WorldWideScience

Sample records for world climate conference

  1. World Climate Conference - a play re-enacting the COPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamborg, Freja S. E.; Klockmann, Marlene; Koch, Boris P.; Otto, Juliane; Rauser, Florian; Schemann, Vera; Sonntag, Sebastian; Haug, Helgard; Kaegi, Stefan; Wetzel, Daniel; Schipper, Imanuel; Bochow, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Last December, Paris was the host city for the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Representatives of 195 countries met to dispute a legally binding climate agreement - a highly complex process involving thousands of politicians, scientists and activists, that to date has taken over two decades. The director ensemble "Rimini Protokoll" re-enacted this mammoth-scale drama of diplomacy in the play "Weltklimakonferenz" (World Climate Conference) at the "Deutsches Schauspielhaus" theatre in Hamburg, Germany. Since the opening night (21st Nov. 2014), the play has been performed 16 times, reaching an audience of over 9000. All performers in the play were experts and scientists at different stages of their careers, including PhD students, journalists and professors. Each spectator took on the identity of a delegate of one of the 195 participating countries. We will present the project and the performance, thereby highlighting the role of and the interaction between the spectators and early career scientists. In a nutshell the play went as follows (https://vimeo.com/137817619); after an opening ceremony, the audience was divided up into seven groups, each of which was given advice by experts in several different briefings. These informed on country-specific challenges caused by the social and economic situation, possible future climatic changes and negotiating tactics. In addition, the delegations had bilateral meetings, enabling them to exchange views and experiences with one another. Towards the end of the play each delegation was asked to submit a national commitment to greenhouse gas reduction and a financial contribution to the Green Climate Fund. Based on these national commitments, the final plenum revealed whether or not the delegations had managed to submit reductions compatible with restricting global warming to 2°C compared to pre-industrial times. Due to their direct personal involvement

  2. European Research Framework Programme. Research on Climate Change. Prepared for the Third World Climate Conference (WCC-3) and the UNFCCC Conference of the Parties (COP-15)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This publication gathers the abstracts of European research projects on climate change and related to climate change which have been completed recently or are ongoing under the sixth and seventh framework programmes for research. This document aims at providing a relevant overview of research activities on climate change funded by the European Community to participants to the third World Climate Conference held in Geneva in August 2009 and to the UNFCCC 15th Conference of the Parties meeting in Copenhagen in December 2009.

  3. Doha, Warsaw, transition conferences towards a world agreement on climate in 2015?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auverlot, Dominique; Barreau, Blandine

    2013-10-01

    This note discusses the results of the last conference on climate held in Doha in 2012: beginning of a second period for the Kyoto protocol commitment, a first reflection on a future world agreement, on-going but still unsuccessful debates on international solidarity, increasing importance of the issue of 'loss and damage' in the negotiation. It also discusses the pathway toward a new world agreement: risk of a divided and isolated Europe, taking the requirement of equity by developing countries into account, China and the USA at the centre of negotiations, recurrent decision difficulties within the Climate Convention. Within the perspective of the next Conference which will be held in Le Bourget, in 2015, this note addresses the strategic orientations: setting conditions of a successful debate in 2015 by using lessons learned from previous Conference of Parties, necessity of a united Europe, adoption of a proactive diplomacy by the EU relying on developing countries

  4. World Energy Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, G.; Schilling, H.D.

    1979-01-01

    After making some general remarks about goals, tasks, and works of the World Energy Conference the topics and the frame of the 11th World Energy Conference which will take place in Munich from 8th to 12th September 1980 are outlined. This conference is held under the general topic 'energy for our world' and deals with the reciprocal relation between energy supply, environment, and society. The main part of the publication presented here is the German version of the most important sections of the investigation 'World Energy-Looking Ahead to 2020' by the Conservation Commission (CC) of the World Energy Conference. Added to this is the German original brief version of a report by the Mining-Research Company (Bergbau-Forschung GmbH) to the CC which deals with the estimation of the world's coal resources and their future availability. This report was presented on the 10th World Energy Conference in Istanbul together with the corresponding reports concerning the other energy sources. Finally, an introduction to the technical programme for the 11th World Energy Conference 1980 is given. (UA) [de

  5. 11 World power conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masters, R.

    1981-01-01

    Papers presented to the 11 World power conference ''Power for our peace'' held in Munich in September, 1980 are shortly surveyed. A few papers were devoted to nuclear power, that represents its present- state-of-the-art in the world. Except for the paper presented by experts of the International Energy Agency (IEA) and a number of others, there is carefulness and realism with respect to nuclear power in the most part of the papers; its forecasted growth rates are rather moderate. Even in the IEA paper the total world nuclear installed capacity in 1985 is evaluated about 550 GW, that is substantially smaller earlier evaluations. It is acknowledged that the primary energy production almost in all countries will increase mainly due to nuclear power and coal. But there are no answers to the problems related to management of the nuclear power development and to the public opinion in many countries. It is underlined that the problems of world power supply can be solved only on an international basis [ru

  6. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  7. Climate Leadership Awards and Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    The seventh annual Climate Leadership Awards Dinner will be held during the 2018 Climate Leadership Conference; the event publicly recognize individuals and organizations for their outstanding leadership in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

  8. Conference on climate and water. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huttunen, L.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the Proceedings of the Conference on Climate and Water under the following groupings: Understanding the climate systems - its variability and potential for change; Climate and hydrological cycle - the effects of climate variability and Change

  9. Conference assesses world oil supply scene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the Offshore Northern Seas conference heard a number of long term outlooks in Stavanger, Norway, last week, all with the same conclusion: the oil and gas industry needs massive investment if it is to match future demand. Norwegian Prime Minister Gro Harlem Bruntland built her scenario on a doubling of world population every 40 years. Mrs. Bruntland emphasized the growing dependence of the world economy on Middle East developments. Two thirds of the world's oil reserves are in the Persian Gulf region, she said, but only 28% of production comes from there. As the rest of the world depletes its reserves, dependence on Persian Gulf oil will grow

  10. Towards a greener world : hydrogen and fuel cells 2004 conference and trade show. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Fuel Cells Canada and the Canadian Hydrogen Association hosted the Hydrogen and Fuel Cells 2004 Conference and Tradeshow in Toronto, Ontario, Canada on September 25-28, 2004. Industry leaders from around the world showcased the latest developments in fuel cell and hydrogen technology, and shared research breakthroughs. The conference focussed on many aspects of hydrogen and fuel cell technology, specifically: hydrogen technology progress, including storage, infrastructure and production; fuel cells, including quality, cost and applications; economics and policy, including government and industry strategies; fuel cell demonstrations, including transportation, micro-fuel cells, and portable power; and, impact on climate change, including health and the Kyoto Accord

  11. White House Conference on Global Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    President Clinton has directed the White House office on Environmental Policy to coordinate an interagency process to develop a plan to fulfill the commitment he made in his Earth Day address on April 21, 1993. This plan will become the cornerstone of the Climate Change Plan that will be completed shortly after the Rio Accord enters into force. The Office on Environmental Policy established the Interagency Climate Change Mitigation Group to draw on the expertise of federal agencies including the National Economic Council; the Council of Economic Advisors; the Office of Science and Technology Policy; the Office of Management and Budget; the National Security Council; the Domestic Policy Council; the Environmental Protection Agency; and the Departments of Energy, Transportation, Agriculture, Interior, Treasury, Commerce, and State. Working groups have been established to examine six key policy areas: energy demand, energy supply, joint implementation, methane and other gases, sinks, and transportation. The purpose of the White House Conference on Global Climate Change was to ``tap the real-world experiences`` of diverse participants and seek ideas and information for meeting the President`s goals. During the opening session, senior administration officials defined the challenge ahead and encouraged open and frank conversation about the best possible ways to meet it.

  12. World Conference on Acoustic Emission 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhanwen; Zhang, Junjiao

    2015-01-01

    This volume collects the papers from the 2013 World Conference on Acoustic Emission in Shanghai. The latest research and applications of Acoustic Emission (AE) are explored, with particular emphasis on detecting and processing of AE signals, development of AE instrument and testing standards, AE of materials, engineering structures and systems, including the processing of collected data and analytical techniques as well as experimental case studies.

  13. World Conference on Acoustic Emission 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhanwen; Zhang, Junjiao

    2017-01-01

    This volume collects the papers from the World Conference on Acoustic Emission 2015 (WCAE-2015) in Hawaii. The latest research and applications of Acoustic Emission (AE) are explored, with particular emphasis on detecting and processing of AE signals, development of AE instrument and testing standards, AE of materials, engineering structures and systems, including the processing of collected data and analytical techniques as well as experimental case studies.

  14. First UN member state conference on the climate framework convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamprecht, F.

    1995-01-01

    The ''Framework Convention of the United Nations Concerning Climate Changes'' (Climate Framework Convention - KRK), which was passed at the 1992 World Environment Conference (UNCEO) in Rio de Janeiro and took effect on 21 March 1994, has instituted the UN Conference of Contracting Parties (VSK) as the organ presiding over this issue (Article 7 KRK). This annual conference has the task to implement the KRK and its associated legal instruments and pass the resolutions required to this end. Its premiere took place in Berlin (28 March to 7 April 1995). Delegates from 117 signatory and 53 observer states struggled before an audience of 2000 news reportes to find a solution to the pending tasks that might be tolerable for all participants. The present article gives a brief outline of these tasks and the results achieved in Berlin. The picture is rounded off by information on the different positions defended, lines of conflict and the course of the conference. (orig.) [de

  15. The World Population Conference: an international extravaganza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franda, M F

    1974-09-01

    The World Population Conference, held in Bucharest, Romania, August 19-30, 1974 is described. 1287 delegates representing 135 countries, pl us representatives of nongovernmental organizations, participants in related activities, and journalists attended. The task of the delegates was: 1) to decide on procedures; 2) to amend and approve a 20-page World Population Plan of Action (WPPA); and 3) to participate in 3 conference committees on social and economic development, natural resources and the environment, and family and human rights. The major political problem was that 106 of the 148 countries invited considered their population growth rates to be either satisfactory or too slow. The Chinese, Latin Americans, Africans, and the Holy See were opposed to family planning programs and directed most of their criticism toward the U.S. The Chinese and the U.S.S.R. both opposed the WPPA on most key votes, with both influencing much of the Third World. The U.S., Western Europe, Oceania, and most of Asia supported the draft WPPA. When the votes were counted, the draft WPPA had been weakened, although some strong statements favoring government family planning programs were retained. Perhaps the fact that such a conference was actually held is a step in the right direction.

  16. The World Power Conference and atomic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1962-01-15

    The possibility that emerged after the last World War that useful power could be produced from nuclear fission led to optimistic estimates that nuclear power would prove to be the solution to the world's energy problems. The possible advantages of nuclear methods of power production compared with conventional means are discussed at the World Power Conference. The 1962 Conference with its theme 'The Changing Pattern of Power' will undoubtedly attract great interest in a world where the change-over from conventional to nuclear fuels for power production has started in some countries and is being actively examined in others. It is generally being realized that even though a country may possess indigenous supplies of uranium or thorium minerals, the building up of a nuclear industry i s a long and expensive process and the alternative of depending on countries more advanced in nuclear technology for the supply of materials, skill and know-how is costly in foreign exchange and international prestige. Many of the industrialized countries, still possessing supplies of conventional fuels, are preparing for the day when their reserves will become depleted and are embarking on training schemes to ensure a continuing supply of engineers and scientists skilled in nuclear arts

  17. Selected Papers Presented at MODSIM World 2011 Conference and Expo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E. (Compiler); Bullock, Leanna S. (Compiler)

    2012-01-01

    Selected papers from MODSIM World 2011 Conference & Expo are contained in this NASA Conference Publication (CP). MODSIM World 2011 was held in Virginia Beach, Virginia, October 11-14, 2011. The theme of the 2011 conference & expo was "Overcoming Critical Global Challenges with Modeling & Simulation". The conference program consisted of five technical tracks - Defense, Homeland Security & First Responders; Education; Health & Medicine; The Human Dimension; and Serious Games & Virtual Worlds.

  18. Third national climate change conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The international issue of climate change was discussed at this AREA (Alliance for Responsible Environmental Alternatives) conference. AREA, a coalition of industry, labour and municipalities from across Canada, was created to reflect the views and represent the interest of Canadians in the Climate Change debate. The role that Canada should play to optimize Canada's response to the Global Climate Change Challenge at the Kyoto Conference was the principal topic of discussion. Specific topics for panel discussions included the economic impacts of climate change, the effectiveness of voluntary mechanisms to reduce greenhouse gases versus government-mandated actions for achieving climate change targets, the issue of how a differentiated system for emission reduction targets and timetables might be implemented, the economic imperatives and the effect of those imperatives on negotiating positions at Kyoto, and various national agendas and the likely outcomes at Kyoto. tabs., figs

  19. The World Food Conference--A Frustrating First Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gerald W.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the positive results of the World Food Conference and the world awareness (aroused by the conference) which is the first step in the solution of world hunger. Some of the positive results are the establishment of the World Food Council, establishment of grain reserves, and a worldwide system of food information. (BR)

  20. Climate - 30 questions to understand the Paris Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canfin, Pascal; Staime, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The authors, who participate in the negotiations on climate, propose an analysis and a description of the various geopolitical, economic and financial challenges which are part of the next conference on climate (Conference of Parties, COP 21) which is to take place in France in December 2015. They notably discuss to which extent France is an example, what Obama can do, why things are changing in China, who are the opponents in the struggle against climate change. While one of the main issue of this conference, and the possible cause of its failure, will be the financial issue, and particularly the promise made in 2009 to mobilise 100 billions dollars every year in favour of developing countries which are the most impacted by global warming, in an interview, one of the author evokes the content of his book: he discusses the general consensus about the human origin of climate change, evokes fossil industries and oil producing countries as opponents to an energy revolution, outlines that energy transition is at the heart of what he calls the Battle of Paris (the conference), outlines the important role France can play despite some weaknesses of its climate policy, the new momentum given by China and the USA. He considers low carbon economy as the main world challenge on the long term

  1. [4th World Conference on Women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The World Platform of Action is a document prepared by the secretary of the UN Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) that acknowledges commitments made by the subscribing governments. In the final preparatory meeting for the Fourth International Conference on Women in Beijing, official delegations of the world's governments discussed the draft of the Platform of Action. Throughout the Platform, there is evidence of a retreat from concepts internationally recognized at other conferences. The Vatican, in alliance with countries like Honduras, Argentina, and Guatemala, and with fundamentalist religious groups, is largely responsible for the obstruction. The draft indicates which topics have failed to gain consensus and require discussion at the full Conference. The Platform is defined as an agenda for seeking empowerment of women, an objective necessitating removal of obstacles to active participation by women in all spheres of public life. The Platform defines the critical areas for action as the persistent increase in poverty among women, unequal access to education and training, unequal access to health care, violence against women and girls, effects of persecution and armed conflicts, unequal access to productive processes, and unequal power and influence in decision making at all levels. Insufficient mechanisms for promoting women, protection of the human rights of women, women and communication, and women and the environment are other priority topics. Problems are discussed in each of these areas, and objectives and concrete actions are proposed. The work describes the types of institutional changes that will be needed if the objectives are to be achieved; defines sex, gender, and other relevant terms; and analyses some of the strategic objectives in greater detail. The final section contains recommendations for women's groups and other lobbyists in Colombia to present to the government.

  2. 4th World Conference on Soft Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasov, Ali; Yager, Ronald; Shahbazova, Shahnaz; Reformat, Marek

    2016-01-01

    This book reports on advanced theories and cutting-edge applications in the field of soft computing. The individual chapters, written by leading researchers, are based on contributions presented during the 4th World Conference on Soft Computing, held May 25-27, 2014, in Berkeley. The book covers a wealth of key topics in soft computing, focusing on both fundamental aspects and applications. The former include fuzzy mathematics, type-2 fuzzy sets, evolutionary-based optimization, aggregation and neural networks, while the latter include soft computing in data analysis, image processing, decision-making, classification, series prediction, economics, control, and modeling. By providing readers with a timely, authoritative view on the field, and by discussing thought-provoking developments and challenges, the book will foster new research directions in the diverse areas of soft computing. .

  3. United Nations Climate Change Conference. Nairobi 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Kenya hosted the second meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (COP/MOP 2), in conjunction with the twelfth session of the Conference of the Parties to the Climate Change Convention (COP 12), in Nairobi from 6 to 17 November 2006. The conference also included, from 6 to 14 November, the twenty-fifth session of the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA 25), the twenty-fifth session of the Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI 25), and the second session of the Ad Hoc Working Group on Further Commitments for Annex I Parties under the Kyoto Protocol (AWG 2) including an in-session workshop. The site contains many of the reports and documents relevant to the conference

  4. Durban Climate Conference: new perspectives on forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perugini L

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent Durban Climate Conference can be considered a step forward in the agroforestry sector within the international climate regulatory regime. After four years of negotiations the long-awaited decision on Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry for the second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol was agreed, including a new activity (wetland drainage and rewetting, defining the accounting rules for forest management (which was shifted from voluntary to mandatory, the accounting for harvested wood products and the treatment of emissions from natural disturbances. Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, conservation, sustainable management of forest, and the enhancement of forest carbon stock (REDD+ has moved ahead as well, with the agreement of two decisions as an intermediate step for the finalization of the REDD+ mechanism architecture. The first decision is about methodological aspects on guidance on system for providing information on how safeguards are addressed and respected and on modalities relating to forest reference emission levels and forest reference levels that are benchmarks for assessing country’s performance in implementing REDD+ activities. The second decision is about policy approaches and incentives on REDD+ activities, that is the controversial issue on the sources of financing for REDD+ mechanism. As source of finance for result-based actions, a wide variety of sources are recognized: public and private, bilateral and multilateral, including the Green Climate Fund, provided that they are new, additional and predictable. Both market and non-market approaches were also considered as possible tool for financing REDD+ action, to be developed by the Conference of Parties. Although a more ambitious outcome would have been desirable, the conference in Durban concluded with the finalization of key outcomes in the forestry sector providing important operational instruments to incentivize sustainable

  5. FOREWORD: International Conference on Planetary Boundary Layer and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djolov, G.; Esau, I.

    2010-05-01

    and convection in the climate system and the prominent demonstration of the climate sensitivity to the ocean heat uptake observed off Cape Town. The international conference responded to the urgent need of advancing our understanding of the complex climate system and development of adequate measures for saving the planet from environmental disaster. It also fits well with the Republic of South African government's major political decision to include the responses to global change/climate change at the very top of science and technology policy. The conference participants are grateful to the Norway Research Council and the National Research Foundation (NRF) RSA who supported the Conference through the project "Analysis and Possibility for Control of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Processes to Facilitate Adaptation to Environmental Changes" realized in the framework of the Programme for Research and Co-operation Phase II between the two countries. Kirstenbosh Biodiversity Institute and Botanical Gardens, Cape Town contribution of securing one of the most beautiful Conference venues in the world and technical support is also highly appreciated. G. Djolov and I. Esau Editors Conference_Photo Conference Organising Comittee Djolov, G.South AfricaUniversity of Pretoria Esau, I.NorwayNansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center Hewitson, B.South AfricaUniversity of Cape Town McGregor, J.AustraliaCSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research Midgley, G.South AfricaSouth African National Botanical Institute Mphepya, J.South AfricaSouth African Weather Service Piketh, S.South AfricaUniversity of the Witwatersrand Pielke, R.USAUniversity of Colorado, Boulder Pienaar, K.South AfricaUniversity of the North West Rautenbach, H.South AfricaUniversity of Pretoria Zilitinkevich, S.FinlandUniversity of Helsinki The conference was organized by: University of Pretoria Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center With support and sponsorship from: Norwegian Research Council (grant N 197649

  6. 2nd world TRIGA users conference. Conference volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This conference was organized by the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities (University of Technology Vienna), it was devoted to present results in the operation of TRIGA research reactors. The main general topics were: a) reactor operation experience, b)neutron and solid state physics, c) radiochemistry and activation analysis, d) medical applications (boron neutron capture therapy, labeled compounds), e) reactor related experiments and calculations, f) waste management and decommissioning of TRIGA reactors. (nevyjel)

  7. 2nd world TRIGA users conference. Conference volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This conference was organized by the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities (University of Technology Vienna), it was devoted to present results in the operation of TRIGA research reactors. The main general topics were: a) reactor operation experience, b)neutron and solid state physics, c) radiochemistry and activation analysis, d) medical applications (boron neutron capture therapy, labeled compounds), e) reactor related experiments and calculations, f) waste management and decommissioning of TRIGA reactors. (nevyjel)

  8. IDRC at the World Conference of Science Journalists 2017 | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-12-13

    Dec 13, 2017 ... IDRC at the World Conference of Science Journalists 2017 ... “Bridging Science and Societies”, the theme of WCSJ2017, reflects the vital role of science journalists and ... Using digital tech to improve life for refugees.

  9. China's response to climate change issues after Paris Climate Change Conference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yun

    2016-01-01

    The Paris Climate Change Conference was successfully concluded with the Paris Agreement, which is a milestone for the world in collectively combating climate change. By participating in IPCC assessments and conducting national climate change assessments, China has been increasing its understanding of the issue. For the first time, China's top leader attended the Conference of the Parties, which indicates the acknowledgement of the rationality and necessity of climate change response by China at different levels. Moreover, this participation reflects China's commitment to including climate change in its ecology improvement program and pursuing a low-carbon society and economy. In order to ensure the success of the Paris Conference, China has contributed significantly. China's constructive participation in global governance shows that China is a responsible power. These principles such as the creation of a future of winewin cooperation with each country contributing to the best of its ability;a future of the rule of law, fairness, and justice;and a future of inclusiveness, mutual learning, and common development will serve as China's guidelines in its efforts to facilitate the implementation of the Paris Agreement and participate in the design of international systems.

  10. China's response to climate change issues after Paris Climate Change Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Gao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Paris Climate Change Conference was successfully concluded with the Paris Agreement, which is a milestone for the world in collectively combating climate change. By participating in IPCC assessments and conducting national climate change assessments, China has been increasing its understanding of the issue. For the first time, China's top leader attended the Conference of the Parties, which indicates the acknowledgement of the rationality and necessity of climate change response by China at different levels. Moreover, this participation reflects China's commitment to including climate change in its ecology improvement program and pursuing a low-carbon society and economy. In order to ensure the success of the Paris Conference, China has contributed significantly. China's constructive participation in global governance shows that China is a responsible power. These principles such as the creation of a future of win–win cooperation with each country contributing to the best of its ability; a future of the rule of law, fairness, and justice; and a future of inclusiveness, mutual learning, and common development will serve as China's guidelines in its efforts to facilitate the implementation of the Paris Agreement and participate in the design of international systems.

  11. World Biotechnology Leaders to Gather for Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotechnology Leaders to Gather for Conference For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs biotechnology leaders gather in Fort Collins, CO May 2-6 for the 21st Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and special session on funding opportunities for U.S. biotechnology projects. More than 175 presentations are

  12. The Study of Climate on Alien Worlds

    OpenAIRE

    Heng, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Comment: Published in American Scientist: Volume 100, Number 4, Pages 334 to 341. Text-only version. Full version available at http://www.americanscientist.org/issues/feature/2012/4/the-study-of-climate-on-alien-worlds

  13. The World Bank and climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, W.-C.

    2000-01-01

    The reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is inextricably linked with economic and development policies. This raises the question, to what extent do the commitments to reduce carbon dioxide emissions under the Climate Change Convention affect the practices and policies of the World Bank? After briefly describing the interaction between climate change and economic development, as well as the respective instruments of the Climate Change Treaty and the World Bank, this paper identifies several windows through which the obligations set out by the Climate Change treaty affect the World Bank. These include the Global Environmentally Facility, the Operational Policies adopted by the Executive Directors of the World Bank, specific loan structures and conditions as well as the recent Prototype Carbon Fund. (Author)

  14. Climate Change and Future World

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    of water-borne diseases such as cholera and malaria which, if uncontrolled, could generate epidemics.27 More frequent and more intense extreme 7... Mexico , and the United States. All these trends produced by climate change are likely to increase migration movements to the U.S., and the occurrence

  15. 2010 World bio-energy conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    After having evoked the bio-energy price awarded to a Brazilian for his works on the use of eucalyptus as energy source, this report proposes a synthesis of the highlights of the conference: discussions about sustainability, bio-energies as an opportunity for developing countries, the success of bio-energies in Sweden, and more particularly some technological advances in the field of biofuels: a bio-LPG by Biofuel-solution AB, catalysis, bio-diesel from different products in a Swedish farm, a second generation ethanol by the Danish company Inbicon, a large scale methanization in Goteborg, a bio-refinery concept in Sweden, bio-gases

  16. Climatic change and world governance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousel, M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with the problems of international agreements about the greenhouse effect gases control. Even if the prejudice covers the whole world, the implementing of pollution regulations generate conflicts of interest. Solidarity, equity and not historical responsibilities have to govern the discussions. This involves to take into account the place of the developing countries. (A.L.B.)

  17. Climate History and the Modern World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebsame, William E.

    H. H. Lamb's latest book on the earth's changing climate is a carefully crafted work covering four areas: the physical basis of climate and climate change, the methods of climate reconstruction, the history of climate since the height of the last glaciation, and the impact of climate on human affairs. The book will be of particular interest to three groups. Atmospheric scientists interested in the long history of climate behavior (but perhaps overwhelmed by Lamb's all-encompassing work on the topic, Climate: Past, Present and Future, vol. II, Methuen, New York), will find Climate History and the Modern World to be a good titration of the fuller work. Scientists in other fields, including social scientists grappling with issues of climate-society interaction, will find the book a good entree into the field. Finally, Lamb himself suggests that the book will be useful to resource managers and other decision makers trying to avoid negative climate impacts. With this last audience in mind, no doubt, Lamb has chosen a style that eschews extensive footnoting and references (though sufficient citations are included to lead to further information). This works quite well and seems reasonable in view of his carefully documented previous writings.

  18. International conference on past, present and future climate. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikinheimo, P [ed.

    1996-12-31

    This publications contains the proceedings of the International Conference on Past, Present and Future Climate, held in Helsinki, Finland, on 22-25 August 1995. Conference was organized to serve at least two purposes. First, it was the fourth meeting in a series of Nordic climate conferences. Earlier Nordic meetings had been held in Copenhagen (1978), Stockholm (1983) and Tromsoe (1990). Secondly, the conference formed part of the integration activities of the Finnish Research Programme on Climate Change (SILMU). Four central themes were selected for the conference: (1) climatic changes since the last glaciation inferred from proxy data,(2) detection of climate change from the instrumental record,(3) changes in atmospheric composition, (4) predicting future climate. The Finnish Research Programme on Climate Change was in its sixth and final year at the time of the conference. One of the aims of the meeting was to foster the communication of SlLMU`s results to the scientific community at large. On the other hand, feedback from overseas colleagues was expected to be beneficial for the final reporting of the results of the research programme. Altogether 117 scientific contributions were submitted and more than 140 scientists attended the conference

  19. International conference on past, present and future climate. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikinheimo, P. [ed.

    1995-12-31

    This publications contains the proceedings of the International Conference on Past, Present and Future Climate, held in Helsinki, Finland, on 22-25 August 1995. Conference was organized to serve at least two purposes. First, it was the fourth meeting in a series of Nordic climate conferences. Earlier Nordic meetings had been held in Copenhagen (1978), Stockholm (1983) and Tromsoe (1990). Secondly, the conference formed part of the integration activities of the Finnish Research Programme on Climate Change (SILMU). Four central themes were selected for the conference: (1) climatic changes since the last glaciation inferred from proxy data,(2) detection of climate change from the instrumental record,(3) changes in atmospheric composition, (4) predicting future climate. The Finnish Research Programme on Climate Change was in its sixth and final year at the time of the conference. One of the aims of the meeting was to foster the communication of SlLMU`s results to the scientific community at large. On the other hand, feedback from overseas colleagues was expected to be beneficial for the final reporting of the results of the research programme. Altogether 117 scientific contributions were submitted and more than 140 scientists attended the conference

  20. CCTC 2009 : 2nd Climate Change Technology Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The 2nd Climate Change Technology Conference (CCTC2009) was held in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada on May 12-15, 2009. CCTC2009 is a Canadian/International forum for engineers, scientists, policy advisors, industry and other stakeholders to share new information and ideas for dealing with climate change and global warming. It also provided an opportunity for participants to keep abreast of emerging techniques and technologies for the mitigation of and adaptation to, the impacts of climate change. The conference theme: 'Climate Change ..... Deal with It!' emphasized the need to develop practical engineering and administrative responses to address the impacts of climate change and global warming.

  1. Proceedings of the CERI 2003 World Oil Conference : What lies beneath? CD-ROM ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The 22 presentations at this conference reflected recent developments in the international petroleum industry with particular focus on the outlook of world energy markets and prospects for oil supply and reserves. Topics of discussion included the industry structure, development and operating costs, international spending, the expansion of world oil markets, market access, as well as new technology development and application. The papers also covered environmental issues such as climate change and the responsible use of water. The conference provided an opportunity for participants to discuss issues regarding oil supply and demand, oil prices, Canada's oil sands, and what role non-conventional oil plays in the current marketplace. The conference was divided into 7 sessions entitled: (1) outlook for oil prices, (2) global oil supplies, (3) oil and money, (4) downstream issues, (5) markets for Canadian bitumen and synthetics, (6) Canada's east coast, and (7) the geopolitical landscape. Three papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the database. tabs., figs

  2. Proceedings of the 4. World TRIGA Users Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-10-29

    This document gathers 30 presentations given at the 2008 Conference of the World TRIGA reactor Users. Most presentations are in the form of slides only, and few ones have an additional summary or are presented as an article only. All aspects of TRIGA-type reactors are approached, from upgrading to decommissioning, from radiotherapy to isotope production, from research program management to training, etc.

  3. Proceedings of the 4. World TRIGA Users Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This document gathers 30 presentations given at the 2008 Conference of the World TRIGA reactor Users. Most presentations are in the form of slides only, and few ones have an additional summary or are presented as an article only. All aspects of TRIGA-type reactors are approached, from upgrading to decommissioning, from radiotherapy to isotope production, from research program management to training, etc

  4. The Second UNESCO World Conference on Arts Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on the second UNESCO World Conference on Arts and Education held on May 25-28, 2010 in Seoul, Korea, which brought together approximately 650 arts educators from 95 UNESCO member states (countries) for a four-day summit of international diplomacy, cross-arts networking, global and regional strategic planning and professional…

  5. Climate challenge 2012: growth and climate change - Socio-economical impacts of climate change. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orange-Louboutin, Mylene; Robinet, Olivier; Delalande, Daniel; Reysset, Bertrand; De Perthuis, Christian; Le Treut, Herve; Cottenceau, Jean-Baptiste; Ayong, Alain; Daubaire, Aurelien; Gaudin, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The contributions of this conference session proposed comments and discussion on the relationship between climate change and 'green' growth, on the status of scientific knowledge on climate change (from global to local), on the way to perform carbon print assessment and to decide which actions to implement, on the costs and opportunity of impacts of climate change, on the economy of adaptation, on the benefits and costs of the adaptation policy, and on impacts of climate change on employment in quantitative terms and in terms of profession types

  6. Incorporating climate change into corporate business strategies. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This document contains the papers presented at the International Climate Change Conference and Technologies Exhibition June 12-13, 1997. Topics include energy supply and electricity generation; forestry and agriculture; and the chemical, energy, and manufacturing industries.

  7. Visions for a sustainable world: A conference on science, technology and social responsibility. Conference report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This report summarizes the organization, activities, and outcomes of Student Pugwash USA`s 1992 International Conference, Visions for a Sustainable World: A Conference on Science, Technology and Social Responsibility. The conference was held June 14--20, 1992 at Emory University, and brought together 94 students and over 65 experts from industry, academe, and government. The conference addressed issues ranging from global environmental cooperation to the social impacts of the Human Genome Project to minority concerns in the sciences. It provided a valuable forum for talented students and professionals to engage in critical dialogue on many interdisciplinary issues at the juncture of science, technology and society. The conference challenged students -- the world`s future scientists, engineers, and political leaders -- to think broadly about global problems and to devise policy options that are viable and innovative. The success of the conference in stimulating interest, understanding, and enthusiasm about interdisciplinary global issues is clearly evident from both the participants` feedback and their continued involvement in Student Pugwash USA programs. Six working groups met each morning. The working group themes included: environmental challenges for developing countries; energy options: their social and environmental impact; health care in developing countries; changing dynamics of peace and global security; educating for the socially responsible use of technology; ethics and the use of genetic information. The conference was specifically designed to include mechanisms for ensuring its long-term impact. Participants were encouraged to focus on their individual role in helping resolve global issues. This was achieved through each participant`s development of a Personal Plan of Action, a plan which mapped out activities the student could undertake after the conference to continue the dialogue and work towards the resolution of global and local problems.

  8. The 1992 World Administrative Radio Conference: Technology and Policy Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    As the 20th century draws to a close, new radio technologies and services are poised to change the ways we communicate. Radio waves already make possible a wide range of services considered commonplace--AM and FM radio broadcasting, television, cellular telephones, remote garage-door openers, and baby monitors. Advances in radio technology are giving birth to even more new products and services, including pocket-sized telephones that may allow people to make and receive calls anywhere in the world, high-definition televisions (HDTV) with superior quality pictures and sound, and static-free digital radios. The 1992 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC-92) authorized frequencies for many of these new radio communication services, and granted additional frequencies for many existing services, including international broadcasting, satellite-based mobile communications, and communications in space. The effects of these changes will be felt well into the 21st century as countries around the world develop and deploy new communications systems to serve the needs of consumers, businesses, and governments. For the United States, the decisions made at the conference will critically affect how we develop new radio technologies and applications, how competitive this country will be in radio communications equipment and services, and how effectively the United States can exercise its role as a leader in world radio communication policymaking. This study of the outcomes and implications of WARC-92 was requested by the House Committee on Energy and Commerce and the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. OTA was asked to evaluate the success of U.S. proposals at the conference, discuss the implications of the decisions made for U.S. technology and policy development, and identify options for improving U.S. participation in future world radio communication conferences.

  9. Proceedings of the CERI 2001 World Oil Conference. CD ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The integration and expansion of world oil markets was the main topic of this conference which featured 23 presentations dealing with developments in the international energy sector. The conference was divided into 8 sessions entitled: (1) oil prices, (2) oil and politics, (3) global oil supply, (4) North American supply and markets, (5) global oil demand, (6) oil.com, (7) the business of the environment, and (8) oil and money. The outlook of world energy markets was reviewed with particular emphasis on prospects for oil supply and reserves. The current status of the petroleum industry in both OPEC and non-OPEC oil exporting countries was discussed with reference to exploration, production, reserves, and hydrocarbon potential. The environmental, and socio-economic challenges that both the upstream and downstream industry will face challenges in the next century were also described. refs., tabs., figs

  10. Worlding cities through their climate projects?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blok, Anders

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the built environment has emerged as a critical target of climate change intervention for urban governments around the world, engaging developers, professionals, activists and communities in a range of new eco-urbanism projects. While important contributions have been made......, this paper suggests that critical academic and policy debates on urban climate politics have so far paid insufficient attention to the sheer divergence in urban experiences, concerns and public–professional responses elicited through such experiments worldwide. By juxtaposing architectural and other eco......-housing practices from diverse cities on three continents—Kyoto (Japan), Copenhagen (Denmark) and Surat (India)—this paper aims to conjure a more cosmopolitan research imagination on how climatic solidarities may emerge in the face of multiple urban differences and inequalities. Towards this end, the paper...

  11. 2014 World Conference on Information Systems and Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, Ana; Tan, Felix; Stroetmann, Karl

    2014-01-01

    This book contains a selection of articles from The 2014 World Conference on Information Systems and Technologies (WorldCIST'14), held between the 15th and 18th of April in Funchal, Madeira, Portugal, a global forum for researchers and practitioners to present and discuss recent results and innovations, current trends, professional experiences and challenges of modern Information Systems and Technologies research, technological development and applications. The main topics covered are: Information and Knowledge Management; Organizational Models and Information Systems; Intelligent and Decision Support Systems; Software Systems, Architectures, Applications and Tools; Computer Networks, Mobility and Pervasive Systems; Radar Technologies; Human-Computer Interaction; Health Informatics; and Information Technologies in Education.

  12. The changing world of climate change: Oregon leads the states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, P.H.; Sadler, S.; Kosloff, L.H.; Trexler, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    Following on the heels of recent national and international developments in climate change policy, Oregon's open-quote best-of-batch close-quote proceeding has validated the use of CO 2 offsets as a cost-effective means of advancing climate change mitigation goals. The proceeding was a first in several respects and represents a record commitment of funds to CO 2 mitigation by a private entity. In December 1995, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), issued its Second Assessment Report. The IPCC's conclusion that open-quotes[t]he balance of evidence suggests a discernible human influence on global climateclose quotes fundamentally changed the tenor of the policy debate regarding potential threats associated with global climate change. At the Climate Change Convention's Conference of the Parties (COP) in Geneva in July 1996, most countries, including the United States, advocated adopting the IPCC report as the basis for swift policy movement toward binding international emissions targets. The next COP, in December 1997, is scheduled to be the venue for the signing of a treaty protocol incorporating such targets. Binding targets would have major consequences for power plant operators in the US and around the world. Recent developments in the state of Oregon show the kinds of measures that may become commonplace at the state level in addressing climate change mitigation. First, Oregon recently completed the first administrative proceeding in the US aimed at offsetting the greenhouse gas emissions of a new power plant. Second, a legislatively mandated energy facility siting task force recently recommended that Oregon adopt a carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) standard for new power plant construction and drop use of the open-quotes need for powerclose quotes standard. This article reviews these two policy milestones and their implications for climate change mitigation in the United States

  13. 2016 World Conference on Information Systems and Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, Ana; Adeli, Hojjat; Reis, Luis; Teixeira, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    This book contains a selection of articles from The 2016 World Conference on Information Systems and Technologies (WorldCIST'16), held between the 22nd and 24th of March at Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. WorldCIST is a global forum for researchers and practitioners to present and discuss recent results and innovations, current trends, professional experiences and challenges of modern Information Systems and Technologies research, together with their technological development and applications. The main topics covered are: Information and Knowledge Management; Organizational Models and Information Systems; Software and Systems Modeling; Software Systems, Architectures, Applications and Tools; Multimedia Systems and Applications; Computer Networks, Mobility and Pervasive Systems; Intelligent and Decision Support Systems; Big Data Analytics and Applications; Human-Computer Interaction; Health Informatics; Information Technologies in Education; Information Technologies in Radiocommunications.

  14. 2017 World Conference on Information Systems and Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, Ana; Adeli, Hojjat; Reis, Luís; Costanzo, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a selection of papers from the 2017 World Conference on Information Systems and Technologies (WorldCIST'17), held between the 11st and 13th of April 2017 at Porto Santo Island, Madeira, Portugal. WorldCIST is a global forum for researchers and practitioners to present and discuss recent results and innovations, current trends, professional experiences and challenges involved in modern Information Systems and Technologies research, together with technological developments and applications. The main topics covered are: Information and Knowledge Management; Organizational Models and Information Systems; Software and Systems Modeling; Software Systems, Architectures, Applications and Tools; Multimedia Systems and Applications; Computer Networks, Mobility and Pervasive Systems; Intelligent and Decision Support Systems; Big Data Analytics and Applications; Human–Computer Interaction; Ethics, Computers & Security; Health Informatics; Information Technologies in Education; and Information Tec...

  15. World Regionalization of Climate Change(1961–2010)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peijun; Shi; Shao; Sun; Daoyi; Gong; Tao; Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Traditional climate classification or regionalization characterizes the mean state of climate condition, which cannot meet the demand of addressing climate change currently. We have developed a climate change classification method, as well as the fundamental principles, an indicator system, and mapping techniques of climate change regionalization. This study used annual mean temperature and total precipitation as climatic indices, and linear trend and variation change as change indices to characterize climate change quantitatively. The study has proposed a scheme for world climate change regionalization based on a half century of climate data(1961–2010). Level-I regionalization divides the world into 12 tendency zones based on the linear trend of climate, level-II regionalization resulted in 28 fluctuation regions based on the variation change of climate. Climate change regionalization provides a scientific basis for countries and regions to develop plans for adapting to climate change, especially for managing climate-related disaster or environmental risks.

  16. The Conference Proceedings of the 2003 Air Transport Research Society (ATRS) World Conference, Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent (Editor); Gudmundsson, Sveinn (Editor); Oum, Tae (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    Volume 3 of the 2003 Air Transport Reserch Society (ATRS) World Conference includes papers on topics relevant to airline operations worldwide. Specific topics include: European Union and civil aviation regimens;simulating decision making in airline operations, passenger points of view on convenient airports; route monopolies and nonlinear pricing; cooperation among airports in Europe; fleet modernizaiton in Brazil;the effects of deregulation on the growth of air transportation in Europe and the United States.

  17. Copenhagen Climate Change Conference: The Current Situation and the Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broughton, Emma

    2010-01-01

    The Copenhagen climate change conference has failed to meet expectations but has also led to a shift in the structure of multilateral negotiations on climate change. States have reclaimed negotiations, while the UN-centred structure has been weakened. Relations between developed and emerging countries have shifted, with the latter influence growing. There has also been an increased participation of civil-society actors (NGOs) in the debate. A new negotiation structure is emerging but it faces the difficult challenge of avoiding fragmentation

  18. Electricity in a Climate-Constrained World

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    After experiencing a historic drop in 2009, electricity generation reached a record high in 2010, confirming the close linkage between economic growth and electricity usage. Unfortunately, CO2 emissions from electricity have also resumed their growth: Electricity remains the single-largest source of CO2 emissions from energy, with 11.7 billion tonnes of CO2 released in 2010. The imperative to 'decarbonise' electricity and improve end-use efficiency remains essential to the global fight against climate change. The IEA’s Electricity in a Climate-Constrained World provides an authoritative resource on progress to date in this area, including statistics related to CO2 and the electricity sector across ten regions of the world (supply, end-use and capacity additions). It also presents topical analyses on the challenge of rapidly curbing CO2 emissions from electricity. Looking at policy instruments, it focuses on emissions trading in China, using energy efficiency to manage electricity supply crises and combining policy instruments for effective CO2 reductions. On regulatory issues, it asks whether deregulation can deliver decarbonisation and assesses the role of state-owned enterprises in emerging economies. And from technology perspectives, it explores the rise of new end-uses, the role of electricity storage, biomass use in Brazil, and the potential of carbon capture and storage for ‘negative emissions’ electricity supply.

  19. International Conference on Climate Change Adaptation Assessments: Conference summary and statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The International Conference on Climate Change Adaptation Assessments was held in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation, from May 22--25, 1995. Sponsored by the Russian Federal Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring, the US Country Studies Program, and the directorate General for International Cooperation of the Netherlands Government, it was the first international conference focusing exclusively on adaptation to climate change. More than 100 people from 29 countries on five continents participated. The conference primarily addressed measures to anticipate the potential effects of climate change to minimize negative effects and take advantage of any positive effects. The focus was on what governments, institutions, and individuals can do to prepare for climate change. The conference dealt with two major topics: What adaptation options are most effective and efficient in anticipating climate change and what methods should be used to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of adaptation options. Brief summaries are given from the following sessions on agriculture; Water resources; coastal resources; ecosystems and forests; fisheries; human settlements; water and agriculture; and the panel session on international adaptation in national communications and other development plans and needs for technical assistance.

  20. 2015 World Conference on Information Systems and Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, Ana; Costanzo, Sandor; Reis, Luis

    2015-01-01

    This book contains a selection of articles from The 2015 World Conference on Information Systems and Technologies (WorldCIST'15), held between the 1st and 3rd of April in Funchal, Madeira, Portugal, a global forum for researchers and practitioners to present and discuss recent results and innovations, current trends, professional experiences and challenges of modern Information Systems and Technologies research, technological development and applications. The main topics covered are: Information and Knowledge Management; Organizational Models and Information Systems; Intelligent and Decision Support Systems; Big Data Analytics and Applications; Software Systems, Architectures, Applications and Tools; Multimedia Systems and Applications; Computer Networks, Mobility and Pervasive Systems; Human-Computer Interaction; Health Informatics; Information Technologies in Education; Information Technologies in Radiocommunications.

  1. Serious Simulation Role-Playing Games for Transformative Climate Change Education: "World Climate" and "Future Climate"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney-Varga, J. N.; Sterman, J.; Sawin, E.; Jones, A.; Merhi, H.; Hunt, C.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change, its mitigation, and adaption to its impacts are among the greatest challenges of our times. Despite the importance of societal decisions in determining climate change outcomes, flawed mental models about climate change remain widespread, are often deeply entrenched, and present significant barriers to understanding and decision-making around climate change. Here, we describe two simulation role-playing games that combine active, affective, and analytical learning to enable shifts of deeply held conceptions about climate change. The games, World Climate and Future Climate, use a state-of-the-art decision support simulation, C-ROADS (Climate Rapid Overview and Decision Support) to provide users with immediate feedback on the outcomes of their mitigation strategies at the national level, including global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and concentrations, mean temperature changes, sea level rise, and ocean acidification. C-ROADS outcomes are consistent with the atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMS), such as those used by the IPCC, but runs in less than one second on ordinary laptops, providing immediate feedback to participants on the consequences of their proposed policies. Both World Climate and Future Climate role-playing games provide immersive, situated learning experiences that motivate active engagement with climate science and policy. In World Climate, participants play the role of United Nations climate treaty negotiators. Participant emissions reductions proposals are continually assessed through interactive exploration of the best available science through C-ROADS. Future Climate focuses on time delays in the climate and energy systems. Participants play the roles of three generations: today's policymakers, today's youth, and 'just born.' The game unfolds in three rounds 25 simulated years apart. In the first round, only today's policymakers make decisions; In the next round, the young become the policymakers and inherit the

  2. The Conference Proceedings of the 2003 Air Transport Research Society (ATRS) World Conference, Volume 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent (Editor); Gudmundsson, Sveinn (Editor); Oum, Tae (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The UNO Aviation Institute Monograph Series began in 1994 as a key component of the education outreach and information transfer missions of the Aviation Institute and the NASA Nebraska Space Grant & EPSCoR Programs. The series is an outlet for aviation materials to be indexed and disseminated through an efficient medium. Publications are welcome in all aspects of aviation. Publication formats may include, but are not limited to, conference proceedings, bibliographies, research reports, manuals, technical reports, and other documents that should be archived and indexed for future reference by the aviation and world wide communities. The Conference proceedings of the 2003 Air Transport Research Society (ATRS) world conference, volume 5 is presented. The topics include: 1) The Temporal Configuration of Airline Networks in Europe; 2) Determination and Applications of Environmental Costs at Different Sized Airports-Aircraft Noise and Engine Emissions; 3) Cost Effective Measures to Reduce CO2 Emissions in the Air Freight Sector; 4) An Assessment of the Sustainability of Air Transport System: Quantification of Indicators; 5) Regulation, Competition and Network Evolution in Aviation; 6) Regulation in the Air: Price and Frequency Cap; 7) Industry Consolidation and Future Airline Network Structures in Europe; 8) Application of Core Theory to the U.S. Airline Industry; 9) Air Freight Transshipment Route Choice Analysis; 10) A Fuzzy Approach of the Competition on Air Transport Market; and 11) Developing Passenger Demand Models for International Aviation from/to Egypt: A Case Study of Cairo Airport and Egyptair.

  3. Proceedings of the adapting to climate change in Canada 2005 conference : understanding risks and building capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This four-day conference provided a national forum for researchers and decision-makers from a variety of disciplines to share information and results on climate change. Sponsored by Natural Resources Canada's Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Program, the conference explored ways to improve knowledge of Canada's vulnerability to climate change, to better assess the benefits and risks of climate change and to examine policies and options through which decisions on adaptation can be made. Conference topics included issues such as global warming; sustainable development; climate change and agriculture; adaptation strategies; water, coastline and marine management and climate change; municipal level management and climate change; climate change and health issues; and many other topics related to climate change. The conference featured paper and poster presentations, opening remarks, and panel discussions. A total of 118 conference papers and 46 conference posters were presented at the conference of which 17 have been catalogued separately in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  4. The many facets of climate change - Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    This conference day on climate change was organized by the French meteorological society (SMF) at the Ecole Normale Superieure of Paris. This document brings together the available presentations given at the conference. Eight presentations (slides) are compiled in this document and deal with: 1 - Climate change today and tomorrow, the research stakes (Herve Le Treut, IPSL); 2 - Rise of sea levels: estimations and regional variability (Guy Woeppelmann, La Rochelle Univ.); 3 - Polar ice caps and continental cryo-sphere as seen from space (A. Kouraev, F. Remy, E. Berthier, LEGOS); 4 - Impacts of climate change on exploited marine populations: projections and uncertainties (Patrick Lehodey, CLS); 5 - Climate change stakes on agricultural and winery activities in France (Eric Duchene, INRA); 6 - Impacts of climate change on forest trees phenology and their consequences on trees life and survival (Francois Lebourgeois, ENGREF); 7 - Remote-epidemiology: a health-aid in a climate change context (Murielle Lafaye, CNES); 8 - Socio-economic aspects and adaptation: a climate history, for what? (Emmanuel Garnier, Caen Univ.)

  5. The climate-problem. Evaluation after the Paris-agreement and the Marrakesh-conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, Eike

    2017-01-01

    The Paris-Climate-Agreement came into effect on November 4th 2016. Still, the contradiction in this agreement - ambitious goals and (presumably) inadequate commitments - has persisted. Also in the follow-up conference in Marrakesh, this discrepancy remained unresolved. 2017 the countries will meet again. However, since Donald Trump became president-elect of the United States of America, uncertainty about how the largest economy in the world will act in the future has intensified. This amplifies the pressure to clarify the true level of human influence on the climate in a scientifically consistent manner, as a basis for more reliable decisions. This paper tries to contribute to that effort.

  6. The Conference Proceedings of the 2003 Air Transport Research Society (ATRS) World Conference, Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent (Editor); Gudmundsson, Sveinn (Editor); Oum, Tae (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The UNO Aviation Institute Monograph Series began in 1994 as a key component of the education outreach and information transfer missions of the Aviation Institute and the NASA Nebraska Space Grant & EPSCoR Programs. The series is an outlet for aviation materials to be indexed and disseminated through an efficient medium. Publications are welcome in all aspects of aviation. Publication formats may include, but are not limited to, conference proceedings, bibliographies, research reports, manuals, technical reports, and other documents that should be archived and indexed for future reference by the aviation and world wide communities.

  7. Vatican is lone opponent of world conference's compromises on abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-07

    Three years in the making, the draft program of action of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development sets nonbinding policy guidelines to contain the world's population at 7.27 billion in 2015. Although the Vatican was pleased to see Pakistan put forward a compromise formula developed to appease Catholic and Muslim objectors of abortion, the Church was unprepared to accept the compromise immediately and requested further discussion. The Vatican's rejection drew a strong chorus of vocal disapproval from other conference delegates. Even Iran accepted the draft as a "perfect text," while Sweden grudgingly accepted it as a "rock-bottom compromise." With no Catholic countries objecting to the compromise, the Vatican stood alone in its refusal to compromise with the rest of the world's leaders and peoples. Germany, speaking for the European Union, warned that enough concessions had already been made. The rationale for Vatican opposition was unclear since the section explicitly rejects abortion as a means of family planning and urges countries to minimize both the incidence of unsafe abortion and abortion overall by improving family planning. Prevention of unwanted pregnancies must be given highest priority and women should have ready access to compassionate counselling, with abortion never promoted as a means of family planning. Moreover, there is no longer a reference to sexual health education, a plea to governments to review their laws and policies on abortion, and a call to consider women's health rather than relying upon criminal codes and punitive measures. Participants said the Vatican objected to a phrase stating that abortions, where legal, should be safe, while the Church representative argued that any suggestion that abortion is safe contradicts church doctrine on the sanctity of life.

  8. Experts' conference on the Climate and Energy Contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-06-01

    This document first proposes the White Paper prepared for the experts' conference. After a presentation of the Emission Trading System (ETS), this paper highlights the benefit of the introduction of economical instruments rather than regulatory instruments to promote the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. It underlines the distinction between the proposed 'climate-energy contribution' (or carbon tax) and the Cambridge tax. Then, it describes how to implement such a contribution, i.e. how to define its base, and how to relate it with existing taxes. Some graphs compare the tax rates on fuels, gas and domestic oil in European countries. The paper then defines what the field of application of the contribution could be, how to make this contribution more efficient, and what could be its economical consequences. Then, the document proposes the text of Michel Rocard's intervention on the stakes of conference on this climate-energy contribution

  9. Selected Papers and Presentations Presented at MODSIM World 2010 Conference and Expo. Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E. (Editor)

    2011-01-01

    MODSIM World 2010 was held in Hampton, Virginia, October 13-15, 2010. The theme of the 2010 conference & expo was "21st Century Decision-Making: The Art of Modeling& Simulation". The conference program consisted of seven technical tracks - Defense, Engineering and Science, Health & Medicine, Homeland Security & First Responders, The Human Dimension, K-20 STEM Education, and Serious Games & Virtual Worlds. Selected papers and presentations from MODSIM World 2010 Conference & Expo are contained in this NASA Conference Publication (CP). Section 8.0 of this CP contains papers from MODSIM World 2009 Conference & Expo that were unavailable at the time of publication of NASA/CP-2010-216205 Selected Papers Presented at MODSIM World 2009 Conference and Expo, March 2010.

  10. Selected Papers and Presentations Presented at MODSIM World 2010 Conference Expo. Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E. (Editor)

    2011-01-01

    MODSIM World 2010 was held in Hampton, Virginia, October 13-15, 2010. The theme of the 2010 conference & expo was "21st Century Decision-Making: The Art of Modeling& Simulation". The conference program consisted of seven technical tracks - Defense, Engineering and Science, Health & Medicine, Homeland Security & First Responders, The Human Dimension, K-20 STEM Education, and Serious Games & Virtual Worlds. Selected papers and presentations from MODSIM World 2010 Conference & Expo are contained in this NASA Conference Publication (CP). Section 8.0 of this CP contains papers from MODSIM World 2009 Conference & Expo that were unavailable at the time of publication of NASA/CP-2010-216205 Selected Papers Presented at MODSIM World 2009 Conference and Expo, March 2010.

