 0.75%, respectively yielded no activity within the concentration range against the three strains of bacteria tested. In comparison with the positive control, relative inhibition zone diameter (RIZD) values of 0% resulted for both the negative control and the extracts, with the positive control having a value of 100%. The in vitro screen of the extracts prepared from J secunda, yielded no antimicrobial activity against the three strains of bacteria tested and therefore does not support the folklore claims by this mechanism of action.

  4. Prospective Randomized Evaluation of Intraoperative Application of Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma on Surgical Site Infection or Delayed Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanGiovanni, Thomas P; Kiebzak, Gary M

    2016-05-01

    Prevention of surgical site infections and the reduction of wound-related complication rates have become increasingly emphasized by hospital task groups and government agencies given the degree of economic burden it places on the health care system. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains growth factors and other biomolecules that promote endogenous microbicidal activity. We hypothesized that PRP would help prevent postoperative infection and delayed wound healing (DWH). We randomized patients having foot or ankle surgery to the treatment group receiving intraoperative PRP (applied to operative field) and platelet-poor plasma at closing (PPP, on the sutured skin) or the control group (no PRP/PPP). The incidence of deep surgical site infection and DWH (collectively called endpoints) was compared between groups (n = 250/group). PRP had a mean 5.3-fold platelet concentration compared to whole blood, with concentrated white blood cells. Mean age (±SD) of patients was 52 years (±15), 65% were women. Minor and major operative procedures were included. Patients were followed for 60 days. Seventy controls had PRP prepared for assay of growth factors. Procedure mix, ASA scores, mean operative times, and comorbidity mix were similar between groups. The primary result was no difference in number of endpoints between groups: 19 patients in the PRP group (7.6%) versus 18 controls (7.2%). Endpoints were deep surgical site infections in 2 PRP/PPP patients and 1 control, and DWH in 17 PRP/PPP patients and 17 controls. Analysis of PRP samples revealed a large variation in growth factor concentrations between patients. Intraoperative application of PRP/PPP did not reduce the incidence of postoperative infection or DWH. Growth factor profiles varied greatly between patients, suggesting that the potentially therapeutic treatment delivered was not consistent from patient-to-patient. Level I, prospective randomized trial. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Aseptic surgical preparation for upper eyelid blepharoplasty via full-face octenidine antiseptic without antibiotic medication shows effective prophylaxis against post-surgical wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiasek, Johannes; Kienzl, Philip; Otti, Gerlinde R; Turk, Bela R; Djedovic, Gabriel; Rieger, Ulrich M

    2018-02-01

    Blepharoplasty is the third most common plastic surgical procedure in the USA. Due to the emergence of multiresistant bacteria, optimising the antiseptic procedure is crucial. Choice of antiseptics plays an important role as they may cause skin irritation and colouring of disinfected areas. In this study, the use of the aqueous antiseptic octenisept® (octenidine) was evaluated in the outcome of blepharoplasties: incidence of wound dehiscence; haematoma; and infection in correlation with gender, medication, smoking habits and time of year. This retrospective surveillance study included 352 patients (median age 58·3 years). Skin disinfection was performed thrice prior to blepharoplasty. Sutures were removed on day 6. None of the patients suffered from wound infection. The total rate of wound dehiscence was 6·3%, with a higher ratio among male patients. Smokers and patients on anticoagulant medication showed a significantly higher incidence of wound dehiscence. Throughout the year, rates of wound dehiscence were highest in summer. Aseptic surgical preparation for blepharoplasty via full-face scrub with octenisept® without oral antibiotic prophylaxis is well tolerated, with no report of wound infection, which may improve antibiotic stewardship as well as patient comfort. Elective upper eyelid blepharoplasty may ideally be performed in winter. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Severe odontogenic infection: An emergency. Case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisosto-Jara, Claudia; Diaz-Ricouz, Camilo; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David

    2017-01-01

    Odontogenic infections (OI) are a major reason for consultation in dental practice. They affect people of all ages, and most of them respond well to current medical and surgical treatments. However, some OI can spread to vital and deep structures, overcome the host immune system - especially in diabetic, immunocompromised or weakened patients - and even prove fatal. Ludwig’s angina is a severe form of diffuse cellulitis that can have an acute onset and spread very rapidly, bilaterally affecting areas of the head and neck, and may prove life threatening. A case of severe dental infection is presented in which emphasis is placed on the importance of airway maintenance, followed by surgical decompression under adequate antibiotic coverage. Key words:Ludwig’s angina, severe odontogenic infection, surgical decompression, dental infection. PMID:28210456

  7. Risk factors for HIV infection among circumcised men in Uganda: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediau, Michael; Matovu, Joseph K B; Byaruhanga, Raymond; Tumwesigye, Nazarius M; Wanyenze, Rhoda K

    2015-01-01

    Male circumcision (MC) reduces the risk of HIV infection. However, the risk reduction effect of MC can be modified by type of circumcision (medical, traditional and religious) and sexual risk behaviours post-circumcision. Understanding the risk behaviours associated with HIV infection among circumcised men (regardless of form of circumcision) is critical to the design of comprehensive risk reduction interventions. This study assessed risk factors for HIV infection among men circumcised through various circumcision approaches. This was a case-control study which enrolled 155 cases (HIV-infected) and 155 controls (HIV-uninfected), all of whom were men aged 18-35 years presenting at the AIDS Information Center for HIV testing and care. The outcome variable was HIV sero-status. Using SPSS version 17, multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors independently associated with HIV infection. Overall, 83.9% among cases and 56.8% among controls were traditionally circumcised; 7.7% of cases and 21.3% of controls were religiously circumcised while 8.4% of cases and 21.9% of controls were medically circumcised. A higher proportion of cases than controls reported resuming sexual intercourse before complete wound healing (36.9% vs. 14.1%; pHIV infection prior to circumcision were:being in a polygamous marriage (AOR: 6.6, CI: 2.3-18.8) and belonging to the Bagisu ethnic group (AOR: 6.1, CI: 2.6-14.0). After circumcision, HIV infection was associated with: being circumcised at >18 years (AOR: 5.0, CI: 2.4-10.2); resuming sexual intercourse before wound healing (AOR: 3.4, CI: 1.6-7.3); inconsistent use of condoms (AOR: 2.7, CI: 1.5-5.1); and having sexual intercourse under the influence of peers (AOR: 2.9, CI: 1.5-5.5). Men who had religious circumcision were less likely to have HIV infection (AOR: 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2-0.9) than the traditionally circumcised but there was no statistically significant difference between those who were traditionally circumcised and

  8. Animal models of chronic wound care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Hannah; Thomsen, Kim; Calum, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    on nonhealing wounds. Relevant hypotheses based on clinical or in vitro observations can be tested in representative animal models, which provide crucial tools to uncover the pathophysiology of cutaneous skin repair in infectious environments. Disposing factors, species of the infectious agent(s), and time....... An inhibiting effect of bacterial biofilms on wound healing is gaining significant clinical attention over the last few years. There is still a paucity of suitable animal models to recapitulate human chronic wounds. The etiology of the wound (venous insufficiency, ischemia, diabetes, pressure) has to be taken...... of establishment of the infection are well defined in suitable animal models. In addition, several endpoints can be involved for evaluation. Animals do not display chronic wounds in the way that humans do. However, in many cases, animal models can mirror the pathological conditions observed in humans, although...

  9. Noncontact, Low Frequency Ultrasound as an Effective Therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected Biofilm Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, and 2. Microbiology Branch, US Army Dental and Trauma Research Detachment...vacuum-assisted closure wound therapy: a prospective randomized trial. J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg 2007; 60: 672–81. 24. Hochbaum AI, Kolodkin-Gal I

  10. Case series of topical and orally administered β-glucan for the treatment of diabetic wounds: clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaaslan, Onder; Kankaya, Yuksel; Sungur, Nezih; Kocer, Ugur; Sedat Cuzdan, Suat; Sahin, Belma; Uysal, Afsin

    2012-01-01

    Chronic, nonhealing wounds, foot ulcers, and lower extremity amputations are among the most problematic complications associated with diabetes mellitus. Standard care for diabetes-related chronic ulcers has included treatment of infection, weight off-loading, aggressive surgical débridement, and maintenance of a moist wound environment with frequent dressing changes. Yeast glucan is a particular high-molecular-weight polymer of β-(1,3)-glycosidic linkages of glycopyranose. We report our observations about the effectiveness of topically and orally administrated β-(1,3)-glucan for the treatment of chronic diabetic wounds and compare them to the literature results previously reported for similar wounds. Twenty-two patients with nonhealing ulcers associated with diabetes were included in this study. β-Glucan was given both orally and topically for the treatment of nonhealing ulcers. Macroscopic changes and surface areas of diabetic ulcers were recorded, and complete healing times were noted for each patient. A rapid decrease in size and healthy granulation were significantly observed in most patients. The duration of complete healing averaged 10.8 weeks (range 6-20 weeks). No adverse events were observed in the treatment period. The complete healing time was shorter than the results previously reported in the literature. Our observations support the view that application of glucan hastens epithelialization and wound closure, so topically and orally administered β-(1,3)-glucan therapy can help reverse some of the deficits in impaired healing diseases such as diabetes mellitus.

