WorldWideScience

Sample records for workplace drug testing

  1. Results of workplace drug testing in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde Marie Erøy Lund

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Workplace drug testing is less common in Norway than in many other countries. During the period from 2000-2006, 13469 urine or blood samples from employees in the offshore industry, shipping companies and aviation industry were submitted to the Norwegian Institute of Public Health for drug testing. The samples were analysed for benzodiazepines, illicit drugs, muscle relaxants with sedating properties, opioids and z-hypnotics. In total, 2.9% of the samples were positive for one or more substances. During the study period the prevalence decreased for morphine (from 1.9% to 1.1% and increased for amphetamine (from 0.04% to 0.6%, clonazepam (from 0% to 0.1%, methamphetamine (from 0.04% to 0.6%, nitrazepam (from 0% to 0.4% and oxazepam (from 0.5% to 1.3% (p<0.05. There was no significant change in prevalence for the other substances included in the analytical programme. Illicit drugs were significantly associated with lower age (OR: 0.93, p<0.05. This study found low prevalence of drugs among employees in companies with workplace drug testing programmes in Norway.

  2. Overview on drug and alcohol testing in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, M

    1993-01-01

    A flashpoint in the debate over workplace responses to alcohol and drug use by members of the workforce centres on the chemical testing of current employees and job applicants for alcohol and drug use. Drug testing may be the most contentious issue faced by enterprises struggling to develop fair and effective programmes to deal with the consequences of substance use in the workplace. The present paper examines scientific evidence on the nature and extent of alcohol and drug use by members of the workforce, evidence linking alcohol and drug use to workplace problems, workplace strategies for managing alcohol- and drug-related difficulties, and arguments for and against drug and alcohol testing. To date, the evidence supportive of alcohol and drug testing is inconclusive. Testing programmes may be useful in identifying drug users in the workforce. Their deterrent value is uncertain, however, and they are not efficient tools for linking drug users to assistance programmes. Enterprises that are contemplating establishing testing programmes should consider: (a) whether substance use is a problem in their setting; (b) whether testing will respond to the problem; (c) the costs and benefits of testing; and (d) any ethical and legal questions raised by the programmes.

  3. LC-MS: a powerful tool in workplace drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, E; Barroso, M; Queiroz, J A

    2009-03-01

    Workplace drug testing is a well-established application of forensic toxicology and it aims to reduce workplace accidents caused by affected workers. Several classes of abused substances may be involved, such as alcohol, amphetamines, cannabis, cocaine, opiates and also prescription drugs, such as benzodiazepines. The use of alternative biological specimens such as hair, oral fluid or sweat in workplace drug testing presents several advantages over urinalysis-mainly the fact that sample collection can be performed easily without infringing on the examinee's privacy, so the subject is more likely to perform the test. However, drugs are usually present in these alternative specimens at low concentrations and the amount of sample available for analysis is small. The use of highly sensitive techniques is therefore necessary. In fact, the successful interface of liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (LC-MS) has brought a new light into bioanalytical and forensic sciences as it allows the detection of drugs and metabolites at concentrations that are difficult to analyse using the more commonly adopted GC-MS based techniques. This paper will discuss the importance of LC-MS in supporting workplace drug-testing programmes. The combination of LC-MS with innovative instrumentation such as triple quadrupoles, ion traps and time-of-flight mass spectrometers will also be focused. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. 75 FR 76478 - Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs AGENCY: Substance Abuse... Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs (Mandatory Guidelines) which took effect on October 1, 2010 address the role and qualifications of...

  5. 75 FR 8524 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... Office of the Secretary 49 CFR Part 40 RIN 2105-AD67 Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and... owner-operators. Consequently, the Department certifies under the Regulatory Flexibility Act that this... WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Accordingly, the Interim Final Rule amending 49 CFR Part 40...

  6. 76 FR 59574 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs: Federal Drug Testing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ... under the DOT drug testing regulation, 49 CFR Part 40, must be collected using chain-of-custody... Alcohol Testing Programs: Federal Drug Testing Custody and Control Form; Technical Amendment AGENCY... of a new Federal Drug Testing Custody and Control Form (CCF) in its drug testing program. Use of the...

  7. 75 FR 59105 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs: Federal Drug Testing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... Transportation (DOT) drug testing regulation, 49 CFR Part 40, must be collected using chain-of-custody procedures... Alcohol Testing Programs: Federal Drug Testing Custody and Control Form; Technical Amendment AGENCY... Services recently issued a new Federal Drug Testing Custody and Control Form for use in both the Federal...

  8. Development, implementation and management of a drug testing program in the workplace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtis, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    To combat the rising use of drugs in the workplace many American companies have implemented drug testing programs and are testing employees and job applicants for use of illegal drugs. In addition, on September 15, 1986, Executive Order No.12564 was issued by President Reagan, which requires all federal agencies to develop programs and policies, one of the goals of which is to achieve a drug-free federal workplace. Included in this Executive Order is the requirement that federal agencies implement drug testing has become a prevalent practice as a means to detect and deter drug use in the workplace. Before a drug testing program is implemented, it is imperative that policies and procedures are developed that (1) ensure the accuracy of test results, (2) protect the validity and integrity of the specimen, (3) guarantee due process, and (4) maintain confidentiality. To make certain that these prerequisites were met in the government drug testing programs, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) was directed to develop technical and scientific guidelines for conducting such programs. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. (Automation in the clinical laboratory and drug testing programs in the workplace)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtis, C.

    1990-10-17

    The traveler chaired a session on Laboratory Robotics at 4th International Congress on Automation in the Clinical Laboratory. In addition, the traveler chaired a session on Drugs-of-Abuse at 2nd International Congress of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring and Toxicology. In this session, the traveler also presented a paper entitled Development, Implementation and Management of a Drug Testing Program in the Workplace.'' These two Congress were run concurrently in the Congress Center in Barcelona, Spain.

  10. 75 FR 8526 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... Office of the Secretary 49 CFR Part 40 RIN 2105-AD64 Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and... required method. However, in response to comments requesting additional flexibility in testing methods, the... may increase flexibility and lower costs for employers who choose to use them over more expensive...

  11. Testing for drug and alcohol аbuse at the workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Kavrakovski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Drug and alcohol abuse in the workplace represents a great risk to employee’s health and safety. More than 50% of the employees worldwide are related to easily accessible drug abuse, while 70% of the employees are related to alcohol abuse in the workplace. Tests for detecting drug and alcohol abuse in the workplace should be part of a new regulation, compulsory for all employees in the Republic of Macedonia. Implementing this sort of testing program should at the same time be a step towards devising particular solutions that shall bring about greater safety in the working environment. A key element in the implementation is to devise and establish an adequate policy that shall determine the risk factors within a working establishment which shall clearly express its position regarding drug and alcohol abuse during working hours. Along with the risk factors, the policy may also include the program for testing both, employees and the ones who are about to be employed, for drug and alcohol abuse. In order to implement this sort of test, it must be in accordance with the Occupational Safety and Health Act (Official gazette of the Republic of Macedonia, No 92/07, 2007 and a legal framework has to be defined, that shall regulate and solve numerous aspects of this issue, in order to fully implement the program for drug free working environment pursuant to the Declaration and the decrees of the United Nations General Assembly in 1998.

  12. Racial/ethnic differences in report of drug testing practices at the workplace level in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, William C; Meghani, Salimah; Tetrault, Jeanette M; Fiellin, David A

    2014-01-01

    It is unknown whether racial/ethnic differences in report of workplace drug testing persist when analyzed within and across various occupations. We sought to examine the association between worker demographics, workplace characteristics, and report of employment in a workplace that performs drug testing. We performed a cross-sectional study of the 2008-2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health examining the relationship between race/ethnicity and report of workplace drug testing among employed, white, black, or Hispanic respondents ≥18 years old. In logistic regression analysis, we adjusted for demographic, occupational, and other relevant variables and performed stratified analyses among three specific occupations. Among 69,163 respondents, 48.2% reported employment in a workplace that performs drug testing. On multivariable analysis, younger age, male sex, black race, income greater than $20,000, completion of high school and non-urban residence were associated with report of drug testing at one's workplace among the full sample as were non-white collar occupation, work in medium or large workplace, and absence of other substance abuse/dependence. In stratified analyses, black race was associated with report of workplace level drug testing among executive/administrative/managerial/financial workers and technicians/related support occupations; Hispanic ethnicity was associated with the outcome among technicians/related support occupations. Racial/ethnic differences in report of workplace drug testing exist within and across various occupations. These differences have important public health implications deserving further study. Increased report of drug testing where racial/ethnic minorities work highlights the potential bias that can be introduced when drug testing policies are not implemented in a universal fashion. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  13. Drug and alcohol testing in the workplace: moral, ethical and legal issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, C

    1993-01-01

    The proponents of drug and alcohol testing advance several safety and productivity arguments in support of their position. It is asserted that persons who test positively for drug and alcohol at the workplace experience higher levels of absenteeism and use sick leave to a much greater extent than non-users. Moreover, it is claimed that they have levels of productivity from 10 to 60 per cent lower than persons who do not test positively for drugs or alcohol. Perhaps the greatest argument advanced by those in favour of testing, however, is the safety element. Persons who abuse drugs or who consume alcohol to excess are involved in significantly more accidents than those who test negatively. In other words, proponents take the position that persons who test positively for the presence of drugs or alcohol form a category of individuals and that being in this category is grounds for labelling them as problematic employees. Moreover, so the reasoning goes, the only way to find out if an employee is a member of the category of drug or alcohol users is to test. Opponents of alcohol testing feel that the goal of ensuring a drug- and alcohol-free workplace is reached at too high a social cost and that the testing process constitutes an unwarranted invasion of the privacy of the individual. The provision of urine for analysis is a search, which, if conducted without consent or reason, would constitute an assault. Some opponents to testing feel that the real motivation for testing is controlling employee behaviour. Enterprises impose behavioural constraints on employees that may extend to off-duty times. Moreover, it is advanced that the testing process itself is humiliating to many people. In order to obtain a sample for testing, the person being tested must urinate in the presence of an attendant or supervisor. Often, medical standards are not used. Another moral issue is the implication of discrimination as a result of drug or alcohol testing. Perhaps the greatest concern

  14. 75 FR 8528 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... Office of the Secretary 49 CFR Part 40 RIN OST 2105-AD84 Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and... of small entities, for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. The Department makes these... necessary for the Department to conduct a regulatory evaluation or Regulatory Flexibility Analysis for this...

  15. 77 FR 60318 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs: 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary 49 CFR Part 40 RIN 2105-AE14 Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug... 12866 and Regulatory Flexibility Act This Final Rule is not significant for purposes of Executive Order... certify, under the Regulatory Flexibility Act, that this rule does not have a significant economic impact...

  16. 75 FR 26183 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... Office of the Secretary 49 CFR Part 40 RIN OST 2105-AE01 Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and... economic effect on a substantial number of small entities, for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act... been necessary for the Department to conduct a regulatory evaluation or Regulatory Flexibility Analysis...

  17. 77 FR 26471 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs: 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-04

    ... Office of the Secretary 49 CFR Part 40 RIN 2105-AE14 Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and... notify ODAPC of 6-AM only positive results. Executive Order 12866 and Regulatory Flexibility Act This... MROs. The Department consequently certifies, under the Regulatory Flexibility Act, that this rule does...

  18. 75 FR 38422 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... Office of the Secretary 49 CFR Part 40 RIN OST 2105-AD84 Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and... economic effect on a substantial number of small entities, for ] purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act... been necessary for the Department to conduct a regulatory evaluation or Regulatory Flexibility Analysis...

  19. 76 FR 34086 - Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs; Request for Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... governing the chain of custody of specimens collected for drug testing. These revisions to the Mandatory... specimen be collected? For an oral fluid split specimen collection, how should the collection of the two...

  20. Benzodiazepines and workplace safety: an examination of postaccident urine drug tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James W

    2014-01-01

    Benzodiazepines were introduced for clinical use since the 1960s and rapidly became the sedative-hypnotic of choice. The purpose of this study was to determine whether benzodiazepine use as measured by drug tests is higher in postaccident drug tests than in random tests. This is a case-control study comparing the proportion of benzodiazepine laboratory positive urine specimens for random versus postaccident samples. Any sample that tested positive for 1 or more substances other than benzodiazepines was eliminated from the study to correct for the confounding effect of other potentially impairing substances. The group prevalence of benzodiazepine positive samples was compared via the odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals and the P-values. The study began with 4756 urine samples with 2161 postaccident specimens and 2595 random specimens. A total of 243 of the samples were confirmed positive for drugs other than benzodiazepines. The study was left with 2016 postaccident and 2497 random samples. In the controlled postaccident group, there were 57 positive screens and 17 (29.8%) were confirmed as positive for either a benzodiazepine or benzodiazepine metabolites. In the controlled random group, there were 48 positive screens and 10 (20.8%) were confirmed as positive for either a benzodiazepine or benzodiazepine metabolites. The OR comparing the total confirmed laboratory positive benzodiazepine specimens after controlling for other substances was 2.1150 (0.9663-4.6292) with a P-value of 0.0609. The results for comparing the total confirmed laboratory positive benzodiazepine tests controlled for other substances, although suggestive of an association, did not achieve statistical significance.

  1. Drug testing in the workplace: could a positive test for one of the mandated drugs be for reasons other than illicit use of the drug?

    Science.gov (United States)

    elSohly, M A; Jones, A B

    1995-10-01

    This manuscript reviews data available in the scientific literature relative to drug testing for the five mandated drug classes and circumstances other than abuse of the drug itself that could result in a positive test. For marijuana, passive inhalation, unknowing oral ingestion, and the use of Marinol are discussed. Data are presented on the concentration of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its precursors, acid-A and acid-B, in illicit marijuana and the extent of extraction of THC in boiled (tea) or cooked products. For cocaine, passive inhalation and passive exposure issues are reviewed. For opiates, poppy seed ingestion and guidelines for exclusion of poppy seeds as a cause for a positive test are discussed. For amphetamines, issues such as the presence of other phenethylamines, l-methamphetamine (Vicks' inhalers), and other prescription drugs are discussed. Although passive inhalation of methamphetamine and phencyclidine is theoretically possible, no data were available on these issues.

  2. 75 FR 5722 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    ... include making specimen validity testing (SVT) mandatory for the transportation industry contingent upon U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) publishing its Mandatory Guidelines on SVT. In late... HHS had not finalized its Mandatory Guidelines regarding SVT. We said that SVT would remain authorized...

  3. 75 FR 49850 - Procedures for Transportation Workplace Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... Validity Testing final rule in 2008 (SVT Final Rule), we stated that the Omnibus Act ``provides only one... collections, MROs, and what laboratories can report. As we said in our 2008 SVT Final Rule preamble, ``Since... amendments to their Mandatory Guidelines.'' (73 FR 35961, June 25, 2008) In the 2008 SVT Final Rule, we also...

  4. 22 CFR 210.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug-free workplace. 210.635 Section 210.635 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 210.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the...

  5. HIV testing in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tri, D L

    1988-11-01

    Because the incidence of AIDS continues to grow, affecting a greater number of the working population, the disease is also rapidly becoming a major issue for employers. AIDS has implications for employer decisions in the areas of hiring, termination, training, promotions, benefits, collective bargaining, health and safety in the workplace. This article examines the advantages and disadvantages of HIV screening in the workplace. Technical issues regarding the validity of current HIV tests being used are outlined. Precedent-setting court decisions are reviewed, and the resulting legal and ethical implications and dilemmas of employers and health care providers are examined.

  6. Not to catch but to deter : simple, less intrusive drug and alcohol tests can improve workplace safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stastny, P.

    2009-04-15

    Canadian employees who test positive for drug use have access to a wide range of substance counselling and rehabilitation options. As a result of Canadian human right legislation, drug dependence is considered a disability, and Canadian employers are required to accommodate the employee and retain their position when they are deemed fit for work. While Alberta is considered an employee-friendly province, the oil and gas industry has significant hazards that require a lucid and attentive workforce. As a result, Alberta courts approved pre-employment drug testing in a recent court case. The decision involved an employee who tested positive for traces of marijuana. After being fired, the employee filed a complaint. Although the Queen's Bench decided in favour of the employee, the Alberta Court of Appeal stated that the company's pre-employment drug testing policy did not discriminate against the employee on the basis of a disability. Drug use amongst construction workers and employees in the energy industry has now reached upwards of 24 per cent. While urine testing is a commonly used drug testing method, oral fluid testing is now being more widely adopted in industry. Oral fluids can be used to detect recent drug and alcohol use rather than historical use and can be conducted in the presence of a test administrator. It was concluded that the aim of drug and alcohol testing is to deter substance abuse on the job. 3 figs.

  7. NRC drug-free workplace plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    On September 15, 1986, President Reagan signed Executive Order 12564, establishing the goal of a Drug-Free Federal Workplace. The Order made it a condition of employment that all Federal employees refrain from using illegal drugs on or off duty. On July 11, 1987, Congress passed legislation affecting implementation of the Executive Order under Section 503 of the Supplemental Appropriations Act of 1987, Public Law 100-71 (the Act). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission first issued the NRC Drug Testing Plan to set forth objectives, policies, procedures, and implementation guidelines to achieve a drug-free Federal workplace, consistent with the Executive Order and Section 503 of the Act. Revision 1, titled, ``NRC Drug-Free Workplace Plan,`` supersedes the previous version and its supplements and incorporates changes to reflect current guidance from the Department of Justice, the Department of Health and Human Services, as well as other guidance.

  8. 31 CFR 20.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drug-free workplace. 20.635 Section 20.635 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 20.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free...

  9. 40 CFR 36.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drug-free workplace. 36.635 Section 36.635 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 36.635 Drug-free...

