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Sample records for world glacier inventory

  1. World Glacier Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The World Glacier Inventory (WGI) contains information for over 130,000 glaciers. Inventory parameters include geographic location, area, length, orientation,...

  2. The Glacier Inventory of the Central Andes of Argentina (31°-35°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri Hidalgo, L.; Zalazar, L.; Castro, M.; Pitte, P.; Masiokas, M. H.; Ruiz, L.; Villalba, R.; Delgado, S.; Gimenez, M.; Gargantini, H.

    2015-12-01

    The National Law for protection of glaciers in Argentina envisages the development of a National Inventory of Glaciers. All glaciers and periglacial landforms which are important as strategic water resource must be properly identified and mapped. Here we present a detailed and complete glacier and rock glacier inventory of the Central Andes of Argentina between 31° and 35°S. This semi-arid region contains some of the highest mountains of South America and concentrates the second most glacierized area in Argentina after the Patagonian Andes. To develop the inventory, we used remotely sensed data and related techniques complemented with field surveys. Clean ice and perennial snowfields were identified applying an automatic extraction method on medium spatial-resolution images. Debris-covered and rock glaciers were manually digitized on higher spatial-resolution images. With minor modifications, the present digital inventory is consistent with GLIMS standards. For each glacier, we derived 38 database fields, adding five specific attributes for rock glaciers, which are not included in the original GLIMS database. In total we identified 8069 glaciers covering an area of 1768 km2. Debris-covered ice and rock glaciers represent 57% of the total inventoried area. In this region, rock glaciers are a common feature in the arid landscape and constitute an important water reserve at regional scale. Many glaciers were characterized by gradual transition from debris-covered glaciers, in the upper part, to rock glaciers, in the lower sector. The remaining 43% includes clean ice glaciers and permanent snowfields. These are mostly mountain and valley-type glaciers with medium-to-small sizes. This detailed inventory constitutes a valuable contribution to the ongoing global efforts (e.g. WGI, RGI and GLIMS) to map the world's glaciers. It is also the base for ongoing glaciological, climatological and hydrological studies in this portion of southern Andes.

  3. An ALOS-derived glacier inventory of the Bhutan Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Hiroto; Fujita, Koji; Nuimura, Takayuki; Sakai, Akiko

    2013-04-01

    Glacier inventory provides fundamental information of glacier settings such as number, area, and horizontal/altitudinal distribution, which make possible to study management of water resources, glacial response to climate change, and glacier-related hazards. In the Bhutan Himalaya, heavily debris-covered surface and seasonal snow cover under the humid climate hamper automated mapping of glaciers. We present a novel glacier inventory manually delineated from high resolution (2.5 m) ALOS-PRISM images along the Bhutan Himalaya including Tibetan side. We delineated 1273 glaciers with area of 1408.3 km2, in which 210 debris-covered glaciers with area of 951.2 km2 were identified. Scatter plot of top and terminus altitudes of these glaciers shows that the termini of debris-covered glaciers tend to be located at lower altitude than those of debris-free glaciers. Classifying surface aspect into eight directions, surface of the debris-free glaciers tends to be exposed northward (16.7%) while the southwestward surface is minimum (9.2%). No remarkable aspect tendency is found for the debris-covered glaciers. We compare the locations of debris-free glaciers with annual precipitation of TRMM 3B43 data. Median altitude, at which glacier surface is divided into two equal areas obviously increases northward (toward Tibet) along latitude. Additionally the median altitude averaged over basin scale (~2500 km2) shows a significant negative correlation against the annual precipitation (r= -0.48, p< 0.05). Our results suggest that the high latitudinal gradient of annual precipitation crossing the Bhutan Himalaya contrasts the glacier altitudinal distribution within a scale of 100 km.

  4. The Greater Caucasus Glacier Inventory (Russia, Georgia and Azerbaijan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielidze, Levan G.; Wheate, Roger D.

    2018-01-01

    There have been numerous studies of glaciers in the Greater Caucasus, but none that have generated a modern glacier database across the whole mountain range. Here, we present an updated and expanded glacier inventory at three time periods (1960, 1986, 2014) covering the entire Greater Caucasus. Large-scale topographic maps and satellite imagery (Corona, Landsat 5, Landsat 8 and ASTER) were used to conduct a remote-sensing survey of glacier change, and the 30 m resolution Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer Global Digital Elevation Model (ASTER GDEM; 17 November 2011) was used to determine the aspect, slope and height distribution of glaciers. Glacier margins were mapped manually and reveal that in 1960 the mountains contained 2349 glaciers with a total glacier surface area of 1674.9 ± 70.4 km2. By 1986, glacier surface area had decreased to 1482.1 ± 64.4 km2 (2209 glaciers), and by 2014 to 1193.2 ± 54.0 km2 (2020 glaciers). This represents a 28.8 ± 4.4 % (481 ± 21.2 km2) or 0.53 % yr-1 reduction in total glacier surface area between 1960 and 2014 and an increase in the rate of area loss since 1986 (0.69 % yr-1) compared to 1960-1986 (0.44 % yr-1). Glacier mean size decreased from 0.70 km2 in 1960 to 0.66 km2 in 1986 and to 0.57 km2 in 2014. This new glacier inventory has been submitted to the Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) database and can be used as a basis data set for future studies.

  5. Southern Carpathian rock glaciers: Inventory, distribution and environmental controlling factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaca, Alexandru; Ardelean, Florina; Urdea, Petru; Magori, Brigitte

    2017-09-01

    Rock glaciers are valuable diagnostic landforms indicating permafrost creeping during their genesis and activity. Based on the analysis of high quality air-orthophoto and field work, a first polygon-based inventory of rock glaciers from the Southern Carpathians has been elaborated. In total, 306 rock glaciers were included in the inventory comprising 79 debris and 227 talus rock glaciers. Most of these landforms were classified as relict (258), while only 48, covering 2.81 km2, were considered intact. The size of rock glaciers, considered as a proxy for past environmental conditions, and the relationships with the predictor variables (lithology, aspect, contributing area, geographic coordinates, elevation and slope range) were analysed using bivariate statistics, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and various post hoc tests. The statistical analysis revealed that the rock glaciers occurring in the highest mountain ranges in areas composed of granites and granodiorites are considerably larger than the others, because their duration of activity is greater. Strong dependences between rock glacier size and other topographic attributes (contributing area, aspect and slope range) were also confirmed. The rock glacier distribution in the Southern Carpathians is clearly controlled by topography, lithology and debris availability. The abundance of rock glaciers increases with altitude, but their size decreases slightly. In mountain units where granites and granodiorites predominate (Retezat and Parâng Mountains), the density of rock glaciers and the mean specific area covered by these spectacular landforms are considerably higher than in other areas. The higher continentality effects of the Southern Carpathians enabled the formation of rock glaciers at substantially lower elevations than in the Alps. The mean altitude of intact rock glaciers front, which could be used as a morphological indicator of discontinuous permafrost, is located at 2088 m.

  6. A Revised Glacier Inventory of Bhaga Basin Himachal Pradesh, India : Current Status and Recent Glacier Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birajdar, F.; Venkataraman, G.; Bahuguna, I.; Samant, H.

    2014-11-01

    Himalayan glaciers show large uncertainty regarding their present and future state due to their sensitive reaction towards change in climatic condition. Himalayan glaciers are unique as they are located in tropical, high altitude regions, predominantly valley type and many are covered with debris. The great northern plains of India sustain on the perennial melt of glaciers meeting the water requirements of agriculture, industries, domestic sector even in the months of summer when large tracts of the country go dry. Therefore, it is important to monitor and assess the state of snow and glaciers and to know the sustainability of glaciers in view of changing global scenarios of climate and water security of the nation. Any information pertaining to Himalayan glaciers is normally difficult to be obtained by conventional means due to its harsh weather and rugged terrains. Due to the ecological diversity and geographical vividness, major part of the Indian Himalaya is largely un-investigated. Considering the fact that Himalayan glaciers are situated in a harsh environment, conventional techniques of their study is challenging and difficult both in terms of logistics and finances whereas the satellite remote sensing offers a potential mode for monitoring glaciers in long term. In order to gain an updated overview of the present state of the glacier cover and its changes since the previous inventories, an attempt has been made to generate a new remotesensing- derived glacier inventory on 1:50,000 scale for Bhaga basin (N32°28'19.7'' - N33°0'9.9'' ; E76°56'16.3'' - E77°25'23.7'' ) Western Himalaya covering an area of 1695.63 km2. having 231 glaciers and occupying glacierized area of 385.17 ±3.71 km2. ranging from 0.03 km2. to 29.28 km2. Glacier inventory has been carried out using high resolution IRS P6 LISS III data of 2011, ASTER DEM and other ancillary data. Specific measurements of mapped glacier features are the inputs for generating the glacier inventory data

  7. The length of the world's glaciers - a new approach for the global calculation of center lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machguth, Horst; Huss, M.

    2014-01-01

    Glacier length is an important measure of glacier geometry. Nevertheless, global glacier inventories are mostly lacking length data. Only recently semi-automated approaches to measure glacier length have been developed and applied regionally. Here we present a first global assessment of glacier l...... appear to be related to characteristics of topography and glacier mass balance. The present study adds glacier length as a key parameter to global glacier inventories. Global and regional scaling laws might prove beneficial in conceptual glacier models....

  8. An inventory and estimate of water stored in firn fields, glaciers, debris-covered glaciers, and rock glaciers in the Aconcagua River Basin, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Jason R.; Ng, Sam; Bellisario, Antonio

    2017-11-01

    An inventory of firn fields, glaciers, debris-covered glaciers, and rock glaciers was conducted in the Aconcagua River Basin of the semiarid Andes of central Chile. A total of 916 landforms were identified, of which rock glaciers were the most abundant (669) and occupied the most total area. Glaciers and debris-covered glaciers were less numerous, but were about five times larger in comparison. The total area occupied by glaciers and debris-covered glaciers was roughly equivalent to the total area of rock glaciers. Debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers were subcategorized into six ice-content classes based on interpretation of surface morphology with high-resolution satellite imagery. Over 50% of rock glaciers fell within a transitional stage; 85% of debris-covered glaciers were either fully covered or buried. Most landforms occupied elevations between 3500 and 4500 m. Glaciers and firn occurred at higher elevations compared to rock glaciers and debris-covered glaciers. Rock glaciers had a greater frequency in the northern part of the study area where arid climate conditions exist. Firn and glaciers were oriented south, debris-covered glaciers west, and rock glaciers southwest. An analysis of water contribution of each landform in the upper Andes of the Aconcagua River Basin was conducted using formulas that associate the size of the landforms to estimates of water stored. Minimum and maximum water storage was calculated based on a range of debris to ice content ratios for debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers. In the Aconcagua River Basin, rock glaciers accounted for 48 to 64% of the water stored within the landforms analyzed; glaciers accounted for 15 to 25%; debris-covered glaciers were estimated at 15 to 19%; firn fields contained only about 5 to 8% of the water stored. Expansion of agriculture, prolonged drought, and removal of ice-rich landforms for mining have put additional pressure on already scarce water resources. To develop long

  9. GLIMS: Progress in Mapping the World's glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raup, B. H.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Armstrong, R.; Racoviteanu, A.

    2009-04-01

    The Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) initiative has built a database of glacier outlines and related attributes, derived primarily from satellite imagery, such as from ASTER and Landsat. Each snapshot of a glacier is from a specific time, and the database is designed to store multiple snapshots representative of different times. The database currently contains outlines for approximately 83,000 glaciers. Of these, 549 glaciers have outlines from more than one time, which can be studied for change. The glacier-by-glacier area-change signal over large areas tends to be noisy, but the mode of the distribution of area change for these 549 glaciers is -5%. We have implemented two web-based interfaces to the database. One enables exploration of the data via interactive maps (Web map server), while the other allows searches based on text-field constraints. The Web map server creates interactive maps on our Web site, www.glims.org, and can also supply glacier layers to other servers over the Internet. As a service to the GLIMS community, the database contains metadata on all ASTER imagery (approximately 200,000 images) acquired over glacierized terrain. Reduced-resolution images can be viewed either as a layer in the MapServer application, or overlaid on the virtual globe within Google Earth. The system allows users to download their selected glacier data in a choice of formats. The results of a query based on spatial selection (using a mouse) or text-field constraints can be downloaded in any of these formats: ESRI shapefiles, KML (Google Earth), MapInfo, GML (Geography Markup Language) and GMT (Generic Mapping Tools). This "clip-and-ship" function allows users to download only the data they are interested in. In this presentation we describe our flexible Web interfaces to the database, which includes various ancillary layers, facilitates enhanced analysis of glacier systems, their distribution, and their impacts on other Earth systems.

  10. Inventorying rock glaciers: The relevance of definitions, processes and base data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas; Lieb, Gerhard Karl; Wagner, Thomas; Winkler, Gerfried

    2017-04-01

    Rock glacier inventories have been elaborated for many mountain regions during the last decades. Such inventories have been used for instance to determine the current (using intact rock glaciers) or the past extent (using relict ones) of mountain permafrost and its change over time. However, the recognition and delineation of a rock glacier is not always a trivial task in particular in cases where the "typical" rock glacier surface morphology with longitudinal and transversal ridges and furrows is missing. A further inventorying restriction is based on which genetic model for rock glacier formation is used or favored by the elaborator, i.e. glacier-derived rock glaciers (with massive sedimentary or "glacier" ice), talus-derived rock glaciers (dominated by congelation ice), or a mix thereof. In addition to that, relict rock glaciers are commonly more difficult to recognize and to delineate due to the decay of morphological features or the coverage by vegetation. In this regard the geomorphic concept of equifinality plays an important role because similar looking landforms might have been formed as a result of quite different sets of processes and time periods. Two examples illustrating this problem are as follows: (i) relict embryonal rock glaciers or protalus ramparts look very similar to pronival ramparts although the acting process was substantial different; (ii) multiple ridges at a presumed rock glacier front might have been formed by several phases of glacier advance forming a set of terminal moraines. Therefore, the elaboration of a rock glacier inventory is certainly influenced by subjectivity related to the expertise and field knowledge of the mapping person. A further crucial mapping restriction is based upon the used terrain (digital elevation models/DEM and maps) and optical (airborne, spaceborne) data. Under the assumption that improved data bases help to solve the problems mentioned above the authors of this abstract elaborated three generations of

  11. An airborne laser scanner data based glacier inventory for South Tyrol, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Ch.; Kerschner, H.

    2009-04-01

    The airborne laser scanner data (ALS) based glacier inventory for South Tyrol, Italy, is a new approach in compiling glacier inventories. It gives the possibility for highly accurate results with a minimum expense in human supervision. Two earlier inventories of 1983 and 1997 provide the basis for the comparison of glacier parameters like area and volume change or equilibrium line altitude (ELA). A reduction of glacier area is observed for almost all glaciers in South Tyrol between 1983 and 2006. 32% of the glacier area was lost. Volume changes for the ice and firn cover have been derived from the digital elevation models (DEMs) of 1997 and 2006 as -1.037 km³ and an ELA rise of 54 m to almost 3000 m a.s.l. is calculated for this period. The loss in the calculated parameters shows a wide variability for individual glaciers but an increasing acceleration is recognizable for all of the South Tyrolean glaciers since the first inventory of 1983.

  12. A glacier inventory for the western Nyainqentanglha Range and the Nam Co Basin, Tibet, and glacier changes 1976–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bolch

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The western Nyainqentanglha Range is located in the south-eastern centre of the Tibetan Plateau. Its north-western slopes drain into Lake Nam Co. The region is of special interest for glacio-climatological research as it is influenced by both the continental climate of Central Asia and the Indian Monsoon system, and situated at the transition zone between temperate and subcontinental glaciers. A glacier inventory for the whole mountain range was generated for the year around 2001 using automated remote sensing and GIS techniques based on Landsat ETM+ and SRTM3 DEM data. Glacier change analysis was based on data from Hexagon KH-9 and Landsat MSS (both 1976, Metric Camera (1984, and Landsat TM/ETM+ (1991, 2001, 2005, 2009. Manual adjustment was especially necessary for delineating the debris-covered glaciers and the glaciers on the panchromatic Hexagon data. In the years around 2001 the whole mountain range contained about 960 glaciers covering an area of 795.6 ± 22.3 km2 while the ice in the drainage basin of Nam Co covered 198.1 ± 5.6 km2. The median elevation of the glaciers was about 5800 m with the majority terminating around 5600 m. Five glaciers with debris-covered tongues terminated lower than 5200 m. The glacier area decreased by −6.1 ± 3% between 1976 and 2001. This is less than reported in previous studies based on the 1970s topographic maps and Landsat data from 2000. Glaciers continued to shrink during the period 2001–2009. No advancing glaciers were detected. Detailed length measurements for five glaciers indicated a retreat of around 10 m per year (1976–2009. Ice cover is higher south-east of the mountain ridge which reflects the windward direction to the monsoon. The temperature increase during the ablation period was probably the main driver of glacier wastage, but the complex glacier-climate interactions need further investigation.

  13. Ice thickness estimations based on multi-temporal glacier inventories - potential and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfricht, Kay; Huss, Matthias; Otto, Jan-Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The ongoing glacier retreat exposes a large number of surface depressions in the former glacier bed that can be filled with water or act as sediment traps. This has already been observed at various sites in Austria and in other mountain areas worldwide. The formation of glacial lakes can constitute an important environmental and socio-economic impact on high mountain systems including water resource management, sediment delivery, natural hazards, energy production and tourism. In general, information on ice thickness distribution is the basis for simulating future glacier change. We used the approach proposed by Huss and Farinotti (2012) to model the ice thickness distribution and potential locations of subglacial depressions. The study is part of the FUTURELAKE project that seeks to model the formation of new glacier lakes and their possible future evolution in the Austria Alps. The required data on glacier extent, surface elevation and slope were taken from the Austrian Glacier Inventories GI1 from 1969, GI2 from 1998 and GI3 from2006 (Fischer et al., 2015). The different glacier outlines and surface elevations from the inventories enable us to evaluate (i) the robustness of the modelled bedrock depressions with respect to different glacier settings, (ii) the power of the model to simulate recently formed glacial lakes, (iii) the similarities in calculated ice thickness distributions across the inventories and (iv) the feasibility of simulating observed changes in ice thickness and glacier volume. In general, the modelled localization of large potential depressions was relatively stable using the observed glacier settings. A number of examples show that recently formed glacial lakes could be detected by the model based on previous glacier extents. The locations of maximum ice depths within different elevation zones appeared to be sensitive to changes in glacier width. However, observed ice thickness changes and, thus, volume changes between the inventories could

  14. Rock glacier inventory, Printse Valley, Valais, Switzerland, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Printse Valley is a 16-km-long north-orientated basin. The south-part (summits at 300 m asl) is glacierized. The intermediate sector, more continental, is very...

  15. The first complete inventory of the local glaciers and ice caps on Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rastner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Glacier inventories provide essential baseline information for the determination of water resources, glacier-specific changes in area and volume, climate change impacts as well as past, potential and future contribution of glaciers to sea-level rise. Although Greenland is heavily glacierised and thus highly relevant for all of the above points, a complete inventory of its glaciers was not available so far. Here we present the results and details of a new and complete inventory that has been compiled from more than 70 Landsat scenes (mostly acquired between 1999 and 2002 using semi-automated glacier mapping techniques. A digital elevation model (DEM was used to derive drainage divides from watershed analysis and topographic attributes for each glacier entity. To serve the needs of different user communities, we assigned to each glacier one of three connectivity levels with the ice sheet (CL0, CL1, CL2; i.e. no, weak, and strong connection to clearly, but still flexibly, distinguish the local glaciers and ice caps (GIC from the ice sheet and its outlet glaciers. In total, we mapped ~ 20 300 glaciers larger than 0.05 km2 (of which ~ 900 are marine terminating, covering an area of 130 076 ± 4032 km2, or 89 720 ± 2781 km2 without the CL2 GIC. The latter value is about 50% higher than the mean value of more recent previous estimates. Glaciers smaller than 0.5 km2 contribute only 1.5% to the total area but more than 50% (11 000 to the total number. In contrast, the 25 largest GIC (> 500 km2 contribute 28% to the total area, but only 0.1% to the total number. The mean elevation of the GIC is 1700 m in the eastern sector and around 1000 m otherwise. The median elevation increases with distance from the coast, but has only a weak dependence on mean glacier aspect.

  16. Glaciers of Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard S.; Ferrigno, Jane G.

    1993-01-01

    supraglacial morainic debris and crevasses. The maps are revised every 6 years by use of aerial photogrammetric methods. The possibility of producing a glacier inventory by combining the topographic maps with Landsat digital and visual data is discussed. ALPS: FRENCH: The glaciers of the French Alps are distributed in four main groups and have a total area of 350 square kilometers. The northernmost group, on the Mont Blanc massif, has a glacier area of 110 square kilometers, which includes Met de Glace, which, with an area of 40 square kilometers, is the largest glacier in the Western Alps. Farther south, the Massif de la Vanoise contains 130 glaciers that have a total area of 85 square kilometers. The glaciers of the Grandes Rousses massif have a total area of 11 square kilometers. Lastly, the Massif du Pelvoux has a total glacier area of 120 square kilometers. Studies of glacier variations since 1600 A.D. have shown numerous fluctuations in glacier length. The glaciers on Mont Blanc that appear to show similar fluctuations in fact have different individual response times. Mass-balance measurements are presently being carried out on nine glaciers. The measurements on one of these glaciers, Glacier de Saint Sorlin, have been used to validate a linear statistical model for mass-balance variation. The model seems to give good results when extended over the entire region of French Alpine glaciers. New methods of mass-balance reconstructions by use of a continuity equation are discussed. Current satellite data have limited usefulness for glacier studies in the French Alps, with the exception of the method correlating changes in the elevation of snowline to changes in glacier mass balance. ALPS: ITALIAN: Research carried out by Italian glaciologists in support of the World Glacier Inventory project identified approximately 1,400 glaciers in the mountain groups of the Italian Alps. The total surface area of all glaciers, glacierets, and permanent snow fields in Italy with

  17. Satellite image atlas of glaciers of the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard S.; Ferrigno, Jane G.; Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Ferrigno, Jane G.

    1988-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1386, Satellite Image Atlas of Glaciers of the World, contains 11 chapters designated by the letters A through K. Chapter A provides a comprehensive, yet concise, review of the "State of the Earth's Cryosphere at the Beginning of the 21st Century: Glaciers, Global Snow Cover, Floating Ice, and Permafrost and Periglacial Environments," and a "Map/Poster of the Earth's Dynamic Cryosphere," and a set of eight "Supplemental Cryosphere Notes" about the Earth's Dynamic Cryosphere and the Earth System. The next 10 chapters, B through K, are arranged geographically and present glaciological information from Landsat and other sources of historic and modern data on each of the geographic areas. Chapter B covers Antarctica; Chapter C, Greenland; Chapter D, Iceland; Chapter E, Continental Europe (except for the European part of the former Soviet Union), including the Alps, the Pyrenees, Norway, Sweden, Svalbard (Norway), and Jan Mayen (Norway); Chapter F, Asia, including the European part of the former Soviet Union, China, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, and Bhutan; Chapter G, Turkey, Iran, and Africa; Chapter H, Irian Jaya (Indonesia) and New Zealand; Chapter I, South America; Chapter J, North America (excluding Alaska); and Chapter K, Alaska. Chapters A–D each include map plates.

  18. The length of the glaciers in the world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machguth, Horst; Huss, M.; Huss, M.

    2014-01-01

    a fully automated method based on glacier surface slope, distance to the glacier margins and a set of trade-off functions. The method is developed for East Greenland, evaluated for the same area as well as for Alaska, and eventually applied to all ∼ 200000 glaciers around the globe. The evaluation...

  19. Permafrost Favorability Index: Spatial Modeling in the French Alps Using a Rock Glacier Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Marcer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we used the first rock glacier inventory for the entire French Alps to model spatial permafrost distribution in the region. Climatic and topographic data evaluated at the rock glacier locations were used as predictor variables in a Generalized Linear Model. Model performances are strong, suggesting that, in agreement with several previous studies, this methodology is able to model accurately rock glacier distribution. A methodology to estimate model uncertainties is proposed, revealing that the subjectivity in the interpretation of rock glacier activity and contours may substantially bias the model. The model highlights a North-South trend in the regional pattern of permafrost distribution which is attributed to the climatic influences of the Atlantic and Mediterranean climates. Further analysis suggest that lower amounts of precipitation in the early winter and a thinner snow cover, as typically found in the Mediterranean area, could contribute to the existence of permafrost at higher temperatures compared to the Northern Alps. A comparison with the Alpine Permafrost Index Map (APIM shows no major differences with our model, highlighting the very good predictive power of the APIM despite its tendency to slightly overestimate permafrost extension with respect to our database. The use of rock glaciers as indicators of permafrost existence despite their time response to climate change is discussed and an interpretation key is proposed in order to ensure the proper use of the model for research as well as for operational purposes.

  20. A new rock glacier inventory of the Lombardy, Central Alps, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, R.; Brardinoni, F.; Alberti, S.; Frattini, P.; Crosta, G. B.

    2012-04-01

    The Lombardy Alps, with a surface of 2148 km2 above 2000 m a.s.l. (9% of the total) represents an important portion of the southern side of the orogen. For encompassing a variety of tectonic and climatic regimes, they represent an interesting area to examine environmental controls on periglacial processes. Today, technological developments in remote sensing techniques allow us to study periglacial landforms with increasing detail. We present a new inventory for the whole Lombardy Alps in which we identify and classify rock glaciers and protalus ramparts. The inventory has been conducted by combining a number of remotely-sensed images with field traverses. Specifically, the interpretation of high-resolution (0.5 x 0.5 m) digital aerial photos (2000, 2003, 2007) and a 2 m*2 m Digital Surface Model that cover the whole region has allowed inventorying a greater number of relevant landforms when compared to prior regional efforts. Measurements and photographs taken during fieldwork provided critical ground control for the validation of data extracted from remotely-based analysis. Rock glaciers have been mapped in GIS polygons. The inventory follows the specifics detailed by Scapozza and Mari (2010), with some additional information adapted from the PermaNET evidences guidelines (Cremonese et al., 2011). Landform attributes include, geographic coordinates, mountain sector, type, activity, area, elevation (min, max and mean), slope gradient, slope aspect, dominant lithology, vegetation at the front, and upstream presence/absence of a glacier. In total, we identify 1734 periglacial landforms covering a surface of 81,5 km2 (0,34% of the region). In terms of activity, the inventory includes 673 (39%) intact classified and 1061 (61%) relict landforms. The most common landform typology is the talus-lobate (931, 54%) followed by talus tongue-shaped (436, 25%) and protalus ramparts (232, 13%). Minimum elevation, often considered a good approximation of discontinuous permafrost

  1. An estimate of global glacier volume

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    A. Grinsted

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available I assess the feasibility of using multivariate scaling relationships to estimate glacier volume from glacier inventory data. Scaling laws are calibrated against volume observations optimized for the specific purpose of estimating total global glacier ice volume. I find that adjustments for continentality and elevation range improve skill of area–volume scaling. These scaling relationships are applied to each record in the Randolph Glacier Inventory, which is the first globally complete inventory of glaciers and ice caps. I estimate that the total volume of all glaciers in the world is 0.35 ± 0.07 m sea level equivalent, including ice sheet peripheral glaciers. This is substantially less than a recent state-of-the-art estimate. Area–volume scaling bias issues for large ice masses, and incomplete inventory data are offered as explanations for the difference.

  2. State of the Earth’s cryosphere at the beginning of the 21st century : glaciers, global snow cover, floating ice, and permafrost and periglacial environments: Chapter A in Satellite image atlas of glaciers of the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard S.; Ferrigno, Jane G.; Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Ferrigno, Jane G.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter is the tenth in a series of 11 book-length chapters, collectively referred to as “this volume,” in the series U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1386, Satellite Image Atlas of Glaciers of the World. In the other 10 chapters, each of which concerns a specific glacierized region of Earth, the authors used remotely sensed images, primarily from the Landsat 1, 2, and 3 series of spacecraft, in order to analyze that glacierized region and to monitor changes in its glaciers. Landsat images, acquired primarily during the period 1972 through 1981, were used by an international team of glaciologists and other scientists to study the various glacierized regions and (or) to discuss related glaciological topics. In each glacierized region, the present distribution of glaciers within its geographic area is compared, wherever possible, with historical information about their past areal extent. The atlas provides an accurate regional inventory of the areal extent of glacier ice on our planet during the 1970s as part of an expanding international scientific effort to measure global environmental change on the Earth’s surface. However, this chapter differs from the other 10 in its discussion of observed changes in all four elements of the Earth’s cryosphere (glaciers, snow cover, floating ice, and permafrost) in the context of documented changes in all components of the Earth System. Human impact on the planet at the beginning of the 21st century is pervasive. The focus of Chapter A is on changes in the cryosphere and the importance of long-term monitoring by a variety of sensors carried on Earth-orbiting satellites or by a ground-based network of observatories in the case of permafrost. The chapter consists of five parts. The first part provides an introduction to the Earth System, including the interrelationships of the geosphere (cryosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and atmosphere), the biosphere, climate processes, biogeochemical cycles, and the

  3. Fusion of Multi-Source Satellite Data and DEMs to Create a New Glacier Inventory for Novaya Zemlya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Rastner

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring glacier changes in remote Arctic regions are strongly facilitated by satellite data. This is especially true for the Russian Arctic where recently increased optical and SAR satellite imagery (Landsat 8 OLI, Sentinel 1/2, and digital elevation models (TanDEM-X, ArcticDEM are becoming available. These datasets offer new possibilities to create high-quality glacier inventories. Here, we present a new glacier inventory derived from a fusion of multi-source satellite data for Novaya Zemlya in the Russian Arctic. We mainly used Landsat 8 OLI data to automatically map glaciers with the band ratio method. Missing debris-covered glacier parts and misclassified lakes were manually corrected. Whereas perennial snow fields were a major obstacle in glacier identification, seasonal snow was identified and removed using Landsat 5 TM scenes from the year 1998. Drainage basins were derived semi-automatically using the ArcticDEM (gap-filled by the ASTER GDEM V2 and manually corrected using fringes from ALOS PALSAR. The new glacier inventory gives a glacierized area of 22,379 ± 246.16 km2 with 1474 glacier entities >0.05 km2. The region is dominated by large glaciers, as 909 glaciers <0.5 km2 (62% by number cover only 156 ± 1.7 km2 or 0.7% of the area, whereas 49 glaciers >100 km2 (3.3% by number cover 18,724 ± 205.9 km2 or 84%. In total, 41 glaciers are marine terminating covering an area of 16,063.7 ± 118.8 km2. The mean elevation is 596 m for all glaciers in the study region (528 m in the northern part, 641 in the southern part. South-east (north-west facing glaciers cover >35% (20% of the area. For the smaller glaciers in the southern part we calculated an area loss of ~5% (52.5 ± 4.5 km2 from 2001 to 2016.

  4. Controlling Inventory: Real-World Mathematical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Thomas G.; Özgün-Koca, S. Asli; Chelst, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    Amazon, Walmart, and other large-scale retailers owe their success partly to efficient inventory management. For such firms, holding too little inventory risks losing sales, whereas holding idle inventory wastes money. Therefore profits hinge on the inventory level chosen. In this activity, students investigate a simplified inventory-control…

  5. Surface motion of active rock glaciers in the Sierra Nevada, California, USA: inventory and a case study using InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. Liu; C.I. Millar; R.D. Westfall; H.A. Zebker

    2013-01-01

    Despite the abundance of rock glaciers in the Sierra Nevada of California, USA, few efforts have been made to measure their surface flow. Here we use the interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) technique to compile a~benchmark inventory describing the kinematic state of 59 active rock glaciers in this region. Statistically, these rock glaciers moved at...

  6. The World Coal Quality Inventory: South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Alex W.; Tewalt, Susan J.; Bragg, Linda J.; Finkelman, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary-Introduction: The concepts of a global environment and economy are strongly and irrevocably linked to global energy issues. Worldwide coal production and international coal trade are projected to increase during the next several decades in an international energy mix that is still strongly dependent on fossil fuels. Therefore, worldwide coal use will play an increasingly visible role in global environmental, economic, and energy forums. Policy makers require information on coal, including coal quality data, to make informed decisions regarding domestic coal resource allocation, import needs and export opportunities, foreign policy objectives, technology transfer policies, foreign investment prospects, environmental and health assessments, and byproduct use and disposal issues. The development of a worldwide, reliable, coal quality database would help ensure the most economically and environmentally efficient global use of coal. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with many agencies and scientists from the world's coal producing countries, originally undertook a project to obtain representative samples of coal from most of the world's producing coal provinces during a limited period of time (roughly 1998-2005), which is called the World Coal Quality Inventory (WoCQI). The multitude of producing coal mines, coal occurrences, or limited accessibility to sites in some countries can preclude collecting more than a single sample from a mine. In some areas, a single sample may represent an entire coal mining region or basin. Despite these limitations in sampling and uneven distribution of sample collection, the analytical results can still provide a general overview of world coal quality. The USGS intends to present the WoCQI data in reports and, when possible, in Geographic Information System (GIS) products that cover important coal bearing and producing regions.

  7. Mapping and inventorying active rock glaciers in the northern Tien Shan of China using satellite SAR interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaowen; Liu, Lin; Zhao, Lin; Wu, Tonghua; Li, Zhongqin; Liu, Guoxiang

    2017-04-01

    Rock glaciers are widespread in the Tien Shan. However, rock glaciers in the Chinese part of the Tien Shan have not been systematically investigated for more than 2 decades. In this study, we propose a new method that combines SAR interferometry and optical images from Google Earth to map active rock glaciers (ARGs) in the northern Tien Shan (NTS) of China. We compiled an inventory that includes 261 ARGs and quantitative information about their locations, geomorphic parameters, and downslope velocities. Our inventory shows that most of the ARGs are moraine-derived (69 %) and facing northeast (56 %). The altitude distribution of ARGs in the western NTS is significantly different from those located in the eastern part. The downslope velocities of the ARGs vary significantly in space, with a maximum of about 114 cm yr-1 and a mean of about 37 cm yr-1. Using the ARG locations as a proxy for the extent of alpine permafrost, our inventory suggests that the lowest altitudinal limit for the presence of permafrost in the NTS is about 2500-2800 m, a range determined by the lowest ARG in the entire inventory and by a statistics-based estimation. The successful application of the proposed method would facilitate effective and robust efforts to map rock glaciers over mountain ranges globally. This study provides an important dataset to improve mapping and modeling permafrost occurrence in vast western China.

  8. Glaciers of Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Ferrigno, Jane G.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter is the ninth to be released in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1386, Satellite Image Atlas of Glaciers of the World, a series of 11 chapters. In each of the geographic area chapters, remotely sensed images, primarily from the Landsat 1, 2, and 3 series of spacecraft, are used to analyze the specific glacierized region of our planet under consideration and to monitor glacier changes. Landsat images, acquired primarily during the middle to late 1970s and early 1980s, were used by an international team of glaciologists and other scientists to study various geographic regions and (or) to discuss related glaciological topics. In each glacierized geographic region, the present areal distribution of glaciers is compared, wherever possible, with historical information about their past extent. The atlas provides an accurate regional inventory of the areal extent of glacier ice on our planet during the 1970s as part of a growing international scientific effort to measure global environmental change on the Earth?s surface. The chapter is divided into seven geographic parts and one topical part: Glaciers of the Former Soviet Union (F-1), Glaciers of China (F-2), Glaciers of Afghanistan (F?3), Glaciers of Pakistan (F-4), Glaciers of India (F-5), Glaciers of Nepal (F?6), Glaciers of Bhutan (F-7), and the Paleoenvironmental Record Preserved in Middle-Latitude, High-Mountain Glaciers (F-8). Each geographic section describes the glacier extent during the 1970s and 1980s, the benchmark time period (1972-1981) of this volume, but has been updated to include more recent information. Glaciers of the Former Soviet Union are located in the Russian Arctic and various mountain ranges of Russia and the Republics of Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Kazakstun. The Glacier Inventory of the USSR and the World Atlas of Ice and Snow Resources recorded a total of 28,881 glaciers covering an area of 78,938 square kilometers (km2). China includes many of the mountain-glacier

  9. Assessment of multispectral glacier mapping methods and derivation of glacier area changes, 1978–2002, in the central Southern Alps, New Zealand, from ASTER satellite data, field survey and existing inventory data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gjermundsen, EF

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available can be made by the use of satellite remote sensing, capable of acquiring comprehensive, uniform and frequent global observations of glaciers and ice sheets. In New Zealand the first and only glacier inventory including the two main islands...? glaciers was made from aerial photographs recorded in 1978 (Chinn, unpublished). The mapping showed that the Southern Alps hosted 3144 glaciers exceeding 0.01 km2, totalling an area of 1158 km2 and an estimated ice volume of 53.3 km3 (Chinn, 2001...

  10. Inventory of Rock Glaciers along the Ghunsa Valley, Kanchanjunga Himal, Eastern Nepal, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset provides information on a number of Nepali rock glaciers distributed above 4250 m ASL along the Ghunsa valley and the Kanchanjunga glacier (originating...

  11. Recent Advances in the GLIMS Glacier Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raup, Bruce; Cogley, Graham; Zemp, Michael; Glaus, Ladina

    2017-04-01

    Glaciers are shrinking almost without exception. Glacier losses have impacts on local water availability and hazards, and contribute to sea level rise. To understand these impacts and the processes behind them, it is crucial to monitor glaciers through time by mapping their areal extent, changes in volume, elevation distribution, snow lines, ice flow velocities, and changes to associated water bodies. The glacier database of the Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) initiative is the only multi-temporal glacier database capable of tracking all these glacier measurements and providing them to the scientific community and broader public. Here we present recent results in 1) expansion of the geographic and temporal coverage of the GLIMS Glacier Database by drawing on the Randolph Glacier Inventory (RGI) and other new data sets; 2) improved tools for visualizing and downloading GLIMS data in a choice of formats and data models; and 3) a new data model for handling multiple glacier records through time while avoiding double-counting of glacier number or area. The result of this work is a more complete glacier data repository that shows not only the current state of glaciers on Earth, but how they have changed in recent decades. The database is useful for tracking changes in water resources, hazards, and mass budgets of the world's glaciers.

  12. Glaciers and Ice Sheets As Analog Environments of Potentially Habitable Icy Worlds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Garcia-Lopez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Icy worlds in the solar system and beyond have attracted a remarkable attention as possible habitats for life. The current consideration about whether life exists beyond Earth is based on our knowledge of life in terrestrial cold environments. On Earth, glaciers and ice sheets have been considered uninhabited for a long time as they seemed too hostile to harbor life. However, these environments are unique biomes dominated by microbial communities which maintain active biochemical routes. Thanks to techniques such as microscopy and more recently DNA sequencing methods, a great biodiversity of prokaryote and eukaryote microorganisms have been discovered. These microorganisms are adapted to a harsh environment, in which the most extreme features are the lack of liquid water, extremely cold temperatures, high solar radiation and nutrient shortage. Here we compare the environmental characteristics of icy worlds, and the environmental characteristics of terrestrial glaciers and ice sheets in order to address some interesting questions: (i which are the characteristics of habitability known for the frozen worlds, and which could be compatible with life, (ii what are the environmental characteristics of terrestrial glaciers and ice sheets that can be life-limiting, (iii What are the microbial communities of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms that can live in them, and (iv taking into account these observations, could any of these planets or satellites meet the conditions of habitability? In this review, the icy worlds are considered from the point of view of astrobiological exploration. With the aim of determining whether icy worlds could be potentially habitable, they have been compared with the environmental features of glaciers and ice sheets on Earth. We also reviewed some field and laboratory investigations about microorganisms that live in analog environments of icy worlds, where they are not only viable but also metabolically active.

  13. GLACIERS IN THE MEYNYPILGYNSKY RANGE: CURRENT STATE AND DEVELOPMENT FORECAST OF GLACIER SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Ananicheva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available SummaryPaper presents the results of interpretation of space images (from Landsat and World View-2, which made possible to estimate the areal extent of glaciers ofMeynypilgynskyRange, North-East of Koryak Upland, in the early 2000's. Assessments of glaciers were analyzed in comparison with the Glacier Inventory of the region, compiled by R.V. Sedov (2001, as a whole and for groups of glaciers belonging to the selected six glacial systems. After dozens of years since the compilation of the Inventory (1985 and from some glacier data referred to 1967, the glaciers ofMeynypilgynskyRangelost about 30% of the area, mainly due to drying that accompanies climate warming. The analysis of glaciers, which had retreated, was conducted for the groups by the same morphological type, and the same aspect. The largest retreat and area reduction is relevant to valley-corrie and hanging glaciers of eastern aspect. Glaciers facing north less suffered. As a result of application of the developed methodology for assessing the evolution of glacier systems under given climate scenario, the parameters for the state of the glacier systems ofMeynypilgynskyRangeup to the time span 2049–2060 were obtained. The AOGCM–ECHAM 5 (B1 was used as a scenario; it is the optimal for theNorthern Eurasia. It turned out that the glaciers reduction would be catastrophic (about 90%, but nevertheless they would not completely disappeared.

  14. Glacier mapping and inventory in Northern B.C. using Landsat imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheate, R.; Whyte, G. [Northern British Columbia Univ., Prince George, BC (Canada). Faculty of Natural Resources

    2000-09-01

    The importance of finding an accurate means by which to map and monitor glaciers in northern British Columbia was discussed. Alpine glaciers contribute to summer river flows bringing with them temperature modifications that can be critical to some fish species. In the last 20 years, mapping of glaciers in difficult to reach areas has been made possible through the use of remotely sensed satellite imagery. Field work, however, is still needed to validate findings. In this field study northeast of Prince George, B.C., the use of optical sensors such as the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and other radar data showed that aerial photography taken during the British Columbia TRIM glacier mapping program between 1985 and 1996 was too generalised and inaccurate. The TRIM data gave an overestimate of glacier extents. The image processing in the study involved the creation of enhanced channels from seven TM bands. The combination of channels yielded the best classification for glacier surfaces to derive the following classes: areas of accumulation and ablation, firn, plus water and non-glacier areas. The study showed that there has been a significant change (loss) in glaciation between 1992 and 1997. The Monkman Glacier was reduced by about 3 sq. km. and the Ice Mountain group was reduced by 8 sq. km. This represents a loss of about 20 to 20 per cent over a five year period and suggests that the glaciers may disappear in 25 to 50 years. 4 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  15. Spatial modeling of permafrost distribution using rock glacier inventories, topographic attributes and temperature data in the semiarid Andes, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azocar Sandoval, G.; Brenning, A.; Bodin, X.

    2012-12-01

    Statistical-empirical models have been widely used to estimate the spatial distribution of permafrost in the European Alps and North America using topographic, climatic data and geomorphic indicators of permafrost (i.e. rock glaciers). At present, little knowledge about mountain permafrost distribution is available for the Andes. As a first approximation of permafrost distribution, a logistic regression model was fitted to predict rock glacier activity status. The model is based on explanatory variables elevation and potential incoming solar radiation (PISR) derived from an ASTER G-DEM v. 2 digital elevations model and air temperature data in the Chilean Andes between 29 and 34°S. Rock glacier activity status (intact versus fossil) was obtained from several recent rock glacier inventories and is based on the interpretation of aerial photographs or satellite imagery with a resolution higher than 5 m. Constant lapse rates of temperature are obtained for several weather stations in the study region. These are used to estimate the change in temperature with elevation based on the digital elevation model. The model's predictive performance was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve. As a preliminary result using a probability threshold of 0.5, mountain permafrost may be present in up to 21% (1510 km2) of the Huasco watershed (29°S) located in the northern part of the study area. Considering a threshold > 0.75, about 12% (709 km2) of this watershed may be underlain by mountain permafrost. As next steps toward a permafrost distribution model, sources of bias related to the thermal offset and displacement of rock glaciers will be eliminated, and downscaling as well as spatial interpolation approaches will be evaluated in order to replace elevation as a proxy variable with estimates of mean annual air temperature.

  16. Discovering Chile's hidden water treasures – rock glaciers | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-05-30

    May 30, 2011 ... Dr. Brenning stresses that global warming could have a significant impact on rock glaciers in many regions and thus on the world supply of fresh water in the form of ice. Hence, the importance of building rock glacier inventories now – not only to support environmental impact assessment for specific projects ...

  17. Inventory and Spatial distribution of rock glaciers in the Eastern Pyrenees: paleoenvironmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Franch, Ferran; Pérez-Sánchez, Jordi; Salvà-Catarineu, Montserrat; Gómez-Ortiz, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    In this communication we present a detailed analysis of the spatial distribution and morphometric characteristics of all the rock glaciers identified in the massifs located in the easternmost fringe of the Eastern Pyrenees. From west to east, this area encompasses the massifs of Puigmal (2910 m)-Bastiments (2881 m)-Costabona (2465 m) and Canigó (2784 m). The presence of rock glaciers in these mountains shows evidence of the cold-climate geomorphological processes that occurred during the Late Pleistocene in the Pyrenees. Moreover, they constitute a paleoclimate indicator of the conditions that occurred during their development. Up to 122 rock glaciers have been identified, either formed by individualized or by complex landforms formed by coalescence units. For each of these units several variables have been determined: a) location: topographic and geomorphological setting, valley and flow aspect, maximum and minimum elevation, slope, maximum and mean slope; b) lithology and morphology: underlying/prevailing lithology, general morphology, surface morphological features, grain size characterization, vegetation cover, degree of preservation, maximum elevation of the surrounding area; and c) morphometry: maximum length of the landform in the flow direction, width, perimeter and total surface. The Puigmal-Bastiments-Costabona massifs, most extensive and higher, concentrate 89% of the landforms, while the Canigó massif encompasses the remaining 11%. Most of them are located on the north slopes (69%), with a significant percentage south exposed (31%). In total, they extend over an area of 985 Ha. The distribution of rock glaciers in the study area presents significant irregularities, with a remarkable asymmetry between slopes in some sections. Consequently, we have also analyzed the dual presence/absence of rock glaciers based on the identification and morphometry of all headwaters that due to their altitude and/or morphotopography could be susceptible to house them

  18. Significant contribution to total mass from very small glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Bahr

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A single large glacier can contain tens of millions of times the mass of a small glacier. Nevertheless, very small glaciers (with area ≤1 km2 are so numerous that their contribution to the world's total ice volume is significant and may be a notable source of error if excluded. With current glacier inventories, total global volume errors on the order of 10% are possible. However, to reduce errors to below 1% requires the inclusion of glaciers that are smaller than those recorded in most inventories. At the global scale, 1% accuracy requires a list of all glaciers and ice caps (GIC, exclusive of the ice sheets larger than 1 km2, and for regional estimates requires a complete list of all glaciers down to the smallest possible size. For this reason, sea-level rise estimates and other total mass and total volume analyses should not omit the world's smallest glaciers. In particular, upscaling GIC inventories has been common practice in sea level estimates, but downscaling may also be necessary to include the smallest glaciers.

  19. Glacier volume response time and its links to climate and topography based on a conceptual model of glacier hypsometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. B. Raper

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Glacier volume response time is a measure of the time taken for a glacier to adjust its geometry to a climate change. It has been previously proposed that the volume response time is given approximately by the ratio of glacier thickness to ablation at the glacier terminus. We propose a new conceptual model of glacier hypsometry (area-altitude relation and derive the volume response time where climatic and topographic parameters are separated. The former is expressed by mass balance gradients which we derive from glacier-climate modelling and the latter are quantified with data from the World Glacier Inventory. Aside from the well-known scaling relation between glacier volume and area, we establish a new scaling relation between glacier altitude range and area, and evaluate it for seven regions. The presence of this scaling parameter in our response time formula accounts for the mass balance elevation feedback and leads to longer response times than given by the simple ratio of glacier thickness to ablation at the terminus. Volume response times range from decades to thousands of years for glaciers in maritime (wet-warm and continental (dry-cold climates respectively. The combined effect of volume-area and altitude-area scaling relations is such that volume response time can increase with glacier area (Axel Heiberg Island and Svalbard, hardly change (Northern Scandinavia, Southern Norway and the Alps or even get smaller (The Caucasus and New Zealand.

  20. Inventorying and monitoring the recent behavior of Afghanistan's glaciers - debris-covered glaciers, supraglacial lakes, and the potential for catastrophic flooding (jökulhlaups)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnia, B. F.

    2009-04-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's nationwide investigation of the water resources of Afghanistan has one component focused on characterizing the behavior of the country's glaciers and their response to changing climate. A recent emphasis has been on determining the distribution and extent of debris-covered glaciers in order to understand the relationship between debris cover, supraglacial lakes, and the potential for catastrophic flooding (jökulhlaups). In glacier environments, catastrophic flooding (jökulhlaups) is usually caused by (1) drainage of ice-dammed lakes, (2) drainage of ice-marginal lakes, (3) release of water stored subglacially, englacially, or supraglacially, sometimes through surge-related processes, or (4) through melting of glaciers located around the summit craters of erupting volcanoes. All but the last are significant sources of flooding in Himalayan Mountain glacier environments. A systematic examination of two data sets: (1) VNIR (visible and near-infrared) digital images collected between 2001 and 2004 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on the Terra spacecraft, and (2) Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper (ETM+) digital images, was used to determine the distribution of glacier-related lakes. This examination of all of the glacier-covered areas of Afghanistan revealed relatively few ice-dammed and ice-marginal lakes. However, it determined that many valley glaciers have large concentrations of debris on their lower reaches, and that this debris hosts significant numbers of supraglacial lakes. Typically, supraglacial lakes develop on stagnant or slowly moving ice through thermokarst processes. Because of the ephemeral character of supraglacial water storage, these debris-covered glaciers present a high risk with respect to jökulhlaup generation. Some Afghan debris-covered glaciers support more than 30 supraglacial lakes. Among the areas that support large numbers of debris-covered glaciers with

  1. Hasty retreat of glaciers in northern Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Frank; Mölg, Nico

    2014-05-01

    Mapping glacier extent from optical satellite data has become a most efficient tool to create or update glacier inventories and determine glacier changes over time. A most valuable archive in this regard is the nearly 30-year time series of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data that is freely available (already orthorectified) for most regions in the world from the USGS. One region with a most dramatic glacier shrinkage and a missing systematic assessment of changes, is the Palena province in Chile, located south of Puerto Montt in northern Patagonia. A major bottleneck for accurate determination of glacier changes in this region is related to the huge amounts of snow falling in this very maritime region, hiding the perimeter of glaciers throughout the year. Consequently, we found only three years with Landsat scenes that can be used to map glacier extent through time. We here present the results of a glacier change analysis from six Landsat scenes (path-rows 232-89/90) acquired in 1985, 2000 and 2011 covering the Palena district in Chile and neighbouring regions. Clean glacier ice was mapped automatically with a standard technique (TM3/TM band ratio) and manual editing was applied to remove wrongly classified lakes and to add debris-covered glacier parts. The digital elevation model (DEM) from ASTER (GDEM2) was used to derive drainage divides, determine glacier specific topographic parameters, and analyse the area changes in regard to topography. The scene from the year 2000 has the best snow conditions and was used to eliminate seasonal snow in the other two scenes by digital combination of the binary glacier masks and neighbourhood analysis. The derived mean relative area loss over the entire study area is 25%, showing a large spatial variability and a strong dependence on elevation. While small mountain glaciers at high elevations and steep slopes show only little change over the 26-year period, ice at low elevations from large valley glaciers shows a dramatic

  2. Sedimentary connection between rock glaciers and torrential channels: definition, inventory and quantification from a test area in the south-western Swiss Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummert, Mario; Barboux, Chloé; Delaloye, Reynald

    2017-04-01

    Permafrsot creep is an important sediment transfer process in periglacial alpine hillslopes (Delaloye et al. 2010). Rock glaciers are the visible expression of mountain permafrost creep (Delaloye 2004). Large volumes of rock debris originating from headwalls, moraines and weathering deposits are slowly transported within rock glaciers from their rooting zone to their fronts. In the Alps, most rock glaciers can be considered as sediment traps, because the sediment output at their margin is usually limited (Gärtner-Roer 2012). However, cases of rock glacier supplying torrential channels with sediments have been documented (e.g. Lugon and Stoffel 2010, Delaloye et al. 2013) Such rock glaciers can act as a sediment source for the triggering of gravitational processes propagating further downstream. Moreover, in such configuration the amount of sediment available is not a finite volume but is gradually renewed or increased as the rock glacier advances. These cases are therefore very specific, especially in the perspective of natural hazards assessment and mitigation. However, in the Alps very little is known about such type of rock glaciers. In addition, the sediment transfer rates between the fronts of the rock glaciers and the torrents are often not known. In this context, our study aims at (i) defining better the configurations in which a sedimentary connection exists between rock glaciers and torrential channels, (ii) localizing the cases of active rock glaciers connected to the torrential network and (iii) estimating approximate sediment transfer rates between the fronts and the torrential gullies. For that purpose, an inventory method for the classification of torrential catchments based on the analysis of aerial images and the computation of connectivity indexes have been developped. In addition, sediment transfer rates were estimated taking into account the geometry of the frontal areas and the velocity rates of the rock glaciers derived from DInSAR data. In

  3. Internationally coordinated glacier monitoring - a timeline since 1894

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaumer, Samuel U.; Armstrong, Richard; Fetterer, Florence; Gärtner-Roer, Isabelle; Hoelzle, Martin; Machguth, Horst; Mölg, Nico; Paul, Frank; Raup, Bruce H.; Zemp, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Changes in glaciers and ice caps provide some of the clearest evidence of climate change, with impacts on sea-level variations, regional hydrological cycles, and natural hazard situations. Therefore, glaciers have been recognized as an Essential Climate Variable (ECV). Internationally coordinated collection and distribution of standardized information about the state and change of glaciers and ice caps was initiated in 1894 and is today organized within the Global Terrestrial Network for Glaciers (GTN-G). GTN-G ensures the continuous development and adaptation of the international strategies to the long-term needs of users in science and policy. A GTN-G Steering Committee coordinates, supports and advices the operational bodies responsible for the international glacier monitoring, which are the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS), the US National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), and the Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) initiative. In this presentation, we trace the development of the internationally coordinated glacier monitoring since its beginning in the 19th century. Today, several online databases containing a wealth of diverse data types with different levels of detail and global coverage provide fast access to continuously updated information on glacier fluctuation and inventory data. All glacier datasets are made freely available through the respective operational bodies within GTN-G, and can be accessed through the GTN-G Global Glacier Browser (http://www.gtn-g.org/data_browser.html). Glacier inventory data (e.g., digital outlines) are available for about 180,000 glaciers (GLIMS database, RGI - Randolph Glacier Inventory, WGI - World Glacier Inventory). Glacier front variations with about 45,000 entries since the 17th century and about 6,200 glaciological and geodetic mass (volume) change observations dating back to the 19th century are available in the Fluctuations of Glaciers (FoG) database. These datasets reveal clear evidence that

  4. Glacier Photograph Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Glacier Photograph Collection is a database of photographs of glaciers from around the world, some dating back to the mid-1850's, that provide an historical...

  5. Global Terrestrial Network for Glaciers: Databases and Web interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raup, B.; Armstrong, R.; Fetterer, F.; Gartner-Roer, I.; Haeberli, W.; Hoelzle, M.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Nussbaumer, S.; Weaver, R.; Zemp, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Global Terrestrial Network for Glaciers (GTN-G) is an umbrella organization with links to the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS), Global Terrestrial Observing System (GTOS), and UNESCO (all organizations under the United Nations), for the curation of several glacier-related databases. It is composed of the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS), the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), and the Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) initiative. The glacier databases include the World Glacier Inventory (WGI), the GLIMS Glacier Database, the Glacier Photograph Collection at NSIDC, and the Fluctuations of Glaciers (FoG) and Mass Balance databases at WGMS. We are working toward increased interoperability between these related databases. For example, the Web interface to the GLIMS Glacier Database has also included queryable layers for the WGI and FoG databases since 2008. To improve this further, we have produced a new GTN-G web portal (http://www.gtn-g.org/), which includes a glacier metadata browsing application. This web application allows the browsing of the metadata behind the main GTN-G databases, as well as querying the metadata in order to get to the source, no matter which database holds the data in question. A new glacier inventory, called the Randolph Glacier Inventory 1.0, has recently been compiled. This compilation, which includes glacier outlines that do not have the attributes or IDs or links to other data like the GLIMS data do, was motivated by the tight deadline schedule of the sea level chapter of the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Now served from the GLIMS website (http://glims.org/), it is designed to serve that narrowly focused research goal in the near term, and in the longer term will be incorporated into the multi-temporal glacier database of GLIMS. For the required merging of large sets of glacier outlines and association of proper IDs that tie together outlines

  6. The Microclimate of Valley Glaciers

    OpenAIRE

    Oerlemans, J.

    2010-01-01

    Glaciers have fascinated mankind throughout history. Glaciers look solid and robust, but observing them for only a couple of years shows that they are dynamic and change shape all the time. The lower glaciers come, the greater the contrast with the surrounding landscape. Many glaciers in the world enter pastures and forests. It is not surprising that laymen, artists and scientists have reported on the behaviour of large valley glaciers. A wealth of information on glacier fluctuations in histo...

  7. Chemical analyses in the World Coal Quality Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewalt, Susan J.; Belkin, Harvey E.; SanFilipo, John R.; Merrill, Matthew D.; Palmer, Curtis A.; Warwick, Peter D.; Karlsen, Alexander W.; Finkelman, Robert B.; Park, Andy J.

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of the World Coal Quality Inventory (WoCQI) was to collect and analyze a global set of samples of mined coal during a time period from about 1995 to 2006 (Finkelman and Lovern, 2001). Coal samples were collected by foreign collaborators and submitted to country specialists in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Energy Program. However, samples from certain countries, such as Afghanistan, India, and Kyrgyzstan, were collected collaboratively in the field with USGS personnel. Samples were subsequently analyzed at two laboratories: the USGS Inorganic Geochemistry Laboratory located in Denver, CO and a commercial laboratory (Geochemical Testing, Inc.) located in Somerset, PA. Thus the dataset, which is in Excel (2003) format and includes 1,580 samples from 57 countries, does not have the inter-laboratory variability that is present in many compilations. Major-, minor-, and trace-element analyses from the USGS laboratory, calculated to a consistent analytical basis (dry, whole-coal) and presented with available sample identification information, are sorted alphabetically by country name. About 70 percent of the samples also have data from the commercial laboratory, which are presented on an as-received analytical basis. The USGS initiated a laboratory review of quality assurance in 2008, covering quality control and methodology used in inorganic chemical analyses of coal, coal power plant ash, water, and sediment samples. This quality control review found that data generated by the USGS Inorganic Geochemistry Laboratory from 1996 through 2006 were characterized by quality practices that did not meet USGS requirements commonly in use at the time. The most serious shortcomings were (1) the adjustment of raw sample data to standards when the instrument values for those standards exceeded acceptable limits or (2) the insufficient use of multiple standards to provide adequate quality assurance. In general, adjustment of raw data to account for instrument

  8. The microclimate of valley glaciers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    2010-01-01

    Glaciers have fascinated mankind throughout history. Glaciers look solid and robust, but observing them for only a couple of years shows that they are dynamic and change shape all the time. The lower glaciers come, the greater the contrast with the surrounding landscape. Many glaciers in the world

  9. Hasty retreat of glaciers in the Palena province of Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, F.; Mölg, N.; Bolch, T.

    2013-12-01

    Mapping glacier extent from optical satellite data has become a most efficient tool to create or update glacier inventories and determine glacier changes over time. A most valuable archive in this regard is the nearly 30-year time series of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data that is freely available (already orthorectified) for most regions in the world from the USGS. One region with a most dramatic glacier shrinkage and a missing systematic assessment of changes, is the Palena province in Chile, south of Puerto Montt. A major bottleneck for accurate determination of glacier changes in this region is related to the huge amounts of snow falling in this very maritime region, hiding the perimeter of glaciers throughout the year. Consequently, we found only three years with Landsat scenes that can be used to map glacier extent through time. We here present the results of a glacier change analysis from six Landsat scenes (path-rows 232-89/90) acquired in 1985, 2000 and 2011 covering the Palena district in Chile. Clean glacier ice was mapped automatically with a standard technique (TM3/TM band ratio) and manual editing was applied to remove wrongly classified lakes and to add debris-covered glacier parts. The digital elevation model (DEM) from SRTM was used to derive drainage divides, determine glacier specific topographic parameters, and analyse the area changes in regard to topography. The scene from 2000 has the best snow conditions and was used to eliminate seasonal snow in the other two scenes by digital combination of the binary glacier masks. The observed changes show a huge spatial variability with a strong dependence on elevation and glacier hypsometry. While small mountain glaciers at high elevations and steep slopes show virtually no change over the 26-year period, ice at low elevations from large valley glaciers shows a dramatic decline (area and thickness loss). Some glaciers retreated more than 3 km over this time period or even disappeared completely

  10. World heritage site - Bien du Patrimoine Mondial - Kluane/Wrangell-St. Elias/Glacier Bay/Tatshenshini-Alsek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labay, Keith A.; Wilson, Frederic H.

    2004-01-01

    The four parks depicted on this map make up a single World Heritage Site that covers 24.3 million acres. Together, they comprise the largest internationally protected land-based ecosystem on the planet. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) established the World Heritage Program in 1972 for the identification and protection of the world?s irreplaceable natural and cultural resources. World Heritage Sites are important as storehouses of memory and evolution, as anchors for sustainable tourism and community, and as laboratories for the study and understanding of the earth and culture. This World Heritage Site protects the prominent mountain ranges of Kluane, Wrangell, Saint Elias, and Chugach. It includes many of the tallest peaks on the continent, the world's largest non-polar icefield, extensive glaciers, vital watersheds, and expanses of dramatic wilderness. [Les quatre parcs figurant sur cette carte ne constituent qu?un seul site du patrimoine mondial recouvrant plus de 99 millions de km2, ce qui en fait le plus grand ecosysteme terrestre protege par loi internationale. En 1972, L?UNESCO (l?organisation des Nations Unies pour les sciences, l'education et la culture) a etabli le programme du patrimoine mondial afin d?identifier et de proteger les ressources naturelles et culturelles irremplacables de notre plan?te. Si les sites du patrimoine mondial sont si importants c'est parce qu'ils representent a la fois des livres ouverts sur l?histoire de la Terre, le point de depart du tourisme durable et du developpement des collectivites, des laboratoires pour etudier et comprendre la nature et la culture. Ce site du patrimoine mondial assure la protection des chaines de montagnes de Kluane, Wrangell, Saint Elias, et Chugach. On y trouve plusieurs des plus hauts sommets du continent, le plus grand champ de glace non-polaire du monde, d?immenses glaciers, des bassins hydrologiques essentiels, et de la nature sauvage a perte de vue.

  11. The retreat of the world's mountain glaciers during recent decades; Le retrait des glaciers de montagne dans le monde au cours des dernieres decennies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francou, B. [Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement (IRD), Mission de Quito, Equateur - LTHE, 38 - Grenoble (France); Vincent, Ch. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), UJF, LGGE, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2009-08-15

    Glaciers have become essential tools for measuring changes in the global environment. Here, we analyze glacier evolution during the last few decades and we wonder whether the observed retreat remains in the range of glacier fluctuations since the mid-Holocene. The main fluctuations experienced by glaciers during the last millenniums, and particularly during the Little Ice Age (-1300 A.D. to {approx}1860 A.D.), are presented succinctly. The recent 1960-2005 period, well documented both by ground and remote sensing observations, shows important disparities between different massifs concerning the timing and the magnitude of glacier fluctuations, which depend on regional climatic conditions. The links between glacier mass balance evolution and climate is clear when approached from an energy balance but the variables commonly considered are only temperature and precipitation. The strong correlation existing between these variables and the mass balance evolution makes it possible to simulate glaciers in the future in function of distinct climatic scenarios. Modeling glacier retreat for the 21. century is an important goal because it will allow the impacts on water resource and sea level to be assessed. (authors)

  12. Inventory of real world data sources in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanguy, Audrey; Jönsson, Linus; Ishihara, Lianna

    2017-12-08

    Real world data have an important role to play in the evaluation of epidemiology and burden of disease; and in assisting health-care decision-makers, especially related to coverage and payment decisions. However, there is currently no overview of the existing longitudinal real world data sources in Parkinson's disease (PD) in the USA. Such an assessment can be very helpful, to support a future effort to harmonize real world data collection and use the available resources in an optimal way. The objective of this comprehensive literature review is to systematically identify and describe the longitudinal, real world data sources in PD in the USA, and to provide a summary of their measurements (categorized into 8 main dimensions: motor and neurological functions, cognition, psychiatry, activities of daily living, sleep, quality of life, autonomic symptoms and other). The literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE and internet key word search. Of the 53 data sources identified between May and August 2016, 16 were still ongoing. Current medications (81%) and comorbidities (79%) were frequently collected, in comparison to medical imaging (36%), genetic information (30%), caregiver burden (11%) and healthcare costs (2%). Many different measurements (n = 108) were performed and an interesting variability among used measurements was revealed. Many longitudinal real world data sources on PD exist. Different types of measurements have been performed over time. To allow comparison and pooling of these multiple data sources, it will be essential to harmonize practices in terms of types of measurements.

  13. Glacier Ecosystems of Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohshima, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Takeuchi, N.; Segawa, T.; Uetake, J.

