WorldWideScience

Sample records for world cancer day

  1. CGH Supports World Cancer Day Every Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    We celebrate World Cancer Day every year on February 4th. This year the theme “We can. I can.” invites us to think not only about how we can work with one another to reduce the global burden of cancer, but how we as individuals can make a difference. Every day the staff at CGH work to establish and build upon programs that are aimed at improving the lives of people affected by cancer.

  2. World Cancer Day 2017: Fact sheet and promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The three-year (2016-2018 World Cancer Day campaign ‘We can. I can.’ Explores how everyone – together or individually – can help reduce the global burden of cancer.What is World Cancer Day? World Cancer Day takes place every year on 4 February and unites the world under a single theme to highlight the on-going fight against cancer. World Cancer Day aims to reduce the number of preventable deaths each year by raising cancer awareness amongst the general public and pressing governments to take further action against the disease.

  3. World Heart Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-01

    For World Heart Day, learn more about what heart-healthy steps you can take in the workplace.  Created: 9/1/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/9/2009.

  4. WORLD HEALTH DAY THEMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S C Saxena

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available 1970     - Early Detection of Cancer Saves Life.1971     - A Full Life Despite Diabetes.1972     - Your Heart is Your Health.1973     - Health Begins at Home.1974     - Better Food for a Healthier World.1975     - Small Pox - Point of no Return.1976     - Foresight Prevents Blindness.1977     - Immunise and Protect Your Child.1978     - Down With High Blood Pressure.1979     - A Health Child-A Sure Future.1980     - Smoking or Health - The Choice is Yours.1981     - Health for all for by the Year 2000.1982     - Add Years to Life.1983     - Health for all by 2000 - The Count Down has Begun1984     - Children’s Health: Tomorrows Wealth.1985     - Health Youth : Our best Resource.1986     - Health Living - Everyone a Winner.1987     - Immunisation - A Chance for Every Child.1988     - Health For All - All for Health.1989-Let’s Talk Health.1990    - Our Planet - Ourhealth; Think Globally, Act Locally.1991    - Should Disaster Strike - Be Prepared.1992    - Health Beat - The Rhythm of Life.1993    - Handle Life with Care - Prevent Violence and Negligence.1994    - Our Health for a Healthy Life.1995    - Target - 2000 - A World Without Polio.1996    - Healthy Cities for Better Life.1997    - Emerging Infectious Diseases.1998    - Safe Motherhood.1999    - Active Ageing Makes the Difference.2000     - Be a Life Saver, Be a Blood Doner; Blood Saves Life.2001     - Stop Exclusion, Dare to Care.2002     - Move for Health.- Shape the Future of Life, Healthy Environments for Children

  5. 78 FR 46247 - World Hepatitis Day, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9001 of July 25, 2013 World Hepatitis Day, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Each year, we mark World Hepatitis Day to bring attention to a disease that afflicts one in twelve people worldwide. Viral hepatitis is a major cause of liver cancer and...

  6. World AIDS Day PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-16

    December 1 is World AIDS Day. In this PSA, communities are encouraged to get tested for HIV.  Created: 11/16/2011 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 11/16/2011.

  7. World Population Day special symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This article describes Japan's celebration of World Population Day, and provides excerpts from speeches at the symposium held on July 8, 1998. The symposium, in Tokyo, was attended by about 300 people. The Chairman of JOICFP gave the opening address. The executive director of UNFPA congratulated Japan for its efforts in the field of population awareness and noted Japan's self-sufficiency despite its importation of 40% of its food and most of its raw materials. A keynote address was delivered by the president of CPE and the former UN Secretary General, who stressed income inequities in the 66% of developing countries within the 185 UN member states. The UN has been promoting sustainable development, but is facing the issue of limited arable land and population growth. The Tutsi and Hutus are fighting due to population based issues. The emphasis should be on women's reproductive rights and protection of women's human rights. 1998 is the 50th year of human rights; progress has been made. The UNFPA Goodwill Ambassador spoke about the disparity between the rich and poor in the Philippines. A small donation reaps incredible progress. Manila has high levels of adolescent childbearing. Men appear to be unaware of the disadvantages of childbearing too early. Rural areas are dominated by strict Roman Catholic beliefs. Manila has commercial sex workers who provide services to Japanese men. The 1998 Kato Award was given to women who raised awareness about coercion in the sex trade and female genital mutilation. The economic situation in Japan creates even greater need to promote family planning and reproductive health.

  8. 77 FR 68043 - World Freedom Day, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... Documents#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8903 of November 9, 2012 World Freedom Day..., 2012, as World Freedom Day. I call upon the people of the United States to observe this day with... WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand...

  9. Happy World IPv6 Day!

    CERN Multimedia

    Adrian Giordani (iSGTW)

    2011-01-01

    Almost 20 years after Tim Berners-Lee posted a summary of his World Wide Web project on the newsgroup, there are more than two billion users worldwide, and billions more web pages. It has transformed the way we socialize, conduct business, and even changed the way we do science. But unfortunately, the number of available Internet addresses has not grown at the same place to accommodate these changes.   The number of Internet addresses is fixed because of the way the Internet operates: data is routed through the Internet in packets that use numeric addresses to encode its origin and its destination. The layer of communication at this level is called Internet Protocol (IP), originally developed by Vint Cerf, a program manager at the US Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and now Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist of Google, USA, and member of numerous boards including as Commissioner for the Broadband Commission for Digital Development in 2010. IPv4 addresses, w...

  10. 76 FR 46181 - World Hepatitis Day, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... August 1, 2011 Part VI The President Proclamation 8696--World Hepatitis Day, 2011 #0; #0; #0... Hepatitis Day, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Across our Nation, millions of Americans are living with viral hepatitis. As many as three-fourths of Americans living with...

  11. Around the World in Eighty Days

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernes, Jules

    2005-01-01

    Around the World in Eighty Days (Le tour du monde en quatre-vingt jours) is a classic. The story starts in London on 2 October 1872. Phileas Fogg is a wealthy, solitary man with regular habits, who fires his former butler for getting wrong the temperature of his shaving water. He hires Passepartout

  12. Open Day at the World Trade Organization

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    On Sunday 6 September, the World Trade Organization will open its doors to the public. Throughout the day there will be guided tours of the building, which will reveal the many works of art donated by countries over the years; on the main terrace, food stands will give visitors a flavour of the worldwide membership of the WTO and provide the opportunity to sample regional specialities; and children can have fun with face painting, a bouncy castle and a drawing contest on the theme "Draw me globalization" and/or "Draw me the WTO". The full programme of activities

  13. World Water Day 2014 – Water & Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Majewski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available World Water Day was established in 1992 at the United Nations conference – Environment and Development. It was approved to be held every year on 22 March under the heading, theme selected for a given year. The purpose of WWD was to draw the attention of societies, politicians and decision-makers to the fact that water is essential for life and for conducting economic and social activity. The first WWD was held in 1994 under the theme: Caring for our Water Resources is Everybody’s Business. For the subsequent 20 years, the WWD has been held under headings closely related to water and use of water resources. In 2014, the WWD subject has been extended by the issue of energy. It results from the fact that energy – just like water – is a factor essential for global economic and social development. Moreover, both these areas (water and energy are strictly related to each other and are interdependent.

  14. 77 FR 45895 - World Hepatitis Day, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ... globe. As a leading cause of liver cancer in the United States, it remains a major public health... liver cancer. Tragically, complications resulting from viral hepatitis claim thousands of American lives...-threatening complications, including liver cancer. I encourage all Americans to talk with a physician about...

  15. World Rabies Day campaign in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Danellie Joy O; Jayme, Sarah I; Amparo, Anna Charinna B; Cresencio, Rubina O; Lopez, Emelinda L; Baquilod, Mario S; Hernandez, Leda M; Villalon, Ernesto E S; Nel, Louis D

    2016-01-01

    Rabies is a fatal disease, claiming the lives of around 59,000 people annually worldwide. It is considered a neglected and underreported disease leading to inadequate support from governments. Apart from dog vaccination and proper animal bite management, an integral part of a successful rabies control program is community education. The Philippine government conducts an extensive nationwide annual World Rabies Day (WRD) celebration as part of its community education. Strong inter-sectoral collaboration at the national level is a key factor for the success of WRD, capitalizing on the partners' strengths to mobilize various sectors. Strategies include the National WRD Celebration and releasing national government memorandums. An invitation letter campaign was initiated, encouraging stakeholders to register their activities. Banners were given as an incentive for those who registered. Mass and social media were also utilized to promote WRD. Registered WRD events held in the Philippines rose from 10 events in 2012, to 37 events in 2013, to 66 events in 2014 and 76 events in 2015. The individual activities involved veterinary services and information, communication, and education (IEC) activities. Nine unique WRD IEC activities are highlighted in this paper. Promotion of WRD through social media was also utilized in recent years. More news items were published online than those printed in newspapers and aired on television. The campaign's success underlines the value of a national government-led program. The national rabies program sets the agenda for priority activities including the WRD campaign. Its capacity to allocate funds for the program also denotes stability which is beneficial for local program implementers. Different segments of society were tapped through various strategies. The campaign's flexibility allowed for a large range of activities and presented opportunities for expanding partnerships and integration with others interventions for its sustainability

  16. 75 FR 69571 - World Freedom Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... people separated by geography, cultures, and beliefs. Across the world, we have seen the power of the... liberty, share knowledge, and protect human dignity. With enduring bonds forged across decades, the... nations inspire all who still yearn to exercise their universal human rights. The 21st anniversary of the...

  17. 75 FR 35951 - World Refugee Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... refugees. Through the Refugee Act and continued humanitarian aid, America's leadership in international... our own country and advancing our leadership in the world. Refugees face daunting challenges in an... blessings of liberty and opportunity are available to all who seek it. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA...

  18. Article on the World Population Day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadik, N

    1990-07-01

    The world's population stands at about 5.3 billion. It increases by about 90 million/year. 90% of this growth is in the developing world where about 75% of the world population live. In Arab countries, the population is growing 2.6%/year and total fertility rates (TFRs) stand 5 whereas the TFR for the entire world is a bit 3. Much of the growth has occurred in cities, e.g., Cairo, where the population has outpaced basic services. Cities require food and fuel thereby stressing rural areas which rural-urban migration only exacerbates. Population growth and distribution have a more profound and long term effect on the planet than does the destruction of rain forests and desertification. Indeed they contribute heavily to these very problems. Even though people have the right to decide how many children they have and their spacing, they also have the responsibility, as Islam professes, to have only number of children they can afford. Likewise governments have the right and responsibility to develop population policies each suited to the individual nation's needs and conditions. Each government must set policies that improve the role and status of women, such as ensuring literacy and education for girls and women. In fact, women must be involved in designing and managing population and development policies to ensure success of any related endeavors. The Arab would agrees on the safer motherhood strategy (providing means to prevent and space births) as a means to reduce population growth. The UNFPA encourages the Arab world to develop a unique Arab population policy which is in accordance with Islamic teachings and is acceptable to all countries and to both men and women.

  19. 77 FR 72195 - World AIDS Day, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... AIDS Day, in memory of those no longer with us and in solidarity with all who carry on the fight, let... States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution ] and the laws of the...

  20. World Sustainable Energy Days Next 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Egger, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    These conference proceedings contain contributions to one of Europe’s largest annual conferences on energy efficiency and renewable energy. From two main fields – biomass and energy efficiency in buildings – contributions offer an insight into the research work and the scientific findings and developments of young researchers from all over the world. The papers were selected by a high-level scientific committee for oral presentation. They also communicate results, trends and opinions that will concern and influence the world’s energy experts and policy makers over the next decades. The conference was held from 26-27 February 2014. The conference The conference is organized by the Energy Agency of Upper Austria (OÖ Energiesparverband) and held in Wels annually in February or March. It attracts more than 700 experts from over 50 countries every year. The Editors Christiane Egger is the deputy managing director of the OÖ Energiesparverband and the Manager of the Ökoenergie-Cluster, a network of 160 co...

  1. SHORT COMMUNICATIONS World Food Day: 16 October 2008

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-10-16

    Oct 16, 2008 ... World Food Day highlights the human right of each person to food and provides a platform to increase awareness of the plight of the 850 million malnourished people around the world, most of whom live in developing countries and depend on agriculture for their livelihoods. Due to global warming and the ...

  2. Stroke risk factors among participants of a world stroke day ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-04-20

    Apr 20, 2015 ... Conclusion: Stroke risk factors such as hypertension and obesity were common among the participants of the world stroke day awareness program in an urban area of Nigeria. Community screening and modification of these risk factors should be intensified in order to reduce stroke morbidity and mortality.

  3. 78 FR 37427 - World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office #0; #0; #0; Presidential... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8995 of June 14, 2013 World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, 2013 By the President... citizens are the victims of abuse, neglect, or financial exploitation. Elder abuse is a global public...

  4. Diabetes Dictating Policy: An Editorial Commemorating World Health Day 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirhossein Takian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The 21st century is an era of great challenge for humankind; we are combating terrorism, climate change, poverty, human rights issues and last but not least non-communicable diseases (NCDs. The burden of the latter has become so large that it is being recognized by world leaders globally as an area that it is in need of much greater attention. In light of this concern, the World Health Organization (WHO dedicated this year’s World Health Day (held on April 7, 2016 to raising international awareness on diabetes, the fastest growing NCD in the world. This editorial is an account of the macro politics in place for fighting diabetes, both internationally and nationally.

  5. 2014: WHO's 25th World No Tobacco Day Global Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco Munoz, Cesar; Alejandra, Pérez-Pérez; Peruga, Armando; Luminita, Sanda

    2016-01-01

    Since 1988, WHO have celebrated and supported World No Tobacco Day (WNTD), linking each year to a different tobacco-related theme. New technologies and creative design have been used by WHO in order to adapt to the current trends and needs providing the public with visually attractive posters and brochures. A review of World Health Organization (WHO) material on WNTD was made, every year themes and posters were collected and analysed to be presented in a comprehensive way. A systematic timeline and an infographic were designed, enclosing the themes of WNTD across the years. The evolution of WNTD themes was commented on with a historical approach. WNTD has evolved adapting to the current scenarios, and is a good example of a global communication campaign on public health awareness and prevention.

  6. World Day for Safety and Health at Work

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    27 April is World Day for Safety and Health at Work.   CERN’s health and safety teams look forward to seeing you at their stands in each of the three restaurants. This year, we cast the spotlight on two topics: • ergonomics • electrical hazards. Come and get tips that will help you to ensure your safety and to stay healthy and, you never know, you might be lucky enough to win a nice prize. Don't forget, Friday, 27 April 2012 from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in your nearest restaurant!

  7. The August 2011 URSI World Day campaign: Initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immel, Thomas J.; Liu, Guiping; England, Scott L.; Goncharenko, Larisa P.; Erickson, Philip J.; Lyashenko, Mykhaylo V.; Milla, Marco; Chau, Jorge; Frey, Harald U.; Mende, Stephen B.; Zhou, Qihou; Stromme, Anja; Paxton, Larry J.

    2015-11-01

    During a 10-day URSI World Day observational campaign beginning on August 1, 2011, an isolated, major geomagnetic storm occurred. On August 5, Kp reached values of 8- and Dst dropped to -113 nT. The occurrence of this isolated storm in the middle of a 10-day URSI World Day campaign provides and unprecedented opportunity to observe the coupling of solar wind energy into the magnetosphere and to evaluate the varied effects that occur in the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system. Dramatic changes in the ionosphere are seen at every one of the active radar stations, extending from Greenland down to equatorial Peru in the American sector and at middle latitudes in Ukraine. Data from TIMED and THEMIS are shown to support initial interpretations of the observations, where we focus on processes in the middle latitude afternoon sector during main phase, and the formation of a dense equatorial ionosphere during storm recovery. The combined measurements strongly suggest that the changes in ionospheric conditions observed after the main storm phase can be attributed in large part to changes in the stormtime thermosphere. This is through the generation of disturbance dynamo winds and also global neutral composition changes that either reduce or enhance plasma densities in a manner that depends mainly upon latitude. Unlike larger storms with possibly more sustained forcing, this storm exhibits minimal effects of persistent meridional stormtime wind drag, and little penetration of solar wind electric potentials to low latitudes. It is, therefore, an outstanding example of an impulsive event that exhibits longer-term effects through modification of the background atmosphere.

  8. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for World War II veterans do not have to be...

  9. 78 FR 20409 - World Autism Awareness Day, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... officials estimate that 1 in every 88 children in America is growing up on the autism spectrum. It is a reality that affects millions of families every day, from the classroom to the job market. And while our... need a health care system that works for children and adults with ASDs. The Affordable Care Act...

  10. 77 FR 36901 - World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... live out the full measure of their days in health and security. Yet, every year, millions of older... grandparents, neighbors and friends. Elder abuse cuts across race, gender, culture, and circumstance, and... and premature death, while financial exploitation can rob men and women of the security they have...

  11. The Changing World of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Christiane K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Compared with other fields of medicine, there is hardly an area that has seen such fast development as the world of breast cancer. Indeed, the way we treat breast cancer has changed fundamentally over the past decades. Breast imaging has always been an integral part of this change, and it undergoes constant adjustment to new ways of thinking. This relates not only to the technical tools we use for diagnosing breast cancer but also to the way diagnostic information is used to guide treatment. There is a constant change of concepts for and attitudes toward breast cancer, and a constant flux of new ideas, new treatment approaches, and new insights into the molecular and biological behavior of this disease. Clinical breast radiologists and even more so, clinician scientists, interested in breast imaging need to keep abreast with this rapidly changing world. Diagnostic or treatment approaches that are considered useful today may be abandoned tomorrow. Approaches that seem irrelevant or far too extravagant today may prove clinically useful and adequate next year. Radiologists must constantly question what they do, and align their clinical aims and research objectives with the changing needs of contemporary breast oncology. Moreover, knowledge about the past helps better understand present debates and controversies. Accordingly, in this article, we provide an overview on the evolution of breast imaging and breast cancer treatment, describe current areas of research, and offer an outlook regarding the years to come. PMID:26083829

  12. A real health problem of our days: Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghita Raluca-Andreea

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the major mortality causes in the world, with an increased frequency in western countries, which are better developed economically. Romanian statistics show that the frequency of this type of cancer is increasing rapidly. In the year 2000, all over the world there were approximately 1 million new cases of colorectal cancer, and over 500 thousands deaths, thus affecting 1 from 20 inhabitants from the developed countries and being the second main cancer death cause, at both sexes in Europe. In Romania, incidence and mortality have doubled in the last 20 years, reaching a 17.74/100000 inhabitants incidence in the year 2000. Both for men and women, this disease is on the 3rd place in Romania, after bronhopulmonary cancer and gastric (for men and breast and uterus cancer, respectively.

  13. Stop TB in My Lifetime: A Call for a World Free of TB - World TB Day 2013

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-12

    In this podcast Dr. Kenneth Castro, Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, discusses World TB Day, the 2013 slogan and theme.  Created: 3/12/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/13/2012.

  14. World health day - 7th april, 2004 "road safety is no accident"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S C Saxena

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1948, the First World Health Assembly called for the creation of a "World Health Day". Since 1950, World Health Day has been celebrated on the 7th of April of each year. The objective of World Health Day is to raise global awareness of a specific health theme to highlight a priority area of concern for the World Health Organization (WHO. The Day serves as a launch for a long-term advocacy program for which activities will be undertaken and resources provided well beyond 7th April.To Celebrate the theme of this year "Road Safety is No accident", on 7th April 2004 around the globle, hundreds of organizations hosted events to help raise awareness about road traffic injuries, their grave consequences and enormous casts to society. They alsocontributed to spreading the message that such injuries can be prevented.In 1948, the First World Health Assembly called for the creation of a "World Health Day". Since 1950, World Health Day has been celebrated on the 7th of April of each year. The objective of World Health Day is to raise global awareness of a specific health theme to highlight a priority area of concern for the World Health Organization (WHO. The Day serves as a launch for a long-term advocacy program for which activities will be undertaken and resources provided well beyond 7th April.To Celebrate the theme of this year "Road Safety is No accident", on 7th April 2004 around the globle, hundreds of organizations hosted events to help raise awareness about road traffic injuries, their grave consequences and enormous casts to society. They alsocontributed to spreading the message that such injuries can be prevented.t '            ■The accident is defined as unexpected, unplanned event envolving injury, disability or death. The accidents occur in almost all countries. The most alarming fact is that accidents kill more young trained adults between 15-24 years of age group of males, mainly among two wheelers. All sorts of accidents

  15. Cancer incidence among Danish Seventh-day Adventists and Baptists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Hvidt, Niels Christian; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2012-01-01

    American Seventh-day Adventists have been reported to have lower cancer mortality and incidence than the general population. Adventists do not consume tobacco, alcohol or pork, and many adhere to a lacto-ovo-vegetarian lifestyle. Baptists discourage excessive use of alcohol and tobacco. In this s......American Seventh-day Adventists have been reported to have lower cancer mortality and incidence than the general population. Adventists do not consume tobacco, alcohol or pork, and many adhere to a lacto-ovo-vegetarian lifestyle. Baptists discourage excessive use of alcohol and tobacco...

  16. Nobel's day on recent advances in cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, A

    1993-01-01

    The June 7-10th Symposium on 'Recent Advances in Cancer Research', organized by Lorenzo Moretta in San Remo, Italy, on the occasion of Nobel's day, designated cancer genetics and tumor immunology as forefront areas in fundamental cancer research. While the central importance of oncogenes is obvious, this is less the case for the immunology of tumors, which has long been an area of descriptive phenomenology, wild speculation and unfulfilled expectation. The recent molecular identification of genes encoding a human melanoma antigen recognized by T cells, and of cytokines involved in the tumor-host interaction justifies renewed oncological interest in this area.

  17. 20 CFR 404.1321 - Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... post-World War II veterans. 404.1321 Section 404.1321 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... of the Uniformed Services Post-World War II Veterans § 404.1321 Ninety-day active service requirement for post-World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for post-World War II...

  18. Healthy Kids; Healthy World - Take Your Child to Work Day 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    On April 28th CGH joined several NCI offices at the Shady Grove campus to celebrate Take Your Child to Work Day 2016. Volunteers hosted three activity stations, each offering creative fun with a message: With healthy kids, we can create a healthier world.

  19. The theme of the world diabetes day 2014; healthy living and diabetes; a nephrology viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beladi-Mousavi Seyed Seifollah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Annually, on November 14, the world diabetes day (WDD is celebrated. WDD is a campaign led by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF and its member associations throughout the world. It was created in 1991 by IDF and World Health Organization (WHO in response to increasing concerns about the intensifying threat of diabetes worldwide. The WDD 2014 organization marks the first of a three-year (2014-16 emphasis on "healthy living and diabetes". Replacement of whole grain and cereal-based foods with refined grains in diet planning could be an operative and practical strategy in type II diabetic patients. This strategy beyond the development of glycemic control, leads to more benefits for management of other features of diabetes, diminution of diabetes-induced metabolic disorders, and prevents long-term complications especially diabetic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease.

  20. National convention on world homoeopathy day: Enhancing quality of research in homoeopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A national convention on World Homoeopathy Day was held to commemorate the 262nd birth anniversary of Dr. Samuel Hahnemann on 9th–10th April, 2017 at National Agricultural Science Complex, Pusa, New Delhi, India. The theme of the convention was ‘Enhancing Quality of Research in Homoeopathy’ inspired by the World Health Organization Traditional Medicine Strategy 2014–2023 for achieving Universal Health Coverage. Organised by the Central Council for Research in Homoeopathy, an autonomous research organisation of the Ministry of AYUSH, Government of India, the convention witnessed 11 oral presentations and focused group discussions held in parallel in the main and side hall, respectively. On this occasion, Awards of Excellence such as Lifetime Achievement Award, Best Teacher and Researcher Award, Young Scientist Award and Best Research Paper Award were also given.

  1. Cancer incidence in Israeli Jewish survivors of World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinan-Boker, Lital; Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Liphshitz, Irena; Linn, Shai; Barchana, Micha

    2009-11-04

    Israeli Jews of European origin have high incidence rates of all cancers, and many of them were exposed to severe famine and stress during World War II. We assessed cancer incidence in Israeli Jewish survivors of World War II. Cancer rates were compared in a cohort of 315 544 Israeli Jews who were born in Europe and immigrated to Israel before or during World War II (nonexposed group, n = 57 496) or after World War II and up to 1989 (the exposed group, ie, those potentially exposed to the Holocaust, n = 258 048). Because no individual data were available on actual Holocaust exposure, we based exposure on the immigration date for European-born Israeli Jews and decided against use of the term "Holocaust survivors," implying a known, direct individual Holocaust exposure. Cancer incidences were obtained from the Israel National Cancer Registry. Relative risk (RR) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for all cancer sites and for specific cancer sites, stratified by sex and birth cohort, and adjusted for time period. The nonexposed group contributed 908 436 person-years of follow-up, with 13 237 cancer diagnoses (crude rate per 100 000 person-years = 1457.1). The exposed group contributed 4 011 264 person-years of follow-up, with 56 060 cancer diagnoses (crude rate per 100 000 person-years = 1397.6). Exposure, compared with nonexposure, was associated with a statistically significantly increased risk for all-site cancer for all birth cohorts and for both sexes. The strongest associations between exposure and all-site cancer risk were observed in the youngest birth cohort of 1940-1945 (for men, RR = 3.50, 95% CI = 2.17 to 5.65; for women, RR = 2.33, 95% CI = 1.69 to 3.21). Excess risk was pronounced for breast cancer in the 1940-1945 birth cohort (RR = 2.44, 95% CI = 1.46 to 4.06) and for colorectal cancer in the 1935-1939 cohort (for men, RR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.19 to 2.59; for women, RR = 1.93, 95% CI = 1.25 to 3.00). Incidence of all cancers

  2. Days out of role due to common physical and mental conditions : results from the WHO World Mental Health surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, J.; Petukhova, M.; Vilagut, G.; Chatterji, S.; Heeringa, S.; Uestuen, T. B.; Alhamzawi, A. O.; Viana, M. C.; Angermeyer, M.; Bromet, E.; Bruffaerts, R.; de Girolamo, G.; Florescu, S.; Gureje, O.; Haro, J. M.; Hinkov, H.; Hu, C-y; Karam, E. G.; Kovess, V.; Levinson, D.; Medina-Mora, M. E.; Nakamura, Y.; Ormel, J.; Posada-Villa, J.; Sagar, R.; Scott, K. M.; Tsang, A.; Williams, D. R.; Kessler, R. C.; Ustun, T.B.; de, Girolamo G.

    2011-01-01

    Days out of role because of health problems are a major source of lost human capital. We examined the relative importance of commonly occurring physical and mental disorders in accounting for days out of role in 24 countries that participated in the World Health Organization (WHO) World Mental

  3. Probiotics and nutrients for the first 1000 days of life in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enos, M K; Burton, J P; Dols, J; Buhulata, S; Changalucha, J; Reid, G

    2013-03-01

    Clinically proven probiotics are, for the most part, not available in the developing world and certainly not affordable for the majority of people. This is unconscionable considering these products can alleviate diarrhoea and various infections, which are by far the major cause of death in children and in adults who are HIV positive. Indeed, some of these products have been proven in developing world settings. Distribution networks exist along with pharmacies and clinics that dispense drugs and products that require refrigeration. So, are lack of profit or company resources the problem? Our university has shown that alternative community based kitchen models that produce probiotics can be established. These empower local people, are socially responsible, produce affordable products and deliver benefits to over 3,000 children and adults daily. Surely, other institutions and corporations can multiply this effect and develop social business models across the developing world that are supported by clinical and basic science studies? In this review, we will discuss the application of probiotics and selected nutrients in the first 1000 days of life, a critical timepoint which is particularly challenging in resource disadvantaged countries.

  4. [Message of the Minister of Health, Dr. Casimir Bizimungu, on World Population Day, July 11, 1992].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizimungu, C

    1992-08-01

    Each year since 1987, when the world population reached 5 billion, the UN Population Fund has organized a World Population Day. Population problems are a worldwide phenomenon, although each country's experience is different. Rwanda has long been affected by a population growing faster than food production. The population in 1900 was estimated to be 1 million. It will probably exceed 10 million by the year 2000. Population density will have increased from around 40 per sq. km in 1900 to more than 400 in 2000. Almost all available lands are already under cultivation. Harvests are already insufficient as a result of drought and war, and chronic or even structural famine is occurring. Forests are disappearing due to excessive consumption of wood, and even steep slopes have been denuded. The population has no possibility of survival except through destruction of its precious capital. Health care is also deteriorating because construction of new centers cannot keep pace with population growth. Despite great progress in school enrollment, which increased from 320,000 primary school students in 1962 to 1,058,000 in 1989, the number of unenrolled primary aged children has increased from 260,000 in 1962 to more than 560,000 today. Rwanda's population growth is also a problem of urbanization, as rural youth with no possibilities of employment seek their livelihood in towns and cities. The secondary school system in Rwanda is blocked, and facilities for technical education are insufficient. Rural migrants often lack the skills needed for meaningful employment in the cities. Population growth is therefore, the principal obstacle to development in Rwanda. The pronatalist traditions of Rwanda should be altered to give greater weight to the quest for an improved quality of life. 5 million Rwandans under 25 should have fewer children and give them the means to achieve a better future through education. This goal of fewer children will require a revolution in attitudes and beliefs

  5. Observations of TID during the February 2016 ISR World Day campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Andrew J.; Baddeley, Lisa; Grocott, Adrian; Lorentzen, Dag; Moffat-Griffin, Tracy; Partamies, Noora

    2017-04-01

    Gravity waves in the thermosphere interact with the ionosphere causing Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs); periodic structures observed in ionospheric parameters such as the plasma density and temperatures. There are two broad sources for these TIDs: waves are generated in-situ by processes such as Joule Heating or they propagate upwards from the lower and middle atmosphere. If the latter source dominates this provides a mechanism for gravity waves generated by meteorological forcing to play a role in the variability of the upper atmosphere in the polar regions. For five days in February 2016 the global array of incoherent scatter radars operated in conjunction as part of a World Day campaign to study gravity waves in the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. Due to the combination of local orography and weather northern Norway is a hotspot for gravity wave generation in the winter months. It also lies within the auroral zone, where geomagnetic activity plays a key role in the ionospheric variability. Data from the EISCAT radars in Norway indicate the presence of gravity waves in the thermosphere during the campaign; TID with periods of 1-2 hours were observed as well as longer period tidal features. These occurred on a variable ionospheric background driven by geomagnetic activity, including bursts of strong ionospheric heating. We will present an analysis of the waves observed by the radars and surrounding instrumentation and an assessment of their contribution to the ionospheric variability during this experimental campaign.

  6. Influence of World Thrombosis Day on digital information seeking on venous thrombosis: a Google Trends study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheres, L J J; Lijfering, W M; Middeldorp, S; Cannegieter, S C

    2016-12-01

    Essentials In 2014, World Thrombosis Day (WTD) was initiated to increase global awareness of thrombosis. Google Trends can be used freely to monitor digital information seeking behavior. We used Google Trends data to assess the impact of WTD on internet searches on venous thrombosis. The WTD period was associated with more searches on thrombosis compared to control periods. Background World Thrombosis Day (WTD) was launched in 2014 and is to be held every year to increase global awareness of venous thrombosis. Measuring the impact of health awareness days is challenging; however, use of internet-based data seems promising. Methods Google Trends data were used to quantify digital searches for 'venous thrombosis' worldwide and 'trombose' in the Netherlands. The relative search volume (RSV), which is the proportion of the term of interest amongst all Google searches for a specific region and timeframe was used. Mean differences for 4 weeks surrounding WTD (period of interest) and the remaining weeks of the year (control period) were estimated with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). This was done for 2014, 2015 and 2009-2013 (control years). Results and discussion Mean differences in RSV for worldwide searches were 2.9 (95% CI, -8.2, 14.1) in 2014 and 10.5 (95% CI, 0.4, 20.5) in 2015. These figures were 15.3 (95% CI, 4.7, 25.8) and 15.9 (95% CI, 7.8, 24.1) for the Netherlands, respectively. Relatively, this corresponds to an increase in RSV of 3.9% and 13.9% for 2014 and 2015 worldwide and a 21.9% and 23.3% increase for 2014 and 2015 in the Netherlands. There was one control year with an increase in RSV in the WTD period. Conclusion In 2014 and 2015 WTD was associated with an increase in digital information seeking on venous thrombosis worldwide. This association was more pronounced in 2015 than in 2014. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  7. Mapping Monolingualism within a Language/Race Cartography: Reflections and Lessons Learned from "World Languages and Cultures Day"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Adam; Boovy, Bradley

    2017-01-01

    An interactive exhibit at a university's "World Language Day" challenges systems of privilege that organize the study of "foreign" and "world" languages. Through discursive framing, participants' written responses reveal an alignment with hegemonic ideologies of race and nation that elevate English monolingualism as a…

  8. The effect of World Blood Donor Day on digital information seeking and donor recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranenburg, Floris J; Kreuger, Aukje L; Arbous, M Sesmu; Laeijendecker, Daphne; van Kraaij, Marian G J

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of World Blood Donor Day (WBDD) is to raise awareness for the importance of blood donation. The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of WBDD on digital information seeking and donor recruitment. Google Trends data were used to quantify seeking behavior on "blood donation" and "blood donor." Differences in relative search volume (RSV) between the 3 weeks surrounding WBDD and the rest of the year were calculated. Second, mean differences in RSV were compared to assess the additional effect of hosting using translated search terms. Third, we compared the period around WBDD with the control period regarding page views of the Sanquin website and Facebook likes and number of newly registered donors in 2016. The mean RSV for "blood donation" in the period of interest was 78.6, compared to 72.1 in the control period (difference, 6.5; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.2-11.8). For "blood donor" this was 78.9 compared to 65.9 (difference, 12.9; 95% CI, 8.1-17.8). We found no additional effect of hosting. In the period of interest, the website of Sanquin was visited 6862 times a day and 4293 times in the control period (difference, 2569; 95% CI, 1687-3451). In June 2016, 54.6% (95% CI, 53.0-56.2) more new donors were registered compared to the control period. An international campaign like WBDD raises the awareness of blood donation and is effective in convincing people to register as blood donors. © 2017 AABB.

  9. Annual City Festivals as Tools for Sustainable Competitiveness: The World Port Days Rotterdam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin van Tuijl

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Many cities organize annual local festivals for the positive effects on urban development, although success is far from straightforward. This article reviews a case study of the World Port Days in Rotterdam in order to demonstrate how annual city festivals can contribute to sustainable competitiveness, despite limitations as well. We show how this maritime event—that is jointly organized by the business community, the Port Authority and the City Government—offers benefits for citizens as well as for firms. Our empirical results unveil that the business value of the event includes generation of societal support, image improvement, labor market development and networking, while the value for society refers to education, leisure and to a certain degree to social inclusion. The direct value of the event for business in terms of sales and recruitment is limited, while the long-term effects of educational function deserve further attention. Finally, we provide policy lessons that, when properly contextualized, other cities may help to use annual local festivals as tools for sustainable competitiveness.

  10. World Sight Day 2013 Memorandum - Farabi Statement on the Prevention of Blindness and Eye Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S-Farzad Mohammadi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The World Sight Day (WSD is held on the 2nd Thursday of October to emphasize the importance of sight and impact of vision impairment. This observance is a joint initiative of the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB, the World Health Organization (WHO and other international non-governmental organizations.1 The celebration resonates with Vision 2020 initiative for the control of avoidable blindness by the year 2020. It can promote professional as well as public awareness about sight and vision impairment. This is wise as we know that most cases of visual impairment are preventable or treatable; nonetheless there are more than 280 million people, including 19 million children, who live with visual impairment.2 This is much more a priority for the developing countries because they inhabit 90% of the visually impaired.3 Epidemiological transition has already commenced in the developing world4-7 but they are not ready to take care of the age-related blinding conditions. Non-governmental and community organizations would probably be the ideal entities to organize and celebrate WSD on a national level. But participation from a wide range of state and humanitarian bodies and even leading figures and celebrities is conceivable and welcomed. This should culminate in community initiatives for wanting resources and fund raising, and should influence policy-makers to develop and implement blindness prevention programs. The WHO Action Plan 2013 on the prevention of avoidable blindness and visual impairment has suggested the theme ‘Universal Eye Health’ for WSD 2013. The plan seeks “integration of comprehensive eye care (from promotion to rehabilitation services into health systems”, and expects to address equity challenge. The theme is so ambitious and encompassing that might continue as a consistent one in the next years, focusing on a different aspect of the theme each year. The call to action in 2013 was ‘Get your Eyes

  11. What we do and do not know about women and kidney diseases; Questions unanswered and answers unquestioned: Reflection on World Kidney Day and International Woman's Day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Giorgina B; Alrukhaimi, Mona; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Zakharova, Elena; Levin, Adeera

    2017-11-13

    Chronic Kidney Disease affects approximately 10% of the world's adult population: it is within the top 20 causes of death worldwide, and its impact on patients and their families can be devastating. World Kidney Day and International Women's Day in 2018 coincide, thus offering an opportunity to reflect on the importance of women's health and specifically their kidney health, on the community, and the next generations, as well as to strive to be more curious about the unique aspects of kidney disease in women so that we may apply those learnings more broadly. Girls and women, who make up approximately 50% of the world's population, are important contributors to society and their families. Gender differences continue to exist around the world in access to education, medical care, and participation in clinical studies. Pregnancy is a unique state for women, offering an opportunity for diagnosis of kidney disease, but also a state where acute and chronic kidney diseases may manifest, and which may impact future generations with respect to kidney health. There are various autoimmune and other conditions that are more likely to impact women with profound consequences for child bearing, and on the fetus. Women have different complications on dialysis than men, and are more likely to be donors than recipients of kidney transplants. In this editorial, we focus on what we do and do not know about women, kidney health, and kidney disease, and what we might learn in the future to improve outcomes worldwide. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Days Out of Role due to Common Physical and Mental Conditions: Results from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys.

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Days out of role due to health problems are a major source of lost human capital. We examined the relative importance of commonly occurring physical and mental disorders in accounting for days out of role in 24 countries that participated in the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys. Face-to-face interviews were carried out with 62,971 respondents (72.0% pooled response rate). Presence of ten chronic physical disorders and nine mental disorders was assessed for each respon...

  13. Filozofia i świat współczesny (Philosophy and the present-day world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Judycki

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article aims at showing what role philosophical education should fulfill in the present-day world. One of the main causes of cultural, scientific and technological development of the Western civilization can be seen in the close cooperation between philosophy, theology, science and humanities. Although modern science functions independently from philosophy, it is nevertheless possible that even today fundamental theoretical problems in science and speculative philosophical problems are closely connected and mutually influence each other.Characteristic for present-day world is the broad access to education and information, but new means of information which we possess today are also used as means of manipulation. Philosophical education can fulfill the role of a defense mechanism against manipulation because it leads to the development of critical attitude and to the very broad understanding of natural and social world. Only uncompromising desire for truth, broad understanding of natural and social world, the habit of critical thinking could in an important way influence the development of true tolerance and harmony in the social life in the present-day world.

  14. What we do and do not know about women and kidney diseases; questions unanswered and answers unquestioned: Reflection on World Kidney Day and International Woman's Day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Giorgina B; Alrukhaimi, Mona; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Zakharova, Elena; Levin, Adeera

    2017-12-26

    Chronic kidney disease affects approximately 10% of the world's adult population: it is within the top 20 causes of death worldwide, and its impact on patients and their families can be devastating. World Kidney Day and International Women's Day in 2018 coincide, thus offering an opportunity to reflect on the importance of women's health and specifically their kidney health, on the community, and the next generations, as well as to strive to be more curious about the unique aspects of kidney disease in women so that we may apply those learnings more broadly. Girls and women, who make up approximately 50% of the world's population, are important contributors to society and their families. Gender differences continue to exist around the world in access to education, medical care, and participation in clinical studies. Pregnancy is a unique state for women, offering an opportunity for diagnosis of kidney disease, but also a state where acute and chronic kidney diseases may manifest, and which may impact future generations with respect to kidney health. There are various autoimmune and other conditions that are more likely to impact women with profound consequences for child bearing, and on the fetus. Women have different complications on dialysis than men, and are more likely to be donors than recipients of kidney transplants. In this editorial, we focus on what we do and do not know about women, kidney health, and kidney disease, and what we might learn in the future to improve outcomes worldwide. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. All rights reserved.

  15. Berlin : Three-day Geomatics Capital of the World. A Review of Intergeo 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kodde, M.; Lemmens, M.J.P.M.; Van Wegen, W.

    2014-01-01

    Intergeo is the annual gathering in Germany of geomaticians, surveyors and GIS experts from around the world. The show provides an excellent opportunity to meet other professionals and to compare products. It is also an occasion to assess the state of business and innovation in the fi eld of

  16. Peace Begins with Me--Celebrating United Nations World Peace Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Jeanette E.

    2009-01-01

    By integrating the concept of peace into the school curriculum, children can be taught that peaceful resolution of conflicts is a desirable goal for them, personally, as well as the world at large. Staff members at Orange-Ulster School in Monroe, New York, took on the challenge of integrating the concept of peace into the curriculum. They soon…

  17. Days out of role due to common physical and mental conditions: results from the WHO World Mental Health surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, J; Petukhova, M; Vilagut, G; Chatterji, S; Heeringa, S; Üstün, T B; Alhamzawi, A O; Viana, M C; Angermeyer, M; Bromet, E; Bruffaerts, R; de Girolamo, G; Florescu, S; Gureje, O; Haro, J M; Hinkov, H; Hu, C-y; Karam, E G; Kovess, V; Levinson, D; Medina-Mora, M E; Nakamura, Y; Ormel, J; Posada-Villa, J; Sagar, R; Scott, K M; Tsang, A; Williams, D R; Kessler, R C

    2011-12-01

    Days out of role because of health problems are a major source of lost human capital. We examined the relative importance of commonly occurring physical and mental disorders in accounting for days out of role in 24 countries that participated in the World Health Organization (WHO) World Mental Health (WMH) surveys. Face-to-face interviews were carried out with 62 971 respondents (72.0% pooled response rate). Presence of ten chronic physical disorders and nine mental disorders was assessed for each respondent along with information about the number of days in the past month each respondent reported being totally unable to work or carry out their other normal daily activities because of problems with either physical or mental health. Multiple regression analysis was used to estimate associations of specific conditions and comorbidities with days out of role, controlling by basic socio-demographics (age, gender, employment status and country). Overall, 12.8% of respondents had some day totally out of role, with a median of 51.1 a year. The strongest individual-level effects (days out of role per year) were associated with neurological disorders (17.4), bipolar disorder (17.3) and post-traumatic stress disorder (15.2). The strongest population-level effect was associated with pain conditions, which accounted for 21.5% of all days out of role (population attributable risk proportion). The 19 conditions accounted for 62.2% of all days out of role. Common health conditions, including mental disorders, make up a large proportion of the number of days out of role across a wide range of countries and should be addressed to substantially increase overall productivity.

  18. CERN birthplace of the World Wide Web relies on Day's Communiqué

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    In close collaboration with CERN, Day developed a platform to enable interested research groups to integrate disparate data sources and to author content based on individual needs... Days Virtual Repository - The ContentBus - allows the integration of data sources and provides for the presentation of all work processes at CERN, from pure text to complex research data. With data procured in real time from the original location, it avoids data redundancy, insufficient scalability and unneccessary allocation of resources for constant data reconcilliation and additional database licenses.

  19. Empirical behavior of a world stock index from intra-day to monthly time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breymann, W.; Lüthi, D. R.; Platen, E.

    2009-10-01

    Most of the papers that study the distributional and fractal properties of financial instruments focus on stock prices or foreign exchange rates. This typically leads to mixed results concerning the distributions of log-returns and some multi-fractal properties of exchange rates, stock prices, and regional indices. This paper uses a well diversified world stock index as the central object of analysis. Such index approximates the growth optimal portfolio, which is demonstrated under the benchmark approach, it is the ideal reference unit for studying basic securities. When denominating this world index in units of a given currency, one measures the movements of the currency against the entire market. This provides a least disturbed observation of the currency dynamics. In this manner, one can expect to disentangle, e.g., the superposition of the two currencies involved in an exchange rate. This benchmark approach to the empirical analysis of financial data allows us to establish remarkable stylized facts. Most important is the observation that the repeatedly documented multi-fractal appearance of financial time series is very weak and much less pronounced than the deviation of the mono-scaling properties from Brownian-motion type scaling. The generalized Hurst exponent H(2) assumes typical values between 0.55 and 0.6. Accordingly, autocorrelations of log-returns decay according to a power law, and the quadratic variation vanishes when going to vanishing observation time step size. Furthermore, one can identify the Student t distribution as the log-return distribution of a well-diversified world stock index for long time horizons when a long enough data series is used for estimation. The study of dependence properties, finally, reveals that jumps at daily horizon originate primarily in the stock market while at 5min horizon they originate in the foreign exchange market. The principal message of the empirical analysis is that there is evidence that a diffusion model

  20. Learning about World War II at the D-Day Beaches of Normandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Lynne M.

    2013-01-01

    In the winter of 2011, this author was working late in her classroom at Central Bucks High School West in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, when she opened an email offering a summer institute where 15 teachers would walk the D-Day beaches in Normandy, France. The catch--each teacher had to bring one high school student. The Albert Small Student/Teacher…

  1. Breast cancer in the world: Incidence and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Paula Curado

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe the burden of breast cancer in the world, as the now most common cancer in women in the globe. Here a descriptive pattern based on information available in IARC and WHO databases describing estimated age-specific incidence is presented, both for incidence and mortality. The newer treatment modalities and screening programs have been developed to alleviate the burden of this disease, but much more needs to be done in the developing countries for the impact to reach outside of the developed nations.El objetivo de este documento es describir la carga del cáncer de mama en el mundo, puesto que es el cáncer más común entre las mujeres del planeta. Aquí se presenta un patrón descriptivo basado en la información disponible en las bases de datos de la IARC y la OMS, describiendo estimaciones de la incidencia por grupos específicos de edad, tanto para incidencia como mortalidad. Las nuevas modalidades de tratamiento y programas de tamizaje se han desarrollado para aligerar la carga de esta enfermedad, pero necesita hacerse mucho más en los países en vías de desarrollo para que el impacto alcance más allá de las naciones desarrolladas.

  2. MCTP Summer Research Internship Program. Research Presentation Day: Experience Mathematics and Science in the Real World

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the summaries of the MCTP Summer Research Internship Program. Technological areas discussed include: Mathematical curriculum development for real world problems; Rain effects on air-water gas exchange; multi-ring impact basins on mars; developing an interactive multimedia educational cd-rom on remote sensing; a pilot of an activity for for the globe program; fossils in maryland; developing children's programming for the american horticultural society at river farm; children's learning, educational programs of the national park service; a study of climate and student satisfaction in two summer programs for disadvantaged students interested in careers in mathematics and science; the maryland governor's academy, integrating technology into the classroom; stream sampling with the maryland biological stream survey (MBSS); the imaging system inspection software technology, the preparation and detection of nominal and faulted steel ingots; event-based science, the development of real-world science units; correlation between anxiety and past experiences; environmental education through summer nature camp; enhancing learning opportunities at the Salisbury zoo; plant growth experiment, a module for the middle school classroom; the effects of proxisome proliferators in Japanese medaka embryos; development of a chapter on birth control and contraceptive methodologies as part of an interactive computer-based education module on hiv and aids; excretion of gentamicin in toadfish and goldfish; the renaissance summer program; and Are field trips important to the regional math science center?

  3. Day One Talk: parent preferences when learning that their child has cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Rachel M; Roth, Michael; Moody, Karen; Levy, Adam

    2013-11-01

    The discussion that occurs between a pediatric oncologist and a family when they first learn about their child's new diagnosis of cancer is known as the "Day One Talk." Few studies have addressed parent preferences when learning that their child has been diagnosed with cancer. The objective of this study is to assess what information parents of children with newly diagnosed cancer believe is important to learn during the Day One Talk. In this cross-sectional study, a survey tool based on expert opinion was created to assess parents' views of components of the Day One Talk including its content, length, and setting, as well as whether the child should be present for the initial talk and which staff should be present for the talk. Sixty-two parents of children with newly diagnosed cancer participated. Ninety-seven percent believed that the Day One Talk is extremely important. Ninety percent believed that the word "cancer" should be used during the Day One Talk. Seventy-seven percent believed that the pediatric oncologist should provide specific numbers regarding cure rates for the patient's diagnosis. Eighty-four percent of parents do not believe that children younger than 14 should be present. These results suggest that parents of children with cancer have certain preferences regarding the Day One Talk. When conducting the Day One Talk, providers should elicit parent preferences regarding these issues in order to best meet families' needs.

  4. Countdown to zero Day stuxnet and the launch of the world's first digital weapon

    CERN Document Server

    Zetter, Kim

    2014-01-01

    In January 2010, inspectors with the International Atomic Energy Agency noticed that centrifuges at an Iranian uranium enrichment plant were failing at an unprecedented rate. The cause was a complete mystery—apparently as much to the technicians replacing the centrifuges as to the inspectors observing them. Then, five months later, a seemingly unrelated event occurred: A computer security firm in Belarus was called in to troubleshoot some computers in Iran that were crashing and rebooting repeatedly. At first, the firm’s programmers believed the malicious code on the machines was a simple, routine piece of malware. But as they and other experts around the world investigated, they discovered a mysterious virus of unparalleled complexity. They had, they soon learned, stumbled upon the world’s first digital weapon. For Stuxnet, as it came to be known, was unlike any other virus or worm built before: Rather than simply hijacking targeted computers or stealing information from them, it escaped the d...

  5. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research recommendations and head and neck cancers risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravi, Francesca; Polesel, Jerry; Garavello, Werner; Serraino, Diego; Negri, Eva; Franchin, Gianni; La Vecchia, Carlo; Bosetti, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) have proposed eight recommendations for cancer prevention, related to body fatness, diet, and physical activity. Our aim is to evaluate the role of adherence to these recommendations on head and neck cancers risk. We obtained an overall score including seven of the WCRF/AICR recommendations, and examined its relationship with head and neck cancers risk in two Italian case-control studies including 946 patients with oral cavity and pharyngeal (OCP) cancer and 2492 controls, and 689 patients with laryngeal cancer and 1605 controls. Higher adherence to WCRF/AICR recommendations was associated to a reduced risk of OCP cancer (odds ratio, OR=0.45, 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.33-0.62 for a score of 4-laryngeal cancer were 0.68 (95% CI: 0.50-0.92) for a score of 3-cancer prevention is associated with a substantially decreased risk of head and neck cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The role of skin self-examination at the Swiss skin cancer day

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badertscher, N.; Meier, M.; Rosemann, T.; Braun, R.; Cozzio, A.; Tag, B.; Wensing, M.; Tandjung, R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The rising incidence of melanoma - Switzerland has the highest incidence in Europe - is a major public health challenge. Swiss dermatologist introduced the "Swiss Skin Cancer Day" (SSCD) in 2006, which provides skin cancer screening at no costs. The aim of the study was to describe the

  7. Implementing world class manufacturing ideas: A case study at the Dalles/John Day Dams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armentrout, T.B. [Army Corps of Engineers, Dalles, OR (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The key question is can a very autocratically lead, vertically defined organization change to a horizontal, employee empowered structure where the employees have significant influence? All too often managers look to a simple and easy procedure which will bring about dramatic change, however this kind of dreaming is naive. {open_quotes}For every complex question there is a simple answer, and it is wrong!{close_quotes} This experience described in this case indicates the transformation from the autocratic extreme to the team model takes a long time and is a difficult process. To begin the transformation at The Dalles and John Day has taken concerted effort over six years to set the foundations in place. Guiding the organization to a complete restructuring will take at least several more years. Managers and organizations who are not willing to make the long term commitment need not attempt the change!

  8. Accuracy and consequences of same-day, invasive lung cancer workup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kirsten Riis; Høegholm, Asbjørn; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Though widely used, little is known about accuracy and efficacy of same-day, invasive workup of suspected lung cancer. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the accuracy and efficacy of same-day, invasive lung cancer workup (diagnosis and mediastinal staging), and to identify differences between...... patients without (Group A) or with (Group B) need for resampling. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed on all consecutive patients referred for surgical treatment for localised lung cancer after invasive diagnostic and staging workup at our unit. Data were extracted from electronic medical files...... pulmonary disease. Tumour located in right upper lobe was associated with need for resampling. DISCUSSION: Our retrospective study suggests that same-day, invasive workup for lung cancer is safe, accurate, and efficacious in reducing time to therapy, even in patients with small lesions and low tumour burden....