  11. Microfluidic 3D bone tissue model for high-throughput evaluation of wound-healing and infection-preventing biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joung-Hyun; Gu, Yexin; Wang, Hongjun; Lee, Woo Y

    2012-02-01

    We report the use of a microfluidic 3D bone tissue model, as a high-throughput means of evaluating the efficacy of biomaterials aimed at accelerating orthopaedic implant-related wound-healing while preventing bacterial infection. As an example of such biomaterials, inkjet-printed micropatterns were prepared to contain antibiotic and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) nanoparticles dispersed in a poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic) acid matrix. The micropatterns were integrated with a microfluidic device consisting of eight culture chambers. The micropatterns immediately and completely killed Staphylococcus epidermidis upon inoculation, and enhanced the calcified extracellular matrix production of osteoblasts. Without antibiotic elution, bacteria rapidly proliferated to result in an acidic microenvironment which was detrimental to osteoblasts. These results were used to demonstrate the tissue model's potential in: (i) significantly reducing the number of biomaterial samples and culture experiments required to assess in vitro efficacy for wound-healing and infection prevention and (ii) in situ monitoring of dynamic interactions of biomaterials with bacteria as wells as with tissue cells simultaneously. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Aloe vera Gel: Effective Therapeutic Agent against Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Recovered from Burn Wound Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Goudarzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Aloe vera is an herbal medicinal plant with biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic ones, and immunomodulatory properties. The purpose of this study was investigation of in vitro antimicrobial activity of A. vera gel against multidrug-resistant (MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients with burn wound infections. Methods. During a 6-month study, 140 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from patients admitted to the burn wards of a hospital in Tehran, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was carried out against the pathogens using the A. vera gel and antibiotics (imipenem, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin. Results. The antibiogram revealed that 47 (33.6% of all isolates were MDR P. aeruginosa. The extract isolated from A. vera has antibacterial activity against all of isolates. Also, 42 (89.4% isolates were inhibited by A. vera gel extract at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC ≤ 200 µg/mL. MIC value of A. vera gel for other isolates (10.6% was 800 µg/mL. All of MDR P. aeruginosa strains were inhibited by A. vera at similar MIC50 and MIC90 200 µg/mL. Conclusion. Based on our results, A. vera gel at various concentrations can be used as an effective antibacterial agent in order to prevent wound infection caused by P. aeruginosa.

  13. Infective endocarditis of the Dacron patch-a report of 13 cases at autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaideeswar, Pradeep; Mishra, Prashant; Nimbalkar, Manglesh

    2011-01-01

    One of the complications of using a synthetic material as a patch in correction of left-to-right shunts is the development of infection. This is an autopsy report of 13 patients who developed infective endocarditis of the Dacron patch as a postoperative complication. We retrospectively reviewed the autopsy records of patients with infective endocarditis over a 15-year period (1994-2008) and selected cases with Dacron-patch infective endocarditis. The patch infective endocarditis was classified into early-onset and late-onset infective endocarditis. Patch infective endocarditis was seen in 13 patients affecting the patches covering an atrial septal defect and 12 ventricular septal defects. There were nine males and four females, with a mean age of 13.1 years. The episodes occurred 2 to 118 days (mean of 30) after operation, with early-onset infective endocarditis in 10 and late-onset infective endocarditis in three patients. Postoperative wound infection had been present in eight. The organisms isolated or demonstrated on microscopy included Staphylococcus aureus (5), gram-positive cocci (4), Pseudomonas (2), Aspergillus species (1), and Candida species (1). Death was related to embolization and/or accompanying septicemia. Correction of simple or complex congenital cardiac defects offers new substrates for organisms to colonize resulting in infective endocarditis, which are often difficult to treat. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Therapy of infections in mice irradiated in mixed neutron/photon fields and inflicted with wound trauma: A review of current work. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledney, G.D.; Madonna, G.S.; Elliott, T.B.; Moore, M.M.; Jackson, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    When host antimicrobial defenses are severely compromised by radiation or trauma in conjunction with radiation, death from sepsis results. To evaluate therapies for sepsis in radiation casualties, the authors developed models of acquired and induced bacterial infections in irradiated and irradiated-wounded mice. Animals were exposed to either a mixed radiation field of equal proportions of neutrons and gamma rays (n/gamma = 1) from a TRIGA reactor or pure gamma rays from 60 (Co sources). Skin wounds (15% of total body surface area) were inflicted under methoxyflurane anesthesia 1 h after irradiation. In all mice, wounding after irradiation decreased resistance to infection. Treatments with the immunomodulator synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM) before or after mixed neutron-gamma irradiation or gamma irradiation increased survival. Therapy with S-TDCM for mice irradiated with either a mixed field or gamma rays increased resistance to Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced infections.

  15. Immune Modulating Topical S100A8/A9 Inhibits Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Mitigates Biofilm Infection in Chronic Wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Hannah; Lerche, Christian Johann; Christophersen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    in a murine model and P. aeruginosa growth in vitro. Seventy-six mice, inflicted with a full-thickness burn wound were challenged subcutaneously (s.c.) by 10⁶ colony-forming units (CFUs) of P. aeruginosa biofilm. Mice were subsequently randomized into two treatment groups, one group receiving recombinant......-treatment ameliorated wound infection, as evaluated by quantitative bacteriology (p ≤ 0.05). In vitro, growth of P. aeruginosa was inhibited dose-dependently by S100A8/A9 in concentrations from 5 to 40 μg/mL, as determined by optical density-measurement (OD-measurement) and quantitative bacteriology......, treatment by S100A8/A9 provides local infection control. Implications for a role as adjunctive treatment in healing of chronic biofilm-infected wounds are discussed....

  16. Potential of combination therapy of endolysin MR-10 and minocycline in treating MRSA induced systemic and localized burn wound infections in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Shivani; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2016-12-01

    MRSA is the predominant pathogen responsible for fatal burn wound infection in patients. Antibiotic resistance and its ability to form biofilms on the surface of burn wounds limit the use of antibiotics to contain this pathogen. The results of present study have shown that single dose of combination therapy of endolysin MR-10 (50μg/s.c) and minocycline (50mg/kg/orally) resulted in 100% survival of group of mice with systemic MRSA infection. Maximum reduction in bacterial load in various organs was observed in the group that received combination therapy. In comparison to control, a significant reduction (pendolysin MR-10 and minocycline is a better option in controlling burn wound infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Renal flagellate infections in reptiles: 29 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan-Sallés, Caries; Garner, Michael M; Nordhausen, Robert W; Valls, Xavier; Gallego, Miguel; Soto, Sara

    2014-03-01

    Renal infection with flagellated protozoa was retrospectively evaluated in 29 reptiles, including 12 turtles, 7 tortoises, and 6 chameleons; overall, 20 species of reptiles were represented. Most cases presented with nonspecific clinical signs or a combination of several concurrent diseases. Nineteen of 29 reptiles had tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with flagellates, and this lesion was considered contributory to death in 15 cases, although concurrent diseases were frequent. Infection was invasive into the renal interstitium in three reptiles due to tubular rupture and in one chameleon also spread to adjacent tissues, coelomic cavity, and blood vessels due to renal rupture. Cytologic or ultrastructural evaluation of trophozoites in two cases was consistent with diplomonad flagellates. Renal disease was often complicated with soft-tissue mineralization and/or gout. Gastrointestinal and cloacal infection with flagellates and inflammation were frequent in reptiles in which the digestive tract was available for histopathologic examination, and this supports the possibility of infections ascending the urinary tract from the cloaca. Renal disease associated with flagellate protozoa is rare in vertebrates but appears to be relevant in reptiles, particularly chelonians and chameleons.

  18. Supplementation with tocotrienols from Bixa orellana improves the in vivo efficacy of daptomycin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a mouse model of infected wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierpaoli, Elisa; Orlando, Fiorenza; Cirioni, Oscar; Simonetti, Oriana; Giacometti, Andrea; Provinciali, Mauro

    2017-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common cause of skin and soft-tissue infection worldwide. An adequate immune response acts as a first line of defence against infections and therefore plays an essential role in the maintenance of health. Tocotrienols (T3s), the lesser known isomers of vitamin E, possess many biological properties and have been recognized as immunomodulators. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the in vivo supplementation with a mixture of 87.1% δ- and 12.9% γ-T3s extract from seeds of Bixa orellana, (T3s) could be effective in increasing the effect of daptomycin (DAP) in a mouse model of wound infection due to MRSA. Bacteria were inoculated onto full-thickness wound on the dorsal side of BALB/c mice at 5 × 106 CFU per mouse. Mice were randomized into five groups: an uninfected group, an infected-untreated group, a T3s-pretreated group with no antibiotics given after challenge, a T3s-pretreated group plus DAP given after challenge, a group only given DAP after challenge. Main outcome measures were: bacterial load on the wounds, analysis of Natural Killer (NK) cytotoxicity, immunological phenotype and markers of tissue repair. Our results showed that bacterial load in wounds from mice receiving T3s or DAP alone was 1- or 3-log10 lower, respectively, compared with the infected-untreated group. T3s plus daptomycin showed the highest efficacy, achieving a 4-log10 decrease in bacterial load. This higher antimicrobial effect was associated with increased levels of NK cytotoxicity and markers of wound repair. These data suggest that treatment with T3s may be useful for the management of infected wounds as immune adjuvants in combination with DAP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Chloramphenicol encapsulated in poly-ε-caprolactone–pluronic composite: nanoparticles for treatment of MRSA-infected burn wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Sanjeeb; Devi, Banasmita; Kandimalla, Raghuram; Sharma, Kaustav Kalyan; Sharma, Arup; Kalita, Kasturi; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Kotoky, Jibon