    2012-12-01

    Biological activity on glaciers has been believed to be extremely limited. However, we found various biotic communities specialized to the glacier environment in various part of the world, such as Himalaya, Patagonia and Alaska. Some of these glacier hosted biotic communities including various cold-tolerant insects, annelids and copepods that were living in the glacier by feeding on algae and bacteria growing in the snow and ice. Thus, the glaciers are simple and relatively closed ecosystems sustained by the primary production in the snow and ice. In this presentation, we will briefly introduce glacier ecosystems in Himalaya; ecology and behavior of glacier animals, altitudinal zonation of snow algal communities, and the structure of their habitats in the glacier. Since the microorganisms growing on the glacier surface are stored in the glacial strata every year, ice-core samples contain many layers with these microorganisms. We showed that the snow algae in the ice-core are useful for ice core dating and could be new environmental signals for the studies on past environment using ice cores. These microorganisms in the ice core will be important especially in the studies of ice core from the glaciers of warmer regions, in which chemical and isotopic contents are often heavily disturbed by melt water percolation. Blooms of algae and bacteria on the glacier can reduce the surface albedo and significantly affect the glacier melting. For example, the surface albedo of some Himalayan glaciers was significantly reduced by a large amount of dark-colored biogenic material (cryoconite) derived from snow algae and bacteria. It increased the melting rates of the surfaces by as much as three-fold. Thus, it was suggested that the microbial activity on the glacier could affect the mass balance and fluctuation of the glaciers.

  14. A systematically-derived global glacier map derived from MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodzik, M.; Painter, T. H.; Armstrong, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    A wealth of glacier data are contained in the archives of both the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS), Zurich, Switzerland, and the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), Boulder, USA. Types of data range from detailed, high resolution digital glacier outlines, to carefully compiled time series of terminus fluctuation and mass balance measurements, to glacier photograph pairs showing change through time. One fundamental missing component of a world glacier inventory is simply a single, systematically-derived base map of the world’s glaciers, at any scale. The MODICE project has developed a prototype example of such a consistently-derived base map, using 500 m MODIS data. The MODICE algorithm identifies surfaces with persistent snow and ice, derived from MODIS Snow-covered Area and Grain-Size Albedo (MODSCAG) subpixel snow fraction, during the annual period that includes the seasonal minimum snow cover. We describe the persistence algorithm approach that accounts for problems of transient snow or clouds that may incorrectly be identified as ice in any given scene. We demonstrate the algorithm results for the Himalayan Plateau (comprising 10 MODIS tiles) for the autumns of 2001 and 2002. We are validating the MODICE persistent ice map by comparing to areas of glaciers identified by Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS). Our presentation includes standard image classification statistics as metrics of the accuracy of the MODICE approach.

  15. Mapping Glacier Data and Photographs via GeoServer and Virtual Globes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballagh, L. M.; Wang, I.; Wallace, A.

    2008-12-01

    Two extensively used glacier data sets include the World Glacier Inventory and the Glacier Photograph Collection. Both data sets are hosted at the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colorado. The World Glacier Inventory encompasses over 100,000 records of glacier data and the Glacier Photograph Collection houses approximately 9,000 digitized photographs. The online Glacier Photograph Collection has doubled in size this year due to significant updates from the USGS Ice and Climate Project collection. A majority of these aerial photographs were taken by legendary aerial photographer Austin Post. These updates bring images from the past to the forefront by allowing users to view Alaskan glaciers from the 1960s through the 1990s. Since KML is now an open standard, these glacier KML files are accessible through many virtual globes. The glacier photograph KML files are updated at infrequent intervals. Because the WGI contains over 100,000 data records, it is impractical to create a static KML file to access the data. A remedy to this issue is to host the data in a spatial database. A PostgreSQL database with a PostGIS extension is selected for this reason. GeoServer, an open source server, supports PostGIS and produces KML/KMZ as an output option. The need for manual KML/KMZ updates is alleviated since GeoServer includes the built-in functionality. GeoServer acts as the intermediary between the database and the final content in a virtual globe. When viewing the output KML/KMZ from GeoServer, the World Glacier Inventory fields are difficult to interpret since the database field names are displayed without an explanation. Customizations to the field names implemented locally at NSIDC make the pop-up windows in a virtual globe more comprehensible and user friendly. By enabling access to both glacier files, scientific data users have the ability to locate their region of interest and look for both data sets in a spatial context. Data users can see where the

  16. Glacier fluctuations, global temperature and sea-level change

    OpenAIRE

    P. W. Leclercq

    2012-01-01

    The current world-wide glacier retreat is a clear sign of global warming. In addition, glaciers contribute to sea-level rise as a consequence of the current retreat. In this thesis we use records of past glacier fluctuations to reconstruct past climate variations and the glacier contribution to sea-level change. Firstly, a coherent data set of world-wide glacier fluctuations over the past centuries is compiled. Most available information of glacier fluctuations concerns glacier length fluctua...

  17. Glaciers and society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagné, Karine; Rasmussen, Mattias Borg; Orlove, Ben

    2014-01-01

    toward technological methodologies. Yet, as elements of the landscape, glaciers are strongly integrated to various societies around the world in ways that exceed their role as provider of fundamental sources of water. The relation between glaciers and societies is therefore marked by processes...

  18. Glacier Mapping With Landsat Tm: Improvements and Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, F.; Huggel, C.; Kaeaeb, A.; Maisch, M.

    The new Swiss Glacier Inventory for the year 2000 (SGI 2000) is presently derived from Landsat TM data. Glacier areas were obtained by segmentation of a ratio image from TM band 4 and 5. This method has proven to be very simple and highly accurate - an essential requirement for world-wide application within the project GLIMS (Global Land Ice Measurements from Space). Mis-classification using TM4 / TM 5 results for lakes, forests and areas with vegetation in cloud shadows. Digital image processing techniques are used to classify these regions separately and eliminate them from the glacier map. Automatic mapping of debris-covered glacier ice is difficult due to the spectral similarity with the surrounding terrain. For the SGI 2000, an attempt has been made to obtain the debris-covered area on glaciers by a combination of pixel- based image classification, digital terrain modelling, an object-oriented procedure and change detection analysis. First results of these improvements are presented. The accuracy of the TM derived glacier outlines is assessed by a comparison with manually derived outlines of higher resolution data sets (pan bands from SPOT, IRS- 1C and Ikonos). The overlay of outlines show very good correspondence (within the georeferencing accuracy) and the comparison of glacier areas reveals differences smaller than 5% for debris-free ice. Since acquisition of IRS-1C and Ikonos imagery is one year before and after the TM scene, respectively, small differences are also a result of glacier retreat. The automatically mapped debris-covered glacier areas are compared to the areas assigned manually on the TM image by visual interpretation. For most glaciers only a few pixels have to be corrected, for some others larger modi- fications are required.

  19. GLIMS Glacier Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) is an international project with the goal of surveying a majority of the world's estimated 160,000 glaciers. GLIMS...

  20. A minimal model for reconstructing interannual mass balance variability of glaciers in the European Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzeion, B.; Hofer, M.; Jarosch, A. H.; Kaser, G.; Mölg, T.

    2012-01-01

    We present a minimal model of the glacier surface mass balance. The model relies solely on monthly precipitation and air temperatures as forcing. We first train the model individually for 15 glaciers with existing mass balance measurements. Based on a cross validation, we present a thorough assessment of the model's performance outside of the training period. The cross validation indicates that our model is robust, and our model's performance compares favorably to that from a less parsimonious model based on seasonal sensitivity characteristics. Then, the model is extended for application on glaciers without existing mass balance measurements. We cross validated the model again by withholding the mass balance information from each of the 15 glaciers above during the model training, in order to measure its performance on glaciers not included in the model training. This cross validation indicates that the model retains considerable skill even when applied on glaciers without mass balance measurements. As an exemplary application, the model is then used to reconstruct time series of interannual mass balance variability, covering the past two hundred years, for all glaciers in the European Alps contained in the extended format of the world glacier inventory. Based on this reconstruction, we present a spatially detailed attribution of the glaciers' mass balance variability to temperature and precipitation variability.

  1. A minimal model for reconstructing interannual mass balance variability of glaciers in the European Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Marzeion

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a minimal model of the glacier surface mass balance. The model relies solely on monthly precipitation and air temperatures as forcing. We first train the model individually for 15 glaciers with existing mass balance measurements. Based on a cross validation, we present a thorough assessment of the model's performance outside of the training period. The cross validation indicates that our model is robust, and our model's performance compares favorably to that from a less parsimonious model based on seasonal sensitivity characteristics. Then, the model is extended for application on glaciers without existing mass balance measurements. We cross validated the model again by withholding the mass balance information from each of the 15 glaciers above during the model training, in order to measure its performance on glaciers not included in the model training. This cross validation indicates that the model retains considerable skill even when applied on glaciers without mass balance measurements.

    As an exemplary application, the model is then used to reconstruct time series of interannual mass balance variability, covering the past two hundred years, for all glaciers in the European Alps contained in the extended format of the world glacier inventory. Based on this reconstruction, we present a spatially detailed attribution of the glaciers' mass balance variability to temperature and precipitation variability.

  2. Comparison of bacterial diversity in proglacial soil from Kafni Glacier, Himalayan Mountain ranges, India, with the bacterial diversity of other glaciers in the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, T N R; Singh, S M; Pradhan, Suman; Pratibha, M S; Kishore, K Hara; Singh, Ashish K; Begum, Z; Prabagaran, S R; Reddy, G S N; Shivaji, S

    2011-11-01

    Two 16S rRNA gene clone libraries (KF and KS) were constructed using two soil samples (K7s and K8s) collected near Kafni Glacier, Himalayas. The two libraries yielded a total of 648 clones. Phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetae, Tenericutes and Verrucomicrobia were common to the two libraries. Phyla Acidobacteria, Chlamydiae and Nitrospirae were present only in KF library, whereas Lentisphaerae and TM7 were detected only in KS. In the two libraries, clones belonging to phyla Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria were the most predominant. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that KF and KS were different and arsenic content influenced the differences in the percentage of OTUs. PCA indicated that high water content in the K8s sample results in high total bacterial count. PCA also indicated that bacterial diversity of KF and KS was similar to soils from the Pindari Glacier, Himalayas; Samoylov Island, Siberia; Schrimacher Oasis, Antarctica and Siberian tundra. The eleven bacterial strains isolated from the above two soil samples were phylogenetically related to six different genera. All the isolates were psychro-, halo- and alkalitolerant. Amylase, lipase and urease activities were detected in the majority of the strains. Long chain, saturated, unsaturated and branched fatty acids were predominant in the psychrotolerant bacteria.

  3. The Response of Rock Glaciers and Protalus Lobes to Ice and Debris Supply in a Warming World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, B.; Azizi, F.

    2012-12-01

    Valley glacier mass balances in upland areas are indicators of temperature and precipitation distribution and also respond in their distribution to altitude and continentality. Rock glaciers (valley floor) with low velocities, originally considered as restricted to continental interiors, have also been found in maritime areas. Rock glaciers have been considered as indicators of permafrost but have also been found with (glacier) ice cores. Protalus lobes (lobate rock glaciers) also show low velocities and thought to be admixtures of meltwater-derived ice plus rock debris and related to and indicative of permafrost. Climate forcing may be expected to produce differing responses in terms of movement and the form of the traces left when ice has melted from the system (relict/fossil forms). The formation and maintenance of these forms needs to be understood before present and palaeo-forms can be interpreted correctly. The difficulty of using admixtures of rock debris and interstitial ice to explain flow has been argued previously. This paper investigates the distribution of ice origin and debris supply to these features as part of an explanation of their origin, distribution and response to a warming climate. It also makes some predictions that should be seen in individual cases and generally for the type of feature seen. The present day distribution of glaciers, rock glaciers, protalus lobes and scree slopes from several areas is discussed (Svalbard, Iceland, Alpes Martimes, Central Alaska, New Zealand, Hundu Kush). Distributions of rock glaciers and protalus lobes are rarely coincident. This paper shows that, in the great majority of cases, small valley glaciers co-exist with rock glaciers but scree slopes (talus) only supply debris to them from valley heads. This is true in areas of known permafrost as well as where such conditions are unlikely. Glacier ice cores can be observed or inferred in both situations. Climate warming will ultimately produce modified

  4. Rock glaciers in the Pyrenees, Spain and France, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This study and inventory of active rock glaciers was carried out by means of the usual techniques used in the study of alpine permafrost. First, the rock glaciers...

  5. Peak water from glaciers: advances and challenges in a global perspective (Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Young Scientists Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, Matthias; Hock, Regine

    2014-05-01

    Mountain glaciers show a high sensitivity to changes in climate forcing. In a global perspective, their anticipated retreat will pose far-reaching challenges to the manage- ment of fresh water resources and will raise sea levels significantly within only a few decades. Different model frameworks have been applied to simulate melt water con- tributions of glaciers outside the two ice sheets for the recent IPCC report. However, these models depend on strongly simplified, and often empirical descriptions of the driving processes hampering the reliability of the results. For example, glacier retreat is parameterized with volume-area scaling thus neglecting the glacier's actual geome- try and the surface elevation feedback. Frontal ablation of tidewater and lake-calving glaciers, an important mass loss component for a third of the world's glacier area, is not accounted for. Thus, a transition from the physically-based mass balance-ice flow models developed for single glaciers to the application at the global scale is urgently needed. The chal- lenges are manifold but can be tackled with the new data sets, methods and process- understanding that have emerged during the last years. Here, we present a novel glacier model for calculating the response of surface mass balance and 3D glacier geometry for each individual glacier around the globe. Our approach accounts for feedbacks due to glacier retreat and includes models for mass loss due to frontal ablation and the refreezing of water in the snow/firn. The current surface geometry and thickness distribution for each of the world's roughly 200'000 glaciers is extracted from the Randolph Glacier Inventory v3.2 and terrain models. Our simulations are driven with 14 Global Circulation Models from the CMIP5 project using the RCP4.5, RCP8.5 and RCP2.6 scenarios. Regionally specified cumulative global sea level rise due to glacier mass loss until 2100 is discussed in the light of model uncertainties and the advantages of using a

  6. Surface melt dominates Alaska glacier mass balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen Chris F,; Burgess, E; Arendt, A.A.; O'Neel, Shad; Johnson, A.J.; Kienholz, C.

    2015-01-01

    Mountain glaciers comprise a small and widely distributed fraction of the world's terrestrial ice, yet their rapid losses presently drive a large percentage of the cryosphere's contribution to sea level rise. Regional mass balance assessments are challenging over large glacier populations due to remote and rugged geography, variable response of individual glaciers to climate change, and episodic calving losses from tidewater glaciers. In Alaska, we use airborne altimetry from 116 glaciers to estimate a regional mass balance of −75 ± 11 Gt yr−1 (1994–2013). Our glacier sample is spatially well distributed, yet pervasive variability in mass balances obscures geospatial and climatic relationships. However, for the first time, these data allow the partitioning of regional mass balance by glacier type. We find that tidewater glaciers are losing mass at substantially slower rates than other glaciers in Alaska and collectively contribute to only 6% of the regional mass loss.

  7. Sensitivity of Glaciers and Small Ice Caps to Greehouse Warming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.; Fortuin, J.P.F.

    1992-01-01

    Recent field programs on glaciers have supplied information that makes simulation of glacier mass balance with meteorological models meaningful. An estimate of world-wide glacier sensitivity based on a modeling study of 12 selected glaciers situated in widely differing climatic regimes shows that

  8. Glacier fluctuations, global temperature and sea-level change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leclercq, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    The current world-wide glacier retreat is a clear sign of global warming. In addition, glaciers contribute to sea-level rise as a consequence of the current retreat. In this thesis we use records of past glacier fluctuations to reconstruct past climate variations and the glacier contribution to

  9. GLIMS Glacier Database, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) is an international initiative with the goal of repeatedly surveying the world's estimated 200,000 glaciers. GLIMS...

  10. A Worldwide Glacier Information System to go

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölg, N.; Steinmann, M.; Zemp, M.

    2016-12-01

    In the forefront of the Paris Climate Conference COP21 in December 2015, the WGMS and UNESCO jointly launched a glacier application for mobile devices. This new information system aims at bringing scientifically sound facts and figures on worldwide glacier changes to decision makers at governmental and intergovernmental levels as well as reaching out to the interested public. The wgms Glacier App provides a map interface based on satellite images that display all the observed glaciers in the user's proximity. Basic information is provided for each glacier, including photographs and general information on size and elevation. Graphs with observation data illustrate the glacier's development, along with information on latest principal investigators and their sponsoring agencies as well as detailed explanations of the measurement types. A text search allows the user to filter the glacier by name, country, region, measurement type and the current "health" status, i.e. if the glacier has gained or lost ice over the past decade. A compass shows the closest observed glaciers in all directions from the user's current position. Finally, the card game allows the user to compete against the computer on the best monitored glaciers in the world. Our poster provides a visual entrance point to the wgms Glacier App and, hence, provides access to fluctuation series of more than 3'700 glaciers around the world.

  11. Classification of debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers in the Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Jason R.; Bellisario, Antonio C.; Ferrando, Francisco A.

    2015-07-01

    transverse ridges and furrows that arch across the surface, which indicates flow produced via ice. Class 5 rock glaciers have ridges and furrows that appear linear in the direction of flow, indicating reduced flow from limited internal ice; and class 6 rock glaciers have subdued surface topography because the movement of the rock glacier has ceased. Ice content decreases from 25-45%, to 10-25%, to glaciers and rock glaciers to create an inventory. This will help improve recognition of these landforms as an important water resource in the dry Andes of Chile, which will aid in sustainable planning and development in basins that hold the majority of the population and support a large share of the economic activity in Chile.

  12. Peak water from glaciers: advances and challenges in a global perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, M.; Hock, R.

    2014-12-01

    Mountain glaciers show a high sensitivity to changes in climate forcing. In a global perspective, their anticipated retreat will pose far-reaching challenges to the management of fresh water resources and will raise sea levels significantly within only a few decades. Different model frameworks have been applied to simulate melt water contributions of glaciers outside the two ice sheets for the recent IPCC report. However, these models depend on strongly simplified, and often empirical descriptions of the driving processes hampering the reliability of the results. Thus, a transition from the physically-based mass balance-ice flow models developed for single glaciers to the application at the global scale is urgently needed. The challenges are manifold but can be tackled with the new data sets, methods and process-understanding that have emerged during the last years. Here, we present a novel glacier model for calculating the response of surface mass balance and 3D glacier geometry for each individual glacier around the globe. Our approach accounts for feedbacks due to glacier retreat and includes models for mass loss due to frontal ablation and refreezing of water in the snow/firn. This allows the calculation of the components of proglacial runoff for each individual glacier in a process-based way. The current surface geometry and thickness distribution for each of the world's roughly 200'000 glaciers is extracted from the Randolph Glacier Inventory v3.3 and terrain models. Our simulations are driven with 14 Global Circulation Models from the CMIP5 project using the RCP4.5, RCP8.5 and RCP2.6 scenarios. We focus on the timing of peak water from glacierized catchments in all climatic regions of the earth and the corresponding importance of these regime changes on hydrological stress. Peak water represents a crucial tipping point for sustained water supply even for regions with only a minor glacier coverage, and is relevant to the dynamics of sea level rise. The

  13. THE INTERNET PRESENTATION OF DATABASES OF GLACIERS OF THE SOUTH OF EASTERN SIBERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kitov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider the technology for creating databases of glaciers in Southern Siberia and the presentation of these databases on the Internet. The technology consists in the recognition and vectorization of spatial, multi-temporal data using GIS techniques, followed by the formation of databases that reflect the spatial and temporal variation of nival-glacial formations. The results of GIS design are presented on the website IG SB RAS and with the help of Internet service ArcGISonline on the public map. The mapping of databases shows the dynamic of nival-glacial formations for three time phases: the beginning of the 20th century (if you have data, its middle (the catalogs of glaciers and topographic maps and the beginning of the 21st century (according to satellite images and field research. Graphic objects are represented as point, line, and polygonal GIS-themes. Point-themes indicate parameters such as the center, lower and upper boundaries of the glacier. Line-themes determine the length and perimeter of the glacier. Polygonal-themes define the contour of the glacier and its area. The attributive table corresponds to the international standard World Glacier Inventory (WGI. The contours of the glaciers of northern Asia are represented conditionally (ellipses at international portals, and attribute characteristics correspond to the state that was displayed in catalogs of glaciers of the USSR, and they are inaccurate. Considered databases are devoid of these shortcomings. Coordinates of the center of glaciers have been refined. Glaciers contours have boundaries, appropriate to space images or topographic maps, in shp-file format. New glaciers of Baikalskiy and Barguzinskiy ridges are also presented. Existing catalogs and databases still do not include these glaciers. Features of the glaciers are examined in the context of the latitudinal transect of southern Siberia, from the Kodar ridge to the Eastern Sayan. GIS-analysis of the Databases

  14. A semi-automatic method to create central glacier flow lines: A pilot study with Alaskan glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bris, R.; Paul, F.

    2012-04-01

    Glacier length is an important, but largely missing parameter in digital glacier inventories as it has to be digitized by hand (with the related variability). Length changes of glaciers are key indicators of climate change, but can only be measured in the field for a few hundred selected glaciers globally. Its vector representation (a central flow line) is a most important input for modelling future glacier evolution, but only seldom available from digital databases. Hence, there is an urgent need to generate such flow lines for a large number of glaciers from automated methods. The study describes a new method to automatically create central flowlines of glaciers along with an application to a study site where its suitability to automatically derive changes in glacier length is demonstrated. Our new method will likely strongly facilitate the number of available data on both issues (length values and changes) and thus help to improve the assessment and modelling of climate change impacts on glaciers. This new algorithm is based on Python scripting and additional libraries (GDAL / OGR) and requires only a DEM and glacier outlines as an input. The core of the method is based on a glacier axis concept that is combined with geometry rules such as the k-d Tree, Nearest Neighbour and crossing test theory. We have applied the method to 400 glaciers located in Western Alaska, where a new glacier inventory was recently created. The accuracy of the method was assessed by a quantitative and qualitative (outline overlay) comparison with a manually digitized data set for 20 glaciers. This comparison revealed for 17 out of the 20 glaciers a length value that is within the range of the manual digitizations. Other potential methods to determined glacier length performed less good. Combined with previous glacier outlines from the same region we determined and analysed length changes for 390 glaciers over a c. 50 year period.

  15. Glaciers: clues to future climate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard S.

    1983-01-01

    A glacier is a large mass of ice having its genesis on land and represents a multiyear surplus of snowfall over snowmelt. At the present time, perennial ice covers about 10 percent of the land areas of the Earth. Although glaciers are generally thought of as polar entities, they also are found in mountainous areas throughout the world, on all continents except Australia, and even at or near the Equator on high mountains in Africa and South America.

  16. Climate reconstructions derived from global glacier length records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, E.J.; Oerlemans, J.

    2004-01-01

    As glacier length fluctuations provide useful information about past climate, we derived historic fluctuations in the equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) on the basis of 19 glacier length records from different parts of the world. We used a model that takes into account the geometry of the glacier,

  17. Nanotechnology in the real world: Redeveloping the nanomaterial consumer products inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiken, Todd; Vejerano, Eric P; McGinnis, Sean P; Hochella, Michael F; Rejeski, David; Hull, Matthew S

    2015-01-01

    Summary To document the marketing and distribution of nano-enabled products into the commercial marketplace, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies created the Nanotechnology Consumer Products Inventory (CPI) in 2005. The objective of this present work is to redevelop the CPI by leading a research effort to increase the usefulness and reliability of this inventory. We created eight new descriptors for consumer products, including information pertaining to the nanomaterials contained in each product. The project was motivated by the recognition that a diverse group of stakeholders from academia, industry, and state/federal government had become highly dependent on the inventory as an important resource and bellweather of the pervasiveness of nanotechnology in society. We interviewed 68 nanotechnology experts to assess key information needs. Their answers guided inventory modifications by providing a clear conceptual framework best suited for user expectations. The revised inventory was released in October 2013. It currently lists 1814 consumer products from 622 companies in 32 countries. The Health and Fitness category contains the most products (762, or 42% of the total). Silver is the most frequently used nanomaterial (435 products, or 24%); however, 49% of the products (889) included in the CPI do not provide the composition of the nanomaterial used in them. About 29% of the CPI (528 products) contain nanomaterials suspended in a variety of liquid media and dermal contact is the most likely exposure scenario from their use. The majority (1288 products, or 71%) of the products do not present enough supporting information to corroborate the claim that nanomaterials are used. The modified CPI has enabled crowdsourcing capabilities, which allow users to suggest edits to any entry and permits researchers to upload new findings ranging from human and environmental exposure data to complete life cycle

  18. Nanotechnology in the real world: Redeveloping the nanomaterial consumer products inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina E. Vance

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available To document the marketing and distribution of nano-enabled products into the commercial marketplace, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies created the Nanotechnology Consumer Products Inventory (CPI in 2005. The objective of this present work is to redevelop the CPI by leading a research effort to increase the usefulness and reliability of this inventory. We created eight new descriptors for consumer products, including information pertaining to the nanomaterials contained in each product. The project was motivated by the recognition that a diverse group of stakeholders from academia, industry, and state/federal government had become highly dependent on the inventory as an important resource and bellweather of the pervasiveness of nanotechnology in society. We interviewed 68 nanotechnology experts to assess key information needs. Their answers guided inventory modifications by providing a clear conceptual framework best suited for user expectations. The revised inventory was released in October 2013. It currently lists 1814 consumer products from 622 companies in 32 countries. The Health and Fitness category contains the most products (762, or 42% of the total. Silver is the most frequently used nanomaterial (435 products, or 24%; however, 49% of the products (889 included in the CPI do not provide the composition of the nanomaterial used in them. About 29% of the CPI (528 products contain nanomaterials suspended in a variety of liquid media and dermal contact is the most likely exposure scenario from their use. The majority (1288 products, or 71% of the products do not present enough supporting information to corroborate the claim that nanomaterials are used. The modified CPI has enabled crowdsourcing capabilities, which allow users to suggest edits to any entry and permits researchers to upload new findings ranging from human and environmental exposure data to complete life cycle

  19. Alpine Glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 27 August 2003This image shows part of the western flank of Arsia Mons, the southernmost of the three great Tharsis Montes. The surface shows parallel ridges more reminiscent of a Zen garden than any typical geological feature. These ridges are not typical of lava flow fronts, so a different explanation has been proposed by Mars scientists. These ridges may instead be ancient signs of previously existing glaciers that formed high on the volcano's flank. As glaciers retreat with the seasons and shifting climate, they leave behind a mound of debris along their receding edge. Successive retreats can produce a series of parallel ridges similar to those seen here.Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -6.9, Longitude 230.5 East (129.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  20. Glaciers of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard S.; Ferrigno, Jane G.

    1988-01-01

    Of all the world?s continents Antarctica is the coldest, the highest, and the least known. It is one and a half times the size of the United States, and on it lies 91 percent (30,109,800 km3) of the estimated volume of all the ice on Earth. Because so little is known about Antarctic glaciers compared with what is known about glaciers in populated countries, satellite imagery represents a great leap forward in the provision of basic data. From the coast of Antarctica to about 81?south latitude, there are 2,514 Landsat nominal scene centers (the fixed geographic position of the intersection of orbital paths and latitudinal rows). If there were cloud-free images for all these geographic centers, only about 520 Landsat images would be needed to provide complete coverage. Because of cloud cover, however, only about 70 percent of the Landsat imaging area, or 55 percent of the continent, is covered by good quality Landsat images. To date, only about 20 percent of Antarctica has been mapped at scales of 1:250,000 or larger, but these maps do include about half of the coastline. The area of Antarctica that could be planimetrically mapped at a scale of 1:250,000 would be tripled if the available Landsat images were used in image map production. This chapter contains brief descriptions and interpretations of features seen in 62 carefully selected Landsat images or image mosaics. Images were chosen on the basis of quality and interest; for this reason they are far from evenly spaced around the continent. Space limitations allow less than 15 percent of the Landsat imaging area of Antarctica to be shown in the illustrations reproduced in this chapter. Unfortunately, a wealth of glaciological and other features of compelling interest is present in the many hundreds of images that could not be included. To help show some important features beyond the limit of Landsat coverage, and as an aid to the interpretation of certain features seen in the images, 38 oblique aerial photographs

  1. Rock glaciers from Norway and Svalbard, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A complete inventory of rock glaciers on mainland Norway and Svalbard has only been carried out in connection with coarse geomorphological mapping. The data...

  2. Inventory of rock avalanches in western Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska, 1984-2016: a baseline data set for evaluating the impact of climate change on avalanche magnitude, mobility, and frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessette-Kirton, Erin; Coe, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of climate change have the potential to impact slope stability. Negative impacts are expected to be greatest at high northerly latitudes where degradation of permafrost in rock and soil, debuttressing of slopes as a result of glacial retreat, and changes in ocean ice-cover are likely to increase the susceptibility of slopes to landslides. In the United States, the greatest increases in air temperature and precipitation are expected to occur in Alaska. In order to assess the impact that these environmental changes will have on landslide size (magnitude), mobility, and frequency, inventories of historical landslides are needed. These inventories provide baseline data that can be used to identify changes in historical and future landslide magnitude, mobility, and frequency.  This data release presents GIS and attribute data for an inventory of rock avalanches in a 5000 km2 area of western Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska. We created the inventory from 30 m resolution Landsat imagery acquired from June 1984 to September 2016.  For each calendar year, we visually examined a minimum of one Landsat image obtained between the months of May and October. We examined a total of 104 Landsat images. The contrast between the spectral signatures of freshly exposed rock avalanche source areas and deposits and surrounding undisturbed snow and ice was typically significant enough to detect surficial changes. We identified and mapped rock avalanches by locating areas with 1) high contrast compared to surrounding snow and ice, 2) different spectral signatures between successive Landsat images, and 3) lobate forms typical of rock-avalanche deposits. Using these criteria, we mapped a total of 24 rock avalanches ranging in size from 0.1 to 22 km2.Attribute data for each rock avalanche includes: a date, or range in possible dates, of occurrence; the name of the Landsat image(s) used to identify and map the avalanche; the total area covered by the rock avalanche

  3. Glaciers of North America - Glaciers of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnia, Bruce F.

    2008-01-01

    Glaciers cover about 75,000 km2 of Alaska, about 5 percent of the State. The glaciers are situated on 11 mountain ranges, 1 large island, an island chain, and 1 archipelago and range in elevation from more than 6,000 m to below sea level. Alaska's glaciers extend geographically from the far southeast at lat 55 deg 19'N., long 130 deg 05'W., about 100 kilometers east of Ketchikan, to the far southwest at Kiska Island at lat 52 deg 05'N., long 177 deg 35'E., in the Aleutian Islands, and as far north as lat 69 deg 20'N., long 143 deg 45'W., in the Brooks Range. During the 'Little Ice Age', Alaska's glaciers expanded significantly. The total area and volume of glaciers in Alaska continue to decrease, as they have been doing since the 18th century. Of the 153 1:250,000-scale topographic maps that cover the State of Alaska, 63 sheets show glaciers. Although the number of extant glaciers has never been systematically counted and is thus unknown, the total probably is greater than 100,000. Only about 600 glaciers (about 1 percent) have been officially named by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names (BGN). There are about 60 active and former tidewater glaciers in Alaska. Within the glacierized mountain ranges of southeastern Alaska and western Canada, 205 glaciers (75 percent in Alaska) have a history of surging. In the same region, at least 53 present and 7 former large ice-dammed lakes have produced jokulhlaups (glacier-outburst floods). Ice-capped volcanoes on mainland Alaska and in the Aleutian Islands have a potential for jokulhlaups caused by subglacier volcanic and geothermal activity. Because of the size of the area covered by glaciers and the lack of large-scale maps of the glacierized areas, satellite imagery and other satellite remote-sensing data are the only practical means of monitoring regional changes in the area and volume of Alaska's glaciers in response to short- and long-term changes in the maritime and continental climates of the State. A review of the

  4. Glaciers in 21st Century Himalayan Geopolitics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargel, J. S.; Wessels, R.; Kieffer, H. H.

    2002-05-01

    Glaciers are ablating rapidly the world over. Nowhere are the rates of retreat and downwasting greater than in the Hindu Kush-Himalaya (HKH) region. It is estimated that over the next century, 40,000 square kilometers of present glacier area in the HKH region will become ice free. Most of this area is in major valleys and the lowest glaciated mountain passes. The existence and characteristics of glaciers have security impacts, and rapidly changing HKH glaciers have broad strategic implications: (1) Glaciers supply much of the fresh water and hydroelectric power in South and Central Asia, and so glaciers are valuable resources. (2) Shared economic interests in water, hydroelectricity, flood hazards, and habitat preservation are a force for common cause and reasoned international relations. (3) Glaciers and their high mountains generally pose a natural barrier tending to isolate people. Historically, they have hindered trade and intercultural exchanges and have protected against aggression. This has further promoted an independent spirit of the region's many ethnic groups. (4) Although glaciers are generally incompatible with human development and habitation, many of the HKH region's glaciers and their mountains have become sanctuaries and transit routes for militants. Siachen Glacier in Kashmir has for 17 years been "the world's highest battlefield," with tens of thousands of troops deployed on both sides of the India/Pakistan line of control. In 1999, that conflict threatened to trigger all-out warfare, and perhaps nuclear warfare. Other recent terrorist and military action has taken place on glaciers in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. As terrorists are forced from easily controlled territories, many may tend to migrate toward the highest ground, where definitive encounters may take place in severe alpine glacial environments. This should be a major concern in Nepali security planning, where an Army offensive is attempting to reign in an increasingly robust and brutal

  5. Contrasting responses of Central Asian rock glaciers to global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorg, Annina; Kääb, Andreas; Roesch, Andrea; Bigler, Christof; Stoffel, Markus

    2015-01-01

    While the responses of Tien Shan glaciers – and glaciers elsewhere – to climatic changes are becoming increasingly well understood, this is less the case for permafrost in general and for rock glaciers in particular. We use a novel approach to describe the climate sensitivity of rock glaciers and to reconstruct periods of high and low rock glacier activity in the Tien Shan since 1895. Using more than 1500 growth anomalies from 280 trees growing on rock glacier bodies, repeat aerial photography from Soviet archives and high-resolution satellite imagery, we present here the world's longest record of rock glacier movements. We also demonstrate that the rock glaciers exhibit synchronous periods of activity at decadal timescales. Despite the complex energy-balance processes on rock glaciers, periods of enhanced activity coincide with warm summers, and the annual mass balance of Tuyuksu glacier fluctuates asynchronously with rock glacier activity. At multi-decadal timescales, however, the investigated rock glaciers exhibit site-specific trends reflecting different stages of inactivation, seemingly in response to the strong increase in air temperature since the 1970s. PMID:25657095

  6. Contrasting responses of Central Asian rock glaciers to global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorg, Annina; Kääb, Andreas; Roesch, Andrea; Bigler, Christof; Stoffel, Markus

    2015-02-01

    While the responses of Tien Shan glaciers - and glaciers elsewhere - to climatic changes are becoming increasingly well understood, this is less the case for permafrost in general and for rock glaciers in particular. We use a novel approach to describe the climate sensitivity of rock glaciers and to reconstruct periods of high and low rock glacier activity in the Tien Shan since 1895. Using more than 1500 growth anomalies from 280 trees growing on rock glacier bodies, repeat aerial photography from Soviet archives and high-resolution satellite imagery, we present here the world's longest record of rock glacier movements. We also demonstrate that the rock glaciers exhibit synchronous periods of activity at decadal timescales. Despite the complex energy-balance processes on rock glaciers, periods of enhanced activity coincide with warm summers, and the annual mass balance of Tuyuksu glacier fluctuates asynchronously with rock glacier activity. At multi-decadal timescales, however, the investigated rock glaciers exhibit site-specific trends reflecting different stages of inactivation, seemingly in response to the strong increase in air temperature since the 1970s.

  7. Contrasting responses of Central Asian rock glaciers to global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorg, Annina; Kääb, Andreas; Roesch, Andrea; Bigler, Christof; Stoffel, Markus

    2015-02-06

    While the responses of Tien Shan glaciers--and glaciers elsewhere--to climatic changes are becoming increasingly well understood, this is less the case for permafrost in general and for rock glaciers in particular. We use a novel approach to describe the climate sensitivity of rock glaciers and to reconstruct periods of high and low rock glacier activity in the Tien Shan since 1895. Using more than 1500 growth anomalies from 280 trees growing on rock glacier bodies, repeat aerial photography from Soviet archives and high-resolution satellite imagery, we present here the world's longest record of rock glacier movements. We also demonstrate that the rock glaciers exhibit synchronous periods of activity at decadal timescales. Despite the complex energy-balance processes on rock glaciers, periods of enhanced activity coincide with warm summers, and the annual mass balance of Tuyuksu glacier fluctuates asynchronously with rock glacier activity. At multi-decadal timescales, however, the investigated rock glaciers exhibit site-specific trends reflecting different stages of inactivation, seemingly in response to the strong increase in air temperature since the 1970s.

  8. Combined detection of depression and anxiety in epilepsy patients using the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy and the World Health Organization well-being index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Pilebæk; Amiri, Moshgan

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To validate the Danish version of the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E), and compare it with the World Health Organization index for psychological well-being (WHO-5) as screening tests for depression and anxiety in epilepsy patients. METHODS: Epilepsy...

  9. Classification of Debris-Covered Glaciers and Rock Glaciers in the Andes of Central Chile - An Approach Integrating Field Measurements, High-Resolution Satellite Imagery, and Coring Data to Estimate Water Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, J. R.; Bellisario, A. C.; Ferrando, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    In the Dry Andes of Chile (17 to 35° S), debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers are differentiated from "true" glaciers based on the percentage of surface debris cover, thickness of surface debris, and ice content. These landforms are more numerous than glaciers in the Central Andes; however, there are often omitted from inventories. Glaciers, debris covered glaciers, and rock glaciers are being removed by mining, while agricultural expansion and population growth have placed an additional demand on water resources. As a result, it is important to identify and locate these features to implement sustainable solutions. The objective of this study is to develop a classification system to identify debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers based on satellite imagery interpretation. The classification system is linked to field observations and measurements of ice content. Debris covered glaciers have three subclasses: surface coverage of semi (Class 1) and fully covered (Class 2) glaciers differentiates the first two forms, whereas debris thickness is critical for Class 3 when glaciers become buried with more than 3 m of surface debris. The amount of ice decreases from more than 85%, to 65-85%, to 45-65% for semi, fully, and buried debris-covered glaciers, respectively. Rock glaciers are characterized by three stages. Class 4 rock glaciers have pronounced transverse ridges and furrows that arch across the surface, which indicate flow produce via ice. Class 5 rock glaciers have ridges and furrows that appear linear in the direction of flow, and Class 6 rock glaciers have subdued surface topography that has been denudated as the rock glacier ceases movement. Ice content decreases from 25-45% ice, to 10-25% ice, to less than 10% ice from Class 4 to 6, respectively. The classification scheme can be used to identify and map debris covered glaciers and rock glaciers to create an inventory to better estimate available water resources at the basin-wide scale.

  10. Glacier shrinkage and climatic change in the Russian Altai from the mid-20th century: An assessment using remote sensing and PRECIS regional climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahgedanova, Maria; Nosenko, Gennady; Khromova, Tatyana; Muraveyev, Anton

    2010-08-01

    This paper examines changes in the surface area of glaciers in the North and South Chuya Ridges, Altai Mountains in 1952-2004 and their links with regional climatic variations. The glacier surface areas for 2004 were derived from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) imagery. Data from the World Glacier Inventory (WGI) dating to 1952 and aerial photographs from 1952 were used to estimate the changes. 256 glaciers with a combined area of 253 ± 5.1 km2 have been identified in the region in 2004. Estimation of changes in extent of 126 glaciers with the individual areas not less than 0.5 km2 in 1952 revealed a 19.7 ± 5.8% reduction. The observed glacier retreat is primarily driven by an increase in summer temperatures since the 1980s when air temperatures were increasing at a rate of 0.10-0.13°C a-1 at the glacier tongue elevation. The regional climate projections for A2 and B2 CO2 emission scenarios developed using PRECIS regional climate model indicate that summer temperatures will increase in the Altai in 2071-2100 by 6-7°C and 3-5°C respectively in comparison with 1961-1990 while annual precipitation will increase by 15% and 5%. The length of the ablation season will extend from June-August to the late April-early October. The projected increases in precipitation will not compensate for the projected warming and glaciers will continue to retreat in the 21st century under both B2 and A2 scenarios.

  11. Svalbard glacier elevation changes and contribution to sea level rise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nuth, Christopher; Moholdt, Geir; Kohler, Jack; Hagen, Jon Ove; Kääb, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    ... third of the total observed global sea level rise. It is therefore important to quantify glacier volume changes for the various glaciated regions in the world, both to estimate glacial sea level contribution and to link such contributions to regional climatic changes. In this paper we estimate the contribution of Svalbard glaciers to sea level rise. Various m...

  12. CHANGING OF THE ALTAI GLACIER SYSTEM SINCE THE MID-TWENTIETH CENTURY AND ITS RESPONSE TO THE CLIMATE WARMING IN FUTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Kotlyakov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of the Altai glacier system are analyzed on the data from Chinese and Former Soviet Union glacier inventories. Two glacier data sets, recent remote sensing data and the glacier inventories data were compared. It has been found that 208 glaciers disappeared and the glacial area decreased by 12%. Functional models of the glacier system variations have been developed using the equation of relationship between an annual glacier ablation and a mean summer temperature; the glacier system structure and behavior of the equilibrium line altitudes at the steady state were taken into account as well. The models were used to study response of the glacial runoff to a climatic change. The model results show that, under the climate warming scenario of 0.05°С/year, only 3% Altai glaciers inChinaand 9% inRussiawill remain by the end of this century.

  13. Rising river flows throughout the twenty-first century in two Himalayan glacierized watersheds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Immerzeel, W.W.; Pelliciotti, F.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2013-01-01

    Greater Himalayan glaciers are retreating and losing mass at rates comparable to glaciers in other regions of the world1–5 . Assessments of future changes and their associated hydrological impacts are scarce, oversimplify glacier dynamics or include a limited number of climate models6–9 . Here, we

  14. Modelling distributed mountain glacier volumes: A sensitivity study in the Austrian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfricht, Kay; Huss, Matthias; Fischer, Andrea; Otto, Jan Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge about the spatial ice thickness distribution in glacier covered mountain regions and the elevation of the bedrock underneath the glaciers yields the basis for numerous applications in geoscience. Applications include the modelling of glacier dynamics, natural risk analyses and studies on mountain hydrology. Especially in recent times of accelerating and unprecedented changes of glacier extents, the remaining ice volume is of interest regarding future glacier and sea level scenarios. Subglacial depressions concern because of their hazard potential in case of sudden releases of debris or water. A number of approaches with different level of complexity have been developed in the past years to infer glacier ice thickness from surface characteristics. Within the FUTURELAKES project, the ice thickness estimation method presented by Huss and Farinotti (2012) was applied to all glaciers in the Austrian Alps based on glacier extents and surface topography corresponding to the three Austrian glacier inventories (1969 - 1997 - 2006) with the aim to predict size and location of future proglacial lakes. The availability of measured ice thickness data and a time series of glacier inventories of Austrian glaciers, allowed carrying out a sensitivity study of the key parameter, the apparent mass balance gradient. First, the parameters controlling the apparent mass balance gradient of 58 glaciers where calibrated glacier-wise with the aim to minimize mean deviations and mean absolute deviations to measured ice thickness. The results were analysed with respect to changes of the mass balance gradient with time. Secondly, we compared the observed to modelled ice thickness changes. For doing so, glacier-wise as well as regional means of mass balance gradients have been used. The results indicate that the initial values for the apparent mass balance gradient have to be adapted to the changing conditions within the four decades covered by the glacier inventories. The gradients

  15. Comparative metagenome analysis of an Alaskan glacier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhari, Sulbha; Lohia, Ruchi; Grigoriev, Andrey

    2014-04-01

    The temperature in the Arctic region has been increasing in the recent past accompanied by melting of its glaciers. We took a snapshot of the current microbial inhabitation of an Alaskan glacier (which can be considered as one of the simplest possible ecosystems) by using metagenomic sequencing of 16S rRNA recovered from ice/snow samples. Somewhat contrary to our expectations and earlier estimates, a rich and diverse microbial population of more than 2,500 species was revealed including several species of Archaea that has been identified for the first time in the glaciers of the Northern hemisphere. The most prominent bacterial groups found were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. Firmicutes were not reported in large numbers in a previously studied Alpine glacier but were dominant in an Antarctic subglacial lake. Representatives of Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria and Planctomycetes were among the most numerous, likely reflecting the dependence of the ecosystem on the energy obtained through photosynthesis and close links with the microbial community of the soil. Principal component analysis (PCA) of nucleotide word frequency revealed distinct sequence clusters for different taxonomic groups in the Alaskan glacier community and separate clusters for the glacial communities from other regions of the world. Comparative analysis of the community composition and bacterial diversity present in the Byron glacier in Alaska with other environments showed larger overlap with an Arctic soil than with a high Arctic lake, indicating patterns of community exchange and suggesting that these bacteria may play an important role in soil development during glacial retreat.

  16. The current state of glaciers within the Koryak Highland and assessment of their development by the middle of this century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Ananicheva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Koryak Upland, located in Russian Far East, has so far been poorly studied in terms of glaciology. The information contained in the USSR Glacier Inventory (1982 was obtained by analysis of topographic maps and aerial photography. On the publication date, the Inventory of Koryak Upland included 715 glaciers. To study of the current state of Koryak glaciers, we used satellite imageries – Landsat, Terra /Aqua (EOS AM-1 and ASTER. Deciphering the scenes showed that a significant portion of the glaciers melted away since the mid-1970's until now. We have found only 237 glaciers. Some glaciers are appeared to be rock glaciers, filled with detrital material, cemented by ice in a single body. They might be taken for real glaciers while categorization. The analysis of the retreat (reduction in area of Koryak glaciers by groups with the same morphological type and the same aspect was conducted. The total retreat of the glaciers of this region varied from 40 (for those measured in situ to 70% (mean total as compared to aerial photography surveys (1950. This is the most intense reduction among the studied glacier systems of the Russian Subarctic. It can be explained by the changes in atmospheric circulation due to climate change, the Koryak Upland dries out while the increasing of annual air temperatures. Significant reduction of the glacier area was an incentive for us to undertake a work to assess the evolution of the glaciers in the near future. We used a GCM – ECHAM5 (B1 as the climatic scenario. The projection method has got further development: we have estimated the evolution of glacier systems in which the prevailing type is corries (relatively small circus glacier. The results show a diverse picture of glacier reduction by area, but in general the glacierization will not disappear for the period 2049–2060, reducing the extent by only 17% of the contemporary state.

  17. Monitoring glacier change: advances in cross-disciplinary research and data sharing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, A. A.; O'Neel, S.; Cogley, G.; Hill, D. F.; Hood, E. W.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the importance of understanding interactions between glacier change and downstream ecosystems, ocean dynamics and human infrastructure. Despite the need for integrated assessments, few in-situ and remote sensing glacier monitoring studies also collect concurrent data on surrounding systems affected by glacier change. In addition, the sharing of glacier datasets across disciplines has often been hampered by limitations in data sharing technologies and a lack of data standardization. Here we provide an overview of recent efforts to facilitate distribution of glacier inventory/change datasets under the framework provided by the Global Terrestrial Network for Glaciers (GTN-G). New, web accessible data products include glacier thickness data and updated glacier extents from the Randolph Glacier Inventory. We also highlight a 2016 data collection effort led by the US Geological Survey on the Wolverine Glacier watershed, Alaska, USA. A large international team collected glaciological, water quality, snow cover, firn composition, vegetation and freshwater ecology data, using remote sensing/in-situ data and model simulations. We summarize preliminary results and outline our use of cloud-computing technologies to coordinate the integration of complex data types across multiple research teams.

  18. Minimal glacier models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06833656X

    2008-01-01

    During the past few decades the study of glaciers and their response to climate change has shown a strong development. Early theoretical work in the fifties and sixties has been complemented by the construction of numerical models of glaciers and ice sheets with various degrees of complexity.

  19. Contrasting responses of Central Asian rock glaciers to global warming

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sorg, Annina; Kääb, Andreas; Roesch, Andrea; Bigler, Christof; Stoffel, Markus

    2015-01-01

    .... Using more than 1500 growth anomalies from 280 trees growing on rock glacier bodies, repeat aerial photography from Soviet archives and high-resolution satellite imagery, we present here the world's...

  20. Modelling the behaviour of tidewater glaciers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nick, Faezeh Maghami

    2006-01-01

    More than half of the annual mass transfer from whole cryosphere to the world's oceans occurs through calving. Uncertainties in predicting future sea level are partly caused by a lack of knowledge of the behaviour of calving glaciers. A better understanding of the factors that control the response

  1. The Microclimate of Valley Glaciers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    2010-01-01

    Glaciers have fascinated mankind throughout history. Glaciers look solid and robust, but observing them for only a couple of years shows that they are dynamic and change shape all the time. The lower glaciers come, the greater the contrast with the surrounding landscape. Many glaciers in

  2. Alpine glacier change in the Eastern Altun mountains of Northwest China during 1972-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinyang; Lu, Changhe

    2015-01-01

    Accurately mapping and monitoring glacier changes over decades is important for providing information to support sustainable use of water resource in arid regions of northwest China. Since 1970, glaciers in the Eastern Altun Mountains showed remarkable recession. Further study is indispensable to indicate the extent and amplitude of glacial change at basin and individual glacier scale. In this study, spatiotemporal glacier changes referring to the year 1972, 1990, 2000 and 2010 were studied for the Eastern Altun Mountains using Landsat MSS/TM/ETM+ images and glacier volume-area scaling. The results demonstrated that the total area and volume of glaciers in EAMs decreased significantly by 10.70±0.57 km² (19.56±10.41%) and 0.61±0.03 km³ (23.19±11.40%) during 1972-2010, respectively. More than half of the total receding area occurred during 1990-2000, primarily due to higher temperature increasing. However, varied response of individual glaciers indicated that glacier change was also affected by glacier dynamics, which was related to local topography. In addition, five glaciers unrecorded in the glacier inventory of China were reported in this study.

  3. Climatic and topographic influences on glacier distribution in the Bhutan Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, H.; Fujita, K.; Sakai, A.; Nuimura, T.; Tadono, T.

    2014-02-01

    The locations and extent of mountain glaciers are affected by climatic constraints such as air temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation, as well as by local topography, which influences avalanche accumulation and debris supply. To evaluate these influences on the elevational distribution of glaciers in the Bhutan Himalaya, we created a glacier inventory together with debris-covered area and potential material-supply (PMS) slopes using satellite images with high spatial resolution. The median elevation of a glacier, which is used as a proxy of the equilibrium line altitude (ELA), decreases with increasing annual precipitation, suggesting the influence of climatic factors, according to which the ELA is lowered in relatively warm and humid environments, and raised when the opposite conditions prevail. We found a weak but significant influence of topography on the elevational distribution of glaciers, indicated by the relationship between the deviation of the median elevation of an individual glacier from the regional average and the PMS slope ratio (defined as the ratio of the PMS slope area to glacier area). We further analysed the dependency of the median glacier elevation on the gradient and aspect of PMS slopes. We found that the median elevation is affected by the avalanche-driven redistribution of snow accumulation on debris-free glaciers, and that in debris-covered glaciers the debris supply affects glacier extent through the insulation effect of the debris layer.

  4. Glacier fluctuations, global temperature and sea-level change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, P. W.

    2012-02-01

    The current world-wide glacier retreat is a clear sign of global warming. In addition, glaciers contribute to sea-level rise as a consequence of the current retreat. In this thesis we use records of past glacier fluctuations to reconstruct past climate variations and the glacier contribution to sea-level change. Firstly, a coherent data set of world-wide glacier fluctuations over the past centuries is compiled. Most available information of glacier fluctuations concerns glacier length fluctuations. There is currently a large number of sources available, varying from field observations, satellite images and aerial photography to reconstructions from historical documents and geological evidence. The data set, resulting from the compilation of available data, contains 374 length records of glaciers from all continents and is described in Chapter 2. In Chapter 3, a climatic interpretation of the length fluctuations of Glaciar Frías is presented. This glacier in North Patagonia has the longest detailed length record in southern South America. The glacier behaviour is modelled with a simplified mass balance model that is coupled with a flow line model. A warming of North Patagonian climate with 1.16 °Csince the mid 17th century, or a decrease in precipitation of 34%, would best explain the observed retreat since 1639. Driving the glacier model with existing climate reconstructions shows that the uncertainties in these reconstructions are rather large. In addition, it appears that the length fluctuations are mainly driven by variations in temperature rather than variations in precipitation. The development of such detailed models is not feasible for all glaciers in the length fluctuations data set. In the next chapter a simplified approach is used to reconstruct global and hemispheric temperature for the period 1600-2000 from world-wide glacier length fluctuations. The reconstructions show that global temperature was more or less constant from 1600 until the middle of

  5. REMOTELY-SENSED GLACIER CHANGE ESTIMATION: A CASE STUDY AT LINDBLAD COVE, ANTARCTIC PENINSULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. D. Fieber

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study builds on existing literature of glacier change estimation in polar regions and is a continuation of efforts aimed at unlocking the information encapsulated in archival aerial photography of Antarctic Peninsula glaciers. Historical aerial imagery acquired in 1957 over three marine-terminating glaciers at Lindblad Cove on the West Coast of Trinity Peninsula is processed to extract digital elevation models (DEMs which are subsequently compared to DEMs generated from present day (2014 WorldView-2 satellite stereo-imagery. The new WorldView-2 images offer unprecedented sub-metre resolution of the Antarctic Peninsula and are explored here to facilitate improved registration and higher accuracy analysis of glacier changes. Unlike many studies, which focus on glacier fronts or only restricted regions of glaciers, this paper presents a complete coverage of elevation changes across the glacier surfaces for two of the studied glaciers. The study utilises a robust least squares matching technique to ensure precise registration of the archival and modern DEMs, which is applied due to lack of existing ground control in this remote region. This case study reveals that, while many glaciers in polar regions are reported as experiencing significant mass loss, some glaciers are stable or even demonstrate mass gain. All three glaciers reported here demonstrated overall mean increases in surface elevation, indicative of positive mass balance ranging from 0.6 to 5.8 metre water equivalent between 1957 and 2014.

  6. Multitemporal airborne laser scanning for the analysis of glacier change in South-Tyrol (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieg, Lorenzo; Galos, Stephan; Klug, Christoph; Sailer, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    The mountain ranges in the area of the Autonomous Province of Bozen - South-Tyrol (Italy) contain numerous glaciers of various sizes and in different elevations and expositions. During the annual melt period, the runoff of these glaciers feeds the Etsch-river, which is the main water source for the extensive fruit production in the Vinschgau, an inner alpine dry valley with very low precipitation. Nevertheless, relatively little is still known about the current state of the glaciers in this area, except from the glacier inventories for 1983, 1997 and 2005/2006 and few glaciers which are subject to mass-balance studies. The study area encompasses the glaciers within the main part of the Ortler-Cevedale group (Sulden and Martell valleys), which is the most heavily glaciated region in South-Tyrol, the glaciers of the upper Ulten valley and the glaciers of the Schnals valley at the alpine main ridge. For this study, two sets of airborne laser scanning (ALS) data are used to calculate the recent changes in glacier area and volume. ALS data from 2005 is available from the Autonomous Province of Bozen, while another data acquisition campaign was conducted in context of the project MALS (Multitemporal Airborne Laserscanning South-Tyrol) in autumn 2011. The extents of all glaciers in the study areas have been delineated for both dates, based on digital terrain models (DTM), hillshades and intensity information. Those results are used to calculate changes in the glaciated areas. The geodetic mass balance for al studied glaciers is calculated as well. Therefore, changes in glacier volume between 2005 and 2011 and their altitudinal distribution are calculated from the differences of the ALS-based DTM. The results of the mass-balance calculations for the single glaciers are interpreted with respect to their spatial distribution, taking topographic parameters such as altitudinal distribution of glacier area, slope into account.

  7. Glacial lake inventory and lake outburst potential in Uzbekistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Maxim A; Sabitov, Timur Y; Tomashevskaya, Irina G; Glazirin, Gleb E; Chernomorets, Sergey S; Savernyuk, Elena A; Tutubalina, Olga V; Petrakov, Dmitriy A; Sokolov, Leonid S; Dokukin, Mikhail D; Mountrakis, Giorgos; Ruiz-Villanueva, Virginia; Stoffel, Markus

    2017-08-15

    Climate change has been shown to increase the number of mountain lakes across various mountain ranges in the World. In Central Asia, and in particular on the territory of Uzbekistan, a detailed assessment of glacier lakes and their evolution over time is, however lacking. For this reason we created the first detailed inventory of mountain lakes of Uzbekistan based on recent (2002-2014) satellite observations using WorldView-2, SPOT5, and IKONOS imagery with a spatial resolution from 2 to 10m. This record was complemented with data from field studies of the last 50years. The previous data were mostly in the form of inventories of lakes, available in Soviet archives, and primarily included localized in-situ data. The inventory of mountain lakes presented here, by contrast, includes an overview of all lakes of the territory of Uzbekistan. Lakes were considered if they were located at altitudes above 1500m and if lakes had an area exceeding 100m2. As in other mountain regions of the World, the ongoing increase of air temperatures has led to an increase in lake number and area. Moreover, the frequency and overall number of lake outburst events have been on the rise as well. Therefore, we also present the first outburst assessment with an updated version of well-known approaches considering local climate features and event histories. As a result, out of the 242 lakes identified on the territory of Uzbekistan, 15% are considered prone to outburst, 10% of these lakes have been assigned low outburst potential and the remainder of the lakes have an average level of outburst potential. We conclude that the distribution of lakes by elevation shows a significant influence on lake area and hazard potential. No significant differences, by contrast, exist between the distribution of lake area, outburst potential, and lake location with respect to glaciers by regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Rock glacier analyses in the Tyrolean Central Alps based on airborne lidar-data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girstmair, Anna; Mitterer-Hoinkes, Susanna; Bollmann, Erik; Krainer, Karl; Sailer, Rudolf; Stötter, Johann

    2013-04-01

    Airborne LIDAR-datasets offer a high potential for the monitoring of surface changes within high mountain environments. Based on an analysis of rock glaciers with airborne LIDAR-datasets a rock glacier activity index is developed. The results are then compared to the classified rock glacier activities from the Tyrolean rock glacier inventory. LIDAR-data from 2006 and 2010 are used to generate bi-temporal, high-resolution DTMs, for more than 400 rock glaciers in the Tyrolean Central Alps (Austria). The differential DTMs are used to identify basic processes on rock glacier surfaces including vertical and horizontal displacement rates. In order to calculate the vertical displacement rates the DTMs from 2006 are subtracted from 2010 DTMs, whereas the velocities are calculated by image matching. Based on the DTMs the mean and standard deviation of the surface elevation changes and the surface velocities are calculated for each rock glacier. The accuracy of the results of the surface elevation change calculations is improved by applying a simple stable area approach. This approach allows to correct the systematic error between the bi-temporal DTMs, yielding a higher accuracy for the vertical displacement rates. By combining the normalized mean and standard deviation of the surface elevation changes and velocities, a rock glacier activity index is developed. The activity index ranges from values between zero and one indicating low and high activity rates for each rock glacier. A clear trend between the activity index and the rock glacier inventory is found. Most of the active classified rock glaciers show a high activity index with values exceeding 0.4 and most of the fossil classified rock glaciers show a low activity index with values around zero. Discrepancies between the two methods, the developed rock glacier activity index and the prior manual rock glacier classification, will be discussed. The activity index is in good agreement with the standard classification of

  9. Impacts of glacier recession and declining meltwater on mountain societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carey, Mark; Molden, Olivia C.; Rasmussen, Mattias Borg

    2017-01-01

    Glacierized mountains are often referred to as our world's water towers because glaciers both store water over time and regulate seasonal stream flow, releasing runoff during dry seasons when societies most need water. Ice loss thus has the potential to affect human societies in diverse ways, inc...... around ice and climate. By systematically evaluating human impacts in different mountain regions, the article strives to stimulate cross-regional thinking and inspire new studies on glaciers, hydrology, risk, adaptation, and human–environment interactions in mountain regions....

  10. Karakoram glacier surge dynamics: KARAKORAM GLACIER SURGE DYNAMICS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quincey, D. J; Braun, M; Glasser, N. F; Bishop, M. P; Hewitt, K; Luckman, A

    2011-01-01

      Recent Karakoram glacier surges are thermally controlled Previous non-surge glaciers are showing surge-type activity Thermal conditions may be changing across the Karakoram regionally We examine...

  11. Spatial distribution of rock glaciers in the semi-arid Andes of Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöthe, Jan Henrik; Halla, Christian; Schrott, Lothar; Götz, Joachim; Trombotto, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Active rock glaciers are indicators for permafrost in periglacial environments of high mountain areas. Within the permafrost body and the seasonally frozen active layer, these rock glaciers potentially store large amounts of water. Especially in semiarid mountain belts, such as the central Andes of Argentina, rock glaciers attain several kilometres in length, covering surface areas of >106 m2. Here, rock glaciers even outrange ice glaciers in cumulative area and absolute number, indicating they might constitute a large water reservoir in this semiarid part of the Andes. Despite their potential hydrological importance, our knowledge about the rock glaciers' spatial distribution, subsurface composition and absolute ice content is still very limited. Our study addresses this shortcoming and aims at assessing the hydrological significance of rock glacier permafrost in the semi-arid Andes of Argentina by combining local geophysical investigations with regional remote sensing analysis. Our research focuses on the central Andes between 30°S and 33°S, where we have compiled an inventory that comprises more than 1200 rock glaciers, as well as 154 clear-ice and debris-covered glaciers. Two field sites that bracket this regional study area towards their northern and southern edge have been selected for local geophysical investigations. At these locations, earlier studies detected the presence of rock glacier permafrost by thermal monitoring and geophysical prospection. Preliminary results of the regional spatial distribution indicate that the spatial density of rock glaciers increases towards the south, concomitant with a twofold increase in mean annual precipitation. Rock glacier density peaks in the area of the Aconcagua massif, while precipitation is further increasing towards the south. Simultaneously, the lower altitudinal limit of intact rock glaciers slightly decreases, with the lowest rock glacier toe positions in the northern study area located at ~3800 m a. s. l

  12. The GLIMS Glacier Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raup, B. H.; Khalsa, S. S.; Armstrong, R.

    2007-12-01

    The Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) project has built a geospatial and temporal database of glacier data, composed of glacier outlines and various scalar attributes. These data are being derived primarily from satellite imagery, such as from ASTER and Landsat. Each "snapshot" of a glacier is from a specific time, and the database is designed to store multiple snapshots representative of different times. We have implemented two web-based interfaces to the database; one enables exploration of the data via interactive maps (web map server), while the other allows searches based on text-field constraints. The web map server is an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) compliant Web Map Server (WMS) and Web Feature Server (WFS). This means that other web sites can display glacier layers from our site over the Internet, or retrieve glacier features in vector format. All components of the system are implemented using Open Source software: Linux, PostgreSQL, PostGIS (geospatial extensions to the database), MapServer (WMS and WFS), and several supporting components such as Proj.4 (a geographic projection library) and PHP. These tools are robust and provide a flexible and powerful framework for web mapping applications. As a service to the GLIMS community, the database contains metadata on all ASTER imagery acquired over glacierized terrain. Reduced-resolution of the images (browse imagery) can be viewed either as a layer in the MapServer application, or overlaid on the virtual globe within Google Earth. The interactive map application allows the user to constrain by time what data appear on the map. For example, ASTER or glacier outlines from 2002 only, or from Autumn in any year, can be displayed. The system allows users to download their selected glacier data in a choice of formats. The results of a query based on spatial selection (using a mouse) or text-field constraints can be downloaded in any of these formats: ESRI shapefiles, KML (Google Earth), Map

  13. Present-day changes of mountain glaciers on the southern slope of the Dzhungarian Alatau range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Kokarev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glacierization of southern slope of the Dzhungarian (Zhetysu Alatau range was estimated by means of data obtained by operational satellite Landsat 7 surveys on August 19 and September 2011 (sensors ETM+ with the use of digital relief models (ASTER GDEM. Analysis of these materials by means of computer programs ENVI, ERDAS Imagine, MapInfo, and ArcGIS made it possible to obtain a spatial information of glacier systems of the territory under investigation and to define morphological characteristics of glaciers, present-day moraine complexes, glacier lakes as well as other elements of glacial monitoring at the survey moments. To estimate changes of the glacierization the data from previous Inventories of this glacier system as of 1956 and 1972 (P.A. Cherkasov, 1990 and 2000 (authors of this article were used. 30 glaciers being now located on the Chine territory but included into the Inventories of 1956 and 1972 (because the boundaries were changed after 1990 were included into new Inventory.As of 2011, 500 glaciers with total area of their open parts 120.12 km2 were registered in Southern Dzhungaria. 124 glaciers (57% of total number cover area less 0.1 km2 each, and their total area is equal to 9.01 km2 (8% of total area of the glacierization.Total area of the moraines reached 105.6 km2. Volume of open ice calculated by formulas was estimated 4.6 km3. According to calculations, the firn line altitude of the glaciers on the southern slope was equal to 3685 m. As compared to 1956 (3645 m this line lifted by 40 m. 190 glacier lakes with total area 6.0 km2 were found on this territory, among them 19 lakes were classified as especially dangerous for outbursting (their total area – 2.5 km2.For the last 55 years the glacierization area in the Southern Dzhungaria was reduced by 47.4% or, on the average, by 0.86% in every year. It should be noted that for the several last years, the rate of degradation decreased almost twice as compared to earlier years

  14. Glacier elevation and mass change over the upper Maipo Basin, Central Andes, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farías, David; Seehaus, Thorsten; Vivero, Sebastian; Braun, Matthias H.; Casassa, Gino

    2017-04-01

    The upper Maipo basin (33° S, 70° W, 5400 km2) is located 15 km from the eastern outskirts of the mega-city of Santiago. The basin is characterized by Mediterranean climate with marked winter and summer seasons and occasionally disturbed by large annual and multi-annual variations in temperature and precipitation (ENSO). The upper Maipo basin is the main glacierized region of Chile, where the last Chilean glacier inventory revealed a glacier extent of about 397.6 km2 distributed over 1009 glaciers larger than 0.01 km2. The glaciers located in this basin represent 2% of the total glacierized area in Chile. The 1009 glaciers in this area, compose of 708 rock glaciers (159.91 km2), 126 glaciarets (5.85 km2) and 175 valley and mountain glaciers (231.84 km2). Our focus in this study is to evaluate the suitability of TanDEM-X to derive geodetic glacier mass balance on small mountain glaciers. Our database comprises different digital elevation models (DEM) from historical cartography based on aerial photographs (1955), SRTM (2000), Lidar data and TanDEM-X (2015). The historical cartography was scanned and georeferenced with the aid of several GCPs derived from the Lidar dataset. The TanDEM-X data was processed using differential interferometry using SRTM C-band DEM as reference. Differences resulting from X- and C-band penetration are considered comparing X- and C-band SRTM data. All DEMs were horizontal and vertically co-registered to each other. Error assessment was done over stable ground (off-glacier). On our poster we present preliminary results about detailed quantification of glacier elevation and mass change in this area.