  11. Assessment of achievements of the Lima Climate Change Conference and perspectives on the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Du Lü

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Lima call for climate action adopted at the Lima Climate Conference on Climate Change specifies that the principles of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, including the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities, shall apply to the new climate agreement to be adopted at the Paris Conference on Climate Change in 2015. Decisions on other heavily debated items, including the intended nationally determined contributions, were also made at the Lima Conference. The significant achievements in Lima and the positive momentum have laid a solid foundation for the adoption of a new climate agreement in the Paris Climate Conference. Four measures are proposed for China to meet great challenges in addressing climate change beyond 2020, including early formulation and issuance of a climate change law, establishment of a greenhouse gas emission trading scheme, promotion of advanced climate technology investments, and further international engagement for climate change.

  12. Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program: Proceedings of the carbon dioxide and climate research program conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, L E [ed.

    1980-12-01

    Papers presented at the Carbon Dioxide and Climate Research Program Conference are included in this volume. Topics discussed are: the carbon cycle; modeling the carbon system; climatic response due to increased CO2; climate modeling; the use of paleoclimatic data in understanding climate change; attitudes and implications of CO2; social responses to the CO2 problem; a scenario for atmospheric CO2 to 2025; marine photosynthesis and the global carbon cycle; and the role of tropical forests in the carbon balance of the world. Separate abstracts of nine papers have been prepared for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  13. Theological and ethical dimensions of addressing climate change : reflections from the World Council of Churches (WCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallman, D.G. [World Council of Churches, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2000-06-01

    The World Council of Churches (WCC) has supported regional workshops around the world which focus on examining climate change issues from a theological and ethical perspective. The human responsibility is one dimension of the ethics of climate change and is supplemented by the fact that the problem is caused largely by rich industrialized countries, the consequences of which will be suffered in most part by the poor and politically weak developing nations and by future generations. When the WCC delivered a statement at the Kyoto Climate Conference in December 1997, they integrated these two ethical dimensions and spoke of climate change as an issue of justice. Their point of view was that as individuals and as societies, particularly in the over-developed parts of the world, we must be held responsible for the destructive impact of our actions which are leading to climate change and threatening vulnerable human communities, other species and broader ecosystems. Justice implies that we must be accountable for promises that we make to limit the emissions of greenhouse gases. The WCC has been actively involved in the climate change issue since 1988 through the education of its member churches around the world and through monitoring the inter-governmental negotiations through the UN, as well as through advocacy at national levels. In May 2000, the WCC held an international consultation to examine the issue of emissions trading from a perspective of equity. This paper included 2 appendices: Appendix A entitled Statement by the World Council of Churches to the high level segment of the third session of the Conference of the Parties (COP3) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, and Appendix B entitled The atmosphere as a global commons : responsible caring and equitable sharing.

  14. Historical and political development of the UN’s main conferences on the climate and the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Pessini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This reflection aims to analyze the historical and political evolution of the major UN world conferences on climate and the environment. Aware that human action has compromised the future continuity of life on the planet, the United Nations has promoted the debate to rethink humankind’s relationship with nature, and with the idea of development and sustainability. The itinerary for this reflection begins with the Conference on Environment and Development held in Rio de Janeiro in 1992, Eco-92, and goes on to consider Rio + 20, the Conference on Sustainable Development in 2012, before finally coming to the Climate Conference (COP 21 held in Paris in December 2015, known as the Paris Agreement. It aims to evaluate the impasses, breakthroughs and historical and political perspectives of these documents aimed at preventing human “achievements” and “progress” from compromising life on Earth as a whole.

  15. Purchasing & supply management for a sustainable world: Introduction to the IPSERA 2013 conference special issue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, T. E.; Giannakis, M.; Miemczyk, J.

    2014-01-01

    Special issue of best papers of the 22nd annual IPSERA conference 2013: Purchasing & Supply Management for a Sustainable World......Special issue of best papers of the 22nd annual IPSERA conference 2013: Purchasing & Supply Management for a Sustainable World...

  16. Case Studies on Climate Change and World Heritage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colette, A.

    2007-07-01

    The UNESCO World Heritage Centre (WHC) initiated an assessment of the impacts of climate change on World Heritage in 2005, after the World Heritage Committee noted that 'the impacts of climate change are affecting many and are likely to affect many more World Heritage properties, both natural and cultural in the years to come'. A meeting of experts was convened in March 2006 bringing together over 50 representatives from the States Parties to the World Heritage Convention, various international organizations, non-governmental organizations, the Advisory Bodies to the World Heritage Committee, and academic and scientific experts, to discuss current and future impacts of climate change on World Heritage sites. The outcome of this initiative included a 'Report on Predicting and Managing the Effects of Climate Change on World Heritage', as well as a 'Strategy to Assist States Parties to Implement Appropriate Management Responses' which were endorsed by the World Heritage Committee at its 30th session in July 2006, Vilnius, Lithuania. The outcome of this work has shown that it is timely to develop and implement appropriate management responses to protect World Heritage in the face of climate change. The solutions to global warming are the subject of continuing debate. Some of these measures, beyond the scope of the World Heritage Convention, are discussed under the auspices of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). But although climate change is a global challenge, there are many adaptation and preventive measures that can be taken at the local scale, i.e. at the level of the World Heritage sites. Studies are currently being conducted at several World Heritage sites to monitor climate change impacts and plan appropriate adaptation measures. But the World Heritage network is also a useful tool to share and promote lessons learnt and best practices, as well as to raise awareness regarding climate change impacts

  17. Proceedings of the cold climate construction conference and expo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This conference provided a forum to present innovative technologies in engineering, construction, energy efficiency, workforce productivity and several other aspects affecting cold regions. The session on winter construction featured tools techniques and technologies that maximize winter construction, with reference to the latest in cold weather construction techniques and lessons learned from the far north and south. It featured lessons on building on ice, frozen ground and permafrost. The session on sustainability addressed issues regarding sustainable design; solar, wind and geothermal systems; building envelopes that work in cold climates; and energy efficient products and techniques. The session on workforce productivity presented methods to keep the workforce warm and healthy in cold conditions; attracting and preparing foreign workers for the far north; worker productivity in a cold environment; tools, techniques and clothing to minimize the effects of cold weather; and cold weather equipment operations. Three presentations from the conference have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  18. 18th world hydrogen energy conference 2010. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains lectures, power points slides and posters presented on the 18th World Hydrogen Energy Conference. The topics of the conference are: (A). Fuel Cell Basics: 1. Electrochemistry of PEM Fuell Cells; 2. PEM/HT-PEM Fuel Cells: Electrolytes, Stack Components; 3. Direct Fuel Cells; 4. High-Temperature Fuel Cells; 5. Advanced Modelling (B). Existing and Emerging Markets: 1. Off-Grid Power Supply and Premium Power Generation; 2. Space and Aeronautic Applications; 3. APUs for LDV, Trucks, Ships and Airplanes; 4. Portable Applications and Light Traction. (C). Stationary Applications: 1. High-Temperature Fuel Cells; 2. Fuell Cells for Buildings. (D). Transportation Applications: 1. Fuel-Cell Power Trains; 3. Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engines; 4. Systems Analysis and Well-to-Wheel Studies; 5. Demonstration Projects, Costs and Market Introduction; 6 Electrification in Transportation Systems. (E). Fuel Infrastructures: 1. Hydrogen Distribution Technologies; 2. Hydrogen Deployment; 3. Fuel Provision for Early Market Applications. (G). Hydrogen Production Technologies: 1a. Photobiological Hydrogen Production; 1b. Fermentative Hydrogen Production; 1c. The HYVOLUTION Project. (H). Thermochemical Cycles: 3a. Hydrogen from Renewable Electricity; 3b. High-Temperature Electrolysis; 3c Alcaline Electrolysis; 3d PEM Electrolysis; 4a Reforming and Gasification-Fossil Energy Carriers; 4b Reforming and Gasification-Biomass; 5. Hydrogen-Separation Membranes; 6. Hydrogen Systems Assessment;.7. Photocatalysis (I). Storages: 1. Physical Hydrogen Storage; 2a. Metal Hydrides; 2b. Complex Hydrides; 3. Adsorption Technologies; (J). Strategic Analyses: 1. Research + Development Target and Priorities; 2. Life-Cycle Assessment and Economic Impact; 3. Socio-Economic Studies; 4. Education and Public Awareness; 5. Market Introduction; 7. Regional Activities; 8. The Zero Regio Project. (K). Safety Issues: 1. Vehicle and Infrastructural Safety; 2. Regulations, Codes, Standards and Test

  19. 18th world hydrogen energy conference 2010. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This CD-ROM contains lectures, power points slides and posters presented on the 18th World Hydrogen Energy Conference. The topics of the conference are: (A). Fuel Cell Basics: 1. Electrochemistry of PEM Fuell Cells; 2. PEM/HT-PEM Fuel Cells: Electrolytes, Stack Components; 3. Direct Fuel Cells; 4. High-Temperature Fuel Cells; 5. Advanced Modelling (B). Existing and Emerging Markets: 1. Off-Grid Power Supply and Premium Power Generation; 2. Space and Aeronautic Applications; 3. APUs for LDV, Trucks, Ships and Airplanes; 4. Portable Applications and Light Traction. (C). Stationary Applications: 1. High-Temperature Fuel Cells; 2. Fuell Cells for Buildings. (D). Transportation Applications: 1. Fuel-Cell Power Trains; 3. Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engines; 4. Systems Analysis and Well-to-Wheel Studies; 5. Demonstration Projects, Costs and Market Introduction; 6 Electrification in Transportation Systems. (E). Fuel Infrastructures: 1. Hydrogen Distribution Technologies; 2. Hydrogen Deployment; 3. Fuel Provision for Early Market Applications. (G). Hydrogen Production Technologies: 1a. Photobiological Hydrogen Production; 1b. Fermentative Hydrogen Production; 1c. The HYVOLUTION Project. (H). Thermochemical Cycles: 3a. Hydrogen from Renewable Electricity; 3b. High-Temperature Electrolysis; 3c Alcaline Electrolysis; 3d PEM Electrolysis; 4a Reforming and Gasification-Fossil Energy Carriers; 4b Reforming and Gasification-Biomass; 5. Hydrogen-Separation Membranes; 6. Hydrogen Systems Assessment;.7. Photocatalysis (I). Storages: 1. Physical Hydrogen Storage; 2a. Metal Hydrides; 2b. Complex Hydrides; 3. Adsorption Technologies; (J). Strategic Analyses: 1. Research + Development Target and Priorities; 2. Life-Cycle Assessment and Economic Impact; 3. Socio-Economic Studies; 4. Education and Public Awareness; 5. Market Introduction; 7. Regional Activities; 8. The Zero Regio Project. (K). Safety Issues: 1. Vehicle and Infrastructural Safety; 2. Regulations, Codes, Standards and Test

  20. More than just a conference : the European Particule Accelerator Conference, EPAC, has developped a distinctive role on the world stage, explains Christine Petit-Jean-Genaz, the EPAC conferences coordinator

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    More than just a conference : the European Particule Accelerator Conference, EPAC, has developped a distinctive role on the world stage, explains Christine Petit-Jean-Genaz, the EPAC conferences coordinator

  1. Proceedings of the 2. world conference on Pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-07-01

    The conference and exhibition had over 1000 participants from 60 different countries. Subject areas covered by the conference were: Raw Materials For Densification; Pellet Production Technologies; Pellet Burning Technologies; Supply Chain Logistics; Environmental Issues; Marketing of Densified Fuels; Co-Generation of Heat and Electricity from Densified Fuels; 57 contributions have been separately indexed for the database

  2. Climate Science in a Postmodern World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verosub, Kenneth L.

    2010-08-01

    Like many readers of Eos, I have found it hard to understand the persistence of climate doubters and climate skeptics. How can they not accept the science? An important clue can be found in an editorial by Daniel Henninger in the Wall Street Journal that made a connection between climate science and postmodernism [Henninger, 2009]. Postmodernism is a concept that permeates the humanities and the social sciences. In its simplest terms, it postulates that truth is a relative concept. Facts exist, but their interpretation is determined as much by society, culture, politics, and economics as by scientific objectivity. From this perspective, any interpretation is as valid as any other. So, for instance, Herman Melville's Moby Dick can be seen as a novel equally about morality, homosexuality, the repression of the masses, the quest for God, or the killing of whales in the nineteenth century. All interpretations are valid, and all truth is relative.

  3. The World Climate Exercise: Is (Simulated) Experience Our Best Teacher?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, K.; Rooney-varga, J. N.; Jones, A.; Johnston, E.; Sterman, J.

    2015-12-01

    Meeting the challenge of climate change will clearly require 'deep learning' - learning that motivates a search for underlying meaning, a willingness to exert the sustained effort needed to understand complex problems, and innovative problem-solving. This type of learning is dependent on the level of the learner's engagement with the material, their intrinsic motivation to learn, intention to understand, and relevance of the material to the learner. Here, we present evidence for deep learning about climate change through a simulation-based role-playing exercise, World Climate. The exercise puts participants into the roles of delegates to the United Nations climate negotiations and asks them to create an international climate deal. They find out the implications of their decisions, according to the best available science, through the same decision-support computer simulation used to provide feedback for the real-world negotiations, C-ROADS. World Climate provides an opportunity for participants have an immersive, social experience in which they learn first-hand about both the social dynamics of climate change decision-making, through role-play, and the dynamics of the climate system, through an interactive computer simulation. Evaluation results so far have shown that the exercise is highly engaging and memorable and that it motivates large majorities of participants (>70%) to take action on climate change. In addition, we have found that it leads to substantial gains in understanding key systems thinking concepts (e.g., the stock-flow behavior of atmospheric CO2), as well as improvements in understanding of climate change causes and impacts. While research is still needed to better understand the impacts of simulation-based role-playing exercises like World Climate on behavior change, long-term understanding, transfer of systems thinking skills across topics, and the importance of social learning during the exercise, our results to date indicate that it is a

  4. The understanding of world climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, M.

    2008-01-01

    After having recalled that the problem of global warming in relationship with human activities has been studied since the end of the nineteenth century and since then by different scientific programs, the author describes how the IPCC's or Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's report is produced. He briefly comments how Earth's temperature is determined and the various natural parameters which influence the climate on Earth. He recalls how the IPCC showed the actual influence of human activities, and which changes have actually been observed

  5. World Gas Conference 1997. Working committee H. Liquefied gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This volume of the proceedings contains the report of the International Gas Union's Working Committee H, Liquefied gases, and oral and poster papers presented at the conference. The committee report and each paper have been abstracted separately. (LN)

  6. Global climate change and international security. Report on a conference held at Argonne National Laboratory, May 8--10, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, M.

    1991-12-31

    On May 8--10, 1991, the Midwest Consortium of International Security Studies (MCISS) and Argonne National Laboratory cosponsored a conference on Global Climate Change and International Security. The aim was to bring together natural and social scientists to examine the economic, sociopolitical, and security implications of the climate changes predicted by the general circulation models developed by natural scientists. Five themes emerged from the papers and discussions: (1) general circulation models and predicted climate change; (2) the effects of climate change on agriculture, especially in the Third World; (3) economic implications of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (4) the sociopolitical consequences of climate change; and (5) the effect of climate change on global security.

  7. Key data for climate. France and the World. Issue 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouradou, Frederic; Wong, Florine; Delalande, Daniel; Delbosc, Anais

    2012-01-01

    This document proposes figures, tables, graphs and maps which illustrate climate change (greenhouse effect, impact of human activity, greenhouse gas tanks, fluxes and concentrations), emissions of greenhouse gases (at the world, European and French levels), emissions of greenhouse gases due to energy production in the world, the sector-based distribution of greenhouse gas emissions in Europe and in France (energy combustion, energy production and transformation, transports, industry, other sectors). Then, it presents the climate policies: Kyoto protocol, the emission permit market, Kyoto protocol project mechanisms, other initiatives aimed at emission reduction, the European trading scheme (EU ETS), carbon price in the EU ETS, French climate policy

  8. World status: the Climate Change Treaty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Last month, 153 countries signed a legally binding treaty to stabilise atmospheric emissions at 1990 levels, at various target dates. The USA refused to put a time limit on its stabilisation period, but nonetheless the fact that so many nations signed was regarded as one of the triumphs of Rio conference. Yet for all the apparent over-kill, Rio had one very important message for energy producers: controlling emissions is going to dominate the global agenda for the next twenty years. The rearguard action being waged by many producers to the effect that global warming does not exist, or is not as bad as we thought, is not going to kill the fundamental legislative effort that has now started. (Author)

  9. Energy and climate: the essential world cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesourne, J.

    2008-01-01

    Considering the double challenge of energy supply for economic development and of greenhouse gas emission management to struggle against climate change, the author identifies what can be done at different levels: between governments and households (in terms of energy costs, public transport development, information and education), between governments and firms (in terms of standards, network leakage reductions, intellectual property on new technologies), and between governments. He identifies the related objectives for the European Union, the United States of America, Japan, Russia, China, India, Brazil, the Middle-East, and Sub-Saharan Africa

  10. 17th Online World Conference on Soft Computing in Industrial Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Krömer, Pavel; Köppen, Mario; Schaefer, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    This volume of Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing contains accepted papers presented at WSC17, the 17th Online World Conference on Soft Computing in Industrial Applications, held from December 2012 to January 2013 on the Internet. WSC17 continues a successful series of scientific events started over a decade ago by the World Federation of Soft Computing. It brought together researchers from over the world interested in the ever advancing state of the art in the field. Continuous technological improvements make this online forum a viable gathering format for a world class conference. The aim of WSC17 was to disseminate excellent research results and contribute to building a global network of scientists interested in both theoretical foundations and practical applications of soft computing.   The 2012 edition of the Online World Conference on Soft Computing in Industrial Applications consisted of general track and special session on Continuous Features Discretization for Anomaly Intrusion Detectors...

  11. Vancouver AIDS conference: special report. A verdict on the conference: sadly, not one world or one hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, A

    1996-01-01

    Although the theme of the 11th International Conference on AIDS held in Vancouver during July 7-12, 1996, was "One World, One Hope," developed and developing countries have HIV/AIDS epidemics of different magnitudes, different levels of resources with which to combat the problems, and dissimilar objectives. The latest data released at the conference report an estimated 21.8 million people to be currently living with HIV/AIDS, the vast majority of whom live in developing countries. 84% of the estimated 7.7 million AIDS cases which have occurred since the beginning of the pandemic were in Africa or Asia; only 9% were in Europe and the US. The greatest burden of disease is and will be therefore experienced in the developing world which, relative to the developed world, has extremely limited resources. The epidemic continues to spread throughout much of the developing world, while levels of HIV infection in the developed world are largely remaining constant, with the center seemingly moving more into marginalized groups such as the homeless, drug users, and other groups. A whole range of new drugs will soon be available to treat HIV/AIDS among those who can afford them. It is possible that AIDS may simply become manageable as a chronic illness in the west. Such drugs, however, will be prohibitively expensive for almost all people infected with HIV. Moreover, the side effects of these new drugs remain to be seen, and it is possible that individuals will develop resistance to the treatment. The author laments the lack of papers at the conference analyzing the impact of the epidemic and hopes to see more representation and consideration of the developing world at the next conference, to be held in Geneva in 1998.

  12. Managing Climate Risk. Integrating Adaptation into World Bank Group Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Aalst, M.

    2006-08-01

    Climate change is already taking place, and further changes are inevitable. Developing countries, and particularly the poorest people in these countries, are most at risk. The impacts result not only from gradual changes in temperature and sea level but also, in particular, from increased climate variability and extremes, including more intense floods, droughts, and storms. These changes are already having major impacts on the economic performance of developing countries and on the lives and livelihoods of millions of poor people around the world. Climate change thus directly affects the World Bank Group's mission of eradicating poverty. It also puts at risk many projects in a wide range of sectors, including infrastructure, agriculture, human health, water resources, and environment. The risks include physical threats to the investments, potential underperformance, and the possibility that projects will indirectly contribute to rising vulnerability by, for example, triggering investment and settlement in high-risk areas. The way to address these concerns is not to separate climate change adaptation from other priorities but to integrate comprehensive climate risk management into development planning, programs, and projects. While there is a great need to heighten awareness of climate risk in Bank work, a large body of experience on climate risk management is already available, in analytical work, in country dialogues, and in a growing number of investment projects. This operational experience highlights the general ingredients for successful integration of climate risk management into the mainstream development agenda: getting the right sectoral departments and senior policy makers involved; incorporating risk management into economic planning; engaging a wide range of nongovernmental actors (businesses, nongovernmental organizations, communities, and so on); giving attention to regulatory issues; and choosing strategies that will pay off immediately under current

  13. 3. world TRIGA users conference. Papers and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Conference is focused on TRIGA reactors operation and applications. The main topics are: use of the reactor as a research tool; inspection of spent fuel elements; integrity of fuel rods cladding checks; evaluation of corrosion of aluminum-base fuel cladding materials; Pitting behavior of Aluminum alloys; Monte Carlo simulation of TRIGA: reactivity worth, burnup, flux and power; irradiation facilities; thermal hydraulics analyses etc

  14. 6th World Conference on 21st Century Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Choudary, ADR; Waldschmidt, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Numerous well-presented and important papers from the conference are gathered in the proceedings for the purpose of pointing directions for useful future research in diverse areas of mathematics including algebraic geometry, analysis, commutative algebra, complex analysis, discrete mathematics, dynamical systems, number theory and topology. Several papers on computational and applied mathematics such as wavelet analysis, quantum mechanics, piecewise linear modeling, cosmological models of super symmetry, fluid dynamics, interpolation theory, optimization, ergodic theory and games theory are also presented.

  15. Global Deliberative Democracy and Climate Change: Insights from World Wide Views on Global Warming in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Riedy

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available On 26 September 2009, approximately 4,000 citizens in 38 countries participated in World Wide Views on Global Warming (WWViews. WWViews was an ambitious first attempt to convene a deliberative mini-public at a global scale, giving people from around the world an opportunity to deliberate on international climate policy and to make recommendations to the decision-makers meeting at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen (COP-15 in December 2009. In this paper, we examine the role that deliberative mini-publics can play in facilitating the emergence of a global deliberative system for climate change response. We pursue this intent through a reflective evaluation of the Australian component of the World Wide Views on Global Warming project (WWViews. Our evaluation of WWViews is mixed. The Australian event was delivered with integrity and feedback from Australian participants was almost universally positive. Globally, WWViews demonstrated that it is feasible to convene a global mini-public to deliberate on issues of global relevance, such as climate change. On the other hand, the contribution of WWViews towards the emergence of a global deliberative system for climate change response was limited and it achieved little influence on global climate change policy. We identify lessons for future global mini-publics, including the need to prioritise the quality of deliberation and provide flexibility to respond to cultural and political contexts in different parts of the world. Future global mini-publics may be more influential if they seek to represent discourse diversity in addition to demographic profiles, use designs that maximise the potential for transmission from public to empowered space, run over longer time periods to build momentum for change and experiment with ways of bringing global citizens together in a single process instead of discrete national events.

  16. Travelling through a warming world: climate change and migratory species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, A.; Crick, H.Q.P.; Learmonth, J.A.; Maclean, I.M.D.; Thomas, C.D.; Bairlein, F.; Forchhammer, M.C.; Francis, C.M.; Gill, J.A.; Godley, B.J.; Harwood, J.; Hays, G.C.; Huntley, B.; Hutson, A.M.; Pierce, G.J.; Rehfisch, M.M.; Sims, D.W.; Vieira dos Santos, M.C.; Sparks, T.H.; Stroud, D.; Visser, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    Long-distance migrations are among the wonders of the natural world, but this multi-taxon review shows that the characteristics of species that undertake such movements appear to make them particularly vulnerable to detrimental impacts of climate change. Migrants are key components of biological

  17. Latitude, elevational climatic zonation and speciation in New World vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cadena, Carlos Daniel; Kozak, Kenneth H.; Gomez, Juan Pablo

    2012-01-01

    in tropical versus temperate areas. Here, we quantify overlap in the climatic distributions of 93 pairs of sister species of mammals, birds, amphibians and reptiles restricted to either the New World tropics or to the Northern temperate zone. We show that elevational ranges of tropical- and temperate...

  18. NCSE's 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy, and the Environment: Energy and Climate Change, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, Ellen [National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-07-08

    The National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE) held its 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment: Energy and Climate Change, on January 27-29, 2015, at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, Crystal City, VA. The National Conference: Energy and Climate Change developed and advanced partnerships that focused on transitioning the world to a new “low carbon” and “climate resilient” energy system. It emphasized advancing research and technology, putting ideas into action, and moving forward on policy and practice. More than 900 participants from the scientific research, policy and governance, business and civil society, and education communities attended. The Conference was organized around four themes: (1) a new energy system (including energy infrastructure, technologies and efficiencies, changes in distribution of energy sources, and low carbon transportation); (2) energy, climate and sustainable development; (3) financing and markets; and (4) achieving progress (including ideas for the 21st Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change). The program featured six keynote presentations, six plenary sessions, 41 symposia and 20 workshops. Conference participants were involved in the 20 workshops, each on a specific energy and climate-related issue. The workshops were designed as interactive sessions, with each workshop generating 10-12 recommendations on the topic. The recommendations were prepared in the final conference report, were disseminated nationally, and continue to be available for public use. The conference also featured an exhibition and poster sessions. The National Conference on Energy and Climate Change addressed a wide range of issues specific to the U.S. Department of Energy’s programs; involved DOE’s scientists and program managers in sessions and workshops; and reached out to a broad array of DOE stakeholders.

  19. Charting the new world order: proceedings of the 15. CERI international oil and gas markets conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    The 15th International Oil and Gas Markets Conference, organized by the Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI) and held in Calgary, AB, provided a wide variety of opportunities for discussion of the global oil and gas market outlook, international oil and gas market strategies and corporate planning in the new world order, competition for investments, the re-emergence of the geopolitics of energy, energy in the Americas, international gas market strategies, and the financing of Canadian international operations. More than 100 delegates from around the world attended the conference to hear some 20 presentations. refs., tabs., figs

  20. Climate change and its effect on world food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, W.O.

    1974-01-01

    In February of 1972 earth-orbiting artificial satellites revealed the existence of a greatly increased area of the snow and ice cover of the north polar cap as compared to all previous years of space age observations. Some scientists believe that this may have presaged the onset of the dramatic climate anomalies of 1972 that brought far-reaching adversities to the world's peoples. Moreover, there is mounting evidence that the bad climate of 1972 may be the forerunner of a long series of less favorable agricultural crop years that lie ahead for most world societies. Thus widespread food shortages threaten just at the same time that world populations are growing to new highs. Indeed, less favorable climate may be the new global norm. The Earth may have entered a new 'little ice age'. Perhaps this future period will not be so extreme as that around 1700 AD, but it seems likely, at least, to be a cooler period resembling the hemispheric climatic regimes of the period from 1880-1920. (author)

  1. Earth Experiments in a Virtual World: Introducing Climate & Coding to High School Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H. A.; Twedt, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    In our increasingly technologically-driven and information-saturated world, literacy in STEM fields can be crucial for career advancement. Nevertheless, both systemic and interpersonal barriers can prevent individuals, particularly members of under-represented groups, from engaging in these fields. Here, we present a high school-level workshop developed to foster basic understanding of climate science while exposing students to the Python programming language. For the past four years, the workshop has been a part of the annual Expanding Your Horizons conference for high school girls, whose mission is to spark interest in STEM fields. Moving through current events in the realm of global climate policy, the fundamentals of climate, and the mathematical representation of planetary energy balance, the workshop culminates in an under-the-hood exploration of a basic climate model coded in the Python programming language. Students interact directly with the underlying code to run `virtual world' experiments that explore the impact of solar insolation, planetary albedo, the greenhouse effect, and meridional energy transport on global temperatures. Engagement with Python is through the Jupyter Notebook interface, which permits direct interaction with the code but is more user-friendly for beginners than a command-line approach. We conclude with further ideas for providing online access to workshop materials for educators, and additional venues for presenting such workshops to under-represented groups in STEM.

  2. World renewable energy and environmental conference: abstract book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The energy is a wrap of the life and the main source of it is sources. The protection continuity of the energy is important cause of the scientific research development which we observe it on our energy every day life. But instead of the importance of the oil a main energy source which all the world depend on, there are many notes from the scientist, researchers and the environment institutions about the risks of the dependence on the traditional energy sources, and stressed on the study of it is negative effect on the environment human life and global community, also the call for looking for another substitutions about more safe sources and suitable for the environment. This comes on the interest frame which the university of Sebha and Libya in general gives it is special concern and reflect it is care of the scientific research and technical development to ascent our higher education institutions level in Libya, and it is contribution in the investigation and study of scientific issues which serve the aims of the society and it is anticipation and to be a good event for the meeting between the specialists and researchers from all over the world. (author)

  3. Proceedings of the fourth international conference and exhibition: World Congress on superconductivity. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishen, K.; Burnham, C. [eds.] [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (United States). Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    1994-12-31

    This document contains papers presented at the 4th International Conference Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity held at the Marriott Orlando World Center, Orlando, Florida, June 27--July 1, 1994. This conference encompassed research, technology, applications, funding, political, and social aspects of superconductivity. Specifically, the areas of research, technology, and development covered during the conference included high-temperature materials, thin films, C-60 based superconductors, persistent magnetic fields and shielding, fabrication methodology, space applications, physical applications, performance characterization, device applications, weak link effects and flux motion, accelerator technology, superconductivity energy, storage, future research and development directions, medical applications, granular superconductors, wire fabrication technology, computer applications, technical and commercial challenges, and power and energy applications. The key objective of this conference was to provide a forum for the world community to share technological results of recent advances made in the field of superconductivity and to discuss translation of the research to technology which will benefit humanity. More than 150 presentations were made at this conference. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Data Bases.

  4. Proceedings of the fourth international conference and exhibition: World Congress on superconductivity. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishen, K.; Burnham, C.

    1994-01-01

    This document contains papers presented at the 4th International Conference Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity held at the Marriott Orlando World Center, Orlando, Florida, June 27--July 1, 1994. This conference encompassed research, technology, applications, funding, political, and social aspects of superconductivity. Specifically, the areas of research, technology, and development covered during the conference included high-temperature materials, thin films, C-60 based superconductors, persistent magnetic fields and shielding, fabrication methodology, space applications, physical applications, performance characterization, device applications, weak link effects and flux motion, accelerator technology, superconductivity energy, storage, future research and development directions, medical applications, granular superconductors, wire fabrication technology, computer applications, technical and commercial challenges, and power and energy applications. The key objective of this conference was to provide a forum for the world community to share technological results of recent advances made in the field of superconductivity and to discuss translation of the research to technology which will benefit humanity. More than 150 presentations were made at this conference. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Data Bases

  5. Phylogenetic signals in the climatic niches of the world's amphibians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hof, Christian; Rahbek, Carsten; Araújo, Miguel B.

    2010-01-01

    amphibian orders and across biogeographical regions. To our knowledge, this is the first study providing a comprehensive analysis of the phylogenetic signal in species climatic niches for an entire clade across the world. Even though our results do not provide a strong test of the niche conservatism......The question of whether closely related species share similar ecological requirements has attracted increasing attention, because of its importance for understanding global diversity gradients and the impacts of climate change on species distributions. In fact, the assumption that related species...... are also ecologically similar has often been made, although the prevalence of such a phylogenetic signal in ecological niches remains heavily debated. Here, we provide a global analysis of phylogenetic niche relatedness for the world's amphibians. In particular, we assess which proportion of the variance...

  6. 1995 World Conference on Women. African Regional Preparatory Conference, November 94, Dakar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-01

    During the African Regional Preparatory Conference, held in Dakar in November 1994, the Inter-African Committee on Traditional Practices Affecting the Health of Women and Children (IAC) organized a workshop on "Traditional Practices and Beliefs as a Violation of the Human Rights of the Woman and the Girl Child" in collaboration with the Organisation of African Unity (OAU) and the UN Economic Commission for Africa (ECA). Eight panelists shared their country experiences and made proposals for eradicating harmful traditional practices. A film was shown, and Mrs. Marianne Sidibe, president of the Senegalese IAC National Committee, gave a vivid description of female genital mutilation (FGM). Proposals made during the workshop include 1) a follow-up workshop in Beijing; 2) inclusion of IAC concerns in the Platform of Action; 3) integration of IAC concerns into the national health programs of African nations with allocated budgets for implementation; 4) strengthening of interagency collaboration with governments; 5) adoption of legislation prohibiting harmful traditional practices such as FGM; 6) a minimum legal age for marriage of 18 years; 7) inclusion of information on traditional practices and gender sensitivity in primary and high school curricula; 8) involvement of youth in the campaign against harmful traditional practices; 9) regular evaluation of IAC activities; and 10) education of parents concerning gender equality. The African Platform for Action adopted by the conference considers FGM a form of violence against women.

  7. UNESCO World Conference on Education for Sustainable Development: Learning Today for a Sustainable Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Education for Sustainable Development, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The UNESCO World Conference on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) will be co-organised in 2014 by UNESCO and the Government of Japan on the occasion of the end of the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development. It has the following objectives: (1) Celebrating a decade of action; (2) Reorienting education to build a better future…

  8. Proceedings of the 11th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Specht, Marcus; Sharples, Mike; Multisilta, Jari

    2013-01-01

    Specht, M., Sharples, M., & Multisilta, J. (Eds.) (2012). Proceedings of the 11th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning (mLearn 2012). October, 16-18, 2012, Helsinki, Finland. Published by CEUR Workshop Proceedings, 2012, Vol. 995. Retrieved from http://ceur-ws.org/Vol-955/

  9. Proceedings of the Atlantic climate change 2008 conference : risk, responses and tools for action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This conference provided a forum for members of the private and public sector, as well as researchers and industry leaders to discuss methods of preventing and adapting to climate change in the Maritime provinces. Presentations at the conference evaluated a range of options, opportunities, and potential outcomes from strategies for reducing environmental impacts and improving energy efficiency in the region. Topics discussed at the conference included adaptation tools; carbon markets; resource management; corporate and public policy; and risk assessment and decision-making processes. The conference was divided into the following 5 sessions: (1) land use planning and adaptation, (2) fish, farms and forests, (3) climate science and modelling, (4) energy policy for mitigation and sustainability, and (5) tools for adaptation and infrastructure. A workshop discussing the use of LIDAR in decision-making processes was also held. The conference featured 11 presentations, of which 3 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs.

  10. World energy, technology and climate policy outlook 2030. WETO 2030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Starting from a set of clear key assumptions on economic activity, population and hydrocarbon resources, WETO describes in detail scenarios for the evolution of World and European energy systems, power generation technologies and impacts of climate change policy in the main world regions or countries.It presents a coherent framework to analyse the energy, technology and environment trends and issues over the period to 2030, focusing on Europe in a world context. Three of the key results of this work are: (1) in a Reference scenario, i.e.if no strong specific policy initiatives and measures are taken, world CO2 emissions are expected to double in 2030 and, with a share of 90%, fossil fuels will continue to dominate the energy system; (2) the great majority of the increase in oil production will come from OPEC countries and the EU will rely predominantly on natural gas imported from the CIS; and (3) as the largest growing energy demand and CO2 emissions originate from developing countries (mainly China and India), Europe will have to intensify its co-operation, particularly in terms of transfer of technologies. The analysis of long-term scenarios and a particular attention to the energy world context, is an important element for efficient energy, technology and environment policies towards a sustainable world

  11. Thoughts on the World Conference on Women. A Chinese woman writes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuan, R

    1995-01-01

    Increasing social consciousness about human rights issues in China has, in turn, stimulated Chinese women's awareness of their individual rights. The Chinese government, however, has maintained tight control over the dissemination of feminist ideas and restricted media coverage of the Fourth World Conference on Women, held in Beijing in 1995. To discredit feminism, Chinese officials link it with sexual liberation, single motherhood, and lesbianism. Nonetheless, there is a new awareness that government statistics on the high rates of female employment conceal the reality that Chinese women are concentrated in low-paying, low-status occupations. In contrast to official propaganda, a United Nations Development Report ranked China 23rd in the world for women's participation in politics and the economy. In the course of preparing for the World Conference, a few nonofficial, grass-roots Chinese women's organizations were able to present their ideas.

  12. World Gas Conference 1997. Working committee J. World gas prospects, strategies and economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This volume of the proceedings contains the report of the International Gas Union's Working Committee J - World gas prospects, strategies and economics - and 7 oral papers dealing with natural gas supply and demand and transmission. (LN)

  13. Population policy at a crossroads. Will world conference signal new directions for U.S.?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccarty, L; Sherman, D

    1994-06-01

    In September 1994 in Cairo, at the third population conference hosted by the United Nations, world leaders will be asked to approve a plan that could stabilize the world population at about 8 billion people by the middle of the next century. Participants will consider interrelated issues: population growth, access to family planning, women's empowerment, sustainable development, poverty, consumption, and the environment. This campaign for a more equitable world is likely to continue after Cairo, with the UN-sponsored social summit in Copenhagen and a women's conference in Beijing slated for next year. The Cairo International Conference on Population and Development will require a new approach to sustainability by balancing environmental protection, economic development, and present and future human needs. The United States has only 5% of the world's population, but it uses 25% of the world's commercial energy, produces more garbage and waste than any other country, and generates 21% of all carbon dioxide emissions, which contribute to global warming. Demands for energy, water and food already cannot be met as natural resources are being exhausted at an alarming rate. The fight over water rights to the Colorado River exemplifies the shrinking natural resource base. In contrast to the Reagan-Bush administration, the Clinton administration restored funding to international family planning agencies and endorsed sustainable development. The US birth rate is back at a 2-decade high, while 60% of pregnancies are unintended. US adolescent pregnancy is the highest among industrialized countries, leading to a cycle of poverty and soaring public costs. Government funding for new contraceptive research has been stagnant because of the pressure of right-wing groups, although finally RU-486 became available for clinical trials. The Cairo conference is likely to recognize the US as the leader in global political issues, however, domestic population and consumption issues have

  14. 1st Complex Systems Digital Campus World E-Conference 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Bourgine, Paul; Collet, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings as well as invited papers for the first annual conference of the UNESCO Unitwin Complex System Digital Campus (CSDC), which is an international initiative gathering 120 Universities on four continents, and structured in ten E-Departments. First Complex Systems Digital Campus World E-Conference 2015 features chapters from the latest research results on theoretical questions of complex systems and their experimental domains. The content contained bridges the gap between the individual and the collective within complex systems science and new integrative sciences on topics such as: genes to organisms to ecosystems, atoms to materials to products, and digital media to the Internet. The conference breaks new ground through a dedicated video-conferencing system – a concept at the heart of the international UNESCO UniTwin, embracing scientists from low-income and distant countries. This book promotes an integrated system of research, education, and training. It also aims at contr...

  15. It's A Gassy World: Middle School Students Investigate Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, C.

    2016-12-01

    When middle school students are asked about our changing earth system, their responses likely include terms like global warming, climate change, and greenhouse gases. However, many students struggle to understand how it all fits together, and sometimes they hear conflicting information or myths about climate change. This activity allows students to explore the impacts of warming oceans and oceans' absorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) through a student planned and carried out investigation that begins with a pre-laboratory engagement and exploration piece, includes a laboratory component, and concludes with an explanation where students analyze their data and interpret their results through the claim-evidence-reasoning framework. It's a Gassy World was developed with three-dimensional instruction in mind to introduce middle school students to the relationship between warming oceans and changes in carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption in the oceans. Students explore disciplinary core ideas in the Earth and Space Sciences discipline of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) using crosscutting concepts and science and engineering practices. Specifically, students study CO2 as a greenhouse gas and the effect of increased atmospheric CO2 levels on global climate change by planning and carrying out their own investigations. We structured this activity in a 5E format that can take place in four to five days during a climate change unit. After piloting this activity in over 20 formal classrooms and with 5 informal education groups, we have seen how It's a Gassy World helps support inquiry in the classroom and allows students to experience crosscutting concepts and science and engineering practices in NGSS. We found that students were engaged and actively learning throughout the activity. Student work and pilot teacher feedback indicated that, through this activity, many students increased their understanding of CO2 as a greenhouse gas and recognized that warmer oceans will

  16. World energy, technology and climate policy outlook 2030 - WETO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    WETO describes in detail scenarios for the evolution of World and European energy systems, power generation technologies and impacts of climate change policy in the main world regions or countries. It presents a coherent framework to analyse the energy, technology and environment trends and issues over the period to 2030, focusing on Europe in a world context. The document highlights three key topics. First, in a Reference scenario, i.e. if no strong specific policy initiatives and measures are taken, world CO 2 emissions are expected to double in 2030 and, with a share of 90%, fossil fuels will continue to dominate the energy system. Secondly, the great majority of the increase in oil production will come from OPEC countries and the EU will rely predominantly on natural gas imported from the CIS. Lastly, as the largest growing energy demand and CO 2 emissions originate from developing countries (mainly China and India), Europe will have to intensify its co-operation, particularly in terms of transfer of technologies. (A.L.B.)

  17. Proceedings of the upwind downwind 2008 conference : climate change and healthy cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This conference provided a forum to examine the effects of poor air quality on public health. It was attended by urban planners, public health officials, policy makers, environmental managers, non-government organizations, academics, industry, community groups and politicians. The first session of the conference focused on research in cardiovascular and respiratory health impacts, linkages and actions to improve air quality and address climate change. The session on urban and transportation planning focused on how the implementation of transportation systems and land use patterns through urban design can impact health and air quality. It examined green buildings, standards and their linkages to improving local air quality. The session on climate change and local partnerships focused on local actions that cities, organizations and individuals can take to improve air quality and address climate change. One of the 16 presentations featured at this conference has been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  18. Proceedings of the CERI 2002 World Oil Conference : Reading the Future. CD ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The integration and expansion of world oil markets was the main topic of this conference which featured 18 presentations dealing with developments in the international energy sector. The conference provided an opportunity for participants to discuss issues regarding oil supply and demand, oil prices, OPEC's spare capacity, OPEC's view regarding increasing competition from Canada's oil sands, and what role non-conventional oil plays in today's marketplace. The conference was divided into 6 sessions entitled: (1) oil prices, business as usual, (2) world oil demand, the incredible shrinking market, (3) global oil supplies, (4) going offshore, (5) the politics of oil, and (6) the growing North American supply. The outlook of world energy markets was reviewed with particular emphasis on prospects for oil supply and reserves. Also, the current status of the petroleum industry in both OPEC and non-OPEC oil exporting countries was discussed with reference to exploration, production, reserves, and hydrocarbon potential as well as the environmental, and socio-economic challenges that the industry must face. refs., tabs., figs

  19. Multisectoral Climate Impact Hotspots in a Warming World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piontek, Franziska; Mueller, Christoph; Pugh, Thomas A. M.; Clark, Douglas B.; Deryng, Delphine; Elliott, Joshua; deJesusColonGonzalez, Felipe; Floerke, Martina; Folberth, Christian; Franssen, Wietse; hide

    2014-01-01

    The impacts of global climate change on different aspects of humanity's diverse life-support systems are complex and often difficult to predict. To facilitate policy decisions on mitigation and adaptation strategies, it is necessary to understand, quantify, and synthesize these climate-change impacts, taking into account their uncertainties. Crucial to these decisions is an understanding of how impacts in different sectors overlap, as overlapping impacts increase exposure, lead to interactions of impacts, and are likely to raise adaptation pressure. As a first step we develop herein a framework to study coinciding impacts and identify regional exposure hotspots. This framework can then be used as a starting point for regional case studies on vulnerability and multifaceted adaptation strategies. We consider impacts related to water, agriculture, ecosystems, and malaria at different levels of global warming. Multisectoral overlap starts to be seen robustly at a mean global warming of 3 degC above the 1980-2010 mean, with 11% of the world population subject to severe impacts in at least two of the four impact sectors at 4 degC. Despite these general conclusions, we find that uncertainty arising from the impact models is considerable, and larger than that from the climate models. In a low probability-high impact worst-case assessment, almost the whole inhabited world is at risk for multisectoral pressures. Hence, there is a pressing need for an increased research effort to develop a more comprehensive understanding of impacts, as well as for the development of policy measures under existing uncertainty.

  20. 2014 Earth System Grid Federation and Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools Conference Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-27

    The climate and weather data science community met December 9–11, 2014, in Livermore, California, for the fourth annual Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) Face-to-Face (F2F) Conference, hosted by the Department of Energy, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the European Infrastructure for the European Network of Earth System Modelling, and the Australian Department of Education. Both ESGF and UVCDATremain global collaborations committed to developing a new generation of open-source software infrastructure that provides distributed access and analysis to simulated and observed data from the climate and weather communities. The tools and infrastructure created under these international multi-agency collaborations are critical to understanding extreme weather conditions and long-term climate change. In addition, the F2F conference fosters a stronger climate and weather data science community and facilitates a stronger federated software infrastructure. The 2014 F2F conference detailed the progress of ESGF, UV-CDAT, and other community efforts over the year and sets new priorities and requirements for existing and impending national and international community projects, such as the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase Six. Specifically discussed at the conference were project capabilities and enhancements needs for data distribution, analysis, visualization, hardware and network infrastructure, standards, and resources.

  1. Proceedings of the 7. world wind energy conference 2008 : community power : energy autonomy for local economies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This international conference profiled the topic of community power within the dynamic renewable energy sector. The objective was to promote international technology transfer and bring a new perspective to community development, economic growth and environmental awareness in the context of climate change. It was attended by academics and industry representatives from 20 countries who focused on leading edge research on the topic of innovative technology in the rapidly growing renewable power market. The topics of discussion addressed issues such as ownership of renewable energy projects by local communities, including farmers, landowners, cooperatives, Aboriginal groups, municipalities, utilities and educational institutions. Presentations focused on policy development, financial mechanisms, ownership models, technology advancements, grid interconnection issues, governance and capacity building. The conference featured more than 100 presentations, of which 65 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  2. Global ocean monitoring for the World Climate Research Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelle, R; Bretherton, F

    1986-07-01

    Oceanic research and modelling for the World Climate Research Program will utilize several recently-developed instruments and measuring techniques as well as well-tested, long-used instruments. Ocean-scanning satellites will map the component of the ocean-surface topography related to ocean currents and mesoscale eddies and to fluctuating water volumes caused by ocean warming and cooling. Other satellite instruments will measure the direction and magnitude of wind stress on the sea surface, surface water temperatures, the distribution of chlorophyll and other photosynthetic pigments, the characteristics of internal waves, and possible precipitation over the ocean. Networks of acoustic transponders will obtain a three-dimensional picture of the distribution of temperature from the surface down to mid-depth and of long-term changes in temperature at depth. Ocean research vessels will determine the distribution and fate of geochemical tracers and will also make high-precision, deep hydrographic casts. Ships of opportunity, using expendable instruments, will measure temperature, salinity and currents in the upper water layers. Drifting and anchored buoys will also measure these properties as well as those of the air above the sea surface. Tide gauges installed on islands and exposed coastal locations will measure variations in monthly and shorter-period mean sea level. These tide gauges will provide 'ground truth' for the satellite maps of sea-surface topography, and will also determine variations in ocean currents and temperature.All these instruments will be used in several major programs, the most ambitious of which is the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) designed to obtain global measurements of major currents throughout the world ocean, greater understanding of the transformation of water masses, and the role of advective, convective, and turbulent processes in exchange of properties between surface and deep-ocean layers.A five- to ten-year experiment

  3. The Paris Climate Conference: What kind of international agreement in 2015?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmet, Sylvie; Watkinson, Paul; Navizet, Damien

    2015-01-01

    At stake during the 21. Climate Conference (COP21) to be held in Paris in 2015 is the adoption of a worldwide agreement that can be applied to all countries. This agreement, which will take effect by 2020, will focus not only on reducing greenhouse gases and adapting to climate change but also on funding and concrete actions for sustainable, resilient economic development. Throughout the coming year, France, which hosts and chairs the COP21, must see to it that a transparent, inclusive process allows all parties to express their viewpoints and be heard. An agreement is not the only result expected of this conference. For the sake of fairness and in order to limit global warming to 2 deg. C, pledges and commitments, including financial ones, from countries in favor of protecting the climate are expected too. International recognition will also have to be provided to climate-related initiatives that have already been launched

  4. Archimedes in the 21st Century : World Conference at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book is a collection of papers presented at the “Archimedes in the 21st Century” world conference, held at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences in 2013. This conference focused on the enduring and continuing influence of Archimedes in our modern world, celebrating his centuries of influence on mathematics, science, and engineering.  Archimedes planted the seeds for a myriad of seminal ideas that would grow over the ages. Each chapter surveys the growth of one or more of these seeds, and the fruit that they continue to bear to this day. The conference speakers contributing to this book are actively involved in STEM fields whose origins trace back to Archimedes, many of whom have conducted and published research that extends Archimedes’ work into the 21st century. The speakers are not historians, so while historical context is provided, this book is uniquely focused on the works themselves as opposed to their history.   The breadth and depth of Archimedes’ influence will inspire, deligh...

  5. Climate change and the World Bank: opportunity for global governance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmer-Christiansen, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    The direct and indirect efforts of the World Bank and its off-spring, the Global Environment Facility (GEF), to become leading international agents of global environmental 'governance' and 'sustainable development' are described and analysed politically with reference to the development of an implementation regime of the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC). The Bank/GEF are seen as engaging in a potentially dangerous experiment of 'global ecological modernisation', or industrial transformation, in 'emerging economies', an experiment legitimised by reference to the catastrophic threat of man-made 'global warming'. This threat is already being translated into political, commercial and bureaucratic benefits accruing to a small global elite. How was this achieved and what are the likely political implications? (author)

  6. 2011 Raditation & Climate Gordon Research Conference (July 10-15 2011- Colby College, Waterville, Maine)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prof. Max Hoggblom

    2012-02-09

    The 2011 Gordon Research Conference on Radiation and Climate will present cutting-edge research on outstanding issues in climate change, particularly those in which the interactions between clouds, aerosols, and precipitation play a major role. The Conference will feature a broad range of topics, including grand challenges in atmospheric radiation and climate, cloud and water vapor feedbacks, aerosol-cloud-precipitation-climate interactions across scales, new approaches for remote sensing and in-situ observations of clouds, aerosols and precipitation, and multi-scale modeling challenges. The invited speakers will present the most important recent advances and future challenges in these areas. The Conference will bring together a collection of leading investigators who are at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for scientists, especially junior scientists and graduate students, to present their work in poster format and exchange ideas with leaders in the field. The collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with programmed discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, provides an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to brainstorm and promotes cross-disciplinary collaborations in the various research areas represented.

  7. 2B continued... The outcomes of the Warsaw Climate Conference and implications for Paris 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the 19. Conference of Parties (COP19) at the UN Climate Convention. It stresses in particular on the importance of the planning of States' 'contributions' in the domain of greenhouse gases abatement, on which delegations agreed after two weeks of intense negotiations

  8. Biographical Data in a Digital World 2015 : Proceedings of the First Conference on Biographical Data in a Digital World 2015, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, April 9, 2015.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Braake, Serge; Fokkens, Antske; Sluijter, R.G.H.; Declerck, Thierry; Wandl-Vogt, Eveline

    2015-01-01

    Biographical Data in a Digital World 2015 brought together researchers from Computer Science and History working on digitized biographies from all over the world. This introduction to its proceedings provides our motivation for a conference on this topic, a short history of the origin of the event

  9. Research Spotlight: Climate commitment in an uncertain world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-02-01

    Even if humans immediately ceased emitting carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases, the planet would continue to warm, mainly due to thermal inertia of the world's oceans. This “climate commitment” has been of interest recently for both science and policy because it provides a measure of the minimum climate change the planet will face given human activity that has already occurred. Several studies have looked at what would happen if human emission of CO2 were halted, but these studies have overlooked the role of aerosols and non-CO2 greenhouse gases such as methane and nitrous oxide, which Armour and Roe include in a new study. If human emission stopped, atmospheric aerosols, which cool the planet by blocking light from the surface, would fall to preindustrial levels within weeks. However, non-CO2 greenhouse gases would remain in the atmosphere for decades to centuries, and elevated levels of CO2 would persist for millennia. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2010GL045850, 2011)

  10. Proceedings of the third USGS modeling conference, June 7-11, 2010, Broomfield, Colorado-Understanding and predicting for a changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Shailaja R.

    2011-01-01

    The Third USGS Modeling Conference was held June 7th-11, 2010, in Broomfield, Colorado. The conference focused on the development and application of analytical and theoretical models and data availability that support managing the Nation's resources and help protect lives and property. Participants at the conference included scientists and managers from Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureaus; national and international Federal, State, and local agencies; academic institutions; and nongovernmental organizations. The conference was organized according to DOI priorities and the strategic directions of the USGS Science Strategy; the following themes were emphasized: (1) Understanding Ecosystems and Restoring America's Treasured Landscapes; (2) Climate Change and Impact; (3) New Energy Frontier and Minerals for America; (4) A National Hazards, Risk, and Resilience Assessment Program; (5) Role of Environment and Wildlife in Human Health; (6) A Water Census of the United States; and (7) New Methods of Investigation and Discovery. The conference theme-"Understanding and Predicting for a Changing World"-focused on the following goals: advance development and application of models; provide tools that address management issues; present state-of-the-art models ranging from individual phenomena to integrated systems; and foster a working community among scientists and managers.

  11. Detroit, 22-27 September 1974: Report on ninth world energy conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1974-07-01

    The acceleration of world demand for energy during the last forty years has led to a projection of future needs far in excess of present capacity, and one which threatens exhaustion of today's conventional sources at some future time. Coupled with this premise is the realization of two inter-related facts: inadequate, uneconomic sources of energy cripple a man, his nation, and his world and lead to insecurity, famine and ignorance; on the other hand, excessive, uncontrolled use of energy sources leads to wastage of resources, pollution and human misery that likewise respects no national boundaries. These dominating concerns led to the selection of the main theme of the Ninth World Energy Conference - 'The Economic and Environmental Challenges of Future Energy Requirements'. This theme was broadly broken down into six main categories: energy needs, sources of energy, energy conversion and utilization, conservation of energy, economics and environmental considerations. A total of 229 formal papers were considered by the several thousand participants who represented more than 60 countries and a number of international organizations at the Conference.

  12. Detroit, 22-27 September 1974: Report on ninth world energy conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The acceleration of world demand for energy during the last forty years has led to a projection of future needs far in excess of present capacity, and one which threatens exhaustion of today's conventional sources at some future time. Coupled with this premise is the realization of two inter-related facts: inadequate, uneconomic sources of energy cripple a man, his nation, and his world and lead to insecurity, famine and ignorance; on the other hand, excessive, uncontrolled use of energy sources leads to wastage of resources, pollution and human misery that likewise respects no national boundaries. These dominating concerns led to the selection of the main theme of the Ninth World Energy Conference - 'The Economic and Environmental Challenges of Future Energy Requirements'. This theme was broadly broken down into six main categories: energy needs, sources of energy, energy conversion and utilization, conservation of energy, economics and environmental considerations. A total of 229 formal papers were considered by the several thousand participants who represented more than 60 countries and a number of international organizations at the Conference

  13. Economy and Climate Change The Paris Conference - December 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorel Pop

    2016-01-01

    This paper, other than being a brief listing of Summits dealing with climate changeissues also describes the evolution of the CO2 atmosphere percentage as well as theconsumption of carbon based fuels - the reason for the highly increasing raise in theconcentration of the most nominated greenhouse effect gas that causes the rise oftemperature on our planet.