  9. The appropriateness of 30-day mortality as a quality metric in colorectal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Mohamed Abdelgadir; Turner, Megan C; Sun, Zhifei; Kim, Jina; Ezekian, Brian; Migaly, John; Mantyh, Christopher R

    2018-01-01

    Our study compares 30-day vs. 90-day mortality following colorectal cancer surgery (CRS), and examines hospital performance ranking based on this assessment. Mortality rates were compared between 30 vs. 90 days following CRS for patients with stage I-III colorectal cancers from the National Cancer Database (2004-2012). Risk-adjusted hierarchical regression models evaluated hospital performance based on mortality. Hospitals were ranked into top (10%), middle (80%), and lowest (10%) performance groups. Among 185,464 patients, 90-day mortality was nearly double the 30-day mortality (4.4% vs. 2.5%). Following risk adjustment 176 hospitals changed performance ranking: 39% in the top 30-day mortality group changed ranking to the middle group; 37% of hospitals in the lowest 30-day group changed ranking to the middle 90-day group. Evaluation of hospital performance based on 30-day mortality is associated with misclassification for 15% of hospitals. Ninety-day mortality may be a better quality metric in oncologic CRS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Occurrence of the Day-of-the-Week Effects on Polish and Major World Stock Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamróz Paweł

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze the occurrence of the so called day of the week effects in market return time series from the period of January 2003 to September 2013 (and additionally January 1999 to December 2002. The study focuses on four indices of the Warsaw Stock Exchange (WIG, WIG20, mWIG40 and sWIG80 and additionally five indices of major world stock exchanges (NIKKEI 225, DAX, CAC40, S&P 500, and IBEX. The main data sample was divided into three subperiods in order to determine whether or not the intensity of day of the week anomalies is constant in time. The study revealed a substantial number of the day of the week anomalies in earliest subperiods and very limited evidence of those effects in later ones, giving rise to the conclusion that the intensity of the day of the week anomalies is diminishing with time. The most common effect identified on the WSE was a positive Friday effect. The Monday effect often described in early literature on the subject matter seems to currently occur very rarely. The study also indicates that the day of the week effects were more persistent among stocks with smaller market capitalization on the WSE.

  11. Young breast cancer patients in the developing world: incidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cancer in a young woman (or early onset breast cancer) as occurring in a woman less than 35 years of age. A diagnosis of breast cancer in a young woman impacts severely on all aspects ... The average age of diagnosis may be younger for women in developing countries than for ... 1995 it has overtaken cervical cancer as.

  12. Young breast cancer patients in the developing world: incidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carcinoma of the breast is the most common cause of cancer in women in Western society. Although breast cancer occurs predominantly in older premenopausal and postmenopausal women, it also occurs in young women. Literature defines breast cancer in a young woman (or early onset breast cancer) as occurring in a ...

  13. [Days out of role due to common mental and physical disorders: French results from the WHO World Mental Health surveys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icick, R; Kovess, V; Gasquet, I; Lépine, J-P

    2014-09-01

    The burden of health problems, including mental disorders, can be assessed in several ways such as through healthcare costs or loss of productivity. Their impact on daily activities as a whole has received much less attention, especially in France. Therefore, we undertook the analysis of the French general population data from the World Mental Health (WMH) surveys promoted by the World Health Organization (WHO) assessing the number of days out of role due to common mental and physical disorders. Face-to-face interviews were carried out with 2894 respondents (45.9% pooled response rate). Presence of ten chronic physical disorders and nine mental disorders was assessed for each respondent along with information about the number of days in the past month each respondent reported being totally unable to work or carry out their other normal daily activities because of problems with either physical or mental health. Multiple regression analysis was used to estimate associations of specific conditions and comorbidities with days out of role, after controlling for basic socio-demographics. One thousand four hundred and thirty-six subjects reporting at least one core-symptom of a mental disorder underwent the whole assessment. The mean annual number of days out of role was high among those with at least one mental disorder (24.2±8.3). The population attributable risk proportion (PARP), i.e. the proportion of days out of role that would have been avoided if the considered disorder had remitted, was also estimated. Mental disorders as a whole accounted for 49.5% of the PARP. French data on days out of role from the WHO WMH surveys showed the high burden of mental illness in the general population. These results may have been underestimated, taking into account that subjects who were hospitalized at the time of recruitment, whose disorders might also account for a high proportion of days out of role, could not be assessed with our design. Common health conditions, especially

  14. 75 FR 77901 - 30-Day Notice of Opportunity for Public Comment on U.S. Nominations to the World Heritage List...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... the long term. In order to guide the U.S. World Heritage Program effectively and in a timely manner... new U.S. World Heritage Tentative List by governmental and private property owners. It was intended... National Park Service 30-Day Notice of Opportunity for Public Comment on U.S. Nominations to the World...

  15. Preparation of triple-negative breast cancer vaccine through electrofusion with day-3 dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs in human immune system. DC-based tumor vaccine has met with some success in specific malignancies, inclusive of breast cancer. In this study, we electrofused MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line with day-3 DCs derived from peripheral blood monocytes, and explored the biological characteristics of fusion vaccine and its anti-tumor effects in vitro. Day-3 mature DCs were generated from day-2 immature DCs by adding cocktails composed of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and PEG2. Day-3 mature DCs were identified and electofused with breast cancer cells to generate fusion vaccine. Phenotype of fusion cells were identified by fluorescence microscope and flow cytometer. The fusion vaccine was evaluated for T cell proliferation, secretion of IL-12 and IFN-γ, and induction of tumor-specific CTL response. Despite differences in morphology, day-3 and day-7 DC expressed similar surface markers. The secretion of IL-12 and IFN-γ in fusion vaccine group was much higher than that in the control group. Compared with control group, DC-tumor fusion vaccine could better stimulate the proliferation of allogeneic T lymphocytes and kill more breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 in vitro. Day-3 DCs had the same function as the day-7 DCs, but with a shorter culture period. Our findings suggested that day-3 DCs fused with whole apoptotic breast cancer cells could elicit effective specific antitumor T cell responses in vitro and may be developed into a prospective candidate for adoptivet immunotherapy.

  16. World Teachers Day (optional)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    A panel of experts, moderated by Matt Parker, will take his cue to discuss what CERN does to empower teachers and to promote scientific education, especially within the CERN & Society programme and in the context of the United Nations’ 2030 agenda for Sustainable Development. See more details here and register here

  17. World Thyroid day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - -

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available В 2009 г. Европейская тиреоидная ассоциация (www.eurothyroid.com предложила отмечать 25 мая Всемирный день щитовидной железы. Эта инициатива была поддержана на международном тиреоидологическом конгрессе осенью 2012 г. в Париже всеми другими тиреоидными ассоциациями: Американской, Латиноамериканской и ассоциацией Азии и Океании. Всемирный день житовидной железы преследует пять основных целей (http://www.worldthyroidday.com/: 1. Повышение общественной информированности о проблемах, связанных с щитовидной железой (ЩЖ, и об их медико-социальном значении. 2. Повышение информированности о распространенности заболеваний ЩЖ и методах их раннего выявления.3. Пропаганда программ профилактики и образовательных программ в области патологии ЩЖ. 4. Пропаганда современных методов лечения заболеваний ЩЖ. 5. Повышение доступности медицинской помощи в области заболеваний ЩЖ. В первую очередь, Всемирный день щитовидной железы посвящен проблемам пациентов с патологией ЩЖ, по аналогии с днем диабета. Патология ЩЖ значительно распространена в популяции: если суммировать число пациентов, получавших лечение по поводу рака ЩЖ, болезни Грейвса, получающих заместительную терапию гипотиреоза и приплюсовать к ним пациентов с эндокринной орбитопатией, получится внушительная цифра. При разных заболеваниях ЩЖ перед пациентами возникают и постоянно наполняют их жизнь совершенно разные проблемы: от канцерофобии и боязни рецидива рака ЩЖ до выраженных изменений внешности при орбитопатии. Многие пациенты ощущают себя изгоями, теряют работу, испытывают проблемы в личной жизни.

  18. World Kidney Day 2012

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-01

    Feb 1, 2012 ... white populations in the USA.7 In New. Zealand, Maori and Pacific Island recipients of deceased donor transplants .... New Zealand, where Maori/Pacific Islanders are disadvantaged (14% v. 53%).21 In Mexico, ... social, cultural and economic disparities in transplant outcomes, including biological, immune ...

  19. Cost of breast cancer based on real-world data: a cancer registry study in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capri, Stefano; Russo, Antonio

    2017-01-26

    In European countries, it is difficult for local health organizations to determine the resources allocated to different hospitals for breast cancer. The aim of the current study was to examine the costs of breast cancer during the different phases of the diagnostictherapeutic sequence based on real world data. To identify breast cancer cases diagnosed between 2007 and 2011, we used the cancer registry of the Agency for Health Protection of the Province of Milan (3.2 million inhabitants). A generalized linear model controlling for patient age, cancer stage and Charlson co-morbidity index was used to calculate the adjusted mean costs for each hospital and for each study phase. Regression analyses were based on dependent variables of individual costs (diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and total cost were logtransformed. The following independent variables were included as covariates: age at diagnosis, hospital volume, stage, job category, educational level, marital status, comorbidities, deprivation index. Total and mean costs were computed for several variables and for each phase. On average for each subject, the costs were collected over 2.5 years. A total of 12,580 breast cancer cases were studied. The mean cost of diagnosis was €414, the mean cost of treatment was €8,780, the mean overall cost of follow-up was approximately €2,351, and the mean total direct medical cost was €10,970. The age of the patients, stage of tumor and employment level of the patient were significantly correlated with the variability of the costs. The highest variability in costs was observed for the follow-up costs, in which 38% of hospitals fell outside the 95% confidence interval. In the overspending-hospitals, patients received an intensive follow-up regimen with scintigraphy and thoracic CAT (computerized axial tomography). In this study, which represents the first population-level study of its kind in Italy, we estimated all direct medical costs for the 6-month period before

  20. Incidence and Mortality and Epidemiology of Breast Cancer in the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoncheh, Mahshid; Pournamdar, Zahra; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women around the world. Information on the incidence and mortality of breast cancer is essential for planning health measures. This study aimed to investigate the incidence and mortality of breast cancer in the world using age-specific incidence and mortality rates for the year 2012 acquired from the global cancer project (GLOBOCAN 2012) as well as data about incidence and mortality of the cancer based on national reports. It was estimated that 1,671,149 new cases of breast cancer were identified and 521,907 cases of deaths due to breast cancer occurred in the world in 2012. According to GLOBOCAN, it is the most common cancer in women, accounting for 25.1% of all cancers. Breast cancer incidence in developed countries is higher, while relative mortality is greatest in less developed countries. Education of women is suggested in all countries for early detection and treatment. Plans for the control and prevention of this cancer must be a high priority for health policy makers; also, it is necessary to increase awareness of risk factors and early detection in less developed countries.

  1. Postoperative care fragmentation and thirty-day unplanned readmissions after head and neck cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graboyes, Evan M; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Saeed, Mohammed J; Olsen, Margaret A; Nussenbaum, Brian

    2017-04-01

    Postdischarge care fragmentation, readmission to a hospital other than the one performing the surgery, has not been described in head and neck cancer patients. We sought to determine the frequency, risk factors, and outcomes for head and neck cancer patients experiencing postdischarge care fragmentation. Retrospective cohort study. We analyzed patients in the 2008 to 2010 California State Inpatient Database with a 30-day unplanned readmission following head and neck cancer surgery. The frequency of postdischarge care fragmentation, patient- and hospital-level risk factors for care fragmentation, readmission diagnosis, and readmission outcomes were determined. Of 561 patients with a 30-day unplanned readmission, 210 (37.4%) were readmitted to a hospital other than the one performing the surgery. Surgical hospitalization length of stay ≥15 days (odds ratio [OR]: 1.87, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.13-3.10) and discharge to a care facility (OR: 2.85, 95% CI: 1.77-4.58) were associated with care fragmentation. Overall, 39.8% of unplanned 30-day readmissions (223/561) were treatment complications, and 30.9% of treatment complication readmissions (69/223) occurred at a nonindex hospital. Patients with postdischarge care fragmentation had a 2.1-fold increased risk of in-hospital mortality within 30 days of readmission compared to patients readmitted to the index hospital (95% CI: 1.04-4.26). Postdischarge care fragmentation following head an neck cancer surgery is common, as 37% of readmitted patients and 31% of patients readmitted with a treatment complication are readmitted to a hospital other than the surgical hospital. Head and neck cancer patients experiencing care fragmentation are at increased risk of in-hospital mortality within 30 days of readmission. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:868-874, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Breast Cancer Awareness among Females in a Developing world- A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Breast cancer is a major health issue and in developing regions, where the early cancer detection facilities are unavailable awareness about this disease can lead to early detection and thereby potentially decrease the morbidity and mortality. Methods: A self designed questionnaire was used to study the level ...

  3. Young breast cancer patients in the developing world: incidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The extent of genetic factors such as mutations on BRCA 1 and 2 (BReast CAncer 1 and 2) genes is still largely unknown ... a disease occurring predominantly in .... sporadic.6 There are other rare genet- ic causes that predispose young wom- en to breast cancer. Li- Fraumeni syn- drome is a mutation of the TP53 gene on.

  4. Social determinants of cancer incidence and mortality around the world: an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Justin T; Nuhu, Kaamel; Ruiz, Juan; Alorbi, Genevieve

    2017-03-01

    Cancer continues to be a leading cause of mortality and morbidity the world over. While the incidence of cancer is projected to increase by 70% over the next two decades, some research findings suggest a disproportionate distribution of new cancer cases and attendant fatalities across certain regions of the world, with poor and lower income countries worse affected at a time when advances in cancer research, medical technology, and drug development are giving rise to better cancer survival in developed countries. In this study, the role of selected social determinants of health in gauging cancer outcomes relative to incidence across various countries in different regions of the world was explored. The results indicated that the education index, income index, Gini coefficient, availability of cancer control policies and programs, as well as health system performance have an association with and are good predictors of the mortality to incidence ratio (MIR) of lung, breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers. In other words, populations with better education, higher incomes and lower inequalities, active cancer control policies and programs and high performing health systems have better cancer outcomes as reflected in lower MIRs relative to other populations.

  5. 78 FR 44136 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ...). The CNPPs are part of the Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer, a network of awards funded by NCI to... the awards, along with their institutional business officials. The awards are administered by and the...

  6. Full dates (day, month, year) should be used in population-based cancer survival studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Laura M; Rachet, Bernard; Ellis, Libby; Coleman, Michel P

    2012-10-01

    Accurate survival estimates are essential for monitoring cancer survival trends, for health care planning and for resource allocation. To obtain precise estimates of survival, full dates (day, month and year) rather than partial dates (month and year) are required. In some jurisdictions, however, cancer registries are constrained from providing full dates on the grounds of confidentiality. The bias resulting from the use of partial dates in the estimation and comparison of survival makes it impossible to determine precisely the differences in the risk of death from cancer between population groups or in successive calendar periods. Important operational arguments also exist against the use of incomplete dates for survival analysis, including increased workload for cancer registry staff and the introduction of avoidable complexity for quality control of survival data. Cancer survival is one of the most widely known outputs produced by population-based cancer registries, and it is a crucial metric for the comparative effectiveness of health services. The bodies that set data access guidelines must take a more balanced view of the risks and benefits of using full dates for the estimation of cancer survival. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  7. Increased 30-day mortality in patients with diabetes undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fransgaard, T; Thygesen, L C; Gögenur, I

    2016-01-01

    with the use of antidiabetic drugs identified through the Danish National Prescription Registry and DCCG. The 30-day mortality was examined by the Kaplan-Meier method with the log-rank test and the Cox regression model used to test statistical significance. RESULTS: The study included 29 353 patients, of whom......AIM: The primary aim of the study was to determine whether preexisting diabetes is associated with increased 30-day mortality after curative resection of colorectal cancer (CRC). The association between antidiabetic treatment and 30-day mortality was also examined. METHOD: Patients diagnosed...... 3250 had preexisting diabetes. The 30-day mortality was significantly increased in patients with CRC and preexisting diabetes (adjusted hazard ratio 1.17, 95% CI 1.01-1.35, P = 0.03). The type of antidiabetic medication used was not associated with 30-day mortality. CONCLUSION: Preexisting diabetes...

  8. The World Congress on Controversies in Breast Cancer (CoBRA in Melbourne, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Rabinoff-Sofer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The World Congress on Controversies in Breast Cancer (CoBRA will take place October 22-24, 2015 in Melbourne, Australia.CoBRA is a concept congress dealing with controversial topics in breast cancer in the format of debates and discussions, allowing ample time for speaker-participant interaction.CLICK HERE for more information

  9. Extracellular vesicles, tissue factor, cancer and thrombosis – discussion themes of the ISEV 2014 Educational Day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Gardiner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the association between cancer and venous thromboembolism (VTE has long been known, the mechanisms are poorly understood. Circulating tissue factor–bearing extracellular vesicles have been proposed as a possible explanation for the increased risk of VTE observed in some types of cancer. The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV and International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH held a joint Educational Day in April 2014 to discuss the latest developments in this field. This review discusses the themes of that event and the ISEV 2014 meeting that followed.

  10. Missing memories of death: Dissociative amnesia in the bereaved the day after a cancer death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Mayumi; Onishi, Hideki; Toyama, Hiroaki; Tsutsumi, Chizuko; Endo, Chieko; Tanahashi, Iori; Takahashi, Takao; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2015-12-01

    The death of a loved one is one of the most stressful events of life, and such stress affects the physical and psychological well-being of the bereaved. Dissociative amnesia is characterized by an inability to recall important autobiographical information. Dissociative amnesia in the bereaved who have lost a loved one to cancer has not been previously reported. We discuss herein the case of a patient who developed dissociative amnesia the day after the death of here beloved husband. A 38-year-old woman was referred for psychiatric consultation because of restlessness and abnormal behavior. Her 44-year-old husband had died of pancreatic cancer the day before the consultation. On the day of the death, she looked upset and began to hyperventilate. The next day, she behaved as if the deceased were still alive, which embarrassed her family. At her initial psychiatric consultation, she talked and behaved as if her husband was still alive and in the hospital. Her psychiatric features fulfilled the DSM-V criteria for dissociative amnesia. The death of her husband had been very traumatic for her and was considered to have been one of the causes of this dissociation. This report adds to the list of psychiatric symptoms in the bereaved who have lost a loved one to cancer. In an oncology setting, we should consider the impact of death, the concomitant defense mechanisms, and the background of the families.

  11. An apple a day to prevent cancer formation: Reducing cancer risk with flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hsin Tu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to update and discuss key findings from in vitro and in vivo studies on apple and its biocompounds, with a special focus on its anticancer role. Several studies have proposed that apple and its extracts exhibit a variety of biological functions that may contribute to health benefits including beneficial effects against chronic heart and vascular disorders, respiratory and pulmonary dysfunction, diabetes, obesity, and cancer. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanism(s of various components in apple, as established in previous studies that indicated their growth-inhibitory effects in various cancer cell types. Moreover, an attempt is made to delineate the direction of future studies that could lead to the development of apple components as a potent chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic agent against cancer.

  12. An apple a day to prevent cancer formation: Reducing cancer risk with flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shih-Hsin; Chen, Li-Ching; Ho, Yuan-Soon

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to update and discuss key findings from in vitro and in vivo studies on apple and its biocompounds, with a special focus on its anticancer role. Several studies have proposed that apple and its extracts exhibit a variety of biological functions that may contribute to health benefits including beneficial effects against chronic heart and vascular disorders, respiratory and pulmonary dysfunction, diabetes, obesity, and cancer. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanism(s) of various components in apple, as established in previous studies that indicated their growth-inhibitory effects in various cancer cell types. Moreover, an attempt is made to delineate the direction of future studies that could lead to the development of apple components as a potent chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic agent against cancer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research recommendations and colorectal cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turati, Federica; Bravi, Francesca; Di Maso, Matteo; Bosetti, Cristina; Polesel, Jerry; Serraino, Diego; Dalmartello, Michela; Giacosa, Attilio; Montella, Maurizio; Tavani, Alessandra; Negri, Eva; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2017-11-01

    The World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) released in 2007 eight recommendations for cancer prevention on body fatness, diet and physical activity. Our aim is to evaluate the relation between adherence to these recommendations and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. We pooled data from two Italian case-control studies including overall 2419 patients with CRC and 4723 controls. Adherence to the WCRF/AICR guidelines was summarised through a score incorporating seven of the WCRF/AICR recommendations, with higher scores indicating higher adherence to the guidelines. Odds ratios (ORs) of colorectal cancer were estimated using multiple logistic regression models. Higher adherence to the WCRF/AICR recommendations was associated with a significantly reduced CRC risk (OR 0.67, 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.56-0.80 for a score ≥5 versus cancer (OR 0.67). Inverse associations were observed with the diet-specific WCRF/AICR score (OR 0.71, 95% CI, 0.61-0.84 for ≥3.5 versus <2.5 points) and with specific recommendations on body fatness (OR 0.82, 95% CI, 0.70-0.97), physical activity (OR 0.86, 95% CI, 0.75-1.00), foods and drinks that promote weight gain (OR 0.70, 95% CI, 0.56-0.89), foods of plant origin (OR 0.56, 95% CI, 0.42-0.76), limiting alcohol (OR 0.87, 95% CI, 0.77-0.99) and salt intake (OR 0.63, 95% CI, 0.48-0.84). Our study indicated that adherence to the WCRF/AICR recommendations is inversely related to CRC risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. PRISMA Analysis of 30 Day Readmissions to a Tertiary Cancer Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooksley, Tim; Merten, Hanneke; Kellett, John

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospital readmissions are increasingly used as a quality indicator. Patients with cancer have an increased risk of readmission. The purpose of this study was to develop an in depth understanding of the causes of readmissions in patients undergoing cancer treatment using PRISMA...... methodology and was subsequently used to identify any potentially preventable causes of readmission in this cohort. METHODS: 50 consecutive 30 day readmissions from the 1st November 2014 to the medical admissions unit (MAU) at a specialist tertiary cancer hospital in the Northwest of England were analysed...... retrospectively. RESULTS: Q25(50%) of the patients were male with a median age of 59 years (range 19-81). PRISMA analysis showed that active (human) factors contributed to the readmission of 4 (8%) of the readmissions, which may have been potentially preventable. All of the readmissions were driven by a medical...

  15. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prostate cancer Lung cancer Colorectal cancer In US women, other than skin cancer the three most common cancers are: Breast cancer Lung cancer Colorectal cancer Some cancers are more common in certain parts of the world. For example, in Japan, there are many cases of stomach cancer . But ...

  16. 78 FR 22794 - World Trade Center Health Program; Certification of Breast Cancer in WTC Responders and Survivors...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... disruption, as a 9/11 exposure, could be associated with breast cancer.\\3\\ For that reason, the Administrator... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 88 World Trade Center Health Program; Certification of Breast Cancer in WTC... Federal Register adding certain types of cancer to the List of World Trade Center (WTC)-Related Health...

  17. Adapting cancer immunotherapy models for the real world

    OpenAIRE

    Klevorn, Lauryn E.; Teague, Ryan M.

    2016-01-01

    Early experiments in mice predicted the success of checkpoint blockade immunotherapy in cancer patients. However, these same animal studies failed to accurately predict many of the limitations and toxicities of treatment. One of the likely reasons for this discrepancy is the nearly universal use of young healthy mice, which stand in stark contrast to diverse patient populations varying in age, weight, diet and hygiene. Because these variables impact immunity and metabolism, they also influenc...

  18. Aerosol Optical Properties over Beijing during the World Athletics Championships and Victory Day Military Parade in August and September 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A special period in Beijing from 6 August to 17 September 2015, during which the World Athletics Championships and Victory Day military parade took place, and which involved measures to restrict traffic and reduce factory emissions, was selected to analyze the aerosol optical properties and the impact of meteorological conditions on pollution levels. The study was based on AERONET observational and retrieval data, particulate matter measurements (TEOM 1405, meteorological data, and then the HYSPLIT model was used to analyze the pollution sources. The study period was divided into three sub-periods according to the different stages of implementation of the control measures, and the main conclusions can be summarized as follows. During the period in which the restrictive measures were applied, the air quality improved significantly, with the average value of the AOD being 0.34 ± 0.20, about 69% less than before. Meanwhile, the average Ångström exponent was about 9.5% higher than before, with an average value of 1.38 ± 0.25, indicating that the main pollutants were fine particles. Single scattering albedo decreased as wavelength increased, being higher than in the other two stages (mean value of 0.944 ± 0.045. This showed that the strong scattering capacity and absorption aerosol optical depth was at its lowest, at about 0.008 ± 0.009. The peaks of aerosol volume concentration in the fine and coarse mode were significantly reduced. Meteorological conditions also had a certain effect on the aerosol optical properties, with the blowing of clean and dry wind and the occurrence of precipitation contributing to the overall improvement in air quality.

  19. The treatment of breast cancer in one day surgery. A four year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirone, Andrea; Cesaretti, Manuela; Vuolo, Giuseppe; Gaggelli, Ilaria; Guarnieri, Alfredo; Piccolomini, Alessandro; Verre, Luigi; Savelli, Vinno; Varrone, Fabrizio; D'Onofrio, Pasquale; Di Bella, Caterina; Carli, Antonio Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    The number of short-stay surgery procedures has progressively increased since the concept of short-stay surgery was first introduced. Initially this type of surgery was reserved for patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair, proctological surgery, and various minor procedures. Careful patient selection makes it possible to apply one-day surgery to other surgical specialties including breast cancer surgery. Reducing the length of hospital stay lowers health care costs, and shortens waiting lists. The most important benefits for patients are a more rapid return to work and positive psychological effects. Exclusion criteria for one-day surgery are the lack of home care, excessive distance from place of treatment and the presence of any concomitant pathology that is a contraindication to this type of surgery. We report our experience in oncological surgery of the breast in one-day surgery.

  20. Cancer risk and prevention in a globalised world: solving the public policy mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, R; Homberg, L; Purushotham, A D

    2012-09-01

    The world faces an unprecedented growth in cancer incidence over the next fifty years, the majority of the burden falling on low-middle income countries. At the same time as the changing demographic profiles, including global population ageing we are also seeing the rapid globalisation of pro-cancer behaviours and commodities such as tobacco. The human and economic impact will continue to be severe unless radical changes occur to current public policy mismatches in cancer prevention. At the same time high level political actions through bodies such as the UN suggest that supra-national approaches are needed to solve these issues. However, we argue that only local nation-state approaches can fundamentally address cancer risk and enhance prevention in a globalised world. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Social objectives in cancer care: the example of palliative day care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, M

    2006-12-01

    Social objectives are poorly specified and evaluated in cancer care. Palliative day care is an example where social objectives are often identified but research has focused on health-care outcomes. A literature review identifies four types of social objective: emotional and spiritual care, general social care, services for families and carers and creative arts. Social objectives include: distinguishing between therapeutic work and leisure and supportive interventions, promoting service continuity, reducing social isolation, increasing social interaction, reassuring introduction to palliative care, rehearsal of reactions to illness with a sympathetic audience, integration of families and carers into care services, respite for carers and creative work for three separable objectives. It is argued that interventions to achieve social objectives may be defined and evaluated in a measurable way. Similarly, social objectives and interventions can be specified at other stages in the cancer journey.

  2. The impact of obesity on the 30-day morbidity and mortality after surgery for endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Haider; Jernigan, Amelia M; Aljebori, Qataralnada; Lockhart, David; Moslemi-Kebria, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    To examine the effect of body mass index (BMI) on postoperative 30-day morbidity and mortality after surgery to treat endometrial cancer. Retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Patients with endometrial cancer who underwent surgery from 2005 to 2011. Women were grouped according to weight, as follows: normal weight (BMI 18 to obese (BMI 30 to obese (BMI ≥ 40). Univariate and multivariable logistic regression models were analyzed. Of 3947 patients, 38% were of normal weight, 38% were obese, and 24% were morbidly obese. Of these, 48% underwent laparoscopy and 52% underwent laparotomy. Overall 30-day morbidity and mortality were 13% and 0.7%, respectively. Obesity and morbid obesity were associated with a higher American Society of Anesthesiologists class, diabetes, and hypertension. Preoperatively, elevated serum creatinine concentration, hypoalbuminemia, and leukocytosis were more common in morbidly obese women than those of normal weight. Laparoscopic surgery was performed less frequently in morbidly obese women than in those of normal weight (42.5% vs 50%; p = .001). Morbidly obese patients were more likely to develop postoperative complications (morbidly obese 16% vs normal weight 13% vs obese 11%; p = .001), in particular surgical (morbidly obese 14% vs normal weight 11% vs obese 9%; p obese 10% vs normal weight 5% vs obese 5%; p = .01). After laparotomy, morbidly obese women demonstrated a higher rate of any complication (normal weight 21%, obese 18%, morbidly obese 25%; p = .002), surgical complications (normal weight 18%, obese 14%, morbidly obese 22%; p = .002) and infectious complications (normal weight 6%, obese 10%, morbidly obese 16%; p obesity and morbid obesity did not independently predict 30-day morbidity or mortality. Morbidly obese patients with endometrial cancer have more preoperative morbidities and postoperative complications, in particular surgical and infectious

  3. [The Bulletin du cancer: the years before the First World War].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaudin, Jean-François

    2013-12-01

    Three years after its founding in 1909, the Association française pour l'étude du cancer is a major scientific society developing transdisciplinary debates particularly on innovative therapeutics in cancer, such as the developing use of radium. The Association at that time assembles together all the French medical elite. Reading the Bulletin offers a clear view of the brilliant monthly debates. First World War stopped the life of the Association for four years. After this break, the set up of dedicated centers for cancer treatment was responsible for a major turn in the Association's life.

  4. Comparative validation of the IPAQ and the 7-Day PAR among women diagnosed with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rock Cheryl L

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The criterion-related validity and measurement bias of the long form of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ was compared to the 7-Day Physical Activity Recall (PAR. Methods Participants were women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer and enrolled in the ongoing Women's Healthy Eating and Living Study. Women (N = 159, average age 57 years wore an accelerometer for one week and then completed the IPAQ or the PAR. Results The validity correlation of the PAR was significantly higher (p Conclusion The PAR was superior to the IPAQ in terms of validity, measurement bias, and screening statistics.

  5. Comparative validation of the IPAQ and the 7-Day PAR among women diagnosed with breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Kozlow, Marilyn; Sallis, James F; Gilpin, Elizabeth A; Rock, Cheryl L; Pierce, John P

    2006-01-01

    Background The criterion-related validity and measurement bias of the long form of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) was compared to the 7-Day Physical Activity Recall (PAR). Methods Participants were women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer and enrolled in the ongoing Women's Healthy Eating and Living Study. Women (N = 159, average age 57 years) wore an accelerometer for one week and then completed the IPAQ or the PAR. Results The validity correlation of the PAR was significantly higher (p ACSM physical activity guideline. Conclusion The PAR was superior to the IPAQ in terms of validity, measurement bias, and screening statistics. PMID:16579852

  6. Sociological Transition and Breast Cancer in the Arab World: the Experience of Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Lakkis, Najla; Adib, Salim M; Hamadeh, Ghassan; El Jarrah, Rana; H Osman, Mona

    2017-05-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among females in Lebanon. This study aimed at analyzing its epidemiology in the country over time. Methods: Data were extracted from the Lebanese National Cancer Registry (NCR) for the years 2004 through 2010. Age-standardized and age-specific incidence rates for cancers per 100,000 population were calculated. Results: Breast cancer ranked first, accounting for an average of 37.6% of all new female cancer cases in Lebanon during the period of 2004-2010. Breast cancer was found to have been increasing faster than other hormone-related women’s cancers (i.e. of the ovaries and corpus uteri). The breast cancer age-standardized incidence rates (world population) (ASRw) increased steadily from 2004 (71.0) to 2010 (105.9), making the burden comparable to that in developed countries, reflecting the influence of sociological and reproductive patterns transitioning from regional norms to global trends. The age-specific incidence rates for breast cancer rose steeply from around age 35-39 years, to reach a first peak in the age group 45-49 years, and then dropped slightly between 50 and 64 years to rise again thereafter and reach a second peak in the 75+ age group. Five-year age-specific rates among Lebanese women between 35 and 49 years were among the highest observed worldwide in 2008. Conclusion: Breast cancer is continuously on the rise in Lebanon. The findings of this study support the national screening recommendation of starting breast cancer screening at the age of 40 years. It is mandatory to conduct an in-depth analysis of contributing factors and develop consequently a comprehensive National Breast Cancer Control strategy. Creative Commons Attribution License

  7. Monthly 5-days 5-fluorouracil and low-dose leucovorin for adjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, J B; Shim, K Y; Jeung, H C; Rha, S Y; Yoo, N C; Kim, N K; Roh, J K; Min, J S; Kim, B S; Chung, H C

    2001-06-26

    We investigated the dose-related effect of the 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)/leucovorin regimen on survival in 139 colon cancer patients with Dukes' B2 and C2 stage disease. Chemotherapy consisted of 400 mg/m(2) of 5-FU and 20 mg/m(2) of leucovorin injected daily for 5 days in every 4 weeks for a maximum of 12 cycles. The total dose of 5-FU administered per body surface area had a significant effect on the 5-year disease-free survival and 5-year overall survival in stage B2 and C2 colon cancer patients (P=0.0018, P=0.0011). Analysis with reference to the median DSDI demonstrated that there was a significant difference in 5-year survival in Dukes' C2 (P=0.0016), but survival was not affected by the dose intensity. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that only the total dose of 5-FU administered per surface area affected the 5-year disease-free survival and 5-year overall survival (P=0.0016, P=0.0007, respectively). It can be concluded that the total dose of 5-FU administered is important in planned dosage schedule of adjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancer.

  8. 78 FR 27974 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Platform Partnership Scientific Progress..., including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (3) Ways to enhance the quality, utility... for Strategic Scientific Initiatives, Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research, National Cancer...

  9. Sixty women a day examined with world-unique mammography system from Sectra. Breast disease centre in Sweden offers lowest radiation dose in the world

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Sectra's digital mammography system, Sectra MicroDose Mammography(TM), has been used to examine more than 1,500 women in the Helsingborg Hospital mammography screening program. This was accomplished in the record time of two months in clinical operation. The system is now being used to examine more than sixty women every day" (1 page).

  10. Hospital variation in 30-day mortality after colorectal cancer surgery in denmark: the contribution of hospital volume and patient characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Borglykke, Anders

    2011-01-01

    This study examines variation between hospitals in 30-day mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals.......This study examines variation between hospitals in 30-day mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals....

  11. Oral cancer prevention and control--the approach of the World Health Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality today. It is estimated that around 43% of cancer deaths are due to tobacco use, unhealthy diets, alcohol consumption, inactive lifestyles and infection. Low-income and disadvantaged groups are generally more exposed to avoidable risk factors such as environmental carcinogens, alcohol, infectious agents, and tobacco use. These groups also have less access to the health services and health education that would empower them to make decisions to protect and improve their own health. Oro-pharyngeal cancer is significant component of the global burden of cancer. Tobacco and alcohol are regarded as the major risk factors for oral cancer. The population-attributable risks of smoking and alcohol consumption have been estimated to 80% for males, 61% for females, and 74% overall. The evidence that smokeless tobacco causes oral cancer was confirmed recently by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Studies have shown that heavy intake of alcoholic beverages is associated with nutrient deficiency, which appears to contribute independently to oral carcinogenesis. Oral cancer is preventable through risk factors intervention. Prevention of HIV infection will also reduce the incidence of HIV/AIDS-related cancers such as Kaposi sarcoma and lymphoma. The WHO Global Oral Health Programme is committed to work for country capacity building in oral cancer prevention, inter-country exchange of information and experiences from integrated approaches in prevention and health promotion, and the development of global surveillance systems for oral cancer and risk factors. The WHO Global Oral Health Programme has established a global surveillance system of oral cavity cancer in order to assess risk factors and to help the planning of effective national intervention programmes. Epidemiological data on oral cancer (ICD-10: C00-C08) incidence and mortality are stored in the Global Oral Health Data Bank. In 2007, the World

  12. World Cinema: Diary of a Day. A Celebration of the Centenary of Cinema: In Conjunction with bfi [British Film Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Peter, Ed.

    This publication resulted from a project of the British Film Institute (bfi). The aim was to emphasize that cinema takes a number of different forms, fulfills a variety of roles within different societies, and has different models of its social function. Toward this end, film-makers from all over the world were invited to write a diary about the…

  13. Real-world cost-effectiveness of laparoscopy versus open colectomy for colon cancer: a nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chih-Hsien; Tan, Elise Chia-Hui; Chen, Chien-Chih; Yang, Ming-Chin

    2017-04-01

    Laparoscopic colectomy is increasingly being adopted for the treatment of colon cancer; however, the long-term effectiveness of this approach in a real-world clinical setting has yet to be verified. This study aims to compare the effectiveness and costs associated with laparoscopic and open colectomy from the perspective of the National Health Insurance (NHI) system in Taiwan. A nationwide population-based colon cancer cohort was observed by linking the Taiwan Cancer Registry, claims data from NHI system, and the National Death Registry. Adult patients with Stage I to Stage III colon cancer who underwent primary cancer resection using either laparoscopy or open colectomy between 2009 and 2011 were included. A propensity score-matched cohort (1745 pairs) was applied to examine three clinical endpoints: overall survival, recurrence-free survival, and disease-free survival within 2 years after the operation. To comply with the perspective as well as the analytic horizon of the study, we limited the research to NHI claims from the study population for the corresponding time period. The health outcomes and net monetary benefits were verified by multivariate mixed-effect models. This analysis revealed that laparoscopy resulted in longer overall survival (adjusted difference 16.8 days, 95 % CI 7.3-26.2), recurrence-free survival (16.8 days, 5.0-28.6) and disease-free survival (26.4 days, 7.4-45.4), compared to open colectomy at 2 years post-op. Laparoscopy also led to a significantly shorter length of stay (3.2 days, 2.4-3.9) and lower index hospitalization costs (US$ 455, 181-729) than open colectomy; however, no differences in costs were observed over the long term. Overall, laparoscopy was more cost-effective than open colectomy under various willingness-to-pay thresholds in the setting of the Taiwan NHI. The continued adoption of laparoscopy in primary curable colon cancer resection is expected to reduce health care costs over the short term while providing

  14. Impact of preoperative serum albumin on 30-day mortality following surgery for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montomoli, Jonathan; Erichsen, Rune; Antonsen, Sussie

    2015-01-01

    is sparse. METHODS: We performed a population-based cohort study including patients undergoing CRC surgery in North and Central Denmark (1997-2011). We categorised patients according to HSA concentration measured 1-30 days prior to surgery date. We used the Kaplan-Meier method to compute 30-day mortality...... and Cox regression model to compute HRs as measures of the relative risk of death, controlling for potential confounders. We further stratified patients by preoperative conditions, including cancer stage, comorbidity level, and C reactive protein concentration. RESULTS: Of the 9339 patients undergoing...... first-time CRC surgery with preoperative HSA measurement, 26.4% (n=2464) had HSA below 35 g/L. 30-day mortality increased from 4.9% among patients with HSA 36-40 g/L to 26.9% among patients with HSA equal to or below 25 g/L, compared with 2.0% among patients with HSA above 40 g/L. The corresponding...

  15. Real-world impact of non-breast cancer-specific death on overall survival in resectable breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jianfei; Wu, Lunpo; Jiang, Mengjie; Li, Dan; Jiang, Ting; Fu, Wei; Wang, Liangjing; Du, Jinlin

    2017-07-01

    The real-world occurrence rate of non-breast cancer-specific death (non-BCSD) and its impact on patients with breast cancer are poorly recognized. Women with resectable breast cancer from 1990 to 2007 in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database (n = 199,963) were analyzed. The outcome events of breast cancer were classified as breast cancer-specific death (BCSD), non-BCSD, or survival. Binary logistics was used to estimate the occurrence rates of non-BCSD and BCSD with different clinicopathological factors. The Gray method was used to measure the cumulative incidence of non-BCSD and BCSD. The ratio of non-BCSDs to all causes of death and stacked cumulative incidence function plots were used to present the impact of non-BCSD on overall survival (OS). Models of Cox proportional hazards regression and competing risk regression were compared to highlight the suitable model. There were 12,879 non-BCSDs (6.44%) and 28,784 BCSDs (14.39%). The oldest age group (>62 years), black race, and a single or divorced marital status were associated with more non-BCSDs. With adjustments for age, a hormone receptor-positive (HoR+) status was no longer related to increased non-BCSDs. In patients with grade 1, stage I disease and an HoR+ status as well as the oldest subgroup, a great dilution of non-BCSD on all causes of death could be observed, and this led to incorrect interpretations. The inaccuracy, caused by the commonly used Cox proportional hazards model, could be corrected by a competing risk model. OS was largely impaired by non-BCSD during early breast cancer. For some future clinical trial planning, especially for the oldest patients and those with HoR+ breast cancer, non-BCSD should be considered a competing risk event. Cancer 2017;123:2432-43. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  16. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  17. Incidence and Mortality of Colorectal Cancer and Relationships with the Human Development Index across the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiemanesh, Hosein; Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah; Ghoncheh, Mahshid; Sepehri, Zahra; Shamlou, Reza; Salehiniya, Hamid; Towhidi, Farhad; Makhsosi, Behnam Reza

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the standardized incidence and mortality rate of colorectal cancer and its relationship with the human development index (HDI) across the world in 2012. This ecologic study was conducted for assessment of the correlation between age-specific incidence rate (ASIR) and age-specific mortality rate (ASMR) with HDI and its components. Data for SIR and SMR for every country for the year 2012 were obtained from the global cancer project. We used a bivariate method for assessment of the correlation between SIR and SMR and HDI. Statistical significance was assumed at <0.05. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS (Version 22.0, SPSS Inc.). Countries with the highest SIR of colorectal cancer in the world in 2012, were Republic of Korea, Slovakia, Hungary and countries with the highest SMR were Hungary, Croatia and Slovakia. The correlation between SIR of colorectal cancer and the HDI was 0.712 (P≤0.001), with life expectancy at birth 0.513 (P≤0.001), with mean years of schooling 0.641 (P≤0.001) and with level of income per each person of the population 0.514 (P=0.013). In addition, the correlation between SMR of colorectal cancer and the HDI was 0.628 (P≤0.001), with life expectancy at birth 0.469 (P≤0.001), with mean years of schooling 0.592 (P≤0.001) and with level of income per each person of the population 0.378 (P=0.013). The highest SIR and SMR of colorectal cancer was in the WHO Europe region. There was a positive correlation between HDI and SIR and SMR of colorectal cancer.

  18. Impact of same day vs day before pre-operative lymphoscintigraphy for sentinel lymph node biopsy for early breast cancer (local Australian experience).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yang Yang; Maurel, Amelie; Hamza, Saud; Jackson, Lee; Al-Ogaili, Zeyad

    2017-11-09

    To assess the impact of delayed vs immediate pre-operative lymphoscintigraphy (LSG) for sentinel lymph node biopsy in a single Australian tertiary breast cancer centre. Retrospective cohort study analysing patients with breast cancer or DCIS who underwent lumpectomy or mastectomy with pre-operative LSG and intra-operative sentinel lymph node biopsy from January 2015 to June 2016. A total of 182 LSG were performed. Group A patients had day before pre-operative LSG mapping (n = 79) and Group B had LSG mapping on the day of surgery (n = 103). The overall LSG localisation rate was 97.3% and no statistical difference was detected between the two groups. The overall sentinel lymph node biopsies (SLN) were identified in 99.6% of patients. The number of nodes excised was slightly higher in Group A (1.90 vs 1.72); however, this was not statistically significant. In addition, the number of nodes on histopathology and the incidence of second echelon nodal detection were also similar between the two groups without statistical significance. In conclusion, the 2-day LSG protocol had no impact on overall SLNB and LSG detection rates although slightly higher second tier nodes but this did not translate to any difference between the number of harvest nodes between the two groups. The 2-day LSG allows for greater flexibility in theatre planning and more efficient use of theatre time. We recommend a dose of 40 Mbq of Tc99 m pertechnetate-labelled colloid be given day prior to surgery within a 24-hour timeframe. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  19. Characteristics and comparison of colorectal cancer incidence in Beijing with other regions in the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongmin; Yang, Lei; Du, Changzheng; Fang, Xuedong; Wang, Ning; Gu, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Background Population-based epidemiologic studies about colorectal cancer are lacking in China. This study aims to provide a basis for colorectal cancer screening and prevention, through analysis and comparisons the characteristics of the trends in colorectal cancer incidence in Beijing and selected representative regions. RESULTS The annual incidence rate in Beijing region increased significantly, from 9.40/100,000 in 1998 to 18.61/100,000 in 2012. The stratified rate showed that the incidence of distal colon adenocarcinoma increased substantially in men, especially in those aged > 75 years and residing in urban areas. Although the incidence rate in Beijing is still lower than in Shanghai, Jiashan, and Hong Kong in China, it is increasing rapidly. Further, the incidence rate in Beijing is lower than in New York, Oxford and Osaka, but higher than in Mumbai and Kyadondo. The incidence trend in Beijing is increasing especially in older groups, while in other regions such as New York, it is decreasing in these age groups. Materials and Methods Colorectal cancer incidence data were obtained from Beijing Cancer Registry and Cancer Incidence in Five Continents Plus database. All incidence rates were age-standardized according to Segi's world population. Incidence trends were characterized by calculating the annual percent changes using the Joinpoint Regression Program. Conclusions Compared with other regions, Beijing has a medium level of colorectal cancer incidence, however, it is increasing significantly. There are obvious differences in the cancer subsite, sex and age distributions between Beijing and other regions. Prevention and screening of colorectal cancer in Beijing should be strengthened. PMID:28445947

  20. 78 FR 36788 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request; Awareness and Beliefs About Cancer Survey, National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... Beliefs About Cancer Survey, National Cancer Institute (NCI) Summary: In compliance with the requirement... this publication. Proposed Collection: Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer Survey, 0925-NEW, National... objective of the study is gather data about American adults' awareness and beliefs about cancer. The...

  1. Predictors of 30-day mortality and the risk of recurrent systemic thromboembolism in cancer patients suffering acute ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Woong Nam

    Full Text Available Stroke in cancer patients is not rare but is a devastating event with high mortality. However, the predictors of mortality in stroke patients with cancer have not been well addressed. D-dimer could be a useful predictor because it can reflect both thromboembolic events and advanced stages of cancer.In this study, we evaluate the possibility of D-dimer as a predictor of 30-day mortality in stroke patients with active cancer.We included 210 ischemic stroke patients with active cancer. The 30-day mortality data were collected by reviewing medical records. We also collected follow-up D-dimer levels in 106 (50% participants to evaluate the effects of treatment response on D-dimer levels.Of the 210 participants, 30-day mortality occurred in 28 (13% patients. Higher initial NIHSS scores, D-dimer levels, and CRP levels as well as frequent cryptogenic mechanism, systemic metastasis, multiple vascular territory lesion, hemorrhagic transformation, and larger infarct volume were related to 30-day mortality. In the multivariate analysis, D-dimer [adjusted OR (aOR = 2.19; 95% CI, 1.46-3.28, P < 0.001] predicted 30-day mortality after adjusting for confounders. The initial NIHSS score (aOR = 1.07; 95% CI, 1.00-1.14, P = 0.043 and hemorrhagic transformation (aOR = 3.02; 95% CI, 1.10-8.29, P = 0.032 were also significant independent of D-dimer levels. In the analysis of D-dimer changes after treatment, the mortality group showed no significant decrease in D-dimer levels, despite treatment, while the survivor group showed the opposite response.D-dimer levels may predict 30-day mortality in acute ischemic stroke patients with active cancer.

  2. US News and World Report cancer hospital rankings: do they reflect measures of research productivity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Prasad

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Prior research has faulted the US News and World Report hospital specialty rankings for excessive reliance on reputation, a subjective measure of a hospital's performance. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether and to what extent reputation correlates with objective measures of research productivity among cancer hospitals. DESIGN: A retrospective observational study. SETTING: Automated search of NIH Reporter, BioEntrez, BioMedline and Clinicaltrials.gov databases. PARTICIPANTS: The 50 highest ranked cancer hospitals in 2013's US News and World Report Rankings. EXPOSURE: We ascertained the number of NCI funded grants, and the cumulative funds received by each cancer center. Additionally, we identified the number of phase I, phase II, and phase III studies published and indexed in MEDLINE, and registered at clinicaltrials.gov. All counts were over the preceding 5 years. For published articles, we summed the impact factor of the journals in which they appeared. Trials were attributed to centers on the basis of the affiliation of the lead author or study principal investigator. MAIN OUTCOME: Correlation coefficients from simple and multiple linear regressions for measures of research productivity and a center's reputation. RESULTS: All measures of research productivity demonstrated robust correlation with reputation (mean r-squared  = 0.65, median r-squared = 0.68, minimum r-squared = .41, maximum r-squared = 0.80. A multivariable model showed that 93% of the variation in reputation is explained by objective measures. CONCLUSION: Contrary to prior criticism, the majority of reputation, used in US News and World Rankings, can be explained by objective measures of research productivity among cancer hospitals.

  3. Stable lead isotope compositions in selected coals from around the world and implications for present day aerosol source tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Somoano, M; Kylander, M E; López-Antón, M A; Suárez-Ruiz, I; Martínez-Tarazona, M R; Ferrat, M; Kober, B; Weiss, D J

    2009-02-15

    The phasing out of leaded gasoline in many countries around the world at the end of the last millennium has resulted in a complex mixture of lead sources in the atmosphere. Recent studies suggest that coal combustion has become an important source of Pb in aerosols in urban and remote areas. Here, we report lead concentration and isotopic composition for 59 coal samples representing major coal deposits worldwide in an attempt to characterize this potential source. The average concentration in these coals is 35 microg Pb g(-1), with the highest values in coals from Spain and Peru and the lowest in coals from Australia and North America. The 206Pb/207Pb isotope ratios range between 1.15 and 1.24, with less radiogenic Pb in coals from Europe and Asia compared to South and North America. Comparing the Pb isotopic signatures of coals from this and previous studies with those published for Northern and Southern Hemisphere aerosols, we hypothesize that coal combustion might now be an important Pb source in China, the eastern U.S., and to some extent, in Europe but not as yet in other regions including South Africa, South America, and western U.S. This supports the notion that "old Pb pollution" from leaded gasoline reemitted into the atmosphere or long-range transport (i.e., from China to the western U.S.) is important. Comparing the isotope ratios of the coals, the age of the deposits, and Pb isotope evolution models for the major geochemical reservoirs suggests that the PbIC in coals is strongly influenced by the depositional coal forming environment.

  4. World Health Day 1997: emerging infectious diseases Día Mundial de la Salud 1997: enfermedades infecciosas emergentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available Para el Día Mundial de la Salud de 1997, la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS ha elegido el tema "Enfermedades infecciosas emergentes; alerta mundial, respuesta mundial" con el fin de llamar la atención hacia la amenaza que representan algunas enfermedades infecciosas recientemente reconocidas en seres humanos y otras que han vuelto a aparecer. En la emergencia y reemergencia de enfermedades infecciosas intervienen factores como el deterioro de la infraestructura de salud pública, la creciente resistencia microbiana a los antibióticos y los cambios sociales y ecológicos asociados con el crecimiento de la población humana. La OMS ha hecho hincapié en la necesidad de que se compromentan a entrar juntos en acción tanto países como organizaciones internacionales, organizaciones no gubernamentales e individuos, con objeto de mejorar la vigilancia de las enfermedades y la capacidad de controlarlas para prevenir y refrenar las epidemias. Por su parte, la OMS está reforzando su sistema de vigilancia mundial tripartito, que consta de los centros de colaboración de la OMS en el área de enfermedades infecciosas, las redes de monitoreo de resistencia antimicrobiana y el Reglamento Sanitario Internacional. Para hacer frente adecuadamente al problema de las enfermedades infecciosas durante el siglo próximo, se necesitarán programas de vigilancia y control; redes mundiales de monitoreo y notificación; rápido intercambio de información por vía electrónica (incluida la World Wide Web; y un estado de preparación efectivo con la capacidad para responder rápidamente a las epidemias y contenerlas.