  10. Alcohol and drug use in the workplace : managing the human factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKibbon, D. [Kelly Luttmer and Associates Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    The importance of implementing comprehensive drug and alcohol policies in the workplace was discussed with particular emphasis on the procedures which are needed to ensure that employers meet due diligence requirements regarding alcoholism and drug abuse. A study of workplace substance abuse issues in Alberta revealed that 80 per cent of the Alberta workforce uses alcohol, 27 per cent use cold medication, and 6.5 per cent use illicit drugs. The impact of drug and alcohol use in the workplace was also reviewed. Under the Canadian human rights legislation an employer cannot terminate an employee for having a medical illness including alcoholism or drug addiction. The issue of drug testing and when to drug screen was also discussed. It was suggested that addressing substance abuse in the workplace through policy procedures and practices can reduce costs related to lost productivity, absenteeism, workers` compensation claims, staff turnover, health benefit premiums and legal liabilities. 3 refs.

  11. Drug Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or slurred speech Dilated or small pupils Agitation Panic Paranoia Delirium Difficulty breathing Nausea Changes in blood ... MedlinePlus Health Topics Drug Abuse Opioid Abuse and Addiction Prescription Drug Abuse The medical information provided is ...

  12. Alcohol and drug abuse in the workplace - managing the human factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKibbon, D.; Glass, H. [Kelly Luttmer and Associates Ltd., (Canada)

    1998-09-01

    The impact of drugs and alcohol in the workplace was reviewed. The policies and procedures which are required to ensure that employers meet due diligence requirements were discussed. Under the Canadian human rights legislation an employer cannot terminate an employee for having a medical illness including alcoholism or drug addiction. The implementation of a comprehensive drug and alcohol policy was said to be important to demonstrate to employees that the organization is ready to take a proactive and supportive role in addressing this health concern. The issue of drug testing and when to drug screen was also discussed. It was suggested that addressing substance abuse in the workplace through policies, procedures and practices can reduce costs related to lost productivity, absenteeism, workers` compensation claims, staff turnover, health benefit premiums and legal liabilities.

  13. Standardized dirts for testing the efficacy of workplace cleaning products: validation of their workplace relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Peter; Seyfarth, Florian; Sonsmann, Flora; Strunk, Meike; John, Swen-Malte; Diepgen, Thomas; Schliemann, Sibylle

    2013-10-01

    In order to assess the cleaning efficacy of occupational skin cleansers, standardized test dirts mimicking the spectrum of skin soiling at dirty workplaces are necessary. To validate newly developed standardized test dirts (compliant with the EU Cosmetics Directive) for their occupational relevance. In this single-blinded, monocentric questionnaire-based clinical trial, 87 apprentices of three trades (household management; house painting and varnishing; and metal processing) evaluated the cleanability of six standardized test dirts in relation to their workplace dirts. In addition, they judged the similarity of the test dirts to actual dirts encountered in their working environments. Most of the household management participants assessed the hydrophilic model dirt ('mascara'), the lipophilic model dirt ('W/O cream') and a film-forming model dirt ('disperse paint') as best resembling the dirts found at their workplaces. Most of the painters and varnishers judged the filmogenic model dirts ('disperse paint' and 'acrylic paint') as best resembling the dirts found at their workplaces. For the metal workers, the lipophilic and paste-like model dirts were most similar to their workplace dirts. The spectrum of standardized test dirts developed represents well the dirts encountered at various workplaces. The test dirts may be useful in the development and in vivo efficacy testing of occupational skin cleansers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Drug testing in oral fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummer, Olaf H

    2006-08-01

    Over the last decade there have been considerable developments in the use of oral fluid (saliva) for drug testing. Oral fluid can provide a quick and non-invasive specimen for drug testing. However, its collection may be thwarted by lack of available fluid due to a range of physiological factors, including drug use itself. Food and techniques designed to stimulate production of oral fluid can also affect the concentration of drugs. Current applications are mainly focused on drugs of abuse testing in employees at workplaces where drug use has safety implications, in drivers of vehicles at the roadside and in other situations where drug impairment is suspected. Testing has included alcohol (ethanol) and a range of clinical tests eg antibodies to HIV, therapeutic drugs and steroids. Its main application has been for testing for drugs of abuse such as the amphetamines, cocaine and metabolites, opioids such as morphine, methadone and heroin, and for cannabis. Oral fluid concentrations of basic drugs such as the amphetamines, cocaine and some opioids are similar or higher than those in plasma. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major species present from cannabis use, displays similar concentrations in oral fluid compared to blood in the elimination phase. However, there is significant local absorption of the drug in the oral cavity which increases the concentrations for a period after use of drug. Depot effects occur for other drugs introduced into the body that allow local absorption, such as smoking of tobacco (nicotine), cocaine, amphetamines, or use of sub-lingual buprenorphine. Screening techniques are usually an adaptation of those used in other specimens, with an emphasis on the parent drug since this is usually the dominant species present in oral fluid. Confirmatory techniques are largely based on mass spectrometry (MS) with an emphasis on Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS), due to low sample volumes and the low detection limits required. Drug testing

  15. New technology and new initiatives in U.S. workplace testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J Michael

    2008-01-30

    A current perspective of workplace drug testing in the USA is presented covering three major issue areas: (1) epidemiology, (2) new technology and (3) initiatives to reach out and assist small business. First, national illegal drug-use self-reported survey data is compared with national laboratory drug testing results, illustrating a number of inconsistencies. During the 17-year period (1988-2004) the number of laboratory positive test results has decreased by 66% while during the same period self-reported drug-use has increased by 30%. The lack of concurrence between lab results and self-report surveys are examined in light of the typical panel of drugs being tested in U.S. laboratories, the increased specificity of immunoassay screening tests, and the critical issues of adulteration and substitution. Second, a brief review of the state-of-the-science in rapid point-of-collection (POCT) oral fluid drug-testing devices is presented along with some device evaluation findings. In general the window of drug detection in oral fluid is measured in hours. Most of the available oral fluid POCT devices can detect methamphetamine and amphetamines and opiates very well. The ability to detect cocaine appears to vary significantly across devices, while the ability to detect cannabis use is generally poor across all devices. Finally, efforts to reach out and assist small businesses in the development of workplace anti-drug programs are discussed in the context of increasing workplace programs in the European Union.

  16. 76 FR 34573 - Implementation of OMB Guidance on Drug-Free Workplace Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... rule after consideration of public comments . The agencies proposed an update to the drug-free... implement drug-free workplace requirements for financial assistance. The guidance requires each agency to replace the common rule on drug-free workplace requirements that the agency previously issued in its own...

  17. Ethical aspects of workplace urine screening for drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, A R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the ethical and legal implications of the involvement of medical practitioners in workplace screening for drug misuse. CONCLUSIONS: Workplace screening for drugs of abuse raises many ethical issues. If screening is considered as being part of medical practice with the involvement of occupational health physicians, as suggested by the Faculty of Occupational Medicine, then the ethical requirements of a normal medical consultation are fully applicable. The employee's full and informed consent to the process must be obtained and the employee should have an unfettered right of access to all the relevant records and to the urine sample he/she has provided in the event that he/she wishes to challenge the opinion expressed by the physician. If the process is not part of medical practice then employees should have the same rights as they would have if required to provide intimate body samples in the course of a criminal investigation, given the potentially serious consequences of an erroneous positive finding for their livelihood. PMID:9055156

  18. 31 CFR 20.210 - To whom must I distribute my drug-free workplace statement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false To whom must I distribute my drug-free workplace statement? 20.210 Section 20.210 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements...

  19. 31 CFR 20.205 - What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement? 20.205 Section 20.205 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for...

  20. 49 CFR 40.207 - What is the effect of a cancelled drug test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the effect of a cancelled drug test? 40... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Drug Tests § 40.207 What is the effect of a cancelled drug test? (a) A cancelled drug test is neither positive nor negative. (1) As an...

  1. Workplace violence and drug use in women workers in a Peruvian Barrio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musayón Oblitas, F Y; Caufield, C

    2007-12-01

    This exploratory and descriptive study explored the relationship between workplace violence and drug use in women. It also explored the perception of women workers on the relationship between workplace violence and drug use. The World Health Organization and the United Nations recognize violence against women and have adopted a definition of it. The Centres for Disease Control and Prevention reports that violence in the workplace has increased 300% over the last decade. Alcohol misuse, occupation and gender are associated with aggression in the workplace. Estimations of the incidence of non-fatal injuries sustained because of workplace violence and evaluations of the associated risk factors have rarely been documented. 125 women workers between the ages of 18 and 60 years were surveyed in four suburbs of Zapallal, Lima. Of the 125 women, 28.8% experienced violence in the workplace. Of the 36 women who had experienced violence in the workplace, 16 agreed to participate in interviews to explore their perceptions. The data were saturated with the 16 interviews. Of the 125 workers surveyed 17.6% experienced verbal violence, 9.6%% experienced physical violence, and 1.6% were sexually harassed in their workplace. Women who were verbally abused demonstrated eight times greater risk of drug use than those who did not experience this type of violence in their workplace. This paper contributes to an understanding of the relationships among drug abuse, gender and the incidence of violence in the workplace; it documents the perception women have of these relationships; and it supports the development of programmes and strategies related to the prevention of workplace violence and drug consumption by women workers.

  2. 7 CFR 248.22 - Nonprocurement debarment/suspension, drug-free workplace, and lobbying restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... workplace, and lobbying restrictions. 248.22 Section 248.22 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of.../suspension, drug-free workplace, and lobbying restrictions. The State agency shall ensure compliance with the... lobbying (7 CFR part 3018), where applicable. ...

  3. Chemical analysis of wastewater as a new way of monitoring drugs and medicines consumption at workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Wiergowski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The available information on the quality and frequency of illegal psychoactive substances used or medicines misused by workers, are often out of date at the time of its publication. This is due to the dynamic introduction of new synthetic drugs on the black market, changes in trends in the recreational use of medicines and the lack of readily available and reliable tests for fast identification. Strategy for detection of narcotic and non-medical psychoactive drugs use at workplace should embrace all possible sources of information. Classical sources of information on the use of psychoactive substances at the workplace include: statistical data (general information on trends and magnitude of drug and medicine addiction collected by the Polish National Police, the National Bureau for Drug Prevention and emergency medical services, surveys, psychomotor tests and qualitative and quantitative analyses of biological material. Of the new and promising methods, used throughout the world in recent years, chemical-toxicological analysis of surface water and wastewater deserve special mention. An increasing interest in the study of urban waste water can significantly complement the source of knowledge about drug and medicine addiction using obtainable conventional methods. In recent years, a municipal wastewater analysis has become a new and very promising way of collecting updated information on the use of psychoactive substances and medicines. It seems that this kind of study may play an important role in the ongoing monitoring of drug and/or medicines use by selected groups of population (e.g., students, military, firemen, policemen, etc.. Med Pr 2015;66(6:837–847

  4. 49 CFR 40.199 - What problems always cause a drug test to be cancelled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What problems always cause a drug test to be... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Drug Tests § 40.199 What problems always cause a drug test to be cancelled? (a) As the MRO, when the laboratory discovers a “fatal flaw” during...

  5. 49 CFR 40.205 - How are drug test problems corrected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How are drug test problems corrected? 40.205... WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Drug Tests § 40.205 How are drug test problems...), you must try to correct the problem promptly, if doing so is practicable. You may conduct another...

  6. 75 FR 80287 - Environmental Protection Agency Implementation of OMB Guidance on Drug-Free Workplace Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ... 40 CFR Part 36 Environmental Protection Agency Implementation of OMB Guidance on Drug-Free Workplace... Protection Agency is removing its regulation implementing the Governmentwide common rule on drug-free... make no substantive change in Environmental Protection Agency policy or procedures for drug-free...

  7. School and work status, drug-free workplace protections, and prescription drug misuse among Americans ages 15-25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ted; Novak, Scott P; Galvin, Deborah M; Spicer, Rebecca S; Cluff, Laurie; Kasat, Sandeep

    2015-03-01

    We assessed the prevalence and characteristics of prescription drug misuse among youth ages 15-25 to examine differences by student and employment status, and associations with workplace antidrug policies and programs. Multivariate logistic regressions analyzed associations in weighted data on the 20,457 young adults in the combined 2004-2008 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health. Demographic controls included sex, race, community size, and age group. After we accounted for demographic controls, at ages 15-25, students were less likely than nonstudents to misuse prescription drugs. Segmenting student from nonstudent groups, working consistently was associated with a further reduction in misuse for those ages 18-25. When we controlled for demographics and substance use history, both Employee Assistance Program (EAP) services and awareness that one's employer had a drug-free workplace policy were associated with significantly lower misuse of prescription drugs (OR = 0.85 for each program, 95% CI [0.73, 1.00] and [0.72, 1.00]). Associations of workplace antidrug policies and programs with marijuana use and with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria for alcohol abuse and dependence contrasted sharply with these patterns. All four aspects were significantly associated with lower marijuana use. None was associated with problem drinking. Protective effects of drug-free workplace policy and EAPs persist after other substance use was controlled for. Comparing the effects of workplace programs on illicit drug use and problem drinking versus prescription misuse suggests that those protective associations do not result from selection bias. Thus, drug-free workplace policies and EAPs appear to help protect younger workers against prescription misuse. If workplace substance use disorder programs focused prevention messages and interventions on prescription drug misuse, their impact on misuse might increase.

  8. Drug testing at work: issues and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two decades there has been a significant rise in the number of employers requiring their staff or prospective staff members to undergo testing to determine whether they have been taking illicit drugs. Such testing usually takes place within the framework of broad employee-assistance programs and is underpinned by the wish to ensure public safety and corporate security, as well as achieving a "drug-free workplace" by helping staff who have drug-use-related problems. By whatever means these tests are conducted, though, issues of privacy raise a question mark against whether this is truly an area in which the interests of collective security should always override individual civil liberties.

  9. 38 CFR 48.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 48.220 Section 48.220... § 48.220 By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness... and an ongoing awareness program as described in § 48.215, you must publish the statement and...

  10. 75 FR 31273 - Social Security Administration Implementation of OMB Guidance for Drug-Free Workplace Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... 20 CFR Part 439 RIN 0960-AH14 Social Security Administration Implementation of OMB Guidance for Drug... at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . Background Congress passed the Drug-Free Workplace Act of... as it applied to grants. 54 FR 4946, January 31, 1989. The agencies issued a final common rule after...

  11. Improving nurses' therapeutic attitude to patients who use illicit drugs: workplace drug and alcohol education is not enough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Rosemary; Bammer, Gabriele; Becker, Niels

    2009-04-01

    This study examines the impact of workplace drug and alcohol education on nurses' therapeutic attitude to patients who use illicit drugs. It builds on a study of the generalist nursing workforce in the Australian Capital Territory in 2003, which showed that the interaction of role support with workplace drug and alcohol education facilitated nurses' therapeutic attitude. This paper explores this interaction in detail, showing that workplace education has no independent association with therapeutic attitude and that an effect from education only occurs when nurses have at least a moderate level of role support. Nursing workforce development needs to focus on strategies that provide role support for nurses as they work with this clinically challenging patient group. Without the ready availability of someone in the nurse's clinical field to advise and assist them, efforts to increase nurses' knowledge and skills are wasted.

  12. 43 CFR 43.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 43.220 Section 43.220 Public Lands... drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 43.205 and an ongoing awareness program...

  13. 31 CFR 20.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 20.220 Section 20.220 Money and Finance... drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 20.205 and an ongoing awareness program...

  14. 14 CFR 1267.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 1267.220 Section 1267.220 Aeronautics and... my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 1267.205 and an ongoing awareness...

  15. 24 CFR 21.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 21.220 Section 21.220 Housing and Urban... must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you... ongoing awareness program as described in § 21.215, you must publish the statement and establish the...

  16. 40 CFR 36.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 36.220 Section 36.220 Protection of....220 By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness... and an ongoing awareness program as described in § 36.215, you must publish the statement and...

  17. Barriers to workplace HIV testing in South Africa: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihs, Martin; Meyer-Weitz, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Low workplace HIV testing uptake makes effective management of HIV and AIDS difficult for South African organisations. Identifying barriers to workplace HIV testing is therefore crucial to inform urgently needed interventions aimed at increasing workplace HIV testing. This study reviewed literature on workplace HIV testing barriers in South Africa. Pubmed, ScienceDirect, PsycInfo and SA Publications were systematically researched. Studies needed to include measures to assess perceived or real barriers to participate in HIV Counselling and Testing (HCT) at the workplace or discuss perceived or real barriers of HIV testing at the workplace based on collected data, provide qualitative or quantitative evidence related to the research topic and needed to refer to workplaces in South Africa. Barriers were defined as any factor on economic, social, personal, environmental or organisational level preventing employees from participating in workplace HIV testing. Four peer-reviewed studies were included, two with quantitative and two with qualitative study designs. The overarching barriers across the studies were fear of compromised confidentiality, being stigmatised or discriminated in the event of testing HIV positive or being observed participating in HIV testing, and a low personal risk perception. Furthermore, it appeared that an awareness of an HIV-positive status hindered HIV testing at the workplace. Further research evidence of South African workplace barriers to HIV testing will enhance related interventions. This systematic review only found very little and contextualised evidence about workplace HCT barriers in South Africa, making it difficult to generalise, and not really sufficient to inform new interventions aimed at increasing workplace HCT uptake.

  18. 76 FR 76609 - Implementation of Office of Management and Budget Guidance on Drug-Free Workplace Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... 421 7 CFR Part 3021 RIN 0505AA14 Implementation of Office of Management and Budget Guidance on Drug-Free Workplace Requirements AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, USDA. ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY... rule on drug-free workplace requirements for financial assistance, currently located within part 3021...