  14. The World Climate Project: Bringing the UN Climate Negotiations to Classrooms, Boardrooms, and Living Rooms Near You

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, K.; Rooney-varga, J. N.; Jones, A.; Johnston, E.; Sterman, J.

    2015-12-01

    As a simulation-based role-playing exercise, World Climate provides an opportunity for participants to have an immersive experience in which they learn first-hand about both the social dynamics of climate change decision-making, through role-play, and the geophysical dynamics of the climate system, through an interactive computer simulation. In June 2015, we launched the World Climate Project with the intent of bringing this powerful tool to students, citizens, and decision-makers across government, NGO, and private sectors around the world. Within a period of six weeks from the launch date, 440 educators from 36 states and 56 countries have enrolled in the initiative, offering the potential to reach tens of thousands of participants around the world. While this project is clearly in its infancy, we see several characteristics that may be contributing to widespread interest in it. These factors include the ease-of-use, real-world relevance, and scientific rigor of the decision-support simulation, C-ROADS, that frames the World Climate Exercise. Other characteristics of World Climate include its potential to evoke an emotional response that is arousing and inspirational and its use of positive framing and a call to action. Similarly, the World Climate Project takes a collaborative approach, enabling educators to be innovators and valued contributors and regularly communicating with people who join the initiative through webinars, social media, and resources.

  15. Trends in NDE science and technology: proceedings of the fourteenth world conference on NDT. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnadas Nair, C.G.; Baldev Raj; Murthy, C.R.L.; Jayakumar, T.

    1996-01-01

    The multi volume proceedings of the 14th World Conference on Nondestructive Testing (NDT) cover the applications of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) in a wide range of industries, viz. aerospace, chemical, defence, manufacturing, nuclear etc. and for different materials. The major topics covered under it are NDE in nuclear industry, NDE of tubes and bars, non destructive evaluation of composites, NDE of concrete, non destructive evaluation of stresses, NDE of defects, condition monitoring, vibration monitoring, life prediction and NDE for medical applications. Papers relevant to INIS from this volume are indexed separately

  16. Trends in NDE science and technology: proceedings of the fourteenth world conference on NDT. V. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnadas Nair, C.G.; Baldev Raj; Murthy, C.R.L.; Jayakumar, T.

    1996-01-01

    The multi volume proceedings of the 14th World Conference on Nondestructive Testing (NDT) cover the applications of Non destructive Evaluation (NDE) in a wide range of industries, viz. aerospace, chemical, defence, manufacturing, nuclear etc. and for different materials. The major topics covered under it are NDE in nuclear industry, NDE of tubes and bars, non destructive evaluation of composites, NDE of concrete, non destructive evaluation of stresses, NDE of defects, condition monitoring, vibration monitoring, life prediction and NDE for medical applications. Papers relevant to INIS from this volume are indexed separately

  17. Trends in NDE science and technology: proceedings of the fourteenth world conference on NDT. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnadas Nair, C.G.; Baldev Raj; Murthy, C.R.L.; Jayakumar, T.

    1996-01-01

    The multi volume proceedings of the 14th World Conference on Nondestructive Testing (NDT) cover the applications of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) in a wide range of industries, viz. aerospace, chemical, defence, manufacturing, nuclear etc. and for different materials. The major topics covered under it are NDE in nuclear industry, NDE of tubes and bars, non destructive evaluation of composites, NDE of concrete, non destructive evaluation of stresses, NDE of defects, condition monitoring, vibration monitoring, life prediction and NDE for medical applications. Papers relevant to INIS from this volume are indexed separately

  18. Trends in NDE science and technology: proceedings of the fourteenth world conference on NDT. V. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnadas Nair, C.G.; Baldev Raj; Murthy, C.R.L.; Jayakumar, T.

    1996-01-01

    The multi volume proceedings of the 14th World Conference on Nondestructive Testing (NDT) cover the applications of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) in a wide range of industries, viz. aerospace, chemical, defence, manufacturing, nuclear etc. and for different materials. The major topics covered under it are NDE in nuclear industry, NDE of tubes and bars, non destructive evaluation of composites, NDE of concrete, non destructive evaluation of stresses, NDE of defects, condition monitoring, vibration monitoring, life prediction and NDE for medical applications. Papers relevant to INIS from this volume are indexed separately

  19. Trends in NDE science and technology: proceedings of the fourteenth world conference on NDT V. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnadas Nair, C.J.; Baldev Raj; Murthy, C.R.L.; Jayakumar, T.

    1996-01-01

    The multi volume proceedings of the 14th World Conference on Nondestructive Testing (NDT) cover the applications of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) in a wide range of industries, viz. aerospace, chemical, defence, manufacturing, nuclear etc. and for different materials. The major topics covered under it are NDE in nuclear industry, NDE of tubes and bars, non destructive evaluation of composites, NDE of concrete, non destructive evaluation of stresses, NDE of defects, condition monitoring, vibration monitoring, life prediction and NDE for medical applications. Papers relevant to INIS from this volume are indexed separately

  20. The climate-problem. Evaluation after the Paris-agreement and the Marrakesh-conference; Das Klimaproblem. Bewertung nach dem Paris-Abkommen und der Marrakesch-Konferenz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Eike

    2017-05-15

    The Paris-Climate-Agreement came into effect on November 4th 2016. Still, the contradiction in this agreement - ambitious goals and (presumably) inadequate commitments - has persisted. Also in the follow-up conference in Marrakesh, this discrepancy remained unresolved. 2017 the countries will meet again. However, since Donald Trump became president-elect of the United States of America, uncertainty about how the largest economy in the world will act in the future has intensified. This amplifies the pressure to clarify the true level of human influence on the climate in a scientifically consistent manner, as a basis for more reliable decisions. This paper tries to contribute to that effort.

  1. A chain reaction: the Fourth World Conference on Women and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, D

    1995-01-01

    The UN's Fourth World Conference on Women, held in September 1995 in Beijing, China, fostered international dialogue on complex issues related to women. The Platform of Action maps the boundaries that confine women and recommends actions to redress key concerns, including poverty, violence, education health, the environment, and political and social status. National and regional studies throughout the world show that a great number of women are pushed into prostitution, are sexually abused, raped, forcibly sterilized, and coerced into having abortions. In the US, nearly 4 million women are physically abused every year, according to a 1994 US Department of State report on the status of women. The 1995 UN Human Development Report estimates that one American woman in six is raped in her lifetime. The Beijing document underscores education as a way to empower women and help to break patterns of violence and discrimination. It is estimated that women perform 60% of the world's work but earn only 10% of the world's income and own less that 1% of the world's assets. Governments, institutions, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) pledged monetary support to develop programs that are favorable toward women. The US announced that a 6-year $1.5 billion program will fight domestic violence, and additional proposals include increasing resources to combat the spread of HIV/AIDS, decrease smoking and breast cancer, improve wages and conditions for women in the workplace, expand financial credit for women, and promote their participation in the political process. In addition, the World Bank has pledged to spend $5 billion of its $20 billion annual lending to address the particular concerns of women and to target $200 million for miniloans to help women start their own businesses. Throughout the world, education and family planning projects have helped women make informed choices about their families, resulting in improved reproductive health and lower fertility rates.

  2. Camp Creates a World of Magic: The Trail to Innovative Thinking Begins at the ACA National Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Marla

    2001-01-01

    The American Camping Association 2001 National Conference at Walt Disney World draws parallels between the administration of camp programs and practices at Disney World. Seminars led by Disney managers focus on recruitment of college students, development of a corporate culture and philosophy, emphasis on environment, and quality service that…

  3. Climate of an Earth-Like World with Changing Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    Having a giant planet like Jupiter next door can really wreak havoc on your orbit! A new study examines what such a bad neighbor might mean for the long-term climate of an Earth-like planet.Influence of a Bad NeighborThe presence of a Jupiter-like giant planet in a nearby orbit can significantly affect how terrestrial planets evolve dynamically, causing elements like the planets orbital eccentricities and axial tilts to change over time. Earth is saved this inconvenience Jupiter isnt close enough to significantly influence us, and our large moon stabilizes our orbit against Jupiters tugs.Top panels: Authors simulationoutcomes for Case1, in which the planets eccentricity varies from 0 to 0.283 over 6500 years. Bottom panels: Outcomes for Case 2, in which the planets eccentricity varies from 0 to 0.066 over 4500 years. The highereccentricities reached in Case 1 causes the climate parameters to vary more widely. Click for a better look! [Way Georgakarakos 2017]Mars, on the other hand, isnt as lucky: its possible that Jupiters gravitational pull causes Marss axial tilt, for instance, to evolve through a range as large as 0 to 60 degrees on timescales of millions of years! Marss orbital eccentricity is similarly thought to vary due to Jupiters influence, and both of these factors play a major role in determining Marss climate.As exoplanet missions discover more planets many of which are Earth-like we must carefully consider which among these are most likely to be capable of sustaining life. If having a nearby neighbor like a Jupiter can tug an Earth-like world into an orbit with varying eccentricity, how does this affect the planets climate? Will the planet remain temperate? Or will it develop a runaway heating or cooling effect as it orbits, rendering it uninhabitable?Oceans and OrbitsTo examine these questions, two scientists have built the first ever 3D global climate model simulations of an Earth-like world using a fully coupled ocean (necessary for understanding

  4. Proceedings of the 2002 climate change and GHG technology conference and tradeshow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The emphasis of this conference and tradeshow was to provide all participants, from corporate planners and decision makers to technical staff and technology solution providers, with a forum where they could exchange views concerning economical climate change technology solutions applicable to the oil and gas, oilsands, coal, mining, pipeline and petrochemical industries operating in Western Canada. There were six major objectives for this conference: (1) disseminate information with regard to how implementing climate change and greenhouse gas technologies and associated projects can improve financial and environmental performance, (2) look at case studies on economical climate change and greenhouse gas technologies and projects that have helped organizations improve their environmental and economical performance, (3) stimulate the launch of new projects and partnerships and further advance existing projects, (4) identify and facilitate new opportunities for implementation of climate change and greenhouse gas technologies and projects in the long term, (5) participate in a tradeshow as a greenhouse gas technology supplier or customer, and (6) network with other industry representatives. Six half-day sessions comprised the conference with topics as follows: session 1 dealt with business risk, economics and opportunities, session 2 discussed fugitive emissions and energy efficiency, session 3 was concerned with carbon dioxide capture, transportation, storage and use, session 4 was devoted to flaring and venting, session 5 dealt with long-term verification and monitoring technologies, and session 6 included additional technology solution presentations. refs., tabs., figs

  5. Climate Velocity Can Inform Conservation in a Warming World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito-Morales, Isaac; García Molinos, Jorge; Schoeman, David S; Burrows, Michael T; Poloczanska, Elvira S; Brown, Christopher J; Ferrier, Simon; Harwood, Tom D; Klein, Carissa J; McDonald-Madden, Eve; Moore, Pippa J; Pandolfi, John M; Watson, James E M; Wenger, Amelia S; Richardson, Anthony J

    2018-06-01

    Climate change is shifting the ranges of species. Simple predictive metrics of range shifts such as climate velocity, that do not require extensive knowledge or data on individual species, could help to guide conservation. We review research on climate velocity, describing the theory underpinning the concept and its assumptions. We highlight how climate velocity has already been applied in conservation-related research, including climate residence time, climate refugia, endemism, historic and projected range shifts, exposure to climate change, and climate connectivity. Finally, we discuss ways to enhance the use of climate velocity in conservation through tailoring it to be more biologically meaningful, informing design of protected areas, conserving ocean biodiversity in 3D, and informing conservation actions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Climate refugia for salmon in a changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change threatens to create fundamental shifts in in the distributions and abundances of endothermic organisms such as cold-water salmon and trout species (salmonids). Recently published projected declines in salmonid distributions under future climates range from modest t...

  7. Climate change: Evolving technologies, U.S. business, and the world economy in the 21. century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harter, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    The International Climate Change Partnership presents this report as one of its efforts to present current information on climate change to the public. One often hears about the expenses entailed in protecting the environment. Unfortunately, one hears less about the economic benefits that may be associated with prudent actions to counter environmental threats. This conference is particularly useful because it focuses attention on profitable business opportunities in the United States and elsewhere that arise from practical efforts to mitigate the risks of climate change. The report contains a brief synopsis of each speaker's address on climate change

  8. Climate change: Evolving technologies, U.S. business, and the world economy in the 21. century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harter, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    The International Climate Change Partnership presents this report as one of its efforts to present current information on climate change to the public. One often hears about the expenses entailed in protecting the environment. Unfortunately, one hears less about the economic benefits that may be associated with prudent actions to counter environmental threats. This conference is particularly useful because it focuses attention on profitable business opportunities in the United States and elsewhere that arise from practical efforts to mitigate the risks of climate change. The report contains a brief synopsis of each speaker`s address on climate change.

  9. [Twenty-second conference of the Czechoslovak Demographic Society: "The Demographic Position of Czechoslovakia within Europe and the World"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialova, L; Rychtarikova, J; Roubicek, V; Stloukal, L; Veres, P; Koschin, F; Novakova, B; Pavlik, Z

    1992-01-01

    This is a collection of short papers presented at a conference held in Prague, Czechoslovakia, in 1991. The focus of the conference was on the demographic changes that have occurred in Czechoslovakia since World War II and their relationship to such changes in the rest of Europe and elsewhere in the world. Essay topics include fertility trends; contraceptive prevalence, including abortion rates; living standards and health care; and changes in the age structure. Some data for selected countries are included for comparison. (SUMMARY IN ENG AND RUS)

  10. 18{sup th} world hydrogen energy conference 2010 (WHEC 2010). Proceedings. Speeches and plenary talks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolten, Detlef; Emonts, Bernd [eds.

    2012-07-03

    A comprehensive and renowned conference offers the opportunity to extend the scope beyond mere technical issues. It allows for having strategic presentations and discussing aspects of market introduction, industrial and Governmental target setting as well as approaches to and actions for implementation. The 18th World Hydrogen Conference 2010, WHEC2010, succeeded in exploiting this opportunity and satisfied the expectations. Strong political support in Germany and in the State of North Rhine Westphalia in particular made it possible to have high profile decision makers at the conference presenting their strategies first hand. Hence, a full day was dedicated to plenary speeches and overview talks. The WHEC2010 came handy at a time when fuel cells are developed to suit the requirements for vehicles, except for cost and durability. At a time when the competition with batteries and whether or how a hydrogen infrastructure can be established and afforded were hot topics in the public debate, which needed answers on a well informed basis. Considering fuel cells and hydrogen at a time at one conference and supplementing it with the current knowledge on batteries and hybridization clarity on the future role of these technologies was gained. Very likely fuel cells and batteries will coexist in a future of electrified vehicular transport. Their different technical characteristics will open the doors to different market segments. Implementing hydrogen infrastructure, being a requirement for fuel cells in transport, is considered doable and affordable. This book presents the speeches and overview papers from the plenary session of the WHEC2010 on May 17, 2010. Six further books of this issue contain the papers of the oral and poster presentations, except for the introductory talks of the sessions. The latter are published separately by Wiley in a book named Hydrogen and Fuel Cells. In total the 18th WHEC is documented on over 3800 pages in a structured way in order to reach

  11. Climate change in high definition : scenarios for impacts and adaptation research : conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This conference provided a forum to review information and tools to conduct climate change impact and adaptation research and assessments. The research community, policy advisors and resource managers reviewed the latest advancements in global and regional climate modeling, climate scenarios, downscaling tools and application of scenarios for decision-making. The new Climate Change Scenarios Network (CCSN) website was also launched at this meeting, which also provided training in Environment Canada's new statistical downscaling tool developed in collaboration with the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Eau, Terre et Environnement (INRS-ETE). New features of the CCSN were presented along with examples of how information from the network can be applied in specific cases, including assessments of impacts in areas such as human health and water resources. A training session on downscaling with the newly developed Automated Statistical Downscaling (ASD) tool was also provided. The conference featured 19 presentations, of which 3 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  12. Mind games: standing by while the world ignores climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Daniel L.; Berry, Helen L.

    2015-01-01

    The mental health effects of climate change are significant and highly concerning, yet little is known about the magnitude of these effects or how best to manage them. This introduction to the thematic papers in this issue explains why climate change is an increasingly important matter for all health services. PMID:29093843

  13. How to build confidence in climate science and politics? Return on an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aykut, Stefan C.

    2015-01-01

    Taking as a starting point the communications at an international conference held in Paris in 2014, the article analyzes the construction of confidence in climate sciences and politics. How, by which methods and procedures, do climate modeling communities establish the validity of their models? What link can be established between the confidence in numerical simulations of global warming and in the capacity of the international system to successfully tackle the climate issue? The article shows that the existence of a close link between these different forms of confidence questions common belief that expertise should be completely separated from the political process. More generally, it examines the necessity of a 'constitution' for the science-policy relationship at the global level at a time where new paradigms for research and for policy converge toward increasing importance of regional and local levels

  14. Sustainability, energy policy, climatic change, world food supply. Political and legal challenges of the 21th century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haertel, Ines

    2014-01-01

    The book on sustainability, energy policy, climatic change, world food supply as political challenges in the 21th century includes contributions on the following topics: sustainability and environment, energy and climatic change, agriculture and world food supply.

  15. A systematic review of ecological attributes that confer resilience to climate change in environmental restoration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta L Timpane-Padgham

    Full Text Available Ecological restoration is widely practiced as a means of rehabilitating ecosystems and habitats that have been degraded or impaired through human use or other causes. Restoration practices now are confronted by climate change, which has the potential to influence long-term restoration outcomes. Concepts and attributes from the resilience literature can help improve restoration and monitoring efforts under changing climate conditions. We systematically examined the published literature on ecological resilience to identify biological, chemical, and physical attributes that confer resilience to climate change. We identified 45 attributes explicitly related to climate change and classified them as individual- (9, population- (6, community- (7, ecosystem- (7, or process-level attributes (16. Individual studies defined resilience as resistance to change or recovery from disturbance, and only a few studies explicitly included both concepts in their definition of resilience. We found that individual and population attributes generally are suited to species- or habitat-specific restoration actions and applicable at the population scale. Community attributes are better suited to habitat-specific restoration at the site scale, or system-wide restoration at the ecosystem scale. Ecosystem and process attributes vary considerably in their type and applicability. We summarize these relationships in a decision support table and provide three example applications to illustrate how these classifications can be used to prioritize climate change resilience attributes for specific restoration actions. We suggest that (1 including resilience as an explicit planning objective could increase the success of restoration projects, (2 considering the ecological context and focal scale of a restoration action is essential in choosing appropriate resilience attributes, and (3 certain ecological attributes, such as diversity and connectivity, are more commonly considered to

  16. A systematic review of ecological attributes that confer resilience to climate change in environmental restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpane-Padgham, Britta L; Beechie, Tim; Klinger, Terrie

    2017-01-01

    Ecological restoration is widely practiced as a means of rehabilitating ecosystems and habitats that have been degraded or impaired through human use or other causes. Restoration practices now are confronted by climate change, which has the potential to influence long-term restoration outcomes. Concepts and attributes from the resilience literature can help improve restoration and monitoring efforts under changing climate conditions. We systematically examined the published literature on ecological resilience to identify biological, chemical, and physical attributes that confer resilience to climate change. We identified 45 attributes explicitly related to climate change and classified them as individual- (9), population- (6), community- (7), ecosystem- (7), or process-level attributes (16). Individual studies defined resilience as resistance to change or recovery from disturbance, and only a few studies explicitly included both concepts in their definition of resilience. We found that individual and population attributes generally are suited to species- or habitat-specific restoration actions and applicable at the population scale. Community attributes are better suited to habitat-specific restoration at the site scale, or system-wide restoration at the ecosystem scale. Ecosystem and process attributes vary considerably in their type and applicability. We summarize these relationships in a decision support table and provide three example applications to illustrate how these classifications can be used to prioritize climate change resilience attributes for specific restoration actions. We suggest that (1) including resilience as an explicit planning objective could increase the success of restoration projects, (2) considering the ecological context and focal scale of a restoration action is essential in choosing appropriate resilience attributes, and (3) certain ecological attributes, such as diversity and connectivity, are more commonly considered to confer

  17. Analyzing Regional Climate Change in Africa in a 1.5, 2, and 3°C Global Warming World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, T.; Haensler, A.; Rechid, D.; Pfeifer, S.; Eggert, B.; Jacob, D.

    2018-04-01

    At the 21st session of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP21) in Paris, an agreement to strengthen the effort to limit the global temperature increase well below 2°C was decided. However, even if global warming is limited, some regions might still be substantially affected by climate change, especially for continents like Africa where the socio-economic conditions are strongly linked to the climatic conditions. In the paper we will discuss the analysis of indices assigned to the sectors health, agriculture, and infrastructure in a 1.5, 2, and 3°C global warming world for the African continent. For this analysis an ensemble of 10 different general circulation model-regional climate model simulations conducted in the framework of the COordinated Downscaling EXperiment for Africa was investigated. The results show that the African continent, in particular the regions between 15°S and 15°N, has to expect an increase in hot nights and longer and more frequent heat waves even if the global temperature will be kept below 2°C. These effects intensify if the global mean temperature will exceed the 2°C threshold. Moreover, the daily rainfall intensity is expected to increase toward higher global warming scenarios and will affect especially the African Sub-Saharan coastal regions.

  18. World-wide anthropogenic climate changes: facts, uncertainties and open questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenwiese, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    Various human activities are, without a doubt, leading to a steady increase world-wide in the emissions of trace gases which affect the climate into the atmosphere. As a result, the global climate is also forced to change. The evidence from climate models regarding this is uncertain, however, both with respect to the quantitative aspect and the regional aspect, especially concerning climatic elements apart from temperature. It is therefore important to examine the data of climate history for anthropogenic climate signals. It is difficult, though, to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic climate effects. Despite these uncertainties, however, which result in many questions remaining open, estimations of risk and the principle of responsibility lead to immediate, international climate protection measures being demanded. (orig.) [de

  19. Forests in a water limited world under climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mátyás, Csaba; Sun, Ge

    2014-01-01

    The debate on ecological and climatic benefits of planted forests at the sensitive dry edge of the closed forest belt (i.e. at the ‘xeric limits’) is still unresolved. Forests sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide, accumulate biomass, control water erosion and dust storms, reduce river sedimentation, and mitigate small floods. However, planting trees in areas previously dominated by grassland or cropland can dramatically alter the energy and water balances at multiple scales. The forest/grassland transition zone is especially vulnerable to projected drastic temperature and precipitation shifts and growing extremes due to its high ecohydrological sensitivity. We investigated some of the relevant aspects of the ecological and climatic role of forests and potential impacts of climate change at the dryland margins of the temperate-continental zone using case studies from China, the United States and SE Europe (Hungary). We found that, contrary to popular expectations, the effects of forest cover on regional climate might be limited and the influence of forestation on water resources might be negative. Planted forests generally reduce stream flow and lower groundwater table level because of higher water use than previous land cover types. Increased evaporation potential due to global warming and/or extreme drought events is likely to reduce areas that are appropriate for tree growth and forest establishment. Ecologically conscious forest management and forestation planning should be adjusted to the local, projected hydrologic and climatic conditions, and should also consider non-forest alternative land uses. (paper)

  20. Call for Nominations The Nusselt Reynolds Prize Sponsored by Assembly of World Conferences on Experimental Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics, and Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasagi, Nobuhide

    2000-01-01

    The Nusselt Reynolds Prize has been established by the Assembly of World Conferences to commemorate outstanding contributions by Wilhelm Nusselt and Osborne Reynolds as experimentalists, researchers, educators, and authors. As many as three prizes may be bestowed at every World Conference, one in each of the areas of heat transfer, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, or any combination of these.

  1. Ph.D. Researchers in a Changing World: A Self-Critical Reflection of the CES Conference 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander James Darracott

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The theme of this year’s Centre for Education Studies Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Conference, now in its fifth year, is 'Education in a Changing World'. I attended the conference as a paper presenter and a conference attendee. My personal goals were to develop confidence as an oral presenter, seek professional development opportunities, and engage critically and reflectively with my work and the work of others.  My relativist epistemological beliefs define knowledge as uncertain, context-bound, fallible, defeasible and therefore changeable, and are compatible with my personal goals. Both the goals and beliefs led to the adoption of knowledge co-constructor, communicator, and analyst roles.  Beliefs, goals and adopted roles led to the identification of points of fallibility in my own knowledge and understanding of the phenomenon of interest. Therefore, I formed a perspective of conferences as enabling and facilitating knowledge construction between presenter and audience. Being reflective, critical, adaptable, creative, intuitive, flexible, and open minded are key attitudinal attributes of postgraduates, leading to positive conference experiences and increased self-awareness of own emerging identity as a social scientist. Increasing self-awareness of own identity is important for graduates, as on a broader scale this assists in keeping pace with an ever-changing world.

  2. Water, oil, climate: a dried-up broken down world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, C.; Fellous, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Climate crisis, oil crisis, water crisis, food crisis: the 21. century has started badly. Climate is deteriorating under man's action and natural resources are drying up while demand is still on the rise under the double effect of demographic and economic growth. Even worse, tensions are working together and worsen each other in a climate of financial crisis. All warning lights are on the red and a huge challenge has been launched which involves all countries, developed and developing. Solutions are urgently needed, otherwise our civilization would be threatened. The reasoned use of technologies, but also the abatement of poverty and inequalities and the education of people are essential points to take up the challenge. The authors examine the interconnections between energy, water, food at the time of climate change and explore the possible alternative solutions. The lesson that should be learnt from their analysis is that everyone should contribute to the complex decisions that will have an impact on the future of humanity. (J.S.)

  3. Forests in a water limited world under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Mátyás; G. Sun

    2014-01-01

    The debate on ecological and climatic benefits of planted forests at the sensitive dry edge of the closed forest belt (i.e. at the ‘xeric limits’) is still unresolved. Forests sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide, accumulate biomass, control water erosion and dust storms, reduce river sedimentation, and mitigate small floods. However, planting trees in areas previously...

  4. Climate Science - getting the world to understand, and to care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmin, T.; Ackerman, S. A.; Whittaker, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    Effectively teaching and conveying climate science has become one of Earth Science's greatest challenges. Existing barriers are many and varied, from political, ideological, and religious, to purely economic. Additionally, studies show the general public at present has a surprising number of basic misconceptions regarding the Earth system, and Earth-Sun relationships. Addressing these misconceptions is the first hurdle to overcome for properly teaching climate science. This talk will discuss ways to address the various barriers. Strategies are being employed to arm teachers with new tools leveraging the move to online, interactive learning. Content can be tailored particular audiences. For any individual, learning will be most effective if there is an understood significance, the information is presented clearly and at an appropriate education level, and when possible some personal relevance can be inferred. People need a reason to care. Examples and approaches for several common education scenarios will be given. A simple "Climate Change 101" outline will be given, a blueprint that could be used to educate most of the general public. Freely available online resources to address Earth System misconceptions will be referenced. Finally, a case will be made that a dramatic improvement in climate literacy worldwide may be the only viable means to successfully tackling global warming.

  5. Title Highlight: Scientists respond to climate change challenges at ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-14

    Apr 14, 2016 ... ... Change (UNFCC) conference, to be hosted by France later this year. ... Nobel Prize winner Joseph Stiglitz, a conference keynote speaker, ... to attempt to deal with climate change when the world is recovering, and in some ...

  6. Is world trade law a barrier to saving our climate? Questions and answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernasconi-Osterwalder, N.; Norpoth, J.

    2009-09-01

    The present 'Questions and Answers' provide an overview of the various climate-related measures and policies that fall under the scope of the WTO (World Trade Organization) and offers an initial assessment of their WTO-compatibility. Is the WTO blocking progress in the fight against climate change? This was the question at the origin of this legal analysis. With this paper and its simple question and answer format, we hope to dispel some myths and shed some light on the reality of world trade rules in their relation with climate-friendly measures. In the end, we hope to encourage policy-makers in Europe and around the world not to see the WTO as an insurmountable barrier and not to use it as an excuse against strong action on climate change.

  7. U.S. Navy Marine Climatic Atlas of the World. Volume IX. World-Wide Means and Standard Deviations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    TITLE (..d SobtII,) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED U. S. Navy Marine Climatic Atlas of the World Volume IX World-wide Means and Standard Reference...Ives the best estimate of the population standard deviations. The means, , are com~nuted from: EX IIN I 90 80 70 60" 50’ 40, 30 20 10 0 1070 T- VErr ...or 10%, whichever is greater Since the mean ice limit approximates the minus two de l temperature isopleth, this analyzed lower limit was Wave Heights

  8. Talks and status of the national conference of the national program of fight against climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    In order to fulfill its commitments in the Kyoto protocol for the abatement of greenhouse gases emissions, France has started important environmental actions: the creation of the national program of fight against climate change (validated in January 2000), the integration of the problem of climate change in government actions (collective services and state-region contracts), creation of a national laboratory of global warming effects, creation of a research council on climate change and durable development, presentation of an annual status of the actions carried out in the framework of the national program. This last point was the aim of the conference held in Paris in June 2001. Debates were organized around four main sectors: industry, energy, buildings and transportation systems. The topics approached during the round-tables raised several essential questions for the fight against climate change: which practice changes are needed in the industry and energy production activities? Which actions need to be carried out in new and existing buildings to save energy? Which consistent transportation policies need to be implemented in urban areas? Is a rail-road traffic re-balancing possible? Which importance can have the territory organizations? What are the public expectations in front of the climate change risk? This document brings together the talks of Mrs D. Voynet, Minister of national development and environment, the talk of Mr R.G. Schwartzenberg, Minister of research, the talk of Mr C. Pierret, State Secretary of Industry, and a sectoral status (transports, industry, energy, buildings and mastery of electricity demand) of the first year of the program presented by Mr M. Mousel, head of the inter-ministry mission on greenhouse effect. The document ends with a presentation of the British and European climate change programs. (J.S.)

  9. Adaptation research meets adaptation decision-making. Second Nordic international conference on climate change adaption. Programme and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Nearly two years have passed since a small team of researchers began a new chapter in Nordic co-operation on climate change by organising a conference in Stockholm, Sweden. The conference, entitled Climate Adaptation in the Nordic Countries - Science, Practice, Policy, co-ordinated by the Stockholm Environment Institute and hosted by Stockholm University in November 2010, was the first of its kind in the Nordic region. Since the European Commission adopted its White Paper on adaptation to climate change in 2009, many of that document's 33 actions have been implemented, a climate change adaptation platform, Climate-ADAPT, was launched at the European Environment Agency in March this year, and just a week before this conference the Commission concluded a public consultation of stakeholders and experts in member states designed to feed into the preparation of a European Union adaptation strategy. The 2012 conference therefore presents an ideal opportunity to take stock of ongoing efforts and to consider how adaptation research efforts are keeping pace with policy demands as well as the needs of public and private decision-makers operating at a range of scales. It brings together researchers, public and private decision- makers, as well as those who plan and realize adaptation plans. Session themes include, among others: national and local adaptation plans, climate portals and climate services, adaptation in developing countries, legal aspects of adaptation, economic appraisal of adaptation, analysing and handling risk and uncertainty, urban planning and scenarios. The contributors have very diverse backgrounds, ranging from biosciences to social sciences, economics to geo-sciences, and engineering to architecture. Interest in climate change adaptation in the Nordic region is clearly high, with over 70% of our participants drawn from the five Nordic countries, but the conference has also managed to attract participation from further afield, with registrations

  10. Cutting the climate-development Gordian Knot - economic options in a politically constrained world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hourcade, J.Ch.; Shukla, P.R.; Mathy, S.

    2005-09-01

    The actual main objective of international negotiations on climate change aims at elaborating a coordination regime integrating developing countries. The international coordination system built at the Kyoto Conference relies on a coordination system based on quantity based objectives. This architecture is more the result of successive compromises rather than the result from the deployment of an ex-ante fully-fledged vision of any actor, and its elaboration has been fully disconnected from development issues. In addition to the impossibility to get an agreement on rules for quota allocation among all the parties, this system shows irreconcilable contradictions between climate and development issues. This article aims, starting fi-om examples of synergies between climate and development, at enunciating bases of an amended Kyoto Protocol which could bridge the gap between climate and development. (authors)

  11. Statement to Conference for a Nuclear-Weapons-Free World, 12 October 2011, Astana, Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: It is a great honour for me to address this Conference for a Nuclear-Weapons-Free World. Astana is a highly appropriate venue for this Conference. Kazakhstan has made a very important contribution to nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament. Under the leadership of President Nursultan Nazarbayev, Kazakhstan renounced the nuclear weapons which it inherited from the Soviet Union and closed the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site, where over 450 underground and atmospheric nuclear tests had been conducted. It joined the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) as a non-nuclear-weapon State and has concluded both a safeguards agreement and an additional protocol with the IAEA. Kazakhstan played a significant role in establishing a nuclear-weapon-free zone in Central Asia in 2009. The treaty creating this nuclear-weapon-free zone established an important precedent as it is the only arms control treaty to date that requires its parties to bring into force an additional protocol to their IAEA safeguards agreements. The treaty, which was supported by the IAEA, forbids the development, manufacture, stockpiling, acquisition or possession of any nuclear explosive device within the zone. Peaceful uses of nuclear energy are permitted if placed under enhanced IAEA safeguards. The treaty also requires Parties to meet international standards regarding security of nuclear facilities. This is intended to reduce the risk of nuclear terrorism and prevent smuggling of nuclear and radioactive materials in the region. Today, the scientific and technical facilities at Semipalatinsk are being converted to peaceful uses under the jurisdiction of the National Nuclear Centre of the Republic of Kazakhstan. IAEA is pleased to have assisted in this work. Shutting down the nuclear test range at Semipalatinsk sends a strong signal of support for the nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament regime. It contributes both directly and symbolically to the goals of the

  12. Climate-wise choices in a world of oil abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Adam R.; Masnadi, Mohammad S.; Englander, Jacob G.; Koomey, Jonathan; Gordon, Deborah

    2018-04-01

    Constrained oil supply has given way to abundance at a time when strong action on climate change is wavering. Recent innovation has pushed US oil production to all-time heights and driven oil prices lower. At the same time, attention to climate policy is wavering due to geopolitical upheaval. Nevertheless, climate-wise choices in the oil sector remain a priority, given oil’s large role in modern economies. Here we use a set of open-source models along with a detailed dataset comprising 75 global crude oils (~25% of global production) to estimate the effects of carbon intensity and oil demand on decadal scale oil-sector emissions. We find that oil resources are abundant relative to all projections of 21st century demand, due to large light-tight oil (LTO) and heavy oil/bitumen (HOB) resources. We then investigate the ‘barrel forward’ emissions from producing, refining, and consuming all products from a barrel of crude. These oil resources have diverse life-cycle-greenhouse gas (LC-GHG) emissions impacts, and median per-barrel emissions for unconventional resources vary significantly. Median HOB life cycle emissions are 1.5 times those of median LTO emissions, exceeding them by 200 kgCO2eq./bbl. We show that reducing oil LC-GHGs is a mitigation opportunity worth 10–50 gigatonnes CO2 eq. cumulatively by 2050. We discuss means to reduce oil sector LC-GHGs. Results point to the need for policymakers to address both oil supply and oil demand when considering options to reduce LC-GHGs.

  13. Role of modern climate and hydrology in world oil preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmari, Peter

    1992-12-01

    The accumulation of oil requires a favorable source, a reservoir, good seal-rock quality, and suitably timed thermal history and structuring. The accumulated oil, especially its light fractions, may be subsequently removed by hydrologically controlled processes such as water washing, biodegradation, and tilting of the oil-water contact. These processes are dependent on the climate. In regions that have become increasingly cold or dry during late Cenozoic time, low rainfall, low ground-water flow rates, and low input of nutrients and microorganisms have protected the oil; in warm or temperate rainy climates, high flow rates and high input of nutrients and microorganisms have led to partial or total removal of oil. Thus, most of the rich (>500 000 barrels/day) oil provinces on land are in cold or dry regions, where water is recharged in highlands that receive little rain (sub-Saharan Africa, Brazil, India, and most of China, rich oil provinces on land (outside young deltas) are rare, and biodegradation is widespread.

  14. 7th World Conference on Mass Customization, Personalization, and Co-Creation

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Kjeld; Joergensen, Kaj; Taps, Stig

    2014-01-01

    The MCPC 2014 is a multi‐track conference featuring a combination of high profile keynotes with expert talks, panel discussions, paper sessions, workshops, receptions, and much more. While it is devoted to sharing and discussing the latest research in the field, the MCPC conference has a strong focus on real life applications. Since its beginning, the MCPC conference has had an equal share of participants, practitioners and academics/researchers. This makes the MCPC conference truly unique among many conferences. It strives to connect MCPC thinkers, first movers, entrepreneurs, technology developers, and researchers with people applying these strategies in practice. Twenty years ago Mass Customization was acknowledged as the ”New Frontier in Business Competition”. Ever since, industry has been applying the concept and researchers have developed the topic into a well-established research area and businesses have formed new strategies. More knowledge, methods and technologies are available now than ever b...

  15. Key figures for the climate in France and in the World - Issue 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dussud, Francois-Xavier; Joassard, Irenee; Wong, Florine; Duvernoy, Jerome; Morel, Romain

    2015-01-01

    This publication proposes graphs, maps and tables to illustrate the status and the evolution of climate in France and in the World. The first part addresses climate change: global warming, consequences of climate change, predictions, factors influencing temperature, greenhouse effect and greenhouse gases, greenhouse gas tanks and flows (case of CO 2 ), and increase of greenhouse gas atmospheric stock. The second part proposes an overview of greenhouse gas emissions in the world, globally and due to energy combustion or to electricity production. The third part addresses greenhouse gas emissions in France and in Europe and gives data on carbon footprint and imported emissions. The fourth part addresses the distribution of emissions among sectors in Europe and in France (energy industry, transports, manufacturing and building industry, other sectors, emissions out of energy use). The last part addresses climate policies: carbon pricing in the World, international negotiations, the Kyoto protocol in its successive periods (2008-2012, 2013-2020), the EU commitments, the European ETS, carbon price in the EU ETS, the Energy Climate package for 2030, financing of the struggle against climate change, and the French climate policy

  16. Making a Success of the 2015 Paris Climate Conference. Opinion of the Economic, Social and Environmental Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquida, Celine; Guirkinger, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    In November 2011, the ESEC voted on an opinion entitled 'International Climate Negotiations and the Durban Conference'. The holding in France, at the end of this year, of the 21. Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention (COP 21) provides an opportunity for the ESEC to issue a follow-up opinion. All of the scientific data points to the same alarming finding: global warming is being exacerbated due to the effects of an unprecedented increase in Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions. Worldwide, the signs of climate disruption are already more than apparent and will continue to intensify if nothing is done about them, as was highlighted by the IPCC. The outlook for the future is therefore disturbing to say the least, as the lives of current and future generations are at stake if we fail to challenge current modes of production and consumption that are incompatible with limited resources and the fair distribution of wealth. At the same time, the successive major international climate change conferences have struggled to progress towards an international climate regulatory framework. These conferences are not about the climate alone, but take place at the confluence of contradictory geostrategic, political and economic interests. Within this context, the goal of concluding a global, fair and ambitious agreement in Paris is a challenge that must be risen to. (authors)

  17. World Cup fever? How different climates will affect performance

    OpenAIRE

    Ruddock, Alan

    2014-01-01

    No matter who’s playing, the first game of a World Cup is always special – full of excitement, anticipation and hope for tournament filled with skills, goals and drama. This time, hosts Brazil take on a solid Croatian side in Sao Paulo, in a match suited to Brazilian flair and, most importantly, a glut of goals. Around 20 hours later, Mexico and Cameroon will jog out onto the pitch 1,400 miles north in Natal to begin their warm-up.\\ud \\ud Despite the momentum created by the opening fixture, t...

  18. Key figures for climate in France and in the World - 2013 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouradou, Frederic; Wong, Florine; Delalande, Daniel; Morel, Romain

    2012-01-01

    Graphs and figures related to different aspects of climate in France and in the World are presented and briefly commented. The different parts respectively address climate change (global warming, consequences, forecasts, greenhouse effect, impact of human activity, carbon reservoirs, evolution and concentrations of greenhouse gases, temperatures), emissions of greenhouse gases (in the world, in Europe, in France), CO 2 emissions due to energy and to electricity production, the shares of sectors in greenhouse gas emissions in Europe and in France (energy production and transformation, transports, industry, other sectors, without energy combustion, CO 2 emission factors), and climate policies (international negotiations, Kyoto protocol and its flexibility mechanisms, the European Union commitments, the European Union Emission Trading Scheme and its carbon price, the French climate policy)

  19. World Energy Outlook Special Report 2013: Redrawing the Energy Climate Map

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    Governments have decided collectively that the world needs to limit the average global temperature increase to no more than 2°C and international negotiations are engaged to that end. Yet any resulting agreement will not emerge before 2015 and new legal obligations will not begin before 2020. Meanwhile, despite many countries taking new actions, the world is drifting further and further from the track it needs to follow. The energy sector is the single largest source of climate-changing greenhouse-gas emissions and limiting these is an essential focus of action. The World Energy Outlook has published detailed analysis of the energy contribution to climate change for many years. But, amid major international economic preoccupations, there are worrying signs that the issue of climate change has slipped down the policy agenda. This Special Report seeks to bring it right back on top by showing that the dilemma can be tackled at no net economic cost.

  20. World Energy Outlook Special Report 2013: Redrawing the Energy Climate Map (Executive Summary)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    Governments have decided collectively that the world needs to limit the average global temperature increase to no more than 2 °C and international negotiations are engaged to that end. Yet any resulting agreement will not emerge before 2015 and new legal obligations will not begin before 2020. Meanwhile, despite many countries taking new actions, the world is drifting further and further from the track it needs to follow. The energy sector is the single largest source of climate-changing greenhouse-gas emissions and limiting these is an essential focus of action. The World Energy Outlook has published detailed analysis of the energy contribution to climate change for many years. But, amid major international economic preoccupations, there are worrying signs that the issue of climate change has slipped down the policy agenda. This Special Report seeks to bring it right back on top by showing that the dilemma can be tackled at no net economic cost.

  1. Climate change, economics and Buddhism. Part 2. New views and practices for sustainable world economies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    The evidence of impending and serious climate and other consequences of an expanding world economy based on fossil carbon energy continues to accumulate. This two-part paper examines the potential contribution of the world view and insights of Buddhism to this search. It presents both a conceptual and practical case that Buddhism can help shape and move towards an alternative and effective paradigmatic basis for sustainable economies - one capable of bringing about and maintaining genuine, high welfare levels across the world's societies. The first paper outlined a comprehensive analytical framework to identify the fundamental nature of anthropogenic climate change. Based on the integration of two of the most influential environmental analysis tools of recent decades (the DPSIR model and IPAT equation), the framework was then broadened to facilitate ideas from the Buddhist world view by injecting two key missing aspects - the interrelated role of (1) beliefs and values (on goals and behavior) and (2) the nature of well-being or human happiness. Finally, the principal linkages between this climate change analysis framework and Buddhism were explored. In this concluding paper, the systems framework is used to demonstrate how Buddhist and related world views can feed into appropriate and effective responses to the impending challenges of climate change. This is undertaken by systematically presenting a specific, if indicative, list of relevant strategies informed by the understanding of interconnectedness and other basic principles about the nature of reality and human well-being as proposed in Buddhism. (author)

  2. Climate change, economics and Buddhism. Part 2. New views and practices for sustainable world economies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, Peter L. [Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, Brisbane, 4111 (Australia)

    2010-03-15

    The evidence of impending and serious climate and other consequences of an expanding world economy based on fossil carbon energy continues to accumulate. This two-part paper examines the potential contribution of the world view and insights of Buddhism to this search. It presents both a conceptual and practical case that Buddhism can help shape and move towards an alternative and effective paradigmatic basis for sustainable economies - one capable of bringing about and maintaining genuine, high welfare levels across the world's societies. The first paper outlined a comprehensive analytical framework to identify the fundamental nature of anthropogenic climate change. Based on the integration of two of the most influential environmental analysis tools of recent decades (the DPSIR model and IPAT equation), the framework was then broadened to facilitate ideas from the Buddhist world view by injecting two key missing aspects - the interrelated role of (1) beliefs and values (on goals and behavior) and (2) the nature of well-being or human happiness. Finally, the principal linkages between this climate change analysis framework and Buddhism were explored. In this concluding paper, the systems framework is used to demonstrate how Buddhist and related world views can feed into appropriate and effective responses to the impending challenges of climate change. This is undertaken by systematically presenting a specific, if indicative, list of relevant strategies informed by the understanding of interconnectedness and other basic principles about the nature of reality and human well-being as proposed in Buddhism. (author)

  3. The first conference of Signatory States to the UN Global Climate Convention: Results of the Berlin summit conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrmann, M.

    1996-01-01

    The article briefly explains the background of the Berlin summit conference as well as some results, as for instance the ''Berlin mandate'', or agreements concerning organisational structures or procedures like those termed ''joint implementation''. (Orig./CB) [de

  4. Ozone Climate Penalty and Mortality in a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakami, A.; Zhao, S.; Pappin, A.; Mesbah, M.

    2013-12-01

    The expected increase in ozone concentrations with temperature is referred to as the climate penalty factor (CPF). Observed ozone trends have resulted in estimations of regional CPFs in the range of 1-3 ppb/K in the Eastern US, and larger values around the globe. We use the adjoint of a regional model (CMAQ) for attributing changes in ozone mortality and attainment metrics to increased temperature levels at each location in North America during the summer of 2007. Unlike previous forward sensitivity analysis studies, we estimate how changes in temperatures at various locations influence such policy-relevant metrics. Our analysis accounts for separate temperature impact pathways through gas-phase chemistry, moisture abundance, and biogenic emissions. We find that water vapor impact, while mostly negative, is positive and large for temperature changes in urban areas. We also find that increased biogenic emissions plays an important role in the overall temperature influence. Our simulations show a wide range of spatial variability in CPFs between -0.4 and 6.2 ppb/K with largest values in urban areas. We also estimate mortality-based CPFs of up to 4 deaths/K for each grid cell, again with large localization in urban areas. This amounts to an estimated 370 deaths/K for the 3-month period of the simulation. We find that this number is almost equivalent to 5% reduction in anthropogenic NOx emissions for each degree increase in temperature. We show how the CPF will change as the result progressive NOx emission controls from various anthropogenic sectors and sources at different locations. Our findings suggest that urban NOx control can be regarded as an adaptation strategy with regards to ozone air quality. Also, the strong temperature dependence in urban environments suggests that the health and attainment burden of urban heat island may be more substantial than previously thought. Spatial distribution of average adjoint-based CPFs Adjoint-based CPF and Mortality CPF

  5. The Netherlands in a sustainable world. Poverty, climate and biodiversity. Second Sustainability Outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanemaaijer, A.; De Ridder, W.; Aalbers, T.; Eickhout, B.; Hilderink, H.; Hitman, L.; Manders, T.; Nagelhout, D.; Petersen, A.

    2007-11-01

    Poverty reduction, climate change and biodiversity loss to be tackled as an integrated global problem. The world is too small to simultaneously produce enough food (including meat) for everyone and to deliver biofuels on a large enough scale to slow down climate change and maintain biodiversity. In this report sufficient options for fighting poverty, tackling climate change and limiting the loss of biodiversity are presented and discussed. The costs of these options can be limited to a few percent of GDP in 2040. However this will only be possible with coordinated international policies [nl

  6. Policy of gradualism. Background information and results on the first UN conference of the parties to the climate framework convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schafhausen, F.

    1995-01-01

    Not quite three years after Rio, representatives from altogether 167 states met in Berlin for the First UN Conference of the Parties (1. VSK) to the Climate Framework Convention (KRK) from 28 March to 7 April 1995. By the end of the Conference altogether 128 states (including the European Union) had ratified the Climate Framework Convention. One hundred and seventeen of the states that had incorporated the United Nations Convention in their national legal system were present in Berlin. A total of around 4000 government representatives, journalists, scientists, industrial representatives, and members of environmental associations and other socially relevant groups took part in the Conference. The 1. VSK has to date been the largest event of the United Nations to take place in Germany. (orig./UA) [de

  7. Updated world map of the Köppen-Geiger climate classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Peel

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Although now over 100 years old, the classification of climate originally formulated by Wladimir Köppen and modified by his collaborators and successors, is still in widespread use. It is widely used in teaching school and undergraduate courses on climate. It is also still in regular use by researchers across a range of disciplines as a basis for climatic regionalisation of variables and for assessing the output of global climate models. Here we have produced a new global map of climate using the Köppen-Geiger system based on a large global data set of long-term monthly precipitation and temperature station time series. Climatic variables used in the Köppen-Geiger system were calculated at each station and interpolated between stations using a two-dimensional (latitude and longitude thin-plate spline with tension onto a 0.1°×0.1° grid for each continent. We discuss some problems in dealing with sites that are not uniquely classified into one climate type by the Köppen-Geiger system and assess the outcomes on a continent by continent basis. Globally the most common climate type by land area is BWh (14.2%, Hot desert followed by Aw (11.5%, Tropical savannah. The updated world Köppen-Geiger climate map is freely available electronically in the Supplementary Material Section.

  8. Co-benefits of addressing climate change can motivate action around the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Paul G.; Milfont, Taciano L.; Kashima, Yoshihisa; Bilewicz, Michał; Doron, Guy; Garðarsdóttir, Ragna B.; Gouveia, Valdiney V.; Guan, Yanjun; Johansson, Lars-Olof; Pasquali, Carlota; Corral-Verdugo, Victor; Aragones, Juan Ignacio; Utsugi, Akira; Demarque, Christophe; Otto, Siegmar; Park, Joonha; Soland, Martin; Steg, Linda; González, Roberto; Lebedeva, Nadezhda; Madsen, Ole Jacob; Wagner, Claire; Akotia, Charity S.; Kurz, Tim; Saiz, José L.; Schultz, P. Wesley; Einarsdóttir, Gró; Saviolidis, Nina M.

    2016-02-01

    Personal and political action on climate change is traditionally thought to be motivated by people accepting its reality and importance. However, convincing the public that climate change is real faces powerful ideological obstacles, and climate change is slipping in public importance in many countries. Here we investigate a different approach, identifying whether potential co-benefits of addressing climate change could motivate pro-environmental behaviour around the world for both those convinced and unconvinced that climate change is real. We describe an integrated framework for assessing beliefs about co-benefits, distinguishing social conditions (for example, economic development, reduced pollution or disease) and community character (for example, benevolence, competence). Data from all inhabited continents (24 countries; 6,196 participants) showed that two co-benefit types, Development (economic and scientific advancement) and Benevolence (a more moral and caring community), motivated public, private and financial actions to address climate change to a similar degree as believing climate change is important. Critically, relationships were similar for both convinced and unconvinced participants, showing that co-benefits can motivate action across ideological divides. These relationships were also independent of perceived climate change importance, and could not be explained by political ideology, age, or gender. Communicating co-benefits could motivate action on climate change where traditional approaches have stalled.

  9. WebNet 99 : proceedings of WebNet 99 - World Conference on the WWW and Internet, Honolulu, Hawaii, October 24-30, 1999

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bra, P.M.E.; Leggett, J.

    1999-01-01

    The 1999 WebNet conference addressed research, new developments, and experiences related to the Internet and World Wide Web. The 394 contributions of WebNet 99 contained in this proceedings comprise the full and short papers accepted for presentation at the conference. Major topics covered include:

  10. World nuclear power once again in the spotlight. Comments on the 13th Pacfic Basin Nuclear Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang Mingchang; Ruan Keqiang

    2004-01-01

    This paper comments on The 13th Pacific Basin Nuclear Conference held in Shenzhen, China, on October 21/25, 2002 and summarizes some key papers presented in the Conference and viewpoints from their following discussions, which indicates that nuclear power in the world is once again in the spotlight. The Conference shows that in the coming 50 years the roadmap to develop nuclear energy would be divided into two stages: Near-Term Deployment by 2010-2015, some advanced designs were developed for Utilities; Generation IV Program, its overall goal is to identify and develop next-generation nuclear power systems that could be deployed over the next 30 years to help meet the world's energy needs throughout the 21st century. Some visions is the future, such as co-generation of electricity and space heating or desalination, and combination of Generation IV and so-called Hydrogen Economy-the use of hydrogen in vehicle transport to replace petroleum, were presented. As a primary energy source nuclear power is particularly well suited to hydrogen production, offering the almost unique position of large-scale hydrogen production with near-zero emissions. (authors)

  11. Climate change mitigation in Asia and financing Mechanisms.Proceedings of a Regional Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.R.; Deo, P.

    1998-12-01

    The three primary objectives of the conference, which was organized by the UNEP Collaborating Centre on Energy and Environment (UCCEE) in conjunction with the Environment Department of the World Bank, at Goa in India from May 4 to 6, 1998, were: 1) to share the GHG mitigation experiences from Asian developing countries; 2) to disseminate the standard methodological approach for mitigation analysis developed by UNEP and its applications in different countries; and 3) assess the role and efficacy of financial mechanisms and to, specifically, seek feedback on the Prototype Carbon Fund proposed by the World Bank. Follwing these objectives, the workshop presentations and discussions were structured in three parts. In the first part, participants from eleven Asian developing countries made presentations that were followed by discussions. The second part included the presentations by the experts from UCCEE, UNFCCC and other invited experts who presented the mitigation methodology and the issues and experiences relating to various co-operative implementation mechanisms. The third part included the presentations by the World Bank representatives on the Prototype Carbon Fund and the discussions on financial mechanisms. (EG)

  12. Potentials and limitations of epistemic communities. An analysis of the World Climate Council and the Framework Convention on Climate Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In times of increasing global uncertainties, science takes a central position for policy decisions. According to Peter M. Haas, epistemic communities are able to influence the cooperative behavior of states through their consensual knowledge. This book critically examines this statement. As the case of the Framework Convention on Climate Change shows, the World Climate Council (IPCC) was not in a position to enforce its solution options in the intergovernmental negotiations, as these affected the individual convictions of the decision-makers. While Angela Merkel advocated an agreement, the US government under George W. Bush denied the existence of climate change. Decision-makers and their individual convictions must therefore have a greater significance in international politics. [de

  13. The many facets of climate change - Conference proceedings; Les multiples facettes du changement climatique - Recueil des presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-03-15

    This conference day on climate change was organized by the French meteorological society (SMF) at the Ecole Normale Superieure of Paris. This document brings together the available presentations given at the conference. Eight presentations (slides) are compiled in this document and deal with: 1 - Climate change today and tomorrow, the research stakes (Herve Le Treut, IPSL); 2 - Rise of sea levels: estimations and regional variability (Guy Woeppelmann, La Rochelle Univ.); 3 - Polar ice caps and continental cryo-sphere as seen from space (A. Kouraev, F. Remy, E. Berthier, LEGOS); 4 - Impacts of climate change on exploited marine populations: projections and uncertainties (Patrick Lehodey, CLS); 5 - Climate change stakes on agricultural and winery activities in France (Eric Duchene, INRA); 6 - Impacts of climate change on forest trees phenology and their consequences on trees life and survival (Francois Lebourgeois, ENGREF); 7 - Remote-epidemiology: a health-aid in a climate change context (Murielle Lafaye, CNES); 8 - Socio-economic aspects and adaptation: a climate history, for what? (Emmanuel Garnier, Caen Univ.)