  15. Linear modeling of glacier fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06833656X

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution a linear first-order differential equation is used to model glacier length fluctuations. This equation has two parameters describing the physical characteristics of a glacier: the climate sensitivity, expressing how the equilibrium glacier length depends on the climatic state,

  16. The distribution and hydrological significance of rock glaciers in the Nepalese Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. B.; Harrison, S.; Anderson, K.; Selley, H. L.; Wood, J. L.; Betts, R. A.

    2018-01-01

    In the Nepalese Himalaya, there is little information on the number, spatial distribution and morphometric characteristics of rock glaciers, and this information is required if their hydrological contribution is to be understood. Based on freely available fine spatial resolution satellite data accessible through Google Earth, we produced the first comprehensive Nepalese rock glacier inventory, supported through statistical validation and field survey. The inventory includes the location of over 6000 rock glaciers, with a mean specific density of 3.4%. This corresponds to an areal coverage of 1371 km2. Our approach subsampled approximately 20% of the total identified rock glacier inventory (n = 1137) and digitised their outlines so that quantitative/qualitative landform attributes could be extracted. Intact landforms (containing ice) accounted for 68% of the subsample, and the remaining were classified as relict (not containing ice). The majority (56%) were found to have a northerly aspect (NE, N, and NW), and landforms situated within north- to west-aspects reside at lower elevations than those with south- to- east aspects. In Nepal, we show that rock glaciers are situated between 3225 and 5675 m a.s.l., with the mean minimum elevation at the front estimated to be 4977 ± 280 m a.s.l. for intact landforms and 4541 ± 346 m a.s.l. for relict landforms. The hydrological significance of rock glaciers in Nepal was then established by statistically upscaling the results from the subsample to estimate that these cryospheric reserves store between 16.72 and 25.08 billion m3 of water. This study, for the first time, estimates rock glacier water volume equivalents and evaluates their relative hydrological importance in comparison to ice glaciers. Across the Nepalese Himalaya, rock glacier to ice glacier water volume equivalent is 1:9, and generally increases westwards (e.g., ratio = 1:3, West region). This inventory represents a preliminary step for understanding the

  17. Glacier shrinkage and water resources in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francou, Bernard; Coudrain, Anne

    For more than a century glaciers around the world have been melting as air temperatures rise due to a combination of natural processes and human activity. The disappearance of these glaciers can have wide-ranging effects, such as the creation of new natural hazards or changes in stream flow that could threaten water suppliesSome of the most dramatic melting has occurred in the Andes mountain range in South America. To highlight the climatic and glacial change in the Andes and to encourage the scientific community to strengthen the glacier observation network that stretches from Colombia to the Patagonian ice fields, the Instituto Nacional de Recursos Naturales (INRENA), Perú, and the Institute of Research and Development (IRD), France, recently organized the second Symposium on Mass Balance of Andean Glaciers in Huaráz,Perú.

  18. Influence of topographic and climatological characteristics on rock glacier creep rates in the Western Austrian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollmann, E.; Abermann, J.; Krainer, K.; Sailer, R.; Spross, M.; Stötter, J.

    2012-04-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing technologies and data analysis tools resulted in detailed monitoring activities of rock glacier surface kinetics. In combination with geophysical methods and numerical modeling the remotely sensed data led to an increased process understanding of rock glacier creep dynamics. However, the number of studies where such method combinations are carried out is limited to a rather small number of rock glaciers. With our study we aim to contribute to an improved understanding on the significance of topographic and climatological variables on rock glacier creep rates. Therefore, creep rates of 347 intact rock glaciers in the Western Austrian Alps (Tyrol) are calculated. According to the new Tyrolean rock glacier inventory 200 of them are active and 147 inactive. In contrast to other studies, where often a few rock glaciers are investigated in detail, the 347 rock glaciers represent all rock glaciers within the study area of 887 sqkm. For the calculation of creep rates, the Open Source image-correlation software IMCORR is used and implemented into an automated work-flow. Input data for the image correlation are shaded relief raster maps with 0.5 m spatial resolution, which were obtained form airborne laser scanning data acquisition campaigns carried out in 2006 and 2010. By comparing the calculated creep rates with results from differential global positioning system data, an absolute accuracy of 0.30 m (standard deviation) could be determined. Thus, reliable interpretations can be made for creep rates > 0.30 m between 2006 and 2010. In such cases, statistical correlations between the rock glacier creep rates and topographic parameters of the rock glacier, e. g. surface gradient, thickness, length, area, elevation, aspect, potential solar radiation and surface roughness (also indicator for geological properties), as well as climatological parameters, e. g. temperature are calculated. Spatial descriptive statistics on the calculated creep

  19. Glacier surface temperatures in the Canadian High Arctic, 2000–15

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mortimer, Colleen; Sharp, Martin; Wouters, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Canada's Queen Elizabeth Islands (QEI) contain ~14% of the world's glacier and ice-cap area. Sparse in-situ measurements indicate that interannual variability in glacier surface mass balance in this region is driven primarily by variations in summer melt, and that the annual surface mass balance of

  20. The Response of Alpine Glaciers in Western Canada to Early 21st Century Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menounos, B.; Beedle, M. J.; Lueders, S.

    2014-12-01

    Since 1998, the rate of global warming has slowed but the degree to which this slowdown has affected alpine glaciers in North America remains uncertain. Here we describe glacier fluctuations in the continental mountain ranges of British Columbia, Alberta, Yukon and the Northwest Territories for the period 1985-2013. Our manual digitization of over 3,000 glaciers mapped from 12 Landsat scenes builds upon a glacier inventory for the period 1985-2005 that utilized aerial photography and satellite imagery (Landsat) for the mountain ranges of British Columbia and Alberta. Landsat imagery allowed us to extend the spatial distribution of this inventory to include most alpine glaciers that straddle the Yukon and Northwest Territory border (Nahanni region) for the years 1985 and 2004. We also digitized glaciers from pan-sharpened Landsat 8 imagery for the year 2013. Glacier recession rates differ among regions between the early [1985-2005] and recent [2005-2013] periods. Recession rates during the recent period, for example, slowed by 43% and 15% for the Nahanni and Columbia Basin regions respectively. When compared to the early period, recent recession rates accelerated by 17% and 121% for glaciers in the Southern and Northern Rocky Mountains. Some of this regional variability is attributed to climate anomalies in the study area based on our analysis of instrumental (CRU 3.21) and reanalysis (ERA Interim) data, but the doubling of the recessional rate for the Northern Rocky Mountains is anomalous. Non-climatic factors that could explain this anomalous rapid retreat of Northern Rocky Mountain glaciers includes low minimum elevation of these glaciers, debris cover and shadowed terrain in the Landsat imagery.

  1. Recent glacierization of the Tsambagarav ridge (North‑Western Mongolia and its changes since the Little Ice Age maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Ganyushkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of glacierization of the Tsambagarav mountain ridge were determined on the basis of images obtained from satellites Corona, Landsat‑5, Spot‑4, Landsat‑8 together with results of field investigations. Inventories of glaciers located on the ridge had been prepared for three time periods: 1968, 2006, and 2015. Glacierization of the ridge during the Little Ice Age (LIA maximum was then reconstructed. In 2015, 67 glaciers formed the ridge glacierization with their total area 68.41 km2. Mean weighed altitude of the firn line averaged 3748 m. The flat‑top glaciers accounted for almost 40% of the glacierization area, and the glaciers composed 6 complexes. For the period of the LIA maximum, 73 glaciers had been reconstructed, their total area was 128.4 km2, and the calculated firn line altitude – 3583 м; these glaciers were combined into two complexes where the flat‑top glaciers predominated as well. By 1968, the area of the glacierization decreased by 36%, and the firn line altitude increased by 89 m. By 2006, area of glaciers decreased down to 71.32 km2, and the firn line altitude increased more by 60 m. Finally, in 2006–2015, area of the glacierization contracted additionally by 2.91 km2, and the firn line altitude still more increased by 16 m. Over the whole period from the LIA maximum, the flat‑top glaciers reduced the most. The general rate of contraction of glaciers tends to increase. Reconstructed rates of retreating of the valley glaciers of the Tsambagarav ridge are similar to estimates of other researchers made for the nearest centers of glacierization. Continuation of the current trend to a rise of summer temperature and a growth of precipitation should result in primary fast degradation of the flat‑top glaciers and reorganization of morphological structure of the glacierization.

  2. Snow and Glacier Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Kaye

    The study of snow and ice is rich in both fundamental science and practical applications. Snow and Glacier Hydrology offers something for everyone, from resource practitioners in regions where water supply depends on seasonal snow pack or glaciers, to research scientists seeking to understand the role of the solid phase in the water cycle and climate. The book is aimed at the advanced undergraduate or graduate-level student. A perusal of online documentation for snow hydrology classes suggests that there is currently no single text or reference book on this topic in general use. Instructors rely on chapters from general hydrology texts or operational manuals, collections of journal papers, or their own notes. This variety reflects the fact that snow and ice regions differ in climate, topography, language, water law, hazards, and resource use (hydropower, irrigation, recreation). Given this diversity, producing a universally applicable book is a challenge.

  3. Glaciological measurements and mass balances from Sperry Glacier, Montana, USA, years 2005–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Adam; Fagre, Daniel B.; Peitzsch, Erich H.; Reardon, Blase A.; Harper, Joel T.

    2017-01-01

    Glacier mass balance measurements help to provide an understanding of the behavior of glaciers and their response to local and regional climate. In 2005 the United States Geological Survey established a surface mass balance monitoring program on Sperry Glacier, Montana, USA. This project is the first quantitative study of mass changes of a glacier in the US northern Rocky Mountains and continues to the present. The following paper describes the methods used during the first 11 years of measurements and reports the associated results. From 2005 to 2015, Sperry Glacier had a cumulative mean mass balance loss of 4.37 m w.e. (water equivalent). The mean winter, summer, and annual glacier-wide mass balances were 2.92, −3.41, and −0.40 m w.e. yr−1 respectively. We derive these cumulative and mean results from an expansive data set of snow depth, snow density, and ablation measurements taken at selected points on the glacier. These data allow for the determination of mass balance point values and a time series of seasonal and annual glacier-wide mass balances for all 11 measurement years. We also provide measurements of glacier extent and accumulation areas for select years. All data have been submitted to the World Glacier Monitoring Service and are available at doi:10.5904/wgms-fog-2016-08. This foundational work provides valuable insight about Sperry Glacier and supplies additional data to the worldwide record of glaciers measured using the glaciological method. Future research will focus on the processes that control accumulation and ablation patterns across the glacier. Also we plan to examine the uncertainties related to our methods and eventually quantify a more robust estimate of error associated with our results.

  4. Glaciological measurements and mass balances from Sperry Glacier, Montana, USA, years 2005-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Adam M.; Fagre, Daniel B.; Peitzsch, Erich H.; Reardon, Blase A.; Harper, Joel T.

    2017-01-01

    Glacier mass balance measurements help to provide an understanding of the behavior of glaciers and their response to local and regional climate. In 2005 the United States Geological Survey established a surface mass balance monitoring program on Sperry Glacier, Montana, USA. This project is the first quantitative study of mass changes of a glacier in the US northern Rocky Mountains and continues to the present. The following paper describes the methods used during the first 11 years of measurements and reports the associated results. From 2005 to 2015, Sperry Glacier had a cumulative mean mass balance loss of 4.37 m w.e. (water equivalent). The mean winter, summer, and annual glacier-wide mass balances were 2.92, -3.41, and -0.40 m w.e. yr-1 respectively. We derive these cumulative and mean results from an expansive data set of snow depth, snow density, and ablation measurements taken at selected points on the glacier. These data allow for the determination of mass balance point values and a time series of seasonal and annual glacier-wide mass balances for all 11 measurement years. We also provide measurements of glacier extent and accumulation areas for select years. All data have been submitted to the World Glacier Monitoring Service and are available at doi:10.5904/wgms-fog-2016-08. This foundational work provides valuable insight about Sperry Glacier and supplies additional data to the worldwide record of glaciers measured using the glaciological method. Future research will focus on the processes that control accumulation and ablation patterns across the glacier. Also we plan to examine the uncertainties related to our methods and eventually quantify a more robust estimate of error associated with our results.

  5. Glacier Monitoring and Capacity Building: Important Ingredients for Sustainable Mountain Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel U. Nussbaumer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Glacier observation data from major mountain regions of the world are key to improving our understanding of glacier changes: they deliver fundamental baseline information for climatological, hydrological, and hazard assessments. In many mountain ecosystems, as well as in the adjacent lowlands, glaciers play a crucial role in freshwater provision and regulation. This article first presents the state of the art on glacier monitoring and related strategies within the framework of the Global Terrestrial Network for Glaciers (GTN-G. Both in situ measurements of changes in glacier mass, volume, and length as well as remotely sensed data on glacier extents and changes over entire mountain ranges provide clear indications of climate change. Based on experiences from capacity-building activities undertaken in the Tropical Andes and Central Asia over the past years, we also review the state of the art on institutional capacity in these regions and make further recommendations for sustainable mountain development. The examples from Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, and Kyrgyzstan demonstrate that a sound understanding of measurement techniques and of the purpose of measurements is necessary for successful glacier monitoring. In addition, establishing durable institutions, capacity-building programs, and related funding is necessary to ensure that glacier monitoring is sustainable and maintained in the long term. Therefore, strengthening regional cooperation, collaborating with local scientists and institutions, and enhancing knowledge sharing and dialogue are envisaged within the GTN-G. Finally, glacier monitoring enhances the resilience of the populations that depend on water resources from glacierized mountains or that are affected by hazards related to glacier changes. We therefore suggest that glacier monitoring be included in the development of sustainable adaptation strategies in regions with glaciated mountains.

  6. Simulating the Hydrological Response of Rock Glaciers to Climate Change with GEOtop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaloo, J.; Brenning, A.; Gruber, S.

    2013-05-01

    Rock glaciers are creeping bodies of ice-rich permafrost typical in cold high-mountain environments. In the arid and semi-arid Andes, and presumably other dry high-mountain areas, rock glaciers are considered more significant than glaciers as a water resource. The active layer of rock glaciers, and other seasonally frozen ground, in more temperate high-mountain climates may also represent an important contribution to summer baseflow in lowland rivers. The multi-decadal evolution of rock glacier permafrost and its relationship to climate is largely unknown and presents a massive challenge to assess in-situ due to limited spatial and temporal observations, the resource-intensity of geophysical observation, and lack of meteorological observation in most rock glaciers areas. As a step in addressing these knowledge gaps, this work simulates a rock glacier based on the Murtel-Corvatsch rock glacier in the Upper Engadin, Switzerland - the most intensively studied rock glacier in the world. Three decades of high-quality hourly climate data are used to generate 50 year time-series of synthetic meteorological observations with the Advanced WEather GENerator (AWE-GEN) under the observed climate and 8 additional climate change scenarios. One-dimensional simulations of rock glaciers are conducted with the combined hydrological and energy balance model GEOtop, which is forced by the synthetic meteorological data. The experimental approach consists of three parts: 1) establishing a realistic rock glacier model under the observed climate, 2) subjecting the rock glacier to meteorological forcing from climate change scenarios, and 3) testing the sensitivity of the model to input parameters. For the mountain cryosphere community and many lowland populations around the world, this work represents an important outcome in developing the understanding and methodologies pertaining to the role of seasonal ice and permafrost in the hydrological cycle of high mountain watersheds.

  7. Vapor transport and sublimation on Mullins Glacier, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamp, J. L.; Marchant, D. R.

    2017-05-01

    We utilize an environmental chamber capable of recreating the extreme polar conditions of the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV) of Antarctica to investigate the sublimation rate of the Mullins Valley debris-covered glacier (hereafter Mullins Glacier), reportedly one of the oldest debris-covered alpine glaciers in the world. We measure ice loss via sublimation beneath sediment thicknesses ranging from 0 to 69 mm; from this, we determine an effective diffusivity for Fickian vapor transport through Mullins till of (5.2 ± 0.3) ×10-6 m2s-1 at -10 °C. We use this value, coupled with micrometeorological data from Mullins Valley (atmospheric temperature, relative humidity, and soil temperature) to model the sublimation rate of buried glacier ice near the terminus of Mullins Glacier, where the overlying till thickness approaches 70 cm. We find that the ice-lowering rate during the modeled year (2011) was 0.066 mm under 70 cm of till, a value which is in line with previous estimates for exceedingly slow rates of ice sublimation. These results provide further evidence supporting the probable antiquity of Mullins Glacier ice and overall landscape stability in upland regions of the MDV.

  8. Strong ELA increase causes fast mass loss of glaciers in central Spitsbergen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małecki, J.

    2015-11-01

    Svalbard is a heavily glacier covered archipelago in the Arctic. Its central regions, including Dickson Land (DL), are occupied by small alpine glaciers, which post-Little Ice Age (LIA) changes remain only sporadically investigated. This study presents a comprehensive analysis of glacier changes in DL based on inventories compiled from topographic maps and digital elevation models (DEMs) for LIA, 1960's, 1990 and 2009/11. The 37.9 ± 12.1 % glacier area decrease in DL (i.e. from 334.1 ± 38.4 km2 during LIA to 207.4 ± 4.6 km2 in 2009/11) has been primarily caused by accelerating termini retreat. The mean 1990-2009/11 geodetic mass balance of glaciers was -0.70 ± 0.06 m a-1 (-0.63 ± 0.05 m w.e. a-1), being one of the most negative from Svalbard regional means known from the literature. If the same figure was to be applied for other similar regions of central Spitsbergen, that would result in a considerable contribution to total Svalbard mass balance despite negligible proportion to total glacier area. Glacier changes in Dickson Land were linked to dramatic equilibrium line altitude (ELA) shift, which in the period 1990-2009/11 has been located ca. 500 m higher than required for steady-state. The mass balance of central Spitsbergen glaciers seems to be therefore more sensitive to climate change than previously thought.

  9. Listening to Glaciers: Passive hydroacoustics near marine-terminating glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, E.C.; Nystuen, J.A.; O'Neel, Shad

    2012-01-01

    The catastrophic breakup of the Larsen B Ice Shelf in the Weddell Sea in 2002 paints a vivid portrait of the effects of glacier-climate interactions. This event, along with other unexpected episodes of rapid mass loss from marine-terminating glaciers (i.e., tidewater glaciers, outlet glaciers, ice streams, ice shelves) sparked intensified study of the boundaries where marine-terminating glaciers interact with the ocean. These dynamic and dangerous boundaries require creative methods of observation and measurement. Toward this effort, we take advantage of the exceptional sound-propagating properties of seawater to record and interpret sounds generated at these glacial ice-ocean boundaries from distances safe for instrument deployment and operation.

  10. Plant growth on debris covered glacier surfaces - ecology, vegetation patterns and implications for debris mantled glaciers serving as cold and warm stage plant refugia in the past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickert, Thomas; Friend, Donald; Grüninger, Friederike; Molnia, Bruce; Richter, Michael

    2017-04-01

    As stated at the International Conference on Debris-Covered Glaciers in 2000, "debris-covered glaciers comprise a significant fraction of the global population of glaciers...." Given a minimum of debris thickness and sufficient stability, these surfaces host surprisingly diverse plant assemblages, both floristically and structurally. Observations of plant growth on glacier surfaces are reported from around the world - including mature forests with trees more than 50cm in diameter. Debris covered glacier surfaces are mobile habitats for plants, which migrate downhill with glacier movement, but are able to spread upward with strong anabatic valley winds. Plant growth is possible even on a very shallow debris cover. Depending on site conditions, floristic composition and structure of vegetation on debris covered glaciers represent a mosaic of environments, including subnival pioneer communities, glacier foreland early- to late-successional stages, and morainal locations. The taxa involved display a wide spectrum of adaptations to habitat conditions with particular migration and dispersal strategies. With a shallow debris cover, alpine/subnival taxa can grow considerably below their usual altitudinal niche due to the cooler subsurface soil temperatures. In contrast, a greater thickness of debris cover allows even thermophilous plants of lower elevations to grow on glacier surfaces. Employing the principle of actualism, debris covered glaciers provided important and previously undocumented refugia for plants during the Pleistocene cold stages from which alpine and arctic plant species were able to re-establish and spread in post-glacial time. This assumption is complementary to the two competing ideas to explain the fate of alpine and/or arctic taxa during the Pleistocene, the nunatak hypothesis (i.e. in-situ survival of plants on unglaciated summits) and tabula rasa theory (i.e. displacement of plants and subsequent remigration). Vice versa debris covered glaciers

  11. Chernobyl fallout on Alpine glaciers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambach, W; Rehwald, W; Blumthaler, M; Eisner, H; Brunner, P

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the gross beta activity of snow samples from four Alpine glaciers contaminated by radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident and a gamma-spectrum analysis of selected samples are reported. The results are discussed with respect to possible risks to the population from using meltwater from these glaciers as drinking water.

  12. Glacier Runoff and Human Vulnerability to Climate Change: The Case of Export Agriculture in Peru (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, M.

    2013-12-01

    There is growing concern about the effects of climate change and ensuing glacier shrinkage on water supplies for mountain communities worldwide. The issue is only becoming more complex as researchers seek to quantify glacier contributions to streamflow and to pinpoint when and how much glacier runoff will likely change as a result of future climate change and glacier variation. Additionally, some researchers are beginning to recognize the importance of understanding the human dimensions of glacier retreat to identify which social groups (stakeholders) use glacier runoff and how much they use, as well as what socio-environmental forces affect both water supplies and water use. This presentation examines these societal aspects of glacier runoff to analyze human vulnerability to hydrological changes in Peru's Santa River watershed below the most glaciated tropical mountain range in the world, the Cordillera Blanca. Specifically, it focuses on the billion-dollar export-oriented agricultural industry within the Chavimochic irrigation project, which uses Santa River water to irrigate approximately 80,000 hectares in the coastal desert region. Since the 1980s, Santa River water has allowed Chavimochic to sustain a major export economy, provide jobs in the agro-industry and related services, stimulate human migration, enhance or alter livelihoods, generate hydroelectricity, supply drinking water, and shape urban growth and land use practices. All of these variables are dependent on glacier meltwater from the Cordillera Blanca, especially during the dry season when glaciers provide most of the Santa River's water. In short, hundreds of thousands of people have come to depend on glacier runoff, thus revealing their high level of vulnerability to hydrological fluctuations in a glacier-fed watershed. What's more, people worldwide rely on the asparagus, avocados, and artichokes grown with glacier runoff. Consequently, the export-oriented agriculture, through the "virtual water

  13. A multi-level strategy for anticipating future glacier lake formation and associated hazard potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Frey

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In the course of glacier retreat, new glacier lakes can develop. As such lakes can be a source of natural hazards, strategies for predicting future glacier lake formation are important for an early planning of safety measures. In this article, a multi-level strategy for the identification of overdeepened parts of the glacier beds and, hence, sites with potential future lake formation, is presented. At the first two of the four levels of this strategy, glacier bed overdeepenings are estimated qualitatively and over large regions based on a digital elevation model (DEM and digital glacier outlines. On level 3, more detailed and laborious models are applied for modeling the glacier bed topography over smaller regions; and on level 4, special situations must be investigated in-situ with detailed measurements such as geophysical soundings. The approaches of the strategy are validated using historical data from Trift Glacier, where a lake formed over the past decade. Scenarios of future glacier lakes are shown for the two test regions Aletsch and Bernina in the Swiss Alps. In the Bernina region, potential future lake outbursts are modeled, using a GIS-based hydrological flow routing model. As shown by a corresponding test, the ASTER GDEM and the SRTM DEM are both suitable to be used within the proposed strategy. Application of this strategy in other mountain regions of the world is therefore possible as well.

  14. Modeling glacier beds in the Austrian Alps: How many lakes will form in future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Dominik; Geilhausen, Martin; Linsbauer, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Glacial retreat exposes landscapes with relief characteristics greatly differing from the former ice covered surfaces. If glacial retreat exposes natural basins capable of forming proglacial lakes, then the downstream hydrologic and geomorphic systems in such catchments will be significantly altered due to discharge modifications, sediment trapping, decoupling effects and long term sediment storage (e.g. Geilhausen et al. 2013). Further implications are related to hydropower management, tourism and natural hazards. Consequently, sound knowledge of present day glacier beds ("proglacial zones of tomorrow") and in particular the total number, locations and characteristics of overdeepenings are of importance. For Austria, however, this important information about significant future changes of high alpine regions is yet missing. An interdisciplinary research project is currently in preparation to close this gap. This paper presents results of a pilot study. We used a novel GIS-based approach (GlabTop, cf. Linsbauer et al. 2012) to compute approximate glacier beds in the Austrian Alps. GlabTop ('Glacier bed Topography') is based on an empirical relation between average basal shear stress and elevation range of individual glaciers and makes use of digital elevation models (DEM), glacier outlines and branch lines (i.e. a set of lines covering all important glacier branches). DEMs and glacier outlines were derived from the Austrian glacier inventory (1998) and branch lines were manually digitized. The inventory includes 911 glaciers of which 876 (96%) were considered and 35 were excluded due to size restrictions ( 0.01 km²) with the potential of forming proglacial lakes when glacier retreat reveals the bed. The total area and volume of all overdeepenings is approx. 10 km² and 236 Mio m³ respectively and 33 lakes will be larger than 1 km³. A total glacier volume of 16 ± 5 km³ with an average ice thickness of 36 ± 11 m was calculated for 1998. Comparisons with

  15. Ben Orlove, Ellen Wiegandt and Brian H. Luckman (eds, Darkening Peaks. Glacier Retreat, Science, and Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Debarbieux

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An interestring scientific symposium took place in Wengen (CH in October 2004. Many specialists of various disciplines and from various regions of the world gathered for one of the very few international meetings willing to adopt an general analysis of glaciers, with both natural and social scopes. This book is released 4 years later with many presentations given there.The book contains very different contributions. One can find factual information on glaciers at the world scale; since the b...

  16. A data set of worldwide glacier fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leclercq, P.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/339579951; Oerlemans, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06833656X; Basagic, H.J.; Bushueva, I.; Cook, A.J.; Le Bris, R.

    2014-01-01

    Glacier fluctuations contribute to variations in sea level and historical glacier length fluctuations are natural indicators of past climate change. To study these subjects, longterm information of glacier change is needed. In this paper we present a data set of global long-term glacier length

  17. A minimal model of a tidewater glacier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.; Nick, Faezeh Maghami

    2005-01-01

    We propose a simple, highly parameterized model of a tidewater glacier. The mean ice thickness and the ice thickness at the glacier front are parameterized in terms of glacier length and, when the glacier is calving, water depth. We use a linear relation between calving rate and water depth. The

  18. Inventory Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Known as MRO for Maintenance, Repair and Operating supplies, Tropicana Products, Inc.'s automated inventory management system is an adaptation of the Shuttle Inventory Management System (SIMS) developed by NASA to assure adequate supply of every item used in support of the Space Shuttle. The Tropicana version monitors inventory control, purchasing receiving and departmental costs for eight major areas of the company's operation.

  19. Hypsometric control on glacier mass balance sensitivity in Alaska and northwest Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, D.; Sass, L.; O'Neel, S.; Arendt, A.; Kienholz, C.

    2017-03-01

    Glacier hypsometry provides a first-order approach for assessing a glacier's response to climate forcings. We couple the Randolph Glacier Inventory to a suite of in situ observations and climate model output to examine potential change for the ˜27,000 glaciers in Alaska and northwest Canada through the end of the 21st century. By 2100, based on Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) 4.5-8.5 forcings, summer temperatures are predicted to increase between +2.1 and +4.6°C, while solid precipitation (snow) is predicted to decrease by -6 to -11%, despite a +9 to +21% increase in total precipitation. Snow is predicted to undergo a pronounced decrease in the fall, shifting the start of the accumulation season back by ˜1 month. In response to these forcings, the regional equilibrium line altitude (ELA) may increase by +105 to +225 m by 2100. The mass balance sensitivity to this increase is highly variable, with the most substantive impact for glaciers with either limited elevation ranges (often small (ELAs, given RCP 6.0 forcings, will exceed the maximum elevation of the glacier, resulting in their eventual demise, while for others, accumulation area ratios will decrease by >60%. Our results highlight the first-order control of hypsometry on individual glacier response to climate change, and the variability that hypsometry introduces to a regional response to a coherent climate perturbation.

  20. Glacier area changes in the Rio Olivares catchment, Central Andes 1955-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmros, Jeppe.; Wilson, Ryan; Mernild, Sebastian; Fensholt, Rasmus

    2014-05-01

    Here, we present a new glacier inventory for the Rio Olivares catchment (531 km2), Central Chilean Andes (33°14`44 S, 70°07`26 V). Area changes for 145 glaciers were analyzed for the period 1955 through 2013 based on terrestrial photogrammetry, aerial photography, and satellite imagery. The results show that glacier area not including rock glaciers reduced by ~18 % - from 93.8 (1955) to 75.9 km2 (2013), equivalent to an estimated volume loss of 40 % (2.9 km3) based on volume-area scaling functions. Rock glacier area increased from 10.4 (1955) to 10.7 km2 (2013). Additionally, a detailed area, hypsometry, and elevation time series analysis for the five largest glaciers in the catchment was conducted, showing that terminus positions ascended by an average of 351 ± 8 meters and slope increased 0.7° on average. A comparison between changes in glacier area and variations in the El Niño Southern Oscillation index indicates a significant climatic link.

  1. Glacier-Wide Mass Balance and Input Data: Alaska Benchmark Glaciers, 1966-2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Since the late 1950s, USGS has maintained a long-term glacier mass-balance program at three North American glaciers. Similar measurements began at Sperry Glacier, MT...

  2. Current state and changes of glaciers in the Tavan Bogd Mountains (Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Syromyatina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is the first stage of detailed investigation of large glaciers located in the Tavan-Bogd Mountains. The main task of this work is to estimate a current state and dynamics of glaciers and to update glacier and rock-glacier inventory. Basing on results of 2013 field survey together with remote sensing data the main glaciers located on eastern slopes of the Tavan Bogd mountain massif in the Tsagan-Us and Tsagan-Gol river basins are described (these glaciers are Potanin, Alexandra, Grane, Kozlov, and Krylov ones. In order to monitor regime of glacier systems the geodetic survey of glaciers and rock-glacier edges was carried out using Trimble GNSS system and the ranging mark system. The Landsat satellite images made taken in August-September of 1989, 2006, and 2013, their spatial resolution 15-30 m, were used to map areas of debris-free glaciers and to estimate the glacier changes between 1989 and 2013. Pictures were taken from the USGS site, the ArcGIS software was used for this work. In addition, the high-resolution satellite pictures with resolution of 0.5–2.5 m made at the end of the ablation season if 2008 (CARTOSAT-1 and 2010 (Geoeye-1 and SPOT-5 were also used to analyze current conditions and changes of the above glaciers and to improve visual estimation of the Landsat imagery. In 2013, the study included 26 glaciers with the debris-free glacier area of 67 km2 in the Tsagan-Gol river basin and 37 glaciers with area of 30 km2 in the Tsagan-Us river basin. According to our estimates, areas of these glaciers did not significantly changed since 1989 however a certain regression of the glacier tongues had been fixed. The Kozlov glacier retreated with average rate of 21 m/year between 2001 and 2013. Retreat of the Potanin glacier was slower and between 1989 and 2001 the average rate was equal to 5 m/year, but between 2001 and 2013 it became more active and its average rate reached 24 m/year. One of the largest One of the largest rock-glacier

  3. Long-term monitoring of glacier dynamics of Fleming Glacier after the disintegration of Wordie Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, Peter; Seehaus, Thorsten; Wendt, Anja; Braun, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    The Antarctic Peninsula is one of the world`s most affected regions by Climate Change. Dense and long time series of remote sensing data enable detailed studies of the rapid glaciological changes in this area. We present results of a study on Fleming Glacier, which was the major tributary glacier of former Wordie Ice Shelf, located at the south-western side of the Antarctic Peninsula. Since the ice shelf disintegrated in a series of events starting in the 1970s, only disconnected tidewater glaciers have remained today. As a reaction to the loss of the buttressing force of the ice shelf, Fleming Glacier accelerated and dynamically thinned. However, all previous studies conducted at Wordie Bay covered only relatively short investigation periods and ended in 2008 the latest. Hence it was not well known how long the process of adaption to the changing boundary conditions exactly lasts and how it is characterized in detail. We provide long time series (1994 - 2016) of glaciological parameters (i.e. ice extent, velocity, grounding line position, ice elevation) for Fleming Glacier obtained from multi-mission remote sensing data. For this purpose large datasets of previously active (e.g. ERS, Envisat, ALOS PALSAR, Radarsat-1) as well as currently recording SAR sensors (e.g. Sentinel-1, TerraSAR-X, TanDEM-X) were processed and combined with data from other sources (e.g. optical images, laser altimeter and ice thickness data). The high temporal resolution of our dataset enables us to present a detailed history of 22 years of glacial dynamics at Fleming Glacier after the disintegration of Wordie Ice Shelf. We found strong evidence for a rapid grounding line retreat of up to 13 km between 2008 and 2011, which led to a further amplification of dynamic ice thinning. Today Fleming Glacier seems to be far away from approaching a new equilibrium. Our data show that the current glacier dynamics of Fleming Glacier are not primarily controlled by the loss of the ice shelf anymore, but

  4. Microbial dynamics in glacier forefield soils show succession is not just skin deep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Arwyn; Cook, Sophie

    2015-03-01

    All over the world, glaciers are receding. One key consequence of glacier area loss is the creation of new terrestrial habitats. This presents an experimental opportunity to study both community formation and the implications of glacier loss for terrestrial ecosystems. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Rime et al. (2015) describe how microbial communities are structured according to soil depth and development in the forefield of Damma glacier in Switzerland. The study provides insights into the contrasting structures of microbial communities at different stages of soil development. An important strength of the study is the integration of soil depth into the paradigm of primary succession, a feature which has rarely been considered by other studies. These findings underscore the importance of studying the interactions between microbial communities and glaciers at a time when Earth's glacial systems are experiencing profound change. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Decrease of glacier area in the Stubai Alps and the Ötztal Alps between 1991 and 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Sabine

    2017-04-01

    The mountain area of the Stubai and Ötztal Alps is part of the European Alps in Austria just at the border to Italy. It is a well-known skiing and mountaineering area and several known peaks and glaciers are located there. Therefore, it is well studied and glacier area is inventoried for many different time steps available via the GLIMS webpage. Since the last decades, severe decrease of glacier area and volume are monitored in this area as in several other parts of the European Alps. This study focuses on the last 25 years and compares glacier area development of several time steps. Data from the GLIMS database as data mapped from remote sensing products (Landsat 7 and 8) is used. Climate and climate forcing variables as temperature and precipitation are analyzed to especially explain rapidly changes in glacier area.

  6. Slowing down the retreat of the Morteratsch glacier, Switzerland, by artificially produced summer snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerlemans, Johannes; Keller, Felix; Haag, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Many large valley glaciers in the world are retreating at historically unprecedented rates. Also in the Alps, where warming over the past decades has been more than twice as large as the global mean, all major glaciers have retreated over distances of several kilometers over the past hundred years. The Morteratsch Glacier, Pontresina, Switzerland, is a major touristic attraction. Due to strong retreat the lowest part of the glacier is getting out of sight from the gravel road that provided direct access to the glacier front. The Community of Pontresina has commissioned a preparatory study to find out if it is possible to slow down the retreat of the Morteratsch Glacier in an environmentally friendly way. In this article we report on the outcome of such a study, based on a modelling approach. Our analysis is based on a 20- year weather station record from the lower part of the glacier, combined with calculations with an ice flow model. This model has been carefully calibrated against the historical glacier length record, to ensure an optimal initial state for projections into the future. We arrive at the conclusion that producing summer snow in the ablation zone over a larger area (typically 0.5 to 1 km ^2) is the best option, and may have a significant effect on the rate of retreat on a timescale of decades. We consider three scenarios of climate change: (i) no change, (ii) a rise of the Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) by 1 m/yr, and (iii) a rise of the ELA by 2 m/yr. Projections of glacier length are done until the year 2100. It takes about 10 years before snow deposition in the higher ablation zone starts to affect the position of the glacier snout. The difference in glacier length between the snow and no-snow experiments becomes 400 to 500 m within two decades.

  7. Rock glaciers in the Western and High Tatra Mountains, Western Carpathians

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uxa, Tomáš; Mida, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 2 (2017), s. 844-857 ISSN 1744-5647 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : rock glaciers * inventory * Western and High Tatra Mts * Carpathians * Slovakia * Poland Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.174, year: 2016

  8. Antarctic Peninsula Tidewater Glacier Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, E. C.; Scambos, T. A.; Haran, T. M.; Wellner, J. S.; Domack, E. W.; Vernet, M.

    2015-12-01

    The northern Antarctic Peninsula (nAP, north of 66°S) is a north-south trending mountain range extending transverse across the prevailing westerly winds of the Southern Ocean resulting in an extreme west-to-east precipitation gradient. Snowfall on the west side of the AP is one to two orders of magnitude higher than the east side. This gradient drives short, steep, fast-flowing glaciers into narrow fjords on the west side, while longer lower-sloping glaciers flow down the east side into broader fjord valleys. This pattern in ice dynamics affects ice-ocean interaction on timescales of decades to centuries, and shapes the subglacial topography and submarine bathymetry on timescales of glacial cycles. In our study, we calculate ice flux for the western and eastern nAP using a drainage model that incorporates the modern ice surface topography, the RACMO-2 precipitation estimate, and recent estimates of ice thinning. Our results, coupled with observed rates of ice velocity from InSAR (I. Joughin, personal communication) and Landsat 8 -derived flow rates (this study), provide an estimate of ice thickness and fjord depth in grounded-ice areas for the largest outlet glaciers. East-side glaciers either still terminate in or have recently terminated in ice shelves. Sedimentary evidence from the inner fjords of the western glaciers indicates they had ice shelves during LIA time, and may still have transient floating ice tongues (tabular berg calvings are observed). Although direct oceanographic evidence is limited, the high accumulation rate and rapid ice flux implies cold basal ice for the western nAP glaciers and therefore weak subglacial discharge relative to eastern nAP glaciers and or other tidewater fjord systems such as in Alaska. Finally, despite lower accumulation rates on the east side, the large elongate drainage basins result in a greater ice flux funneled through fewer deeper glaciers. Due to the relation between ice flux and erosion, these east-side glaciers

  9. Possible future lakes resulting from continued glacier shrinkage in the Aosta Valley Region (Western Alps, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viani, Cristina; Machguth, Horst; Huggel, Christian; Godio, Alberto; Perotti, Luigi; Giardino, Marco

    2017-04-01

    number and area of overdeepenings are very sensitive to the selected pixel size: the number of lakes increases from about 50 to 150 for a resolution of 60 m or 20 m respectively, while keeping the other parameters constant . The main variation in ice thickness (which doubles or triples according to a higher resolution) are shown mainly for glaciers larger than 1 km2 (such as the Rutor Glacier); for the many smaller glaciers (i.e. Grand Etrèt) changes are less relevant and in accordance with GPR data (about 30-40 meters of ice thickness in the central part). At Indren Glacier, thanks to the GPR survey, we verified the presence of the overdeepening and we found a good correspondence between the modelled and the measured ice thickness (about 50 meters in the centre). As a main result we provided a map of possible future lakes in Aosta Valley. Information about their location and geometry analysed in relation with the conditions of the surrounding environment (i.e. slope instabilities from IFFI landslide inventory; glacier lakes from existing inventories; human infrastructures) will support timely forecasting of hazardous scenarios and proper water management from glaciers.

  10. Full Stokes glacier model on GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licul, Aleksandar; Herman, Frédéric; Podladchikov, Yuri; Räss, Ludovic; Omlin, Samuel

    2015-04-01

    Two different approaches are commonly used in glacier ice flow modeling: models based on asymptotic approximations of ice physics and full stokes models. Lower order models are computationally lighter but reach their limits in regions of complex flow, while full Stokes models are more exact but computationally expansive. To overcome this constrain, we investigate the potential of GPU acceleration in glacier modeling. The goal of this preliminary research is to develop a three-dimensional full Stokes numerical model and apply it to the glacier flow. We numerically solve the nonlinear Stokes momentum balance equations together with the incompressibility equation. Strong nonlinearities for the ice rheology are also taken into account. We have developed a fully three-dimensional numerical MATLAB application based on an iterative finite difference scheme. We have ported it to C-CUDA to run it on GPUs. Our model is benchmarked against other full Stokes solutions for all diagnostic ISMIP-HOM experiments (Pattyn et al.,2008). The preliminary results show good agreement with the other models. The major advantages of our programming approach are simplicity and order 10-100 times speed-up in comparison to serial CPU version of the code. Future work will include some real world applications and we will implement the free surface evolution capabilities. References: [1] F. Pattyn, L. Perichon, A. Aschwanden, B. Breuer, D.B. Smedt, O. Gagliardini, G.H. Gudmundsson, R.C.A. Hindmarsh, A. Hubbard, J.V. Johnson, T. Kleiner, Y. Konovalov, C. Martin, A.J. Payne, D. Pollard, S. Price, M. Ruckamp, F. Saito, S. Sugiyama, S., and T. Zwinger, Benchmark experiments for higher-order and full-Stokes ice sheet models (ISMIP-HOM), The Cryosphere, 2 (2008), 95-108.

  11. From Glaciers to Icebergs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wendy

    I will describe works from a collaboration between physics and glaciology that grew out of interactions at the Computations in Science seminar Leo Kadanoff organized at the University of Chicago. The first project considers the interaction between ocean waves and Antarctic ice shelves, large floating portions of ice formed by glacial outflows. Back-of-envelop calculation and seismic sensor data suggest that crevasses may be distributed within an ice shelf to shield it from wave energy. We also examine numerical scenarios in which changes in environmental forcing causes the ice shelf to fail catastrophically. The second project investigates the aftermath of iceberg calving off glacier terminus in Greenland using data recorded via time-lapse camera and terrestrial radar. Our observations indicate that the mélange of icebergs within the fjord experiences widespread jamming during a calving event and therefore is always close to being in a jammed state during periods of terminus quiescence. Joint work with Jason Amundson, Ivo R. Peters, Julian Freed Brown, Nicholas Guttenberg, Justin C Burton, L. Mac Cathles, Ryan Cassotto, Mark Fahnestock, Kristopher Darnell, Martin Truffer, Dorian S. Abbot and Douglas MacAyeal. Kadanoff Session DCMP.

  12. Climate change threats to environment in the tropical Andes : glaciers and water resources

    OpenAIRE

    Chevallier, Pierre; Pouyaud, Bernard; Suarez, W.; Condom, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Almost all of the world's glaciers in the tropical latitudes are located in the Central Andes (Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador and Colombia). Due to their high altitude, to the high level of radiation and to the tropical climate dynamics, they all are particularly threatened by climate change, as a result of not only warming, but also of changing variability of precipitation. Many glaciers are of crucial importance for the livelihood of the local populations and even for three capitals, Lima (Peru), L...

  13. Photogrammetric recognition of subglacial drainage channels during glacier lake outburst events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Ellen; Koschitzki, Robert

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, many glaciers all over the world have been distinctly retreating and thinning. One of the consequences of this is the increase of so called glacier lake outburst flood events (GLOFs): Lakes that have been dammed by a glacier spontaneously start to drain through a subglacial channel underneath the glacier due to their outweighing hydrostatic pressure. In a short period of time, the lake water drains under the glacier and causes floods in downstream valleys. In many cases the latter become hazardous for people and their property. Due to glacier movement, the tunnel will soon collapse, and the glacier lake refills, thus starting a new GLOF cycle. The mechanisms ruling GLOF events are yet still not fully understood by glaciologists. Thus, there is a demand for data and measurement values that can help to understand and model the phenomena. In view of the above, we will show how photogrammetric image sequence analysis can be used to collect data which allows for drawing conclusions about the location and development of a subglacial channel. The work is a follow-up on earlier work on a photogrammetric GLOF early warning system (Mulsow et. al., 2013). For the purpose of detecting the subglacial tunnel, a camera has been installed in a pilot study to observe the area of the Colonia glacier (Northern Patagonian ice field) where it dams the lake Lago Cachet II. To verify the hypothesis, that the course of the subglacial tunnel is indicated by irregular surface motion patterns during its collapse, the camera acquired image sequences of the glacier surface during several GLOF events. Applying LSM-based tracking techniques to these image sequences, surface feature motion trajectories could be obtained for a dense raster of glacier points. Since only a single camera has been used for image sequence acquisition, depth information is required to scale the trajectories. Thus, for scaling and georeferencing of the measurements a GPS-supported photogrammetric network

  14. Holocene record of glacier variability from lake sediments reveals tripartite climate history for Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bilt, Willem; Bakke, Jostein; Vasskog, Kristian; D`Andrea, William; Bradley, Raymond; Olafsdottir, Sædis

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic is responding sensitively to ongoing global climate change, warming and moistening faster than any other region on the planet. Holocene proxy paleoclimate time series are increasingly used to put this amplified response in perspective by understanding Arctic climate processes beyond the instrumental period. Glaciers rapidly respond to climate shifts as demonstrated by their current demise around the world. This response has a composite climate signature, marked by shifts in hydroclimate (winter precipitation) as well as (summer) temperature. Attendant changes in glacier size are recorded by variations in glacigenic rock flour that may be deposited in downstream lakes. Here, we present a Holocene reconstruction of glacier activity, based on sediments from Hajeren, a glacier-fed lake on northwest Spitsbergen in the High Arctic Svalbard archipelago. Owing to undisturbed sediments and robust age control, we could resolve variability on a sub-centennial scale. To ensure the accurate detection of glacier activity, we applied a toolbox of physical, magnetic and geochemical proxies in conjunction with multivariate statistics. Our findings indicate a three-stage Holocene climate history for Svalbard, driving by melt water pulses, episodic Atlantic cooling and a decline in orbitally driven summer insolation. Correspondence between inferred advances, including a Holocene glacier maximum around 9.5 ka BP, suggests forcing by the melting LIS during the Early Holocene. Following a late Holocene Thermal Maximum around 7.4 ka BP, glaciers disappeared from the catchment. Glaciers reformed around 4.2 ka BP during the regional onset of the Neoglacial, supporting previous findings. This transition did, however, not mark the onset of persistent glacier activity in the catchment, but a series of centennial-scale cycles of growth and decay, including events around 3.3 and 1.1 ka BP. As orbitally driven insolation declined towards the present, the glaciation threshold

  15. Airborne Surface Profiling of Alaskan Glaciers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of glacier outline, laser altimetry profile, and surface elevation change data for 46 glaciers in Alaska and British Columbia, Canada,...

  16. Rock glaciers, Central Andes, Argentina, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Primary rock glaciers are fed by avalanche chutes. At the El Salto rock glacier, surveys have been undertaken in order to determine the creep rate. Between 1981 and...

  17. The Physics of Glaciers, 3rd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, David

    At one time or another, who among us has not marveled at the beauty of the snow and ice-covered Alps, or admired the tenacity of polar explorers and the adventurous spirits of climbers on the glacier-clad summits of the high Himalaya? The fascination of distant ice covered expanses has enlisted more than a few recruits into the ranks of glaciologists, but many, if not most, of today's students of glaciology are a slightly less romantic and more mathematical lot, attracted by the quantitative world of physics and the applied sciences of polar climatology, ice mechanics, and snow hydrology.Once a relatively quiet branch of geophysics filled with venturesome climbers capable of reaching the objects of their study, glaciology is now a field that is fueled by a rapid influx of talent, technology, and new ideas due to the increasingly acknowledged relationships between global climate, sea level, and ice sheets. While the understanding of glacier processes has seen significant progress, as a result there is also a sense of being overwhelmed by the voluminous and sometimes speculative theories and field observations associated with an expanding discipline.

  18. Rock glacier inventory, Hautes Alpes Calcaires, Switzerland, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hautes Alpes Calcaires is a limestone range in the northern part of the Rhone Valley (Switzerland). It is characterized by a transitional climate between the wet...

  19. Inventory parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a detailed overview of various parameters/factors involved in inventory analysis. It especially focuses on the assessment and modeling of basic inventory parameters, namely demand, procurement cost, cycle time, ordering cost, inventory carrying cost, inventory stock, stock out level, and stock out cost. In the context of economic lot size, it provides equations related to the optimum values. It also discusses why the optimum lot size and optimum total relevant cost are considered to be key decision variables, and uses numerous examples to explain each of these inventory parameters separately. Lastly, it provides detailed information on parameter estimation for different sectors/products. Written in a simple and lucid style, it offers a valuable resource for a broad readership, especially Master of Business Administration (MBA) students.

  20. A NEW APPROACH TO ESTIMATE WATER OUTPUT FROM THE MOUNTAIN GLACIERS IN ASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir G. Konovalov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional data on climate, river runoff and inventory of glaciers within High Mountainous Asia were used as informational basis to elaborate new approach in computing components of the hydrological cycle (glaciers runoff, evaporation, precipitation. In order to improve and optimize the calculation methodology, 4 675 homogeneous groups of glaciers were identified in the largest Asian river basins, i.e., Amu Darya, Syr Darya, Indus, Ganges, Brahmaputra, Tarim, and others. As the classification criteria for 53 225 glaciers located there, the author consistently used 8 gradations of orientation (azimuth and 23 gradations of area. Calculating of the hydrological regime of glaciers was performed on the example of several Asian river basins. It has been shown that in the drainless basins in Asia, the only potential factor of the glacial influence on the changes in global Ocean level is the seasonal amount of evaporation from the melted surface of perennial ice and old firn. These results and published sources were used for re-evaluation of the previous conclusions on the influence of glacier runoff on change of the Ocean level. Comparison of measured and calculated annual river runoff, which was obtained by means of modeling the components of water-balance equation, showed good correspondence between these variables.

  1. Permafrost distribution map of San Juan Dry Andes (Argentina) based on rock glacier sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper Angillieri, María Yanina

    2017-01-01

    Rock glaciers are frozen water reservoirs in mountainous areas. Water resources are important for the local populations and economies. The presence of rock glaciers is commonly used as a direct indicator of mountain permafrost conditions. Over 500 active rock glaciers have been identified, showing that elevations between 3500 and 4500 m asl., a south-facing or east-facing aspect, areas with relatively low solar radiation and low mean annual air temperature (-4 to 0 °C) favour the existence of rock glaciers in this region. The permafrost probability model, for Dry Andes of San Juan Province between latitudes 28º30‧S and 32°30‧S, have been analyzed by logistic regression models based on the active rock glaciers occurrence in relation to some topoclimatic variables such as altitude, aspect, mean annual temperature, mean annual precipitation and solar radiation, using optical remote sensing techniques in a GIS environment. The predictive performances of the model have been estimated by known rock glaciers locations and by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). This regional permafrost map can be applied by the Argentinean Government for their recent initiatives which include creating inventories, monitoring and studying ice masses along the Argentinean Andes. Further, this generated map provides valuable input data for permafrost scenarios and contributes to a better understanding of our geosystem.

  2. Glacier Mass Balance measurements in Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Miriam; Tenzin, Sangay; Tashi, Tshering

    2014-05-01

    Long-term glacier measurements are scarce in the Himalayas, partly due to lack of resources as well as inaccessibility of most of the glaciers. There are over 600 glaciers in Bhutan in the Eastern Himalayas, but no long-term measurements. However, such studies are an important component of hydrological modelling, and especially relevant to the proposed expansion of hydropower resources in this area. Glaciological studies are also critical to understanding the risk of jøkulhlaups or GLOFS (glacier lake outburst floods) from glaciers in this region. Glacier mass balance measurements have been initiated on a glacier in the Chamkhar Chu region in central Bhutan by the Department of Hydro-Met Services in co-operation with the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate. Chamkhar Chu is the site of two proposed hydropower plants that will each generate over 700 MW, although the present and future hydrological regimes in this basin, and especially the contribution from glaciers, are not well-understood at present. There are about 94 glaciers in the Chamkhar Chhu basin and total glacier area is about 75 sq. km. The glaciers are relatively accessible for the Himalayas, most of them can be reached after only 4-5 days walk from the nearest road. One of the largest, Thana glacier, has been chosen as a mass balance glacier and measurements were initiated in 2013. The glacier area is almost 5 sq. km. and the elevation range is 500 m (5071 m a.s.l. to 5725 m a.s.l.) making it suitable as a benchmark glacier. Preliminary measurements on a smaller, nearby glacier that was visited in 2012 and 2013 showed 1 m of firn loss (about 0.6 m w.eq.) over 12 months.

  3. Monitoring glacier albedo as a proxy to derive summer and annual surface mass balances from optical remote-sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davaze, Lucas; Rabatel, Antoine; Arnaud, Yves; Sirguey, Pascal; Six, Delphine; Letreguilly, Anne; Dumont, Marie

    2018-01-01

    Less than 0.25 % of the 250 000 glaciers inventoried in the Randolph Glacier Inventory (RGI V.5) are currently monitored with in situ measurements of surface mass balance. Increasing this archive is very challenging, especially using time-consuming methods based on in situ measurements, and complementary methods are required to quantify the surface mass balance of unmonitored glaciers. The current study relies on the so-called albedo method, based on the analysis of albedo maps retrieved from optical satellite imagery acquired since 2000 by the MODIS sensor, on board the TERRA satellite. Recent studies revealed substantial relationships between summer minimum glacier-wide surface albedo and annual surface mass balance, because this minimum surface albedo is directly related to the accumulation-area ratio and the equilibrium-line altitude. On the basis of 30 glaciers located in the French Alps where annual surface mass balance data are available, our study conducted on the period 2000-2015 confirms the robustness and reliability of the relationship between the summer minimum surface albedo and the annual surface mass balance. For the ablation season, the integrated summer surface albedo is significantly correlated with the summer surface mass balance of the six glaciers seasonally monitored. These results are promising to monitor both annual and summer glacier-wide surface mass balances of individual glaciers at a regional scale using optical satellite images. A sensitivity study on the computed cloud masks revealed a high confidence in the retrieved albedo maps, restricting the number of omission errors. Albedo retrieval artifacts have been detected for topographically incised glaciers, highlighting limitations in the shadow correction algorithm, although inter-annual comparisons are not affected by systematic errors.

  4. Glacier trends in the Eastern Himalayas (Nepal and Sikkim) derived from remote sensing and field observations: a contribution to the GLIMS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racoviteanu, Adina; Armstrong, Richard; Williams, Mark

    2010-05-01

    The paucity of field-based glacier measurements in the high Himalayas limits our understanding of the temporal and spatial patterns of glacier dynamics and the sensitivity of glaciers to climate variability. While there is some information on decadal changes in glacier extents in the Himalayas, there still remains a gap in glacier parameters such as hypsometry, size distribution and termini elevations. Moreover, the influence of the South Asian monsoon on the response of glaciers to climatic changes is not well understood. Here we compare and contrast present day glacier characteristics in two glacierized areas of the Himalayas: (1) Khumbu (~27.78°N, E 86.54°E ) in the Nepal Himalaya and 2) Sikkim (27.33°N and 88.62°E ) in the Indian Himalaya. These regions were selected to capture a wide variability of glacier topography and debris cover, as well as the pronounced influence of the Asian monsoon. Glacier mapping techniques include: semi-automated algorithms using ASTER and Landsat ETM imagery combined with SRTM data; a decision tree for debris-cover delineation based on visible, near infrared and thermal data combined with morphology; field-based observations (ground-based photography using a GPS-enabled camera); GPS data and meteorological records. We focus on: frequency distribution of glacier area; changes in termini elevations; hypsometry changes over time; glacier topography (slope, aspect, length/width ratio); debris cover characteristics and decadal precipitation and temperature trends. The goal is to apply the results of this new inventory towards assessing the contribution of glaciers to streamflow runoff using area-distributed processes and degree-day methods that we developed for the Nepalese Himalaya.

  5. Earth's Climate History from Glaciers and Ice Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lonnie

    2013-03-01

    Glaciers serve both as recorders and early indicators of climate change. Over the past 35 years our research team has recovered climatic and environmental histories from ice cores drilled in both Polar Regions and from low to mid-latitude, high-elevation ice fields. Those ice core -derived proxy records extending back 25,000 years have made it possible to compare glacial stage conditions in the Tropics with those in the Polar Regions. High-resolution records of δ18O (in part a temperature proxy) demonstrate that the current warming at high elevations in the mid- to lower latitudes is unprecedented for the last two millennia, although at many sites the early Holocene was warmer than today. Remarkable similarities between changes in the highland and coastal cultures of Peru and regional climate variability, especially precipitation, imply a strong connection between prehistoric human activities and regional climate. Ice cores retrieved from shrinking glaciers around the world confirm their continuous existence for periods ranging from hundreds to thousands of years, suggesting that current climatological conditions in those regions today are different from those under which these ice fields originated and have been sustained. The ongoing widespread melting of high-elevation glaciers and ice caps, particularly in low to middle latitudes, provides strong evidence that a large-scale, pervasive and, in some cases, rapid change in Earth's climate system is underway. Observations of glacier shrinkage during the 20th and 21st century girdle the globe from the South American Andes, the Himalayas, Kilimanjaro (Tanzania, Africa) and glaciers near Puncak Jaya, Indonesia (New Guinea). The history and fate of these ice caps, told through the adventure, beauty and the scientific evidence from some of world's most remote mountain tops, provide a global perspective for contemporary climate. NSF Paleoclimate Program

  6. Glacier development and topographic context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Moreno, J. I.; Nogués-Bravo, David; Chueca-Cía, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyses the topographic context of the remaining glaciated areas in the Maladeta Massif (Central Spanish Pyrenees). These ice-covered surfaces have been incorporated into a geographic information system (GIS) in an attempt at correlating the presence of ice with a range of topographic...... variables obtained from a digital elevation model. The use of generalized additive models and binary regression tree models enabled us (i) to quantify the spatial variability in the distribution of glaciers attributable to characteristics of the local terrain, (ii) to investigate the interaction between...... the variables that account for the ice cover distribution and (iii) to map the probability of glacier development. Our results show that although the development of glaciers depends on regional climate conditions, the topographic context is of paramount importance in determining the location, extent, shape...

  7. When glaciers and ice sheets melt: consequences for planktonic organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    SOMMARUGA, RUBEN

    2016-01-01

    The current melting of glaciers and ice sheets is a consequence of climatic change and their turbid meltwaters are filling and enlarging many new proglacial and ice-contact lakes around the world, as well as affecting coastal areas. Paradoxically, very little is known on the ecology of turbid glacier-fed aquatic ecosystems even though they are at the origin of the most common type of lakes on Earth. Here, I discuss the consequences of those meltwaters for planktonic organisms. A remarkable characteristic of aquatic ecosystems receiving the discharge of meltwaters is their high content of mineral suspensoids, so-called glacial flour that poses a real challenge for filter-feeding planktonic taxa such as Daphnia and phagotrophic groups such as heterotrophic nanoflagellates. The planktonic food-web structure in highly turbid meltwater lakes seems to be truncated and microbially dominated. Low underwater light levels leads to unfavorable conditions for primary producers, but at the same time, cause less stress by UV radiation. Meltwaters are also a source of inorganic and organic nutrients that could stimulate secondary prokaryotic production and in some cases (e.g. in distal proglacial lakes) also phytoplankton primary production. How changes in turbidity and in other related environmental factors influence diversity, community composition and adaptation have only recently begun to be studied. Knowledge of the consequences of glacier retreat for glacier-fed lakes and coasts will be crucial to predict ecosystem trajectories regarding changes in biodiversity, biogeochemical cycles and function. PMID:26869738

  8. Glacier fluctuations during the past 2000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomina, Olga N.; Bradley, Raymond S.; Jomelli, Vincent; Geirsdottir, Aslaug; Kaufman, Darrell S.; Koch, Johannes; McKay, Nicholas P.; Masiokas, Mariano; Miller, Gifford; Nesje, Atle; Nicolussi, Kurt; Owen, Lewis A.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Wanner, Heinz; Wiles, Gregory; Yang, Bao

    2016-10-01

    A global compilation of glacier advances and retreats for the past two millennia grouped by 17 regions (excluding Antarctica) highlights the nature of glacier fluctuations during the late Holocene. The dataset includes 275 time series of glacier fluctuations based on historical, tree ring, lake sediment, radiocarbon and terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide data. The most detailed and reliable series for individual glaciers and regional compilations are compared with summer temperature and, when available, winter precipitation reconstructions, the most important parameters for glacier mass balance. In many cases major glacier advances correlate with multi-decadal periods of decreased summer temperature. In a few cases, such as in Arctic Alaska and western Canada, some glacier advances occurred during relatively warm wet times. The timing and scale of glacier fluctuations over the past two millennia varies greatly from region to region. However, the number of glacier advances shows a clear pattern for the high, mid and low latitudes and, hence, points to common forcing factors acting at the global scale. Globally, during the first millennium CE glaciers were smaller than between the advances in 13th to early 20th centuries CE. The precise extent of glacier retreat in the first millennium is not well defined; however, the most conservative estimates indicate that during the 1st and 2nd centuries in some regions glaciers were smaller than at the end of 20th/early 21st centuries. Other periods of glacier retreat are identified regionally during the 5th and 8th centuries in the European Alps, in the 3rd-6th and 9th centuries in Norway, during the 10th-13th centuries in southern Alaska, and in the 18th century in Spitsbergen. However, no single period of common global glacier retreat of centennial duration, except for the past century, has yet been identified. In contrast, the view that the Little Ice Age was a period of global glacier expansion beginning in the 13th century

  9. Organic Carbon Dynamics in Glacier Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J.; Sharp, M.; Klassen, J.; Foght, J.; Turner, R.

    2004-12-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of organic carbon (OC) has important implications for aquatic system ecology because the abundance and molecular characteristics of OC influence contaminant transport and bioavailability, and determine its suitability as a substrate for microbial metabolism. There have been few studies of OC cycling in glacier systems, and questions remain regarding the abundance, provenance, and biogeochemical transformations of OC in these environments. To address these questions, the abundance and molecular characteristics of OC is investigated in three glacier systems. These systems are characterized by different thermal and hydrological regimes and have different potential OC sources. John Evans Glacier is a polythermal glacier in arctic Canada. Outre Glacier is a temperate glacier in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia, Canada. Victoria Upper Glacier is a cold-based glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica. To provide an indication of the extent to which glacier system OC dynamics are microbially mediated, microbial culturing and identification is performed and organic acid abundance and speciation is determined. Where possible, samples of supraglacial runoff, glacier ice and basal ice and subglacial meltwater were collected. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in each sample was measured by combustion/non-dispersive infrared gas analysis. Emission and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy were used to characterize the molecular properties of the DOC from each environment. When possible, microbial culturing and identification was performed and organic acid identification and quantification was measured by ion chromatography. DOC exists in detectable quantities (0.06-46.6 ppm) in all of the glacier systems that were investigated. The molecular characteristics of DOC vary between glaciers, between environments at the same glacier, and over time within a single environment. Viable microbes are recoverable in significant (ca

  10. Effects of basal debris on glacier flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Neal R; Cohen, Denis; Hooyer, Thomas S; Fischer, Urs H; Jackson, Miriam; Moore, Peter L; Lappegard, Gaute; Kohler, Jack

    2003-07-04

    Glacier movement is resisted partially by debris, either within glaciers or under glaciers in water-saturated layers. In experiments beneath a thick, sliding glacier, ice containing 2 to 11% debris exerted shear traction of 60 to 200 kilopascals on a smooth rock bed, comparable to the total shear traction beneath glaciers and contrary to the usual assumption that debris-bed friction is negligible. Imposed pore-water pressure that was 60 to 100% of the normal stress in a subglacial debris layer reduced shear traction on the debris sufficiently to halt its deformation and cause slip of ice over the debris. Slip resistance was thus less than debris shearing resistance.

  11. Riparian Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset is a digital representation of the 1:24,000 Land Use Riparian Areas Inventory for the state of Kansas. The dataset includes a 100 foot buffer around all...

  12. The contribution of glacier melt to streamflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaner, Neil; Voisin, Nathalie; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-09-13

    Ongoing and projected future changes in glacier extent and water storage globally have lead to concerns about the implications for water supplies. However, the current magnitude of glacier contributions to river runoff is not well known, nor is the population at risk to future glacier changes. We estimate an upper bound on glacier melt contribution to seasonal streamflow by computing the energy balance of glaciers globally. Melt water quantities are computed as a fraction of total streamflow simulated using a hydrology model and the melt fraction is tracked down the stream network. In general, our estimates of the glacier melt contribution to streamflow are lower than previously published values. Nonetheless, we find that globally an estimated 225 (36) million people live in river basins where maximum seasonal glacier melt contributes at least 10% (25%) of streamflow, mostly in the High Asia region.