  19. 49 CFR 40.203 - What problems cause a drug test to be cancelled unless they are corrected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What problems cause a drug test to be cancelled... PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Drug Tests § 40.203 What problems cause a drug test to be cancelled unless they are corrected? (a) As the MRO, when a...

  20. Drug Testing in Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklun, Eugene C.; Gluckman, Ivan B., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Public concern about use of drugs by young people in the United States remains high and efforts to counter drug abuse through education and intervention continue. While drug testing of athletes at the collegiate level is fairly common, legal restraints make testing less common at the secondary school level. After citing numerous statistics…

  1. 13 CFR 147.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 147.220 Section 147.220 Business... workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 147.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in...

  2. 15 CFR 29.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 29.220 Section 29.220 Commerce and Foreign... workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 29.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in...

  3. Safe procedure development to manage hazardous drugs in the workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Gaspar Carreño

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a safety working procedure for the employees in the Intermutual Hospital de Levante (HIL in those areas of activity that deal with the handling of hazardous drugs (MP. Methods: The procedure was developed in six phases: 1 hazard definition; 2 definition and identification of processes and development of general correct work practices about hazardous drugs’ selection and special handling; 3 detection, selection and set of specific recommendations to handle with hazardous drugs during the processes of preparation and administration included in the hospital GFT; 4 categorization of risk during the preparation/administration and development of an identification system; 5 information and training of professionals; 6 implementation of the identification measures and prevention guidelines. Results: Six processes were detected handling HD. During those processes, thirty HD were identified included in the hospital GFT and a safer alternative was found for 6 of them. The HD were classified into 4 risk categories based on those measures to be taken during the preparation and administration of each of them. Conclusions: The development and implementation of specific safety-work processes dealing with medication handling, allows hospital managers to accomplish effectively with their legal obligations about the area of prevention and provides healthcare professional staff with the adequate techniques and safety equipment to avoid possible dangers and risks of some drugs.

  4. Implications of Drug Testing Cheerleaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachsler, Tracy A.; Birren, Genevieve

    2016-01-01

    With the untimely death of a University of Louisville cheerleader due to an accidental drug overdose in the summer of 2014, the athletic department representatives took steps to prevent future incidents by adding cheerleaders to the randomized drug testing protocols conducted at the university for the student-athletes involved in National…

  5. Do employees participate in workplace HIV testing just to win a lottery prize? A quantitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Weihs

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: To encourage workers to participate in workplace HIV testing, some SouthAfrican automotive companies use lotteries. However, there is a lack of empirical evidence on how lottery incentives may influence employees’ workplace HIV counselling and testing behaviour.Research purpose: Determine whether workers intend to test for HIV only to win a lottery prize.Motivation for the study: The positive and also negative influences of lotteries on workers’ HIV testing behaviour need to be understood to avoid undue coercion in workplace HIV testing participation.Research design, approach and method: Post-test only quasi-experimental studies were conducted the day HIV testing and lotteries were announced to staff in four companies using a cross-sectional, self-administered survey that measured workers’ workplace HIV testing behaviour intentions. Intention to participate in workplace HIV counselling and testing was used as the main outcome of respondents’ behaviour and investigated via the statement: ‘If the company would organise its on-site Wellness Day tomorrow, I would go testing for HIV tomorrow’. In a first setting, two companies’ workers had to test for HIV to be entered in the lottery (n = 198. In the second setting, two other companies’ workers did not have to test to be entered in the lottery (n = 316. Chi-square tests were conducted to measure significant differences between the two conditions distinguishing between permanent and non-permanent staff.Main findings: No significant association was found between behaviour intention in the two settings for permanent workers’ workplace HIV testing intention ( χ2 = 1.145, p = 0.285, phi = -0.097. However, a significant association with a small effect size was found for non-permanent workers ( χ2 = 8.04, p = 0.005, phi = -0.279.Practical/managerial implications: Results show that lotteries to encourage workplace HIV testing are very likely to help workers ‘do the right

  6. 29 CFR 1472.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... establish my drug-free awareness program? 1472.220 Section 1472.220 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 1472.205 and an ongoing awareness...

  7. 45 CFR 630.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 630.220 Section 630.220 Public Welfare Regulations... when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If... ongoing awareness program as described in § 630.215, you must publish the statement and establish the...

  8. 32 CFR 26.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 26.220 Section 26.220 National Defense Department of....220 By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness... and an ongoing awareness program as described in § 26.215, you must publish the statement and...

  9. Workplace violence among female sex workers who use drugs in Vancouver, Canada: does client-targeted policing increase safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prangnell, Amy; Shannon, Kate; Nosova, Ekaterina; DeBeck, Kora; Milloy, M-J; Kerr, Thomas; Hayashi, Kanna

    2017-11-06

    Workplace violence, by clients or predators, poses serious negative health consequences for sex workers. In 2013, the Vancouver (British Columbia), Canada Police Department changed their guidelines with the goal of increasing safety for sex workers by focusing law enforcement on clients and third parties, but not sex workers. We sought to examine the trends and correlates of workplace violence among female sex workers (FSW) before and after the guideline change, using data collected from prospective cohorts of persons who use illicit drugs in Vancouver, Canada. Among 259 FSW, 21.0% reported workplace violence at least once during the study period between 2008 and 2014. There was no statistically significant change in rates of workplace violence after the guideline change. In our multivariable analysis, daily heroin use was independently associated with workplace violence. The 2013 policing guideline change did not appear to have resulted in decreased reports of workplace violence. Increased access to opioid agonist therapies may reduce workplace violence among drug-using FSW.

  10. 49 CFR 40.201 - What problems always cause a drug test to be cancelled and may result in a requirement for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What problems always cause a drug test to be... Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Drug Tests § 40.201 What problems always cause a drug test to be cancelled...

  11. Incentives for HIV testing at the workplace in the automotive industry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comprehensive HIV and AIDS workplace programmes made use of substantial lottery incentives in HIV counselling and testing drives to promote HIV testing at four companies in the automotive industry in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality. The main aim was to use lottery incentives to increase uptake for HIV testing.

  12. Personality Testing and Workplace Training: Exploring Stakeholders, Products and Purpose in Western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Henriette; Kroon, Brigitte; Poell, Rob F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how and why personality tests are used in workplace training. This research paper is guided by three research questions that inquire about the role of external and internal stakeholders, the value of psychometric and practical considerations in test selection, and the purpose of personality test use…

  13. Development and Pilot Test of the Workplace Readiness Questionnaire, a Theory-Based Instrument to Measure Small Workplaces' Readiness to Implement Wellness Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Peggy A; Helfrich, Christian D; Chan, K Gary; Allen, Claire L; Hammerback, Kristen; Kohn, Marlana J; Parrish, Amanda T; Weiner, Bryan J; Harris, Jeffrey R

    2017-01-01

    To develop a theory-based questionnaire to assess readiness for change in small workplaces adopting wellness programs. In developing our scale, we first tested items via "think-aloud" interviews. We tested the revised items in a cross-sectional quantitative telephone survey. The study setting comprised small workplaces (20-250 employees) in low-wage industries. Decision-makers representing small workplaces in King County, Washington (think-aloud interviews, n = 9), and the United States (telephone survey, n = 201) served as study subjects. We generated items for each construct in Weiner's theory of organizational readiness for change. We also measured workplace characteristics and current implementation of workplace wellness programs. We assessed reliability by coefficient alpha for each of the readiness questionnaire subscales. We tested the association of all subscales with employers' current implementation of wellness policies, programs, and communications, and conducted a path analysis to test the associations in the theory of organizational readiness to change. Each of the readiness subscales exhibited acceptable internal reliability (coefficient alpha range, .75-.88) and was positively associated with wellness program implementation ( p theory of organizational readiness to change, except change efficacy did not predict change-related effort. We developed a new questionnaire to assess small workplaces' readiness to adopt and implement evidence-based wellness programs. Our findings also provide empirical validation of Weiner's theory of readiness for change.

  14. Personality testing and workplace training : Exploring stakeholders, products and purpose in Western Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundgren, H.; Kroon, B.; Poell, R.F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore how and why personality tests are used in workplace training. This research paper is guided by three research questions that inquire about the role of external and internal stakeholders, the value of psychometric and practical considerations in test

  15. Incentives for HIV testing at the workplace in the auto motive industry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-12

    Jun 12, 2017 ... Creative Commons licence CC-BY-NC 4.0. Comprehensive HIV and AIDS workplace programmes made use of substantial lottery incentives in HIV counselling and testing drives to promote HIV testing at four companies in the automotive industry in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality. The main aim was ...

  16. 28 CFR 83.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 83.220 Section 83.220 Judicial... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 83.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in § 83...

  17. 41 CFR 105-74.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 105-74.220 Section 105... awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 105-74.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in § 105-74.215, you must publish the...

  18. 36 CFR 1212.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 1212.220 Section 1212.220... awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 1212.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in § 1212.215, you must publish the statement...

  19. Hostility, job attitudes, and workplace deviance: test of a multilevel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Timothy A; Scott, Brent A; Ilies, Remus

    2006-01-01

    The authors tested a model, inspired by affective events theory (H. M. Weiss & R. Cropanzano, 1996), that examines the dynamic nature of emotions at work, work attitudes, and workplace deviance. Sixty-four employees completed daily surveys over 3 weeks, reporting their mood, job satisfaction, perceived interpersonal treatment, and deviance. Supervisors and significant others also evaluated employees' workplace deviance and trait hostility, respectively. Over half of the total variance in workplace deviance was within-individual, and this intraindividual variance was predicted by momentary hostility, interpersonal justice, and job satisfaction. Moreover, trait hostility moderated the interpersonal justice-state hostility relation such that perceived injustice was more strongly related to state hostility for individuals high in trait hostility. (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. 2 CFR 182.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 182.220 Section 182.220 Grants and... awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 182.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in § 182.215, you must publish the statement and...

  1. A test of safety, violence prevention, and civility climate domain-specific relationships with relevant workplace hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazica, Michele W; Spector, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Safety climate, violence prevention climate, and civility climate were independently developed and linked to domain-specific workplace hazards, although all three were designed to promote the physical and psychological safety of workers. To test domain specificity between conceptually related workplace climates and relevant workplace hazards. Data were collected from 368 persons employed in various industries and descriptive statistics were calculated for all study variables. Correlational and relative weights analyses were used to test for domain specificity. The three climate domains were similarly predictive of most workplace hazards, regardless of domain specificity. This study suggests that the three climate domains share a common higher order construct that may predict relevant workplace hazards better than any of the scales alone.

  2. Applying computerized adaptive testing to the Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised: Rasch analysis of workplace bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shu-Ching; Chien, Tsair-Wei; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Li, Yu-Chi; Yui, Mei-Shu

    2014-02-17

    Workplace bullying is a prevalent problem in contemporary work places that has adverse effects on both the victims of bullying and organizations. With the rapid development of computer technology in recent years, there is an urgent need to prove whether item response theory-based computerized adaptive testing (CAT) can be applied to measure exposure to workplace bullying. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative efficiency and measurement precision of a CAT-based test for hospital nurses compared to traditional nonadaptive testing (NAT). Under the preliminary conditions of a single domain derived from the scale, a CAT module bullying scale model with polytomously scored items is provided as an example for evaluation purposes. A total of 300 nurses were recruited and responded to the 22-item Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R). All NAT (or CAT-selected) items were calibrated with the Rasch rating scale model and all respondents were randomly selected for a comparison of the advantages of CAT and NAT in efficiency and precision by paired t tests and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). The NAQ-R is a unidimensional construct that can be applied to measure exposure to workplace bullying through CAT-based administration. Nursing measures derived from both tests (CAT and NAT) were highly correlated (r=.97) and their measurement precisions were not statistically different (P=.49) as expected. CAT required fewer items than NAT (an efficiency gain of 32%), suggesting a reduced burden for respondents. There were significant differences in work tenure between the 2 groups (bullied and nonbullied) at a cutoff point of 6 years at 1 worksite. An AUROC of 0.75 (95% CI 0.68-0.79) with logits greater than -4.2 (or >30 in summation) was defined as being highly likely bullied in a workplace. With CAT-based administration of the NAQ-R for nurses, their burden was substantially reduced without compromising measurement precision.

  3. A Web-Based Therapeutic Workplace for the Treatment of Drug Addiction and Chronic Unemployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Kenneth; Wong, Conrad J.; Grabinski, Michael J.; Hampton, Jacqueline; Sylvest, Christine E.; Dillon, Erin M.; Wentland, R. Daniel

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a Web-based therapeutic workplace intervention designed to promote heroin and cocaine abstinence and train and employ participants as data entry operators. Patients are paid to participate in training and then to perform data entry jobs in a therapeutic workplace business. Salary is linked to abstinence by requiring patients…

  4. Evaluating employee health risks due to hypertension and obesity: self-testing workplace health stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John T

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated employee health risks due to hypertension, pre-hypertension, overweight, and obesity through the use of self-testing workplace health stations that measure blood pressure (BP) and weight. We analyzed BP and weight data from the first 18 months after the installation of health stations in the offices of a financial services company with approximately 20,000 employees in 13 US workplace locations. Data showed that 21.7% of the employees voluntarily used a health station at least once to measure BP or weight during the first 18 months. Health station usage ranged from a high of 51.8% to a low of 5.3% at the 13 workplace locations. Among health station users, 52.5% used a health station more than once. Health station users used the health stations an average of 4.2 times (median, 2 times). Among health station users, 95.6% measured BP, 92.2% measured weight, and 87.8% measured both BP and weight. Initial BP results were: hypertension 26.7%, prehypertension 40.3%, and normal BP 32.9%. The initial body mass index (BMI) results were: obese 38%, overweight 34.7%, normal weight 25.3%, and underweight 2%. Employees with hypertension on the initial reading used the health stations more frequently than employees with pre-hypertension or normal BP. Employees with an obese BMI result on the initial reading used the health stations more frequently than employees with an overweight or normal BMI result. Many employees reduced their health risks due to hypertension, pre-hypertension, overweight, or obesity, although the health risks of many other employees were unchanged or increased. Self-testing workplace health stations that measure BP and weight provide employees with information about their health risks due to hypertension, pre-hypertension, overweight, and obesity. Self-testing workplace health stations can also be used to identify at-risk employees who may benefit from health and wellness programs.

  5. 49 CFR 655.21 - Drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug testing. 655.21 Section 655.21 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 655.21 Drug testing. (a) An employer shall establish a program that provides testing for prohibited...

  6. A lottery incentive system to facilitate dialogue and social support for workplace HIV counselling and testing: a qualitative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihs, Martin; Meyer-Weitz, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Despite South African mid-sized companies' efforts to offer HIV counselling and testing (HCT) in the workplace, companies report relatively poor uptake rates. An urgent need for a range of different interventions aimed at increasing participation in workplace HCT has been identified. The aim of this study was to explore qualitatively the influence of a lottery incentive system (LIS) as an intervention to influence shop-floor workers' workplace HIV testing behaviour. A qualitative study was conducted among 17 shop-floor workers via convenience sampling in two mid-sized South African automotive manufacturing companies in which an LIS for HCT was implemented. The in-depth interviews employed a semi-structured interview schedule and thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. The interviews revealed that the LIS created excitement in the companies and renewed employees' personal interest in HCT. The excitement facilitated social interactions that resulted in a strong group cohesion pertaining to HCT that mitigated the burden of HIV stigma in the workplace. Open discussions allowed for the development of supportive social group pressure to seek HCT as a collective in anticipation of a reward. Lotteries were perceived as a supportive and innovative company approach to workplace HCT. The study identified important aspects for consideration by companies when using an LIS to enhance workplace HIV testing. The significance of inter- and intra-player dialogue in activating supportive social norms for HIV testing in collectivist African contexts was highlighted.

  7. Legal Forum: Drug Testing in Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Janet M; Thomas, Stephen B.

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews court decisions concerning drug testing among prisoners, military personnel, public employees, and school employees. Fourth Amendment considerations of unreasonable search and seizure are discussed. In developing drug testing policies school districts must review these decisions in order to both protect individual rights and…

  8. 29 CFR 1472.225 - What actions must I take concerning employees who are convicted of drug violations in the workplace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What actions must I take concerning employees who are convicted of drug violations in the workplace? 1472.225 Section 1472.225 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... in a drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation program approved for these purposes by a Federal, State...

  9. Drug progression model: a social control test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, A C; Bahr, S J

    1995-09-01

    A social control drug progression model was delineated and tested using a sample of 2,626 high school students from the southwestern United States. Along with the social control constructs of parental attachment, educational attachment, religious attachment, and conventional values, we incorporated alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use into the model as intervening variables. The model explains 39% of the variation in the self-reported amphetamine use and 24% of the variation in "hard drug" use (cocaine, heroin, LSD, and PCP). The findings suggest that the integration of social control theory and drug progression improves the predictive power of the model of adolescent drug use.

  10. Final Progress Report: Developing Ethical Practices for Genetics Testing in the Workplace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laura Roberts, MD; Teddy Warner, PhD

    2008-05-14

    Our multidisciplinary research team for this project involved collaboration between the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) and the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center (UNM HSC). Our research team in Wisconsin was led by Laura Roberts, M.D., Principal Investigator, and included Scott Helberg, MLS (Project Coordinator), Kate Green Hammond, Ph.D. (Consultant), Krisy Edenharder (Research Coordinator), and Mark Talatzko (Research Assistant). Our New Mexico-based team was led by Teddy Warner, Ph.D., Co-Principal Investigator and UNM Site Principal Investigator, and included Suzanne Roybal (Project Assistant), Darlyn Mabon (Project Assistant), Kate Green Hammond, PhD (Senior Research Scientist on the UNM team from 2004 until January, 2007), and Paulette Christopher (Research Assistant). In addition, computer technical and web support for the web-based survey conducted on a secure server at the University of New Mexico was provided by Kevin Wiley and Kim Hagen of the Systems and Programming Team of the Health Sciences Center Library and Information Center. We stated 3 aims in the grant proposal: (1) To collect web survey reports of the ethical perspectives, concerns, preferences and decision-making related to genetic testing using surveys from employees at: (a) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); (b) Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); and (c) the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center (UNMHSC); (2) To perform an extensive literature search and the extant survey data to develop evidence-based policy recommendations for ethically sound genetic testing associated with research and occupational health activities in the workplace; and, (3) To host a conference at the Medical College of Wisconsin to provide employers, workers, health professionals, researchers, the public, and the media an opportunity to consider ethical issues involved in genetic

  11. Growing pains : how drug testing keeps workers and assets safe in a booming oil patch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulgaard, T.S.