  5. Incidence and mortality of kidney cancer and its relationship with HDI (Human Development Index) in the world in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian, Maryam; Pakzad, Reza; Towhidi, Farhad; Makhsosi, Behnam Reza; Ahmadi, Abbas; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    Kidney cancer is among the cancers that have the highest growth rate in all age and racial groups in the world and is as the most deadly type of urinary tract cancer. Since awareness about this cancer incidence status and mortality is essential for better planning, this study aimed to investigate the incidence and mortality rate of kidney cancer and its relationship with the development index in the world in 2012. This study was an ecological study conducted based on GLOBOCAN project of the World Health Organization (WHO) for the countries in the world. The correlation between Standardized Incidence Rates (SIRs) and Standardized Mortality Rates (SMRs) of kidney cancer with HDI and its components was assessed using SPSS18. In total, 337,860 incidence cases (213,924 were men and 123,936 women) and 143,406 deaths (90,802 cases in men and 52,604 in women) of kidney cancer were recorded in 2012. A positive correlation of 0.731 was seen between SIR of kidney cancer and HDI (p≤0.001). Also, a negative correlation of 0.627 was seen between SMR of kidney cancer and HDI (p≤0.001). The incidence and mortality rate of kidney cancer is higher in developed countries. A significant positive correlation has been seen between the standardized incidence and mortality rate of kidney cancer with the Human Development Index and its components. We need more studies to examine variation in incidence and mortality of kidney cancer and its related factors in the world.

  6. Women and kidney disease: reflections on World Kidney Day 2018: Kidney Health and Women's Health: a case for optimizing outcomes for present and future generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Giorgina B; Alrukhaimi, Mona; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Zakharova, Elena; Levin, Adeera

    2018-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects ∼10% of the world's adult population: it is one of the top 20 causes of death worldwide and its impact on patients and their families can be devastating. World Kidney Day and International Women's Day coincide in 2018, thus offering an opportunity to reflect on the importance of women's health, and specifically their kidney health, on the community and the next generations, as well as to strive to be more curious about the unique aspects of kidney disease in women so that we may apply these learnings more broadly. Girls and women, who make up ∼50% of the world's population, are important contributors to society and their families. Gender differences continue to exist around the world in access to education, medical care and participation in clinical studies. Pregnancy is a unique state for women, offering an opportunity for the diagnosis of kidney disease, and also a state where acute and chronic kidney diseases may manifest and that may impact future generations with respect to kidney health. There are various autoimmune and other conditions that are more likely to impact women with profound consequences for childbearing and on the fetus. Women have different complications on dialysis than men and are more likely to be donors than recipients of kidney transplants. In this editorial we focus on what we do and do not know about women, kidney health and kidney disease and what we might learn in the future to improve outcomes worldwide. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  7. Outcomes from the first mouth cancer awareness and clinical check-up day in the Dublin Dental University Hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    MacCarthy, Denise

    2012-04-01

    To increase public awareness about mouth cancer, the Dublin Dental University Hospital (DDUH) hosted an awareness day and free mouth check-up in September 2010. The messages of information, self-examination and risk management, and the importance of early detection, were available to all attendees. The role of general dental and medical practitioners in examination of the mouth was stressed.

  8. Pain on the first postoperative day after head and neck cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhestern, Johanna; Schuerer, Jenny; Illge, Christina; Thanos, Ira; Meissner, Winfried; Volk, Gerd Fabian; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2015-11-01

    Postoperative pain within the first 24 h after head and neck cancer (HNC) surgery was assessed. Factors influencing postoperative pain were identified. In a prospective cohort single center study 145 HNC patients rated their pain on the first postoperative day using questionnaires of the German-wide project Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Treatment (QUIPS) including numeric rating scales (NRS, 0-10) for the determination of patient's pain on ambulation, his maximal and minimal pain. QUIPS allowed a standardized assessment of patients' characteristics and pain-related parameters. The influence of these parameters on the patients' postoperative pain was estimated by univariate and multivariate statistical analysis. One-third had already pain prior to the surgical intervention. Overall, the mean pain on ambulation, maximal pain and minimal pain were 2.55 ± 2.36, 3.18 ± 2.86, and 1.38 ± 2.86 (NRS), respectively. 53 % of the patients had maximal pain scores >3. Multivariate analysis revealed independent predictors for more postoperative pain on ambulation: intensity of chronic preoperative pain, usage of non-opioids on ward, and existence of pain documentation on ward. Intensity of chronic preoperative pain and usage of non-opioids on ward were independent risk factors for more maximal pain. Intensity of chronic preoperative pain was independently associated to more minimal pain. Concerning pain management side effects, the risk for drowsiness increased with longer time of surgery. Postoperative pain after HNC surgery is highly variable and seems often to be unnecessarily high. Many patients seem to receive less analgesia than needed or ineffective analgesic drug regimes.

  9. Real-world cabazitaxel safety: the Italian early-access program in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracarda, Sergio; Gernone, Angela; Gasparro, Donatello; Marchetti, Paolo; Ronzoni, Monica; Bortolus, Roberto; Fratino, Lucia; Basso, Umberto; Mazzanti, Roberto; Messina, Caterina; Tucci, Marcello; Boccardo, Francesco; Cartenì, Giacomo; Pinto, Carmine; Fornarini, Giuseppe; Mattioli, Rodolfo; Procopio, Giuseppe; Chiuri, Vincenzo; Scotto, Tiziana; Dondi, Davide; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    Cabazitaxel is a novel taxane that is approved for use in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer based on the Phase III TROPIC study, which showed improved overall survival with cabazitaxel/prednisone versus mitoxantrone/prednisone. A global early-access program was initiated in order to provide early access to cabazitaxel in docetaxel-pretreated patients and to obtain real-world data. We report interim safety results from an Italian prospective, single-arm, multicenter, open-label trial of 218 patients receiving cabazitaxel 25 mg/m2 every 3 weeks plus prednisolone 10 mg/day, until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, investigator's decision or death. Patients completing treatment received a median of six cabazitaxel cycles. The most common grade 3/4 adverse events were neutropenia (33.9%), leukopenia (15.6%), anemia (6%) and asthenia (6%). No peripheral neuropathy or nail disorders were observed. These results confirm that cabazitaxel has a manageable safety profile in daily clinical practice and support its use in patients with prostate cancer who progress during or after a docetaxel-based therapy.

  10. Effectiveness of percutaneous coronary intervention within 12 hours to 28 days of ST-elevation myocardial infarction in a real-world Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xingli; Yang, Dingyou; Zhao, Yusheng; Lu, Caiyi; Wang, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention( PCI) for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has been widely accepted for patient who come within 12 hours, but for those who come to the hospital late (12 hours to 28 days) the long-term data and possible predictors are limited regarding 'hard' endpoints in 'real world'. The registry data of all 5523 consecutive patients admitted due to an incident STEMI (12 hours to 28 days) in our center were analyzed. Patients were divided into 3 age groups (age<65; age = 65-74; age ≥75) and two therapeutic groups including conservative and PCI group. The primary endpoints included 30-day mortality and 1-year mortality. The clinical characteristics include female gender; history of diabetes mellitus, previous myocardial infarction, cerebral vascular disease, chronic renal failure, atrial fibrillation, hypertension, anemia, gastric bleeding; presentation of ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation, pneumonia, heart failure, multiple organ failure and cardiogenic shock. The ratio of all the above factors increased with the age getting older (all p<0.05), while that of the PCI decreased significantly with ageing (53.9%, 36.3% and 21.7%). Except hypertension, all the other factors were less seen in the PCI group than in the conservative group (p<0.01). Pooled estimates, based on type of therapy and age groups, PCI resulted in significantly lower 30-day and 1-year mortality. Cox analysis showed the positive predictors for 30 days and 1 year mortality were heart failure, cerebral vascular disease, chronic renal failure, ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation, age, female, gastric intestinal bleeding, cardiogenic shock, multiple organ failure, while PCI was a negative predictor. ROCs analysis showed AUCs were always higher for PCI group. The elderly have more comorbidities and higher rates of mortality, mandating thorough evaluation before acceptance for PCI. PCI between 12 hours to 28 days in all ages of patients

  11. A population-based comparison of 30-day readmission after surgery for colon and rectal cancer: How are they different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumouras, Aristithes G; Tsao, Miriam W; Saleh, Fady; Hong, Dennis

    2016-09-01

    An implicit assumption in the analysis of colorectal readmission is that colon and rectal cancer patients are similar enough to analyze together. However, no studies have examined this assumption and whether substantial differences exist between colon and rectal cancer patients. This was a retrospective analysis of the differences in predictors, diagnoses, and costs of readmission between colon and rectal cancer cohorts for 30-day readmission. This study included all patients aged >18 who received an elective colectomy or low anterior resection for colorectal cancer from April 2008 until March 2012 in the province of Ontario. Overall, 13,571 patients were identified and the readmission rates significantly differed between rectal and colon cancer patients (7.1% colon and 10.7% rectal P = 0.001). Diabetes, age, and discharge to long term care were significantly different among colon and rectal patients in the prediction of readmission. Readmission for renal and stoma causes was more prominent in the rectal cohort. The adjusted cost difference for readmission did not significantly differ between rectal and colon cancer $178 ($1,924-1,568 P = 0.84) CONCLUSION: Several important differences in predictors and diagnoses exist between the two cohorts. Conversely, the costs associated with readmission were homogenous between rectal and colon cancer patients. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:354-360. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Extracellular vesicles, tissue factor, cancer and thrombosis - discussion themes of the ISEV 2014 Educational Day

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardiner, Chris; Harrison, Paul; Belting, Mattias; Böing, Anita; Campello, Elena; Carter, Bob S.; Collier, Mary E.; Coumans, Frank; Ettelaie, Camille; van Es, Nick; Hochberg, Fred H.; Mackman, Nigel; Rennert, Robert C.; Thaler, Johannes; Rak, Janusz; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2015-01-01

    Although the association between cancer and venous thromboembolism (VTE) has long been known, the mechanisms are poorly understood. Circulating tissue factor-bearing extracellular vesicles have been proposed as a possible explanation for the increased risk of VTE observed in some types of cancer.

  13. Clinical trials of cancer screening in the developing world and their impact on cancer healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, R; Sauvaget, C; Ramadas, K; Ngoma, T; Teguete, I; Muwonge, R; Naud, P; Nessa, A; Kuhaprema, T; Qiao, Y

    2011-11-01

    Several research and training initiatives were organized by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in collaboration with national institutions in countries such as Angola, Brazil, Burkina Faso, China, Republic of Congo, Guinea, India, Mali, Mauritania, Nepal, Niger, Peru, Tanzania and Thailand among others, to address feasible and effective means of early detection and prevention of cervical, breast and oral cancers. The impact of these activities, that involved over 600 000 participants and more than 1200 healthcare personnel trained on strengthening the local health services in terms of infrastructure, human resources and service delivery aspects in host countries and other regions, is addressed here. These studies, inbuilt in appropriate health services platforms, have resulted in the development and sustenance of several continuing point of care services of screening and treatment in most host countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, and have catalysed regional early detection programmes in India, China and Thailand. The IARC collaborative studies have evolved into major focal points of training and extending services in many countries. The large evidence base, resulting from ours and other studies is likely, in due course, to facilitate much wider scaling up of screening and treatment services through organised programmes.

  14. Wheel Balanced Cancer Therapy for Longer Than 21 Days Can Have a Positive Effect on the Survival of Patients with Stage IV Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Joon Jeon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Correlations of the levels of the nonspecific inflammatory markers C-reactive protein (CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and of the coagulation marker fibrinogen with the treatment period of wheel balanced cancer therapy were determined. Methods: Electronic charts of stage IV cancer patients hospitalized from February 1, 2008, to November 30, 2013, were reviewed retrospectively. Patients whose laboratory follow-up tests included at least two data points for at least one marker were included. Patients receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy or having Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG levels exceeding 2 were excluded. Correlations of the markers with the length of treatment for treatment periods ≥ 21 and ≤ 20 days were determined by gender and whether or not surgery had been performed. Results: Analyses of the CRP and the ESR revealed a higher proportion of patients with stable marker levels than with increased or decreased levels. Also, only the ESR in female and the CRP in male groups had higher proportions of patients with stable marker levels than with increased or decreased levels. The ≥ 21 day group had a higher proportion of patients with stable CRP and ESR levels than the ≤ 20 day group. Only the ESR in female and the CRP in male groups had higher proportions of patients with stable marker levels in the ≥ 21 day than in the ≤ 20 day group. In addition, only the CRP in the surgery group and the ESR in the non-surgery group had higher proportions of patients with stable marker levels in the ≥ 21 day group than in the ≤ 20 day group. Conclusion: For stage IV cancer patients at hospitals that offer Korean medicine, more than 21 days of long-term wheel balanced cancer therapy (WBCT should help maintain the CRP and the ESR levels and should have a favorable effect on the survival rate.

  15. Epidemiology, incidence and mortality of lung cancer and their relationship with the development index in the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiemanesh, Hosein; Mehtarpour, Mojtaba; Khani, Farah; Hesami, Sayed Mohammadali; Shamlou, Reza; Towhidi, Farhad; Salehiniya, Hamid; Makhsosi, Behnam Reza; Moini, Ali

    2016-06-01

    The highest incidence of lung cancer is seen in North America and the lowest incidence in central Africa. Socioeconomic factors of inequality reflect regional disparities in human development. Due to the importance of awareness about incidence and mortality of lung cancer in health programming and the possible role of the human development index (HDI), this study was done with the aim to investigate the epidemiology of lung cancer in the world and its relationship with HDI. The study was conducted based on data from the world data of cancer and the World Bank (including the HDI and its components). Data about the age-specific incidence and mortality rate (ASR) for every country in 2012 were getting from the global cancer project. To analyze data, correlation tests between incidence and death rates, and HDI and its components were employed with a significance level of 0.05 using SPSS software. Lung cancer with standardized incidence rate (ASIR) and standardized mortality rate (ASMR), equal to 23.1 and 19.7 (in 100,000 people), respectively. The highest and lowest values of mortality incidence ratio (MIR) for lung cancer due to continents division were 0.93 and 0.71 for Eastern Africa and Australia/New Zealand, respectively. Univariate analysis showed significant relationship (PASMR with life expectancy at birth and mean years of schooling. The highest MIR for lung cancer was for medium human development countries. Linear regression analysis showed a reverse significant relationship between MIR and HDI.

  16. Hospice admissions for cancer in the final days of life: independent predictors and implications for quality measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Nina R; Hu, Rong; Harris, Pamela S; Ache, Kevin; Casarett, David J

    2014-10-01

    To define patient characteristics associated with hospice enrollment in the last 3 days of life, and to describe adjusted proportions of patients with late referrals among patient subgroups that could be considered patient-mix adjustment variables for this quality measure. Electronic health record-based retrospective cohort study of patients with cancer admitted to 12 hospices in the Coalition of Hospices Organized to Investigate Comparative Effectiveness network. Of 64,264 patients admitted to hospice with cancer, 10,460 (16.3%) had a length of stay ≤ 3 days. There was significant variation among hospices (range, 11.4% to 24.5%). In multivariable analysis, among patients referred to hospice, patients who were admitted in the last 3 days of life were more likely to have a hematologic malignancy, were more likely to be male and married, and were younger (age < 65 years). Patients with Medicaid or self-insurance were less likely to be admitted to hospice within 3 days of death. Quality measures of hospice lengths of stay should include patient-mix adjustments for type of cancer and site of care. Patients with hematologic malignancies are at especially increased risk for late admission to hospice. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  17. Lower Breast Cancer Risk among Women following the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research Lifestyle Recommendations: EpiGEICAM Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Castelló

    Full Text Available According to the "World Cancer Research Fund" and the "American Institute of Cancer Research" (WCRF/AICR one in four cancer cases could be prevented through a healthy diet, weight control and physical activity.To explore the association between the WCRF/AICR recommendations and risk of breast cancer.During the period 2006 to 2011 we recruited 973 incident cases of breast cancer and 973 controls from 17 Spanish Regions. We constructed a score based on 9 of the WCRF/AICR recommendations for cancer prevention:: 1Maintain adequate body weight; 2Be physically active; 3Limit the intake of high density foods; 4Eat mostly plant foods; 5Limit the intake of animal foods; 6Limit alcohol intake; 7Limit salt and salt preserved food intake; 8Meet nutritional needs through diet; S1Breastfeed infants exclusively up to 6 months. We explored its association with BC by menopausal status and by intrinsic tumor subtypes (ER+/PR+ & HER2-; HER2+; ER&PR-&HER2- using conditional and multinomial logistic models respectively.Our results point to a linear association between the degree of noncompliance and breast cancer risk. Taking women who met 6 or more recommendations as reference, those meeting less than 3 showed a three-fold excess risk (OR=2.98(CI95%:1.59-5.59, especially for postmenopausal women (OR=3.60(CI95%:1.24;10.47 and ER+/PR+&HER2- (OR=3.60(CI95%:1.84;7.05 and HER2+ (OR=4.23(CI95%:1.66;10.78 tumors. Noncompliance of recommendations regarding the consumption of foods and drinks that promote weight gain in premenopausal women (OR=2.24(CI95%:1.18;4.28; p for interaction=0.014 and triple negative tumors (OR=2.93(CI95%:1.12-7.63; the intake of plant foods in postmenopausal women (OR=2.35(CI95%:1.24;4.44 and triple negative tumors (OR=3.48(CI95%:1.46-8.31; and the alcohol consumption in ER+/PR+&HER2- tumors (OR=1.52 (CI95%:1.06-2.19 showed the strongest associations.Breast cancer prevention might be possible by following the "World Cancer Research Fund" and the

  18. The World Cancer Research Fund report 2007: A challenge for the meat processing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeyer, Daniël; Honikel, Karl; De Smet, Stefaan

    2008-12-01

    One of the 10 universal guidelines for healthy nutrition in a report of the World Cancer Research Fund released at the end of 2007 is to "limit intake of red meat and avoid processed meat", as a result of the "convincing evidence" for an association with an increased risk of colorectal cancer development. In the present paper, the scientific evidence for the association between processed meats intake and colorectal cancer development is explored and the most probable hypothesis on the mechanism underlying this relationship formulated. It seems that the present state of knowledge is not well understood but relates to a combination of haem iron, oxidative stress, formation of N-nitroso compounds and related residues in the digestive tract as the causal factors. Although criticisms of the inaccurate definition of processed meats and the insufficient accounting for the large variability in composition of meat products have been expressed, it is clear that the report urges proper action by the meat and nutrition research community and the meat industry. Research items that in our view should be addressed are discussed. They include: (1) evaluating the health risks associated with processed meats intake within the context of the supply of beneficial nutrients and other nutrition associated health risks; (2) definition of the role of nitrites and nitrates in meat processing; (3) investigating the role of red and processed meats on the endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds in the digestive tract; and (4) developing improved processed meats using new ingredients.

  19. 5C.02: PREVALENCE OF HYPERTENSION AND OTHER CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN PARTICIPANTS IN THE 2014 HYPERTENSION WORLD DAY CAMPAIGN IN ITALY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torlasco, C; Calvanese, C; Faini, A; Santini, F; Borghi, C; Parati, G

    2015-06-01

    Aim of our study was to obtain information on prevalence and awareness of hypertension and other cardiovascular risk factors in individuals participating in the 2014 "World Hypertension Day" in Italy. During the 2014 "World Hypertension Day", health care providers from 50 hypertension centers affiliated to the Italian Society of Hypertension, spread all over the country, anonymously interviewed individuals spontaneously participating in this campaign. Information on demography, cardiovascular risk factors prevalence, awareness of hypertension and of its consequences was obtained. The average of two conventional blood pressure (BP) measurements, taken in seated position after a few min rest by a validated oscillometric device (Microlife BP A150), was recorded. Data were collected from 6356 individuals (53.2% females, 46.8% males) aged 57.8 years. (18-105 years).43.6% of subjects were aware of being hypertensive, 89.9% being treated. In this cohort active and former smokers were respectively 19.2% and 22%; 28.6% reported hypercholesterolemia and 8.3% diabetes. Mean systolic BP > 139mmHg was found in 34.8% and mean diastolic BP > 89mmHg in 18.3% of the entire cohort and in 47.7% and 23.5% of aware hypertensive individuals, respectively. In 14.5% of participating subjects and in 19.6% of aware hypertensives both systolic/diastolic BP were found above 139/89mmHg respectively. On average, BP was higher in aware hypertensive individuals, in spite of being treated, than in the overall cohort (139.6/81.7 ± 19.7/14.5 vs 133.1/79.7 ± 20.3/15 mmHg, respectively, p < 0.005). Awareness of hypertension complications was imperfect, acute myocardial infarction, stroke and renal failure being recognized as consequences of hypertension by 85.1%, 61.6% and 28.6% of individuals, respectively. Our data, obtained in Italy at the time of the 2014 World Hypertension Day show a yet high hypertension prevalence, accompanied by an unsatisfactory awareness of its

  20. Improving the care of sepsis: Between system redesign and professional responsibility: A roundtable discussion in the world sepsis day, September 25, 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaseen Arabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the roundtable discussion in September 25, 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia as part of the World Sepsis Day held in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh. The objectives of the roundtable discussion were to (1 review the chasm between the current management of sepsis and best practice, (2 discuss system redesign and role of the microsystem in sepsis management, (3 emphasize the multidisciplinary nature of the care of sepsis and that improvement of the care of sepsis is the responsibility of all, (4 discuss the bundle concept in sepsis management, and (5 reflect on the individual responsibility of the health care team toward sepsis with a focus on accountability and the moral agent.

  1. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research guidelines and risk of death in Europe: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer cohort study1,4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergnaud, A.C.; Romaguera, D.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Gils, C.H. van; Chan, D.S.; Romieu, I.; Freisling, H.; Ferrari, P.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Fagherazzi, G.; Dartois, L.; Li, K.; Tikk, K.; Bergmann, M.M.; Boeing, H.; Tjonneland, A.; Olsen, A.; Overvad, K.; Dahm, C.C.; Redondo, M.L.; Agudo, A.; Sanchez, M.J.; Amiano, P.; Chirlaque, M.D.; Ardanaz, E.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.J.; Crowe, F.; Trichopoulou, A.; Orfanos, P.; Trichopoulos, D.; Masala, G.; Sieri, S.; Tumino, R.; Vineis, P.; Panico, S.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Ros, M.M.; May, A.; Wirfalt, E.; Sonestedt, E.; Johansson, I.; Hallmans, G.; Lund, E.; Weiderpass, E.; Parr, C.L.; Riboli, E.; Norat, T.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2007, the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) issued recommendations on diet, physical activity, and weight management for cancer prevention on the basis of the most comprehensive collection of available evidence. OBJECTIVE: We

  2. 77 FR 56138 - World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Certain Types of Cancer to the List of WTC-Related...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... immunoproliferative diseases ; multiple myeloma and malignant plasma cell neoplasms ; lymphoid leukemia ; myeloid..., lymphoma, leukemia, and myeloma) Childhood cancers Rare cancers The Administrator developed a hierarchy of... Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. Geneva: World Health Organization. The International Classification...

  3. Metabolomics Evaluation of Serum Markers for Cachexia and Their Intra-Day Variation in Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Takashi; Chayahara, Naoko; Imamura, Yoshinori; Toyoda, Masanori; Kiyota, Naomi; Mukohara, Toru; Nishiumi, Shin; Azuma, Takeshi; Yoshida, Masaru; Minami, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by progressive loss of weight and muscle atrophy. Using metabolomics, we investigated serum markers and their intra-day variation in advanced pancreatic cancer patients with cachexia. Methods Patients were enrolled in two groups: those with or without cachexia. Blood samples collected at 6:30 AM, 11:30 AM, 4:30 PM, and 9:30 PM were analyzed using metabolomics, and serum levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and leptin were measured and compared between the two groups. Intra-day variation was then evaluated. Results Twenty-one patients were enrolled in total. In the cachexia group (n = 9), median body weight loss rate over 6 months was greater, performance status was poorer, and anorexia was more severe than in the non-cachexia group (n = 12). Each metabolites level showed substantial intra-day variation, and some of them displayed significant differences between the two groups. Levels of paraxanthine remained markedly lower in the cohort with cachexia at all measurement points. Besides, median IL-6 and TNF-α levels appeared higher and leptin concentration appeared lower in the cachexia group, albeit without statistical significance. Conclusion Some metabolites and some serological marker levels were affected by cancer cachexia. Although paraxanthine levels were consistently lower in patients with cachexia, we identified that many metabolites indicated large intra- and inter-day variation and that it might be necessary to pay attention to intra-day variation in metabolomics research. PMID:25411961

  4. Incidence and Mortality of Nasopharynx Cancer and Its Relationship With Human Development Index in the World in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavifar, Neda; Towhidi, Farhad; Makhsosi, Behnam Reza; Pakzad, Reza; Moini, Ali; Ahmadi, Abbas; Lotfi, Sarah; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2016-12-01

    One of the most common cancers in head and neck is nasopharynx. Knowledge about the incidence and mortality of this disease and its distribution in terms of geographical areas is necessary for further study, better planning and prevention. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the incidence and mortality of nasopharynx cancer and its relationship with human development index (HDI) in the world in 2012. This study was an ecological study conducted based on GLOBOCAN project of World Health Organization (WHO) for the countries in world. The correlation between standardized incidence rates (SIRs) and standardized mortality rates (SMRs) of nasopharynx cancer with HDI and its components was assessed with correlation coefficient by using SPSS 15. In 2012, 86,691 nasopharynx cancer cases occurred in the world, so that 60,896 new cases were seen in men and 25,795 new cases in women (sex ratio = 2.36). SIR of the cancer was 1.2 per 100,000 (1.7 in men and 0.7 in women per 100,000) in the world. In 2012, 50,831 nasopharynx death cases occurred in the world, so that 35,756 death cases were seen in men and 15,075 death cases in women (sex ratio = 2.37). SIR of mortality from the cancer was 0.7 per 100,000 (0.7 in women and 1 in men per 100,000) in the world. The results of correlation analysis showed a negative correlation between the SIR and HDI (r = -0.037, P = 0.629), and also the results of correlation analysis showed a negative correlation between the SMR and HDI (r = -0.237, P = 0.002). Nasopharyngeal cancer is native to Southeast Asia and the highest incidence and mortality were seen in countries with moderate and low HDI. It is suggested that studies are conducted on determining the causes of the cancer incidence and mortality in the world and the differences between various regions.

  5. 78 FR 2678 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request (60-Day FRN): The National Cancer Institute (NCI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... collection plans and instruments, contact: Erik Augustson, Ph.D., MPH, Behavioral Scientist/ Health Science Administrator, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, 6130 Executive Blvd., EPN-4034, Bethesda, MD..., mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology. To submit...

  6. 78 FR 53763 - Proposed Collection; 60-day Comment Request Cancer Trials Support Unit (CTSU) (NCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... Support Unit (CTSU) (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the... Rockville, MD 20850 or call non-toll-free number 240-276-6080 or Email your request, including your address...: Cancer Trials Support Unit (CTSU) (NCI), 0925- 0624, Expiration Date 12/31/2013, REVISION, National...

  7. Tolerability of Capecitabine Monotherapy in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Real-World Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicher, Laura W; de Graaf, Jacques C; Coers, Wilko; Tascilar, Metin; de Groot, Jan Willem B

    2017-03-01

    Capecitabine monotherapy is a treatment option for selected patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) and is administered to up to 17% of patients. Data are limited with regard to adverse events and dosing practices associated with capecitabine monotherapy in real-world situations. The aim of this study was to provide real-world data on adverse event rates and dose adjustments/discontinuations associated with capecitabine monotherapy in patients with mCRC. This retrospective study analyzed data from CRC patients scheduled to receive up to eight planned cycles of capecitabine monotherapy between 2009 and 2013 at a single large community hospital in The Netherlands. Data on adverse events (hand-foot syndrome [HFS], gastrointestinal (GI) events, hematological adverse events, and cardiotoxicity), as well as relative dose intensities (RDIs), dose reductions, and discontinuations, were evaluated. Data from 86 patients (45 females; mean age at the start of treatment, 69 years) were included. A total of 46.5% of patients experienced HFS and 44.2% experienced a GI event at some time during treatment. Hematological events and cardiotoxicity were rare. Most patients (77%) started at below the recommended dose, and patients at the lowest dose also had the lowest median RDIs. Dose reductions and discontinuations occurred in 15-25% of patients who experienced HFS or GI event over the course of eight cycles. HFS and GI events were very common in patients treated with capecitabine monotherapy in a real-world clinical setting. Most patients started treatment at below the recommended dose, and 15-25% of patients who had HFS or a GI event had a dose reduction or discontinuation.

  8. Estimates of the world-wide prevalence of cancer for 25 sites in the adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Paola; Bray, Freddie; Parkin, D Maxwell

    2002-01-01

    In health services planning, in addition to the basic measures of disease occurrence incidence and mortality, other indexes expressing the demand of care are also required to develop strategies for service provision. One of these is prevalence of the disease, which measures the absolute number, and relative proportion in the population, of individuals affected by the disease and that require some form of medical attention. For most cancer sites, cases surviving 5 years from diagnosis experience thereafter the same survival as the general population, so most of the workload is therefore due to medical acts within these first 5 years. This article reports world-wide estimates of 1-, 2-3- and 4-5-year point prevalence in 1990 in the population aged 15 years or over, and hence describes the number of cancer cases diagnosed between 1986 and 1990 who were still alive at the end of 1990. These estimates of prevalence at 1, 2-3 and 4-5 years are applicable to the evaluation of initial treatment, clinical follow-up and point of cure, respectively, for the majority of cancers. We describe the computational procedure and data sources utilised to obtain these figures and compare them with data published by 2 cancer registries. The highest prevalence of cancer is in North America with 1.5% of the population affected and diagnosed in the previous 5 years (about 0.5% of the population in years 4-5 and 2-3 of follow-up and 0.4% within the first year of diagnosis). This corresponds to over 3.2 million individuals. Western Europe and Australia and New Zealand show very similar percentages with 1.2% and 1.1% of the population affected (about 3.9 and 0.2 million cases respectively). Japan and Eastern Europe form the next batch with 1.0% and 0.7%, followed by Latin America and the Caribbean (overall prevalence of 0.4%), and all remaining regions are around 0.2%. Cancer prevalence in developed countries is very similar in men and women, 1.1% of the sex-specific population, while in

  9. Assessing the real-world cost-effectiveness of adjuvant trastuzumab in HER-2/neu positive breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hedden, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    Among women with surgically removed, high-risk HER-2\\/neu-positive breast cancer, trastuzumab has demonstrated significant improvements in disease-free and overall survival. The objective of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the currently recommended 12-month adjuvant protocol of trastuzumab using a Markov modeling approach and real-world cost data.

  10. Meaning Making and Psychological Adjustment following Cancer: The Mediating Roles of Growth, Life Meaning, and Restored Just-World Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Crystal L.; Edmondson, Donald; Fenster, Juliane R.; Blank, Thomas O.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer survivors' efforts at meaning making may influence the extent to which they successfully make meaning from their experience (i.e., experience posttraumatic growth, find life meaningful, and restore beliefs in a just world), which may, in turn, influence their psychological adjustment. Previous research regarding both meaning making…

  11. The impact of socioeconomic factors on 30-day mortality following elective colorectal cancer surgery: A nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B L; Osler, M; Harling, H

    2009-01-01

    We investigated postoperative mortality in relation to socioeconomic status (SES) in electively operated colorectal cancer patients, and evaluated whether social inequalities were explained by factors related to patient, disease or treatment. Data from the nationwide database of Danish Colorectal...... Cancer Group were linked to individual socioeconomic information in Statistics Denmark. Patients born before 1921 and those having local surgical or palliative procedures were excluded. A total of 7160 patients, operated on in the period 2001-2004, were included, of whom 342 (4.8%) died within 30 days...... of surgery. Postoperative mortality was significantly lower in patients with high income (odds ratio (OR)=0.82 (0.70-0.95) for each increase in annual income of EUR 13,500), higher education versus short education (OR)=0.60 (0.41-0.87), and owner-occupied versus rental housing (OR)=0.73 (0...

  12. Optimising the management of primary breast cancer in older women - a report of a multi-disciplinary study day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, K L; Ellis, I O; Morgan, D A L; Leonard, R; Reed, M W; Porock, D; Winterbottom, L; Barnard, K

    2011-12-01

    The objectives of the study day were to (i) develop an in-depth understanding around the biology and treatment options; (ii) explore the specific physical and psychosocial needs and consideration including patients perspective; and (iii) gain insight into the development of a dedicated, holistic and multi-disciplinary clinic service and the importance of supporting research, for older women with primary breast cancer. The format included presentations (with lectures from external and local faculty, and short research papers from Nottingham) with a number of interactive discussions, and sharing of patients' experience. Four sessions were held covering (i) pathological features, (ii) role of radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy, (iii) role of surgery, geriatric assessment and quality of life issues, and (iv) challenges in running research trials. A dedicated and joint team approach is required to improve clinical service and support research, in order to optimise the management of primary breast cancer in older women. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Real-world experience with 0.2 μg/day fluocinolone acetonide intravitreal implant (ILUVIEN) in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, C; Chakravarthy, U; Lotery, A; Menon, G; Talks, J

    2017-12-01

    AimsTo compare safety outcomes and visual function data acquired in the real-world setting with FAME study results in eyes treated with 0.2 μg/day fluocinolone acetonide (FAc).MethodsFourteen UK clinical sites contributed to pseudoanonymised data collected using the same electronic medical record system. Data pertaining to eyes treated with FAc implant for diabetic macular oedema (DMO) was extracted. Intraocular pressure (IOP)-related adverse events were defined as use of IOP-lowering medication, any rise in IOP>30 mm Hg, or glaucoma surgery. Other measured outcomes included visual acuity, central subfield thickness (CSFT) changes and use of concomitant medications.ResultsIn total, 345 eyes had a mean follow-up of 428 days. Overall, 13.9% of patients required IOP-lowering drops (included initiation, addition and switching of current drops), 7.2% had IOP elevation >30 mm Hg and 0.3% required glaucoma surgery. In patients with prior steroid exposure and no prior IOP-related event, there were no new IOP-related events. In patients without prior steroid use and without prior IOP-related events, 10.3% of eyes required IOP-lowering medication and 4.3% exhibited IOP >30 mm Hg at some point during follow-up. At 24 months, mean best-recorded visual acuity increased from 51.9 to 57.2 letters and 20.8% achieved ≥15-letter improvement. Mean CSFT reduced from 451.2 to 355.5 μm.ConclusionsWhile overall IOP-related emergent events were observed in similar frequency to FAME, no adverse events were seen in the subgroup with prior steroid exposure and no prior IOP events. Efficacy findings confirm that the FAc implant is a useful treatment option for chronic DMO.

  14. Influenza outbreak during Sydney World Youth Day 2008: the utility of laboratory testing and case definitions on mass gathering outbreak containment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiaan J van Hal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Influenza causes annual epidemics and often results in extensive outbreaks in closed communities. To minimize transmission, a range of interventions have been suggested. For these to be effective, an accurate and timely diagnosis of influenza is required. This is confirmed by a positive laboratory test result in an individual whose symptoms are consistent with a predefined clinical case definition. However, the utility of these clinical case definitions and laboratory testing in mass gathering outbreaks remains unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: An influenza outbreak was identified during World Youth Day 2008 in Sydney. From the data collected on pilgrims presenting to a single clinic, a Markov model was developed and validated against the actual epidemic curve. Simulations were performed to examine the utility of different clinical case definitions and laboratory testing strategies for containment of influenza outbreaks. Clinical case definitions were found to have the greatest impact on averting further cases with no added benefit when combined with any laboratory test. Although nucleic acid testing (NAT demonstrated higher utility than indirect immunofluorescence antigen or on-site point-of-care testing, this effect was lost when laboratory NAT turnaround times was included. The main benefit of laboratory confirmation was limited to identification of true influenza cases amenable to interventions such as antiviral therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Continuous re-evaluation of case definitions and laboratory testing strategies are essential for effective management of influenza outbreaks during mass gatherings.

  15. Migration: Dangers and Opportunities for the Family in the Light of John Paul II’s Messages for World Migrant Day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ireneusz Stolarczyk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of migration has become a subject of numerous sociological, economic and political analyses. It has also become an issue of interest for Catholic Social Teaching. The complexity of this subject, its topicality and a need for a diagnosis in the light of ethical and social rules are contained within the consecutive messages for the World Migrant Day by the Holy Father John Paul II. A particularly interesting dimension of the discussion of the phenomenon of migration is the analysis of this problem in terms of its influence on the modern family. John Paul II notices that owing to the dignity of the family and its significant role in the process of upbringing of the young generation, the decision to migrate by members of a family or entire families must be well thought ‑out and carefully considered in the context of a necessity to undertake such steps. The necessity condition is related to a wide array of threats, which a family would have to face if they chose to take the migration path. The Pope also points out that migration is, at the same time, a justifiable opportunity for the development of a family, which should be provided ample assistance by the Church and state in a new environment.

  16. Comorbidity of common mental disorders with cancer and their treatment gap: Findings from the World Mental Health Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakash, Ora; Levav, Itzhak; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Alonso, Jordi; Andrade, Laura Helena; Angermeyer, Matthias C.; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Florescu, Slivia; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Gureje, Oye; He, Yanling; Hu, Chiyi; de Jonge, Peter; Karam, Elie G.; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Murphy, Sam; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Piazza, Marina; Posada-Villa, Jose; Stein, Dan J.; Taib, Nezar Ismet; Zarkov, Zahari; Kessler, Ronald C.; Scott, Kate M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the comorbidity of common mental disorders (CMDs) and cancer, and the mental health treatment gap among community residents with active cancer, cancer survivors and cancer-free respondents in 13 high- and 11 low-middle income countries. Methods Data were derived from the World Mental Health Surveys (N=66,387; n=357 active cancer, n=1,373 cancer survivors, n=64,657 cancer free respondents). The WHO/Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used in all surveys to estimate CMDs prevalence rates. Respondents were also asked about mental health service utilization in the preceding 12 months. Cancer status was ascertained by self-report of physician’s diagnosis. Results Twelve month prevalence rates of CMDs were higher among active cancer (18.4% SE=2.1) than cancer free respondents (13.3%, SE=0.2) adjusted for socio-demographic confounders and other lifetime chronic conditions (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=1.44 95% CI 1.05–1.97). CMD rates among cancer survivors (14.6% SE=0.9) compared with cancer-free respondents did not differ significantly (AOR=0.95 95% CI 0.82–1.11). Similar patterns characterized high and low-middle income countries. Of respondents with active cancer who had CMD in the preceding 12 months 59% sought services for mental health problems (SE=5.3). The pattern of service utilization among people with CMDs by cancer status (highest among persons with active cancer, lower among survivors and lowest among cancer-free respondents) was similar in high- (64.0% SE=6.0, 41.2% SE=3.0, 35.6% SE=0.6) and low-middle income countries (46.4% SE=11.0, 22.5% SE=9.1, 17.4% SE=0.7). Conclusions Community respondents with active cancer have relatively higher CMD rates and relatively high treatment gap. Comprehensive cancer care should consider both factors. PMID:23983079

  17. Incidence and Mortality of Liver Cancer and their Relationship with the Human Development Index in the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Arabsalmani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Information on the incidence and mortality of liver cancer can be useful for health programs and research activities, and with regard to the possible role of the HDI and liver cancer, this study aimed to investigate incidence and mortality from the cancer and their relationship with the indicator and its components in 2012 in world. Methods: In this ecologic study, data were extracted from GLOBOCAN in 2012. Data on HDI and its components were extracted from the World Bank. The number and standardized incidence and mortality rates of liver cancer were reported by regions in the world. Data were analyzed by SPSS software and Correlation coefficient test. Results: There was a total of 782,451 incidence cases. Of these patients, 228, 082 cases (29.15 % were women and 554, 369 cases (70.85 % men, and there were 745,533 deaths. Of the deaths, 224, 492 cases (30.11 % occurred in women and 521, 041 cases (69.89 % men were recorded in the world in 2012. Results showed that there was a significant inverse correlation between age-specific incidence rate ( ASIR and HDI (r=-0.345, p and #8804;0.001, as well significant inverse correlation was seen between age-specific mortality rate (ASMR, and HDI and its components. Conclusion: Liver cancer incidence and mortality are higher in the medium HDI countries. The relationship between the standardized incidence and mortality of liver cancer with HDI and its components, including life expectancy at birth, mean years of schooling and income level per person was significantly negative. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(9.000: 800-807

  18. Human colon cancers as a major problem in poland and in the world – medical and environmental issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Katarzyna Król

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Many epidemiological data have shown an increasing incidence and mortality of colon cancer cases in the past several years, not only in Poland but all over the world as well. Each year, approximately a million new cases of colon cancer are diagnosed and that is the cause of death of almost half a million patients in the world. The aim of this article is to present the epidemiology and the current state of scientific knowledge concerning etiology and pathogenesis of neoplastic diseases in human large intestine. Furthermore, this short review describes the essential risk factors and suggests the simple and effective ways of colon cancer prevention.Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in EU countries. Scientific studies have proved that genetic and hereditary factors have a strong influence on carcinogenesis in human colon. Moreover, environmental factors, such as dietary contribute to the development of colon neoplasm. The most useful tool to reduce high morbidity and mortality is a prevention. Screening tests in nonsymptomatic people from high-risk groups or populations enable diagnosis in the early stage of colorectal cancer. Many publications have reported that modification of lifestyle and daily diet also play a significant role in prevention.

  19. Breast cancer incidence in food- vs non-food-producing areas in Norway: possible beneficial effects of World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robsahm, Trude Eid; Tretli, S

    2002-02-01

    It has been suggested that World War II influenced breast cancer risk among Norwegian women by affecting adolescent growth. Diet changed substantially during the war, and the reduction in energy intake was assumed to be larger in non-food-producing than in food-producing municipalities. In the present study, we have looked at the influence of residential history in areas with and without food production on the incidence of breast cancer in a population-based cohort study consisting of 597,906 women aged between 30 and 64 years. The study included 7311 cases of breast cancer, diagnosed between 1964 and 1992. The risk estimates were calculated using a Poisson regression model. The results suggest that residential history may influence the risk of breast cancer, where the suggested advantageous effect of World War II seems to be larger in non-food-producing than in food-producing areas. Breast cancer incidence was observed to decline for the post-war cohorts, which is discussed in relation to diet. Copyright 2002 The Cancer Research Campaign

  20. Prediction of 90 Day and Overall Survival after Chemoradiotherapy for Lung Cancer: Role of Performance Status and Body Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, J C S; Williams, L J; Simms, A; Price, A; Campbell, S; Fallon, M T; Fearon, K C H

    2017-09-01

    If appropriate patients are to be selected for lung cancer treatment, an understanding of who is most at risk of adverse outcomes after treatment is needed. The aim of the present study was to identify predictive factors for 30 and 90 day mortality after chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and factors that were prognostic for overall survival. A retrospective cohort study of 194 patients with lung cancer who had undergone CRT in South East Scotland from 2008 to 2010 was undertaken. Gender, age, cancer characteristics, weight loss, body mass index (BMI), performance status (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group; ECOG) and computed tomography-derived body composition variables were examined for prognostic significance using Cox's proportional hazards model and logistic regression. The median overall survival was 19 months (95% confidence interval 16.3, 21.7). Four of 194 patients died within 30 days of treatment completion, for which there were no independent predictive variables; 22/194 (11%) died within 90 days of treatment completion. BMI performance status ≥2 were independent predictors of death within 90 days of treatment completion (P = 0.001 and P = 0.004, respectively). Patients with either BMI performance status ≥ 2 had an odds ratio of death within 90 days of 5.97 (95% confidence interval 2.20, 16.19), rising to an odds ratio of 13.27 (1.70, 103.47) for patients with both BMI performance status ≥ 2. Patients with low muscle attenuation had significantly reduced overall survival (P = 0.004); individuals with low muscle attenuation had a median survival of 15.2 months (95% confidence interval 12.7, 17.7) compared with 23.0 months (95% confidence interval 18.3, 27.8) for those with high muscle attenuation, equating to a hazard ratio of death of 1.62 (95% confidence interval 1.17, 2.23, P = 0.003). Poor performance status, low BMI and low muscle attenuation identify patients at increased risk of premature death after CRT. Risk factors for adverse outcomes

  1. Data mining and medical world: breast cancers' diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskouei, Rozita Jamili; Kor, Nasroallah Moradi; Maleki, Saeid Abbasi

    2017-01-01

    The amount of data in electronic and real world is constantly on the rise. Therefore, extracting useful knowledge from the total available data is very important and time consuming task. Data mining has various techniques for extracting valuable information or knowledge from data. These techniques are applicable for all data that are collected inall fields of science. Several research investigations are published about applications of data mining in various fields of sciences such as defense, banking, insurances, education, telecommunications, medicine and etc. This investigation attempts to provide a comprehensive survey about applications of data mining techniques in breast cancer diagnosis, treatment & prognosis till now. Further, the main challenges in these area is presented in this investigation. Since several research studies currently are going on in this issues, therefore, it is necessary to have a complete survey about all researches which are completed up to now, along with the results of those studies and important challenges which are currently exist in this area for helping young researchers and presenting to them the main problems that are still exist in this area.

  2. Lung Cancer in Never-Smoking Women: A Sub-Analysis of the Spanish Female-Specific Database WORLD07.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñolas, Nuria; Garrido, Pilar; Isla, Dolores; Provencio, Mariano; Majem, Margarita; Artal, Angel; Carcereny, Enric; Garcia Campelo, Rosario; Lianes, Pilar; De La Peñas, Ramon; Felip, Enriqueta

    2017-05-28

    The WORLD07 study characterizes lung cancer in Spanish women. This analysis investigated lung cancer features in never-smoking women. Of 2072 women recruited, 2035 were analyzed. Patient characteristics and demographics were similar for current/former smokers and never smokers. Among never smokers, 38.3% were exposed to passive smoking. Non-small-cell lung cancer was the most common type (78.8% of current/former smokers and 96.1% of never smokers) and adenocarcinoma the most common histology (69.1% and 83.4% respectively). There was a high incidence of lung cancer in Spanish never-smoking women and a high proportion (about 50%) had mutant epidermal growth factor receptor.

  3. Incidence and Mortality of Breast Cancer and their Relationship with the Human Development Index (HDI) in the World in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoncheh, Mahshid; Mirzaei, Maryam; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women worldwide and its incidence is generally increasing. In 2012, it was the second most common cancer in the world. It is necessary to obtain information on incidence and mortality for health planning. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the human development index (HDI), and the incidence and mortality rates of breast cancer in the world in 2012. This ecologic study concerns incidence rate and standardized mortality rates of the cancer from GLOBOCAN in 2012, and HDI and its components extracted from the global bank site. Data were analyzed using correlation tests and regression with SPSS software (version 15). Among the six regions of WHO, the highest breast cancer incidence rate (67.6) was observed in the PAHO, and the lowest incidence rate was 27.8 for SEARO. There was a direct, strong, and meaningful correlation between the standardized incidence rate and HDI (r=0.725, p≤0.001). Pearson correlation test showed that there was a significant correlation between age-specific incidence rate (ASIR) and components of the HDI (life expectancy at birth, mean years of schooling, and GNP). On the other, a non-significant relationship was observed between ASIR and HDI overall (r=0.091, p=0.241). In total, a significant relationship was not found between age-specific mortality rate (ASMR) and components of HDI. Significant positive correlations exist between ASIR and components of the HDI. Socioeconomic status is directly related to the stage of the cancer and patient's survival. With increasing the incidence rate of the cancer, mortality rate from the cancer does not necessariloy increase. This may be due to more early detection and treatment in developed that developing countries. It is necessary to increase awareness of risk factors and early detection in the latter.

  4. Seven-day intensive preoperative rehabilitation for elderly patients with lung cancer: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yutian; Huang, Jian; Yang, Mei; Su, Jianhua; Liu, Jing; Che, Guowei

    2017-03-01

    As a newly developed treatment, preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has been studied in depth. However, few studies have assessed the relationship between advanced age and a shorter term intensive pattern of preoperative PR in patients with lung cancer (LC) and especially those patients waiting for therapeutic LC surgeries. This study investigated short-term preoperative PR combined with inspiratory muscle training (IMT) and aerobic endurance training in elderly patients scheduled to undergo LC lobectomy. A prospective randomized controlled trial with a total of 60 subjects aged ≥70 y was conducted. The intervention group (PR group) was treated for 1 wk with systematic and highly intensive preoperative PR training before lobectomy, and the control group (NPR group) was treated with conventional preoperative respiratory management. We analyzed the 6-min walking distance (6-MWD), the peak expiratory flow (PEF), and quality-of-life scores before and after the rehabilitation regimen as well as the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs). In total, 30 patients (PR group) completely executed the 7-d intensive preoperative PR, and 30 patients (NPR group) served as the control group. The two groups were comparable at baseline. During the preoperative PR, a significantly longer 6-MWD (increase: 28.6 ± 18.2 versus 9.4 ± 27.0 m; between-groups difference: 19.2 m, P = 0.029) and an increased PEF (increase: 26.2 ± 22.5 versus 8.2 ± 10.3 L/min; between-groups difference: 18.0 L/min, P elderly LC patients scheduled to undergo surgery in China, a 7-d intensive pattern of preoperative PR combined with IMT and aerobic endurance training may be a feasible rehabilitation strategy with positive physical and psychological effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Breast cancer screening disparities among immigrant women by world region of origin: a population-based study in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabi, Mandana; Lofters, Aisha; Kumar, Matthew; Glazier, Richard H

    2016-07-01

    Rates of mammography screening for breast cancer are disproportionately low in certain subgroups including low-income and immigrant women. The purpose of the study was to examine differences in rates of appropriate breast cancer screening (i.e., screening mammography every 2 years) among Ontario immigrant women by world region of origin and explore the association between appropriate breast cancer screening among these women groups and individual and structural factors. A cohort of 183,332 screening-eligible immigrant women living in Ontario between 2010 and 2012 was created from linked databases and classified into eight world regions of origin. Appropriate screening rates were calculated for each region by age group and selected sociodemographic, immigration, and healthcare-related characteristics. The association between appropriate screening across the eight regions of origin and selected sociodemographic, immigration, and health-related characteristics was explored using multivariate Poisson regression. Screening varied by region of origin, with South Asian women (48.5%) having the lowest and Caribbean and Latin American women (63.7%) the highest cancer screening rates. Factors significantly associated with lower screening across the world regions of origin included living in the lowest income neighborhoods, having a refugee status, being a new immigrant, not having a regular physical examination, not being enrolled in a primary care patient enrollment model, having a male physician, and having an internationally trained physician. Multiple interventions entailing cross-sector collaboration, promotion of patient enrollment models, community engagement, comprehensive and intensive outreach to women, and knowledge translation and transfer to physicians should be considered to address screening disparities among immigrant population. Consideration should be given to design and delivery of culturally appropriate and easily accessible cancer screening programs

  6. [The strategy for establishment of comprehensive cervical cancer prevention and control in the world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, H L; Fang, L W; Wang, L H

    2017-01-06

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common malignancies among women. Screening programs for cervical cancer have been implemented in many developed countries. Comprehensive systems for cervical cancer prevention and control have improved over the past 30 years, which has led to a significant decline in the morbidity and mortality of cervical cancer. Since 2009, the Chinese government has conducted the Cervical Cancer and Breast Cancer Screening Program for Rural Women on a national scale, which has substantially improved cervical cancer prevention and control. However, a comprehensive system for cervical cancer prevention has been not established in China. It is essential to investigate suitable strategies for cervical cancer prevention system in the country by referring to the experiences of developed nations in comparison with the situation in China, with respect to system operations, compatibility with the existing health care system, choice of suitable technologies, and information and evaluation platforms.