  13. A spatially resolved estimate of High Mountain Asia glacier mass balances from 2000 to 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Fanny; Berthier, Etienne; Wagnon, Patrick; Kääb, Andreas; Treichler, Désirée

    2017-09-01

    High Mountain Asia hosts the largest glacier concentration outside the polar regions. These glaciers are important contributors to streamflow in one of the most populated areas of the world. Past studies have used methods that can provide only regionally averaged glacier mass balances to assess the glacier contribution to rivers and sea level rise. Here we compute the mass balance for about 92% of the glacierized area of High Mountain Asia using time series of digital elevation models derived from satellite stereo-imagery. We calculate a total mass change of -16.3 +/- 3.5 Gt yr-1 (-0.18 +/- 0.04 m w.e. yr-1) between 2000 and 2016, which is less negative than most previous estimates. Region-wide mass balances vary from -4.0 +/- 1.5 Gt yr-1 (-0.62 +/- 0.23 m w.e. yr-1) in Nyainqentanglha to +1.4 +/- 0.8 Gt yr-1 (+0.14 +/- 0.08 m w.e. yr-1) in Kunlun, with large intra-regional variability of individual glacier mass balances (standard deviation within a region ~0.20 m w.e. yr-1). Specifically, our results shed light on the Nyainqentanglha and Pamir glacier mass changes, for which contradictory estimates exist in the literature. They provide crucial information for the calibration of the models used for projecting glacier response to climatic change, as these models do not capture the pattern, magnitude and intra-regional variability of glacier changes at present.

  14. Food web structure in a harsh glacier-fed river.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie R Clitherow

    Full Text Available Glacier retreat is occurring across the world, and associated river ecosystems are expected to respond more rapidly than those in flowing waters in other regions. The river environment directly downstream of a glacier snout is characterised by extreme low water temperature and unstable channel sediments but these habitats may become rarer with widespread glacier retreat. In these extreme environments food web dynamics have been little studied, yet they could offer opportunities to test food web theories using highly resolved food webs owing to their low taxonomic richness. This study examined the interactions of macroinvertebrate and diatom taxa in the Ödenwinkelkees river, Austrian central Alps between 2006 and 2011. The webs were characterised by low taxon richness (13-22, highly connected individuals (directed connectance up to 0.19 and short mean food chain length (2.00-2.36. The dominant macroinvertebrates were members of the Chironomidae genus Diamesa and had an omnivorous diet rich in detritus and diatoms as well as other Chironomidae. Simuliidae (typically detritivorous filterers had a diet rich in diatoms but also showed evidence of predation on Chironomidae larvae. Food webs showed strong species-averaged and individual size structuring but mass-abundance scaling coefficients were larger than those predicted by metabolic theory, perhaps due to a combination of spatial averaging effects of patchily distributed consumers and resources, and/or consumers deriving unquantified resources from microorganisms attached to the large amounts of ingested rock fragments. Comparison of food web structural metrics with those from 62 published river webs suggest these glacier-fed river food web properties were extreme but in line with general food web scaling predictions, a finding which could prove useful to forecast the effects of anticipated future glacier retreat on the structure of aquatic food webs.

  15. Food web structure in a harsh glacier-fed river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clitherow, Leonie R; Carrivick, Jonathan L; Brown, Lee E

    2013-01-01

    Glacier retreat is occurring across the world, and associated river ecosystems are expected to respond more rapidly than those in flowing waters in other regions. The river environment directly downstream of a glacier snout is characterised by extreme low water temperature and unstable channel sediments but these habitats may become rarer with widespread glacier retreat. In these extreme environments food web dynamics have been little studied, yet they could offer opportunities to test food web theories using highly resolved food webs owing to their low taxonomic richness. This study examined the interactions of macroinvertebrate and diatom taxa in the Ödenwinkelkees river, Austrian central Alps between 2006 and 2011. The webs were characterised by low taxon richness (13-22), highly connected individuals (directed connectance up to 0.19) and short mean food chain length (2.00-2.36). The dominant macroinvertebrates were members of the Chironomidae genus Diamesa and had an omnivorous diet rich in detritus and diatoms as well as other Chironomidae. Simuliidae (typically detritivorous filterers) had a diet rich in diatoms but also showed evidence of predation on Chironomidae larvae. Food webs showed strong species-averaged and individual size structuring but mass-abundance scaling coefficients were larger than those predicted by metabolic theory, perhaps due to a combination of spatial averaging effects of patchily distributed consumers and resources, and/or consumers deriving unquantified resources from microorganisms attached to the large amounts of ingested rock fragments. Comparison of food web structural metrics with those from 62 published river webs suggest these glacier-fed river food web properties were extreme but in line with general food web scaling predictions, a finding which could prove useful to forecast the effects of anticipated future glacier retreat on the structure of aquatic food webs.

  16. Varying impact of surface glacier energy and mass balance processes on recent glacier changes at sites of the Southern Patagonia Icefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidemann, S. S.; Schneider, C.; Malz, P.; Jaña, R.; Gacitúa, G.; Casassa, G., Sr.

    2016-12-01

    The great majority of Patagonian glaciers have shown one of the largest retreats in the past decades world-wide. Despite the overall glacier retreat and thinning, a diverse response to climate variability has been observed. Individual glacier-climate interactions and the influence of mass balance processes controlling the specific glacier response to climate forcing have been rarely investigated. However, these are a key to understand recent changes as well as to estimate future glacier change. As part of the Chilean-German GABY-VASA project (Responses of Glaciers, Biosphere and Hydrology to Climate Variability and Climate Change across the Southern Andes)this study focusses on quantifying the energy-fluxes and mass balance processes at the glacier surface and subsurface at selected sites of the Southern Patagonia Icefield (SPI) and the Cordillera Darwin. The COoupled Snow and Ice energy and MAss balance model COSIMA(Huintjes et al. 2015) is applied to assess recent surface energy and mass balance changes with a high temporal and spatial resolution for Glaciar Grey and Glaciar Tyndall at the SPI. The model is driven by ERA-Interim data statistically downscaled based on meteorological observations at each study site. Glaciological measurements and time series of aerial photos are integrated for validation. Spatial patterns of climatic mass balance are related to surface height changes obtained by SRTM and TanDEM-X data for the time period 2000 to 2014 to approximate the influence of ice dynamical processes on glacier thinning in the ablation areas of individual glacier systems. This enables to quantify the main drivers of spatially varying response at each glacier system due to a specific climate and topographic settings. Huintjes, E., T. Sauter, B. Schröter, F. Maussion, W. Yang, J. Kropacek, M. Buchroithner, D. Scherer, S. Kang & C. Schneider (2015): Evaluation of a coupled snow and energy balance model for Zhadang glacier, Tibetan Plateau, using glaciological

  17. Glacial Lake Growth and Associated Glacier Dynamics: Case Study from the Himalayas, Andes, Alaska and New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binger, D. J.; Haritashya, U. K.; Kargel, J. S.; Shugar, D. H.

    2016-12-01

    Glacial lake growth and associated glacier dynamics: Case study from the Himalayas, Andes, Alaska and New Zealand David J. Binger1, Umesh K. Haritashya1 and Jeffrey S. Kargel21University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 2University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ As a result of climate change most of the world's alpine glaciers are undergoing measurable retreat and dynamic changes. The result of accelerated melting has led to the formation and growth of potentially dangerous glacial lakes. In this study, alpine glaciers and associated lakes from the Himalayas, Andes, Alaska and New Zealand, showing similar geomorphological settings were analyzed to compare differences in regional proglacial lake growth and its relationship with glacier dynamics. Specifically, we analyzed the surface area growth of the lakes, retreat of glacier terminus, changes in glacier velocity, surface temperature and potential glacial lake outburst flood triggers. Using Landsat and ASTER satellite images, Cosi - Corr software, and in house thermal mapping, 10 glaciers were analyzed and compared. Results show a substantial increase in proglacial lake surface area, accelerated velocity and significant calving of the glaciers. Glacier surface temperatures varied by location, with some remaining constant and others 2°C - 4°C increases; although increased surface temperature did not always show a direct correlation with increasing retreat rate. Lakes with high rates of surface area growth paired with glaciers with increased velocity and calving could prove to be unsustainable and lead to an increased risk for glacial lake outburst floods. Overall, result show the changing dynamics of the alpine glaciers in different mountain regions and the growth of their proglacial lakes.

  18. Glacier Area and River Runoff Changes in the Head of Ob River Basins During the Last 50 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surazakov, A. B.; Aizen, V. B.; Aizen, E. M.; Nikitin, S. A.; Narojniy, J. K.

    2006-12-01

    The Altai mountains in Siberia define southern periphery of the Asian Arctic Basin, and the Ob River is a major Siberian river fed by fresh water from Altai glaciers. Intensification of glacier melt in the head of Ob River since the middle of 20th century may have a considerable influence on the water resources and hydrological regime of Siberian rivers, and freshwater budget of the Arctic Ocean. In our research we estimated glacier area and runoff changes in the Aktru River basin (34.9 km2, 45% covered by glaciers) in the Central Altai using remote sensing data and in situ glaciological and hydrological observations. The measurements of the glacier mass-balance started in this basin in 1952 as a part of the World Glacier Monitoring Service, however an accurate estimation of the glacier area change in the last two decades have not been accomplished. In our research we used aerial photographs (1952, 1975), Corona (1968) and ASTER (2004) images, and Ground Control Points collected with DGPS in 2005 and 2006 field surveys. Preliminary analysis shows that area of the studied glaciers reduced up to 7% and glacier tongues retreated up to 600 m from 1952 to 2004. The rate of the glacier recession doubled between 1975 and 2004 and the river runoff increased by 30 mm/year at the head of Ob river tributaries fed by snow and glacier melt water. During the period from 1954 to 2004 annual (mainly summer) air temperature increased by 0.1 C° a decade and precipitation (mainly spring and summer) increased by 50 mm at an elevation of 2000 m.

  19. Incorporation of a glacier and snow melting model with CREST to resolve alpine glaciers and snow melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Long, D.; Zeng, C.; Hong, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Dynamics of alpine glaciers and snow cover respond to global climate change notably, particularly over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) as the world's third pole where complex topography and lack of ground-based observations result in knowledge gaps in cryospheric processes and large uncertainties in model output. This study develops a snow and glacier melt model and coupled with a distributed hydrological model (Coupled Routing and Excess Storage model, CREST) using the upper Brahmaputra River basin in the TP as a case study. Satellite-based precipitation and land surface temperature are used as primary model forcing and a progressive two-stage calibration strategy is designed to derive model parameters by two steps, i.e., (1) the processes of snow melting and (2) glacier melting and runoff generation using multi-source remote sensing data. Calibration for the snow melting model is performed using snow cover area (SCA) and snow water equivalent (SWE) products combined with some in situ measurements. Calibration for glacier melting and runoff generation is based on remotely sensed total water storage (TWS) and observational streamflow records. Results indicate that sole consideration of the SCA or streamflow performance would result in significant degradation of the performance of SWE simulation and vice versa. The overestimated glacier and snow melting rates and their contribution to streamflow in previous studies were reexamined. This study could be valuable in studying the impacts of climate change on cryospheric regions and providing an improved approach for calibrating and simulating more accurate melting rates over the study basin and potentially similar regions globally.

  20. Mass balance of Djankuat Glacier, Central Caucasus: observations, modeling and prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybak, Oleg; Mariia, Kaminskaia; Stanislav, Kutuzov; Ivan, Lavrentiev; Polina, Morozova; Victor, Popovnin; Elena, Rybak

    2017-04-01

    Djankuat is a typical valley glacier on the northern slope of the main Caucasus chain. Its present day area is approximately 2.5 square km with the characteristic ice thickness of several tens of meters. As well as other glaciers in the region, Djankuat has been shrinking during the last several decades, its cumulative mass balance in 1968-2016 was equal to -13.6 m w.e. In general, Caucasus' glaciers lost approximately one-third of their area and half of the volume. Prediction of further deradation of glaciers in changing environment is a challenging task because rivers fed by glacier melt water provide from 40 to 70% of the total river run-off in the adjacent piedmont territories. Growing demand in fresh water is rather critical for the local economy development and for growing population, motivating elaboration of an effitient instrument for evaluation and forecasting of the glaciation in the Greater Caucasus. Unfortunately, systematic observations are sparse limiting possibilities for proper model development for the most of the glaciers. Under these circumstances, we have to rely on the models developed for the few well-studied ones, like Djankuat, which is probably one of the most explored glaciers in the world. Accumulation and ablation rates have been observed here systematically and uninterruptedly since mid 60-ies using dense stake network. Together with the mass balance components, changes in flow velocity, ice thickness and geometry were regularly evaluated. During the last several ablation seasons, direct meteorological observations were carried out using an AMS. Long series of meteorological observations at the nearest weather station allow making assessment of the glacier response to climate change in the second half of the 20th century. Abundant observation data gave us the opportunity to elaborate, calibrate and validate an efficient mathematical model of surface mass balance of a typical glacier in the region. Since many glaciers in the Caucasus

  1. Glacier albedo decrease in the European Alps: potential causes and links with mass balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mauro, Biagio; Julitta, Tommaso; Colombo, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Both mountain glaciers and polar ice sheets are losing mass all over the Earth. They are highly sensitive to climate variation, and the widespread reduction of glaciers has been ascribed to the atmospheric temperature increase. Beside this driver, also ice albedo plays a fundamental role in defining mass balance of glaciers. In fact, dark ice absorbs more energy causing faster glacier melting, and this can drive to more negative balances. Previous studies showed that the albedo of Himalayan glaciers and the Greenland Ice Sheet is decreasing with important rates. In this contribution, we tested the hypothesis that also glaciers in the European Alps are getting darker. We analyzed 16-year time series of MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometer) snow albedo from Terra (MOD13A1, 2000-2015) and Aqua (MYD13A1, 2002-2015) satellites. These data feature a spatial resolution of 500m and a daily temporal resolution. We evaluated the existence of a negative linear and nonlinear trend of the summer albedo values both at pixel and at glacier level. We also calculated the correlation between MODIS summer albedo and glacier mass balances (from the World Glaciological Monitoring Service, WGMS database), for all the glaciers with available mass balance during the considered period. In order to estimate the percentage of the summer albedo that can be explained by atmospheric temperature, we correlated MODIS albedo and monthly air temperature extracted from the ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset. Results show that decreasing trends exist with a strong spatial variability in the whole Alpine chain. In large glaciers, such as the Aletch (Swiss Alps), the trend varies significantly also within the glacier, showing that the trend is higher in the area across the accumulation and ablation zone. Over the 17 glaciers with mass balance available in the WGMS data set, 11 gave significant relationship with the MODIS summer albedo. Moreover, the comparison between ERA-Interim temperature

  2. From 'true' glaciers to rock glaciers? The case of the Llanos la Liebre rock glacier, dry Andes of Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, S.; Kinnard, C.

    2012-04-01

    In the dry Andes of Chile, rock glaciers are the most widespread and remarkable superficial landforms, and may constitute important solid water reservoirs. The existence of huge (up to 2-3 kilometres of length) rock glaciers located in deep cirques questions possible derivation from former 'true' glaciers. The issue is of importance (i) for understanding the mechanisms of the landscape evolution from glacial realm to periglacial realm, and (ii) because it may determine the ice content of the concerned rock glaciers. In the Colorado Río valley, in the upper part of the Elqui catchment (~30.15 deg. S and 70.80 deg. W), we investigated the internal structure of the Llanos la Liebre rock glacier using ground-penetrating radar (GPR). With 50 MHz antennas and a constant offset of 2 m between antennas, we performed various GPR profiles, especially a ~2.2 km-long one almost covering the entire length of the rock glacier. The processing and the subsequent interpretation of the GPR data were mainly based on the modelling of the radar wave velocity. Hence, the final representation of the internal structure of the rock glacier integrates the reconstructed stratigraphy, the 2-D velocity model, and first attempts for estimating the ice/water contents. The most striking results are: the neat identification of the base of the superficial blocky layer and of the rock glacier floor; the occurrence of stratigraphic patterns reminiscent of 'true' glaciers; the supremacy of high radar wave velocities in the upper part of the rock glacier. On the latter bases and taking into account the whole geomorphology of the site, the derivation of the Llanos la Liebre rock glacier from a former, buried glacier is debated.

  3. Temporal fluctuations and frontal area change of Bangni and Dunagiri glaciers from 1962 to 2013, Dhauliganga Basin, central Himalaya, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinit; Mehta, Manish; Mishra, Ajai; Trivedi, Anjali

    2017-05-01

    Glaciers have been receding for the last 100 years in many glaciated regions of the world, and the rate of recession has accelerated during the last 60 years. Recent assessments of changes in glaciers in the Himalaya have usually recognized their variable rate of recession. The present study deals with snout retreat, frontal area vacation, and estimation of the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) of Bangni and Dunagiri glaciers, in the Dhauliganga Basin, central Himalaya (India), using multi-image satellite data (Landsat MSS, 1976; Landsat TM, 1990; Landsat ETM +, 2005) and Survey of India topographic maps (1962; 1:50,000) along with field surveys (2012 to 2014) for the period of 1962-2013. The meteorological data of the India Meteorological Department (IMD) and TRMM suggested that the central Himalaya received less precipitation between 1960 and 1990. Because of the less precipitation, glaciers receded rapidly during this period. The present study shows that Bangni and Dunagiri glaciers retreated 2080 ± 162 m and 484 ± 38 m with average rates of 41 ± 3.2 m a- 1 and 9 ± 0.6 m a- 1 between 1962 and 2013, respectively. During this period Bangni and Dunagiri glaciers lost about 17% and 11% of their length, respectively. The result also suggested that Bangni Glacier vacated 598,948 ± 12,257 m2 frontal area, while Dunagiri Glacier vacated 170,428 ± 7833 m2 frontal area between 1962 and 2013. Moreover, the estimated ELA change for Bangni Glacier was 64 ± 30 m upward during the study period. The Geological Survey of India (GSI, 1998a,b) suggested that the ELA of Dunagiri Glacier rose 28 m between 1984 and 1992 and that the glacier lost (-)16 × 106 m3 w.e. ice with an average rate of loss of (-)1.04 m w.e. a- 1. The geomorphology of the Dunagiri Valley reflected that Bangni and Dunagiri glaciers were joined together in the past. Nevertheless, these two glaciers retreat at different rates, indicating that climate change is not the only factor in glacier retreat but that

  4. A comparison of glacier melt on debris-covered glaciers in the northern and southern Caucasus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A. Lambrecht; C. Mayer; W. Hagg; V. Popovnin; A. Rezepkin; N. Lomidze; D. Svanadze

    2011-01-01

    .... In this study, regional differences of the conditions for glacier melt with a special focus on debris covered glacier tongues in the well-studied Adyl-su basin on the northern slope of the Caucasus Mountains (Russia...

  5. A database of worldwide glacier thickness observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gärtner-Roer, I.; Naegeli, K.; Huss, M.

    2014-01-01

    surface observations. However, although thickness has been observed on many glaciers and ice caps around the globe, it has not yet been published in the shape of a readily available database. Here, we present a standardized database of glacier thickness observations compiled by an extensive literature...... review and from airborne data extracted from NASA's Operation IceBridge. This database contains ice thickness observations from roughly 1100 glaciers and ice caps including 550 glacier-wide estimates and 750,000 point observations. A comparison of these observational ice thicknesses with results from...... area- and slope-dependent approaches reveals large deviations both from the observations and between different estimation approaches. For glaciers and ice caps all estimation approaches show a tendency to overestimation. For glaciers the median relative absolute deviation lies around 30% when analyzing...

  6. Representing glaciers in a regional climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotlarski, Sven [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany); ETH Zurich, Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, Zurich (Switzerland); Jacob, Daniela; Podzun, Ralf [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany); Paul, Frank [University of Zurich, Department of Geography, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-01-15

    A glacier parameterization scheme has been developed and implemented into the regional climate model REMO. The new scheme interactively simulates the mass balance as well as changes of the areal extent of glaciers on a subgrid scale. The temporal evolution and the general magnitude of the simulated glacier mass balance in the European Alps are in good accordance with observations for the period 1958-1980, but the strong mass loss towards the end of the twentieth century is systematically underestimated. The simulated decrease of glacier area in the Alps between 1958 and 2003 ranges from -17.1 to -23.6%. The results indicate that observed glacier mass balances can be approximately reproduced within a regional climate model based on simplified concepts of glacier-climate interaction. However, realistic results can only be achieved by explicitly accounting for the subgrid variability of atmospheric parameters within a climate model grid box. (orig.)

  7. DATA BASE OF THE BAIKAL REGION GLACIERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kitov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The data base of the glaciers consider of the Baikal region: North Baikal (Baikalskiy and Barguzinskiy ridges, Eastern Sayan (Munku-Sardykridge. These databases are registered in the Registry database of the Russian Federation. Features glaciers are given in accordance with the Russian representation [WEBGEO, WESTRA] of the international databases [GTN-G; NGDC; NSIDC] and supplemented by other parameters glaciers. The initial state of glaciers is shown in the initial period of their study, from topographic maps or from the catalog of glaciers of the USSR. Thus, for each considered mountain structure shows the state of glaciation half a century ago and now the results of expeditions and remote sensing data. The information provided allows you to assess the dynamics of glaciers due to climate change.

  8. Surface wave generation due to glacier calving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław R. Massel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Coastal glaciers reach the ocean in a spectacular process called "calving". Immediately after calving, the impulsive surface waves are generated, sometimes of large height. These waves are particularly dangerous for vessels sailing close to the glacier fronts. The paper presents a theoretical model of surface wave generation due to glacier calving. To explain the wave generation process, four case studies of ice blocks falling into water are discussed: a cylindrical ice block of small thickness impacting on water, an ice column sliding into water without impact, a large ice block falling on to water with a pressure impulse, and an ice column becoming detached from the glacier wall and falling on to the sea surface. These case studies encompass simplified, selected modes of the glacier calving, which can be treated in a theoretical way. Example calculations illustrate the predicted time series of surface elevations for each mode of glacier calving.

  9. Peeking Under the Ice… Literally: Records of Arctic Climate Change from Radiocarbon Dating Moss Emerging from Beneath Retreating Glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briner, J. P.; Schweinsberg, A.; Miller, G. H.; Lifton, N. A.; Beel, C. R.; Bennike, O.

    2014-12-01

    Dramatic changes are taking place throughout the Arctic. Many glaciers have already melted away completely, and most others are well on their way as rising snowline elevations promise continued glacier retreat. Emerging from beneath retreating glacier margins is a landscape rich in information about past climate and glacier changes. Within newly exposed bedrock is an inventory of cosmogenic nuclides that archive past ice cover timing and duration. Lake basins re-appearing due to retreating ice preserve sediment archives that tell of cooling climate and advancing ice. And ancient surfaces vegetated with tundra communities that have long been entombed beneath frozen-bedded ice caps are now being revealed for the first time in millennia. This presentation will focus on the climate and glacier record derived from radiocarbon dating of in situ moss recently exhumed from retreating local ice cap margins on western Greenland. Dozens of radiocarbon ages from moss group into several distinct modes, which are interpreted as discrete times of persistent summer cooling and resultant glacier expansion. The data reveal a pattern of glacier expansion beginning ~5000 years ago, followed by periods of glacier growth around 3500 and 1500 years ago. Because these times of glacier expansion are recorded at many sites in western Greenland and elsewhere in the Arctic, they are interpreted as times of step-wise summer cooling events during the Holocene. These non-linear climate changes may be a result of feedbacks that amplify linear insolation forcing of Holocene climate. In addition to these insights into the Arctic climate system, the antiquity of many radiocarbon ages of ice-killed moss indicate that many arctic surfaces are being re-exposed for the first time in millennia due to retreating ice, emphasizing the unprecedented nature of current summer warming.

  10. Assessing glacier melt contribution to streamflow at Universidad Glacier, central Andes of Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Bravo, Claudio; Loriaux, Thomas; Rivera, Andrés; Brock, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Glacier melt is an important source of water for high Andean rivers in central Chile, especially in dry years, when it can be an important contributor to flows during late summer and autumn. However, few studies have quantified glacier melt contribution to streamflow in this region. To address this shortcoming, we present an analysis of meteorological conditions and ablation for Universidad Glacier, one of the largest valley glaciers in the central Andes of Chile at the head of the Tinguiriri...

  11. Evolution of glacier-dammed lakes through space and time; Brady Glacier, Alaska, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Capps, Denny McLane

    2011-01-01

    Glacier-dammed lakes and their associated jökulhlaups cause severe flooding in downstream areas and substantially influence glacier dynamics. The goal of this dissertation is to identify and characterize the evolution of glacier-dammed lakes to predict their future behaviour using ground-truthed remote sensing techniques and dendrochronology. Brady Glacier in southeast Alaska is particularly well suited for a study of these phenomena because it presently dams ten large (>1 square km) lakes...

  12. Diversity and Assembling Processes of Bacterial Communities in Cryoconite Holes of a Karakoram Glacier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Roberto; Musitelli, Federica; Navarra, Federico; Tagliaferri, Ilario; Gandolfi, Isabella; Bestetti, Giuseppina; Mayer, Christoph; Minora, Umberto; Azzoni, Roberto Sergio; Diolaiuti, Guglielmina; Smiraglia, Claudio; Franzetti, Andrea

    2017-05-01

    Cryoconite holes are small ponds that form on the surface of glaciers that contain a dark debris, the cryoconite, at the bottom and host active ecological communities. Differences in the structure of bacterial communities have been documented among Arctic and mountain glaciers, and among glaciers in different areas of the world. In this study, we investigated the structure of bacterial communities of cryoconite holes of Baltoro Glacier, a large (62 km in length and 524 km2 of surface) glacier of the Karakoram, by high-throughput sequencing of the V5-V6 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. We found that Betaproteobacteria dominated bacterial communities, with large abundance of genera Polaromonas, probably thanks to its highly versatile metabolism, and Limnohabitans, which may have been favoured by the presence of supraglacial lakes in the area where cryoconite holes were sampled. Variation in bacterial communities among different sampling areas of the glacier could be explained by divergent selective processes driven by variation in environmental conditions, particularly pH, which was the only environmental variable that significantly affected the structure of bacterial communities. This variability may be due to both temporal and spatial patterns of variation in environmental conditions.

  13. Contrasting responses of Central Asian rock glaciers to global warming

    OpenAIRE

    Annina Sorg; Andreas Kääb; Andrea Roesch; Christof Bigler; Markus Stoffel

    2015-01-01

    While the responses of Tien Shan glaciers ? and glaciers elsewhere ? to climatic changes are becoming increasingly well understood, this is less the case for permafrost in general and for rock glaciers in particular. We use a novel approach to describe the climate sensitivity of rock glaciers and to reconstruct periods of high and low rock glacier activity in the Tien Shan since 1895. Using more than 1500 growth anomalies from 280 trees growing on rock glacier bodies, repeat aerial photograph...

  14. New approaches to observation and modeling of fast-moving glaciers and ice streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzfeld, U. C.; Trantow, T.; Markle, M. J.; Medley, G.; Markus, T.; Neumann, T.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we will give an overview of several new approaches to remote-sensing observations and analysis and to modeling of fast glacier flow. The approaches will be applied in case studies of different types of fast-moving glaciers: (1) The Bering-Bagley Glacier System, Alaska (a surge-type glacier system), (2) Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland (a tide-water terminating fjord glacier and outlet of the Greenland Inland Ice), and (3) Icelandic Ice Caps (manifestations of the interaction of volcanic and glaciologic processes). On the observational side, we will compare the capabilities of lidar and radar altimeters, including ICESat's Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), CryoSat-2's Synthetic Aperture Interferometric Radar Altimeter (SIRAL) and the future ICESat-2 Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), especially regarding retrieval of surface heights over crevassed regions as typical of spatial and temporal acceleration. Properties that can be expected from ICESat-2 ATLAS data will be illustrated based on analyses of data from ICESat-2 simulator instruments: the Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar (SIMPL) and the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL). Information from altimeter data will be augmented by an automated surface classification based on image data, which includes satellite imagery such as LANDSAT and WorldView as well as airborne video imagery of ice surfaces. Numerical experiments using Elmer/Ice will be employed to link parameters derived in observations to physical processes during the surge of the Bering Bagley Glacier System. This allows identification of processes that can be explained in an existing framework and processes that may require new concepts for glacier evolution. Topics include zonation of surge progression in a complex glacier system and crevassing as an indication, storage of glacial water, influence of basal topography and the role of friction laws.

  15. Estimating stream discharge from a Himalayan Glacier using coupled satellite sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, S. F.; Stearns, L. A.; van der Veen, C. J.; Haritashya, U. K.; Tarpanelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    The 4th IPCC report highlighted our limited understanding of Himalayan glacier behavior and contribution to the region's hydrology. Seasonal snow and glacier melt in the Himalayas are important sources of water, but estimates greatly differ about the actual contribution of melted glacier ice to stream discharge. A more comprehensive understanding of the contribution of glaciers to stream discharge is needed because streams being fed by glaciers affect the livelihoods of a large part of the world's population. Most of the streams in the Himalayas are unmonitored because in situ measurements are logistically difficult and costly. This necessitates the use of remote sensing platforms to obtain estimates of river discharge for validating hydrological models. In this study, we estimate stream discharge using cost-effective methods via repeat satellite imagery from Landsat-8 and SENTINEL-1A sensors. The methodology is based on previous studies, which show that ratio values from optical satellite bands correlate well with measured stream discharge. While similar, our methodology relies on significantly higher resolution imagery (30 m) and utilizes bands that are in the blue and near-infrared spectrum as opposed to previous studies using 250 m resolution imagery and spectral bands only in the near-infrared. Higher resolution imagery is necessary for streams where the source is a glacier's terminus because the width of the stream is often only 10s of meters. We validate our methodology using two rivers in the state of Kansas, where stream gauges are plentiful. We then apply our method to the Bhagirathi River, in the North-Central Himalayas, which is fed by the Gangotri Glacier and has a well monitored stream gauge. The analysis will later be used to couple river discharge and glacier flow and mass balance through an integrated hydrologic model in the Bhagirathi Basin.

  16. Making geodetic glacier mass balances available to the community - Progress and challenges in modifying the WGMS database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machguth, Horst; Landmann, Johannes; Zemp, Michael; Paul, Frank

    2017-04-01

    The recent years have seen a sharp increase in the publication of geodetically derived glacier mass balances. Internationally coordinated glacier monitoring, however, has so far focused mainly on direct glaciological mass balance measurements. There is thus a need to collect geodetic glacier mass balance data in a standardized format and make the data available to the scientific community. This would allow easy access and data use for, e.g., assessment of regional to global scale glacier changes, re-analysis of glaciological mass balance series, evaluation of and comparison to, other data or model results. It appears logical to build such a data archive where glaciological data are already routinely collected. In the framework of the ESA project Glaciers_cci, the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS) has started an initiative to establish the expertise, the strategy and the infrastructure to make the increasing amount of geodetic glacier mass balance available to the scientific community. The focus is (i) on geodetic (glacier wide) changes as obtained from differencing digital elevation models from two epochs, and (ii) on point elevation change from altimetry. Here we outline the chosen strategy to include gridded data of surface elevation change into the WGMS database. We describe the basic strategy using the netCDF4 data format, summarize the data handling as well as the standardization and discuss major challenges in efficient inclusion of geodetic glacier changes into the WGMS database. Finally, we discuss the potential use of the data and thereby highlight how the added geodetic data influence the calculation of regional to global averages of glacier mass balance.

  17. Glaciers. Attribution of global glacier mass loss to anthropogenic and natural causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzeion, Ben; Cogley, J Graham; Richter, Kristin; Parkes, David

    2014-08-22

    The ongoing global glacier retreat is affecting human societies by causing sea-level rise, changing seasonal water availability, and increasing geohazards. Melting glaciers are an icon of anthropogenic climate change. However, glacier response times are typically decades or longer, which implies that the present-day glacier retreat is a mixed response to past and current natural climate variability and current anthropogenic forcing. Here we show that only 25 ± 35% of the global glacier mass loss during the period from 1851 to 2010 is attributable to anthropogenic causes. Nevertheless, the anthropogenic signal is detectable with high confidence in glacier mass balance observations during 1991 to 2010, and the anthropogenic fraction of global glacier mass loss during that period has increased to 69 ± 24%. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Optimization of Inventory

    OpenAIRE

    PROKOPOVÁ, Nikola

    2017-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is optimization of inventory in selected organization. Inventory optimization is a very important topic in each organization because it reduces storage costs. At the beginning the inventory theory is presented. It shows the meaning and types of inventory, inventory control and also different methods and models of inventory control. Inventory optimization in the enterprise can be reached by using models of inventory control. In the second part the company on which is...

  19. Monitoring glacier albedo as a proxy to derive summer and annual surface mass balances from optical remote-sensing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Davaze

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Less than 0.25 % of the 250 000 glaciers inventoried in the Randolph Glacier Inventory (RGI V.5 are currently monitored with in situ measurements of surface mass balance. Increasing this archive is very challenging, especially using time-consuming methods based on in situ measurements, and complementary methods are required to quantify the surface mass balance of unmonitored glaciers. The current study relies on the so-called albedo method, based on the analysis of albedo maps retrieved from optical satellite imagery acquired since 2000 by the MODIS sensor, on board the TERRA satellite. Recent studies revealed substantial relationships between summer minimum glacier-wide surface albedo and annual surface mass balance, because this minimum surface albedo is directly related to the accumulation–area ratio and the equilibrium-line altitude. On the basis of 30 glaciers located in the French Alps where annual surface mass balance data are available, our study conducted on the period 2000–2015 confirms the robustness and reliability of the relationship between the summer minimum surface albedo and the annual surface mass balance. For the ablation season, the integrated summer surface albedo is significantly correlated with the summer surface mass balance of the six glaciers seasonally monitored. These results are promising to monitor both annual and summer glacier-wide surface mass balances of individual glaciers at a regional scale using optical satellite images. A sensitivity study on the computed cloud masks revealed a high confidence in the retrieved albedo maps, restricting the number of omission errors. Albedo retrieval artifacts have been detected for topographically incised glaciers, highlighting limitations in the shadow correction algorithm, although inter-annual comparisons are not affected by systematic errors.

  20. Surface Elevation Changes and Velocities from Remote-Sensing Data at Vil'kitskogo, Inostranzeva and Bunge Glaciers on the Novaya Zemlya Icefield in the Russian High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkonian, A. K.; Willis, M. J.; Pritchard, M. E.; Stewart, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Northern Ice Cap of Novaya Zemlya is the largest (22,000 km2) and most rapidly changing ice cap in the Russian High Arctic, accounting for 80% of the region's estimated 0.025 mm/yr contribution to sea level rise between 2003-2009 (Moholdt et al., 2012). We use several remote sensing instruments to extend this time series forward and instead of computing a regional average, we seek a detailed glacier-by-glacier inventory of elevation and velocity changes. Here, we focus on three glaciers along the Barents Sea coast of the ice cap: Vil'kitskogo, Inostranzeva and Bunge, all of which experienced area reduction at an average rate of roughly 1 sq. km/yr from 1990 to 2000 (Kouraev, Legrésy and Remy, 2006). Our estimates of the current surface elevation change rates (dh/dt) and velocities at these glaciers will allow us to determine the connections between thinning, dynamics and the documented climatic changes -- 2004-2009 mean summer temperatures in Novaya Zemlya were anomalously high, +0.50×0.28C greater than mean summer temperatures from 1980-2009 (Moholdt et al., 2012), while Meng (2013) found that melt duration increased by 1.3 days/yr from 1996 to 2011. Based on warming and increased melt in the region, we expect to find a seasonally-related increase in velocity. Comparing acceleration (or the lack thereof) with thinning rates and combining both with existing bathymetry to calculate flux will enable us to estimate the contribution of dynamics to mass change at these glaciers relative to melt. We estimate dh/dt by applying a weighted linear regression to time series of ASTER DEMs acquired between 2003/07/29 to 2013/07/27 and Russian cartographic DEMs issued in 1970/71. Glacier velocities are calculated using automated normalized cross correlation, or 'pixel-tracking', applied to ASTER image pairs from 2003 to 2013. We supplement our ASTER time series with velocities and DEMs from very high-resolution (0.5-2 m/pixel) imagery acquired by QuickBird, WorldView and

  1. Rock avalanches and glacier dynamics: a case study in the Chugach Mountains, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, Manuela; Fischer, Luzia; Huggel, Christian; Kargell, Jeffrey; Korup, Oliver

    2010-05-01

    Massive rock slope failures resulting in rock avalanches in glacierized environments can have serious consequences for downstream areas. Furthermore they are important drivers of erosion. The Chugach Mountains in south-central Alaska are a vast remote and strongly glacierized area with evidence of numerous rock avalanches, although a systematic documentation and assessment of their role as geomorphic agents is missing so far. Here we use glaciers as a unique archive of rock avalanches that have deposited extensive debris sheets on glaciers. A number of well preserved rock avalanche deposits from past years and decades furthermore facilitate the quantification of hitherto poorly known historic glacier surface velocities in the region. The principal objective of this work was first to create an inventory of rock avalanches on the basis of Landsat satellite images in the Chugach Mountains, and to analyze their characteristics regarding lithology, climate, runout-distance, area and volume, as well as their spatial distribution. The runout distances of mass movements are generally larger in glacial environments than in non-glacial environments. This characteristic was also shown in the studied cases as they always travelled over glaciers, firn or snow. The distribution of the rock avalanches was compared with the occurrence of earthquakes in the region. It has been shown in this study, that especially big earthquakes trigger rock avalanches. Smaller earthquakes do not appear to have enough energy to trigger rock avalanches. Furthermore, the climate conditions were analyzed of being responsible for the spatial pattern of the rock avalanches. The south-eastern part of the Chugach Mountains is affected by high precipitation and mild temperatures. Concentration of rock avalanches occurs in the same area. To analyze glacier dynamics over more than 20 years, rock avalanche deposits on the glaciers were used to derive simple but robust measures of flow velocities over periods

  2. Glacier-derived August runoff in northwest Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Adam; Harper, Joel T.; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    The second largest concentration of glaciers in the U.S. Rocky Mountains is located in Glacier National Park (GNP), Montana. The total glacier-covered area in this region decreased by ∼35% over the past 50 years, which has raised substantial concern about the loss of the water derived from glaciers during the summer. We used an innovative weather station design to collect in situ measurements on five remote glaciers, which are used to parameterize a regional glacier melt model. This model offered a first-order estimate of the summer meltwater production by glaciers. We find, during the normally dry month of August, glaciers in the region produce approximately 25 × 106 m3 of potential runoff. We then estimated the glacier runoff component in five gaged streams sourced from GNP basins containing glaciers. Glacier-melt contributions range from 5% in a basin only 0.12% glacierized to >90% in a basin 28.5% glacierized. Glacier loss would likely lead to lower discharges and warmer temperatures in streams draining basins >20% glacier-covered. Lower flows could even be expected in streams draining basins as little as 1.4% glacierized if glaciers were to disappear.

  3. Microbial biodiversity in glacier-fed streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Linda; Singer, Gabriel A; Fasching, Christina; Battin, Tom J; Besemer, Katharina

    2013-08-01

    While glaciers become increasingly recognised as a habitat for diverse and active microbial communities, effects of their climate change-induced retreat on the microbial ecology of glacier-fed streams remain elusive. Understanding the effect of climate change on microorganisms in these ecosystems is crucial given that microbial biofilms control numerous stream ecosystem processes with potential implications for downstream biodiversity and biogeochemistry. Here, using a space-for-time substitution approach across 26 Alpine glaciers, we show how microbial community composition and diversity, based on 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, in biofilms of glacier-fed streams may change as glaciers recede. Variations in streamwater geochemistry correlated with biofilm community composition, even at the phylum level. The most dominant phyla detected in glacial habitats were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria/chloroplasts. Microorganisms from ice had the lowest α diversity and contributed marginally to biofilm and streamwater community composition. Rather, streamwater apparently collected microorganisms from various glacial and non-glacial sources forming the upstream metacommunity, thereby achieving the highest α diversity. Biofilms in the glacier-fed streams had intermediate α diversity and species sorting by local environmental conditions likely shaped their community composition. α diversity of streamwater and biofilm communities decreased with elevation, possibly reflecting less diverse sources of microorganisms upstream in the catchment. In contrast, β diversity of biofilms decreased with increasing streamwater temperature, suggesting that glacier retreat may contribute to the homogenisation of microbial communities among glacier-fed streams.

  4. Climate science: The future of Asia's glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogley, J. Graham

    2017-09-01

    Glaciers in the high mountains of Asia are a crucial water resource, but are at risk from global warming. Modelling suggests that the glaciers will shed mass in direct proportion to the warming to which they are exposed. See Letter p.257

  5. The response of glaciers to climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, Elisabeth Jantina

    2003-01-01

    The research described in this thesis addresses two aspects of the response of glaciers to climate change. The first aspect deals with the physical processes that govern the interaction between glaciers and climate change and was treated by (1) studying the spatial and temporal variation of the

  6. Inventory of marine and estuarine fishes in southeast and central Alaska National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimitsu, Mayumi L.; Litzow, Michael A.; Piatt, John F.; Robards, Martin D.; Abookire, Alisa A.; Drew, Gary S.

    2003-01-01

    As part of a national inventory program funded by the National Park Service, we conducted an inventory of marine and estuarine fishes in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Sitka National Historical Park, and Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park in 2001 and 2002. In addition, marine fish data from a previous project that focused on forage fishes and marine predators during 1999 and 2000 in Glacier Bay proper were compiled for this study. Sampling was conducted with modified herring and Isaacs-Kidd midwater trawls, a plumb staff beam trawl, and beach seines. Species lists of relative abundance were generated for nearshore fishes in all parks, and for demersal and pelagic fishes in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve and Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. With a total sampling effort of 531 sets, we captured 100 species in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, 31 species in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, 23 species in Sitka National Historical Park, and 11 species in Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park. We estimated that between 59 and 85 percent of the total marine fish species present were sampled by us in the various habitat-park units. We also combined these data with historical records and prepared an annotated species list of 160 marine and estuarine fishes known to occur in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. Shannon-Wiener diversity index and catch per unit effort were used to assess the effects of depth and latitude (distance from tidewater glaciers) on marine fish community ecology in Glacier Bay proper. Our findings suggest that demersal fishes are more abundant and diverse with increased distance from tidewater glaciers, and that pelagic fishes sampled deeper than 50 m are more abundant in areas closer to tidewater glaciers.

  7. Englacial Hydrology of Temperate Glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, A. G.; Creyts, T. T.

    2015-12-01

    The englacial region of temperate glaciers is generally treated as a passive conveyor of water from the surface to the bed. Consequently, few studies have examined this region and relatively little is known. This is an important issue because englacial processes probably exert a first order control on the distribution of water to the subglacial hydraulic system. Controlling the water distribution probably controls the type of subglacial hydraulic features present and therefore sliding behavior. Certainly, englacial conduits play a major, if not primary, role in conveying water in the ablation zone. In regions of over-deepenings, areas highly crevassed, or in the accumulation zone, the importance of englacial conduits is less clear. Field studies have shown that intersecting englacial passageways in these regions are relatively common, implying that large water fluxes can drain efficiently through a network of fractures. Hypothetically, efficient drainage systems composed of englacial conduits develop in response to point input of large surface water fluxes. Where input is small and distributed, common to highly crevassed areas or the accumulation zone, water is probably routed through a network of englacial fractures. Glacier geometry may also play a role. Conduits may not develop in the over-deepened (closed basins) regions of a glacier requiring another flow pathway. That englacial fractures exist and can convey water presents a promising alternative. Measured rates of flow in fractures strongly suggest laminar conditions and a sufficient fracture density exists to accommodate the estimated water flux generated upstream by surface melt. The slow flow rates do not generate sufficient viscous heat to compensate expected rates of closure by freezing, however field observations and seismic evidence point to spontaneous fracture formation at depth that must regenerate the fracture network. It is unfortunate that englacial investigations are ignored in favor of

  8. Space Radar Image of San Rafael Glacier, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A NASA radar instrument has been successfully used to measure some of the fastest moving and most inaccessible glaciers in the world -- in Chile's huge, remote Patagonia ice fields -- demonstrating a technique that could produce more accurate predictions of glacial response to climate change and corresponding sea level changes. This image, produced with interferometric measurements made by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flown on the Space Shuttle last fall, has provided the first detailed measurements of the mass and motion of the San Rafael Glacier. Very few measurements have been made of the Patagonian ice fields, which are the world's largest mid-latitude ice masses and account for more than 60 percent of the Southern Hemisphere's glacial area outside of Antarctica. These features make the area essential for climatologists attempting to understand the response of glaciers on a global scale to changes in climate, but the region's inaccessibility and inhospitable climate have made it nearly impossible for scientists to study its glacial topography, meteorology and changes over time. Currently, topographic data exist for only a few glaciers while no data exist for the vast interior of the ice fields. Velocity has been measured on only five of the more than 100 glaciers, and the data consist of only a few single-point measurements. The interferometry performed by the SIR-C/X-SAR was used to generate both a digital elevation model of the glaciers and a map of their ice motion on a pixel-per-pixel basis at very high resolution for the first time. The data were acquired from nearly the same position in space on October 9, 10 and 11, 1994, at L-band frequency (24-cm wavelength), vertically transmitted and received polarization, as the Space Shuttle Endeavor flew over several Patagonian outlet glaciers of the San Rafael Laguna. The area shown in these two images is 50 kilometers by 30 kilometers (30 miles by 18 miles) in

  9. The Microseismicity of Glacier Sliding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Fabian; Röösli, Claudia; Kissling, Edi

    2017-04-01

    Our understanding of glacier and ice sheet basal motion remains incomplete. The past decades have witnessed a shift away from initially proposed hard bed theories towards soft, till-laden beds, which deform and thus participate in basal motion. The theoretical treatment of deformable beds is subject to debate, yet our capability to predict ice sheet flow and ultimately sea level rise is contingent upon correct parameterization of basal motion (Ritz et al., 2015). Both hard and soft bed theories neglect frictional sliding across distinct basal fault planes and elastic deformation in response to sudden dislocation. Over recent years, this view has been repeatedly challenged as more and more studies report seismogenic faulting associated with basal sliding. For instance, large parts of the Whillans Ice Stream at Antarctica's Siple Coast move nearly exclusively during sudden sliding episodes (Wiens et al., 2008). This "stick-slip motion" is difficult to explain with traditional glacier sliding theories but more analogous to earthquake dislocation on tectonic faults. Although the Whillans Ice Stream motion may be an extreme example, there exists evidence for much smaller microseismic stick-slip events beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet and non-polar glaciers (Podolskiy and Walter, 2016). This raises the question how relevant and widespread the stick-slip phenomenon is and if it is necessary to include it into ice sheet models. Here we discuss recent seismic deployments, which focused on detection of stick-slip events beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet and European Alpine Glaciers. For all deployments, a considerable challenge lies in detection of stick-slip seismograms in the presence of a dominant background seismicity associated with surface crevassing. Nevertheless, automatic search algorithms and waveform characteristics provide important insights into temporal variation of stick-slip activity as well as information about fault plane geometry and co-seismic sliding

  10. Fluctuations of glaciers of the Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes in the 20th –21st centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ya. Muraviev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in sizes of the Klyuchevskaya volcanic group's glaciers had been estimated for the period from 1949–1950 to 2010–2015 using results of analysis of current satellite imagery, data of field observations and historic records. Changes in front positions for some glaciers were analyzed for different periods of time. According to results of comparison between our data and similar ones from the Glacier Inventory the glacier areas decreased by 0.7%. Calculations made with corrected data demonstrated the total increase of the glaciation area by 4.3%. Glaciation of the Klyuchevskoy volcano is characterized by dynamic instability and significant changeability. The Erman glacier, the largest one in this region, did constantly advance since 1945. In 1949‑2015, its area at the front increased by 4.96±0.39 km2, while the front advanced along the valley of the Sukhaya River by approximately 3675±15 m and by 3480±20 m along the valley of the Krutenkaya River. A number of «wandering glaciers» located on the North‑Eastern and Eastern slopes of the volcano, on the contrary, significantly reduced their areas. At the same time, formation of new flows of ice is noticed within the «ice belt». Under the influence of active volcanic processes, the configuration of glacier boundaries on the slopes of Klyuchevskoy volcano does actively change in not only the tongue areas but also in the accumulation areas. Changes in dynamics of the glaciation areas of the Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes don’t correspond to the present‑day climate changes. The interaction of modern volcanism and glaciation in the area as a whole is conducive to the preservation and development of glaciers, despite the deterioration of climatic conditions of their existence.

  11. Glacier surface mass balance and freshwater runoff modeling for the entire Andes Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernild, Sebastian H.; Liston, Glen E.; Yde, Jacob C.

    2017-04-01

    Glacier surface mass balance (SMB) observations for the Andes Cordillera are limited and, therefore, estimates of the SMB contribution from South America to sea-level rise are highly uncertain. Here, we simulate meteorological, snow, glacier surface, and hydrological runoff conditions and trends for the Andes Cordillera (1979/80-2013/14), covering the tropical latitudes in the north down to the sub-polar latitudes in the far south, including the Northern Patagonia Ice Field (NPI) and Southern Patagonia Ice Field (SPI). SnowModel - a fully integrated energy balance, blowing-snow distribution, multi-layer snowpack, and runoff routing model - was used to simulate glacier SMBs for the Andes Cordillera. The Randolph Glacier Inventory and NASA Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications products, downscaled in SnowModel, allowed us to conduct relatively high-resolution simulations. The simulated glacier SMBs were verified against independent directly-observed and satellite gravimetry and altimetry-derived SMB, indicating a good statistical agreement. For glaciers in the Andes Cordillera, the 35-year mean annual SMB was found to be -1.13 m water equivalent. For both NPI and SPI, the mean SMB was positive (where calving is the likely reason for explaining why geodetic estimates are negative). Further, the spatio-temporal freshwater river runoff patterns from individual basins, including their runoff magnitude and change, were simulated. For the Andes Cordillera rivers draining to the Pacific Ocean, 86% of the simulated runoff originated from rain, 12% from snowmelt, and 2% from ice melt, whereas, for example, for Chile, the water-source distribution was 69, 24, and 7%, respectively. Along the Andes Cordillera, the 35-year mean basin outlet-specific runoff (L s-1 km-2) showed a characteristic regional hourglass shape pattern with highest runoff in both Colombia and Ecuador and in Patagonia, and lowest runoff in the Atacama Desert area.

  12. Seasonal variability of organic matter composition in an Alaskan glacier outflow: insights into glacier carbon sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Robert G. M.; Vermilyea, Andrew; Fellman, Jason; Raymond, Peter; Stubbins, Aron; Scott, Durelle; Hood, Eran

    2014-05-01

    Glacier ecosystems are a significant source of bioavailable, yet ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Characterizing DOC in Mendenhall Glacier outflow (southeast Alaska) we document a seasonal persistence to the radiocarbon-depleted signature of DOC, highlighting ancient DOC as a ubiquitous feature of glacier outflow. We observed no systematic depletion in Δ 14C-DOC with increasing discharge during the melt season that would suggest mobilization of an aged subglacial carbon store. However, DOC concentration, δ 13C-DOC, Δ 14C-DOC and fluorescence signatures appear to have been influenced by runoff from vegetated hillslopes above the glacier during onset and senescence of melt. In the peak glacier melt period, the Δ 14C-DOC of stream samples at the outflow (-181.7 to -355.3‰) was comparable to the Δ 14C-DOC for snow samples from the accumulation zone (-207.2 to -390.9‰), suggesting that ancient DOC from the glacier surface is exported in glacier runoff. The pre-aged DOC in glacier snow and runoff is consistent with contributions from fossil fuel combustion sources similar to those documented previously in ice cores and thus provides evidence for anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon cycle. Overall, our results emphasize the need to further characterize DOC inputs to glacier ecosystems, particularly in light of predicted changes in glacier mass and runoff in the coming century.

  13. Brief communication "Historical glacier length changes in West Greenland"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leclercq, P.W.; Weidick, A.; Paul, F.; Bolch, T.; Citterio, M.; Oerlemans, J.

    2012-01-01

    Past glacier fluctuations provide insight into glacier dynamics, climate change, and the contribution of glaciers to sea-level rise. Here, the length fluctuations since the 19th century of 18 local glaciers in West and South Greenland are presented, extending and updating the study by Weidick

  14. Interannual variability of rock glacier surface velocities and its relationship to climatic conditions on a decadal scale: Some insights from the European Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas; Bodin, Xavier; Delaloye, Reynald; Fischer, Andrea; Gärtner-Roer, Isabelle; Hartl, Lea; Kaufmann, Viktor; Krainer, Karl; Lambiel, Christophe; Mair, Volkmar; Marcer, Marco; Morra di Cella, Umberto; Scapozza, Cristian; Schoeneich, Philippe; Staub, Benno

    2017-04-01

    Active, inactive and relict rock glaciers are widespread periglacial landforms in the European Alps as revealed by several inventories elaborated for Slovenia, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, and France. Rock glaciers indicate present or past permafrost conditions in mountain environments and hence have a high climatic or paleoclimatic relevance. The monitoring of surface velocities at active rock glaciers has a long tradition in the European Alps with first terrestrial photogrammetric surveys in the Swiss and Austrian Alps already in the 1920s. Since the 1990s velocity monitoring activities have been substantially expanded but also institutionalized. Today, several research groups carry out annual or even continuous monitoring of rock glacier creep at more than 30 rock glaciers in Austria, France, Italy, and Switzerland. In many cases such a kinematic monitoring is jointly accomplished with meteorological and ground temperature monitoring in order to better understand the rock glacier-climate relationships and the reaction of rock glacier behavior to climatic changes. In this contribution we present a synthesis of the main results from long-term monitoring of several rock glaciers in the European Alps with at least annually-repeated data. Similarities but also differences of the movement patterns at the different sites are discussed, while the spatio-temporal pattern of the surface displacement is looked at against the climate context. In general, rock glacier surface velocities in the European Alps have been rather low during the 1980s and 1990s and reached a first peak in 2003/04 followed by a drastic drop until c.2007/08. Since then rock glacier surface velocities increased again with new velocity records in 2015/16 superior to the first peak around 2003/04. These creep rate maxima coincide with the warmest permafrost temperatures ever measured in boreholes and are likely a result of the continuously warm conditions at the ground surface over the past seven years.

  15. Glaciers in Patagonia: Controversy and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargel, J. S.; Alho, P.; Buytaert, W.; Célleri, R.; Cogley, J. G.; Dussaillant, A.; Guido, Z.; Haeberli, W.; Harrison, S.; Leonard, G.; Maxwell, A.; Meier, C.; Poveda, G.; Reid, B.; Reynolds, J.; Rodríguez, C. A. Portocarrero; Romero, H.; Schneider, J.

    2012-05-01

    Lately, glaciers have been subjects of unceasing controversy. Current debate about planned hydroelectric facilities—a US7- to 10-billion megaproject—in a pristine glacierized area of Patagonia, Chile [Romero Toledo et al., 2009; Vince, 2010], has raised anew the matter of how glaciologists and global change experts can contribute their knowledge to civic debates on important issues. There has been greater respect for science in this controversy than in some previous debates over projects that pertain to glaciers, although valid economic motivations again could trump science and drive a solution to the energy supply problem before the associated safety and environmental problems are understood. The connection between glaciers and climate change—both anthropogenic and natural—is fundamental to glaciology and to glaciers' practical importance for water and hydropower resources, agriculture, tourism, mining, natural hazards, ecosystem conservation, and sea level [Buytaert et al., 2010; Glasser et al., 2011]. The conflict between conservation and development can be sharper in glacierized regions than almost anywhere else. Glaciers occur in spectacular natural landscapes, but they also supply prodigious exploitable meltwater.

  16. Interaction between glacier and glacial lake in the Bhutan, Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutaki, S.; Fujita, K.; Yamaguchi, S.; Sakai, A.; Nuimura, T.; Sugiyama, S.; Komori, J.; Takenaka, S.; Tshering, P.

    2012-12-01

    Recession of mountain glaciers in the Himalayas has been reported in the context of global warming. Associated with the glacier retreat, supraglacial lakes have been formed on the termini of debris-covered glaciers. Although it has been said that lake-terminating glaciers flow faster than land-terminating glaciers, observational evidence was scarce. We observationally investigated the influence of the presence/absence of glacial lakes on changes in surface elevation through glacier dynamics in two debris-covered glaciers, Thorthormi Glacier (land-terminating) and Lugge Glacier (lake-terminating), in the Lunana region, the Bhutan Himalaya. We surveyed the surface elevation of debris-covered areas of the two glaciers in 2004 and 2011 by a differential GPS. Change in surface elevation of the lake-terminating Lugge Glacier was much more negative than that of the land-terminating Thorthormi Glacier. Considering almost flat slope and location at lower elevation, however, larger ice thinning rate of the Thorthormi Glacier should have been expected than the Lugge Glacier. We measured surface flow speed of the two glaciers during 2009-2010 by multitemporal orthorectified The Panchromatic Remote-sensing Instrument for Stereo Mapping (PRISM) images of ALOS. Surface flow speed of the Thorthormi Glacier was faster in the upper reaches and reduced toward the downstream. In contrast, the flow speed at the Lugge Glacier measured in the same periods was greatest at the lower most part. Observed spatial distribution of surface flow speed at both glaciers are evaluated by a two-dimensional numerical flow model. The model shows that contribution of basal sliding to surface flow velocity is large in the lower part of both glaciers. Particularly in the Thorthormi Glacier, approximately 100% of surface flow velocity attribute to basal sliding. Calculated emergence velocity at the Thorthormi Glacier is larger than that at the Lugge Glacier. This result suggests that decreasing in flow

  17. Comparing effects of gridded input data from different sources in glacier mass balance modelling using a minimal glacier model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröer, Katharina; Marzeion, Ben

    2014-05-01

    The knowledge of the development of glaciers in both past and future is valuable for understanding our climate system. The vast majority of the world's glaciers is poorly observed and often no data or resources are available to study them. Minimal modelling approaches requiring a minimal amount of easily available input data can be a valuable first step to gain valuable information at low cost. This study is concerned with the effects of the spatial and temporal resolution of gridded input data on the applicability of a minimal surface mass balance model. Three sources of temperature and precipitation data freely available for the Alpine region were used to drive a statistical multiple linear regression surface mass balance model (HISTALP 'grid mode 2' instrumental database, monthly, 5' spatial resolution (Auer et al., 2007); CRU TS 3.10.01 instrumental database, monthly, 0.5° spatial resolution (Harris et al., 2013); European temperature and precipitation reconstructions 1500-2000, seasonal, 0.5° spatial resolution (Luterbacher et al., 2004; Pauling et al., 2006)). The model is trained, tested and cross-validated to test the model's robustness using the different datasets. The surface mass balance model is coupled to a simple volume-area and volume-length scaling scheme to roughly include surface mass balance and glacier geometry feedbacks. Observed mass balance data of Hintereisferner in the Ötztal Alps (Austria) allow for a sound validation of the model. The findings of the study reveal that there is only a weak dependency of the reliability of the multiple linear regression model on the spatial resolution of the input data sets. The anomalies of the regional HISTALP 5' grid mode 2 data series were not found to lead to better model results than the anomalies of the 0.5° global CRU TS 3.10.01 data set. An artificial deterioration of the input data quality by aggregating the 5' data grid to 10' and 0.5° of spatial resolution did even lead to slightly enhanced

  18. Regional and global forcing of glacier retreat during the last deglaciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakun, Jeremy D; Clark, Peter U; He, Feng; Lifton, Nathaniel A; Liu, Zhengyu; Otto-Bliesner, Bette L

    2015-08-21

    The ongoing retreat of glaciers globally is one of the clearest manifestations of recent global warming associated with rising greenhouse gas concentrations. By comparison, the importance of greenhouse gases in driving glacier retreat during the most recent deglaciation, the last major interval of global warming, is unclear due to uncertainties in the timing of retreat around the world. Here we use recently improved cosmogenic-nuclide production-rate calibrations to recalculate the ages of 1,116 glacial boulders from 195 moraines that provide broad coverage of retreat in mid-to-low-latitude regions. This revised history, in conjunction with transient climate model simulations, suggests that while several regional-scale forcings, including insolation, ice sheets and ocean circulation, modulated glacier responses regionally, they are unable to account for global-scale retreat, which is most likely related to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations.

  19. Development of Adygine glacier complex (glacier and proglacial lakes) and its link to outburst hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falatkova, Kristyna; Schöner, Wolfgang; Häusler, Hermann; Reisenhofer, Stefan; Neureiter, Anton; Sobr, Miroslav; Jansky, Bohumir

    2017-04-01

    Mountain glacier retreat has a well-known impact on life of local population - besides anxiety over water supply for agriculture, industry, or households, it has proved to have a direct influence on glacier hazard occurrence. The paper focuses on lake outburst hazard specifically, and aims to describe the previous and future development of Adygine glacier complex and identify its relationship to the hazard. The observed glacier is situated in the Northern Tien Shan, with an area of 4 km2 in northern exposition at an elevation range of 3,500-4,200 m a.s.l. The study glacier ranks in the group of small-sized glaciers, therefore we expect it to respond faster to changes of the climate compared to larger ones. Below the glacier there is a three-level cascade of proglacial lakes at different stages of development. The site has been observed sporadically since 1960s, however, closer study has been carried out since 2007. Past development of the glacier-lake complex is analyzed by combination of satellite imagery interpretations and on-site measurements (geodetic and bathymetric survey). A glacier mass balance model is used to simulate future development of the glacier resulting from climate scenarios. We used the simulated future glacier extent and the glacier base topography provided by GPR survey to assess potential for future lake formation. This enables us to assess the outburst hazard for the three selected lakes with an outlook for possible/probable hazard changes linked to further complex succession/progression (originating from climate change scenarios). Considering the proximity of the capital Bishkek, spreading settlements, and increased demand for tourism-related infrastructure within the main valley, it is of high importance to identify the present and possible future hazards that have a potential to affect this region.

  20. MONITORING OF MOUNTAIN GLACIERS USING AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING (ACCORDING TO THE GLACIER FISCHT, WESTERN CAUCASUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pogorelov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available GlacierFischt–the most western glacierin the Caucasus, characterized by some geographical features. According to theobservations of 1909, tacheometry 1982 andairborne laser scanningin 2010were obtainedinformation aboutits evolution. For 100 years the glacier retreatedat 120–250m, the areahas decreased by33%. During 1982–2010, the surfaceof the glacier on average decreased by2 m. Madelidar survey laid the foundation for further monitoring.

  1. Supraglacial lakes on Himalayan debris-covered glacier (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, A.; Fujita, K.

    2013-12-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are common in many of the world's mountain ranges, including in the Himalayas. Himalayan debris-covered glacier also contain abundant glacial lakes, including both proglacial and supraglacial types. We have revealed that heat absorption through supraglacial lakes was about 7 times greater than that averaged over the whole debris-covered zone. The heat budget analysis elucidated that at least half of the heat absorbed through the water surface was released with water outflow from the lakes, indicating that the warm water enlarge englacial conduits and produce internal ablation. We observed some portions at debris-covered area has caved at the end of melting season, and ice cliff has exposed at the side of depression. Those depression has suggested that roof of expanded water channels has collapsed, leading to the formation of ice cliffs and new lakes, which would accelerate the ablation of debris-covered glaciers. Almost glacial lakes on the debris-covered glacier are partially surrounded by ice cliffs. We observed that relatively small lakes had non-calving, whereas, calving has occurred at supraglacial lakes with fetch larger than 80 m, and those lakes expand rapidly. In the Himalayas, thick sediments at the lake bottom insulates glacier ice and lake water, then the lake water tends to have higher temperature (2-4 degrees C). Therefore, thermal undercutting at ice cliff is important for calving processes in the glacial lake expansion. We estimated and subaqueous ice melt rates during the melt and freeze seasons under simple geomorphologic conditions. In particular, we focused on valley wind-driven water currents in various fetches during the melt season. Our results demonstrate that the subaqueous ice melt rate exceeds the ice-cliff melt rate above the water surface when the fetch is larger than 20 m with the water temperature of 2-4 degrees C. Calculations suggest that onset of calving due to thermal undercutting is controlled by water

  2. Reconsidering the glacier to rock glacier transformation problem: New insights from the central Andes of Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, Sébastien; Kinnard, Christophe

    2015-06-01

    The glacier to rock glacier transformation problem is revisited from a previously unseen angle. A striking case in the Juncal Massif (located in the upper Aconcagua Valley, Chilean central Andes) is documented. There, the Presenteseracae debris-covered glacier has advanced several tens of metres and has developed a rock glacier morphology in its lower part over the last 60 years. The conditions for a theoretically valid glacier to rock glacier transformation are discussed and tested. Permafrost probability in the area of the studied feature is highlighted by regional-scale spatial modelling together with on-site shallow ground temperature records. Two different methods are used to estimate the mean surface temperature during the summer of 2014, and the sub-debris ice ablation rates are calculated as ranging between 0.05 and 0.19 cm d- 1, i.e., 0.04 and 0.17 m over the summer. These low ablation rates are consistent with the development of a coherent surface morphology over the last 60 years. Furthermore, the rates of rock wall retreat required for covering the former glacier at Presenteseracae lie within the common 0.1-2 mm y- 1 range, assuming an average debris thickness and a range of debris-covering time intervals. The integration of the geomorphological observations with the numerical results confirms that the studied debris-covered glacier is evolving into a rock glacier.

  3. Widespread expansion of glacier moraine-dammed lakes in the Chinese Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiyin; Ng, Felix; Wang, Xin; Guo, Wanqin; Yao, Xiaojun; Yu, Pengchun; Xu, Junli; Ding, Yongjian

    2010-05-01

    More moraine-dammed lakes in the Himalaya may form and enlarge due to glacier retreat and increased meltwater availability under the climatic warming that has been recorded across this mountain range over the last few decades. Because of this, and because such lakes have caused major GLOF (glacial lake outburst flood) events before, international organisations have been developing lake inventories to evaluate flood risks in the Himalaya, mainly in the south. Here we present the first complete inventory of moraine-dammed lakes on the Chinese side, which shows expansion and formation dominate their behaviour from the 1970s to the 2000s. We found that while their number has remained at ≈1200, their combined area has drastically increased, and glacier retreat also helped focus this overall growth in a narrow elevation range where many large new lakes have appeared. Our discovery of a glacier-recession signal in the lakes' variation underlines the need to study the climatological and glaciological factors behind lake evolution.