    2006-06-15

    Drug abuse has become a subject of concern to the oil and gas industry, where mistakes in the operation of large machines can result in injury, death and the loss of millions of dollars. Pre-employment urine tests are becoming standard procedure in the oil field. Many supervisors refuse to let employees start work without a clear test. Urine samples are tested for the presence of cannabis, cocaine, opiates, amphetamines and phencyclidine. When a worker is injured or killed on the job, or after an uncommon error that causes significant damage, all parties involved are tested as soon as possible and a receipt of the results are expedited. The Alberta Human Rights and Citizenship Commission is now addressing the issue of drug testing, and has ascertained that drug and alcohol testing are only allowable in certain circumstances, and that it is discriminatory to test potential or existing employees for drug and alcohol use if the testing is not reasonable or justifiable. They have also suggested that there is a duty to accommodate persons with disabilities in the workplace. Drug and alcohol dependency fall within the meaning of disabled. Under the Construction Owner's Association of Alberta's Canadian Model for a Safe Workplace, testing must work in concert with treatment. Current employees are directed to seek help via an employee assistant plan. Workers and supervisors report that drug use is rampant in work camps. Industry-wide, fail rates for those who take part in drug testing are quoted by experts as ranging from between 2 to 14 per cent. 2 figs.

  12. A successful workplace program for voluntary counseling and testing and treatment of HIV/AIDS at Heineken, Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collier, Alizanne C.; van der Borght, Stefaan F. M.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias; Richards, Sarah C.; Feeley, Frank G.

    2007-01-01

    Heineken Breweries launched a workplace HIV/AIDS program at its Rwanda subsidiary in September 2001. By January 25, 2005, 736/2,595 eligible individuals had reported for counseling and HIV testing: 380/521 employees (72.9%), 254/412 spouses (61.7%), 99/1,517 children (6.5%), and 3/145 retired

  13. Development of a standardized procedure for testing the efficacy of workplace cleansers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Peter; Seyfarth, Florian; Sonsmann, Flora; John, Swen-Malte; Diepgen, Thomas; Schliemann, Sibylle

    2014-01-01

    Occupational skin cleansing is a risk factor for cumulative irritant dermatitis. Standardized methods are required to assess the cleaning efficacy of occupational skin cleansers, allowing us to choose the optimal cleanser with minimal irritation for specific workplaces. To develop a standardized procedure for testing the cleaning efficacy of occupational skin cleansers. In this single-blind, randomized, monocentric clinical trial in 24 healthy volunteers, the cleaning efficacy of generic reference cleansers was assessed against standardized test dirts. The test procedure included standardized dirt application, standardized washing with an automated skin cleaning device, and quantification of the cleaning efficacy by chromametry. For two cleansers, reproducibility of the cleaning efficacy assessment was studied. Furthermore, the performance of two cleansers was compared with that of commercial skin cleansers. Cleaning factors ranged from 12% up to 97% for the respective model dirts. A high reproducibility of the washing and the assessment procedure could be shown. The comparison of the washing efficacies for two reference cleansers with those of commercial cleansers showed partly similar performances, but also a higher cleaning efficacy for some dirts of the reference cleansers. The testing procedure proved to be applicable to a wide spectrum of cleansers and model dirts. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Incentives for HIV testing at the workplace in the automotive industry in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality: Ethical considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Weihs; Anna Meyer-Weitz; Friederike Baasner-Weihs

    2017-01-01

    Comprehensive HIV and AIDS workplace programmes made use of substantial lottery incentives in HIV counselling and testing drives to promote HIV testing at four companies in the automotive industry in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality. The main aim was to use lottery incentives to increase uptake for HIV testing. This would help to define company HIV prevalence and ensure timely support, care and treatment of employees. In total, 1 324 employees, making up about 90% of the total staff, were ...

  15. Critical issues in psychological test use in the South African workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Paterson

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Various factors in South African workplaces, ranging from unemployment and equity considerations to rapid occupational change driven by technological inputs, have placed greater emphasis on effective selection and development of human resources. This leads to greater demands on psychological assessment in the organizational setting with respect to ensuring responsible, ethical and equitable assessment. The study aims to investigate the extent and purposes of psychological test usage, the influence of the changing world of work on assessment, equity and cross-cultural applicability of tests and competence of test users in South Africa. The results are based on twenty two structured individual interviews, which were conducted with purposively sampled stakeholders from various economic sectors. Opsomming Verskeie faktore in Suid-Afrikaanse werkomgewing, wat wissel van werkloosheid en billikheidsoorwegings tot by vinnig veranderende beroepsomstandighede as gevolg van tegnologiese ontwikkeling, plaas toenemende druk op die doeltreffende keuring en ontwikkeling van menslike hulpbronne. Dit lei tot toenemende eise wat in die organisasie konteks aan sielkundige meting gestel word om verantwoordelike, etiese en billike assessering te verseker. Hierdie studie was daarop gerig om die doel met en omvang van die gebruik van sielkundige toetse, die invloed van die veranderende wêreld van werk op die assessering, billike en kruiskulturele toepaslikheid van toetse, asook die bevoegdheid van toetsgebruikers in Suid-Afrika te ondersoek. Die resultate is gebaseer op ’n doelgerigte steekproef van twee-en-twintig gestruktureerde onderhoude wat met belanghebbers uit verskillende ekonomiese sektore, gevoer is.

  16. Incentives for HIV testing at the workplace in the automotive industry in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality: Ethical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Weihs

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive HIV and AIDS workplace programmes made use of substantial lottery incentives in HIV counselling and testing drives to promote HIV testing at four companies in the automotive industry in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality. The main aim was to use lottery incentives to increase uptake for HIV testing. This would help to define company HIV prevalence and ensure timely support, care and treatment of employees. In total, 1 324 employees, making up about 90% of the total staff, were tested for HIV in the four companies during wellness testing days. In order to gain an understanding of employees’ experiences of the lotteries as part of the HIV counselling and testing drive, quantitative data were collected among a total of 414 employees, and 17 interviews were conducted in the four companies. In this article, we investigate the issue of whether the lotteries unduly influenced the employees’ participation in workplace HIV testing, and an approach to resolving an identified ethical dilemma is presented. The ethical question as to whether lottery incentives contribute to undue coercion was explored using both a utilitarian and a deontological approach. The analysis concluded that the use of lotteries to encourage HIV testing in the workplaces of the automotive industry in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality can be deemed morally acceptable.

  17. 44 CFR Appendix to Part 17 - Certification Regarding Drug-Free Workplace Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... criminal drug offense resulting from a violation occurring during the conduct of any grant activity, he or... the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812) and as further defined by regulation (21 CFR 1308.11... the Federal or State criminal drug statutes; Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal...

  18. 22 CFR Appendix C to Part 513 - Certification Regarding Drug-Free Workplace Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... criminal drug offense resulting from a violation occurring during the conduct of any grant activity, he or... the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812) and as further defined by regulation (21 CFR 1308.11... the Federal or State criminal drug statutes; Criminal drug statute means a Federal or non-Federal...

  19. Postulating a dermal pathway for exposure to anti-neoplastic drugs among hospital workers. Applying a conceptual model to the results of three workplace surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, H.; Hoek, F.; Uitterhoeve, R.; Huijbers, R.; Overmars, R.F.; Anzion, R.; Vermeulen, R.

    2000-01-01

    Dermal exposure to anti-neoplastic drugs has been suggested as a potentially important route of exposure of hospital workers. Three small-scale workplace surveys were carried out in several hospitals focusing on contamination by leakage from IV infusion systems; contamination by spilled urine of

  20. Testing knowledge sharing effectiveness: trust, motivation, leadership style, workplace spirituality and social network embedded model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Muhammad Sabbir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this inquiry is to investigate the relationships among the antecedents of knowledge sharing effectiveness under the position of non-academic staff of higher learning institutions through an empirical test of a conceptual model consisting of trust, extrinsic and intrinsic motivation, leadership style, workplace spirituality and online social network. This study used the respondents from the non-academic staff of higher learning institutions in Malaysia (n = 200, utilizing a self-administered survey questionnaire. The structural equation modeling approach was used to test the proposed hypotheses. The outcomes indicate that all the antecedents play a substantial function in knowledge sharing effectiveness. In addition, perceived risk plays a mediating role between trust and knowledge sharing effectiveness. On the other hand, this research also proved the communication skill also plays a mediating role between leadership style and knowledge sharing effectiveness. This study contributes to pioneering empirical findings on knowledge sharing literature under the scope of the non-academic staff perspective.

  1. Workplace Activity in Health Professionals Exposed to Chemotherapy Drugs: An Otoneurological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes, Natália Martinez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The manipulation of antineoplastic drugs presents high risk for accidents and occupational diseases. Objective To evaluate the auditory and vestibular systems of workers who are exposed to chemotherapeutic treatment in the University Hospital of Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil, and to identify the use of individual protection equipment, related to the obtained results. Methods This study is a cross-sectional study using a quantitative method. We evaluate 33 male and female workers, ranging from 21–60 years old, of the nursing and pharmacy sectors. The workers underwent conventional Audiologic Assessment; Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions; and Computerized Vectoelectronystagmography. Results The majority of the sample was female (90.9%. Individual protection equipment was used by 90.9% of the workers. Complaints of dizziness were reported by 56.25% of nursing workers and 52.94% of pharmacy workers. Audiological and vestibular assessment results were within normal limits, 96.97% and 74.20%, respectively. However, audiometric configuration of notch type was identified in 75.75% of all workers. Audiometric notches (76% and altered caloric test (100% were often associated with decreased use of coal masks. Conclusion Among the workers evaluated, the vestibulocochlear system was within the normal limits. The presence of notch configuration indicates the need to use individual protection equipment.

  2. Creating Safe Neighborhoods, Safe Streets, Safe Schools, [and] Safe Workplaces: Using Illinois' Drug Laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority, Chicago.

    This handbook provides renters, homeowners, teachers, parents, and workers with tools for ridding their communities of illegal drugs. The booklet describes relevant anti-drug laws, and provides examples of how they are being used successfully in one state. The case studies cited almost always involve individuals and community groups working…

  3. 75 FR 22205 - Implementation of OMB Guidance on Drug-Free Workplace Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... levels of government. List of Subjects 2 CFR Part 2245 Administrative practice and procedure, Drug abuse... procedure, Drug abuse, Grant programs, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. 0 Accordingly, for the...;having general applicability and legal effect, most of which are keyed #0;to and codified in the Code of...

  4. The Development of a Test to Assess Drug Using Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoff, Michael E.

    The objective of the study was to develop a test which could measure both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of drug-using behavior, including such factors as attitudes toward drugs, experience with drugs, and knowledge about drugs. The Drug Use Scale was developed containing 134 items and dealing with five classes of drugs: marijuana,…

  5. Additive value of patch testing custom epoxy materials from the workplace at the occupational disease specialty clinic in Toronto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Marie-Claude; Holness, D Linn; Dekoven, Joel; Skotnicki, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to epoxy resins is one of the major causes of occupationally induced ACD. Testing of custom epoxy materials from the workplace is often performed to diagnose ACD. The objective of this study was to investigate the additive value of patch testing custom-made epoxy materials. We retrospectively analyzed outcomes of 24 patients who were tested to custom epoxy resin materials between January 2002 and July 2011. For 11 patients (46%), the testing of their materials from work had no additional value (negative results). For 13 patients (54%), there was an additional value of testing custom allergens. Of those, 7 patients (54%) had positive reactions to custom epoxy materials that reinforced the test results found with the commercially available allergens, and 6 (46%) patients had positive reactions only to custom epoxy materials. Therefore, for 6 patients (25%), there was a definite additive value of testing custom epoxy materials because the allergy was discovered with custom testing and not with the commercially available allergens. Because of the high percentage (54%) of patients with additive value of patch testing custom epoxy materials, we think that the inclusion of actual workplace epoxy materials should be strongly considered when patch testing patients with occupational epoxy exposure.

  6. Medication monitoring and drug testing ethics project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Richard; Moe, Jeffrey L; Sevier, Catherine Harvey; Sevier, David; Waitzkin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, Duke University initiated a research project, funded by an unrestricted research grant from Millennium Laboratories, a drug testing company. The project focused on assessing the frequency and nature of questionable, unethical, and illegal business practices in the clinical drug testing industry and assessing the potential for establishing a business code of ethics. Laboratory leaders, clinicians, industry attorneys, ethicists, and consultants participated in the survey, were interviewed, and attended two face-to-face meetings to discuss a way forward. The study demonstrated broad acknowledgment of variations in the legal and regulatory environment, resulting in inconsistent enforcement of industry practices. Study participants expressed agreement that overtly illegal practices sometimes exist, particularly when laboratory representatives and clinicians discuss reimbursement, extent of testing, and potential business incentives with medical practitioners. Most respondents reported directly observing probable violations involving marketing materials, contracts, or, in the case of some individuals, directly soliciting people with offers of clinical supplies and other "freebies." While many study respondents were skeptical that voluntary standards alone would eliminate questionable business practices, most viewed ethics codes and credentialing as an important first step that could potentially mitigate uneven enforcement, while improving quality of care and facilitating preferred payment options for credentialed parties. Many were willing to participate in future discussions and industry-wide initiatives to improve the environment.

  7. Discrimination and Well-being: Testing the differential source and Organizational Justice theories of workplace aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wood, S.; Braeken, J.; Niven, K.

    2013-01-01

    People may be subjected to discrimination from a variety of sources in the workplace. In this study of mental health workers, we contrast four potential perpetrators of discrimination (managers, co-workers, patients, and visitors) to investigate whether the negative impact of discrimination on

  8. Mitragynine (Kratom) - monitoring in sports drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guddat, Sven; Görgens, Christian; Steinhart, Vanessa; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2016-11-01

    In 2014, mitragynine (Kratom) was placed on the Monitoring List of the World Anti-Doping Agency to gain information of its current use in professional sports. Therefore, analytical strategies in sports drug testing are presented and the first Kratom case in professional sports is described. It is outlined that thorough monitoring by anti-doping laboratories is of utmost importance to obtain data on Kratom's misuse and to protect athletes from potential health hazards. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. 49 CFR 655.41 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... employee takes a pre-employment drug test administered under this part with a verified negative result. An...) When a covered employee or applicant has previously failed or refused a pre-employment drug test...-employment drug test administered under this part with a verified negative result. (c) If a pre-employment...

  10. 49 CFR 219.501 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pre-Employment Tests § 219.501 Pre... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 219.501 Section 219... covered service, unless the employee has been administered a test for drugs with a result that did not...

  11. 78 FR 52931 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Abbreviated New Drug Applications: Stability Testing of Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Abbreviated New Drug...,'' November 1996; (4) ``Q1D Bracketing and Matrixing Designs for Stability Testing of New Drug Substances and... represent the Agency's current thinking on ANDAs: Stability Testing of Drug Substances and Products...

  12. A Mobile Application for Easy Design and Testing of Algorithms to Monitor Physical Activity in the Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Spinsante

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses approaches to Human Activity Recognition (HAR with the aim of monitoring the physical activity of people in the workplace, by means of a smartphone application exploiting the available on-board accelerometer sensor. In fact, HAR via a smartphone or wearable sensor can provide important information regarding the level of daily physical activity, especially in situations where a sedentary behavior usually occurs, like in modern workplace environments. Increased sitting time is significantly associated with severe health diseases, and the workplace is an appropriate intervention setting, due to the sedentary behavior typical of modern jobs. Within this paper, the state-of-the-art components of HAR are analyzed, in order to identify and select the most effective signal filtering and windowing solutions for physical activity monitoring. The classifier development process is based upon three phases; a feature extraction phase, a feature selection phase, and a training phase. In the training phase, a publicly available dataset is used to test among different classifier types and learning methods. A user-friendly Android-based smartphone application with low computational requirements has been developed to run field tests, which allows to easily change the classifier under test, and to collect new datasets ready for use with machine learning APIs. The newly created datasets may include additional information, like the smartphone position, its orientation, and the user’s physical characteristics. Using the mobile tool, a classifier based on a decision tree is finally set up and enriched with the introduction of some robustness improvements. The developed approach is capable of classifying six activities, and to distinguish between not active (sitting and active states, with an accuracy near to 99%. The mobile tool, which is going to be further extended and enriched, will allow for rapid and easy benchmarking of new algorithms based

  13. 21 CFR 862.3910 - Tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system. 862.3910 Section 862.3910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology...

  14. Choosing the right laboratory: a review of clinical and forensic toxicology services for urine drug testing in pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisfield, Gary M; Goldberger, Bruce A; Bertholf, Roger L

    2015-01-01

    Urine drug testing (UDT) services are provided by a variety of clinical, forensic, and reference/specialty laboratories. These UDT services differ based on the principal activity of the laboratory. Clinical laboratories provide testing primarily focused on medical care (eg, emergency care, inpatients, and outpatient clinics), whereas forensic laboratories perform toxicology tests related to postmortem and criminal investigations, and drug-free workplace programs. Some laboratories now provide UDT specifically designed for monitoring patients on chronic opioid therapy. Accreditation programs for clinical laboratories have existed for nearly half a century, and a federal certification program for drug-testing laboratories was established in the 1980s. Standards of practice for forensic toxicology services other than workplace drug testing have been established in recent years. However, no accreditation program currently exists for UDT in pain management, and this review considers several aspects of laboratory accreditation and certification relevant to toxicology services, with the intention to provide guidance to clinicians in their selection of the appropriate laboratory for UDT surveillance of their patients on opioid therapy.