  14. Neutron radiography at the HFR Petten compilation of HFR Petten contributions to the second world conference on neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markgraf, J.W.F.

    1986-01-01

    This booklet summarizes the six papers on neutron radiography activities at the Petten High Flux Reactor (HFR), presented at the Second World Conference on neutron radiography, held in June 1986 in Paris, France. The conference was organized by the French CEA and COFREND, and JRC Petten, HFR Division, with joint sponsorship of the national societies on Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) from the Federal Republic of Germany, United Kingdom, Japan and the United States. The Petten papers are concerned with: (i) the work of the Neutron Radiography Working Group (NRWG), an expert group operating under the auspices of the Commission of the European Communities represented by JRC Petten, HFR Division; (ii) applications of neutron radiography in research programmes performed at HFR; (iii) neutron radiography facilities at HFR; and (iv) image evaluation techniques

  15. The energy transition in a climate-constrained world: Regional vs. global optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brede, M.; de Vries, B.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a stylized economy-energy-climate model and discuss the role of the atmosphere, fossil fuels, and a stock of accumulated knowledge about renewable energy technologies in collaboratively and competitively managed worlds. The model highlights that assumptions about the 'degree

  16. Climate Change Draws World Attention: The 2007 Nobel Peace Award Goes to Gore and IPCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisland, Beverly Milner; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, the Nobel Committee awarded their Peace Prize to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (a scientific intergovernmental body set up by the World Meteorological Organization and by the United Nations Environment Program) and to former Vice-President Al Gore, Jr. The committee praised the United Nations panel for creating…

  17. The All-Russian Scientific Conference “The Ananyino World: Sources, Development, Interrelations, Historical Destinies”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzminykh Sergey V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The report on the conference, which was held in Bolgar (the Republic of Tatarstan in November, 2012, and dedicated to the Ananyino cultural and historical community, is presented. A wide range of problems related to the final Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age in the forest-steppe zone of European Russia, the Urals and Western Siberia were considered. Special attention was paid to the intercultural relations of the time. The results of the latest research in the field, including broad historical and cultural generalizations, are presented. It was decided to publish the materials contributed, and to hold future similar conferences at 3-4- years’ intervals.

  18. XVth World Conference of the International Union for Health Promotion and Education, Makuhari, Japan, 20-25 August 1995. Conference report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westaway, M S

    1995-09-01

    This article briefly highlights information provided by speakers at the World Conference of the International Union for Health Promotion and Education. The conference took place during August 1995, in Makuhari, Japan. One paper focused on health education in Japan, which would not be suitable for health promotion efforts in South Africa. Another paper focused on intersectoral efforts for health, policy, and networking. This paper addressed an issue important for all countries; the need for better communication among people working in health fields and improved outreach. A paper focusing on strengthening community action was presented. South Africa, as well as Japan, must work to involve communities in health service management. The author found that the paper on policy, practice, and research for health promotion and education was relevant to South Africa. Policymakers and practitioners tend to rely on precedence, intuition, personal experience, and political experience. Academic research funding does not support research that is relevant to policymakers and practitioners. The papers on healthy cities research were stimulating and had practical input. The proposed model involved a 3-phase and 14-step process of choosing a topic for an intervention, analyzing the intervention's political environment, and planning the political aspects of intervention. Another model of intersectoral action was spiral shaped and centered problem definition, direction setting, and structuring between networking and interorganizational relations. Four papers from Botswana focused on reproductive health. Other papers focused on teenage pregnancy.

  19. Energy, world should not chose nuclear energy to fight against climatic change. Nuclear and climatic change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, S.

    2007-06-01

    This document proposes an abstract of the conclusions of an expert group, the Oxford Research Group, which criticizes the today boost in favor of the electricity from nuclear energy. They explain that the nuclear energy should not be a solution for the fight against the climatic change. (A.L.B.)

  20. The Indo-Pacific Warm Pool: critical to world oceanography and world climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Deckker, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    The Indo-Pacific Warm Pool holds a unique place on the globe. It is a large area [>30 × 106 km2] that is characterised by permanent surface temperature >28 °C and is therefore called the `heat engine' of the globe. High convective clouds which can reach altitudes up to 15 km generate much latent heat in the process of convection and this area is therefore called the `steam engine' of the world. Seasonal and contrasting monsoonal activity over the region is the cause for a broad seasonal change of surface salinities, and since the area lies along the path of the Great Ocean Conveyor Belt, it is coined the `dilution' basin due to the high incidence of tropical rain and, away from the equator, tropical cyclones contribute to a significant drop in sea water salinity. Discussion about what may happen in the future of the Warm Pool under global warming is presented together with a description of the Warm Pool during the past, such as the Last Glacial Maximum when sea levels had dropped by ~125 m. A call for urgent monitoring of the IPWP area is justified on the grounds of the significance of this area for global oceanographic and climatological processes, but also because of the concerned threats to human population living there.

  1. Health risks of climate change in the World Health Organization South-East Asia Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Kathryn J; Ebi, Kristie L

    2017-09-01

    Countries in the World Health Organization (WHO) South-East Asia Region are particularly vulnerable to a changing climate. Changes in extreme weather events, undernutrition and the spread of infectious diseases are projected to increase the number of deaths due to climate change by 2030, indicating the need to strengthen activities for adaptation and mitigation. With support from the WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia and others, countries have started to include climate change as a key consideration in their national public health policies. Further efforts are needed to develop evidence-based responses; garner the necessary support from partner ministries; and access funding for activities related to health and climate change. National action plans for climate change generally identify health as one of their priorities; however, limited information is available on implementation processes, including which ministries and departments would be involved; the time frame; stakeholder responsibilities; and how the projects would be financed. While progress is being made, efforts are needed to increase the capacity of health systems to manage the health risks of climate change in South-East Asia, if population health is to be protected and strengthened while addressing changing weather and climate patterns. Enhancing the resilience of health systems is key to ensuring a sustainable path to improved planetary and population health.

  2. [Progress and prospects on evaluation of ecological restoration: a review of the 5th World Conference on Ecological Restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jing-Yi; Zhao, Wen-Wu

    2014-09-01

    The 5th World Conference on Ecological Restoration was held in Madison, Wisconsin, USA on October 6-11, 2013. About 1200 delegates from more than 50 countries attended the conference, and discussed the latest developments in different thematic areas of ecological restoration. Discussions on evaluation of ecological restoration were mainly from three aspects: The construction for evaluation indicator system of ecological restoration; the evaluation methods of ecological restoration; monitoring and dynamic evaluation of ecological restoration. The meeting stressed the importance of evaluation in the process of ecological restoration and concerned the challenges in evaluation of ecological restoration. The conference had the following enlightenments for China' s research on evaluation of ecological restoration: 1) Strengthening the construction of comprehensive evaluation indicators system and focusing on the multi-participation in the evaluation process. 2) Paying more attentions on scale effect and scale transformation in the evaluation process of ecological restoration. 3) Expanding the application of 3S technology in assessing the success of ecological restoration and promoting the dynamic monitoring of ecological restoration. 4) Carrying out international exchanges and cooperation actively, and promoting China's international influence in ecological restoration research.

  3. Key figures for the climate in France and in the World - issue 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouradou, Frederic; Wong, Florine; Duvernoy, Jerome; Morel, Romain

    2013-01-01

    This publication proposes graphs, maps and tables to illustrate the status and the evolution of climate in France and in the World. The first part addresses climate change: atmosphere warming, consequences of climate change, predictions, factors influencing temperature, greenhouse effect and greenhouse gases, greenhouse gas tanks and flows (case of CO 2 ), and increase of greenhouse gas atmospheric stock. The second part addresses greenhouse gas emissions in the world, globally and due to energy combustion or to electricity production. The third part addresses greenhouse gas emissions in France and in Europe and gives data on carbon print and imported emissions. The fourth part addresses the distribution of emissions among sectors in Europe and in France (energy industry, transports, manufacturing and building industry, other sectors, emissions out of energy use, CO 2 emission factors). The last part addresses climate policies: international negotiations, the Kyoto protocol and its flexibility mechanism, the emission trading scheme during its first period, the second period of the Kyoto protocol, the EU commitments, the European ETS, carbon price in the EU ETS, the French climate policy

  4. Energy and the public as viewed by the World Energy Conference. Energie und Oeffentlichkeit aus der Sicht der WEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, P.M. (Kernforschungsanlage Juelich GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Programmgruppe Technik und Gesellschaft); Jungermann, H. (Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Psychologie)

    1989-09-01

    The committee 'Energy and the Public', set up by the World Energy Conference, at this year's meeting of the WEK presented a comparative international study on the attitude of the public towards systems of energy production, respectively energy supply. Attitudes towards a certain energy system depend on different aspects: With nuclear energy it is above all the safety aspect; for the rest, environmental-protection and economic aspects are important. But the conflict between materialistic and postmaterialistic values also influences people's energy-political convictions. What this study documents is the origin of a world-wide problem-consciousness that energy policy has to contend with if it wants to be economically, environmentally, and socially compatible. (orig./UA).

  5. World climate research: an (un)comfortable coexistence among science and scientists' opinion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson-Sellers, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Full text: My hypothesis is that the effective global governance so urgently needed in relation to greenhouse climate change is not developing, in part, because climate research scientists are failing to communicate well. This is, I believe, because traditionally science has informed society through a sequence of steps moving from facts, through assessment, projection, risk evaluation to policy for changed governance. Any prioritisation, facilitation, and co-ordination activity (such as the World Climate Research Programme) has to be concerned about the way in which science participates in policy. The range of options encompasses: Hands off: it is the job of policy, not science to make decisions; Recognise risk: provide credible and defensible information to help deal with risk; Inform people: because the ultimate policy-maker is the public. Good global governance of common resource, the climate, uses risk management to avoid free riding. History teaches that international cooperation can be successful, e.g. protection of the ozone layer. Some international collective moves towards global carbon governance are occurring: multilateral frameworks such as the UNFCCC, Kyoto Protocol and its follow-up (endorsed by the G8 in June) and domestic mandatory goals set by the EU, UK, China, California and other US states. It is very clear that the world must move from actuarial style climate risk management strategy (history as a good predictor of future) to a dynamically-based prediction and management regime. The urgency of this includes that while mitigation costs are high, delaying action increases them (e.g. Stern 2006; IPCC 2007); that atmospheric concentration of C02 is 380 ppmv (up from the pre-industrial 270 ppmv); current emissions are already higher than the 1990s IPCC scenarios; positive feedbacks seem to predominate; and finally social and climate systems inertias of decades mean that the world is already committed to unrealised warming. Stronger and

  6. Climate Central World Weather Attribution (WWA) project: Real-time extreme weather event attribution analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, Karsten; Otto, Friederike; Uhe, Peter; Allen, Myles; Cullen, Heidi

    2015-04-01

    Extreme weather detection and attribution analysis has emerged as a core theme in climate science over the last decade or so. By using a combination of observational data and climate models it is possible to identify the role of climate change in certain types of extreme weather events such as sea level rise and its contribution to storm surges, extreme heat events and droughts or heavy rainfall and flood events. These analyses are usually carried out after an extreme event has occurred when reanalysis and observational data become available. The Climate Central WWA project will exploit the increasing forecast skill of seasonal forecast prediction systems such as the UK MetOffice GloSea5 (Global seasonal forecasting system) ensemble forecasting method. This way, the current weather can be fed into climate models to simulate large ensembles of possible weather scenarios before an event has fully emerged yet. This effort runs along parallel and intersecting tracks of science and communications that involve research, message development and testing, staged socialization of attribution science with key audiences, and dissemination. The method we employ uses a very large ensemble of simulations of regional climate models to run two different analyses: one to represent the current climate as it was observed, and one to represent the same events in the world that might have been without human-induced climate change. For the weather "as observed" experiment, the atmospheric model uses observed sea surface temperature (SST) data from GloSea5 (currently) and present-day atmospheric gas concentrations to simulate weather events that are possible given the observed climate conditions. The weather in the "world that might have been" experiments is obtained by removing the anthropogenic forcing from the observed SSTs, thereby simulating a counterfactual world without human activity. The anthropogenic forcing is obtained by comparing the CMIP5 historical and natural simulations

  7. Promising results of the first Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Charge (FCCC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkus, H.

    1995-01-01

    The first Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), held from 28 March-7 April 1995 in Berlin, Germany, resulted in a positive outcome, despite gloomy prospects at the start of the conference. After two weeks of negotiations agreement was reached to start negotiating commitments after 2000. Also a decision was taken to set up a pilot phase for Joint Implementation. Furthermore, several institutional (a.o. FCCC secretariat will settle in Bonn) and organizational (a.o. budget) topics were solved. The challenge for negotiators now is to work out a concrete draft protocol for the conference in 1997 (Japan). In Berlin, Parties were prepared to compromise in the final (early morning) hours. The question remains whether the same willingness exists when definite choices have to be made on measures, targets and timetables

  8. Nucleaire et Energies Nr 63 - June 2014. 18 months before the Paris Climate Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenail, Bernard; Ducroux, Guy; Lamorlette, Guy; Seyve, Claude; Simonnet, Jacques; Justin, Francois; Darricau, Aime; Blanc, Jacques; Salanave, Jean-Luc; Raisonnier, Daniele; Deleigne, Francoise

    2014-06-01

    After a first article which evokes the perspective and challenges of the Paris Climate Conference, two articles address energy issues: a discussion of the evolution of the energy sector (challenge of energy transition, evolutions of the energy mix in different countries, shale gases in the USA, Europe and France, electricity prices in France, situation and projects of French energy companies) and an overview of news in the renewable energy sector (in Morocco, Germany and the UK, the second bidding for offshore wind projects in France). Three articles deal with nuclear energy: agreements and projects in Niger, news about various fuel production sites in different countries, overview of the situation of reactors (EPR, China) and decisions on projects and investments in different countries, overview of activities and events related to the back-end of the fuel cycle (notably in different Areva sites) and to decommissioning in different countries. Four articles address societal issues related to nuclear safety and environment (relationships between French nuclear operators and Safety Authorities, the situation of populations around Fukushima, Greenpeace in Fessenheim, the issue of fuel sheath wear, use of rare earth materials in wind turbines), a positive perception of the presence of Areva (after Cogema) in Niger, a scenario for Fessenheim, and the deep disposal Cigeo project

  9. Handbook on surficial uranium deposits. Chapter 3. World distribution relative to climate and physical setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlisle, D.

    This chapter discusses regional controls which affect the world distribution of surficial chemogenic uranium deposits. The most important of these are (1) climate, (2) geomorphology, including physiographic and climatic stability, and (3) provenance, i.e., the weathering terrain from which uranium and associated substances are derived. The three economically important environments are the calcrete environment, simple evaporative environments and paludal environments. Of these three categories, the calcrete uranium environment is probably the most uniquely constrained in terms of regional climate, geomorphic setting, provenance (vanadium as well as uranium) and especially the need for long term stability of both climate and physiography. Purely evaporative deposits, though subject to some of the same kinds of constraints, can also reflect local circumstances and a wider range of climates, physiographic settings, and source terrains. The third category encompassing bogs, marshes and organic-rich playas can form under an even wider range of climates and settings provided only that organic materials accumulate in abundance and are contacted by uranium-bearing waters. For all of these reasons and also because of the great economic importance of the calcrete environment as well as its relative novelty and complexity the discussion in this chapter is focused on calcrete, dolocrete and gypcrete uranium deposits. Objective data are reviewed first follwed by inferences and suggestions. 13 figures

  10. The treat of global climate change has important implications throughout the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejazi, R.

    2008-01-01

    Energy in general is essential for economic and social development, prosperity, health and security of citizens. of the other hand, world population over the last 10 years has increased by more than 12%, and now it is exactly about 6.4 billion people and it means more demand for energy. Meanwhile, global primary energy consumption has seen an increase of 20%. Energy supply has some sources and unfortunately most of them have impact on life cycle in biosphere. However, the developed countries, that are only 16% in the population in 2000, consume the energy of 80%. This article deals with the threat of global climate change and its implications throughout the world

  11. Proceedings of the conference days on 'Climate change impacts on coastal risks'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, M.; Meyssignac, B.; Llovel, W.; Cazenave, A.; Rogel, P.; Woppelmann, G.; Salas y Melia, D.; Morelatto, D.; Benoit, M.; Tiberi-Wadier, A.L.; Charles, E.; Thiebot, J.; Le Cozannet, G.; Pedreros, R.; Ardhuin, F.; Planton, S.; Balouin, Y.; Ferreira, O.; Ciavola, P.; Donato, V.; Walker, P.; Dubois, A.; Sedrati, M.; Menier, D.; Idier, D.; Balouin, Y.; Bohn Bertoldo, R.; Bouchette, F.; Boulahya, F.; Brivois, O.; Calvete, D.; Capo, S.; Castelle, B.; Certain, R.; Charles, E.; Chateauminois, E.; Delvallee, E.; Falques, A.; Fattal, P.; Larroude, P.; Lecacheux, S.; Garnier, R.; Hequette, A.; Maanan, M.; Mallet, C.; Maspataud, A.; Mays, C.; Oliveros, C.; Paillart, M.; Parisot, J.P.; Pedreros, R.; Poumadere, M.; Robin, N.; Ruz, M.H.; Robin, M.; Vinchon, C.; Capo, S.; Rihouey, D.; Howa, H.; Desmazes, F.; Fauque, L.; Maillet, G.; Vella, C.; Pelinovski, E.; Demory, F.; Canut, V.; Dussouillez, P.; Fleury, T.J.; Lecacheux, S.; Garcin, M.; Krien, Y.; Poisson, B.; Almar, R.; Senechal, N.; Bonneton, P.; Ennesser, Y.; Cataliotti, D.; Terrier, M.; Genovese, E.; Hallegatte, S.; Dumas, P.; Sauzeau, T.; Peret, J.; Zaninetti, J.M.; Vinchon, C.; Agenais, A.L.; Baron-Yelles, N.; Berthelier, E.; Garcin, M.; Herivaux, C.; Kuhfuss, L.; Maton, L.; Meur-Ferec, C.; Rey-Valette, H.; Charles, J.C.; Franquart, H.; Hellequin, A.P.; Marche, F.; Mazeiraud, V.; Nathan, F.; Romieu, E.; Rulleau, B.; Maton, L.; Rulleau, B.; Flanquart, H.; Balouin, Y.; Poumadere, M.; Deve, I.; Bouteau, F.; Aubie, S.; Mugica, J.; Hoareau, A.; Duvat, V.; Magnan, A.; Sergent, P.; Prevot, G.; Tissier, M.; Chazel, F.; Lannes, D.; Falques, A.; Ruessink, G.; Maspataud, A.; Ruz, M.H.; Vanhee, S.; Vanroye, C.; Elineau, S.; Duperret, A.; Mallet, P.; Caspar, R.; Bonnot-Courtois, C.; Perherin, C.; Roche, A.; Trmal, C.; Roux, I.; Pons, F.; Boura, C.; Devaux, E.; Desire, G.; Cayocca, F.; Le Hir, P.; Vinchon, C.; Andre, C.; Meur-Ferec, C.; Idier, D.; Rohmer, J.; Turpin, V.; Magnan, A.; Baillarin, F.; Galarraga, D.; Gardel, A.; Fromard, F.; Froidefond, J.M.; Lafon, V.; Proisy, C.; Walcker, R.; Mercier, F.; Pronier, O.; Dehouck, A.; Bertrand, F.; Goeldner-Gianella, L.

    2011-01-01

    This document gathers the articles of the presentations given during this conference about the climate change impacts on coastal risks: - Topic 1 - forcing changes: Regional sea level changes rebuilt for the last five decades; Sea level modeling in decennial and centennial experiments of the coupled CNRM-CERFACS model; Sea level state simulations in the Atlantic ocean between 1960 and 2100 for 3 climate change scenarios; Wave trends and characteristics variability in the Bay of Biscay from 1958 to 2001; Climate change impacts on storm events affecting the European coastline, the MICORE project; CECILE project: coastal environmental changes, impacts of sea level rise; Hydro-dynamism of a meso-tidal bay-shore in modal conditions and in storm conditions, Suscinio Bay, South-Brittany; - Topic 2 - impacts on unforeseen turns of events: VULSACO - vulnerability of sandy coastal systems in front of climate changes and anthropic pressures, methods, tools, results and lessons learnt; Climate change vulnerability with a 2DH modeling on 4 French beaches; Analysis of the 'Truc-Vert' beach (Gironde) evolution over a decennial period, link with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO); Impact of the reduction of the Rhone river solid fraction on the delta coastline mobility since the Little Ice Age; Mega-blocs of the eastern side of the Fos Gulf as markers of exceptional SW-oriented storms; Implementation of a multi-model approach to evaluate the Languedoc coast exposure to marine submersions in a climate change context; Continuous video observation of the littoral: multi-scales and multi-processes; - Topic 3 - Socio-economic impacts: Climate change and coastal risk evaluation in North Africa; Assessment of damage from storm surge and sea level rise to coastal cities: lessons from the Miami area; Construction and environmental protection of centre-west Atlantic coastal communities: contribution of geo-history; Consideration of climate change effects in new coastal protection schemes

  12. Energy, technology and climatic policy: the world perspectives at the 2030 prospect. Key messages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This paper comments the different points of the reference scenario described in the WETO study (World energy, technology and climate policy outlook). This scenario describes a world energy situation, assuming a continuation of the present day trends and structural changes. A comment is made for each of the following aspects of the scenario: world energy demand, share of fossil fuels in the world energy supplies, world CO 2 emissions, petroleum reserves, world petroleum, gas and coal productions, petroleum and gas prices trend, end-use energy demand, power production and natural gas share in power generation. Then, the document analyses the impact of changes linked with hydrocarbon resources and technology developments: reduction of hydrocarbon resources, increase of gas resources, acceleration of technological developments in power generation. A third part analyzes the natural gas market of the European Union in a world perspective: market, reserves, demand, supply risks. Finally, the last part presents the impact of environmental policies in the case of a CO 2 tax and in the case of a carbon abatement scenario. (J.S.)

  13. Our struggle for climate - a low carbon world with growth is possible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalendar, Pierre-Andre de

    2015-01-01

    In order to avoid an irreversible climate catastrophe, and as the will and commitments of States are not enough, the mobilisation of companies and enterprises is essential. This book aims to show that enterprises, which have been for long considered as responsible of greenhouse gas emissions, are now at the forefront of the struggle against climate change. The author describes the various challenges faced by French companies regarding climate and the environment. He thinks that the world will always need more energy, more steel, more aluminium, more building materials, more cars, more chemistry, more machines, more tubes and cables. The solution is then a technological one to transform industrial activities for a low carbon or zero carbon and growing economy

  14. Measuring and tracking the flow of climate change adaptation aid to the developing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Simon D.; Kandlikar, Milind; Webber, Sophie

    2016-05-01

    The developed world has pledged to mobilize at least US 100 billion per year of ‘new’ and ‘additional’ funds by 2020 to help the developing world respond to climate change. Tracking this finance is particularly problematic for climate change adaptation, as there is no clear definition of what separates adaptation aid from standard development aid. Here we use a historical database of overseas development assistance projects to test the effect of different accounting assumptions on the delivery of adaptation finance to the developing countries of Oceania, using machine algorithms developed from a manual pilot study. The results show that explicit adaptation finance grew to 3%-4% of all development aid to Oceania by the 2008-2012 period, but that total adaptation finance could be as high as 37% of all aid, depending on potentially politically motivated assumptions about what counts as adaptation. There was also an uneven distribution of adaptation aid between countries facing similar challenges like Kiribati, the Marshall Islands, and the Federated States of Micronesia. The analysis indicates that data allowing individual projects to be weighted by their climate change relevance is needed. A robust and mandatory metadata system for all aid projects would allow multilateral aid agencies and independent third parties to perform their own analyses using different assumptions and definitions, and serve as a key check on international climate aid promises.

  15. World Council of Nuclear Workers (WONUC). Report of the 1st international Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domel, R.

    1999-08-01

    This, the first conference organised by WONUC, attracted papers dealing with many aspects of low and very low doses of ionising radiation, including molecular and genetic aspects and epidemiological studies. There was a lively debate on the 'linear no threshold' model and on whether Hiroshima/Nagasaki data should still be used to determine dose limits for workers and the general public. The conference highlighted the growing scientific understanding and debate of effects of low and very low doses of ionising radiation and it is important that workers in Australia should have first-hand access to this information. Indeed, if in years to come radiation hormesis is demonstrated, workers should be made aware of that possibility and the fact that their place of employment may hold an additional health benefit rather than a reputed health risk. I believe that such a positive attitudinal shift would certainly help nuclear workers to counter the ever-present negative sentiments of the anti-nuclear lobby groups

  16. Sustainability, energy policy, climatic change, world food supply. Political and legal challenges of the 21th century; Nachhaltigkeit, Energiewende, Klimawandel, Welternaehrung. Politische und rechtliche Herausforderungen des 21. Jahrhunderts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertel, Ines (ed.)

    2014-07-01

    The book on sustainability, energy policy, climatic change, world food supply as political challenges in the 21th century includes contributions on the following topics: sustainability and environment, energy and climatic change, agriculture and world food supply.

  17. Climate change and the long-term viability of the World's busiest heavy haul ice road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, Donal; Swindles, Graeme; Patterson, Tim; Galloway, Jennifer; Macumber, Andrew; Falck, Hendrik; Crossley, Laura; Chen, Jie; Pisaric, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Climate models project that the northern high latitudes will warm at a rate in excess of the global mean. This will pose severe problems for Arctic and sub-Arctic infrastructure dependent on maintaining low temperatures for structural integrity. This is the case for the economically important Tibbitt to Contwoyto Winter Road (TCWR)—the world's busiest heavy haul ice road, spanning 400 km across mostly frozen lakes within the Northwest Territories of Canada. In this study, future climate scenarios are developed for the region using statistical downscaling methods. In addition, changes in lake ice thickness are projected based on historical relationships between measured ice thickness and air temperatures. These projections are used to infer the theoretical operational dates of the TCWR based on weight limits for trucks on the ice. Results across three climate models driven by four RCPs reveal a considerable warming trend over the coming decades. Projected changes in ice thickness reveal a trend towards thinner lake ice and a reduced time window when lake ice is at sufficient thickness to support trucks on the ice road, driven by increasing future temperatures. Given the uncertainties inherent in climate modelling and the resultant projections, caution should be exercised in interpreting the magnitude of these scenarios. More certain is the direction of change, with a clear trend towards winter warming that will reduce the operation time window of the TCWR. This illustrates the need for planners and policymakers to consider future changes in climate when planning annual haulage along the TCWR.

  18. Long term modelling in a second rank world: application to climate policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crassous, R.

    2008-11-01

    This research aims at the identification of the dissatisfaction reasons with respect to the existing climate models, at the design of an innovating modelling architecture which would respond to these dissatisfactions, and at proposing climate policy assessment pathways. The authors gives a critique assessment of the modelling activity within the field of climate policies, outlines the fact that the large number and the scattering of existing long term scenarios hides a weak control of uncertainties and of the inner consistency of the produced paths, as well as the very low number of modelling paradigms. After a deepened analysis of modelling practices, the author presents the IMACLIM-R modelling architecture which is presented on a world scale and includes 12 areas and 12 sectors, and allows the simulation of evolutions by 2050, and even 2100, with a one-year time step. The author describes a scenario without any climate policy, highlights reassessment possibilities for economical trajectories which would allow greenhouse gas concentration stabilisation on a long term basis through the application of IMACLIM-R innovations. He outlines adjustment and refinement possibilities for climate policies which would robustly limit the transition cost risks

  19. Global assessment of technological innovation for climate change adaptation and mitigation in developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenle, Ademola A; Azadi, Hossein; Arbiol, Joseph

    2015-09-15

    Concerns about mitigating and adapting to climate change resulted in renewing the incentive for agricultural research investments and developing further innovation priorities around the world particularly in developing countries. In the near future, development of new agricultural measures and proper diffusion of technologies will greatly influence the ability of farmers in adaptation and mitigation to climate change. Using bibliometric approaches through output of academic journal publications and patent-based data, we assess the impact of research and development (R&D) for new and existing technologies within the context of climate change mitigation and adaptation. We show that many developing countries invest limited resources for R&D in relevant technologies that have great potential for mitigation and adaption in agricultural production. We also discuss constraints including weak infrastructure, limited research capacity, lack of credit facilities and technology transfer that may hinder the application of innovation in tackling the challenges of climate change. A range of policy measures is also suggested to overcome identified constraints and to ensure that potentials of innovation for climate change mitigation and adaptation are realized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. World pharmaceuticals--Financial Times tenth annual conference. 22-23 April 1999, London, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhsin, M

    1999-07-01

    This two-day conference was organized by The Financial Times, in association with PriceWaterhouseCoopers LLP. The general theme of the event was the state of the healthcare industry, past, present and future. The main areas covered included addressing the challenges of the 1990s, anticipating the challenges of the next decade, the changing shape of global marketing, IT in healthcare, consolidation challenges, shareholder expectations, and new strategies and technologies for growth sustenance within the industry. Key speakers within the industry addressed these issues to an audience of approximately 200 healthcare business executives. The first day was chaired by Mr Robert Cawthorn (Chairman Emeritus, Rhone-Poulenc Rorer Inc) and the second by Professor Trevor Jones (Director General, Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry).

  1. Proceedings of the 14. world hydrogen energy conference 2002 : The hydrogen planet. CD-ROM ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venter, R.D.; Bose, T.K. [Quebec Univ., Trois-Rivieres, PQ (Canada). Institut de recherche sur l' hydrogene; Veziroglu, N. [International Association for Hydrogen Energy, Coral Gables, FL (United States)] (eds.)

    2002-07-01

    Hydrogen has often been named as the ultimate fuel because it can be generated from a variety of renewable and non-renewable fuels and its direct conversion to electricity in fuel cells is efficient and results in no emissions other than water vapour. The opportunities and issues associated with the use of hydrogen as the energy carrier of the future were presented at this conference which addressed all aspects of hydrogen and fuel cell development including hydrogen production, storage, hydrogen-fuelled internal combustion engines, hydrogen infrastructure, economics, and the environment. Hydrogen is currently used as a chemical feedstock and a space fuel, but it is receiving considerable attention for bring renewable energy into the transportation and power generation sectors with little or no environmental impact at the point of end use. Canada leads the way in innovative ideas for a hydrogen infrastructure, one of the most challenging tasks for the transportation sector along with hydrogen storage. Major vehicle manufacturers have announced that they will have hydrogen-fueled cars and buses on the market beginning in 2003 and 2004. Solid oxide fuel cells will be used for generating electricity with efficiencies of 70 per cent, and proton exchange membrane (PEM) and other fuel cells are being tested for residential power supply with efficiencies of 85 per cent. The conference included an industrial exposition which demonstrated the latest developments in hydrogen and fuel cell research. More than 300 papers were presented at various oral and poster sessions, of which 172 papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the database.

  2. White Paper Report of the 2011 RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries: Integrating Multidisciplinary Strategies for Imaging Services in the Developing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazal, Jonathan; Lexa, Frank; Starikovsky, Anna; Jimenez, Pablo; Jain, Sanjay; DeStigter, Kristen K.; Nathan, Robert; Krebs, Elizabeth; Noble, Vicki; Marks, William; Hirsh, Richard N.; Short, Brad; Sydnor, Ryan; Timmreck-Jackson, Emily; Lungren, Matthew P.; Maxfield, Charles; Azene, Ezana M.; Garra, Brian S.; Choi, Brian G.; Lewin, Jonathan S.; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    The 2011 RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries discussed data, experiences and models pertaining to radiology in the developing world, where widespread shortages of imaging services significantly reduce health care quality and increase health care disparity. This white paper from the 2011 RAD-AID Conference represents consensus advocacy of multidisciplinary strategies to improve planning, accessibility and quality of imaging services in the developing world. Conference presenters and participants discussed numerous solutions to imaging and healthcare disparities including: (1) economic development for radiology service planning, (2) public health mechanisms to address disease and prevention at the population and community levels, (3) comparative clinical models to implement various clinical and workflow strategies adapted to unique developing world community contexts, (4) education to improve training and optimize service quality, and (5) technology innovation to bring new technical capabilities to limited-resource regions. PMID:22748790

  3. Hydrological drought across the world: impact of climate and physical catchment structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. J. Van Lanen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale hydrological drought studies have demonstrated spatial and temporal patterns in observed trends, and considerable difference exists among global hydrological models in their ability to reproduce these patterns. In this study a controlled modeling experiment has been set up to systematically explore the role of climate and physical catchment structure (soils and groundwater systems to better understand underlying drought-generating mechanisms. Daily climate data (1958–2001 of 1495 grid cells across the world were selected that represent Köppen–Geiger major climate types. These data were fed into a conceptual hydrological model. Nine realizations of physical catchment structure were defined for each grid cell, i.e., three soils with different soil moisture supply capacity and three groundwater systems (quickly, intermediately and slowly responding. Hydrological drought characteristics (number, duration and standardized deficit volume were identified from time series of daily discharge. Summary statistics showed that the equatorial and temperate climate types (A- and C-climates had about twice as many drought events as the arid and polar types (B- and E-climates, and the durations of more extreme droughts were about half the length. Selected soils under permanent grassland were found to have a minor effect on hydrological drought characteristics, whereas groundwater systems had major impact. Groundwater systems strongly controlled the hydrological drought characteristics of all climate types, but particularly those of the wetter A-, C- and D-climates because of higher recharge. The median number of droughts for quickly responding groundwater systems was about three times higher than for slowly responding systems. Groundwater systems substantially affected the duration, particularly of the more extreme drought events. Bivariate probability distributions of drought duration and standardized deficit for combinations of K

  4. Assessment of winter air pollution episodes using long-range transport modeling in Hangzhou, China, during World Internet Conference, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Zhi-Zhen; Luo, Kun; Zhang, Jun-Xi; Feng, Rui; Zheng, He-Xin; Zhu, Hao-Ran; Wang, Jing-Fan; Fan, Jian-Ren; Gao, Xiang; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2018-05-01

    A winter air pollution episode was observed in Hangzhou, South China, during the Second World Internet Conference, 2015. To study the pollution characteristics and underlying causes, the Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry model was used to simulate the spatial and temporal evolution of the pollution episode from December 8 to 19, 2015. In addition to scenario simulations, analysis of the atmospheric trajectory and synoptic weather conditions were also performed. The results demonstrated that control measures implemented during the week preceding the conference reduced the fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) pollution level to some extent, with a decline in the total PM 2.5 concentration in Hangzhou of 15% (7%-25% daily). Pollutant long-range transport, which occurred due to a southward intrusion of strong cold air driven by the Siberia High, led to severe pollution in Hangzhou on December 15, 2015, accounting for 85% of the PM 2.5 concentration. This study provides new insights into the challenge of winter pollution prevention in Hangzhou. For adequate pollution prevention, more regional collaborations should be fostered when creating policies for northern China. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 16th International Conference on Hybrid Intelligent Systems and the 8th World Congress on Nature and Biologically Inspired Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Haqiq, Abdelkrim; Alimi, Adel; Mezzour, Ghita; Rokbani, Nizar; Muda, Azah

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the latest research in hybrid intelligent systems. It includes 57 carefully selected papers from the 16th International Conference on Hybrid Intelligent Systems (HIS 2016) and the 8th World Congress on Nature and Biologically Inspired Computing (NaBIC 2016), held on November 21–23, 2016 in Marrakech, Morocco. HIS - NaBIC 2016 was jointly organized by the Machine Intelligence Research Labs (MIR Labs), USA; Hassan 1st University, Settat, Morocco and University of Sfax, Tunisia. Hybridization of intelligent systems is a promising research field in modern artificial/computational intelligence and is concerned with the development of the next generation of intelligent systems. The conference’s main aim is to inspire further exploration of the intriguing potential of hybrid intelligent systems and bio-inspired computing. As such, the book is a valuable resource for practicing engineers /scientists and researchers working in the field of computational intelligence and artificial intelligence.

  6. Human Development report 2007/2008 - Fighting climate change: human solidarity in a divided world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Climate change is the defining human development challenge of the 21. Century. Failure to respond to that challenge will stall and then reverse international efforts to reduce poverty. The poorest countries and most vulnerable citizens will suffer the earliest and most damaging setbacks, even though they have contributed least to the problem. Looking to the future, no country - however wealthy or powerful - will be immune to the impact of global warming. The Human Development Report 2007/2008 shows that climate change is not just a future scenario. Increased exposure to droughts, floods and storms is already destroying opportunity and reinforcing inequality. Meanwhile, there is now overwhelming scientific evidence that the world is moving towards the point at which irreversible ecological catastrophe becomes unavoidable. Business-as-usual climate change points in a clear direction: unprecedented reversal in human development in our lifetime, and acute risks for our children and their grandchildren. There is a window of opportunity for avoiding the most damaging climate change impacts, but that window is closing: the world has less than a decade to change course. Actions taken - or not taken - in the years ahead will have a profound bearing on the future course of human development. The world lacks neither the financial resources nor the technological capabilities to act. What is missing is a sense of urgency, human solidarity and collective interest. As the Human Development Report 2007/2008 argues, climate change poses challenges at many levels. In a divided but ecologically interdependent world, it challenges all people to reflect upon how we manage the environment of the one thing that we share in common: planet Earth. It challenges us to reflect on social justice and human rights across countries and generations. It challenges political leaders and people in rich nations to acknowledge their historic responsibility for the problem, and to initiate deep and

  7. Providing Geospatial Education and Real World Applications of Data across the Climate Initiative Themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, A. M.; Griffin, R.; Bugbee, K.

    2015-12-01

    Various organizations such as the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) have developed a structure for general thematic areas in Earth science research, however the Climate Data Initiative (CDI) is addressing the challenging goal of organizing such datasets around core themes specifically related to climate change impacts. These thematic areas, which currently include coastal flooding, food resilience, ecosystem vulnerability, water, transportation, energy infrastructure, and human health, form the core of a new college course at the University of Alabama in Huntsville developed around real-world applications in the Earth sciences. The goal of this course is to educate students on the data available and scope of GIS applications in Earth science across the CDI climate themes. Real world applications and datasets serve as a pedagogical tool that provide a useful medium for instruction in scientific geospatial analysis and GIS software. With a wide range of potential research areas that fall under the rubric of "Earth science", thematic foci can help to structure a student's understanding of the potential uses of GIS across sub-disciplines, while communicating core data processing concepts. The learning modules and use-case scenarios for this course demonstrate the potential applications of CDI data to undergraduate and graduate Earth science students.

  8. General technical comments on climate change - comment 1: Answers to five questions posed at the conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firor, J.

    1992-01-01

    An attempt is made to answer the following five questions: (1) what are the projections of global average temperature increase? (2) What are the prospects for projecting regional climate change? (3) Do the climate models produce outlooks for a group of climate variables closely related to sociatal impacts? (4) What is the feasibility and what are the costs of proposed geoengineering options for responding to climate change? (5) What climate variables co-vary with global average temperature

  9. Learning at a Distance. Report on the DSE Conference (West Berlin, Germany, June 2-7, 1982) in Connection with the World Conference of ICCE (12th, Vancouver, Canada, June 8-17, 1982).

    Science.gov (United States)

    German Foundation for International Development, Bonn (West Germany).

    Two international meetings on distance education are summarized in this report. The first, a preparatory seminar on "Staff Development for Distance Education," was held in Berlin to give African participants an opportunity to meet prior to attending the 12th World Conference of the International Council for Correspondence Education…

  10. "Zweckoptimismus" and the Paris process will not save the world from climate catastrophe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clémençon, Raymond

    2018-03-01

    Politicians, government officials, business representatives, and nongovernmental climate activists all in various ways emphasize what they see as progress being made in the aftermath of the Paris Agreement, even if they continue to warn of the dire consequences of business as usual. Indeed, there is no lack of encouraging private and public sector initiatives on climate change. Some macro trends seem to be moving in the right direction, as well. But, closer scrutiny shows that these positive trends are still far from adding up to the necessary fundamental shift in the global energy economy. Furthermore, the public may greatly overestimate the advancement of renewable solar and wind energy technology, which contributes to a false sense of progress and lessens political urgency. Without determined and reinvigorated political leadership from the European Union (EU), there is little hope that necessary emission reduction goals to stay below 2 °C above preindustrial levels can be met. The EU has driven international climate policy from the beginning of climate negotiations, and there is unfortunately no other source of leadership in sight. It will require difficult political decisions to be taken sooner rather than later to force a much quicker domestic energy transition and to raise financing to help developing countries with their own energy transition and adaptation to a rapidly warming world. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2018;14:198-201. © 2018 SETAC. © 2018 SETAC.

  11. International Conference on Remote Sensing Applications for Archaeological Research and World Heritage Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the following: Monitoring the Ancient Countryside: Remote Sensing and GIS at the Chora of Chersonesos (Crimea, Ukraine). Integration of Remote Sensing and GIS for Management Decision Support in the Pendjari Biosphere Reserve (Republic of Benin). Monitoring of deforestation invasion in natural reserves of northern Madagascar based on space imagery. Cartography of Kahuzi-Biega National Park. Cartography and Land Use Change of World Heritage Areas and the Benefits of Remote Sensing and GIS for Conservation. Assessing and Monitoring Vegetation in Nabq Protected Area, South Sinai, Egypt, using combine approach of Satellite Imagery and Land Surveys. Evaluation of forage resources in semi-arid savannah environments with satellite imagery: contribution to the management of a protected area (Nakuru National Park) in Kenya. SOGHA, the Surveillance of Gorilla Habitat in World Heritage sites using Space Technologies. Application of Remote Sensing to monitor the Mont-Saint-Michel Bay (France). Application of Remote Sensing & GIS for the Conservation of Natural and Cultural Heritage Sites of the Southern Province of Sri Lanka. Social and Environmental monitoring of a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve: Case Study over the Vosges du Nord and Pfalzerwald Parks using Corona and Spot Imagery. Satellite Remote Sensing as tool to Monitor Indian Reservation in the Brazilian Amazonia. Remote Sensing and GIS Technology for Monitoring UNESCO World Heritage Sites - A Pilot Project. Urban Green Spaces: Modern Heritage. Monitoring of the technical condition of the St. Sophia Cathedral and related monastic buildings in Kiev with Space Applications, geo-positioning systems and GIS tools. The Murghab delta palaeochannel Reconstruction on the Basis of Remote Sensing from Space. Acquisition, Registration and Application of IKONOS Space Imagery for the cultural World Heritage site at Mew, Turkmenistan. Remote Sensing and VR applications for the reconstruction of archaeological landscapes

  12. Climate policies in a second-best world-A case study on India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathy, Sandrine; Guivarch, Celine

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the potential for synergies between climate policies and development in a case study on India focusing on the power sector sub-optimalities. To do so, we use IMACLIM-R, a dynamic recursive energy-economy model that represents a second best world with market imperfections and short-run adjustments constraints along a long-term growth path. The analysis suggests (i) global carbon pricing induces prohibitive macroeconomic costs for the Indian economy, even in the case of significant financial transfers associated with a global cap-and-trade system and a 'Contraction and Convergence in 2100' allocation scheme and (ii) the most cost efficient climate policies are not uniform carbon pricing only. The implementation of domestic policies suited to the national context, for instance targeting sub-optimalities in the power sector for India, allows reducing significantly the macroeconomic costs induced by international mitigation policies.

  13. Proceedings of the fourth international conference and exhibition: World Congress on superconductivity. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishen, K.; Burnham, C.

    1994-01-01

    The goals of the World Congress on Superconductivity (WCS) have been to establish and foster the development and commercial application of superconductivity technology on a global scale by providing a non-adversarial, non-advocacy forum where scientists, engineers, businessmen and government personnel can freely exchange information and ideas on recent developments and directions for the future of superconductive research. Sessions were held on: accelerator technology, power and energy, persistent magnetic fields, performance characterization, physical properties, fabrication methodology, superconductive magnetic energy storage (SMES), thin films, high temperature materials, device applications, wire fabrication, and granular superconductors. Individual papers are indexed separately

  14. Proceedings of the fourth international conference and exhibition: World Congress on superconductivity. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishen, K.; Burnham, C. [eds.] [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (United States). Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    1994-12-31

    The goals of the World Congress on Superconductivity (WCS) have been to establish and foster the development and commercial application of superconductivity technology on a global scale by providing a non-adversarial, non-advocacy forum where scientists, engineers, businessmen and government personnel can freely exchange information and ideas on recent developments and directions for the future of superconductive research. Sessions were held on: accelerator technology, power and energy, persistent magnetic fields, performance characterization, physical properties, fabrication methodology, superconductive magnetic energy storage (SMES), thin films, high temperature materials, device applications, wire fabrication, and granular superconductors. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  15. Precipitation in a warming world: Assessing projected hydro-climate changes in California and other Mediterranean climate regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polade, Suraj D; Gershunov, Alexander; Cayan, Daniel R; Dettinger, Michael D; Pierce, David W

    2017-09-07

    In most Mediterranean climate (MedClim) regions around the world, global climate models (GCMs) consistently project drier futures. In California, however, projections of changes in annual precipitation are inconsistent. Analysis of daily precipitation in 30 GCMs reveals patterns in projected hydrometeorology over each of the five MedClm regions globally and helps disentangle their causes. MedClim regions, except California, are expected to dry via decreased frequency of winter precipitation. Frequencies of extreme precipitation, however, are projected to increase over the two MedClim regions of the Northern Hemisphere where projected warming is strongest. The increase in heavy and extreme precipitation is particularly robust over California, where it is only partially offset by projected decreases in low-medium intensity precipitation. Over the Mediterranean Basin, however, losses from decreasing frequency of low-medium-intensity precipitation are projected to dominate gains from intensifying projected extreme precipitation. MedClim regions are projected to become more sub-tropical, i.e. made dryer via pole-ward expanding subtropical subsidence. California's more nuanced hydrological future reflects a precarious balance between the expanding subtropical high from the south and the south-eastward extending Aleutian low from the north-west. These dynamical mechanisms and thermodynamic moistening of the warming atmosphere result in increased horizontal water vapor transport, bolstering extreme precipitation events.

  16. Prioritizing environmental issues around the world: opinions from an international Central and Eastern European environmental health conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Elena S; Donnelly, Kirby C; Neamtiu, Iulia; McCarty, Kathleen M; Bruce, Erica; Surkova, Irina; Kim, David; Uhnakova, Iveta; Gyorffy, Erika; Tesarova, Eva; Anderson, Beth

    2006-12-01

    As the next generation of scientists enters the field of environmental health, it is imperative that they view their contributions in the context of global environmental stewardship. In this commentary, a group of international graduate students facilitated by three experienced environmental health scientists present their views on what they consider to be the global environmental health concerns of today. This group convened initially in October 2004 at an international health conference in Prague, Czech Republic. In this report we identify perceived environmental health concerns that exist around the world, with a focus on Central and Eastern Europe. Additionally, we address these perceived problems and offers some potential solutions. At the meeting, students were invited to participate in two panel discussions. One group of young international scientists identified several significant global environmental health concerns, including air pollution, occupational hazards, and risk factors that may exacerbate current environmental health issues. The second panel determined that communication, education, and regulation were the mechanisms for addressing current environmental challenges. In this commentary we expand on the views presented at the meeting and represent the concerns of young investigators from nine different countries. We provide ideas about and support the exchange of information between developed and developing countries on how to handle the environmental health challenges that face the world today.

  17. World climate patterns in grassland and savanna and their relation to growing seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kirk Steinhorst

    1977-11-01

    Full Text Available The climate at eleven IBP savanna or grassland study sites from five continents are described and principal components analysis is used to compare them. A multivariate linear discriminant function based on mean monthly precipitation, mean monthly temperature, latitude and altitude, is used to predict the length of the growing season at each site. At most sites, the actual and predicted start and end of the growing season agreed closely. It is concluded that growing season on a world-wide basis may be predicted fairly reliably from a small number of abiotic variables by means of a multivariate discriminant function.

  18. Dare to be different! Keynote at the Wonca world conference in Prague, June 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švab, Igor

    2013-12-01

    After decades of developing family medicine, one can see that it has been successful in defining its principles and in proving the importance of its contribution using quantitative measures of quality that are prevailing today. But if family medicine needs to make a real contribution to society, it needs not to forget that using only rationalistic approach is not enough to define its quality and that caring for a fellow being is as important as science. Our contribution to changing the world for the better should be in constantly reminding that personal care is essential for every doctor regardless the speciality. This largely neglected feature of medicine can be best taught and researched in the context of family medicine, because it represents the very essence of the discipline. This implies that we must often take a different path from other disciplines when we address the issues of policy, research and education and use every opportunity to stress the importance of personal care.

  19. White Paper Report of the 2010 RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries: Identifying Sustainable Strategies for Imaging Services in the Developing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welling, Rodney D.; Azene, Ezana M.; Kalia, Vivek; Pongpirul, Krit; Starikovsky, Anna; Sydnor, Ryan; Lungren, Matthew P.; Johnson, Benjamin; Kimble, Cary; Wiktorek, Sarah; Drum, Tom; Short, Brad; Cooper, Justin; Khouri, Nagi F.; Mayo-Smith, William W.; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Goldberg, Barry B.; Garra, Brian S.; DeStigter, Kristen K.; Lewin, Jonathan S.; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The 2010 RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries was a multidisciplinary meeting to discuss data, experiences, and models pertaining to radiology in the developing world, where widespread shortages of imaging services reduce health care quality. The theme of this year’s conference was sustainability, with a focus on establishing and maintaining imaging services in resource-limited regions. Conference presenters and participants identified 4 important components of sustainability: (1) sustainable financing models for radiology development, (2) integration of radiology and public health, (3) sustainable clinical models and technology solutions for resource-limited regions, and (4) education and training of both developing and developed world health care personnel. PMID:21807349

  20. Controlling harmful cyanobacterial blooms in a world experiencing anthropogenic and climatic-induced change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paerl, Hans W., E-mail: hpaerl@email.unc.edu; Hall, Nathan S.; Calandrino, Elizabeth S.

    2011-04-15

    Harmful (toxic, food web altering, hypoxia generating) cyanobacterial algal blooms (CyanoHABs) are proliferating world-wide due to anthropogenic nutrient enrichment, and they represent a serious threat to the use and sustainability of our freshwater resources. Traditionally, phosphorus (P) input reductions have been prescribed to control CyanoHABs, because P limitation is widespread and some CyanoHABs can fix atmospheric nitrogen (N{sub 2}) to satisfy their nitrogen (N) requirements. However, eutrophying systems are increasingly plagued with non N{sub 2} fixing CyanoHABs that are N and P co-limited or even N limited. In many of these systems N loads are increasing faster than P loads. Therefore N and P input constraints are likely needed for long-term CyanoHAB control in such systems. Climatic changes, specifically warming, increased vertical stratification, salinization, and intensification of storms and droughts play additional, interactive roles in modulating CyanoHAB frequency, intensity, geographic distribution and duration. In addition to having to consider reductions in N and P inputs, water quality managers are in dire need of effective tools to break the synergy between nutrient loading and hydrologic regimes made more favorable for CyanoHABs by climate change. The more promising of these tools make affected waters less hospitable for CyanoHABs by 1) altering the hydrology to enhance vertical mixing and/or flushing and 2) decreasing nutrient fluxes from organic rich sediments by physically removing the sediments or capping sediments with clay. Effective future CyanoHAB management approaches must incorporate both N and P loading dynamics within the context of altered thermal and hydrologic regimes associated with climate change. - Research Highlights: {yields} Toxic cyanobacterial blooms (CyanoHABs) increasingly threaten global water supplies. {yields} Human (nutrient) and climate (hydrology, temperature) changes synergistically promote CyanoHABs. {yields

  1. Controlling harmful cyanobacterial blooms in a world experiencing anthropogenic and climatic-induced change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paerl, Hans W.; Hall, Nathan S.; Calandrino, Elizabeth S.

    2011-01-01

    Harmful (toxic, food web altering, hypoxia generating) cyanobacterial algal blooms (CyanoHABs) are proliferating world-wide due to anthropogenic nutrient enrichment, and they represent a serious threat to the use and sustainability of our freshwater resources. Traditionally, phosphorus (P) input reductions have been prescribed to control CyanoHABs, because P limitation is widespread and some CyanoHABs can fix atmospheric nitrogen (N 2 ) to satisfy their nitrogen (N) requirements. However, eutrophying systems are increasingly plagued with non N 2 fixing CyanoHABs that are N and P co-limited or even N limited. In many of these systems N loads are increasing faster than P loads. Therefore N and P input constraints are likely needed for long-term CyanoHAB control in such systems. Climatic changes, specifically warming, increased vertical stratification, salinization, and intensification of storms and droughts play additional, interactive roles in modulating CyanoHAB frequency, intensity, geographic distribution and duration. In addition to having to consider reductions in N and P inputs, water quality managers are in dire need of effective tools to break the synergy between nutrient loading and hydrologic regimes made more favorable for CyanoHABs by climate change. The more promising of these tools make affected waters less hospitable for CyanoHABs by 1) altering the hydrology to enhance vertical mixing and/or flushing and 2) decreasing nutrient fluxes from organic rich sediments by physically removing the sediments or capping sediments with clay. Effective future CyanoHAB management approaches must incorporate both N and P loading dynamics within the context of altered thermal and hydrologic regimes associated with climate change. - Research Highlights: → Toxic cyanobacterial blooms (CyanoHABs) increasingly threaten global water supplies. → Human (nutrient) and climate (hydrology, temperature) changes synergistically promote CyanoHABs. → CyanoHAB control

  2. Global Climate Change and Environmental Health: Proceedings of the 1997 Annual Conference of the Society for Occupational and Environmental Health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovats, Sari; Patz, Jonathan A.; Dobbins, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the conference was to bring together a diverse group of occupational and environmental health experts to address the potential effects of climate change and ozone depletion on the current and future incidence of disease, heat stress, food and water supplies, and air pollution; to discuss initial strategies for improving R and D, global health surveillance systems, disease prevention, medical and public health community education, international cooperation, and public outreach; to address this international occupational and environmental health problem; and to explore international challenges and opportunities for collaborative projects in addressing these potential effects

  3. Educating on a Human Scale: Visions for a Sustainable World. Proceedings of the Human Scale Education Conference (Oxford, England, September 26, 1998).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnie, Fiona, Ed.