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection has increased precipitously over the past several decades, with far-reaching health care and societal costs. MRSA infections in the context of burn wounds lead to invasive disease that could potentially cause mortality. Chloramphenicol is a well-known broad-spectrum bacteriostatic antibiotic that has been used since 1949, but due to its hydrophobicity, poor penetration in skin, fast degradation, and toxicity, its application has been hindered. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that old antibiotics such as chloramphenicol remained active against a large number of currently prevalent resistant bacterial isolates due to their low-level use in the past. Recently, the novel nanoparticulate drug-delivery system has been used and reported to be exceptionally useful for topical therapeutics, due to its distinctive physical characteristics such as a high surface-to-volume ratio and minuscule size. It helps to achieve better hydrophilicity, bioavailability, and controlled delivery with enhanced therapeutic index, which has resulted in decreased toxicity levels compared to the crude drug. Here, we report a novel chloramphenicol loaded with poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-pluronic composite nanoparticles (CAM-PCL-P NPs), physicochemical characterizations, and its bioactivity evaluation in a MRSA-infected burn-wound animal model. CAM-PCL-P NPs could encapsulate 98.3% of the drug in the nanoparticles and release 81% of the encapsulated drug over 36 days with a time to 50% drug release of 72 hours (51%). Nanoparticle suspensions maintained the initial properties with respect to size and encapsulation efficiency, even after 6 months of storage at 4°C and 25°C, respectively (P>0.05). Significant reduction in the level of toxicity was observed for CAM-PCL-P NPs compared with that of free drug as confirmed from hemolytic activity against human blood erythrocytes and cytotoxicity assay against an MCF-7

  20. Chloramphenicol encapsulated in poly-ε-caprolactone-pluronic composite: nanoparticles for treatment of MRSA-infected burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Sanjeeb; Devi, Banasmita; Kandimalla, Raghuram; Sharma, Kaustav Kalyan; Sharma, Arup; Kalita, Kasturi; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Kotoky, Jibon

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection has increased precipitously over the past several decades, with far-reaching health care and societal costs. MRSA infections in the context of burn wounds lead to invasive disease that could potentially cause mortality. Chloramphenicol is a well-known broad-spectrum bacteriostatic antibiotic that has been used since 1949, but due to its hydrophobicity, poor penetration in skin, fast degradation, and toxicity, its application has been hindered. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that old antibiotics such as chloramphenicol remained active against a large number of currently prevalent resistant bacterial isolates due to their low-level use in the past. Recently, the novel nanoparticulate drug-delivery system has been used and reported to be exceptionally useful for topical therapeutics, due to its distinctive physical characteristics such as a high surface-to-volume ratio and minuscule size. It helps to achieve better hydrophilicity, bioavailability, and controlled delivery with enhanced therapeutic index, which has resulted in decreased toxicity levels compared to the crude drug. Here, we report a novel chloramphenicol loaded with poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-pluronic composite nanoparticles (CAM-PCL-P NPs), physicochemical characterizations, and its bioactivity evaluation in a MRSA-infected burn-wound animal model. CAM-PCL-P NPs could encapsulate 98.3% of the drug in the nanoparticles and release 81% of the encapsulated drug over 36 days with a time to 50% drug release of 72 hours (51%). Nanoparticle suspensions maintained the initial properties with respect to size and encapsulation efficiency, even after 6 months of storage at 4°C and 25°C, respectively (P>0.05). Significant reduction in the level of toxicity was observed for CAM-PCL-P NPs compared with that of free drug as confirmed from hemolytic activity against human blood erythrocytes and cytotoxicity assay against an MCF-7

  1. Use of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of neonatal and pediatric wounds: a retrospective examination of clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharestani, Mona Mylene

    2007-06-01

    The clinical effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy for the management of acute and chronic wounds is well documented in the adult population but information regarding its use in the pediatric population is limited. A retrospective, descriptive study was conducted to examine the clinical outcomes of using negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of pediatric wounds. The medical records of 24 consecutive pediatric patients receiving negative pressure wound therapy were reviewed. Demographic data, wound etiology, time to closure, closure method, duration of negative pressure wound therapy, complications, dressing change frequency, dressing type used, and pressure settings were analyzed. All categorical variables in the dataset were summarized using frequency (count and percentages) and all continuous variables were summarized using median (minimum, maximum). The 24 pediatric patients (mean age 8.5 years [range 14 days to 18 years old]) had 24 wounds - 12 (50%) were infected at baseline. Sixteen patients had hypoalbuminemia and six had exposed hardware and bone in their wounds. Twenty-two wounds reached full closure in a median time of 10 days (range 2 to 45) following negative pressure wound therapy and flap closure (11), split-thickness skin graft (three), secondary (four), and primary (four) closure. Pressures used in this population ranged from 50 to 125 mm Hg and most wounds were covered with reticulated polyurethane foam. One patient developed a fistula during the course of negative pressure wound therapy. When coupled with appropriate systemic antibiotics, surgical debridement, and medical and nutritional optimization, in this population negative pressure wound therapy resulted in rapid granulation tissue and 92% successful wound closure. Future neonatal and pediatric negative pressure wound therapy usage registries and prospective studies are needed to provide a strong evidence base from which treatment decisions can be made in the management

  2. Degree of the hazards of silver-containing dressings on MRSA-infected wounds in Sprague-Dawley and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Eui Dong; Yoon, Su Ah; Oh, Seong Rok; Choi, Young Suk; Lee, Young Koo

    2015-04-01

    Silver-containing dressings are commonly used on healing wounds, including diabetic ulcers. Some studies have shown that dressing materials with silver have negative effects on wound healing, specifically, that the wound healing process is inhibited by deposited silver. Therefore, the authors treated wounds infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats with silver dressings to evaluate the risks of silver. The study used 54 SD rats and 54 STZ-induced diabetic rats. Full-thickness skin defects were created in all animals and then infected with MRSA. The rats were divided into 6 groups according to the dressing materials: nanocrystalline silver (Ac) (ACTICOAT, Smith and Nephew Healthcare, Hull, UK), silver carboxymethylcellulose (Aq) (AQUACEL Ag, ConvaTec, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Skillman, NJ), silver sulfadiazine (M) (Medifoam Silver, Biopol Global Co, Ltd, Seoul, Korea), nanocrystalline silver (P) (PolyMem Silver, Ferris Mfg Corp, Fort Worth, TX), Ilvadon cream (I) (Ildong Pharaceutical Co, Ltd, Seoul, Korea), and 10% povidone iodine (B) (Betadine, Sung Kwang Pharmaceutical Co Ltd, Gyeonggi-Do, Korea) as a control agent. Blood was collected from all animals to measure the hematological effects. The skin, spleen, liver, and kidneys of each rat were biopsied and used to make paraffin sections in which the silver deposition was measured using energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Fifteen days after wounding, only the Ac, P, and I groups differed significantly (P wounds were insignificant.

  3. Epidermal skin grafting in patients with complex wounds: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A

    2016-03-01

    Complex wounds are often difficult to close and sometimes require a split-thickness skin graft (STSG). However, epidermal skin grafts, which contain only an epidermal layer of skin, are a viable option for wound coverage in these challenging wounds. We report our experience using an automated epidermal harvesting tool to harvest epidermal skin grafts for the treatment of complex wounds. Epidermal skin grafts were harvested from the patient's thigh, which was first washed with isopropyl alcohol. After harvesting, they were transferred to the recipient site using a film dressing. A bolster dressing using gauze and a self-adherent wrap held the grafts in place. We selected 34 patients with wounds that had been present from several weeks to over a year. Prior treatments, included skin substitutes, alginate dressings, Unna Boot, and collagen dressings. There were 17 female and 17 male patients with a mean age of 67.1 years (range: 37-103). Wound types were: traumatic wounds, diabetic foot ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, pressure ulcers, and surgical wounds. Patient comorbidities included hypertension, diabetes, congestive heart failure, and osteoarthritis. Mean epithelialisation rate at the recipient site was 7.0 weeks (range: 1-35 weeks). Wound complications included drainage, hypergranulation, and oedema. At follow-up 82.4% (28/34) of wounds were healed, 2.9% (1/34) wounds showed improved healing, 11.8% (4/34) of wounds did not heal, and 2.9% (1/34) were lost to follow-up. All donor sites healed without complications. In our cohort, use of epidermal skin grafts in conjunction with bolster dressings resulted in full closure or wound improvement of a majority of patients. Epidermal grafting provides another treatment option to physicians when only the epidermal layer is needed. Dr. Bhatia is a consultant for KCI, an Acelity company.

  4. Persistent Hepatitis A infection: case report | Ngunga | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Hepatitis A viral infection resolves completely within six months in all patients infected. The case presented is a rare one that took fifteen months to resolve from hepatitis A viral infection.

  5. Four Human Cases of Diphyllobothrium latum Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee-Jung; Lee, Junghye

    2012-01-01

    Diphyllobothrium latum infections in 4 young Korean men detected from 2008 to 2012 are presented. Three were diagnosed based on spontaneously discharged strobila of the adult worm in their feces, and 1 case was diagnosed by finding the worm at colonoscopy examination in a local clinic. The morphologic characteristics of the gravid proglottid and eggs were consistent with D. latum. All patients were treated with praziquantel 15 mg/kg, and follow-up stool examinations were done at 2 months after the medication. The main clinical complaints were intermittent gastrointestinal troubles such as indigestion, abdominal distension, and spontaneous discharge of tapeworm's segments in their feces. The most probable source of infection was the flesh of salmon or trout according to a patient's past history. These are the 45th to 48th recorded cases diagnosed by the adult worm in the Republic of Korea since 1971. PMID:22711926

  6. Immune Modulating Topical S100A8/A9 Inhibits Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Mitigates Biofilm Infection in Chronic Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Trøstrup

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm maintains and perturbs local host defense, hindering timely wound healing. Previously, we showed that P. aeruginosa suppressed S100A8/A9 of the murine innate host defense. We assessed the potential antimicrobial effect of S100A8/A9 on biofilm-infected wounds in a murine model and P. aeruginosa growth in vitro. Seventy-six mice, inflicted with a full-thickness burn wound were challenged subcutaneously (s.c. by 106 colony-forming units (CFUs of P. aeruginosa biofilm. Mice were subsequently randomized into two treatment groups, one group receiving recombinant murine S100A8/A9 and a group of vehicle controls (phosphate-buffered saline, PBS all treated with s.c. injections daily for up to five days. Wounds were analyzed for quantitative bacteriology and contents of key inflammatory markers. Count of blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes was included. S100A8/A9-treatment ameliorated wound infection, as evaluated by quantitative bacteriology (p ≤ 0.05. In vitro, growth of P. aeruginosa was inhibited dose-dependently by S100A8/A9 in concentrations from 5 to 40 μg/mL, as determined by optical density-measurement (OD-measurement and quantitative bacteriology. Treatment slightly augmented key inflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α, but dampened interferon-γ (IFN-γ levels and blood polymorphonuclear count. In conclusion, topical S100A8/A9 displays remarkable novel immune stimulatory and anti-infective properties in vivo and in vitro. Importantly, treatment by S100A8/A9 provides local infection control. Implications for a role as adjunctive treatment in healing of chronic biofilm-infected wounds are discussed.