  15. Workplace violence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossche, S. van den

    2014-01-01

    Workplace violence refers to incidents where workers are abused, threatened or assaulted, either by people from within or outside their workplace. Workplace violence may have severe negative consequences for the workers affected, their co-workers and families; as well as for organisations and the

  16. 14 CFR 120.35 - Testing for prohibited drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Testing for prohibited drugs. 120.35... (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS DRUG AND... for prohibited drugs. (a) Each certificate holder or operator shall test each of its employees who...

  17. 49 CFR 219.903 - Retention of drug testing records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Retention of drug testing records. 219.903 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Recordkeeping Requirements § 219.903 Retention of drug testing records. (a) General requirement. In addition to the records required to be kept...

  18. 78 FR 41999 - Combined Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... air traffic controllers, Drug abuse, Drug testing, Operators, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements...;having general applicability and legal effect, most of which are keyed #0;to and codified in the Code of... Administration 14 CFR Part 120 RIN 2120-AK01 Combined Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs AGENCY: Federal Aviation...

  19. Scientific issues in drug testing: council on scientific affairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-12

    Testing for drugs in biologic fluids, especially urine, is a practice that has become widespread. The technology of testing for drugs in urine has greatly improved in recent years. Inexpensive screening techniques are not sufficiently accurate for forensic testing standards, which must be met wihen a person's employment or reputation may be affected by results. This is particularly a concern during screening of a population in which the prevalence of drug use is very low, in which the predictive value of a positive result would be quite low. Physicians should be aware that results from drug testing can yield accurate evidence of prior exposure to drugs, but they do not provide information about patterns of drug use, about abuse of or dependence on drugs, or about mental or physical impairments that may result from drug use.

  20. A Computerized Lifestyle Application to Promote Multiple Health Behaviors at the Workplace: Testing Its Behavioral and Psychological Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippke, Sonia; Fleig, Lena; Wiedemann, Amelie U; Schwarzer, Ralf

    2015-10-01

    Preventive health behaviors, such as regular physical activity and healthy nutrition, are recommended to maintain employability and to facilitate the health of employees. Theory-based workplace health promotion needs to include psychological constructs and consider the motivational readiness (so-called stages of change) of employees. According to the stages, people can be grouped as nonintenders (not motivated to change and not performing the goal behavior), intenders (decided to adopt the goal behavior but not started yet), or actors (performing the goal behavior already). The tailoring to these stages can be done computer based and should make workplace health promotion more effective. It was tested whether a parsimonious computer-based health promotion program implemented at the workplace was effective in terms of lifestyle changes and psychological outcomes as well as body weight. We hypothesized that the stage-matched intervention would outperform the one-size-fits-all active control condition (standard care intervention). In a randomized controlled trial, a total of 1269 employees were recruited by a trained research assistant at their workplace during a routine medical examination. After excluding noneligible employees, 560 completed Time 1 (T1), and 384 also completed Time 2 (T2), achieving a retention rate of 68.6%. Two fully automated computer-based treatments were adopted: (1) an active control condition with information about benefits of exercise and healthy nutrition (n=52), or (2) a stage-matched multiple-behavior intervention that provided different psychological treatments to 9 subgroups, addressing stages of change (nonintenders, intenders, and actors per behavior; n=332). Baseline assessments (T1) on behavior, psychological constructs, and body weight were repeated after 4 weeks (T2). The stage-matched intervention outperformed the active control condition for lifestyle changes containing physical activity and nutrition (χ(2) 1=3.5; P=.04, for N

  1. Drug Combinations: Tests and Analysis with Isoboles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarida, Ronald J

    2016-03-18

    Described in this unit are experimental and computational methods to detect and classify drug interactions. In most cases, this relates to two drugs or compounds with overtly similar effects, e.g., two analgesics or two anti-hypertensives. From the dose-response data of the individual drugs, it is possible to generate a curve, the isobole, which defines all dose combinations that are expected to yield a specified effect. The theory underlying the isobole involves the calculation of doses of drug A that are effectively equivalent to doses of drug B with that equivalence determining whether the isobole is linear or nonlinear. In either case, the isobole allows for a comparison with actual combination effects making it possible to determine whether the interaction is synergistic, additive, or sub-additive. Actual as well as illustrative data are employed to demonstrate experimental design and data analysis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. A test of cognitive mediation in a 12-month physical activity workplace intervention: does it explain behaviour change in women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Pickering, Michael A; Rhodes, Ryan E; Courneya, Kerry S; Spence, John C

    2010-05-03

    Attempts to demonstrate the efficacy of interventions aimed at increasing physical activity (PA) have been mixed. Further, studies are seldom designed in a manner that facilitates the understanding of how or why a treatment is effective or ineffective and PA intervention designs should be guided by a heavier reliance upon behavioral theory. The use of a mediating variable framework offers a systematic methodological approach to testing the role of theory, and could also identify the effectiveness of specific intervention components. The primary purpose of this paper was to test the mediating role that cognitive constructs may have played in regards to the positive effect that a workplace behavioral intervention had on leisure-time PA for women. A subsidiary purpose was to examine the cross-sectional relationships of these cognitive constructs with PA behavior. The Physical Activity Workplace Study was a randomized controlled trial which compared the effects of stage-matched and standard print materials upon self-reported leisure-time PA, within a workplace sample at 6 and 12-months. In this secondary analysis we examined the mediation effects of 14 psychosocial constructs across 3 major social-cognitive theories which were operationalized for the intervention materials and measured at baseline, 6 and 12-months. We examined change in PA and change in the psychological constructs employing a mediation strategy proposed by Baron and Kenny for: (1) the first 6-months (i.e., initial change), (2) the second 6-months (i.e., delayed change), and (3) the entire 12-months (overall change) of the study on 323 women (n = 213 control/standard materials group; n = 110 stage-matched materials group). Of the 14 constructs and 42 tests (including initial, delayed and overall change) two positive results were identified (i.e., overall change in pros, initial change in experiential powerful intervention approaches processes), with very small effect sizes. However, these mediating

  3. A test of cognitive mediation in a 12-month physical activity workplace intervention: does it explain behaviour change in women?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pickering Michael A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attempts to demonstrate the efficacy of interventions aimed at increasing physical activity (PA have been mixed. Further, studies are seldom designed in a manner that facilitates the understanding of how or why a treatment is effective or ineffective and PA intervention designs should be guided by a heavier reliance upon behavioral theory. The use of a mediating variable framework offers a systematic methodological approach to testing the role of theory, and could also identify the effectiveness of specific intervention components. The primary purpose of this paper was to test the mediating role that cognitive constructs may have played in regards to the positive effect that a workplace behavioral intervention had on leisure-time PA for women. A subsidiary purpose was to examine the cross-sectional relationships of these cognitive constructs with PA behavior. Methods The Physical Activity Workplace Study was a randomized controlled trial which compared the effects of stage-matched and standard print materials upon self-reported leisure-time PA, within a workplace sample at 6 and 12-months. In this secondary analysis we examined the mediation effects of 14 psychosocial constructs across 3 major social-cognitive theories which were operationalized for the intervention materials and measured at baseline, 6 and 12-months. We examined change in PA and change in the psychological constructs employing a mediation strategy proposed by Baron and Kenny for: (1 the first 6-months (i.e., initial change, (2 the second 6-months (i.e., delayed change, and (3 the entire 12-months (overall change of the study on 323 women (n = 213 control/standard materials group; n = 110 stage-matched materials group. Results Of the 14 constructs and 42 tests (including initial, delayed and overall change two positive results were identified (i.e., overall change in pros, initial change in experiential powerful intervention approaches processes, with very

  4. 21 CFR 864.3260 - OTC test sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false OTC test sample collection systems for drugs of abuse testing. 864.3260 Section 864.3260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Pathology...

  5. Testing for drugs of abuse in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Sharon; Siqueira, Lorena M; Ammerman, Seth D; Gonzalez, Pamela K; Ryan, Sheryl A; Siqueira, Lorena M; Smith, Vincent C

    2014-06-01

    Drug testing is often used as part of an assessment for substance use in children and adolescents. However, the indications for drug testing and guidance on how to use this procedure effectively are not clear. The complexity and invasiveness of the procedure and limitations to the information derived from drug testing all affect its utility. The objective of this clinical report is to provide guidance to pediatricians and other clinicians on the efficacy and efficient use of drug testing on the basis of a review of the nascent scientific literature, policy guidelines, and published clinical recommendations.

  6. Workplace learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warring, Niels

    2005-01-01

    In November 2004 the Research Consortium on workplace learning under Learning Lab Denmark arranged the international conference “Workplace Learning – from the learner’s perspective”. The conference’s aim was to bring together researchers from different countries and institutions to explore...... and discuss recent developments in our understanding of workplace and work-related learning. The conference had nearly 100 participants with 59 papers presented, and among these five have been selected for presentation is this Special Issue....

  7. 78 FR 59946 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug... the Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities (IITF) currently certified to meet the standards of the Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs (Mandatory Guidelines...

  8. 78 FR 7795 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug... the Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities (IITF) currently certified to meet the standards of the Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs (Mandatory Guidelines...

  9. Comparison of assay formats for drug-tolerant immunogenicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Anthony M; Chain, Jana S; Ackermann, Bradley L; Konrad, Robert J

    2010-12-01

    Immunogenicity testing is required for safety assessment of biotherapeutic drugs. Because levels observed during biotherapeutic administration can approach the mg/ml range, establishing drug tolerance is significantly important for assay development. Three assay formats for immunogenicity assessment were tested with respect to drug tolerance: Meso Scale Discovery(®) bridging (MSDB), solid-phase extraction with acid dissociation (SPEAD) and affinity capture elution (ACE). Six biotherapeutic drugs were analyzed by the three methods; four monoclonal antibodies, one Fc fusion protein and one Pegylated protein. Overall, ACE performed best for assays involving therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and also functioned well for therapeutic proteins. Despite several advantages, the MSDB assays displayed a potentially significant hook effect. SPEAD was comparable in performance to ACE for the biotherapeutic drugs tested, but suffers the disadvantage of being reagent-intensive. Novel assay formats offer significant advantages for immunogenicity testing, particularly in the design of assays that are tolerant to circulating levels of the biotherapeutic drug.

  10. Frequently Asked Questions about Drug Testing in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... June 2002, the U.S. Supreme Court broadened the authority of public schools to test students for illegal ... drug testing as a means of achieving substance abuse intervention. 3 Relevant studies include the following: A ...

  11. Why We Test Students for Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Lisa A.

    2008-01-01

    Today, there is a collective national awareness that an unacceptable number of teens are involved in the use of dangerous drugs such as methamphetamine, ecstasy, and heroin, and they have access to high-grade marijuana. Alcohol use, even more pervasive, results in risky sexual behaviors, automobile accidents, and even death. To the dismay of many…

  12. The Value of In Vitro Tests to Diminish Drug Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristobalina Mayorga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Drug hypersensitivity reactions have multiple implications for patient safety and health system costs, thus it is important to perform an accurate diagnosis. The diagnostic procedure includes a detailed clinical history, often unreliable; followed by skin tests, sometimes with low sensitivity or unavailable; and drug provocation testing, which is not risk-free for the patient, especially in severe reactions. In vitro tests could help to identify correctly the responsible agent, thus improving the diagnosis of these reactions, helping the physician to find safe alternatives, and reducing the need to perform drug provocation testing. However, it is necessary to confirm the sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values for these in vitro tests to enable their implementation in clinical practice. In this review, we have analyzed these parameters from different studies that have used in vitro test for evaluating drug hypersensitivity reactions and estimated the added value of these tests to the in vivo diagnosis.

  13. Testing a workplace physical activity intervention: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachan, Rosemary R C; Lawton, Rebecca J; Jackson, Cath; Conner, Mark; Meads, David M; West, Robert M

    2011-04-11

    Increased physical activity levels benefit both an individuals' health and productivity at work. The purpose of the current study was to explore the impact and cost-effectiveness of a workplace physical activity intervention designed to increase physical activity levels. A total of 1260 participants from 44 UK worksites (based within 5 organizations) were recruited to a cluster randomized controlled trial with worksites randomly allocated to an intervention or control condition. Measurement of physical activity and other variables occurred at baseline, and at 0 months, 3 months and 9 months post-intervention. Health outcomes were measured during a 30 minute health check conducted in worksites at baseline and 9 months post intervention. The intervention consisted of a 3 month tool-kit of activities targeting components of the Theory of Planned Behavior, delivered in-house by nominated facilitators. Self-reported physical activity (measured using the IPAQ short-form) and health outcomes were assessed. Multilevel modelling found no significant effect of the intervention on MET minutes of activity (from the IPAQ) at any of the follow-up time points controlling for baseline activity. However, the intervention did significantly reduce systolic blood pressure (B=-1.79 mm/Hg) and resting heart rate (B=-2.08 beats) and significantly increased body mass index (B=.18 units) compared to control. The intervention was found not to be cost-effective, however the substantial variability round this estimate suggested that further research is warranted. The current study found mixed support for this worksite physical activity intervention. The paper discusses some of the tensions involved in conducting rigorous evaluations of large-scale randomized controlled trials in real-world settings. © 2011 McEachan et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  14. Testing a workplace physical activity intervention: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Cath

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased physical activity levels benefit both an individuals' health and productivity at work. The purpose of the current study was to explore the impact and cost-effectiveness of a workplace physical activity intervention designed to increase physical activity levels. Methods A total of 1260 participants from 44 UK worksites (based within 5 organizations were recruited to a cluster randomized controlled trial with worksites randomly allocated to an intervention or control condition. Measurement of physical activity and other variables occurred at baseline, and at 0 months, 3 months and 9 months post-intervention. Health outcomes were measured during a 30 minute health check conducted in worksites at baseline and 9 months post intervention. The intervention consisted of a 3 month tool-kit of activities targeting components of the Theory of Planned Behavior, delivered in-house by nominated facilitators. Self-reported physical activity (measured using the IPAQ short-form and health outcomes were assessed. Results and discussion Multilevel modelling found no significant effect of the intervention on MET minutes of activity (from the IPAQ at any of the follow-up time points controlling for baseline activity. However, the intervention did significantly reduce systolic blood pressure (B = -1.79 mm/Hg and resting heart rate (B = -2.08 beats and significantly increased body mass index (B = .18 units compared to control. The intervention was found not to be cost-effective, however the substantial variability round this estimate suggested that further research is warranted. Conclusions The current study found mixed support for this worksite physical activity intervention. The paper discusses some of the tensions involved in conducting rigorous evaluations of large-scale randomized controlled trials in real-world settings. Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN08807396

  15. Drug testing in Europe: monitoring results of the Trans European Drug Information (TEDI) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Tibor M; Nagy, Constanze; Bücheli, Alexander; Martins, Daniel; Ugarte, Miren; Beduwe, Cécile; Ventura Vilamala, Mireia

    2017-02-01

    Drug testing is a harm reduction strategy that has been adopted by certain countries in Europe. Drug users are able to hand in their drugs voluntarily for chemical analysis of composition and dose. Drug users will be alerted about dangerous test results by the drug testing systems directly and through warning campaigns. An international collaborative effort was launched to combine data of drug testing systems, called the Trans European Drug Information (TEDI) project. Drug testing systems of Spain, Switzerland, Belgium, Austria, Portugal, and the Netherlands participated in this project. This study presents results of some of the main illicit drugs encountered: cocaine, ecstasy and amphetamine and also comments on new psychoactive substances (NPS) detected between 2008 and 2013. A total of 45 859 different drug samples were analyzed by TEDI. The drug markets of the distinct European areas showed similarities, but also some interesting differences. For instance, purity of cocaine and amphetamine powders was generally low in Austria, whilst high in Spain and the Netherlands. And the market for ecstasy showed a contrast: whereas in the Netherlands and Switzerland there was predominantly a market for ecstasy tablets, in Portugal and Spain MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) crystals were much more prevalent. Also, some NPS appearing in ecstasy seemed more specific for one country than another. In general, prevalence of NPS clearly increased between 2008 and 2013. Drug testing can be used to generate a global picture of drug markets and provides information about the pharmacological contents of drugs for the population at risk. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. A Computerized Lifestyle Application to Promote Multiple Health Behaviors at the Workplace: Testing Its Behavioral and Psychological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleig, Lena; Wiedemann, Amelie U; Schwarzer, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background Preventive health behaviors, such as regular physical activity and healthy nutrition, are recommended to maintain employability and to facilitate the health of employees. Theory-based workplace health promotion needs to include psychological constructs and consider the motivational readiness (so-called stages of change) of employees. According to the stages, people can be grouped as nonintenders (not motivated to change and not performing the goal behavior), intenders (decided to adopt the goal behavior but not started yet), or actors (performing the goal behavior already). The tailoring to these stages can be done computer based and should make workplace health promotion more effective. Objective It was tested whether a parsimonious computer-based health promotion program implemented at the workplace was effective in terms of lifestyle changes and psychological outcomes as well as body weight. We hypothesized that the stage-matched intervention would outperform the one-size-fits-all active control condition (standard care intervention). Methods In a randomized controlled trial, a total of 1269 employees were recruited by a trained research assistant at their workplace during a routine medical examination. After excluding noneligible employees, 560 completed Time 1 (T1), and 384 also completed Time 2 (T2), achieving a retention rate of 68.6%. Two fully automated computer-based treatments were adopted: (1) an active control condition with information about benefits of exercise and healthy nutrition (n=52), or (2) a stage-matched multiple-behavior intervention that provided different psychological treatments to 9 subgroups, addressing stages of change (nonintenders, intenders, and actors per behavior; n=332). Baseline assessments (T1) on behavior, psychological constructs, and body weight were repeated after 4 weeks (T2). Results The stage-matched intervention outperformed the active control condition for lifestyle changes containing physical activity and

  17. Drug Testing of Student-Athletes: Another Weapon in the War against Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Charles J.; Morse, Timothy E.