    Human Scale Education's 1998 conference addressed the creation of schools and learning experiences to foster in young people the attitudes and skills to shape a fairer and more sustainable world. "Values and Vision in Business and Education" (Anita Roddick) argues that educational curricula must contain the language and action of social…

  4. Hands That Shape the World: Report on the Conditions of Immigrant Women in the U.S. Five Years after the Beijing Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights, Oakland, CA.

    This report details the challenges that immigrant women in the United States have faced since the 1995 United Nations World Conference on Women in Beijing, China. It presents a compilation of research and synthesis by immigrants' rights activists and organizations. Data come from immigrant women's testimony. The following topics are featured:…

  5. Bridging Services: Drug Abuse, Human Services and the Therapeutic Community. Proceedings of the World Conference of Therapeutic Communities (9th, San Francisco, California, September 1-6, 1985).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acampora, Alfonso P., Ed.; Nebelkopf, Ethan, Ed.

    The World Federation of Therapeutic Communities is an international association of drug treatment centers that use the "Therapeutic Community" (TC) to combat chemical dependency and drug addiction. Their 1985 conference focused on bridging services between the TC and the traditional human service systems. A total of 85 separate papers were…

  6. "Radical" Feminists and "Bickering" Women: Backlash in U.S. Media Coverage of the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Lauren; Walsh, Susan

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes United States' newspaper coverage of the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women for themes indicating backlash against feminism. Finds that several backlash themes, such as women in conflict and stereotypical portrayals of women, were present throughout the coverage. (CR)

  7. Identifying the World's Most Climate Change Vulnerable Species: A Systematic Trait-Based Assessment of all Birds, Amphibians and Corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foden, Wendy B.; Butchart, Stuart H. M.; Stuart, Simon N.; Vié, Jean-Christophe; Akçakaya, H. Resit; Angulo, Ariadne; DeVantier, Lyndon M.; Gutsche, Alexander; Turak, Emre; Cao, Long; Donner, Simon D.; Katariya, Vineet; Bernard, Rodolphe; Holland, Robert A.; Hughes, Adrian F.; O’Hanlon, Susannah E.; Garnett, Stephen T.; Şekercioğlu, Çagan H.; Mace, Georgina M.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change will have far-reaching impacts on biodiversity, including increasing extinction rates. Current approaches to quantifying such impacts focus on measuring exposure to climatic change and largely ignore the biological differences between species that may significantly increase or reduce their vulnerability. To address this, we present a framework for assessing three dimensions of climate change vulnerability, namely sensitivity, exposure and adaptive capacity; this draws on species’ biological traits and their modeled exposure to projected climatic changes. In the largest such assessment to date, we applied this approach to each of the world’s birds, amphibians and corals (16,857 species). The resulting assessments identify the species with greatest relative vulnerability to climate change and the geographic areas in which they are concentrated, including the Amazon basin for amphibians and birds, and the central Indo-west Pacific (Coral Triangle) for corals. We found that high concentration areas for species with traits conferring highest sensitivity and lowest adaptive capacity differ from those of highly exposed species, and we identify areas where exposure-based assessments alone may over or under-estimate climate change impacts. We found that 608–851 bird (6–9%), 670–933 amphibian (11–15%), and 47–73 coral species (6–9%) are both highly climate change vulnerable and already threatened with extinction on the IUCN Red List. The remaining highly climate change vulnerable species represent new priorities for conservation. Fewer species are highly climate change vulnerable under lower IPCC SRES emissions scenarios, indicating that reducing greenhouse emissions will reduce climate change driven extinctions. Our study answers the growing call for a more biologically and ecologically inclusive approach to assessing climate change vulnerability. By facilitating independent assessment of the three dimensions of climate change vulnerability

  8. Multidisciplinary ENVIROMIS conferences as a tool connecting climate information producers and users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordov, E. P.; Lykosov, V. N.; Gordova, Yu E.; Genina, E. Yu

    2016-11-01

    The paper describes a regular multidisciplinary conference and early carrier scientists’ school ENVIROMIS as a tool for facilitation of cooperation of specialists in different fields of environmental sciences and users of research results. The conference addresses critically important issues occurring in environmental sciences, namely, crossing disciplinary borders of this multidisciplinary research area, young scientists’ training and diminishing a gap between science and decision-making. The viability of the approach to the Schools organization is proved by the fact that single event turned into a series, quite a few young participants successfully defended their PhD thesis and a number of researchers became Doctors of Science, several international multidisciplinary projects, initiated at these conferences, have been successfully carried out. Researchers from Russia and foreign countries show undiminishing interest to these conferences.

  9. The Climate Disruption Challenge for Water Security in a Growing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, L. J.; Nix, M.; Ihde, A.; MacDonald, L. H.; Parker, C.; Schaefer, R. K.; Weiss, M.; Babin, S. M.; Swartz, W. H.; Schloman, J.

    2012-12-01

    Climate disruption, the increasingly large and erratic departures of weather and climate from the benign conditions of the last one hundred years, is the greatest challenge to the long-term stability of world governments. Population growth, food and water security, energy supplies, and economic factors are, to some degree, within the control of governance and policy and all of these are impacted by climate disruption. Climate disruption, on the other hand, is not amenable to direct modification on the short timescales that commonly dictate governmental policy and human response. Global average temperatures will continue to increase even if there were immediate, profound changes in emission scenarios. Policy makers are faced with the very practical and immediate problem of determining what can one reasonably do to ameliorate the impact of climate disruption. The issue from a policy viewpoint is: how does one make effective policy when faced with a situation in which there are varied viewpoints in competition. How does one establish a consensus for action? What information "speaks" to policy makers? Water security is one such issue and provides an important, immediate, and tangible device to use when we examine how one can determine what policies can be effectively pursued. The Global Assimilation of Information for Action (GAIA) project creates a support environment to address the impact of climate disruption on global, national, regional, and/or local interests. The basic research community is concerned with the scientific aspects of predicting climate change in terms of environmental parameters such as rainfall, temperature and humidity while decision makers must deal with planning for a world that may be very different from the one we have grown accustomed to. Decision makers must deal with the long-term impacts on public health, agriculture, economic productivity, security, extreme weather, etc in an environment that has come to focus on short-term issues. To

  10. Energy fair - further selection from the 15th world energy conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, H.

    1993-01-01

    As a quintessence the author quotes the statement made by Knizia in November 1992 before the Nuclear Society: Problems such as population growth, impending distribution wars and enormous migration movements or atmosphere damaging seem to be of secondary importance if in the public the hazards of nuclear energy are conjured up. Isn't that the only way of understanding that many hundreds of politicians met in Rio in order to deplore the threat to the atmosphere by CO 2 overloading, but none of the statesmen of the Western world, which because of its scientific, technological and investigation potentials would be able to do so, mentions the utilization of nuclear energy as a possible remedy. Is it not the only way of understanding that an appeal by various hundreds of scientists, among them more than 50 Nobel prize winners, to the heads of state assembled in Rio, goes unheard, may be because it contained sentences such as: We view with concern how on the threshold of the 21st century an irrational ideology is spreading which counteracts scientific and industrial progress, thus hindering economic and social development. (orig./HSCH) [de

  11. Strategies for addressing climate change: policy perspectives from around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, M.D.; Sathaye, J.A.; Craig, P.P.

    1992-01-01

    The greenhouse effect is intrinsically global. Accordingly, effective responses require global coordination. While limited policies have been adopted, notably for phasing out chlorofluorocarbons, there is no clear consensus as to what to do about other greenhouse gases. In this paper, we survey attitudes and policy responses among the nations of the world. Public opinion surveys are consistent in showing that considerable sensitivity to environmental issues exists virtually everywhere. On the other hand, there is acute awareness that other issues, especially economic development, can conflict with global climate-change mitigation goals. In such a state of uncertainty there is a strong argument to be made for implementing policies which are good ideas independent of greenhouse-gas considerations. There is also good reason to expand research. What is feasible depends strongly on present and changing attitudes of the citizens of the world, and of their governments. It is thus critical to follow closely the evolution of attitudes. The kind of work summarized in this paper needs to be updated on a continuing basis, and the results made available routinely to the global policy community. We conclude our review with several recommendations for research designed specifically to reduce uncertainty about costs and institutional issues relating to responses to global climate change. (author)

  12. Climate Change: A Future of Less Water and More people - Strategies for a Water Constrained World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahai, D.

    2010-12-01

    Today, the fact that the Earth is warming is indisputable. The evidence of climate change is already all around us, with the occurence of ever more intense weather events, droughts, heat waves, floods and sea level rise. Predictions of greater calamities in the future without swift action must be taken seriously. However, while international summits have focused on means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, these are largely strategies of containment, not of cure. Even if emissions were to cease today, the current effects of climate change would remain with us for millenia. This is clear from the 2007 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The world must not only tackle the causes of global warming; it must adapt to the damage already done. This need is most acute where water supply is concerned. The world already faces daunting chalenges. According to United Nations' reports, even today 1.8 million children under 5 die from water related diseases every year; 900 million people lack access to safe drinking water; and 2.6 billion go without basic sanitation. In the developing world, 90% of sewage is discharged to water bodies without adequate treatment contributing to "dead zones". Population increases will make matters worse (an addition of around 3 billion people by 2050 is expected) and climate change will compound the crisis. It is forecast that, as the Earth warms, deserts will expand and droughts will intensify causing demographic shifts even as the world's population burgeons. We are already seeing different regions react to water shortages. Many countries are pursuing seawater desalination. However, seawater desalination has numerous drawbacks; it remains the most expensive of water treatment options and the most energy intensive. Some societies may have no choice but to turn to the sea; others should look to other alternatives first. Such frontrunners could include: (1) enhanced conservation, utilizing public education programs, price

  13. Climate mitigation under an uncertain technology future: A TIAM-World analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labriet, Maryse; Kanudia, Amit; Loulou, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the impacts of long-term technology and climate uncertainties on the optimal evolution of the World energy system. Stochastic programming with the TIAM-World model is used for a parametric analysis of hedging strategies, varying the probabilities associated to each of two contrasted technology outlooks. The parametric analysis constitutes an original supplement to the computation of hedging strategies by identifying technologies that are robust under a broad range of probabilities of the two technology outlooks. Natural gas appears to be one of the most appealing robust options in an uncertain technological context, especially in China, given its relatively low emissions and the low capital cost of associated technologies. Natural gas and some other options are in fact considered as “super-hedging” actions, penetrating more in the hedging solution than in any of the deterministic scenarios. Nuclear power and CCS use are less robust: they depend much more on either the level of the climate target or the probabilities of the technology outlooks. The analysis also shows that technological uncertainty has a greater impact under milder climate targets than under more severe ones. Future research might consider a larger set of possible technology outlooks, as well as specific analyses focused on key characteristics of low-carbon technologies. - Highlights: ► The hedging strategy is not an average of deterministic strategies. ► The hedging offers a mix of abatement actions that cannot easily be found otherwise. ► Natural gas is an appealing choice in an uncertain context, especially in China. ► China reduces its emissions only when options in other countries are exhausted.

  14. The Fate of the World is in your hands: computer gaming for multi-faceted climate change education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is a multi-faceted (or 'wicked') problem. True climate literacy therefore requires understanding not only the workings of the climate system, but also the current and potential future impacts of climate change and sea level rise on individuals, communities and countries around the world, as noted in the US Global Change Research Program's (2009) Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Sciences. The asymmetric nature of climate change impacts, whereby the world's poorest countries have done the least to cause the problem but will suffer disproportionate consequences, has also been widely noted. Education in climate literacy therefore requires an element of ethics in addition to physical and social sciences. As if addressing these multiple aspects of climate change were not challenging enough, polling data has repeatedly shown that many members of the public tend to see climate change as a far away problem affecting people remote from them at a point in the future, but not themselves. This perspective is likely shared by many students. Computer gaming provides a possible solution to the combined problems of, on the one hand, addressing the multi-faceted nature of climate change, and, on the other hand, making the issue real to students. Fate of the World, a game produced by the company Red Redemption, has been used on several occasions in a small (20-30 students) introductory level general education course on global warming at Weber State University. Players are required to balance difficult decisions about energy investment while managing regional political disputes and attempting to maintain minimum levels of development in the world's poorer countries. By providing a realistic "total immersion" experience, the game has the potential to make climate change issues more immediate to players, and presents them with the ethical dilemmas inherent in climate change. This presentation reports on the use of Fate of the World in an educational

  15. Summary of the Fourth Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and of the Activities of The International Nuclear Forum in Buenos Aires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Kuster, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Fourth Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Convention on Climate Change was concluded on 14 November 1998 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Unlike Kyoto in 1997, this conference was on a smaller scale and was convened as a technical work session, its aim being to produce a plan of action and a timetable for a programme of work for the next two years. This paper summarizes the main outcomes of the conference and looks at the way in which the International Nuclear Forum organized the nuclear industry's representation. In particular, the paper assesses the impact of the nuclear industry's message regarding the avoidance of greenhouse gas emissions, and goes on to consider what lessons can be reached for raising the industry's profile at future climate change conferences. (author)

  16. Climate change negotiation simulations for students: responses across gender and age.A case study: San Francisco State University World Climate Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheva, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    For decades, role-play and simulation exercises have been utilized for learning and policy decision making. While the power of Model UN simulations in building first-person experience and understanding of complex international issues is well known, the effectiveness of simulations for inspiring citizen engagement in scientific public-policy issues is little studied. My work hypothesizes that climate-change negotiation simulations can enhance students' scientific literacy and policy advocacy. It aims to determine how age and gender influence the responsiveness of students to such simulations. During the 2015 fall semester, I am conducting World Climate exercises for fellow graduate and undergraduate students at San Francisco State University. At the end of the exercise, I will have collected the responses to an anonymous questionnaire in which the participants indicate age and gender. The questionnaire asks participants to describe their hopes and fears for the future and to propose public and personal actions for achieving a strong climate change agreement. I am tracking differences to determine whether participants' age and gender correlate with particular patterns of feeling and thinking. My future research will aim to determine whether and how strongly the World Climate Exercise has affected participants' actual policy engagement. This work will also reflect on my experiences as a World Climate facilitator. I will describe the facilitation process and then discuss some of my observations from the sessions. I will specify the challenges I have encountered and suggest strategies that can strengthen the learning process. World Climate is a computer-simulation-based climate change negotiations role-playing exercise developed by Climate Interactive in partnership with the System Dynamics Group at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

  17. A summary of the recommendations adopted unanimously at the Fourth World Conference on Women (4-15 September 1995).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This article presents a summary of the platform of action recommendations adopted unanimously at the Fourth World Conference on Women in 1995. The Platform called for the empowerment of women; the protection of human rights and freedoms throughout the life cycle; and equity at home, at work, and abroad, items that reinforced the Beijing Declaration. This article identifies recommended actions on poverty, education and training, health, domestic violence, armed conflict, economy, decision-making, institutional mechanisms, human rights, mass media, environment, the girl-child, and institutional and financial arrangements. The Platform recommends, for example, action to create macroeconomic policies and development strategies that address the needs of women in poverty. It recommends changes in laws and administrative practices to ensure women's equal rights and access to economic resources. It recommends action to ensure equal access to education throughout the life cycle, to eradicate illiteracy among women, to develop nondiscriminatory education and training, and to allocate sufficient resources for educational reform. It recommends action to increase women's access throughout the life cycle to appropriate, affordable, and quality health care, information, and related services. Action should reduce maternal mortality by at least 50% of 1990 levels by the year 2000, and a further 50% by 2015. Legislation must be adopted to end violence against women in peace and wartime. Action must promote women's economic and human rights and women's equal access to and full participation in power structures and government decision-making.

  18. Proceedings of the IEA Bioenergy Task 39 conference : biofuels and bioenergy, a changing climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this conference was to showcase the advancements that have been made in bioenergy development. The presentations addressed several issues, including biorefinery integration; thermochemical technologies; biochemical technologies; feedstock harvest, pretreatment and logistics; biomass production and management; policy, strategies and trade; and greenhouse gas and life cycle assessment. Discussions focused on recent innovations in bioenergy and the feasibility of biofuels in the commercial marketplace with the aim to advance bioenergy development and reduce fossil fuel dependency. A two-day forest management and supply chain field trip was organized in conjunction with the conference. The conference featured 152 presentations, of which 30 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  19. LEDS Global Partnership in Action: Advancing Climate-Resilient Low Emission Development Around the World (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-11-01

    Many countries around the globe are designing and implementing low emission development strategies (LEDS). These LEDS seek to achieve social, economic, and environmental development goals while reducing long-term greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and increasing resiliency to climate change impacts. The LEDS Global Partnership (LEDS GP) harnesses the collective knowledge and resources of more than 120 countries and international donor and technical organizations to strengthen climate-resilient low emission development efforts around the world.

  20. Climate policy. The dirt, the country and the world. Part 1. Solo climate policy is damaging symbol politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, P.

    2008-01-01

    This article assumes that the objective of climate policy is to limit climate change. The alternative goal of security of supply was not considered. Some measures can be defended in view of both objectives. This is for example the case with energy saving. It is evident that the climate problem becomes increasingly urgent. If the Netherlands or Europe choose individual climate policy, some 'leakage effects' are unavoidable. Such symbol politics harm the economy, whereas the climate does not benefit. On a national and European scale all means must be put to use to bring global collaboration closer at the shortest possible term. [mk] [nl

  1. Climate change adaptation under uncertainty in the developing world: A case study of sea level rise in Kiribati

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, S. D.; Webber, S.

    2011-12-01

    Climate change is expected to have the greatest impact in parts of the developing world. At the 2010 meeting of U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change in Cancun, industrialized countries agreed in principle to provide US$100 billion per year by 2020 to assist the developing world respond to climate change. This "Green Climate Fund" is a critical step towards addressing the challenge of climate change. However, the policy and discourse on supporting adaptation in the developing world remains highly idealized. For example, the efficacy of "no regrets" adaptation efforts or "mainstreaming" adaptation into decision-making are rarely evaluated in the real world. In this presentation, I will discuss the gap between adaptation theory and practice using a multi-year case study of the cultural, social and scientific obstacles to adapting to sea level rise in the Pacific atoll nation of Kiribati. Our field research reveals how scientific and institutional uncertainty can limit international efforts to fund adaptation and lead to spiraling costs. Scientific uncertainty about hyper-local impacts of sea level rise, though irreducible, can at times limit decision-making about adaptation measures, contrary to the notion that "good" decision-making practices can incorporate scientific uncertainty. Efforts to improve institutional capacity must be done carefully, or they risk inadvertently slowing the implementation of adaptation measures and increasing the likelihood of "mal"-adaptation.

  2. The Importance of Topography in Modeling the Climates of Potentially Habitable Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohl, L. E.; Chandler, M. A.; Way, M.; Jonas, J.

    2017-12-01

    The surface features of distant potentially habitable worlds are unknown and likely to remain so for the foreseeable future. As a result, 3-D general circulation model (GCM) simulations of the climates of these worlds commonly utilize an aquaplanet configuration (no emergent land). We highlight here the differences in simulated climates that are produced when using realistic, reconstructed, or idealized continental distributions. Paleo-Earth scenarios as analogues of habitable exoplanets with emergent land exist back to 2 Gyr. There is high confidence in continental reconstructions back to 300 Myr, with moderate confidence reconstructions dating to at least 1 Gyr. A range of habitable states exists throughout the last two billion years of Earth history, including periods that are representative of both inner and outer edge environments, i.e., Snowball Earth and the Cretaceous Greenhouse. Using reconstructed land/ocean distributions with the GCM permits us to test hypotheses based on conceptual models (does a supercontinent at tropical latitudes encourage global cooling via albedo feedbacks?) as well as explore far-field climate teleconnections that may explain enhanced habitability (does the closing of an equatorial seaway drive increased heating in polar regions?). Paleo-Venus simulations, using current topography and a slow rotation rate, have shown that large land fraction in the tropics combined with modest amounts of water actually limits the amount of planetary warming to habitable levels, moreso than aquaplanets, given the equivalent solar flux - thus showing the inner edge of the HZ to be more transitional than previously described. For distant exoplanets or paleo-Earth prior to 2 Gyr, idealized continents or modern Earth topography help illustrate the range of possible habitable states for a given case. With idealized continents, varying the land fraction and location produces as much as a 20˚C difference in global MAT for otherwise identical simulations

  3. Climate change, coral bleaching and the future of the world's coral reefs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoegh-Guldberg, O. [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Biological Sciences

    1999-07-01

    Sea temperatures in many tropical regions have increased by almost 1{degree}C over the past 100 years, and are currently increasing at about 1-2{degree}C per century. Mass coral bleaching has occurred in association with episodes of elevated sea temperatures over the past 20 years and involves the loss of the zooxanthellae following chronic photoinhibition. Mass bleaching has resulted in significant losses of live coral in many parts of the world. This paper considers the biochemical, physiological and ecological perspectives of coral bleaching. It also uses the outputs of four runs from three models of global climate change which simulate changes in sea temperature and hence how the frequency and intensity of bleaching events will change over the next 100 years. The results suggest that the thermal tolerances of reef-building corals are likely to be exceeded every year within the next few decades. Events as severe as the 1998 event, the worst on record, are likely to become commonplace within 20 years. Most information suggests that the capacity for acclimation by corals has already been exceeded, and that adaptation will be too slow to avert a decline in the quality of the world's reefs.

  4. 1995 world methanol conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The 20 papers contained in this volume deal with the global markets for methanol, the production of MTBE, integrating methanol production into a coal-to-SNG complex, production of methanol from natural gas, catalysts for methanol production from various synthesis gases, combined cycle power plants using methanol as fuel, and economics of the methanol industry. All papers have been processed for inclusion on the data base

  5. Current Business and Economics Driven Discourse and Education: Perspectives from around the World. BCES Conference Books, Volume 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Nikolay, Ed.; Wolhuter, Charl, Ed.; Kalin, Jana, Ed.; Hilton, Gillian, Ed.; Ogunleye, James, Ed.; Niemczyk, Ewelina, Ed.; Chigisheva, Oksana, Ed.

    2017-01-01

    This volume contains selected papers submitted to the 15th Annual International Conference of the Bulgarian Comparative Education Society (BCES), held in June 2017 in Borovets, Bulgaria, and papers submitted to the 5th International Partner Conference of the International Research Centre (IRC) "Scientific Cooperation," Rostov-on-Don,…

  6. Strategical challenges for the Copenhagen conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    A CARA team analyzed the impacts and challenges generated by the new climatic, energetic and food situation of our security: conflict of interests between the North and South countries, USA-China equation, the european Union, France specificities. This analyse points out the main challenges for the France and the European Union during the world conference on the climate in december 2009 at Copenhagen. (A.L.B.)

  7. Twenty-fifth Semiannual Report of the Commission to the Congress, January 1959. Atomic Industrial Process and Second World Conference, July - December 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCone, John A.

    1959-01-31

    The document represents the twenty-fifth semiannual Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) report to Congress. The report sums up the major activities and developments in the national atomic energy program in Part Three, covering the period July - December 1958. A special Part One of this semiannual report is titled ''Industrial Atomic Progress During 1958", and a Part Two entitled "Second World Conference on Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy".

  8. White Paper Report of the RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries: identifying challenges, opportunities, and strategies for imaging services in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollura, Daniel J; Azene, Ezana M; Starikovsky, Anna; Thelwell, Aduke; Iosifescu, Sarah; Kimble, Cary; Polin, Ann; Garra, Brian S; DeStigter, Kristen K; Short, Brad; Johnson, Benjamin; Welch, Christian; Walker, Ivy; White, David M; Javadi, Mehrbod S; Lungren, Matthew P; Zaheer, Atif; Goldberg, Barry B; Lewin, Jonathan S

    2010-07-01

    The RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries was an assembly of individuals and organizations interested in improving access to medical imaging services in developing countries where the availability of radiology has been inadequate for both patient care and public health programs. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss data, experiences, and models pertaining to radiology in the developing world and to evaluate potential opportunities for future collaboration. Conference participants included radiologists, technologists, faculty members of academic medical institutions, and leadership of nongovernmental organizations involved in international health care and social entrepreneurship. Four main themes from the conference are presented in this white paper as important factors for the implementation and optimization of radiology in the developing world: (1) ensuring the economic sustainability of radiologic services through financial and administrative training support of health care personnel; (2) designing, testing, and deploying clinical strategies adapted for regions with limited resources; (3) structuring and improving the role of American radiology residents interested in global health service projects; and (4) implementing information technology models to support digital imaging in the developing world. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Meeting of the eighth session of the scientific advisory committee of the world climate impact assessment and response strategies programme, Budapest, 1-4 October 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The World Climate Data and Monitoring Programme continued its help in improving climate data management. The World Climate Applications and Services Programme has developed an inventory of climate application related activities in WMO member countries. Other developments have been the encouragement of national climate programme development and projects related to mitigation of drought. The World Climate Research Programme is organized through seven main projects: Climate model development; Research on climate processes; Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiments (GEWEX); Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere (TOGA); World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE); Study of global change; Scientific exploration of satellite data, in particular in the areas of clouds and the hydrological cycle, transport of greenhouse gases and their distribution in the atmosphere, global ocean circulation and transport of heat and chemicals, polar climate and sea ice, surface hydrological processes and their relation to vegetation. The World Climate Impact Studies Programme (WCIP) in 1990/91 was structured to give to: (i) Greenhouse Gases/Climate Change; (ii) Coordination of Climate Impact Activities; (iii) Methods of Climate Impact Assessment; (iv) Monitoring of erosion, flooding, desertification and high urban atmospheric pollution

  10. Roadmap towards justice in urban climate adaptation research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, L.; Chu, E.; Anguelovski, I.; Aylett, A.; Debats, J.; Goh, K.; Schenk, T.; Seto, K.C.; Dodman, D.; Roberts, D.; Roberts, J.T.; VanDeveer, S.D.

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris (COP21) highlighted the importance of cities to climate action, as well as the unjust burdens borne by the world's most disadvantaged peoples in addressing climate impacts. Few studies have documented the barriers to redressing the drivers

  11. Conference Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    National and international aspects of climate change were the central concern of this conference organized by the Alliance for Responsible Environmental Alternatives (AREA). AREA is a coalition of industry, labour and municipalities from across Canada which was created to reflect the views and represent the interests of Canadians in the Climate Change Debate. Ways and means of optimizing Canada's response to the Global Climate Change Challenge were discussed. Discussions emphasized issues regarding the effectiveness of voluntary mechanisms to reduce greenhouse gases, as opposed to government-mandated actions for achieving climate change targets. The issue of how a differentiated system for emission reduction targets and timetables can be implemented was also debated. The economic implications of climate change were outlined. Canada's national agenda and the likely outcomes of the Conference of Parties (COP 4) in Buenos Aires also received much attention. tabs., figs

  12. Can the World's Farmers Feed a World of 10 Billion People In Spite of Climate Change? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterling, W. E.

    2010-12-01

    The rapid rise in agricultural productivity due to technological innovation and science-based methods was one of the great human achievements of the 20th century. We now face the prospect of needing to double agricultural output by the latter third of the current century to match the growth of demand for food and fiber—albeit the pace of growth in demand shows signs of slowing in the future. How farmers and the agricultural industry deal with climate change will, in large measure, determine success or failure. The Earth is committed to about the same amount of warming in the future as has been experienced over the past hundred years regardless of future greenhouse gas emissions trajectories; such will require adaptive responses by plants, animals, producers and consumers if society’s goals for global food security are to be met. In this paper, I summarize the state-of-the science of how climate change may affect our global agricultural production system. I review the latest thinking on the combined effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate changes on crop productivity across the globe. Prospects for adaptation in agriculturally important regions are examined. While it appears that global food production will be adequate to meet global food demand in spite of advancing climate change, it is clear that many parts of the tropics and dry sub-tropics will see yield decreases and possible loss of comparative advantage. In those regions, continued large population growth and deleterious climate changes will contribute to declining per capita agricultural production. Increasing numbers of people at risk of hunger are probable there.

  13. Evaluating climate field reconstruction techniques using improved emulations of real-world conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Emile-Geay, J.; Guillot, D.; Smerdon, J. E.; Rajaratnam, B.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudoproxy experiments (PPEs) have become an important framework for evaluating paleoclimate reconstruction methods. Most existing PPE studies assume constant proxy availability through time and uniform proxy quality across the pseudoproxy network. Real multiproxy networks are, however, marked by pronounced disparities in proxy quality, and a steep decline in proxy availability back in time, either of which may have large effects on reconstruction skill. A suite of PPEs constructed from a millennium-length general circulation model (GCM) simulation is thus designed to mimic these various real-world characteristics. The new pseudoproxy network is used to evaluate four climate field reconstruction (CFR) techniques: truncated total least squares embedded within the regularized EM (expectation-maximization) algorithm (RegEM-TTLS), the Mann et al. (2009) implementation of RegEM-TTLS (M09), canonical correlation analysis (CCA), and Gaussian graphical models embedded within RegEM (GraphEM). Each method's risk properties are also assessed via a 100-member noise ensemble. Contrary to expectation, it is found that reconstruction skill does not vary monotonically with proxy availability, but also is a function of the type and amplitude of climate variability (forced events vs. internal variability). The use of realistic spatiotemporal pseudoproxy characteristics also exposes large inter-method differences. Despite the comparable fidelity in reconstructing the global mean temperature, spatial skill varies considerably between CFR techniques. Both GraphEM and CCA efficiently exploit teleconnections, and produce consistent reconstructions across the ensemble. RegEM-TTLS and M09 appear advantageous for reconstructions on highly noisy data, but are subject to larger stochastic variations across different realizations of pseudoproxy noise. Results collectively highlight the importance of designing realistic pseudoproxy networks and implementing multiple noise realizations of PPEs

  14. Forest health in a changing world: Effects of globalization and climate change on forest insect and pathogen impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. D. Ramsfield; Barbara Bentz; M. Faccoli; H. Jactel; E. G. Brockerhoff

    2016-01-01

    Forests and trees throughout the world are increasingly affected by factors related to global change. Expanding international trade has facilitated invasions of numerous insects and pathogens into new regions. Many of these invasions have caused substantial forest damage, economic impacts and losses of ecosystem goods and services provided by trees. Climate...

  15. Slow Onsets, Abrupt Changes, and Fast Reflexes: Learning from Climate Hazards in a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulwarty, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    Adaptation is higher than ever before on the global agenda. Awareness of risks across the weather-climate continuum has increased pressure for information to support planning under changing rates and emergence of multiple hazards (e.g. drought, heat waves, floods). In recognition of this demand, the global community is developing a Global Framework for Climate Services, implementing the Sendai Framework on disaster risk reduction, and formulating climate-sensitive development and research initiatives aimed at nations and communities. The gap between conceptual feasibility and practical implementation remains immense. One of Gilbert White's many important contributions was in developing a framework for structuring adjustment decisions in the context of longer-term risks. The physical environment at a given stage of technology sets the theoretical range of choice while the practical range of choice is set by culture, capacity and institutions. These factors facilitate or impede efficient and equitable responses, with the latter being key in the underestimation of the complexities of adaptation. This presentation will focus on the scientific research, monitoring and information needed to address challenges in (1) Understanding thresholds in the relationship between physical and social changes, including those in connected systems such as water, food and energy, (2) Designing and diffusion of decision support tools and smart practices, and (3) Understanding the links between capacity-building and implementation, including the need to focus researchers and institutions on improving decision quality (not just meeting "user needs"). The author will engage the audience in a discussion of the drivers of social transitions and transformations, drawing on cases from around the world. Key questions, include "What leads to proactive collaboration and action?"; "How often should we revise our assumptions about the direction and magnitude of changes as events unfold?"; and "What

  16. Predictors of public climate change awareness and risk perception around the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tien Ming; Markowitz, Ezra M.; Howe, Peter D.; Ko, Chia-Ying; Leiserowitz, Anthony A.

    2015-11-01

    Climate change is a threat to human societies and natural ecosystems, yet public opinion research finds that public awareness and concern vary greatly. Here, using an unprecedented survey of 119 countries, we determine the relative influence of socio-demographic characteristics, geography, perceived well-being, and beliefs on public climate change awareness and risk perceptions at national scales. Worldwide, educational attainment is the single strongest predictor of climate change awareness. Understanding the anthropogenic cause of climate change is the strongest predictor of climate change risk perceptions, particularly in Latin America and Europe, whereas perception of local temperature change is the strongest predictor in many African and Asian countries. However, other key factors associated with public awareness and risk perceptions highlight the need to develop tailored climate communication strategies for individual nations. The results suggest that improving basic education, climate literacy, and public understanding of the local dimensions of climate change are vital to public engagement and support for climate action.

  17. Energy policies and climate protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, A.

    1994-01-01

    One year after the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, an assessment is made of what progress is being made towards sustainability. The work of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on climate change has provided the expert background for action to protect the climate. It lists some of the measured and noticed first signs of climate change as identified by the German Bundestag Enquete Commission, and mentions the effects of climatically induced catastrophes on the world's insurance industry and the fact that the Third World is likely to suffer most from climatic change. A Greenpeace report advocates the phasing out of fossil fuels and of nuclear power as a way to combat climatic change. The article reviews developments relevant to protecting the climate worldwide and specifically in the Netherlands, incorporating Greenpeace's views on these

  18. The costs of climate policies in a second best world with labour market imperfections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guivarch, C.; Crassous, R.; Sassi, O.; Hallegatte, St.

    2009-09-01

    This article explores the critical role of labour market imperfections in climate stabilisation costs formation. To do so, we use a dynamic recursive energy-economy model that represents a second best world with market imperfections and short-run adjustments constraints along a long-term growth path. We show that the degree of rigidity of the labour markets is a central parameter and we conduct a systematic sensitivity analysis of the model results to this parameter. When labour markets are represented as highly flexible, the model results are in the usual range of existing literature, i.e. less than 2% GDP losses in 2030 for a stabilisation target at 450 ppm CO 2 equivalent, But when labour markets rigidities are accounted for, mitigation costs increase dramatically. In a second time, the article identifies accompanying measures, namely labour subsidies, which guarantees against the risk of large stabilisation costs in the case of high rigidities of the labour markets. That vision complements the usual view that mitigation is a long-term matter that depends on technology, innovation, investment and behavioural change. Here we add the warning that mitigation is also a shorter-term issue and a matter of transition on the labour market. (authors)

  19. Impacts of climate change on living aquatic resources of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flittner, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    Anthropogenic forced warming of the Earth due to the greenhouse effect could have profound impacts on the world's living aquatic resources. An extensive review is provided of literature concerning such impacts, including physical changes in the ocean and coastal zone, biological changes in coastal wetlands and estuaries, effects of temperature rises and changes in ice cover on marine species, physical and biological impacts on inland waters, and impacts on fisheries. The principal effects would be caused by the increases in temperature and sea-level rise, but changes in precipitation would also be important. Suitable habitats would generally shift poleward and inland. Species would likely shift in abundances and distribution, thus affecting fisheries. It is likely that global warming will produce collapses of some fisheries and expansions of others. The likelihood of collapse may be aggravated by inadequate management due to insufficient authority, unwillingness to act, or lack of knowledge. Options available for reducing the impact of these changes are discussed, along with research needed to help prepare for climate change. 111 refs

  20. White book for the conference of experts on the climate-energy contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This publication discusses the main questions raised by the creation of a climate-energy contribution which aims at better taking into account the costs generated by degradations of the environment. It discusses the stakes and justifications of this contribution within the frame of emission reduction objectives and of the Emission Trading Scheme, and outlines the benefit of economic tools with respect to regulation. It discusses how to implement this contribution, how to define its base, whether existing taxes on fossil energies will have the expected effects and how to hinge these existing taxes on the climate-energy contribution. It discusses what would be the scope of application of the contribution, what should be its level and how it should change in time, how to support it and make it more efficient. It discusses its macro-economical consequences, notably by referring to the Swedish example

  1. Report of the experts' conference and of the round table on the Climate-Energy contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The first part of this report discusses the reasons of the introduction of climate-energy contribution, describes its general principles, and discusses its assessment basis, its rate, and the conditions for its efficiency. The second part analyses and discusses its economic and social impact (macro-economic impact, impact on competitiveness and on spending capacity), and the recycling modalities of the generated revenues. The last part proposes a synthesis and recommendations

  2. Mammalian herbivores confer resilience of Arctic shrub-dominated ecosystems to changing climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarlejärvi, Elina; Hoset, Katrine S; Olofsson, Johan

    2015-09-01

    Climate change is resulting in a rapid expansion of shrubs in the Arctic. This expansion has been shown to be reinforced by positive feedbacks, and it could thus set the ecosystem on a trajectory toward an alternate, more productive regime. Herbivores, on the other hand, are known to counteract the effects of simultaneous climate warming on shrub biomass. However, little is known about the impact of herbivores on resilience of these ecosystems, that is, the capacity of a system to absorb disturbance and still remain in the same regime, retaining the same function, structure, and feedbacks. Here, we investigated how herbivores affect resilience of shrub-dominated systems to warming by studying the change of shrub biomass after a cessation of long-term experimental warming in a forest-tundra ecotone. As predicted, warming increased the biomass of shrubs, and in the absence of herbivores, shrub biomass in tundra continued to increase 4 years after cessation of the artificial warming, indicating that positive effects of warming on plant growth may persist even over a subsequent colder period. Herbivores contributed to the resilience of these systems by returning them back to the original low-biomass regime in both forest and tundra habitats. These results support the prediction that higher shrub biomass triggers positive feedbacks on soil processes and microclimate, which enable maintaining the rapid shrub growth even in colder climates. Furthermore, the results show that in our system, herbivores facilitate the resilience of shrub-dominated ecosystems to climate warming. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Vulnerability of solar energy infrastructure and output to extreme events: Climate change implications (Conference paper)

    OpenAIRE

    Patt, A.; Pfenninger, S.; Lilliestam, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the potential vulnerability of solar energy systems to future extreme event risks as a consequence of climate change. We describe the three main technologies likely to be used to harness sunlight -- thermal heating, photovoltaic (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) -- and identify critical extreme event vulnerabilities for each one. We then compare these vulnerabilities with assessments of future changes in extreme event risk levels. We do not identify any vulnerabili...

  4. Worldwide natural gas vehicles become reality. World conference for natural gas vehicles HGV`98 in Cologne; Erdgasfahrzeuge werden weltweit Realitaet. Weltkonferenz fuer Erdgasfahrzeuge NGV`98 in Koeln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganser, B. [Rhenag Rheinische Energie AG, Koeln (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    The 6th World Conference for natural gas vehicles (NGV `98) which was held from May 26th-28th, 1998 in Cologne under the patronage of the Federal Environment Minister Dr. Angela Merkel, lead more than 1000 participants from all over the world to the Cathedral City. The conference, accompanied by an exhibition at which 65 exhibitors showed the newest trends in the vehicle- and filling station technology, was made use of by more than 2000 visitors to inform themselves about the latest technical developments. With this extremely positive resonance of visitors for the conference and trade exhibition, the NGV `98 so far is worldwide the largest event on alternative vehicle drivers. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die 6. Weltkonferenz fuer Erdgasfahrzeuge (NGV `98), die vom 26. bis 28. Maerz 1998 in Koeln unter der Schirmherrschaft von Bundesumweltministerin Dr. Angela Merkel stattfand, fuehrte mehr als 1000 Teilnehmer aus aller Welt in die Domstadt. Die konferenzbegleitende Ausstellung, auf der 65 Aussteller die neuesten Trends in der Fahrzeug- und Tankstellentechnik zeigten, wurde von den mehr als 2000 Besuchern genutzt, um sich ueber die aktuellen technischen Entwicklungen zu informieren. Mit dieser aeusserst positiven Besucherresonanz von Konferenz und Fachausstellung ist die NGV `98 weltweit die bisher groesste Veranstaltung ueber alternative Fahrzeugantriebe. (orig.)

  5. The tragedy of global warming: From the fifth IPCC report to the 2015 Paris Climate Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auverlot, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Reports by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) always signal a new step in the fight against climate change. The first report, in 1990, led to the adoption of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change during the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro. The second one, released in 1996, prepared the way for the 1997 Kyoto Protocol. The third, in 2000, emphasized 'adaptation', an idea taken up during subsequent negotiations. The fourth report in 2007 made a step toward setting at 2 deg. C the maximum increase in temperature and opened the way to the non-binding Copenhagen Accord and then to Cancun. What consequences will the fifth IPCC report of October 2014 have? Will it help finalize the Paris agreement? Or will it be considered to be one report too many - repeating what has oft been stated over the last twenty years? Before replying, the major points raised in this report are discussed; and questions, asked about some of the conclusions. Lessons are drawn for the worldwide agreement on the table in Paris

  6. Cairo conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, A J

    1994-09-03

    The United Nations Conference on Population and Development in Cairo in September, 1994, will evoke criticism of the inability of governments to act quickly enough to avert demographic and environmental crises. Rapid population growth has clear implications for public health. Globally there now occur anthropogenic changes in atmospheric composition, the degradation of fertile lands and ocean fisheries, an accelerating loss of biodiversity, and the social and ecological problems of massive urbanization. In the future, per capita consumption levels will increase in burgeoning populations of developing countries, thus adding to the environmental impacts of overconsuming rich countries. By the end of the decade there will be over six billion people, of whom one half will live in cities. These demographic and environmental trends, if translated into climatic change, regional food shortages, and weakened ecosystems, would adversely affect human health. The World Health Organization is likely to concentrate only on accessible family planning and promotion of health for women and families. Continuing asymmetric child-saving aid, unaccompanied by substantial aid to help mobilize the social and economic resources needed to reduce fertility, may delay the demographic transition in poor countries and potentiate future public health disasters. As a result of recent reductions in fertility, even in Sub-Saharan Africa, average family sizes have been halved. Yet the demographic momentum will double population by 2050. The biosphere is a complex of ecosystems and, if unsustained, it could not fulfill the productive, cleansing, and protective functions on which life depends. The Cairo conference must therefore recognize that sustaining human health is a prime reason for concern about population growth and models of economic development.

  7. News Event: UK to host Science on Stage Travel: Gaining a more global perspective on physics Event: LIYSF asks students to 'cross scientific boundaries' Competition: Young Physicists' tournament is international affair Conference: Learning in a changing world of new technologies Event: Nordic physical societies meet in Lund Conference: Tenth ESERA conference to publish ebook Meeting: Rugby meeting brings teachers together Note: Remembering John L Lewis OBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Event: UK to host Science on Stage Travel: Gaining a more global perspective on physics Event: LIYSF asks students to 'cross scientific boundaries' Competition: Young Physicists' tournament is international affair Conference: Learning in a changing world of new technologies Event: Nordic physical societies meet in Lund Conference: Tenth ESERA conference to publish ebook Meeting: Rugby meeting brings teachers together Note: Remembering John L Lewis OBE

  8. Methane Feedbacks to the Global Climate System in a Warmer World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Joshua F.; Middelburg, Jack J.; Röckmann, Thomas; Aerts, Rien; Blauw, Luke G.; Egger, Matthias; Jetten, Mike S. M.; de Jong, Anniek E. E.; Meisel, Ove H.; Rasigraf, Olivia; Slomp, Caroline P.; in't Zandt, Michiel H.; Dolman, A. J.

    2018-03-01

    Methane (CH4) is produced in many natural systems that are vulnerable to change under a warming climate, yet current CH4 budgets, as well as future shifts in CH4 emissions, have high uncertainties. Climate change has the potential to increase CH4 emissions from critical systems such as wetlands, marine and freshwater systems, permafrost, and methane hydrates, through shifts in temperature, hydrology, vegetation, landscape disturbance, and sea level rise. Increased CH4 emissions from these systems would in turn induce further climate change, resulting in a positive climate feedback. Here we synthesize biological, geochemical, and physically focused CH4 climate feedback literature, bringing together the key findings of these disciplines. We discuss environment-specific feedback processes, including the microbial, physical, and geochemical interlinkages and the timescales on which they operate, and present the current state of knowledge of CH4 climate feedbacks in the immediate and distant future. The important linkages between microbial activity and climate warming are discussed with the aim to better constrain the sensitivity of the CH4 cycle to future climate predictions. We determine that wetlands will form the majority of the CH4 climate feedback up to 2100. Beyond this timescale, CH4 emissions from marine and freshwater systems and permafrost environments could become more important. Significant CH4 emissions to the atmosphere from the dissociation of methane hydrates are not expected in the near future. Our key findings highlight the importance of quantifying whether CH4 consumption can counterbalance CH4 production under future climate scenarios.

  9. Aggression and violence around the world: A model of CLimate, Aggression, and Self-control in Humans (CLASH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lange, Paul A M; Rinderu, Maria I; Bushman, Brad J

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide there are substantial differences within and between countries in aggression and violence. Although there are various exceptions, a general rule is that aggression and violence increase as one moves closer to the equator, which suggests the important role of climate differences. While this pattern is robust, theoretical explanations for these large differences in aggression and violence within countries and around the world are lacking. Most extant explanations focus on the influence of average temperature as a factor that triggers aggression (The General Aggression Model), or the notion that warm temperature allows for more social interaction situations (Routine Activity Theory) in which aggression is likely to unfold. We propose a new model, CLimate, Aggression, and Self-control in Humans (CLASH), that helps us to understand differences within and between countries in aggression and violence in terms of differences in climate. Lower temperatures, and especially larger degrees of seasonal variation in climate, call for individuals and groups to adopt a slower life history strategy, a greater focus on the future (vs. present), and a stronger focus on self-control. The CLASH model further outlines that slow life strategy, future orientation, and strong self-control are important determinants of inhibiting aggression and violence. We also discuss how CLASH differs from other recently developed models that emphasize climate differences for understanding conflict. We conclude by discussing the theoretical and societal importance of climate in shaping individual and societal differences in aggression and violence.

  10. News Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

  11. Meetings on atomic energy. V.26, no.2. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini Plawen, S.

    1994-04-01

    This quarterly list comprises conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The designation of countries or territories and the arrangement of material in this publication should not be considered as implying any endorsement or other judgement by the Agency regarding the legal status of any country or territory, or of its authorities, or in respect of the delimitation of its boundaries. The list has a world-wide distribution and is intended to be comprehensive within the field of nuclear science

  12. Meetings on atomic energy. V.26, no.4. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini Plawen, S.

    1994-10-01

    This quarterly list comprises conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The designation of countries or territories and the arrangement of material in this publication should not be considered as implying any endorsement or other judgement by the Agency regarding the legal status of any country or territory, or of its authorities, or in respect of the delimitation of its boundaries. The list has a world-wide distribution and is intended to be comprehensive within the field of nuclear science

  13. Meetings on atomic energy. V.26, no.3. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini Plawen, S.

    1994-07-01

    This quarterly list comprises conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The designation of countries or territories and the arrangement of material in this publication should not be considered as implying any endorsement or other judgement by the Agency regarding the legal status of any country or territory, or of its authorities, or in respect of the delimitation of its boundaries. The list has a world-wide distribution and is intended to be comprehensive within the field of nuclear science

  14. Build a Catastrophe: Using Digital World and Policy Models to Engage Political Science Students with Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horodyskyj, L.; Lennon, T.; Mead, C.; Anbar, A. D.

    2017-12-01

    Climate change is a problem that involves science, economics, and politics. Particularly in the United States, political resistance to addressing climate change has been exacerbated by a concerted misinformation campaign against the basic science, a negative response to how the proposed solutions to climate change intersect with values. Scientists often propose more climate science education as a solution to the problem, but preliminary studies indicate that more science education does not necessarily reduce polarization on the topic (Kahan et al. 2012). Is there a way that we can better engage non-science students in topics related to climate change that improve their comprehension of the problem and its implications, overcoming polarization? In an existing political science course, "Do You Want to Build a Nation?", we are testing a new digital world-building model based on resource development and consequent environmental and societal impacts. Students spend half the class building their nations based on their assigned ideology (i.e., socialist, absolute monarchy, libertarian) and the second half of the class negotiating with other nations to resolve global issues while remaining true to their ideologies. The course instructor, co-author Lennon, and ASU's Center for Education Through eXploration have collaborated to design a digital world model based on resources linked to an adaptive decision-making environment that translates student policies into modifications to the digital world. The model tracks students' exploration and justification of their nation's policy choices. In the Fall 2017 offering of the course, we will investigate how this digital world model and scenarios built around it affect student learning outcomes. Specifically, we anticipate improved understanding of the policy trade-offs related to energy development, better understanding of the ways that different ideologies approach solutions to climate change, and that both will result in more

  15. Climatic change. The third Conference of the Parties of the United Nations - Framework Convention. Kyoto, Japan, 1-10 December 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meclot, Bernard; Madet, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    Facing the global problems raised by the climatic change, it is absolutely necessary to bring forth worldwide orientations which must balance the economic growth in the developing countries, the competition between countries and between industrial companies, the right repartition of the efforts of developed countries and the remaining world's countries as well as among the developed countries. This EDF press communique, concerning the 3. Conference of the Parties of the UN Framework - Convention, held in Kyoto on 1-10 Dec 1999, presents the results of EDF struggle against the Greenhouse effect, a comparative statistics of the CO 2 emission and, particularly, the role of electric sector. The following conclusions are drown in this report: 1. No matter what common target will be established for CO 2 emission (2-4.5 tones per inhabitant, for instance), it implies that big countries like US and Canada should decide on plans for significant lowering of the emissions while Europe as well as China have still important steps to do; 2. Although, Europe has mastered rather well the global CO 2 emission there are still very contrasting values from the different countries of the European Union; 3. The emissions produced by transport do increase continuously and will soon become the main contributor to the polluting emissions; 4. The European industrial sector has reduced its emission by about 12% during the last ten years and at present it is only the fourth contributor; 5. The electric sector can bring a major contribution to the pollution abatement by choosing CO 2 non-emitting power generating systems, so as the plots giving the emission evolution in France, Sweden or Austria demonstrate

  16. `Not to escape the world but to join it': responding to climate change with imagination not fantasy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Andrew

    2017-05-01

    The work of climate scientists, demonstrating human-driven climate change, has not provoked the widespread and far-reaching changes to human behaviour necessary to avert potentially catastrophic environmental trajectories. This work has not yet sufficiently been able to engage the individual and collective imagination. Drawing on Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) and Iris Murdoch (1919-1999), we can distinguish two modes under which the human imagination can operate: in Murdoch's terms, these are `imagination' and `fantasy'. To relate imaginatively is to be willing to allow one's internal image of the world to be changed by what one encounters, while an outlook characterized by fantasy relates to the world as one would wish it were, rather than how it actually is. Fantasy, therefore, operates not only among those who deny climate change, but also among those who entertain the promise of a technological solution too optimistically. An imaginative outlook, by contrast, evaluates actions and patterns of behaviour in terms of their relation to a wider whole. This is necessary for providing the degree of agency required to step out of a cycle of ever accelerating production, which is explored in terms of an analogy to a discussion of revenge and forgiveness from Hannah Arendt (1906-1975). Ultimately, the need to engage the imagination is an opportunity as well as a challenge. To live imaginatively is fulfilling, and that is precisely what the challenges of climate change require. This article is part of the themed issue 'Material demand reduction'.

  17. Wildlife in a warming world. The effects of climate change on biodiversity in WWF's Priority Places

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Jeff; Warren, Rachel; McDougall, Amy; VanDerWal, Jeremy; Cornelius, Stephen; Sohl, Heather; Rust, Niki; Elliott, Katherine; Jeffries, Barney; Jeffries, Evan; Wood, Matt

    2018-01-01

    Up to half of plant and animal species in the world's most naturally rich areas, such as the Amazon and the Galapagos, could face local extinction by the turn of the century due to climate change if carbon emissions continue to rise unchecked. Even if the Paris Climate Agreement 2 deg. C target is met, these places could lose 25% of their species according to this landmark study by the University of East Anglia, the James Cook University, and WWF. This report examines the impact of climate change on nearly 80,000 species in 35 of the world's most diverse and naturally wildlife-rich areas. It models a number of different climate scenarios - from a no-emissions-cuts business-as-usual rise in global mean temperatures of 4.5 deg. C to a 2 deg. C global rise to keep to the upper limit of the Paris Agreement. Each area was chosen for its uniqueness and the variety of species, including plants, insects and animals, found there

  18. Conference on territorial planning of wind energy - engine or hindrance of climate policy? A French-German comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengyel, Jacques; Von Nicolai, Helmuth; Thomas, Isabelle; Lueer, Michael; Eric Virvaux

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of the 2009 edition of the European Wind Energy Conference, the French-German office for Renewable energies (OFAEnR) organised a side event on the territorial planning of wind energy. During this French-German exchange of experience, participants exchanged views on: the importance given to climate policy with respect to other territorial planning goals, like nature protection; the involvement of project managers and citizens; the conciliation between 'regional development scheme' and wind energy development areas; and the regional implementation of government objectives. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) made during this event: 1 - Territorial planning of wind energy (Jacques Lengyel); 2 - The German planning systems for the definition of wind energy development areas (Helmuth von Nicolai); 3 - The wind energy regional scheme in Brittany - Accompanying the deployment of 1000 MW by 2010 (Isabelle Thomas); 4 - Definition of wind energy development areas in the framework of the German regional planning - Advantages and drawbacks for the wind energy industry (Michael Lueer); 5 - Implementation of the regional schemes for the development of renewable energies: the Renewable Energies Syndicate (SER)/France Wind Energy (FEE) proposals for the wind energy aspect (Eric Virvaux)

  19. International conference “Intellectuals and the First World War: Central European Perspective” (Kraków, Poland, 20–22 Oct., 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Pudłocki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available “Intellectuals and the First World War: Central European Perspective”, a conference organized on October 20–22, 2016 in Kraków, was a perfect opportunity to discuss the phenomenon of the 1914–1918 conflict and its impact on the lives of intellectuals and the creators of culture. Many important scientific studies or cultural activities were interrupted by the war as a result of the conscription of the intellectuals and their death either on the WW1 fronts or as civilian victims. On the other hand, the war was also an opportunity for many to redirect professional careers in new directions e.g. in the service of military propaganda. The conference was organized by the Institute of History of the Jagiellonian University with the financial support of the Kraków City Council – City of Kraków. The conference brought together nearly 30 speakers from the European Union and the United States of America.