  7. Immune Modulating Topical S100A8/A9 Inhibits Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Mitigates Biofilm Infection in Chronic Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trøstrup, Hannah; Lerche, Christian Johann; Christophersen, Lars; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm maintains and perturbs local host defense, hindering timely wound healing. Previously, we showed that P. aeruginosa suppressed S100A8/A9 of the murine innate host defense. We assessed the potential antimicrobial effect of S100A8/A9 on biofilm-infected wounds in a murine model and P. aeruginosa growth in vitro. Seventy-six mice, inflicted with a full-thickness burn wound were challenged subcutaneously (s.c.) by 106 colony-forming units (CFUs) of P. aeruginosa biofilm. Mice were subsequently randomized into two treatment groups, one group receiving recombinant murine S100A8/A9 and a group of vehicle controls (phosphate-buffered saline, PBS) all treated with s.c. injections daily for up to five days. Wounds were analyzed for quantitative bacteriology and contents of key inflammatory markers. Count of blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes was included. S100A8/A9-treatment ameliorated wound infection, as evaluated by quantitative bacteriology (p ≤ 0.05). In vitro, growth of P. aeruginosa was inhibited dose-dependently by S100A8/A9 in concentrations from 5 to 40 μg/mL, as determined by optical density-measurement (OD-measurement) and quantitative bacteriology. Treatment slightly augmented key inflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), but dampened interferon-γ (IFN-γ) levels and blood polymorphonuclear count. In conclusion, topical S100A8/A9 displays remarkable novel immune stimulatory and anti-infective properties in vivo and in vitro. Importantly, treatment by S100A8/A9 provides local infection control. Implications for a role as adjunctive treatment in healing of chronic biofilm-infected wounds are discussed. PMID:28672877

  8. Risk factors for HIV infection among circumcised men in Uganda: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ediau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Male circumcision (MC reduces the risk of HIV infection. However, the risk reduction effect of MC can be modified by type of circumcision (medical, traditional and religious and sexual risk behaviours post-circumcision. Understanding the risk behaviours associated with HIV infection among circumcised men (regardless of form of circumcision is critical to the design of comprehensive risk reduction interventions. This study assessed risk factors for HIV infection among men circumcised through various circumcision approaches. Methods: This was a case-control study which enrolled 155 cases (HIV-infected and 155 controls (HIV-uninfected, all of whom were men aged 18–35 years presenting at the AIDS Information Center for HIV testing and care. The outcome variable was HIV sero-status. Using SPSS version 17, multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors independently associated with HIV infection. Results: Overall, 83.9% among cases and 56.8% among controls were traditionally circumcised; 7.7% of cases and 21.3% of controls were religiously circumcised while 8.4% of cases and 21.9% of controls were medically circumcised. A higher proportion of cases than controls reported resuming sexual intercourse before complete wound healing (36.9% vs. 14.1%; p18 years (AOR: 5.0, CI: 2.4–10.2; resuming sexual intercourse before wound healing (AOR: 3.4, CI: 1.6–7.3; inconsistent use of condoms (AOR: 2.7, CI: 1.5–5.1; and having sexual intercourse under the influence of peers (AOR: 2.9, CI: 1.5–5.5. Men who had religious circumcision were less likely to have HIV infection (AOR: 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2–0.9 than the traditionally circumcised but there was no statistically significant difference between those who were traditionally circumcised and those who were medically circumcised (AOR: 0.40, 95% CI: 0.1–1.1. Conclusions: Being circumcised at adulthood, resumption of sexual intercourse before wound healing, inconsistent

  9. Surgical wound morbidity in an austere surgical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucha, Paul A; Wallace, Douglas; Pasque, Charles; Brickhouse, Neal; Olsen, David; Styk, Stan; Dortch, Myra; Beckman, William A

    2010-05-01

    Surgical wound morbidity was analyzed for a U.S. military field hospital deployed to the Republic of Haiti in support of Operation New Horizons 1998. The purpose of the analysis was to determine whether procedures performed in the field hospital had greater infectious risks as a result of the environment compared with historical reports for traditional hospital or clinic settings. Acceptable historical infection rates of 1.5% for clean surgical cases, 7.7% for clean contaminated cases, 15.2% for contaminated cases, and 40% for dirty cases have been noted. There were 827 operations performed during a 6-month period, with the majority of patients assigned American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status Classification class I or II. The distribution of these cases was: 72% clean cases, 5% clean contaminated cases, 4% contaminated cases, and 19% dirty cases. The overall wound complication rate was 3.6%, which included 5 wound infections, 11 wound hematomas, 8 superficial wound separations, and 6 seromas. The infectious morbidity for clean cases, the index for evaluation of infectious complications, was 0.8%, well within the accepted standards. There were two major complications that required a return to the operating room: a wound dehiscence with infection in an orchiectomy and a postoperative hematoma with airway compromise in a subtotal thyroidectomy. There were no surgical mortalities. The infectious wound morbidity for operations performed in the field hospital environment was found to be equivalent to that described for the fixed hospital or clinic settings. No special precautions were necessary to ensure a low infection rate. The safety for patients undergoing elective surgical procedures has been established. Further training using these types of facilities should not be limited based on concerns for surgical wound morbidity.

  10. Vibrio vulnificus infection in São Paulo, Brazil: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita Elmor de Araujo

    Full Text Available Non cholera Vibrio may cause conjunctivitis, wound infection, gastroenteritis and serious sepsis. Transmission to men is through contact with skin, mucosa or wounds exposed to marine water, and consumption of certain barely cooked or raw seafood, more frequently in the summer. This is one of the first cases of severe infection related to Vibrio vulnificus described in Brazil. The patient was an old man, who ingested seafood in Guarujá, a seashore city near São Paulo, 3 days before hospitalization. He was admitted to the emergency room in an ill state with septic shock. On 2 sets of blood culture a highly virulent microorganism was isolated, Vibrio vulnificus, which leads to sepsis and frequently to death in susceptible patients. The objective of this report was to use this case to discuss clinical aspects, microbiological diagnosis and treatment of the infection caused by this agent, besides the review of epidemiology, associated risk factors and prevention before consuming or getting in contact with seafood, especially in patients with greater susceptibility to this kind of infection.

  11. The Efficacy of Continuous Negative Pressure and Irrigation Treatment Inside the Wound by a Closed System in Reconstruction of All Layers of the Cranium Accompanying Infection and Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Mai; Rikimaru, Hideaki; Migita, Hisashi; Sakata, Kensuke; Kiyokawa, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    There have been many reports to date with respect to treatments on reconstruction of the cranium without accompanying infections following trauma and tumor resection. The morality is, however, high in patients observed with generation of cranial bone defect of all layers accompanying infection and cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and moreover, there are barely any reports on such cases because of the reconstruction thereof being very difficult. In this study, the authors were able to cure such 2 cases by carrying out continuous negative pressure and irrigation treatment inside the wound by a closed system following transplant of free latissimus dorsi muscle flap. This method is believed to be very effective for cranial bone defect of all layers accompanying infection and cerebrospinal fluid leakage, in which treatment was determined to be very difficult.

  12. Repair of Staphylococcus aureus-infected wound with gene-modified C3H10T1/2 cells expressing BPI-BD3 fusion antibiotic peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-ran ZHANG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the antibacterial and tissue reparative effect of BPI-BD3 gene-modified mesenchymal stem cells in a mouse model of wound infection. Methods C3H10T1/2 cells were transfected with recombinant adenovirus vector pAdxsi-BPI-BD3, the expression of BPI-BD3 fusion protein was verified by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Excision wound with a diameter of 1cm was inoculated with Staphylococcus aureuswas made on the back of 30 mice. The mice were randomly divided into 3 groups (10 each. Mice in group T were injected with BPI-BD3 gene-modified C3H10T1/2 cells through caudal vein, those in group C were injected with unmodified C3H10T1/2 cells, and in group N were injected with PBS as control. The wound repair result was evaluated by estimation of the percentage of remaining wound area and the amount of wound bacteria under the scar, followed by observation of pathological changes. Inflammatory reactions of the wounds were assessed accordingly. Results The amount of bacteria under the scar was less in group T than in the other two groups (P<0.05. It was also found that the wound healing process was faster in group T than in group C and group N. Pathological observation showed that the inflammatory reaction in group T was also significantly milder than in the other two groups. Conclusion BPI-BD3 gene-modified mesenchymal stem cells may enhance wound repair by controlling infection and promoting tissue regeneration, thus it may be promising in clinical application. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.09.07

  13. Hidradenitis Suppurativa: Combined Treatment with Dermal Template, Skin Graft and Negative Pressure Wound Therapy, a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Mata Ribeiro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hidrosadenitis supurativa is a chronic inflammatory disease with great physical and psychological impact. Although conservative treatments may be effective in mild forms of the disease, extensive surgical resection and reconstruction are necessary in more severe forms of the disease. The purpose of this paper is to describe our two-stage reconstructive procedure regarding this kind of disease. We present a clinical case of a patient with severe, bilateral axillary hidrosadenitis. In the first surgical step we excised the lesions and applied the artificial dermis secured with negative pressure wound therapy. In the second step we used a split thickness skin graft to close the wound and again applied negative pressure wound therapy. The graft take was very good, without complications. The cosmetic outcome is acceptable and shoulder mobility was not compromised. No recurrence was detected (nine months follow up.