    1995-01-01

    In "Acton," the Supreme Court upheld a local school board policy calling for the random, suspicionless drug testing of interscholastic student-athletes. Reviews the Court's holdings. Concludes that a drug-testing policy that is consistent with "Acton" and enjoys broad-based community support probably would be worth its expense.…

  18. [The Scope, Quality and Safety Requirements of Drug Abuse Testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küme, Tuncay; Karakükcü, Çiğdem; Pınar, Aslı; Coşkunol, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review is to inform about the scopes and requirements of drug abuse testing. Drug abuse testing is one of the tools for determination of drug use. It must fulfill the quality and safety requirements in judgmental legal and administrative decisions. Drug abuse testing must fulfill some requirements like selection of the appropriate test matrix, appropriate screening test panel, sampling in detection window, patient consent, identification of the donor, appropriate collection site, sample collection with observation, identification and control of the sample, specimen custody chain in preanalytical phase; analysis in authorized laboratories, specimen validity tests, reliable testing METHODS, strict quality control, two-step analysis in analytical phase; storage of the split specimen, confirmation of the split specimen in the objection, result custody chain, appropriate cut-off concentration, the appropriate interpretation of the result in postanalytical phase. The workflow and analytical processes of drug abuse testing are explained in last regulation of the Department of Medical Laboratory Services, Ministry of Health in Turkey. The clinical physicians have to know and apply the quality and safety requirements in drug abuse testing according to last regulations in Turkey.

  19. Measuring English Language Workplace Proficiency across Subgroups: Using CFA Models to Validate Test Score Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hanwook; Manna, Venessa F.

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed the factor structure of the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC®) Listening and Reading test, and its invariance across subgroups of test-takers. The subgroups were defined by (a) gender, (b) age, (c) employment status, (d) time spent studying English, and (e) having lived in a country where English is the…

  20. Uptake of Workplace HIV Counselling and Testing: A Cluster-Randomised Trial in Zimbabwe.

    OpenAIRE

    Corbett, EL; E. Dauya; Matambo, R; Cheung, YB; Makamure, B.; Bassett, MT; Chandiwana, S.; Munyati, S.; Mason, PR; Butterworth, AE; Godfrey-Faussett, P; Hayes, RJ

    2006-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. Since the first case of AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) was reported 25 years ago, AIDS has become a major worldwide epidemic, with 3 million people dying from it in 2005. AIDS is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which is usually spread through unprotected sex with an infected partner. HIV damages the immune system, leaving infected individuals unable to fight off other viruses and bacteria. HIV infections can be treated with drugs know ...

  1. The basophil activation test in immediate-type drug allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Oliver V; Gentinetta, Thomas; Bridts, Chris H; Ebo, Didier G

    2009-08-01

    Diagnosis of drug allergy involves first the recognition of sometimes unusual symptoms as drug allergy and, second, the identification of the eliciting drug. This is an often difficult task, as the clinical picture and underlying pathomechanisms are heterogeneous. In clinical routine, physicians frequently have to rely upon a suggestive history and eventual provocation tests, both having their specific limitations. For this reason both in vivo (skin tests) and in vitro tests are investigated intensively as tools to identify the disease-eliciting drug. One of the tests evaluated in drug allergy is the basophil activation test (BAT). Basophils with their high-affinity IgE receptors are easily accessible and therefore can be used as indicator cells for IgE-mediated reactions. Upon allergen challenge and cross-linking of membrane-bound IgE antibodies (via Fc-epsilon-RI) basophils up-regulate certain activation markers on their surface such as CD63 and CD203c, as well as intracellular markers (eg, phosphorylated p38MAPK). In BAT, these alterations can be detected rapidly on a single-cell basis by multicolor flow cytometry using specific monoclonal antibodies. Combining this technique with in vitro passive sensitization of donor basophils with patients' serum, one can prove the IgE dependence of a drug reaction. This article summarizes the authors' current experience with the BAT in the diagnostic management of immediate-type drug allergy mediated by drug-specific IgE antibodies.

  2. Development of a psychological test to measure ability-based emotional intelligence in the Indonesian workplace using an item response theory

    OpenAIRE

    Fajrianthi; Zein RA

    2017-01-01

    Fajrianthi,1 Rizqy Amelia Zein2 1Department of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, 2Department of Personality and Social Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, Universitas Airlangga, Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia Abstract: This study aimed to develop an emotional intelligence (EI) test that is suitable to the Indonesian workplace context. Airlangga Emotional Intelligence Test (Tes Kecerdasan Emosi Airlangga [TKEA]) was designed to measure three EI domains: 1) emotional appraisal, 2) emotio...

  3. [Epicutaneous patch testing in delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions induced by antiepileptic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mahmoud, Lobna; Bahloul, Najla; Ghozzi, Hanen; Kammoun, Brahim; Hakim, Ahmed; Sahnoun, Zouheir; Kammoun, Sami; Zeghal, Khaled

    2017-10-01

    Antiepileptic drugs are widely used and are associated with numerous side effects including skin eruptions. Epicutaneous tests have been used with variable success in skin drug reactions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the profitability of epicutaneous tests in delayed hypersensitivity reactions induced by antiepileptic drugs. We analyzed all cases of allergic skin reactions to antiepileptic drugs notified in regional pharmacovigilance center of Sfax (Tunisia) between June 1, 2014 and April 30, 2016. The imputation score, determined using the French imputation method, should be at least doubtful. Patch-tests were performed in accordance with the general Europen network on Drug Allergy/European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (ENDA/EAACI) guidelines. Patch-tests were read according to the generally accepted criteria of the International contact dermatitis research group (ICDRG). In our study, 20 patients were included, among which 23 events were observed. The drug involved in delayed hypersensitivity reactions was carbamazepine in 11 cases, phenobarbital in 10 cases and valproic acid in 4 cases. The clinical reactions caused by the drug were classified as maculopapular exanthema (11 cases), DRESS syndrome (6 cases), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (2 cases), fixed drug eruption (2 cases) and erythroderma (2 cases). Patch-tests were positive in 19 patients (95 %). Cross-reactivity between antiepileptic drugs was observed in 4 cases: between valproic acid and carbamazepine in 2 cases between valproic acid and phenobarbital in 1 case and between phenobarbital and carbamazepine in 1 case. In this study, patch testing was a safe and useful method in confirming the culprit drug in delayed hypersensitivity reactions induced by antiepileptic drugs. Copyright © 2017 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. A study of drug eruptions by provocative tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das J

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Sixty cases of drug eruptions were observed during the period of one year. The incidence of drug eruption was 0.47% amongst all Dermatology O.P.D. attendances. Male to female ratio was 7:3. The highest number of cases were seen in the age group of 21-30 years. Fixed drug eruptions were the most frequent (58.3%, followed by urticaria and angioedema (20%. The drug sulphonamides (including co-trimoxazole accounted for the highest number of eruptions (35%. The other drugs which were responsible for the eruptions, in order of frequency, were oxyphenbutazone, ampicillin, analgin, penicillin, tetracycline, ibuprofen, paracetamol, phenylbutazone, acetaminophen and phenobarbitone. The causative drug (s were confirmed by provocation tests in 42 (70% cases.

  5. Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing and Orphan Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Matthew; Levenson, James; Quillin, John

    2017-08-01

    Since the introduction of the Orphan Drug Act (ODA) in 1983, orphan drug approvals in the United States have jumped from consumer (DTC) genetic testing companies. This emerging trend is the subject of this article, which begins by considering how rare-disease drugs are regulated and the rising interest in nonclinical genetic testing. It then outlines how DTC companies analyze DNA and how their techniques benefit researchers and drug developers. Then, after an overview of the current partnerships between DTCs and drug developers, it examines concerns about privacy and cost brought up by these partnerships. The article concludes by contrasting the enormous positive potential of DTC-pharma relationships and their concomitant dangers, especially to consumer privacy and cost to the healthcare system.

  6. Associations between workplace affiliation and phlebotomy practices regarding patient identification and test request handling practices in primary healthcare centres: a multilevel model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Karin; Juthberg, Christina; Söderberg, Johan; Bölenius, Karin; Grankvist, Kjell; Brulin, Christine; Lindkvist, Marie

    2015-11-10

    Clinical practice guidelines aim to enhance patient safety by reducing inappropriate variations in practice. Despite considerable efforts to enhance the use of clinical practice guidelines, adherence is often suboptimal. We investigated to what extent workplace affiliation explains variation of self-reported adherence to venous blood specimen collection regarding patient identification and test request handling practices, taking into consideration other primary healthcare centre and individual phlebotomist characteristics. Data were collected through a questionnaire survey of 164 phlebotomy staff from 25 primary healthcare centres in northern Sweden. To prevent the impact of a large-scale education intervention in 2008, only baseline data, collected over a 3-month period in 2006-2007, were used and subjected to descriptive statistics and multilevel logistic analyses. In two patient identification outcomes, stable high median odds ratios (MOR) were found in both the empty model, and in the adjusted full model including both individual and workplace factors. Our findings suggest that variances among phlebotomy staff can be largely explained by primary healthcare centre affiliation also when individual and workplace demographic characteristics were taken in consideration. Analyses showed phlebotomy staff at medium and large primary healthcare centres to be more likely to adhere to guidelines than staff at small centres. Furthermore, staff employed shorter time at worksite to be more likely to adhere than staff employed longer. Finally, staff performing phlebotomy every week or less were more likely to adhere than staff performing phlebotomy on a daily basis. Workplace affiliation largely explains variances in self-reported adherence to venous blood specimen collection guidelines for patient identification and test request handling practices among phlebotomy staff. Characteristics of the workplace, as well as of the individual phlebotomist, need to be identified in

  7. A successful workplace program for voluntary counseling and testing and treatment of HIV/AIDS at Heineken, Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Alizanne C; Van der Borght, Stefaan F M; Rinke de Wit, Tobias; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Richards, Sarah C; Feeley, Frank G

    2007-01-01

    Heineken Breweries launched a workplace HIV/AIDS program at its Rwanda subsidiary in September 2001. By January 25, 2005, 736/2,595 eligible individuals had reported for counseling and HIV testing: 380/521 employees (72.9%), 254/412 spouses (61.7%), 99/1,517 children (6.5%), and 3/145 retired (2.0%). As a result, 109 HIV+ individuals were identified: 62 employees, 34 spouses, 12 children, and 1 retired. In September 2003 an anonymous HIV seroprevalence survey was performed with participation rates of 69.4% for employees, 58.2% for spouses, and 79.7% for adolescents. Using the survey result, the expected number of HIV+ employees was 71, which implies a program uptake of 87.1% (62/71) in this group. Of the identified 109 HIV+ beneficiaries, 42 were on highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). In November 2003 a qualitative study of awareness and health-seeking behavior of the Heineken Rwanda beneficiaries identified key principles contributing to the success of this program.

  8. Usefulness of drug provocation tests in children with a history of adverse drug reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Ran Na

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : There are very few reports of adverse drug reactions (ADR and almost no study of drug provocation test (DPT in Korean children. We aimed to assess the role of DPT in children with unpredictable ADRs, and compare the causative drugs and clinical characteristics between detailed history of ADRs and result of DPTs. Methods : We included 16 children who were experienced ADRs referred to pediatric allergy clinic at Ajou University Hospital (January 2006 to December 2009. With various suspected drugs, 71 DPTs were done in 16 patients using our own protocol, and skin tests to antibiotics were combined in ADRs to antibiotics in medical history. Results : There were 17 (23.9% positive DPTs results out of 71 individual DPTs, and 11 patients (68.8% from 16 patients were positive to at least one drug. Drugs causing positive reactions were acetaminophen in 5 (31%, Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in 4 (25%, penicillin in 3 (19%, cephalosporin in 2 (13%, and cotrimoxazole, macrolide and lactose in 1 each. Conclusion : DPT seems a safe and useful procedure to confirm causative drug and identify safely administering alternative drugs in children with ADR.

  9. [Historical development of drug testing in Swiss equestrian sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, V; von Salis, B; Fürst, A

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the development of equine drug testing in horses in Switzerland. This was achieved through evaluation of a film made by the Institute of Forensic Medicine at the University of Basel entitled 'Doping von Rennpferden' [Doping of Race Horses], toxicological detection, 1962', the analysis of doping test results of the Swiss Equestrian Federation and by interviewing individuals of various professions who were involved in equine drug testing at the time. The study compares early and modern methods of drug testing and highlights the changes in the attitude of equestrian athletes, horse owners and the general public toward doping in equestrian sports. The high sensitivity of modern analytical methods allows the detection of drugs at levels considerably below therapeutic concentrations. This has resulted in a shift from zero tolerance for Controlled Medication Substances to the establishment of sub-therapeutic threshold concentrations. The lists of performance-enhancing drugs used in doping are updated continually. It became clear from this work that in the early 1960s, Switzerland played a leadership role in anti-doping in equestrian sports, and that the efforts to keep the sport free of performance-enhancing drugs remain exemplary.

  10. 10 CFR 26.405 - Drug and alcohol testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... test specimens for marijuana metabolite, cocaine metabolite, opiates (codeine, morphine, 6... standards contained in 29 CFR 1904.7, and subsequent amendments thereto, and results in death, days away... standards and procedures for certification. Any initial drug test performed by a licensee or other entity...

  11. Long-term Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT) uptake dynamics in a multi-country HIV Workplace Program in sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Van Der Borght, Stefaan; Schim Van Der Loeff, Maarten Franciscus; Clevenbergh, Philippe; Kabarega, Jean Pierre; Kamo, Emmanuel; Van Cranenburgh, Katinka; Rijckborst, Henk; Lange, Joep M; Rinke De Wit, Tobias Floris

    2010-01-01

    International audience; High uptake of HIV voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) services is important for the success of HIV workplace programs in sub-Saharan Africa. From 2001 onwards Heineken, a multinational brewing company, implemented a comprehensive HIV prevention and treatment program for employees and their dependents of its African subsidiaries. Confidential in-house VCT is part of this program. VCT uptake dynamics over time, and factors associated with early uptake were studied. ...

  12. Long-term Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT) uptake dynamics in a multi-country HIV Workplace Program in sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract High uptake of HIV voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) services is important for the success of HIV workplace programs in sub-Saharan Africa. From 2001 onwards Heineken, a multinational brewing company, implemented a comprehensive HIV prevention and treatment program for employees and their dependents of its African subsidiaries. Confidential in-house VCT is part of this program. VCT uptake dynamics over time, and factors associated with early uptake were studied. Be...

  13. 76 FR 45165 - Implementation of Office of Management and Budget Guidance on Drug-Free Workplace Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... CFR Part 2429 Administrative practice and procedure, Drug abuse, Grant programs, Loan programs... practice and procedure, Drug abuse, Grant programs, Loan programs, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements...;having general applicability and legal effect, most of which are keyed #0;to and codified in the Code of...

  14. 75 FR 39133 - Institute of Museum and Library Services Implementation of OMB Guidance on Drug-Free Workplace...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... Subjects 2 CFR Part 3186 Administrative practice and procedure, Drug abuse, Grant programs, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. 45 CFR Part 1186 Administrative practice and procedure, Drug abuse, Grant programs...;having general applicability and legal effect, most of which are keyed #0;to and codified in the Code of...

  15. 75 FR 52857 - National Endowment for the Humanities Implementation of OMB Guidance on Drug-Free Workplace...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... Subjects 2 CFR Part 3373 Administrative practice and procedure, Drug abuse, Grant programs, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. 45 CFR Part 1173 Administrative practice and procedure, Drug abuse, Grant programs...;having general applicability and legal effect, most of which are keyed #0;to and codified in the Code of...

  16. 75 FR 79308 - Alcohol and Drug Testing: Determination of Minimum Random Testing Rates for 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... Federal Railroad Administration 49 CFR Part 219 Alcohol and Drug Testing: Determination of Minimum Random... rail industry random testing positive rates were .037 percent for drugs and .014 percent for alcohol... 25 percent of covered railroad employees. In addition, because the industry-wide random alcohol...

  17. 21 CFR 1405.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 1405.220 Section 1405.220 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 1405.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in...

  18. 78 FR 5445 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Drug-Free Workplace (FAR 52.223-6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... Secretariat (MVCB), 1275 First Street NE., Washington, DC 20417. ATTN: Hada Flowers/IC 9000-0101, Drug-Free... clause is not applicable to commercial items, contracts at or below simplified acquisition threshold...

  19. 77 FR 52696 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Drug-Free Workplace (FAR 52.223-6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... Secretariat (MVCB), 1275 First Street NE., Washington, DC 20417. ATTN: Hada Flowers/IC 9000-0101, Drug-Free... applicable to commercial items, contracts at or below simplified acquisition threshold (unless awarded to an...

  20. Changing Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on the changing workplace and its relationship to human resource development (HRD). In "Globalization, Immigration and Quality of Life Dynamics for Reverse Brain Drains" (Ben-Chieh Liu, Maw Lin Lee, Hau-Lien), the factors responsible for the brain drain from Taiwan to the United States…

  1. Liquid Workplaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofma, Christian Casper; Avital, Michel; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2017-01-01

    Recently, virtual realities or immersive virtual environments (IVEs) has gained increasing attention. Yet, IS-researchers have paid little attention to the implications of IVEs in a work context. The objective of this paper is thus to understand how the use of IVEs may impact our workplace, and how...