  4. An inventory of glacial lakes in the Austrian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckel, Johannes; Otto, Jan-Christoph; Keuschnig, Markus; Götz, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    The formation of lakes is one of the consequences of glacier retreat due to climate change in mountain areas. Numerous lakes have formed in the past few decades in many mountain regions around the globe. Some of these lakes came into focus due to catastrophic hazard events especially in the Himalayas and the Andes. Glacial lake development and lifetime is controlled by the complex interplay of glacier dynamics, geomorphological process activity and geological boundary conditions. Besides the hazard potential new lakes in formerly glaciated areas will significantly contribute to a new landscape setting and to changing geomorphologic, hydrologic and ecologic conditions at higher alpine altitudes. We present an inventory of high alpine lakes in the Austrian Alps located above an altitude of 1700 m asl. Most of these lakes are assumed to be of glacial origin, but other causes for development, like mass movements are considered as well. The inventory is a central part of the project FUTURELAKES that aims at modelling the potential development of glacial lakes in Austria (we refer to the presentation by Helfricht et al. during the conference for more details on the modelling part). Lake inventory data will serve as one basis for model validation since modelling is performed on different time steps using glacier inventory data. The purpose of the lake inventory is to get new insights into boundary conditions for lake formation and evolution by analysing existing lake settings. Based on these information the project seeks to establish a model of lake sedimentation after glacier retreat in order to assess the potential lifetime of the new lakes in Austria. Lakes with a minimum size of 1000 m² were mapped using multiple aerial imagery sources. The dataset contains information on location, geometry, dam type, and status of sedimentation for each lake. Additionally, various geologic, geomorphic and morphometric parameters describe the lake catchments. Lake data is related to

  5. Glaciers-Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    V. M. Kotlyakov, A. Ushakov, and A. Glazovsky (Eds.), International Association of Hydrological Sciences Publication 208, Great Yarmouth, Great Britain, 1991.This volume consists of fifty-five papers presented at an international symposium held in St. Petersburg, Russia, in September 1990. The papers are divided into nine subsections covering ice cores, sea ice, modeling of ice sheets, glaciation and sea-level variation, mass and heat balances, paleoclimatic studies, and glacier-atmospheric interactions. The majority of authors are Russian, although Estonian, German, French, Chinese, American, English, Dutch, Polish, Norwegian, Uzbekian, and Japanese authors are represented. As stated in the preface, this symposium was convened by the International Commission on Snow and Ice “to consider fundamental questions of the interactions which are of great importance to global change processes.”

  6. Quantifying changes and trends in glacier area and volume in the Austrian Ötztal Alps (1969-1997-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Abermann

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we apply a simple and reliable method to derive recent changes in glacier area and volume by taking advantage of high resolution LIDAR (light detection and ranging DEMs (digital elevation models from the year 2006. Together with two existing glacier inventories (1969 and 1997 the new dataset enables us to quantify area and volume changes over the past 37 years at three dates. This has been done for 81 glaciers (116 km2 in the Ötztal Alps which accounts for almost one third of Austria's glacier extent. Glacier area and volume have reduced drastically with significant differences within the individual size classes. Between 1997 and 2006 an overall area loss of 10.5 km2 or 8.2% occurred. Volume has reduced by 1.0 km3 which accounts for a mean thickness change of −8.2 m. The availability of three comparable inventories allows a comprehensive size and altitude dependent analysis of glacier changes but lacks a high temporal resolution. For the comparison of rates of changes between the two different periods (1969 to 1997 with 1997 to 2006 we propose two approaches in this study: a to estimate mean overall rates of changes (including a period of advance and b to extract periods of net-retreat by using additional information (length change and mass balance measurements. Analysis of the resulting acceleration factors reveals that the retreat of volume and mean thickness changes has accelerated significantly more than that of area changes.

  7. Rock glaciers, Prealps, Vaud, Switzerland, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The investigated area forms part of the western lobe of the Prealps (Swiss Prealps). The 25 identified fossil rock glaciers are found mainly in the Prealpes medianes...

  8. The microbiome of glaciers and ice sheets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alexandre M Anesio; Stefanie Lutz; Nathan A M Chrismas; Liane G Benning

    2017-01-01

    .... Habitats on glaciers and ice sheets with enough liquid water to sustain microbial activity include snow, surface ice, cryoconite holes, englacial systems and the interface between ice and overridden rock/soil...

  9. The geochemical record in rock glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steig, E.J.; Fitzpatrick, J.J.; Potter, N.; Clark, D.H.

    1998-01-01

    A 9.5 m ice core was extracted from beneath the surficial debris cover of a rock glacier at Galena Creek, northwestern Wyoming. The core contains clean, bubble-rich ice with silty debris layers spaced at roughly 20 cm intervals. The debris layers are similar in appearance to those in typical alpine glaciers, reflecting concentration of debris by melting at the surface during the summer ablation season. Profiles of stable isotope concentrations and electrical conductivity measurements provide independent evidence for melting in association with debris layers. These observations are consistent with a glacial origin for the ice, substantiating the glacigenic model for rock glacier formation. The deuterium excess profile in the ice indicates that the total depth of meltwater infiltration is less than the thickness of one annual layer, suggesting that isotope values and other geochemical signatures are preserved at annual resolution. This finding demonstrates the potential for obtaining useful paleoclimate information from rock glacier ice.

  10. ROCK GLACIERS IN THE KOLYMA HIGHLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Galanin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on remote mapping and field studies inGrand Rapids, Tumansky,Hasynsky,Del-Urechen Ridges as well as Dukchinsky and Kilgansky Mountain Massifs there were identified about 1160 landforms which morphologically are similar to the rock glaciers or they develop in close association with them. Besides tongue-shaped cirque rock glaciers originated due to ablation, a large number of lobate-shaped slope-associated rock glaciers were recognized. Significant quantity of such forms are developing within the active neotectonic areas, in zones of seismic-tectonic badland and in association with active earthquakes-controlling faults. Multiplication of regional data on volcanic-ash-chronology, lichenometry, Schmidt Hammer Test, pollen spectra and single radiocarbon data, most of the active rock glaciers were preliminary attributed to the Late Holocene.

  11. Underwater acoustic signatures of glacier calving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, O.; Deane, G. B.; Moskalik, M.; Blondel, Ph.; Tegowski, J.; Blaszczyk, M.

    2015-02-01

    Climate-driven ice-water interactions in the contact zone between marine-terminating glaciers and the ocean surface show a dynamic and complex nature. Tidewater glaciers lose volume through the poorly understood process of calving. A detailed description of the mechanisms controlling the course of calving is essential for the reliable estimation and prediction of mass loss from glaciers. Here we present the potential of hydroacoustic methods to investigate different modes of ice detachments. High-frequency underwater ambient noise recordings are combined with synchronized, high-resolution, time-lapse photography of the Hans Glacier cliff in Hornsund Fjord, Spitsbergen, to identify three types of calving events: typical subaerial, sliding subaerial, and submarine. A quantitative analysis of the data reveals a robust correlation between ice impact energy and acoustic emission at frequencies below 200 Hz for subaerial calving. We suggest that relatively inexpensive acoustic methods can be successfully used to provide quantitative descriptions of the various calving types.

  12. Malaspina Glacier, Alaska, Perspective with Landsat Overlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Malaspina Glacier in southeastern Alaska is considered the classic example of a piedmont glacier. Piedmont glaciers occur where valley glaciers exit a mountain range onto broad lowlands, are no longer laterally confined, and spread to become wide lobes. Malaspina Glacier is actually a compound glacier, formed by the merger of several valley glaciers, the most prominent of which seen here are Agassiz Glacier (left) and Seward Glacier (right). In total, Malaspina Glacier is up to 65 kilometers (40 miles) wide and extends up to 45 kilometers (28 miles) from the mountain front nearly to the sea. This perspective view was created from a Landsat satellite image and an elevation model generated by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Landsat views both visible and infrared light, which have been combined here into a color composite that generally shows glacial ice in light blue, snow in white, vegetation in green, bare rock in grays and tans, and the ocean (foreground) in dark blue. The back (northern) edge of the data set forms a false horizon that meets a false sky. Glaciers erode rocks, carry them down slope, and deposit them at the edge of the melting ice, typically in elongated piles called moraines. The moraine patterns at Malaspina Glacier are quite spectacular in that they have huge contortions that result from the glacier crinkling as it gets pushed from behind by the faster-moving valley glaciers. Glaciers are sensitive indicators of climatic change. They can grow and thicken with increasing snowfall and/or decreased melting. Conversely, they can retreat and thin if snowfall decreases and/or atmospheric temperatures rise and cause increased melting. Landsat imaging has been an excellent tool for mapping the changing geographic extent of glaciers since 1972. The elevation measurements taken by SRTM in February 2000 now provide a near-global baseline against which future non-polar region glacial thinning or thickening can be assessed. Elevation data used

  13. 2010 ARRA Lidar: Eklutna Glacier (AK)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This task order is for planning, acquisition, processing, and derivative products of lidar data to be collected for an area over Eklutna Glacier in the Chugach...

  14. Adminstrative Boundary for Glacier National Park, Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The current administrative boundary of Glacier National Park, Montana. This data is based on 1:24000 scale USGS quad mapping published in 1968, but was revised in...

  15. Application of terrestrial scanning LIDAR to study the evolution of Quisoquipina Glacier in the Cordillera Vilcanota, Cusco - Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Nilton; Macedo, Nicolas; Sanchez, Olivier; Huggel, Christian; Giraldez, Claudia; Schauwecker, Simone; Drenkhan, Fabian; Frey, Holger; Molina, Edwin; Sikos, Felipe

    2017-04-01

    Tropical glaciers are highly sensitive to alterations in climate and therefore good indicators for global climate change. Glaciers located in Peru represent 71% of all tropical glaciers in the world, and have shown a significant area reduction of about 43% within the last 40 years mainly due to the increase in surface temperature. Tropical glaciers play a particular role as freshwater reservoirs and buffers to river discharge variability and water scarcity within a pronounced wet and dry season. Their monitoring is extraordinarily important but few studies exist on mass balance. The Cordillera Vilcanota, at the origin of the Rio Vilcanota-Urubamba, contains about 25% of all glaciers in Peru. In recent decades, glacier shrinkage has accelerated in this mountain range. Between 1988 and 2010, glacier area was reduced at an annual rate of about 4 km2 (1.1 %) from some 360 km2 to about 270 km2 (25%). A total volume loss of 40-45% (from 17-20 km3 to 9.2-12.4 km3) can be estimated for the period 1962-2006, with an accelerated rate since the 1980s. Terrestrial scanning LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) surveys represent nowadays the most powerful tool to accurately map its inaccessible glacier surfaces. A laser scanner enables researchers to capture laser range data at a rate of thousands of x, y, z and laser-intensity points per second; such data can be used to construct a very accurate 3D model of the surveyed surface. We used a terrestrial LiDAR sensor (Optech ILRIS 3D-LR) for intensively monitoring the changes occurred at volume and front glacier: the Quisoquipina glacier. In August and October 2015, August and December 2016, four terrestrial scanning LIDAR surveys have been carried out in order to monitor the evolution of the glacier. The comparison between repeated surveys showed significant retreats in the front, area and volume of the glacier (e.g. lost volume 375000 m3 between august 2015 and December 2016, in 80812 m2 of area of study).

  16. Fuzzy Cognitive Maps for Glacier Hazards Assessment: Application to Predicting the Potential for Glacier Lake Outbursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furfaro, R.; Kargel, J. S.; Fink, W.; Bishop, M. P.

    2010-12-01

    Glaciers and ice sheets are among the largest unstable parts of the solid Earth. Generally, glaciers are devoid of resources (other than water), are dangerous, are unstable and no infrastructure is normally built directly on their surfaces. Areas down valley from large alpine glaciers are also commonly unstable due to landslide potential of moraines, debris flows, snow avalanches, outburst floods from glacier lakes, and other dynamical alpine processes; yet there exists much development and human occupation of some disaster-prone areas. Satellite remote sensing can be extremely effective in providing cost-effective and time- critical information. Space-based imagery can be used to monitor glacier outlines and their lakes, including processes such as iceberg calving and debris accumulation, as well as changing thicknesses and flow speeds. Such images can also be used to make preliminary identifications of specific hazardous spots and allows preliminary assessment of possible modes of future disaster occurrence. Autonomous assessment of glacier conditions and their potential for hazards would present a major advance and permit systematized analysis of more data than humans can assess. This technical leap will require the design and implementation of Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms specifically designed to mimic glacier experts’ reasoning. Here, we introduce the theory of Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (FCM) as an AI tool for predicting and assessing natural hazards in alpine glacier environments. FCM techniques are employed to represent expert knowledge of glaciers physical processes. A cognitive model embedded in a fuzzy logic framework is constructed via the synergistic interaction between glaciologists and AI experts. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed AI methodology as applied to predicting hazards in glacier environments, we designed and implemented a FCM that addresses the challenging problem of autonomously assessing the Glacier Lake Outburst Flow

  17. Linking glacier annual mass balance and glacier albedo retrieved from MODIS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dumont

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Albedo is one of the variables controlling the mass balance of temperate glaciers. Multispectral imagers, such as MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS on board the TERRA and AQUA satellites, provide a means to monitor glacier surface albedo. In this study, different methods to retrieve broadband glacier surface albedo from MODIS data are compared. The effect of multiple reflections due to the rugged topography and of the anisotropic reflection of snow and ice are particularly investigated. The methods are tested on the Saint Sorlin Glacier (Grandes Rousses area, French Alps. The accuracy of the retrieved albedo is estimated using both field measurements, at two automatic weather stations located on the glacier, and albedo values derived from terrestrial photographs. For summers 2008 and 2009, the root mean square deviation (RMSD between field measurements and the broadband albedo retrieved from MODIS data at 250 m spatial resolution was found to be 0.052 or about 10% relative error. The RMSD estimated for the MOD10 daily albedo product is about three times higher. One decade (2000–2009 of MODIS data were then processed to create a time series of albedo maps of Saint Sorlin Glacier during the ablation season. The annual mass balance of Saint Sorlin Glacier was compared with the minimum albedo value (average over the whole glacier surface observed with MODIS during the ablation season. A strong linear correlation exists between the two variables. Furthermore, the date when the average albedo of the whole glacier reaches a minimum closely corresponds to the period when the snow line is located at its highest elevation, thus when the snow line is a good indicator of the glacier equilibrium line. This indicates that this strong correlation results from the fact that the minimal average albedo values of the glacier contains considerable information regarding the relative share of areal surfaces between the ablation zone (i.e. ice with generally

  18. Glacier monitoring and glacier-climate interactions in the tropical Andes: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veettil, Bijeesh Kozhikkodan; Wang, Shanshan; Florêncio de Souza, Sergio; Bremer, Ulisses Franz; Simões, Jefferson Cardia

    2017-08-01

    In this review, we summarized the evolution of glacier monitoring in the tropical Andes during the last few decades, particularly after the development of remote sensing and photogrammetry. Advantages and limitations of glacier mapping, applied so far, in Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia are discussed in detail. Glacier parameters such as the equilibrium line altitude, snowline and mass balance were given special attention in understanding the complex cryosphere-climate interactions, particularly using remote sensing techniques. Glaciers in the inner and the outer tropics were considered separately based on the precipitation and temperature conditions within a new framework. The applicability of various methods to use glacier records to understand and reconstruct the tropical Andean climate between the Last Glacial Maximum (11,700 years ago) and the present is also explored in this paper. Results from various studies published recently were analyzed and we tried to understand the differences in the magnitudes of glacier responses towards the climatic perturbations in the inner tropics and the outer tropics. Inner tropical glaciers, particularly those in Venezuela and Colombia near the January Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), are more vulnerable to increase in temperature. Surface energy balance experiments show that outer tropical glaciers respond to precipitation variability very rapidly in comparison with the temperature variability, particularly when moving towards the subtropics. We also analyzed the gradients in glacier response to climate change from the Pacific coast towards the Amazon Basin as well as with the elevation. Based on the current trends synthesised from recent studies, it is hypothesized that the glaciers in the inner tropics and the southern wet outer tropics will disappear first as a response to global warming whereas glaciers in the northern wet outer tropics and dry outer tropics show resistance to warming trends due to

  19. Changes in Glaciers and Glacial Lakes and the Identification of Dangerous Glacial Lakes in the Pumqu River Basin, Xizang (Tibet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Che

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Latest satellite images have been utilized to update the inventories of glaciers and glacial lakes in the Pumqu river basin, Xizang (Tibet, in the study. Compared to the inventories in 1970s, the areas of glaciers are reduced by 19.05% while the areas of glacial lakes are increased by 26.76%. The magnitudes of glacier retreat rate and glacial lake increase rate during the period of 2001–2013 are more significant than those for the period of the 1970s–2001. The accelerated changes in areas of the glaciers and glacial lakes, as well as the increasing temperature and rising variability of precipitation, have resulted in an increased risk of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs in the Pumqu river basin. Integrated criteria were established to identify potentially dangerous glacial lakes based on a bibliometric analysis method. It is found, in total, 19 glacial lakes were identified as dangerous. Such finding suggests that there is an immediate need to conduct field surveys not only to validate the findings, but also to acquire information for further use in order to assure the welfare of the humans.

  20. Decadal Scale Changes in Glacier Area in the Hohe Tauern National Park (Austria Determined by Object-Based Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Aubrey Robson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we semi-automatically classify clean and debris-covered ice for 145 glaciers within Hohe Tauern National Park in the Austrian Alps for the years 1985, 2003, and 2013. We also map the end-summer transient snowline (TSL, which approximates the annual Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA. By comparing our results with the Austrian Glacier Inventories from 1969 and 1998, we calculate a mean reduction in glacier area of 33% between 1969 and 2013. The total ice area reduced at a mean rate of 1.4 km2 per year. This TSL rose by 92 m between 1985 and 2013 to an altitude of 3005 m. Despite some limitations, such as some seasonal snow being present at higher elevations, as well as uncertainties related to the range of years that the LiDAR DEM was collected, our results show that the glaciers within Hohe Tauern National Park conform to the heavy shrinkage experienced in other areas of the European Alps. Moreover, we believe that Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA is a promising methodology for future glacier mapping.

  1. An analysis of the long term hydrological dynamics of the Careser, a rapidly retreating Alpine glacier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Elisa; Meneghetti, Erica; Cainelli, Oscar; Bellin, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    Alpine glaciers are shrinking at a relentless pace, as an effect of the increasing temperature and the concomitant reduction of snowfall that the Alpine region experienced in the last 40 years. The impact of these changes is relevant, given the importance of the Alps from ecological and economical points of view. While the ubiquitous reduction of glaciers mass through the Alps has been reported in a number of studies, its effect on streamflow is less studied, mainly because much less data are available on streamflow emerging from glaciers. In the present work we analyze a long streamflow time series, recorded since the 70s, in the Careser creek emerging from the Careser Glacier, which mass has been monitored since 1920, first discontinuously and then continuously from 1967. Because of these long-term observations, the Careser has been classified as one of the reference glaciers by the World Glacier Monitoring Service, which provides balances data every two years. We performed a comprehensive analysis of multiscale variations of precipitation, temperature, water discharge and glacier mass. In addition we explored the correlations between streamflow and climatic drivers at monthly and subdaily scales. We observed significant changes in the timing of streamflow, with anticipated snow melting and a reduction of summer runoff, while at the annual scale the increase of ice-melting offsets runoff reduction caused by less winter precipitation falling as snow. In fact, in most years since the 1990 ice melts from beginning of May to October, thereby causing a dramatic reduction of the glacier volume. However, in the last years the significant reduction of the glacier surface, attenuated this tendency to increase the total annual runoff volume. At the sub-daily scale we observed a progressive increase of the difference between the maximum and minimum water discharge. Overall the hydrological regime changes significantly as an effect of the rise in temperature and the lower

  2. Further insights into glacier changes derived from declassified reconnaissance imagery (Corona and Hexagon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerlich, Franz; Paul, Frank; Bolch, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    The variable and often complex dynamics of the glaciers in High Mountain Asia have recently been studied intensively from satellite imagery. Time-series of optical and SAR imagery revealed rapid changes and strong trends in glacier extent and surface flow velocities as well as elevation changes from differencing of DEMs and altimetry sensors over the 1990 to 2015 period. In contrast to nearly all other regions in the world, especially glaciers in the Karakoram had balanced budgets and often rapidly advanced during surge events and retreated thereafter. This complicates the interpretation of climate change impacts on the glaciers in the region and leaves high uncertainties for calculation of future glacier and run-off development. A key for an improved understanding of glacier dynamics in this region is an extension of the observation period. This can be achieved using Corona and Hexagon reconnaissance satellite imagery from the 1960s and 1970s providing a comparably high spatial resolution between 2.7 and 7.6 m. Thereby, the keyhole satellites allow both, determination of glacier extents and calculation of DTMs from stereo image pairs that can be used to determine geodetic volume/ mass changes. The latter has already been performed on a regional scale for glaciers in the Himalaya and Tien Shan using Hexagon and Corona imagery with high accuracies. However, due to a particular camera model and complex distortion effects, which is especially the case for Corona images, the analysis is a challenging task. Therefore, we have developed a workflow to generate DTMs and orthophotos from Corona that considers the complex camera model. This study will present the workflow with its limitations, challenges and the obtained accuracy over stable ground. With our generated DTMs and Orthophotos, we already calculated mass balances and length changes for the Ak-Shirak range in Tian Shan and currently adapting the workflow to the Karakoram and Pamir mountains. Furthermore, the DTMs

  3. Reduced melt on debris-covered glaciers: investigations from Changri Nup Glacier, Nepal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vincent, Christian; Wagnon, Patrick; Shea, Joseph M.; Immerzeel, W.W.; Kraaijenbrink, P.D.A.; Shrestha, Dibas; Soruco, Alvaro; Arnaud, Yves; Brun, Fanny; Berthier, E.; Sherpa, Sonam Futi

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 25 % of the glacierized area in the Everest region is covered by debris, yet the surface mass balance of debris-covered portions of these glaciers has not been measured directly. In this study, ground-based measurements of surface elevation and ice depth are combined with terrestrial

  4. Using marine sediment archives to reconstruct past outlet glacier variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Camilla Snowman; Straneo, Fiamma; Ribergaard, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Ice-rafted debris in fjord sediment cores provides information about outlet glacier activity beyond the instrumental time period. It tells us that the Helheim Glacier, Greenland’s third most productive glacier, responds rapidly to short-term (3 to 10 years) climate changes.......Ice-rafted debris in fjord sediment cores provides information about outlet glacier activity beyond the instrumental time period. It tells us that the Helheim Glacier, Greenland’s third most productive glacier, responds rapidly to short-term (3 to 10 years) climate changes....

  5. What Influences Climate and Glacier Change in the Southwestern China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Teppei J.

    2012-01-01

    The subject of climate change in the areas of the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and the Himalayas has taken on increasing importance because of available water resources from their mountain glaciers. Many of these glaciers over the region have been retreating, while some are advancing and stable. Other studies report that some glaciers in the Himalayas show acceleration on their shrinkage. However, the causes of the glacier meltings are still difficult to grasp because of the complexity of climatic change and its influence on glacier issues. However, it is vital that we pursue further study to enable the future prediction on glacier changes.

  6. Contrasting response of glacierized catchments in the Central Himalaya and the Central Andes to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragettli, Silvan; Pellicciotti, Francesca; Immerzeel, Walter

    2015-04-01

    The Andes of South America and the Himalaya in high-mountain Asia are two regions where advanced simulation models are of vital importance to anticipate the impacts of climate change on water resources. The two mountain systems hold the largest ice masses outside the polar regions. Major rivers originate here and downstream regions are densely populated. In the long run, glacier recession generates concerns about the sustainability of summer runoff. This study benefits from recent efforts of carefully planned short-term field experiments in two headwater catchments in the Central Andes of Chile and in the Central Himalaya in Nepal. The two study catchments contrast in terms of their climate and in the characteristics of their glaciers. A systematic approach is developed, built upon the available local data, to reduce the predictive uncertainty of a state-of-the-art glacio-hydrological model used for the projection of 21st century glacier changes and catchment runoff. The in-situ data are used for model development and step-wise, multivariate parameter calibration. Catchment runoff and remotely sensed MODIS and Landsat snow cover are used for model validation. The glacio-hydrological model simulates the water cycle with a high temporal (hourly time steps) and spatial (100 m grid cells) resolution and accounts for processes typical of both regions like glacier melt under debris cover or mass redistribution through avalanching. Future projections are based on the outputs of twelve stochastically downscaled global climate models for two emission scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5). This is one of the first truly intercomparative modeling studies at the catchment scale across mountain regions of the world to assess and compare future changes in glaciers and snow cover and associated impacts on streamflow production. Both catchments will experience significant glacier mass loss throughout the twenty-first century. However, the trajectories of simulated future runoff and

  7. Assessing glacier melt contribution to streamflow at Universidad Glacier, central Andes of Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Claudio; Loriaux, Thomas; Rivera, Andrés; Brock, Ben W.

    2017-07-01

    Glacier melt is an important source of water for high Andean rivers in central Chile, especially in dry years, when it can be an important contributor to flows during late summer and autumn. However, few studies have quantified glacier melt contribution to streamflow in this region. To address this shortcoming, we present an analysis of meteorological conditions and ablation for Universidad Glacier, one of the largest valley glaciers in the central Andes of Chile at the head of the Tinguiririca River, for the 2009-2010 ablation season. We used meteorological measurements from two automatic weather stations installed on the glacier to drive a distributed temperature-index and runoff routing model. The temperature-index model was calibrated at the lower weather station site and showed good agreement with melt estimates from an ablation stake and sonic ranger, and with a physically based energy balance model. Total modelled glacier melt is compared with river flow measurements at three sites located between 0.5 and 50 km downstream. Universidad Glacier shows extremely high melt rates over the ablation season which may exceed 10 m water equivalent in the lower ablation area, representing between 10 and 13 % of the mean monthly streamflow at the outlet of the Tinguiririca River Basin between December 2009 and March 2010. This contribution rises to a monthly maximum of almost 20 % in March 2010, demonstrating the importance of glacier runoff to streamflow, particularly in dry years such as 2009-2010. The temperature-index approach benefits from the availability of on-glacier meteorological data, enabling the calculation of the local hourly variable lapse rate, and is suited to high melt regimes, but would not be easily applicable to glaciers further north in Chile where sublimation is more significant.

  8. Assessing glacier melt contribution to streamflow at Universidad Glacier, central Andes of Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bravo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Glacier melt is an important source of water for high Andean rivers in central Chile, especially in dry years, when it can be an important contributor to flows during late summer and autumn. However, few studies have quantified glacier melt contribution to streamflow in this region. To address this shortcoming, we present an analysis of meteorological conditions and ablation for Universidad Glacier, one of the largest valley glaciers in the central Andes of Chile at the head of the Tinguiririca River, for the 2009–2010 ablation season. We used meteorological measurements from two automatic weather stations installed on the glacier to drive a distributed temperature-index and runoff routing model. The temperature-index model was calibrated at the lower weather station site and showed good agreement with melt estimates from an ablation stake and sonic ranger, and with a physically based energy balance model. Total modelled glacier melt is compared with river flow measurements at three sites located between 0.5 and 50 km downstream. Universidad Glacier shows extremely high melt rates over the ablation season which may exceed 10 m water equivalent in the lower ablation area, representing between 10 and 13 % of the mean monthly streamflow at the outlet of the Tinguiririca River Basin between December 2009 and March 2010. This contribution rises to a monthly maximum of almost 20 % in March 2010, demonstrating the importance of glacier runoff to streamflow, particularly in dry years such as 2009–2010. The temperature-index approach benefits from the availability of on-glacier meteorological data, enabling the calculation of the local hourly variable lapse rate, and is suited to high melt regimes, but would not be easily applicable to glaciers further north in Chile where sublimation is more significant.

  9. Step-wise changes in glacier flow speed coincide with calving and glacial earthquakes at Helheim Glacier, Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nettles, M.; Larsen, T. B.; Elósegui, P.

    2008-01-01

    Geodetic observations show several large, sudden increases in flow speed at Helheim Glacier, one of Greenland's largest outlet glaciers, during summer, 2007. These step-like accelerations, detected along the length of the glacier, coincide with teleseismically detected glacial earthquakes and major...... at Greenland's largest outlet glaciers, on timescales as short as minutes to hours, and clarify the mechanism by which glacial earthquakes occur. Citation: Nettles, M., et al. (2008), Step-wise changes in glacier flow speed coincide with calving and glacial earthquakes at Helheim Glacier, Greenland....

  10. GlacierRocks - Glacier-Headwall Interaction and its Influence on Rockfall Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmeyer, Ingo; Keuschnig, Markus; Krautblatter, Michael; Helfricht, Kay; Leith, Kerry; Otto, Jan-Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Climate models predict continued climate warming and a decrease of Austrian glaciers to less than 20% of their present area by the end of this century. Rockfall from freshly exposed headwalls has been documented as an increasing risk factor with considerable significance for man and high-alpine infrastructure. Recent findings of a five-year terrestrial laserscanning campaign (2011-2016) monitoring glacial headwalls at the Kitzsteinhorn (3.203 m a.s.l.), Hohe Tauern Range, Austria, show the dramatic impact of glacier thinning on adjacent headwalls: 80 % of the detected rockfall volumes were triggered from areas located less than 20 m above the current glacier surface. Despite these implications, little is known about the thermal, mechanical and hydrological processes that operate at the glacier-headwall interface (randkluft). Systemic in-situ monitoring of stability-relevant parameters are lacking, leaving fundamental gaps in the understanding of rockfall preconditioning in glacial headwalls and the geomorphological evolution of glaciated catchments. In this contribution we introduce the recently approved research project 'GlacierRocks', which starts in 2017 and will run for at least three years. 'GlacierRocks' will establish the worldwide first research site for long-term monitoring of stability-relevant processes inside a randkluft system. Based on the acquired monitoring data 'GlacierRocks' is pursuing three overall aims at (1) gaining a better understanding of rockfall preconditioning in randklufts and related geomorphological shaping of headwalls, (2) analyzing poorly understood glacial thinning dynamics near headwalls, and (3) estimating present and future rockfall hazard potential in headwalls on a regional scale. The three system components (headwall, glacier, randkluft) will be investigated by combining geomorphological, glaciological and meteorological methods. 'GlacierRocks' will continuously monitor rock temperature, rock moisture, frost cracking

  11. A two-step mass-conservation approach to infer ice thickness maps: Performance for different glacier types on Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürst, Johannes J.; Seehaus, Thorsten; Sass, Björn; Aas, Kjetil; Benham, Toby J.; Dowdeswell, Julian; Fettweis, Xavier; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Moholdt, Geir; Navarro, Francisco; Nuth, Christopher; Petterson, Rickard; Braun, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Satellite remote sensing based on optical or radar instruments has enable us to measure glacier-wide surface velocities as well as changes both in glacier extent and in surface elevation with good coverage worldwide. Yet, for the large majority of all glaciers and ice caps, there is in fact no information on how thick the ice cover is. Any attempt to predict glacier demise under climatic warming and to estimate the future contribution to sea-level rise is limited as long as the glacier thickness is not well constrained. Moreover, the poor knowledge of the bed topography inhibits the applicability of ice-flow models which could help to understand dominant processes controlling the ice-front evolution of marine-terminating glaciers. The reason is that the basal topography exerts major control on the dynamic response of grounded ice. As it is impractical to measure ice thicknesses on most glaciers, reconstruction approaches have been forwarded that can infer thickness fields from available geometric, climatic and ice-flow information. Here, we presented a two-step, mass-conserving reconstruction approach to infer 2D ice-thickness fields with prior knowledge on source and sink terms in the mass budget. The first-step reconstruction is aimed at glaciers for which not much information is available. Input requirements for this first step are comparable to other reconstruction approaches that have successfully been applied to glaciers world-wide. In fast-flowing areas where surface velocity measurements are most reliable, these observations enter a second-step reconstruction providing an improved thickness estimate. In both steps, available thickness measurements are readily assimilated to constrain the reconstruction. The approach is tested on different glacier geometries on Svalbard were an abundant thickness record was available. On these test geometries, we show that the approach performs well for entire ice caps as well as for marine- and land-terminating glaciers

  12. Rock glaciers on South Shetland Islands, Antarctic Peninsula, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the South Shetland Islands the investigators found eight active rock glaciers, no relict or fossil examples, and seven protalus ramparts. The rock glaciers are...

  13. Deep icequakes: What happens at the base of Alpine glaciers?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walter, Fabian; Dalban Canassy, Pierre; Husen, Stephan; Clinton, John F

    2013-01-01

    Basal seismicity cannot be attributed exclusively to glacier stick‐slip motion. As shown by previous studies on temperate Alpine glaciers, there also exist basal seismic sources, which are not due to pure shear mechanisms...

  14. Tidal bending of glaciers: a linear viscoelastic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Niels; Christensen, Erik Lintz; Mayer, Christoph

    2003-01-01

    In theoretical treatments of tidal bending of floating glaciers, the glacier is usually modelled as an elastic beam with uniform thickness, resting on an elastic foundation. With a few exceptions, values of the elastic (Young's) modulus E of ice derived from tidal deflection records of floating....... This suggests that ice creep may have a significant influence on tidal bending of glaciers. Moreover, detailed tidal-deflection and tilt data from Nioghalvfjerdsfjorden glacier, northeast Greenland, cannot be explained by elastic-beam theory. We present a theory of tidal bending of glaciers based on linear...... glaciers are in the range 0.9-3 GPa. It has therefore been suggested that the elastic-beam model with a single value of E approximate to 1 GPa adequately describes tidal bending of glaciers.In contrast, laboratory experiments with ice give E =93 GPa, i.e. 3-10 times higher than the glacier-derived values...

  15. Centennial glacier retreat as categorical evidence of regional climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Gerard H.; Baker, Marcia B.; Herla, Florian

    2017-02-01

    The near-global retreat of glaciers over the last century provides some of the most iconic imagery for communicating the reality of anthropogenic climate change to the public. Surprisingly, however, there has not been a quantitative foundation for attributing the retreats to climate change, except in the global aggregate. This gap, between public perception and scientific basis, is due to uncertainties in numerical modelling and the short length of glacier mass-balance records. Here we present a method for assessing individual glacier change based on the signal-to-noise ratio, a robust metric that is insensitive to uncertainties in glacier dynamics. Using only meteorological and glacier observations, and the characteristic decadal response time of glaciers, we demonstrate that observed retreats of individual glaciers represent some of the highest signal-to-noise ratios of climate change yet documented. Therefore, in many places, the centennial-scale retreat of the local glaciers does indeed constitute categorical evidence of climate change.

  16. Ablation Rates of Taylor Glacier, Antarctica, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides glacier surface ablation rates for a network of approximately 250 sites on Taylor Glacier, spanning a period from 2003 to 2011. Here...

  17. OPTICAL FLOW FOR GLACIER MOTION ESTIMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Vogel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative measurements of glacier flow over time are an important ingredient for glaciological research, for example to determine the mass balances and the evolution of glaciers. Measuring glacier flow in multi-temporal images involves the estimation of a dense set of corresponding points, which in turn define the flow vectors. Furthermore glaciers exhibit rather difficult radiometry, since their surface usually contains homogeneous areas as well as weak texture and contrast. To date glacier flow is usually observed by manually measuring a sparse set of correspondences, which is labor-intensive and often yields rather irregular point distributions, with the associated problems of interpolating over large areas. In the present work we propose to densely compute motion vectors at every pixel, by using recent robust methods for optic flow computation. Determining the optic flow, i.e. the dense deformation field between two images of a dynamic scene, has been a classic, long-standing research problem in computer vision and image processing. Sophisticated methods exist to optimally balance data fidelity with smoothness of the motion field. Depending on the strength of the local image gradients these methods yield a smooth trade-off between matching and interpolation, thereby avoiding the somewhat arbitrary decision which discrete anchor points to measure, while at the same time mitigating the problem of gross matching errors. We evaluate our method by comparing with manually measured point wise ground truth.

  18. Mathematical challenges in glacier modeling (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    jouvet, G.

    2013-12-01

    Many of Earth's glaciers are currently shrinking and it is expected that this trend will continue as global warming progresses. To virtually reproduce the evolution of glaciers and finally to predict their future, one needs to couple models of different disciplines and scales. Indeed, the slow motion of ice is described by fluid mechanics equations while the daily snow precipitations and melting are described by hydrological and climatic models. Less visible, applied mathematics are essential to run such a coupling at two different levels: by solving numerically the underlying equations and by seeking parameters using optimisation methods. This talk aims to make visible the role of mathematics in this area. I will first present a short educational film I have made for the "Mathematics of Planet Earth 2013", which is an introduction to the topic. To go further, solving the mechanical model of ice poses several mathematical challenges due to the complexity of the equations and geometries of glaciers. Then, I will describe some strategies to deal with such difficulties and design robust simulation tools. Finally, I will present some simulations of the largest glacier of the European Alps, the Aletsch glacier. As a less unexpected application, I will show how these results allowed us to make a major advance in a police investigation started in 1926.

  19. Photogrammetric monitoring of glacier margin lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Mulsow

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The growing number of glacier margin lakes that have developed due to glacier retreat have caused an increase of dangerous glacier lake outburst floods (GLOFs in several regions over the last decade. This normally causes a flood wave downstream the glacier. Typically, such an event takes few to several hours. GLOF scenarios may be a significant hazard to life, property, nature and infrastructure in the affected areas. A GLOF is usually characterized by a progressive water level drop. By observing the water level of the lake, an imminent GLOF-event can be identified. Common gauging systems are often not suitable for the measurement task, as they may be affected by ice fall or landslides in the lake basin. Therefore, in our pilot study, the water level is observed by processing images of a terrestrial camera system observing a glacier margin lake. The paper presents the basic principle of an automatic single-camera-based GLOF early warning system. Challenges and approaches to solve them are discussed. First, results from processed image sequences are presented to show the feasibility of the concept. Water level changes can be determined at decimetre precision.

  20. Topography, relief, climate and glaciers: a global prespective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagnac, Jean-Daniel; Valla, Pierre; Herman, fred

    2014-05-01

    The examination of the relationship between Earth's topography and present and past climate (i.e. long-term elevation of glaciers Equilibrium Line Altitude) reveals that the elevation of mountain ranges may be limited or controlled by glaciations. This is of prime importance, because glacial condition would lead to a limit the mountain development, hence the accumulation of gravitational energy and prevent the development of further glacial conditions as well as setting the erosion in (peri)glacial environments. This study examines the relationships between topography and the global Equilibrium Line Altitude of alpine glaciers around the world (long term snowline, i.e. the altitude where the ice mass balance is null). Two main observations can be drawn: 1) The distance between the (averaged and maximum) topography, and the ELA decreases pole ward the poles, and even become reversed (mean elevation above to ELA) at high latitude. Correlatively, the elevation of very large portion of land at mid-latitude cannot be related to glaciations, simply because it was never glaciated (large distance between topography and long-term mean ELA). The maximum distance between the ELA and the topography is greater close to the equator and decreases poleward. In absence of glacial and periglacial erosion, this trend cannot have its origin in glacial and periglacial processes. Moreover, the ELA elevation shows a significant (1000 - 1500m) depression in the intertropical zone. This depression of the ELA is not reflected at all in the topography. 2) The distribution of relief on Earth, if normalized by the mean elevation of mountain ranges (as a proxy for available space to create relief) shows a latitudinal band of greater relief between 40° and 60° (or between ELA of 500m to 2500m a.s.l.). This mid-latitude relatively greater relief challenges the straightforward relationship between glaciations, erosion and topography. Oppositely, it suggests that glacier may be more efficient

  1. The altitudinal distribution of snow algae on an Alaska glacier (Gulkana Glacier in the Alaska Range)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Nozomu

    2001-12-01

    The altitudinal distribution of a snow algal community was investigated on an Alaska glacier (Gulkana Glacier in the Alaska Range) from 1270 to 1770 m a.s.l.. Seven species of snow and ice algae (Chlorophyta and cyanobacteria) were observed on the glacier surface. These species were Chlamydomonas nivalis, Mesotaenium berggrenii, Ancylonema nordenskioldii, Cylindrocystis brébissonii, Raphidonema sp., and two Oscillatoriaceae cyanobacteria. The altitudinal distribution of snow algae was different among the species: Cd. nivalis was distributed on the middle to upper area, M. berggrenii; A. nordenskioldii, and one Oscillatoriaceae cyanobacterium on the middle to lower area; Raphidonema sp. on the middle area; and Cyl. brébissonii and one Oscillatoriaceae cyanobacterium on the lower area. The total cell concentration and the cell volume biomass of the snow algae ranged from 4·4 × 103 to 9·9 × 105 cells ml-1 and from 33 to 2211 µl m-2 respectively. The cell volume biomass changed with altitude; the biomass increased with altitude below 1600 m a.s.l., and decreased above 1600 m a.s.l. The community structure showed that algae is discussed in terms of the physical and chemical condition of the glacier surface, and is compared with that on a Himalayan glacier. A larger biomass in the snow area on the Alaska glacier than that of the Himalayan glacier is likely due to less frequent snow cover in summer in Alaska. Small amounts of filamentous cyanobacteria on the Alaska glacier may allow washouts of unicellular green algae by running melt water and may cause a different pattern of altitudinal distribution of algal biomass on the ice area from the Himalayan glacier.

  2. Determining glacier velocity with single frequency GPS receivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijmer, C.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/229345956; van de Wal, R.S.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/101899556; Boot, W.

    2011-01-01

    A well-known phenomenon in glacier dynamics is the existence of a relation between the glacier velocity and available amount of melt water (Zwally et al., 2002; Van de Wal et al., 2008). This relation is of particular importance when estimating the reaction of glaciers and ice sheets to climate

  3. 36 CFR 7.3 - Glacier National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Glacier National Park. 7.3... REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.3 Glacier National Park. (a) Fishing. (1) Fishing... food, drink, or lodging for sale may be operated on any privately owned lands within Glacier National...

  4. Using marine sediment archives to reconstruct past outlet glacier variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Camilla Snowman; Straneo, Fiamma; Ribergaard, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Ice-rafted debris in fjord sediment cores provides information about outlet glacier activity beyond the instrumental time period. It tells us that the Helheim Glacier, Greenland’s third most productive glacier, responds rapidly to short-term (3 to 10 years) climate changes....

  5. Human activities and its Responses to Glacier Melt Water Over Tarim River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hai; Zhou, Shenbei; Bai, Minghao

    2017-04-01

    Tarim River Basin lies in the south area of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, the north-west area of China. It is the longest inland river of China. Being far away from ocean and embraced by high mountains, Tarim River Basin is the typical arid region in the world. The intensity of human activities increased rapidly in Tarim River Basin since 1980's and water resources lacking is the major issue restricting the development of social economy. The glacier melt water plays an important role for the regional social and economic development, and it accounts for 40% of mountain-pass runoff. It is a fragile mutual-dependent relationship between local sustainable development and runoff. Under the background of global change glacier melt water process has also changed especially in the arid and semi-arid region. Due to climate change, glacier in Tarim River Basin has melted in an observed way since 1980s, together with increasing trend of annual rainfall and virgin flow in mountain basins. Correspondingly, human activity gets more frequent since 1970s, resulting into the obvious fragile mutual-dependent relationship between basin runoff and water use amount. Through an analysis of meteorological, hydrological and geographical observation data from 1985 to 2015, this thesis make a multi-factor variance analysis of population, cultivation area, industrial development and runoff in upstream and mid-stream of Tarim River under changing conditions. Furthermore, the regulation function of natural factors and water demand management factors on relationship between runoff and water using amount are discussed, including temperature, rainfall, and evaporation, water conservation technology and soil-water exploitation administrative institutions. It concludes that: first, increase in glacier runoff, rainfall amount, and virgin flow haven't notably relieved ecological issue in Tarim River Basin, and even has promoted water use behaviour in different flowing areas and noticeably reduced

  6. Thermal and Hydrological Response of Rock Glaciers to Climate Change: A Scenario Based Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaloo, Jotham; Brenning, Alexander; Gruber, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    Rock glaciers are ice-debris landforms characterized by creeping ice-rich permafrost. Recognition of their hydrological significance is increasing and is of particular relevance to the dry Andes, where rock glaciers cover greater area than glaciers. However, additional knowledge and research approaches pertaining to the seasonal hydrological contributions and climatic sensitivities of rock glaciers are necessary for improved water resource planning in many regions around the world. This work explores the utility of the energy and water balance model GEOtop to quantify the thermal and hydrological response of rock glaciers to climate scenarios. Weather data was generated with the intermediate-stochastic weather generator AWE-GEN for a site in the Southeast Swiss Alps, which marked a novel approach in cryospheric studies. Weather data for a reference scenario was generated which approximates conditions during the observation period (1985-2012). AWE-GEN produced time series of weather data for the reference scenario with statistical properties of precipitation in close agreement with observations, but air temperature showed substantial negative biases in summer months, which are attributed to difficulties in modeling local climatic characteristics. To examine the influence of climate change, data for eight climate change scenarios were generated by specifying change factors for mean monthly air temperature. The thermal and hydrological evolution of rock glacier soils were simulated for 50 years under the climatic forcing of the reference scenario followed by 50 years under each climate change scenario. Mean annual ground surface temperature (MAGST), active layer depth, permafrost total ice content, and the potential summer runoff contribution were quantified and compared before and after the onset of the climate change conditions. Air temperature increases in the climate change scenarios were amplified in MAGST. Stable rock glacier points were resistant to changes in

  7. The Mass Balance of Glacier No. 1 at the Headwaters of the Urumqi River in Relation to Northern Hemisphere Teleconnection Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Yuan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Most small glaciers in the world have significantly decreased their volume during the last century, which has caused water shortage problems. Glacier No. 1, at the headwaters of the Urumqi River, Tianshan, China, has been monitored since 1959 and similarly has experienced significant mass and volume losses over the last few decades. Thus, we examined the trend and potential abrupt changes of the mass balance of Glacier No. 1. Principal component analysis and singular value decomposition were used to find significant relations between the mass balance of Glacier No. 1 and Northern Hemisphere teleconnection patterns using climate indices. It was found that the mass balance of Glacier No. 1 had a significantly decreasing trend corresponding to −14.5 mm/year from 1959 to 2010. A change point was detected in 1997 with 99% confidence level. Two time periods with different mass balances were identified as 1959–1996 and 1997–2010. The mass balance for the first period was −136.4 mm/year and up to −663.9 mm/year for the second period. The mass balance of Glacier No. 1 is positively related to the Scandinavian Pattern (SCA, and negatively related to the East Atlantic Pattern (EA. These relationships are useful in better understanding the interaction between glacier mass balance and climate variability.

  8. The Mass Balance of Glacier No. 1 at the Headwaters of the Urumqi River in Relation to Northern Hemisphere Teleconnection Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Feifei; Hao, Zhenchun

    2017-04-01

    Most small glaciers in the world have significantly decreased their volume during the last century, which has caused water shortage problems. Glacier No. 1, at the headwaters of the Urumqi River, Tianshan, China, has been monitored since 1959 and similarly has experienced significant mass and volume losses over the last few decades. Thus, we examined the trend and potential abrupt changes of the mass balance of Glacier No. 1. Principal component analysis and singular value decomposition were used to find significant relations between the mass balance of Glacier No. 1 and Northern Hemisphere teleconnection patterns using climate indices. It was found that the mass balance of Glacier No. 1 had a significantly decreasing trend corresponding to -14.5 mm/year from 1959 to 2010. A change point was detected in 1997 with 99% confidence level. Two time periods with different mass balances were identified as 1959-1996 and 1997-2010. The mass balance for the first period was -136.4 mm/year and up to -663.9 mm/year for the second period. The mass balance of Glacier No. 1 is positively related to the Scandinavian Pattern (SCA), and negatively related to the East Atlantic Pattern (EA). These relationships are useful in better understanding the interaction between glacier mass balance and climate variability.

  9. Glaciological and marine geological controls on terminus dynamics of Hubbard Glacier, southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, L. A.; Hamilton, G. S.; van der Veen, C. J.; Finnegan, D. C.; O'Neel, S.; Scheick, J. B.; Lawson, D. E.

    2015-06-01

    Hubbard Glacier, located in southeast Alaska, is the world's largest nonpolar tidewater glacier. It has been steadily advancing since it was first mapped in 1895; occasionally, the advance creates an ice or sediment dam that blocks a tributary fjord (Russell Fiord). The sustained advance raises the probability of long-term closure in the near future, which will strongly impact the ecosystem of Russell Fiord and the nearby community of Yakutat. Here, we examine a 43 year record of flow speeds and terminus position to understand the large-scale dynamics of Hubbard Glacier. Our long-term record shows that the rate of terminus advance has increased slightly since 1895, with the exception of a slowed advance between approximately 1972 and 1984. The short-lived closure events in 1986 and 2002 were not initiated by perturbations in ice velocity or environmental forcings but were likely due to fluctuations in sedimentation patterns at the terminus. This study points to the significance of a coupled system where short-term velocity fluctuations and morainal shoal development control tidewater glacier terminus position.

  10. Glaciological and marine geological controls on terminus dynamics of Hubbard Glacier, southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Leigh A.; Hamilton, Gordon S.; van der Veen, C. J.; Finnegan, D. C.; O'Neel, Shad; Scheick, J. B.; Lawson, D. E.

    2015-01-01

    Hubbard Glacier, located in southeast Alaska, is the world's largest non-polar tidewater glacier. It has been steadily advancing since it was first mapped in 1895; occasionally, the advance creates an ice or sediment dam that blocks a tributary fjord (Russell Fiord). The sustained advance raises the probability of long-term closure in the near-future, which will strongly impact the ecosystem of Russell Fiord and the nearby community of Yakutat. Here, we examine a 43-year record of flow speeds and terminus position to understand the large-scale dynamics of Hubbard Glacier. Our long-term record shows that the rate of terminus advance has increased slightly since 1895, with the exception of a slowed advance between approximately 1972 and 1984. The short-lived closure events in 1986 and 2002 were not initiated by perturbations in ice velocity or environmental forcings, but were likely due to fluctuations in sedimentation patterns at the terminus. This study points to the significance of a coupled system where short-term velocity fluctuations and morainal shoal development control tidewater glacier terminus position.

  11. Seismological observations of glaciers dynamic on the Spitsbergen archipelago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorov A. V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides a brief description of results of Spitsbergen glacier observations by the seismic method. The study has been carried out both by permanent and temporary stations data. Characteristic features of glacier-related seismic events have been shown. Main areas of glacier seismic activity on the Archipelago have been revealed. A detailed study of Horsund-fjord glacier activity has been carried out using local seismic station HSPB data. Temporal and spatial distributions of glacier-related events have been obtained for the area. Season variations in temporal distribution of the events have been found

  12. Glacier dynamics at Helheim and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers, southeast Greenland, since the Little Ice Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Kjeldsen, Kristian Kjellerup; Kjær, Kurt H.

    2014-01-01

    Observations over the past decade show significant ice loss associated with the speed-up of glaciers in southeast Greenland from 2003, followed by a deceleration from 2006. These short-term, episodic, dynamic perturbations have a major impact on the mass balance on the decadal scale. To improve...... the projection of future sea level rise, a long-term data record that reveals the mass balance beyond such episodic events is required. Here, we extend the observational record of marginal thinning of Helheim and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers from 10 to more than 80 years. We show that, although the frontal portion...... of Helheim Glacier thinned by more than 100 m between 2003 and 2006, it thickened by more than 50 m during the previous two decades. In contrast, Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier underwent minor thinning of 40–50 m from 1981 to 1998 and major thinning of more than 100 m after 2003. Extending the record back...

  13. Housing Inventory Count

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report displays the data communities reported to HUD about the nature of their dedicated homeless inventory, referred to as their Housing Inventory Count (HIC)....

  14. National Wetlands Inventory Polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Wetland area features mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The National Wetlands Inventory is a national program sponsored by the US Fish and...

  15. Integrated inventory information system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarupria, J.S.; Kunte, P.D.

    The nature of oceanographic data and the management of inventory level information are described in Integrated Inventory Information System (IIIS). It is shown how a ROSCOPO (report on observations/samples collected during oceanographic programme...

  16. Science Inventory | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Science Inventory is a searchable database of research products primarily from EPA's Office of Research and Development. Science Inventory records provide descriptions of the product, contact information, and links to available printed material or websites.

  17. HHS Enterprise Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Enterprise Data Inventory (EDI) is the comprehensive inventory listing of agency data resources including public, restricted public, and non-public datasets.

  18. Glacierized headwater streams as aquifer recharge corridors, subarctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljedahl, A. K.; Gädeke, A.; O'Neel, S.; Gatesman, T. A.; Douglas, T. A.

    2017-07-01

    Arctic river discharge has increased in recent decades although sources and mechanisms remain debated. Abundant literature documents permafrost thaw and mountain glacier shrinkage over the past decades. Here we link glacier runoff to aquifer recharge via a losing headwater stream in subarctic Interior Alaska. Field measurements in Jarvis Creek (634 km2), a subbasin of the Tanana and Yukon Rivers, show glacier meltwater runoff as a large component (15-28%) of total annual streamflow despite low glacier cover (3%). About half of annual headwater streamflow is lost to the aquifer (38 to 56%). The estimated long-term change in glacier-derived aquifer recharge exceeds the observed increase in Tanana River base flow. Our findings suggest a linkage between glacier wastage, aquifer recharge along the headwater stream corridor, and lowland winter discharge. Accordingly, glacierized headwater streambeds may serve as major aquifer recharge zones in semiarid climates and therefore contributing to year-round base flow of lowland rivers.

  19. Glacierized headwater streams as aquifer recharge corridors, subarctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilledahl, Anna K.; Gadeke, Anne; O'Neel, Shad; Gatesman, T. A.; Douglas, T. A.

    2017-01-01

    Arctic river discharge has increased in recent decades although sources and mechanisms remain debated. Abundant literature documents permafrost thaw and mountain glacier shrinkage over the past decades. Here we link glacier runoff to aquifer recharge via a losing headwater stream in subarctic Interior Alaska. Field measurements in Jarvis Creek (634 km2), a subbasin of the Tanana and Yukon Rivers, show glacier meltwater runoff as a large component (15–28%) of total annual streamflow despite low glacier cover (3%). About half of annual headwater streamflow is lost to the aquifer (38 to 56%). The estimated long-term change in glacier-derived aquifer recharge exceeds the observed increase in Tanana River base flow. Our findings suggest a linkage between glacier wastage, aquifer recharge along the headwater stream corridor, and lowland winter discharge. Accordingly, glacierized headwater streambeds may serve as major aquifer recharge zones in semiarid climates and therefore contributing to year-round base flow of lowland rivers.

  20. Glacier modeling in support of field observations of mass balance at South Cascade Glacier, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josberger, Edward G.; Bidlake, William R.

    2010-01-01

    The long-term USGS measurement and reporting of mass balance at South Cascade Glacier was assisted in balance years 2006 and 2007 by a new mass balance model. The model incorporates a temperature-index melt computation and accumulation is modeled from glacier air temperature and gaged precipitation at a remote site. Mass balance modeling was used with glaciological measurements to estimate dates and magnitudes of critical mass balance phenomena. In support of the modeling, a detailed analysis was made of the "glacier cooling effect" that reduces summer air temperature near the ice surface as compared to that predicted on the basis of a spatially uniform temperature lapse rate. The analysis was based on several years of data from measurements of near-surface air temperature on the glacier. The 2006 and 2007 winter balances of South Cascade Glacier, computed with this new, model-augmented methodology, were 2.61 and 3.41 mWE, respectively. The 2006 and 2007 summer balances were -4.20 and -3.63 mWE, respectively, and the 2006 and 2007 net balances were -1.59 and -0.22 mWE. PDF version of a presentation on the mass balance of South Cascade Glacier in Washington state. Presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting 2010.

  1. Ice sheet features identification, glacier velocity estimation, and glacier zones classification using high-resolution optical and SAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Praveen K.; Dixit, Ankur; Chouksey, Arpit; Aggarwal, S. P.; Kumar, A. Senthil

    2016-05-01

    Ice sheet features, glacier velocity estimation and glacier zones or facies classification are important research activities highlighting the dynamics of ice sheets and glaciers in Polar Regions and in inland glaciers. The Cband inSAR data is of ERS 1/2 tandem pairs with one day interval for spring of 1996 and L-band PolinSAR data of ALOS-PALSAR-2 for spring of 2015 is used in glacier velocity estimation. Glacier classification is done using multi-temporal C-and L-band SAR data and also with single date full polarization and hybrid polarization data. In first part, a mean displacement of 9 cm day-1 was recorded using SAR interferometric technique using ERS 1/2 tandem data of 25-26 March 1996. Previous studies using optical data based methods has shown that Gangotri glacier moves with an average displacement of 4 cm and 6 cm day-1. As present results using ERS 1/2 data were obtained for one day interval, i.e., 25th March 05:00pm to 26th March 05:00 pm, 1996, variation in displacement may be due to presence of snow or wet snow melting over the glacier, since during this time snow melt season is in progress in Gangotri glacier area. Similarly the results of glacier velocity derived using ALOSPALSAR- 2 during 22 March - 19 April 2015 shows the mean velocity of 5.4 to 7.4 cm day-1 during 28 day time interval for full glacier and main trunk glacier respectively. This L-band data is already corrected for Faraday's rotation effects by JAXA, and tropospheric correction are also being applied to refine the results. These results are significant as it is after gap of 20 years that DInSAR methods has given glacier velocity for fast moving Himalayan glacier. RISAT-1 FRS-1 hybrid data is used to create Raney's decompositions parameters, which are further used for glacier zones classification using support vector machine based classification method. The Radarsat-2 and ALOS-PALSAR-2 fully polarized data of year 2010 and 2015 are also used for glacier classification. The identified

  2. Rock Glaciers in the Upper Basin of Bermejo River, Santa Victoria, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada, A. L.; Íbáñez Palacios, G. P.; Toledo, M. A.; Páez, S. V.

    2013-05-01

    The Bermejo River is an international basin in the Tropical Andes, Santa Victoria range. The Santa Victoria range extend in N-S sense (22°08' and 23°00' South latitude between 65° and 65°30' West longitude). It maxim height is about 5.055 m s.n.m. and it average height is 3000 m s.n.m. There have been localize intact rock glaciers (active and inactive) and relict. The rock glaciers are frozen water reservoir and regulate the water regime in the high mountain over the world. The global warming effects have been express in this region with average annual air temperatures in increase: The series of temperatures of La Quiaca weather station, years 1911-2010, shows an increase about 1° C (from 9,14° C to 10,08° C) since 70' decade to actuality. This study aims to contribute to the survey of intact rock glaciers and the suite of accompanying landforms. The geographic identification and location of rock glaciers have made through the interpretation of aerial photographs and LandSat 7 and Aster Images in comparison with Google Earth using GIS and visual interpretation technics. This information has controlled with fieldwork in several campaigns. The rock glaciers are classified (in base of it activity) in actives, inactives and relict. The first and the second class were grouped in a category called intact rock glaciers for simplify it identification. The unified categories are water-storing. In the fieldwork have determinated the following aspects: 1- Active processes determination (needle ice, lenticular ice formation, etc.) and its sedimentary products: sucrose structure, inverted gradation, extrusion, open work gravels. 2- Location and geomorphologic measurement of rock glaciers and periglacial forms. There are identified 318 intact rock glaciers in high basin of Bermejo river, Sub-basins Condado river, Los Toldos-Lipeo river and Iruya river, Santa Victoria range. The actives rock glaciers, indicators of discontinuous permafrost, are installed from 4300 m s

  3. Hubbard Glacier, Alaska: growing and advancing in spite of global climate change and the 1986 and 2002 Russell Lake outburst floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabant, Dennis C.; March, Rod S.; Thomas, Donald S.

    2003-01-01

    Hubbard Glacier, the largest calving glacier on the North American Continent (25 percent larger than Rhode Island), advanced across the entrance to 35-mile-long Russell Fiord during June 2002, temporarily turning it into a lake. Hubbard Glacier has been advancing for more than 100 years and has twice closed the entrance to Russell Fiord during the last 16 years by squeezing and pushing submarine glacial sediments across the mouth of the fiord. Water flowing into the cutoff fiord from mountain streams and glacier melt causes the level of Russell Lake to rise. However, both the 1986 and 2002 dams failed before the lake altitude rose enough for water to spill over a low pass at the far end of the fiord and enter the Situk River drainage, a world-class sport and commercial fishery near Yakutat, Alaska.

  4. Estimating dead wood during national forest inventories: a review of inventory methodologies and suggestions for harmonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher W. Woodall; Jacques Rondeux; Pieter J. Verkerk; G& #246; ran St& #229; hl

    2009-01-01

    Efforts to assess forest ecosystem carbon stocks, biodiversity, and fire hazards have spurred the need for comprehensive assessments of forest ecosystem dead wood (DW) components around the world. Currently, information regarding the prevalence, status, and methods of DW inventories occurring in the world's forested landscapes is scattered. The goal of this study...

  5. A GRASS GIS module to obtain an estimation of glacier behavior under climate change: A pilot study on Italian glacier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strigaro, Daniele; Moretti, Massimiliano; Mattavelli, Matteo; Frigerio, Ivan; Amicis, Mattia De; Maggi, Valter

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to integrate the Minimal Glacier Model in a Geographic Information System Python module in order to obtain spatial simulations of glacier retreat and to assess the future scenarios with a spatial representation. The Minimal Glacier Models are a simple yet effective way of estimating glacier response to climate fluctuations. This module can be useful for the scientific and glaciological community in order to evaluate glacier behavior, driven by climate forcing. The module, called r.glacio.model, is developed in a GRASS GIS (GRASS Development Team, 2016) environment using Python programming language combined with different libraries as GDAL, OGR, CSV, math, etc. The module is applied and validated on the Rutor glacier, a glacier in the south-western region of the Italian Alps. This glacier is very large in size and features rather regular and lively dynamics. The simulation is calibrated by reconstructing the 3-dimensional dynamics flow line and analyzing the difference between the simulated flow line length variations and the observed glacier fronts coming from ortophotos and DEMs. These simulations are driven by the past mass balance record. Afterwards, the future assessment is estimated by using climatic drivers provided by a set of General Circulation Models participating in the Climate Model Inter-comparison Project 5 effort. The approach devised in r.glacio.model can be applied to most alpine glaciers to obtain a first-order spatial representation of glacier behavior under climate change.

  6. Monitoring population status of sea otters (Enhydra lutris) in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska: options and considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esslinger, George; Esler, Daniel N.; Howlin, S.; Starcevich, L.A.

    2015-06-25

    After many decades of absence from southeast Alaska, sea otters (Enhydra lutris) are recolonizing parts of their former range, including Glacier Bay, Alaska. Sea otters are well known for structuring nearshore ecosystems and causing community-level changes such as increases in kelp abundance and changes in the size and number of other consumers. Monitoring population status of sea otters in Glacier Bay will help park researchers and managers understand and interpret sea otter-induced ecosystem changes relative to other sources of variation, including potential human-induced impacts such as ocean acidification, vessel disturbance, and oil spills. This report was prepared for the National Park Service (NPS), Southeast Alaska Inventory and Monitoring Network following a request for evaluation of options for monitoring sea otter population status in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. To meet this request, we provide a detailed consideration of the primary method of assessment of abundance and distribution, aerial surveys, including analyses of power to detect interannual trends and designs to reduce variation around annual abundance estimates. We also describe two alternate techniques for evaluating sea otter population status—(1) quantifying sea otter diets and energy intake rates, and (2) detecting change in ages at death. In addition, we provide a brief section on directed research to identify studies that would further our understanding of sea otter population dynamics and effects on the Glacier Bay ecosystem, and provide context for interpreting results of monitoring activities.