  14. Open Wound Drainage Versus Wound Excision on the Modern Battlefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-01

    penicillin coverage to eliminate the threat of invasive bacteremia by hemolytic streptococcus , presumably produced conditions that insured unimpeded...pyemia, septicemia and erysipelas remained major causes of death in the war wounded (10). Friedrich originated the idea of excising the bacteria...hemolytic streptococcus in 10 to 15% of cases, but after a week in the hospital over 90% of w-unds were infected with this bacteria (12,13), and

  15. A Gustilo type IIIB open forearm fracture treated by negative pressure wound therapy and locking compression plates: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Naohide; Mae, Takao; Hotokezaka, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Kosuke; Matsushita, Akinobu; Miake, Go; Kuchiishi, Rintaro; Noguchi, Yasuo

    2011-10-01

    A 91-year-old female sustained injuries to her left forearm while walking across a crosswalk. X-rays showed left radial shaft and ulna shaft fractures, and the injury was a type IIIB open fracture. On the day of admission, irrigation and debridement of the open wound, and temporary fixation of the radius and ulna using an external fixator and a Kirschner wire were peformed. Six days after the surgery, we used negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) using the V.A.C.ATS system for the open wound. Thirteen days after the first surgery, definitive fixation was performed by using locking compression plates, and full thickness skin grafting was undertaken for the open wound. NPWT is a treatment that accelerates the wound healing process through the delivery of continuous subatmospheric pressure within a closed environment. In our case, we could reduce the healing period of the soft tissue and could convert to the definitive fixation in a timely fashion. NPWT is thought to be a useful adjunct in the management of the soft tissues of open fractures.

  16. Comparison between Three Rare Cases of Co‑Infection with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Co‑infection in immunocompetent patients is rare. Though co‑infection with dengue and leptospira cases is increasingly reported, a co‑infection of this combination along with hepatitis E is rarely thought of. Until date only two case of triple co‑infection have been reported world‑wide. Here, we are reporting a patient with ...

  17. Complex wounds Feridas complexas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Castro Ferreira

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex wound is the term used more recently to group those well-known difficult wounds, either chronic or acute, that challenge medical and nursing teams. They defy cure using conventional and simple "dressings" therapy and currently have a major socioeconomic impact. The purpose of this review is to bring these wounds to the attention of the health-care community, suggesting that they should be treated by multidisciplinary teams in specialized hospital centers. In most cases, surgical treatment is unavoidable, because the extent of skin and subcutaneous tissue loss requires reconstruction with grafts and flaps. New technologies, such as the negative pressure device, should be introduced. A brief review is provided of the major groups of complex wounds-diabetic wounds, pressure sores, chronic venous ulcers, post-infection soft-tissue gangrenes, and ulcers resulting from vasculitis.Ferida complexa é uma nova definição para identificar aquelas feridas crônicas e algumas agudas já bem conhecidas e que desafiam equipes médicas e de enfermagem. São difíceis de serem resolvidas usando tratamentos convencionais e simples curativos. Têm atualmente grande impacto sócio-econômico. Esta revisão procura atrair atenção da comunidade de profissionais de saúde para estas feridas, sugerindo que devam ser tratadas por equipe multidisciplinar em centro hospitalar especializado. Na maioria dos casos o tratamento cirúrgico deve ser indicado, uma vez que a perda de pele e tecido subcutâneo é extensa, necessitando de reconstrução com enxertos e retalhos. Nova tecnologia, como uso da terapia por pressão negativa foi introduzido. Breves comentários sobre os principais grupos de feridas complexas: pé diabético, úlceras por pressão, úlceras venosas, síndrome de Fournier e vasculites.

  18. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with RLP068 kills methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and improves wound healing in a mouse model of infected skin abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, Daniela; Dai, Tianhong; Huang, Liyi; Fantetti, Lia; Roncucci, Gabrio; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an alternative treatment for infections that can kill drug resistant bacteria without damaging host-tissue. In this study we used bioluminescent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, in a mouse skin abrasion model, to investigate the effect of PDT on bacterial inactivation and wound healing. RLP068/Cl, a tetracationic Zn(II)phthalocyanine derivative and toluidine blue (TBO) were used. The light-dose response of PDT to kill bacteria in vivo and the possible recurrence in the days post-treatment were monitored by real-time bioluminescence imaging, and wound healing by digital photography. The results showed PDT with RLP068/Cl (but not TBO) was able to kill bacteria, to inhibit bacterial re-growth after the treatment and to significantly accelerate the wound healing process. Successive bioluminescence images of a representative mouse skin scratch model infected with 108 CFU MRSA. PMID:22987338

  19. Effects of the topical application of an ethyl acetate fraction from Vernonia scorpioides on excisional wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Regina Orofino Kreuger

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the healing process on excisional wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus in rats, treated with 50 µL of ethyl acetate III from Vernonia scorpioides (Lam. Pers., Asteraceae, rifamycin diethylamide B 25 mg, or saline. The lesions were measured daily and after seven days were surgically removed and histologically processed. The results indicate a favorable action of the EAIII, demonstrated by the increased wound contraction, smaller area of necrotic tissue, good development of granulation tissue, extensive extracellular matrix deposition and epithelial regeneration. This sub-fraction was phytochemically investigated in parallel studies, revealing the presence of sesquiterpene lactones (glaucolides and hirsutinolides such as diacethylpiptocarphol and related hirsutinolides, flavonoids and cinnamic acid derivatives and also a new polyacetylene, which have been previously published. Results support the effectiveness of V. scorpioides antimicrobial activity in infected wound healing in rats.

  20. Surgical site infection in cesarean sections with the use of a plastic sheath wound retractor compared to the traditional self-retaining metal retractor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkson, Larry; Siedentopf, Jan-Peter; Weichert, Alexander; Henrich, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    A cesarean section rate of up to 19.4% is reported worldwide. Surgical site infection occurs with rates of up to 13.5%. Plastic-sheath wound retractors show reduced rates of surgical site infections in abdominal surgery. There is limited evidence in women having cesarean sections. This study evaluates the use of the Alexis(®) O C-Section Retractor in the prevention of surgical site infection in patients undergoing their first planned cesarean section compared to the traditional Collins self-retaining metal retractor. A single center, prospective, randomized, controlled, observational trial. The primary outcome is surgical site infection as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The secondary outcomes included intraoperative surgical parameters, postoperative pain scores and the short and long-term satisfaction with wound healing. From October 2013 to December 2015 at the Charité University Hospital, Berlin. 98 patients to the Alexis(®) O C-Section Retractor group and 100 to the traditional Collins self-retaining metal retractor group. A statistically significant reduction in the rate of surgical site infections, when the Alexis(®) O C-Section Retractor was used for wound retraction compared to the traditional Collins metal self-retaining wound retractor, 1% vs. 8% (RR 7.84, 95% CI (2.45-70.71) p=0.035). The use of plastic-sheath wound retractors compared to the traditional self-retaining metal retractor in low risk women, having the first cesarean section is associated with a significantly reduced risk of surgical site infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    whether BMPs maintain their osteoinductive capability in infected human wounds. The authors are aware of only one series describing the use of BMP in an...et al. Osteogenic protein-1 induces bone formation in the presence of bacterial infection in a rat intramuscular osteoinduction model. J Orthop Trauma

  2. Cave canem: HBO₂ therapy efficacy on Capnocytophaga canimorsus infections: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmo, Mariano; Villani, Romolo; Di Minno, Raffaele Maria; Noschese, Giuseppe; Paganini, Matteo; Quartesan, Silvia; Rizzato, Alex; Bosco, Gerardo

    2017-01-01

    Dog bites are a frequent injury, but the incidence and type of lesions vary across countries. Although only few patients develop complications, the treatment of advanced injuries has a considerable medical, social and economic impact. A frequently isolated pathogen in dog bite wounds is Capnocytophaga canimorsus, a bacterium that can cause sepsis or meningitis. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO₂) therapy has been shown to be useful in treating anaerobic infections, most likely because it creates an inhospitable environment for the bacterium and enhances the patient's immune response. We present a case series of C. canimorsus infections treated with HBO₂ in adjunction to antibiotic therapy. Furthermore, we tested the in vitro activity of ceftaroline against C. canimorsus, alone and in association with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. We included nine (9) patients admitted to the surgery department of "A. Cardarelli" Hospital (Naples) after dog bite, from 2010 to 2016. All were initially treated with antibiotics and required transfer to the intensive care unit due to worsening conditions. C. canimorsus was isolated from wounds, and HBO₂ therapy was administered in adjunction to antibiotics, until clinical improvement and microbiological test negativity. We tested the activity of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in adjunction to ceftaroline on cultured plates with C. canimorsus versus ceftaroline alone. Minimal inhibitory concentration was evaluated. Our findings confirm the utility of HBO₂ therapy after biting injuries. Indeed, increased oxygen supply to the wound (as well as in vitro) may be toxic for bacteria, can improve healing and may improve the effectiveness of antibiotics.

  3. Predictive ability of the Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system after first-time lower extremity revascularizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Darling (Jeremy); J.C. McCallum (John C.); P.A. Soden (Peter A.); Guzman, R.J. (Raul J.); Wyers, M.C. (Mark C.); Hamdan, A.D. (Allen D.); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence); M.L. Schermerhorn (Marc)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Objective:__ The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Wound, Ischemia and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system was proposed to predict 1-year amputation risk and potential benefit from revascularization. Our goal was to evaluate the predictive ability of this scale in a

  4. Predictive ability of the Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system following infrapopliteal endovascular interventions for critical limb ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Darling (Jeremy); J.C. McCallum (John C.); P.A. Soden (Peter A.); Meng, Y. (Yifan); Wyers, M.C. (Mark C.); Hamdan, A.D. (Allen D.); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence); M.L. Schermerhorn (Marc)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Lower Extremity Guidelines Committee has composed a new threatened lower extremity classification system that reflects the three major factors that impact amputation risk and clinical management: Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI).