  2. are Workplace

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJM Venter

    did not fall within the scope of collective bargaining. ... This article explores the position regarding workplace forums in South Africa and whether it is time ... Africa) should take the region's particular socio-economic profile into account and ... [n]otwithstanding the right [to] bargain collectively, the law generally limits collective.

  3. Evaluation of drug provocation test-related anxiety in patients with drug hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyyiğit, Şadan; Aydın, Ömür; Yılmaz, İnsu; Özdemir, Seçil Kepil; Cankorur, Vesile Şentürk; Atbaşoğlu, Cem; Çelik, Gülfem Elif

    2016-09-01

    Drug provocation tests (DPTs) are important in the treatment of patients with drug hypersensitivity (DH), but they carry certain hypersensitivity reaction risks, which lead to procedure-related concerns in patients. To investigate DPT-related anxiety and its effect on long-term use of tested drugs. The study included patients who underwent DPT from July 1, 2009, to July 1, 2012. After recording the patients' history and characteristics, a variety of psychiatric (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Panic and Agoraphobia Scale, and the Maudsley Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory) and quality-of-life (36-item Short Form Health Survey) tests were performed. DPT-related anxiety was also evaluated using a visual analog scale. The patients were requestioned about whether they had used the tested drug within 1 year. A total of 126 patients were included in the study. According to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, 23.4% and 30.6% of the patients had depression and anxiety symptoms, respectively. The mean (SD) visual analog scale anxiety scores after a negative DPT result were lower than those before DPTs (2 [2.5] after vs 5.2 [3.4] before; P anxiety related to drug reactions, despite negative DPT results and symptoms indicated for use of the drug. Our findings suggest that DPTs in themselves cause significant anxiety in patients with DH. Importantly, anxiety levels decreased after a negative test result. However, our results also suggested that a negative DPT result is not convincing enough for some patients to use the tested drug when needed in the future. Therefore, supporting strategies appear to be the most effective way to eliminate DH-related anxiety of patients. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Test implementation of a school-oriented drug prevention program "Study without Drugs": pre- and post-testing for effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaak, Fariel; de Vries, Nanne Karel; van der Wolf, Kees

    2014-06-11

    In this article, the test implementation of a school-oriented drug prevention program "Study without Drugs" is discussed. The aims of this study were to determine the results of the process evaluation and to determine whether the proposed school-oriented drug prevention program during a pilot project was effective for the participating pupils. Sixty second-grade pupils at a junior high school in Paramaribo, Suriname participated in the test implementation. They were divided into two classes. For the process evaluation the students completed a structured questionnaire focusing on content and teaching method after every lesson. Lessons were qualified with a score from 0-10. The process was also evaluated by the teachers through structured interviews. Attention was paid to reach, dose delivered, dose received, fidelity, connection, achieved effects/observed behaviors, areas for improvement, and lesson strengths. The effect evaluation was conducted by using the General Liniair Model (repeated measure). The research (-design) was a pre-experimental design with pre-and post-test. No class or sex differences were detected among the pupils with regard to the assessment of content, methodology, and qualification of the lessons. Post-testing showed that participating pupils obtained an increased knowledge of drugs, their drug-resisting skills were enhanced, and behavior determinants (attitude, subjective norm, self-efficacy, and intention) became more negative towards drugs. From the results of the test implementation can be cautiously concluded that the program "Study without Drugs" may yield positive results when applied in schools). Thus, this pilot program can be considered a step towards the development and implementation of an evidence-based school-oriented program for pupils in Suriname.

  5. Discrimination and well-being in organizations : Testing the differential power and organizational justice theories of workplace aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wood, S.; Braeken, J.; Niven, K.

    2013-01-01

    People may be subjected to discrimination from a variety of sources in the workplace. In this study of mental health workers, we contrast four potential perpetrators of discrimination (managers, co-workers, patients, and visitors) to investigate whether the negative impact of discrimination on

  6. 22 CFR 312.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 312.220 Section 312.220 Foreign Relations PEACE... establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 312.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in § 312.215, you must...

  7. 49 CFR 32.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 32.220 Section 32.220 Transportation Office of the... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 32.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in § 32...

  8. 22 CFR 1008.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 1008.220 Section 1008.220 Foreign Relations INTER... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 1008.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in...

  9. 45 CFR 1155.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 1155.220 Section 1155.220 Public Welfare Regulations... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 1155.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in...

  10. 34 CFR 84.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and establish my drug-free awareness program? 84.220 Section 84.220 Education Office of the Secretary... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 84.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in § 84...

  11. 10 CFR 607.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and establish my drug-free awareness program? 607.220 Section 607.220 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 607.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in...

  12. 45 CFR 1173.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 1173.220 Section 1173.220 Public Welfare Regulations... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 1173.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in...

  13. 20 CFR 439.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 439.220 Section 439.220 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 439.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in...

  14. 7 CFR 3021.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 3021.220 Section 3021.220 Agriculture Regulations of... establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 3021.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in § 3021.215, you must...

  15. 22 CFR 1509.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 1509.220 Section 1509.220 Foreign Relations AFRICAN... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 1509.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in...

  16. 22 CFR 133.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 133.220 Section 133.220 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 133.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in...

  17. 22 CFR 210.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? 210.220 Section 210.220 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR... statement and establish my drug-free awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 210.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in...

  18. Workplace incivility: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolfazl Vagharseyyedin, Seyyed

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the meaning of the concept 'workplace incivility' and promote consistency in its application in nursing research and practice. The methodology introduced by Walker and Avant was used to analyze this concept. A total number of 50 studies that had essentially addressed the concept of incivility in employees' work environment was selected. Ambiguous intent, violation of mutual respect, low intensity and lack of physical assault were identified as the defining attributes of workplace incivility. The necessary antecedent of workplace incivility consisted of the presence of two or more people, with one or more as the source of the incivility, and another or others as its target in the workplace. Moreover, certain individual and organisational factors were the potential antecedents of workplace incivility. Possible negative outcomes for victims, witnesses, organisations, society and perpetrators of such behaviours, such as increased cost for the organisation, reduced citizenship performance, psychological distress and anxiety were identified as outcomes of workplace incivility. Results of the current concept analysis can guide nurse managers to design interventions so that the occurrence of workplace incivility can be reduced. Further studies can focus on testing the psychometric properties of the existing workplace incivility scales, especially uncivil behaviours experienced by nurses across different societies or cultures.

  19. NCAA Drug-Testing Program 2010-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Collegiate Athletic Association (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Drug-Testing Program was created to protect the health and safety of student-athletes and to ensure that no one participant might have an artificially induced advantage or be pressured to use chemical substances. This publication describes this program in the following chapters: (1) NCAA…

  20. 77 FR 39194 - Combined Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... must obtain an Antidrug and Alcohol Misuse Prevention Program Operations Specification, Letter of...) A part 119 certificate holder Obtain an Antidrug and Alcohol with authority to operate under Misuse... holder Obtain an Antidrug and Alcohol who has your own drug testing Misuse Prevention Program program...

  1. Towards a pragmatic human migraine model for drug testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Emma Katrine; Olesen, Jes

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A model for the testing of novel anti-migraine drugs should preferably use healthy volunteers for ease of recruiting. Isosorbide-5-mononitrate (5-ISMN) provokes headache in healthy volunteers with some migraine features such as pulsating pain quality and aggravation by physical activity...

  2. Toward a pragmatic migraine model for drug testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Emma Katrine; Guo, Song; Ashina, Messoud

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A model for the testing of novel antimigraine drugs should ideally use healthy volunteers for ease of recruiting. Cilostazol provokes headache in healthy volunteers with some migraine features such as pulsating pain quality and aggravation by physical activity. Therefore, this headach...

  3. 'False-positive' and 'false-negative' test results in clinical urine drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisfield, Gary M; Goldberger, Bruce A; Bertholf, Roger L

    2009-08-01

    The terms 'false-positive' and 'false-negative' are widely used in discussions of urine drug test (UDT) results. These terms are inadequate because they are used in different ways by physicians and laboratory professionals and they are too narrow to encompass the larger universe of potentially misleading, inappropriate and unexpected drug test results. This larger universe, while not solely comprised of technically 'true' or 'false' positive or negative test results, presents comparable interpretive challenges with corresponding clinical implications. In this review, we propose the terms 'potentially inappropriate' positive or negative test results in reference to UDT results that are ambiguous or unexpected and subject to misinterpretation. Causes of potentially inappropriate positive UDT results include in vivo metabolic conversions of a drug, exposure to nonillicit sources of a drug and laboratory error. Causes of potentially inappropriate negative UDT results include limited assay specificity, absence of drug in the urine, presence of drug in the urine, but below established assay cutoff, specimen manipulation and laboratory error. Clinical UDT interpretation is a complicated task requiring knowledge of recent prescription, over-the-counter and herbal drug administration, drug metabolism and analytical sensitivities and specificities.

  4. Skin test concentrations for systemically administered drugs -- an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brockow, K.; Garvey, L. H.; Aberer, W.; Atanaskovic-Markovic, M.; Barbaud, A.; Bilo, M. B.; Bircher, A.; Blanca, M.; Bonadonna, B.; Campi, P.; Castro, E.; Cernadas, J. R.; Chiriac, A. M.; Demoly, P.; Grosber, M.; Gooi, J.; Lombardo, C.; Mertes, P. M.; Mosbech, H.; Nasser, S.; Pagani, M.; Ring, J.; Romano, A.; Scherer, K.; Schnyder, B.; Testi, S.; Torres, M.; Trautmann, A.; Terreehorst, I.

    2013-01-01

    Skin tests are of paramount importance for the evaluation of drug hypersensitivity reactions. Drug skin tests are often not carried out because of lack of concise information on specific test concentrations. The diagnosis of drug allergy is often based on history alone, which is an unreliable

  5. In Vitro Drug Sensitivity Tests to Predict Molecular Target Drug Responses in Surgically Resected Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryohei Miyazaki

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK inhibitors have dramatically changed the strategy of medical treatment of lung cancer. Patients should be screened for the presence of the EGFR mutation or echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4-ALK fusion gene prior to chemotherapy to predict their clinical response. The succinate dehydrogenase inhibition (SDI test and collagen gel droplet embedded culture drug sensitivity test (CD-DST are established in vitro drug sensitivity tests, which may predict the sensitivity of patients to cytotoxic anticancer drugs. We applied in vitro drug sensitivity tests for cyclopedic prediction of clinical responses to different molecular targeting drugs.The growth inhibitory effects of erlotinib and crizotinib were confirmed for lung cancer cell lines using SDI and CD-DST. The sensitivity of 35 cases of surgically resected lung cancer to erlotinib was examined using SDI or CD-DST, and compared with EGFR mutation status.HCC827 (Exon19: E746-A750 del and H3122 (EML4-ALK cells were inhibited by lower concentrations of erlotinib and crizotinib, respectively than A549, H460, and H1975 (L858R+T790M cells were. The viability of the surgically resected lung cancer was 60.0 ± 9.8 and 86.8 ± 13.9% in EGFR-mutants vs. wild types in the SDI (p = 0.0003. The cell viability was 33.5 ± 21.2 and 79.0 ± 18.6% in EGFR mutants vs. wild-type cases (p = 0.026 in CD-DST.In vitro drug sensitivity evaluated by either SDI or CD-DST correlated with EGFR gene status. Therefore, SDI and CD-DST may be useful predictors of potential clinical responses to the molecular anticancer drugs, cyclopedically.

  6. Quality Testing of Artemisinin-Based Antimalarial Drugs in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Suqin; Kyaw, Myat Phone; He, Lishan; Min, Myo; Ning, Xiangxue; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Baomin; Cui, Liwang

    2017-10-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapies are the frontline treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The circulation of falsified and substandard artemisinin-based antimalarials in Southeast Asia has been a major predicament for the malaria elimination campaign. To provide an update of this situation, we purchased 153 artemisinin-containing antimalarials, as convenience samples, in private drug stores from different regions of Myanmar. The quality of these drugs in terms of their artemisinin derivative content was tested using specific dipsticks for these artemisinin derivatives, as point-of-care devices. A subset of these samples was further tested by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This survey identified that > 35% of the collected drugs were oral artesunate and artemether monotherapies. When tested with the dipsticks, all but one sample passed the assays, indicating that the detected artemisinin derivative content corresponded approximately to the labeled contents. However, one artesunate injection sample was found to contain no active ingredient at all by the dipstick assay and subsequent HPLC analysis. The continued circulation of oral monotherapies and the description, for the first time, of falsified parenteral artesunate provides a worrisome picture of the antimalarial drug quality in Myanmar during the malaria elimination phase, a situation that deserves more oversight from regulatory authorities.

  7. Stability Testing of Herbal Drugs: Challenges, Regulatory Compliance and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Gulshan; Suthar, Nancy; Kaur, Jasmeen; Jain, Astha

    2016-07-01

    Stability testing is an important component of herbal drugs and products (HDPs) development process. Drugs regulatory agencies across the globe have recommended guidelines for the conduct of stability studies on HDPs, which require that stability data should be included in the product registration dossier. From the scientific viewpoint, numerous chemical constituents in an herbal drug are liable to varied chemical reactions under the influence of different conditions during its shelf life. These reactions can lead to altered chemical composition of HDP and consequently altered therapeutic profile. Many reports on stability testing of HDPs have appeared in literature since the last 10 years. A review of these reports reveals that there is wide variability in temperature (-80 to 100 °C), humidity (0-100%) and duration (a few hours-36 months) for stability assessment of HDPs. Of these, only 1% studies are conducted in compliance with the regulatory guidelines for stability testing. The present review is aimed at compiling all stability testing reports, understanding key challenges in stability testing of HDPs and suggesting possible solutions for these. The key challenges are classified as chemical complexity and biochemical composition variability in raw material, selection of marker(s) and influences of enzymes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Aseptic simulation test for cytotoxic drug production in isolators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savry, Amandine; Correard, Florian; Bennis, Youssef; Roubaud, Sophie; Gauthier-Villano, Laurence; Pisano, Pascale; Pourroy, Bertrand

    2014-03-15

    The results of a media-fill test (MFT) study to validate processes for cytotoxic drug preparation inside and outside aseptic compounding isolators are presented. Using an MFT protocol adapted to institution-specific production conditions, the pharmacy team at a hospital in France performed a series of tests to verify the efficacy of decontamination and sterile compounding procedures, as required by French compendial standards, while assessing the performance of its team of 12 isolator operators; all operators were tested on three occasions, producing 10 MFT samples per test for a total of 30 samples per operator. The team also tested alternative compounding systems (i.e., two closed-system transfer devices and a classic spike system) for use during power outages or other emergencies precluding drug preparation within isolators. MFTs were performed using a standard tryptone soy broth-based test kit under worst-case conditions. The hospital's facilities for cytotoxic drug preparation were found to be in conformance with applicable sterility standards. Bacterial growth was not detected in any of the MFT samples produced by isolator operators during the study (total n = 360). In one instance, an MFT sample prepared using a closed-system transfer device was found to be contaminated due to improper cleaning of the medication vial, highlighting the importance of strict adherence to proper decontamination procedures. A hospital's practices for preparation of sterile products according to applicable good manufacturing guidelines, as well as emergency procedures for cytotoxic drug preparation outside isolators, were validated by the results of an MFT study.

  9. Drug testing for current employees: an ethical dilemma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J A

    1993-12-01

    1. An ethical dilemma can be defined as either a difficult problem seemingly incapable of a satisfactory solution or a situation involving choice between equally unsatisfactory alternatives. 2. When designing drug testing policies for current employees, the occupational health nurse may face ethical dilemmas related to the scope of testing, the selection of a test methodology, and the assurance of confidentiality. 3. This article demonstrates the application of bioethical theories to these dilemmas. It may assist the occupational health nurse who is developing or revising a worksite policy to analyze alternatives and reach appropriate decisions.

  10. General pharmacology of pidotimod and testing for drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzardo, S; Falcone, A; Pinzetta, A; Ieva, G; Coppi, G

    1994-12-01

    Pidotimod ((R)-3-[(S)-(5-oxo-2-pyrrolidinyl) carbonyl]-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, PGT/1A, CAS 121808-62-6) is a new biological response modifier. General pharmacology and interactions with some drugs were tested. The drug, at doses of 200 mg/kg i.p. and 400 mg/kg p.o., did not affect the normal behaviour, did not modify the responses to stimulation of autonomic nervous system or central nervous system. Pidotimod did not display any cardiovascular or respiratory effect up to 125 mg/kg i.v. in 3 animal species. The drug did not show antimicrobial or antifungal activities nor interact with some of the most common therapeutics (antibiotics, tolbutamide, pentobarbital, antihypertensives, chlorothiazide, warfarin, non-steroidal antiinflammatory agents). On the basis of these results pidotimod shows a safe profile; moreover it does not interact with many therapeutic agents.