  7. Quality of life assessment in advanced cancer patients treated at home, an inpatient unit, and a day care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leppert W

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wojciech Leppert,1 Mikolaj Majkowicz,2 Maria Forycka,1 Eleonora Mess,3 Agata Zdun-Ryzewska2 1Department of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Quality of Life Research, Gdansk Medical University, Gdansk, Poland; 3Palliative Care Nursing Department, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Aim of the study: To assess quality of life (QoL in cancer patients treated at home, at an in-patient palliative care unit (PCU, and at a day care center (DCC. Patients and methods: QoL was assessed in advanced cancer patients at baseline and after 7 days of symptomatic treatment using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative Care (EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS, and the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS scale. Results: A total of 129 patients completed the study, with 51 patients treated at home, 51 patients treated at the PCU, and 27 patients at DCC. In the EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL, improvement in functional and symptom scales was observed except in physical functioning and fatigue levels; patients at DCC had a better physical functioning, global QoL, appetite, and fatigue levels. In the ESAS, improvement in all items was found except for drowsiness levels, which was stable in patients treated at DCC and deteriorated in home and PCU patients. Higher activity, better appetite and well-being, and less drowsiness were observed in patients treated at DCC. KPS was better in DCC patients compared to those treated at home and at the PCU; the latter group deteriorated. Conclusions: QoL improved in all patient groups, with better results in DCC patients and similar scores in those staying at home and at the PCU. Along with clinical assessment, baseline age, KPS, physical and emotional functioning may be considered when assigning patients to care at a DCC, PCU, or at home. Keywords: oncology, patient care

  8. Palliative care units in lung cancer in the real-world setting: a single institution's experience and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Eva Katharina; Schur, Sophie; Nemecek, Romina; Mayrhofer, Michael; Huber, Patrick; Adamidis, Feroniki; Maehr, Bruno; Unseld, Matthias; Watzke, Herbert Hans; Pirker, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Palliative care plays a crucial role in the overall management of patients with advanced lung cancer and was shown to lead to clinically meaningful improvement in quality of life, less aggressive endof-life care, and potentially prolonged survival. Here we summarize our single institution experience on palliative care in patients with lung cancer. The data of patients with lung cancer treated at the palliative care unit of the Medical University of Vienna between June 2010 and March 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient characteristics, reasons for admissions, treatment as well as interventions during hospitalization, and clinical outcomes were determined. The study enrolled 91 lung cancer patients, who represented 19.8% of the 460 patients admitted to the palliative care unit. They had the following clinical characteristics: 39% females, 61% males; median age 62 years; median Karnofsky performance status 50%, 92% metastatic disease, 74% non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 19% small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), 7% neuroendocrine carcinomas of the lung. Primary reasons for admission were deterioration of performance status in 40%, uncontrolled cancer-related pain in 38%, dyspnea in 13%, and psychosocial factors in 8% of the patients. Median duration of hospitalization was 16 days (range, 1-101 days). Improvement or stabilisation of tumor-related symptoms was achieved in 25% of the patients. Seventy-five percent of all patients died during their first admission. Their median survival from primary diagnosis until death was 16 months (95% confidence interval, 13.7-18.3 months). Patients with lung cancer admitted to the palliative care unit had late-stage disease. In order to provide early palliative care, the management of lung cancer patients should guarantee access to ambulatory care, inpatient care and home care as well as cooperation and communication between oncologists and palliative care physicians.

  9. February 4 Will Focus on Dispelling Dangerous Myths Like "Cancer is My Fate." | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Cancer Day is a chance to raise our collective voices in the name of improving general knowledge around cancer and dismissing misconceptions about the disease. From a global level, we focused our messaging on four myths. Learn the truth and supporting evidence on the World Cancer Day website. |

  10. Meanings of existential uncertainty and certainty for people diagnosed with cancer and receiving palliative treatment: A life-world phenomenological study.

    OpenAIRE

    Friberg, Febe; Karlsson, Magdalena; Wallengren, Catarina; Öhlén, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many people around the world are getting cancer and living longer with the disease. Thanks to improved treatment options in healthcare, patients diagnosed with advanced gastrointestinal cancer can increasingly live for longer. Living with cancer creates existential uncertainty, but what does this situation mean for the individual? The purpose of the study is to interpret meanings of existential uncertainty and certainty for people diagnosed with advanced gastrointestinal cancer...

  11. Meanings of existential uncertainty and certainty for people diagnosed with cancer and receiving palliative treatment: a life-world phenomenological study

    OpenAIRE

    Friberg, Febe; Karlsson, Magdalena; Wallengren, Catarina; Öhlén, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many people around the world are getting cancer and living longer with the disease. Thanks to improved treatment options in healthcare, patients diagnosed with advanced gastrointestinal cancer can increasingly live for longer. Living with cancer creates existential uncertainty, but what does this situation mean for the individual? The purpose of the study is to interpret meanings of existential uncertainty and certainty for people diagnosed with advanced gastrointestinal cancer...

  12. Validation of Fully Automated VMAT Plan Generation for Library-Based Plan-of-the-Day Cervical Cancer Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharfo, Abdul Wahab M; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Voet, Peter W J; Heijkoop, Sabrina T; Mens, Jan-Willem M; Hoogeman, Mischa S; Heijmen, Ben J M

    2016-01-01

    To develop and validate fully automated generation of VMAT plan-libraries for plan-of-the-day adaptive radiotherapy in locally-advanced cervical cancer. Our framework for fully automated treatment plan generation (Erasmus-iCycle) was adapted to create dual-arc VMAT treatment plan libraries for cervical cancer patients. For each of 34 patients, automatically generated VMAT plans (autoVMAT) were compared to manually generated, clinically delivered 9-beam IMRT plans (CLINICAL), and to dual-arc VMAT plans generated manually by an expert planner (manVMAT). Furthermore, all plans were benchmarked against 20-beam equi-angular IMRT plans (autoIMRT). For all plans, a PTV coverage of 99.5% by at least 95% of the prescribed dose (46 Gy) had the highest planning priority, followed by minimization of V45Gy for small bowel (SB). Other OARs considered were bladder, rectum, and sigmoid. All plans had a highly similar PTV coverage, within the clinical constraints (above). After plan normalizations for exactly equal median PTV doses in corresponding plans, all evaluated OAR parameters in autoVMAT plans were on average lower than in the CLINICAL plans with an average reduction in SB V45Gy of 34.6% (pImprovements in SB dose delivery with autoVMAT instead of manVMAT were higher for empty bladder PTVs compared to full bladder PTVs, due to differences in concavity of the PTVs. Quality of automatically generated VMAT plans was superior to manually generated plans. Automatic VMAT plan generation for cervical cancer has been implemented in our clinical routine. Due to the achieved workload reduction, extension of plan libraries has become feasible.

  13. Cancer burden with ageing population in urban regions in China: projection on cancer registry data from World Health Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoi, Kelvin K F; Hirai, Hoyee W; Chan, Felix C H; Griffiths, Sian; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2017-01-01

    China is facing the challenges of an expanding ageing population and the impact of rapid urbanization, cancer rates are subsequently increasing. This study focuses on the changes of the ageing population and projects the incidence of common ageing-related cancers in the urban regions in China up to 2030. Cancer incidence data and population statistics in China were extracted from the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Due to improving longevity in China, continuous and remarkable increasing trends for the lung, colorectal and prostate cancers are expected. The rate of expanding ageing population was taken into account when predicting the trend of cancer incidence; the estimations of ageing-related cancers were more factual and significant than using the conventional approach of age standardization. The incidence rates of lung, colorectal and prostate cancers will continue to rise in the future decades due to the rise of ageing population. Lifestyle modification such as cutting tobacco smoking rates and promoting healthier diets as well as cancer screening programs should be a health system priority in order to decrease the growing burden of cancer-related mortality and morbidity.

  14. Epidemiology, Incidence and Mortality of Bladder Cancer and their Relationship with the Development Index in the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavifar, Neda; Ghoncheh, Mahshid; Pakzad, Reza; Momenimovahed, Zohre; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is an international public health problem. It is the ninth most common cancer and the fourteenth leading cause of death due to cancer worldwide. Given aging populations, the incidence of this cancer is rising. Information on the incidence and mortality of the disease, and their relationship with level of economic development is essential for better planning. The aim of the study was to investigate bladder cancer incidence and mortality rates, and their relationship with the the Human Development Index (HDI) in the world. Data were obtained from incidence and mortality rates presented by GLOBOCAN in 2012. Data on HDI and its components were extracted from the global bank site. The number and standardized incidence and mortality rates were reported by regions and the distribution of the disease were drawn in the world. For data analysis, the relationship between incidence and death rates, and HDI and its components was measured using correlation coefficients and SPSS software. The level of significance was set at 0.05. In 2012, 429,793 bladder cancer cases and 165,084 bladder death cases occurred in the world. Five countries that had the highest age-standardized incidence were Belgium 17.5 per 100,000, Lebanon 16.6/100,000, Malta 15.8/100,000, Turkey 15.2/100,000, and Denmark 14.4/100,000. Five countries that had the highest age-standardized death rates were Turkey 6.6 per 100,000, Egypt 6.5/100,000, Iraq 6.3/100,000, Lebanon 6.3/100,000, and Mali 5.2/100,000. There was a positive linear relationship between the standardized incidence rate and HDI (r=0.653, Pincidence rate with life expectancy at birth, average years of schooling, and the level of income per person of population. A positive linear relationship was also noted between the standardized mortality rate and HDI (r=0.308, Pincidence of bladder cancer in developed countries and parts of Africa was higher, while the highest mortality rate was observed in the countries of North Africa and the

  15. Complications of chemoport in children with cancer: Experience of 54,100 catheter days from a tertiary cancer center of Southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Aparna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemoport is an essential part of the management of children with cancer and provides long-term venous access. There are few studies from resource poor countries reporting complications of chemoport. Aims: This study was aimed at describing the complications of chemoport in patients with cancer. Materials and Methods: This retrospective observational study analyzed 200 patients <15 years of age who underwent chemoport insertion. The medical records of these patients were reviewed for the patient characteristics, diagnosis, nature of port use, port-related complications and their management. Results: A total of 209 ports were implanted in 200 patients and 24 ports were removed due to port-related complications. There were 122 boys and 78 girls whose ages ranged from 4 months to 13 years (median age 2.5 years. About72% of patients were <2 years old. The cumulative duration of catheterization was 54,100 days. Of 209 ports, there were 36 complications that led to the removal of 21 ports. Port-related infection was the most common infection observed in our study (0.66/1000 catheter days and 11.9%. Mechanical complications were seen in 9 patients. Venous thrombosis and skin necrosis occurred in one patient each. Conclusions: Use of chemoport is safe and is a boon for children with cancer in developing countries with incidence of complications similar to Western countries. Although use of chemoport is associated with complications, they are easily managed. With stringent catheter care by trained personnel, some complications can be prevented.

  16. Why I Do Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Cancer Research Day is recognized on September 24, 2017. This day presents an opportunity for all of us to remind the world of the critically important roles research and cancer researchers play in reducing the global burden of cancer. Together with ten other global partners, NCI participated in the planning and launch of this initiative, highlighting the amplified impact of international cooperation in the clinical research arena.

  17. Hospitalizations During Systemic Therapy for Metastatic Lung Cancer: A Systematic Review of Real World vs Clinical Trial Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Rebecca M; Atenafu, Eshetu G; Krzyzanowska, Monika K

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the risk of hospitalization due to treatment-related toxic effects is essential for patients, their clinicians, and health systems. Unplanned hospitalizations represent potential gaps in patient care; definition of these gaps allows characterization and identification of areas for quality improvement. To compare the rates of hospitalization in patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (mNSCLC) receiving chemotherapy in the "real world" vs clinical trial settings and to identify factors associated with hospitalization. A systematic review of Medline and EMBASE was conducted for records dating from database inception (1946 and 1974, respectively) through December 2014 to identify articles reporting rates of hospitalization during chemotherapy in patients with cancer. Both observational studies and clinical trials were eligible. This report focuses on patients with mNSCLC receiving chemotherapy because data were available for this clinical scenario in both the clinical trial and observational setting, allowing comparison. Summary statistics were used to describe results, and the χ2 test was used to compare hospitalization rates. Of the 74 articles reporting hospitalization rates during chemotherapy, 10 studies, all published after 2004, examined chemotherapy in mNSCLC, 5 randomized clinical trials (3962 patients) and 5 observational studies (8624 patients). Chemotherapy regimens included doublet therapy, single-agent therapy, or chemotherapy type unspecified. The real world cohort was older (71 vs 63 years). All real world studies reported on comorbidities, while clinical trials reported performance status. The aggregate hospitalization rate among real world patients was significantly higher than among trial patients (51% vs 16%) (odds ratio, 7.7; 95% CI, 7.0-8.4; P chemotherapy were associated with hospitalization during chemotherapy in clinical trials, while type of chemotherapy was a risk factor in observational studies. Clinical trials in

  18. Bridging the Knowledge of Different Worlds to Understand the Big Picture of Cancer Nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Vimalkumar; Liu, Zehua; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A

    2017-06-01

    Explosive growth of nanomedicines continues to significantly impact the therapeutic strategies for effective cancer treatment. Despite the significant progress in the development of advanced nanomedicines, successful clinical translation remains challenging. As cancer nanomedicine is a multidisciplinary field, the fundamental problem is that the knowledge gaps stem from different vantage points in the understanding of cancer nanomedicines. The complexities and heterogenecity of both nanomedicines and cancer are further demanding the integration of highly diverse expertise to develop clinically translatable cancer nanomedicines. This progress report aims to discuss the current understanding of cancer nanomedicines between different research areas in terms of nanoparticle engineering, formulation, tumor patho-physiology and clinical medicine, as well as to identify the knowledge gaps lying at the interface between the different fields of research in nanomedicine. Here we also highlight for the necessity to harmonize the multidisciplinary effort in the research of nanomedicines in order to bridge the knowledge and to advance the full understanding in cancer nanomedicines. A paradigm shift is needed in the strategic development of disease specific nanomedicines in order to foster the successful translation into clinic of future cancer nanomedicines. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Oral cancer prevention and control--the approach of the World Health Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2009-01-01

    was confirmed recently by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Studies have shown that heavy intake of alcoholic beverages is associated with nutrient deficiency, which appears to contribute independently to oral carcinogenesis. Oral cancer is preventable through risk factors intervention......Cancer is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality today. It is estimated that around 43% of cancer deaths are due to tobacco use, unhealthy diets, alcohol consumption, inactive lifestyles and infection. Low-income and disadvantaged groups are generally more exposed to avoidable...... risk factors such as environmental carcinogens, alcohol, infectious agents, and tobacco use. These groups also have less access to the health services and health education that would empower them to make decisions to protect and improve their own health. Oro-pharyngeal cancer is significant component...

  20. Validation of Fully Automated VMAT Plan Generation for Library-Based Plan-of-the-Day Cervical Cancer Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Voet, Peter W. J.; Heijkoop, Sabrina T.; Mens, Jan-Willem M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Heijmen, Ben J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop and validate fully automated generation of VMAT plan-libraries for plan-of-the-day adaptive radiotherapy in locally-advanced cervical cancer. Material and Methods Our framework for fully automated treatment plan generation (Erasmus-iCycle) was adapted to create dual-arc VMAT treatment plan libraries for cervical cancer patients. For each of 34 patients, automatically generated VMAT plans (autoVMAT) were compared to manually generated, clinically delivered 9-beam IMRT plans (CLINICAL), and to dual-arc VMAT plans generated manually by an expert planner (manVMAT). Furthermore, all plans were benchmarked against 20-beam equi-angular IMRT plans (autoIMRT). For all plans, a PTV coverage of 99.5% by at least 95% of the prescribed dose (46 Gy) had the highest planning priority, followed by minimization of V45Gy for small bowel (SB). Other OARs considered were bladder, rectum, and sigmoid. Results All plans had a highly similar PTV coverage, within the clinical constraints (above). After plan normalizations for exactly equal median PTV doses in corresponding plans, all evaluated OAR parameters in autoVMAT plans were on average lower than in the CLINICAL plans with an average reduction in SB V45Gy of 34.6% (p<0.001). For 41/44 autoVMAT plans, SB V45Gy was lower than for manVMAT (p<0.001, average reduction 30.3%), while SB V15Gy increased by 2.3% (p = 0.011). AutoIMRT reduced SB V45Gy by another 2.7% compared to autoVMAT, while also resulting in a 9.0% reduction in SB V15Gy (p<0.001), but with a prolonged delivery time. Differences between manVMAT and autoVMAT in bladder, rectal and sigmoid doses were ≤ 1%. Improvements in SB dose delivery with autoVMAT instead of manVMAT were higher for empty bladder PTVs compared to full bladder PTVs, due to differences in concavity of the PTVs. Conclusions Quality of automatically generated VMAT plans was superior to manually generated plans. Automatic VMAT plan generation for cervical cancer has been implemented in

  1. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lobectomy for lung cancer is associated with a lower 30-day morbidity compared with lobectomy by thoracotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lykke Østergaard; Petersen, René Horsleben; Hansen, Henrik Jessen

    2016-01-01

    . Consequently, our aim was to compare the 30-day morbidity and mortality for lung cancer patients operated by VATS lobectomy or lobectomy by OT. METHOD: Data were obtained from prospective national and regional databases, including patients who underwent lobectomy for lung cancer in the eastern part of Denmark...... from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2011. All patients operated before 2009 were re-staged according to the latest International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer lung cancer classification. Patient characteristics, comorbidities, pathology and operative data were assessed using an independent...... samples t-test, Pearson's χ(2), Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney test. Morbidity was assessed using multinomial logistic regression adjusted for gender, age, cancer stage, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), year of surgery and Charlson comorbidity score. RESULTS: In total, 1379 patients underwent...

  2. Molecular epidemiology, and possible real-world applications in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hidemi; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2016-01-01

    Gene-environment interaction, a key idea in molecular epidemiology, has enabled the development of personalized medicine. This concept includes personalized prevention. While genome-wide association studies have identified a number of genetic susceptibility loci in breast cancer risk, however, the application of this knowledge to practical prevention is still underway. Here, we briefly review the history of molecular epidemiology and its progress in breast cancer epidemiology. We then introduce our experience with the trial combination of GWAS-identified loci and well-established lifestyle and reproductive risk factors in the risk prediction of breast cancer. Finally, we report our exploration of the cumulative risk of breast cancer based on this risk prediction model as a potential tool for individual risk communication, including genetic risk factors and gene-environment interaction with obesity.

  3. Patterns of information-seeking for cancer on the internet: an analysis of real world data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ofran, Yishai; Paltiel, Ora; Pelleg, Dan; Rowe, Jacob M; Yom-Tov, Elad

    2012-01-01

    ... may be misleading and confusing. We assess Internet searching patterns to understand the information needs of cancer patients and their acquaintances, as well as to discern their underlying psychological states...

  4. [Recovering the thread of life--destruction and reconstruction of the social world of patients after cancer of the colon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, D

    1995-09-01

    To find a lifeline again. The destruction and rebuilding of the social world of patients after cancer of the colon. This qualitative study arose from the concern of the Swiss Cancer Society (Schweizerische Krebsliga) to optimise the service of social work and home-nursing. 36 patients who lived in their own homes after treatment for cancer of the colon were interviewed. Transcripts were analysed, using the method and coding practice of "Grounded Theory" of Glaser, Strauss & Corbin. The results reported here show that the illness affected life to varying degree. The experience of cancer of the colon affected body image, activities of daily living, work, thought, emotion, social life and material circumstances. The process of continuing to live is affected by the state of health, quality of social relationships and financial security among other factors. Research which focuses on interactions in the context of their conditions and consequences is the hallmark of the interactionist social sciences. The theoretical and methodological premises of the interactionist school of Anselm Strauss generate knowledge which is particularly useful in relation to professional support of clients in the health and social services.

  5. The role of common mental and physical disorders in days out of role in the Iraqi general population: Results from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamzawi, Ali Obaid; Rosellini, Anthony J.; Lindberg, Marrena; Petukhova, Maria; Kessler, Ronald C; Bruffaerts, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to support mental health policy planning efforts in conjunction with the reconstruction of Iraq, a nationally representative face-to-face household survey was carried out that assessed the prevalence and correlates of common mental disorders in the Iraqi population. A total of 4,332 adult (ages 18+) respondents were interviewed (95.2% response rate). The current report presents data on the role impairments (number of days out-of-role in the past 30 days) associated with the nine mental disorders assessed in the survey in comparison to the impairments associated with ten chronic physical disorders also assessed in the survey. These disorders were all assessed with the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Days out-of-role was assessed with the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule. Both individual-level and societal-level effects of the disorders were estimated. Strongest individual-level predictors were bipolar and drug abuse disorders (176-95 days per year), with mental disorders making up five of the seven strongest predictors. The strongest population-level predictors were headache/migraine and arthritis (22-12% population proportions). Overall population proportions were 57% of days out-of-role due to the chronic physical disorders considered here and 18% for the mental disorders. Despite commonly-occurring mental disorders accounting for more individual-level days out-of-role than the physical disorders, mental disorders are much less likely to receive treatment in Iraq (e.g., due to stigma). These results highlight the need for culturally tailored mental health prevention and treatment programs in Iraq. PMID:24581572

  6. Day to day with COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    COPD - day to day; Chronic obstructive airways disease - day to day; Chronic obstructive lung disease - day to ... Having COPD can sap your energy. These simple changes can make your days easier and preserve your strength. Ask ...

  7. Between Two Worlds: Liminality and Late-Stage Cancer-Directed Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Disease-directed therapy near death is a growing trend among persons living with late-stage cancer. As a sociocultural phenomenon, cancer-directed therapy (e.g., chemotherapy) when given for very advanced disease is a process that offers questionable benefits and portends further suffering, but also suggests potential for growth and transcendence. Theories and concepts drawn from cultural anthropology, sociology, and existentialism illustrate how contextual factors contribute to the creation of a "liminal space"; the latter part of the cancer trajectory where living and dying can overlap. When applied to clinical practice, this theoretical framework gives the patient, family, and health care provider a way of "unmasking" a period of transition during terminal illness when aggressive disease-directed care continues to be provided. The liminal space may function as an existential plane; a gateway or threshold with inherent potential for psychospiritual development during the final stage of life.

  8. Non-imaging assisted insertion of un-cuffed, non-tunneled internal jugular venous catheters for hemodialysis: Safety and utility in modern day world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Rathi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Absolute necessity in acute kidney injury (AKI and ignorance in chronic kidney disease (CKD make the use of un-cuffed, non-tunneled catheters an indispensable vascular access for hemodialysis. Although these catheters should be inserted under radiological guidance, it may not be feasible in certain circumstances. The aim of the present study was to evaluate safety and outcome of non-imaging assisted insertion of these catheters in internal jugular vein (IJV for hemodialysis. Methods: We analyzed 233 attempts of non-imaging assisted un-cuffed, non-tunneled IJV catheterization at our center. The immediate insertion complications, duration of use, rate and type of infection and other complications were assessed. Results: Out of the 233 attempts, 223 (213-right, 10-left were successful. The most common indication was AKI (n = 127, 54.5%, followed by CKD (n = 99, 42.5%. Successful catheterization at first attempt was achieved in 78.9%. Insertion complications were noted in 12.8% and included arterial puncture (5.2%, hematoma (3.0% and malposition (2.1%. Amongst 219 catheters followed for 4825 days, the mean duration of use was 22 days. Catheter related infections occurred in 42 patients with an incidence of 8.7 per 1000 catheter days. Bacteraemia was present in 10/36 cases (27.7%, positive catheter tip cultures in 71.4% cases and staphylococcal species were the most common organism. Cumulative hazard analysis by Cox regression revealed a linear increase in the risk for infection with each week. Conclusion: Non-imaging assisted insertion of uncuffed, non-tunneled catheters is associated with slightly higher rate of insertion complication but comparable outcome in terms of infection rate or days of use. Keywords: Hemodialysis, Internal jugular vein catheterization, Catheter related infection

  9. Surgical treatment of head and neck cancers in the ancient world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J; Mahalingam, S

    2015-06-01

    This paper attempts to chart the history of head and neck cancers and their surgical treatment, starting from ancient Egypt and concluding with Galen. The ancient Egyptians appear to have treated head and neck cancers with local applications. The ancient Greek corpus contains a reference to treating pharyngeal carcinoma with cautery, but the description is too vague to establish the diagnosis conclusively. The ancient Romans moved away from surgical treatments, with Galen establishing a prejudice against surgery that would last through the Middle Ages.

  10. The 2016 revision of the World Health Organization classification of lymphoid neoplasms | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A revision of the nearly 8-year-old World Health Organization classification of the lymphoid neoplasms and the accompanying monograph is being published. It reflects a consensus among hematopathologists, geneticists, and clinicians regarding both updates to current entities as well as the addition of a limited number of new provisional entities.

  11. Anticoagulant treatment of cancer patients with pulmonary embolism in the real world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, A.; Hutten, B.; Di Nisio, M.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Büller, H.R.

    Background: Since 2004, international guidelines provide specific recommendations for patients with cancer and pulmonary embolism (PE), namely long-term treatment with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). However, recent studies indicate that the use of LMWH mono-therapy might be far from optimal.

  12. Endobronchial Ultrasound Changed the World of Lung Cancer Patients: A 11-Year Institutional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Hung; Liao, Wei-Chih; Wu, Biing-Ru; Chen, Chih-Yu; Chen, Wei-Chun; Hsia, Te-Chun; Cheng, Wen-Chien; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsu, Wu-Huei

    2015-01-01

    The role of advanced bronchoscopic diagnostic techniques in the detection and staging of lung cancer has increased sharply in recent years. The development of endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) improved minimally invasive mediastinal staging and diagnosis of peripheral lung lesions (PLLs). We investigated the impact of using EBUS as a diagnostic method for tissue acquisition in lung cancer patients. In a single center observational retrospective study, 3712 subjects were diagnosed with lung cancer from 2003 to 2013 (EBUS was introduced in 2008). Thus, we divided the data into two periods: the conventional bronchoscopy period (2003 to 2007) and the EBUS period (2008 to 2013). A total of 3712 patients were included in the analysis. Comparing the conventional bronchoscopy period with the EBUS period data, there has been a significant reduction in the use of diagnostic modalities: CT-guided biopsy (P < 0.0001) and pleural effusion cytology (P < 0.0001). The proportion of subjects diagnosed using bronchoscopy significantly increased from 39.4% in the conventional period to 47.4% in the EBUS period (P < 0.0001). In the EBUS period, there has also been a significant increase in the proportion of patients proceeding directly to diagnostic surgery (P < 0.0001). Compared to bronchoscopy, the incidence of complications was higher in those who underwent CT guide biopsy. The incidence of iatrogenic pneumothorax significantly decreased in the EBUS period. Advanced bronchoscopic techniques are widely used in the diagnosis of lung cancer. At our institution, the increasing use of EBUS for providing lung cancer diagnosis has led to a significant reduction in other diagnostic modalities, namely CT-guided biopsy and pleural effusion cytology. These changes in practice also led to a reduction in the incidence of complications.

  13. Endobronchial Ultrasound Changed the World of Lung Cancer Patients: A 11-Year Institutional Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hung Chen

    Full Text Available The role of advanced bronchoscopic diagnostic techniques in the detection and staging of lung cancer has increased sharply in recent years. The development of endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS improved minimally invasive mediastinal staging and diagnosis of peripheral lung lesions (PLLs. We investigated the impact of using EBUS as a diagnostic method for tissue acquisition in lung cancer patients.In a single center observational retrospective study, 3712 subjects were diagnosed with lung cancer from 2003 to 2013 (EBUS was introduced in 2008. Thus, we divided the data into two periods: the conventional bronchoscopy period (2003 to 2007 and the EBUS period (2008 to 2013.A total of 3712 patients were included in the analysis. Comparing the conventional bronchoscopy period with the EBUS period data, there has been a significant reduction in the use of diagnostic modalities: CT-guided biopsy (P < 0.0001 and pleural effusion cytology (P < 0.0001. The proportion of subjects diagnosed using bronchoscopy significantly increased from 39.4% in the conventional period to 47.4% in the EBUS period (P < 0.0001. In the EBUS period, there has also been a significant increase in the proportion of patients proceeding directly to diagnostic surgery (P < 0.0001. Compared to bronchoscopy, the incidence of complications was higher in those who underwent CT guide biopsy. The incidence of iatrogenic pneumothorax significantly decreased in the EBUS period.Advanced bronchoscopic techniques are widely used in the diagnosis of lung cancer. At our institution, the increasing use of EBUS for providing lung cancer diagnosis has led to a significant reduction in other diagnostic modalities, namely CT-guided biopsy and pleural effusion cytology. These changes in practice also led to a reduction in the incidence of complications.

  14. Costs for Childhood and Adolescent Cancer, 90 Days Prediagnosis and 1 Year Postdiagnosis: A Population-Based Study in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Claire; Bremner, Karen E; Liu, Ning; Greenberg, Mark L; Nathan, Paul C; McBride, Mary L; Krahn, Murray D

    2017-03-01

    Childhood and adolescent cancers are uncommon, but they have important economic and health impacts on patients, families, and health care systems. Few studies have measured the economic burden of care for childhood and adolescent cancers. To estimate costs of cancer care in population-based cohorts of children and adolescents from the public payer perspective. We identified patients with cancer, aged 91 days to 19 years, diagnosed from 1995 to 2009 using cancer registry data, and matched each to three noncancer controls. Using linked administrative health care records, we estimated total and net resource-specific costs (in 2012 Canadian dollars) during 90 days prediagnosis and 1 year postdiagnosis. Children (≤14 years old) numbered 4,396: 36% had leukemia, 21% central nervous system tumors, 10% lymphoma, and 33% other cancers. Adolescents (15-19 years old) numbered 2,329: 28.9% had lymphoma. Bone and soft tissue sarcoma, germ cell tumor, and thyroid carcinoma each comprised 12% to 13%. Mean net prediagnosis costs were $5,810 and $1,127 and mean net postdiagnosis costs were $136,413 and $62,326 for children and adolescents, respectively; the highest were for leukemia ($157,764 for children and $172,034 for adolescents). In both cohorts, costs were much higher for patients who died within 1 year of diagnosis. Inpatient hospitalization represented 69% to 74% of postdiagnosis costs. Treating children with cancer is costly, more costly than treating adolescents or adults. Substantial survival gains in children mean that treatment may still be very cost-effective. Comprehensive age-specific population-based cost estimates are essential to reliably assess the cost-effectiveness of cancer care for children and adolescents, and measure health system performance. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Phase II study of a 3-day schedule with topotecan and cisplatin in patients with previously untreated small cell lung cancer and extensive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M.; Lassen, Ulrik Niels; Jensen, Peter Buhl

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Treatment with a topoisomerase I inhibitor in combination with a platinum results in superior or equal survival compared with etoposide-based treatment in extensive disease small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Five-day topotecan is inconvenient and therefore shorter schedules of topotecan.......3-7.7), respectively. CONCLUSION: Three-day topotecan with cisplatin on day 3 is active and safe in extensive disease SCLC. An ongoing phase III randomized trial compares this combination to standard treatment Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8......, adequate organ functions and performance status less than 3 were eligible. Topotecan (2.0 mg/m, intravenously) was administered on days 1 to 3 with cisplatin (50 mg/m, intravenously) on day 3 every 3 weeks for a total of six cycles. RESULTS: Forty-three patients received 219 cycles of chemotherapy. Median...

  16. A computer-assisted model for predicting probability of dying within 7 days of hospice admission in patients with terminal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Jui-Kun; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Koo, Malcolm; Kao, Yee-Hsin; Chen, Ching-Yu

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the accuracy in using laboratory data or clinical factors, or both, in predicting probability of dying within 7 days of hospice admission in terminal cancer patients. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 727 patients with terminal cancer. Three models for predicting the probability of dying within 7 days of hospice admission were developed: (i) demographic data and laboratory data (Model 1); (ii) demographic data and clinical symptoms (Model 2); and (iii) combination of demographic data, laboratory data and clinical symptoms (Model 3). We compared the models by using the area under the receiver operator curve using stepwise multiple logistic regression. We estimated the probability dying within 7 days of hospice admission using the logistic function, P = Exp(betax)/[1 + Exp(betax)]. The highest prediction accuracy was observed in Model 3 (82.3%), followed by Model 2 (77.8%) and Model 1 (75.5%). The log[probability of dying within 7 days/(1 - probability of dying within 7 days)] = -6.52 + 0.77 x (male = 1, female = 0) + 0.59 x (cancer, liver = 1, others = 0) + 0.82 x (ECOG score) + 0.59 x (jaundice, yes = 1, no = 0) + 0.54 x (Grade 3 edema = 1, others = 0) + 0.95 x (fever, yes = 1, no = 0) + 0.07 x (respiratory rate, as per minute) + 0.01 x (heart rate, as per minute) - 0.92 x (intervention tube = 1, no = 0) - 0.37 x (mean muscle power). We proposed a computer-assisted estimated probability formula for predicting dying within 7 days of hospice admission in terminal cancer patients.

  17. The Janus face of iron on anoxic worlds: iron oxides are both protective and destructive to life on the early Earth and present-day Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Jennifer; Cockell, Charles S

    2017-05-01

    The surface of the early Earth was probably subjected to a higher flux of ultraviolet (UV) radiation than today. UV radiation is known to severely damage DNA and other key molecules of life. Using a liquid culture and a rock analogue system, we investigated the interplay of protective and deleterious effects of iron oxides under UV radiation on the viability of the model organism, Bacillus subtilis. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide, there exists a fine balance between iron oxide's protective effects against this radiation and its deleterious effects caused by Photo-Fenton reactions. The maximum damage was caused by a concentration of hematite of ∼1 mg/mL. Concentrations above this confer increasing protection by physical blockage of the UV radiation, concentrations below this cause less effective UV radiation blockage, but also a correspondingly less effective Photo-Fenton reaction, providing an overall advantage. These results show that on anoxic worlds, surface habitability under a high UV flux leaves life precariously poised between the beneficial and deleterious effects of iron oxides. These results have relevance to the Archean Earth, but also the habitability of the Martian surface, where high levels of UV radiation in combination with iron oxides and hydrogen peroxide can be found. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. A double-edged sword: The world according to Capicua in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Miwa; Yoshimoto, Toyoki; Nakamura, Takuro

    2017-12-01

    CIC/Capicua is an HMG-box transcription factor that is well conserved during evolution. CIC recognizes the T(G/C)AATG(A/G)A sequence and represses its target genes, such as PEA3 family genes. The receptor tyrosine kinase/RAS/MAPK signals downregulate CIC and relieves CIC's target genes from the transrepressional activity; CIC thus acts as an important downstream molecule of the pathway and as a tumor suppressor. CIC loss-of-function mutations are frequently observed in several human neoplasms such as oligodendroglioma, and lung and gastric carcinoma. CIC is also involved in chromosomal translocation-associated gene fusions in highly aggressive small round cell sarcoma that is biologically and clinically distinct from Ewing sarcoma. In these mutations, PEA3 family genes and other important target genes are upregulated, inducing malignant phenotypes. Downregulation of CIC abrogates the effect of MAPK inhibitors, suggesting its potential role as an important modifier of molecular target therapies for cancer. These data reveal the importance of CIC as a key molecule in signal transduction, carcinogenesis, and developing novel therapies. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  19. Real-world palbociclib dosing patterns and implications for drug costs in the treatment of HR+/HER2- metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nanxin; Du, Ella X; Chu, Lihao; Peeples, Miranda; Xie, Jipan; Barghout, Victoria; Tang, Derek H

    2017-08-01

    This study described real-world palbociclib dosing patterns and associated impacts on treatment costs for HR+/HER2- metastatic breast cancer (mBC) in the US. Postmenopausal women with HR+/HER2- mBC who initiated palbociclib-based therapy (initiation date = index date) between 02/03/2015 (palbociclib approval) and 02/29/2016, and continuous quarterly activity 1 year before and 6 months after the index date, were identified in the Symphony Health Solutions database. Rates of 1) dose reduction (≥25 mg dose decrease/daily), and 2) reduction or interruption (>60 day gap in continuous drug supply) were assessed using Kaplan-Meier analyses. Drug wastage cost was estimated based on overlapping days between two prescription fills: the last original dose fill and the first reduced dose fill. 1,242 patients initiated palbociclib-based therapy (mean age = 62.7 years, median follow-up = 8.7 months). During the 12-month post-index period, across the first four lines, dose reduction rates were 31.9-33.7% and dose reduction/interruption rates were 63.5-80.9%. A total of 411 (33.1%) patients changed dose, among whom 128 (31.1%) experienced prescription fill overlap (average = 11.1 days). Mean potential drug wastage cost among patients with fill overlap was $5,471. Most patients receiving palbociclib experienced dose reduction or interruption early in treatment; the associated drug wastage may lead to considerable costs.

  20. "Cautiously optimistic that today will be another day with my disease under control": understanding women's lived experiences of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burles, Meridith; Holtslander, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Women diagnosed with ovarian cancer face a multitude of physical, psychological, and social issues. However, existing research has typically focused on those newly diagnosed with an initial occurrence or recurrence or women with advanced disease. As such, few studies have examined women's experiences across the illness trajectory and the impact of ovarian cancer on their everyday lives. This research explores women's lived experiences of ovarian cancer and how they negotiate and make sense of illness-related issues. Sixteen women participated in face-to-face interviews and e-mail follow-ups that were informed by hermeneutic and social phenomenological approaches. Five broad themes emerged from data analysis related to changes in health status and the body, disruptions to everyday activities and relationships, uncertainty, and coping and finding meaning in illness. These themes reflect the structures of participants' experiences and constitute the essence of living with ovarian cancer, "cautious optimism." This research contributes to our understanding of women's lived experiences of ovarian cancer across the illness trajectory; specifically, the findings indicate that embodiment and relationships were a central focus for participants as they sought to cope with myriad issues resulting from ovarian cancer. Insight into women's ovarian cancer experiences can help nurses in their provision of care to this population. Furthermore, the findings can inform support interventions for affected women across the illness trajectory, as participants' experiences show that support needs often persist following treatment as women negotiate survivorship or recurrence.

  1. An apple a day may hold colorectal cancer at bay: recent evidence from a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Maugeri, Umberto

    2009-01-01

    Environmental factors play an important role in the etiology of colorectal cancer, the second-most common malignancy in both genders in developed countries. Evidence has shown that potential cancer-inducing oxidative damage might be prevented or restricted largely by the presence of dietary antioxidants of plant origin, such as fruits or vegetables. The protective antioxidant effect of fruits and vegetables has been attributed to flavonoids, a major class of phytochemicals naturally occurring in fruits, vegetables, and various foods of plant origin. Yet, epidemiologic cohort studies relating flavonoid intake to risk of colorectal cancer have been sparse and inconclusive. Apples are a rich source of flavonoids and have the second highest level of antioxidant power among all fruits, with peels having a stronger antioxidant activity than apple flesh. A recent reanalysis of several case-control studies in Italy demonstrated a consistent inverse association between apple consumption and the risk of various cancers, and among them ofcolorectal cancer. Here we assessed the potential protective impact of apples on risk of colorectal cancer in the course of a recently performed hospital-based case-control study in a country with dietary habits very different from those of Mediterranean region. The results showed that highest risk of colorectal cancer was among older persons and those who were residents of villages or small towns. The risk of colorectal cancer was inversely correlated with daily number of apple servings, but the most significant reductions of OR estimates were observed for an intake one or more apple servings daily (OR = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.15-0.91). No other fruit was significantly associated with altering the risk of colorectal cancer.

  2. A strategy to overcome the radiology lottery in the staging of head and neck cancer: an aid to attaining the 30-day rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elloy, Marianne; Jarvis, Sara; Davis, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Rapid access to radiological services is essential, if the British Association of Otolaryngologists - Head and Neck Surgeons Minimum Temporal Standards are to be met in the management of head and neck cancer patients. This study assesses a new initiative whereby the multidisciplinary team prioritises allocated imaging appointments rather than using the traditional radiological triage system. This study was a prospective audit of all patients referred over a 3-month period with suspected head and neck cancer. The main outcome measures were: (i) median interval in days from general practitioner (GP) referral to staging scan; and (ii) median interval in days from first clinic appointment to staging scan. The new multidisciplinary team booking system led to a statistically significant reduction in the 'request-to-scan time' (from 12 days to 5 days). The time from 'GP to scan' also improved. This new multidisciplinary team-led booking system, could, in the future, speed up access to radiology services for head and neck cancer patients, allowing earlier definitive treatment.

  3. Predictors of 7- and 30-day mortality in pediatric intensive care unit patients with cancer and hematologic malignancy infected with Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Patrícia de Oliveira; Atta, Elias Hallack; Silva, André Ricardo Araujo da

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Gram-negative bacteria is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictors of 7- and 30-day mortality in pediatric patients in an intensive care unit with cancer and/or hematologic diseases and Gram-negative bacteria infection. Data were collected relating to all episodes of Gram-negative bacteria infection that occurred in a pediatric intensive care unit between January 2009 and December 2012, and these cases were divided into two groups: those who were deceased seven and 30 days after the date of a positive culture and those who survived the same time frames. Variables of interest included age, gender, presence of solid tumor or hematologic disease, cancer status, central venous catheter use, previous Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, infection by multidrug resistant-Gram-negative bacteria, colonization by multidrug resistant-Gram-negative bacteria, neutropenia in the preceding seven days, neutropenia duration ≥3 days, healthcare-associated infection, length of stay before intensive care unit admission, length of intensive care unit stay >3 days, appropriate empirical antimicrobial treatment, definitive inadequate antimicrobial treatment, time to initiate adequate antibiotic therapy, appropriate antibiotic duration ≤3 days, and shock. In addition, use of antimicrobial agents, corticosteroids, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy in the previous 30 days was noted. Multivariate logistic regression analysis resulted in significant relationship between shock and both 7-day mortality (odds ratio 12.397; 95% confidence interval 1.291-119.016; p=0.029) and 30-day mortality (odds ratio 6.174; 95% confidence interval 1.760-21.664; p=0.004), between antibiotic duration ≤3 days and 7-day mortality (odds ratio 21.328; 95% confidence interval 2.834-160.536; p=0.003), and between colonization by multidrug resistant-Gram-negative bacteria and 30-day mortality (odds ratio 12.002; 95% confidence interval 1

  4. Pain Experience Profile in Children with Cancer: Prospective Analysis of 2216 Treatment Days in a Developing Country

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Montaser A.; Morsy, Ahmed Mohammed; Khaled F. Riad

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Background: Cancer in children is a potentially curable disease, particularly in developed countries. Conventional chemotherapy is essentially an integral part of treatment, either alone, or as a part of multimodality therapy including surgery & radiotherapy. How to deal with pain is an integral part of symptom management in pediatric cancer patients in general, with especially great importance in the context of palliative care in developing countries, in which curabil...

  5. Can the Day 0 CT-scan predict the post-implant scanning? Results from 136 prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattani, Federica; Vavassori, Andrea; Comi, Stefania; Gherardi, Federica; Russo, Stefania; Orecchia, Roberto; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A

    2017-08-01

    Post-implant CT-scanning is an essential part of permanent prostate brachytherapy. However, the evaluation of post-implant CT dosimetry is not straightforward due to the edema that can modify the dose to the prostate and to the organs at risk. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of the timing of the post-implant CT-scan on the dosimetric results and to verify if the Day 0 scan findings can predict Day 50 scanning. 136 consecutive patients who received monotherapy with I-125 implants were selected for this study. Two sets of 8 dosimetric quality parameters corresponding to 2 different CT-scans (Day 0 and Day 50) were calculated and compared. The dosimetric parameters included are the percentage volume of the post-implant prostate receiving 80%, 100% and 150% of the prescribed dose, the doses covering 80% and 90% of the prostate volume and the Dose Homogeneity Index. The values of the dose covering 1cm3 of the rectum and urethra were assessed. All the dosimetric parameters of the Day 50 were higher than those of the Day 0 scan. Linear functions were obtained that calculate D90 and V100 values at Day 50 based on the Day 0 findings. Rectal and urethral parameters tended to be underestimated on Day 0 CT-scan relative to Day 50 based dosimetry. Predicting the Day 50 dosimetry from the Day 0 scan could be a possible alternative to a Day 50 scan only in specific situations, but with a degree of uncertainty in the predicted values. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Real-world experience using the ACURATE neo™ prosthesis: 30-day outcomes of 1000 patients enrolled in the SAVI-TF registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möllmann, Helge; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hilker, Michael; Kerber, Sebastian; Schäfer, Ulrich; Rudolph, Tanja; Linke, Axel; Franz, Norbert; Kuntze, Thomas; Nef, Holger; Kappert, Utz; Walther, Thomas; Zembala, Michael O; Toggweiler, Stefan; Kim, Won-Keun

    2017-11-14

    The aim of the SAVI-TF registry was to assess the safety and performance of the self-expanding ACURATE neoTM transfemoral transcatheter heart valve in a large patient population with severe aortic stenosis and to investigate if the outcomes obtained in the CE-mark cohort can be replicated in an unselected all-comers population. From October 2014 until April 2016, 1000 patients were enrolled in this prospective, European multicenter registry. Patients were 81.1±5.2 years in average and had a logistic EuroSCORE-II and STS-score of 6.6±7.5% and 6.0±5.6%, respectively. Pre-dilatation was performed in 96.1% of patients and post-dilatation in 44.8%. Procedural and device success were both obtained in 98.7%; success failure were 9 valve-in-valve procedures 3 conversion to surgery, and one aborted procedure. The primary endpoint was 30-day mortality, which was observed in 14 patients (1.4% [95%CI:0.7-2.1]). Disabling stroke was seen in 1.2% [95%CI:0.5-1.9] and new pacemaker implantation in 8.3% [95%CI:6.6-10.0]. At discharge, mean effective orifice area was 1.77±0.46 cm²and mean gradient 8.4±4.0 mmHg. 4.1% of patients had a more than mild paravalvular leak. In this initial experience, treatment with the ACURATE neoTM prosthesis resulted in excellent clinical outcomes with very low complication rates.

  7. Socio-economic and health access determinants of breast and cervical cancer screening in low-income countries: analysis of the World Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemiju, Tomi F

    2012-01-01

    Breast and Cervical cancer are the two most common cancers among women in developing countries. Regular screening is the most effective way of ensuring that these cancers are detected at early stages; however few studies have assessed factors that predict cancer screening in developing countries. To assess the influence of household socio-economic status (SES), healthcare access and country level characteristics on breast and cervical cancer screening among women in developing countries. Women ages 18-69 years (cervical cancer screening) and 40-69 years (breast cancer screening) from 15 developing countries who participated in the 2003 World Health Survey provided data for this study. Household SES and healthcare access was assessed based on self-reported survey responses. SAS survey procedures (SAS, Version 9.2) were used to assess determinants of breast and cervical cancer screening in separate models. 4.1% of women ages 18-69 years had received cervical cancer screening in the past three years, while only 2.2% of women ages 40-69 years had received breast cancer screening in the past 5 years in developing countries. Cancer screening rates varied by country; cervical cancer screening ranged from 1.1% in Bangladesh to 57.6% in Congo and breast cancer screening ranged from 0% in Mali to 26% in Congo. Significant determinants of cancer screening were household SES, rural residence, country health expenditure (as a percent of GDP) as well as healthcare access. A lot more needs to be done to improve screening rates for breast and cervical cancer in developing countries, such as increasing health expenditure (especially in rural areas), applying the increased funds towards the provision of more, better educated health providers as well as improved infrastructure.

  8. Availability of palliative care services for children with cancer in economically diverse regions of the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Eduardo; Barfield, Raymond C; Baker, Justin N; Hinds, Pamela S; Yang, Jie; Nambayan, Ayda; Quintana, Yuri; Kane, Javier R

    2010-08-01

    We assessed the availability and quality of palliative care for children with cancer according to national income per capita. We surveyed physicians who care for children with cancer using the Cure4Kids website (http://www.cure4kids.org). Queries addressed oncology practice site; reimbursement; specialised palliative care, pain management and bereavement care; location of death; decision-making support and perceived quality of care. Responses were categorised by low-, middle- and high-income country (LIC, MIC and HIC). Of 262 completed questionnaires from 58 countries (response rate, 59.8%), 242 were evaluable (55%). Out-of-pocket payment for oncology (14.8%), palliative care (21.9%) and comfort care medications (24.3%) was most likely to be required in LIC (pregions, but particularly in LIC. Access to adequate palliation is associated with national income. Programme development strategies and collaborations less dependent on a single country's economy are suggested. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Epidemiology, incidence and mortality of oral cavity and lips cancer and their relationship with the human development index in the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Ramezani Siakholak

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: According to the importance of knowledge about incidence and mortality of oral cavity and lip cancer in health planning, this study was performed with the aim of investigating the incidence and mortality rate of oral cavity and lip cancer and its relation with the Human Development Index in the world in 2012. Methods: The study was conducted based on data from the world data of cancer and the World Bank (including the HDI and its components. Data about the age-specific incidence and mortality rate (ASR for every country in 2012 were getting from the global cancer project. To analyze data, correlation tests between incidence and death rates, and HDI and its components were employed with a significance level of 0.05 using SPSS software. Results: In 2012, 300373 cases of oral cavity and lip cancer and 145353 cases of death from it have occurred in the world. A positive correlation of 0.221 was seen between the standardized incidence rate of oral cavity and lip cancer and HDI but this correlation was not statistically significant (p=0.114. On the other side, a correlation of 0.295 was seen between the standardized mortality rate of oral cavity and lip cancer with HDI that this correlation was statistically significant (p<0.001. Conclusion: The incidence and mortality of oral cavity cancer is high in the Asian countries especially south eastern of Asia. Performing preventive plans in high incidence and mortality rate regions and also obtaining etiological studies in these regions is recommended for diagnosing the causes of high incidence and mortality rates. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(10.000: 872-888

  10. Past and future trends in cancer and biomedical research: a comparison between Egypt and the World using PubMed-indexed publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeneldin Ahmed Abdelmabood

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PubMed is a free web literature search service that contains almost 21 millions of abstracts and publications with almost 5 million user queries daily. The purposes of the study were to compare trends in PubMed-indexed cancer and biomedical publications from Egypt to that of the world and to predict future publication volumes. Methods The PubMed was searched for the biomedical publications between 1991 and 2010 (publications dates. Affiliation was then limited to Egypt. Further limitation was applied to cancer, human and animal publications. Poisson regression model was used for prediction of future number of publications between 2011 and 2020. Results Cancer publications contributed 23% to biomedical publications both for Egypt and the world. Egyptian biomedical and cancer publications contributed about 0.13% to their world counterparts. This contribution was more than doubled over the study period. Egyptian and world’s publications increased from year to year with rapid rise starting the year 2003. Egyptian as well as world’s human cancer publications showed the highest increases. Egyptian publications had some peculiarities; they showed some drop at the years 1994 and 2002 and apart from the decline in the animal: human ratio with time, all Egyptian publications in the period 1991-2000 were significantly more than those in 2001-2010 (P  Conclusions The Egyptian contribution to world’s biomedical and cancer publications needs significant improvements through research strategic planning, setting national research priorities, adequate funding and researchers’ training.