  5. Wound Infections Following Implant removal below the knee: the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis; the WIFI-trial, a multi-centre randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backes, Manouk; Dingemans, Siem A.; Schep, Niels W. L.; Bloemers, Frank W.; van Dijkman, Bart; Garssen, Frank P.; Haverlag, Robert; Hoogendoorn, Jochem M.; Joosse, Pieter; Mirck, Boj; Postma, Victor; Ritchie, Ewan; Roerdink, W. Herbert; Sintenie, Jan Bernard; Soesman, Nicolaj M. R.; Sosef, Nico L.; Twigt, Bas A.; van Veen, Ruben N.; van der Veen, Alexander H.; van Velde, Romuald; Vos, Dagmar I.; de Vries, Mark R.; Winkelhagen, Jasper; Goslings, J. Carel; Schepers, Tim

    2015-01-01

    In the Netherlands about 18,000 procedures with implant removal are performed annually following open or closed reduction and fixation of fractures, of which 30-80% concern the foot, ankle and lower leg region. For clean surgical procedures, the rate of postoperative wound infections (POWI) should

  6. Wound Infections Following Implant removal below the knee: the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis; the WIFI-trial, a multi-centre randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backes, M.; Dingemans, S.A.; Schep, N.W.; Bloemers, F.W.; Van, D.B.; Garssen, F.P.; Haverlag, R.; Hoogendoorn, J.M.; Joosse, P.; Mirck, B.; Postma, V.; Ritchie, E.; Roerdink, W.H.; Sintenie, J.B.; Soesman, N.M.; Sosef, N.L.; Twigt, B.A.; Van Veen, R.N.; van der Veen, A.H.; Van, V.R.; Vos, D.I.; de Vries, M.R.; Winkelhagen, J.; Goslings, J.C.; Schepers, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands about 18,000 procedures with implant removal are performed annually following open or closed reduction and fixation of fractures, of which 30-80% concern the foot, ankle and lower leg region. For clean surgical procedures, the rate of postoperative wound infections

  7. Ascorbic acid deficiency impairs wound healing in surgical patients: Four case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bikker

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: AA deficiency is not uncommon in the hospital population, especially in those at risk. Treating deficient patients with AA leads to swift improvement of the wound healing process post-surgery, thereby reducing the costs of extensive wound treatment and extended stay in hospital.

  8. The prevalence, aetiology and management of wounds in a community care area in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Skerritt, Louise

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to establish the prevalence and aetiology of wounds, allowing an insight into the management of wound care, the use of dressings and the nursing time allocated to the provision of wound care in a community setting in Ireland. A cross-sectional survey was used, with data collected on all clients in the community who received treatment from public health nurses or community registered general nurses for wound care over a 1-week period in April 2013. A 98.9% response rate was realised, and 188 people were identified as having wounds, equating to a crude prevalence of 5% of the active community nursing caseload. A total of 60% (n=112) had leg ulcers, 22% (n=42) had pressure ulcers, 16% (n=30) had an acute wound (surgical or traumatic wounds), 1% (n=2) had a diabetic foot wound and a further 1% (n=2) had wounds of other aetiologies. The mean duration of wounds was 5.41 months. A total of 18% of wounds were identified as infected; however, 60% (n=112) of wounds had antimicrobial products in use as either a primary or secondary dressing. The study established that there is a significant prevalence of wounds in this community care area. There was absence of a clinical diagnosis in many cases, and evidence of inappropriate dressing use, risking an increase in costs and a decrease in good clinical outcomes. It also highlighted the importance of ongoing education and auditing in the provision of wound care.

  9. The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system predicts wound healing but not major amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcers treated in a multidisciplinary setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Hicks, Caitlin W; Canner, Joseph K; Sherman, Ronald L; Hines, Kathryn F; Lum, Ying W; Perler, Bruce A; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2017-06-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) threatened limb classification has been shown to correlate well with risk of major amputation and time to wound healing in heterogeneous diabetic and nondiabetic populations. Major amputation continues to plague the most severe stage 4 WIfI patients, with 1-year amputation rates of 20% to 64%. Our aim was to determine the association between WIfI stage and wound healing and major amputation among patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated in a multidisciplinary setting. All patients presenting to our multidisciplinary DFU clinic from July 2012 to December 2015 were enrolled in a prospective database. Wound healing and major amputation were compared for patients stratified by WIfI classification. There were 217 DFU patients with 439 wounds (mean age, 58.3 ± 0.8 years; 58% male, 63% black) enrolled, including 28% WIfI stage 1, 11% stage 2, 33% stage 3, and 28% stage 4. Peripheral arterial disease and dialysis were more common in patients with advanced (stage 3 or 4) wounds (P ≤ .05). Demographics of the patients, socioeconomic status, and comorbidities were otherwise similar between groups. There was a significant increase in the number of active wounds per limb at presentation with increasing WIfI stage (stage 1, 1.1 ± 0.1; stage 4, 1.4 ± 0.1; P = .03). Mean wound area (stage 1, 2.6 ± 0.6 cm2; stage 4, 15.3 ± 2.8 cm2) and depth (stage 1, 0.2 ± 0.0 cm; stage 4, 0.8 ± 0.1 cm) also increased progressively with increasing wound stage (P amputations (stage 1, 18%; stage 4, 56%) and revascularizations (stage 1, 6%; stage 4, 55%) were more common with increasing WIfI stage (P amputation (P = .99). For stage 4 wounds, the mean wound healing time was 190 ± 17 days, and risk of major amputation at 1 year was 5.7% ± 3.2%. Among patients with DFU, the WIfI classification system correlated well with wound healing but was not associated with risk of major amputation

  10. Integrated Detection of Pathogens and Host Biomarkers for Wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaing, C

    2012-03-19

    The increasing incidence and complications arising from combat wounds has necessitated a reassessment of methods for effective treatment. Infection, excessive inflammation, and incidence of drug-resistant organisms all contribute toward negative outcomes for afflicted individuals. The organisms and host processes involved in wound progression, however, are incompletely understood. We therefore set out, using our unique technical resources, to construct a profile of combat wounds which did or did not successfully resolve. We employed the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array and identified a number of nosocomial pathogens present in wound samples. Some of these identities corresponded with bacterial isolates previously cultured, while others were not obtained via standard microbiology. Further, we optimized proteomics protocols for the identification of host biomarkers indicative of various stages in wound progression. In combination with our pathogen data, our biomarker discovery efforts will provide a profile corresponding to wound complications, and will assist significantly in treatment of these complex cases.

  11. Wound Assessment: Made Easy

    OpenAIRE

    Ousey, Karen; Cook, Leanne

    2012-01-01

    A structured approach to wound assessment is required to maintain a good standard of care. This involves a thorough patient assessment, which should be carried out by skilled and competent practitioners, adhering to local and national guidelines (Harding et al, 2008). Inappropriate or inaccurate assessment can lead to delayed wound healing, pain, increased risk of infection, inappropriate use of wound dressings and a reduction in the quality of life for patients.

  12. Infected paratracheal air cyst; A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Jou, Sung Shick; Kim, Young Tong; Han, Jong Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    An air-filled paratracheal cyst is a common radiological finding. It may be a congenital defect or an acquired lesion. 'Acquired paratracheal cyst' is the term given to the acquired abnormalities, which usually arise in adults. They result from a weakness of the tracheal wall, and they may be caused by trauma, infection, high pressure injuries, long lasting tracheostomy, and obstructive tracheal disease. Majority of the paratracheal air cysts are asymptomatic and are discovered incidentally on radiological images. Also, the management is primarily conservative treatment. Here, we report a case of an infected paratracheal air cyst on the right posterolateral wall of the trachea, which developed into an abscess and was visualized on follow-up multidetector computed tomography and was surgically removed due to persistent symptoms.

  13. In Vitro Osteoblast Model for Bone Wound Infections and Antimicrobial Therapy (Addendum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    recent study indicated that infection of Chlamydia pneumonia induced that maximum expression of proinflammatory IL8 (among other cytokines) at 72 hours...2011. Induction of proinflammatory cytokines in human osteoblastic cells by Chlamydia pneumoniae . Cytokine. Nov;56(2):450-7. APPENDIXES: None ...of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Infection of osteoblasts revealed that all 3 species

  14. Hesitation Wounds and Sharp Force Injuries in Forensic Pathology and Psychiatry: Multidisciplinary Review of the Literature and Study of Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakasi, Maria-Valeria; Nastoulis, Evangelos; Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Vasilikos, Epameinondas; Kyropoulos, Grigorios; Pavlidis, Pavlos

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to showcase the significant diagnostic value of hesitation wounds in terms of forensic, psychiatric, and medicolegal interest. A number of studies were reviewed to update and summarize the relevant literature on the incidence, distribution, character, and function of hesitation wounds as well as the sociodemographic variables and psychopathology of the inducers. This study also investigates their importance as a forensic criterion in the distinction between suicide and homicide as well as a psychiatric diagnostic tool in suicide prevention. In addition, the paper reports two new cases. Results conclude that there is equal incidence, but different distribution of hesitation wounds between genders. Furthermore, the low dispersion of hesitation wounds contrasts with the high dispersion of defense wounds. The inducers' psychopathology lies principally in Axis I disorders. Finally, there is a comprehensive analysis of non-suicidal self-injury and the role of self-wounding in suicide prevention. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  15. Multiple actions of Lucilia sericata larvae in hard-to-heal wounds: larval secretions contain molecules that accelerate wound healing, reduce chronic inflammation and inhibit bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Pritchard, David I; Nigam, Yamni; Jung, Willi; Nibbering, Peter H