  7. Evaluating tourist perception of environmental changes as a contribution to managing natural resources in glacierized areas: a case study of the Forni glacier (Stelvio National Park, Italian Alps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavaglia, Valentina; Diolaiuti, Guglielmina; Smiraglia, Claudio; Pasquale, Vera; Pelfini, Manuela

    2012-12-01

    Climate change effects are noticeably evident above the timberline where glacier and permafrost processes and mass movements drive the surface evolution. In particular, the cryosphere shrinkage is deeply changing the features and characteristics of several glacierized mountain areas of the world, and these modifications can also affect the landscape perception of tourists and mountaineers. On the one hand glacier retreat is increasing the interest of tourists and visitors in areas witnessing clear climate change impacts; on the other hand cryosphere shrinkage can impact the touristic appeal of mountain territories which, diminishing their ice and snow coverage, are also losing part of their aesthetic value. Then, to promote glacierized areas in a changing climate and to prepare exhaustive and actual proposals for sustainable tourism, it is important to deepen our knowledge about landscape perception of tourists and mountaineers and their awareness of the ongoing environmental modifications. Here we present the results from a pilot study we performed in summer 2009 on a representative glacierized area of the Alps, the Forni Valley (Stelvio National Park, Lombardy, Italy), a valley shaped by Forni, the largest Italian valley glacier. During the 2009 summer season we asked tourists visiting the Forni Valley to complete a questionnaire. This study was aimed at both describing the features and characteristics of tourists and mountaineers visiting this Alpine zone in summer and evaluating their landscape perception and their ability to recognize climate change impacts and evidence. Our results suggest that the dissemination strategies in a natural protected area have to take into account not only the main landscape features but also the sites where the information will be given. In particular considering the peculiarities of the huts located in the area, such as their different accessibility and the fact that they are included or not in a mountaineering network like that

  8. Evaluating Tourist Perception of Environmental Changes as a Contribution to Managing Natural Resources in Glacierized Areas: A Case Study of the Forni Glacier (Stelvio National Park, Italian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavaglia, Valentina; Diolaiuti, Guglielmina; Smiraglia, Claudio; Pasquale, Vera; Pelfini, Manuela

    2012-12-01

    Climate change effects are noticeably evident above the timberline where glacier and permafrost processes and mass movements drive the surface evolution. In particular, the cryosphere shrinkage is deeply changing the features and characteristics of several glacierized mountain areas of the world, and these modifications can also affect the landscape perception of tourists and mountaineers. On the one hand glacier retreat is increasing the interest of tourists and visitors in areas witnessing clear climate change impacts; on the other hand cryosphere shrinkage can impact the touristic appeal of mountain territories which, diminishing their ice and snow coverage, are also losing part of their aesthetic value. Then, to promote glacierized areas in a changing climate and to prepare exhaustive and actual proposals for sustainable tourism, it is important to deepen our knowledge about landscape perception of tourists and mountaineers and their awareness of the ongoing environmental modifications. Here we present the results from a pilot study we performed in summer 2009 on a representative glacierized area of the Alps, the Forni Valley (Stelvio National Park, Lombardy, Italy), a valley shaped by Forni, the largest Italian valley glacier. During the 2009 summer season we asked tourists visiting the Forni Valley to complete a questionnaire. This study was aimed at both describing the features and characteristics of tourists and mountaineers visiting this Alpine zone in summer and evaluating their landscape perception and their ability to recognize climate change impacts and evidence. Our results suggest that the dissemination strategies in a natural protected area have to take into account not only the main landscape features but also the sites where the information will be given. In particular considering the peculiarities of the huts located in the area, such as their different accessibility and the fact that they are included or not in a mountaineering network like that

  9. Deriving supraglacial debris thickness using satellite data on the Lirung Glacier in the Nepalese Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Lene; Schauwecker, Simone; Brock, Ben; Immerzeel, Walter; Pellicciotti, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    Glaciers with debris-covered ablation zones are widely present in mountain ranges such as the Alps, the Himalayas and the Andes. An expansion of rock debris-covered areas has been documented in recent decades. It is therefore increasingly important to take the effect of debris cover into account in glacio-hydrological modelling. Debris thickness is a key control on a glacier's energy balance and it governs the melt rate beneath debris, hence the estimation of debris extent and thickness is crucial to predict melt. Data on debris thickness are scarce on most glaciers and thus simplified assumptions are commonly used. In this study we test a new, recently developed physically based method to produce debris thickness maps from satellite imagery. The model is based on a solution of the energy balance equation at the debris surface to reconstruct debris thickness as a residual in each satellite pixel. This approach requires ASTER thermal images and reanalysis meteorological data and has the potential to map distribution of debris thickness without the need for detailed field data. In a previous study we tested the model for glaciers with different characteristics and in different climatic regions of the world. The validation of debris thickness, however, is problematic due to data scarcity, the inhomogeneous debris distribution and the resolution of the ASTER product (90 m). The standard application of the model seems to work for glaciers for which debris characteristics such as the effective conductivity are known and reanalysis data are representative. In this study we additionally test the approach with a recently collected data set over the Lirung glacier in the Nepalese Himalayas, where initial application of the remote sensing method using reanalysis data led to a significant underestimation of debris thickness. Extensive field data were collected from May to October 2012 consisting of data from an AWS, spatially distributed air and surface temperature, effective

  10. Glacier Mass Balance in the Cordillera Vilcanota, Glacier Suyuparina, Cusco - Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikos, Felipe; Giráldez, Claudia; Schauwecker, Simone; Molina, Edwin; Haeberli, Wilfried; Drenkhan, Fabian; Salzmann, Nadine; Rado, Maxwell; Chaparro, Nicacio; Samata, Jaime; Flores, Andrés; Saito, Carlos; Montoya, Nilton

    2017-04-01

    The Cordillera Vilcanota is the second most glaciated mountain range in Peru, and concentrates approximately 279 km2 of ice extent which corresponds to 25% of Peruvian glaciers. These glaciers have shrunk about 33% within the last 40 years and are a direct indicator of climate change impacts. Hydroclimatic changes in this region pose hazards and consecutive risks for local and regional livelihoods, socioeconomic activities and water supply. Therefore, it is important to understand high-mountain climatic and hydroglacial parameters and dynamics. In 2010/11, the first mass balance measurements were made on the Suyuparina glacier and the adjacent Quisoquipina glacier. In 2013, we have continued measurements through the present, of which we present some of the results for Suyuparina glacier. The net point mass balance for the hydrological year 2013-2014 in the lower zone is highly variable with values between +0.2 m w.e. (accumulation) and up to -6 m w.e. (ablation).; whereas for the hydrological year 2014-2015 values range from +0.004 m w.e. (accumulation) to -0.047 m w.e. (ablation) depending on the particular microtopography (e.g. ice cliffs) of the glacier. In the accumulation zone, the average for two stakes was +1.4 m w.e. for the hydrological year 2012-2013 and 1.3 m w.e.,in 2013-2014, +1.2 m w.e. for 2014-2015; and +0.7 m w.e in 2015-2016, respectively. The water equivalent gain has been gradually reduced in the last estimate, depending exclusively on the rainfall regime. The velocity of the glacial flow from October 2013 to November 2014 is in the range of 10 to 20 m per year. The glacier retreat in the front corresponds to 48.49 m for the period 2010-2014. Total glacier area of Suyuparina has decreased by 7% from about 1.21 km2 in 2009 to 1.13 km2 in 2013. A seasonal pattern can be observed in the point mass balance, indicating less ablation in the wet season (December-May), continuous ablation in the dry period, and a high horizontal ablation due to its

  11. Variations of algal communities cause darkening of a Greenland glacier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Stefanie; Anesio, Alexandre M; Jorge Villar, Susana E; Benning, Liane G

    2014-08-01

    We have assessed the microbial ecology on the surface of Mittivakkat glacier in SE-Greenland during the exceptional high melting season in July 2012 when the so far most extreme melting rate for the Greenland Ice Sheet has been recorded. By employing a complementary and multi-disciplinary field sampling and analytical approach, we quantified the dramatic changes in the different microbial surface habitats (green snow, red snow, biofilms, grey ice, cryoconite holes). The observed clear change in dominant algal community and their rapidly changing cryo-organic adaptation inventory was linked to the high melting rate. The changes in carbon and nutrient fluxes between different microbial pools (from snow to ice, cryoconite holes and glacial forefronts) revealed that snow and ice algae dominate the net primary production at the onset of melting, and that they have the potential to support the cryoconite hole communities as carbon and nutrient sources. A large proportion of algal cells is retained on the glacial surface and temporal and spatial changes in pigmentation contribute to the darkening of the snow and ice surfaces. This implies that the fast, melt-induced algal growth has a high albedo reduction potential, and this may lead to a positive feedback speeding up melting processes. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An assessment of uncertainties in using volume-area modelling for computing the twenty-first century glacier contribution to sea-level change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. A. Slangen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A large part of present-day sea-level change is formed by the melt of glaciers and ice caps (GIC. This study focuses on the uncertainties in the calculation of the GIC contribution on a century timescale. The model used is based on volume-area scaling, combined with the mass balance sensitivity of the GIC. We assess different aspects that contribute to the uncertainty in the prediction of the contribution of GIC to future sea-level rise, such as (1 the volume-area scaling method (scaling factor, (2 the glacier data, (3 the climate models, and (4 the emission scenario. Additionally, a comparison of the model results to the 20th century GIC contribution is presented.

    We find that small variations in the scaling factor cause significant variations in the initial volume of the glaciers, but only limited variations in the glacier volume change. If two existing glacier inventories are tuned such that the initial volume is the same, the GIC sea-level contribution over 100 yr differs by 0.027 m or 18 %. It appears that the mass balance sensitivity is also important: variations of 20 % in the mass balance sensitivity have an impact of 17 % on the resulting sea-level projections. Another important factor is the choice of the climate model, as the GIC contribution to sea-level change largely depends on the temperature and precipitation taken from climate models. Connected to this is the choice of emission scenario, used to drive the climate models. Combining all the uncertainties examined in this study leads to a total uncertainty of 0.052 m or 35 % in the GIC contribution to global mean sea level. Reducing the variance in the climate models and improving the glacier inventories will significantly reduce the uncertainty in calculating the GIC contributions, and are therefore crucial actions to improve future sea-level projections.

  13. An Active Englacial Hydrological System in a Cold Glacier: Blood Falls, Taylor Glacier, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, C. G.; Pettit, E. C.; Carmichael, J.; Badgeley, J.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Lyons, W. B.; Mikucki, J.

    2016-12-01

    Blood Falls is a supraglacial hydrological feature formed by episodic release of iron-rich subglacial brine derived from an extensive aquifer beneath the cold, polar, Taylor Glacier. While fluid transport in non-temperate ice typically occurs through meltwater delivery from the glacier surface to the bed (hydrofracturing, supraglacial lake drainage), Blood Falls represents the opposite situation: brine moves from a subglacial source to the glacier surface. Here, we present the first complete conceptual model for brine transport and release, as well as the first direct evidence of a wintertime brine release at Blood Falls obtained through year-round time-lapse photography. Related analyses show that brine pools subglacially underneath the northern terminus of Taylor Glacier, rather than flowing directly into proglacial Lake Bonney because ice-cored moraines and channelized surface topography provide hydraulic barriers. This pooled brine is pressurized by hydraulic head from the upglacier brine source region. Based on seismic data, we propose that episodic supraglacial release is initiated by high strain rates coupled with pressurized subglacial brine that drive intermittent subglacial and englacial fracturing. Ultimately, brine-filled basal crevasses propagate upward to link with surface crevasses, allowing brine to flow from the bed to the surface. The observation of wintertime brine release indicates that surface-generated meltwater is not necessary to trigger crack propagation or to maintain the conduit as previously suggested. The liquid brine persists beneath and within the cold ice (-17°C) despite ambient ice/brine temperature differences of as high as 10°C through both locally depressed brine freezing temperatures through cryoconcentration of salts and increased ice temperatures through release of latent heat during partial freezing of brine. The existence of an englacial hydrological system initiated by basal crevassing extends to polar glaciers a process

  14. Glacier Changes in the Bhutanese Himalaya - Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupper, S.; Schaefer, J. M.; Burgener, L. K.; Maurer, J.; Smith, R.; Cook, E.; Putnam, A. E.; Krusic, P.; Tsering, K.; Koenig, L.

    2012-12-01

    Glacierized change in the Himalayas affects river-discharge, hydro-energy and agricultural production, and Glacial Lake Outburst Flood potential, but its quantification and extent of impacts remains highly uncertain. Here we present conservative, comprehensive and quantitative predictions for glacier area and meltwater flux changes in Bhutan, monsoonal Himalayas. In particular, we quantify the uncertainties associated with the glacier area and meltwater flux changes due to uncertainty in climate data, a critical problem for much of High Asia. Based on a suite of gridded climate data and a robust glacier melt model, our results show that glacier area and meltwater change projections can vary by an order of magnitude for different climate datasets. The most conservative results indicate that, even if climate were to remain at the present-day mean values (1980-2000), almost 10% of Bhutan's glacierized area would vanish and the meltwater flux would drop by as much as 30%. New mapping of glacierized area from 2000-2010 shows a significant change in glacierized area of 4-6%. Thus the conservative steady-state area changes predicted by the model are already being realized. Under the conservative scenario of an additional 1°C regional warming, glacier retreat is predicted to continue until about 25% of Bhutan's glacierized area will have disappeared and the annual meltwater flux, after an initial spike, would drop by as much as 65%.

  15. Controlling mechanisms of Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seroussi, H. L.; Morlighem, M.; Rignot, E. J.; Larour, E. Y.; Mouginot, J.; Khazendar, A.

    2013-12-01

    Ice shelves play a major role in the stability of fast flowing ice streams in Antarctica, by exerting buttressing on inland ice and controlling the discharge of ice into the ocean. However, the mechanisms at work remain poorly understood and interactions between floating and grounded ice need to be better characterized in order to estimate the impact of climate change on the ice sheets. Thwaites glacier, in West Antarctica, features a small and heavily fractured ice shelf that provides limited back stress pressure on inland ice but is pinned on the eastern part on a prominent ridge. Thwaites glacier has maintained a consistently high velocity and negative mass balance for at least 20 years. Recent observations show a widening of its fast flowing area as well as a sustained acceleration since 2006 and a rapid retreat of its grounding line in the center of the glacier. The objective of this work is to characterize the dynamic response of Thwaites glacier to changes in its floating tongue on decadal to centennial time scales. To achieve this objective, we rely on high resolution ice flow modeling and grounding line dynamics using the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). We will focus on the complex interplay between the main floating tongue of Thwaites Glacier and its eastern, slow moving ice shelf, which is pinned down by an ice rumple. The speed of the eastern ice shelf is strongly affected by the coupling with the main floating ice tongue, which results in significant fluctuations in speed of the eastern ice shelf the formation of ice shelf cracks at the grounding line during acceleration phases. Our results show that ice rigidity at the junction between the eastern and western part of the shelf controls the dynamic regime of the ice shelf and suggest that Thwaites Glacier is likely to undergo substantial changes in the coming decades. This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the University of California Irvine

  16. The Petermann Glacier Experiment, NW Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mix, A. C.; Jakobsson, M.; Andrews, J. T.; Jennings, A. E.; Mayer, L. A.; Marcott, S. A.; Muenchow, A.; Stoner, J. S.; Andresen, C. S.; Nicholls, K. W.; Anderson, S. T.; Brook, E.; Ceperley, E. G.; Cheseby, M.; Clark, J.; Dalerum, F.; Dyke, L. M.; Einarsson, D.; Eriksson, B.; Frojd, C.; Glueder, A.; Hedman, U.; Heirman, K.; Heuzé, C.; Hogan, K.; Holden, R.; Holm, C.; Jerram, K.; Krutzfeldt, J.; Nicolas, L.; Par, L.; Lomac-MacNair, K.; Madlener, S.; McKay, J. L.; Meijer, T.; Meiton, A.; Brian, M.; Mohammed, R.; Molin, M.; Moser, C.; Normark, E.; Padman, J.; Pecnerova, P.; Reilly, B.; Reusche, M.; Ross, A.; Stranne, C.; Trinhammer, P.; Walczak, M. H.; Walczak, P.; Washam, P.; Karasti, M.; Anker, P.

    2016-12-01

    The Petermann Glacier Experiment is a comprehensive study on land, ocean, and ice in Northwest Greenland, staged from Swedish Icebreaker Oden in 2015 as a collaboration between the US, Sweden, UK, and Denmark. This talk introduces the strategic goals of the experiment and connects the various scientific results. Petermann Glacier drains a significant marine-based sector of the northern Greenland Ice Sheet and terminates in a floating ice tongue, one of the largest remaining systems of its kind in the northern hemisphere. Records of the modern state of Petermann Glacier and its past variations are of interest to understand the sensitivity of marine terminating outlet glaciers to change, and to constrain the rates and extent of changes that have actually occurred. With this case study we are learning the rules of large scale dynamics that cannot be understood from modern observations alone. Although past behavior is not an simple analog for the future, and no single system captures all possible behaviors, insights from these case studies can be applied through models to better project how similar systems may change in the future. The Petermann Expedition developed the first comprehensive bathymetric maps of the region, drilled through the floating ice tongue to obtain sub-shelf sediment cores near the grounding line and to monitor sub-ice conditions, recovered a broad array of sediment cores documenting changing oceanic conditions in Petermann Fjord, Hall Basin, and Nares Strait, measured watercolumn properties to trace subsurface watermasses that bring heat from the Arctic Ocean into deep Petermann Fjord to melt the base of the floating ice tongue, developed a detailed record of relative sealevel change on land to constrain past ice loads, and recovered pristine boulders for cosmogenic exposure dating of areal ice retreat on land. Together, these studies are shedding new light on the dynamics of past glaciation in Northwest Greenland, and contributing to fundamental

  17. Geoengineering Outlet Glaciers and Ice Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolovick, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Mass loss from Greenland and Antarctica is highly sensitive to the presence of warm ocean water that drives melting of ice shelves and marine terminated glaciers. This warm water resides offshore at depth and accesses the grounding line through deep but narrow troughs and fjords. Here, we investigate the possibility of blocking warm water transport through these choke points with an artificial sill. Using a simple width-averaged model of ice stream flow coupled to a buoyant-plume model of submarine melt, we find that grounding line retreat and sea level rise can be delayed or reversed for hundreds of years if warm water is prevented from accessing outlet glaciers and ice-shelf cavities. Glaciers with a floating shelf exhibit a strong response to the presence of the artificial sill regardless of our choice of calving law, while tidewater glaciers require a strong linkage between submarine melt and iceberg calving for the artificial sill to have an effect. As a result of this difference and as a result of differing degrees of overdeepening in the basal topography, Antarctica and Greenland present very different societal cost-benefit analyses. Intervention in Greenland would be low-cost and low-reward: the volume of the artificial sill is comparable to existing large public works projects such as the Dubai Islands or the Suez Canal, but the magnitude of averted sea-level rise is small, the success of the intervention depends on the choice of calving law, and the glaciers return to their non-geoengineered trajectories within one to two centuries. Intervention in Antarctica, on the other hand, would be high-cost and high-reward: the volume of the artificial sill is one to two orders of magnitude greater, but the averted sea level rise is much larger, the intervention is successful regardless of the choice of calving law, and the ice streams remain far from their non-geoengineered trajectories throughout the 1000 year duration of our model runs. In both cases, an

  18. Recent Activity of Glaciers of Mount Rainier, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigafoos, Robert S.; Hendricks, E.L.

    1972-01-01

    Knowing the ages of trees growing on recent moraines at Mount Rainier, Wash., permits the moraines to be dated. Moraines which are ridges of boulders, gravel, sand, and dust deposited at the margins of a glacier, mark former limits of a receding glacier. Knowing past glacial activity aids our understanding of past climatic variations. The report documents the ages of moraines deposited by eight glaciers. Aerial photographs and planimetric maps show areas where detailed field studies were made below seven glaciers. Moraines, past ice positions, and sample areas are plotted on the photographs and maps, along with trails, roads, streams, and landforms, to permit critical areas to be identified in the future. Ground photographs are included so that sample sites and easily accessible moraines can be found along trails. Tables present data about trees sampled in areas near the glaciers of Mount Rainier, Wash. The data in the tables show there are modern moraines of different age around the mountain; some valleys contain only one modern moraiine; others contain as many as nine. The evidence indicates a sequence of modern glacial advances terminating at about the following A.D. dates: 1525, 1550, 1625-60, 1715, 1730-65, 1820-60, 1875, and 1910. Nisqually River valley near Nisqually Glacier contains one moraine formed before A.D. 1842; Tahoma Creek valley near South Tahoma Glacier contains three moraines formed before A.D. 1528; 1843, and 1864; South Puyallup River valley near Tahoma Glacier, six moraines A.D. 1544, 1761, 1841, 1851, 1863, 1898; Puyallup Glacier, one moraine, A.D. 1846; Carbon Glacier, four moraines, 1519, 1763, 1847, 1876; Winthrop Glacier, four moraines, 1655, 1716, 1760, amid 1822; Emmons Glacier, nine moraines, 1596, 1613, 1661, 1738, 1825, 1850, 1865, 1870, 1901; and Ohanapecosh Glacier, three moraines, 1741, 1846, and 1878. Abandoned melt-water and flood channels were identified within moraine complexes below three glaciers, and their time of

  19. Decadal and Seasonal Variations of Alpine Lakes in Glacierized areas of Central Asia during 1990-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Warner, T.; Chen, X.; Bao, A.

    2016-12-01

    Central Asia is one of the world's most vulnerable areas responding to global change. Glacier lakes in the alpine regions remain sensitive to climatic change and fluctuate with temperature and precipitation variations. Study shows that glaciers in Central Asia have retreated dramatically, leading to the expansion of the existing glacial lakes and the emergence of many new glacier lakes. The existence of these lakes increases the possibility of outburst flood during the ice melting season, which can bring a disaster to the downstream area. Mapping glacial lakes and monitoring their changes would improve our understanding of regional climate change and glacier-related hazards. Glacial lakes in Central Asia are mainly located at the Tianshan Mountains, the Altai Mountains, the Kunlun Mountains and the Pamirs with average elevation more than 1500 meters. Most of these lakes are supplied with the glaciers or snowmelt water during the summer seasons. Satellite remote sensing provides an efficient and objective tool to analyze the status and variations of glacial lakes. The increased availability of remote sensing sensors with appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions, broad coverage makes lake investigations more feasible and cost-effective. The paper intends to map glacier lake changes in glacierized alpine mountains with Landsat TM/ETM+ imagery. More than 600 scenes of Landsat images in circa 1990, circa 2000, circa 2010 and circa 2015 are used to map the decadal glacial lake changes over the Central Asia, and about 8 expanding glacial lakes are selected to map seasonal changes. Over 12000 glacial lakes were mapped in circa 1990, and in 2015, lake number are more than 16000, most of these new lakes are emerging in the last 10 years. The result shows that the number and area of the glacial lakes in the Altain Mountain remain stable, while the Tianshan Mountain have experienced expanding changes in the last two decades, and about a half number of lake areas are

  20. Characterizing changing stream water quality in a glacierized tropical watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, B. G.; Eddy, A. M.; Baraer, M.; McKenzie, J. M.; Walsh, E.; Fernandez, A.; Wigmore, O.; Battista, R.; Guittard, A.

    2013-12-01

    Glacier recession in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru has been causing downstream hydrologic transformations, altering the amount, timing and chemical quality of stream water. Increased demand from multiple water resource users, particularly industrial-scale agricultural irrigation along the desert coast, underscores the need for accurate source attribution and treatment of pollutants. Water quality assessment is challenging given natural geologic controls on water chemistry concentrations, and a lack of consistent historical monitoring. Here we present results from an analytical characterization of spatial and temporal variability in the dissolved loads of major ions, isotopes and select trace metals in the Pacific-draining Santa River and tributaries. Our approach incorporates multi-year synoptic sampling of water chemistry and stream discharge along the river course and at tributary pour points, along with weekly sampling at single point along the upper Santa. Samples were taken predominately during the austral winter months of June, July, and August in 2004 - 2009 and 2011 - 2013 at 20-30 stream localities. Digitized maps of geology, land use and hydrography permit geographic visualization and exploratory GIS-based data analysis. Results indicate that the dominant hydrochemical processes throughout the Santa watershed include silicate weathering, coupled pyrite oxidation with silicate weathering, and to a lesser extent, carbonate weathering. Low pH and high concentrations of sulfate are found in the presence of high-silica granitic and metamorphic surface lithology in some sites proximal to receding glaciers, reflecting an environment that is driven by coupled sulfide-oxidation and silicate dissolution. Numerous sites had elevated concentrations of trace metals (such as As, Cd, and Pb) indicating potential local sources of contamination, some in excess of World Health Organization. Weekly sampling show dilution of certain trace metals during the wet season, and

  1. Glacier lake outburst floods caused by glacier shrinkage: case study of Ala-Archa valley, Kyrgyz Ala Too, northern Tian Shan, Kyrgyzstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakov, D.; Erochin, S. A.; Harbor, J.; Ivanov, M.; Rogozhina, I.; Stroeven, A. P.; Usubaliev, R.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in glacier extent and runoff in Central Asia increase socio-economic stress and may result in political conflict between donors of freshwater (Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan) and recipients of freshwater (Uzbekistan, China). Glaciers in the Pamir and Tian Shan regions have experienced an unprecedented downwasting due to regional climate changes over the past decades. This is because air temperature increases are in some areas accompanied by a decrease in precipitation. Such conditions have already resulted in a reduction of glacier runoff, especially in the northern and western Tian Shan, and an increase of the number and area of glacial lakes in Kyrgyzstan. Even though glacial lakes in the mountains are in general relatively small and located far from densely populated areas, their outbursts often produce destructive debris flows. Such debris flows are especially common in Kyrgyzstan because of its steep river channels and abundance of Holocene and Quaternary glacier deposits that can be remobilized. The glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) in the Shakhimardan river catchment in 1999, for example, resulted in 100 fatalities in Uzbekistan, and the GLOF from the Zyndan glacial lake led to substantial economic losses in 2009. According to the latest inventory, there are more than 350 glacial lakes in Kyrgyzstan of which about 70 occur in the Kyrgyz Ala Too. The Ala-Archa valley is among the most important glacierized catchments in Kyrgyzstan. Despite the presence of a relatively small glacier-covered area of 36 km2, the Ala-Archa river is of critical importance to the Bishkek area, its agriculture, and its population which currently exceeds one million. GLOFs are therefore a threat to both numerous settlements of touristic value in the Ala-Archa headwaters and to Bishkek. The Teztor lake in the Adygene catchment of the Ala-Archa river system experienced an outburst during 1988 and 2005. On the early morning of July 31, 2012, this lake began draining through a dam

  2. Seasonal dynamic thinning at Helheim Glacier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bevan, Suzanne L.; Luckman, Adrian; Khan, Shfaqat Abbas

    2015-01-01

    We investigate three annual mass-balance cycles on Helheim Glacier in south-east Greenland using TanDEM-X interferometric digital elevation models (DEMs), bedrock GPS measurements, and ice velocity from feature-tracking. The DEMs exhibit seasonal surface elevation cycles at elevations up to 800 m...... of 671±70kgm-3 and calculate that total water equivalent volume loss from the active part of the glacier (surface flow speeds >1 m day-1) ranges from 0.5 km3 in 2011 to 1.6 km3 in 2013. A rough ice-flux divergence analysis shows that at lower elevations (... the time series, that melt-induced acceleration is most likely the main driver of the seasonal dynamic thinning, as opposed to changes triggered by retreat....

  3. Glaciers and ice caps outside Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Marin; Wolken, G.; Burgess, D.; Cogley, J.G.; Copland, L.; Thomson, L.; Arendt, A.; Wouters, B.; Kohler, J.; Andreassen, L.M.; O'Neel, Shad; Pelto, M.

    2015-01-01

    Mountain glaciers and ice caps cover an area of over 400 000 km2 in the Arctic, and are a major influence on global sea level (Gardner et al. 2011, 2013; Jacob et al. 2012). They gain mass by snow accumulation and lose mass by meltwater runoff. Where they terminate in water (ocean or lake), they also lose mass by iceberg calving. The climatic mass balance (Bclim, the difference between annual snow accumulation and annual meltwater runoff) is a widely used index of how glaciers respond to climate variability and change. The total mass balance (ΔM) is defined as the difference between annual snow accumulation and annual mass losses (by iceberg calving plus runoff).

  4. Estimating future flood frequency and magnitude in basins affected by glacier wastage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    We present field measurements of meteorology, hydrology and glaciers and long-term modeled projections of glacier mass balance and : stream flow informed by downscaled climate simulations. The study basins include Valdez Glacier Stream (342 km2 : ), ...

  5. Career Education Interest Inventory Assessment. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Ellyn S.

    Career education stresses the importance of increasing the individual's awareness of the world of work, expanding career horizons, and helping students make realistic choices among various adult roles. Career interest inventories are intended to broaden a student's awareness of job requirements and to bring to their attention occupations that…

  6. Vendor-managed inventory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Govindan, Kannan

    2013-01-01

    Vendor-managed inventory (VMI) represents the methodology through which the upstream stage of a supply chain (vendor) takes responsibility for managing the inventories at the downstream stage (customer) based on previously agreed limits. VMI is another method by which supply chains can be managed...... review, we have identified six dimensions of VMI: namely, inventory, transportation, manufacturing, general benefits, coordination/collaboration, and information sharing. In addition, there are, three methodological classifications: modelling, simulation, and case studies. Finally, we will consider...

  7. Passive microwave (SSM/I) satellite predictions of valley glacier hydrology, Matanuska Glacier, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopczynski, S.E.; Ramage, J.; Lawson, D.; Goetz, S.; Evenson, E.; Denner, J.; Larson, G.

    2008-01-01

    We advance an approach to use satellite passive microwave observations to track valley glacier snowmelt and predict timing of spring snowmelt-induced floods at the terminus. Using 37 V GHz brightness temperatures (Tb) from the Special Sensor Microwave hnager (SSM/I), we monitor snowmelt onset when both Tb and the difference between the ascending and descending overpasses exceed fixed thresholds established for Matanuska Glacier. Melt is confirmed by ground-measured air temperature and snow-wetness, while glacier hydrologic responses are monitored by a stream gauge, suspended-sediment sensors and terminus ice velocity measurements. Accumulation area snowmelt timing is correlated (R2 = 0.61) to timing of the annual snowmelt flood peak and can be predicted within ??5 days. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Future streamflow droughts in glacierized catchments: the impact of dynamic glacier modelling and changing thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tiel, Marit; Van Loon, Anne; Wanders, Niko; Vis, Marc; Teuling, Ryan; Stahl, Kerstin

    2017-04-01

    In glacierized catchments, snowpack and glaciers function as an important storage of water and hydrographs of highly glacierized catchments in mid- and high latitudes thus show a clear seasonality with low flows in winter and high flows in summer. Due to the ongoing climate change we expect this type of storage capacity to decrease with resultant consequences for the discharge regime. In this study we focus on streamflow droughts, here defined as below average water availability specifically in the high flow season, and which methods are most suitable to characterize future streamflow droughts as regimes change. Two glacierized catchments, Nigardsbreen (Norway) and Wolverine (Alaska), are used as case study and streamflow droughts are compared between two periods, 1975-2004 and 2071-2100. Streamflow is simulated with the HBV light model, calibrated on observed discharge and seasonal glacier mass balances, for two climate change scenarios (RCP 4.5 & RCP 8.5). In studies on future streamflow drought often the same variable threshold of the past has been applied to the future, but in regions where a regime shift is expected this method gives severe "droughts" in the historic high-flow period. We applied the new alternative transient variable threshold, a threshold that adapts to the changing hydrological regime and is thus better able to cope with this issue, but has never been thoroughly tested in glacierized catchments. As the glacier area representation in the hydrological modelling can also influence the modelled discharge and the derived streamflow droughts, we evaluated in this study both the difference between the historical variable threshold (HVT) and transient variable threshold (TVT) and two different glacier area conceptualisations (constant area (C) and dynamical area (D)), resulting in four scenarios: HVT-C, HVT-D, TVT-C and TVT-D. Results show a drastic decrease in the number of droughts in the HVT-C scenario due to increased glacier melt. The deficit

  9. Reconstruction of Aerosol Concentration and Composition from Glacier Ice Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Alexander; Dällenbach, Kaspar; El-Haddad, Imad; Wendl, Isabel; Eichler, Anja; Schwikowski, Margit

    2017-04-01

    Reconstruction of the concentration and composition of natural aerosol in an undisturbed atmosphere enables the evaluation of the understanding of aerosol-climate effects, which is currently based on highly uncertain emission inventories of the biosphere under pre-industrial conditions. Understanding of the natural state of the pre-industrial atmosphere and evaluating the atmospheric perturbations by anthropogenic emissions, and their potential feedbacks, is essential for accurate model predictions of the future climate (Boucher et al., 2013). Here, we present a new approach for the chemical characterization of the organic fraction preserved in cold-glacier ice cores. From this analysis historic trends of atmospheric organic aerosols are reconstructed, allowing new insights on organic aerosol composition and mass in the pre-industrial atmosphere, which can help to improve climate models through evaluation of our current understanding of aerosol radiative effects. We present results from a proof-of-principal study, analyzing an 800 year ice core record from the Lomonosovfonna glacier ice core, drilled in 2009 in Svalbard, Norway, using a setup that has until then only been applied on offline measurements of aerosol filter extracts (Dällenbach et al., 2016): The melted ice was nebulized and dried, such that aerosols are formed from the soluble and insoluble organic and inorganic compounds that are preserved in the ice. To improve the sensitivity, the aerosol stream was then enriched by the application of an online aerosol concentrator, before the aerosol was analyzed by electron ionization within a high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). We were able to demonstrate that this setup is a quantitative method toward nitrate and sulfate when internal inorganic standards of NH415NO3 and (NH4)234SO4 are added to the sample. Comparison between AMS and IC measurements of nitrate and sulfate resulted in an excellent agreement. The analysis of

  10. Small Glacier Area Studies: A New Approach for Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavasli, Dogukan D.; Tucker, Compton J.

    2012-01-01

    Many regions of Earth have glaciers that have been neglected for study because they are small. We report on a new approach to overcome the problem of studying small glaciers, using Turkey as an example. Prior to our study, no reliable estimates of Turkish glaciers existed because of a lack of systematic mapping, difficulty in using Landsat data collected before 1982, snowpack vs. glacier ice differentiation using existing satellite data and aerial photography, the previous high cost of Landsat images, and a lack of high-resolution imagery of small Turkish glaciers. Since 2008, a large number of Turkey. We also used five Landsat-3 Return Beam Videcon (RBV) 30 m pixel resolution images, all from 1980, for six glaciers. The total area of Turkish glaciers decreased from 23 km2 in the 1970s to 10.1 km2 in 2007-2011. By 2007-2011, six Turkish glaciers disappeared, four were < 0.3 km2, and only three were 1.0 km2 or larger. No trends in precipitation from 1970 to 2006 and cloud cover from 1980 to 2010 were found, while surface temperatures increased, with summer minimum temperatures showing the greatest increase. We conclude that increased surface temperatures during the summer were responsible for the 56% recession of Turkish glaciers from the 1970s to 2006-2011.

  11. Application of interferometry to studies of glacier dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Johan Jacob; Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    1996-01-01

    Multi baseline repeat track interferometry (RTI) can potentially be used to measure both velocities and the micro topography of glaciers. The Danish Center for Remote Sensing (DCRS) in corporation with the Danish Polar Center (DPC) has established a test cite for studies of glacier dynamics...... on the Storstrommen glacier in North East Greenland. DCRS has acquired RTI data over the glacier in 1994 and 1995 and ERS-1/2 tandem mode data are also available. This paper presents recent results from this study. The advantages of satellite and airborne RTI respectively is described. The paper concludes...

  12. Biological processes on glacier and ice sheet surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stibal, Marek; Šabacká, Marie; Žárský, Jakub

    2012-11-01

    Glaciers and ice sheets are melting in response to climate warming. Whereas the physical behaviour of glaciers has been studied intensively, the biological processes associated with glaciers and ice sheets have received less attention. Nevertheless, field observations and laboratory experiments suggest that biological processes that occur on the surface of glaciers and ice sheets -- collectively termed supraglacial environments -- can affect the physical behaviour of glaciers by changing surface reflectivity. Furthermore, supraglacial cyanobacteria and algae capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and convert it into organic matter. Supraglacial microbes break down this material, together with organic matter transported from further afield, and generate carbon dioxide that is released back into the atmosphere. The balance between these two processes will determine whether a glacier is a net sink or source of carbon dioxide. In general, ice sheet interiors seem to function as sinks, whereas ice sheet edges and small glaciers act as a source. Meltwaters flush microbially modified organic matter and pollutants out of the glacier, with potential consequences for downstream ecosystems. We conclude that microbes living on glaciers and ice sheets are an integral part of both the glacial environment and the Earth's ecosystem.

  13. National Wetlands Inventory Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Linear wetland features (including selected streams, ditches, and narrow wetland bodies) mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The National...

  14. Dynamics of glacier calving at the ungrounded margin of Helheim Glacier, southeast Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmes, Nick; James, Timothy D.; Edwards, Stuart; Martin, Ian; O'Farrell, Timothy; Aspey, Robin; Rutt, Ian; Nettles, Meredith; Baugé, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Abstract During summer 2013 we installed a network of 19 GPS nodes at the ungrounded margin of Helheim Glacier in southeast Greenland together with three cameras to study iceberg calving mechanisms. The network collected data at rates up to every 7 s and was designed to be robust to loss of nodes as the glacier calved. Data collection covered 55 days, and many nodes survived in locations right at the glacier front to the time of iceberg calving. The observations included a number of significant calving events, and as a consequence the glacier retreated ~1.5 km. The data provide real‐time, high‐frequency observations in unprecedented proximity to the calving front. The glacier calved by a process of buoyancy‐force‐induced crevassing in which the ice downglacier of flexion zones rotates upward because it is out of buoyant equilibrium. Calving then occurs back to the flexion zone. This calving process provides a compelling and complete explanation for the data. Tracking of oblique camera images allows identification and characterisation of the flexion zones and their propagation downglacier. Interpretation of the GPS data and camera data in combination allows us to place constraints on the height of the basal cavity that forms beneath the rotating ice downglacier of the flexion zone before calving. The flexion zones are probably formed by the exploitation of basal crevasses, and theoretical considerations suggest that their propagation is strongly enhanced when the glacier base is deeper than buoyant equilibrium. Thus, this calving mechanism is likely to dominate whenever such geometry occurs and is of increasing importance in Greenland. PMID:27570721

  15. Improving estimation of glacier volume change: a GLIMS case study of Bering Glacier System, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Beedle

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS project has developed tools and methods that can be employed by analysts to create accurate glacier outlines. To illustrate the importance of accurate glacier outlines and the effectiveness of GLIMS standards we conducted a case study on Bering Glacier System (BGS, Alaska. BGS is a complex glacier system aggregated from multiple drainage basins, numerous tributaries, and many accumulation areas. Published measurements of BGS surface area vary from 1740 to 6200 km2, depending on how the boundaries of this system have been defined. Utilizing GLIMS tools and standards we have completed a new outline (3630 km2 and analysis of the area-altitude distribution (hypsometry of BGS using Landsat images from 2000 and 2001 and a US Geological Survey 15-min digital elevation model. We compared this new hypsometry with three different hypsometries to illustrate the errors that result from the widely varying estimates of BGS extent. The use of different BGS hypsometries results in highly variable measures of volume change and net balance (bn. Applying a simple hypsometry-dependent mass-balance model to different hypsometries results in a bn rate range of −1.0 to −3.1 m a−1 water equivalent (W.E., a volume change range of −3.8 to −6.7 km3 a−1 W.E., and a near doubling in contributions to sea level equivalent, 0.011 mm a−1 to 0.019 mm a−1. Current inaccuracies in glacier outlines hinder our ability to correctly quantify glacier change. Understanding of glacier extents can become comprehensive and accurate. Such accuracy is possible with the increasing volume of satellite imagery of glacierized regions, recent advances in tools and standards, and dedication to this important task.

  16. Divergent Surface Mass Balances of Neighboring glaciers: Reanalysis of Taku and Lemon Creek glaciers, Alaska: 1946-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, C.; O'Neel, S.; Loso, M.; Pelto, M. S.; Sass, L.; Candela, S. G.

    2016-12-01

    Despite high mass loss rates of Alaskan glaciers, altimetric observations suggest strong glacier-to-glacier variability of cumulative surface mass balance, which prevents the detection of climate-forced spatial patterns of glacier change. This observation motivated us to reanalyze surface mass balance records from the neighboring Taku and Lemon Creek glaciers. Our reanalysis spans 1946—present and synthesizes all known field and remotely sensed data. Our results include end-of season temperature-index model corrections forced with regional radiosonde data and geodetic calibration using digital elevation models derived from historic stereo imagery and synthetic aperture radar. The results allowed us to examine the role climate and basin hypsometry play in surface mass balance. They suggest no significant differences from previous glaciological estimates and that the 63-year average, annual mass balance is +0.24 m w.e. a-1 at Taku Glacier and -0.56 m w.e. a-1 for Lemon Creek Glacier. Despite the divergence between the long-term trends, the annual mass balance anomaly time series demonstrate coherent inter-annual variability and are not statistically different. Their similarities suggest that climate forcing is unlikely driving the different trends. To explore the role that glacier hypsometry plays in the time-series, we applied the steeper mass balance profile from Lemon Creek Glacier to the Taku hypsometry and vice-versa. Surface mass balances exhibit high sensitivities to the mass balance profile perturbation, but the divergent nature of the cumulative mass balance series was preserved. This simple experiment suggests that hypsometry and the mass balance profile are both important drivers for systematic differences that accumulate in cumulative surface mass balance rates. Thus, accounting for glacier-to-glacier variability of mass balance profiles, as well as hypsometry, would improve our understanding of climate-forced Alaskan glacier change.

  17. Structure and changing dynamics of a polythermal valley glacier on a centennial timescale: Midre Lovenbreen, Svalbard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hambrey, M. J.; Murray, T.; Glasser, N. F.

    2005-01-01

    structural glaciology, polythermal glacier, Svalbard, ground-penetrating radar, numerical modeling......structural glaciology, polythermal glacier, Svalbard, ground-penetrating radar, numerical modeling...

  18. Central Asian supra-glacier snow melt enhanced by anthropogenic black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, Julia; Flanner, Mark; Kang, Shichang; Sprenger, Michael; Farinotti, Daniel; Zhang, Qianggong; Guo, Junming; Li, Yang; Lawrence, Mark; Schwikowski, Margit

    2016-04-01

    In Central Asia, more than 60 % of the population depends on water stored in glaciers and mountain snow. Densely populated areas near lower-lying mountain ranges are particularly vulnerable and a recent study showed that the region might lose 50 % of its glacier mass by 2050. While temperature, precipitation and dynamic processes are key drivers of glacial change, deposition of light absorbing impurities such as mineral dust and black carbon can lead to accelerated melting through surface albedo reduction. Here, we discuss the origin of deposited mineral dust and black carbon and their impacts on albedo change and snow melt. 218 snow samples were taken on 4 glaciers, Abramov (Pamir), Suek, Glacier No. 354 and Golubin (Tien Shan), representing deposition between summer 2012 and 2014. They were analyzed for elemental carbon, mineral dust and iron among other parameters. We find the elemental carbon concentration to be at the higher end of the range reported for neighboring mountain ranges between 70 and 502 ng g-1 (interquartile range). To investigate the origin of the snow impurities, we used a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, LAGRANTO. Back trajectory ensembles of 40 members with varied starting points to capture the meteorological spread were released every 6 hours for the covered period at all sites. "Footprints" were calculated and combined with emission inventories to estimate the relative contribution of anthropogenic and natural BC to deposited aerosol on the glaciers. We find that more than 94 % of BC is of anthropogenic origin and the major source region is Central Asia followed by the Middle East. Further exploring the implications of mineral dust and BC deposition, we calculate the snow albedo reduction with the Snow-Ice-Aerosol-Radiative model (SNICAR). Even though mineral dust concentrations were up to a factor of 50 higher than BC concentrations, BC dominates the albedo reduction. Using these results we calculate the snow melt induced by

  19. Melting beneath Greenland outlet glaciers and ice streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, David; Perrette, Mahé; Beckmann, Johanna

    2015-04-01

    Basal melting of fast-flowing Greenland outlet glaciers and ice streams due to frictional heating at the ice-bed interface contributes significantly to total glacier mass balance and subglacial meltwater flux, yet modelling this basal melt process in Greenland has received minimal research attention. A one-dimensional dynamic ice-flow model is calibrated to the present day longitudinal profiles of 10 major Greenland outlet glaciers and ice streams (including the Jakobshavn Isbrae, Petermann Glacier and Helheim Glacier) and is validated against published ice flow and surface elevation measurements. Along each longitudinal profile, basal melt is calculated as a function of ice flow velocity and basal shear stress. The basal shear stress is dependent on the effective pressure (difference between ice overburden pressure and water pressure), basal roughness and a sliding parametrization. Model output indicates that where outlet glaciers and ice streams terminate into the ocean with either a small floating ice tongue or no floating tongue whatsoever, the proportion of basal melt to total melt (surface, basal and submarine melt) is 5-10% (e.g. Jakobshavn Isbrae; Daugaard-Jensen Glacier). This proportion is, however, negligible where larger ice tongues lose mass mostly by submarine melt (~1%; e.g. Nioghalvfjerdsfjorden Glacier). Modelled basal melt is highest immediately upvalley of the grounding line, with contributions typically up to 20-40% of the total melt for slippery beds and up to 30-70% for resistant beds. Additionally, modelled grounding line and calving front migration inland for all outlet glaciers and ice streams of hundreds of metres to several kilometres occurs. Including basal melt due to frictional heating in outlet glacier and ice stream models is important for more accurately modelling mass balance and subglacial meltwater flux, and therefore, more accurately modelling outlet glacier and ice stream dynamics and responses to future climate change.

  20. Climate Change and Glacier Retreat: Scientific Fact and Artistic Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagre, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    Mountain glaciers continue to retreat rapidly over most of the globe. In North America, at Glacier National Park, Montana, recent research results from Sperry Glacier (2005-2007) indicate negative mass balances are now 3-4 times greater than in the 1950s. A geospatial model of glacier retreat in the Blackfoot-Jackson basin suggested all glaciers would be gone by 2030 but has proved too conservative. Accelerated glacier shrinkage since the model was developed has mirrored an increase in actual annual temperature that is almost twice the rate used in the model. The glaciers in Glacier National Park are likely to be gone well before 2030. A variety of media, curricula, and educational strategies have been employed to communicate the disappearance of the glaciers as a consequence of global warming. These have included everything from print media and television coverage to podcasts and wayside exhibits along roads in the park. However, a new thrust is to partner with artists to communicate climate change issues to new audiences and through different channels. A scientist-artist retreat was convened to explore the tension between keeping artistic products grounded in factually-based reality while providing for freedom to express artistic creativity. Individual artists and scientists have worked to create aesthetic and emotional images, using painting, poetry, music and photography, to convey core messages from research on mountain ecosystems. Finally, a traveling art exhibit was developed to highlight the photography that systematically documents glacier change through time. The aim was to select photographs that provide the most compelling visual experience for an art-oriented viewer and also accurately reflect the research on glacier retreat. The exhibit opens on January 11, 2009

  1. Denmark's National Inventory Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illerup, J. B.; Lyck, E.; Winther, M.

    This report is Denmark's National Inventory Report reported to the Conference of the Parties under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) due by 15 April 2001. The report contains information on Denmark's inventories for all years' from 1990 to 1999 for CO2, CH4, N2O, CO...

  2. Uncertainties in emission inventories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aardenne, van J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Emission inventories provide information about the amount of a pollutant that is emitted to the atmosphere as a result of a specific anthropogenic or natural process at a given time or place. Emission inventories can be used for either policy or scientific purposes. For

  3. Denmark's National Inventory Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illerup, J. B.; Lyck, E.; Winther, M.

    This report is Denmark's National Inventory Report reported to the Conference of the Parties under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) due by 15 April 2001. The report contains information on Denmark's inventories for all years' from 1990 to 1999 for CO2, CH4, N2O, ...

  4. Evaluating the Scale and Potential of GLOF in the Bhutan Himalayas Using a Satellite-Based Integral Glacier–Glacial Lake Inventory

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroto Nagai; Jinro Ukita; Chiyuki Narama; Koji Fujita; Akiko Sakai; Takeo Tadono; Tsutomu Yamanokuchi; Nobuhiro Tomiyama

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive glacier–glacial lake inventory was developed for the Bhutan Himalayas based on satellite observations between 1987–1990 and 2006–2011. In total, 733 lakes (covering 82.6 km2) were delineated between 4000 and 6000 m a.s.l. and their relationships to associated glaciers were documented. Using this new inventory, the scale and potential for glacial lake outburst flooding (GLOF) based on multiple criteria was examined. This included a history of connectivity characteristics of gla...

  5. Shallow repeating seismic events under an alpine glacier at Mount Rainier, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Weston A.; Allstadt, Kate E.; De Angelis, Silvio; Malone, Stephen D.; Moran, Seth C.; Vidale, John

    2013-01-01

    We observed several swarms of repeating low-frequency (1–5 Hz) seismic events during a 3 week period in May–June 2010, near the summit of Mount Rainier, Washington, USA, that likely were a result of stick–slip motion at the base of alpine glaciers. The dominant set of repeating events ('multiplets') featured >4000 individual events and did not exhibit daytime variations in recurrence interval or amplitude. Volcanoes and glaciers around the world are known to produce seismic signals with great variability in both frequency content and size. The low-frequency character and periodic recurrence of the Mount Rainier multiplets mimic long-period seismicity often seen at volcanoes, particularly during periods of unrest. However, their near-surface location, lack of common spectral peaks across the recording network, rapid attenuation of amplitudes with distance, and temporal correlation with weather systems all indicate that ice-related source mechanisms are the most likely explanation. We interpret the low-frequency character of these multiplets to be the result of trapping of seismic energy under glacial ice as it propagates through the highly heterogeneous and attenuating volcanic material. The Mount Rainier multiplet sequences underscore the difficulties in differentiating low-frequency signals due to glacial processes from those caused by volcanic processes on glacier-clad volcanoes.

  6. Comprehensive spatiotemporal glacier and ice sheet velocity measurements from Landsat 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Twila; Fahnestock, Mark; Scambos, Ted; Klinger, Marin; Haran, Terry

    2015-04-01

    Combining newly developed software with Landsat 8 image returns, we are now producing broad-coverage ice velocity measurements on weekly to monthly scales across ice sheets and glaciers. Using new image-to-image cross correlation software, named PyCorr, we take advantage of the improved radiometric resolution of the Landsat 8 panchromatic band to create velocity maps with sub-pixel accuracy. Landsat 8's 12-bit radiometric resolution supports measurement of ice flow in uncrevassed regions based on persistent sastrugi patterns lasting weeks to a few months. We also leverage these improvements to allow for ice sheet surface roughness measurements. Landsat 8's 16-day repeat orbit and increased image acquisition across the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets supports development of seasonal to annual ice sheet velocity mosaics with full coverage of coastal regions. We also create time series for examining sub-seasonal change with near real time processing in areas such as the Amundsen Sea Embayment and fast flowing Greenland outlet glaciers. In addition, excellent geolocation accuracy enables velocity mapping of smaller ice caps and glaciers, which we have already applied in Alaska and Patagonia. Finally, PyCorr can be used for velocity mapping with other remote sensing imagery, including high resolution WorldView satellite data.

  7. Simulation of historic glacier variations with a simple climate-glacier model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    1988-01-01

    Glacier variations during the last few centuries have shown a marked coherence over the globe. Characteristic features are the maximum stand somewhere in the middle of the nineteenth century, and the steady retreat afterwards (with some minor interrruptions depending on the particular region).

  8. Glacier dynamics at Helheim and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers, southeast Greenland, since the Little Ice Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, S. A.; Kjeldsen, K. K.; Kjaer, K. H.; Bevan, S.; Luckman, A.; Aschwanden, A.; Bjork, A. A.; Korsgaard, N. J.; Box, J. E.; van den Broeke, M.; van Dam, T. M.; Fitzner, A.

    2014-01-01

    Observations over the past decade show significant ice loss associated with the speed-up of glaciers in southeast Greenland from 2003, followed by a deceleration from 2006. These short-term, episodic, dynamic perturbations have a major impact on the mass balance on the decadal scale. To improve the

  9. Inventory Management and the Impact of Anticipation in Evolutionary Stochastic Online Dynamic Optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.N. Bosman (Peter); J.A. La Poutré (Han)

    2007-01-01

    htmlabstractInventory management (IM) is an important area in logistics. The goal is to manage the inventory of a vendor as efficiently as possible. Its practical relevance also makes it an important real-world application for research in optimization. Because inventory must be managed over time, IM

  10. Micrometeorological conditions and surface mass and energy fluxes on Lewis Glacier, Mt Kenya, in relation to other tropical glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Nicholson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Lewis Glacier on Mt Kenya is one of the best-studied tropical glaciers, but full understanding of the interaction of the glacier mass balance and its climatic drivers has been hampered by a lack of long-term meteorological data. Here we present 2.5 yr of meteorological data collected from the glacier surface from October 2009 to February 2012. The location of measurements is in the upper portion of Lewis Glacier, but this location experiences negative annual mass balance, and the conditions are comparable to those experienced in the lower ablation zones of South American glaciers in the inner tropics. In the context of other glaciated mountains of equatorial East Africa, the summit zone of Mt Kenya shows strong diurnal cycles of convective cloud development as opposed to the Rwenzoris, where cloud cover persists throughout the diurnal cycle, and Kilimanjaro, where clear skies prevail. Surface energy fluxes were calculated for the meteorological station site using a physical mass- and energy-balance model driven by measured meteorological data and additional input parameters that were determined by Monte Carlo optimization. Sublimation rate was lower than those reported on other tropical glaciers, and melt rate was high throughout the year, with the glacier surface reaching the melting point on an almost daily basis. Surface mass balance is influenced by both solid precipitation and air temperature, with radiation providing the greatest net source of energy to the surface. Cloud cover typically reduces the net radiation balance compared to clear-sky conditions, and thus the frequent formation of convective clouds over the summit of Mt Kenya and the associated higher rate of snow accumulation are important in limiting the rate of mass loss from the glacier surface. The analyses shown here form the basis for future glacier-wide mass and energy balance modeling to determine the climate proxy offered by the glaciers of Mt Kenya.

  11. Tracer-based identification of rock glacier thawing in a glacierized Alpine catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Michael; Penna, Daniele; Tirler, Werner; Comiti, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Current warming in high mountains leads to increased melting of snow, glacier ice and permafrost. In particular rock glaciers, as a creeping form of mountain permafrost, may release contaminants such as heavy metals into the stream during intense melting periods in summer. This may have strong impacts on both water quantity and quality of fresh water resources but might also harm the aquatic fauna in mountain regions. In this context, the present study used stable isotopes of water and electrical conductivity (EC) combined with trace, major and minor elements to identify the influence of permafrost thawing on the water quality in the glacierized Solda catchment (130 km2) in South Tyrol (Italy). We carried out a monthly sampling of two springs fed by an active rock glacier at about 2600 m a.s.l. from July to October 2015. Furthermore, we took monthly water samples from different stream sections of the Solda River (1110 to m a.s.l.) from March to November 2015. Meteorological data were measured by an Automatic Weather Station at 2825 m a.s.l. of the Hydrographic Office (Autonomous Province of Bozen-Bolzano). First results show that water from the rock glacier springs and stream water fell along the global meteoric water line. Spring water was slightly more variable in isotopic ratio (δ2H: -91 to - 105 ) and less variable in dissolved solutes (EC: 380 to 611 μS/cm) than stream water (δ2H: -96 to - 107 ‰ and EC: 212 to 927 μS/cm). Both spring water and stream water showed a pronounced drop in EC during July and August, very likely induced by increased melt water dilution. In both water types, element concentrations of Ca and Mg were highest (up to 160 and 20 mg/l, respectively). In September, spring water showed higher concentrations in Cu, As, and Pb than stream water, indicating that these elements partly exceeded the concentration limit for drinking water. These observations highlight the important control, which rock glacier thawing may have on water quality

  12. Narrowband to broadband conversion of Landsat TM glacier albedos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.; Knap, W.H.; Reijmer, C.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present an empirical relationship between the broadband glacier albedo (alpha) and the narrowband glacier albedos in Landsat TM bands 2 and 4 (alpha2 and alpha4, respectively). The relationship was established on the basis of multiple linear regression analysis of 112 ground-based

  13. Melting glaciers signal climate change in Bolivia | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-05-13

    May 13, 2011 ... Measuring how farmers use water and forecasting long-term water supply in the Illimani watershed to help communities adapt to climate change. The challenge ... Illimani glacier. IDRC. Global warming is occurring faster at high altitudes, causing the Illimani glacier, and others in the Andes, to shrink.

  14. Modelling the response of valley glaciers to climatic change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the context of Global Change research, glaciers are of interest because they register small but persistent changes in climate, and because they affect global sea level on the decadal-to-century time scale. In addition, in some regions glaciers are of great importance for human activities

  15. Sensitivity and response of Bhutanese glaciers to atmospheric warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupper, Summer; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Burgener, Landon K.; Koenig, Lora S.; Tsering, Karma; Cook, Edward R.

    2012-10-01

    Glacierized change in the Himalayas affects river-discharge, hydro-energy and agricultural production, and Glacial Lake Outburst Flood potential, but its quantification and extent of impacts remains highly uncertain. Here we present conservative, comprehensive and quantitative predictions for glacier area and meltwater flux changes in Bhutan, monsoonal Himalayas. In particular, we quantify the uncertainties associated with the glacier area and meltwater flux changes due to uncertainty in climate data, a critical problem for much of High Asia. Based on a suite of gridded climate data and a robust glacier melt model, our results show that glacier area and meltwater change projections can vary by an order of magnitude for different climate datasets. However, the most conservative results indicate that, even if climate were to remain at the present-day mean values, almost 10% of Bhutan's glacierized area would vanish and the meltwater flux would drop by as much as 30%. Under the conservative scenario of an additional 1°C regional warming, glacier retreat is going to continue until about 25% of Bhutan's glacierized area will have disappeared and the annual meltwater flux, after an initial spike, would drop by as much as 65%.

  16. Sensitivity and Response of Bhutanese Glaciers to Atmospheric Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupper, Summer; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Burgener, Landon K.; Koenig, Lora S.; Tsering, Karma; Cook, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Glacierized change in the Himalayas affects river-discharge, hydro-energy and agricultural production, and Glacial Lake Outburst Flood potential, but its quantification and extent of impacts remains highly uncertain. Here we present conservative, comprehensive and quantitative predictions for glacier area and meltwater flux changes in Bhutan, monsoonal Himalayas. In particular, we quantify the uncertainties associated with the glacier area and meltwater flux changes due to uncertainty in climate data, a critical problem for much of High Asia. Based on a suite of gridded climate data and a robust glacier melt model, our results show that glacier area and meltwater change projections can vary by an order of magnitude for different climate datasets. However, the most conservative results indicate that, even if climate were to remain at the present-day mean values, almost 10% of Bhutan s glacierized area would vanish and the meltwater flux would drop by as much as 30%. Under the conservative scenario of an additional 1 C regional warming, glacier retreat is going to continue until about 25% of Bhutan s glacierized area will have disappeared and the annual meltwater flux, after an initial spike, would drop by as much as 65%. Citation

  17. Global and hemispheric temperature reconstruction from glacier length fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leclercq, P.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/339579951; Oerlemans, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06833656X

    2012-01-01

    Temperature reconstructions for recent centuries provide a historical context for the warming over the twentieth century. We reconstruct annual averaged surface temperatures of the past 400 years on hemispherical and global scale from glacier length fluctuations. We use the glacier length records of

  18. Mazama and Glacier Peak Volcanic Ash Layers: Relative Ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryxell, R

    1965-03-12

    Physiographic and stratigraphic evidence supports the regional correlation of two volcanic ash layers with extinct Mount Mazama at Crater Lake, Oregon, and Glacier Peak in the northern Cascade Range of Washington. A radiocarbon age of 12,000 +/- 310 years confirms geological evidence that ash derived from the Glacier Peak eruption is substantially older than ash from the Mazama eruption of 6600 years ago.

  19. Marine-terminating glaciers sustain high productivity in Greenland fjords.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meire, Lorenz; Mortensen, John; Meire, Patrick; Juul-Pedersen, Thomas; Sejr, Mikael K; Rysgaard, Søren; Nygaard, Rasmus; Huybrechts, Philippe; Meysman, Filip J R

    2017-12-01

    Accelerated mass loss from the Greenland ice sheet leads to glacier retreat and an increasing input of glacial meltwater to the fjords and coastal waters around Greenland. These high latitude ecosystems are highly productive and sustain important fisheries, yet it remains uncertain how they will respond to future changes in the Arctic cryosphere. Here we show that marine-terminating glaciers play a crucial role in sustaining high productivity of the fjord ecosystems. Hydrographic and biogeochemical data from two fjord systems adjacent to the Greenland ice sheet, suggest that marine ecosystem productivity is very differently regulated in fjords influenced by either land-terminating or marine-terminating glaciers. Rising subsurface meltwater plumes originating from marine-terminating glaciers entrain large volumes of ambient deep water to the surface. The resulting upwelling of nutrient-rich deep water sustains a high phytoplankton productivity throughout summer in the fjord with marine-terminating glaciers. In contrast, the fjord with only land-terminating glaciers lack this upwelling mechanism, and is characterized by lower productivity. Data on commercial halibut landings support that coastal regions influenced by large marine-terminating glaciers have substantially higher marine productivity. These results suggest that a switch from marine-terminating to land-terminating glaciers can substantially alter the productivity in the coastal zone around Greenland with potentially large ecological and socio-economic implications. © 2017 The Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Climatic control on extreme sediment transfer from Dokriani Glacier ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The heavy sediment load from the glaciers affects the hydropower generation, irrigation and drinking water supply. Therefore, to understand the sediment delivery from glaciated basins, characteristics and variation of the suspended sediment concentrations in the proglacial meltwater stream, Dokriani Glacier, have been ...

  1. Managing Air Quality - Emissions Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page describes the role of emission inventories in the air quality management process, a description of how emission inventories are developed, and where U.S. emission inventory information can be found.

  2. Observed Mass Balance of Mountain Glaciers and Greenland Ice Sheet in the 20th Century and the Present Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Atsumu

    2011-09-01

    Glacier mass balance and secular changes in mountain glaciers and ice caps are evaluated from the annual net balance of 137 glaciers from 17 glacierized regions of the world. Further, the winter and summer balances for 35 glaciers in 11 glacierized regions are analyzed. The global means are calculated by weighting glacier and regional surface areas. The area-weighted global mean net balance for the period 1960-2000 is -270 ± 34 mm a-1 w.e. (water equivalent, in mm per year) or (-149 ± 19 km3 a-1 w.e.), with a winter balance of 890 ± 24 mm a-1 w.e. (490 ± 13 km3 a-1 w.e.) and a summer balance of -1,175 ± 24 mm a-1 w.e. (-647 ± 13 km3 a-1 w.e.). The linear-fitted global net balance is accelerating at a rate of -9 ± 2.1 mm a-2. The main driving force behind this change is the summer balance with an acceleration of -10 ± 2.0 mm a-2. The decadal balance, however, shows significant fluctuations: summer melt reached its peak around 1945, followed by a decrease. The negative trend in the annual net balance is interrupted by a period of stagnation from 1960s to 1980s. Some regions experienced a period of positive net balance during this time, for example, Europe. The balance has become strongly negative since the early 1990s. These decadal fluctuations correspond to periods of global dimming (for smaller melt) and global brightening (for larger melt). The total radiation at the surface changed as a result of an imbalance between steadily increasing greenhouse gases and fluctuating aerosol emissions. The mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet and the surrounding small glaciers, averaged for the period of 1950-2000, is negative at -74 ± 10 mm a-1 w.e. (-128 ± 18 km3 a-1 w.e.) with an accumulation of 297 ± 33 mm a-1 w.e. (519 ± 58 km3 a-1 w.e.), melt ablation -169 ± 18 mm a-1 w.e. (-296 ± 31 km3 a-1 w.e.), calving ablation -181 ± 19 mm a-1 w.e. (-316 ± 33 km3 a-1 w.e.) and the bottom melt-21 ± 2 mm a-1 w.e. (-35 ± 4 km3 a-1 w.e.). Almost half (-60 ± 3 km3 a

  3. High temporal and spatial variability of atmospheric-methane oxidation in Alpine glacier-forefield soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiri, Eleonora; Nauer, Philipp A; Rainer, Edda-Marie; Zeyer, Josef; Schroth, Martin H

    2017-07-07

    Glacier-forefield soils can provide a substantial sink for atmospheric CH4, facilitated by aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB). However, MOB activity, abundance, and community structure may be affected by soil age, location in different forefield landforms, and temporal fluctuations in soil-physical parameters. We assessed spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric CH4 oxidation in an Alpine glacier forefield during the snow-free season 2013. We quantified CH4 flux in soils of increasing age and in different landforms (sandhill, terrace, floodplain) using soil-gas-profile and static flux-chamber methods. To determine MOB abundance and community structure, we employed pmoA-gene-based quantitative PCR and targeted-amplicon sequencing. Uptake of CH4 increased in magnitude and decreased in variability with increasing soil age. Sandhill soils exhibited CH4 uptake ranging from -0.03- -3.7 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 Floodplain and terrace soils exhibited smaller uptake and even intermittent CH4 emissions. Linear mixed-effect models indicated that soil age and landform were dominating factors shaping CH4 flux, followed by cumulative rainfall (weighted sum ≤ 4 d prior to sampling). Of 31 MOB operational taxonomic units retrieved, ∼30% were potentially novel, and ∼50% were affiliated with Upland Soil Clusters gamma and alpha. The MOB community structures in floodplain and terrace soils were nearly identical, but differed significantly from highly variable sandhill-soil communities. We conclude that soil age and landform modulate the soil CH4 sink strength in glacier forefields, and recent rainfall affects its short-term variability. This should be taken into account when including this environment in future CH4 inventories.Importance Oxidation of methane (CH4) in well-drained, "upland" soils is an important mechanism for the removal of this potent greenhouse gas from the atmosphere. It is largely mediated by aerobic, methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB). Whereas there is

  4. CALICE: Calibrating Plant Biodiversity in Glacier Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festi, Daniela; Cristofori, Antonella; Vernesi, Cristiano; Zerbe, Stefan; Wellstein, Camilla; Maggi, Valter; Oeggl, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    The objective of the project is to reconstruct plant biodiversity and its trend archived in Alpine glacier ice by pollen and eDNA (environmental DNA) during the last five decades by analyzing a 40 m ice core. For our study we chose the Adamello glacier (Trentino - Südtirol, Lombardia) because of i) the good preservation conditions for pollen and eDNA in ice, ii) the thickness of the ice cap (270m) and iii) the expected high time resolution. The biodiversity estimates gained by pollen analysis and eDNA will be validated by historical biodiversity assessments mainly based on vegetation maps, aerial photos and vegetation surveys in the catchment area of the Adamello glacier for the last five decades. This historical reconstruction of biodiversity trends will be performed on a micro-, meso- and macro-scale (5, 20-50 and 50-100 Km radius, respectively). The results will serve as a calibration data set on biodiversity for future studies, such as the second step of the coring by the POLLiCE research consortium (pollice.fmach.it). In fact, arrangements are currently been made to drill the complete ice cap and retrieve a 270 m thick core which has the potential to cover a time span of minimum 400 years up to several millennia. This second stage will extend the time scale and enable the evaluation of dissimilarity/similarity of modern biodiversity in relation to Late Holocene trends. Finally, we believe this case study has the potential to be applied in other glaciated areas to evaluate biodiversity for large regions (e.g. central Asian mountain ranges, Tibet and Tian Shan or the Andes).