  11. A phase II study of a dose-density regimen with fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide on days 1 and 4 every 14 days with filgrastim support followed by weekly paclitaxel in women with primary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietri, Elisabetta; Andreis, Daniele; Fabbri, Francesca; Menna, Cecilia; Schirone, Alessio; Kopf, Barbara; Rocca, Andrea; Amadori, Dino; De Giorgi, Ugo

    2015-03-01

    Recent evidence shows that use of anthracycline and taxane adjuvant chemotherapy and dose-dense regimens, consisting of more frequent administration of the drugs, have improved outcomes for breast cancer patients. In this study, we evaluated administration of an epirubicin-based regimen with paclitaxel in a sequential, dose-dense schedule as adjuvant treatment for patients with high-risk primary breast cancer. In a phase II Simon two-stage design study, we evaluated the feasibility of a modified fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC) regimen at high dose intensity (fluorouracil 500 mg/m(2) i.v. on days 1 and 4, epirubicin 60 mg/m(2) i.v. on days 1 and 4, and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m(2) i.v. on days 1 and 4; all drugs were administered every 14 days for 3 cycles) with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support followed by dose-intense weekly paclitaxel 100 mg/m(2) for 8 cycles. In 11 patients with breast cancer following quadrantectomy (n = 8) or modified radical mastectomy (n = 3), any grade 3 (G3) or higher nonhematologic toxicity (excluding alopecia, nausea or vomiting, and bone pain, which might be a consequence of the administration of filgrastim) and adherence to the scheduled dose-dense treatment (deliverability) were monitored with the purpose of enrolling an additional 27 patients in the case of a satisfying toxicity profile and deliverability of the planned treatment (at least 7 patients completing the treatment). Five of 11 patients experienced G3 or higher nonhematologic toxicity during the FEC regimen. We did not observe G3 or higher nonhematologic toxicity related to paclitaxel treatment. In particular, three patients experienced G3 fatigue, one patient had G3 oral mucositis, three patients had G3 hypokalemia, one patient had G3 syncope, one patient had G3 transaminitis (alanine aminotransferase), one patient experienced G4 pulmonary thromboembolism, and 1 patient had a G3 breast infection. Four of 11 patients received the regimen

  12. The incidence and mortality of esophageal cancer and its relationship with development in the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil Hassanipour

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Understanding the epidemiology of Esophageal Cancer (EC seems to be essential in order to plan and control it. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and mortality rate of EC and its relationship with the worldwide Human Development Index (HDI of 2012. Methods: This study was an ecological study which assessed the correlation of age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR and age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR of EC with HDI and its components. ASIR and ASMR data for EC were extracted from the global cancer project for the year 2012. Statistical analyses were performed by SPSS 16. Results: From EC were recorded worldwide in 2012, there was a total of 455,784 incidents of EC (70.86% males and 29.14% females; ratio of males to females was 2.43:1 and 400,169 mortalities (70.27% males and 29.73% females; ratio of males to females was 2.36:1. The correlation between HDI and SIR was -0.121 (p=0.105; with -0.061 (p=0.415 for men and -0.190 (p=0.010 for women. Moreover, the correlation between HDI and SMR was -0.156 (p=0.036, with -0.101 (p=0.180 for men and -0.218 (p=0.003 for women. Conclusion: The incidence and mortality rates from EC is higher in less developed or developing countries. No statistically significant correlation was seen between the standardized mortality or incidence rates of EC and the 2012 HDI.

  13. Spinning worlds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwarz, H.

    2017-01-01

    The thesis "Spinning Worlds" is about the characterisation of two types of gas-giant exoplanets: Hot Jupiters, with orbital periods of fewer than five days, and young, wide-orbit gas giants, with orbital periods as long as thousands of years. The thesis is based on near-infrared observations of 1

  14. 78 FR 76311 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Outcomes Evaluation of the National Cancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ... CPFP Applicants 170 1 20/60 57 F32 Awardees 220 1 20/60 73 Dated: December 5, 2013. Vivian Horovitch... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Outcomes... previously published in the Federal Register on August 12, 2013, (Vol. 78 FR p. 48879) and allowed 60 days...

  15. Same-day diagnosis based on histology for women suspected of breast cancer: high diagnostic accuracy and favorable impact on the patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten W Barentsz

    Full Text Available Same-day diagnosis based on histology is increasingly being offered to patients suspected of breast cancer. We evaluated to which extent same-day diagnosis affected diagnostic accuracy and patients' anxiety levels during the diagnostic phase.All 759 women referred for same-day evaluation of suspicious breast lesions between November 2011-March 2013 were included. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by linking all patients to the national pathology database to identify diagnostic discrepancies, in which case slides were reviewed. Patients' anxiety was measured in 127 patients by the State Trait and Anxiety Inventory on six moments during the diagnostic workup and changes over time (< = 1 week were analyzed by mixed effect models.Core-needle biopsy was indicated in 374/759 patients (49.3% and in 205/759 (27% patients, invasive or in situ cancer was found. Final diagnosis on the same day was provided for 606/759 (79.8% patients. Overall, 3/759 (0.4% discordant findings were identified. Anxiety levels decreased significantly over time from 45.2 to 30.0 (P = <0.001. Anxiety levels decreased from 44.4 to 25.9 (P = <0.001 for patients with benign disease, and remained unchanged for patients diagnosed with malignancies (48.6 to 46.7, P = 0.933. Time trends in anxiety were not affected by other patient or disease characteristics like age, education level or (family history of breast cancer.Same-day histological diagnosis is feasible in the vast majority of patients, without impairing diagnostic accuracy. Patients' anxiety rapidly decreased in patients with a benign diagnosis and remained constant in patients with malignancy.

  16. A predictive model to identify hospitalized cancer patients at risk for 30-day mortality based on admission criteria via the electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchandran, Kavitha J; Shega, Joseph W; Von Roenn, Jamie; Schumacher, Mark; Szmuilowicz, Eytan; Rademaker, Alfred; Weitner, Bing Bing; Loftus, Pooja D; Chu, Isabella M; Weitzman, Sigmund

    2013-06-01

    This study sought to develop a predictive model for 30-day mortality in hospitalized cancer patients, by using admission information available through the electronic medical record. Observational cohort study of 3062 patients admitted to the oncology service from August 1, 2008, to July 31, 2009. Matched numbers of patients were in the derivation and validation cohorts (1531 patients). Data were obtained on day 1 of admission and included demographic information, vital signs, and laboratory data. Survival data were obtained from the Social Security Death Index. The 30-day mortality rate of the derivation and validation samples were 9.5% and 9.7% respectively. Significant predictive variables in the multivariate analysis included age (P < .0001), assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs; P = .022), admission type (elective/emergency) (P = .059), oxygen use (P < .0001), and vital signs abnormalities including pulse oximetry (P = .0004), temperature (P = .017), and heart rate (P = .0002). A logistic regression model was developed to predict death within 30 days: Score = 18.2897 + 0.6013*(admit type) + 0.4518*(ADL) + 0.0325*(admit age) - 0.1458*(temperature) + 0.019*(heart rate) - 0.0983*(pulse oximetry) - 0.0123 (systolic blood pressure) + 0.8615*(O2 use). The largest sum of sensitivity (63%) and specificity (78%) was at -2.09 (area under the curve = -0.789). A total of 25.32% (100 of 395) of patients with a score above -2.09 died, whereas 4.31% (49 of 1136) of patients below -2.09 died. Sensitivity and positive predictive value in the derivation and validation samples compared favorably. Clinical factors available via the electronic medical record within 24 hours of hospital admission can be used to identify cancer patients at risk for 30-day mortality. These patients would benefit from discussion of preferences for care at the end of life. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  17. Protocol for the OUTREACH trial: a randomised trial comparing delivery of cancer systemic therapy in three different settings - patient's home, GP surgery and hospital day unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCrone Paul

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The national Cancer Reform Strategy recommends delivering care closer to home whenever possible. Cancer drug treatment has traditionally been administered to patients in specialist hospital-based facilities. Technological developments mean that nowadays, most treatment can be delivered in the out-patient setting. Increasing demand, care quality improvements and patient choice have stimulated interest in delivering some treatment to patients in the community, however, formal evaluation of delivering cancer treatment in different community settings is lacking. This randomised trial compares delivery of cancer treatment in the hospital with delivery in two different community settings: the patient's home and general practice (GP surgeries. Methods/design Patients due to receive a minimum 12 week course of standard intravenous cancer treatment at two hospitals in the Anglia Cancer Network are randomised on a 1:1:1 basis to receive treatment in the hospital day unit (control arm, or their own home, or their choice of one of three neighbouring GP surgeries. Overall patient care, treatment prescribing and clinical review is undertaken according to standard local practice. All treatment is dispensed by the local hospital pharmacy and treatment is delivered by the hospital chemotherapy nurses. At four time points during the 12 week study period, information is collected from patients, nursing staff, primary and secondary care teams to address the primary end point, patient-perceived benefits (using the emotional function domain of the EORTC QLQC30 patient questionnaire, as well as secondary end points: patient satisfaction, safety and health economics. Discussion The Outreach trial is the first randomised controlled trial conducted which compares delivery of out-patient based intravenous cancer treatment in two different community settings with standard hospital based treatment. Results of this study may better inform all key

  18. Development and usability evaluation of the mHealth Tool for Lung Cancer (mHealth TLC): a virtual world health game for lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Johnson, Cati G; Berrean, Beth; Cataldo, Janine K

    2015-04-01

    To test the feasibility and usability of mHealth TLC, an interactive, immersive 3-dimensional iPad health game that coaches lung cancer patients toward assertive communication strategies during first-person virtual clinics visits. We observed players and conducted semi-structured interviews. Research questions focused on scenario believability, the impact of technical issues, transparency of game goals, and potential of mHealth TLC to decrease lung cancer stigma (LCS) and improve patient-clinician communication. Eight users confirmed mHealth TLC to be: (1) believable, (2) clinic-appropriate, and (3) helpful in support of informed healthcare consumers. Concerns were expressed about emotionally charged content and plans to use mHealth TLC in clinic settings as opposed to at home. Although the dialog and interactions addressed emotionally charged issues, players were able to engage, learn, and benefit from role-play in a virtual world. Health games have the potential to improve patient-clinician communication, and mHealth TLC specifically may decrease LCS, and promote optimal self-management. Process reflection revealed the need for health games to be created by experienced game developers in collaboration with health care experts. To prepare for this best practice, research institutions and game developers interested in health games should proactively seek out networking and collaboration opportunities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Exploring identity in the 'figured worlds' of cancer care-giving and marriage in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Rebecca E

    2015-03-01

    Following changes in the structure and funding of the Australian medical system, patients have become 'consumers' or 'clients'. Family and friends have become 'carers' or 'caregivers', signifying their increased responsibilities as patients move from hospitals to communities. While policy makers embrace the term 'carer', some argue that the title is not widely recognised and has disempowering connotations. This paper examines spouses' reflections on the term 'carer' based on qualitative interviews with 32 Australians caring for a spouse with cancer from a study conducted between 2006 and 2009. Recruitment involved survey and snowball sampling. Following a grounded theory approach, data collection and analysis were performed simultaneously. Using Holland and colleagues' sociocultural 'identity as practice' theory and a thematic approach to analysis, findings depict identification with the 'spouse' and 'carer' label as relationally situated and dependent on meaningful interaction. Although others argue that the term 'carer' is a 'failure', these findings depict identification with the label as contextual, positional and enacted, not fixed. Furthermore, and of most significance to practitioners and policy makers, the title has value, providing carers with an opportunity to position themselves as entitled to inclusion and support, and providing health professionals with a potential indicator of a spouse's increased burden. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. 77 FR 35573 - World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Certain Types of Cancer to the List of WTC-Related...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... of WTC-Related Health Conditions; 2. Information or published studies about the type of welding that... June 13, 2012 Part IV Department of Health and Human Services 42 CFR Part 88 World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Certain Types of Cancer to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions; Proposed Rule...

  1. NO TOBACCO DAY

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service is joining in with the world no tobacco day, which takes place on 31 May 2002. We encourage you to take this opportunity to stop smoking for good. Nurses and Doctors will be present on that day to give out information on methods to stop smoking and to assist you in your efforts.

  2. Ten-year cancer incidence in rescue/recovery workers and civilians exposed to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiehui; Brackbill, Robert M; Liao, Tim S; Qiao, Baozhen; Cone, James E; Farfel, Mark R; Hadler, James L; Kahn, Amy R; Konty, Kevin J; Stayner, Leslie T; Stellman, Steven D

    2016-09-01

    Cancer incidence in exposed rescue/recovery workers (RRWs) and civilians (non-RRWs) was previously reported through 2008. We studied occurrence of first primary cancer among World Trade Center Health Registry enrollees through 2011 using adjusted standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), and the WTC-exposure-cancer association, using Cox proportional hazards models. All-cancer SIR was 1.11 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.20) in RRWs, and 1.08 (95% CI 1.02-1.15) in non-RRWs. Prostate cancer and skin melanoma were significantly elevated in both populations. Thyroid cancer was significantly elevated only in RRWs while breast cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were significantly elevated only in non-RRWs. There was a significant exposure dose-response for bladder cancer among RRWs, and for skin melanoma among non-RRWs. We observed excesses of total and specific cancers in both populations, although the strength of the evidence for causal relationships to WTC exposures is somewhat limited. Continued monitoring of this population is indicated. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:709-721, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Carboplatin with intravenous and subsequent oral administration of vinorelbine in resected non-small-cell-lung cancer in real-world set-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolek, Vítězslav; Grygárková, Ivona; Koubková, Leona; Skřičková, Jana; Švecová, Jiřina; Sixtová, Dimka; Bartoš, Jiří; Tichopád, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    Adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy is recommended for routine use in patients with Stage IIA, IIB or IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after complete resection. Results obtained for Stage IB were not conclusive. While vinorelbine plus cisplatin is the preferred choice after resection, combining vinorelbine with carboplatin promises improved compliance and delivery of drugs due to lower toxicity. We evaluated the impact of this option on treatment compliance and survival under real-world conditions. A prospective, single-arm, multicenter, non-interventional study evaluated the tolerability, dose intensity and survival resulting from adjuvant use of intravenous carboplatin (AUC 5 on day 1) with vinorelbine administered both intravenously (25 mg/m2 on day 1) and orally (60 mg/m2 on day 8) within four cycles of 21 days each. A total of 74 patients with a median age of 64 years were observed. The mean number of accomplished cycles was 3.78, and 62 patients (83.7%) completed all four planned cycles. Relative dose intensity for carboplatin was 88.9%, for intravenous vinorelbine 93.1%, and for oral vinorelbine 83.2%. Median follow-up was 4.73 years. Median disease-specific survival (DSS) was 7.63 years, median overall survival (OS) was 5.90 years, median disease-free survival (DFS0) was 4.43 years, and five-year survival was 56.2%. TNM stage of disease significantly affected DSS and OS. Favorable survival was observed in females, nonsmokers, patients aged over 65 years, patient with prior lobectomy, patients with tumor of squamous histology, and those who finished the planned therapy, but the differences were non-significant. Adjuvant carboplatin with vinorelbine switched from intravenous to oral administration was shown to be a favorable regimen with regard to tolerability and safety. Compliance to therapy was high, and survival parameters were promising, showing that applied regimen can be another potential option for adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with NSCLC.

  4. Weather, day length and physical activity in older adults: Cross-sectional results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC Norfolk Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tzu Wu

    Full Text Available A wide range of environmental factors have been related to active ageing, but few studies have explored the impact of weather and day length on physical activity in older adults. We investigate the cross-sectional association between weather conditions, day length and activity in older adults using a population-based cohort in England, the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC Norfolk study.Physical activity was measured objectively over 7 days using an accelerometer and this was used to calculate daily total physical activity (counts per minute, daily minutes of sedentary behaviour and light, moderate and vigorous physical activity (LMVPA. Day length and two types of weather conditions, precipitation and temperature, were obtained from a local weather station. The association between these variables and physical activity was examined by multilevel first-order autoregressive modelling.After adjusting for individual factors, short day length and poor weather conditions, including high precipitation and low temperatures, were associated with up to 10% lower average physical activity (p<0.01 and 8 minutes less time spent in LMVPA but 15 minutes more sedentary time, compared to the best conditions.Day length and weather conditions appear to be an important factor related to active ageing. Future work should focus on developing potential interventions to reduce their impact on physical activity behaviours in older adults.

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers ... Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with Cancer Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for ... Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support ...

  7. Around the world in eighty days

    CERN Document Server

    Verne, Jules

    2012-01-01

    An eccentric Englishman accepts a challenge to circle the globe with unprecedented speed. Exotic locales, seemingly insurmountable obstacles, and comic relief provide a fantastic blend of adventure, entertainment, and suspense.

  8. 75 FR 75617 - World AIDS Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    ... continuing our efforts to combat stigma and discrimination, and to finding a cure. Today, we are experiencing... persons--regardless of age, gender, race or ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, or socio... treating this disease, including addressing HIV-related discrimination. Along with this landmark Strategy...

  9. 78 FR 73075 - World AIDS Day, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-04

    ... leadership, strong partners, and shared responsibility, we can realize this historic opportunity. We will win this battle, but it is not over yet. In memory of the loved ones we have lost and on behalf of our...

  10. 76 FR 70631 - World Freedom Day, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... North Africa. Just as the United States supported the aspirations of those who emerged from behind the... developments in the Middle East and North Africa remind us that the pursuit of liberty endures. As people... obstruct democracy and justice for all. Let us keep in our thoughts those who still live under totalitarian...

  11. 76 FR 76025 - World AIDS Day, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... HIV, continuing research to develop a vaccine, and incorporating new scientific tools into our..., including more effective drug regimens to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission and low-cost approaches...

  12. Trastuzumab for metastatic breast cancer: Real world outcomes from an Australian whole-of-population cohort (2001-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Benjamin; Kiely, Belinda E; Lord, Sarah J; Houssami, Nehmat; Lu, Christine Y; Ward, Robyn L; Pearson, Sallie-Anne

    2017-11-21

    Outcomes for patients treated in clinical trials may not reflect the experience in routine clinical care. We aim to describe the real-world treatment patterns and overall survival (OS) for women receiving trastuzumab for metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Retrospective, whole-of-population cohort study using demographic, dispensing, and medical services data for women in the Herceptin Program for HER2+MBC. We estimated time on trastuzumab and OS from first dispensing of trastuzumab for MBC and rates of cardiac monitoring prior to and during treatment. We stratified outcomes by two groups based on year of initiation: 2001-2008 and 2009-2015. We benchmarked outcomes to two key trastuzumab clinical trials: H0648g (median OS 25 months) and CLEOPATRA (control group median OS 41 months). Median age of the 5899 women at first trastuzumab dispensing was 57 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 48-66). Median time on trastuzumab increased from 15 months (7-33) in Group One to 18 months (8-42) in Group Two. Median OS increased from 27 months (12-57) in Group One to 38 months (16-83) in Group Two. Rates of cardiac monitoring increased at baseline (52%-76%), and on-treatment (47%-67%), in Group One and Two, respectively. OS, duration of trastuzumab, and frequency of cardiac monitoring increased over the study period. Outcomes for trastuzumab in this heterogeneous real world population were reassuringly comparable to those from clinical trials, with the median OS > 3 years in Group Two and 25% of patients living 7 years or longer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment Challenges and Survival Analysis of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-positive Breast Cancer in Real World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adusumilli, Praveen; Konatam, Meher Lakshmi; Gundeti, Sadashivudu; Bala, Stalin; Maddali, Lakshmi Srinivas

    2017-01-01

    Advent of trastuzumab has brought tremendous changes in the survival of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2)-positive breast cancer patients. Despite the availability of the drug, it is still out of reach for many patients. There is very limited real world data regarding treatment challenges and survival analysis of these patients. Primary objective is disease-free survival (DFS) and secondary objective is overall survival (OS) and toxicity profile. Statistical analysis is done using GraphPad Prism 7.02. This is a retrospective study of all patients diagnosed with Her2-positive (Her2+) nonmetastatic invasive breast cancer from January 2007 to December 2013. In the period of this study, 885 patients are diagnosed with carcinoma breast, of which 212 are Her2/neu positive (23.9%). Of the 212 patients, only 76 (35.8%) patients received trastuzumab along with chemotherapy. Patients receiving trastuzumab with chemotherapy have longer 5-year DFS compared to those receiving chemotherapy alone, 92% and 52.6%, respectively (P = 0.0001). Five-year OS is 90.5% and 41.7% in those patients who received chemotherapy with and without trastuzumab, respectively (P = 0.0001). Seven patients (9.45%) developed Grade II reversible diastolic dysfunction. Grade II/III peripheral neuropathy due to paclitaxel is the main adverse effect seen in 21 patients. In spite of improvement in DFS and OS with trastuzumab, the number of patient receiving targeted therapy is very low due to financial constraints which need to be addressed to bridge the gap in survival of Her2+ patients.

  14. Weather, day length and physical activity in older adults: Cross-sectional results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Norfolk Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Tzu; Luben, Robert; Wareham, Nicholas; Griffin, Simon; Jones, Andy P

    2017-01-01

    A wide range of environmental factors have been related to active ageing, but few studies have explored the impact of weather and day length on physical activity in older adults. We investigate the cross-sectional association between weather conditions, day length and activity in older adults using a population-based cohort in England, the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Norfolk study. Physical activity was measured objectively over 7 days using an accelerometer and this was used to calculate daily total physical activity (counts per minute), daily minutes of sedentary behaviour and light, moderate and vigorous physical activity (LMVPA). Day length and two types of weather conditions, precipitation and temperature, were obtained from a local weather station. The association between these variables and physical activity was examined by multilevel first-order autoregressive modelling. After adjusting for individual factors, short day length and poor weather conditions, including high precipitation and low temperatures, were associated with up to 10% lower average physical activity (pweather conditions appear to be an important factor related to active ageing. Future work should focus on developing potential interventions to reduce their impact on physical activity behaviours in older adults.

  15. Ambiguity in a masculine world: Being a BRCA1/2 mutation carrier and a man with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, C; Bancroft, E K; Mitra, A; Ardern-Jones, A; Castro, E; Page, E C; Eeles, R A

    2017-11-01

    Increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa) is observed in men with BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations. Sex and gender are key determinants of health and disease although unequal care exists between the sexes. Stereotypical male attitudes are shown to lead to poor health outcomes. Men with BRCA1/2 mutations and diagnosed with PCa were identified and invited to participate in a qualitative interview study. Data were analysed using a framework approach. "Masculinity theory" was used to report the impact of having both a BRCA1/2 mutation and PCa. Eleven of 15 eligible men were interviewed. The umbrella concept of "Ambiguity in a Masculine World" was evident. Men's responses often matched those of women in a genetic context. Men's BRCA experience was described, as "on the back burner" but "a bonus" enabling familial detection and early diagnosis of PCa. Embodiment of PCa took precedence as men revealed stereotypical "ideal" masculine responses such as stoicism and control while creating new "masculinities" when faced with the vicissitudes of having 2 gendered conditions. Health workers are urged to take a reflexive approach, void of masculine ideals, a belief in which obfuscates men's experience. Research is required regarding men's support needs in the name of equality of care. © 2017 The Authors. Psycho-Oncology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Comorbidity of common mental disorders with cancer and their treatment gap : findings from the World Mental Health Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakash, Ora; Levav, Itzhak; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Alonso, Jordi; Andrade, Laura Helena; Angermeyer, Matthias C.; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Florescu, Slivia; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Gureje, Oye; He, Yanling; Hu, Chiyi; de Jonge, Peter; Karam, Elie G.; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Murphy, Sam; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Piazza, Marina; Posada-Villa, Jose; Stein, Dan J.; Taib, Nezar Ismet; Zarkov, Zahari; Kessler, Ronald C.; Scott, Kate M.

    ObjectiveThis study aimed to study the comorbidity of common mental disorders (CMDs) and cancer, and the mental health treatment gap among community residents with active cancer, cancer survivors and cancer-free respondents in 13 high-income and 11 low-middle-income countries. MethodsData were

  17. Adverse post-operative outcomes in Jehovah's witnesses with gynecologic cancer within 30 days of surgery: A single institution review of 36 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J. Moulton

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Rates of blood transfusion are reported as high as 32% in women undergoing major gynecologic cancer surgery. Therefore, care of the gynecologic oncology patient who refuses blood products, such as Jehovah's witnesses, can pose a unique challenge. The objective of this study was to determine rate of adverse post-operative outcomes within 30 days of surgery in Jehovah's witnesses with gynecologic cancer. This was a retrospective cohort study of Jehovah's witnesses undergoing laparotomy or minimally invasive surgery (MIS for gynecologic cancer at a single institution. Data for post-adverse complications within 30 days of surgery were recorded. In total, 36 patients were included with a median age of 58.5 years (32–85 years. The majority had endometrial adenocarcinoma (n = 23; 63.9% or epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer (EOC (n = 8; 22.2%. 61.1% (n = 22 of patients underwent laparotomy and 38.9% (n = 14 had MIS procedures. 31.8% of laparotomies (n = 7 were terminated prematurely due to surgeon concern for ongoing blood loss. In patients with advanced stage EOC, the rate of suboptimal cytoreduction (>1 cm was 50%. In the laparotomy cohort, there were four (18.2% ICU admissions and two (9.1% mortalities. The time to adjuvant chemotherapy or radiation was 45.5 days (31–64 for laparotomy compared to 35.0 days (12–64 for MIS. While the majority of patients (97.2% were unwilling to accept packed red blood cells, over one third (38.9% were agreeable to autologous blood transfusion. Additionally, five (13.9% patients were accepting of fresh frozen plasma, six (16.7% patients were agreeable to cryoprecipitate and seven (19.4% patients were willing to accept platelet transfusions. There is a high rate of postoperative adverse outcomes among Jehovah's witnesses undergoing laparotomy for gynecologic malignancy compared. Acceptance of blood products is low among Jehovah's witnesses, even in the setting of major

  18. Cost and cost-effectiveness of adjuvant trastuzumab in the real world setting: A study of the Southeast Netherlands Breast Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferina, Shanly C; Ramaekers, Bram L T; de Boer, Maaike; Dercksen, M Wouter; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; van Kampen, Roel J W; van de Wouw, Agnès J; Voogd, Adri C; Tjan Heijnen, Vivianne C G; Joore, Manuela A

    2017-10-03

    We assessed the real world costs and cost-effectiveness of the addition of trastuzumab in HER2 positive early breast cancer compared to chemotherapy alone in the Dutch daily practice as opposed to the results based on trial data and based on a subset of patients that were treated according to the guidelines. In a cohort study, we included all patients with stage I-III invasive breast cancer treated with curative intent in 5 Dutch hospitals between 2005 and 2007 (n=2684).We assessed three scenarios: a real-world scenario, a trial scenario and a guideline scenario, with costs and effectiveness based on either the cohort study, the published trials or the guidelines. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves (CEACs) were constructed. Costs were €243,216 and €239,657 for trastuzumab and no trastuzumab for the real world scenario, €224,443 and €218,948 for the guideline scenario and €253,666 and €265,116 for the trial scenario. The QALYs were 0.827, 0.861, 0.993 for the real world, guideline and trial scenario. The corresponding ICERs were €4,304, €6,382 and dominance, respectively. CEACs showed that the probability that trastuzumab is cost-effective is ≥99% in each scenario. Adjuvant trastuzumab in the real world can be considered cost-effective.

  19. Bringing the real world to psychometric evaluation of cervical cancer literacy assessments with Black, Latina, and Arab women in real-world settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Karen Patricia; Templin, Thomas N

    2013-12-01

    This research describes the development and evaluation of a new scale for assessing functional cervical cancer health literacy, the Cervical Cancer Literacy Assessment Tool (C-CLAT). In phase 1, 35 items in English, Spanish, and Arabic for C-CLAT were generated, taking into account three content domains-Awareness, Knowledge, and Prevention/Control. After content validation, 24 items were retained for psychometric evaluation. In phase 2, the 24-item C-CLAT was evaluated in three racial/ethnic populations of urban women (N = 543). Psychometric methods included item analysis, multifactor item response theory modeling, and concurrent correlations. The final C-CLAT consisted of 16 items, with an internal consistency reliability of 0.72. C-CLAT reliabilities in Black, Latina, and Arab women were 0.73, 0.76, and 0.60, respectively. The rank order correlations of item difficulties across racial/ethnic groups was high (r's = 0.97 to 0.98). The C-CLAT was positively related to educational level, and Arab women scored significantly higher than the Black and Latina participants. This study presents a psychometrically sound instrument that measures health literacy related to cervical cancer. The C-CLAT is a tool that can be orally administered by a lay person and used in a community-based health promotion intervention.

  20. Open Day at SHMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosova, M.

    2010-09-01

    During the World Meteorological Day there has been preparing "Open Day" at Slovak Hydrometeorological Institute. This event has more than 10 years traditions. "Open Day" is one of a lot of possibilities to give more information about meteorology, climatology, hydrology too to public. This "Day" is executed in whole Slovakia. People can visit the laboratories, the forecasting room....and meteo and clima measuring points. The most popular is visiting forecasting room. Visitors are interested in e.g. climatologic change in Slovakia territory, preparing weather forecasting, dangerous phenomena.... Every year we have more than 500 visitors.

  1. Damocles' syndrome revisited: Update on the fear of cancer recurrence in the complex world of today's treatments and survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupit-Link, Margaret; Syrjala, Karen L; Hashmi, Shahrukh K

    2018-02-19

    Improvements in curative treatments for many types of cancer have emerged over the past several decades, resulting in a growing population of long-term cancer survivors - of both adult and childhood cancers. Despite this incredible medical achievement, long-term survivors of cancer face a unique fear: the fear of relapse. We conducted a review of the literature for data on fear of relapse among cancer survivors. The fear of cancer recurrence is present in survivors of childhood and adult cancers as well as family members and often leads to psychological sequelae. Literature on the fear of cancer recurrence has begun to emerge. However, herein we provide a unique approach through the use of a metaphor: Cicero's story of Damocles' sword. We aim to outline the many fear-related and emotional challenges faced by cancer survivors with an extensive review of studies demonstrating such challenges. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Current-day precision oncology: from cancer prevention, screening, drug development, and treatment - have we fallen short of the promise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gilberto; Aftimos, Philippe; Awada, Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    Precision oncology has been a strategy of prevention, screening, and treatment. Although much has been invested, have the results fallen so far short of the promise? The advancement of technology and research has opened new doors, yet a variety of pitfalls are present. This review presents the successes, failures, and opportunities of precision oncology in the current landscape. The use of targeted gene sequencing and the overwhelming results of superresponders have generated much excitement and support for precision oncology from the medical community. Despite notable successes, many challenges still pave the way of precision oncology: intratumoral heterogeneity, the need for serial biopsies, availability of treatments, target prioritization, ethical issues with germline incidental findings, medical education, clinical trial design, and costs. Precision oncology shows much potential through the use of next-generation sequencing and molecular advances, but does this potential warrant the investment? There are many obstacles on the way of this technology that should make us question if the investment (both monetary and man-hours) will live up to the promise. The review aims to not criticize this technology, but to give a realistic view of where we are, especially regarding cancer treatment and prevention.

  3. Dinosaur Day!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sandra; Baptiste, H. Prentice

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they capitalized on their first-grade students' love of dinosaurs by hosting a fun-filled Dinosaur Day in their classroom. On Dinosaur Day, students rotated through four dinosaur-related learning stations that integrated science content with art, language arts, math, and history in a fun and time-efficient…

  4. Adjuvant Docetaxel and Cyclophosphamide (DC with prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF on days 8 &12 in breast cancer patients: a retrospective analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinat Yerushalmi

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Four cycles of docetaxel/cyclophosphamide (DC resulted in superior survival than doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide in the treatment of early breast cancer. The original study reported a 5% incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN recommending prophylactic antibiotics with no granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF support. The worldwide adoption of this protocol yielded several reports on substantially higher rates of FN events. We explored the use of growth factor (GF support on days 8 and 12 of the cycle with the original DC protocol. METHODS: Our study included all consecutive patients with stages I-II breast cancer who were treated with the DC protocol at the Institute of Oncology, Davidoff Center (Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Israel from April, 2007 to March, 2012. Patient, tumor characteristics, and toxicity were reported. RESULTS: In total, 123 patients received the DC regimen. Median age was 60 years, (range, 25-81 years. Thirty-three patients (26.8% were aged 65 years and older. Most of the women (87% adhered to the planned G-CSF protocol (days 8 &12. 96% of the patients completed the 4 planned cycles of chemotherapy. Six patients (5% had dose reductions, 6 (5% had treatment delays due to non-medical reasons. Thirteen patients (10.6% experienced at least one event of FN (3 patients had 2 events, all requiring hospitalization. Eight patients (6.5% required additional support with G-CSF after the first chemotherapy cycle, 7 because of FN and one due to neutropenia and diarrhea. IN CONCLUSION: Primary prophylactic G-CSF support on days 8 and 12 of the cycle provides a tolerable option to deliver the DC protocol. Our results are in line with other retrospective protocols using longer schedules of GF support.

  5. Optimization of cancer chemotherapy on the basis of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: from patients enrolled in clinical trials to those in the 'real world'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Sasaki, Yasutsuna

    2014-01-01

      Cytotoxic anticancer drugs are the most challenging therapeutic agents among all medicines with relatively narrow efficacy profiles. Therefore, medical oncologists have to practically manage the risk of severe toxic effects to optimize treatment outcomes. Dose and treatment-schedule recommendations for cytotoxic anticancer agents are determined on the basis of clinical trials. Patients enrolled in clinical trials are those likely to receive the drug in clinical practice, excluding those with conditions such as organ dysfunction, obesity, advanced age, or comorbidity. On the other hand, the 'real world' includes large numbers of such patients who do not meet the eligibility criteria of clinical trials. However, there is a paucity of data from sufficiently powered pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies to support dosage recommendations in such patients. Consequently, dose levels and treatment schedules for chemotherapy in these subjects are somewhat arbitrary and not evidence-based. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies of patients in the 'real world' are needed to address this issue. In this review article, we describe general aspects of clinical pharmacology in cancer patients enrolled in clinical trials and those in the 'real world,' and introduce recent findings regarding the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of irinotecan and S-1 in 'real world' cancer patients.

  6. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy Delivered in Two Fractions Within One Day for Favorable/Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghilezan, Michel, E-mail: mghilezan@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J. Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6-40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Conclusions: Favorable

  7. One Play a Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduate theater students rarely get the chance to work on a major world premiere, but this year hundreds of them will. Currently, more than 70 colleges and universities are participating in "365 Days/365 Plays," an ambitious project from Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks. Every week, as they mount their portion of this epic…

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers Survivorship ... Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers ...

  9. Development and validation of a set of six adaptable prognosis prediction (SAP) models based on time-series real-world big data analysis for patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy: A multicenter case crossover study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu Uneno; Kei Taneishi; Masashi Kanai; Kazuya Okamoto; Yosuke Yamamoto; Akira Yoshioka; Shuji Hiramoto; Akira Nozaki; Yoshitaka Nishikawa; Daisuke Yamaguchi; Teruko Tomono; Masahiko Nakatsui; Mika Baba; Tatsuya Morita; Shigemi Matsumoto; Tomohiro Kuroda; Yasushi Okuno

    2017-01-01

    ... time-series real-world big data. Methods Between April 2004 and September 2014, 4,997 patients with cancer who had received systemic chemotherapy were registered in a prospective cohort database at the Kyoto University Hospital...

  10. Inspire Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohach, Barbara M.; Meade, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    The authors collaborated on hosting a "Spring Inspire Day." planned and delivered by preservice elementary teachers as a social studies/science methods project. Projects that have authentic application opportunities can make learning meaningful for prospective teachers as well as elementary students. With the impetus for an integrated…

  11. Meanings of existential uncertainty and certainty for people diagnosed with cancer and receiving palliative treatment: a life-world phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Magdalena; Friberg, Febe; Wallengren, Catarina; Ohlén, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    Many people around the world are getting cancer and living longer with the disease. Thanks to improved treatment options in healthcare, patients diagnosed with advanced gastrointestinal cancer can increasingly live for longer. Living with cancer creates existential uncertainty, but what does this situation mean for the individual? The purpose of the study is to interpret meanings of existential uncertainty and certainty for people diagnosed with advanced gastrointestinal cancer and receiving palliative treatment. This study is part of a larger project in which 7 men and 7 women aged between 49 and 79 participated in a study of information and communication for people with advanced gastrointestinal cancer. A total of 66 interviews were conducted with participants who were followed up over time. The narrative interviews were transcribed verbatim and the texts were analysed in three steps: naive reading, structural analysis and interpreted whole by utilizing a phenomenological life-world approach. THIS STUDY HAS IDENTIFIED DIFFERENT SPHERES IN WHICH PEOPLE DIAGNOSED WITH ADVANCED GASTROINTESTINAL CANCER VACILLATE BETWEEN EXISTENTIAL UNCERTAINTY AND CERTAINTY: bodily changes, everyday situations, companionship with others, healthcare situations and the natural environment. Existing in the move between existential uncertainty and certainty appears to change people's lives in a decisive manner. The interview transcripts reveal aspects that both create existential certainty and counteract uncertainty. They also reveal that participants appear to start reflecting on how the new and uncertain aspects of their lives will manifest themselves -a new experience that lays the foundation for development of knowledge, personal learning and growth. People diagnosed with advanced gastrointestinal cancer and receiving palliative care expressed thoughts about personal learning initiated by the struggle of living with an uncertain future despite their efforts to live in the present

  12. Real-world and trial-based cost-effectiveness analysis of bevacizumab in HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer patients: a study of the Southeast Netherlands Breast Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kampen, R J W; Ramaekers, B L T; Lobbezoo, D J A; de Boer, M; Dercksen, M W; van den Berkmortel, F; Smilde, T J; van de Wouw, A J; Peters, F P J; van Riel, J M G; Peters, N A J B; Tjan-Heijnen, V C G; Joore, M A

    2017-07-01

    The aim of our analysis was to assess the real-world cost-effectiveness of bevacizumab in addition to taxane treatment versus taxane monotherapy for HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer compared with the cost-effectiveness based on the efficacy results from a trial. A state transition model was built to estimate costs, life years (LYs) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for both treatments. Two scenarios were examined: a real-world scenario and a trial-based scenario in which transition probabilities were primarily based on a real-world cohort study and the E2100 trial, respectively. In both scenarios, costs and utility parameter estimates were extracted from the real-world cohort study. Moreover, the Dutch health care perspective was adopted. In both the real-world and trial scenarios, bevacizumab-taxane is more expensive (incremental costs of €56,213 and €52,750, respectively) and more effective (incremental QALYs of 0.362 and 0.189, respectively) than taxane monotherapy. In the real-world scenario, bevacizumab-taxane compared to taxane monotherapy led to an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of €155,261 per QALY gained. In the trial scenario, the ICER amounted to €278,711 per QALY gained. According to the Dutch informal threshold, bevacizumab in addition to taxane treatment was not considered cost-effective for HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer both in a real-world and in a trial scenario. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. World Literature - World Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offering their own twenty-first-century perspectives - across generations, nationalities and disciplines -, the contributors to this anthology explore the idea of world literature for what it may add of new connections and itineraries to the study of literature and culture today. Covering a vast ...

  14. Multicenter, randomized, open-label Phase II study comparing S-1 alternate-day oral therapy with the standard daily regimen as a first-line treatment in patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaue, Hiroki; Shimizu, Atsushi; Hagiwara, Yasuhiro; Sho, Masayuki; Yanagimoto, Hiroaki; Nakamori, Shoji; Ueno, Hideki; Ishii, Hiroshi; Kitano, Masayuki; Sugimori, Kazuya; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Imaoka, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Daisuke; Ueda, Kazuki; Nebiki, Hiroko; Nagakawa, Tatsuya; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Isao; Ohashi, Yasuo; Shirasaka, Tetsuhiko

    2017-04-01

    Non-inferiority for overall survival (OS) following alternate-day treatment with the oral anticancer drug S-1 compared with standard daily treatment was assessed in Japanese patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer in a multicenter, randomized, phase II study. This trial was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (no. 000008604). Chemotherapy-naïve patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer were randomly assigned 2:1 to treatment with alternate-day (twice daily on alternate days from days 1 through 42 of a 42-day cycle) or daily (twice daily on days 1 through 28 of a 42-day cycle) treatment with S-1. The primary endpoint was OS. Secondary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS), time to treatment failure, response rate, quality of life assessments, and safety. A total of 190 patients were enrolled, of which 185 were included in the final analysis (alternate-day: 121; daily: 64). Median OS was 9.4 for the alternate-day group and 10.4 months for the daily group [hazard ratio (HR), 1.19; 95% credible interval, 0.86 to 1.64], indicating that non-inferiority of alternate-day treatment to daily treatment was not demonstrated. Median PFS was 3.0 for the alternate-day group and 4.2 months for the daily group (HR, 1.65; 95% credible interval, 1.20-2.29). The incidence of anorexia, fatigue, neutrophils, pigmentation, and pneumonitis was lower in alternate-day treatment compared with daily treatment. S-1 for advanced pancreatic cancer should be taken daily as recommended, based on the decreased OS and PFS and marginal improvement in safety observed in the alternate-day group.

  15. Comparative effectiveness of early-line nab-paclitaxel vs. paclitaxel in patients with metastatic breast cancer: a US community-based real-world analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahtani RL

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Reshma L Mahtani,1 Monika Parisi,2 Stefan Glück,3 Quanhong Ni,2 Siyeon Park,4 Corey Pelletier,2 Claudio Faria,2 Fadi Braiteh5,6 1Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Miami, Miami, FL, 2Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Celgene Corporation, Summit, NJ, 3Global Medical Affairs, Celgene Corporation, Summit, NJ, 4School of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 5Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Las Vegas, NV, 6Department of Hematology/Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Centers of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, USA Background: Real-world analyses of treatments for patients with metastatic breast cancer are limited. We evaluated the comparative effectiveness of nab-paclitaxel vs. paclitaxel in patients with metastatic breast cancer using data from an electronic medical record database from community practices across the USA.Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study using fully de-identified data from an independent US electronic medical record platform of patients with metastatic breast cancer initiating single-agent nab-paclitaxel or paclitaxel as a first- or second-line treatment from December 1, 2010 to October 6, 2014. The clinical efficacy objectives were time to treatment discontinuation (TTD and time to next treatment (TTNT. Subgroup analyses were performed in patients with 2 types of metastatic breast cancer as follows: 1 hormone receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative, and 2 triple-negative disease. Results: This analysis included 925 patients. Patients receiving nab-paclitaxel vs. paclitaxel had significantly longer TTD (median 4.2 vs. 2.8 months, P<0.0001 and TTNT (median 6.0 vs. 4.2 months, P<0.0001; similar outcomes were observed for patients with hormone receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative disease. Compared with paclitaxel, nab-paclitaxel was associated with significantly longer TTD in patients with triple

  16. Anticoagulant treatment of cancer patients with pulmonary embolism in the real world Actual use of low-molecular-weight heparin in cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, A.; Hutten, B. A.; Di Nisio, M.; Buller, H. R.; Kamphuisen, P. W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since 2004, guidelines recommend long-term treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) in patients with cancer and pulmonary embolism (PE). We assessed the proportion of cancer patients with PE actually treated with LMWH and the duration of anticoagulant treatment in the

  17. Anticoagulant treatment of cancer patients with pulmonary embolism in the real world. Actual use of low-molecular-weight heparin in cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, A.; Hutten, B. A.; Di Nisio, M.; Büller, H. R.; Kamphuisen, P. W.

    2014-01-01

    Since 2004, guidelines recommend long-term treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) in patients with cancer and pulmonary embolism (PE). We assessed the proportion of cancer patients with PE actually treated with LMWH and the duration of anticoagulant treatment in the Netherlands. A

  18. Real-World Treatment Patterns for Hormone Receptor-Positive, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Negative Advanced Breast Cancer in Europe and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Rita; Scazafave, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Clinical guidelines generally recommend endocrine therapy over chemotherapy for hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer (unless life-threatening metastases are present). This study aimed to assess the real-world treatment patterns of patients with hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer in Europe and the United States. Treatment patterns in Europe (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK) and the United States from January 2012 to December 2014 were investigated using a patient record database (Global Oncology Monitor©). Sample data were projected to the wider clinical population to provide running annual estimates every 3 months. Sample sizes ranged from 1272 to 1640 patients in Europe and from 2225 to 2760 patients in the United States. Across all lines of therapy, 37-43% (Europe) and 45-50% (United States) of patients received chemotherapy. More patients received endocrine therapy than chemotherapy as first-line treatment for advanced breast cancer (Europe: 51-54% vs. 33-35%; United States: 53-60% vs. 34-42%). In contrast, endocrine therapy-only regimens were given less commonly than chemotherapy-only regimens in the third-line setting in both Europe and the United States. Chemotherapy is used extensively in routine clinical practice for hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative advanced breast cancer. The results also suggest that the treatment patternsin Europe and the United States are qualitatively different. Funding : Ipsos Healthcare and AstraZeneca.

  19. World trends for H. pylori eradication therapy and gastric cancer prevention strategy by H. pylori test-and-treat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hidekazu; Mori, Hideki

    2017-11-14

    Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis leads to the development of gastric cancer. Kyoto global consensus report on H. pylori gastritis recommended H. pylori eradication therapy to prevent gastric cancer. To manage H. pylori infection, it is important to choose the appropriate regimen considering regional differences in resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole. Quinolones and rifabutin-containing regimens are useful as third- and fourth-line rescue therapies.

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers ...

  1. Clinical Implementation of an Online Adaptive Plan-of-the-Day Protocol for Nonrigid Motion Management in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijkoop, Sabrina T., E-mail: s.heijkoop@erasmusmc.nl; Langerak, Thomas R.; Quint, Sandra; Bondar, Luiza; Mens, Jan Willem M.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical implementation of an online adaptive plan-of-the-day protocol for nonrigid target motion management in locally advanced cervical cancer intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Each of the 64 patients had four markers implanted in the vaginal fornix to verify the position of the cervix during treatment. Full and empty bladder computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired prior to treatment to build a bladder volume-dependent cervix-uterus motion model for establishment of the plan library. In the first phase of clinical implementation, the library consisted of one IMRT plan based on a single model-predicted internal target volume (mpITV), covering the target for the whole pretreatment observed bladder volume range, and a 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) motion-robust backup plan based on the same mpITV. The planning target volume (PTV) combined the ITV and nodal clinical target volume (CTV), expanded with a 1-cm margin. In the second phase, for patients showing >2.5-cm bladder-induced cervix-uterus motion during planning, two IMRT plans were constructed, based on mpITVs for empty-to-half-full and half-full-to-full bladder. In both phases, a daily cone beam CT (CBCT) scan was acquired to first position the patient based on bony anatomy and nodal targets and then select the appropriate plan. Daily post-treatment CBCT was used to verify plan selection. Results: Twenty-four and 40 patients were included in the first and second phase, respectively. In the second phase, 11 patients had two IMRT plans. Overall, an IMRT plan was used in 82.4% of fractions. The main reasons for selecting the motion-robust backup plan were uterus outside the PTV (27.5%) and markers outside their margin (21.3%). In patients with two IMRT plans, the half-full-to-full bladder plan was selected on average in 45% of the first 12 fractions, which was reduced to 35% in the last treatment fractions. Conclusions: The implemented

  2. One Day on Earth

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    In collaboration with the CineGlobe Film Festival, the One Day on Earth global film project invites you to share your story of scientific inspiration, scientific endeavors and technological advancement on 11 November 2011 (11.11.11).   Technology in the 21st century continuously inspires us to re-imagine the world. From outer-space to cyberspace, new ideas that we hope will improve the lives of future generations keep us in a state of change. However, these new technologies may alter the nature of our shared existence in ways not yet known. On 11.11.11, we invite you to record the exciting ways that science is a part of your life, together with people around the world who will be documenting their lives on this day of global creation. See www.onedayonearth.org for details on how to participate.

  3. Concordance with World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) guidelines for cancer prevention and obesity-related cancer risk in the Framingham Offspring cohort (1991-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarem, Nour; Lin, Yong; Bandera, Elisa V; Jacques, Paul F; Parekh, Niyati

    2015-02-01

    This prospective cohort study evaluates associations between healthful behaviors consistent with WCRF/AICR cancer prevention guidelines and obesity-related cancer risk, as a third of cancers are estimated to be preventable. The study sample consisted of adults from the Framingham Offspring cohort (n = 2,983). From 1991 to 2008, 480 incident doctor-diagnosed obesity-related cancers were identified. Data on diet, measured by a food frequency questionnaire, anthropometric measures, and self-reported physical activity, collected in 1991 was used to construct a 7-component score based on recommendations for body fatness, physical activity, foods that promote weight gain, plant foods, animal foods, alcohol, and food preservation, processing, and preparation. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to estimate associations between the computed score, its components, and subcomponents in relation to obesity-related cancer risk. The overall score was not associated with obesity-related cancer risk after adjusting for age, sex, smoking, energy, and preexisting conditions (HR 0.94, 95 % CI 0.86-1.02). When score components were evaluated separately, for every unit increment in the alcohol score, there was 29 % lower risk of obesity-related cancers (HR 0.71, 95 % CI 0.51-0.99) and 49-71 % reduced risk of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. Every unit increment in the subcomponent score for non-starchy plant foods (fruits, vegetables, and legumes) among participants who consume starchy vegetables was associated with 66 % reduced risk of colorectal cancer (HR 0.44, 95 % CI 0.22-0.88). Lower alcohol consumption and a plant-based diet consistent with the cancer prevention guidelines were associated with reduced risk of obesity-related cancers in this population.

  4. World law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold J. Berman

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In the third millennium of the Christian era, which is characterised by the emergence of a world economy and eventually a world society, the concept of world law is needed to embrace not only the traditional disciplines of public international law, and comparative law, but also the common underlying legal principles applicable in world trade, world finance, transnational transfer of technology and other fields of world economic law, as well as in such emerging fields as the protection of the world's environment and the protection of universal human rights. World law combines inter-state law with the common law of humanity and the customary law of various world communities.

  5. Safety of Same-day Pegfilgrastim Administration in Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Treated With Cabazitaxel With or Without Carboplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Mehmet Asim; Cauley, Diana H; Atkinson, Bradley J; Chen, Hsiang-Chun; Kaya, Diana H; Wang, Xuemei; Vikram, Raghu; Tu, Shi-Ming; Corn, Paul G; Kim, Jeri

    2017-06-01

    Although myeloid growth factors are commonly used to treat metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), the optimal timing of administration has not been well studied. We assessed the effects of same-day pegfilgrastim, a neutrophil stimulator, after cabazitaxel treatment with or without carboplatin in patients with mCRPC. We also evaluated the frequency of urinary tract inflammation during treatment. Between September 2010 and September 2014, 151 consecutive patients with mCRPC underwent cabazitaxel treatment with or without the addition of carboplatin at a single institution. We assessed absolute neutrophil count recovery, incidence of neutropenia, neutropenic fever, antibiotic usage, treatment delays or discontinuation, dose reduction, and hospitalization with pegfilgrastim administration. Radiologists blinded to therapy reviewed computed tomography scans to detect urinary tract inflammation. The median patient age was 69 years (range, 41-88 years); 78% of patients were white, and 54% had a Gleason score ≥ 9. Median overall survival was 9 months (95% confidence interval, 8-11 months). One patient (cabazitaxel treatment with or without carboplatin in patients with mCRPC is feasible. The urinary tract inflammation rate (21%) was higher than that reported anecdotally. Results need to be prospectively validated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Results of paclitaxel (day 1 and 8 and carboplatin given on every three weeks in advanced (stage III-IV non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salepci Taflan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both paclitaxel (P and carboplatin (C have significant activity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The weekly administration of P is active, dose intense, and has a favorable toxicity profile. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 51 consecutive patients receiving C and day 1 and 8 P chemotherapy (CT regimen in advanced stage NSCLC to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity. Methods Patients treated in our institutions having pathologically proven NSCLC, no CNS metastases, adequate organ function and performance status (PS ECOG 0–2 were given P 112.5 mg/m2 intravenously (IV over 1 hour on day 1 and 8, followed by C AUC 5 IV over 1 hour, repeated in every three weeks. PC was given for maximum of 6 cycles. Results Median age was 58 (age range 39–77 and 41 patients (80% were male. PS was 0/1/2 in 29/17/5 patients and stage was IIIA/IIIB/IV in 3/14/34 patients respectively. The median number of cycles administered was 3 (1–6. Seven patients (14% did not complete the first 3 cycles either due to death, progression, grade 3 hypersensitivity reactions to P or lost to follow up. Best evaluable response was partial response (PR in 45% and stable disease (SD in 18%. Twelve patients (24% received local RT. Thirteen patients (25% received 2nd line CT at progression. At a median follow-up of 7 months (range, 1–20, 25 (49% patients died and 35 patients (69% progressed. Median overall survival (OS was 11 ± 2 months (95% CI; 6 to 16, 1-year OS ratio was 44%. Median time to progression (TTP was 6 ± 1 months (95% CI; 4 to 8, 1-year progression free survival (PFS ratio was 20%. We observed following grade 3 toxicities: asthenia (10%, neuropathy (4%, anorexia (4%, anemia (4%, hypersensitivity to P (2%, nausea/vomiting (2%, diarrhea (2% and neutropenia (2%. Two patients (4% died of febrile neutropenia. Doses of CT were reduced or delayed in 12 patients (24%. Conclusions P on day 1 and 8 and C every three weeks is practical and fairly

  7. Worlds Fantastic, Worlds Familiar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.

    2017-02-01

    Introduction; 1. Mercury: the hottest little place; 2. Venus: an even hotter place; 3. Mars: the abode of life?; 4. Asteroids and comets: sweat the small stuff; 5. Galileo's treasures: worlds of fire and ice; 6. Enceladus: an active iceball in space; 7. Titan: an Earth in deep freeze?; 8. Iapetus and its friends: the weirdest 'planets' in the Solar System; 9. Pluto: the first view of the 'third zone'; 10. Earths above: the search for exoplanets and life in the universe; Epilogue; Glossary; Acknowledgements; Index.