    2013-12-01

    In Europe ≈15,000 patients receive larval therapy for wound treatment annually. Over the past few years, clinical studies have demonstrated the success of larvae of Lucilia sericata as debridement agents. This is based on a combination of physical and biochemical actions. Laboratory investigations have advanced our understanding of the biochemical mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of larval secretions, including removal of dead tissue, reduction of the bacterial burden, and promotion of tissue regeneration. The present article summarizes our current understanding of the microbiological, immunological, and wound healing actions of larval therapy, and the molecules involved in these beneficial effects. Future studies will focus on the isolation, identification, and (pre)clinical testing of the effective molecules of L. sericata larvae. These molecules may be candidates for the development of new agents for the treatment of several infectious and inflammatory diseases, including chronic wounds. © 2013 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Operative wound classification: an inaccurate measure of pediatric surgical morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Katherine W; Dalton, Brian G; Kurtz, Brendan; Keirsey, Michael C; Oyetunji, Tolulope A; St Peter, Shawn D

    2016-11-01

    Wound classification has catapulted to the forefront of surgical literature and quality care discussions. However, it has not been validated in laparoscopy or children. We analyzed pediatric infection rates based on wound classification and reviewed the most common noninfectious complications which could be a more appropriate measure for quality assessment. We performed a retrospective review of 800 patients from 2011 to 2014 undergoing common procedures at a tertiary pediatric hospital. Demographics, procedure, wound classification and complications were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Infection rates were in the expected low range for clean procedures. However, 5% of pyloromyotomy patients required readmission and 10% of circumcision patients developed penile adhesions; 2% required reoperation. Ostomy reversal, a clean contaminated case, had 17% wound infections, whereas acute appendicitis, a contaminated case had only a 4% infection rate. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (clean-contaminated or contaminated depending on inflammation) had 2% postoperative infections. Perforated appendicitis, a dirty procedure had an 18% infection rate, below the expected >27% for dirty cases in adults. Current wound classifications do not accurately approximate the risk of surgical site infections in children, particularly for laparoscopic procedures. It would be more appropriate to grade hospitals based on disease and procedure specific complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A case of lower respiratory tract infection caused by Neisseria weaveri and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagea, S; Bijoux, R; Corkill, J E; Al Rashidi, F; Hart, C A

    2002-02-01

    Neisseria weaveri (formerly CDC [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] group M-5 is part of the normal canine oral flora. Infections in humans are usually associated with dog bite wounds. Very rarely the organism has been isolated from sites other than wounds, or from deep seated infections. A 60-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of an acute exacerbation of his bronchiectasis. Gram stain of bronchial washings and expectorated sputum showed numerous polymorphs and Gram-negative bacilli. Routine bacterial culture yielded a heavy pure growth of a Gram-negative rod-shaped organism that was strongly oxidase and catalase positive, indole negative, non-motile and did not ferment carbohydrates. The organism was identified as N. weaveri by using 16S rRNA sequencing. The patient was treated with a 3 weeks course of ofloxacin and had a good response. Sputum culture after treatment yielded normal respiratory flora only. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of lower respiratory tract infection caused by N. weaveri. Copyright 2002 The British Infection Society.

  18. Symbiosis theory-directed green synthesis of silver nanoparticles and their application in infected wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Lu; Zeng, Pei; Zhang, Liping; Huang, Wenli; Wang, Hui; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized for the first time using an antibacterial endophytic fungus of Chinese medicinal herb Orchidantha chinensis, which has anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities. The AgNPs were analyzed by various characterization techniques to reveal their morphology, chemical composition, and stability. Also, the relationship between Chinese medicinal herbs, endophytic fungi, and the property of AgNPs was investigated for the first time. Interestingly, an experiment performed in this study revealed the proteins produced by the endophytic fungus to be capped on the nanoparticles, which led to an increase in the stability of spherical and polydispersed AgNPs with low aggregation for over 6 months. More importantly, further study demonstrated that the AgNPs possessed superior antibacterial activity and effectively promoted wound healing. Altogether, the biosynthesis of active AgNPs using the endophytic fungus from Chinese medicinal herb based on the symbiosis theory is simple, eco-friendly, and promising.

  19. Effect of triclosan-coated sutures on the incidence of surgical wound infection after lower limb revascularization surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtiainen, Johanna; Saimanen, Eija I T; Mäkinen, Kimmo T; Nykänen, Antti I; Venermo, Maarit A; Uurto, Ilkka T; Hakala, Tapio

    2012-10-01

    Surgical wound infection (SWI) is a common complication after peripheral vascular surgery. In a prospective study, triclosan-coated sutures were reported to decrease the incidence of surgical site infection after various surgical procedures. The aim of our study was to test the hypothesis that use of triclosan-coated sutures decreases the incidence of SWI after lower limb vascular surgery. This prospective, randomized, multicenter, double-blinded trial was conducted between July 2010 and January 2011 in five hospitals in Finland. We randomly allocated 276 patients undergoing lower limb revascularization surgery to a study (n = 139) or a control (n = 137) group. Surgical wounds in the study group were closed with triclosan-coated suture material, and wounds in the control group were closed with noncoated sutures. The main outcome measure was SWI. A surgical wound complication was considered to be an infection if there were bacteria isolated from the wound or if there were areas of localized redness, heat, swelling, and pain around the wound appearing within 30 days after the operative procedure. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the independent effect of triclosan-coated sutures on the incidence of SWI. Altogether, 61 (22.1 %) patients developed SWI. SWI occurred in 31 (22.3 %) patients in the study group and in 30 (21.9 %) patients in the control group (odds ratio 1.10, 95% confidence interval 0.61-2.01, p = 0.75.) The use of triclosan-coated sutures does not reduce the incidence of SWI after lower limb vascular surgery.

  20. Intervention for Postpartum Infections Following Caesarean Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-14

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

  1. Biobrane improves wound healing in burned children without increased risk of infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lal, S; Barrow, R E; Wolf, S E; Chinkes, D L; Hart, D W; Heggers, J P; Herndon, D N

    2000-01-01

    ...% TBSA with no indication of infection were seen at our hospital. Forty-one were assigned randomly to receive treatment with the skin substitute Biobrane and 48 to receive conservative treatment with topical antimicrobials and dressing...

  2. Punica granatum L. Hydrogel for Wound Care Treatment: From Case Study to Phytomedicine Standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Aline; Cabral, Patrik F G; Vieira, Felipe F M; Pinheiro, Deo A; Pereira, Carlos R; Santos, Wilson C; Machado, Thelma B

    2016-08-22

    The pharmacological activities of many Punica granatum L. components suggest a wide range of clinical applications for the prevention and treatment of diseases where chronic inflammation is believed to play an essential etiologic role. The current work reports a case study analyzing the effect produced by a magistral formulation of ethanolic extracts of Punica granatum peels on a non-healing chronic ulcer. The complete closure of the chronic ulcer that was initially not responsive to standard medical care was observed. A 2% (w/w) P. granatum peels ethanolic extract hydrogel-based formulation (PGHF) was standardized and subjected to physicochemical studies to establish the quality control parameters using, among others, assessment criteria such as optimum appearance, pH range, viscosity and hydrogel disintegration. The stability and quantitative chromatographic data was assessed in storage for six months under two temperature regimes. An efficient HPLC-DAD method was established distinguishing the biomarkers punicalin and punicalagin simultaneously in a single 8 min run. PGHF presented suitable sensorial and physicochemical performance, showing that punicalagin was not significantly affected by storage (p > 0.05). Formulations containing extracts with not less than 0.49% (w/w) total punicalagin might find good use in wound healing therapy.

  3. Punica granatum L. Hydrogel for Wound Care Treatment: From Case Study to Phytomedicine Standardization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Fleck

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacological activities of many Punica granatum L. components suggest a wide range of clinical applications for the prevention and treatment of diseases where chronic inflammation is believed to play an essential etiologic role. The current work reports a case study analyzing the effect produced by a magistral formulation of ethanolic extracts of Punica granatum peels on a non-healing chronic ulcer. The complete closure of the chronic ulcer that was initially not responsive to standard medical care was observed. A 2% (w/w P. granatum peels ethanolic extract hydrogel-based formulation (PGHF was standardized and subjected to physicochemical studies to establish the quality control parameters using, among others, assessment criteria such as optimum appearance, pH range, viscosity and hydrogel disintegration. The stability and quantitative chromatographic data was assessed in storage for six months under two temperature regimes. An efficient HPLC-DAD method was established distinguishing the biomarkers punicalin and punicalagin simultaneously in a single 8 min run. PGHF presented suitable sensorial and physicochemical performance, showing that punicalagin was not significantly affected by storage (p > 0.05. Formulations containing extracts with not less than 0.49% (w/w total punicalagin might find good use in wound healing therapy.