  20. Technology and climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, R.; Layzedl, D.; McLean, G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper was the major one of the opening plenary session at the Climate Change 2 conference. The paper provides a context for assessing the needs for technologies to reduce the concentration of GHG in the atmosphere. It looks at sources, sinks and trends for GHG, in the world at large and in Canada, and at efforts to develop new technologies to achieve the goals of climate change policy. The paper focusses on transport, electricity and biomass as sectors of interest, both because of their potential for contributing to climate change policy goals within Canada, and also because of research interests

  1. Methane feedbacks to the global climate system in a warmer world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dean, Joshua F.; Middelburg, Jack J.; Röckmann, Thomas; Aerts, Rien; Blauw, Luke G.; Egger, Matthias; Jetten, Mike S.M.; de Jong, Anniek E.E.; Meisel, Ove H.; Rasigraf, Olivia; Slomp, Caroline P.; in't Zandt, Michiel H.; Dolman, A. J.

    Methane (CH4) is produced in many natural systems that are vulnerable to change under a warming climate, yet current CH4 budgets, as well as future shifts in CH4 emissions, have high uncertainties. Climate change has the potential to increase CH4 emissions from critical systems such as wetlands,

  2. Managing time in a changing world: Timing of avian annual cycle stages under climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomotani, B.M.

    2017-01-01

    Animals need to time their seasonal activities such as breeding and migration to occur at the right time. They use cues from the environment to predict changes and organise their activities accordingly. What happens, then, when climate change interferes with this ability to make predictions? Climate

  3. Meeting of the 7. session of the scientific advisory committee of the world climate impact studies programme, Mauritius, 9-11 January 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    A brief outline of ongoing projects implemented by UNEP as part of the current phase of the World Climate Impact Studies Programme (WCIP) is given. The projects are classified under several main headings: (i) Greenhouse gas/climate change issue; (ii) Coordination of national climate programmes; (iii) Methodology of climate impact assessment. Following the agreement with Delft Laboratories and the publication of the UNEP supported study of areas vulnerable to sea level rise, a site specific study of sea level rise impacts was being considered for development. However, the project would become the responsibility of the UNEP Oceans and Coastal Areas Programme Activity Centre (OCA/PAC). Overview of sea level rise, the inventory of climate impact studies, newsletter, methodology of climate impact assessment were other topics discussed at the seventh session of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the World Climate Impact Studies Programme, Mauritius, 9-11 January 1990

  4. Producing an integrated climate-land-energy-water (CLEW) model for glaciated regions in the developing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delman, E. M.; Thomas, B. F.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Growing concern over the impact of climate change on global freshwater resources has spurred a demand for practical, basin-specific adaptation tools. The potential for water stress is particularly inflated in the glaciated watersheds of the developing world; widespread and rapid glacial retreat has forced regional resource managers to reconcile the reality of a diminishing supply with an overall increase in demand, while accounting for the underlying geopolitical and cultural context. An integrated approach, such as the development of a Climate-Land-Energy-Water (CLEW) model that examines relationships among climate, land-use, and the energy and water sectors, can be used to assess the impact of different climate change scenarios on basin sustainability and vulnerability. This study will first constrain the hydrologic budget in the Río Santa Watershed of Peru using satellite imagery, historical and contemporary stream discharge data, hydrologic modeling, climatic data analysis, and isotopic and chemical tracers. Ultimately, glacier retreat will be examined at the watershed scale and be used as an input in the CLEW model framework to assess hydrologic budget scenarios and the subsequent impact on regional economic and environmental sustainability.

  5. Energy world governance. Review of the conference which was held at IFRI, 26 March 2009, with Tatsuo Masuda, Andre Mernier et Richard H. Jones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulke, Ch.

    2009-01-01

    The conference was related with some of the major questions concerning global energy governance today, the role of the different international organizations dealing with energy, the rules of the game between market and state players, the efforts to deal with climate change, and the integration of emerging countries in global energy governance, the roles of the different international organizations dealing with energy (will we see further fragmentation or more cooperation between them?). Tatsuo Masuda in his contribution discussed global energy governance from an oil perspective. Andre Mernier noted the particular nature of the Energy Charter, which, as it is founded upon an international treaty, is unlike other organizations in being legally binding. The legal basis of the organization means that agreements are especially powerful. Then Richard H. Jones underlined that last summer's volatility in oil markets, the ensuing financial and economic crisis, the major disruption in gas supplies to European markets this winter and the upcoming climate change negotiations have led to increasing calls for a stronger global dialogue on energy issues. This dialogue should deal with prices and investment, energy security and climate change

  6. Changes in the world rivers' discharge projected from an updated high resolution dataset of current and future climate zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Monia; di Paola, Arianna

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an updated global map of the current climate zoning and of its projections, according to the Köppen-Geiger classification, is first provided. The map at high horizontal resolution (0.5° × 0.5°), representative of the current (i.e. 1961-2005) conditions, is based on the Climate Research Unit dataset holding gridded series of historical observed temperature and precipitation, while projected conditions rely on the simulated series, for the same variables, by the General Circulation Model CMCC-CM. Modeled variables were corrected for their bias and then projections of climate zoning were generated for the medium term (2006-2050) and long term (2056-2100) future periods, under RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 emission scenarios. Results show that Equatorial and Arid climates will spread at the expenses of Snow and Polar climates, with the Warm Temperate experiencing more moderate increase. Maps of climate zones are valuable for a wide range of studies on climate change and its impacts, especially those regarding the water cycle that is strongly regulated by the combined conditions of precipitation and temperature. As example of large scale hydrological applications, in this work we tested and implemented a spatial statistical procedure, the geographically weighted regression among climate zones' surface and mean annual discharge (MAD) at hydrographic basin level, to quantify likely changes in MAD for the main world rivers monitored through the Global Runoff Data Center database. The selected river basins are representative of more than half of both global superficial freshwater resources and world's land area. Globally, a decrease in MAD is projected both in the medium term and long term, while spatial differences highlight how some areas require efforts to avoid consequences of amplified water scarcity, while other areas call for strategies to take the opportunity from the expected increase in water availability. Also the fluctuations of trends between the

  7. Young Voices on Climate Change: The Paul F-Brandwein 2010 NSTA Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Lynne Cherry Brandwein Lecture March 2010 National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) Conference, Philadelphia, PA. Young Voices on Climate Change: Inspired and Empowered Youth Tackle Climate Science and Find Climate Solutions. As a child, Lynne Cherry was profoundly connected to the natural world and a special place. She watched the destruction…

  8. Potential Impacts of Climate Change on World Food Supply: Datasets from a Major Crop Modeling Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Datasets from a Major Crop Modeling Study contain projected country and regional changes in grain crop yields due to global climate change. Equilibrium and transient...

  9. How Can Latin America Help the World to Cope with Climate Change?

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Galiani; Manuel Puente; Federico Weinschelbaum

    2013-01-01

    Latin America has a comparative advantage in deforestation compared to other forms of climate change mitigation. Thus, to the extent that Latin America should engage in mitigation, the optimal climate change policy should manage these advantages by generating incentives in Latin America to deal with forestry. This paper describes the problem of deforestation and studies the market failures that arise in relation to forestry emission problems, analyzing them from a global public good perspecti...

  10. Proceedings of the CanSIA solar conference 2005 : the world of solar. CD-ROM ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This conference focused on recent activities promoting solar energy as a major energy supplier, as well as on actions needed to overcome barriers to greater solar deployment. The potential of solar energy technologies in overcoming energy supply problems was examined, as well as the value of solar energy in achieving greenhouse gas reduction targets and creating jobs and wealth for local economies. Various solar energy programs in Canada were reviewed, as well as greenhouse gas offset systems and domestic hot water programs. Standard Offer Contracts in Ontario were discussed. Various university and industry partnerships in solar energy research were described. Issues concerning interconnection standards and industry updates were reviewed. Financing programs for solar energy projects were presented, including Renewable Energy Deployment Initiative (REDI) program statistics. Performance standards for photovoltaic (PV) modules were reviewed, as well as changes in various building codes relating to the solar energy industry. Issues concerning sustainable energy education, marketing and training were examined. The role of solar energy in Ontario's electricity supply was discussed. An overview of current solar energy projects funded by the Canadian government was provided. Thirty-nine papers were presented at this conference, of which 5 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  11. Challenges in predicting climate and environmental effects on vector-borne disease episystems in a changing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnick, W J

    2010-03-15

    Vector-borne pathogens cause enormous suffering to humans and animals. Many are expanding their range into new areas. Dengue, West Nile and Chikungunya have recently caused substantial human epidemics. Arthropod-borne animal diseases like Bluetongue, Rift Valley fever and African horse sickness pose substantial threats to livestock economies around the world. Climate change can impact the vector-borne disease epidemiology. Changes in climate will influence arthropod vectors, their life cycles and life histories, resulting in changes in both vector and pathogen distribution and changes in the ability of arthropods to transmit pathogens. Climate can affect the way pathogens interact with both the arthropod vector and the human or animal host. Predicting and mitigating the effects of future changes in the environment like climate change on the complex arthropod-pathogen-host epidemiological cycle requires understanding of a variety of complex mechanisms from the molecular to the population level. Although there has been substantial progress on many fronts the challenges to effectively understand and mitigate the impact of potential changes in the environment on vector-borne pathogens are formidable and at an early stage of development. The challenges will be explored using several arthropod-borne pathogen systems as illustration, and potential avenues to meet the challenges will be presented.

  12. Differential and enhanced response to climate forcing in diarrheal disease due to rotavirus across a megacity of the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Pamela P; King, Aaron A; Yunus, Mohammad; Faruque, A S G; Pascual, Mercedes

    2016-04-12

    The role of climate forcing in the population dynamics of infectious diseases has typically been revealed via retrospective analyses of incidence records aggregated across space and, in particular, over whole cities. Here, we focus on the transmission dynamics of rotavirus, the main diarrheal disease in infants and young children, within the megacity of Dhaka, Bangladesh. We identify two zones, the densely urbanized core and the more rural periphery, that respond differentially to flooding. Moreover, disease seasonality differs substantially between these regions, spanning variation comparable to the variation from tropical to temperate regions. By combining process-based models with an extensive disease surveillance record, we show that the response to climate forcing is mainly seasonal in the core, where a more endemic transmission resulting from an asymptomatic reservoir facilitates the response to the monsoons. The force of infection in this monsoon peak can be an order of magnitude larger than the force of infection in the more epidemic periphery, which exhibits little or no postmonsoon outbreak in a pattern typical of nearby rural areas. A typically smaller peak during the monsoon season nevertheless shows sensitivity to interannual variability in flooding. High human density in the core is one explanation for enhanced transmission during troughs and an associated seasonal monsoon response in this diarrheal disease, which unlike cholera, has not been widely viewed as climate-sensitive. Spatial demographic, socioeconomic, and environmental heterogeneity can create reservoirs of infection and enhance the sensitivity of disease systems to climate forcing, especially in the populated cities of the developing world.

  13. “Il Dolore, il Lutto, la Gloria. Rappresentazioni Fotografiche della Grande Guerra fra Pubblico e Privato, 1914-1940” a Conference on the First World War and its Representations

    OpenAIRE

    Gianluigi Di Giangirolamo

    2016-01-01

    On the occasion of the First World War Centenary, the Department for Cultural Heritage of the University of Bologna in Ravenna together with the SISF Italian Society for the Study on photography, promoted the conference Il dolore, il lutto, la gloria. Rappresentazioni fotografiche della grande guerra fra pubblico e privato, 1914-1940 between 26-28 May, 2016. The conference was organised in collaboration with the University of Padova, the Fundation of Historical Studies Filippo Turati of Flore...

  14. Adaptation of lodgepole pine and interior spruce to climate: implications for reforestation in a warming world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepe, Katharina J; Hamann, Andreas; Smets, Pia; Fitzpatrick, Connor R; Aitken, Sally N

    2016-02-01

    We investigated adaptation to climate in populations of two widespread tree species across a range of contrasting environments in western Canada. In a series of common garden experiments, bud phenology, cold hardiness, and seedling growth traits were assessed for 254 populations in the interior spruce complex (Picea glauca, P. engelmannii, and their hybrids) and for 281 populations of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta). Complex multitrait adaptations to different ecological regions such as boreal, montane, coastal, and arid environments accounted for 15-20% of the total variance. This population differentiation could be directly linked to climate variables through multivariate regression tree analysis. Our results suggest that adaptation to climate does not always correspond linearly to temperature gradients. For example, opposite trait values (e.g., early versus late budbreak) may be found in response to apparently similar cold environments (e.g., boreal and montane). Climate change adaptation strategies may therefore not always be possible through a simple shift of seed sources along environmental gradients. For the two species in this study, we identified a relatively small number of uniquely adapted populations (11 for interior spruce and nine for lodgepole pine) that may be used to manage adaptive variation under current and expected future climates.

  15. Combating climate change: How nuclear science and technology are making a difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yukiya

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is the biggest environmental challenge of our time. As governments around the world prepare to negotiate a legally binding, universal agreement on climate at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris at the end of the year, it is important that the contributions that nuclear science and technology can make to combating climate change are recognized. Nuclear science, including nuclear power, can play a significant role in both climate change mitigation and adaptation.

  16. Long-term pattern and magnitude of soil carbon feedback to the climate system in a warming world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, J M; Frey, S D; DeAngelis, K M; Werner, W J; Bernard, M J; Bowles, F P; Pold, G; Knorr, M A; Grandy, A S

    2017-10-06

    In a 26-year soil warming experiment in a mid-latitude hardwood forest, we documented changes in soil carbon cycling to investigate the potential consequences for the climate system. We found that soil warming results in a four-phase pattern of soil organic matter decay and carbon dioxide fluxes to the atmosphere, with phases of substantial soil carbon loss alternating with phases of no detectable loss. Several factors combine to affect the timing, magnitude, and thermal acclimation of soil carbon loss. These include depletion of microbially accessible carbon pools, reductions in microbial biomass, a shift in microbial carbon use efficiency, and changes in microbial community composition. Our results support projections of a long-term, self-reinforcing carbon feedback from mid-latitude forests to the climate system as the world warms. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  17. Selected international efforts to address climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, M.; Christ, R. [Atmosphere Unit, United Nations Environment Programme UNEP, Nairobi (Kenya)

    1995-12-31

    Over the past two decades, concern about human-induced climate change has become an increasingly important item on the environmental and political agenda. The signing of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the adoption of Agenda 21 at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 provided international organizations and the nations of the world with a new focus for climate-related activities. Although there remains considerable scientific uncertainty about the extent, magnitude, and rate of climate change and the impacts of such change, actions to address climate change have been initiated both internationally and nationally. Major international activities include the World Climate Programme, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. and the United Nations Environment Program me. 16 refs.

  18. The global non-proliferation and disarmament regime. Challenges and prospects for the future. Interview with Mr. Ambassador Jayantha Dhanapala, President of the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs, November 26, 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautecouverture, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    President of the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs since November 2007, Mr. Jayantha Dhanapala has had a long career as a Sri Lankan diplomat and leader in the field of international security. Among his numerous appointments, Mr. Dhanapala headed the Geneva-based UNIDIR. He chaired the widely acclaimed 1995 NPT Review and Extension Conference. He was Under-Secretary-General for Disarmament Affairs in the United Nations from 1998 to 2003. In this interview, Mr. Dhanapala gives us his thoughts about the nuclear non-proliferation regime, a few months before the 8. NPT Review Conference. (author)

  19. Climate Change Impact on the Southeastern Europe Security Environment and the Increasing Role of the Bulgarian Army as the World Warms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ON THE SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE SECURITY ENVIRONMENT AND THE INCREASING ROLE OF THE BULGARIAN ARMY AS THE WORLD WARMS...DD-MM-YYYY) 10-06-2016 2. REPORT TYPE Master’s Thesis 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) AUG 2015 – JUN 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Climate Change ...14. ABSTRACT Climate change impacts on the security environment are real and have the potential to create unprecedented levels of risk through

  20. Impact of Real-world Factors Influencing Investment Decisions on the Costs and Distribution of Climate Change Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, J.; Iyer, G.; McJeon, H. C.; Leon, C.; Hultman, N.

    2015-12-01

    Strategies to mitigate dangerous anthropogenic climate change require a dramatic transformation of the energy system to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, that in turn requires large-scale investments. Investment decisions depend not only on investment capital availability but also on investment risks. A number of factors such as national policy environments, quality of public and private institutions, sector, firm and technology specific characteristics can affect investors' assessments of risks, leading to a wide variation in the business climate for investment. Such heterogeneity in investment risks can have important implications, as investors usually respond to risks by requiring higher returns for riskier projects; delaying or forgoing the investments; or preferring to invest in existing, familiar projects. We study the impact of variation in investment risks on regional patterns of emissions mitigation, the cost of emissions mitigation and patterns of technology deployment. We modify an integrated assessment model, widely used in global climate policy analyses (the Global Change Assessment Model) and incorporate decisions on investments based on risks along two dimensions. Along the first dimension, we vary perceived risks associated with particular technologies. To do so, we assign a higher cost of capital for investment in low-carbon technologies as these involve intrinsically higher levels of regulatory and market risk. The second dimension uses a proxy to vary investment risks across regions, based on an institutional quality metric published by the World Economic Forum. Explicit representation of investment risks has two major effects. First, it raises the cost of emissions mitigation relative to a world with uniform investment risks. Second, it shifts the pattern of emissions mitigation, with industrialized countries mitigating more, and developing countries mitigating less. Our results suggest that institutional reforms aimed at lowering investment

  1. 'Not to escape the world but to join it': responding to climate change with imagination not fantasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Andrew

    2017-06-13

    The work of climate scientists, demonstrating human-driven climate change, has not provoked the widespread and far-reaching changes to human behaviour necessary to avert potentially catastrophic environmental trajectories. This work has not yet sufficiently been able to engage the individual and collective imagination. Drawing on Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) and Iris Murdoch (1919-1999), we can distinguish two modes under which the human imagination can operate: in Murdoch's terms, these are 'imagination' and 'fantasy'. To relate imaginatively is to be willing to allow one's internal image of the world to be changed by what one encounters, while an outlook characterized by fantasy relates to the world as one would wish it were, rather than how it actually is. Fantasy, therefore, operates not only among those who deny climate change, but also among those who entertain the promise of a technological solution too optimistically. An imaginative outlook, by contrast, evaluates actions and patterns of behaviour in terms of their relation to a wider whole. This is necessary for providing the degree of agency required to step out of a cycle of ever accelerating production, which is explored in terms of an analogy to a discussion of revenge and forgiveness from Hannah Arendt (1906-1975). Ultimately, the need to engage the imagination is an opportunity as well as a challenge. To live imaginatively is fulfilling, and that is precisely what the challenges of climate change require.This article is part of the themed issue 'Material demand reduction'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Human activities and climate variability drive fast-paced change across the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloern, James E.; Abreu, Paulo C.; Carstensen, Jacob; Chauvaud, Laurent; Elmgren, Ragnar; Grall, Jacques; Greening, Holly; Johansson, John O.R.; Kahru, Mati; Sherwood, Edward T.; Xu, Jie; Yin, Kedong

    2016-01-01

    Time series of environmental measurements are essential for detecting, measuring and understanding changes in the Earth system and its biological communities. Observational series have accumulated over the past 2–5 decades from measurements across the world's estuaries, bays, lagoons, inland seas and shelf waters influenced by runoff. We synthesize information contained in these time series to develop a global view of changes occurring in marine systems influenced by connectivity to land. Our review is organized around four themes: (i) human activities as drivers of change; (ii) variability of the climate system as a driver of change; (iii) successes, disappointments and challenges of managing change at the sea-land interface; and (iv) discoveries made from observations over time. Multidecadal time series reveal that many of the world's estuarine–coastal ecosystems are in a continuing state of change, and the pace of change is faster than we could have imagined a decade ago. Some have been transformed into novel ecosystems with habitats, biogeochemistry and biological communities outside the natural range of variability. Change takes many forms including linear and nonlinear trends, abrupt state changes and oscillations. The challenge of managing change is daunting in the coastal zone where diverse human pressures are concentrated and intersect with different responses to climate variability over land and over ocean basins. The pace of change in estuarine–coastal ecosystems will likely accelerate as the human population and economies continue to grow and as global climate change accelerates. Wise stewardship of the resources upon which we depend is critically dependent upon a continuing flow of information from observations to measure, understand and anticipate future changes along the world's coastlines.

  3. Integrated climate modelling at the Kiel Institute for World Economics: The DART Model and its applications

    OpenAIRE

    Deke, Oliver; Peterson, Sonja

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview over the DART model and its applications. The main focus is on the implementation of climate impacts into DART in the course of coupling DART to the ocean-atmosphere model and on the associated empirical problems. The basic DART model and some applications are presented in the next section. Section 3 describes in detail how the economic impacts of climate change on the agricultural sector and the impact of sea level rise are implemented in DART. Se...

  4. The understanding of world climate change; Les connaissances sur le changement climatique mondial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, M.

    2008-07-01

    After having recalled that the problem of global warming in relationship with human activities has been studied since the end of the nineteenth century and since then by different scientific programs, the author describes how the IPCC's or Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's report is produced. He briefly comments how Earth's temperature is determined and the various natural parameters which influence the climate on Earth. He recalls how the IPCC showed the actual influence of human activities, and which changes have actually been observed

  5. Hydrogen `96: From vision to reality. 11. world hydrogen enery conference in Stuttagrt; Hydrogen `96: Von der Vision zur Realitaet. 11. Welt-Wasserstoffenergie-Konferenz in Stuttgart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1996-08-01

    More than 700 attendants from 45 countries, 140 technical lectures, 6 plenary lectures, 220 poster presentations, 18 exhibitors from sectors such as high-performance electrolysis for hydrogen generation, fuel cells, hydrogen-powered motor cars and hydrogen filling stations - such is, in a few numbers, the statistics of the Hydrogen `96 Conference. The 11th world conference on energy from hydrogen took place in Stuttgart from 23 to 28 June 1996. The event was opened by Dr. Angela Merkel, the federal German minister for environmental affairs, nature conservancy and reactor safety. The organization of the conference was taken care of by DECHEMA (Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Chemisches Apparatewesen, Chemische Technik und Biotechnologie), Frankfurt, who were assisted by experienced partners. To mention only a few: Deutsche Forschungsgesellschaft fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, the VDI Energietechnik Society, the Center for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research, and the European Federation of Chemical Engineering. (orig.) [Deutsch] Mehr als 700 Teilnehmer aus 45 Laendern, 140 Fachvortraege, 6 Plenarvortraege, 220 Posterpraesentationen, dazu 18 Aussteller aus Bereichen, wie Hochleistungselektrolysen zur Wasserstofferzeugung, Brennstoffzellen, wasserstoffgetriebene Autos und Tankstellen fuer Wasserstoff, das ist, in wenigen Zahlen aufgelistet, die Tagungsstatistik der Hydrogen `96. Die 11. Welt-Wasserstoffenergie-Konferenz fand vom 23. bis 28. Juni 1996 in Stuttgart statt. Eroeffnet wurde die Veranstaltung von der Bundesministerin fuer Umwelt, Naturschutz und Reaktorsicherheit, Dr. Angela Merkel. Die organisatorische Kompetenz lag bei der DECHEMA, der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Chemisches Apparatewesen, Chemische Technik und Biotechnologie in Frankfurt, die bei der Vorbereitung der Konferenz auf bewaehrte Partner zurueckgreifen konnte. Genannt seien nur die Deutsche Forschungsgesellschaft fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, die VDI-Gesellschaft Energietechnik, das Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie

  6. Climate change, future Arctic Sea ice, and the competitiveness of European Arctic offshore oil and gas production on world markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, Sebastian; Riemann-Campe, Kathrin; Hoog, Sven; Growitsch, Christian; Schwind, Hannah; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Rehdanz, Katrin

    2017-12-01

    A significant share of the world's undiscovered oil and natural gas resources are assumed to lie under the seabed of the Arctic Ocean. Up until now, the exploitation of the resources especially under the European Arctic has largely been prevented by the challenges posed by sea ice coverage, harsh weather conditions, darkness, remoteness of the fields, and lack of infrastructure. Gradual warming has, however, improved the accessibility of the Arctic Ocean. We show for the most resource-abundant European Arctic Seas whether and how a climate induced reduction in sea ice might impact future accessibility of offshore natural gas and crude oil resources. Based on this analysis we show for a number of illustrative but representative locations which technology options exist based on a cost-minimization assessment. We find that under current hydrocarbon prices, oil and gas from the European offshore Arctic is not competitive on world markets.

  7. Intersectionality in an Era of Globalization: The Implications of the U.N. World Conference against Racism for Transnational Feminist Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maylei Blackwell

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This report examines ‘intersectionality’ as a feminist approach that significantly impacted the discourses and conversations that took place at the World Conference Against Racism and its parallel NGO Forum, in Durban, South Africa in 2001. The term ‘intersectionality’ refers to the links between gender discrimination, homophobia, racism and class exploitation. As women of color feminist scholars positioned within the geographic territories of the U.S., the authors specifically highlight key issues and social movement trends that were ignored by the U.S. media. Alternatively, this report focuses on how the conference framework of ‘related intolerance’ allowed for broader conversations on how racism is exacerbated by globalization as well as on multiple oppressions in relation to sexual orientation and sexual rights. The authors emphasize how an insistence on discussing the significance of race and gender as well as class, in the context of neo-liberal capitalism, puts important new coordinates on the maps of transnational feminist organizing and anti-globalization movement.

  8. Characteristics of the safety climate in teams with world-class safety ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    interact to deliver a project successfully in terms of cost .... small-scale accidents occurring at high frequency and from diverse ... the team dynamics of role players in a construction project and .... modified safety pyramid to measure the impact of the safety climate ...... Methodological Centre for Vocational Education and.

  9. Biodiversity Areas under Threat: Overlap of Climate Change and Population Pressures on the World's Biodiversity Priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aukema, Juliann E; Pricope, Narcisa G; Husak, Gregory J; Lopez-Carr, David

    2017-01-01

    Humans and the ecosystem services they depend on are threatened by climate change. Places with high or growing human population as well as increasing climate variability, have a reduced ability to provide ecosystem services just as the need for these services is most critical. A spiral of vulnerability and ecosystem degradation often ensues in such places. We apply different global conservation schemes as proxies to examine the spatial relation between wet season precipitation, population change over three decades, and natural resource conservation. We pose two research questions: 1) Where are biodiversity and ecosystem services vulnerable to the combined effects of climate change and population growth? 2) Where are human populations vulnerable to degraded ecosystem services? Results suggest that globally only about 20% of the area between 50 degrees latitude North and South has experienced significant change-largely wetting-in wet season precipitation. Approximately 40% of rangelands and 30% of rainfed agriculture lands have experienced significant precipitation changes, with important implications for food security. Over recent decades a number of critical conservation areas experienced high population growth concurrent with significant wetting or drying (e.g. the Horn of Africa, Himalaya, Western Ghats, and Sri Lanka), posing challenges not only for human adaptation but also to the protection and sustenance of biodiversity and ecosystem services. Identifying areas of climate and population risk and their overlap with conservation priorities can help to target activities and resources that promote biodiversity and ecosystem services while improving human well-being.

  10. Keeping up with a warming world; assessing the rate of adaptation to climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    The pivotal question in the debate on the ecological effects of climate change is whether species will be able to adapt fast enough to keep up with their changing environment. If we establish the maximal rate of adaptation, this will set an upper limit to the rate at which temperatures can increase

  11. Preparing for a warmer world: Towards a global governance system to protect climate refugees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biermann, F.; Boas, I.J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Climate change threatens to cause the largest refugee crisis in human history. Millions of people, largely in Africa and Asia, might be forced to leave their homes to seek refuge in other places or countries over the course of the century. Yet the current institutions, organizations, and funding

  12. Biodiversity Areas under Threat: Overlap of Climate Change and Population Pressures on the World's Biodiversity Priorities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliann E Aukema

    Full Text Available Humans and the ecosystem services they depend on are threatened by climate change. Places with high or growing human population as well as increasing climate variability, have a reduced ability to provide ecosystem services just as the need for these services is most critical. A spiral of vulnerability and ecosystem degradation often ensues in such places. We apply different global conservation schemes as proxies to examine the spatial relation between wet season precipitation, population change over three decades, and natural resource conservation. We pose two research questions: 1 Where are biodiversity and ecosystem services vulnerable to the combined effects of climate change and population growth? 2 Where are human populations vulnerable to degraded ecosystem services? Results suggest that globally only about 20% of the area between 50 degrees latitude North and South has experienced significant change-largely wetting-in wet season precipitation. Approximately 40% of rangelands and 30% of rainfed agriculture lands have experienced significant precipitation changes, with important implications for food security. Over recent decades a number of critical conservation areas experienced high population growth concurrent with significant wetting or drying (e.g. the Horn of Africa, Himalaya, Western Ghats, and Sri Lanka, posing challenges not only for human adaptation but also to the protection and sustenance of biodiversity and ecosystem services. Identifying areas of climate and population risk and their overlap with conservation priorities can help to target activities and resources that promote biodiversity and ecosystem services while improving human well-being.

  13. Forestal measures against climate change. Review and status after the Fourth Conference of the Parties of the Climate Convention; Skogtiltak mot klimaendringer. Oversikt og status etter fjerde partskonferanse til Klimakonvensjonen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naess, Lars Otto

    1999-08-01

    The Kyoto Protocol of December 1997 opens up the possibility that forestal measures can be used to meet parts of the commitments of the industrialized countries to achieve a net reduction of emission of climate gases. The present report summarizes the issues involved in forestal measures that will mitigate global climate changes. The emphasis is on forestal measures in the climate negotiations and technical carbon binding potential. There is also a brief review of economic, environmental and social aspects. The next decades will be crucial to the many of the world`s forests. The forests contain a large part of the biological diversity. Above all this is true of tropical forests. But untouched areas in tempered and boreal areas are also experiencing various types of threats, including the effects of a possible global heating. It is a main conclusion that, in spite of many complex challenges, climate measures in the forests may play a constructive role both in counteracting global climate changes and in improving the management of the world`s forest resources. 89 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Talks and status of the national conference of the national program of fight against climate change; Discours et bilans de la conference nationale du programme national de lutte contre le changement climatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    In order to fulfill its commitments in the Kyoto protocol for the abatement of greenhouse gases emissions, France has started important environmental actions: the creation of the national program of fight against climate change (validated in January 2000), the integration of the problem of climate change in government actions (collective services and state-region contracts), creation of a national laboratory of global warming effects, creation of a research council on climate change and durable development, presentation of an annual status of the actions carried out in the framework of the national program. This last point was the aim of the conference held in Paris in June 2001. Debates were organized around four main sectors: industry, energy, buildings and transportation systems. The topics approached during the round-tables raised several essential questions for the fight against climate change: which practice changes are needed in the industry and energy production activities? Which actions need to be carried out in new and existing buildings to save energy? Which consistent transportation policies need to be implemented in urban areas? Is a rail-road traffic re-balancing possible? Which importance can have the territory organizations? What are the public expectations in front of the climate change risk? This document brings together the talks of Mrs D. Voynet, Minister of national development and environment, the talk of Mr R.G. Schwartzenberg, Minister of research, the talk of Mr C. Pierret, State Secretary of Industry, and a sectoral status (transports, industry, energy, buildings and mastery of electricity demand) of the first year of the program presented by Mr M. Mousel, head of the inter-ministry mission on greenhouse effect. The document ends with a presentation of the British and European climate change programs. (J.S.)

  15. Proceedings of the 13th KAIF/KXNS annual conference. Nuclear energy for tomorrow's world - vision and strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Nowadays nuclear power in Korea is not only economically advantageous but also least foreign-dependent in addition to possessing the inherent merit of long-term fuel storage aspects. Effort should also be continued to make nuclear energy more benign and safe. This effort is the national project to develop the Korean Next Generation Reactor which will continue into the early 21st century. Our firm belief in nuclear power's role in the future is deeply rooted in such a conviction that ''light to beam the future will come from nuclear power''. This conference will offer a positive and enjoyable forum to share ideas and experiences that will benefit the effective promotion of nuclear technology. This proceedings is composed of two sessions ( opening session and technical session). Technical session is split into seven sessions that have session 1: nuclear energy and the environment, session 2: technical and regulatory issues of advanced reactor development, session 3: RI application and radiation protection, session 4: new technology in nuclear energy, session 5: seismic and design technology for nuclear power plants, session 6: nuclear fuel cycle and radwaste management technology and session 7: enhancement of operation performance in nuclear power plants. (Cho, G. S.)

  16. Tiny and Hidden but Changing Your World: The Importance of Soil Microbes to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, N.; Neumann, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    When most people think about global climate change they think about massive power plants billowing smoke and expansive glaciers melting to nothingness. What the public often overlooks is how natural processes invisible to the naked eye can be changed by the climate, and the fact that the natural response to those changes can further alter the climate. Scientists call these reactions "feedback cycles", and understanding them is crucial to predicting the true impact of human activities. In our research, we study one particular feedback cycle: the effect of increased plant productivity on methane emissions from wetlands. Globally, wetlands account for about a third of annual emissions of methane, the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide. This heat-trapping gas is generated in the soil of wetlands by microscopic organisms that consume, among other things, proteins and sugars released by the roots of plants. As the atmosphere becomes warmer and richer in carbon dioxide, these plants will grow larger and faster, releasing more of this microbe food into the soil. Our current research seeks to understand how that will affect the microbial ecosystem, and through it the emissions of methane gas.

  17. Climate policy. The dirt, the country and the world. Part 2. Investing in a start

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wit, R.; Honig, E.

    2008-01-01

    The climate policy is a global problem that can only be solved on a global level. The effect of a unilateral emission reduction target on global temperature rise will be limited if international climate negotiations should fail. Nevertheless, there are numerous reasons for the Netherlands and Europe to be in the forefront. The unilateral emission reduction target of 20%, as established by the EU, can have an exemplary function and offer opportunities for other countries to join a large coalition. Such an opportunity offers international trade and industry clarity as to the continuance of the European trading system. The certainty that a price for CO2 will continue to exist in the long term stimulates technology development. Moreover, climate policy contributes to improving local air quality and security of energy supply. The required height of a unilateral target is a political choice, which should incorporate national costs and benefits and the urgency of the problem. This article discusses five arguments for an ambitious unilateral national and European policy. [mk] [nl

  18. Rapid breeding and varietal replacement are critical to adaptation of cropping systems in the developing world to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlin, Gary N; Cairns, Jill E; Das, Biswanath

    2017-03-01

    Plant breeding is a key mechanism for adaptation of cropping systems to climate change. Much discussion of breeding for climate change focuses on genes with large effects on heat and drought tolerance, but phenology and stress tolerance are highly polygenic. Adaptation will therefore mainly result from continually adjusting allele frequencies at many loci through rapid-cycle breeding that delivers a steady stream of incrementally improved cultivars. This will require access to elite germplasm from other regions, shortened breeding cycles, and multi-location testing systems that adequately sample the target population of environments. The objective of breeding and seed systems serving smallholder farmers should be to ensure that they use varieties developed in the last 10 years. Rapid varietal turnover must be supported by active dissemination of new varieties, and active withdrawal of obsolete ones. Commercial seed systems in temperate regions achieve this through competitive seed markets, but in the developing world, most crops are not served by competitive commercial seed systems, and many varieties date from the end of the Green Revolution (the late 1970s, when the second generation of modern rice and wheat varieties had been widely adopted). These obsolete varieties were developed in a climate different than today's, placing farmers at risk. To reduce this risk, a strengthened breeding system is needed, with freer international exchange of elite varieties, short breeding cycles, high selection intensity, wide-scale phenotyping, and accurate selection supported by genomic technology. Governments need to incentivize varietal release and dissemination systems to continuously replace obsolete varieties.

  19. Gas, a decisive pillar of the sustainable future of the world: Contribution of the gas industry to fight against climate change and for sustainable development. LPG: a beneficial solution for the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gourrierec, Meline

    2015-01-01

    Gas has a crucial role to play in developing energy that is less carbon-intensive and more respectful of the environment. Recognised as being the cleanest fossil energy, its use in different sectors of activity leads to a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, gas contributes to the development of renewable energies and becomes itself renewable through biomethane production. The development of this green gas based on a circular economy has opened up new prospects for the use of gas in all parts of the world. The 21. Conference of the Parties of the Framework Convention of the United Nations, that will be held in Paris from 30 November to 11 December 2015 (COP21) is a decisive step in the negotiation of the future international agreement on the climate that will enter in force in 2020. The target is ambitious: restricting the global warming below the critical threshold of 2 deg. C by 2100. Aware of the climate challenge and the essential role of all the economic actors, the gas industry has embarked on a series of measures contributing to keeping to this global target and facilitating sustainable development through access to energy that is less carbon-intensive and more respectful of the environment. Changing from a solid fuel to a liquid or gaseous fuel provides modern domestic energy with beneficial effects on the environment and on the quality of life. The World LPG Association has the ambition that a billion people making this transition

  20. Climate Change Mitigation in a Sustainable World - Findings of the IPCC 4th Assessment Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, R. E. H.

    2007-01-01

    The 4th Assessment Report on climate change of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2007) has recently been completed. The fi rst report in the IPCC 4th Assessment series by Working Group I outlined the latest knowledge on Climate Science. The second by Working Group 2 covered the possibilities for Adaptation of ecosystems, glaciers preceding, sea level rising, droughts etc in various regions. This paper is based on the findings of Working Group III as presented in the recently published report Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change. The 27 paragraph Summary for Policy Makers was approved sentence by sentence over 4 days in May 2007 by 120 government delegations in Bangkok, Thailand. The three short Summaries for Policy Makers (SPM), Synthesis report, and the three full reports can be found at www.ipcc.ch. In addition the short Synthesis Report across all three working groups is soon to be released. The report on Mitigation attempted to compile the latest scientific knowledge relating to low-carbon emitting technologies; assessed their costs and potentials for greenhouse gas (GHG) emission avoidance; evaluated their long term prospects out to 2100 for stabilising atmospheric GHGs; provided a detailed list of policy options; and discussed the opportunities for sustainable development and equity linked with GHG abatement. Over the 3 year writing and review process, the author of this paper was the co-ordinating lead author of the writing team for the Working Group III chapter on Energy Supply. Of the 13 chapters, this one received the greatest attention with over 5000 review comments that were each responded to, and with the sections on nuclear and renewable energy receiving a major share of them. Since the 3rd Assessment Report (TAR) was published in 2001, the over-arching message now being delivered by Working Group III is a stronger but positive one: Action is required. The situation is urgent - but not beyond repair. Many energy

  1. Phylogeny and palaeoecology of Polyommatus blue butterflies show Beringia was a climate-regulated gateway to the New World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Roger; Bell, Charles D; Macniven, Richard; Goldman-Huertas, Benjamin; Ree, Richard H; Marshall, Charles R; Bálint, Zsolt; Johnson, Kurt; Benyamini, Dubi; Pierce, Naomi E

    2011-09-22

    Transcontinental dispersals by organisms usually represent improbable events that constitute a major challenge for biogeographers. By integrating molecular phylogeny, historical biogeography and palaeoecology, we test a bold hypothesis proposed by Vladimir Nabokov regarding the origin of Neotropical Polyommatus blue butterflies, and show that Beringia has served as a biological corridor for the dispersal of these insects from Asia into the New World. We present a novel method to estimate ancestral temperature tolerances using distribution range limits of extant organisms, and find that climatic conditions in Beringia acted as a decisive filter in determining which taxa crossed into the New World during five separate invasions over the past 11 Myr. Our results reveal a marked effect of the Miocene-Pleistocene global cooling, and demonstrate that palaeoclimatic conditions left a strong signal on the ecology of present-day taxa in the New World. The phylogenetic conservatism in thermal tolerances that we have identified may permit the reconstruction of the palaeoecology of ancestral organisms, especially mobile taxa that can easily escape from hostile environments rather than adapt to them. This journal is © 2011 The Royal Society

  2. Climate Projection Data base for Roads - CliPDaR: Design a guideline for a transnational database of downscaled climate projection data for road impact models - within the Conference's of European Directors of Roads (CEDR) TRANSNATIONAL ROAD RESEARCH PROG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulla, Christoph; Namyslo, Joachim; Fuchs, Tobias; Türk, Konrad

    2013-04-01

    national road administrations regarding possible future climate change impacts. First project results are presented at the conference.

  3. Climate Change and Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkovic, I.-A.; Feretic, D.; Debrecin, N.

    2000-01-01

    The 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is one of a series of recent agreements through which countries around the world are banding together to meet the challenge of altering the global climate. In 1997, in respond to the growing public pressure and questions on climate change governments adopted the Kyoto Protocol. The 5th Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP5 UNFCCC) was a rather technical and complex conference which focused in particular on the development of a detailed framework for the application of ''flexible mechanisms'' as laid down in the Kyoto Protocol. Young Generation Network as a part of the International Nuclear Forum at COP5 took part in the debate saying that nuclear is the part of the solution. (author)

  4. Meeting report on the Bellagio Conference 'prevention of vascular diseases in the emerging world: An approach to global health equity'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, J H; Robinson, S W; Alderman, M; Couser, W G; Grundy, S M; Smith, S C; Remuzzi, G; Unwin, N

    2006-10-01

    Representatives from five international organizations (International Society of Nephrology, World Heart Federation, International Diabetes Federation, International Atherosclerosis Federation, and International Society of Hypertension) participated in a strategic planning workshop in December 2005 in Bellagio, Italy sponsored by the Rockefeller Foundation. There were equal representatives from developed and developing countries. Global perspectives on diabetes and cardiovascular and renal diseases were presented, with special emphasis on China, India, Latin America, and Africa. The rationale and effectiveness of preventive measures were discussed. It was apparent that measures for primary prevention and early intervention for all the chronic vascular diseases are similar. The five organizations agreed that an integrated global approach to chronic vascular diseases is needed. They resolved to collaborate and work towards an integrated approach to chronic vascular diseases with the establishment of a 5-year plan for the prevention and treatment of chronic vascular diseases, including public advocacy, advising international and national agencies, and improving education and the practice of established approaches.

  5. 8th World Congress on Engineering Asset Management & the 3rd International Conference on Utility Management & Safety

    CERN Document Server

    Mathew, Joseph; Wong, King; Lam, Rocky; Ko, CN; WCEAM 2013; ICUMAS; Engineering asset management : systems, professional practices and certification

    2015-01-01

    This proceedings represents state-of-the-art trends and developments in the emerging field of engineering asset management as presented at the Eight World Congress on Engineering Asset Management (WCEAM). The Proceedings of the WCEAM 2013 is an excellent reference for practitioners, researchers and students in the multidisciplinary field of asset management, covering topics such as: Asset condition monitoring and intelligent maintenance, 2.  Asset data warehousing, data mining and fusion, 3. Asset performance and level-of-service models, 4. Design and life-cycle integrity of physical assets, 5. Deterioration and preservation models for assets, 6. Education and training in asset management, 7. Engineering standards in asset management, 8. Fault diagnosis and prognostics, 9. Financial analysis methods for physical assets, 10. Human dimensions in integrated asset management, 11. Information quality management, 12. Information systems and knowledge management, 13. Intelligent sensors and devices, 14. Maintenance...

  6. Mitigating Harmful Cyanobacterial Blooms in a Human- and Climatically-Impacted World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans W. Paerl

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bloom-forming harmful cyanobacteria (CyanoHABs are harmful from environmental, ecological and human health perspectives by outcompeting beneficial phytoplankton, creating low oxygen conditions (hypoxia, anoxia, and by producing cyanotoxins. Cyanobacterial genera exhibit optimal growth rates and bloom potentials at relatively high water temperatures; hence, global warming plays a key role in their expansion and persistence. CyanoHABs are regulated by synergistic effects of nutrient (nitrogen:N and phosphorus:P supplies, light, temperature, vertical stratification, water residence times, and biotic interactions. In most instances, nutrient control strategies should focus on reducing both N and P inputs. Strategies based on physical, chemical (nutrient and biological manipulations can be effective in reducing CyanoHABs; however, these strategies are largely confined to relatively small systems, and some are prone to ecological and environmental drawbacks, including enhancing release of cyanotoxins, disruption of planktonic and benthic communities and fisheries habitat. All strategies should consider and be adaptive to climatic variability and change in order to be effective for long-term control of CyanoHABs. Rising temperatures and greater hydrologic variability will increase growth rates and alter critical nutrient thresholds for CyanoHAB development; thus, nutrient reductions for bloom control may need to be more aggressively pursued in response to climatic changes globally.

  7. International conference, future of coal in the economy of the world and Poland; Miedzynarodowa konferencja. Przyszlosc wegla w gospodarce swiata i Polski Miedzynarodowa konferencja. Przyszlosc wegla w gospodarce swiata i Polski

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The conference was held in three sessions entitled: coal as an important element of sustained development of the world energy development; problems of hard and brown coal mining development; and hard and brown coal reserves, their utilization and environmental protection. A total of seventeen papers were presented and are contained in the proceedings. Each has been abstracted separately for the Coal Abstracts database.

  8. International Conference on Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    OMICS International, (conference series) the World Class Open Access Publisher and Scientific Event Organizer is hosting “International Conference on physics” which is going to be the biggest conference dedicated to Physics. The theme “Highlighting innovations and challenges in the field of Physics” and it features a three day conference addressing the major breakthroughs, challenges and the solutions adopted. The conference will be held during June 27-29, 2016 at New Orleans, USA. Will be published in: http://physics.conferenceseries.com/

  9. A changing world: Using nuclear techniques to investigate the impact of climate change on polar and mountainous regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, Sasha

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear techniques are being used in polar and mountainous regions to study climate change and its impact on the quality of land, water and ecosystems in order to better conserve and manage these resources. Researchers from around the world will be using data from 13 benchmark sites to draw conclusions about the effects of the rapidly changing climate on the Arctic, mountains and the western part of Antarctica, which have alarmed communities, environmentalists, scientists and policy makers. Between July 2015 and July 2016 they will be using isotopic and nuclear techniques, as well as geochemical and biological analytical methods from other scientific disciplines. This will enable them to track soil and water, to monitor the movement of soil and sediment and to assess the effects of melting permafrost on the atmosphere, as well as on the land, water and fragile ecosystems of mountainous and polar regions. The measurements follow numerous on-site tests carried out since November 2014 to perfect the sampling technique.

  10. Emergency Preparedness Safety Climate and Other Factors Associated With Mental Health Outcomes Among World Trade Center Disaster Evacuees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Martin F; Gershon, Robyn R; Riley, Halley E M; Zhi, Qi; Magda, Lori A; Peyrot, Mark

    2017-06-01

    We examined psychological outcomes in a sample of participants who evacuated from the World Trade Center towers on September 11, 2011. This study aimed to identify risk factors for psychological injury that might be amenable to change, thereby reducing adverse impacts associated with emergency high-rise evacuation. We used data from a cross-sectional survey conducted 2 years after the attacks to classify 789 evacuees into 3 self-reported psychological outcome categories: long-term psychological disorder diagnosed by a physician, short-term psychological disorder and/or memory problems, and no known psychological disorder. After nonmodifiable risk factors were controlled for, diagnosed psychological disorder was more likely for evacuees who reported lower "emergency preparedness safety climate" scores, more evacuation challenges (during exit from the towers), and evacuation-related physical injuries. Other variables associated with increased risk of psychological disorder outcome included gender (female), lower levels of education, preexisting physical disability, preexisting psychological disorder, greater distance to final exit, and more information sources during egress. Improving the "emergency preparedness safety climate" of high-rise business occupancies and reducing the number of egress challenges are potential strategies for reducing the risk of adverse psychological outcomes of high-rise evacuations. Focused safety training for individuals with physical disabilities is also warranted. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:326-336).

  11. Range-wide latitudinal and elevational temperature gradients for the world's terrestrial birds: implications under global climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A La Sorte

    Full Text Available Species' geographical distributions are tracking latitudinal and elevational surface temperature gradients under global climate change. To evaluate the opportunities to track these gradients across space, we provide a first baseline assessment of the steepness of these gradients for the world's terrestrial birds. Within the breeding ranges of 9,014 bird species, we characterized the spatial gradients in temperature along latitude and elevation for all and a subset of bird species, respectively. We summarized these temperature gradients globally for threatened and non-threatened species and determined how their steepness varied based on species' geography (range size, shape, and orientation and projected changes in temperature under climate change. Elevational temperature gradients were steepest for species in Africa, western North and South America, and central Asia and shallowest in Australasia, insular IndoMalaya, and the Neotropical lowlands. Latitudinal temperature gradients were steepest for extratropical species, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. Threatened species had shallower elevational gradients whereas latitudinal gradients differed little between threatened and non-threatened species. The strength of elevational gradients was positively correlated with projected changes in temperature. For latitudinal gradients, this relationship only held for extratropical species. The strength of latitudinal gradients was better predicted by species' geography, but primarily for extratropical species. Our findings suggest threatened species are associated with shallower elevational temperature gradients, whereas steep latitudinal gradients are most prevalent outside the tropics where fewer bird species occur year-round. Future modeling and mitigation efforts would benefit from the development of finer grain distributional data to ascertain how these gradients are structured within species' ranges, how and why these gradients vary among

  12. Challenges of the banking regulation systems in the climate of the world economic crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedlarević Lazar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At the end of the 20th century, banking systems of the developed countries have undergone multiple changes, where the basic dimensions of those changes were integration, deregulation and globalisation of activities. The resultant of these factors' actions was the creation of highly risky banking environment, which acted as a catalyst of the world economic crisis effects. These effects brought to the forefront weaknesses of the banking sector and of the banking regulation system, while emphasizing the need for their redefining. Hence this work examines in detail concrete models of the banking regulation systems in the European Union area and in the United States of America. In addition, directions of redefining regulation system were highlighted, and also the relevant differences between banking business regulation in the European Union and in the United States of America.

  13. The Academic ‘Patras’ of the Arab World: Creating a Climate of Academic Apartheid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramzi N. Nasser

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses factors that are contributing to the rise of what we refer to as an ethos of “academic apartheid” in Arab institutions of higher education. The paper examines the failure of these institutions to overcome their alienation from indigenous epistemology, to emancipate the education they provide from its colonial past, and to move towards the modern information age. The difficult position of Arab academics striving to rediscover, reintegrate and reorganize an epistemological framework to serve the indigenous world is also discussed. Current institutional approaches have deleterious effects on the performance of Arab academics, including arresting the process of transition to development. The paper concludes that Arab academics have a range of choices in determining how to establish a course of corrective action.

  14. Disruption of the European climate seasonal clock in a warming world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattiaux, J.; Cassou, C.

    2015-12-01

    Strength and inland penetration of the oceanic westerly flow over Europe control a large part of the temperature variability over most of the continent. Reduced westerlies, linked to high-pressure anomalies over Scandinavia, induce cold conditions in winter and warm conditions in summer. Here we propose to define the onset of these two seasons as the calendar day where the daily circulation/temperature relationship over Western Europe switches sign. According to this meteorologically-based metrics assessed from several observational datasets, we provide robust evidence for an earlier summer onset by ~10 days between the 1960s and 2000s. Results from model ensemble simulations dedicated to detection-attribution show that this calendar advance is incompatible with the sole internal climate variability and can be attributed to anthropogenic forcings. Late winter snow disappearance over Eastern Europe affects cold air intrusion to the West when easterlies blow, and is mainly responsible for the observed present-day and near-future summer advance. Our findings agree with phenological-based trends (earlier spring events) reported for many living species over Europe, for which they provide a novel dynamical interpretation beyond the traditionally evoked global warming effect. Based on business-as-usual scenario, a seasonal shift of ~25 days is expected by 2100 for summer onset, while no clear signal arises for winter onset.

  15. Abstract Collection of 24th Forum: Energy Day in Croatia: EU Energy Policy after 21st Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This year's Forum coincides with 21st Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Changes (COP21) in Paris. For energy sector, political agreement about climate change in Paris opens the discussion about realization of the climate policy of CO2 emission reduction, with reference on conceiving an energy policy that will be based on complete implementation of climate protection policy. While content and commitments will be discussed in Paris, EU, which supports climate protection policy, will be discussing about elements of climate and energy policy implementation. In Paris the main question will be: is it possible to achieve an agreement on climate change, that would be legally binding, fair and feasible? The majority answer would probably be: difficult, but absolutely necessary. What is the problem in achieving a legally binding agreement on climate policy? Legally binding climate change agreement has its consequence - every country would be legally bound to change its climate policy, include climate protection in energy costs, modify or change technology in the entire manufacturing chain, transport/transfer, distribution and energy supply, increase in energy efficiency, production of energy from renewable energy sources and other measures that contribute to reduction of CO2 emissions. In the start-up phase, it will directly affect the citizens and entrepreneurship with the increase in expenses and then the competitiveness of economy and living standard of citizens. Where it only for the expenses of energy in question, in which every country would be in the same position, there probably would not be any problem in achieving of the agreement. The larger problem lies in thresholds of emission reductions for every country, which produces the differences between countries - from which level to start and to which level to get to in certain amount of time. The starting point is not the same, responsibility for the current emission levels is

  16. ENC'98 world nuclear congress and exhibition, RECOD 98 the fifth international conference on recycling, conditioning and disposal. Transactions. Volume 1. Opening session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    ENC'98, this four yearly conference - held alongside the world's largest nuclear exhibition - is one of a small number of major international meetings to attract delegates from right across the nuclear energy spectrum. As such, the event provides an invaluable opportunity to take stock of the industry's position in the energy market, measure its technological progress, devise strategies that will help secure its long-term future, and assess its standing with the general public - a factor which we all know will have a bearing on its very survival. Looking back over the four years that have gone by since the last ENC, it is easy to conclude from figures on power station construction, electricity output and market share, that nuclear has, at best, stood still. But, as we all know, statistics can mislead or fail to convey the full picture. In many countries the privatisation of power utilities and liberalization of the energy market is throwing down the commercial gauntlet. The industry, I am happy to say, is responding with vigour. Up-rating programmes, improvement in fuel performance and equipment upgrades are among the many measures successfully being taken to reduce costs and improve competitiveness while maintaining the highest standards of safety. Add to this the advances being made in new reactor technology, improvements in cross border collaboration, joint venture arrangements and progress on the harmonization of regulatory standards, and we have a sound basis for believing a more outward looking industry, far from marking time, is in a state of healthy transition. (author)

  17. “Il Dolore, il Lutto, la Gloria. Rappresentazioni Fotografiche della Grande Guerra fra Pubblico e Privato, 1914-1940” a Conference on the First World War and its Representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Di Giangirolamo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available On the occasion of the First World War Centenary, the Department for Cultural Heritage of the University of Bologna in Ravenna together with the SISF Italian Society for the Study on photography, promoted the conference Il dolore, il lutto, la gloria. Rappresentazioni fotografiche della grande guerra fra pubblico e privato, 1914-1940 between 26-28 May, 2016. The conference was organised in collaboration with the University of Padova, the Fundation of Historical Studies Filippo Turati of Florence and the Institute of the History of Italian Risorgimento of Rome.