  8. Lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it is called metastatic cancer to the lung . Causes Lung cancer is the deadliest type of cancer for both ... under age 45. Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers Survivorship Questions to Ask About Cancer ... Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers Questions to Ask About Cancer Advanced ...

  10. Are different groups of cancer patients offered rehabilitation to the same extent? A report from the population-based study "The Cancer Patient's World".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Johnsen, Anna Thit; Lundstrøm, Louise Hyldborg; Groenvold, Mogens

    2012-05-01

    The number of cancer survivors is growing and cancer is now viewed as a chronic disease. This has highlighted the importance of providing adequate rehabilitation to prevent physical, psychological, and social sequelae of cancer. However, it is unclear whether those in need of rehabilitation are offered this. Using patient-observer agreement and cognitive interviews, we validated a seven-item questionnaire designed to assess cancer patients' perception of the sufficiency of the offered rehabilitation. A cross-sectional study among 2,202 Danish cancer patients affiliated with hospitals was carried out. The questionnaire was well understood, indicating good validity. In the cross-sectional study, 1,490 patients (68%) participated. Up to 39% of cancer patients did not receive the physical rehabilitation they felt they needed. About half of those who had felt a need to talk to a psychologist were offered this. Insufficiency of other rehabilitation offers was reported by 10-24%. Age most consistently predicted insufficient rehabilitation; higher age predicted insufficient information about support from other sources (than hospital staff) and younger age predicted lack of help to manage symptoms, return to everyday life, and deal with financial and especially work-related consequences. We found no consistent signs of traditional social inequality in the perception of rehabilitation, but we observed some signs of social inequality for unemployed or divorced/separated patients. Age predicted sufficiency of the rehabilitation in two directions, possibly reflecting different needs in younger and older patients. When tailoring rehabilitation programs, it should be ensured that the different needs are met.

  11. Image guided adaptive external beam radiation therapy for cervix cancer: Evaluation of a clinically implemented plan-of-the-day technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Martin; Majercakova, Katarina; Sturdza, Alina; Smet, Stephanie; Najjari, Dina; Daniel, Michaela; Pötter, Richard; Georg, Dietmar; Seppenwoolde, Yvette

    2017-10-11

    Radiotherapy for cervix cancer is challenging in patients exhibiting large daily changes in the pelvic anatomy, therefore adaptive treatments (ART) have been proposed. The aim of this study was the clinical implementation and subsequent evaluation of plan-of-the-day (POTD)-ART for cervix cancer in supine positioning. The described workflow was based on standard commercial equipment and current quality assurance (QA) methods. A POTD strategy, which employs a VMAT plan library consisting of an empty bladder plan, a full bladder plan and a motion robust backup plan, was developed. Daily adaption was guided by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging after which the best plan from the library was selected. Sixteen patients were recruited in a clinical study on ART, for nine POTD was applied due to their large organ motion derived from two computed tomography (CT) scans with variable bladder filling. All patients were treated to 45Gy in 25 fractions. Plan selection frequencies over the treatment course were analyzed. Daily doses in the rectum, bladder and cervix-uterus target (CTV-T) were derived and compared to a simulated non-adapted treatment (non-ART), which employed the robust plan for each fraction. Additionally, the adaption consistency was determined by repeating the plan selection procedure one month after treatment by a group of experts. ART-specific QA methods are presented. 225 ART fractions with CBCTs were analyzed. The empty bladder plan was delivered in 49% of the fractions in the first treatment week and this number increased to 78% in the fifth week. The daily coverage of the CTV-T was equivalent between ART and the non-ART simulation, while the daily total irradiated volume V42.75Gy (95% of prescription dose) was reduced by a median of 87cm3. The median delivered V42.75Gy was 1782cm3. Daily delivered doses (V42.75Gy, V40Gy, V30G) to the organs at risk were statistically significantly reduced by ART, with a median difference in daily V42.75Gy in

  12. All the World's a Stage: Facilitating Discovery Science and Improved Cancer Care through the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Mark; Siu, Lillian L; Rehm, Heidi L; Chanock, Stephen J; Alterovitz, Gil; Burn, John; Calvo, Fabien; Lacombe, Denis; Teh, Bin Tean; North, Kathryn N; Sawyers, Charles L

    2015-11-01

    The recent explosion of genetic and clinical data generated from tumor genome analysis presents an unparalleled opportunity to enhance our understanding of cancer, but this opportunity is compromised by the reluctance of many in the scientific community to share datasets and the lack of interoperability between different data platforms. The Global Alliance for Genomics and Health is addressing these barriers and challenges through a cooperative framework that encourages "team science" and responsible data sharing, complemented by the development of a series of application program interfaces that link different data platforms, thus breaking down traditional silos and liberating the data to enable new discoveries and ultimately benefit patients. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. General Rushes Open Days Day II

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    General Footage during the Open Days 2013 (Day 2 -29/09/2013) Images: Antoine Nouel, Clément Sbaffe, Victor Prunier, David Guerazzi, Basile Manent, Réemi Richarme, Noemi Caraban 00:00:00 00:08:56 Interviews 00:08:56 00:20:47 ALICE 00:20:47 00:26:52 ATLAS 00:26:52 00:28:07 Workshops 00:28:07 00:33:13 Crystal Lab 00:33:13 00:44:19 Superconductivity 00:44:19 01:04:42 Cryogenics 01:04:42 01:12:39 Transports 01:12:39 01:16:30 LEIR 01:16:30 01:18:28 LMF 01:18:28 01:19:50 Vacuum 01:19:50 01:36:39 Superconducting magnets (F1) 01:36:39 01:46:06 The idea filled world of vacuum (F2) 01:46:06 01:49:55 CCC 01:49:55 01:52:41 Safety Training Center 01:52:41 01:55:00 COMPASS 01:55:00 02:09:19 Robotics 02:09:19 02:18:36 LHC Point 6 (with DG) 02:18:36 02:25:16 LHC Point 4 02:25:16 02:29:29 LHCb 02:29:29 02:33:12 Control Center 02:33:12 02:39:57 Streets

  14. Shell worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kenneth I.; Kennedy, Robert G., III; Fields, David E.

    2013-02-01

    The traditional concept of terraforming assumes ready availability of candidate planets with acceptable qualities: orbiting a star in its "Goldilocks zone", liquid water, enough mass, years longer than days, magnetic field, etc. But even stipulating affordable interstellar travel, we still might never find a good candidate elsewhere. Whatever we found likely would require centuries of heavy terraforming, just as Mars or Venus would here. Our increasing appreciation of the ubiquity of life suggests that any terra nova would already possess it. We would then face the dilemma of introducing alien life forms (us, our microbes) into another living world. Instead, we propose a novel method to create habitable environments for humanity by enclosing airless, sterile, otherwise useless planets, moons, and even large asteroids within engineered shells, which avoids the conundrum. These shells are subject to two opposing internal stresses: compression due to the primary's gravity, and tension from atmospheric pressure contained inside. By careful design, these two cancel each other resulting in zero net shell stress. Beneath the shell an Earth-like environment could be created similar in almost all respects to that of Home, except for gravity, regardless of the distance to the sun or other star. Englobing a small planet, moon, or even a dwarf planet like Ceres, would require astronomical amounts of material (quadrillions of tons) and energy, plus a great deal of time. It would be a quantum leap in difficulty over building Dyson Dots or industrializing our solar system, perhaps comparable to a mission across interstellar space with a living crew within their lifetime. But when accomplished, these constructs would be complete (albeit small) worlds, not merely large habitats. They could be stable across historic timescales, possibly geologic. Each would contain a full, self-sustaining ecology, which might evolve in curious directions over time. This has interesting implications

  15. Risk assessment of mortality for all-cause, ischemic heart disease, cardiopulmonary disease, and lung cancer due to the operation of the world's largest coal-fired power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Pei-Hsuan; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Chen, Chien-Jen; Hu, Suh-Woan; Chiang, Chun-Ju; Tsai, Jeng-Lin; Tang, Mei-Ling; Chen, Guan-Jie; Ku, Kai-Chen

    2014-10-01

    Based on recent understanding of PM2.5 health-related problems from fossil-fueled power plants emission inventories collected in Taiwan, we have determined the loss of life expectancy (LLE) and the lifetime (75-year) risks for PM2.5 health-related mortalities as attributed to the operation of the world's largest coal-fired power plant; the Taichung Power Plant (TCP), with an installed nominal electrical capacity of 5780 MW in 2013. Five plausible scenarios (combinations of emission controls, fuel switch, and relocation) and two risk factors were considered. It is estimated that the lifetime (75-y) risk for all-cause mortality was 0.3%-0.6% for males and 0.2%-0.4% for females, and LLE at 84 days in 1997 for the 23 million residents of Taiwan. The risk has been reduced to one-fourth at 0.05%-0.10% for males and 0.03%-0.06% for females, and LLE at 15 days in 2007, which was mainly attributed to the installation of desulfurization and de-NOx equipment. Moreover, additional improvements can be expected if we can relocate the power plant to a downwind site on Taiwan, and convert the fuel source from coal to natural gas. The risk can be significantly reduced further to one-fiftieth at 0.001%-0.002% for males and 0.001% for females, and LLE at 0.3 days. Nonetheless, it is still an order higher than the commonly accepted elevated-cancer risk at 0.0001% (10-6), indicating that the PM2.5 health-related risk for operating such a world-class power plant is not negligible. In addition, this study finds that a better-chosen site (involving moving the plant to the leeward side of Taiwan) can reduce the risk significantly as opposed to solely transitioning the fuel source to natural gas. Note that the fuel cost of using natural gas (0.11 USD/kWh in 2013) in Taiwan is about twice the price of using coal fuel (0.05 USD/kWh in 2013).

  16. 75 FR 3843 - Religious Freedom Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ... Religious Freedom Day. I call on all Americans to commemorate this day with events and activities that teach... future generations here and around the world. ] IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this...

  17. World War II-related post-traumatic stress disorder and breast cancer risk among Israeli women: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Dekel, Rachel; Barchana, Micha; Linn, Shai; Keinan-Boker, Lital

    2014-03-01

    Several studies have suggested that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is related to adverse health outcomes. There are limited data on PTSD and cancer, which has a long latency period. We investigated the association between World War II (WWII)-related PTSD and subsequent breast cancer (BC) risk among Jewish WWII survivors and examined whether this association was modified by exposure to hunger during WWII. We compared 65 BC patients diagnosed in 2005 through 2010 to 200 population-based controls who were members of various organizations for Jewish WWII survivors in Israel. All participants were born in Europe, lived at least six months under Nazi rule during WWII, and immigrated to Israel after the war. We estimated PTSD using the PTSD Inventory and applied logistic regression models to estimate the association between WWII-related PTSD and BC, adjusting for potential confounders. We observed a linear association between WWII-related PTSD and BC risk. This association remained significant following adjustment for potential confounders, including obesity, alcohol consumption, smoking, age during WWII, hunger exposure during WWII, and total number of traumatic life events (OR = 2.89, 95% CI = 1.14-7.31). However, the level of hunger exposure during WWII modified this effect significantly. These findings suggest an independent association between WWII-related PTSD and subsequent BC risk in Jewish WWII survivors that is modified by hunger, a novel finding. Future research is needed to further explore these findings.

  18. Hepatocellular carcinoma surgery outcomes in the developing world: A 20-year retrospective cohort study at the National Cancer Institute of Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloy Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the developing world, most patients with hepatocellular carcinoma present with advanced-stage disease, considered to be incurable based on current therapeutic algorithms. Here, we demonstrate that curative liver resection is achievable in a portion of Peruvian patients not addressed by these treatment algorithms. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 253 hepatocellular carcinoma patients that underwent a curative hepatectomy between 1991 and 2011 at the National Cancer Institute of Peru. The median age of the cohort was 36 years, and merely 15.4% of the patients displayed cirrhosis. The average tumor size was over 14 cm in diameter, resulting in 76.3% of major hepatectomies performed. The 5- and 10-year survival probability estimates were 37.5% and 26.2%, respectively. Age (>44 vs. ≤44 years old; P = 0.005, tumor size (>10 cm vs. ≤10 cm in diameter; P = 0.009, cirrhosis (P < 0.001, satellite lesions (P < 0.001, macroscopic vascular invasion (P < 0.001, allogeneic blood transfusion (P = 0.011, and spontaneous rupture of the tumor (P = 0.006 were independent predictive factors for prognosis. Hepatocellular carcinomas in Peru are characterized by a distinct clinical presentation with notable features compared with those typically described throughout relevant literature. Despite a large number of advanced-stage hepatocellular carcinomas, the outcomes of liver resection observed in the present study were in good standing with the results previously described in other series. It thus appears that staging systems and associated therapeutic algorithms designed for use in the developed world remain inadequate in certain populations, especially in the context of Peruvian patients. Our findings suggest that clinicians in the developing world should reconsider management guidelines pertaining to hepatocellular carcinoma. Indeed, we hypothesize that, in developing countries, a strict adherence to these therapeutic algorithms might create a

  19. Hepatocellular carcinoma surgery outcomes in the developing world: A 20-year retrospective cohort study at the National Cancer Institute of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Eloy; Rojas Rojas, Teresa; Berrospi, Francisco; Chávez, Ivan; Luque, Carlos; Cano, Luis; Doimi, Franco; Pineau, Pascal; Deharo, Eric; Bertani, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    In the developing world, most patients with hepatocellular carcinoma present with advanced-stage disease, considered to be incurable based on current therapeutic algorithms. Here, we demonstrate that curative liver resection is achievable in a portion of Peruvian patients not addressed by these treatment algorithms. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 253 hepatocellular carcinoma patients that underwent a curative hepatectomy between 1991 and 2011 at the National Cancer Institute of Peru. The median age of the cohort was 36 years, and merely 15.4% of the patients displayed cirrhosis. The average tumor size was over 14 cm in diameter, resulting in 76.3% of major hepatectomies performed. The 5- and 10-year survival probability estimates were 37.5% and 26.2%, respectively. Age (>44 vs. ≤44 years old; P = 0.005), tumor size (>10 cm vs. ≤10 cm in diameter; P = 0.009), cirrhosis (P literature. Despite a large number of advanced-stage hepatocellular carcinomas, the outcomes of liver resection observed in the present study were in good standing with the results previously described in other series. It thus appears that staging systems and associated therapeutic algorithms designed for use in the developed world remain inadequate in certain populations, especially in the context of Peruvian patients. Our findings suggest that clinicians in the developing world should reconsider management guidelines pertaining to hepatocellular carcinoma. Indeed, we hypothesize that, in developing countries, a strict adherence to these therapeutic algorithms might create a selection bias resulting in the dismissal of patients who could eventually be treated.

  20. Working toward cancer and healthy living education around the world: the experience at La Salle Campus Barcelona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Tallulah

    2012-01-01

    Health education, especially in the earlier stages of life, is essential for the development of healthy habits for life. Though healthy living messages must first be delivered locally, our goal is to distribute these messages globally using new technology and communications mediums. The La Salle schools, with a global network of primary, secondary, and higher education institutions have the capacity to reach thousands of children. La Salle Campus Barcelona, in collaboration with St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and Hospital Sant Joan de Déu , has started to carry out educational activities in schools in Catalonia, as well as supporting the design of video games teaching healthy habits and preparing videos about a healthy lifestyle, with the goal of reaching children around the world.

  1. "The Day All of the Different Parts of Me Can Come Along": Intersectionality and U.S. Third World Feminism in the Poetry of Pat Parker and Willyce Kim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ausdall, Mimi Iimuro

    2015-01-01

    This article brings to light the poetry of Pat Parker and Willyce Kim, two key figures within the 1970s and '80s women in print movement. While Parker and Kim have been rightly placed within African-American and Asian-American histories, respectively, and working-class and lesbian-feminist literary histories, their work is most fully understood within the context of U.S. Third World Feminism. Through close readings of poetic form and content in addition to engagement with current debates about intersectionality as a methodology, the article links Kim and Parker's works to central contributions of U.S. Third World Feminism such as intersectionality and power across and within difference that continue to influence feminist theory today.

  2. Thirty-day mortality rate in women with cancer and venous thromboembolism. Findings from the Registro Informatizado de la Enfermedad Trombo Embólica Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Monreal, Manuel

    2012-09-01

    Cancer patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) are at increased risk of mortality. Estimating the risks for specific causes of death may help to weigh the risks and benefits of different therapeutic strategies in an individual patient. In the Registro Informatizado de la Enfermedad Trombo Embólica Registry of 15 520 consecutive patients with VTE, cancer was present in 20% and was associated with a two-fold increase in the risk of fatal pulmonary embolism. In a subsequent study including 2474 women with cancer, 329 (13%) died during the first month. The incidence of fatal pulmonary embolism (n = 71) exceeded that of fatal bleeding (n = 22), except in women with cancer of the bladder or vulva. Then, we compared the mortality rate according to initial presentation in 3978 women with cancer and VTE, of whom 438 (11%) died during the first month. The risk of fatal bleeding was twice as high as the risk of fatal pulmonary embolism (12 vs. 5 deaths) in those with deep-vein thrombosis alone. The higher risk of dying from bleeding than from pulmonary embolism in some women with cancer and VTE suggests that a less aggressive anticoagulant strategy might reduce fatal bleeding more than it would increase fatal pulmonary embolism during this period.

  3. Survival after failure of first-line chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer patients: differences between Japan and the rest of the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Atsuo; Iizumi, Sakura; Boku, Narikazu

    2017-07-01

    In this review, we focus on post-progression survival after first-line chemotherapy of advanced gastric cancer, and particularly the differences between Japan and the rest of the world. We reviewed 15 recent phase III trials of which 4 were solely recruited from Japanese and 11 from rest of the world. The patient characteristics age, performance status, previous gastrectomy and the number of metastatic sites were similar in Japan and rest of the world. However, the diffuse histological type was more common in Japan. While overall survival was longer in Japan (10.5-14.1 vs. 7.9-12.2 months), progression-free survival tended to be shorter in Japan (3.6-6.0 vs. 3.1-7.4 months). Post-progression survival calculated as the difference between median overall survival and progression-free survival was clearly longer in Japan (6.9-8.6 vs. 2.4-6.2 months). The proportion of patients receiving second-line chemotherapy (%2nd-CX) was quite different in Japan and rest of the world (69-85% vs. 11-59%). Correlations between %2nd-CX and post-progression survival were strong (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient; ρ = 0.86, P < 0.001). Correlations between %2nd-CX and ratio of post-progression survival to total overall survival were also strong (ρ = 0.84, P < 0.001). Because a survival benefit of second-CX was documented in several phase III trials, it can be concluded that higher %2nd-CX partly contributed to extended post-progression survival. However, considering that second-CX increased survival only by ~1.5 months at median, other factors such as third-line chemotherapy may have some influences to prolonged post-progression survival. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers Questions to Ask About Cancer Advanced Cancer Choices For Care Talking About Advanced Cancer Coping With ...

  5. Real-World Evidence: A Comparison of the Australian Herceptin Program and Clinical Trials of Trastuzumab for HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Bonny; Viney, Rosalie; Haas, Marion; Goodall, Stephen; Srasuebkul, Preeyaporn; Pearson, Sallie-Anne

    2016-10-01

    Estimating the real-world cost-effectiveness of a new drug relies on understanding the differences between clinical trial data (pre-reimbursement) and clinical practice (post-reimbursement). This is important for decision makers when reviewing reimbursement decisions, prices, and considering other drugs for the same condition. Differences can arise from differences in patient characteristics, but also from the availability of new evidence and evolving treatment practices. This paper examines these issues using a case study. In 2001, the Australian Government funded trastuzumab for the treatment of HER2+ metastatic breast cancer through the Herceptin Program. The administrative arrangements of the Program resulted in rich observational data that captured information about patients treated with trastuzumab between 2001 and 2010 (n = 3830). The dataset included patient characteristics, dispensed medicines, medical service use and date of death. Compared to participants in the clinical trials, patients were older, received more prior chemotherapies and a broader range of co-administered chemotherapies. Treatment practices differed from the clinical trials, but also changed over time. For example, in situ hybridization testing, rather than immunohistochemistry testing, and a three weekly administration schedule, rather than one weekly, were increasingly used. Compared to the clinical trials, patients administered trastuzumab with a concomitant chemotherapy generally experienced longer overall survival (151.3 weeks, 95 % CI: 142.6, 163.4), while those who received trastuzumab as a monotherapy experienced shorter overall survival (94.4 weeks, 95%CI: 86.4, 102.9). These findings may be due to a differing relative treatment effect in clinical practice, but may also be due to a range of other factors. This analysis demonstrates the challenges for decision makers that arise because new evidence and evolving treatment practices create a gap between clinical trial data and

  6. Superhabitable worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, René; Armstrong, John

    2014-01-01

    To be habitable, a world (planet or moon) does not need to be located in the stellar habitable zone (HZ), and worlds in the HZ are not necessarily habitable. Here, we illustrate how tidal heating can render terrestrial or icy worlds habitable beyond the stellar HZ. Scientists have developed a language that neglects the possible existence of worlds that offer more benign environments to life than Earth does. We call these objects "superhabitable" and discuss in which contexts this term could be used, that is to say, which worlds tend to be more habitable than Earth. In an appendix, we show why the principle of mediocracy cannot be used to logically explain why Earth should be a particularly habitable planet or why other inhabited worlds should be Earth-like. Superhabitable worlds must be considered for future follow-up observations of signs of extraterrestrial life. Considering a range of physical effects, we conclude that they will tend to be slightly older and more massive than Earth and that their host stars will likely be K dwarfs. This makes Alpha Centauri B, which is a member of the closest stellar system to the Sun and is supposed to host an Earth-mass planet, an ideal target for searches for a superhabitable world.

  7. Renal insufficiency is the leading cause of double maintenance (bevacizumab and pemetrexed) discontinuation for toxicity to advanced non-small cell lung cancer in real world setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassier, Marion; Dugué, Audrey Emmanuelle; Clarisse, Bénédicte; Lesueur, Paul; Avrillon, Virginie; Bizieux-Thaminy, Acya; Auliac, Jean-Bernard; Kaluzinski, Laure; Tillon, Julie; Robinet, Gilles; Le Caer, Hervé; Monnet, Isabelle; Madroszyk, Anne; Boza, Gabriella; Falchero, Lionel; Fournel, Pierre; Egenod, Thomas; Toffart, Anne-Claire; Leiber, Nathalie; Do, Pascal; Gervais, Radj

    2015-08-01

    In advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), maintenance therapy has emerged as a novel therapeutic reference for patients with non-progressive disease after platinum-based induction chemotherapy. However, the use of double maintenance (DM) with pemetrexed and bevacizumab is still being evaluated in terms of its clinical benefits and safety profile. The objective of this retrospective study was to describe the reasons for DM discontinuation in a real-world setting. Patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC were eligible if they had received at least 4 cycles of induction chemotherapy, followed by at least 1 cycle of DM. They were identified by using the oncology pharmacy database of 17 French centers. Eighty-one patients who began a DM after induction chemotherapy were identified from September 2009 to April 2013. Among the 78 patients who had stopped DM at the time of the analysis, the main reasons for discontinuation were disease progression (42%), adverse events (33%), and personal preference (8%). The most frequent toxicity responsible for DM discontinuation was renal insufficiency (54%). For patients with advanced NSCLC eligible for DM therapy, a particular attention should be paid to potential renal failure. Kidney function should be monitored carefully before and during DM to detect and manage early this adverse event. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Incidence and survival of lymphohematopoietic neoplasms according to the World Health Organization classification: a population-based study from the Victorian Cancer Registry in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasekara, Harindra; Karahalios, Amalia; Juneja, Surender; Thursfield, Vicky; Farrugia, Helen; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G

    2010-03-01

    We studied the incidence and relative survival of 39 837 cases of lymphohematopoietic neoplasms (LHN) reported to the Victorian Cancer Registry during 1982-2004, classified according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. We modeled excess mortality using Poisson regression to estimate differences in survival by age, sex, and time period. Age-standardized incidence rates varied across subtypes of lymphoid and myeloid neoplasms. All major subtypes predominantly affected the elderly except Hodgkin lymphoma (incidence peaks at 20-24 and 75-79 years) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (0-9 years). After an initial rise, overall lymphoid and myeloid incidence stabilized in the mid-1990s. The 5-year relative survival was 58% for lymphoid and 35% for myeloid neoplasms. Survival improved during 1990-2004 for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndromes (p  < 0.001) and declined with advancing age for all subtypes (p <  0.001). Female sex was associated with higher survival for most myeloid subtypes. The results represent a rare epidemiological characterization of the whole range of LHN according to WHO subtypes.

  9. Real world cost of human epidermal receptor 2-positive metastatic breast cancer patients: a longitudinal incidence-based observational costing study in the Netherlands and Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederix, G W J; Severens, J L; Hövels, A M; van Hasselt, J G C; Hooiveld, M J J; Neven, P; Raaijmakers, J A M; Schellens, J H M

    2015-05-01

    Currently, no country-specific metastatic breast cancer (MBC) observational costing data are available for the Netherlands and Belgium. Our aim is to describe country-specific resource use and costs of human epidermal receptor 2 (HER-2)-positive MBC in the Netherlands and Belgium, making use of real-world data. The eligibility period for patient selection was from April 2004 to April 2010. Inclusion and retrospective data collection begins at the time of first diagnosis of HER-2-positive MBC during the eligibility period and ends 24 months post-index diagnosis of MBC or at patient death. We identified 88 eligible patients in the Netherlands and 44 patients in Belgium. The total costs of medical treatment and other resource use utilisation per patient was €48,301 in the Netherlands and €37,431 in Belgium. Majority of costs was related to the use of trastuzumab in both countries, which was 50% of the total costs in the Netherlands and 56% in Belgium respectively. Our study provides estimates of resource use and costs for HER-2-positive MBC in the Netherlands and Belgium. We noticed various differences in resource use patterns between both countries demonstrating caution is needed when transferring cost estimates between countries. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF...

  11. Disparities of Trastuzumab Use in Resource-Limited or Resource-Abundant Regions and Its Survival Benefit on HER2 Positive Breast Cancer: A Real-World Study from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianbin; Wang, Shusen; Wang, Yongsheng; Wang, Xiaojia; Wang, Haibo; Feng, Jifeng; Zhang, Qingyuan; Sun, Tao; Ouyang, Quchang; Yin, Yongmei; Liu, Yinhua; Geng, Cuizhi; Yan, Min; Jiang, Zefei

    2017-11-01

    Trastuzumab is a key component of therapy for human epidermal growth receptor 2 (HER2) positive breast cancer. Because real-world data are lacking, the present research was conducted to evaluate the actual use of and the effectiveness of trastuzumab in the real world in China. Inpatients with HER2 positive invasive breast cancer from 13 hospitals in Eastern China (2010-2015, n = 1,139) were included in this study. We aimed to assess the actual use of trastuzumab and to evaluate potential efficacy from trastuzumab in real-world research. Of 1,017 patients with early stage breast cancer (EBC), 40.5% (412/1,017) received trastuzumab therapy. Patients with EBC in resource-abundant regions (gross domestic product per capita >$15,000 and trastuzumab included in Medicare) are more likely to receive trastuzumab than those in resource-limited regions (37.3% vs. 13.0%, p world research could help to optimize HER2 therapy after metastasis, especially in regions with limited access to these expensive targeted drugs. © AlphaMed Press 2017.

  12. Belief in a Just World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Kilinc

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Belief in a just world hypothesis is defined as the belief that the world is a just place where people generally get what they deserve. It states that individuals have a need to believe that they live in a just world; they believe in a world where people get what they deserve and where people deserve what they get. Individuals believe that who work hard or who perform good acts obtain rewards for their actions, while the sinners and the laggards receive punishments instead. Similarly, individuals want to believe that positive outcomes, whether money, success, or happiness, are obtained only by good people and, conversely, that negative outcomes only happen to bad persons. Justice beliefs have been hypothesized as adaptive for dealing with day-to-day stres. Just world beliefs protect individuals from the daily negative psychological consequences of living in what is realistically an unjust world. In addition, just world beliefs are thought to enhance feelings of security to the extent that if the individual satisfies the conditions for being "good," he or she is protected from injustice. The belief in a just world, like other positive illusions, should contribute to the maintenance of one's mental health. Belief in a just world's is discussed in two ways: personal belief in a just world's answers the question “how much justly is the world to me?”, whereas the belief in a just world's in general answers the question “how much justly is the world?”

  13. Prognostic Performance and Reproducibility of the 1973 and 2004/2016 World Health Organization Grading Classification Systems in Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer: A European Association of Urology Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer Guidelines Panel Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Viktor; Čapoun, Otakar; Cohen, Daniel; Hernández, Virginia; Babjuk, Marek; Burger, Max; Compérat, Eva; Gontero, Paolo; Lam, Thomas; MacLennan, Steven; Mostafid, A Hugh; Palou, Joan; van Rhijn, Bas W G; Rouprêt, Morgan; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Sylvester, Richard; Yuan, Yuhong; Zigeuner, Richard

    2017-11-01

    Tumour grade is an important prognostic indicator in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Histopathological classifications are limited by interobserver variability (reproducibility), which may have prognostic implications. European Association of Urology NMIBC guidelines suggest concurrent use of both 1973 and 2004/2016 World Health Organization (WHO) classifications. To compare the prognostic performance and reproducibility of the 1973 and 2004/2016 WHO grading systems for NMIBC. A systematic literature search was undertaken incorporating Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. Studies were critically appraised for risk of bias (QUIPS). For prognosis, the primary outcome was progression to muscle-invasive or metastatic disease. Secondary outcomes were disease recurrence, and overall and cancer-specific survival. For reproducibility, the primary outcome was interobserver variability between pathologists. Secondary outcome was intraobserver variability (repeatability) by the same pathologist. Of 3593 articles identified, 20 were included in the prognostic review; three were eligible for the reproducibility review. Increasing tumour grade in both classifications was associated with higher disease progression and recurrence rates. Progression rates in grade 1 patients were similar to those in low-grade patients; progression rates in grade 3 patients were higher than those in high-grade patients. Survival data were limited. Reproducibility of the 2004/2016 system was marginally better than that of the 1973 system. Two studies on repeatability showed conflicting results. Most studies had a moderate to high risk of bias. Current grading classifications in NMIBC are suboptimal. The 1973 system identifies more aggressive tumours. Intra- and interobserver variability was slightly less in the 2004/2016 classification. We could not confirm that the 2004/2016 classification outperforms the 1973 classification in prediction of recurrence and progression. This article

  14. The impact of the Internet on cancer outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysenbach, Gunther

    2003-01-01

    Each day, more than 12.5 million health-related computer searches are conducted on the World Wide Web. Based on a meta-analysis of 24 published surveys, the author estimates that in the developed world, about 39% of persons with cancer are using the Internet, and approximately 2.3 million persons living with cancer worldwide are online. In addition, 15% to 20% of persons with cancer use the Internet "indirectly" through family and friends. Based on a comprehensive review of the literature, the available evidence on how persons with cancer are using the Internet and the effect of Internet use on persons with cancer is summarized. The author distinguishes four areas of Internet use: communication (electronic mail), community (virtual support groups), content (health information on the World Wide Web), and e-commerce. A conceptual framework summarizing the factors involved in a possible link between Internet use and cancer outcomes is presented, and future areas for research are highlighted.

  15. A day to celebrate

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    After several weeks of preparations and hard work on the part of many people, the events to mark International Women's Day at CERN on 8 March were a genuine success. They were followed with great interest by the outside world, judging by the flurry of activity on twitter, various blogs and the media coverage they generated.   Women on shift in the CERN control rooms. Women were overwhelmingly in the majority at the controls of the experiments and accelerators throughout the day, as well as acting as the guides for all official visits. There was no shortage of enthusiasm! "I'm very happy that CERN has supported the project, and I'm especially encouraged by the enthusiastic response from everyone who's taken part", says Pauline Gagnon, a physicist from the Indiana University group and a member of the ATLAS collaboration, who was behind the idea. "I hope that this kind of initiative will help to show that women have a place in science and that young women thinkin...

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers Survivorship Questions to Ask About ... to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers Questions to Ask About ...

  17. Post-9/11 cancer incidence in World Trade Center-exposed New York City firefighters as compared to a pooled cohort of firefighters from San Francisco, Chicago and Philadelphia (9/11/2001-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, William; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Daniels, Robert D; Hall, Charles B; Webber, Mayris P; Jaber, Nadia; Yiin, James H; Schwartz, Theresa; Liu, Xiaoxue; Vossbrinck, Madeline; Kelly, Kerry; Prezant, David J

    2016-09-01

    We previously reported a modest excess of cancer in World Trade Center (WTC)-exposed firefighters versus the general population. This study aimed to separate the potential carcinogenic effects of firefighting and WTC exposure by comparing to a cohort of non-WTC-exposed firefighters. Relative rates (RRs) for all cancers combined and individual cancer subtypes from 9/11/2001 to 12/31/2009 were modeled using Poisson regression comparing 11,457 WTC-exposed firefighters to 8,220 urban non-WTC-exposed firefighters. Compared with non-WTC-exposed firefighters, there was no difference in the RR of all cancers combined for WTC-exposed firefighters (RR = 0.96, 95%CI: 0.83-1.12). Thyroid cancer was significantly elevated (RR = 3.82, 95%CI: 1.07-20.81) from 2001 to 2009; this was attenuated (RR = 3.43, 95%CI: 0.94-18.94) and non-significant when controlling for possible surveillance bias. Prostate cancer was elevated during the latter half (2005-2009; RR = 1.38, 95%CI: 1.01-1.88). Further follow-up is needed to assess the relationship between WTC exposure and cancers with longer latency periods. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:722-730, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Oral Cancer Screening at Workplace in India?One-year Follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    P A Uplap; G A Mishra; Majumdar, P; Gupta, S D; P S Rane; P K Sadalge; A M Avasare; S S Goswami; V A Dhar; S S Shastri

    2011-01-01

    Background: Oral cancer remains the commonest form of cancer and cancer-related deaths among Indian males due to popularity of avoidable risk factors such as tobacco and alcohol use. A workplace oral cancer screening and tobacco cessation study was commenced on World No Tobacco Day 2007 at a chemical industry in rural Maharashtra. Aims: The objectives were to screen the employees for oral neoplasia and to correlate it with their tobacco consumption pattern. In addition, the objective was to p...

  19. World Wind

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — World Wind allows any user to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth, leveraging high resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM elevation data to experience...

  20. 75 FR 17835 - Census Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... Proclamation 8488--Census Day, 2010 Proclamation 8489--National Cancer Control Month, 2010 Proclamation 8490...; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8488 of March 31, 2010 Census Day, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Since our Nation's earliest days, the census has...

  1. SU-F-T-134: Can We Use the Same Dose Constrains Learnt From Photon World to Plan Proton for Lung Cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Z [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Zou, J; Yue, N [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Zhang, M [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers The State University of New, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if the same DVH constrains used in photon plans can be safely used to plan proton therapy for lung cancer. Since protons and photons have different dose deposition patterns, the hypothesis is following DVH constrains derived from photon world is not safe for proton. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated plans for 11 lung cancer patients. Each patient was planned with photon and proton following the same dose constrains. Dose statistics on PTV, normal lung, heart and esophagus were extracted for comparison. gEUD for normal lung was calculated and compared between proton and photon plans. We calculated series of gEUDs for each plan by varying the parameter “a” in gEUD formula from 0.1 to 3, covering the whole confidence interval. Results: For all patients, proton plans yield similar PTV coverage and lower dose to heart and esophagus than photon plans. Normal lung V5 was 32.3 % on average in proton plans than 55.4 % in photon. Normal lung gEUD monotonically increased with increasing “a” for all proton and photon plans. For a given patient, the gEUD-proton(a) had a steeper slope than gEUD-photon(a). The two curves crossed for 8 out of 11 patients when “a” = [0.1, 3]. a-crossing ranged from 0.8 to 2.44 with an average of 1.15. For a

  2. The impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on intensive care unit admission and 30-day mortality in patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery: a Danish population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platon, Anna Maria; Erichsen, Rune; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Andersen, Lea Kjær; Sværke, Claus; Montomoli, Jonathan; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may increase the risk of postoperative complications and thus mortality after colorectal cancer (CRC) surgery, but the evidence is sparse. We conducted this nationwide population-based cohort study in Denmark, including all patients undergoing CRC surgery in the period 2005-2011, identified through medical databases. We categorised the patients according to the history of COPD. We assessed the rate of complications within 30 days. We computed 30-day mortality among patients with/without COPD using the Kaplan-Meier method. We used Cox regression to compute HRs for death, controlling for age, gender, type of admission, cancer stage, hospital volume, alcohol-related diseases, obesity and Charlson comorbidity score. We identified 18 302 CRC surgery patients. Of these, 7.9% had a prior diagnosis of COPD. Among patients with COPD, 16.1% were admitted postoperatively to the intensive care unit, 1.9% were treated with mechanical ventilation, and 3.6% were treated with non-invasive ventilation. In patients without COPD, the corresponding proportions were 9.7%, 1.1% and 1.1%. The reoperation rate was 10.6% among patients with COPD and 8% among patients with cancer without COPD. 30-day mortality was 13% (95% CI 11.4% to 14.9%) among patients with COPD and 5.3% (95% CI 5.0% to 5.7%) among patients without COPD, corresponding to an adjusted HR of 1.7 (95% CI 1.5 to 2.0). COPD is a strong predictor for intensive care unit admission and mortality after CRC surgery.

  3. 76 FR 29989 - National Maritime Day, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... maritime trade was booming, fostering exchanges across the world and aiding our military at war. During... all ships sailing under the American flag dress ship on that day. ] IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have...

  4. "Every day..." : [poems] / Doris Kareva

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kareva, Doris, 1958-

    2003-01-01

    Autori tutvustus lk. 282. Sisu: "Every day..." ; "I dream that I heard Satan speak..." ; "Rainbow-coloured confusion bears us..." ; "Viewing the rainbowing world..." ; "No time to write the final draft..." ; "Burnt poems..." ; Midas ; Pygmalion ; Enigma 1-5 ; Concerto strumenti e voce. Orig.: "Iga päev..." ; "Ma nägin unes - Saatan kõneles..." ; "Viib sünnieelsest unest surmaunne..." ; "Vaadeldes vikerkaarlevat maailma..." ; "Põletatud luuletused..." ; Pygmalion ; Müsteerium 1-5 ; Concerto strumenti e voce

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers Survivorship Questions to Ask ... Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers Questions ...

  6. Clinical impact of PET/MR imaging in patients with cancer undergoing same-day PET/CT: initial experience in 134 patients--a hypothesis-generating exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Onofrio A; Rosen, Bruce R; Sahani, Dushyant V; Hahn, Peter F; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Vangel, Mark G; Nicolai, Emanuele; Soricelli, Andrea; Salvatore, Marco

    2013-12-01

    To compare the clinical impact of combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to that of combined PET and computed tomography (CT) performed on the same day in patients with cancer. This HIPAA-compliant retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board. Patients gave written informed consent for study enrollment, including the possibility to use their imaging and clinical data in future evaluations. A total of 134 patients with cancer with a non-central nervous system primary neoplasm underwent same-day fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT and FDG PET/MR imaging. PET/CT and PET/MR studies were independently interpreted by teams of radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians. Four readers, divided into two teams composed of one radiologist and one nuclear medicine physician each, read all 134 studies. The referring physician classified discordance between PET/CT and PET/MR observations either as findings affecting clinical management or as findings not affecting clinical management. Data were compared with the χ(2) test. Findings affecting clinical management were noted for PET/CT studies but not for PET/MR studies in two (1.5%) of 134 patients and for PET/MR studies but not for PET/CT studies in 24 (17.9%) of 134 patients. The discrepancies between findings affecting clinical management detected with PET/MR imaging over those detected with PET/CT were significant (P < .001). In these patients, PET/MR imaging alone contributed to clinical management more often than did PET/CT alone. PET/MR imaging provides information that affects the care of patients with cancer and is unavailable from PET/CT. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2013.

  7. Rapid decrease of circulating tumor DNA predicted the treatment effect of nivolumab in a lung cancer patient within only 5 days

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Iijima

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 77-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital with a 1-month history of low back pain and was diagnosed as having stage IV EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma. After treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor and cytotoxic chemotherapy, nivolumab was started as fourth-line therapy. Remarkable regression of the primary tumor was observed, suggesting high anti-tumor activity of nivolumab. We retrospectively investigated the change in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA variant allele fractions in serial plasma samples before and after the nivolumab therapy. Targeted sequencing analysis showed tumor-derived TP53R249S and EGFRL858R mutations detectable in plasma, and the timing of decrease was only 5 days, much earlier than the appearance of radiological changes. Overall, these results suggest that ctDNA might reflect tumor burden and might be a surrogate marker of the therapeutic efficacy of immune checkpoint therapy.

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers ...

  9. Breast cancer and early retirement: Associations with disease characteristics, treatment, comorbidity, social position and participation in a six-day rehabilitation course in a register-based study in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damkjaer, Lars Henrik; Deltour, Isabelle; Suppli, Nis Palm; Christensen, Jane; Kroman, Niels T; Johansen, Christoffer; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this register-based study was to identify factors related to disease, treatment, sociodemographics and comorbidity associated with taking early retirement among women treated for breast cancer, and to evaluate the risk for taking early retirement among breast cancer survivors who attended a six-day rehabilitation course. The study population consisted of 856 women who attended the rehabilitation course and a comparison group of 1 805 women who did not attend the course identified through the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. We obtained information on receipt of unemployment benefits, sickness benefits and early retirement pension for each of the years 1996-2007. Multivariate cox-regression models were used to analyze disease-specific, treatment-related, comorbidity and sociodemographics factors associated with early retirement after breast cancer and to evaluate the effect of attending a rehabilitation course on taking early retirement. The rate of retirement was higher for women with somatic comorbidity (hazard ratio [HR], 1.91; 95% CI, 1.3; 2.9 for score 1, and HR 1.42; 95% CI, 0.7; 2.7 for score ≥2), previous depression (HR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.7; 3.2) or having received sickness benefits in the year before their breast cancer diagnosis (HR, 3.75; 95% CI, 1.8; 7.8). Living with a partner was associated with a reduced hazard ratio for taking early retirement (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.5-0.9). Having received chemotherapy, alone or in combination with anti-hormone treatment, reduced the hazard ratio (HR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.3; 0.8 and HR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3; 0.8, respectively). The rate of retirement was higher for women the year after attending the rehabilitation course but returned to unity by three years. The results of this study contribute to the identification of at-risk women and point to the need for tailored rehabilitation to avoid unnecessary marginalization of breast cancer survivors due to permanent labor market withdrawal.

  10. Subcutaneous trastuzumab (Herceptin) versus intravenous trastuzumab for the treatment of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer: A time, motion and cost assessment study in a lean operating day care oncology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjalma, Wiebren A A; Van den Mooter, Tom; Mertens, Tim; Bastiaens, Valerie; Huizing, Manon T; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos

    2018-02-01

    The subcutaneous (SC) formulation of trastuzumab represents an alternative to the intravenous (IV) infusion in the treatment of patients with HER2-positive metastatic and early breast cancer. We compared the two formulations in terms of time and cost differential. We conducted a time, motion and cost assessment study in a lean operating day care oncology unit to determine and compare the time and costs of trastuzumab SC versus IV administration in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. Outcomes were the mean costs and the mean dedicated time of the health care professional (HCP) and patient chair time. Direct observation methodology was applied to collect data and statistical analysis was performed. The total preparation and administration time for trastuzumab IV was 4.07 times longer than the total time required for the trastuzumab SC administration. The total patient time spent in the day care oncology unit (in minutes) was 71% shorter with using SC administration. IV administration costs € 50.4 ($54,89) more in HCP time and consumable supplies and €162.53 ($177.00) of drug wastage. SC administration was associated with a total time saving of 53.7min for the HCPs and 122.5min for the patients. The administration of trastuzumab SC was translated in a cost saving of €212.93 ($231.73) per patient episode compared to trastuzumab IV, which could lead to a total potential saving of €3,832.74 ($4,171.06) over a full course of treatment (18 cycles) CONCLUSION: SC administration of trastuzumab was associated with a substantial reduction in active HCP time, patient chair time, unit time, and overall cost. These time and cost could be used to increase capacity within existing resources in a lean operating day dare oncology unit. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  12. Schoolwide Literacy Days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polder, Darlene D.

    2000-01-01

    Describes 10 "literacy day" activities that one California elementary school has used successfully schoolwide, typically one such day per month, to make reading fun and purposeful, while developing a sense of community. Includes: spread-a-quilt day; teacher exchange day; turn off the TV; Dr. Seuss day; community readers; schoolwide…

  13. World Stroke Day in Taiwan: Raising Public Awareness of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung Chan

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: When preparing for future WSD campaigns, the organizing committee must perform a detailed assessment to understand target population requirements and design more appropriate events. For promoting the WSD campaigns, proficient advertising is necessary for attracting attendees and increasing their willingness to participate.

  14. World Food Day: 16 October 2008 | Laher | African Safety Promotion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Safety Promotion: A Journal of Injury and Violence Prevention. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 7, No 1 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  15. World Food Day 2015 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-05-25

    May 25, 2016 ... Infographic-WFD2015-Kenya-EN.png. Infographic-WFD2015-Nigeria-EN.png. Our $124-million Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF) with Global Affairs Canada, and $15-million Cultivating Africa's Future (CultiAF) with the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research, ...

  16. 76 FR 19265 - World Autism Awareness Day, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    ... disorders (ASDs) affecting nearly one percent of children in the United States, autism is an urgent public... understanding of the autism spectrum grows, my Administration remains dedicated to supporting children and... and their families have gone without adequate support and understanding. While we continue to...

  17. 77 FR 20501 - World Autism Awareness Day, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... for my Administration. Last September, I was proud to sign the Combating Autism Reauthorization Act... services for children and adults. Under the Affordable Care Act, new insurance plans are required to cover... people have a chance at achieving the American dream. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the...

  18. World Food Day Curriculum, Grades 4-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hursh, Heidi; Simmons, Diane R.

    Although crop failures, floods, and other natural disasters contribute to hunger, they are not its root cause. The root cause of hunger is poverty. This guide is designed to have students examine their preconceptions about hunger and to test them against new information. The intent of the lessons is to encourage action, not guilt. Students are…

  19. Stroke Risk Factors among Participants of a World Stroke Day ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertension is the most common stroke risk factor globally as well as in the Nigerian population, however other modifiable risk factors such as obesity are becoming increasingly prevalent due to unhealthy diets and sedentary lifestyle. Materials and Methods: We screened 224 volunteers from Ile‑Ife during the 2011 and ...

  20. Observing the First World Refugee Day: June 20, 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the role of the United National High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in assisting refugees as well as how to assist refugees. Address issues related to refugee children. Offers teaching activities and includes the articles, "An Iranian Surprise" and "Give Me Your Huddled Masses" by Ray Wilkinson. (CMK)

  1. World energy insight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-09-15

    The 21st World Energy Congress offers a unique opportunity for all stake-holders of the energy sector to meet and exchange visions, strategies and practices, during four days of very intensive and interesting sessions, round-tables and exhibitions. More than 3,000 energy leaders gather from around the world from both developed and developing countries, from all types of energy, from public and private companies and government organisations, in order to think together about how to bring about a sustainable and acceptable energy future. The truth is that nobody has the choice any longer. All energy leaders have to take decisions every day, and they need to have a clear analysis of what is at stake, what the risks are, and what the solutions can be.

  2. World Presidents Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Members of the World Presidents' Organization take a try at 'piloting' a mock-up of the space shuttle cockpit during a Jan. 26 visit to StenniSphere, the museum and visitor center at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. WPO members from several states spent the day touring Stennis facilities and learning about the work of the nation's premier rocket engine testing site.

  3. Do celebrity cancer diagnoses promote primary cancer prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, John W; Althouse, Benjamin M; Noar, Seth M; Cohen, Joanna E

    2014-01-01

    Celebrity cancer diagnoses generate considerable media coverage of and increase interest in cancer screening, but do they also promote primary cancer prevention? Daily trends for smoking cessation-related media (information-availability) and Google queries (information-seeking) around Brazilian President and smoker Lula da Silva's laryngeal cancer diagnosis announcements were compared to a typical period and several cessation awareness events. Cessation media coverage was 163% (95% confidence interval, 54-328) higher than expected the week after the announcement but returned to typical levels the second week. Cessation queries were 67% (95% confidence interval, 40-96) greater the week after Lula's announcement, remaining 153% (95% confidence interval, 121-188), 130% (95% confidence interval, 101-163) and 71% (95% confidence interval, 43-100) greater during the second, third, and fourth week after the announcement. There were 1.1 million excess cessation queries the month after Lula's announcement, eclipsing query volumes for the week around New Years Day, World No Tobacco Day, and Brazilian National No Smoking Day. Just as celebrity diagnoses promote cancer screening, they may also promote primary prevention. Discovery of this dynamic suggests the public should be further encouraged to consider primary (in addition to the usual secondary) cancer prevention around celebrity diagnoses, though more cases, cancers, and prevention behaviors must be explored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Infection and esophageal cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Al‐Haddad, Sahar; El‐Zimaity, Hala; Hafezi‐Bakhtiari, Sara; Rajendra, Shanmugarajah; Streutker, Catherine J; Vajpeyi, Rajkumar; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on infection and cancer, and includes commentaries on the influence of bacterial infections on mucin expression and cancer risk...

  5. 75 FR 35947 - Father's Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... Proclamation 8537--Father's Day, 2010 Proclamation 8538--World Refugee Day, 2010 Memorandum of June 18, 2010... thank them for their selfless dedication and love. Fathers are our first teachers and coaches, mentors... who stand to gain from it. Nurturing families come in many forms, and children may be raised by a...

  6. May 28 International Day of Action for Women's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The 1993 Day of Action for Women's Health focused on the number of deaths which occur as a result of unsafe and illegal abortion. In Argentina, a signature campaign to support decriminalization of abortion enlisted the aid of more than 100 influential citizens. The campaign in Brazil coincided with the introduction of reforms which would decriminalize abortion. In Chile, a nationwide campaign was launched to reinstate therapeutic abortion. The day was commemorated in Colombia with several events which advocated the decriminalization of abortion. Women in Costa Rica demanded being treated as subjects, not objects, of health policies, while Ecuadorian activists spent the day distributing an article analyzing the importance of the day and discussing the health problems of Ecuadorian women, especially those related to overwork, subordinate status, and illegal abortion. A new study was released in Mexico which revealed that four women die every day of pregnancy and child-birth related causes (40% of these are the complications of induced abortion). Nationwide activities were coordinated in Nicaragua including forums, theater presentations, festivals, and a women's march. A labor group joined the campaign in Peru, and efforts in Puerto Rico centered on preventing and surviving breast cancer. Elsewhere in the world, genital mutilation was the topic of a seminar in Canada, women in the Philippines launched a campaign against "needless" maternal mortality, and a Spanish group issued a publication analyzing abortion around the world and discussing the introduction of RU-486 to Spain. The next important date is September 28, when women's health groups in Latin America and the Caribbean will join to call for the legalization of abortion.

  7. Nutritional Ketosis Condition and Specific Ketogenic Diet, May Benefit Cancer Patients as an Alternative Treatment by Sudden Change in the Metabolic State of Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Somayeh Zaminpira

    2017-01-01

    Cancer disease is the second cause of death in the United States and world-wide. Most Researchers estimate that 595,690 of American people will die from cancer at the end of the year 2017. That means 1,600 deaths/day approximately [1]. Cancer in modern societies is commonly treated with the combination of organ surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Many kinds of diet strategies have been experimented. However, none of them have been particularly effective. Interestingly, the...