  4. A tangential gunshot wound to the head: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Hamad Issam; Hood, Brian; Bullock, M Ross

    2012-08-01

    Patients with tangential gunshot wounds (TGSWs) commonly present with a good Glasgow Coma Scale score and without a history of loss of consciousness. Typically, the bullet does not breach the skull, however, there is a considerable force directed into the brain, and these patients are best treated as sustaining a moderate-to-severe blunt head injury. These patients require observation and repeat imaging. Physicians should be aware of this entity as these patients can deteriorate in a delayed fashion. The authors present a case of a TGSW to the head in a neurologically intact patient. The initial post-injury computed tomography (CT) scan showed a very small subdural hematoma (SDH) with no overlying fracture of the skull. A delayed CT scan performed 4 h after arrival to the Emergency Department and 6 h after injury demonstrated an increase in size of the SDH, new traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, and bilateral cerebral contusions. Clinically, the patient showed worsening of her neurological examination. She underwent aggressive non-surgical treatment for increased intracranial pressure with almost complete recovery. Although patients with TGSWs are typically in good condition upon presentation, these injuries are not always trivial, and these patients should have, at minimum, a non-contrast brain CT scan to evaluate underlying damage to the brain and skull. In addition, a delayed CT scan and close observation on a neurosurgical service are indicated. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Antibiofilm and Antimicrobial Efficacy of DispersinB (registered trademark)-KSL-W Peptide-Based Wound Gel Against Chronic Wound Infection Associated Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-21

    Agents Chemother 52:2870–2881 31. Semlali A, Leung K-P, Curt S, Rouabhia M (2011) Antimicrobial decapeptide KSL-W attenuates Candida albicans virulence...limb ischemia. J Wound Care 17:145–155 8. Hong SY, Oh JE, Kwon MY, Choi MJ, Lee JH, Lee BL, Moon HM, Lee KH (1998) Identification and characterization of

  6. Effect of apple cider vinegar on the healing of experimentally–induced wounds infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    A. H. Alawi; T. S. Ali; S. Y. Al Dabbagh

    2008-01-01

    Standard wounds were made in the backs of 18 rabbits. The rabbits were then divided into 6 equal groups. Rabbits of group (1), constituted a control group and their wounds were treated with physiological saline solution. In group (2), the wounds were treated with Cefotaxime at a concentration of 500 mg. Wounds of the third, fourth, and fifth groups were treated with 5%, 3.75%, and 2.5% apple cider vinegar respectively. Wounds of the sixth groups of rabbits were treated with a combination of e...

  7. Antibacterial activity of 3,3',4'-Trihydroxyflavone from Justicia wynaadensis against diabetic wound and urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dsouza, Dorin; Nanjaiah, Lakshmidevi

    The present investigation was designed to study the effect of an active compound isolated from Justicia wynaadensis against multi drug resistant organisms (MDRO's) associated with diabetic patients. The drug resistant pathogens implicated in wound and urinary tract infection of diabetic patients were isolated and identified by molecular sequencing. Solvent-solvent fractionation of crude methanol extract produced hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol-water fraction, among which chloroform fraction was found to be potent when compared with other three fractions. Further, chloroform fraction was subjected to preparatory HPLC (High-Performance Liquid Chromatography), that produced four sub-fractions; chloroform HPLC fraction 1 (CHF1) through CHF4. Among the sub-fractions, CHF1 inhibited the pathogens effectively in comparison to other three sub-fractions. The purity of CHF1 was found to be >95%. Therefore, CHF1 was further characterized by NMR and FTIR analysis and based on the structure elucidated, the compound was found to be 3,3',4'-Trihydroxyflavone. The effective dose of this bioactive compound ranged from 32μg/mL to 1.2mg/mL. Thus, the present study shows that 3,3',4'-Trihydroxyflavone isolated from J. wynaadensis is an interesting biopharmaceutical agent and could be considered as a source of antimicrobial agent for the treatment of various infections and used as a template molecule for future drug development. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevention of bloodstream infections by photodynamic inactivation of multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn wounds

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    Hashimoto, M. C. E.; Prates, R. A.; Toffoli, D. J.; Courrol, L. C.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    Bloodstream infections are potentially life-threatening diseases. They can cause serious secondary infections, and may result in endocarditis, severe sepsis or toxic-shock syndrome. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and one of the most important etiological factors responsible for nosocomial infections, mainly in immuno-compromissed hosts, characteristic of patients with severe burns. Its multiresistance to antibiotics produces many therapeutic problems, and for this reason, the development of an alternative method to antibiotic therapy is needed. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) may be an effective and alternative therapeutic option to prevent bloodstream infections in patients with severe burns. In this study we report the use of PDI to prevent bloodstream infections in mice with third-degree burns. Burns were produced on the back of the animals and they were infected with 109 cfu/mL of multi-resistant (MR) P. aeruginosa. Fifteen animals were divided into 3 groups: control, PDT blue and PDT red. PDT was performed thirty minutes after bacterial inoculation using 10μM HB:La+3 and a light-emitting diode (LED) emitting at λ=460nm+/-20nm and a LED emitting at λ=645 nm+/-10nm for 120s. Blood of mice were colected at 7h, 10h, 15h, 18h and 22h pos-infection (p.i.) for bacterial counting. Control group presented 1×104 cfu/mL in bloodstream at 7h p.i. increasing to 1×106 at 22h, while mice PDT-treated did not present any bacteria at 7h; only at 22h p.i. they presented 1×104cfu/mL. These results suggest that HB:La+3 associated to blue LED or red LED is effective to delay and diminish MR P.aeruginosa bloodstream invasion in third-degree-burned mice.

  9. Use of collagenase ointment in conjunction with negative pressure wound therapy in the care of diabetic wounds: a case series of six patients

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    John D. Miller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic wounds with additional comorbidities are costly, time intensive, and difficult to heal. Often, multiple modalities may be necessary to achieve wound resolution, relying on the synergistic advantage of each therapy to affect wound healing. The selectivity of Clostridium collagenase is physiologically effective at degrading non-viable collagen fibers while preserving living collagen tissue. Additionally, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT has long been used to aid wound healing while concurrently depreciating biological wound burden time. Methods: Six patients were selected from those appearing to our university based limb salvage service. Inclusion criteria included patients with a recurrent mixed fibrotic and granular wound base, in which NPWT was indicated, without exclusion criteria. Patients enrolled were administered clostridial collagenase ointment at each regularly scheduled NPWT dressing change. Patients were followed until healing, with visual representations of wound progression and time to full healing recorded. Results: Tandem application of these therapies appeared to expedite wound healing by clearing degenerative fibrous tissue and expediting wound granulation without additional complication. Unfortunately, not all patients were able to reach full healing; with two patients experiencing ulcer recurrence, likely a result of their significant comorbid nature. Conclusion: In our experience, we have noticed a specific subgroup of patients who benefit greatly when collagenase enzymatic debridement therapy is combined with NPWT. It is our belief that this combination therapy combines the molecular clearing of non-viable collagen with the wound granulation necessary to advance complex wounds to the next step in healing despite the current paucity in literature discussing this specific pairing.

  10. Multiple Acute Infection by Anisakis: A Case Series.

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    Shimamura, Yuto; Ishii, Naoki; Ego, Mai; Nakano, Kaoru; Ikeya, Takashi; Nakamura, Kenji; Takagi, Koichi; Fukuda, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of raw seafood infected with nematode larvae of the Anisakidae family can lead to gastric anisakiasis. The majority of the infections involve a single larva, however, there have been instances of multiple infection. The incidence rate and the characteristics of multiple infection by Anisakis remain poorly understood. We herein present a case of parasitization by multiple Anisakis larvae and describe 14 cases of multiple parasitization representing the largest reported case series to date. Endoscopists should therefore be aware of the potential for multiple infection by Anisakis and the need for a thorough inspection of all parts of the stomach when encountering such cases.

  11. Negative pressure wound therapy, silver coated foam dressing and conventional bandages in open wound treatment in dogs. A retrospective comparison of 50 paired cases.

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    Nolff, M C; Fehr, M; Bolling, A; Dening, R; Kramer, S; Reese, S; Meyer-Lindenberg, A

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for treatment of complicated wounds in dogs. Retrospective multicentre study. Dogs (n = 50) undergoing open wound treatment were classified according to treatment method used: bandage (Group A, n = 7), NPWT (Group B, n = 18), and foam dressing (Group C, n = 25). Pairs of patients matched based on wound conformation, localization, and underlying cause were compared between Group A and C (n = 7 pairs) and between groups B and C (n = 18 pairs) in terms of duration of previous treatment, time to closure, and complications. Signalment, antibiotic medications, antiseptic treatment, and bacterial status of wounds were comparable between groups. The duration of previous treatment was significantly higher in patients assigned to Group B (p = 0.04) compared to Group C, while no significant difference was found between groups A and B. Total time to wound closure was significantly shorter in Group C compared to Group A (p = 0.02) and in Group B compared to Group C (p = 0.003). Wounds treated with NPWT suffered significantly less complications (p = 0.008) and were significantly less septic during treatment (p = 0.016) than wounds treated with a foam dressing. This study shows that time to healing was halved in NPWT treated patients compared to foam dressing treated patients, which in turn healed faster than patients treated with conventional bandage, underlining the value of NPWT therapy for the treatment of complicated wounds.

  12. Evaluation of Gallium Citrate Formulations against a Multidrug-Resistant Strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Murine Wound Model of Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mitchell G; Truong-Le, Vu; Alamneh, Yonas A; Black, Chad C; Anderl, Jeff; Honnold, Cary L; Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Abu-Taleb, Rania; Wise, Matthew C; Hall, Eric R; Wagar, Eric J; Patzer, Eric; Zurawski, Daniel V

    2015-10-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common occurrence in health care facilities with a heightened risk for immunocompromised patients. Klebsiella pneumoniae has been increasingly implicated as the bacterial agent responsible for SSTIs, and treatment can be challenging as more strains become multidrug resistant (MDR). Therefore, new treatments are needed to counter this bacterial pathogen. Gallium complexes exhibit antimicrobial activity and are currently being evaluated as potential treatment for bacterial infections. In this study, we tested a topical formulation containing gallium citrate (GaCi) for the treatment of wounds infected with K. pneumoniae. First, the MIC against K. pneumoniae ranged from 0.125 to 2.0 μg/ml GaCi. After this in vitro efficacy was established, two topical formulations with GaCi (0.1% [wt/vol] and 0.3% [wt/vol]) were tested in a murine wound model of MDR K. pneumoniae infection. Gross pathology and histopathology revealed K. pneumoniae-infected wounds appeared to close faster with GaCi treatment and were accompanied by reduced inflammation compared to those of untreated controls. Similarly, quantitative indications of infection