  18. Sport events and climate for visitors—the case of FIFA World Cup in Qatar 2022

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzarakis, Andreas; Fröhlich, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    The effect of weather on sport events is not well studied. It requires special attention if the event is taking place at a time and place with extreme weather situations. For the world soccer championship in Qatar (Doha 2022), human biometeorological analysis has been performed in order to identify the time of the year that is most suitable in terms of thermal comfort for visitors attending the event. The analysis is based on thermal indices like Physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET). The results show that this kind of event may be not appropriate for visitors, if it is placed during months with extreme conditions. For Doha, this is the period from May to September, when conditions during a large majority of hours of the day cause strong heat stress for the visitors. A more appropriate time would be the months November to February, when thermally comfortable conditions are much more frequent. The methods applied here can quantify the thermal conditions and show limitations and possibilities for specific events and locations.

  19. Index-based Crop Insurance for Climate Adaptation in the Developing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M. E.; Osgood, D. E.; Carriquiry, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Weather has always presented a challenge to small-scale farmers, particularly in regions where poverty and lack of infrastructure has restricted the development of financial instruments to limit risk. New 'index' insurance innovations in agriculture are beginning to enable even the poorest farmers to unlock major productivity gains (e.g. insuring loans for improved seeds). Although index insurance has the potential to greatly improve productivity in developing country agriculture, the principal technical challenge to up-scaling this product is "data poverty," the absence of weather data in low-income areas needed to design robust and affordable insurance products. Earth science, particularly remote sensing, has the potential to ameliorate data poverty. However, raw use of earth science model output leads to non-optimal indexes and many obstacles remain to transform earth science products into insurance solutions. Estimation uncertainty, limited availability of consistent time series, and difficulties of predicting loses based on remote observations are reviewed in this article. The importance of multidisciplinary approaches addressing the needs of stakeholders in simple to understand indexes is highlighted. The successful use of Earth science data to support the index insurance industry in currently poor and isolated communities in the developing world would transform the ability of small farmers to increase yields, household incomes and regional economies, if the growing gap between earth science and index insurance can be closed.

  20. The global economic long-term potential of modern biomass in a climate-constrained world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, David; Humpenöder, Florian; Bauer, Nico; Dietrich, Jan Philipp; Popp, Alexander; Bodirsky, Benjamin Leon; Bonsch, Markus; Lotze-Campen, Hermann

    2014-07-01

    Low-stabilization scenarios consistent with the 2 °C target project large-scale deployment of purpose-grown lignocellulosic biomass. In case a GHG price regime integrates emissions from energy conversion and from land-use/land-use change, the strong demand for bioenergy and the pricing of terrestrial emissions are likely to coincide. We explore the global potential of purpose-grown lignocellulosic biomass and ask the question how the supply prices of biomass depend on prices for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the land-use sector. Using the spatially explicit global land-use optimization model MAgPIE, we construct bioenergy supply curves for ten world regions and a global aggregate in two scenarios, with and without a GHG tax. We find that the implementation of GHG taxes is crucial for the slope of the supply function and the GHG emissions from the land-use sector. Global supply prices start at 5 GJ-1 and increase almost linearly, doubling at 150 EJ (in 2055 and 2095). The GHG tax increases bioenergy prices by 5 GJ-1 in 2055 and by 10 GJ-1 in 2095, since it effectively stops deforestation and thus excludes large amounts of high-productivity land. Prices additionally increase due to costs for N2O emissions from fertilizer use. The GHG tax decreases global land-use change emissions by one-third. However, the carbon emissions due to bioenergy production increase by more than 50% from conversion of land that is not under emission control. Average yields required to produce 240 EJ in 2095 are roughly 600 GJ ha-1 yr-1 with and without tax.

  1. The global economic long-term potential of modern biomass in a climate-constrained world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, David; Humpenöder, Florian; Bauer, Nico; Dietrich, Jan Philipp; Popp, Alexander; Leon Bodirsky, Benjamin; Bonsch, Markus; Lotze-Campen, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Low-stabilization scenarios consistent with the 2 °C target project large-scale deployment of purpose-grown lignocellulosic biomass. In case a GHG price regime integrates emissions from energy conversion and from land-use/land-use change, the strong demand for bioenergy and the pricing of terrestrial emissions are likely to coincide. We explore the global potential of purpose-grown lignocellulosic biomass and ask the question how the supply prices of biomass depend on prices for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the land-use sector. Using the spatially explicit global land-use optimization model MAgPIE, we construct bioenergy supply curves for ten world regions and a global aggregate in two scenarios, with and without a GHG tax. We find that the implementation of GHG taxes is crucial for the slope of the supply function and the GHG emissions from the land-use sector. Global supply prices start at $5 GJ −1 and increase almost linearly, doubling at 150 EJ (in 2055 and 2095). The GHG tax increases bioenergy prices by $5 GJ −1 in 2055 and by $10 GJ −1 in 2095, since it effectively stops deforestation and thus excludes large amounts of high-productivity land. Prices additionally increase due to costs for N 2 O emissions from fertilizer use. The GHG tax decreases global land-use change emissions by one-third. However, the carbon emissions due to bioenergy production increase by more than 50% from conversion of land that is not under emission control. Average yields required to produce 240 EJ in 2095 are roughly 600 GJ ha −1 yr −1 with and without tax. (letter)

  2. Sweden's Leadership in a Climate Constrained World. An analysis for Sweden of the Greenhouse Development Rights framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kartha, Sivan; Baer, Paul; Athanasiou, Tom; Kemp-Benedict, Eric

    2008-10-15

    This report presents an analysis of the Greenhouse Development Rights framework applied to the case of Sweden. Its objective is to provide useful quantitative guidance on Sweden's role as a leader in our climate constrained world. It presents guidance that is rigorous from the standpoint of climate science and framed in the context of a right to development for the world's poor. This analysis fully accounts for Sweden's true responsibility, by looking beyond territorial emissions alone, and reckoning emissions in terms of Sweden's net 'carbon footprint.' Accounting for carbon embedded in imports, exports and international transport reveals that Sweden's responsibility is 17% larger than would be inferred by considering Sweden's territorial emissions alone. Sweden will naturally have significant obligations under any burden-sharing regime that is based on capacity and responsibility, and only more so under a regime that honors a right to development. Under the GDR framework, our indicative quantification suggests that Sweden's share of responsibility and capacity, and hence its obligation under a politically viable climate regime, will be approximately 0.51% of the global total in 2010. This can be compared to the US's 33%, the EU's 26%, Japan's 7.8%, China's 5.5%, and India's 0.5%. Sweden's 0.51% share of the global total is thus not large in absolute terms, though it is rather large relative to Sweden's small size (0.14% of the global population). These national shares shift over time, as countries' relative proportion of income and emissions change. In light of the emergence of rapidly growing developing country economies, Sweden's share of the global total obligation is projected to decline to 0.43% by 2020, and to 0.35% by 2030. This quantification of Sweden's obligation is useful in two complementary ways. First, if the total global costs of an emergency climate

  3. The EU-Brazil Strategic Partnership and UN Climate Change Conferences: Media Diplomacy from Durban to Lima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Azpíroz

    2016-12-01

    A Parceria Estratégica União Europeia-Brasil destaca a colaboração na luta contra as mudanças climáticas. O objetivo deste trabalho é analisar se houve coordenação ou, pelo menos, uma convergência de posições entre a União Europeia e o Brasil nas últimas quatro Conferências das Nações Unidas para Mudança do Clima (2011-2014. Para tanto, se faz uma revisão das fontes acadêmicas e oficiais e uma análise empírica das mensagens de diplomacia midiática de ambos os atores nas quatro conferências que são objeto de estudo.

  4. Acting efficiently on climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appert, Olivier; Moncomble, Jean-Eudes

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is a major issue. A survey of the utility companies that account for 80% of the world's electric power was released during the 20. climate conference in Lima as part of the World Energy Council' Global Electricity Initiative. It has concluded that all these utilities see climate change as being real and declare that policies for adapting to it are as important as policies for limiting it. Nonetheless, 97% of these utilities think that consumers will refuse to pay more for decarbonized electricity. This is the core problem in the fight against climate change: all agree that the issue is urgent, some agree about what should be done, but none wants to pay

  5. SIGEF Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Terceño-Gómez, Antonio; Ferrer-Comalat, Joan; Merigó-Lindahl, José; Linares-Mustarós, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of selected papers presented at the SIGEF conference, held at the Faculty of Economics and Business of the University of Girona (Spain), 06-08 July, 2015. This edition of the conference has been presented with the slogan “Scientific methods for the treatment of uncertainty in social sciences”. There are different ways for dealing with uncertainty in management. The book focuses on soft computing theories and their role in assessing uncertainty in a complex world. It gives a comprehensive overview of quantitative management topics and discusses some of the most recent developments in all the areas of business and management in soft computing including Decision Making, Expert Systems and Forgotten Effects Theory, Forecasting Models, Fuzzy Logic and Fuzzy Sets, Modelling and Simulation Techniques, Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms and Optimization and Control. The book might be of great interest for anyone working in the area of management and business economics and might be es...

  6. Program of the Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The International Conference SES 2006 (Secure Energy Supply, Bezpecna dodavka energie) was realised in Bratislava, during September 26 - 29, 2006 in the hotel Crowne Plaza and deals with most important problems of world and Slovak energetics. Objective of this Conference was discussion of experience and information concerning strategic aspects of energy supply safety and the development of the Slovak and European Energy Industry

  7. The Climate Services Partnership (CSP): Working Together to Improve Climate Services Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebiak, S.; Brasseur, G.; Members of the CSP Coordinating Group

    2012-04-01

    Throughout the world, climate services are required to address urgent needs for climate-informed decision-making, policy and planning. These needs were explored in detail at the first International Conference on Climate Services (ICCS), held in New York in October 2011. After lengthy discussions of needs and capabilities, the conference culminated in the creation of the Climate Services Partnership (CSP). The CSP is an informal interdisciplinary network of climate information users, providers, donors and researchers interested in improving the provision and development of climate services worldwide. Members of the Climate Services Partnership work together to share knowledge, accelerate learning, develop new capacities, and establish good practices. These collaborative efforts will inform and support the evolution and implementation of the Global Framework for Climate Services. The Climate Services Partnership focuses its efforts on three levels. These include: 1. encouraging and sustaining connections between climate information providers, users, donors, and researchers 2. gathering, synthesizing and disseminating current knowledge on climate services by way of an online knowledge management platform 3. generating new knowledge on critical topics in climate service development and provision, through the creation of focused working groups on specific topics To date, the Climate Services Partnership has made progress on all three fronts. Connections have been fostered through outreach at major international conferences and professional societies. The CSP also maintains a website and a monthly newsletter, which serves as a resource for those interested in climate services. The second International Conference on Climate Services (ICCS2) will be held in Berlin in September. The CSP has also created a knowledge capture system that gathers and disseminates a wide range of information related to the development and provision of climate services. This includes an online

  8. Climate Change and Development Framings: A Comparative Analysis of the Human Development Report 2007/8 an the World Development Report 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des); A.V. Portocarrero (Ana Victoria); A. Lera St. Clair

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe Human Development Report 2007/8 (HDR) and the World Development Report 2010 (WDR) are both devoted to the connections between climate change and development. The reports provide very different perspectives on where the key challenges reside. Their policy proposals are also different,

  9. Climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellous, J.L.

    2005-02-01

    This book starts with a series of about 20 preconceived ideas about climate and climatic change and analyses each of them in the light of the present day knowledge. Using this approach, it makes a status of the reality of the climatic change, of its causes and of the measures to be implemented to limit its impacts and reduce its most harmful consequences. (J.S.)

  10. Effects of climate change on agriculture particularly in semi-arid tropics of the world with some examples of Ethiopian condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demessie, Almaz

    2004-01-01

    Today climate change is a burning issue all over the world because of its global nature. Fears have arisen that, climate may be changing for the worse and its impact may be felt on agricultural production, which will reduce the supply of food to growing population, especially in developing countries. Climate change would affect various human activities. Agriculture is one of the activities, which can be seriously affected by climate change. Due to high inter-annual variability and uneven distribution of rainfall during the rainy season, recurrent droughts have been observed in semi-arid tropics of the world over the last three decades. As White (1996) pointed out rain fed agriculture in the semi-arid tropics is limited mostly by high climatic variability with principal limiting factor being rainfall. The main crops of traditional rain fed agriculture are sorghum, millet, maize, cowpea, pulses and sesame. There is a suggestion that increased CO 2 will benefit temperate and humid tropical agriculture more than that in the semi-arid tropics. During the process of photosynthesis plant species with the C 3 photosynthetic pathway tend to respond positively to increased CO 2 while the C 4 have a poor response. Since C 4 plants are mostly tropical crops, the situation will be worst over the areas (Parry, 1990). Climate change will alter the nature of occurrence of agricultural pests in terms of area. Warmer temperatures shorten the generation time; increase the development rate of epidemic. For example, assessment of the effect of global warming on the distribution of livestock disease suggests that pests at present limited to tropical countries may spread into other parts of the world, which have different climatic condition (ibid).(Author)

  11. Pleistocene climatic oscillations rather than recent human disturbance influence genetic diversity in one of the world's highest treeline species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yanling; Lachmuth, Susanne; Gallegos, Silvia C; Kessler, Michael; Ramsay, Paul M; Renison, Daniel; Suarez, Ricardo; Hensen, Isabell

    2015-10-01

    Biological responses to climatic change usually leave imprints on the genetic diversity and structure of plants. Information on the current genetic diversity and structure of dominant tree species has facilitated our general understanding of phylogeographical patterns. Using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLPs), we compared genetic diversity and structure of 384 adults of P. tarapacana with those of 384 seedlings across 32 forest sites spanning a latitudinal gradient of 600 km occurring between 4100 m and 5000 m a.s.l. in Polylepis tarapacana (Rosaceae), one of the world's highest treeline species endemic to the central Andes. Moderate to high levels of genetic diversity and low genetic differentiation were detected in both adults and seedlings, with levels of genetic diversity and differentiation being almost identical. Four slightly genetically divergent clusters were identified that accorded to differing geographical regions. Genetic diversity decreased from south to north and with increasing precipitation for adults and seedlings, but there was no relationship to elevation. Our study shows that, unlike the case for other Andean treeline species, recent human activities have not affected the genetic structure of P. tarapacana, possibly because its inhospitable habitat is unsuitable for agriculture. The current genetic pattern of P. tarapacana points to a historically more widespread distribution at lower altitudes, which allowed considerable gene flow possibly during the glacial periods of the Pleistocene epoch, and also suggests that the northern Argentinean Andes may have served as a refugium for historical populations. © 2015 Botanical Society of America.

  12. The Effects of Climate Change on Invasion Potential of Wild Barley (Hordeum spontaneum K.Koch in Iran and the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Karim Mousavi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Invasive species present a major threat to biodiversity, which may be boosted due to the climate change effects, particularly if desired weather conditions allow weed to spread to new areas. Identification of areas climatically suitable to weed establishment can offer great opportunities for stopping or decelerating invasion process. Bioclimatic and species distribution models that relate geographic data of a species to environmental variables have become an important modeling tool in invasion ecology. Although the predicted area by climex as suitable environmental for a species does not mean that, it can necessarily establish there, it does suggest a beneficial knowledge about detecting areas with invasion potential. Taking advantage of climate match index to predict the potential invasion of wild barley grass weed in Iran and other world regions under current climate and different climate change scenarios are the objectives of current research .Identifying suitable environmental areas for invasive species provides an opportunity to prevent or slow down the invasion process Materials and methods Based on the presence intensity index of weeds, the climate of infestation hotspots in the Lorestan province, including Khorramabad (Aymanabad and Rimmelleh region, Dorud, Kuhdasht and Aleshtar, were defined as the favorable climate for wild barley. Wild barley-infected foci climate in Lorestan province was considered as a desirable climate for this weed. Climatic similarity of different regions of the world with the intended zone was evaluated as a criterion of invasion susceptibility of those regions in the current conditions and under climate change scenarios by using Climex model. Results and Discussion Results showed that Kermanshah, Tehran, Hamedan, Kurdistan, Markazi, Qazvin and Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari with composite match Index greater than 0.81 in compare to infected area in Lorestan, were the most prone province of Iran for wild

  13. Countries in transition and the developing countries in the negotiation on the climatic change. Stakes of the Kyoto conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, O.; Cavard, D.; Faudry, D.; Girod, J.; Menanteau, P.; Viguier, L.

    1997-10-01

    This document presents the positions of the countries in transition and the developing countries in the phase of the negotiations on the climatic change between 1994 and 1997, then takes stock on the pilot phase of the actions of the associated implementation. The negotiations stakes and the frame of the discussions are also presented. (A.L.B.)

  14. Proceedings of the Third Environmental Physics Conference (EPC-2008)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsan, M.N.H.

    2009-01-01

    The publication has been set up as proceedings of the environmental physics conference. the conference consistes of atmospere and climate; the ecosystem; radiation and radioactivity; activity review; environmental issues. This conference consistes of 335p., figs., tabs., refs.

  15. Proceedings of the Second Environmental Physics Conference (EPC-2006)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsan, M.N.H.

    2007-01-01

    The publication has been set up as proceedings of the environmental physics conference. the conference consistes of atmospere and climate; the ecosystem; radiation and radioactivity; activity review; environmental issues. This conference consistes of 247p., figs., tabs., refs

  16. Proceedings of the Fourth Environmental Physics Conference (EPC'10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsan, M.N.H.

    2010-01-01

    The publication has been set up as proceedings of the environmental physics conference. the conference consistes of atmospere and climate; the ecosystem; radiation and radioactivity; activity review; environmental issues. This conference consistes of 157 p., figs., tabs., refs

  17. Climate: negotiations are lacking ambitions. Returns on the sixteenth Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), from the 29 November to the 10 December 2010, Cancun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blavier, Sebastien; Mazounie, Alix; Cheron, Marie; Gautier, Celia; Chetaille, Anne; Giraud, Adeline; Angerand, Sylvain; Burger, Patrice; Fauveaud, Swan; Frignet, Jerome; Kaloga, Alpha; Vielajus, Jean-Louis; Mathy, Sandrine

    2011-03-01

    This report proposes an analysis of the COP16 (16. Conference of Parties) by French NGOs committed in international solidarity and in the protection of the environment. The first part addresses the negotiation process in Cancun in terms of transparency and of geopolitical issues, and outlines the lack of ambition of these negotiations as far as the agreement legal form and the objectives of greenhouse gas emission reduction are concerned. After having discussed the issue of financing, the second part discusses stakes, results and challenges regarding various sectors and aspects: adaptation to climate change, agriculture (which has not been addressed in Cancun), forests. The last part proposes and comments a set of recommendations regarding the future legal form of the agreement, financing and sources of financing, adaptation, agriculture, forests, and civil society mobilisation

  18. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 30, no. 3. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    1998-07-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences planned for 1998-2003 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 1998-1999 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given, as well as a list of proceedings of past IAEA meetings

  19. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 30, no. 4. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    1998-10-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for 1998-2003 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 1998-1999 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given. (author)

  20. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 30, no. 2. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    1998-04-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences planned for 1998-2003 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 1998-1999 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given, as well as a list of proceedings of past IAEA meetings

  1. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 33, no. 2. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    2001-04-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subject directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for 2001-2004 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2001 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given

  2. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 35, no. 1. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    2003-01-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subject areas directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy audits peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for January 2003 - November 2006 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2003 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given

  3. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 27, no. 3. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini Plawen, S.

    1995-07-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences planned for 1995-1999 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 1995 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given, as well as a list of proceedings of past IAEA meetings

  4. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 29, no. 4. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    1997-10-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences planned for 1997-2002 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 1997-1998 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetically order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given, as well as a list of proceedings of past IAEA meetings

  5. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 28, no. 1. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini Plawen, S.

    1996-01-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences planned for 1996-1999 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 1996 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetically order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given, as well as a list of proceedings of past IAEA meetings

  6. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 29, no. 3. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    1997-07-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences planned for 1997-2000 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 1997-1998 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetically order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given, as well as a list of proceedings of past IAEA meetings

  7. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 28, no. 2. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    1996-04-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences planned for 1996-1999 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 1996 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetically order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given, as well as a list of proceedings of past IAEA meetings

  8. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 28, no. 4. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    1996-10-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences planned for 1996-1999 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 1996-1997 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetically order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given, as well as a list of proceedings of past IAEA meetings

  9. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 37, no. 3. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertot-Sinozic, D.

    2005-07-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for July 2005 - November 2009 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2005 is arranged chronologically. Latest information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given at http://www.iaea.org/cgi-bin/maeps.page.pl/search.htm

  10. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 34, no. 2. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    2002-04-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subject directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for 2002-2006 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2002 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given

  11. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 36, no. 4. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    2004-10-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for October 2004 - July 2008 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2004/2005 is arranged chronologically. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given

  12. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 32, no. 3. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    2000-07-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subject directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for 2000-2004 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2000-2001 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given

  13. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 37, no. 4. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertot-Sinozic, D.

    2005-10-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for October 2005 - November 2009 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2005/2006 is arranged chronologically. Latest information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given at http://www.iaea.org/cgi-bin/maeps.page.pl/search.htm

  14. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 39, no. 4, October 2007. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertot-Sinozic, D.

    2007-01-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for October 2007 ? February 2015 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2007 is arranged chronologically. Latest information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given at http://www.iaea.org/cgi-bin/maeps.page.pl/search.htm

  15. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 27, no. 2. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini Plawen, S.

    1995-04-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences planned for 1995-1999 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 1995 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given, as well as a list of proceedings of past IAEA meetings

  16. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 40, no. 2, April 2008. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertot-Sinozic, D.

    2008-01-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for April 2008 - February 2015 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2008 - 2009 is arranged chronologically. Latest information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given at http://www.iaea.org/cgi-bin/maeps.page.pl/search.htm

  17. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 37, no. 2. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for April 2005 - November 2009 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2005 is arranged chronologically. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given

  18. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 31, no. 4. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    1999-10-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subject directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for 1999-2004 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 1999-2001 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given

  19. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 33, no. 4. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    2001-10-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subject directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for 2001-2006 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2001-2003 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given

  20. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 35, no. 2. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    2003-04-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subject areas directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy audits peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for April 2003 - November 2006 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2003 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given

  1. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 29, no. 1. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    1997-01-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences planned for 1997-2000 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 1997 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetically order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given, as well as a list of proceedings of past IAEA meetings

  2. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 39, no. 1, January 2007. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertot-Sinozic, D.

    2007-01-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for January 2007 - October 2014 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2007 is arranged chronologically. Latest information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given at http://www.iaea.org/cgi-bin/maeps.page.pl/search.htm

  3. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 40, no. 3, July 2008. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertot-Sinozic, D.

    2008-01-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for July 2008 - February 2015 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2008 - 2009 is arranged chronologically. Latest information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given at http://www.iaea.org/cgi-bin/maeps.page.pl/search.htm

  4. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 29, no. 2. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    1997-04-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences planned for 1997-2000 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 1997 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetically order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given, as well as a list of proceedings of past IAEA meetings

  5. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 30, no. 1. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    1998-01-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences planned for 1998-2003 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 1998-1999 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetically order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given, as well as a list of proceedings of past IAEA meetings

  6. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 34, no. 4. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    2002-10-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subject areas directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for October 2002 - November 2006 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2002 and 2003 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given

  7. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 35, no. 3. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    2003-07-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subject directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for July 2003 - February 2007 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2003-2004 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given

  8. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 38, no. 2. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertot-Sinozic, D.

    2006-04-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for April 2006 - November 2010 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2006 is arranged chronologically. Latest information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given at http://www.iaea.org/cgi-bin/maeps.page.pl/search.htm

  9. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 33, no. 1. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    2001-01-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subject directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for 2001-2004 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2001 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given

  10. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 38, no. 4, October 2006. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertot-Sinozic, D.

    2006-10-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for October 2006 - August 2012 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2006/2007 is arranged chronologically. Latest information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given at http://www.iaea.org/cgi-bin/maeps.page.pl/search.htm

  11. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 36, no. 2. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    2004-04-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for April 2004 - June 2007 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2004/2005 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given

  12. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 31, no. 3. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    1999-07-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subject directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for 1999-2003 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 1999-2001 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given. (author)

  13. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 38, no. 3, July 2006. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertot-Sinozic, D.

    2006-07-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for July 2006 - November 2011 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2006/2007 is arranged chronologically. Latest information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given at http://www.iaea.org/cgi-bin/maeps.page.pl/search.htm

  14. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 34, no. 1. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    2002-01-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subject directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for 2002-2006 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2002 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given

  15. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 37, no. 1. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    2005-01-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for January 2005 - July 2008 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2005 is arranged chronologically. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given

  16. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 27, no. 4. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini Plawen, S.

    1995-10-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences planned for 1995-1999 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 1995-1996 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetically order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given, as well as a list of proceedings of past IAEA meetings

  17. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 35, no. 4. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    2003-10-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subject directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for October 2003 - February 2007 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2003-2004 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given

  18. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 39, no. 2, April 2007. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertot-Sinozic, D.

    2007-01-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for July 2007 - October 2014 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2007 is arranged chronologically. Latest information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given at http://www.iaea.org/cgi-bin/maeps.page.pl/search.htm

  19. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 36, no. 1. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    2004-01-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subject directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for January 2004 - June 2007 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 2004 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given

  20. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 31, no. 1. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    1999-01-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subjects directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for 1999-2003 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 1999-2000 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given. (author)

  1. Meetings on atomic energy. V. 31, no. 2. A quarterly world-wide list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses in atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini-Plawen, S.

    1999-01-01

    This quarterly publication comprises the list of conferences, exhibitions and training courses that have been planned on subject directly or indirectly related to nuclear energy and its peaceful uses. The list of conferences and exhibitions planned for 1999-2003 is arranged chronologically. A conference title KWIC index and an index by place and date are given as well. The list of international training courses for 1999-2000 is arranged chronologically and that of national training courses in alphabetical order of countries. Detailed information on the topics of IAEA meetings and training courses are given

  2. Making the climate part of the human world: Why addressing beliefs and biases is necessary part of effective climate change education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, S. D.

    2009-12-01

    Efforts to raise public awareness and understanding of the social, cultural and economic consequences of climate change often encounter skepticism. The primary causes of this skepticism, whether in the form of a mild rejection of proposed policy responses or an outright rejection of the basic scientific findings, is often cited to be the poor framing of issues by the scientific community, the quality of science education or public science literacy, disinformation campaigns by representatives of the coal and gas industry, individual resistance to behavioral change, and the hyperactive nature of the modern information culture. However, the root cause may be that the weather and climate, and by association climate change, is viewed as independent of the sphere of human influence in ancient and modern societies. In this presentation, I will outline how long-standing human beliefs in the separation between the earth and the sky and the modern framing of climate change as an “environmental” issue are limiting efforts to education the public about the causes, effects and possible response to climate change. First, sociological research in the Pacific Islands (Fiji, Kiribati, Tuvalu) finds strong evidence that beliefs in divine control of the weather and climate limit public acceptance of human-induced climate change. Second, media analysis and polling data from North America supports the role of belief and provides further evidence that climate change is viewed as a threat to an “other” labeled “the environment”, rather than a threat to people or society. The consequences of these mental models of the climate can be an outright reject of scientific theory related to climate change, a milder distrust of climate change predictions, a lack of urgency about mitigation, and an underestimate of the effort required to adapt to climate change. In order to be effective, public education about climate change needs to directly address the two, critical beliefs held by

  3. Nuclear energy: a world of service to humanity. 27th annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society and 30th Canadian Nuclear Society/Canadian Nuclear Association student conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The 27th Annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society was held on June 11-14, 2006 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The conference gathered close to 400 scientists, engineers, technologists and students interested in all aspects and applications of energy from the atom. The central objective of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of views on how this technical enterprise can best serve the needs of humanity, now and in the future. The plenary sessions addressed broad industrial and commercial developments in the field. Over eighty papers were presented in 15 technical sessions on the following topics: safety analysis; plant refurbishment; control room operation; nuclear chemistry and materials; advanced reactor design; plant operation; reactor physics; safety analysis; nuclear instrumentation; and, nuclear general topics. Embedded in the conference was the 30th student conference, sponsored by the Canadian Nuclear Society and the Canadian Nuclear Association. Over thirty-five papers were presented in five sessions on the following topics: corrosion processes; control systems / physics / modelling; and, chemistry / chemical engineering

  4. Basic research on energy conservation in developing countries. Report of the International Conference on Adaptation and Mitigation Technologies for Climate Change; Hatten tojokoku energy shohi koritsuka kiso chosanado jigyo. Kiko hendo ni kansuru tekio kanwa gijutsu kokusai kaigi hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The International Conference on Adaptation and Mitigation Technologies for Climate Change was held based on the 1st Conference of the Parties in 1995 of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, and the 2nd evaluation report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). This report carries the outline of this conference and minutes. Japanese government had studied the framework of activities implemented jointly (AIJ) for emission control of greenhouse gases by voluntary workers jointly with developing countries. The government decided the basis of the AIJ Japan program in 1995, and approved the evaluation guidelines of this program including confirmed and considered matters which are necessary for government offices related to this program to evaluate and approve each project. IPCC approved the 2nd evaluation report in its general meeting in 1995. This conference was thus held to discuss strategic technology and international cooperation with participation of writers of the 2nd IPCC report, policy planners of Asian countries, Japanese industries, governmental offices and NGO.

  5. COP 15 'Climate Change Conference Copenhagen and beyond'. Report of a NeVER meeting; COP 15 'Climate Change Conference Copenhagen and beyond'. Verslag bijeenkomst NeVER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duindam, R.H.; Van EEuwen, M.P. [Cluster Energie en Vervoer, Juridische Dienst, Nederlandse Mededingingsautoriteit NMa, Den Haag (Netherlands)

    2010-08-15

    Report of a meeting of NeVER (the Dutch Energy Law Association) on 8 February 2010 at the Dutch Competition Authority in The Hague, the Netherlands. During this meeting, 2 speakers, who had also attended COP15 in Copenhagen, held speeches about their experiences with informative and stimulating issues in Copenhagen. Does the climate issue benefit from a global approach? How did the negotiations proceed behind the scenes? Are there any positive results worth mentioning as opposed to the critical notes. [Dutch] Verslag van een bijeenkomst van NeVER (Nederlandse Vereniging voor Energierecht) op 8 februari 2010 bij de NMa in Den Haag. Tijdens de bijeenkomst hebben 2 sprekers, die aanwezig waren bij de COP15 in Kopenhagen, voordrachten gehouden over hun ervaringen in Kopenhagen met wetenswaardige en prikkelende kwesties. Is het klimaatprobleem gebaat bij een mondiale aanpak? Hoe verliepen de onderhandelingen achter de schermen? Zijn naast de kritiek ook positieve resultaten te benoemen?.

  6. Competencies Framework for Climate Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Enric

    2016-04-01

    The World Climate Conference-3 (Geneva, 2009) established the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) to enable better management of the risks of climate variability and change and adaptation to climate change at all levels, through development and incorporation of science-based climate information and prediction into planning, policy and practice. The GFCS defines Climate Services as the result of transforming climate data into climate information in a way that responds to user needs and assists decision-making by individuals and organizations. Capacity Development is a cross-cutting pillar of the GFCS to ensure that services are provided by institutions with professionals whom achieved the adequate set of competencies recommended by WMO, which are yet to be fully defined. The WMO-Commission for Climatology Expert Team on Education and Training, ET-ETR, has been working to define a Competencies Framework for Climate Services to help the institutions to deliver high quality climate services in compliance with WMO standards and regulations, specifically those defined by WMO's Commission for Climatology and the GFCS. This framework is based in 5 areas or competence, closely associated to the areas of work of climate services providers: create and manage climate data sets; derive products from climate data; create and/or interpret climate forecasts and model output; ensure the quality of climate information and services; communicate climatological information with users. With this contribution, we intend to introduce to a wider audience the rationale behind these 5 top-level competency statements and the performance criteria associated with them, as well as the plans of the ET-ETR for further developing them into an instrument to support education and training within the WMO members, specially the National Meteorological and Hydrological Services.

  7. Global climate change and international security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, M.

    1991-01-01

    On May 8--10, 1991, the Midwest Consortium of International Security Studies (MCISS) and Argonne National Laboratory cosponsored a conference on Global Climate Change and International Security. The aim was to bring together natural and social scientists to examine the economic, sociopolitical, and security implications of the climate changes predicted by the general circulation models developed by natural scientists. Five themes emerged from the papers and discussions: (1) general circulation models and predicted climate change; (2) the effects of climate change on agriculture, especially in the Third World; (3) economic implications of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (4) the sociopolitical consequences of climate change; and (5) the effect of climate change on global security.

  8. Contribution of the conferences of the parties and the renewable energy role for the fight against climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghezloun, A., E-mail: a.ghezloun@cder.dz; Oucher, N.; Merabet, H. [Centre de Développement des Energies Renouvelables, CDER, BP 62 Route de l’Observatoire, Bouzaréah, 16340, Algiers (Algeria); Saidane, A. [Université d’Alger, Algiers (Algeria)

    2016-07-25

    The Kyoto Protocol, which entered into force on 16 February 2005, commits developed countries to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases by 5% in 2012 compared to 1990. Due to the abstention of the United States and the absence of constraint on Southern countries, the protocol establishes obligations only to countries that represent only 33% of global CO{sub 2} emissions. All the diplomatic effort is therefore to seek the commitment of discussion for the period after 2012. The participation of the United States and emerging countries is imperative. The essential point of this second negotiation process is to search in the effort to integrate the United States and the developing countries and, more particularly, emerging economies such as China, India or Brazil, whose current emissions and / or projected should exceed those of developed countries during the first half of the twenty-first century. Real progress has been made in recent years. Indeed, a first universal historic agreement and legally binding was adopted after two weeks of intense negotiations by the Parties from 30 November to 12 December 2015, which aims to limit global warming by the end of this century well below 2 ° C while continuing efforts to not exceed 1.5 ° C. Moreover, the European Union, China and the United States have expressed their willingness to reduce their greenhouse gas. Because, one of the great hopes of the fight against the emission of greenhouse gases is the development of renewable energy, the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) report highlights the need to move towards renewable energy sources. The European Union, China and United States also expressed their willingness to increase the share of renewable energy. It is therefore necessary to develop the only inexhaustible energy, renewable energy, to fight against climate change.

  9. Contribution of the conferences of the parties and the renewable energy role for the fight against climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezloun, A.; Saidane, A.; Oucher, N.; Merabet, H.

    2016-07-01

    The Kyoto Protocol, which entered into force on 16 February 2005, commits developed countries to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases by 5% in 2012 compared to 1990. Due to the abstention of the United States and the absence of constraint on Southern countries, the protocol establishes obligations only to countries that represent only 33% of global CO2 emissions. All the diplomatic effort is therefore to seek the commitment of discussion for the period after 2012. The participation of the United States and emerging countries is imperative. The essential point of this second negotiation process is to search in the effort to integrate the United States and the developing countries and, more particularly, emerging economies such as China, India or Brazil, whose current emissions and / or projected should exceed those of developed countries during the first half of the twenty-first century. Real progress has been made in recent years. Indeed, a first universal historic agreement and legally binding was adopted after two weeks of intense negotiations by the Parties from 30 November to 12 December 2015, which aims to limit global warming by the end of this century well below 2 ° C while continuing efforts to not exceed 1.5 ° C. Moreover, the European Union, China and the United States have expressed their willingness to reduce their greenhouse gas. Because, one of the great hopes of the fight against the emission of greenhouse gases is the development of renewable energy, the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) report highlights the need to move towards renewable energy sources. The European Union, China and United States also expressed their willingness to increase the share of renewable energy. It is therefore necessary to develop the only inexhaustible energy, renewable energy, to fight against climate change.

  10. Contribution of the conferences of the parties and the renewable energy role for the fight against climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghezloun, A.; Oucher, N.; Merabet, H.; Saidane, A.

    2016-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol, which entered into force on 16 February 2005, commits developed countries to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases by 5% in 2012 compared to 1990. Due to the abstention of the United States and the absence of constraint on Southern countries, the protocol establishes obligations only to countries that represent only 33% of global CO 2 emissions. All the diplomatic effort is therefore to seek the commitment of discussion for the period after 2012. The participation of the United States and emerging countries is imperative. The essential point of this second negotiation process is to search in the effort to integrate the United States and the developing countries and, more particularly, emerging economies such as China, India or Brazil, whose current emissions and / or projected should exceed those of developed countries during the first half of the twenty-first century. Real progress has been made in recent years. Indeed, a first universal historic agreement and legally binding was adopted after two weeks of intense negotiations by the Parties from 30 November to 12 December 2015, which aims to limit global warming by the end of this century well below 2 ° C while continuing efforts to not exceed 1.5 ° C. Moreover, the European Union, China and the United States have expressed their willingness to reduce their greenhouse gas. Because, one of the great hopes of the fight against the emission of greenhouse gases is the development of renewable energy, the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) report highlights the need to move towards renewable energy sources. The European Union, China and United States also expressed their willingness to increase the share of renewable energy. It is therefore necessary to develop the only inexhaustible energy, renewable energy, to fight against climate change.

  11. DOE Workshop; Pan-Gass Conference on the Representation of Atmospheric Processes in Weather and Climate Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Hugh [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-11-12

    This is the first meeting of the whole new GEWEX (Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment) Atmospheric System Study (GASS) project that has been formed from the merger of the GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) Project and the GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary Layer Studies (GABLS). As such, this meeting will play a major role in energizing GEWEX work in the area of atmospheric parameterizations of clouds, convection, stable boundary layers, and aerosol-cloud interactions for the numerical models used for weather and climate projections at both global and regional scales. The representation of these processes in models is crucial to GEWEX goals of improved prediction of the energy and water cycles at both weather and climate timescales. This proposal seeks funds to be used to cover incidental and travel expenses for U.S.-based graduate students and early career scientists (i.e., within 5 years of receiving their highest degree). We anticipate using DOE funding to support 5-10 people. We will advertise the availability of these funds by providing a box to check for interested participants on the online workshop registration form. We will also send a note to our participants' mailing lists reminding them that the funds are available and asking senior scientists to encourage their more junior colleagues to participate. All meeting participants are encouraged to submit abstracts for oral or poster presentations. The science organizing committee (see below) will base funding decisions on the relevance and quality of these abstracts, with preference given to under-represented populations (especially women and minorities) and to early career scientists being actively mentored at the meeting (e.g. students or postdocs attending the meeting with their adviser).

  12. From Kyoto to Durban: the invention of a new climate cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-02-01

    After having recalled the main decisions of the Cancun conference in terms of reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and struggle against climate change, but also in terms of revitalization of an international climate governance, this analysis note identifies four main objectives for the next negotiations in Durban: to open a debate for further efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions so that the average world temperature increase will not exceed 2 degrees, to define contributions of countries to the Green Climate Fund and make real the mechanisms to struggle against deforestation, to ensure the durability of greenhouse gas compensation mechanisms, and to start a reflection on the evolution of the world climate governance

  13. Report on the behalf of the Commission for Foreign Affairs on the bill project adopted by the Senate, after initiation of the accelerated procedure, authorizing the approval of the agreement between the Government of the French Republic and the Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and its Kyoto protocol about the twenty first session of the Conference Of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the eleventh session of the Conference Of the Parties acting as a gathering of parties to the Kyoto protocol and organ sessions. National Assembly Nr 2943, 3062, Senate Nr 587, 512

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Borgn', Pierre-Yves; Larcher, Gerard; Grand, Jean-Pierre; Valls, Manuel; Fabius, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    As France is about to host the twenty first Conference of Parties (COP 21), this report presents this conference on climate changes as an historical step. It describes the context by recalling the content of international negotiations on climate since 1992, and by commenting the preparation of the Paris conference. It addresses the various and important organisational aspects: means, non-budgetary means, security aspects. The second part discusses the content of the agreement between the French government and the Secretary of United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC): provisions related to the material organisation of the conference, provisions related to privileges and immunities, and other arrangements (related to security, financial, responsibility and conflict resolution). The text of the bill project and the discussion of the commission are reported

  14. To conference or not to conference

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    can travel throughout the world, from Cape to Cairo, from Jakarta to. Istanbul, from San ... Is there any real advantage of going to conferences in the era of electronic ... to register and travel, and the time off work, are justified, although we are.

  15. Long term modelling in a second rank world: application to climate policies; Modeliser le long terme dans un monde de second rang: application aux politiques climatiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crassous, R

    2008-11-15

    This research aims at the identification of the dissatisfaction reasons with respect to the existing climate models, at the design of an innovating modelling architecture which would respond to these dissatisfactions, and at proposing climate policy assessment pathways. The authors gives a critique assessment of the modelling activity within the field of climate policies, outlines the fact that the large number and the scattering of existing long term scenarios hides a weak control of uncertainties and of the inner consistency of the produced paths, as well as the very low number of modelling paradigms. After a deepened analysis of modelling practices, the author presents the IMACLIM-R modelling architecture which is presented on a world scale and includes 12 areas and 12 sectors, and allows the simulation of evolutions by 2050, and even 2100, with a one-year time step. The author describes a scenario without any climate policy, highlights reassessment possibilities for economical trajectories which would allow greenhouse gas concentration stabilisation on a long term basis through the application of IMACLIM-R innovations. He outlines adjustment and refinement possibilities for climate policies which would robustly limit the transition cost risks.

  16. Future discharge drought across climate regions around the world modelled with a synthetic hydrological modelling approach forced by three general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanders, N.; Van Lanen, H. A. J.

    2015-03-01

    Hydrological drought characteristics (drought in groundwater and streamflow) likely will change in the 21st century as a result of climate change. The magnitude and directionality of these changes and their dependency on climatology and catchment characteristics, however, is uncertain. In this study a conceptual hydrological model was forced by downscaled and bias-corrected outcome from three general circulation models for the SRES A2 emission scenario (GCM forced models), and the WATCH Forcing Data set (reference model). The threshold level method was applied to investigate drought occurrence, duration and severity. Results for the control period (1971-2000) show that the drought characteristics of each GCM forced model reasonably agree with the reference model for most of the climate types, suggesting that the climate models' results after post-processing produce realistic outcomes for global drought analyses. For the near future (2021-2050) and far future (2071-2100) the GCM forced models show a decrease in drought occurrence for all major climates around the world and increase of both average drought duration and deficit volume of the remaining drought events. The largest decrease in hydrological drought occurrence is expected in cold (D) climates where global warming results in a decreased length of the snow season and an increased precipitation. In the dry (B) climates the smallest decrease in drought occurrence is expected to occur, which probably will lead to even more severe water scarcity. However, in the extreme climate regions (desert and polar), the drought analysis for the control period showed that projections of hydrological drought characteristics are most uncertain. On a global scale the increase in hydrological drought duration and severity in multiple regions will lead to a higher impact of drought events, which should motivate water resource managers to timely anticipate the increased risk of more severe drought in groundwater and streamflow

  17. Threats, protests greet conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, D

    1994-09-04

    In preparation for the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, Egypt has deployed 14,000 police to protect participants from threatened violence. The Vatican has joined forces with Muslim fundamentalists to condemn the conference as a vehicle for imposing Western ideals, particularly abortion, on Third world countries. In addition, the opposition is raising the specter of a descent of homosexuals onto Cairo and Muslim fundamentalists have threatened to murder Western representatives. A suit filed by Islamic lawyers, aimed at stopping the conference, failed. Sudan and Saudi Arabia plan to boycott the conference, and it remains uncertain whether Libya will be represented. Conference organizers have not been deterred by the threats and note that the controversy has drawn public attention to the central issues under debate.

  18. Nuclear power and world energy needs: Looking ahead. Address at the 'Quatrieme Annuelle Conference Strategique', Institut de Relations Internationales et Strategiques, Paris, 5 May 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    In his address at the 'Quatrieme Annuelle Conference Strategique' (Institut de Relations Internationales Strategiques, Paris, 5 May 1999), the Director General of the IAEA presented the future role of the nuclear power from Agency's perspective, emphasizing the following aspects: nuclear power and the environment, nuclear safety and public confidence, economic competitiveness, and the importance of nuclear verification and prevention of illicit trafficking

  19. Digital Debates. WebWise Conference on Libraries and Museums in the Digital World Proceedings (10th, Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C, February 25-27, 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorich, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Debates typically invoke an image of individuals arguing over the merits of opposing viewpoints. However, the term has a softer, more deliberative sense that connotes reflection, discussion, and consideration. The 2009 WebWise conference, titled "Digital Debates," was conducted in this spirit, with panelists and attendees engaged in…

  20. International conference on topical issues in nuclear installation safety: Continuous improvement of nuclear safety in a changing world. Book of contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Papers presented at this conference where devoted to the following NPP safety related topical issues: Changing environments - coping with diversity and globalisation; Operating experience - managing changes effectively; Regulatory management systems - adapting to changes in the environment; Long term operations - maintaining safety margins while extending plant lifetime.

  1. The economics of climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    An international Conference on the Economics of Climate Change was convened by the OECD and the International Energy Agency (IEA) in Paris, in June 1993. Participants included many of the world's foremost experts in the field, as well as representatives from business, labour, and other non-governmental organisations. The Conference sought to examine points of consensus and divergence among existing studies on the economics of climate change. Participants also focused on how economic analysis could contribute to meeting the obligations of OECD countries under the 1992 Framework Convention on Climate Change. Discussions centered on such topics as the economic costs and benefits of greenhouse gas mitigation strategies, the potential role of carbon taxes and other economic instruments in the policy mix, possibilities for technological change and diffusion, especially in the energy sector, and joint abatement action between industrialized and developing countries. This volume contains the papers presented at the Conference, as well as summaries of the subsequent discussions. It provides an overview of the 'state of the art' in the economics of climate change and several suggestions for future research. (author)

  2. Climatic change. The third Conference of the Parties of the United Nations - Framework Convention. Kyoto, Japan, 1-10 December 1997; Les changements climatiques. 3eme conference des Parties de la Convention Cadre des Nations Unies a Kyoto au Japon du 1er au 10 Decembre 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meclot, Bernard; Madet, Daniel [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-11-28

    Facing the global problems raised by the climatic change, it is absolutely necessary to bring forth worldwide orientations which must balance the economic growth in the developing countries, the competition between countries and between industrial companies, the right repartition of the efforts of developed countries and the remaining world's countries as well as among the developed countries. This EDF press communique, concerning the 3. Conference of the Parties of the UN Framework - Convention, held in Kyoto on 1-10 Dec 1999, presents the results of EDF struggle against the Greenhouse effect, a comparative statistics of the CO{sub 2} emission and, particularly, the role of electric sector. The following conclusions are drown in this report: 1. No matter what common target will be established for CO{sub 2} emission (2-4.5 tones per inhabitant, for instance), it implies that big countries like US and Canada should decide on plans for significant lowering of the emissions while Europe as well as China have still important steps to do; 2. Although, Europe has mastered rather well the global CO{sub 2} emission there are still very contrasting values from the different countries of the European Union; 3. The emissions produced by transport do increase continuously and will soon become the main contributor to the polluting emissions; 4. The European industrial sector has reduced its emission by about 12% during the last ten years and at present it is only the fourth contributor; 5. The electric sector can bring a major contribution to the pollution abatement by choosing CO{sub 2} non-emitting power generating systems, so as the plots giving the emission evolution in France, Sweden or Austria demonstrate.

  3. Climatic change. The third Conference of the Parties of the United Nations - Framework Convention. Kyoto, Japan, 1-10 December 1997; Les changements climatiques. 3eme conference des Parties de la Convention Cadre des Nations Unies a Kyoto au Japon du 1er au 10 Decembre 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meclot, Bernard; Madet, Daniel [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-11-28

    Facing the global problems raised by the climatic change, it is absolutely necessary to bring forth worldwide orientations which must balance the economic growth in the developing countries, the competition between countries and between industrial companies, the right repartition of the efforts of developed countries and the remaining world's countries as well as among the developed countries. This EDF press communique, concerning the 3. Conference of the Parties of the UN Framework - Convention, held in Kyoto on 1-10 Dec 1999, presents the results of EDF struggle against the Greenhouse effect, a comparative statistics of the CO{sub 2} emission and, particularly, the role of electric sector. The following conclusions are drown in this report: 1. No matter what common target will be established for CO{sub 2} emission (2-4.5 tones per inhabitant, for instance), it implies that big countries like US and Canada should decide on plans for significant lowering of the emissions while Europe as well as China have still important steps to do; 2. Although, Europe has mastered rather well the global CO{sub 2} emission there are still very contrasting values from the different countries of the European Union; 3. The emissions produced by transport do increase continuously and will soon become the main contributor to the polluting emissions; 4. The European industrial sector has reduced its emission by about 12% during the last ten years and at present it is only the fourth contributor; 5. The electric sector can bring a major contribution to the pollution abatement by choosing CO{sub 2} non-emitting power generating systems, so as the plots giving the emission evolution in France, Sweden or Austria demonstrate.

  4. 19th European Conference on Mathematics for Industry

    CERN Document Server

    Barral, Patricia; Gómez, Dolores; Pena, Francisco; Rodríguez, Jerónimo; Salgado, Pilar; Vázquez-Méndez, Miguel; ECMI 2016; Progress in industrial mathematics

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses mathematics in a wide variety of applications, ranging from problems in electronics, energy and the environment, to mechanics and mechatronics. Using the classification system defined in the EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation H2020, several of the topics covered belong to the challenge climate action, environment, resource efficiency and raw materials; and some to health, demographic change and wellbeing; while others belong to Europe in a changing world – inclusive, innovative and reflective societies. The 19th European Conference on Mathematics for Industry, ECMI2016, was held in Santiago de Compostela, Spain in June 2016. The proceedings of this conference include the plenary lectures, ECMI awards and special lectures, mini-symposia (including the description of each mini-symposium) and contributed talks. The ECMI conferences are organized by the European Consortium for Mathematics in Industry with the aim of promoting interaction between academy and industry, leading...

  5. Conferinţa Mondială a Populaţiei, Bucureşti 1974. Semnificaţii politice (World Population Conference, Bucharest 1974. Political Meanings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezar STANCIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available n 1974, the United Nations organized the first inter-governmental conference dedicated especially to problems of population and demography. Apart from technical issue involved, the conference represented yet another manifestation of disagreements between the industrialized countries, on one hand, and the underdeveloped or developing countries. The first group argued that overpopulation was a major risk as the Earth did not have sufficient resources to feed the ever-growing population and birth control measures were required. The latter group disagreed with this perspective and claimed that population issues could be solved only by the development of the poor countries. Development, argued this group of countries, had to be insured by a restructuring of the international economy and more financial assistance from the developed countries. This paper examines Romania’s position in this context, analyzing how the regime in Bucharest tried to balance between foreign constraints such as its obligation as host country to remain neutral, its effort to build bridges to the underdeveloped or developing countries thus trying to tacitly evade it international status of Warsaw Pact member and gain acceptance in the Group of 77. The World Population Conference in 1974 is a conclusive case study for Romania’s foreign policy after the Soviet-American détente of 1972.

  6. The greatest soda-water lake in the world and how it is influenced by climatic change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kadioğlu

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Global warming resulting from increasing greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and the local climate changes that follow affect local hydrospheric and biospheric environments. These include lakes that serve surrounding populations as a fresh water resource or provide regional navigation. Although there may well be steady water-quality alterations in the lakes with time, many of these are very much climate-change dependent. During cool and wet periods, there may be water-level rises that may cause economic losses to agriculture and human activities along the lake shores. Such rises become nuisances especially in the case of shoreline settlements and low-lying agricultural land. Lake Van, in eastern Turkey currently faces such problems due to water-level rises. The lake is unique for at least two reasons. First, it is a closed basin with no natural or artificial outlet and second, its waters contain high concentrations of soda which prevent the use of its water as a drinking or agricultural water source. Consequently, the water level fluctuations are entirely dependent on the natural variability of the hydrological cycle and any climatic change affects the drainage basin. In the past, the lake-level fluctuations appear to have been rather systematic and unrepresentable by mathematical equations. Herein, monthly polygonal climate diagrams are constructed to show the relation between lake level and some meteorological variables, as indications of significant and possible climatic changes. This procedure is applied to Lake Van, eastern Turkey, and relevant interpretations are presented.

  7. Low Cloud Feedback to Surface Warming in the World's First Global Climate Model with Explicit Embedded Boundary Layer Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parishani, H.; Pritchard, M. S.; Bretherton, C. S.; Wyant, M. C.; Khairoutdinov, M.; Singh, B.

    2017-12-01

    Biases and parameterization formulation uncertainties in the representation of boundary layer clouds remain a leading source of possible systematic error in climate projections. Here we show the first results of cloud feedback to +4K SST warming in a new experimental climate model, the ``Ultra-Parameterized (UP)'' Community Atmosphere Model, UPCAM. We have developed UPCAM as an unusually high-resolution implementation of cloud superparameterization (SP) in which a global set of cloud resolving arrays is embedded in a host global climate model. In UP, the cloud-resolving scale includes sufficient internal resolution to explicitly generate the turbulent eddies that form marine stratocumulus and trade cumulus clouds. This is computationally costly but complements other available approaches for studying low clouds and their climate interaction, by avoiding parameterization of the relevant scales. In a recent publication we have shown that UP, while not without its own complexity trade-offs, can produce encouraging improvements in low cloud climatology in multi-month simulations of the present climate and is a promising target for exascale computing (Parishani et al. 2017). Here we show results of its low cloud feedback to warming in multi-year simulations for the first time. References: Parishani, H., M. S. Pritchard, C. S. Bretherton, M. C. Wyant, and M. Khairoutdinov (2017), Toward low-cloud-permitting cloud superparameterization with explicit boundary layer turbulence, J. Adv. Model. Earth Syst., 9, doi:10.1002/2017MS000968.