  8. Keep using day-to-day tools in the classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Daradkeh, Yousef; Gouveia, Luis Borges

    2017-01-01

    We are in a networked world, where computers and its applications and other digital facilities take part of most human activities. Considering the use of electronic email or taking advantage of search engines and services as Google, it render to be almost impossible to not interact with any of such digital applyances each day of our lifes. If this is a reality to many of us, that born before the availablility of computers and networks, for the millennials and the youngters, even the mos...

  9. Typical worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    2017-05-01

    Hugh Everett III presented pure wave mechanics, sometimes referred to as the many-worlds interpretation, as a solution to the quantum measurement problem. While pure wave mechanics is an objectively deterministic physical theory with no probabilities, Everett sought to show how the theory might be understood as making the standard quantum statistical predictions as appearances to observers who were themselves described by the theory. We will consider his argument and how it depends on a particular notion of branch typicality. We will also consider responses to Everett and the relationship between typicality and probability. The suggestion will be that pure wave mechanics requires a number of significant auxiliary assumptions in order to make anything like the standard quantum predictions.

  10. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  11. Is day surgery safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majholm, Birgitte; Engbæk, J; Bartholdy, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Day surgery is expanding in several countries, and it is important to collect information about quality. The aim of this study was to assess morbidity and unanticipated hospital visits 0-30 days post-operatively in a large cohort....

  12. Day Care: Other Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjartarson, Freida; And Others

    This collection of 5 bilingual papers on day care programs in foreign countries (China, the Soviet Union, and 3 Scandinavian countries) is part of a series of papers on various aspects of day care published by the Canadian Department of Health and Welfare. Each paper is presented in both English and French. Paper I considers day care services in…

  13. Every Day Is Mathematical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Rita H.; Jarrah, Adeeb M.

    2012-01-01

    March 14 is special because it is Pi Day. Mathematics is celebrated on that day because the date, 3-14, replicates the first three digits of pi. Pi-related songs, websites, trivia facts, and more are at the fingertips of interested teachers and students. Less celebrated, but still fairly well known, is National Metric Day, which falls on October…

  14. AAS 227: Day 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new

  15. 2016 SPD: Day 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    three times as many sunspots as would have been possible with historical technology. When you normalize for this effect, the data shows that there has therefore not been a steady increase long-term in sunspot numbers.Worlds Largest Solar TelescopeThe final speaker of the press conference was Joe McMullen (National Solar Observatory), who updated us on the status of the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST). This 4-meter telescope will be the worlds largest solar telescope, and the first new solar facility that the US has had in several decades.The state of the DKIST telescope site as of July 2015. [NSO/AURA/NSF/Brett Simison]The technology involved in this spectacular telescope is impressive. Its thin, enormous mirror is polished to within an error of nearly 1/10,000th of a human hair! Underlying the telescope is the most complex solar adaptive optics systems ever created, with 1600 different actuators controlling the system real-time to within an error of 4 nanometers. In addition, the entire facility is designed to deal with a tremendous heat load (which can severely limit the quality of observations).DKISTs construction on Haleakala in Hawaii has been underway since 2012, and is making solid progress. The majority of the structures have now been completed, as have most of the major telescope subsystems. The primary hurdle that remains is to integrate all the of components and make sure that they can perform together no small feat!DKIST is expected to begin science operations in 2020, with ~10-20 TB of data being produced each day. This data will be freely and immediately accessible to both researchers and the public.

  16. Improved detection of lung or bone metastases with an I-131 whole body scan on the 7th day after high-dose I-131 therapy in patients with thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, Ar I; Song, Ho Chun; Min, Jung Joon; Kim, Ja Hae; Yoo, Su Ung; Oh, Jong Ryool; Bom, Hee Seung [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Shin Young [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Jung Min [Chosun University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to compare post-therapy third day and seventh day I-131 whole body scans (3DWBS and 7DWBS) in detecting lung or bone metastasis from well-differentiated thyroid cancer. We enrolled 52 patients with lung or bone metastasis out of 1,152 patients who were treated with high-dose I-131 therapy from January 2008 to June 2009. All patients underwent 3DWBS and 7DWBS. I-131 avidity was classified into three grades: no uptake, suspicious for uptake, and definite uptake. We compared the presence and grades of metastatic lesions on each scan. We categorized all cases into three groups based on I-131 uptake on each scan and compared several clinical parameters including FDG uptake and thyroglobulin (Tg) level among the groups. Sixty metastatic cases from 52 patients (45 lung and 15 bone metastases) were included. In 35 cases, I-131-avid metastatic lesions were detected by both 3DWBS and 7DWBS (group A). In 15 cases, metastatic lesions were missed on 3DWBS but detected on 7DWBS (group B). In 10 cases, I-131 uptake was not detected on either 3DWBS or 7DWBS (group C). The of 45 cases (22.2%) of lung metastasis that were negative on 3DWBS were detected on 7DWBS (p=0.002). Five of 15 cases (33.3%) of bone metastasis that were negative on 3DWBS were detected on 7DWBS (p=0.0625). The serum Tg level (TSH stimulated) was significantly different among groups A, B, and C (p=0.0030). However, after exclusion of cases without a history of I-131 therapy, there was no significant difference in serum Tg level among the groups (p=0.2330). The number of cases with a prior history of metastasis was higher in group A than in group B (p=0.0069). However, there was no significant difference in prior history of metastasis between groups A and C (p=0.8107). 7DWBS showed more lung or bone metastatic lesions than 3DWBS. After high-dose I-131 therapy, 7DWBS should be considered regardless of the results of the 3DWBS for the diagnosis of lung or bone metastasis from well

  17. The World Science Festival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazmino, J.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) New York City in the late 20th century rose to be a planetary capital for the sciences, not just astronomy. This growth was mainly in the academic sector but a parallel growth occurred in the public and home field. With the millennium crossing, scientists in New York agitated for a celebration of the City as a place for a thriving science culture. In 2008 they began World Science Festival. 2011 is the fourth running, on June 1-5, following the AAVSO/AAS meetings. World Science Festival was founded by Dr. Brian Greene, Columbia University, and is operated through the World Science Foundation. The Festival is "saturation science" all over Manhattan in a series of lectures, shows, exhibits, performances. It is staged in "science" venues like colleges and musea, but also in off-science spaces like theaters and galleries. It is a blend from hard science, with lectures like those by us astronomers, to science-themed works of art, dance, music. Events are fitted for the public, either for free or a modest fee. While almost all events are on Manhattan, effort has been made to geographically disperse them, even to the outer boroughs. The grand finale of World Science Festival is a street fair in Washington Square. Science centers in booths, tents, and pavilions highlight their work. In past years this fair drew 100,000 to 150,000 visitors. The entire Festival attracts about a quarter-million attendees. NYSkies is a proud participant at the Washington Square fair. It interprets the "Earth to the Universe" display, debuting during IYA-2009. Attendance at "Earth..." on just the day of the fair plausibly is half of all visitors in America. The presentation shows the scale and scope of World Science Festival, its relation to the City, and how our astronomers work with it.

  18. Development and validation of a set of six adaptable prognosis prediction (SAP models based on time-series real-world big data analysis for patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy: A multicenter case crossover study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Uneno

    Full Text Available We aimed to develop an adaptable prognosis prediction model that could be applied at any time point during the treatment course for patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy, by applying time-series real-world big data.Between April 2004 and September 2014, 4,997 patients with cancer who had received systemic chemotherapy were registered in a prospective cohort database at the Kyoto University Hospital. Of these, 2,693 patients with a death record were eligible for inclusion and divided into training (n = 1,341 and test (n = 1,352 cohorts. In total, 3,471,521 laboratory data at 115,738 time points, representing 40 laboratory items [e.g., white blood cell counts and albumin (Alb levels] that were monitored for 1 year before the death event were applied for constructing prognosis prediction models. All possible prediction models comprising three different items from 40 laboratory items (40C3 = 9,880 were generated in the training cohort, and the model selection was performed in the test cohort. The fitness of the selected models was externally validated in the validation cohort from three independent settings.A prognosis prediction model utilizing Alb, lactate dehydrogenase, and neutrophils was selected based on a strong ability to predict death events within 1-6 months and a set of six prediction models corresponding to 1,2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 months was developed. The area under the curve (AUC ranged from 0.852 for the 1 month model to 0.713 for the 6 month model. External validation supported the performance of these models.By applying time-series real-world big data, we successfully developed a set of six adaptable prognosis prediction models for patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy.

  19. World Bioenergy 2012. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-01

    The conference of 2012 had contributions on the following themes: A: World Pellets 2012, B: Market outlook, C: Energy systems, D: Transportation, E: World biorefinery 2012, F: Sustainable bioenergy day. 52 contributions in A - D. A: World Pellets 2012 is an integrated part of World Bioenergy 2012. A three day 'conference in the conference' covering all aspects of pellets: raw material potentials, innovative pellets production systems, torrefaction, new combustion technologies, trade and market development, health and safety aspects, etc. B) Market outlook: Policy and targets for renewable energy to find an alternative to fossil energy are being put in place, increasing the demand for sustainable modern bioenergy. Global trade and improved logistics open up to the markets. To facilitate international trade in bioenergy commodities, new trading places and indexes are needed, as well as generally accepted standards. Supply and demand must meet to guarantee stable prices. In this session you learn all about current market development, including drivers like incentives and policies. C) Energy Systems: Modern bioenergy is a young industry. Therefore, technical development is rapid, with many new innovations. This session focuses on technical development in the whole bioenergy chain, from harvesting of forest residues to combustion technologies and co-firing. Optimal use of biomass through district heating or cooling - small scale and large scale - and CHP technology for electricity production. D) Transportation: Sustainable transports are one of the key challenges of tomorrow. Can we transport biomass as well as other products sustainably and at what costs? Which are the future fuels for transports and when will biofuels be viewed as profitable? Biofuels for transport are under rapid development with new methods, producers and feedstock entering the markets. The future biofuels will be produced in biorefineries, to increase profitability and optimize feed

  20. Putting the World into World History Textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, William A.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews whether textbook publishers have put the "world" in world history textbooks by comparing the editions of four different world history textbooks over 25 years. Evaluates 10 current editions of world history textbooks. Offers questions to consider and discusses additional content concerns. Includes charts and references of the reviewed…

  1. General Rushes Open Days Day I

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    General Footage during Open Days 2013 (Day 1 -28/09/2013) Images: Cameramen: Antoine Nouel, Clément Sbaffe, Victor Prunier, David Guerazzi, Basile Manent, Réemi Richarme, Noemi Caraban 00:00:00 00:03:40 Interviews 00:03:40 00:06:54 Beam Instrumentation 00:06:54 00:07:16 Globe 00:07:16 00:10:28 Microcosme 00:10:28 00:12:59 Lectures 00:12:59 00:27:52 Fun with physics 00:27:52 00:28:19 International Village 00:28:19 00:34:18 Fun Zone 00:34:18 00:47:50 ATLAS Surface 00:47:50 00:56:57 ATLAS underground 00:56:57 00:58:53 Detector technologies 00:58:53 01:04:39 CLIC 01:04:39 01:05:56 CMS surface 01:05:56 01:09:32 LINAC 2-3 01:09:32 01:15:29 LINAC 4 01:15:29 01:20:41 Computer Center 01:20:41 01:25:53 Clubs 01:25:53 01:31:49 Beam Instrumentation 01:31:49 01:35:27 Music Festival 01:35:27 01:37:31 SPS 01:37:31 01:46:13 CCC 01:46:13 01:48:24 Safety Trainig Center 01:48:24 01:52:38 COMPASS 01:52:38 01:56:09 EHN1 01:56:09 02:01:42 AMS 02:01:42 02:10:52 Robotics 02:10:52 02:22:48 LHC Point 4 02:22:48 02:23:48 Control Cent...

  2. 2016 SPD: Day 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    last the longest 2 minutes and 40 seconds is the small town of Hopkinsville, KY. WKU is located a little over an hour away, and both locations are prepared for a large influx of people on eclipse day!Partial solar eclipse as viewed by the space-based Solar Dynamics Observatory. [NASA/SDO]WKU is located just off the centerline of eclipse path, which has some advantages: this provides better viewing of some of the chromospheric features of the Sun during the eclipse, like priminences and solar loops. WKU is setting up a variety of educational and public outreach activities at their football stadium and the WKU farm, and they encourage you to come visit for the eclipse!In addition, they are participating in a nationwide experiment called Citizen CATE, short for the Continental American Telescopic Eclipse. This project will use 60 telescopes spanning the 2500 mile path of totality to record continuous data of the eclipse as it travels across the US. The result will be data of a remarkable 90 minutes of totality, revealing the activity of the solar corona and providing an extended view of the eclipse as has never been seen before.Science During the EclipseNext up was Shadia Habbal (University of Hawaii), who is a co-leader of the AAS 2017 Eclipse Task Force. In addition to her education and outreach efforts associated with the eclipse, however, Habbal is a solar eclipse researcher. She and her collaborators are known as the Solar Wind Sherpas, due to the fact that they hand-carry their science equipment around the world for solar eclipses!Solar corona during a 2008 eclipse, with color overlay indicating emission from highly ionized iron lines. [Habbal et al. 2010]The primary science done during solar eclipses is the study of the solar corona, the region that extends from the solar surface out to several solar radii. This region is too faint to observe normally, but when the light from the Suns disk is blocked out, we can examine it.Unfortunately, the space telescopes that

  3. Day Nurseries in Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueye, Khady

    1977-01-01

    Describes a village day nursery organized by peasant women in 1962 to provide care for preschool children whose mothers must work in the rice fields. Outlines the aims of the day nursery and the prerequisites for its establishment. Community and parent participation is stressed. (JK)

  4. My Lucky Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olvey, Maura

    2010-01-01

    Teaching based on problem solving brings challenges for the teacher, primarily that of finding problems with multiple access points that accommodate all students. This article narrates the author's lucky day as she discovers the Four fours problem which impacted her passion for teaching math. The day she presented the Four fours problem to her…

  5. Day of the Dead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dann, Tammy; Murphy, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Foreign Language in Elementary School (FLES) teachers in the West Des Moines schools incorporate the Day of the Dead into the fourth grade curriculum each year. The teachers discuss the Day of the Dead celebration at the Art Center, and many ask for volunteers from fourth grade to participate in the event. Student presentations include a wide…

  6. Science Challenge Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Science fairs can be good motivators, but as extracurricular activities, they leave some students behind. However, by staging a Science Challenge Day at school, educators can involve all students in doing everything from choosing activities to judging projects. This article presents a model for running a successful Science Challenge Day. The…

  7. Algebra success in 20 minutes a day

    CERN Document Server

    LearningExpress, LLC

    2014-01-01

    Stripped of unnecessary math jargon but bursting with algebra essentials, this handy guide covers vital algebra skills that apply to real-world scenarios. Whether you're new to algebra or just looking for a refresher, Algebra Success in 20 Minutes a Day offers a lesson plan that provides quick and thorough instruction in practical, critical skills. All lessons can be completed in just 20 minutes a day, for a manageable and non-intimidating learning experience.

  8. The best of both worlds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carola Simon; Lotte Vermeij; Anja Steenbekkers

    2007-01-01

    Original title: Het beste van twee werelden. In the eyes of many rural dwellers, the Dutch countryside combines the best of both worlds. They enjoy the peace and quiet, space and landscape around them every day and are happy to live in an environment where people still have time and attention

  9. 76 FR 55779 - Labor Day, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Every day, hard-working men and women across America prove that, even in difficult times, our country is still home to the most creative, dynamic, and talented workers in the world. Generations of working people have built this country--from...

  10. 76 FR 3815 - Religious Freedom Day, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... not self- sustaining, and require a stalwart commitment by each generation to preserve and apply them... commemorate this day with events and activities that teach us about this critical foundation of our Nation's liberty, and to show us how we can protect it for future generations here and around the world. ] IN...

  11. Adult Day Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health-related services. Adult day health care offers intensive health, therapeutic, and social services for individuals with serious medical conditions and those at risk of requiring nursing home care. Older adults generally participate on a scheduled basis. ...

  12. Adult Day Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... following is an example of someone who needs adult day care services, both for his well-being and that of his family caregivers. Paul is 69 years old and recently experienced a stroke. He needs some ...

  13. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tobacco uselifestyle choices (such as diet and exercise)family historyfactors in your workplace and environment.How do I know if I am at ... you…Diet Choices to Prevent CancerRead Article >>Healthy Food ChoicesDiet Choices to ... is powered by © 2018 American Academy of Family Physicians

  14. An extended day program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ševkušić-Mandić Slavica G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a pilot project evaluation, carried out as an action investigation whose aim was to provide a better quality extended day for primary school students. The project included the training of teachers involved in extended day program, designing of special activities performed by teachers with children once a week as well as changes and equipping of premises where children stay. The aims of the program were conception and performance of activities in a less formal way than during regular instructional days, linking of learning at school and acquired knowledge to everyday experiences, and work on contents contributing to the development of child's interests and creativity. The program was accomplished in a Belgrade primary school during the 2001/2002 academic year, comprising students of 1st and 2nd grades (N=77. The effects of the program were monitored throughout the academic year (observation and teachers' reports on accomplished workshops and at the end of the academic year (teachers and students' opinions of the program, academic achievement and creativity of students attending the extended day program compared with students not attending it. Findings about positive effects of the program on students' broadening of interests and willingness to express themselves creatively, indicate unequivocally that there is a need for developing special extended day programs. The extended day program is an opportunity for school to exert greater educational influence that has yet to be tapped.

  15. Open Day: General Information

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/ With 50 visit points, including theatre performances, debates and visits to installations that have never before been opened to the public, CERN's 50th anniversary Open Day is set to be a day to remember. Seven hundred volunteers have signed up to help for the day. The Open Day team truly appreciates this wonderful show of support! The Open Day would not be possible without their help. Car parking and Access Cars with a CERN sticker can access all CERN sites as normal. However, to avoid congestion on Meyrin site, we ask you to park in areas that will not be open to the public (see below) and to use the shuttle services wherever possible for your transport during the day. Private cars on the French side of the border without a CERN sticker will be diverted to a car park area in the Prévessin site. There is a shuttle service connecting the Meyrin and Prévessin sites via SM18 every 20 minutes. Private cars on the Swiss side of the border without a CERN sticker will be diverte...

  16. Assessment of Real-World Central Nervous System Events in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer Using Abiraterone Acetate, Bicalutamide, Enzalutamide, or Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilon, Dominic; Behl, Ajay S; Ellis, Lorie A; Robitaille, Marie-Noëlle; Lefebvre, Patrick; Dawson, Nancy A

    2017-05-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) events are frequently reported among patients with advanced prostate cancer as a consequence of the treatments used in this patient population. To assess the incidence of CNS events in patients with advanced prostate cancer who initiated treatment with abiraterone acetate, bicalutamide, enzalutamide, or chemotherapy. The Truven Health MarketScan Research databases were used to retrospectively identify patients with prostate cancer who initiated treatment with abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, bicalutamide, or chemotherapy after September 1, 2012 (ie, the index date). The chemotherapy agents included cabazitaxel, docetaxel, mitoxantrone hydrochloride, and estramustine, and were used as monotherapy or as combination therapy. Patients were followed until December 31, 2014, the end of exposure to treatment, or until loss to follow-up. Kaplan-Meier rates and adjusted Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare the incidence of CNS events between the abiraterone acetate cohort and the other cohorts. A sensitivity analysis of patients with a diagnosis of metastasis was also conducted. A total of 1067 patients receiving abiraterone acetate, 5524 receiving bicalutamide, 592 receiving enzalutamide, and 256 receiving chemotherapy were identified. After 12 months, patients who received abiraterone acetate were less likely to have a CNS event than patients who received enzalutamide (39.5% vs 46.0%, respectively; P = .0036) or chemotherapy (39.5% vs 51.1%, respectively; P = .0277), and were more likely to have a CNS event than patients who received bicalutamide (39.5% vs 34.2%, respectively; P = .0397). After multivariate adjustment, at 12 months, patients who initiated abiraterone acetate treatment had 20% ( P = .0388) reduction in the risk for a CNS event compared with patients who initiated enzalutamide; 8% ( P = .3622) versus bicalutamide; and 27% ( P = .0456) versus chemotherapy. The sensitivity analysis yielded similar results. The

  17. Eating Three Times a Day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hensler Douglas A.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In poor countries, the burgeoning middle-class population, people who eat three times a day1, is placing profound worldwide price pressure on food and natural resources. This keynote address examines the implications of the boom in middle-class population on the world economy and innovation. Where not long ago food production was aplenty and the problem was distribution, today growing middle-class demand on food production has prices of food staples such as wheat and corn, and their derivatives, inflating. This follows the trend in the growth of prices of natural resources and durable commodities emanating from economic globalization and the building of infrastructure. This keynote address examines the five prices that are in play in the global economy and a brief perspective through the supply chain window. The address also examines implications of the middle-class boom and the additional importance this places on innovation, particularly in three areas of economic structure.

  18. AAS 228: Day 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note: Lastweek we were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Here is a final post aboutselectedevents on the last day of the meeting, written by authors fromastrobites.com, a grad-student collaborative project with which we recently announced a new partnership! Starting in July,keep an eye out for astrobites postsat AAS Nova in between Highlights(i.e., on Tuesdays and Thursdays).Were excited to be working together to bring you more recent astronomy research from AAS journals!Extrasolar Planets: Detection (by Leonardo dos Santos)Thursdays first session on exoplanets was about detecting these distant worlds, and the opening talk was given by Robert Siverd (Las Cumbres Observatory). He describes the NRES, a network of spectrographs that will look for exoplanets using the radial velocity method. One of the coolest aspects of this instrument is that it will feature an on the fly scheduling system that will perform observations as efficiently as possible. The spectrograph is still being tested, but a unit will be deployed at CTIO later this year.@lcogt contracted by @NASA_TESS for follow up of their candidates. #aas228 Jessie Christiansen (@aussiastronomer) June 16, 2016Measuring the depths of transits and eclipses in Spitzer has been problematic in the past, since the Spitzer instrument IRAC (InfraRed Array Camera) has a non-uniform response in its detectors pixels. But, as reported by James Ingalls (Spitzer Science Center, Caltech), observers are circumventing this issue by using what they call the staring mode (avoiding large pointing jumps) and an algorithm to pick sweet spot pixels. Moreover, the results from the IRAC Data Challenge are helping to better understand its behavior. Giuseppe Morello (University College London), on the other hand, explained how his research group gets rid of instrumental effects from IRAC using machine learning. This method removes systematics from exoplanet transit data no matter if the noise source is from an instrument or

  19. World Health Organization Guidelines for treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2-3 and screen-and-treat strategies to prevent cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santesso, Nancy; Mustafa, Reem A; Schünemann, Holger J; Arbyn, Marc; Blumenthal, Paul D; Cain, Joanna; Chirenje, Michael; Denny, Lynette; De Vuyst, Hugo; Eckert, Linda O'Neal; Forhan, Sara E; Franco, Eduardo L; Gage, Julia C; Garcia, Francisco; Herrero, Rolando; Jeronimo, José; Lu, Enriquito R; Luciani, Silvana; Quek, Swee Chong; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Tsu, Vivien; Broutet, Nathalie

    2016-03-01

    It is estimated that 1%-2% of women develop cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2-3 (CIN 2-3) annually worldwide. The prevalence among women living with HIV is higher, at 10%. If left untreated, CIN 2-3 can progress to cervical cancer. WHO has previously published guidelines for strategies to screen and treat precancerous cervical lesions and for treatment of histologically confirmed CIN 2-3. Guidelines were developed using the WHO Handbook for Guideline Development and the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. A multidisciplinary guideline panel was created. Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials and observational studies were conducted. Evidence tables and Evidence to Recommendations Tables were prepared and presented to the panel. There are nine recommendations for screen-and-treat strategies to prevent cervical cancer, including the HPV test, cytology, and visual inspection with acetic acid. There are seven for treatment of CIN with cryotherapy, loop electrosurgical excision procedure, and cold knife conization. Recommendations have been produced on the basis of the best available evidence. However, high-quality evidence was not available. Such evidence is needed, in particular for screen-and-treat strategies that are relevant to low- and middle-income countries. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. 4th Optimization Day

    CERN Document Server

    Eberhard, Andrew; Ralph, Daniel; Glover, Barney M

    1999-01-01

    Although the monograph Progress in Optimization I: Contributions from Aus­ tralasia grew from the idea of publishing a proceedings of the Fourth Optimiza­ tion Day, held in July 1997 at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, the focus soon changed to a refereed volume in optimization. The intention is to publish a similar book annually, following each Optimization Day. The idea of having an annual Optimization Day was conceived by Barney Glover; the first of these Optimization Days was held in 1994 at the University of Ballarat. Barney hoped that such a yearly event would bring together the many, but widely dispersed, researchers in Australia who were publishing in optimization and related areas such as control. The first Optimization Day event was followed by similar conferences at The University of New South Wales (1995), The University of Melbourne (1996), the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (1997), and The University of Western Australia (1998). The 1999 conference will return to Ballarat ...

  1. Cancer and Social Media: A Comparison of Traffic about Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, and Other Reproductive Cancers on Twitter and Instagram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vraga, Emily K; Stefanidis, Anthony; Lamprianidis, Georgios; Croitoru, Arie; Crooks, Andrew T; Delamater, Paul L; Pfoser, Dieter; Radzikowski, Jacek R; Jacobsen, Kathryn H

    2018-01-01

    Social media are often heralded as offering cancer campaigns new opportunities to reach the public. However, these campaigns may not be equally successful, depending on the nature of the campaign itself, the type of cancer being addressed, and the social media platform being examined. This study is the first to compare social media activity on Twitter and Instagram across three time periods: #WorldCancerDay in February, the annual month-long campaigns of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (NBCAM) in October and Movember in November, and during the full year outside of these campaigns. Our results suggest that women's reproductive cancers - especially breast cancer - tend to outperform men's reproductive cancer - especially prostate cancer - across campaigns and social media platforms. Twitter overall generates substantially more activity than Instagram for both cancer campaigns, suggesting Instagram may be an untapped resource. However, the messaging for both campaigns tends to focus on awareness and support rather than on concrete actions and behaviors. We suggest health communication efforts need to focus on effective messaging and building engaged communities for cancer communication across social media platforms.

  2. Governing To‐day

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, Kevin

    Governing To-day denotes a domain of research, and what the thesis undertakes is a theoretical discussion of some questions of method vis-à-vis researching this domain. There are two aspects to the title that enfold one another. Firstly, “governing to-day” signposts that it is to!day that is to b...... of departure in the research and writing of the French philosopher and historian, Michel Foucault. It is primarily within the writings of Foucault that the thesis seeks to find a workaround to the problem thrown forth by the aforementioned questions of method....

  3. Brain metastasis in patients with metastatic breast cancer in the real world: a single-institution, retrospective review of 12-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Satomi; Watanabe, Junichiro; Mitsuya, Koichi; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Nakasu, Yoko; Hayashi, Mitsuhiro

    2017-02-01

    The data of 589 metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients in a single institution were reviewed to determine the outcomes of patients with brain metastasis (BM) and assess the efficacy of BM screening. The patients with BM among the 589 MBC patients who underwent treatment at Shizuoka Cancer Center (Shizuoka, Japan) from 09/2002 to 03/2014 were retrospectively analyzed. During the study period, BM developed in 187 (31.7%) patients. The tumor subtypes were as follows: luminal (hormone receptor [HR]+, HER2-), 44.9%; luminal-HER2 (HR+, HER2+), 14.9%; HER2 (HR-, HER2+), 21.3%; and triple-negative (TN), 16.0%. BM was detected in 48.6% of the patients by screening MRI. While 137 of 187 patients underwent local therapy, whole-brain irradiation was the most frequently applied therapy (63.5%). The median overall survival from the diagnosis of BM was as follows: luminal, 7.0 months (M); luminal-HER2, 13.3 M; HER2, 17.7 M; TN, 4.2 M. The HER2 status (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38-0.88) and nonprogressive extracranial lesion(s) (HR: 0.45, 95% CI 0.29-0.71) were identified as prognostic factors in a multivariate analysis. When limited to HER2-overexpressed MBC patients, the multivariate analysis revealed that non-progressive extracranial lesion(s) (HR: 0.20, 95% CI 0.088-0.47) and stereotactic irradiation (STI) as an initial treatment (HR: 0.18, 95% CI 0.061-0.56) were prognostic factors. Our retrospective review showed that early detection of BM by screening MRI, followed by STI, improved the prognosis of HER2-overexpressed MBC patients with BM. A further prospective randomized study is needed to confirm our findings.

  4. Orthopaedics in day surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All spectrum of orthopaedic operations done. Upper limb procedures were 527 and 330 lower limb. Twenty eight amputations were done of which four were major. Admissions were 13 and no infection or serious complications were reported. Conclusion: Day care orthopaedics surgery in Africa is feasible and desirable with ...

  5. Radiochemistry days; Journees radiochimie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This document provides the 44 papers (transparencies used during the presentations and posters) presented at the Radiochemistry Days, held September 3-4, 1998 in Nantes, France. The main studied topics were problematic questions concerning the nuclear fuel cycle and in particular the management, storage of radioactive wastes and the environmental impact. (O.M.)

  6. My Day of Silence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott C.

    1999-01-01

    A heterosexual doctoral student discusses his experiences when he tries to take part in a day of silence to help combat homophobia and heterosexism. His vow of silence teaches him that he will never fully understand the experience of a person who has been historically, socially, and legally silent. (Author/MKA)

  7. NATIONAL HEARING DAY

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 12th of June 2003 Is the French National Hearing Day. The Medical Service invites everyone working at CERN to come and have an ear test at the infirmary. Bld. 57, ground floor, between 9h00 and 16h00 Tel. 73802

  8. National hearing day

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 12th of June 2003 Is the French National Hearing Day. The Medical Service invites everyone working at CERN to come and have an ear test at the infirmary. Bld. 57, ground floor, between 9h00 and 16h00 Tel. 73802

  9. Dark Matter Day

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Wessel Valkenburg, Research Fellow at the Theory Department at CERN will explain the how and why research is carried out on dark matter. The event will be in English with simultaneous interpretation into French. Dark Matter Day falls on Hallow...

  10. First Day of School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bort, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    In this brief article, the author, a science teacher at F. C. Hammond Middle School in Alexandria, Virginia, describes how the setting up of a simple science experiment on the first day of school can get students excited about learning science. The experiment involves heating a small amount of water in a flask, then covering the opening of the…

  11. CERN openlab Open Day

    CERN Multimedia

    Purcell, Andrew Robert

    2015-01-01

    The CERN openlab Open Day took place on 10 June, 2015. This was the first in a series of annual events at which research and industrial teams from CERN openlab can present their projects, share achievements, and collect feedback from their user communities.

  12. Breast cancer and early retirement: Associations with disease characteristics, treatment, comorbidity, social position and participation in a six-day rehabilitation course in a register-based study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjae, Lars Henrik; Deltour, Isabelle; Suppli, Nis Palm

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this register-based study was to identify factors related to disease, treatment, sociodemographics and comorbidity associated with taking early retirement among women treated for breast cancer, and to evaluate the risk for taking early retirement among breast cancer survivors who...

  13. Breast cancer and early retirement: Associations with disease characteristics, treatment, comorbidity, social position and participation in a six-day rehabilitation course in a register-based study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjaer, L. H.; Deltour, I.; Suppli, N. P.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this register-based study was to identify factors related to disease, treatment, sociodemographics and comorbidity associated with taking early retirement among women treated for breast cancer, and to evaluate the risk for taking early retirement among breast cancer...

  14. Real-World Outcomes of Combination Chemotherapy with Trabectedin plus Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin in Patients with Recurrent Ovarian Cancer: A Single-Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriceau, Guillaume; Rivoirard, Romain; Méry, Benoîte; Vallard, Alexis; Pacaut, Cécile; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Espenel, Sophie; Bosacki, Claire; Jacquin, Jean-Philippe; Magné, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Trabectedin plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) proved efficacious as second-line treatment for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC). We report a single-center retrospective analysis of the efficacy and tolerance of trabectedin 1.1 mg/m2 every 3 weeks in a cohort of real-life ROC patients. From February 2012 to January 2014, 17 patients were treated with trabectedin alone or combined with PLD. Median age was 61 years (range: 48-78). Performance status was 0-1 in 16 patients (94%). Disease response rate was 53% and disease control rate was 76%. At the end of the follow-up, 8 patients (47%) were alive. Median overall survival was 17.6 months (95% CI 13.6 to not reached). Median progression-free survival was 6.7 months (95% CI 5.4-10.0). The most frequent grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (n = 4, 24%) and nausea/vomiting (n = 4, 24%). Trabectedin combined with PLD seems efficient in and well tolerated by real-life ROC patients. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Computer Security Day

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

      Viruses, phishing, malware and cyber-criminals can all threaten your computer and your data, even at CERN! Experts will share their experience with you and offer solutions to keep your computer secure. Thursday, 10 June 2010, 9.30, Council Chamber Make a note in your diary! Presentations in French and English: How do hackers break into your computer? Quels sont les enjeux et conséquences des attaques informatiques contre le CERN ? How so criminals steal your money on the Internet? Comment utiliser votre ordinateur de manière sécurisée ? and a quiz: test your knowledge and win one of the many prizes that will be on offer! For more information and to follow the day's events via a live webcast go to: http://cern.ch/SecDay.  

  16. CERN Heart Days

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    14 & 15 OCTOBER 2003 The Medical Service and the Fire Brigade invite everyone working at CERN to participate in the above event. INFIRMARY 9 am to 16.30 pm Building 57, ground floor no need to book HEALTHY HEART? • Evaluation of personal cardiac risks through the monitoring of: Blood pressure Cholesterol and sugar levels Body Mass Index ... and more • Leaflets, information and advice concerning cardiac issues FIRE BRIGADE 9 to 12 am - Building 65 Please book (limited to 15 people/day) FIRST AID COURSES • What to do in a Cardiac Emergency (3 h. duration) Places are limited and on reservation only (15 people/day). To book, e-mail the Medical Services on: service.medical@cern.ch

  17. CERN Heart Days

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    14 & 15 OCTOBER 2003 The Medical Service and the Fire Brigade invite everyone working at CERN to participate in the above event. INFIRMARY 9 am to 16.30 pm Building 57, ground floor No need to book HEALTHY HEART? Evaluation of personal cardiac risks through the monitoring of: Blood pressure Cholesterol and sugar levels Body Mass Index ... and more Leaflets, information and advice concerning cardiac issues FIRE BRIGADE 9 to 12am - Building 65 Please book (limited to 15 people/day) FIRST AID COURSES What to do in a Cardiac Emergency (3 h. duration) Places are limited and on reservation only (15 people/day). To book, e-mail the Medical Services on: service.medical@cern.ch

  18. National HIV Testing Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-09

    Dr. Kevin A. Fenton, Director of CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, discusses National HIV Testing Day, an annual observance which raises awareness of the importance of knowing one's HIV status and encourages at-risk individuals to get an HIV test.  Created: 6/9/2011 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 6/9/2011.

  19. Translating Clinical Evidence-Based Medicine into the Real World: Single-Center Experience with Cabazitaxel in Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriceau, Guillaume; Guillot, Aline; Pacaut, Cécile; Méry, Benoîte; Falk, Alexander Tuan; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Collard, Olivier; De Laroche, Guy; Fournel, Pierre; Merrouche, Yacine; Magné, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    We studied the efficacy and safety of cabazitaxel in unselected real-life patients. We retrospectively investigated all patients with metastatic prostate cancer (mPC) treated with cabazitaxel 25 mg/m2 i.v. every 3 weeks combined with oral prednisolone (10 mg once daily) after first-line docetaxel chemotherapy. Study issues were to report patient characteristics and cabazitaxel data in terms of tolerance and efficacy. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. All data were compared with TROPIC results. From 2011 to 2014, 41 patients received cabazitaxel; 15 patients (37%) had a performance status (PS) ≥2 versus 7% (p cabazitaxel cycles was 5 (1-10) versus 6 (3-10) in TROPIC. Five patients completed 10 cycles of cabazitaxel (12%) versus 28% in TROPIC (p = 0.03). Toxicities were anemia (12 patients, 29%), diarrhea (9 patients, 22%), nausea (7 patients, 17%), pain (6 patients, 15%), sepsis (4 patients, 10%), neutropenia (3 patients, 7%) and urinary tract infection (1 patient, 2%). The tumor response rate was 19.5 versus 14.4% in TROPIC (nonsignificant). PFS was 4.5 months (95% CI 3.3-6.4) in our analysis and 2.8 months (95% CI 2.4-3.0) in TROPIC. OS was 12.1 months (95% CI 9.2 to not reached) and 15.1 months (95% CI 14.1-16.3), respectively. In our unselected mPC patients with poorer baseline clinical conditions and aggressive disease, cabazitaxel seems efficient and not more toxic than in the TROPIC study. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. World Energy Outlook 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-11-07

    The 2008 report provides invaluable analysis to help policy makers around the world assess and address the challenges posed by worsening oil supply prospects, higher energy prices and rising emissions of greenhouse gases. In the WEO-2008 Reference Scenario, which assumes no new government policies, world primary energy demand grows by 1.6% per year on average between 2006 and 2030 - an increase of 45%. This is slower than projected last year, mainly due to the impact of the economic slowdown, prospects for higher energy prices and some new policy initiatives. Demand for oil rises from 85 million barrels per day now to 106 mb/d in 2030 - 10 mb/d less than projected last year. Demand for coal rises more than any other fuel in absolute terms, accounting for over a third of the increase in energy use. Modern renewables grow most rapidly, overtaking gas to become the second-largest source of electricity soon after 2010. China and India account for over half of incremental energy demand to 2030 while the Middle East emerges as a major new demand centre. The share of the world's energy consumed in cities grows from two-thirds to almost three-quarters in 2030. Almost all of the increase in fossil-energy production occurs in non-OECD countries. These trends call for energy-supply investment of $26.3 trillion to 2030, or over 1 trillion US dollars/year. Yet the credit squeeze could delay spending, potentially setting up a supply-crunch that could choke economic recovery. In addition to providing a comprehensive update of long-term energy projections to 2030, WEO-2008 takes a detailed look at the prospects for oil and gas production. Oil will remain the world's main source of energy for many years to come, even under the most optimistic of assumptions about the development of alternative technology. But the sources of oil, the cost of producing it and the prices that consumers will have to pay for it are extremely uncertain. It is far from certain that companies

  1. 2010 Day of Remembrance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Patrick Scheuermann (left), deputy director at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, and Richard Gilbrech, associate director, place a wreath in memory of the 17 astronauts lost in service of the space program since 1967. The wreath was placed during NASA's 2010 Day of Remembrance, observed each year in January. The annual observance memorializes the three astronauts lost in the Apollo 1 launch pad fire in 1967, the seven astronauts lost in the Challenger tragedy in 1986 and the seven astronauts lost in the Columbia accident in 2003. During the Stennis observance, Scheuermann praised the fallen astronauts as 'brave space pioneers who gave their lives in the cause of exploration and discovery.'

  2. Hard-hat day

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    CERN will be organizing a special information day on Friday, 27th June, designed to promote the wearing of hard hats and ensure that they are worn correctly. A new prevention campaign will also be launched.The event will take place in the hall of the Main Building from 11.30 a.m. to 2.00 p.m., when you will be able to come and try on various models of hard hat, including some of the very latest innovative designs, ask questions and pass on any comments and suggestions.

  3. CERN hearing day

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    1 in 10 people suffer from hearing loss - do you? The Medical Service invites everyone working on CERN premises to participate in the National Hearing Day on: Thursday 10th March From 9am to 4pm The Infirmary, Blg. 57, Gr.Fl. We will be offering hearing tests (audiogram); information, advice on hearing loss, tinnitus and more. Deafness does not just affect the elderly: in Europe, 50% the hearing-impaired are under the age of 55. Exposure to excessive noise is one of the main reasons for hearing loss. But PREVENTION IS POSSIBLE AND EFFECTIVE: for example, Hearing protection devices could reduce tinnitus cases by 80%.

  4. CERN hearing day

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    1 in 10 people suffer from hearing loss - do you? The Medical Service invites everyone working on the CERN site to participate in the NATIONAL HEARING DAY on: Thursday 10th March 2005 From 9am to 4pm The Infirmary, Blg. 57, Ground Floor We will be offering hearing tests (audiograms), as well as information and advice on hearing loss, tinnitus, etc. Deafness does not just affect the elderly: in Europe, 50% of the hearing-impaired are under the age of 55. Exposure to excessive noise is one of the main reasons for hearing problems but PREVENTION IS POSSIBLE. For example, hearing protection devices can prevent 80% of tinnitus cases.

  5. CERN hearing day

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    1 in 10 people suffer from hearing loss ? do you? The Medical Service invites everyone working on the CERN site to participate in the NATIONAL HEARING DAY on: Thursday 10th March 2005 From 9am to 4pm The Infirmary, Blg. 57, Ground Floor We will be offering hearing tests (audiograms), as well as information and advice on hearing loss, tinnitus, etc. Deafness does not just affect the elderly: in Europe, 50% of the hearing-impaired are under the age of 55. Exposure to excessive noise is one of the main reasons for hearing problems but prevention is possible. For example, hearing protection devices can prevent 80% of tinnitus cases.

  6. CERN hearing day

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    1 in 10 people suffer from hearing loss - do you? The Medical Service invites everyone working on CERN premises to participate in the National Hearing Day on: Thursday 10th March From 9am to 4pm The Infirmary, Blg. 57, Gr.Fl. We will be offering hearing tests (audiogram); information, advice on hearing loss, tinnitus and more. Deafness does not just affect the elderly: in Europe, 50% the hearing-impaired are under the age of 55. Exposure to excessive noise is one of the main reasons for hearing loss. But prevention is possible and effective: for example, Hearing protection devices could reduce tinnitus cases by 80%.

  7. Day Case Orthopaedic Surgery in a West African Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , is now very popular all over the world due to the reduced cost and improved safety. Regrettably ... Conclusion: Day case (ambulatory surgery) can be performed safely in tertiary institutions in Nigeria according to carefully planned protocols.

  8. 5th Optimization Day

    CERN Document Server

    Mees, Alistair; Fisher, Mike; Jennings, Les

    2000-01-01

    'Optimization Day' (OD) has been a series of annual mini-conferences in Australia since 1994. The purpose of this series of events is to gather researchers in optimization and its related areas from Australia and their collaborators, in order to exchange new developments of optimization theories, methods and their applications. The first four OD mini-conferences were held in The Uni­ versity of Ballarat (1994), The University of New South Wales (1995), The University of Melbourne (1996) and Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (1997), respectively. They were all on the eastern coast of Australia. The fifth mini-conference Optimization Days was held at the Centre for Ap­ plied Dynamics and Optimization (CADO), Department of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Western Australia, Perth, from 29 to 30 June 1998. This is the first time the OD mini-conference has been held at the west­ ern coast of Australia. This fifth OD preceded the International Conference on Optimization: Techniques and Applica...

  9. Higgs Boson Pizza Day

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    CERN celebrated the fourth anniversary of the historical Higgs boson announcement with special pizzas.    400 pizzas were served on Higgs pizza day in Restaurant 1 at CERN to celebrate the fourth anniversary of the announcement of the discovery of the Higgs Boson (Image: Maximilien Brice/ CERN) What do the Higgs boson and a pizza have in common? Pierluigi Paolucci, INFN and CMS collaboration member, together with INFN president Fernando Ferroni found out the answer one day in Naples: the pizza in front of them looked exactly like a Higgs boson event display. A special recipe was then created in collaboration with the chef of the historic “Ettore” pizzeria in the St. Lucia area of Naples, and two pizzas were designed to resemble two Higgs boson decay channel event displays. The “Higgs Boson Pizza Day” was held on Monday, 4 July 2016, on the fourth anniversary of the announcement of the discovery of the Higgs boso...

  10. 2015 Barcelona Asteroid Day

    CERN Document Server

    Gritsevich, Maria; Palme, Herbert

    2017-01-01

    This volume is a compilation of the research presented at the International Asteroid Day workshop which was celebrated at Barcelona on June 30th, 2015. The proceedings discuss the beginning of a new era in the study and exploration of the solar system’s minor bodies. International Asteroid Day commemorates the Tunguska event of June 30th, 1908. The workshop’s goal was to promote the importance of dealing proactively with impact hazards from space. Multidisciplinary experts contributed to this discussion by describing the nature of comets and asteroids along with their offspring, meteoroids. New missions to return material samples of asteroids back to Earth such as Osiris-REx and Hayabusa 2, as well as projects like AIM and DART which will test impact deflection techniques for Potentially Hazardous Asteroids encounters were also covered. The proceedings include both an outreach level to popularize impact hazards and a scientific character which covers the latest knowledge on these topics, as well as offeri...

  11. Validation and real-world assessment of the Functional Assessment of Anorexia-Cachexia Therapy (FAACT) scale in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer and the cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Thomas W; Samsa, Greg P; Wolf, Steven P; Locke, Susan C; Cella, David F; Abernethy, Amy P

    2015-08-01

    Patients with cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS) suffer a significant symptom burden, impaired quality of life (QoL), and shorter survival. Measurement of QoL impairments related to CACS is thereby important both in clinical practice and in research. We aimed to further validate the Functional Assessment of Anorexia-Cachexia Therapy (FAACT) scale in an advanced lung cancer population. We tested the performance of the FAACT and its anorexia-cachexia subscale (ACS) within a dataset of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (aNSCLC), using standard statistical methods. We then compared the performance of commonly used QoL measures stratified by CACS status and by patient self-report of appetite and weight loss. The FAACT and its ACS demonstrate internal validity consistent with acceptable published ranges for other QoL scales (Cronbach alpha = 0.9 and 0.79, respectively). Correlation coefficients demonstrate moderate correlations in the expected directions between FAACT and ACS and scales that measure related constructs. Comparing patients with and without CACS, the ACS is more sensitive to change than other QoL instruments (mean score 33.1 vs. 37.2, p = 0.011, ES = 0.58). In patients with aNSCLC, the FAACT and its ACS performed well compared with other instruments, further supporting their validity and value in clinical research. FAACT and ACS scores covaried with symptoms and other QoL changes that are typical hallmarks of CACS, lending further support to their use as QoL endpoints in clinical trials among patients with CACS.

  12. Day one sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, John; Ibell, Timothy; Evernden, Mark; Darby, Antony

    2015-05-01

    Emissions reductions targets for the UK set out in the Climate Change Act for the period to 2050 will only be achieved with significant changes to the built environment, which is currently estimated to account for 50% of the UK's carbon emissions. The socio-technological nature of Civil Engineering means that this field is uniquely placed to lead the UK through such adaptations. This paper discusses the importance of interdisciplinary teaching to produce multi-faceted team approaches to sustainable design solutions. Methods for measuring success in education are often not fit for purpose, producing good students but poor engineers. Real-world failures to apply sustainable design present a serious, difficult to detect, and ultimately economically negative situation. Techniques to replace summative examinations are presented and discussed, with the aim of enhancing core technical skills alongside those required for sustainable design. Finally, the role of our future engineers in policy-making is discussed. In addition to carbon, the provision of water and food will heavily influence the work of civil engineers in the coming decades. Leadership from civil engineers with the technical knowledge and social awareness to tackle these issues will be required. This provides both opportunities and challenges for engineering education in the UK.

  13. Radiation-Free Weekend Rescued! Continuous Accelerated Irradiation of 7-Days per Week Is Equal to Accelerated Fractionation With Concomitant Boost of 7 Fractions in 5-Days per Week: Report on Phase 3 Clinical Trial in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skladowski, Krzysztof, E-mail: skladowski@io.gliwice.pl [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and the Institute of Oncology, Branch in Gliwice (Poland); Hutnik, Marcin; Wygoda, Andrzej; Golen, Maria; Pilecki, Boleslaw; Przeorek, Wieslawa; Rutkowski, Tomasz; Lukaszczyk-Widel, Beata; Heyda, Alicja; Suwinski, Rafal; Tarnawski, Rafal; Maciejewski, Boguslaw [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and the Institute of Oncology, Branch in Gliwice (Poland)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results of randomized trial comparing 2 accelerated fractionations of definitive radiation therapy assessing the need to irradiate during weekend in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 345 patients with SCC of the oral cavity, larynx, and oro- or hypo-pharynx, stage T2-4N0-1M0, were randomized to receive continuous accelerated irradiation (CAIR: once per day, 7 days per week) or concomitant accelerated boost (CB: once per day, 3 days per week, and twice per day, 2 days per week). Total dose ranged from 66.6-72 Gy, dose per fraction was 1.8 Gy, number of fractions ranged from 37-40 fractions, and overall treatment time ranged from 37-40 days. Results: No differences for all trial end-points were noted. At 5 and 10 years, the actuarial rates of local-regional control were 63% and 60% for CAIR vs 65% and 60% for CB, and the corresponding overall survival were 40% and 25% vs 44% and 25%, respectively. Confluent mucositis was the main acute toxicity, with an incidence of 89% in CAIR and 86% in CB patients. The 5-year rate of grade 3-4 late radiation morbidity was 6% for both regimens. Conclusions: Results of this trial indicate that the effects of accelerated fractionation can be achieve by delivering twice-per-day irradiation on weekday(s). This trial has also confirmed that an accelerated, 6-weeks schedule is a reasonable option for patients with intermediate-stage head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma because of the associated high cure rate and minimal severe late toxicity.

  14. Higgs discovered at Open Days

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    Like his eponymous particle, Peter Higgs can be elusive. However, for the momentous occasion of the Open Days there was a chance, if you were lucky, to catch a glimpse of him. Peter Higgs marvels at the enormity of the ATLAS experiment. Taking a closer look at CMS.Visiting CERN for the first time in more than 20 years, Peter Higgs has become something of a celebrity in the world of particle physics. During his visit he showed genuine amazement at the sight of the LHC and its experiments. On seeing CMS he said, "It’s very impressive, very dramatic. I’d seen pictures of course, but they can’t compare." Surrounded for most of his stay by an entourage of physicists, the notoriously modest scientist laughs at the almost mythical quality his boson has taken on. For him though, it is just one of many aspects of physics that the CMS and ATLAS experiments can shine a light on. Besides finding ...

  15. CERN Heart Days

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    14 & 15 OCTOBER 2003 The Medical Service and the Fire Brigade invite everyone working at CERN to participate in the above event. INFIRMARY 9 am to 16.30 pm Building 57, ground floor HEALTHY HEART? ♥ Evaluation of personal cardiac risks through the monitoring of: • Blood pressure • Cholesterol and sugar levels • Body Mass Index ... and more ♥ Leaflets, information and advice concerning cardiac issues FIRE BRIGADE 9 to 12am Building 65 FIRST AID COURSES ♥ What to do in a Cardiac Emergency (3 h duration) Places are limited and on reservation only (15 people / day) To book, E-mail the Medical Services on: service.medical@cern.ch

  16. Injector MD Days 2017

    CERN Document Server

    Rumolo, G

    2017-01-01

    The Injector Machine Development (MD) days 2017 were held on 23-24 March, 2017, at CERN with thefollowing main goals:Give a chance to the MD users to present their results and show the relevant progress made in 2016 onseveral fronts.Provide the MD users and the Operation (OP) crews with a general overview on the outcome and theimpact of all ongoing MD activities.Identify the open questions and consequently define - with priorities - a list of machine studies in theinjectors for 2017 (covering the operational beams, LHC Injectors Upgrade, High Luminosity LHC,Physics Beyond Colliders, other projects).Create the opportunity to collect and document the highlights of the 2016 MDs and define the perspectivesfor 2017.Discuss how to make best use of the MD time, in particular let the main MD user express their wishesand see whether/how OP teams can contribute to their fulfilment.

  17. Day of Arts Philanthropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde Jørgensen, Ida

    For the Day of Arts Philanthropy I will reflect on the instrumentalisation of art support in Denmark based on the findings from my thesis work (Jørgensen, 2016) investigating the underlyinglegitimations and institutional logics of two of the most significant foundations supporting visual art......, in Denmark, the private New Carlsberg Foundation and public Danish Arts Foundation.Drawing inspiration from neo-institutional theory (Friedland & Alford, 1991) and French pragmatic sociology (Boltanski & Thévenot, 2006), the thesis identifies the most central logics of legitimationunderlying art support......; the industrial, market, inspired, family, renown, civic, projective, emotional and temporal. The most prominent and consistently invoked instrumentalisations identified are theprofessional (industrial), artistic (inspired) and civic purposes of art support. The thesis shows that the instrumentalisations invoked...