  5. Snow glacier melt estimation in tropical Andean glaciers using artificial neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Moya Quiroga

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Snow and glacier melt (SGM estimation plays an important role in water resources management. Although melting process can be modelled by energy balance methods, such studies require detailed data, which is rarely available. Hence, new and simpler approaches are needed for SGM estimations. The present study aims at developing an artificial neural networks (ANN based technique for estimating the energy available for melt (EAM and SGM rates using available and easy to obtain data such as temperature, short-wave radiation and relative humidity. Several ANN and multiple linear regression models (MLR were developed to represent the energy fluxes and estimate the EAM. The models were trained using measured data from the Zongo glacier located in the outer tropics and validated against measured data from the Antizana glacier located in the inner tropics. It was found that ANN models provide a better generalisation when applied to other data sets. The performance of the models was improved by including Antizana data into the training set, as it was proved to provide better results than other techniques like the use of a prior logarithmic transformation. The final model was validated against measured data from the Alpine glaciers Argentière and Saint-Sorlin. Then, the models were applied for the estimation of SGM at Condoriri glacier. The estimated SGM was compared with SGM estimated by an enhanced temperature method and proved to have the same behaviour considering temperature sensibility. Moreover, the ANN models have the advantage of direct application, while the temperature method requires calibration of empirical coefficients.

  6. Dynamics of rock glaciers and debris-covered glaciers in the Central Chilean Andes over the last 50 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Xavier; Brenning, Alexander; Rojas Marchini, Fernanda

    2010-05-01

    In the semiarid Central Andes of Chile at 33.5°S., mountain permafrost is widely present above 3500-4000 m asl, especially in the form of rock glaciers, which often coexist with glaciers and debris-covered glaciers. This peculiar configuration of the cryosphere involves complex and poorly known responses of its components to climate change. Our study area in the Laguna Negra catchment is part of a watershed that provides up to two-thirds of the drinking water supplies to Chile's capital Santiago (5.5 million inhabitants) during the dry summer months. The 35 km² watershed contains 2.3 km² of uncovered glaciers, 0.9 km² of debris-covered glacier area and 4.3 km² of rock glaciers, and hosts the longest series of glacier mass balance measurement in Chile (Echaurren Norte glacier). Using orthorectified aerial photographs of 1956 and 1996 and a high resolution satellite image of 2008, we mapped the geometric changes that affected the glacier and the debris-covered glacier of the Punta Negra sub-catchment during the last 50 years. Surface displacements and volume changes were estimated based on 1956 and 1996 digital elevation models (DEMs), and the total loss of water equivalent in the catchment was quantified. At a shorter time scale, rock glaciers and a debris-covered glacier are being monitored since 2004, providing insights into their kinematics and near-surface thermal regime. The orthophotos reveal a 44.7% reduction of the uncovered glacier area between 1955 and 1996, and only small surface changes between 1996 and 2008. The volume reduction of both uncovered and debris-covered glaciers is estimated at at least 3.9 million m3 water equivalent between 1955 and 1996. The second noticeable change is the growth of the thermokarst areas on the debris-covered glacier, with the formation of new and the widening and deepening of existing melt-out depressions between 1955 and 2008. The thermal monitoring revealed that, in 2003/04, the mean annual ground surface

  7. Observed Changes in the Himalayan Glaciers: Multiple Driving Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romshoo, Shakil; Rashid, Irfan; Abdullah, Tariq; Fayaz, Midhat

    2017-04-01

    There is lack of credible knowledge about Himalayan cryosphere as is evident from the contradictory reports about the status of the glaciers in the region. Glacier behavior in Himalaya has to be understood and interpreted in light of the multiple driving factors; topography, climate and anthropocene. The observed changes in Himalayan glaciers, determined by studying a few hundred glaciers in the Himalaya, indicated that the glacier response varies across different ranges. Satellite images (1990-2015), DEM, altimetry data supported by selective field campaigns, were used to map the changes in glacier boundaries, snout, ELA, AAR, volume, thickness, debris cover and several other glacier parameters. The glaciers across the six ranges of Pir Panjal (PR), Greater Himalaya (GH), Shamasbari (SR), Zanaskar (ZR), Leh (LR) and Karakorum (KR) showed quite varied changes. It was observed that the glaciers in the KR show the least glacial area recession (1.59%) primarily due to the extreme cold winters with -18oC average temperature. Other glacial parameters like snout, ELA, AAR and glacier volume also showed very little changes in the KR during the period. The glaciers in the LR, with an average winter temperature of -6o C, have shrunk, on an average, by 4.19 % during the period, followed by the glaciers in the ZR showing a loss of 5.46%. The highest glacier retreat of 7.72% and 6.94% was observed in the GH and SR with the average winter temperature of -1.3oc and -6.2oc respectively. In the PR, almost all the glaciers have vanished during the last 6-7 decades due to the increasing winter temperatures. The glaciers in the Kashmir showed an overall recession of 26.40% in area which is one of the highest reported for the Himalayan glaciers. The glaciers in the valley showed the maximum reduction in thickness (2.56m) using the IceSat data from 2000-08 while as the Karakoram glaciers showed the least reduction in thickness (0.53m). It was found that the maximum recession of glacial

  8. Ocean forcing of glacier retreat in the western Antarctic Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, A J; Holland, P R; Meredith, M P; Murray, T; Luckman, A; Vaughan, D G

    2016-07-15

    In recent decades, hundreds of glaciers draining the Antarctic Peninsula (63° to 70°S) have undergone systematic and progressive change. These changes are widely attributed to rapid increases in regional surface air temperature, but it is now clear that this cannot be the sole driver. Here, we identify a strong correspondence between mid-depth ocean temperatures and glacier-front changes along the ~1000-kilometer western coastline. In the south, glaciers that terminate in warm Circumpolar Deep Water have undergone considerable retreat, whereas those in the far northwest, which terminate in cooler waters, have not. Furthermore, a mid-ocean warming since the 1990s in the south is coincident with widespread acceleration of glacier retreat. We conclude that changes in ocean-induced melting are the primary cause of retreat for glaciers in this region. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Subglacial discharge at tidewater glaciers revealed by seismic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomaus, Timothy C.; Amundson, Jason M.; Walter, Jacob I.; O'Neel, Shad; West, Michael E.; Larsen, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    Subglacial discharge influences glacier basal motion and erodes and redeposits sediment. At tidewater glacier termini, discharge drives submarine terminus melting, affects fjord circulation, and is a central component of proglacial marine ecosystems. However, our present inability to track subglacial discharge and its variability significantly hinders our understanding of these processes. Here we report observations of hourly to seasonal variations in 1.5–10 Hz seismic tremor that strongly correlate with subglacial discharge but not with basal motion, weather, or discrete icequakes. Our data demonstrate that vigorous discharge occurs from tidewater glaciers during summer, in spite of fast basal motion that could limit the formation of subglacial conduits, and then abates during winter. Furthermore, tremor observations and a melt model demonstrate that drainage efficiency of tidewater glaciers evolves seasonally. Glaciohydraulic tremor provides a means by which to quantify subglacial discharge variations and offers a promising window into otherwise obscured glacierized environments.

  10. River conferences under temperate valley glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Stuart; Egli, Pascal; Irving, James

    2017-04-01

    Both geophysical measurements (ground penetrating radar) and hydrological inference has shown that subglacial drainage networks are dendritic and that means that they must have confluences. In general, there are very few studies of rivers under glaciers and almost no consideration at all of confluences, despite the fact that they could be a critical parameter in understanding coupling at the ice-sediment bed interface. Subglacial channels, normally known as conduits, are typically associated with the combined effect of hydraulic pressure driven ice melt (which opens them) and ice overburden pressure (which closes them). Inferences from dye break out curves shows that has the efficiency of ice melt increases progressively during the summer ablation season, melt rates closure rates and a channelized system becomes progressively more effective. Most recently, measurements at the Upper Arolla Glacier show that the effects of this growing efficiency is an evolution in the subglacial hydrological system towards higher peak flows and lower base flows later in the melt season. This increases the probability that late in the melt season, sediment transport becomes discontinuous, with overnight deposition and daytime erosion. This would in turn produce the rapid reductions in sediment transport capacity overnight needed to deposit sediment and to block conduits, increase basal water pressure and explain the hydraulic jacking observed in snout marginal zones at a time when it should not be expected. The question that follows is what effects do confluences have on this process? The geometry of subglacial channels is such that when they join they lead to rapid changes in hydraulic geometry. Crucially, these are likely to have a non-linear impact upon sediment transport capacity, which should reduce disproportionally in the conduits downstream of the junction. Thus, it is possible that confluence zones under glaciers become sites of very rapid sediment accumulation and blockage

  11. Interactive Inventory Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garud, Sumedha

    2013-01-01

    Method and system for monitoring present location and/or present status of a target inventory item, where the inventory items are located on one or more inventory shelves or other inventory receptacles that communicate with an inventory base station through use of responders such as RFIDs. A user operates a hand held interrogation and display (lAD) module that communicates with, or is part of the base station to provide an initial inquiry. lnformation on location(s) of the larget invenlory item is also indicated visibly and/or audibly on the receptacle(s) for the user. Status information includes an assessment of operation readiness and a time, if known, that the specified inventory item or class was last removed or examined or modified. Presentation of a user access level may be required for access to the target inventgory item. Another embodiment provides inventory informatin for a stack as a sight-impaired or hearing-impaired person adjacent to that stack.

  12. SBA Network Components & Software Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — SBA’s Network Components & Software Inventory contains a complete inventory of all devices connected to SBA’s network including workstations, servers, routers,...

  13. Botanical Evidence of the Modern History of Nisqually Glacier, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigafoos, Robert S.; Hendricks, E.L.

    1961-01-01

    A knowledge of the areas once occupied by mountain glaciers reveals at least part of the past behavior of these glaciers. From this behavior, inferences of past climate can be drawn. The maximum advance of Nisqually Glacier in the last thousand years was located, and retreat from this point is believed to have started about 1840. The maximum downvalley position of the glacier is marked by either a prominent moraine or by a line of difference between stands of trees of strikingly different size and significantly different age. The thousand-year age of the forest beyond the moraine or line between abutting stands represents the minimum time since the surface was glaciated. This age is based on the age of the oldest trees, plus an estimated interval required for the formation of humus, plus evidence of an ancient fire, plus an interval of deposition of pyroclastics. The estimate of the date when Nisqually Glacier began to retreat from its maximum advance is based upon the ages of the oldest trees plus an interval of 5 years estimated as the time required for the establishment of trees on stable moraines. This interval was derived from a study of the ages of trees growing at locations of known past positions of the glacier. Reconnaissance studies were made on moraines formed by Emmons and Tahoma Glaciers. Preliminary analyses of these data suggest that Emmons Glacier started to recede from its maximum advance in about 1745. Two other upvalley moraines mark positions from which recession started about 1849 and 1896. Ages of trees near Tahoma Glacier indicate that it started to recede from its position of maximum advance in about 1635. About 1835 Tahoma Glacier started to recede again from another moraine formed by a readvance that ter minated near the 1635 position.

  14. An exercise in glacier length modeling: Interannual climatic variability alone cannot explain Holocene glacier fluctuations in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Alice M.; Mackintosh, Andrew N.; Anderson, Brian M.; Dadic, Ruzica; Putnam, Aaron E.; Barrell, David J. A.; Denton, George H.; Chinn, Trevor J. H.; Schaefer, Joerg M.

    2017-07-01

    Recent model studies suggest that interannual climatic variability could be confounding the interpretation of glacier fluctuations as climate signals. Paleoclimate interpretations of moraine positions and associated cosmogenic exposure ages may have large uncertainties if the glacier in question was sensitive to interannual variability. Here we address the potential for interannual temperature and precipitation variability to cause large shifts in glacier length during the Holocene. Using a coupled ice-flow and mass-balance model, we simulate the response of Cameron Glacier, a small mountain glacier in New Zealand's Southern Alps, to two types of climate forcing: equilibrium climate and variable climate. Our equilibrium results suggest a net warming trend from the Early Holocene (10.69 ± 0.41 ka; 2.7 °C cooler than present) to the Late Holocene (CE 1864; 1.3 °C cooler than present). Interannual climatic variability cannot account for the Holocene glacier fluctuations in this valley. Future studies should consider local environmental characteristics, such as a glacier's climatic setting and topography, to determine the magnitude of glacier length changes caused by interannual variability.

  15. Terricolous Lichens in the Glacier Forefield of the Morteratsch Glacier (Eastern Alps, Graubünden, Switzerland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilovitz, Peter O; Nascimbene, Juri; Mayrhofer, Helmut

    2015-12-17

    Three sampling sites were established at increasing distance from the Morteratsch glacier to investigate lichen communities on soil in the glacier forefield. The survey yielded 13 lichen species and one lichenicolous fungus. Peltigera extenuata (Nyl. ex Vain.) Lojka (Peltigerales) is new to the canton of Graubünden.

  16. Assessment of perception and adaptation to climate-related glacier changes in the arid Rivers Basin in northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guofeng, Zhu; Dahe, Qin; Jiawen, Ren; Feng, Liang; Huali, Tong

    2017-06-01

    In many mountainous areas of the world, glaciers serve as a source of fresh water that is of critical importance and contributes to the sustainability of agriculture and other socio-economic activities. An enhanced understanding of socio-economic consequences of the climate-related glacier changes is essential to the identification of vulnerable entities and the development of well-targeted environmental adaptation policies. A questionnaire and interviews of farmers in the Heihe River Basin were used to analyze their perception of cryospheric changes, attitudes towards mitigation of cryospheric changes, and the ways in which they perceived their responsibility. Preferred responses and interventions for cryospheric change and views on responsible parties were also collected and evaluated. Our investigation revealed that most rural residents were concerned about glacier changes and believed they would bring harm to present society, individuals, and families, as well as to future generations. The respondents' perceptions were mainly influenced by the mass media. Most respondents tended to favor adaptation measures implemented by the government and other policy-making departments. An integrated approach will be needed to deal with the challenges to tackling climate-related glacier change.

  17. Geomorphology and Ice Content of Glacier - Rock Glacier – Moraine Complexes in Ak-Shiirak Range (Inner Tien Shan, Kyrgyzstan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolch, Tobias; Kutuzov, Stanislav; Rohrbach, Nico; Fischer, Andrea; Osmonov, Azamat

    2015-04-01

    Meltwater originating from the Tien Shan is of high importance for the runoff to the arid and semi-arid region of Central Asia. Previous studies estimate a glaciers' contribution of about 40% for the Aksu-Tarim Catchment, a transboundary watershed between Kyrgyzstan and China. Large parts of the Ak-Shiirak Range drain into this watershed. Glaciers in Central and Inner Tien Shan are typically polythermal or even cold and surrounded by permafrost. Several glaciers terminate into large moraine complexes which show geomorphological indicators of ice content such as thermo-karst like depressions, and further downvalley signs of creep such as ridges and furrows and a fresh, steep rock front which are typical indicators for permafrost creep ("rock glacier"). Hence, glaciers and permafrost co-exist in this region and their interactions are important to consider, e.g. for the understanding of glacial and periglacial processes. It can also be assumed that the ice stored in these relatively large dead-ice/moraine-complexes is a significant amount of the total ice storage. However, no detailed investigations exist so far. In an initial study, we investigated the structure and ice content of two typical glacier-moraine complexes in the Ak-Shiirak-Range using different ground penetrating radar (GPR) devices. In addition, the geomorphology was mapped using high resolution satellite imagery. The structure of the moraine-rock glacier complex is in general heterogeneous. Several dead ice bodies with different thicknesses and moraine-derived rock glaciers with different stages of activities could be identified. Few parts of these "rock glaciers" contain also massive ice but the largest parts are likely characterised by rock-ice layers of different thickness and ice contents. In one glacier forefield, the thickness of the rock-ice mixture is partly more than 300 m. This is only slightly lower than the maximum thickness of the glacier ice. Our measurements revealed that up to 20% of

  18. Geographic Names of Iceland's Glaciers: Historic and Modern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, Oddur; Williams, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Climatic changes and resulting glacier fluctuations alter landscapes. In the past, such changes were noted by local residents who often documented them in historic annals; eventually, glacier variations were recorded on maps and scientific reports. In Iceland, 10 glacier place-names are to be found in Icelandic sagas, and one of Iceland's ice caps, Snaefellsjokull, appeared on maps of Iceland published in the 16th century. In the late 17th century, the first description of eight of Iceland's glaciers was written. Therefore, Iceland distinguishes itself in having a more than 300-year history of observations by Icelanders on its glaciers. A long-term collaboration between Oddur Sigurdsson and Richard S. Williams, Jr., led to the authorship of three books on the glaciers of Iceland. Much effort has been devoted to documenting historical glacier research and related nomenclature and to physical descriptions of Icelandic glaciers by Icelanders and other scientists from as far back as the Saga Age to recent (2008) times. The first book, Icelandic Ice Mountains, was published by the Icelandic Literary Society in 2004 in cooperation with the Icelandic Glaciological Society and the International Glaciological Society. Icelandic Ice Mountains was a glacier treatise written by Sveinn Palsson in 1795 and is the first English translation of this important scientific document. Icelandic Ice Mountains includes a Preface, including a summary of the history and facsimiles of page(s) from the original manuscript, a handwritten copy, and an 1815 manuscript (without maps and drawings) by Sveinn Palsson on the same subject which he wrote for Rev. Ebenezer Henderson; an Editor's Introduction; 82 figures, including facsimiles of Sveinn Palsson's original maps and perspective drawings, maps, and photographs to illustrate the text; a comprehensive Index of Geographic Place-Names and Other Names in the treatise; References, and 415 Endnotes. Professional Paper 1746 (this book) is the second

  19. Emergency satellite observation and assessment of a glacier lake outburst flood in Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Hiroto; Tadono, Takeo; Suzuki, Shinichi

    2016-04-01

    Following a glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) on Jun. 28, 2015, in western Bhutan, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency performed an emergency observation on Jul. 2, 2015 using the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2, "DAICHI-2"). Based on a dataset generated from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) imagery, "The Glacial Lake Inventory of Bhutan using ALOS Data", the glacier lake that potentially contributed to this GLOF were identified at 28°4'7.7"N, 89°34'50.0"E, in a headwater of the Mo Chu river basin, western Bhutan. A post-event lake outline was delineated manually using the acquired PALSAR-2 image. Pre-event outlines were delineated from previously acquired PALSAR-2 images (Apr. 23, 2015), Landsat 8 (Mar. 8, 2015), and ALOS (Dec. 22, 2010). The differences between these outlines reveal a remarkable expansion (+48.0%) from Mar. 8 to Apr. 23, 2015, followed by a remarkable shrinkage (-52.9%) from Apr. 23 to Jul. 2, 2015. This result indicates the lake to be a highly likely source of the flood. Topographically, it is located at a glacier terminus, surrounded by a moraine. Differing backscatter patterns between successive PALSAR-2 images in a certain part of the moraine suggest that it underwent some collapse, possibly as a result of the GLOF. More detailed investigations, including field surveys, are necessary to fully reveal and understand this event.

  20. Climatic and environmental records from Altai glaciers, Siberia, recovered from ice-cores and snow samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizen, V. B.; Aizen, E. M.; Kreutz, K. J.; Fujita, K.; Cecil, D.; Nikitin, S. A.

    2002-12-01

    A depth/accumulation scale for the Altai glaciers, Siberia, established based on δ18O and δD firn-ice cores analysis. In sequences of annual layers in the firn-ice cores recovered in 2001 and 2002, the mean annual snow accumulation was found to be 800 mm at 4115 m of the Belukha Snow-Firn Plateau. The transfer function was developed using the seasonality of accumulation layer profile with normalization of data from the nearby meteorological station. The δ18O and δD firn-ice core records compared with meteorological data and indices of atmospheric circulation patterns using regression analyses revealed a dominant source of moisture from Atlantic Ocean during summer and Pacific Ocean moisture during autumn. At the equal air temperatures the most remote source of moisture from Atlantic Ocean resulted in more negative values of δ18O composition under the negative values of North Atlantic Oscillation. Changes in the prevailing atmospheric circulation patterns (e.g., NAO, WPO) over the Altai Mountains are also reflected in the major ions content in snow, firn and ice samples. The anthropogenic emission inventory for Altai glaciers developed using ice-cores and snow pits sulfate and nitrate records.

  1. Raw materials inventory management for a Coke plant / by Christoffel van Dijk

    OpenAIRE

    Van Dijk, Christoffel

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of inventory management and logistics for a metallurgical coke plant at Mittal Steel, Vanderbijlpark Works , Gauteng, South Africa. Inventory management and logistics is a concept, which has shown considerable development in the post-World War II era. The concept of applying inventory and logistics as a business function initially emerged during the price wars era and evolved during the quest for quality era. Thereafter, business inventory and logistics had a promotion/marketing focu...

  2. Sudden increase in tidal response linked to calving and acceleration at a large Greenland outlet glacier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Juan, Julia; Elósegui, Pedro; Nettles, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    Large calving events at Greenland's largest outlet glaciers are associated with glacial earthquakes and near-instantaneous increases in glacier flow speed. At some glaciers and ice streams, flow is also modulated in a regular way by ocean tidal forcing at the terminus. At Helheim Glacier, analysi...

  3. Modelling the advance–retreat cycle of a tidewater glacier with simple sediment dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.; Nick, Faezeh Maghami

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple coupled glacier-sediment model to simulate the evolution of a tidewater glacier. The model is based on a consideration of the total mass budget of a glacier, whereas ice mechanics are fully parameterized. The calving rate at the glacier terminus is assumed to be proportional to

  4. 36 CFR 13.1132 - What types of commercial fishing are authorized in Glacier Bay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... fishing are authorized in Glacier Bay? 13.1132 Section 13.1132 Parks, Forests, and Public Property...-Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve Commercial Fishing § 13.1132 What types of commercial fishing are authorized in Glacier Bay? Three types of commercial fishing are authorized in Glacier Bay non-wilderness...

  5. Towards an improved inventory of Glacial Lake Outburst Floods in the Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veh, Georg; Walz, Ariane; Korup, Oliver; Roessner, Sigrid

    2016-04-01

    The retreat of glaciers in the Himalayas and the associated release of meltwater have prompted the formation and growth of thousands of glacial lakes in the last decades. More than 2,200 of these lakes have developed in unconsolidated moraine material. These lakes can drain in a single event, producing potentially destructive glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs). Only 44 GLOFs in the Himalayas have been documented in more detail since the 1930s, and evidence for a change, let alone an increase, in the frequency of these flood events remains elusive. The rare occurrence of GLOFs is counterintuitive to our hypothesis that an increasing amount of glacial lakes has to be consistent with a rising amount of outburst floods. Censoring bias affects the GLOF record, such that mostly larger floods with commensurate impact have been registered. Existing glacial lake inventories are also of limited help for the identification of GLOFs, as they were created in irregular time steps using different methodological approach and covering different regional extents. We discuss the key requirements for generating a more continuous, close to yearly time series of glacial lake evolution for the Himalayan mountain range using remote sensing data. To this end, we use sudden changes in glacial lake areas as the key diagnostic of dam breaks and outburst floods, employing the full archive of cloud-free Landsat data (L5, L7 and L8) from 1988 to 2015. SRTM and ALOS World 3D topographic data further improve the automatic detection of glacial lakes in an alpine landscape that is often difficult to access otherwise. Our workflow comprises expert-based classification of water bodies using thresholds and masks from different spectral indices and band ratios. A first evaluation of our mapping approach suggests that GLOFs reported during the study period could be tracked independently by a significant reduction of lake size between two subsequent Landsat scenes. This finding supports the feasibility

  6. Instrument for Analysis of Greenland's Glacier Mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Alberto E.; Matthews, Jaret B.; Tran, Hung B.; Steffen, Konrad; McGrath, Dan; Phillips, Thomas; Elliot, Andrew; OHern, Sean; Lutz, Colin; Martin, Sujita; hide

    2010-01-01

    A new instrument is used to study the inner workings of Greenland s glacier mills by riding the currents inside a glacier s moulin. The West Greenland Moulin Explorer instrument was deployed into a tubular shaft to autonomously record temperature, pressure, 3D acceleration, and location. It is built with a slightly positive buoyancy in order to assist in recovery. The unit is made up of several components. A 3-axis MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) accelerometer with 0.001-g resolution forms the base of the unit. A pressure transducer is added that is capable of withstanding 500 psi (=3.4 MPa), and surviving down to -40 C. An Iridium modem sends out data every 10 minutes. The location is traced by a GPS (Global Positioning System) unit. This GPS unit is also used for recovery after the mission. Power is provided by a high-capacity lithium thionyl chloride D-sized battery. The accelerometer is housed inside a cylindrical, foot-long (=30 cm) polyvinyl chloride (PVC) shell sealed at each end with acrylic. The pressure transducer is attached to one of these lids and a MEMS accelerometer to the other, recording 100 samples per second per axis.

  7. Discriminating glacier thermal and dynamic regimes in the sedimentary record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambrey, Michael J.; Glasser, Neil F.

    2012-04-01

    This paper provides a description and evaluation of the sedimentary facies and environments associated with a range of glacier thermal and dynamic regimes, with additional consideration given to the tectonic context. New and previously published data are evaluated together, and are presented from modern terrestrial and marine glacial sedimentary environments in order to identify a set of criteria that can be used to discriminate between different glacier thermal regimes and dynamic styles in the sedimentary record. Sedimentological data are presented from a total of 28 glaciers in 11 geographical areas that represent a wide range of contemporary thermal, dynamic and topographic regimes. In the context of "landsystems", representatives from terrestrial environments include temperate glaciers in the European Alps, Patagonia, New Zealand, the Cordillera Blanca (Peru), cold glaciers in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica and the Antarctic Peninsula region, and polythermal valley glaciers in Svalbard, northern Sweden, the Yukon and the Khumbu Himal (Nepal). The glaciomarine environment is illustrated by data from cold and polythermal glacier margins on the East Antarctic continental shelf, and from a polythermal tidewater glacier in Svalbard, along with general observations from temperate glaciers in Alaska. These data show that temperate glacial systems, particularly in high-relief areas, are dominated by rockfall and avalanche processes, although sediments are largely reworked by glaciofluvial processes. Debris in polythermal glaciers is both thermally and topographically influenced. In areas of moderate relief, debris is mainly of basal glacial origin, and the resulting facies association is dominated by diamicton. In high-relief areas such as the Himalaya, the debris load in polythermal glaciers is dominated by rockfall and avalanche inputs, resulting in extensive accumulations of sandy boulder-gravel. Cold glaciers are dominated by basal debris-entrainment, but sediments

  8. Contrasting medial moraine development at adjacent temperate, maritime glaciers: Fox and Franz Josef Glaciers, South Westland, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Martin; Hagg, Wilfried; Winkler, Stefan

    2017-08-01

    Medial moraines form important pathways for sediment transportation in valley glaciers. Despite the existence of well-defined medial moraines on several glaciers in the New Zealand Southern Alps, medial moraines there have hitherto escaped attention. The evolving morphology and debris content of medial moraines on Franz Josef Glacier and Fox Glacier on the western flank of the Southern Alps is the focus of this study. These temperate maritime glaciers exhibit accumulation zones of multiple basins that feed narrow tongues flowing down steep valleys and terminate 400 m above sea level. The medial moraines at both glaciers become very prominent in the lower ablation zones, where the medial moraines widen, and develop steeper flanks coeval with an increase in relative relief. Medial moraine growth appears somewhat self-limiting in that relief and slope angle increase eventually lead to transport of debris away from the medial moraine by mass-movement-related processes. Despite similarities in overall morphologies, a key contrast in medial moraine formation exists between the two glaciers. At Fox Glacier, the medial moraine consists of angular rockfall-derived debris, folded to varying degrees along flow-parallel axes throughout the tongue. The debris originates above the ELA, coalesces at flow-unit boundaries, and takes a medium/high level transport pathway before subsequently emerging at point-sources aligned with gently dipping fold hinges near the snout. In contrast at Franz Josef Glacier, the medial moraine emerges farther down-glacier immediately below a prominent rock knob. Clasts show a mix of angular to rounded shapes representing high level transport and subglacially transported materials, the latter facies possibly also elevated by supraglacial routing of subglacial meltwater. Our observations confirm that a variety of different debris sources, transport pathways, and structural glaciological processes can interact to form medial moraines within New Zealand

  9. VA Enterprise Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Department of Veterans Affairs Enterprise Data Inventory accounts for all of the datasets used in the agency's information systems. This entry was approved for...

  10. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  11. NCRN Hemlock Inventory Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — ​Data associated with the 2015 hemlock inventory project in NCR. Eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) is a coniferous tree native to the NE and Appalachian regions of...

  12. Logistics and Inventory System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Logistics and Inventory System (LIS) is the agencys primary supply/support automation tool. The LIS encompasses everything from order entry by field specialists...

  13. Wetlands Inventory Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Nevada wetlands inventory is a unit of a nationwide survey undertaken by the Fish and Wildlife Service to locate and tabulate by habitat types the important...

  14. Asset Inventory Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — AIDM is used to track USAID assets such as furniture, computers, and equipment. Using portable bar code readers, receiving and inventory personnel can capture...

  15. National Emission Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Emission Inventory contains measured, modeled, and estimated data for emissions of all known source categories in the US (stationary sources, fires,...

  16. National Emission Inventory (NEI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data exchange allows states to submit data to the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Emissions Inventory (NEI). NEI is a national database of air...

  17. Business Process Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — Inventory of maps and descriptions of the business processes of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM), with an emphasis on the processes of the Office of the...

  18. National Wetlands Inventory Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Wetland point features (typically wetlands that are too small to be as area features at the data scale) mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The...

  19. Shuttle Inventory Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Inventory Management System (SIMS) consists of series of integrated support programs providing supply support for both Shuttle program and Kennedy Space Center base opeations SIMS controls all supply activities and requirements from single point. Programs written in COBOL.

  20. Raccoon abundance inventory report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the results of a raccoon abundance inventory on Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge in 2012. Determining raccoon abundance allows for...

  1. An Interpersonal Communication Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienvenu, Millard J., Sr.

    1971-01-01

    Patterns, characteristics and styles of interpersonal communication in 316 men and women were investigated using the Inventory; item analysis yielded 50 items which discriminated between good and poor communication. (Author)

  2. Public Waters Inventory Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This theme is a scanned and rectified version of the Minnesota DNR - Division of Waters "Public Waters Inventory" (PWI) maps. DNR Waters utilizes a small scale...

  3. World Literature - World Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offering their own twenty-first-century perspectives - across generations, nationalities and disciplines -, the contributors to this anthology explore the idea of world literature for what it may add of new connections and itineraries to the study of literature and culture today. Covering a vast ...

  4. Changes in glacier and permafrost distribution and natural hazards - Examples from Sulden-, Schnals- and Ultental (South Tyrol, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieg, Lorenzo; Reinthaler, Johannes; Sailer, Rudolf; Stötter, Johann

    2013-04-01

    Due to the ongoing climate change, the spatial distribution of glaciers and permafrost has undergone significant changes, not only during the last 150 years, but also during the last decades. For several valleys in South Tyrol, the lower boundary of permafrost and the glacier extents have been calculated and mapped for the time of the Little Ice Age as well as for 1990 and 2011. For the permafrost distribution, the results for the Little Ice Age are based on the activity classes of the rockglaciers in the area, which are available from the rockglacier inventory of South Tyrol, and on geomorphologic mapping. In the 1980ies and 1990ies, geophysical research and measurements of the base temperature of the snowpack were conducted to investigate the distribution of permafrost and the elevation of the lower permafrost boundary. For 2011, the rockglacier inventory was updated, based on multitemporal airborne laserscanning data and field work. In addition, new geophysical measurements and measurements of the base temperature of the snowpack were carried out. The results of all those investigations were used to calculate an estimated elevation of the lower boundary of permafrost for the different years depending on the sector of the terrain exposition. Based on high resolution digital elevation models calculated from airborne laserscanning data, the potential permafrost areas were determined. Glacier extents for the Little Ice Age were mapped based on lateral and frontal moraines, using digital elevation models and hillshades calculated from airborne laserscanning data. For 1990, data from field investigations is used, while the glacier extents for 2011 were mapped based on data from a recent airborne laserscanning campaign. Multitemporal airborne laserscanning data (2005 and 2011) was also used to map natural hazard processes, such as debris flows, landslides and rock falls, based on the surface changes caused by those processes. The locations of those processes were then

  5. Implications of climate change on Glacier de la Plaine Morte, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huss

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in Switzerland's climate are expected to have major impacts on glaciers, the hydrological regime and the natural hazard potential in mountainous regions. Glacier de la Plaine Morte is the largest plateau glacier in the European Alps and thus represents a particularly interesting site for studying rapid and far-reaching effects of atmospheric warming on Alpine glaciers. Based on detailed field observations combined with numerical modelling, the changes in total ice volume of Glacier de la Plaine Morte since the 1950s and the dynamics of present glacier mass loss are assessed. Future ice melt and changes in glacier runoff are computed using climate scenarios, and a possible increase in the natural hazard potential of glacier-dammed lakes around Plaine Morte over the next decades is discussed. This article provides an integrative view of the past, current and future retreat of an extraordinary Swiss glacier and emphasizes the implications of climate change on Alpine glaciers.

  6. Mercury distribution and deposition in glacier snow over western China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianggong; Huang, Jie; Wang, Feiyue; Mark, Loewen; Xu, Jianzhong; Armstrong, Debbie; Li, Chaoliu; Zhang, Yulan; Kang, Shichang

    2012-05-15

    Western China is home to the largest aggregate of glaciers outside the polar regions, yet little is known about how the glaciers in this area affect the transport and cycling of mercury (Hg) regionally and globally. From 2005 to 2010, extensive glacier snow sampling campaigns were carried out in 14 snowpits from 9 glaciers over western China, and the vertical distribution profiles of Hg were obtained. The Total Hg (THg) concentrations in the glacier snow ranged from glacier snows from the northern region where atmospheric particulate loading is comparably high. Glacier snowpit Hg was largely dependent on particulate matters and was associated with particulate Hg, which is less prone to postdepositional changes, thus providing a valuable record of atmospheric Hg deposition. Estimated atmospheric Hg depositional fluxes ranged from 0.74 to 7.89 μg m(-2) yr(-1), agreeing very well with the global natural values, but are one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the neighboring East Asia. Elevated Hg concentrations were observed in refrozen ice layers in several snowpits subjected to intense melt, indicating that Hg can be potentially released to meltwater.

  7. Global and hemispheric temperature reconstruction from glacier length fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclercq, Paul Willem; Oerlemans, Johannes [Universiteit Utrecht, IMAU, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    Temperature reconstructions for recent centuries provide a historical context for the warming over the twentieth century. We reconstruct annual averaged surface temperatures of the past 400 years on hemispherical and global scale from glacier length fluctuations. We use the glacier length records of 308 glaciers. The reconstruction is a temperature proxy with decadal resolution that is completely independent of other temperature records. Temperatures are derived from glacier length changes using a linear response equation and an analytical glacier model that is calibrated on numerical model results. The global and hemispherical temperatures reconstructed from glacier length fluctuations are in good agreement with the instrumental record of the last century. Furthermore our results agree with existing multi-proxy reconstructions of temperature in the pre-instrumental period. The temperature record obtained from glacier fluctuations confirms the pronounced warming of the twentieth century, giving a global cumulative warming of 0.94 {+-} 0.31 K over the period 1830-2000 and a cumulative warming of 0.84 {+-} 0.35 K over the period 1600-2000. (orig.)

  8. Glacier calving, dynamics, and sea-level rise. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, M.F.; Pfeffer, W.T.; Amadei, B.

    1998-08-01

    The present-day calving flux from Greenland and Antarctica is poorly known, and this accounts for a significant portion of the uncertainty in the current mass balance of these ice sheets. Similarly, the lack of knowledge about the role of calving in glacier dynamics constitutes a major uncertainty in predicting the response of glaciers and ice sheets to changes in climate and thus sea level. Another fundamental problem has to do with incomplete knowledge of glacier areas and volumes, needed for analyses of sea-level change due to changing climate. The authors proposed to develop an improved ability to predict the future contributions of glaciers to sea level by combining work from four research areas: remote sensing observations of calving activity and iceberg flux, numerical modeling of glacier dynamics, theoretical analysis of the calving process, and numerical techniques for modeling flow with large deformations and fracture. These four areas have never been combined into a single research effort on this subject; in particular, calving dynamics have never before been included explicitly in a model of glacier dynamics. A crucial issue that they proposed to address was the general question of how calving dynamics and glacier flow dynamics interact.

  9. Spatiotemporal variations of radar glacier zones in the Karakoram Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Jewell

    2017-04-01

    Glaciers of the Karakoram Mountains are important climate indicators for densely populated South Central Asia. Glacial meltwater is a significant source of runoff in the Indus River Basin, upon which 60 million people rely for food security, economy and hydropower in Pakistan and India. Contrary to worldwide and also Himalayan trends, Karakoram glaciers have recently been verified in near balance, with some glaciers even gaining mass or surging. This 'Karakoram anomaly' is of interest, and many hypotheses exist for its causes. Complex climatology, coupled with the challenges of field study in this region, illicit notable uncertainties both in observation and prediction of glacial status. Constraining spatiotemporal variations in glacial mass balance will elucidate the extent and possible longevity of this anomaly, and its implications for water resources, as climate continues to change. Depending on snowpack conditions during image acquisition, different snow and ice zones on a glacier are identifiable in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The identification and monitoring of radar glacier zones over time can provide indicators of relative glacial mass balance to compliment field studies in a region with sparse field measurement. We will present spatiotemporal evolution of basic radar glacier zones such as wet snow, bare ice, percolation, and firn for glaciers feeding into the Upper Indus Basin. We will incorporate both ascending and descending passes of Sentinel-1 series C -band sensors, and possibly ALOS-2 PALSAR-2 L-band images. We may also explore the impacts of these variations on timing and intensity of runoff.

  10. Glaciers of Avacha group of volcanoes in Neoholocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Manevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of moraines at the Avacha volcano group revealed that glaciers changes at all volcanoes within the group happened almost synchronously. Glacial deposits could be grouped into three generations, corresponding to three periods of glacier fluctuations in Neoholocene. The largest glaciation within the group occurred ~2000 years ago. Fragments of moraine, corresponding to that period were found only in the moraine complex of the Ditmar Glacier which was 15% larger then today at that time. The most of moraines at the Avacha volcano group were formed during the Little Ice Age, which in the studied region continued up to the first decades of XX centuries. The maximal advance of glaciers probably happened in XVII century. The moraine corresponding to that period was found at the Kozelsky Glacier valley. At present time the total area of glaciers which moraines were described and dated approaches 21.46  km2. The area of reconstructed moraines corresponding to the Little Ice Age is estimated to be 2.79 km2, therefore at that period the total glaciation area reaches 24,25 км2 exceeding the present area by 13%. It could be claimed that in general during the time past the Little Ice Age the glaciation nature and glacier types did not change sufficiently. The rate of glacier degradation at various parts of the group is different and depends mainly on exposition. At the valleys of four glaciers we found moraines formed in the middle of XX century. They may appear in 1941–1952 when the unfavorable weather conditions leaded to stable negative anomalies in accumulation have happened.

  11. Glacier loss and emerging hydrologic vulnerabilities in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, B. G.; McKenzie, J. M.; Baraer, M.; Lagos, P.; Lautz, L.; Carey, M.; Bury, J.; Crumley, R.; Wigmore, O.; Somers, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Accelerating glacier recession in the tropical Andes is transforming downstream hydrology, while increasing demands for water by end-users (even beyond the watershed limits) is complicating the assessment of vulnerability. Future scenarios of hydro-climatic vulnerability require a better understanding of coupled hydrologic and human systems, involving both multiscale process studies and more robust models of glacier-climate interactions. We synthesize research in two proglacial valleys of glacierized mountain ranges in different regions of Peru that are both in proximity to growing water usage from urban sectors, agriculture, hydroelectric generation, and mining. In both the Santa River watershed draining the Cordillera Blanca and the Shullcas River watershed below Hyuatapallana Mountain in Junin, glaciers have receded over 25% since the 1980s. Historical runoff and glacier data, combined with glacier-climate modeling, show a long-term decrease in discharge resulting from a net loss of stored water. We find evidence that this altered hydrology is transforming proglacial wetland ecology and water quality, even while water resource use has intensified. Beyond glaciers, our results show that over 60% of the dry season base flow in each watershed is groundwater sourced from heterogeneous aquifers. Municipal water supply in Huancayo already relies on 18 groundwater wells. Perceptions of water availability and actual water use practices remain relatively divorced from the actual water resources provided from each mountain range. Critical changes in glacier volume and water supply are not perceived or acknowledged consistently amongst different water users, nor reflected in water management decisions. In order to identify, understand, model, and adapt to climate-glacier-water changes, it is vital to integrate the analysis of water availability and groundwater processes (the domain of hydrologists) with that of water use (the focus for social scientists). Attention must be

  12. Quantifying the contribution of glacier runoff to streamflow in the upper Columbia River basin, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Jost, G.; R. D. Moore; B. Menounos; R. Wheate

    2011-01-01

    Glacier melt provides important contributions to streamflow in many mountainous regions. Hydrologic model calibration in glacier-fed catchments is difficult because errors in modelling snow accumulation can be offset by compensating errors in glacier melt. This problem is particularly severe in catchments with modest glacier cover, where goodness-of-fit statistics such as the Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency may not be highly sensitive to the streamflow variance associated with glacier melt. W...

  13. The relevance of glacier melt in the water cycle of the Alps: the example of Austria

    OpenAIRE

    G. R. Koboltschnig; W. Schöner

    2011-01-01

    This paper quantifies the contribution of glacier melt to river runoff from compilation and statistical interpretation of data from available studies based on observations or glacio- hydrological modelling for the region of Austria (Austrian Salzach and Inn river basin). A logarithmic fit between the glacier melt contribution and the relative glacierized area was found not only for the long-term mean glacier contributions but also for the glacier melt contribution during the extreme hot an dr...

  14. The Skuta glacier as an indicator of climate changes in Slovenian part of the Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miha Pavšek

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Anton Melik Geographical Institute SRC SASA provide the regular annual measurements of Triglav and Skuta glaciers for more than six decades. Both glaciers show a permanent retreat. Last measurements undoubtedly confirm the importance of the glacier shady position at the foothills of the surrounding walls. Comparison of glacier characteristics with some meteorological data helps us to recognize the influence of climate changes on this, most southeastern lying glaciers in the Alps.

  15. GLACIER-VOLCANO INTERACTIONS IN SOUTHERN CHILE: VOLCANIC HAZARD AND CLIMATE CHANGE IMPLICATIONS.

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Andres Rivera Ibanez; Gino Casassa Rogazinski; Jorge Eduardo Clavero Ribes; Claudio Bravo Lechuga; Angelo Castruccio Alvarez; Pablo Zenteno Soto

    2004-01-01

    GLACIER-VOLCANO INTERACTIONS IN SOUTHERN CHILE: VOLCANIC HAZARD AND CLIMATE CHANGE IMPLICATIONS A 3 years long study on the glacier-volcano interaction in Southern Chile (Los Lagos Region), where most glaciers are located on active volcanic cones. The main objective of the project is differentiating glacier responses to climate changes from responses that might be caused by geothermal systems associated to active volcanoes. In the last few years, most glaciers in the region have significa...

  16. Symptoms of degradation in a tropical rock glacier, Bolivian Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Francou, Bernard; Fabre, D.; Pouyaud, Bernard; Jomelli, V.; Arnaud, Yves

    1999-01-01

    Le glacier rocheux du Caquella (5960-5400 m), par sa taille kilométrique, est probablement le plus volumineux de la zone intertropicale. Dans ce milieu de haute montagne tropicale aride, les glaciers n'existent pas et les glaciers rocheux sont, avec les salars, les meilleurs indicateurs du changement climatique. Ce sont en outre des réserves hydriques qui jouent un rôle actif dans le cycle hydrologique actuel. Les observations directes et les sondages électriques montrent la présence de glace...

  17. Glacier melt buffers river runoff in the Pamir Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Eric; Gloaguen, Richard; Andermann, Christoff; Knoche, Malte

    2017-03-01

    Newly developed approaches based on satellite altimetry and gravity measurements provide promising results on glacier dynamics in the Pamir-Himalaya but cannot resolve short-term natural variability at regional and finer scale. We contribute to the ongoing debate by upscaling a hydrological model that we calibrated for the central Pamir. The model resolves the spatiotemporal variability in runoff over the entire catchment domain with high efficiency. We provide relevant information about individual components of the hydrological cycle and quantify short-term hydrological variability. For validation, we compare the modeled total water storages (TWS) with GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) data with a very good agreement where GRACE uncertainties are low. The approach exemplifies the potential of GRACE for validating even regional scale hydrological applications in remote and hard to access mountain regions. We use modeled time series of individual hydrological components to characterize the effect of climate variability on the hydrological cycle. We demonstrate that glaciers play a twofold role by providing roughly 35% of the annual runoff of the Panj River basin and by effectively buffering runoff both during very wet and very dry years. The modeled glacier mass balance (GMB) of -0.52 m w.e. yr-1 (2002-2013) for the entire catchment suggests significant reduction of most Pamiri glaciers by the end of this century. The loss of glaciers and their buffer functionality in wet and dry years could not only result in reduced water availability and increase the regional instability, but also increase flood and drought hazards.Plain Language SummaryGlaciers store large amounts of water in the form of ice. They grow and shrink dominantly in response to climatic conditions. In Central Asia, where rivers originate in the high mountains, glaciers are an important source for sustainable water availability. Thus, understanding the link between climate, hydrology, and

  18. Calibration of a mathematical model of Marukh Glacier, Western Caucasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. О. Rybak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considered in the paper, three-dimentsional mathematical model of dynamics of Marukh Glacier, Western Caucasus. Block structure of the model and interaction between blocs is described. Key model parameters are calibrated using field radio-echo-sounding, topographic and gravimetrical measurements, as well as observations on surface air temperature and precipitation amount at Klukhorsky Pereval meteostation, closest to the glacier. We determine meanings of parameters favourable to minimum deviations between calculated and observed flow velocities and normalized surface mass balance. The model is supposed to be used in future for prognostic calculations of Caucasus glacier evolution in changing climatic conditions. 

  19. Glaciers and climate; Gletscher und Klima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinwarth, O. [Kommission fuer Glaziologie der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Muenchen (Germany)

    1994-03-01

    Fluctuations in the extent of glaciers, documented i.e. by moraines, are linked to climatic variations in a rather complex way. Mass changes of claciers, which are caused by meteorological conditions, induce a dynamic response, leading finally to advance or retreat. The processes connecting these effects are covering quite different time scales. Regarding these scales, the behaviour of a glacier can be described quantitatively by the water balance related to meteorological fluxes of mass and energy, the directly measured annual mass balance and the volume balance giving the long term changes by repeated surveyings. Details are explained with respect to Vernagtferner in the Oetztal Alps, Tyrol. Actually the glaciers in the Alps represent a minimum extent at least for the last 5000 years whereas the last maximum was reached around 1850 A.D. Since then the shrinkage in area amounts to 50% in the Eastern Alps. Rather more representative is the rise in equilibrium line altitude of about 100 m, connected with an increase of appr. 1 K in mean summer temperature for the same period and region. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die vielfach durch Moraenen gut markierten Groessenschwankungen der Gletscher bedeuten Demonstration und Dokumentation klimatischer Vorgaenge zugleich. Die bei diesen Schwankungsvorgaengen wirksamen Prozesse der Massenaenderung und der dynamischen Reaktion werden naeher erlaeutert sowie die Methoden zur Erfassung des aktuellen Gletscherverhaltens vorgestellt. Diese basieren auf der Ermittlung der Wasserbilanz eines vergletscherten Einzugsgebietes (hydrol. Methode), der direkten Messung von Massenaenderungen (glaziol. Methode) und der Ableitung von Volumen- bzw. Hoehenaenderungen (geodaet. Methode), wobei sich die Methoden bezueglich der Zeitaufloesung wesentlich unterscheiden. Trotz der geringen Zahl weltweit beobachteter Gletscher ist es moeglich, regionale Trends im Gletscherverhalten zu erkennen. Fuer die am besten erfassten Alpengletscher kann gezeigt werden

  20. Polychlorinated Biphenyls in a Temperate Alpine Glacier: 1. Effect of Percolating Meltwater on their Distribution in Glacier Ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Pavlina Aneva; Jenk, Theo Manuel; Schmid, Peter; Bogdal, Christian; Steinlin, Christine; Schwikowski, Margit

    2015-12-15

    In Alpine regions, glaciers act as environmental archives and can accumulate significant amounts of atmospherically derived pollutants. Due to the current climate-warming-induced accelerated melting, these pollutants are being released at correspondingly higher rates. To examine the effect of melting on the redistribution of legacy pollutants in Alpine glaciers, we analyzed polychlorinated biphenyls in an ice core from the temperate Silvretta glacier, located in eastern Switzerland. This glacier is affected by surface melting in summer. As a result, liquid water percolates down and particles are enriched in the current annual surface layer. Dating the ice core was a challenge because meltwater percolation also affects the traditionally used parameters. Instead, we counted annual layers of particulate black carbon in the ice core, adding the years with negative glacier mass balance, that is, years with melting and subsequent loss of the entire annual snow accumulation. The analyzed samples cover the time period 1930-2011. The concentration of indicator PCBs (iPCBs) in the Silvretta ice core follows the emission history, peaking in the 1970s (2.5 ng/L). High PCB values in the 1990s and 1930s are attributed to meltwater-induced relocation within the glacier. The total iPCB load at the Silvretta ice core site is 5 ng/cm(2). A significant amount of the total PCB burden in the Silvretta glacier has been released to the environment.

  1. The response of glacier melt runoff to climate change: a glacierized catchment in Tieshan Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Gonghuan; Yang, Jing; Chen, Yaning; Li, Zhi

    2017-04-01

    Water resources are sensitive to climate change for the arid inland basins, whose water originates largely from the glacierized mountains. In this study, we simulated the glacial process and then analyzed its response to future climate change in a typical Tieshan Mountains watershed - Aksu watershed. To simulate glacial process, we developed a glacial module into a semi-distributed hydrologic model and then performed multi-objective sensitivity analysis and optimization by combining observed flow data and water isotope data. The calibrated model was then used to analyze the response to climate change through future climate forcing obtained by applying BMA (Bayesian Model Averaging) technique to an ensemble of one RCM and 21-GCM simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. Results indicated that the parameters related to groundwater flow and its interaction with surface water flow are the most sensitive parameters, and glacier-related parameters are also sensitive, indicating a large part of the streamflow is recharged by glacier melt water. Runoff will overall increase in the near future but will decrease at the end of the 21st century. The combined use of different data sources sheds some sights on hydrological modelling in the Tienshan mountainous.

  2. Project Plan - Inventory Management basics

    OpenAIRE

    Philip F. Lafontaine

    2017-01-01

    Inventory management technology is a mix of hardware and software intended to add dependability to inventory bookkeeping, diminish episodes of burglary and encourage inventory reviews. Individual inventory things or groups of things could be furnished with RFID tags that recognize the thing sort, expense, value, shipment number, date of shipment and basically whatever other valuable data. Software inventory management arrangements supplant pen-and-paper frameworks, diminishing the time needed...

  3. A decreasing glacier mass balance gradient from the edge of the Upper Tarim Basin to the Karakoram during 2000-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Li, Gang; Cuo, Lan; Hooper, Andrew; Ye, Qinghua

    2017-07-27

    In contrast to the glacier mass losses observed at other locations around the world, some glaciers in the High Mountains of Asia appear to have gained mass in recent decades. However, changes in digital elevation models indicate that glaciers in Karakoram and Pamir have gained mass, while recent laser altimetry data indicate mass gain centred on West Kunlun. Here, we obtain results that are essentially consistent with those from altimetry, but with two-dimensional observations and higher resolution. We produced elevation models using radar interferometry applied to bistatic data gathered between 2011 and 2014 and compared them to a model produced from bistatic data collected in 2000. The glaciers in West Kunlun, Eastern Pamir and the northern part of Karakoram experienced a clear mass gain of 0.043 ± 0.078~0.363 ± 0.065 m w.e. yr -1 . The Karakoram showed a near-stable mass balance in its western part (-0.020 ± 0.064 m w.e. yr -1 ), while the Eastern Karakoram showed mass loss (-0.101 ± 0.058 m w.e. yr -1 ). Significant positive glacier mass balances are noted along the edge of the Upper Tarim Basin and indicate a decreasing gradient from northeast to southwest.

  4. Simulating the mass- and energy balance of Freya Glacier (NE-Greenland) using the physically based snow model AMUNDSEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marke, T.; Plach, A.; Hanzer, F.; Strasser, U.; Hynek, B.; Weyss, G.; Schöner, W.

    2012-04-01

    Climate change will increasingly influence terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in many regions all over the world. The arctic environment is known to be both, particularly affected and extremely sensitive to changes in the earth's climate system. An increase in temperature, which may be accompanied by an increase in precipitation as predicted for some regions in northeast Greenland over the next 100 years, severely affects the temporal storage of water in the snowpack in winter and the melting of snow and ice masses in spring and summer. Increased precipitation in combination with an increase in snow/ice melt results in an increased influx of freshwater and sediment to the oceans contributing to sea level rise and affecting the the thermohaline circulation in the sea surrounding Greenland. Besides the snow/ice reaction on changing climate conditions, the presence of snow/ice feeds back on the climate system itself. To analyze ongoing changes in arctic ecosystems numerical models represent a valuable supplementary source of information to sparsely available field measurements as they are capable to deliver spatially distributed and detailed knowledge on meteorological and hydrological conditions in arctic areas. The FreyEx project continues research that has been initiated in the framework of the preceding projekt GlacierMEMO by using the distributed snow/ice model AMUNDSEN to simulate snow accumulation, distribution, sublimation and surface melt at Freya Glacier, a small valley glacier in the north of Clavering Island (NE-Greenland). The results of GlacierMEMO have indicated a strong need for i) additional meteorological data in the area of interest and ii) a modification of the standard method implemented for the remapping of meteorological parameters in AMUNDSEN. To close these gaps, in the framework of the project FreyEx, an additional energy balance station has been installed on Freya Glacier. The remapping algorithms, particularly that for the interpolation of

  5. World law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold J. Berman

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In the third millennium of the Christian era, which is characterised by the emergence of a world economy and eventually a world society, the concept of world law is needed to embrace not only the traditional disciplines of public international law, and comparative law, but also the common underlying legal principles applicable in world trade, world finance, transnational transfer of technology and other fields of world economic law, as well as in such emerging fields as the protection of the world's environment and the protection of universal human rights. World law combines inter-state law with the common law of humanity and the customary law of various world communities.

  6. Reconstructing the mass balance of Brewster Glacier, New Zealand, using MODIS-derived glacier-wide albedo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sirguey

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In New Zealand, direct measurements of mass balance are sparse due to the inaccessibility of glaciers in the Southern Alps and the logistical difficulties associated with maintaining a mass balance record. In order to explore the benefit of remotely sensed imaging to monitor mass balance in the Southern Alps, this research assesses the relationship between measurements of glacier surface albedo derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and mass balance observations using the glaciological method on Brewster Glacier over the 2005–2013 period. We confirm that minimum glacier-wide albedo is a reliable predictor for annual mass balance in this maritime environment (R2 = 0.93. Furthermore, we show that regular monitoring of glacier-wide albedo enables a new metric of winter accumulation to be derived, namely the cumulative winter albedo, which is found to correlate strongly with winter mass balance (R2 = 0.88, thus enabling the reconstruction of separate winter and summer mass balance records. This allows the mass balance record for Brewster Glacier to be extended back to the start of MODIS observations in 2000 and to confirm that the annual balance of Brewster Glacier is largely controlled by summer balance (R2  =  92 %. An application of the extended record is proposed whereby the relationship between mass balance and the photographic record of the end-of-summer snowline altitude is assessed. This allowed the annual balance record of Brewster Glacier to be reconstructed over the period 1977–2013, thus providing the longest record of mass balance for a glacier in New Zealand. Over the 37-year period, our results show that Brewster Glacier gained a significant mass of up to 14.5 ± 2.7 m w.e. by 2007. This gain was offset by a marked shift toward negative balances after 2008, yielding a loss of 5.1 ± 1.2 m w.e., or 35 % of the gain accumulated over the previous 30 years. The good

  7. Bathymetry of Patagonia glacier fjords and glacier ice thickness from high-resolution airborne gravity combined with other data

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, L.; Rignot, E.; Rivera, A.; Bunetta, M.

    2012-12-01

    The North and South Patagonia Ice fields are the largest ice masses outside Antarctica in the Southern Hemisphere. During the period 1995-2000, these glaciers lost ice at a rate equivalent to a sea level rise of 0.105 ± 0.001 mm/yr. In more recent years, the glaciers have been thinning more quickly than can be explained by warmer air temperatures and decreased precipitation. A possible cause is an increase in flow speed due to enhanced ablation of the submerged glacier fronts. To understand the dynamics of these glaciers and how they change with time, it is critical to have a detailed view of their ice thickness, the depth of the glacier bed below sea or lake level, how far inland these glaciers remain below sea or lake level, and whether bumps or hollows in the bed may slow down or accelerate their retreat. A grid of free-air gravity data over the Patagonia Glaciers was collected in May 2012 and October 2012, funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (GBMF) to measure ice thickness and sea floor bathymetry. This survey combines the Sander Geophysics Limited (SGL) AIRGrav system, SGL laser altimetry and Chilean CECS/UCI ANDREA-2 radar. To obtain high-resolution and high-precision gravity data, the helicopter operates at 50 knots (25.7 m/s) with a grid spacing of 400m and collects gravity data at sub mGal level (1 Gal =1 Galileo = 1 cm/s2) near glacier fronts. We use data from the May 2012 survey to derive preliminarily high-resolution, high-precision thickness estimates and bathymetry maps of Jorge Montt Glacier and San Rafael Glacier. Boat bathymetry data is used to optimize the inversion of gravity over water and radar-derived thickness over glacier ice. The bathymetry maps will provide a breakthrough in our knowledge of the ice fields and enable a new era of glacier modeling and understanding that is not possible at present because ice thickness is not known.

  8. Reconstructing the mass balance of Brewster Glacier, New Zealand, using MODIS-derived glacier-wide albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirguey, P. J.; Still, H.; Cullen, N. J.; Dumont, M.; Arnaud, Y.; Conway, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    In New Zealand, direct measurements of mass balance are sparse due to the inaccessibility of glaciers in the Southern Alps and the logistical difficulties associated with maintaining a mass balance record. In order to explore the benefit of remotely sensed imaging to monitor mass balance in the Southern Alps, this research assesses the relationship between measurements of glacier surface albedo derived from MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and mass balance observations using the glaciological method on Brewster Glacier over the 2005-2013 period. We confirm that minimum glacier-wide albedo is a reliable predictor for annual mass balance in this maritime environment (R2 = 0.93). Furthermore, we show that regular monitoring of glacier-wide albedo enables a new metric of winter accumulation to be derived, namely the cumulative winter albedo, that is found to correlate strongly with winter mass balance (R2 = 0.88), thus enabling the reconstruction of separate winter and summer mass balance records. This allows the mass balance record for Brewster Glacier to be extended back to the start of MODIS observations in 2000 and to confirm that the annual balance of Brewster Glacier is largely controlled by summer balance (R2 = 92 %). An application of the extended record is proposed whereby the relationship between mass balance and the photographic record of the end-of-summer snowline altitude is assessed. This allowed the annual balance record of Brewster Glacier to be reconstructed over the period 1977-2013, thus providing the longest record of mass balance for a glacier in New Zealand. Over the 37-year period, our results show that Brewster Glacier gained significant mass of up to 14.5 ± 2.7 m w.e. by 2007. This gain was offset by a marked shift toward negative balances after 2008, yielding a loss of 5.1 ± 1.2 m w.e., or 35 % of the gain accumulated over the previous 30 years. The good correspondence between mass balance of Brewster Glacier and the

  9. Glacier loss on Kilimanjaro continues unabated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, L G; Brecher, H H; Mosley-Thompson, E; Hardy, D R; Mark, B G

    2009-11-24

    The dramatic loss of Kilimanjaro's ice cover has attracted global attention. The three remaining ice fields on the plateau and the slopes are both shrinking laterally and rapidly thinning. Summit ice cover (areal extent) decreased approximately 1% per year from 1912 to 1953 and approximately 2.5% per year from 1989 to 2007. Of the ice cover present in 1912, 85% has disappeared and 26% of that present in 2000 is now gone. From 2000 to 2007 thinning (surface lowering) at the summits of the Northern and Southern Ice Fields was approximately 1.9 and approximately 5.1 m, respectively, which based on ice thicknesses at the summit drill sites in 2000 represents a thinning of approximately 3.6% and approximately 24%, respectively. Furtwängler Glacier thinned approximately 50% at the drill site between 2000 and 2009. Ice volume changes (2000-2007) calculated for two ice fields reveal that nearly equivalent ice volumes are now being lost to thinning and lateral shrinking. The relative importance of different climatological drivers remains an area of active inquiry, yet several points bear consideration. Kilimanjaro's ice loss is contemporaneous with widespread glacier retreat in mid to low latitudes. The Northern Ice Field has persisted at least 11,700 years and survived a widespread drought approximately 4,200 years ago that lasted approximately 300 years. We present additional evidence that the combination of processes driving the current shrinking and thinning of Kilimanjaro's ice fields is unique within an 11,700-year perspective. If current climatological conditions are sustained, the ice fields atop Kilimanjaro and on its flanks will likely disappear within several decades.

  10. What color should glacier algae be?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dial, Roman J; Ganey, Gerard Q; Skiles, S McKenzie

    2018-01-15

    Red-colored secondary pigments in glacier algae play an adaptive role in melting snow and ice. We advance this hypothesis using a model of color-based absorption of irradiance, an experiment with colored particles in snow, and the natural history of glacier algae. Carotenoids and phenols-astaxanthin in snow-algae and purpurogallin in ice-algae-shield photosynthetic apparatus by absorbing over-abundant visible wavelengths, then dissipating the excess radiant energy as heat. This heat melts proximal ice crystals, providing liquid-water in a 0°C environment and freeing-up nutrients bound in frozen water. We show that purple-colored particles transfer 87-89% of solar energy absorbed by black particles. However, red-colored particles transfer nearly as much (85-87%) by absorbing peak solar wavelengths and reflecting the visible wavelengths most absorbed by nearby ice and snow crystals; this latter process may reduce potential cellular overheating when snow insulates cells. Blue and green particles transfer only 80-82% of black particle absorption. In the experiment, red-colored particles melted 87% as much snow as black particles, while blue particles melted 77%. Green-colored snow-algae naturally occupy saturated snow where water is non-limiting; red-colored snow-algae occupy drier, water-limited snow. In addition to increasing melt, we suggest esterified astaxanthin in snow-algae increases hydrophobicity to keep cells surficial. © FEMS 2018. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Cryo-life habitability on a polythermal glacier in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, S.; Anesio, A. M.; Benning, L. G.

    2012-12-01

    Modern surface glacial ice and snow are extreme environments at the edge of Earth's biosphere and potential sites of biosignatures in future planetary missions. The primary colonization of snow and ice is an important biogeological scenario with clear implications for the life detection on other icy planets [1]. Hence, knowledge of the adaptations and survival strategies adopted by extremophiles - cryophiles - in terrestrial cryogenic environments is vital for our ability to process data from future planetary missions. Despite it being one of the most extreme habitats on Earth, glacial ice and snow fields are colonised by a plethora of organisms including snow algae, bacteria, fungi, protozoa, rotifers and even invertebrates [2]. Although low in number and diversity compared to other habitats, snow and ice algae are a major primary producer in glacial settings [3,4]. Their life cycle influences the structure and diversity of neighbouring microbial communities [5] and they produce a suite of complex molecules to protect themselves against cold [6], UV [7], or nutrient deficiency [8]. However, these adaptations are poorly understood and we know very little about the complexity of the biological inventory contained within snow and ice environments. We have been investigating the potential of carbon fluxes from snow to ice, cryoconites and runoff water on the polythermal Mittivakkat glacier in SE Greenland and the effect of cell retention at the glacial surface on the albedo. The complementary microbiological and geochemical characteristics have been characterized at a suite of sampling sites in the ablation, superimposed and accumulation zone of the glacier. Results from photosynthesis and respiration measurements (e.g., snow fields, cryoconites, glacial outflow, clean snow) show that snow and ice surfaces have the potential to accumulate algal cells which become an important source of organic carbon for cryoconites. The accumulation of cells at the glacial surface

  12. Worlds Fantastic, Worlds Familiar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.

    2017-02-01

    Introduction; 1. Mercury: the hottest little place; 2. Venus: an even hotter place; 3. Mars: the abode of life?; 4. Asteroids and comets: sweat the small stuff; 5. Galileo's treasures: worlds of fire and ice; 6. Enceladus: an active iceball in space; 7. Titan: an Earth in deep freeze?; 8. Iapetus and its friends: the weirdest 'planets' in the Solar System; 9. Pluto: the first view of the 'third zone'; 10. Earths above: the search for exoplanets and life in the universe; Epilogue; Glossary; Acknowledgements; Index.

  13. Rock glacier Macun 1, Lower Engadin, Switzerland, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The rock glacier 'Macun 1' is located in the Lower Engadine, Grisons, Swiss Alps and reaches from about 2720 m asl down to 2610 m asl. It has been surveyed by...