  8. Landscaping climate change: a mapping technique for understanding science and technology debates on the world wide web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogers, R.; Marres, N.

    2000-01-01

    New World Wide Web (web) mapping techniques may inform and ultimately facilitate meaningful participation in current science and technology debates. The technique described here "landscapes" a debate by displaying key "webby" relationships between organizations. "Debate-scaping" plots two

  9. The GLOBE Program's Student Climate Research Campaign: Empowering Students to Measure, Investigate, and Understand Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackaro, J.; Andersen, T.; Malmberg, J.; Randolph, J. G.; Wegner, K.; Tessendorf, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    The GLOBE Program's Student Climate Research Campaign (SCRC) is a two-year campaign focused on empowering students to measure, investigate, and understand the climate system in their local community and around the world. Schools can participate in the campaign via three mechanisms: climate foundations, intensive observing periods (IOPs), and research investigations. Participation in the first year of the SCRC focused on increasing student understanding and awareness of climate. Students in 49 countries participated by joining a quarterly webinar, completing the online climate learning activity, collecting and entering data during IOPs, or completing an online join survey. The year also included a video competition with the theme of Earth Day 2012, as well as a virtual student conference in conjunction with The GLOBE Program's From Learning to Research Project. As the SCRC continues into its second year, the goal is for students to increase their understanding of and ability to conduct scientific research focused on climate. Furthermore, year two of the SCRC seeks to improve students' global awareness by encouraging collaborations among students, teachers and scientists focused on understanding the Earth as a system. In addition to the continuation of activities from year one, year two will have even more webinars offered, two competitions, the introduction of two new IOPs, and a culminating virtual student conference. It is anticipated that this virtual conference will showcase research by students who are enthusiastic and dedicated to understanding climate and mitigating impacts of climate change in their communities. This presentation will highlight examples of how the SCRC is engaging students all over the world in hands-on and locally relevant climate research.

  10. Show Me the Evidence: How a Unit Challenge Can Support Middle School Teachers and Students in Investigating Climate Change Using Real-World Data and Science Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochis, E. E.; Tubman, S.; Grazul, K.; Bluth, G.; Huntoon, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    Michigan Science Teaching and Assessment Reform (Mi-STAR) is developing an NGSS-aligned integrated science middle school curriculum and associated teacher professional learning program that addresses all performance expectations for the 6-8 grade-band. The Mi-STAR instructional model is a unit- and lesson-level model that scaffolds students in using science practices to investigate scientific phenomena and apply engineering principles to address a real-world challenge. Mi-STAR has developed an 8th grade unit on climate change based on the Mi-STAR instructional model and NGSS performance expectations. The unit was developed in collaboration with Michigan teachers, climate scientists, and curriculum developers. The unit puts students in the role of advisers to local officials who need an evidence-based explanation of climate change and recommendations about community-based actions to address it. Students discover puzzling signs of global climate change, ask questions about these signs, and engage in a series of investigations using simulations and real data to develop scientific models for the mechanisms of climate change. Students use their models as the basis for evidence-based arguments about the causes and impacts of climate change and employ engineering practices to propose local actions in their community to address climate change. Dedicated professional learning supports teachers before and during implementation of the unit. Before implementing the unit, all teachers complete an online self-paced "unit primer" during which they assume the role of their students as they are introduced to the unit challenge. During this experience, teachers experience science as a practice by using real data and simulations to develop a model of the causes of climate change, just as their students will later do. During unit implementation, teachers are part of a professional learning community led by a teacher facilitator in their local area or school. This professional learning

  11. Climate policy. The dirt, the country and the world. Part 3. From less emission to more influences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haan, G.

    2008-01-01

    According to the author the desire for action of the Dutch cabinet when it comes to climate policy is sympathetic, yet focused on the wrong targets. The Dutch ambition should be formulated in terms of a Dutch contribution to global measures. [mk] [nl

  12. A Energy Balance Analysis of the Climate Sensitivity to Variations in the Rate of Upwelling in the World Oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morantine, Michael Creighton

    The climate system of the Earth has been under investigation for many years, and the "Green-House Effect" has introduced a sense of urgency into the effort. The globally averaged temperature of the Earth undergoes what is commonly referred to as natural fluctuations in the climate signal. One effort of climate modellers is to isolate the responses of particular climate forcings in order to better understand each effect. The use of energy balance climate models (EBM's) has been one of the major tools in this respect. Studies conducted on the response of the environment to the "Green-House Effect" predict a warming trend. After experiencing such a trend in the early 1900's, however, the globally averaged temperature of the Earth began to decrease in the 1940's and continued this trend for approximately 20 years before resuming its trend of increase. It will be shown that a reduction of ~10% in the upwelling rate in the oceans could produce a decrease in the globally averaged temperature sufficient to explain this departure from the expected trend. The analysis of paleoclimatic indicators has produced strong evidence that the orbital forcing with periods of approximately 21000, 41000 and 93000 years predicted by the Milankovitch Theory is the primary cause of the glacial cycles known to have occurred on the Earth. However, there is a dynamic interaction between the environment and the ice caps that is not completely understood at this time. The paleoclimatic indicators available for the last deglaciation are abundant and well preserved (relative to the evidence of previous glacial periods), and analysis of the evidence indicates that during the most recent deglaciation a pulsation in the polar front occurred on such a small time scale that Milankovitch forcing is ruled out as a possible cause. It will be shown that an abrupt shutdown in the deep-water formation process which feeds the upwelling in the oceans could produce an influence of appropriate magnitude and time

  13. Changing Climates. The Role of Renewable Energy in a Carbon-Constrained World. A Paper Prepared for REN21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, J.; Denton, F.; Garg, A.; Kamel, S.; Pacudan, R.; Usher, E.

    2005-12-01

    The current paper on renewable energy and climate change is focused on the key characteristics of the climate change challenge, the intergovernmental action to address the challenge, and how current and future renewable energy projects can contribute to global carbon mitigation and adaptation efforts at the local level. The report presents the current and possible different future contributions that renewable energy can make. This is based on analysis of different authoritative global scenarios and their underlying assumptions, and is aimed at providing guidance on what would be required in terms of policy decisions and technological developments if renewable energy is going to significantly mitigate climate change. Although the focus is particularly on climate change and the opportunities for renewable energy, other issues are closely interlinked. Reducing GHG emissions by introducing more renewable energy, for example, will also have positive impacts on the security of energy supply, while potentially compounding the need for investment capital. The report begins with the current global energy demand and the contribution of renewable energy to meeting that demand. Next, different key internationally recognised energy development scenarios are presented from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the International Energy Agency (IEA), together with selected policy scenarios of very different specific options to mitigate climate change and stabilize CO2 levels in the range of 450-550 ppm. These scenarios are presented with both high and limited penetrations of renewable energy, along with discussions of underlying assumptions leading to these different results, including comparisons of projected technology costs. Existing policies worldwide to promote renewable energy are then analysed for their relative efficiency and results. Guidance is presented on the possible policy tools governments can use to move from the stipulated 'business

  14. Changing Climates. The Role of Renewable Energy in a Carbon-Constrained World. A Paper Prepared for REN21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, J.; Denton, F.; Garg, A.; Kamel, S.; Pacudan, R. [UNEP Risoe Centre on Energy, Climate and Sustainable Development URC, Roskilde (Denmark); Usher, E. [UNEP Energy Unit, Paris (France)

    2005-12-15

    The current paper on renewable energy and climate change is focused on the key characteristics of the climate change challenge, the intergovernmental action to address the challenge, and how current and future renewable energy projects can contribute to global carbon mitigation and adaptation efforts at the local level. The report presents the current and possible different future contributions that renewable energy can make. This is based on analysis of different authoritative global scenarios and their underlying assumptions, and is aimed at providing guidance on what would be required in terms of policy decisions and technological developments if renewable energy is going to significantly mitigate climate change. Although the focus is particularly on climate change and the opportunities for renewable energy, other issues are closely interlinked. Reducing GHG emissions by introducing more renewable energy, for example, will also have positive impacts on the security of energy supply, while potentially compounding the need for investment capital. The report begins with the current global energy demand and the contribution of renewable energy to meeting that demand. Next, different key internationally recognised energy development scenarios are presented from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the International Energy Agency (IEA), together with selected policy scenarios of very different specific options to mitigate climate change and stabilize CO2 levels in the range of 450-550 ppm. These scenarios are presented with both high and limited penetrations of renewable energy, along with discussions of underlying assumptions leading to these different results, including comparisons of projected technology costs. Existing policies worldwide to promote renewable energy are then analysed for their relative efficiency and results. Guidance is presented on the possible policy tools governments can use to move from the stipulated &apos

  15. Conference on the Trend in Income Inequality in the U.S. Part I, Trends in Inequality of Well-Offness in the United States since World War II. Part 2, Conference Overview: Conceptual Issues, Data Issues, and Policy Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taussig, Michael K.; Danziger, Sheldon

    The first part of this document summarizes the current state of knowledge on trends in inequality of economic well-being in the United States since World War II. It surveys alternative answers to the often asked question: Has inequality in the U.S. increased, decreased, or remained roughly the same over a period of time? Intelligent laymen, and…

  16. Scenarios of the development of the world market for environmental and climate protection goods and services; Szenarien zur Entwicklung des Weltmarktes fuer Umwelt- und Klimaschutzgueter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazejczak, Juergen [Fachhochschule Merseburg (Germany); Deutsches Inst. fuer Wirtschaftsforschung, Berlin (Germany); Edler, Dietmar [Deutsches Inst. fuer Wirtschaftsforschung, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    Supply potentials of German and European producers of goods and services for the protection of environment and climate have been accessed in a study by DIW, FhG-ISI and Roland Berger (2007). The present study explores a simple methodology to supplement such supply oriented assessments by a projection of world wide demand for environmental and climate protection goods and services (ECPGS) and to determine the share directed at German and European producers. The analysis starts from assumptions about world economic growth disaggregated by 175 countries. For each country the presumed importance of environmental protection - disaggregated by 4 areas - is described by its expected GDP share of environmental protection expenditures; rich countries devote more of their GDP than poor countries to environmental and climate protection. Environmental protection expenditure is delimited in this study in accordance with the rather traditional classification of Eurostat which only includes measures directly aimed at the reduction of pollution or other environmental pressures but excludes measures to allow for a more rational use of natural ressources. Combining this information yields an estimate of the world market of ECPGS. By adjusting statistical information on overall import shares of the 175 countries to account for the particularities of ECPGS, world imports (i.e. world trade) of ECPGS can be estimated. World market shares of German and EU suppliers of ECPGS have been derived from OECD trade statistics. Applying these to the estimates of world trade of ECPGS yields German an EU exports of ECPGS. Together with domestic demand less imports, total domestically effective demand in Germany and the EU results. To account for uncertainties, a number sensitivity analyses have been performed. They assume e.g. a less pronounced shift of growth centres to Asia, differently focussed expenditure, and reduced world market shares of Germany and Europe. Even under the assumption of a

  17. Toward a political analysis of the consequences of a world climate change produced by increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schware, R.

    1980-01-01

    It was Hegel's extraordinarily deep and perceptive insight that mankind is caught up in a drama that cannot be fully understood until it has been played out. The owl of Minewa spreads its wings only with the falling of the dusk. On the more hopeful side is the fact that, although we cannot know the consequences of future interactions between climate and society, we can begin to work toward political solutions and gird ourselves for ominous trends that are now coming into view. The purpose of this paper is to identify one such trend, namely the increase of atmospheric temperatures due to increased carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) and lay some initial groundwork for political research related to climate-societal interactions.

  18. The Netherlands in a sustainable world. Poverty, climate and biodiversity. Second Sustainability Outlook; Nederland en een duurzame wereld. Armoede, klimaat en biodiversiteit. Tweede Duurzaamheidsverkenning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanemaaijer, A.; De Ridder, W.; Aalbers, T.; Eickhout, B.; Hilderink, H.; Hitman, L.; Manders, T.; Nagelhout, D.; Petersen, A. (eds.)

    2007-11-15

    Poverty reduction, climate change and biodiversity loss to be tackled as an integrated global problem. The world is too small to simultaneously produce enough food (including meat) for everyone and to deliver biofuels on a large enough scale to slow down climate change and maintain biodiversity. In this report sufficient options for fighting poverty, tackling climate change and limiting the loss of biodiversity are presented and discussed. The costs of these options can be limited to a few percent of GDP in 2040. However this will only be possible with coordinated international policies. [Dutch] In de Tweede Duurzaamheidsverkening staan drie duurzaamheidsvraagstukken centraal: het ontwikkelingsvraagstuk, de klimaatverandering en het biodiversiteitsverlies. Deze verkenning beschrijft de trends en de beleidsopties om de internationaal afgesproken doelen voor deze vraagstukken dichterbij te brengen. Er is voor gekozen om te werken met een Trendscenario van de OESO dat loopt tot 2040. In een Trendscenario wordt geen aanvullend beleid verondersteld, zoals het recent afgesproken EU-klimaatbeleid. Vervolgens zijn additionele beleidsopties geinventariseerd, gericht op het dichterbij brengen van de doelen. Vanuit verschillende visies op de wereld (wereldbeelden) zijn daarna de geidentificeerde beleidsopties geanalyseerd.

  19. Proceedings of the CERI 2004 Oil Conference : Insecurity of supply? CD-ROM ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The 21 presentations at this conference reflected recent developments in the international petroleum industry with particular focus on the outlook of world energy markets and prospects for oil supply and reserves. Topics of discussion included an outlook for world oil prices, geopolitical hotspots for oil exporting countries, and geopolitical warm spots for the former Soviet Union. The conference also featured a debate on oil supply, prices and markets for Canadian oil. The significant potential of the Western Canadian oil sands reserves was also discussed with reference to oil sands supply outlook and development issues. Several presentations reviewed environmental issues such as climate change and the responsible use of water. The conference also provided an opportunity for participants to discuss the role that non-conventional oil play will play in the current marketplace. Thirteen papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the database. tabs., figs

  20. 2008 Gordon Research Conference on Catalysis [Conference summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soled, Stuart L.; Gray, Nancy Ryan

    2009-01-01

    The GRC on Catalysis is one of the most prestigious catalysis conferences as it brings together leading researchers from around the world to discuss their latest, most exciting work in catalysis. The 2008 conference will continue this tradition. The conference will cover a variety of themes including new catalytic materials, theoretical and experimental approaches to improve understanding of kinetics and transport phenomena, and state of the art nanoscale characterization probes to monitor active sites. The conference promotes interactions among established researchers and young scientists. It provides a venue for students to meet, talk to and learn from some of the world leading researchers in the area. It also gives them a platform for displaying their own work during the poster sessions. The informal nature of the meeting, excellent quality of the presentations and posters, and ability to meet many outstanding colleagues makes this an excellent conference.

  1. 7. Eurasia Conference on Chemical Sciences (abstracts)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atta-ur-Rahman; Choudhary, M.I.

    2002-01-01

    The 7th Eurasia Conference on Chemical sciences (EuAs/sub 2/S-7) was held from 8-12 March, 2002 at Karachi, Pakistan. Scientists from thirty different countries had participated in this conference. Several topics from chemical world were highlighted in this conference including use of radioisotopes in different fields and specially environment which have been included here. (A.B)

  2. Conference Papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    A total of 18 papers were presented at the 2003 Annual Executive Conference of the Canadian Gas Association held at St. Andrews, NB, from June 25th to June 28th. Titles of the presentations were as follows: (1) 'Positioning natural gas in a transforming world' by Pierre Marcel Desjardins; (2) 'Positioning natural gas in a transforming world' by Jean-Paul Theoret; (3) 'Perceptions of natural gas' by Noel Sampson; (4) 'Energy efficiency as an opportunity for the natural gas industry' by Peter Love; (5) 'Natural gas R and D - NRCan perspective' by Graham R. Campbell; (6) 'Impact of earned media on corporate perceptions in the gas industry' by Michael Coates; (7) 'Moving forward with an initiative for natural gas technology innovation' by Emmanuel Morin; (8) 'Natural gas R and D - No more dodging the issue' by Chuck Szmurlo; (9) 'Meeting the technology needs of the gas industry and the gas consumer' by Stanley S. Borys; (10) 'Market signals' by John Wellard; (11) 'Future sources of Canadian natural gas' by Rick Hyndman; (12) 'The state of supply: Northeast U.S. perspective' by Tom Kiley; (13) 'AGA's priorities and perspectives' by Dick Reiten; (14) 'Global energy issues: Recent development in policy and business' by Gerald Doucet; (15) 'Keeping the distribution cart behind the horse: Why finding more offshore gas is much more important than completing the natural gas grid, including for New Brunswick' by Brian Lee Crowley; (16) 'Environmental opportunities and challenges for the gas industry' by Manfred Klein; (17) 'The potential for natural gas demand destruction' by Timothy Partridge; and (18) 'Pushing the envelope on gas supply' by Roland R. George. In most instances only speaking notes and view graphs are available

  3. Potentials and limitations of epistemic communities. An analysis of the World Climate Council and the Framework Convention on Climate Change; Potenziale und Grenzen von epistemic communities. Eine Analyse des Weltklimarates und der Klimarahmenkonvention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    In times of increasing global uncertainties, science takes a central position for policy decisions. According to Peter M. Haas, epistemic communities are able to influence the cooperative behavior of states through their consensual knowledge. This book critically examines this statement. As the case of the Framework Convention on Climate Change shows, the World Climate Council (IPCC) was not in a position to enforce its solution options in the intergovernmental negotiations, as these affected the individual convictions of the decision-makers. While Angela Merkel advocated an agreement, the US government under George W. Bush denied the existence of climate change. Decision-makers and their individual convictions must therefore have a greater significance in international politics. [German] In Zeiten zunehmender globaler Unsicherheiten nimmt die Wissenschaft fuer die Entscheidungen der Politik eine zentrale Stellung ein. Epistemic communities sind nach Peter M. Haas durch ihr konsensuales Wissen in der Lage, das Kooperationsverhalten von Staaten zu beeinflussen. Das vorliegende Buch prueft diese Aussage kritisch. Wie der Fall der Klimarahmenkonvention zeigt, war der Weltklimarat (IPCC) nicht in der Lage, seine Loesungsoptionen in den zwischenstaatlichen Verhandlungen durchzusetzen, da diesen die individuellen Ueberzeugungen der Entscheidungstraeger entgegenstanden. Waehrend Angela Merkel ein Abkommen befuerwortete, bestritt die US-Regierung unter George W. Bush die Existenz des Klimawandels. Entscheidungstraegern und ihren individuellen Ueberzeugungen muss daher in der internationalen Politik eine staerkere Bedeutung zukommen.

  4. Role of technologies in energy-related CO2 mitigation in China within a climate-protection world: A scenarios analysis using REMIND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shuwei; Bauer, Nico; Luderer, Gunnar; Kriegler, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The augmented REMIND model is used to study the role of energy technologies under a carbon tax. • The scale and timing of fossil fuels with CCS, nuclear, and renewables are examined. • CCS is important but the window of opportunity for its deployment is limited. • The effectiveness of nuclear is strongly linked to its cost performance. • Renewable energy is a long-term mitigation option. - Abstract: In a world with the need of climate protection through emission reduction, China’s domestic mitigation will be put on the national agenda. The large-scale deployment of innovative technologies induced by climate policies is a key determinant for reducing emissions in an effective and efficient manner. A distinguishing feature of the Chinese energy sector (especially electricity generation), is that investment costs are significantly lower than in other world regions. Represented in the methodological framework of the augmented REMIND model, three promising mitigation technologies (also known as technology clusters) in the electricity sector: CCS with advanced coal-generation technologies, nuclear, and renewables are the focus of this study. The scenarios are designed to analyze the roles of these technologies and their associated economic impacts under a climate policy (i.e., a carbon tax). Our results indicate that: (1)Technology policies improving the techno-economic features of low-carbon technologies are insufficient to restrain China’s increasing emissions. (2)Carbon-pricing policies can effectively reduce emissions by making low-carbon options more competitive than conventional fossil fuel alternatives. In the global carbon tax regime framed in this paper, China’s mitigation potential is larger than that of any of other region and the peak of emissions occurs earlier (by 2020) and is 50% lower than in the BASE scenario. (3)CCS is important, but the window of opportunity for its deployment is limited to the near- to mid-term future. It

  5. Diagnostic standards for dopaminergic augmentation of restless legs syndrome: report from a World Association of Sleep Medicine-International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group consensus conference at the Max Planck Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Borreguero, Diego; Allen, Richard P; Kohnen, Ralf; Högl, Birgit; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Oertel, Wolfgang; Hening, Wayne A; Paulus, Walter; Rye, David; Walters, Arthur; Winkelmann, Juliane; Earley, Christopher J

    2007-08-01

    Augmentation of symptom severity is the main complication of dopaminergic treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS). The current article reports on the considerations of augmentation that were made during a European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (EURLSSG)-sponsored Consensus Conference in April 2006 at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) in Munich, Germany, the conclusions of which were endorsed by the International RLS Study Group (IRLSSG) and the World Association of Sleep Medicine (WASM). The Consensus Conference sought to develop a better understanding of augmentation and generate a better operational definition for its clinical identification. Current concepts of the pathophysiology, clinical features, and therapy of RLS augmentation were evaluated by subgroups who presented a summary of their findings for general consideration and discussion. Recent data indicating sensitivity and specificity of augmentation features for identification of augmentation were also evaluated. The diagnostic criteria of augmentation developed at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conference in 2002 were reviewed in light of current data and theoretical understanding of augmentation. The diagnostic value and criteria for each of the accepted features of augmentation were considered by the group. A consensus was then developed for a revised statement of the diagnostic criteria for augmentation. Five major diagnostic features of augmentation were identified: usual time of RLS symptom onset each day, number of body parts with RLS symptoms, latency to symptoms at rest, severity of the symptoms when they occur, and effects of dopaminergic medication on symptoms. The quantitative data available relating the time of RLS onset and the presence of other features indicated optimal augmentation criteria of either a 4-h advance in usual starting time for RLS symptoms or a combination of the occurrence of other features. A paradoxical response to changes in medication dose also indicates

  6. Climate warrior : David Keith and his team are engineering the world to manage global climate change : scrubbing CO{sub 2} out of the air we breathe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, S.

    2009-01-15

    A team of scientists from the University of Calgary's Institute for Sustainable Energy, Environment and Economy have developed an innovative way to capture atmospheric carbon. The process involves reducing carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) using a simple machine that can capture the trace amount of CO{sub 2} present in ambient air anywhere in the world. The research offers a way to capture CO{sub 2} emissions from transportation sources such as vehicles and airplanes, which represent about 50 per cent of global annual greenhouse gas emissions. This article described how the custom-built prototype air capture tower, called a contractor, works. It measures 6 metres tall by 1.2 metres wide and runs on a gasoline-powered generator. The energy efficient and cost effective air capture technology complements other approaches for reducing emissions from the transportation sector, such as biofuels and electric vehicles. The air capture tower can capture the CO{sub 2} that is present in ambient air and store it wherever it is cheapest. The custom-built tower can capture the equivalent of 20 tonnes per year of CO{sub 2} on a single square meter of scrubbing material. The team devised a way to use a chemical process from the pulp and paper industry to cut the energy cost of air capture in half. The simple, reliable and scalable technology offers an opportunity to build a commercial-scale plant. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  7. The 'diverse, dynamic new world of global tobacco control'? An analysis of participation in the Conference of the Parties to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikova, Evgeniya; Hill, Sarah E; Collin, Jeff

    2014-03-01

    The increasingly inequitable impacts of tobacco use highlight the importance of ensuring developing countries' ongoing participation in global tobacco control. The WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) has been widely regarded as reflecting the high engagement and effective influence of developing countries. We examined participation in FCTC governance based on records from the first four meetings of the Conference of the Parties (COP), comparing representation and delegate diversity across income levels and WHO regions. While attendance at the COP sessions is high, there are substantial disparities in the relative representation of different income levels and regions, with lower middle and low income countries contributing only 18% and 10% of total meeting delegates, respectively. In regional terms, Europe provided the single largest share of delegates at all except the Durban (2008) meeting. Thirty-nine percent of low income countries and 27% of those from Africa were only ever represented by a single person delegation compared with 10% for high income countries and 11% for Europe. Rotation of the COP meeting location outside of Europe is associated with better representation of other regions and a stronger presence of delegates from national ministries of health and focal points for tobacco control. Developing countries face particular barriers to participating in the COP process, and their engagement in global tobacco control is likely to diminish in the absence of specific measures to support their effective participation.

  8. Low Energy Conference 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    11 of the 19 presentations have been indexed for the database. The following national organisations jointly organised the Low-energy Conference 2009: The Norwegian Society for the Conservation of Nature, the Norwegian Society of Engineers and Technologists, Norwegian Technology, the Federation of Norwegian Industries and the Low-Energy Program. Energy efficiency is often given little attention in the ongoing debates concerning different initiatives in order to reduce greenhouse emissions. The aim of the conference was to set energy efficiency on the agenda as an important environmental instrument. Both the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change - IPCC and the International Energy Agency - IEA regard energy efficiency as one of the fastest and most effective ways of reducing greenhouse emissions. Despite of this little is done. Many countries are ahead of Norway - why are we lagging behind? The Low-Energy conference has a broad approach: Nigel Jollands from the International Energy Agency -IEA puts energy efficiency in a global perspective. Soeren Rise from Teqniq in Denmark informs about the Danes' energy saving agreement, which appears to have been a success. The conference increased the competencies on concrete energy efficiency solutions, how to speed up the marketing of energy-friendly buildings and technologies, possibilities through industry and the impact of EU-directives and other instruments in order to trigger the potential. The conference closed with a discussion panel of leading energy politicians. The conference contributed to raise the debate in advance of the General election in Norway and the climate negotiations in Copenhagen during the autumn 2009. (EW)

  9. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries for the 31. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the 12. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; industrial irradiation; computer applications; fuel channel analysis; small reactors; severe accidents; fuel behaviour under accident conditions; reactor components, safety related computer software; nuclear fuel management; fuel behaviour and performance; reactor safety; reactor engineering; nuclear waste management; and, uranium mining and processing

  10. INTERCARTO CONFERENCES

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Tikunov

    2010-01-01

    The InterCarto conferences are thematically organized to target one of the most pressing problems of modern geography—creation and use of geographical information systems (GISs) as effective tools for achieving sustainable development of territories. Over the years, from 1994 to 2009, 1872 participants from 51 countries and 156 cities, who made 1494 reports, attended the conferences. There were 1508 participants from 49 regions of Russia making 1340 presentations. The conferences hosted 31 di...

  11. Internet conferences in glycobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, B J; Doughty, S W; Parretti, M F; Tennison, J; Wilson, I

    1997-09-01

    In this article we describe recent activities in the use of electronic conferencing in glycobiology focusing on our experiences with the organization and development of the Second Electronic Glycoscience Conference (EGC-2), which was held on the Internet and World Wide Web in September 1996. EGC-2 involved the presentation and discussion of scientific research results in a virtual conferencing environment which incorporated virtual replicas of many activities usually observed at a physical conference in addition to features unique to the electronic medium. Highlights of the scientific program and technical developments in the design and use of these facilities are briefly described. EGC-3 will be held in October 1997.

  12. Climate Adaptation in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parry, M.; McGlade, J.; Verschoor, M.; Isoard, S.; Anema, K.; Boer, J.; Cowan, C.; Collins, R.; Smeets, M.

    2009-01-01

    At the Conference of Parties in Copenhagen, Denmark, December 7-18, 2009 Change Magazine will present a special issue on 'Climate Adaptation in Europe'. The magazine contains articles on climate policy strategies in European countries and cross-border studies on climate change, articles on climate adaptation in the Alps, on water quality as a bottleneck for the agricultural sector, and drought in the mediterranean countries. How will member countries in the European Union tackle the climate crisis?.

  13. International Conference on Sustainable Rice Production - Policy, Technology and Extension Celebration Activity for International Year of Rice and World Food Day 2004

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Rice is the staple food of more than half of the world's population. The production, processing and management of paddy rice have provided the basic conditions for the living of mankind. The production of rice has not only created employment opportunities for one billion agricultural population in developing nations, but has also contributed to the development of the splendid culture associated with rice production. Hence, effective and productive rice systems play an influential role in development of economy and improvement of quality of life. In view of this, on 16 December,2002, the UN General Assembly declared the year of 2004 the International Year of Rice.

  14. Crop productivity changes in 1.5 °C and 2 °C worlds under climate sensitivity uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleussner, Carl-Friedrich; Deryng, Delphine; Müller, Christoph; Elliott, Joshua; Saeed, Fahad; Folberth, Christian; Liu, Wenfeng; Wang, Xuhui; Pugh, Thomas A. M.; Thiery, Wim; Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Rogelj, Joeri

    2018-06-01

    Following the adoption of the Paris Agreement, there has been an increasing interest in quantifying impacts at discrete levels of global mean temperature (GMT) increase such as 1.5 °C and 2 °C above pre-industrial levels. Consequences of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions on agricultural productivity have direct and immediate relevance for human societies. Future crop yields will be affected by anthropogenic climate change as well as direct effects of emissions such as CO2 fertilization. At the same time, the climate sensitivity to future emissions is uncertain. Here we investigate the sensitivity of future crop yield projections with a set of global gridded crop models for four major staple crops at 1.5 °C and 2 °C warming above pre-industrial levels, as well as at different CO2 levels determined by similar probabilities to lead to 1.5 °C and 2 °C, using climate forcing data from the Half a degree Additional warming, Prognosis and Projected Impacts project. For the same CO2 forcing, we find consistent negative effects of half a degree warming on productivity in most world regions. Increasing CO2 concentrations consistent with these warming levels have potentially stronger but highly uncertain effects than 0.5 °C warming increments. Half a degree warming will also lead to more extreme low yields, in particular over tropical regions. Our results indicate that GMT change alone is insufficient to determine future impacts on crop productivity.

  15. Asian Urban Environment and Climate Change: Preface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Julian; Wu, Jianping

    2017-09-01

    The Asian Network on Climate Science and Technology (www.ancst.org), in collaboration with Tsinghua University, held a conference on environmental and climate science, air pollution, urban planning and transportation in July 2015, with over 40 Asian experts participating and presentation. This was followed by a meeting with local government and community experts on the practical conclusions of the conference. Of the papers presented at the conference a selection are included in this special issue of Journal of Environmental Science, which also reflects the conclusions of the Paris Climate meeting in Dec 2015, when the major nations of the world agreed about the compelling need to reduce the upward trend of adverse impacts associated with global climate change. Now is the time for urban areas to work out the serious consequences for their populations, but also how they should work together to take action to reduce global warming to benefit their own communities and also the whole planet! Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Climate Change, Risks and Natural Resources didactic issues of educational content geography of Bulgaria and the world in 9th and 10th grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermendzhieva, Stela; Nejdet, Semra

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to follow "Climate change, risks and Natural Resources" in the curriculum of Geography of Bulgaria and the world in 9th and 10th grade and to interpret some didactic aspects. Analysis of key themes, concepts and categories related to the environment, events and approaches to environmental protection and the environmentally sound development of sectors of the economy is didikticheski targeted. Considering the emergence and development of geo-ecological issues, their scope and their importance to the environment, systematize some species and some approaches to solving them. Geography education in grade 9 and 10 involves acquiring knowledge, developing skills and composing behaviors of objective perception and assessment of the reality of globed, regional and local aspect. The emerging consumer and individualistic culture snowballing globalization, are increasingly occurring global warming, declining biodiversity form new realities which education must respond appropriately. The objective, consistency, accessibility and relevance in real terms are meaningful, logical accents. Whether and how reproduced in the study of Geography of Bulgaria and the world is the subject of research study in this report. Geoecological structuring of topics, concepts and categories can be done in different signs. In terms of their scope are local, national or regional, and global. Matter and interdisciplinary approach, which is to reveal the unity of the "man-society-nature" to clarify the complexity of their character with a view to forming a harmonious personality with high Geoecological consciousness and culture, and the activities carried out in their study.

  17. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries of the international conference on radioactive waste management of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: storage and disposal; hydrogeology and geochemistry; transportation; buffers and backfill; public attitudes; tailings; site investigations and geomechanics; concrete; economics; licensing; matrix materials and container design; durability of fuel; biosphere modelling; radioactive waste processing; and, future options

  18. INTERCARTO CONFERENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Tikunov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The InterCarto conferences are thematically organized to target one of the most pressing problems of modern geography—creation and use of geographical information systems (GISs as effective tools for achieving sustainable development of territories. Over the years, from 1994 to 2009, 1872 participants from 51 countries and 156 cities, who made 1494 reports, attended the conferences. There were 1508 participants from 49 regions of Russia making 1340 presentations. The conferences hosted 31 different sections, most popular of which were Environmental GIS-Projects: Development and Experience, Sustainable Development and Innovative Projects, GIS: the Theory and Methodology, Projects for Russia and Regions, and GIS-Technologies and Digital Mapping. The next annual InterCarto-InterGIS conference will take place in December 2011. The Russian component of the conference will be held in the Altay Kray followed by another meeting on Bali, Indonesia

  19. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries of the 28. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association, and the 9. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: power reactors; fuel cycles; nuclear power and public understanding; future trends; applications of nuclear technology; CANDU reactors; operational enhancements; design of small reactors; accident behaviour in fuel channels; fuel storage and waste management; reactor commissioning/decommissioning; nuclear safety experiments and modelling; the next generation reactors; advances in nuclear engineering education in Canada; safety of small reactors; current position and improvements of fuel channels; current issues in nuclear safety; and radiation applications - medical and industrial

  20. IFLA General Conference, 1984. Management and Technology Division. Section on Information Technology and Joint Meeting of the Round Table Audiovisual Media, the International Association for Sound Archives, and the International Association for Music Libraries. Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Six papers on information technology, the development of information systems for Third World countries, handling of sound recordings, and library automation were presented at the 1984 IFLA conference. They include: (1) "Handling, Storage and Preservation of Sound Recordings under Tropical and Subtropical Climatic Conditions" (Dietrich…

  1. Dementia: treating patients and caregivers with complementary and alternative medicine--results of a clinical expert conference using the World Café method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teut, Michael; Bloedt, Susanne; Baur, Roland; Betsch, Frederik; Elies, Michael; Fruehwald, Maria; Fuesgen, Ingo; Kerckhoff, Annette; Krüger, Eckard; Schimpf, Dorothee; Schnabel, Katharina; Walach, Harald; Warme, Britta; Warning, Albercht; Wilkens, Johannes; Witt, Claudia M

    2013-01-01

    In Germany the number of inhabitants with dementia is expected to increase from 1.2 million at present to 2.3 million in 2050. Our aim was to investigate which treatments complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) experts consider to be of therapeutic use in developing treatment strategies and hypotheses for further clinical studies. In a participatory group workshop the 'World Café' method was used. As questions we asked: 1) 'Based on your clinical experience, which CAM therapies are effective in the treatment of patients with dementia? 2) Based on your clinical experience, which CAM therapies are effective in the treatment of lay and professional caregivers of patients with dementia?, and 3) How should a CAM treatment program look like?' Further Delphi rounds were used to reach consensus and summarize the results. The 2-day workshop took place in January 2012 in Berlin. A total of 17 experts participated. The most important subject in the treatment was the need to understand patients' biographies in order to individualize the therapy. Therapy itself consists of the therapeutic relationship, nonmedical therapies such as sports, massage, music and arts therapy as well as medical treatment such as herbal or homeopathic medicines. With regard to caregivers the most important aim is to prevent or reduce psychological distress, e.g., by mind-body programs. Instead of single treatments, more general elements such as understanding the patients' biographies, therapeutic relationships, individualizing, networking, and self-care emerged as main results. An integrative treatment program should connect outpatient and inpatient care as well as all experts. CAM training courses should be offered to doctors, nurses, and caregivers. Future clinical studies should focus on complex intervention programs integrating these key elements. © 2013 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  2. The 9. European nuclear conference; La 9. conference nucleaire europeenne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurel, V.; Lewis, D.; Smirnov, V.P.; Gutierrez, J.E.; Paulin, Ph.; Markov, D.V.; Smirnov, A.V.; Polenok, V.S.; Horhoianu, G.; Olteanu, G.; Van der Schaaf, B.; Gavillet, D.; Lapena, J.; Ohms, C.; Roth, A.; Van Dyck, St.; Mardon, J.P.; Thomas, A.; Cipiere, M.F.; Faidy, C.; Hedin, F.; Delnondedieu, M.; Chassignole, B.; Doudet, L.; Dupond, O.; Kang, K.; Park, K.; Kim, K.; Ha, J.; Hoon-Seok, Jung; Yong-koo, Lee; Kwang-Ho, Kim; Seungwoo, Paek; Heui-Joo, Choi; Do-Hee, Ahn; Kwang-Rag, Kim; Minsoo, Lee; Sung-Paal, Yim; Hongsuk, Chung; Detroux, P.; Meessen, O.; Defloor, J.; Lars-Erik, Holm; Barescut, J.C.; Vacquier, B.; Laurier, D.; Caer, S.; Quesne, B.; Oudalova, A.; Geras' kin, St.; Dikarev, V.; Dikareva, N.; Chernonog, E.; Yang-Geun, Chung; Gab-Bock, Lee; Sun-Young, Bang; Yong-Sun, Lee; Bolognese-Milsztajn, T.; Frank, D.; Lacoste, V.; Pihet, P.; Lacronique, J.F.; Chauliac, C.; Verwaerde, D.; Pavageau, O.; Zaetta, A.; Varaine, F.; Warin, D.; Hudelot, J.P.; Bioux, Ph.; Klann, R.; Petruzzi, A.; D' auria, F.; Yung Kwon, Jin; Chul Jin, Chol; Mihalache, M.; Radu, V.; Pavelescu, M.; Schneidesch, Ch.R.; Jinzhao, Zhang; Dalleur, J.P.; Nuttin, A.; Meplan, O.; Wilson, J.; Perdu, F.; Campioni, G.; Mounier, C.; Sigrist, J.F.; Laine, Ch.; Broc, D.; Robbe, M.F.; Cariou, Y.; Seok-Kyun, Yoon; Win, Naing; Myung-Hyun, Kim; Kyung, Hee; Fridman, E.; Shwageraus, E.; Galperin, A.; Meplan, O.; Laulan, O.; Mechel-Sendis, F.; Belgaid, M.; Kadem, F.; Amokrane, A.; Hamidouche, T.; El-Khider, Si-Ahmed

    2005-11-15

    This issue gathers the abstracts of the papers presented at the ninth European nuclear conference (ENC-2005). The main part of the conference is split into 20 sessions. These sessions cover all technical aspects of nuclear power, from reactor design to waste management, without forgetting experimental and research reactors, reactor dismantling, economy, resources, safety, radioprotection and education issues. Perspectives of a nuclear renaissance are clearly visible in the world. This renaissance, mainly due to political, economical, societal and ecological factors, is fuelled by scientific and technical progress. This conference was the opportunity to present together these aspects of nuclear power and to analyze their mutual interactions.

  3. 28th Linear Accelerator Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Facco, Alberto; McCausey, Amy; Schaa, Volker R W

    2017-01-01

    The 28th Linear Accelerator Conference, LINAC 16, to take place at the Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center in East Lansing, Michigan, on 25-30 September 2016. This conference is the main bi-yearly gathering for the world-wide community of linac specialists. It provides a unique opportunity to hear about the latest advances of projects and developments concerning hadron and lepton linacs, and their applications. In the tradition of previous LINAC conferences, plenary sessions including invited speakers are scheduled every day. Poster sessions will be held on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. There will also be two special events on Sunday, 25 September 2016, namely a student poster session and an evening reception for registrants and their companions at the Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center. Participants are also warmly invited to join an outing to Lake Michigan and the beautiful surroundings on Wednesday afternoon, and to visit the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams on Friday afternoon, after the formal...

  4. Roadmap towards justice in urban climate adaptation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Linda; Chu, Eric; Anguelovski, Isabelle; Aylett, Alexander; Debats, Jessica; Goh, Kian; Schenk, Todd; Seto, Karen C.; Dodman, David; Roberts, Debra; Roberts, J. Timmons; Vandeveer, Stacy D.

    2016-02-01

    The 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris (COP21) highlighted the importance of cities to climate action, as well as the unjust burdens borne by the world's most disadvantaged peoples in addressing climate impacts. Few studies have documented the barriers to redressing the drivers of social vulnerability as part of urban local climate change adaptation efforts, or evaluated how emerging adaptation plans impact marginalized groups. Here, we present a roadmap to reorient research on the social dimensions of urban climate adaptation around four issues of equity and justice: (1) broadening participation in adaptation planning; (2) expanding adaptation to rapidly growing cities and those with low financial or institutional capacity; (3) adopting a multilevel and multi-scalar approach to adaptation planning; and (4) integrating justice into infrastructure and urban design processes. Responding to these empirical and theoretical research needs is the first step towards identifying pathways to more transformative adaptation policies.

  5. Climate change and sustainability in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfsen, Knut H.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the climate history of the Earth, exploring some of the driving forces of climate change along the way. It points out that it may not be the gradual increase in global mean temperature that we have to fear the most. Rather the variability of the climate may pose an even greater threat to us. The paper outlines some possible future scenarios of climate change based on what we now think we know about the causes of climate change and possible future development in emissions of greenhouse gases. It then goes on to describe the current climate negotiations and possible political solutions in the near term, before concluding with a description of the more long-term fundamental challenges we face. The aim of the discussion is to provide a deeper understanding of the climate problem we are facing, as well as the challenges that lie ahead of us, individually as well as a region, in securing the climate aspect of a sustainable development for Europe and the world. The paper is based on a presentation given at the conference Rio + 10 in Dublin in September 2001, made possible by a kind contribution from the European Environment Agency. (author)

  6. Climate change and sustainability in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfsen, Knut H

    2001-07-01

    This paper discusses the climate history of the Earth, exploring some of the driving forces of climate change along the way. It points out that it may not be the gradual increase in global mean temperature that we have to fear the most. Rather the variability of the climate may pose an even greater threat to us. The paper outlines some possible future scenarios of climate change based on what we now think we know about the causes of climate change and possible future development in emissions of greenhouse gases. It then goes on to describe the current climate negotiations and possible political solutions in the near term, before concluding with a description of the more long-term fundamental challenges we face. The aim of the discussion is to provide a deeper understanding of the climate problem we are facing, as well as the challenges that lie ahead of us, individually as well as a region, in securing the climate aspect of a sustainable development for Europe and the world. The paper is based on a presentation given at the conference Rio + 10 in Dublin in September 2001, made possible by a kind contribution from the European Environment Agency. (author)

  7. Make Markets Work for Climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-11-01

    to make those investments, but they need assurances that carbon will retain its value long term. The conference partners - ABN Amro, the World Bank group, Shell, WBCSD (World Business Council for Sustainable Development), IETA (International Emissions Trading Association) and the Dutch government - are committed to continue their work on making markets work for climate. They will urge private companies, financial institutions and governments to work together to make markets work for climate now

  8. Conference on High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Conference on High Energy Physics (HEP 2016) will be held from August 24 to 26, 2016 in Xi'an, China. This Conference will cover issues on High Energy Physics. It dedicates to creating a stage for exchanging the latest research results and sharing the advanced research methods. HEP 2016 will be an important platform for inspiring international and interdisciplinary exchange at the forefront of High Energy Physics. The Conference will bring together researchers, engineers, technicians and academicians from all over the world, and we cordially invite you to take this opportunity to join us for academic exchange and visit the ancient city of Xi’an.

  9. The 9. European nuclear conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurel, V.; Lewis, D.; Smirnov, V.P.; Gutierrez, J.E.; Paulin, Ph.; Markov, D.V.; Smirnov, A.V.; Polenok, V.S.; Horhoianu, G.; Olteanu, G.; Van der Schaaf, B.; Gavillet, D.; Lapena, J.; Ohms, C.; Roth, A.; Van Dyck, St.; Mardon, J.P.; Thomas, A.; Cipiere, M.F.; Faidy, C.; Hedin, F.; Delnondedieu, M.; Chassignole, B.; Doudet, L.; Dupond, O.; Kang, K.; Park, K.; Kim, K.; Ha, J.; Hoon-Seok, Jung; Yong-koo, Lee; Kwang-Ho, Kim; Seungwoo, Paek; Heui-Joo, Choi; Do-Hee, Ahn; Kwang-Rag, Kim; Minsoo, Lee; Sung-Paal, Yim; Hongsuk, Chung; Detroux, P.; Meessen, O.; Defloor, J.; Lars-Erik, Holm; Barescut, J.C.; Vacquier, B.; Laurier, D.; Caer, S.; Quesne, B.; Oudalova, A.; Geras'kin, St.; Dikarev, V.; Dikareva, N.; Chernonog, E.; Yang-Geun, Chung; Gab-Bock, Lee; Sun-Young, Bang; Yong-Sun, Lee; Bolognese-Milsztajn, T.; Frank, D.; Lacoste, V.; Pihet, P.; Lacronique, J.F.; Chauliac, C.; Verwaerde, D.; Pavageau, O.; Zaetta, A.; Varaine, F.; Warin, D.; Hudelot, J.P.; Bioux, Ph.; Klann, R.; Petruzzi, A.; D'auria, F.; Yung Kwon, Jin; Chul Jin, Chol; Mihalache, M.; Radu, V.; Pavelescu, M.; Schneidesch, Ch.R.; Jinzhao, Zhang; Dalleur, J.P.; Nuttin, A.; Meplan, O.; Wilson, J.; Perdu, F.; Campioni, G.; Mounier, C.; Sigrist, J.F.; Laine, Ch.; Broc, D.; Robbe, M.F.; Cariou, Y.; Seok-Kyun, Yoon; Win, Naing; Myung-Hyun, Kim; Kyung, Hee; Fridman, E.; Shwageraus, E.; Galperin, A.; Meplan, O.; Laulan, O.; Mechel-Sendis, F.; Belgaid, M.; Kadem, F.; Amokrane, A.; Hamidouche, T.; El-Khider, Si-Ahmed

    2005-01-01

    This issue gathers the abstracts of the papers presented at the ninth European nuclear conference (ENC-2005). The main part of the conference is split into 20 sessions. These sessions cover all technical aspects of nuclear power, from reactor design to waste management, without forgetting experimental and research reactors, reactor dismantling, economy, resources, safety, radioprotection and education issues. Perspectives of a nuclear renaissance are clearly visible in the world. This renaissance, mainly due to political, economical, societal and ecological factors, is fuelled by scientific and technical progress. This conference was the opportunity to present together these aspects of nuclear power and to analyze their mutual interactions

  10. Conference on Environmental Data Management

    CERN Document Server

    Oppenheimer, Dorothy; Brogden, William; Environmental Data Management

    1976-01-01

    Throughout the world a staggering amount of resources have been used to obtain billions of environmental data points. Some, such as meteorological data, have been organized for weather map display where many thousands of data points are synthesized in one compressed map. Most environmental data, however, are still widely scattered and generally not used for a systems approach, but only for the purpose for which they were originally taken. These data are contained in relatively small computer programs, research files, government and industrial reports, etc. This Conference was called to bring together some of the world's leaders from research centers and government agencies, and others concerned with environmental data management. The purpose of the Conference was to organize discussion on the scope of world environmental data, its present form and documentation, and whether a systematic approach to a total system is feasible now or in the future. This same subject permeated indirectly the Stockholm Conference...

  11. The climatic change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    In order to take stock on the climatic change situation and initiatives at the beginning of 2006, the INES (National Institute on the Solar Energy) proposes this special document. It presents the Montreal conference of December 2005, realized to reinforced the actions of the international community against the greenhouse gases. The technical decisions decided at this conference are detailed. The document discusses also the causes and consequences of the climatic warming, the intervention sectors and the actions possibilities. (A.L.B.)

  12. Learning in a technology enhanced world

    OpenAIRE

    Specht, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Specht, M. (2009). Learning in a technology enhanced world. Invited talk given at the World Conference on E-learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare & Higher Education. October, 27, 2009, Vancouver, Canada.

  13. Indian Academy of Sciences Conference Series | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Indian Academy of Sciences Conference Series. SUDHARSANA V IYENGAR. Articles written in Indian Academy of Sciences Conference Series. Volume 1 Issue 1 December 2017 pp 93-99 Proceedings of the Conference on Perspectives in Nonlinear Dynamics - 2016. Missing cycles: Effect of climate ...

  14. Indian Academy of Sciences Conference Series | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Indian Academy of Sciences Conference Series. JANAKI BALAKRISHNAN. Articles written in Indian Academy of Sciences Conference Series. Volume 1 Issue 1 December 2017 pp 93-99 Proceedings of the Conference on Perspectives in Nonlinear Dynamics - 2016. Missing cycles: Effect of climate change ...

  15. Climate Catastrophe - The Giant Swindle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerell, P. E.

    1998-01-01

    Energy is the life-blood of civilization. More than 80% of global energy is supplied by fossil fuels. And this will continue for the foreseeable future - if an implementation of the Kyoto Protocol does not lead to a dramatic decrease of these fuels causing worldwide turmoil of unprecedented dimensions. However, the scaremongering with a 'climate catastrophe' allegedly caused by 'greenhouse gas' emissions from the burning of fossil fuels is a huge hoax. Its only 'scientific' base is the IPCC management's enigmatic assessment: 'The balance of evidence suggests a discernable human influence on climate'. But even IPCC had to admit at the World Energy Conference in Tokyo in 1996: 'We have no evidence'. And all the scaremongering assertions of the protagonists of 'global warming' have been convincingly refuted by the world elite of scientists. This paper will: - show how the whole anti-CO 2 campaign has been manipulated from the very beginning till today; - give great many scientific and logical reason why the arguments of the scaremongers are incorrect; - outline the catastrophic economic and social consequences of the proposed anti-CO 2 measures - without any benefit for the environment of climate; - name the driving forces behind this campaign and their interests. The witchhunt against CO 2 is an incredible scientific and political scandal, CO 2 does not damage the environment at all, and labelling it a 'climate killer' is absurd. On the contrary, this gas is vital for the life on our plant, and a stronger concentration of CO 2 will be beneficial by doubling plant growth and with this combatting global famine. And to pretend that we could influence - with a CO 2 tax - the climate, is insane arrogance. Man is absolutely helpless when confronted with the forces of nature. The squandering of multimillions USD of taxpayer's money for the travelling circus of 'Climate summits' and the stultification of the population must stop. The 'global warming' lie is the biggest

  16. Mendel conference

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of selected accepted papers of Mendel conference that has been held in Brno, Czech Republic in June 2015. The book contents three chapters which represent recent advances in soft computing including intelligent image processing and bio-inspired robotics.: Chapter 1: Evolutionary Computing, and Swarm intelligence, Chapter 2: Neural Networks, Self-organization, and Machine Learning, and Chapter3: Intelligent Image Processing, and Bio-inspired Robotics. The Mendel conference was established in 1995, and it carries the name of the scientist and Augustinian priest Gregor J. Mendel who discovered the famous Laws of Heredity. In 2015 we are commemorating 150 years since Mendel's lectures, which he presented in Brno on February and March 1865. The main aim of the conference was to create a periodical possibility for students, academics and researchers to exchange their ideas and novel research methods.  .

  17. World resources 1992-93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The World Resources series is intended to meet the critical need for accessible, accurate information on some of the most pressing issues of our time. Wise management of natural resources and protection of the global environment are essential to achieve sustainable economic development and hence to alleviate poverty, improve the human condition, and preserve the biological systems on which all life depends. This volume has a special focus on sustainable development, in support of the upcoming 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED). Part 1 consists of four special chapters on sustainable development: an overview chapter and three case studies of what sustainable development might mean in industrial countries, low-income countries, and rapidly industrializing countries. Additional material pertinent to this topic is found throughout the volume. Part 2 continues the tradition of examining in each volume a particular region in more detail - in this case, an overview of the severe environmental and resource problems faced by Central Europe as that region makes a difficult transition to more democratic governments and more market-oriented economies. Part 3 reports on basic conditions and trends, key issues, major problems and efforts to resolve them, and recent developments in each of the major resource categories, from population and human development to energy to atmosphere and climate. Where data exist, the chapters give a 20-year perspective on trends in the physical environment - spanning the time between the first United Nations Conference on the Environment and UNCED. Supporting data, as well as the core data tables from the World Resources Data Base, are found in Part 4. Chapters have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  18. Berkeley Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-10-15

    To a regular observer at annual international meetings, progress in particle physics from one year to the next sometimes might seem ponderously slow. But shift the timescale and the result is startling. Opening his summary of the 1986 International Conference on High Energy Physics, held in Berkeley, California, from 16-23 July, Steve Weinberg first recalled the 1966 Conference, also held in Berkeley. Then the preoccupations were current algebra, hadron resonances and the interpretation of scattering in terms of Regge poles, and the theory of weak interactions. Physics certainly has moved.

  19. Berkeley Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    To a regular observer at annual international meetings, progress in particle physics from one year to the next sometimes might seem ponderously slow. But shift the timescale and the result is startling. Opening his summary of the 1986 International Conference on High Energy Physics, held in Berkeley, California, from 16-23 July, Steve Weinberg first recalled the 1966 Conference, also held in Berkeley. Then the preoccupations were current algebra, hadron resonances and the interpretation of scattering in terms of Regge poles, and the theory of weak interactions. Physics certainly has moved

  20. Social Climate Science: A New Vista for Psychological Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Adam R; Schuldt, Jonathon P; Romero-Canyas, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    The recent Paris Agreement to limit greenhouse gas emissions, adopted by 195 nations at the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference, signaled unprecedented commitment by world leaders to address the human social aspects of climate change. Indeed, climate change increasingly is recognized by scientists and policymakers as a social issue requiring social solutions. However, whereas psychological research on intrapersonal and some group-level processes (e.g., political polarization of climate beliefs) has flourished, research into other social processes-such as an understanding of how nonpartisan social identities, cultural ideologies, and group hierarchies shape public engagement on climate change-has received substantially less attention. In this article, we take stock of current psychological approaches to the study of climate change to explore what is "social" about climate change from the perspective of psychology. Drawing from current interdisciplinary perspectives and emerging empirical findings within psychology, we identify four distinct features of climate change and three sets of psychological processes evoked by these features that are fundamentally social and shape both individual and group responses to climate change. Finally, we consider how a more nuanced understanding of the social underpinnings of climate change can stimulate new questions and advance theory within psychology. © The Author(s) 2016.