  18. "A Day Without Immigrants"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Benita

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This article considers the debates surrounding the "Day Without Immigrants" protests organized in major U.S. cities on 1 May 2006, prompted by H.R. 4437, the Border Protection, Anti-Terrorism, and Illegal Immigration Control Act of 2005, from the multiple perspectives of scholars, pundits......, policy makers, and participants. Although much of these debates ostensibly centered around illegal Latino/a immigration to the United States, underneath the discussion ran a curious ideological thread, one that invoked groups' right to be in the United States in the first place. The article argues...... that the rhetoric used in these discourses pitted various class-based ethnoracial groups against each other not so much to tackle the proposed immigration bill but, rather, to comment on the ramifications of an increasingly multiracial United States. Udgivelsesdato: 01 December 2009...

  19. Childhood cancer: Early warning signs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    World-wide there are more than 200 000 new cases of childhood cancer per year and more than 70% of these occur in the developing world. In the First World more than 70% of these children will become long-term survivors. For some childhood cancers 5-year survival rates approach 95% . In England only 0.5% of all ...

  20. Last Days of Life (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors. Many patients with advanced cancer have anemia . Patients with advanced blood cancers may have thrombocytopenia (a condition in which there is a lower-than-normal number of platelets in the blood ). Deciding whether to ...

  1. Parallel comparison of chronological risk changes among cancers of the breast, the uterine cervix and the stomach, as tested in 9 female populations of the world from early 1960s to mid 1980s: a stochastic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Mitsuo; Kodama, Toshiko

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate comparatively the chronological changes of age-adjusted incidence rate (AAIR) as well as age-specific incidence rate (ASIR) of cancers of the breast (Br), the uterine cervix (Cer) and the stomach (St) from early 1960s to mid 1980s (5 data collections) using the data sets of 9 female populations world wide, the total data set number amounting to 45 per tumor. More specifically, we wanted to see whether or not there was any regular relationship between the differential time trends of the above 3 human neoplasias and their oncogene-tumor suppressor gene balances. Our investigation proceeded in 3 steps as follows: step 1, straight line regression analysis of log AAIR was applied to each of tumor pairs Br(x)-Cer(y), Br(x)-St(y) and Cer(x)-St(y). Step 2, direct successive elimination test (Gauss) of log AAIR was applied to each of 6 tumor pairs (Br-St, Br-Cer, Cer-St, Cer-Br, St-Br and St-Cer) to assess the fitness of a test tumor (x-partaner of fitness test) to either the oncogene type equilibrium model (r=-1.000) or the tumor suppressor gene type equilibrium model (r=+1.000). For each of 6 tumor pairs, the fitness test was repeated 3 times using i) the original data set in the ordinary (x,y) framework, ii) the rect-type data sets in the rect-(x,y) framework, and iii) the para-type data set in the para-(x,y) framework. The fitness of a test tumor (x partner in the calculation) to an equilibrium system was assessed in terms of the correlation coefficient value r within the range of -1.000 to +1.000 (step 3). Staging of the whole carcinogenesis process was attempted for each of 3 human neoplasias using either the ASIR profiles of a high- and low-risk populations, and/or those of early 1960s and mid 1980s. Results of key importance are given as follows: i) Br with rapidly growing cancer risk, Cer with rapidly declining cancer risk and St with slowly declining cancer risk were clearly distinguished from one another by the single

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of a Bio-Nanocomposite for Cancer Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longo Martins, Murillo

    Abstract Cancer is one of the biggest public health problems in the whole world. In 2014, about 585,720 Americans are expected to die of cancer, almost 1,600 people per day. Cancer is the second most common cause of death in the US, exceeded only by heart disease, accounting for nearly 1 of every 4...... deaths. Anyone can develop cancer. Since the risk of being diagnosed with cancer increases with age, most cases occur in adults who are middle aged or older. The disease is caused by both external factors (tobacco, infectious organisms, chemicals, and radiation) and internal factors (inherited mutations......, hormones, immune conditions, and mutations that occur from metabolism). These causal factors may act together or in sequence to initiate or promote the development of cancer. Cancer is treated with surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, immune therapy, and targeted therapy. In the case...

  3. Printshop open days

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    With new machines, new services and new opening hours, the CERN Printshop has turned over many new leaves at the start of 2013. Come and find out more from 25 to 27 March at the Printshop open days!   The CERN Printshop’s new 8-metre long black and white printer. The CERN Printshop’s new 8-metre long black-and-white printer is a technical marvel. It can produce 160 pages per minute (it prints on both sides in one pass) and can also staple, punch holes, do thermal binding and make A4 or A5 brochures. The new colour printer is more discreet but no less efficient: it churns out 70 A4 or A3 pages per minute. Once they are printed, colour documents can be inserted into the black and white machine to be hole-punched, made into brochures or bound. They can even be mixed in with black-and-white pages and, as if by magic, come out in the right order! Having recently acquired a state-of-the-art large-format printer, the CERN Printshop can now print posters in A2, A1 or A0 format. ...

  4. Seven remarkable days

    CERN Multimedia

    This has been a truly remarkable seven days for CERN. Things have moved so fast that it has sometimes been hard to separate fact from fiction – all the more so since facts have often seemed too good to be true. It’s been a week of many firsts. Monday was the first time we’ve had two captured beams in the LHC. It’s the first time the LHC has functioned as a particle accelerator, boosting particles to the highest beam energy so far achieved at CERN. And it’s been a week in which we’ve seen the highest energy proton-proton collisions ever produced at CERN: our last hadron collider, the SPS was a proton-antiproton collider, a technically simpler machine than the LHC. This week’s successes are all the more remarkable precisely because of the complexity of the LHC. Unlike the SPS collider, it is two accelerators not one, making the job of commissioning nearly twice as difficult. I’d like to express my heartfelt thanks and congra...

  5. CERN diabetes awareness days

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Do you have diabetes without knowing it? Following last year's successful campaign, the CERN Infirmary has organised two further diabetes prevention and screening days on 10th & 11th October 2005 from 9am to 4pm (INFIRMARY, Bldg 57, ground floor) open to everyone working on the CERN site who was unable to participate in 2004. Testing of blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels, Body Mass Index, etc. Information - documentation - personal and individual advice. Presence of a dietician from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. In cooperation with the NOVAE, DSR & AVENANCE restaurants. Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in many countries and, if not diagnosed sufficiently early, can be a major cause of blindness, heart and kidney disease, etc. Prevention is possible through screening and life-style changes such as improved dietary habits and regular physical exercise. Diabetes is not a serious condition in itself if diagnosed and treated early enough but it can have very serious consequences if und...

  6. CERN Diabetes Awareness Days

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Do you have diabetes without knowing it? Following last year's successful campaign, the CERN Infirmary has organised two further diabetes prevention and screening days on 10th & 11th October 2005 from 9am to 4pm (INFIRMARY, Bldg 57, ground floor) open to everyone working on the CERN site who was unable to participate in 2004. Testing of blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels, Body Mass Index, etc. Information - documentation - personal and individual advice. Presence of a dietician from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. In cooperation with the NOVAE, DSR & AVENANCE restaurants Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in many countries and, if not diagnosed sufficiently early, can be a major cause of blindness and of heart and kidney disease, etc. Prevention is possible through screening and life-style changes such as improved dietary habits and regular physical exercise. Diabetes is not a serious condition in itself if it is diagnosed and treated early enough but it can have very serious consequences...

  7. The triple day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, V

    1980-08-01

    The risks are high and the returns low when Peruvian women work outside the home, but they have few other options. Most have large families, and their husbands scramble to earn a few dollars. For some women the day begins at 3:30 a.m. when they go to Lima to peddle fish, combs, or whatever commodity is available. The poor women who live in the pueblos jovenes of Lima, the newly formed outskirts, have banded together in a Christian group called Luz y Esperanza, or Light and Hope. The group has a 10-year history of coping with unsanitary water and resultant health problems, child care, and lack of electricity. The women began with neighborhood issues but have also developed an interest in trade unions and other less local concerns. Members have also started to attend union meetings in Lima and involved themselves in recent trade union struggles. The development of the women's political consciousness is closely intertwined with their Christian faith. They believe Christ is the source of the energy they need to persevere.

  8. Two days of films

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    The Chinese community at CERN and the CERN CineClub, on the occasion of the Chinese New Year, invite everyone to two days of films Thursday 3 February 2011 at 20:30 - CERN Council Chamber Eat drink man woman Directed by Ang LEE (Taiwan, 1994) 122 min. With Sihung Lung, Yu-Wen Wang, Chien-Lien Wu, Kuei-Mei Yang Senior Master Chef Chu lives in a large house in Taipei with his three unmarried daughters, Jia-Jen, a chemistry teacher converted to Christianity, Jia-Chien, an airline executive, and Jia-Ning, a student who also works in a fast food restaurant. Life in the house revolves around the ritual of an elaborate dinner each Sunday, and the love lives of all the family members. Original version Mandarin with English subtitles Friday 4 February 2011 at 19:30 - CERN Council Chamber Adieu, ma concubine Directed by Chen KAIGE (China / Hong Kong, 1993) 171 min. With Leslie Cheung, Fengyi Zhang, Li Gong "Farewell, My Concubine" is a movie with two parallel, intertwined stories. It is the story of two performers in t...

  9. AAS 227: Day 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 3 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope (by Erika Nesvold)The Henry Norris Russell Award is the highest honor given by the AAS, for a lifetime of eminence in astronomy research. This years award went to Giovanni Fazio of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Fazio became a leader in gamma ray astronomy before switching mid-career to the study of infrared astronomy, and he gave his award lecture on the latter subject, specifically on the Spitzer Space Telescope, one of the most successful infrared telescopes of all time.Artists rendering of the Spitzer space telescope. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Spitzer has been operating for more than twelve years, and has resulted in over six thousand papers in refereed journals in that time. The telescope sits in an Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, and is now farther from the Earth (1.4 AU) than the Earth is from the Sun. Fazio gave the audience a fascinating overview of the science done by Spitzer over more than a decade. One of the most productive areas of research for Spitzer is the study of exoplanets, which hadnt even been discovered when the Spitzer Telescope was first conceived. Spitzers high sensitivity and ability to observe exoplanets over

  10. AAS 227: Day 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt

  11. Predicting 7-day, 30-day and 60-day all-cause unplanned readmission: a case study of a Sydney hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maali, Yashar; Perez-Concha, Oscar; Coiera, Enrico; Roffe, David; Day, Richard O; Gallego, Blanca

    2018-01-04

    The identification of patients at high risk of unplanned readmission is an important component of discharge planning strategies aimed at preventing unwanted returns to hospital. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors associated with unplanned readmission in a Sydney hospital. We developed and compared validated readmission risk scores using routinely collected hospital data to predict 7-day, 30-day and 60-day all-cause unplanned readmission. A combination of gradient boosted tree algorithms for variable selection and logistic regression models was used to build and validate readmission risk scores using medical records from 62,235 live discharges from a metropolitan hospital in Sydney, Australia. The scores had good calibration and fair discriminative performance with c-statistic of 0.71 for 7-day and for 30-day readmission, and 0.74 for 60-day. Previous history of healthcare utilization, urgency of the index admission, old age, comorbidities related to cancer, psychosis, and drug-abuse, abnormal pathology results at discharge, and being unmarried and a public patient were found to be important predictors in all models. Unplanned readmissions beyond 7 days were more strongly associated with longer hospital stays and older patients with higher number of comorbidities and higher use of acute care in the past year. This study demonstrates similar predictors and performance to previous risk scores of 30-day unplanned readmission. Shorter-term readmissions may have different causal pathways than 30-day readmission, and may, therefore, require different screening tools and interventions. This study also re-iterates the need to include more informative data elements to ensure the appropriateness of these risk scores in clinical practice.

  12. International Women's Day speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazibwe, S W

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the International Women's Day are: 1) to celebrate the struggle for women's rights in the economic, social, political, and cultural domain; 2) to reaffirm women's solidarity in the struggle for peace; 3) and to show what women have achieved. In 1988, Uganda's government of the National Resistance Movement created the Ministry of Women in Development. The period 1988-1990 was one of consultations, needs assessment, planning, and recruiting staff for the Ministry. From 1990 to 1993, measurable results have been achieved. The Ministry's gender concerns pertained to the sector policies of the Ministries of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries, Education, Health, Water, Energy, Minerals, and Environment Protection. Under the Umbrella Project for Women in Development, gender sensitization has been achieved with policy makers in ministries, at district level, and in the media. Gender issues have also been incorporated in the National Political School Curriculum. The Ministry has also trained a corps of 73 women trainers from 38 districts. The Ministry, with funding from DANIDA, collected women's views on the constitution through meetings and seminars in all the districts in the country. Recommendations were submitted in a consolidated report to the Constitution Commission. A pilot para-legal scheme is successfully being implemented in Kamuli district. A community-based pool of legal advisors has been developed. Legal matters that affect both women and men are undertaken at the community level. The economic emancipation of women is a crucial part of the Ministry's mandate. In conjunction with NGOs, pilot credit programs are being run in Mukono, Jinja, Mbale, and Kapchorwa districts. Cross-sectoral programs are in close collaboration with the rural water and sanitation program, the Northern Uganda rehabilitation program, and the integrated Basic Education Pilot Project to be implemented in 8 districts.

  13. The Real World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, John Sears

    1981-01-01

    Relates personal experiences about what constitutes the "real world." Shows how experiences from philosophy, history, literature, art, and the movies add meaning to "reality." Stresses a compromise of imagination and sensation to make the real world palatable. (RL)

  14. 10 April 2014: Safety Day at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of chemicals is used every day in the different laboratories and workshops around CERN. Potentially toxic, corrosive, polluting or hazardous in other ways, these chemicals all have to be handled carefully, as we will be reminded by the Safety Day campaign to be held by the HSE Unit on 10 April to mark World Day for Safety and Health at Work.   The use of chemicals at CERN is regulated by "Safety Regulation SR-C, Chemical Agents", which defines the minimum health and safety protection requirements for people exposed to the potentially hazardous effects of dangerous chemicals. This regulation is complemented by other Safety guides. Regretfully, despite strict procedures and regular inspections, accidents caused by the improper use of chemicals do occur every year. "Unfortunately, each year we see a small number of accidents related to the handling of chemicals," confirms chemicals expert Jonathan Gulley, who is a member of the Prevention and Sa...

  15. World Council-OMEP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Margaret

    1990-01-01

    Details the 1990 meeting of the World Council of the World Organization for Early Childhood Education (OMEP) in Lagos, Nigeria. OMEP's Statement to the World Summit for Children is provided. The conditions of Nigerian children and female children in India are considered. (BG)

  16. Semantic Game Worlds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tutenel, T.

    2012-01-01

    The visual quality of game worlds increased massively in the last three decades. However, the closer game worlds depict reality, the more noticeable it is for gamers when objects do not behave accordingly. An important problem is that the data of a game world is often scattered across different

  17. 2016 SPD: Day 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors note: This week were in Boulder, Colorado at the 47th meeting of the AAS Solar Physics Division (SPD). Follow along to catch some of the latest news from the field of solar physics!The 2016 SPD meeting was launched this morning from the University of Colorado Boulder campus. Two of the hot topics at this years meeting include celebration of the recent move of the National Solar Observatorys headquarters to Boulder, and discussion of the future Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope, ATST). DKIST, planned for a 2019 completion in Hawaii, is the next big telescope on the horizon for solar physics.Todays press conference had an interesting focus: instruments providing new high-energy observations of the Sun. Representatives from four different instruments were here to talk about some of the latest X-ray solar observations.GRIPSThe GRIPS payload flew at 130,000 ft over Antarctica on a giant balloon in January 2016. [NASA/Albert Shih]First up, Albert Shih (NASA Goddard) described the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares, or GRIPS. GRIPS is a balloon-borne instrument designed to detect X-rays and gamma rays emitted during solar flares. Up to tens of a percent of the energy in solar flares is emitted in the form of accelerated particles, but the physics behind this process is not well understood. GRIPS observes where the highest-energy particles are accelerated, in an effort to learn more about the process.GRIPS was launched on 19 January, 2016 and flew for roughly 12 days gathering ~1 million seconds of data! The logistics of this instruments flight are especially interesting, since it was launched from Antarctica and carried by a balloon at a whopping elevation of 130,000 ft (to get high enough that the atmosphere doesnt absorb all the photons GRIPS is trying to observe). Though the data from the mission has been retrieved, the bulk of the hardware remains where it landed at the end of January. It must

  18. How They Teach the Holocaust in Jewish Day Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Jeffrey Alan

    2017-01-01

    Though Holocaust education is of critical importance in the world of Jewish Day Schools, little research has been conducted about it. The purpose of this paper is to answer some critical questions about how they teach the Holocaust in Jewish Day Schools--the who, what, when, where, how, and why questions. Additionally, comparisons are made between…

  19. Infectious Agents and Cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cancers show substantial variations in their in- cidence in different parts of the world and in particular countries, they present significant health problems. Worldwide, infections account .... cancer, oral cavity cancers. Oncorna virus - Lymphomas .... However, other risk factors including male sex, tobacco smoking and chemical.

  20. Chemoprevention of Skin Cancer Program Project | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Skin cancer is the most common malignancy in the world. One out of three new cancers is a skin cancer. More than 1 million cases of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) (basal cell carcinoma [BCC] and squamous cell cancers [SCC]) occur annually. While the incidence rates for non-melanoma skin cancers continue to rise, there continues to be a substantial impact on morbidity, health and health care costs. |

  1. Nanotechnology: Emerging Developments and Early Detection of Cancer. A Two-Day Workshop Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, August 30–31 2001, on the National Institute of Standards and Technology Campus, Gaithersburg, MD, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullo, Steven J.; Srivastava, Sudhir; Looney, J. Patrick; Barker, Peter E.

    2002-01-01

    A recent meeting jointly sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) brought together researchers active in nanotechnology and cancer molecular biology to discuss and evaluate the interface between disciplines. Emerging areas where nanotechnologies may impact cancer prevention and early cancer detection were elaborated by key researchers who catalyzed interdisciplinary dialogue aimed at fostering cross-discipline communications and future collaboration. PMID:12590168

  2. Nanotechnology: Emerging Developments and Early Detection of Cancer. A Two-Day Workshop Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, August 30–31 2001, on the National Institute of Standards and Technology Campus, Gaithersburg, MD, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. Zullo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent meeting jointly sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST brought together researchers active in nanotechnology and cancer molecular biology to discuss and evaluate the interface between disciplines. Emerging areas where nanotechnologies may impact cancer prevention and early cancer detection were elaborated by key researchers who catalyzed interdisciplinary dialogue aimed at fostering cross-discipline communications and future collaboration.

  3. Some Ways to Get a Piece of Pi Day Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Alice; Ascione, Judith; Barker, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    In many parts of the world, Pi Day is celebrated on March 14 (3.14), but because of the day-month ordering of dates in Australia, and because March is very close to the start of the academic year, Australians prefer to celebrate Pi (Approximation) Day on 22 July (22/7). Thirty-eight Year 8 students (aged 13-14 years) from two local high schools in…

  4. AAS 227: Day 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or at astrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the @astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Things kicked off last night at our undergraduate reception booth. Thanks to all of you who stopped by we were delightedto have so many people tell us that they already know about and useastrobites, and we were excited to introduce a new cohort of students at AAS to astrobites for the first time.Tuesday morning was the official start of the meeting. Here are just a few of the talks and workshops astrobiters attended today.Opening Address (by Becky Smethurst)The President of the AAS, aka our fearless leader Meg Urry kicked off the meeting this morning at the purely coffee powered hour of 8am this morning. She spoke about the importance of young astronomers at the meeting (heres looking at you reader!) and also the importance of the new Working Group for Accessibility and Disabilities (aka WGAD pronounced like wicked) at the AAS. The Society has made extra effort this year to make the conference accessible to all,a message which was very well received by everyone in attendance.Kavli Lecture: New Horizons Alan Stern (by Becky Smethurst)We were definitely spoilt with the first Plenary lecture at this years conference Alan Stern gave us a a review of the New Horizons mission of the Pluto Fly By (astrobites covered the mission back in July with this post). We were treated to beautiful images, wonderful results and a foray into geology.Before (Hubble) and after #NewHorizons. #thatisall #science #astro alanstern #aas227 pic.twitter.com/kkMt6RsSIR Science News (@topsciencething) January 5, 2016Some awesome facts from the lecture that blew my mind:New Horizons is now 2AU (!) beyond Pluto

  5. TP53 and ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Schuijer (Monique); P.M.J.J. Berns (Els)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractOvarian cancer represents the fourth most frequent type of cancer among females and is the leading cause of death from gynecological cancer in the western world. This review describes gene alterations in ovarian cancer. Specific emphasis is placed on genetic alterations and the

  6. Histologically diagnosed cancers in South Africa, 1988 | Sitas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In females they were: (i) cancer of the cervix; (ii) breast cancer; (iii) basal cell skin cancer; (iv) squamous cell skin cancer; and (v) cancer of the oesophagus. Despite under-reporting, a nwnber of cancers, especially those of the oesophagus and cervix in blacks and skin cancers in whites, rank among the highest in the world.

  7. Teaching World Religions without Teaching "World Religions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locklin, Reid B.; Tiemeier, Tracy; Vento, Johann M.

    2012-01-01

    Tomoko Masuzawa and a number of other contemporary scholars have recently problematized the categories of "religion" and "world religions" and, in some cases, called for its abandonment altogether as a discipline of scholarly study. In this collaborative essay, we respond to this critique by highlighting three attempts to teach…

  8. World Cup Final

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    On July 9, hundreds of millions of fans worldwide will be glued to their television sets watching the final match of the 2006 FIFA World Cup, played in Berlin's Olympic stadium (Olympiastadion). The stadium was originally built for the 1936 Summer Olympics. The Olympic Stadium seats 76,000,; its roof rises 68 meters over the seats and is made up of transparent panels that allow sunlight to stream in during the day. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Size: 12.1 by 15.9 kilometers (7.5 by 9.5 miles) Location: 52.5 degrees North latitude, 13.3 degrees East longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49.2 feet) Dates Acquired: October 15, 2005

  9. Occupational Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Agents Regulation and Policy Surveillance References Around the world, 12.7 million people are diagnosed with cancer every year, and the number is expected to increase due to the growth and aging of the population, as well as reductions in childhood mortality and ...

  10. World Government: Utopia?

    OpenAIRE

    Vahram Ayvazyan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the possibility of having a world government, which world has been facing overarching changes since the end of Cold war, where bipolar world order has evolved into multipolar system through unipolarity. Analysis method in this paper have the sistematics: discussion of human nature and philosophical dimensions vis-à-vis individual, society and government, as well as society of societies; then briefly analyse globalization, the impact of individuals on inter...

  11. Cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cairns, Linda; Aspeslagh, Sandrine; Anichini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This report covers the Immunotherapy sessions of the 2016 Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) Oncology Days meeting, which was held on 15th-17th June 2016 in Brussels, Belgium. Immunotherapy is a potential cancer treatment that uses an individual's immune system to fight the tumour....... In recent years significant advances have been made in this field in the treatment of several advanced cancers. Cancer immunotherapies include monoclonal antibodies that are designed to attack a very specific part of the cancer cell and immune checkpoint inhibitors which are molecules that stimulate...... or block the inhibition of the immune system. Other cancer immunotherapies include vaccines and T cell infusions. This report will summarise some of the research that is going on in this field and will give us an update on where we are at present....

  12. Copyright and Innovation in the Developing World | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This refers to any form of content such as video, blogs, digital images, audio files, and other media that are created by end users. Research shows that the majority of Internet ... Six world-class research teams to investigate overcoming therapeutic resistance in high fatality cancers. The world-class research teams will direct ...

  13. Day case surgery in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    concept in order to improve healthcare delivery to the rapidly expanding populations. A systematic search of the current published literature was carried out to look for articles related to day case surgery (day care or day surgery) in Nigeria and to examine some published articles in relation to the surgical subspecialities, with ...

  14. Query Migration from Object Oriented World to Semantic World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassima Soussi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, object-oriented approach was able to take a large share of databases market aiming to design and implement structured and reusable software through the composition of independent elements in order to have programs with a high performance. On the other hand, the mass of information stored in the web is increasing day after day with a vertiginous speed, exposing the currently web faced with the problem of creating a bridge so as to facilitate access to data between different applications and systems as well as to look for relevant and exact information wished by users. In addition, all existing approach of rewriting object oriented languages to SPARQL language rely on models transformation process to guarantee this mapping. All the previous raisons has prompted us to write this paper in order to bridge an important gap between these two heterogeneous worlds (object oriented and semantic web world by proposing the first provably semantics preserving OQLto-SPARQL translation algorithm for each element of OQL Query (SELECT clause, FROM clause, FILTER constraint, implicit/ explicit join and union/intersection SELECT queries.

  15. Day-to-day and within-day variation in urinary iodine excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Ovesen, L.; Christiansen, E.

    1999-01-01

    our Institute. Subjects: Study 1: Ten healthy subjects (seven females and three males) aged 30-46 y. Study 2. Twenty-two healthy subjects (9 males and 13 females) aged 30-55 y. Methods: Study 1: 24-h urine samples were collected for four consecutive days. Study 2. Each urine voided over 24 h......Objective: To examine the day-to-day and within-day variation in urinary iodine excretion and the day-to-day variation in iodine intake. Design: Collection of consecutive 24-h urine samples and casual urine samples over 24 h. Setting: The study population consisted of highly motivated subjects from...

  16. Benchmarking the World's Best

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Marc S.

    2012-01-01

    A century ago, the United States was a world leader in industrial benchmarking. However, after World War II, once no one could compete with the U.S., it became complacent. Many industrialized countries now have higher student achievement and more equitable and efficient education systems. A higher proportion of young people in their workforces…

  17. Land and World Order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mische, Patricia, Ed.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The papers in this publication discuss the land and how what happens to the land affects us. The publication is one in a series of monographs that examine the linkages between local and global concerns and explore alternative world futures. Examples of topics discussed in the papers follow. The paper "Land and World Order" examines…

  18. World Music Ensemble: Kulintang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegle, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    As instrumental world music ensembles such as steel pan, mariachi, gamelan and West African drums are becoming more the norm than the exception in North American school music programs, there are other world music ensembles just starting to gain popularity in particular parts of the United States. The kulintang ensemble, a drum and gong ensemble…

  19. World-Class Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Margery

    2012-01-01

    Future leaders' creativity and problem-solving skills have been honed in leadership courses, but that doesn't mean they are ready to use those skills to further a company's place in the world. With emerging markets in Asia, South America, and other areas of the world, a workforce needs to have an understanding of and interest in cultures beyond…

  20. Fermentation. Third World Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Natalie; Hughes, Wyn

    This unit, developed by the Third World Science Project, is designed to add a multicultural element to existing science syllabi (for students aged 11-16) in the United Kingdom. The project seeks to develop an appreciation of the: boundless fascination of the natural world; knowledge, skills, and expertise possessed by men/women everywhere;…

  1. Archives: Science World Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 39 of 39 ... Archives: Science World Journal. Journal Home > Archives: Science World Journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 39 of 39 Items. 2017 ...

  2. The World without Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author reviews several books on world history from the 1920s to the 1940s. These include books authored by a diverse group: H.G. Wells, "Outline of History" (Macmillan, 1920); James Henry Breasted, "Ancient Times, A History of the Early World" (published in 1916 by Ginn and Company and largely rewritten in 1935); M.…

  3. The Two World Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Ross E.

    2008-01-01

    In the arenas where the two world histories have taken shape, educators vigorously debate among themselves intellectual, pedagogical, and policy issues surrounding world history as a school subject. The people in each arena tend to share, despite internal disagreements, a common set of premises and assumptions for ordering the discussion of world…

  4. Towards Developmental World Englishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Kingsley; Graddol, David; Meierkord, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    Over the last three decades scholars promoting the world Englishes paradigm (WE) have worked towards establishing a more positive attitude towards international varieties of English. However, despite the best intentions of Western linguists working in this field, there is an obvious imbalance between the developed and developing world in many…

  5. World Englishes and Globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamgbose, Ayo

    2001-01-01

    Examines the theoretical concept of the world Englishes in light of globalization. Outlines phenomena in the organic spread of English around the globe and raises the issue of opportunism in English language teaching. Ethical implications and implications for research on world English are discussed. (Author/VWL)

  6. World Society and Globalisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate discourses on globalisation and world society and to disclose the commonalities and differences of both scientific debates. In particular, it draws attention to theoretical concepts of globalisation and world society. This is considered fruitful for comprehending the complex mechanisms of…

  7. A comparison of overall survival with 40 and 50mg/m(2) pegylated liposomal doxorubicin treatment in patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer: Propensity score-matched analysis of real-world data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Hisanori; Takahara, Tomihiro; Nishimura, Yukiko; Fukushima, Koji; Yoshizawa, Kazutake

    2016-11-01

    In clinical practice, 40mg/m(2) of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD40) has been used as an initial dosage for treating recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (OC) instead of the recommended dose of 50mg/m(2) (PLD50). However, no robust evidence is available to support the use of PLD40. This post-hoc study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of initial PLD dosages in propensity score (P-score)-matched dataset. The data source was a PLD postmarketing surveillance dataset (n=2189) conducted in Japan. Eligibility criteria for the present study were as follows: recurrent OC, history of chemotherapy, and treatment with PLD monotherapy at a dosage between 35.5 and 54.4mg/m(2). Overall survival (OS) was compared between PLD50- and PLD40-treated groups using the log-rank test. Incidences of palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia (PPE) and stomatitis were also compared between the groups. Overall, 503 matched pairs were generated using P-score analysis. The median survival time with PLD50 and PLD40 was 383 and 350days, respectively, with a hazard ratio of 1.10 (95% confidence interval, 0.98-1.26; p=0.211), although the difference was not statistically significant in the P-score-matched dataset. However, the incidence and severity of PPE and stomatitis were significantly lower with PLD40. Our study showed that the efficacy of PLD did not differ based on initial dosages, but the risk of adverse events was reduced with PLD40. Considering the balance between patient benefits and risks, our results support the use of PLD40 in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Confessions of a Second Life: Conforming in the Virtual World?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicas, K.; Bailenson, J.; Stevenson Won, A.; Bailey, J.

    2012-12-01

    Virtual Worlds such as Second Life or World of Warcraft are increasingly popular, with people all over the world joining these online communities. In these virtual environments people break the barrier of reality every day when they fly, walk through walls and teleport places. It is easy for people to violate the norms and behaviors of the real world in the virtual environment without real world consequences. However, previous research has shown that users' behavior may conform to their digital self-representation (avatar). This is also known as the Proteus effect (Yee, 2007). Are people behaving in virtual worlds in ways that most people would not in the physical world? It's important to understand the behaviors that occur in the virtual world if they have an impact on how people act in the real world.

  9. National Ovarian Cancer Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... History Day – Prepare for a Family Conversation About Genetics and Cancer November 08, 2017 Live Webinar on ... us here . Thanksgiving Day, November 23rd, is National Family ... Read ... Tree Display November 19, 2017 @ 10:00AM Hosted by ...

  10. Histologically diagnosed cancers in South Africa, 1988

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cancer; and (v) cancer ofthe oesophagus. Despite under-reporting, a nwnber of cancers, especially those of the oesophagus and cervix in blacks and skin cancers in whites, rank among the highest in the world. Moreover, 40,4% ofthe cancers in adult males (15 - 64 years) and 15,2% of those in adult females were ...

  11. Gastric Cancer Screening

    OpenAIRE

    Ayala Acosta, Juan Carlos; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Lotero Gómez, Juan David; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer worldwide and is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the world, being more common in developing countries. An early detection of the disease and an early treatment are key strategies to reduce mortality. in this review will present recent data regarding epidemiology and the most effective methods for screening of gastric cancer, which remain subject to review and ongoing controversy in the world due to the emergence of new techniques...

  12. Survey of Enteric Pathogens Causing Bacteremia in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enayatollah Kalantar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Symptomatic bacteraemia, is a frequent condition among cancer patients with a significant morbidity and mortality all over the world. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the burden of enteric pathogens causing bacteremia among cancer patients. Patients and Methods: Ten ml blood samples were withdrawn from the cancer patients under aseptic conditions. The blood specimens were added to the blood culture bottles and incubated at 37°C. The bacterial isolates from these samples were identified by routine biochemical reactions. Results: During the study period, 68 blood samples from cancer patients were analyzed for bacteremia. Of these patients, six were female (08/82% and 62 were male (91.18%; with age ranging from under 40 years to 85 years old (mean, 63 years. Gastro-intestinal cancer and cancers of head and neck were the most frequent cancer types in the studied group, accounting for 51 (75% and 15 (22.1% cases, respectively. The mean weight of patients was 69.18 Kg (range: 49-100 Kg. Similarly, the mean length of hospital stay was 8 days (range: 4-12 days. Positive blood cultures were detected in only 12 (17.65% and 11 (91.7% blood specimens from the Cancer Institute, Tehran, compared with one (08.33% from Shahid Kamali hospital, Karaj. From these patients, 15 bacteria were isolated; E. coli alone outnumbered other species and accounted for 33.33% of the episodes of bacteremia. Conclusions: In conclusion, our investigation revealed that cancers of GI tract are the most common cancer types causing bacteremia and also we identified that most common bacteria causing bacteremia in Cancer Institute, Tehran and Shahid Kamali Hospital, Karaj, are E. coli and S. aureus

  13. CinéGlobe presents: "One Day on Earth"

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    The CinéGlobe International Film Festival is proud to announce that it will be hosting the Swiss edition of the Global Screening of “One Day on Earth”, the first film to be shot and then screened in every country in the world.   Founded in 2008, “One Day on Earth's” first media creation event occurred on 10.10.10. The collaboration was the first ever simultaneous filming event occuring in every country of the world. It created a unique geo-tagged video archive as well as a unique feature film. “One Day on Earth” showcases the amazing diversity, conflict, tragedy, and triumph that occurs in one day on our planet.  This Earth Day, April 22nd, CinéGlobe and CERN invite the public to a free global screening event of the first One Day on Earth Motion Picture. This unique film, created from over 3000 hours of footage, was shot by the One Day on Earth community in every country of the world on October...

  14. A Prospective, Randomized Study Comparing 7-day and 14-day ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Standard triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori has a low eradication rate in Turkey. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of 7-day and 14-day lansoprazole, amoxicillin, clarithromycin, and bismuth subsalicylate (LACB) treatment regimens as first-line H. pylori eradication therapies.

  15. Study of the Half-Day/Full-Day Kindergarten Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInroy, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    This case study and problem analysis was an in-depth investigation of the half-day/full-day kindergarten model by utilizing interviews and focus groups to provide insight from parents, teachers, and other district personnel as to how the model has impacted the social, emotional, and academic development of the participating students. This study…

  16. A Prospective, Randomized Study Comparing 7-day and 14-day ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... KEYWORDS: Duodenum, dyspepsia, Helicobacter pylori, gastritis, stomach. A Prospective, Randomized Study Comparing 7-day and 14-day. Quadruple Therapies as First-line Treatments for Helicobacter pylori. Infection in Patients with Functional Dyspepsia. A Yağbasan, DÖ Coşkun1, Ö Özbakir2, ...

  17. Shift work and cancer: Night work and breast cancer – results from a large prospective study in the Dutch general working population. Oral presentations: Day 1: Wednesday, September 7, 2011. 22nd International Conference on Epidemiology in Occupational Health EPICOH 2011 September 7-9, 2011, Oxford, UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuskens, G.; Vroome, E. de; Weerd, M. de; Koppes, L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Despite the current debate, few prospective studies on night work and breast cancer have been performed, and the scientific evidence is limited. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the relation between night work and breast cancer in the general working population.

  18. AAS 228: Day 1 afternoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session: From Space Archeology to Serving the World Today: A 20-year Journey from the Jungles of Guatemala to a Network of Satellite Remote Sensing Facilities Around the World(by Michael Zevin)In the conferences second plenary session, NASAs Daniel Irwin turned the eyes of the conference back to Earth by highlighting the huge impact that NASA missions play in protecting and developing our own planet.Daniel Irwin: using satellite imagery to detect differences in vegetation and find ancient Mayan cities. #aas228 pic.twitter.com/9LFPQdCHTM astrobites (@astrobites) June 13, 2016Irwin came to be involved in NASA through his work mapping Guatemalan jungles, where he would spend 22 days at a time exploring the treacherous jungles on foot armed with a 1st generation GPS, a compass, and a machete. A colleague introduced Irwin to the satellite imagery thathe was exploring, demonstratinghow these images are a strong complement to field work. The sharing of this satellite data with nearby villages helped to show the encroachment of agriculture and the necessity of connecting space to the village. Satellite imagery also played a role in archeological endeavors, uncovering dozens of Mayan cities that have been buried for over a millennia by vegetation, and it provided evidence that the fall of the Mayan civilization may have been due to massive deforestation that ledto drought.Glacial retreat in Chile imaged by ISERV.Irwin displayed the constellation of NASAs Earth-monitoring satellites that have played an integral role in conserving our planet and alerting the world of natural disasters. He also showed

  19. Debate and the World Debates with You

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Tina

    2011-01-01

    These days, many children do not enjoy the freedom to play outside. However, one of the advantages for children growing up now is the new technology that allows them to communicate with people their age, anywhere in the world. The author's company, Illumination Educational Software, decided to take advantage of these advances in technology to get…

  20. RETHINKING WORLD SECURITY PARAMETERS UNDER THE INCESSANT CHALLENGES OF TERRORISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Belamghari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Security has on a continuous basis posed multiple challenges to so many countries around the world over the past few years. The attempt to maintain world order has been a prerequisite for quite many countries, headed by the USA, especially as challenges of terrorism accrue day by day. Therefore, the present paper is set on a venture to question whether such attempts are to be met and whether there might rise a world power that can turn over all conventional understandings of world security paradigms.

  1. World Federation of Vascular Societies: presidential address

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik Hegaard

    2010-01-01

    The presidential address describes briefly the history of the World Federation for Vascular Societies (WFVS) and its objectives. Vascular Surgery today includes interventional procedures (open surgical and endovascular) in addition to risk factor reduction and medical treatment. It is equally imp...... throughout the world. In addition, for introduction of new treatments, training issues and dissemination of science a global organisation like the WFVS is needed.......The presidential address describes briefly the history of the World Federation for Vascular Societies (WFVS) and its objectives. Vascular Surgery today includes interventional procedures (open surgical and endovascular) in addition to risk factor reduction and medical treatment. It is equally....... Similar, in order to be able to train with relevant case mix and numbers, and in order always to have both complex open and endovascular skills on call 24 hours per day, 365 days a year, centralisation into larger units is necessary. The WFVS is important simply looking at the huge demographic differences...

  2. Sundowning: Late-Day Confusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aggravate late-day confusion include: Fatigue Low lighting Increased shadows Disruption of the body's "internal clock" Difficulty separating reality from dreams Presence of an infection such as ...

  3. 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence | CRDI - Centre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    25 nov. 2017 ... The World Health Organization reports that 35% of the world's women and girls experience sexual or physical violence in their lifetime. The International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on November 25 — which marks the first of 16 days of activism against gender-based violence and ...

  4. World Glacier Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The World Glacier Inventory (WGI) contains information for over 130,000 glaciers. Inventory parameters include geographic location, area, length, orientation,...

  5. Brazil World Cup Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MANSUR, R.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Overcoming the productivity challenge is the main benefit of the 2014 World Cup for Brazilian people. The sustainable development of our cultural tourism industry will catapult the new middle class growing up rate.

  6. World Trade Center

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Esilinastus katastroofifilm "World Trade Center" : stsenarist Andrea Berloff : režissöör Oliver Stone : kunstnik Jan Roelfs : osades Nicholas Cage, Michael Pena, Stephen Dorff jpt : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2006. Ka filmi prototüüpidest

  7. World Magnetic Model 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The World Magnetic Model is the standard model used by the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.K. Ministry of Defence, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)...

  8. Who in the World?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Allee J.

    The live and taped portions of a speech concerning human needs, particularly the need to find one's own identity, and the responsibility of educators in helping young children answer the question "who in the world am I?" are presented. (KM)

  9. One Class, Many Worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Boutonne, Sylvie; Lucas, Keith B.; McRobbie, Campbell J.

    1999-01-01

    Reports on a study of a physics class in which few interactions occur among students. Concludes, through observations and interviews. that students describe both the social and physical world in different ways. Contains 33 references. (DDR)

  10. World Magnetic Model 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The World Magnetic Model is the standard model used by the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.K. Ministry of Defence, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)...

  11. IS THE WORLD FLAT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Încalţărău

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Globalization became more and more prominent during the last decades. There is no way to argue that globalization led to more interconnected economies, facilitating the communication and the collaboration around the world. But where is this going? Doesglobalization mean uniformity or diversity? As the world begins to resemble more, the people are trying to distinguish between them more, which can exacerbate nationalistic feeling. Friedman argues that globalization made the world smaller and flatter, allowing all countries to take chance of the available opportunities equally. But is this really true? Although politic and cultural factors can stand in front of a really flat world, what is the key for Chinese and Indian success and which are theirs perspectives?

  12. Globalization in world economy

    OpenAIRE

    Garifullina, A.; Ilyasova, I.

    2013-01-01

    Globalization is objective process of formation, development and action of new world, global system. Undoubtedly, consequences of globalization can carry both positive, and negative character, however to it isn’t present alternative

  13. The world's biggest experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gregson, Liz

    2008-01-01

    According to CERN, our understanding of the Universe is about the change. Meet the Imperial alumni and staff who are involved in CERN's Large Hadron Collider, the world's biggest experiment. (3 pages)

  14. Virtual-World Naturalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Reynolds

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Sometimes a player will stray from the path described by a game, moving into new spaces, developing new possible modes of interaction, and often discovering the rougher edges of the game world, where physics models break down, textures become incongruous, and the pieces don’t quite fit together. Gameplay that seeks out these spaces and these phenomena, that searches for such clues to the underlying construction of the virtual environment, is a kind of virtual-world naturalism, at once a return to an investigative urge that has been subsumed to the exhaustive mapping and description of the real world and a form of resistance to the very idea of pre-defined paths of action, of externally imposed limits, in virtual worlds as well as in our own.

  15. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gastric cancer in the world are in China, Japan, and other countries in Southeast Asia, as well ... of people with this syndrome. Additional screening for women: Women at risk for HDGC are at high ...

  16. A world on fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Olson; David N. Bengston

    2015-01-01

    We live in a world on fire. In just the past few years, major wildland fires have struck at least 13 U.S. states, as well as Indonesia, Australia, China, southern Europe, Russia, Canada, Bolivia, and other parts of the world. Wildland fires are increasing in number, size, and intensity. In particular, there has been an increase in large fire events—megafires—that...

  17. World competitiveness and agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. van Zyl

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Against the background of a changing environment in which market factors and greater world trade and competitiveness are increasingly becoming the only criteria for success, a framework for the analysis of world competitiveness is initially developed. This is followed by a discussion on the growth of productivity in agriculture, as well as an exposition of the role of agricultural research. Thirdly, price factors and the terms of trade are discussed, followed by a summary of policy implications.

  18. Montessori All Day, All Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Connie; Davis, Liza

    2015-01-01

    Introducing real community into the Children's House goes back to the roots of Montessori education through all-day Montessori. The all-day environment is a house where children live with a "developmental room" of Montessori materials including a living room, kitchen, dining area, bedroom, bathroom, greeting rooms, and outdoor spaces.…

  19. Solomon Schechter Day School. Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Pesach; Siegel, Morton

    By 1969 32 Solomon Schechter Day Schools existed to provide students with elementary and secondary education in the context of Conservative Judaism. These day schools are designed to extend the options for religious education already available in the afternoon congregational schools operating in many synagogues. This document outlines the…

  20. Children and Modern Day Slavery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DrNneka

    accounting for over 26 percent of the lot by Ilo (2012) Slavery is a hidden crime. It is illegal in all countries ... It persists till this day. Here, an enquiry is launched into Child Slavery as prevalent in this modern day; the .... with the child's education or compromises his or her health or physical, social, mental, spiritual and moral ...

  1. Green accounts & day high schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    1997-01-01

    The arcticle presents the concept of green accounts and describes how it can be used in the daily work and the teaching at day high schools.......The arcticle presents the concept of green accounts and describes how it can be used in the daily work and the teaching at day high schools....

  2. Implementation of "Marginalism" in Day to Day Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    of thinking? To begin with, it is exactly what the term suggests: an approach, rather than a set of conclusions. John Maynard Keynes phrased it...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California THESIS IMPLEMENTATION OF "MARGINALISM" IN DAY TO DAY LIFE by Elyezer Shkedy June 1998...LIFE 6. AUTHOR(S) Shkedy, Elyezer 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA

  3. Macrocognition in Day-To-Day Police Incident Response

    OpenAIRE

    Chris eBaber; Richard eMcMaster

    2016-01-01

    Using examples of incidents that UK Police Forces deal with on a day-to-day basis, we explore the macrocognition of incident response. Central to our analysis is the idea that information relating to an incident is translated from negotiated to structured and actionable meaning, in terms of the Community of Practice of the personnel involved in incident response. Through participant observation of, and interviews with, police personnel, we explore the manner in which these different types o...

  4. Big Bang Day: Engineering Solutions

    CERN Multimedia

    Lyn Evans; Austin Ball; Jim Virdee; Adam Hart-Davis

    2008-01-01

    CERN's Large Hadron Collider is the most complicated scientific apparatus ever built. Many of the technologies it uses hadn't even been invented when scientists started building it. Adam Hart-Davis discovers what it takes to build the world's most intricate discovery machine.

  5. Rugby World Cup 2015: World Rugby injury surveillance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Colin W; Taylor, Aileen; Kemp, Simon P T; Raftery, Martin

    2017-01-01

    To determine the incidence, severity and nature of injuries sustained during the Rugby World Cup (RWC) 2015 together with the inciting events leading to the injuries. A prospective, whole population study. 639 international rugby players representing 20 countries. The study protocol followed the definitions and procedures recommended in the consensus statement for epidemiological studies in rugby union; output measures included players' age (years), stature (cm), body mass (kg) and playing position, and the group-level incidence (injuries/1000 player-hours), mean and median severity (days-absence), location (%), type (%) and inciting event (%) for match and training injuries. Incidence of injury was 90.1 match injuries/1000 player-match-hours (backs: 100.4; forwards: 81.1) and 1.0 training injuries/1000 player-training-hours (backs: 0.9; forwards: 1.2). The mean severity of injuries was 29.8 days-absence (backs: 30.4; forwards: 29.1) during matches and 14.4 days-absence (backs: 6.3; forwards: 19.8) during training. During matches, head/face (22.0%), knee (16.2%), muscle-strain (23.1%) and ligament-sprain (23.1%) and, during training, lower limb (80.0%) and muscle-strain (60.0%) injuries were the most common locations and types of injury. Being-tackled (24.7%) was the most common inciting event for injury during matches and rugby-skills-contact activities (70.0%) the most common during training. While the incidence, nature and inciting events associated with match injuries at RWC 2015 were similar to those reported previously for RWCs 2007 and 2011, there were increasing trends in the mean severity and total days-absence through injury. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  7. Esophageal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  8. Stages of Gallbladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  9. NCI Designated Cancer Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  10. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  11. Esophageal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  12. Stages of Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  13. Day-Care in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Helle

    2011-01-01

      The chapter explores central notions of appropriate social behavior in what is arguably the most important institution in Denmark when it comes to social integration, namely day-care, also known as pre-school. Moral values guiding everyday practices are generally taken for granted. When...... interacting with ethnic minority children and their parents, however, staff are occasionally forced to make explicit the reasoning behind their actions. A focus on the interaction of ethnic minority children and their parents in day-care centres therefore provides insights into the cultural beliefs and values...... which structure daily socialization practices in a Danish day-care, and by implication in Danish society....

  14. The ocean sampling day consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate...... the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our...... vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits....

  15. End-of-Life Care for People Who Have Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care (PDQ®) Coping with Advanced Cancer Coping with Cancer Grief, Bereavement, and Coping With Loss (PDQ®) Hospice Care Last Days of Life (PDQ®) Palliative Care in Cancer When Someone You Love Has Advanced Cancer: Support ...

  16. World Bank Group/World Bank Corporate Scorecards, April 2016

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2016-01-01

    This pamphlet presents the World Bank Group and World Bank Corporate Scorecards updated with latest data available for Tier 3 (Performance Tier) as of December 31, 2015. Tiers 1 and 2 present data from end of fiscal year 2015. The World Bank Group Corporate Scorecard monitors the implementation of the World Bank Group Strategy. The Scorecard provides an apex view of the results and performance indicators of the three World Bank Group institutions—the World Bank (WB), ...

  17. Phase I, dose-escalation trial of the oral cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor PD 0332991, administered using a 21-day schedule in patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Keith T; Lorusso, Patricia M; Demichele, Angela; Abramson, Vandana G; Courtney, Rachel; Randolph, Sophia S; Shaik, M Naveed; Wilner, Keith D; O'Dwyer, Peter J; Schwartz, Gary K

    2012-01-15

    To identify the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of the first-in-class, oral CDK4/6 inhibitor PD 0332991 administered once daily for 21 of 28 days (3/1 schedule) in patients with retinoblastoma protein (Rb)-positive advanced solid tumors and to describe pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationships relative to drug effects. This open-label phase I study (NCT00141297) enrolled patients who received PD 0332991 orally in six dose-escalation cohorts in a standard 3 + 3 design. Forty-one patients were enrolled. DLTs were observed in five patients (12%) overall; at the 75, 125, and 150 mg once daily dose levels. The MTD and recommended phase II dose of PD 0332991 was 125 mg once daily. Neutropenia was the only dose-limiting effect. After cycle 1, grade 3 neutropenia, anemia, and leukopenia occurred in five (12%), three (7%), and one (2%) patient(s), respectively. The most common non-hematologic adverse events included fatigue, nausea, and diarrhea. Thirty-seven patients were evaluable for tumor response; 10 (27%) had stable disease for ≥4 cycles of whom six derived prolonged benefit (≥10 cycles). PD 0332991 was slowly absorbed (median T(max), 5.5 hours), and slowly eliminated (mean half-life was 25.9 hours) with a large volume of distribution (mean, 2,793 L). The area under the concentration-time curve increased linearly with dose. Using an E(max) model, neutropenia was shown to be proportional to exposure. PD 0332991 warrants phase II testing at 125 mg once daily, at which dose neutropenia was the sole significant toxicity. ©2011 AACR.

  18. When Virtual Worlds Expand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, William Sims

    The future of a virtual world depends on whether it can grow in subjective size, cultural content, and numbers of human participants. In one form of growth, exemplified by Second Life, the scope of a world increases gradually as new sponsors pay for new territory and inhabitants create content. A very different form of growth is sudden expansion, as when World of Warcraft (WoW) added entire new continents in its Burning Crusade and Lich King expansions (Lummis and Kern 2006, 2008; Corneliussen and Rettberg 2008; Sims et al. 2008). Well-established gamelike worlds have often undergone many expansions. Both the pioneer science fiction game Anarchy Online, which was launched in 2001, and Star Wars Galaxies dating from 2003, have had three, and EVE Online also from 2003 has had nine, although smaller ones. This chapter reports research on WoW's 2008 Lich King expansion, using both quantitative and qualitative methods, in order to develop theoretical ideas of the implications of expansion for virtual worlds.

  19. Knowledge and Perceptions of Cypriots about Oral Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalambous Chrystala

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the world. Cyprus recorded 312 new cases between 1998 and 2009, which represent a significant percentage of all cancers reported in Cyprus.

  20. Intestinal Parasites in Children Attending Day Care Centers in Jos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is estimated that 3 billion people world wide are infected with intestinal parasites. Morbidity is highest amongst children; infestation causes a threat to the growth and development of the child. The study aims to determine the prevalence of intestinal helminthes in children attending day care centers in Jos metropolis.