  14. Rock glaciers, Fletschhorn Area, Valais, Switzerland, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains a total amount of 74 rock glaciers which were investigated in the Fletschhorn Area in the southern Swiss Alps during the summer of 1995. The...

  15. Accumulation of anthropogenic radionuclides in cryoconites on Alpine glaciers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieber, A; Lettner, H; Bossew, P; Hubmer, A; Sattler, B; Hofmann, W

    2009-07-01

    Cryoconites are airborne sediments which accumulate on the surface of glaciers. In samples of cryoconites a temperate Austrian glacier high activity concentrations of anthropogenic radionuclides were found, which stem from global and Chernobyl fallouts. Radionuclides identified were (137)Cs, (134)Cs, (238)Pu, (239+240)Pu, (90)Sr, (241)Am, (60)Co, (154)Eu, (207)Bi, and (125)Sb. Given the approximately known isotopic ratios, Cs and Pu can be separated into the contributions of either source of origin. Published (137)Cs/(134)Cs and (239+240)Pu/(238)Pu ratios were used for the discrimination of the Dachstein-glacier cryoconites according to their origin from global or Chernobyl fallout. Two different groups of cryoconites were identified, an older population dominated by nuclear weapons fallout and a younger one with predominant Chernobyl fallout. With those data a simple model was formulated to demonstrate the transition and mixing of these two populations on the glacier surface.

  16. Calving rates at tidewater glaciers vary strongly with ocean temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckman, Adrian; Benn, Douglas I; Cottier, Finlo; Bevan, Suzanne; Nilsen, Frank; Inall, Mark

    2015-10-09

    Rates of ice mass loss at the calving margins of tidewater glaciers (frontal ablation rates) are a key uncertainty in sea level rise projections. Measurements are difficult because mass lost is replaced by ice flow at variable rates, and frontal ablation incorporates sub-aerial calving, and submarine melt and calving. Here we derive frontal ablation rates for three dynamically contrasting glaciers in Svalbard from an unusually dense series of satellite images. We combine ocean data, ice-front position and terminus velocity to investigate controls on frontal ablation. We find that frontal ablation is not dependent on ice dynamics, nor reduced by glacier surface freeze-up, but varies strongly with sub-surface water temperature. We conclude that calving proceeds by melt undercutting and ice-front collapse, a process that may dominate frontal ablation where submarine melt can outpace ice flow. Our findings illustrate the potential for deriving simple models of tidewater glacier response to oceanographic forcing.

  17. Helheim 2006: Integrated Geophysical Observations of Glacier Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nettles, M.; Ahlstrøm, A.; Elosegui, P.

    During the summer field season, 2006, we undertook a pilot geophysical experiment at Helheim Glacier, East Greenland, in which we deployed a network of GPS instruments on and around the glacier to measure the ice deformation field as a function of time. The experiment was motivated by the discovery...... of a new class of earthquakes occurring at glaciers in Alaska, Antarctica, and Greenland (Ekström, Nettles, and Abers, 2003). Teleseismic analysis indicates that these glacial earthquakes may result from the rapid sliding of the glacial ice over the glacier bed, and recent evidence (Ekström, Nettles...... behind the calving front during field visits in late June, late July, and late August, and we recorded the tidal stage using a pressure sensor near the end of Helheim Fjord for ~3~weeks during the experiment. Initial results show a variation in flow speed from about 25~m/day near the calving front...

  18. Colonization of maritime glacier ice by bdelloid Rotifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shain, Daniel H; Halldórsdóttir, Katrín; Pálsson, Finnur; Aðalgeirsdóttir, Guðfinna; Gunnarsson, Andri; Jónsson, Þorsteinn; Lang, Shirley A; Pálsson, Hlynur Skagfjörð; Steinþórssson, Sveinbjörn; Arnason, Einar

    2016-05-01

    Very few animal taxa are known to reside permanently in glacier ice/snow. Here we report the widespread colonization of Icelandic glaciers and ice fields by species of bdelloid Rotifera. Specimens were collected within the accumulation zones of Langjökull and Vatnajökull ice caps, among the largest European ice masses. Rotifers reached densities up to ∼100 individuals per liter-equivalent of glacier ice/snow, and were freeze-tolerant. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that glacier rotifers are polyphyletic, with independent ancestries occurring within the Pleistocene. Collectively, these data identify a previously undescribed environmental niche for bdelloid rotifers and suggest their presence in comparable habitats worldwide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Spatial Vegetation Data for Glacier National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The geographic information system (GIS) format spatial data set of vegetation for Glacier National Park (GNP) was created by the U.S. Geological Survey...

  20. A tsunami wave recorded near a glacier front

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Marchenko

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We observed a tsunami wave near the glacier front in the Temple Fjord (Spitsbergen. Two temperature and pressure recorders were deployed on a wire from the ice approximately 300 m from the glacier front. A pressure recorder was located under them on the bottom. The vertical displacement of the ice was approximately 30 cm and the period of the tsunami wave was 90 s. We attribute the generation of this wave to the displacement of the glacier similarly to the landslide tsunami generated by the motion of a block of rocks down the sloping bottom. The glacier motion also generated a short-period (12 s deformation wave in the ice cover. The measurements allowed us to estimate the wave number of these waves and the Young's modulus of the ice.

  1. CHANGES IN THICKNESS OF PERETOLCHIN GLACIER (EASTERN SAYAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kitov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, the ice volume of Peretolchina Glacier in the mountain range of MunkuSardyk (Eastern Sayan has been estimated using various models and results of georadar profiling. It is advisable to use the averaged values for calculations in accordance with power formulas taking into account the different shape of the glacier bed. Results of area radar survey and ice thickness modeling of Peretolchina Glacier have been presented. Insufficient number of instrumental data on the thickness and volume of the Eastern Sayan glaciers limits the possibility of a correct assessment of regional ice resources. Measurements of the ice thickness on the northern Peretolchin Glacier were carried out in mid-June 2014 and early May 2016 by the Oko-2 radar with the antenna unit ABDL “Triton” at a frequency of 100 MHz. During the field work, profiles of lengths from 100 to 340 m were traversed along the glacier. In total, 8 transverse (1510 m and one for the 8th, longitudinal (760 m georadar profiles with a total length of 2270 m. The maximum measured thickness of ice reaches 23 m when interpolated using mathematical models of 37 m. Preliminary maps of ice thickness and profiles of the bed of the northern Peretolchin Glacier have been made and its volume has been determined by different models with field study corrections of 0.007 ± 0.001 km3 . The most accurate results have been obtained from the section method taking into account the relief of the glacier. In the parabolic form of the glacier, a somewhat understated result has been obtained, and an elliptic result has been overestimated. For more than 100 years the Peretolchin Glacier (northern has decreased in area and length by two times from 0.68 to 0.34 km2 , and in the volume from 0.026 to 0.007 km3 , by 3.7 times. It has been established that the rate of reduction of Peretolchin Glacier was most intensive in 2009-2012.

  2. Life Cycle Inventory Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Anders; Moltesen, Andreas; Laurent, Alexis

    2017-01-01

    of different sources. The output is a compiled inventory of elementary flows that is used as basis of the subsequent life cycle impact assessment phase. This chapter teaches how to carry out this task through six steps: (1) identifying processes for the LCI model of the product system; (2) planning......The inventory analysis is the third and often most time-consuming part of an LCA. The analysis is guided by the goal and scope definition, and its core activity is the collection and compilation of data on elementary flows from all processes in the studied product system(s) drawing on a combination...

  3. Evaluating the Scale and Potential of GLOF in the Bhutan Himalayas Using a Satellite-Based Integral Glacier–Glacial Lake Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroto Nagai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive glacier–glacial lake inventory was developed for the Bhutan Himalayas based on satellite observations between 1987–1990 and 2006–2011. In total, 733 lakes (covering 82.6 km2 were delineated between 4000 and 6000 m a.s.l. and their relationships to associated glaciers were documented. Using this new inventory, the scale and potential for glacial lake outburst flooding (GLOF based on multiple criteria was examined. This included a history of connectivity characteristics of glacial lakes to mother glaciers, potential flood volumes, and debris-cover of mother glaciers in addition to the conventional criteria of expansion rate and lake size. The majority of the lakes with high expansion rates (more than double in size and large areas (>0.1 km2 met the conditions of being continuously in contact with a mother debris-covered glacier for nearly 20 years. Based on these multiple criteria, two lakes were identified as having potential for large-scale GLOF. Potentially dangerous glacial lakes listed in the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD study were re-visited, and some overlaps with the glacier–glacial lake inventory were found.

  4. Radiocarbon dating of glacier ice: overview, optimisation, validation and potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Uglietti

    2016-12-01

    of 10 000 years. WIOC 14C dating was not only crucial for interpretation of the embedded environmental and climatic histories, but additionally gave a better insight into glacier flow dynamics close to the bedrock and past glacier coverage. For this the availability of multiple dating points in the deepest parts was essential, which is the strength of the presented WIOC 14C dating method, allowing determination of absolute ages from principally every piece of ice.

  5. Mass balance investigation of alpine glaciers through LANDSAT TM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayr, Klaus J.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) data of the Pasterze Glacier and the Kleines Fleisskees in the Austrian Alps was undertaken and compared with meteorological data of nearby weather stations. Alpine or valley glaciers can be used to study regional and worldwide climate changes. Alpine glaciers respond relatively fast to a warming or cooling trend in temperature through an advance or a retreat of the terminus. In addition, the mass balance of the glacier is being affected. Last year two TM scenes of the Pasterze Glacier of Aug. 1984 and Aug. 1986 were used to study the difference in reflectance. This year, in addition to the scenes from last year, one MSS scene of Aug. 1976 and a TM scene from 1988 were examined for both the Pasterze Glacier and the Kleines Fleisskees. During the overpass of the LANDSAT on 6 Aug. 1988 ground truthing on the Pasterze Glacier was undertaken. The results indicate that there was considerable more reflectance in 1976 and 1984 than in 1986 and 1988. The climatological data of the weather stations Sonnblick and Rudolfshuette were examined and compared with the results found through the LANDSAT data. There were relations between the meteorological and LANDSAT data: the average temperature over the last 100 years showed an increase of .4 C, the snowfall was declining during the same time period but the overall precipitation did not reveal any significant change over the same period. With the use of an interactive image analysis computer, the LANDSAT scenes were studied. The terminus of the Pasterze Glacier retreated 348 m and the terminus of the Kleines Fleisskees 121 m since 1965. This approach using LANDSAT MSS and TM digital data in conjunction with meteorological data can be effectively used to monitor regional and worldwide climate changes.

  6. Large-Scale Seasonal Changes in Glacier Thickness Across High Mountain Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuyu; Yi, Shuang; Chang, Le; Sun, Wenke

    2017-10-01

    Recently, increased efforts have been made to estimate the mass budgets of glaciers in High Mountain Asia (HMA). However, seasonal changes in glaciers are poorly understood, despite the fact that seasonal meltwater released from glaciers is a crucial local water resource in HMA. Utilizing satellite altimetry and gravimetry data, we constructed annual changes in glacier elevation and identified two general patterns of the seasonality of glacier elevation changes. Glaciers in the periphery of HMA (except for those in the eastern Himalayas) thicken from approximately December to April-June, thus exhibiting winter and spring accumulation. Glaciers in the inner Tibetan Plateau, especially those in Western Kunlun and Tanggula, accumulate from approximately March to approximately August, thus exhibiting spring and summer accumulation. The amounts of seasonal glacier ablation were obtained using a new approach of direct observations of glacier changes, rather than inferring changes using a climate model.

  7. Rock glaciers in the Suntar‑Khayata Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Lytkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The remote map‑making technique and results of field investigations made possible for the first time to reveal a great number of rock glaciers within the area of the Suntar‑Khayata Range (North‑East Asia. A total of 540 formations were identified. Among them, 47 rock glaciers were classified as corrie (cirque tongue‑shaped formations and 493 ones – as niche lobe‑shaped (single‑ and multi‑lobe rock glaciers. Occurrence of such formations is 8.4/100 km2, that is the largest in the North‑East Asia. The rock glaciers in this region are found within a range of true altitudes from 1297 up to 2402 m asl. The majority of active features, however, are confined to the interval between 1500 and 1900 m asl. Rock glaciers occur in the altitudinal range of 1297 to 2402 m asl. The majority of active features, however, are confined to the interval between 1500 and 1900 m asl, and the main part of active formations is located within the range of 1500‑2500 m. The frequency analysis of true altitudes of the rock‑glacier occurrence indicates that their formation can be caused by the hypsometry of the region relation to morphoclimatic zonality.

  8. On the estimation of ice volume of alpine glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Ya. Macheret

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Volume (V − area (S scaling approach (V = kSp, where V and S are obtained from direct measurements is widely used for ice storage assessments in glacier-mountain systems. Accuracy of this approach was tested using surface area and volume dataset for 121 glaciers of different morphological type and sizes in Altay Mountains. It is shown that to increase total volume estimation accuracy, the coefficients k and p should be calculated for dominant morphological glacier types in the given region. Volume assessments for individual glaciers can be done using limited ice thickness data along the longitudinal profile. For two glaciers in Caucasus volume was calculated using parabolic and Topo to Raster approximation for cross section profiles of their surface and bedrock with acceptable accuracy (from 1 to 33%. It is also shown that ice-thickness data for 10–15 glaciers of dominant morphological type is enough for adequate estimation of the total ice storage in given mountain system with error less than 20%.

  9. Environmental controls on the thermal structure of alpine glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water entrapped in glacier accumulation zones represents a significant latent heat contribution to the development of thermal structure. It also provides a direct link between glacier environments and thermal regimes. We apply a two-dimensional mechanically-coupled model of heat flow to synthetic glacier geometries in order to explore the environmental controls on flowband thermal structure. We use this model to test the sensitivity of thermal structure to physical and environmental variables and to explore glacier thermal response to environmental changes. In different conditions consistent with a warming climate, mean glacier temperature and the volume of temperate ice may either increase or decrease, depending on the competing effects of elevated meltwater production, reduced accumulation zone extent and thinning firn. For two model reference states that exhibit commonly-observed thermal structures, the fraction of temperate ice is shown to decline with warming air temperatures. Mass balance and aquifer sensitivities play an important role in determining how the englacial thermal regimes of alpine glaciers will adjust in the future.

  10. Inferring Past Climate in Equatorial East Africa using Glacier Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, A. M.; Kelly, M. A.; Anderson, B.; Russell, J. M.; Jackson, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Mountain glaciers in the northern and southern middle latitudes advanced nearly synchronously during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), but the timing and magnitude of cooling is less certain for the tropics. Knowing the degree of cooling in high altitude, low latitude regions advances our understanding of the cryosphere in understudied areas and contributes to our understanding of what causes ice ages. Here we use a 2-D ice flow and mass balance model to simulate glacier extents in the Rwenzori Mountains of Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo during the Last Glacial Maximum. In particular, we model steady-state ice extent that matches the dated moraines in the Rwenzori Mountains to infer past climate. Steady-state simulations of LGM glacier extents, which match moraines dated to 20,000 years ago, can be obtained with a 20% reduction in precipitation and a 7°C cooling to match the associated moraines. A 0-50% reduction in precipitation combined with a 5-8°C cooling, respectively, agrees well with paleoclimate estimates from independent proxy records. As expected in a high precipitation environment, these glaciers are very sensitive to decreases in temperature, converting large volumes of precipitation from rain to snow as well as decreasing melting. Glaciers in equatorial Africa appear to have been waxing and waning synchronously and by the same magnitude as glaciers in the middle latitudes, suggesting a common, global forcing mechanism.

  11. Calving on tidewater glaciers amplified by submarine frontal melting

    CERN Document Server

    O'Leary, Martin

    2012-01-01

    While it has been shown repeatedly that ocean conditions exhibit an important control on the behaviour of grounded tidewater glaciers, modelling studies have focused largely on the effects of basal and surface melting. Here, a finite-element model of stresses near the front of a tidewater glacier is used to investigate the effects of frontal melting on calving, independently of the calving criterion used. Applications of the stress model to idealized scenarios reveal that undercutting of the ice front due to frontal melting can drive calving at up to ten times the mean melt rate. Factors which cause increased frontal melt-driven calving include a strong thermal gradient in the ice, and a concentration of frontal melt at the base of the glacier. These properties are typical of both Arctic and Antarctic tidewater glaciers. The finding that frontal melt near the base is a strong driver of calving leads to the conclusion that water temperatures near the bed of the glacier are critically important to the glacier f...

  12. Pluri-decadal evolution of glacier--rock glacier transitional landforms in the central Andes of Chile

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Monnier, Sébastien; Kinnard, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Three glacier–rock glacier transitional landforms in the central Andes of Chile are investigated over the last decades in order to highlight and question the significance of their landscape and flow dynamics. Historical (1955–2000...

  13. The relevance of glacier melt in the water cycle of the Alps: the example of Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Koboltschnig

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper quantifies the contribution of glacier melt to river runoff from compilation and statistical interpretation of data from available studies based on observations or glacio- hydrological modelling for the region of Austria (Austrian Salzach and Inn river basin. A logarithmic fit between the glacier melt contribution and the relative glacierized area was found not only for the long-term mean glacier contributions but also for the glacier melt contribution during the extreme hot an dry summer of 2003. Interestingly, the mean contributions of glacier melt to river runoff do not exceed 15 % for both river catchments and are uncorrelated to glacierization for glacierization values >10 %. This finding, however, has to be seen in the light of the general precipitation increase with altitude for the study region which levels out the increase of absolute melt with glacierization thus resulting in the rather constant value of glacier melt contribution. In order to qualitatively proof this finding another approach has been applied by calculating the quotient qA03 of the mean monthly August runoff in 2003 and the long-term mean August runoff for 38 gauging stations in Austria. The extreme summer 2003 was worth to be analysed as from the meteorological and glaciological point of view an extraordinary situation was observed. During June and July nearly the entire snow-cover melted and during August mainly bare ice melt of glaciers contributed to runoff. The qA03 quotients were calculated between 0.32 for a non-glacierized and 2.0 for a highly glacierized catchment. Using the results of this study the mean and maximum possible glacier melt contribution of catchments can be estimated based on the relative glacierized area. It can also be shown that the found correlation of glacierized area and glacier melt contribution is applicable for the Drau basin where yet no results of modelled glacier melt contributions are

  14. Retreating Canadian glaciers and their implications for regional climate and hydrology in future climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruman, Caio Jorge; Sushama, Laxmi; Winger, Katja

    2017-04-01

    Glaciers are frozen fresh water reservoirs that respond to changes in temperature and snow accumulation at the surface. Outside Greenland and Antarctica, Canada has the greatest concentration of glacier coverage. In western Canada, concern is growing about the impact that changes in glaciers, particularly reducing glacier melt in summer, may have on water resources. Canada's Arctic Glaciers, with an area of approximately 146,000 km2, are among the largest of the Arctic glaciers, and their possible contribution to sea level rise is not negligible. Regional Climate Models (RCM) are an important tool to assess the projected changes to climate, particularly due to its high resolution compared with GCMs. Recently, a dynamic glacier scheme, based on volume-area relationship, has been introduced in CRCM5. Both offline (i.e., glacier scheme and land surface scheme) and online (CRCM5 with the new glacier scheme) simulations were performed for the 2000-2100 period over a domain covering the glaciers of western and Arctic Canada. The offline simulations were driven by outputs from a CRCM5 transient climate change simulation, driven by CanESM2 at the lateral boundaries, for RCPs 4.5 and 8.5. This driving data shows an increase in winter precipitation for the Arctic region and a decrease over the west Canadian glaciers. Despite the increase in winter precipitation for the Arctic glacier regions, the offline simulations suggest significant decreases in glacier fraction for the region, suggesting that the gain of mass from the increase in precipitation over the Arctic Glaciers won't offset the glacier mass loss due to the temperature increase. Results also suggest significant decreases in glacier fraction and volume for the west Canadian glaciers. The results of the offline simulation will be confirmed with the coupled simulation, and the impact of retreating glaciers on the regional climate and hydrology will be presented based on the coupled simulation.

  15. Reducing risks from hazardous glacier lakes in the Cordillera Blanca (Peru): Six decades of experience and perspectives for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portocarrero, Cesar; Cochachin, Alejo; Frey, Holger; González, Cesar; Haeberli, Wilfried; Huggel, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Outbursts from glacier lakes at various spatial and temporal scales have had marked geomorphological effects in many mountain ranges. In many glacierized Andean mountain regions substrates of human settlements made out of flood and debris-flow deposits are testimonies of such events. Examples in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, are the towns of Caraz, Carhuaz or parts of Huaraz. Continued glacier shrinking since the end of the Little Ice Age caused the formation or enlargement of numerous lakes. The outburst of Laguna Palcacocha, destroying the centre of Huaraz and causing more than 1800 losses of life in December 1941, marked the beginning of systematic risk reduction work in Peru. Corresponding efforts included glacier and lake inventories, hazard assessments, definition of high-risk situations, and completion of engineering work for lake-level lowering in more than 30 cases. The latter comprises outlet reinforcements on morainic dams as well as artificial tunnels in bedrock thresholds. This work has been remarkably efficient as documented in the latest case of the Laguna Huallcacocha (Carhuaz-Ancash), where the earlier made installations withstood the erosive power of an impact wave from an ice avalanche in 2015. In the case of the Laguna 513, the impact wave and far-reaching flood caused by a rock/ice avalanche from Nevado Hualcán in April 2010 showed that the risk had been essentially reduced by the preventive lake-level lowering in the early 1990s but not to zero. Risk assessments, planning, construction and non-structural risk reduction efforts continue. Work is in progress to increase the safety of Laguna Palcacocha where extensive assessments and model calculations had been carried out. Risks related to rock/ice avalanches into lakes from steep icy slopes and related to de-buttressing processes as well as long-term permafrost degradation increases. Based on morphological indications and numerical modelling (GlabTop) an inventory of possible future lakes

  16. Modelling glacier-bed overdeepenings and possible future lakes for the glaciers in the Himalaya-Karakoram region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linsbauer, A.; Frey, H.; Haeberli, W.

    2016-01-01

    retreat may fill with water and form new lakes. In this study, the bed overdeepenings for ∼28000 glaciers (40 775km2) of the Himalaya-Karakoram region are modelled using GlabTop2 (Glacier Bed Topography model version 2), in which ice thickness is inferred from surface slope by parameterizing basal shear...... future lake formation with associated opportunities (tourism, hydropower) and risks (lake outbursts)....

  17. Glacier surges and landforms in a permafrost environment at the tidewater glacier Paulabreen, inner Van Mijenfjorden, Svalbard

    OpenAIRE

    Kristensen, Lene

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents a study of the landsystem of the Svalbard tidewater glacier Paulabreen and its late Holocene surge moraines, focusing on the glaciology and the glacial geology. An active surge of Skobreen/Paulabreen was observed and the glacier dynamics and stress regime was studied using satellite images, a time-lapse movie and photographs. A persistent subglacial conduit was found beneath the medial moraine between Paulabreen and Bakaninbreen, and we postulate that this constrained sur...

  18. Inventory Control and Purchasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mason

    1981-01-01

    An inventory control system stimulates competitive bidding, resulting in the best price for an item. Other cost savings can be achieved by specifying prepayment of freight charges by the successful bidder, seeking standardization of products, and purchasing jointly with nearby municipalities and school districts. (Author/MLF)

  19. Inventory order crossovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riezebos, J.

    2006-01-01

    The control policies that are used in inventory management systems assume that orders arrive in the same sequence as they were ordered. Due to changes in supply chains and markets, this assumption is no longer valid. This paper aims at providing an improved understanding of the phenomenon of order

  20. Cooperative Alaska Forest Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Malone; Jingjing Liang; Edmond C. Packee

    2009-01-01

    The Cooperative Alaska Forest Inventory (CAFI) is a comprehensive database of boreal forest conditions and dynamics in Alaska. The CAFI consists of field-gathered information from numerous permanent sample plots distributed across interior and south-central Alaska including the Kenai Peninsula. The CAFI currently has 570 permanent sample plots on 190 sites...

  1. Mass Producing Concept Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin-Doxas, K.; Klymkowsky, M.; Doxas, I.

    2005-12-01

    Concept Inventories are research based assessment instruments which derive their validity and reliability from well researched distracters that represent students' dominant misconceptions in the field. They have formed the backbone of research based reform efforts in Physics by providing valid, reliable common assessment instruments with which to evaluate different teaching approaches and materials, and many disciplines are in the process of developing large numbers of Concept Inventories for their own subject areas. Unfortunately, Concept Inventories are labour and time intensive, with instruments taking anywhere from 2-8 years to develop, and correspondingly high price tags. The time and cost is directly related to the fact that valid, reliable instruments require mapping the dominant misconceptions in a field, which is usually a time consuming and labour intensive task. This paper will describe how we use Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) with unsupervised clustering of the LSA vectors to identify and classify misconceptions in various science disciplines, considerably speeding up the process of misconception discovery and classification. The paper will present results from Astronomy and Biology, and will describe current efforts to develop a Concept Inventory for Space Physics.

  2. Materials inventory management manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This NASA Materials Inventory Management Manual (NHB 4100.1) is issued pursuant to Section 203(c)(1) of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (42 USC 2473). It sets forth policy, performance standards, and procedures governing the acquisition, management and use of materials. This Manual is effective upon receipt.

  3. Student Attitude Inventory - 1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, Gerald M.; Aleamoni, Lawrence M.

    This 42-item Student Attitude Inventory (SAI) was administered to entering college freshmen at the University of Illinois (see TM 001 015). The SAI items are divided into nine categories on the basis of content as follows: voting behavior, drug usage, financial, Viet Nam war, education, religious behavior, pollution, housing, and alienation. A…

  4. Hybrid inventory, gravimetry and altimetry (HIGA) mass balance product for Greenland and the Canadian Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colgan, W.; Abdalati, W.; Citterio, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel inversion algorithm that generates a mass balance field that is simultaneously consistent with independent observations of glacier inventory derived from optical imagery, cryosphere-attributed mass trends derived from satellite gravimetry, and ice surface elevation trends derived...... from airborne and satellite altimetry. We use this algorithm to assess mass balance across Greenland and the Canadian Arctic over the Sep-2003 to Oct-2009 period at 26 km resolution. We evaluate local algorithm-inferred mass balance against forty in situ point observations. This evaluation yields...... Arctic. These magnitudes of mass loss are dependent on the gravimetry-derived spherical harmonic mass trend we invert. We spatially partition the transient glacier continuity equation by differencing algorithm-inferred mass balance from modeled surface mass balance, in order to solve the horizontal...

  5. Glacier dynamics over the last quarter of a century at Helheim, Kangerdlugssuaq and 14 other major Greenland outlet glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Bevan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Greenland ice sheet is experiencing increasing rates of mass loss, the majority of which results from changes in discharge from tidewater glaciers. Both atmospheric and ocean drivers have been implicated in these dynamic changes, but understanding the nature of the response has been hampered by the lack of measurements of glacier flow rates predating the recent period of warming. Here, using Landsat-5 data from 1985 onwards, we extend back in time the record of surface velocities and ice-front position for 16 of Greenland's fastest-flowing tidewater glaciers, and compare these to more recent data from Landsat-7 and satellite-borne synthetic-aperture radar. Climate re-analysis data and sea surface temperatures from 1982 show that since 1995 most of Greenland and its surrounding oceans have experienced significant overall warming, and a switch to a warming trend. During the period from 1985 to 1995 when Greenland and the surrounding oceans were not warming, major tidewater outlet glaciers around Greenland, including Kangerdlugssuaq and Helheim, were dynamically stable. Since the mid-1990s, glacier discharge has consistently been both greater and more variable. Together, these observations support the hypothesis that recent dynamic change is a rapid response to climate forcing. Both air and ocean temperatures in this region are predicted to continue to warm, and will therefore likely drive further change in outlet glacier discharge.

  6. Quiescent-phase evolution of a surge-type glacier: Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, T.A.; Mayo, L.R.; Echelmeyer, K.A.; Harrison, W.D.

    1996-01-01

    Black Rapids Glacier, a surge-type glacier in the Alaska Range, most recently surged in 1936-37 and is currently in its quiescent phase. Mass balance, ice velocity and thickness change have been measured at three to ten sites from 1972 to 1994. The annual speed has undergone cyclical fluctuations of as much as 45% about the mean speed. Ice thickness and surface slope did not change enough to cause the speed fluctuations through changes in ice deformation, which indicates that they are being driven by changes in basal motion. The behavior of Black Rapids Glacier during this quiescent phase is significantly different from that of Variegated Glacier, another well-studied surge-type glacier in Alaska. The present medial-moraine configuration of Black Rapids Glacier indicates that a surge could occur at any time. However, ice velocity data indicate that the next surge may not be imminent. We believe that there is little chance that the next surge will cross and dam the Delta River.

  7. Wisconsin's fourth forest inventory: area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Brad Smith

    1986-01-01

    In 1983, the fourth Wisconsin forest inventory found 14.8 million acres of commercial forest land, an increase of nearly 2% since 1968. This bulletin analyzes findings from the inventory and presents detailed tables of forest area.

  8. Modified temperature index model for estimating the melt water discharge from debris-covered Lirung Glacier, Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Parajuli, A; Chand, M. B.; Kayastha, R.B.; Shea, J. M.; Mool, P. K.

    2015-01-01

    In the Nepalese Himalayas, the complex topography, occurrence of debris covered glaciers, and limited data availability creates substantial difficulties for modelling glacier melt. The proper recognition of melt processes governs the accurate estimation of melt water from glacier dominated systems, even in the presence of debris-covered glaciers. This paper presents a glacier melt model developed for the Lirung sub-basin of Langtang valley, which has both a clean glacier area, 5.86 km2, and a...

  9. The Church Mountain Sturzstrom (Mega-Landslide), Glacier, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, M.R.; Easterbrook, D.J. (Western Washington Univ., Bellingham, WA (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Detailed investigation of an ancient sturzstrom or mega-landslide near Glacier, Washington has revealed it areal extent, approximate volume, age, geomorphology, source area, and possible causes. Stratigraphic and lithologic investigations indicate Church Mountain as the source area; therefore, this mega-landslide has been named the Church Mountain Sturzstrom (CMS). The CMS deposit is approximately 9 km in length, averages about 1 km in width, and has an estimated volume of 3 [times] 10[sup 8] m[sup 3]. Characteristics of the morphology and stratigraphy of the CMS deposit are suggestive of a sturzstrom origin, and may be indicative of sturzstrom elsewhere in the world. The overall stratigraphy of the deposit mimics the stratigraphy of the source area. The deposit is very compact, poorly sorted, matrix supported, and composed of highly angular clasts. Over steepening of the mountain due to glacial erosion may have contributed to the cause of failure, although the age of the CMS is at least 7,000 years younger than deglaciation. Four trees were C[sup 14] dated, yielding ages of about 2,700 B.P. for the CMS. Several other mega-landslides have been identified within 5--30 km of the CMS. The close proximity of these mega-landslides to the CMS suggests the possibility that they may have been triggered by an earthquake, although the ages of the other slides are currently unknown. The age of the CMS correlates approximately with age ranges of co-seismic events occurring along the west coast of Washington, further suggesting the possibility of an earthquake triggering mechanism.

  10. Denmark's National Inventory Report 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Lyck, Erik; Mikkelsen, Mette Hjorth

    2010-01-01

    This report is Denmark's National Inventory Report 2010. The report contains information on Denmark's emission inventories for all years' from 1990 to 2008 for CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs and SF6, NOx, CO, NMVOC, SO2.......This report is Denmark's National Inventory Report 2010. The report contains information on Denmark's emission inventories for all years' from 1990 to 2008 for CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs and SF6, NOx, CO, NMVOC, SO2....

  11. Practical application of inventory models

    OpenAIRE

    RŮŽIČKOVÁ, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    This bachelor thesis is based on finding a suitable method of supplying a company. The emphasis lays on gaining data about inventory, supplying and demand of a company. The teoretical part deals with the allocation of inventory, with the determination of inventory managment models that can be applied in practice, and with demand and costs. The practical part deals with the analysis of stocks in the company, with used model inventory management and with finding of demand. For finding the model...

  12. Glacier contribution to streamflow in two headwaters of the Huasco River, Dry Andes of Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gascoin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative assessment of glacier contribution to present-day streamflow is a prerequisite to the anticipation of climate change impact on water resources in the Dry Andes. In this paper we focus on two glaciated headwater catchments of the Huasco Basin (Chile, 29° S. The combination of glacier monitoring data for five glaciers (Toro 1, Toro 2, Esperanza, Guanaco, Estrecho and Ortigas with five automatic streamflow records at sites with glacier coverage of 0.4 to 11 % allows the estimation of the mean annual glacier contribution to discharge between 2003/2004 and 2007/2008 hydrological years. In addition, direct manual measurements of glacier runoff were conducted in summer at the snouts of four glaciers, which provide the instantaneous contribution of glacier meltwater to stream runoff during summer. The results show that the mean annual glacier contribution to streamflow ranges between 3.3 and 23 %, which is greater than the glaciated fraction of the catchments. We argue that glacier contribution is partly enhanced by the effect of snowdrift from the non-glacier area to the glacier surface. Glacier mass loss is evident over the study period, with a mean of −0.84 m w.e. yr−1 for the period 2003/2004–2007/2008, and also contributes to increase glacier runoff. An El Niño episode in 2002 resulted in high snow accumulation, modifying the hydrological regime and probably reducing the glacier contribution in favor of seasonal snowmelt during the subsequent 2002/2003 hydrological year. At the hourly timescale, summertime glacier contributions are highly variable in space and time, revealing large differences in effective melting rates between glaciers and glacierets (from 1 mm w.e. h−1 to 6 mm w.e. h−1.

  13. Microbial community development on the surface of Hans and Werenskiold Glaciers (Svalbard, Arctic): a comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzesiak, Jakub; Górniak, Dorota; Świątecki, Aleksander; Aleksandrzak-Piekarczyk, Tamara; Szatraj, Katarzyna; Zdanowski, Marek K

    2015-09-01

    Surface ice and cryoconite holes of two types of polythermal Svalbard Glaciers (Hans Glacier--grounded tidewater glacier and Werenskiold Glacier-land-based valley glacier) were investigated in terms of chemical composition, microbial abundance and diversity. Gathered data served to describe supraglacial habitats and to compare microbe-environment interactions on those different type glaciers. Hans Glacier samples displayed elevated nutrient levels (DOC, nitrogen and seston) compared to Werenskiold Glacier. Adjacent tundra formations, bird nesting sites and marine aerosol were candidates for allochtonic enrichment sources. Microbial numbers were comparable on both glaciers, with surface ice containing cells in the range of 10(4) mL(-1) and cryoconite sediment 10(8) g(-1) dry weight. Denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis band-based clustering revealed differences between glaciers in terms of dominant bacterial taxa structure. Microbial community on Werenskiold Glacier benefited from the snow-released substances. On Hans Glacier, this effect was not as pronounced, affecting mainly the photoautotrophs. Over-fertilization of Hans Glacier surface was proposed as the major factor, desensitizing the microbial community to the snow melt event. Nitrogen emerged as a limiting factor in surface ice habitats, especially to Eukaryotic algae.

  14. Sensitivity of very small glaciers in the Swiss Alps to future climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias eHuss

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Very small glaciers (<0.5 km2 account for more than 80% of the total number of glaciers in mid- to low-latitude mountain ranges. Although their total area and volume is small compared to larger glaciers, they are a relevant component of the cryosphere, contributing to landscape formation, local hydrology and sea-level rise. Worldwide glacier monitoring mostly focuses on medium-sized to large glaciers leaving us with a limited understanding of the response of dwarf glaciers to climate change. In this study, we present a comprehensive modeling framework to assess past and future changes of very small glaciers at the mountain-range scale. Among other processes our model accounts for snow redistribution, changes in glacier geometry and the time-varying effect of supraglacial debris. It computes the mass balance distribution, the englacial temperature regime and proglacial runoff. The evolution of 1,133 individual glaciers in the Swiss Alps is modeled in detail until 2060 based on new distributed data sets. Our results indicate that 52% of all very small glaciers in Switzerland will completely disappear within the next 25 years. However, a few avalanche-fed glaciers at low elevation might be able to survive even substantial atmospheric warming. We find highly variable sensitivities of very small glaciers to air temperature change, with gently-sloping, low-elevation, and debris-covered glaciers being most sensitive.

  15. Modeling Ocean-Forced Changes in Smith Glacier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilien, D.; Joughin, I. R.; Smith, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Glaciers along the Amundsen Coast are changing rapidly, which has drawn substantial scientific and public attention. Modeling and observation suggest warm-water intrusion and consequent melting as the cause of observed changes, and that unstoppable retreat may have already been triggered in some drainages. While Pine Island and Thwaites Glaciers are losing the most mass and have been the predominant objects study, other systems, particularly Smith, Pope and Kohler Glaciers and the corresponding Dotson and Crosson Shelves, are changing more rapidly relative to their size. Though smaller, these glaciers still have potentially large implications for overall regional dynamics as their beds connect below sea level to surrounding basins. In particular, the long, deep trough of Smith Glacier nearly links to the large eastern tributary of Thwaites, potentially causing rapid changes of Smith to have significant impact on the continuing retreat of Thwaites.We implemented a numerical model in Elmer/Ice, an open-source, full-Stokes, finite-element software package, to investigate the response of the Smith/Pope/Kohler system to different initial conditions. We use various parameterizations of sub-shelf melting with constant magnitude to examine the sensitivity of overall dynamics to melt distribution. Because melt distribution affects lateral buttressing and upstream grounded areas, it is potentially an important control on ice shelf and outlet glacier dynamics. Through comparison to the most recent velocity data, we evaluate the ability of differing melt parameterizations to reproduce the behavior currently seen in Smith/Pope/Kohler glaciers. In addition, we investigate the effect of using different years of velocity data with constant elevation input when initiating model runs. By comparing results over the satellite record to initiation with synchronous observations, we assess the accuracy of the often necessary practice of using differently timestamped datasets.

  16. Application of a minimal glacier model to Hansbreen, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Oerlemans

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hansbreen is a well studied tidewater glacier in the southwestern part of Svalbard, currently about 16 km long. Since the end of the 19th century it has been retreating over a distance of 2.7 km. In this paper the global dynamics of Hansbreen are studied with a minimal glacier model, in which the ice mechanics are strongly parameterised and a simple law for iceberg calving is used. The model is calibrated by reconstructing a climate history in such a way that observed and simulated glacier length match. In addition, the calving law is tuned to reproduce the observed mean calving flux for the period 2000–2008.

    Equilibrium states are studied for a wide range of values of the equilibrium line altitude. The dynamics of the glacier are strongly nonlinear. The height-mass balance feedback and the water depth-calving flux feedback give rise to cusp catastrophes in the system.

    For the present climatic conditions Hansbreen cannot survive. Depending on the imposed climate change scenario, in AD 2100 Hansbreen is predicted to have a length between 10 and 12 km. The corresponding decrease in ice volume (relative to the volume in AD 2000 is 45 to 65%.

    Finally the late-Holocene history of Hansbreen is considered. We quote evidence from dated peat samples that Hansbreen did not exist during the Holocene Climatic Optimum. We speculate that at the end of the mid-Holocene Climatic Optimum Hansbreen could advance because the glacier bed was at least 50 m higher than today, and because the tributary glaciers on the western side may have supplied a significant amount of mass to the main stream. The excavation of the overdeepening and the formation of the shoal at the glacier terminus probably took place during the Little Ice Age.

  17. Climate-hydrology-ecology interactions in glacierized river systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, David; Brown, Lee; Milner, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    High climatic sensitivity and low anthropogenic influence make glacierized river basins important environments for examining hydrological and ecological response to global change. This presentation is based on previous and ongoing research in glacierized river basins (located in the French Pyrenees, New Zealand and Swedish Lapland), which adopts an interdisciplinary approach to investigate the climate-hydrology-ecology cascade. Data are used to advance hypotheses concerning impacts of climate change/ variability on glacier river system hydrology and ecology. Aquatic ecosystems in high latitude and altitude environments are influenced strongly by cryospheric and hydrological processes due to links between atmospheric forcing, snowpack/ glacier mass-balance, river runoff, physico-chemistry and biota. In the current phase of global warming, many glaciers are retreating. Shrinking snow and ice-masses may alter spatial and temporal dynamics in bulk basin runoff with significant changes in the relative contributions of snowmelt, glacier-melt and groundwater to stream flow. The timing of peak snow- and ice-melt may shift; and proportion of stream flow sourced from rainfall-runoff and groundwater may increase. In this presentation, the influence of changing water source contributions on physico-chemical habitat and, in turn, benthic communities is assessed using an alternative alpine stream classification. In the future, this model predicts more rapid downstream change in benthic communities as meltwater contributions decline; and, at the basin-scale, biodiversity may be reduced due to less spatio-temporal heterogeneity in water sources contributions and, thus, physico-chemical habitat. Integrated, long-term research into the climate-hydrology-ecology cascade in other glacierized river basins is vital because interdisciplinary science is fundamental: to predicting stream hydrology and ecology under scenarios of future climate/ variability, to assessing the utility of

  18. A numerical study of glacier advance over deforming till

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J.-M. C. Leysinger Vieli

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The advance of a glacier over a deforming sediment layer is analysed numerically. We treat this problem as a contact problem involving two slowly-deforming viscous bodies. The surface evolution of the two bodies, and of the contact interface between them, is followed through time. Using various different non-linear till rheologies, we show how the mode of advance depends on the relative effective viscosities of ice and till. Three modes of advances are observed: (1 overriding, where the glacier advances through ice deformation only and without deforming the sediment; (2 plug-flow, where the sediment is strongly deformed, the ice moves forward as a block and a bulge is built in front of the glacier; and (3 mixed-flow, where the glacier advances through both ice and sediment deformation. For the cases of both overriding and mixed-flow, an inverse depth-age relationship within the ice is obtained. A series of model experiments show the contrast in effective viscosity between ice and till to be the single most important model parameter defining the mode of advance and the resulting thickness distribution of the till. Our model experiments indicate that the thickness of the deforming till layer is greatest close to the glacier front. Measurements of till thickness taken in such locations may not be representative of deforming till thickness elsewhere. Given sufficiently large contrast in effective viscosity between ice and till, a sediment bulge is formed in front of the glacier. During glacier advance, the bulge quickly reaches a steady state form strongly resembling single-crested push moraines. Inspection of particle paths within the sediment bulge, shows that particles within the till travel at a different speed from the bulge itself, and the push moraine to advance as a form-conserving non-linear wave.

  19. Inventory Costs: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka, Clifford H.; Ursery, Nancy

    1985-01-01

    Presents procedures and statistics for a manual inventory and an inventory coordinated with conversion to an online circulation system at University of Kansas main library. Results of this two-phase inventory (Dewey Decimal-classified materials, LC-classified materials) and the cost-effectiveness of such a project in a large library are…

  20. Comparing the spatial variability of snow depth on glacierized and non- glacierized surfaces using a geostatistical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K.; Schöber, J.; Stötter, J.

    2012-04-01

    Snow water storage is crucial for discharge generation in alpine headwater catchments. Hence, information on the snow pack and its spatial distribution and variation is of vital importance for the application of hydrological models. However, the assessment and quantification of the water equivalent stored in the snow cover is complicated due to several factors: i) wind or gravity driven relocation of snow results in heterogeneous spatial snow cover and snow depth patterns; ii) measuring snow characteristics (e.g. snow depth or snow water equivalent) and their spatial distribution is difficult in high alpine catchments and often limited to few point measurements only. Remote sensing can provide area-wide information on snow, but often the spatial resolution is too coarse and the temporal coverage is too low. Furthermore, sensors like MODIS or Landsat provide information on snow cover distribution only, but not on snow depth which is highly relevant for hydrological applications. Airborne Laser Scan (ALS) data can bridge this lack of information as there precise information on both distribution and depth of the snow cover is provided. In this paper, we analyse the spatial distribution of snow depth using data from ALS flights in the glacierized parts of the Oetztal Alps, Austria. Snow depth is calculated from consecutive ALS flights at the beginning and the end of the snow accumulation period. The analysis of the spatial distribution of snow depth on both glacierized and non-glacierized surfaces is based on a geostatistical approach. From ALS snow depth data, six subsets (350 m x 350 m, 1 m raster width) were selected for the analysis: two subsets from Hintereisferner glacier, two subsets from Kesselwandferner glacier, and two subsets from adjacent, non- glacierized areas. In order to avoid biased results, the subsets from glacierized surfaces were chosen on areas without crevasses. The variability of snow depth is analysed with respect to surface properties (i

  1. Indian scales and inventories

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesan, S

    2010-01-01

    This conceptual, perspective and review paper on Indian scales and inventories begins with clarification on the historical and contemporary meanings of psychometry before linking itself to the burgeoning field of clinimetrics in their applications to the practice of clinical psychology and psychiatry. Clinimetrics is explained as a changing paradigm in the design, administration, and interpretation of quantitative tests, techniques or procedures applied to measurement of clinical variables, t...

  2. PROCESSING REVERSE LOGISTICS INVENTORIES

    OpenAIRE

    Bajor, Ivona; Novačko, Luka; Ogrizović, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Developed logistics systems have organized reverse logistics flows and are continuously analyzing product returns, tending to detect patterns in oscillations of returning products in certain time periods. Inventory management in reverse logistics systems depends on different criteria, regarding goods categories, formed contracts between subjects of supply chains, uncertainty in manufacturer’s quantities of DOA (dead on arrival) products, etc. The developing logistics systems, such as the Croa...

  3. Climate change and tropical Andean glaciers: Past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuille, Mathias; Francou, Bernard; Wagnon, Patrick; Juen, Irmgard; Kaser, Georg; Mark, Bryan G.; Bradley, Raymond S.

    2008-08-01

    Observations on glacier extent from Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia give a detailed and unequivocal account of rapid shrinkage of tropical Andean glaciers since the Little Ice Age (LIA). This retreat however, was not continuous but interrupted by several periods of stagnant or even advancing glaciers, most recently around the end of the 20th century. New data from mass balance networks established on over a dozen glaciers allows comparison of the glacier behavior in the inner and outer tropics. It appears that glacier variations are quite coherent throughout the region, despite different sensitivities to climatic forcing such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, etc. In parallel with the glacier retreat, climate in the tropical Andes has changed significantly over the past 50-60 years. Temperature in the Andes has increased by approximately 0.1 °C/decade, with only two of the last 20 years being below the 1961-90 average. Precipitation has slightly increased in the second half of the 20th century in the inner tropics and decreased in the outer tropics. The general pattern of moistening in the inner tropics and drying in the subtropical Andes is dynamically consistent with observed changes in the large-scale circulation, suggesting a strengthening of the tropical atmospheric circulation. Model projections of future climate change in the tropical Andes indicate a continued warming of the tropical troposphere throughout the 21st century, with a temperature increase that is enhanced at higher elevations. By the end of the 21st century, following the SRES A2 emission scenario, the tropical Andes may experience a massive warming on the order of 4.5-5 °C. Predicted changes in precipitation include an increase in precipitation during the wet season and a decrease during the dry season, which would effectively enhance the seasonal hydrological cycle in the tropical Andes. These observed and predicted changes in climate affect the tropical glacier energy balance through its

  4. Stratigraphic reconnaissance of the Middle Jurassic Red Glacier Formation, Tuxedni Group, at Red Glacier, Cook Inlet, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    LePain, David L.; Stanley, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    The Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are implementing ongoing programs to characterize the petroleum potential of Cook Inlet basin. Since 2009 this program has included work on the Mesozoic stratigraphy of lower Cook Inlet, including the Middle Jurassic Tuxedni Group between Tuxedni and Iniskin bays (LePain and others, 2013; Stanley and others, 2013; fig. 5-1). The basal unit in the group, the Red Glacier Formation (fig. 5-2), is thought to be the principal source rock for oil produced in upper Cook Inlet, and available geochemical data support this contention (Magoon and Anders, 1992; Magoon, 1994). Despite its economic significance very little has been published on the formation since Detterman and Hartsock’s (1966) seminal contribution on the geology of the Iniskin–Tuxedni area nearly 50 years ago. Consequently its stratigraphy, contact relations with bounding formations, and source rock characteristics are poorly known. During the 2014 field season, a nearly continuous stratigraphic section through the Red Glacier Formation in its type area at Red Glacier was located and measured to characterize sedimentary facies and to collect a suite of samples for analyses of biostratigraphy, Rock-Eval pyrolysis, vitrinite reflectance, and sandstone composition (fig. 5-3).The poorly known nature of the Red Glacier Formation is likely due to its remote location, steep terrain, and the fact that the type section is split into two segments that are more than 3 km apart. The lower 375 m segment of the formation is on the ridge between Red Glacier and Lateral Glacier and the upper 1,009 m segment is on the ridge between Red Glacier and Boulder Creek (fig. 5-3). Structural complications in the area add to the difficulty in understanding how these two segments fit together.

  5. 170 years of debris covered glacier surface evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölg, Nico; Bolch, Tobias; Vieli, Andreas; Bauder, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    The local effect of debris layer thickness on ice melt can be studied considering short time periods and is quite well known to date. How the reduced melt, the additional weight of the debris, and the formation of ice cliffs and lakes are linked with the flow behaviour of the glacier is less well understood and much longer time periods are required for such investigations, typically in the order of the response time of the respective glacier, if possible even longer. For this reason we selected to study Zmuttgletscher in the Western Swiss Alps, which today is a heavily debris covered valley glacier. We produced a time series of glacier area, debris cover and surface elevation changes on the basis of 14 old maps and aerial images, 11 orthoimages and additional terrestrial photographs starting at the end of the little ice age (LIA) in 1859. During these 170 years the glacier lost a volume of 52.9*106 m3 (mean thickness change of -89 m) at its tongue while its debris covered area increased from about 14 to 20%. Several periods of variable retreat rates can be discerned and spatially varying change patterns become visible. Commonly the glacier has been retreating, but we can discern locally different elevation change, and also stable to positive periods in the 1980s become visible on different dynamical section of the glacier. Surface features that are commonly linked to debris cover and ice flow have emerged after the end of the LIA. For example, supraglacial thermokarst features become visible in 1880 and are widespread in the lower area of the glacier tongue in 1946. Considering big ice cliffs that are typically related to a realtively high, steep elevation difference and a large surface area, their number has increased somewhat from zero in 1859 to about 15 today. However, its the small ice cliffs, lakes and surface water channels that have emerged and also contribute to stronger melt through either exposed clean ice or ice in contact with water. Elevation

  6. Resolving inventory differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, J.H.; Clark, J.P.

    1991-12-31

    Determining the cause of an inventory difference (ID) that exceeds warning or alarm limits should not only involve investigation into measurement methods and reexamination of the model assumptions used in the calculation of the limits, but also result in corrective actions that improve the quality of the accountability measurements. An example illustrating methods used by Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel to resolve an ID is presented that may be useful to other facilities faced with a similar problem. After first determining that no theft or diversion of material occurred and correcting any accountability calculation errors, investigation into the IDs focused on volume and analytical measurements, limit of error of inventory difference (LEID) modeling assumptions, and changes in the measurement procedures and methods prior to the alarm. There had been a gradual gain trend in IDs prior to the alarm which was reversed by the alarm inventory. The majority of the NM in the facility was stored in four large tanks which helped identify causes for the alarm. The investigation, while indicating no diversion or theft, resulted in changes in the analytical method and in improvements in the measurement and accountability that produced a 67% improvement in the LEID.

  7. The impact of glacier geometry on meltwater plume structure and submarine melt in Greenland fjords

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carroll, D.; Sutherland, D. A.; Hudson, B.; Moon, T.; Catania, G. A.; Shroyer, E. L.; Nash, J. D.; Bartholomaus, T. C.; Felikson, D.; Stearns, L. A.; Noël, B. P Y; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Meltwater from the Greenland Ice Sheet often drains subglacially into fjords, driving upwelling plumes at glacier termini. Ocean models and observations of submarine termini suggest that plumes enhance melt and undercutting, leading to calving and potential glacier destabilization. Here we

  8. Point Measurements of Surface Mass Balance, Eklutna Glacier, Alaska, 2008-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of a time-series of direct measurements of glacier surface mass balance, at Eklutna Glacier, Alaska. It includes seasonal measurements of...

  9. Point measurements of surface mass balance, Eklutna Glacier, Alaska, 2008-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, Louis; Loso, Michael G.; Geck, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This data set consists of a time-series of direct measurements of glacier surface mass balance, at Eklutna Glacier, Alaska. It includes seasonal measurements of winter snow accumulation and summer snow and ice ablation.

  10. Bacterial biodiversity from Roopkund Glacier, Himalayan mountain ranges, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Suman; Srinivas, T N R; Pindi, Pavan Kumar; Kishore, K Hara; Begum, Z; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Singh, Ashish Kumar; Pratibha, M S; Yasala, Arun K; Reddy, G S N; Shivaji, S

    2010-07-01

    The bacterial diversity of two soil samples collected from the periphery of the Roopkund glacial lake and one soil sample from the surface of the Roopkund Glacier in the Himalayan ranges was determined by constructing three 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. The three clone libraries yielded a total of 798 clones belonging to 25 classes. Actinobacteria was the most predominant class (>10% of the clones) in the three libraries. In the library from the glacial soil, class Betaproteobacteria (24.2%) was the most predominant. The rarefaction analysis indicated coverage of 43.4 and 41.2% in the samples collected from the periphery of the lake thus indicating a limited bacterial diversity covered; at the same time, the coverage of 98.4% in the glacier sample indicated most of the diversity was covered. Further, the bacterial diversity in the Roopkund glacier soil was low, but was comparable with the bacterial diversity of a few other glaciers. The results of principal component analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene clone library data, percentages of OTUs and biogeochemical data revealed that the lake soil samples were different from the glacier soil sample and the biogeochemical properties affected the diversity of microbial communities in the soil samples.

  11. Changing Hydrology in Glacier-fed High Altitude Andean Peatbogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayback, D. A.; Yager, K.; Baraer, M.; Mohr, K. I.; Argollo, J.; Wigmore, O.; Meneses, R. I.; Mark, B. G.

    2012-12-01

    Montane peatbogs in the glacierized Andean highlands of Peru and Bolivia provide critical forage for camelids (llama and alpaca) in regionally extensive pastoral agriculture systems. During the long dry season, these wetlands often provide the only available green forage. A key question for the future of these peatbog systems, and the livelihoods they support, is the impact of climate change and glacier recession on their hydrology, and thus forage production. We have already documented substantial regional glacier recession, of, on average, approximately 30% of surface area over the past two decades. As glaciers begin to retreat under climate change, there is initially a period of increased meltwater outflow, culminating in a period of "peak water", and followed by a continual decline in outflows. Based on previous work, we know that some glaciers in the region have already passed peak water conditions, and are now declining. To better understand the impacts of these processes on peatbog hydrology and productivity, we have begun collecting a variety of surface data at several study sites in both Bolivia and Peru. These include precipitation, stream flow, water levels, water chemistry and isotope analyses, and peatbog biodiversity and biomass. These measurements will be used in conjunction with a regional model driven by satellite data to predict likely future impacts. We will present the results from these initial surface measurements, and an overview of satellite datasets to be used in the regional model.

  12. Modeling Glacier Elevation Change from DEM Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a methodology for glacier elevation reconstruction from Digital Elevation Model (DEM time series (tDEM is described for modeling the evolution of glacier elevation and estimating related volume change, with focus on medium-resolution and noisy satellite DEMs. The method is robust with respect to outliers in individual DEM products. Fox Glacier and Franz Josef Glacier in New Zealand are used as test cases based on 31 Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER DEMs and the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM DEM. We obtained a mean surface elevation lowering rate of −0.51 ± 0.02 m·a−1 and −0.09 ± 0.02 m·a−1 between 2000 and 2014 for Fox and Franz Josef Glacier, respectively. The specific volume difference between 2000 and 2014 was estimated as −0.77 ± 0.13 m·a−1 and −0.33 ± 0.06 m·a−1 by our tDEM method. The comparably moderate thinning rates are mainly due to volume gains after 2013 that compensate larger thinning rates earlier in the series. Terminus thickening prevailed between 2002 and 2007.

  13. HIMALA: Climate Impacts on Glaciers, Snow, and Hydrology in the Himalayan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly Elizabeth; Ouyang, Hua; Habib, Shahid; Shrestha, Basanta; Shrestha, Mandira; Panday, Prajjwal; Tzortziou, Maria; Policelli, Frederick; Artan, Guleid; Giriraj, Amarnath; hide

    2010-01-01

    Glaciers are the largest reservoir of freshwater on Earth, supporting one third of the world s population. The Himalaya possess one of the largest resources of snow and ice, which act as a freshwater reservoir for more than 1.3 billion people. This article describes a new project called HIMALA, which focuses on utilizing satellite-based products for better understanding of hydrological processes of the river basins of the region. With support from the US Agency for International Development (USAID), the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), together with its partners and member countries, has been working on the application of satellite-based rainfall estimates for flood prediction. The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) partners are working with ICIMOD to incorporate snowmelt and glacier melt into a widely used hydrological model. Thus, through improved modeling of the contribution of snow and ice meltwater to river flow in the region, the HIMALA project will improve the ability of ICIMOD and its partners to understand the impact of weather and climate on floods, droughts, and other water- and climate-induced natural hazards in the Himalayan region in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal, and Pakistan.

  14. Melting Alpine glaciers enrich high-elevation lakes with reactive nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saros, Jasmine E; Rose, Kevin C; Clow, David W; Stephens, Verlin C; Nurse, Andrea B; Arnett, Heather A; Stone, Jeffery R; Williamson, Craig E; Wolfe, Alexander P

    2010-07-01

    Alpine glaciers have receded substantially over the last century in many regions of the world. Resulting changes in glacial runoff not only affect the hydrological cycle, but can also alter the physical (i.e., turbidity from glacial flour) and biogeochemical properties of downstream ecosystems. Here we compare nutrient concentrations, transparency gradients, algal biomass, and fossil diatom species richness in two sets of high-elevation lakes: those fed by snowpack melt alone (SF lakes) and those fed by both glacial and snowpack meltwaters (GSF lakes). We found that nitrate (NO(3)(-)) concentrations in the GSF lakes were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than in SF lakes. Although nitrogen (N) limitation is common in alpine lakes, algal biomass was lower in highly N-enriched GSF lakes than in the N-poor SF lakes. Contrary to expectations, GSF lakes were more transparent than SF lakes to ultraviolet and equally transparent to photosynthetically active radiation. Sediment diatom assemblages had lower taxonomic richness in the GSF lakes, a feature that has persisted over the last century. Our results demonstrate that the presence of glaciers on alpine watersheds more strongly influences NO(3)(-)concentrations in high-elevation lake ecosystems than any other geomorphic or biogeographic characteristic.

  15. Quantifying the contribution of glacier runoff to streamflow in the upper Columbia River Basin, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Jost, G.; R. D. Moore; B. Menounos; R. Wheate

    2012-01-01

    Glacier melt provides important contributions to streamflow in many mountainous regions. Hydrologic model calibration in glacier-fed catchments is difficult because errors in modelling snow accumulation can be offset by compensating errors in glacier melt. This problem is particularly severe in catchments with modest glacier cover, where goodness-of-fit statistics such as the Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency may not be highly sensitive to the streamflow variance associated wi...

  16. The geochemical Phenomenon-Local geochemical fields in a glacier (scientific note)

    OpenAIRE

    V. N., Makarov

    2001-01-01

    Geochemical fields in alpine cold and warm glaciers were studied. Local geochemical fields of typomorphic elements were found to form in the ice and on the surface of glaciers overlying ore bodies and endogenic geochemical haloes. The formation of local cryogenic geochemical fields in the glaciers results from sharp geochemical heterogeneity and geochemical processes in underlying rocks which cause cryogenic migration of chemical elements and compounds in the glacier. The thickness of geochem...

  17. Decadal evolution of a very small heavily debris-covered glacier in an Alpine permafrost environment

    OpenAIRE

    Capt, M.; Bosson, Jean-Baptiste; Fischer, M; Micheletti, N.; Lambiel, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Glacier response to climate forcing can be heterogeneous and complex, depending on glacier system characteristics. This article presents the decadal evolution of the Tsarmine Glacier (Swiss Alps), a very small and heavily debris-covered cirque glacier located in the Alpine periglacial belt. Archival aerial photogrammetry and autocorrelation of orthophotos were used to compute surface elevation, volume and geodetic mass changes, as well as horizontal displacement rates for several periods...

  18. Surge-type and surge-modified glaciers in the Karakoram

    OpenAIRE

    Bhambri, R.; Hewitt, K.; P. Kawishwar; Pratap, B

    2017-01-01

    Glaciers in the Karakoram exhibit irregular behavior. Terminus fluctuations of individual glaciers lack consistency and, unlike other parts of the Himalaya, total ice mass remained stable or slightly increased since the 1970s. These seeming anomalies are addressed through a comprehensive mapping of surge-type glaciers and surge-related impacts, based on satellite images (Landsat and ASTER), ground observations, and archival material since the 1840s. Some 221 surge-type and surge-like glaciers...

  19. An Ice Thickness Study Utilizing Ground Penetrating Radar on the Lower Jamapa Glacier of Citlaltepetl (El Pico de Orizaba), Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S. B.; Weissling, B. P.; Lewis, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    Citlalt6petl (Pico de Orizaba) is a dormant stratovolcano located at the eastern end of the trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt at approximately 19 degrees of latitude. It is one of the largest stratovolcanos in the world and at 5,630 meters above sea level, the highest mountain in Mexico and the third highest in North America. Situated on the summit cone and north face of the volcano is a permanent ice cap known as the Jamapa Glacier. Recent and historical studies of Citlaltepetl have been based primarily on volcanic risk assessment, in particular stability assessments of the summit cone. Relatively little work has been directed toward the glacial environment of the mountain, possibly due in part to its high altitude, steep slopes, and general inaccessibility. In addition to this glacier's potential to contribute to a better understanding of climate change, the Jamapa glacier and its environmental, cryologic and geologic setting could also serve as a valuable terrestrial analog to studies of Martian geology, hydrology, and subsurface ice.

  20. Estimating Snow and Glacier Melt in a Himalayan Watershed Using an Energy Balance Snow and Glacier Melt Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen Gupta, A.; Tarboton, D. G.; Racoviteanu, A.; Brown, M. E.; Habib, S.

    2014-12-01

    This study enhances an energy balance snowmelt model (Utah Energy Balance, UEB) to include the capability to quantify glacier melt. To account for clean and debris covered glaciers, substrate albedo and glacier outlines determined from remote sensing, are taken as inputs. The model uses the surface energy balance to compute the melting of seasonal snow and glacier substrate once the seasonal snow has melted. In this application the model was run over a 360 km2 glacierized watershed, Langtang Khola, in the Nepal Himalaya for a 10-year simulation period starting in water year 2003. The model was run on a distributed mesh of grid cells providing the capability to quantify both timing and spatial variability in snow and glacier melt. The distributed UEB melt model has a relatively high data demand, while the Hindu-Kush Himalayan region is a data-scarce region, a limitation that affects most water resources impact studies in this region. In this study, we determined model inputs from the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and Southern Asia Daily Rainfall Estimate (RFE2) data products. The model estimates that roughly 57% of total surface water input is generated from glacier melt, while snowmelt and rain contribute 34% and 9%, respectively over the simulation period. The melt model provided input to the USGS Geospatial Stream Flow Model (GeoSFM) for the computation of streamflow and produced reasonable streamflow simulations at daily scale with some discrepancies, while monthly and annual scale comparisons resulted in better agreement. The result suggests that this approach is of interest for water resources applications where monthly or longer scale streamflow estimates are needed. Mean annual streamflow was positively correlated with the total annual surface water input. However, mean annual streamflow was not correlated with total annual precipitation, highlighting the importance of energy balance melt calculation, in comparison

  1. Debris-covered glacier anomaly? Morphological factors controlling changes in the mass balance, surface area, terminus position, and snow line altitude of Himalayan glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Franco; Thakuri, Sudeep; Tartari, Gianni; Nuimura, Takayuki; Sunako, Sojiro; Sakai, Akiko; Fujita, Koji

    2017-08-01

    What are the main morphological factors that control the heterogeneous responses of debris-covered glaciers to climate change in the southern central Himalaya? A debate is open whether thinning rates on debris-covered glaciers are comparable to those of debris-free ones. Previous studies have adopted a deterministic approach, which is indispensable, but is also limiting in that only a few glaciers can be monitored. In this context, we propose a statistical analysis based on a wider glacier population as a complement to these deterministic studies. We analysed 28 glaciers situated on the southern slopes of Mt. Everest in the central southern Himalaya during the period 1992-2008. This study combined data compiled by three distinct studies for a common period and population of glaciers for use in a robust statistical analysis. Generally, surface gradient was the main morphological factor controlling the features and responses of the glaciers to climate change. In particular, the key points that emerged are as follows. 1) Reduced downstream surface gradient is responsible for increased glacier thinning. 2) The development of supraglacial ponds is a further controlling factor of glacier thinning: where supraglacial ponds develop, the glaciers register further surface lowering. 3) Debris coverage and thickness index were not found to be significantly responsible for the development of supraglacial ponds, changes in elevation, or shifts in snow line altitude.

  2. Pluri-decadal (1955-2014) evolution of glacier-rock glacier transitional landforms in the central Andes of Chile (30-33° S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, Sébastien; Kinnard, Christophe

    2017-08-01

    Three glacier-rock glacier transitional landforms in the central Andes of Chile are investigated over the last decades in order to highlight and question the significance of their landscape and flow dynamics. Historical (1955-2000) aerial photos and contemporary (> 2000) Geoeye satellite images were used together with common processing operations, including imagery orthorectification, digital elevation model generation, and image feature tracking. At each site, the rock glacier morphology area, thermokarst area, elevation changes, and horizontal surface displacements were mapped. The evolution of the landforms over the study perio