  11. Skin test concentrations for systemically administered drugs -- an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockow, K; Garvey, L H; Aberer, W; Atanaskovic-Markovic, M; Barbaud, A; Bilo, M B; Bircher, A; Blanca, M; Bonadonna, B; Campi, P; Castro, E; Cernadas, J R; Chiriac, A M; Demoly, P; Grosber, M; Gooi, J; Lombardo, C; Mertes, P M; Mosbech, H; Nasser, S; Pagani, M; Ring, J; Romano, A; Scherer, K; Schnyder, B; Testi, S; Torres, M; Trautmann, A; Terreehorst, I

    2013-06-01

    Skin tests are of paramount importance for the evaluation of drug hypersensitivity reactions. Drug skin tests are often not carried out because of lack of concise information on specific test concentrations. The diagnosis of drug allergy is often based on history alone, which is an unreliable indicator of true hypersensitivity.To promote and standardize reproducible skin testing with safe and nonirritant drug concentrations in the clinical practice, the European Network and European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) Interest Group on Drug Allergy has performed a literature search on skin test drug concentration in MEDLINE and EMBASE, reviewed and evaluated the literature in five languages using the GRADE system for quality of evidence and strength of recommendation. Where the literature is poor, we have taken into consideration the collective experience of the group.We recommend drug concentration for skin testing aiming to achieve a specificity of at least 95%. It has been possible to recommend specific drug concentration for betalactam antibiotics, perioperative drugs, heparins, platinum salts and radiocontrast media. For many other drugs, there is insufficient evidence to recommend appropriate drug concentration. There is urgent need for multicentre studies designed to establish and validate drug skin test concentration using standard protocols. For most drugs, sensitivity of skin testing is higher in immediate hypersensitivity compared to nonimmediate hypersensitivity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Workplace harassment: a test of definitional criteria derived from an analysis of research definitions and Canadian social definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claybourn, Marvin; Spinner, Barry; Malcom, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Public awareness of the occurrence and effects of workplace harassment continues to grow. However, despite increasing awareness, ambiguity remains about how harassment is defined and, consequently, how to determine whether a questionable situation should be judged as harassment. For this research we reviewed definitions of workplace harassment and identified four elements that were frequently included as criteria for making judgments of whether harassment had occurred (i.e., repetition, intent, perceived intent, consequences). In two separate studies, fictional scenarios were used to evaluate the extent to which participants' judgments about harassment were affected by the presence or absence of the four elements. Ratings of the scenarios provided by student participants (study one; N=160) and a convenience sample of community participants (study two; N=292) with varying levels of work experience and diverse professional backgrounds were analysed. According to our results the four elements significantly influenced participants' judgments of harassment. The intent of the harasser had the strongest and most consistent effect on harassment judgements and whether the behaviour was repeated had the weakest and least consistent effect. In addition to the unique effects of the individual elements, significant interactions between the elements emerged and suggest that harassment judgements depend on the interplay of a variety of factors. Though the results of these studies add to the growing body of research that focuses on defining workplace harassment, they also highlight the need for additional research in the area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 76 FR 35678 - SPF Labeling and Testing Requirements and Drug Facts Labeling for Over-the-Counter Sunscreen Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 201 and 310 SPF Labeling and Testing Requirements and Drug Facts Labeling for Over-the-Counter Sunscreen Drug Products; Agency Information.... SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing an opportunity for public comment on the...

  14. Exploring potential anticoagulant drug formulations using thrombin generation test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Zavyalova

    2016-03-01

    The thrombin generation test was used to assess the whole coagulation cascade in normal and factor-deficient human blood plasma. Potential therapeutic windows were estimated for coagulation factors, ranking them as targets for anticoagulant drugs. Thrombin and factor Xa have been revealed as the most promising targets, which fully agrees with the current drug development strategy. Inhibitors of factors Va and VIIa are expected to have narrow therapeutic windows. Inhibitors of factors VIIIa and IXa are expected to have a moderate anticoagulant effect. Factors XI and XII are poor targets for anticoagulant drugs. Compared with plasma that is deficient in factor II, the thrombin inhibitors bivalirudin and aptamer HD1 had increased activity. Both inhibitors were tested in deficient plasma providing a model of potential drug combination. The most promising combinations were anti-thrombin with anti-V/Va and also anti-thrombin with anti-IX/IXa. Each combination had an incremental dose-effect dependence that is promising from the standpoint of the therapeutic window.

  15. Long-term voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) uptake dynamics in a multicountry HIV workplace program in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Borght, Stefaan F; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; Clevenbergh, Philippe; Kabarega, Jean Pierre; Kamo, Emmanuel; van Cranenburgh, Katinka; Rijckborst, Henk; Lange, Joep M; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F

    2010-02-01

    High uptake of HIV voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) services is important for the success of HIV workplace programs in sub-Saharan Africa. From 2001 onwards, Heineken, a multinational brewing company, implemented a comprehensive HIV prevention and treatment program for employees and their dependents of its African subsidiaries. Confidential in-house VCT is part of this program. VCT uptake dynamics over time, and factors associated with early uptake were studied. Between September 2001 and December 2007, 9723 adult beneficiaries were tested for HIV in 14 company sites in five African countries. Three hundred and seventy (3.8%) of tested persons were infected with HIV-1. During the first 12 months 1412 tests were done, compared to 8311 tests in the subsequent years. The annual average uptake of testing among eligible persons varied between 15 and 32%. The coverage was higher among female compared to male employees, and higher among female compared to male spouses. Distinct peaks in uptake were linked to specific local events. HIV-1 infected persons were significantly more likely to be tested in the early period. The proportion of HIV-1 infected persons among testees was 8.8% in the first 12 months compared to 3.0% in the subsequent period (p<0.001). HIV-1 infected persons diagnosed in the early period were in a more advanced clinical stage, and had a significantly lower CD4 count than those tested later (median CD4 count 227 vs. 314 cells/microl; p=0.002). In this workplace program, HIV-1 infected individuals came earlier for an HIV test than uninfected people, and people with advanced infection came earlier than those with less advanced disease. Employees' spouses are harder to reach than employees and extra efforts should be undertaken to reach them as well. Uptake of HIV testing can be actively influenced by educational or promotional activities.

  16. Preclinical testing of drug delivery systems to bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Griensven, Martijn

    2015-11-01

    Bone defects do not heal in 5-10% of the fractures. In order to enhance bone regeneration, drug delivery systems are needed. They comprise a scaffold with or without inducing factors and/or cells. To test these drug delivery systems before application in patients, they finally need to be tested in animal models. The choice of animal model depends on the main research question; is a functional or mechanistic evaluation needed? Furthermore, which type of bone defects are investigated: load-bearing (i.e. orthopedic) or non-load-bearing (i.e. craniomaxillofacial)? This determines the type of model and in which type of animal. The experiments need to be set-up using the 3R principle and must be reported following the ARRIVE guidelines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Colour Test for drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toit, K; Mitchell, S; Balabanova, Y; Evans, C A; Kummik, T; Nikolayevskyy, V; Drobniewski, F

    2012-08-01

    Tartu, Estonia. To assess the performance and feasibility of the introduction of the thin-layer agar MDR/XDR-TB Colour Test (Colour Test) as a non-commercial method of drug susceptibility testing (DST). The Colour Test combines the thin-layer agar technique with a simple colour-coded quadrant format, selective medium to reduce contamination and colorimetric indication of bacterial growth to simplify interpretation. DST patterns for isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RMP) and ciprofloxacin (CFX) were determined using the Colour Test for 201 archived Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates. Susceptibilities were compared to blinded DST results obtained routinely using the BACTEC™ Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube™ (MGIT) 960 to assess performance characteristics. In all, 98% of the isolates produced interpretable results. The average time to positivity was 13 days, and all results were interpretable. The Colour Test detected drug resistance with 98% sensitivity for INH, RMP and CFX and 99% for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Specificities were respectively 100% (95%CI 82-100), 88% (95%CI 69-97) and 91% (95%CI 83-96) and 90% (95%CI 74-98). Agreement between the Colour Test and BACTEC MGIT 960 were respectively 98%, 96%, 94% and 97%. The Colour Test could be an economical, accurate and simple technique for testing tuberculosis strains for drug resistance. As it requires little specialist equipment, it may be particularly useful in resource-constrained settings with growing drug resistance rates.

  18. 29 CFR 94.220 - By when must I publish my drug-free workplace statement and establish my drug-free awareness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... establish my drug-free awareness program? 94.220 Section 94.220 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor... awareness program? If you are a new recipient that does not already have a policy statement as described in § 94.205 and an ongoing awareness program as described in § 94.215, you must publish the statement and...

  19. Skin test concentrations for systemically administered drugs -- an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockow, K; Garvey, L H; Aberer, W

    2013-01-01

    Skin tests are of paramount importance for the evaluation of drug hypersensitivity reactions. Drug skin tests are often not carried out because of lack of concise information on specific test concentrations. The diagnosis of drug allergy is often based on history alone, which is an unreliable...... search on skin test drug concentration in MEDLINE and EMBASE, reviewed and evaluated the literature in five languages using the GRADE system for quality of evidence and strength of recommendation. Where the literature is poor, we have taken into consideration the collective experience of the group...... to recommend appropriate drug concentration. There is urgent need for multicentre studies designed to establish and validate drug skin test concentration using standard protocols. For most drugs, sensitivity of skin testing is higher in immediate hypersensitivity compared to nonimmediate hypersensitivity....

  20. Segmental hair testing to disclose chronic exposure to psychoactive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchei, Emilia; Palmi, Ilaria; Pichini, Simona; Pacifici, Roberta; Anton Airaldi, Ileana-Rita; Costa Orvay, Juan Antonio; García Serra, Joan; Bonet Serra, Bartolomé; García-Algar, Óscar

    2016-06-15

    This study presents the case of a 4-year-old healthy child admitted to the paediatric ward for suspected accidental intoxication due to ingestion of narcoleptic drugs (methylphenidate, sertraline and quetiapine), taken on a regular basis by his 8-year-old brother affected by Asperger syndrome.Intoxication can be objectively assessed by measurements of drugs and metabolites in biological matrices with short-term (blood and urine) or long-term (hair) detection windows. At the hospital, the child's blood and urine were analysed by immunoassay (confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry), and sertraline and quetiapine and their metabolites were identified. The suspicion that the mother administered drugs chronically prompted the analysis of six, consecutive 2-cm segments of the child's hair, using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, thereby accounting for ingestion over the previous 12 months. Quetiapine was found in the first four segments with a mean concentration of 1.00 ng/mg ± 0.94 ng/mg hair while sertraline and its metabolite, desmethyl-sertraline, were found in all segments with a mean concentration of 2.65 ± 0.94 ng/mg and 1.50 ± 0.94 ng/mg hair, respectively. Hair analyses were negative for methylphenidate and its metabolite (ritalinic acid). Biological matrices testing for psychoactive drugs disclosed both acute and chronic intoxication with quetiapine and sertraline administered by the mother.

  1. Animal models for testing anti-prion drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Elezgarai, Saioa R; Eraña, Hasier; Castilla, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases belong to a group of fatal infectious diseases with no effective therapies available. Throughout the last 35 years, less than 50 different drugs have been tested in different experimental animal models without hopeful results. An important limitation when searching for new drugs is the existence of appropriate models of the disease. The three different possible origins of prion diseases require the existence of different animal models for testing anti-prion compounds. Wild type, over-expressing transgenic mice and other more sophisticated animal models have been used to evaluate a diversity of compounds which some of them were previously tested in different in vitro experimental models. The complexity of prion diseases will require more pre-screening studies, reliable sporadic (or spontaneous) animal models and accurate chemical modifications of the selected compounds before having an effective therapy against human prion diseases. This review is intended to put on display the more relevant animal models that have been used in the search of new antiprion therapies and describe some possible procedures when handling chemical compounds presumed to have anti-prion activity prior to testing them in animal models.

  2. The differing perspectives of workers and occupational medicine physicians on the ethical, legal and social issues of genetic testing in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt-Rauf, Sherry I; Brandt-Rauf, Elka; Gershon, Robyn; Brandt-Rauf, Paul W

    2011-01-01

    Genetic testing in the workplace holds the promise of improving worker health but also raises ethical, legal, and social issues. In considering such testing, it is critical to understand the perspectives of workers, who are most directly affected by it, and occupational health professionals, who are often directly involved in its implementation. Therefore, a series of focus groups of unionized workers (n=25) and occupational medicine physicians (n=23) was conducted. The results demonstrated strikingly different perspectives of workers and physicians in several key areas, including the goals and appropriateness of genetic testing, and methods to minimize its risks. In general, workers were guided by a profound mistrust of the employer, physician, and government, while physicians were guided primarily by scientific and medical concerns, and, in many cases, by the business concerns distrusted by the workers.

  3. Erythrocyte adenosine transport. A rapid screening test for cardiovascular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, P K; Mosher, S J; Li, R; Farmer, P S; Klassen, G A; Pollak, P T; McMullen, M; Ferrier, G

    1993-11-01

    An erythrocyte (RBC) model based on whole blood was used to investigate the effect of cardiovascular drugs on the uptake of adenosine in vitro. Fresh whole blood obtained from healthy volunteers was allowed to equilibrate with various concentrations (5-1000 microM) of a tested agent. (2-3H)-Adenosine was used as a substrate, and the reaction was terminated after 2 sec of incubation at room temperature by rapid addition of a "Stopping Solution" which was a mixture of erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine, dipyridamole, and EDTA. The mixture was centrifuged (1760 g, 4 degrees C, 10 min), and the radioactivity of an aliquot of the supernatant was determined by a scintillation counter. The results showed that dipyridamole was the most potent agent tested (IC50 = 0.2 microM). Amongst the calcium antagonists studied, isradipine was most potent, followed by verapamil, clentiazem, diltiazem, and then nifedipine. The racemates of two metabolites of diltiazem, MX and MB, were more potent than the parent drug. The antiarrhythmic agents, amiodarone and sotalol, the two new lipid peroxidation inhibitors, U-74389F and U-78517F, and the anxiolytic agent, alprazolam, were as active as verapamil. The beta-receptor antagonist propranolol and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, enalapril, were practically inactive. In addition, the model was stereoselective such that the S(-)-enantiomer of verapamil was considerably more potent than the R(+)-antipote, whereas d(+)-sotalol was practically inactive compared to racemic sotalol.

  4. Developing a workplace resilience instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallak, Larry A; Yildiz, Mustafa

    2016-05-27

    Resilience benefits from the use of protective factors, as opposed to risk factors, which are associated with vulnerability. Considerable research and instrument development has been conducted in clinical settings for patients. The need existed for an instrument to be developed in a workplace setting to measure resilience of employees. This study developed and tested a resilience instrument for employees in the workplace. The research instrument was distributed to executives and nurses working in the United States in hospital settings. Five-hundred-forty completed and usable responses were obtained. The instrument contained an inventory of workplace resilience, a job stress questionnaire, and relevant demographics. The resilience items were written based on previous work by the lead author and inspired by Weick's [1] sense-making theory. A four-factor model yielded an instrument having psychometric properties showing good model fit. Twenty items were retained for the resulting Workplace Resilience Instrument (WRI). Parallel analysis was conducted with successive iterations of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Respondents were classified based on their employment with either a rural or an urban hospital. Executives had significantly higher WRI scores than nurses, controlling for gender. WRI scores were positively and significantly correlated with years of experience and the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire. An instrument to measure individual resilience in the workplace (WRI) was developed. The WRI's four factors identify dimensions of workplace resilience for use in subsequent investigations: Active Problem-Solving, Team Efficacy, Confident Sense-Making, and Bricolage.

  5. [Health promotion effectiveness: developing and testing a system for routine evaluation in health education, workplace health promotion and setting approach supplied by the German statutory health insurance agencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliche, T; Riemann, K; Bockermann, C; Niederbühl, K; Wanek, V; Koch, U

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the study was to develop and test a routine evaluation system for all health promotion and education activities funded by the German statutory health insurance companies. The system aims at measuring both individual health effects and the complex organisational effects of setting projects. Measurement instruments were developed synoptically and tested in three field tests (2003-2008). In order to assess the impact of individual health training, 212 courses of the health insurance companies were evaluated. To assess the setting approach, 56 schools participating in a health-promotion project were included, and for workplace health-promotion 6 projects of different health insurance companies were included. The research design was an observational study. Instead of control groups, individual data were compared to reference values for gender- and age-matched groups from national health surveys. The studies consisted of baseline and final assessment (T1/T2), complemented by a follow-up (T3), all adapted to the time of intervention (i. e., 3-24 months for T1/T2 and 3-18 months for T2/T3). The evaluation system provides multilevel-measurement based upon validated questionnaires for health-related structures and processes in institutions, and for the participating individual's subjective health, health problems, health-related quality of life, workplace and institutional satisfaction. Controlling for central confounders is also possible (input and dosage, age, gender, educational background). Thus, short but valid measurement instruments of high usability are available to evaluate the effectiveness of prevention, health promotion and education. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Drug Testing Guidelines and Practices for Juvenile Probation and Parole Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Probation and Parole Association, Lexington, KY.

    This document, intended as a resource manual, provides guidelines on drug testing. These topics are covered: (1) National Institute on Drug Abuse guidelines applicability; (2) introduction to legal issues, drug testing in juvenile probation and parole, and juvenile law; (3) mission of a juvenile parole agency; (4) purpose of testing; (5) drug…

  7. [Workplace mobbing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soljan, Ivana; Josipović-Jelić, Zeljka; Jelić Kis, I Anita

    2008-03-01

    Workplace mobbing is a hostile and unethical communication, systematically aimed from one or more individuals towards mostly one individual, who are forced into a helpless position and are held in it by constant bullying. This article describes some of the most important characteristics of mobbing: offensive behaviour, organizational and non-organizational causes of this behaviour, the victim and the consequences. Modern business environment is complex, dynamic, volatile, and requires better ability to adjust. Constant changes are a part of organizational reality, but they also produce an ideal environment for all kinds of conflicts. Conflicts are inevitable in every organization, but the task of its management is to identify them and resolve before they affect the workforce, productivity and costs. The idea is to avert psychological abuse and aberrant behaviour such as mobbing which that may cause physical and mental disorders. Mobbing is a problem of the modern society; as a violation of human rights it is relatively new and unrecognised in Croatia. Abuse is mostly psychological: it affects the victim's health and life, quality of work, productivity, profitability, and may lead to significant economic losses in the community. Mobbing can be averted by joint forces that would involve employee and management, medical and legal professionals, and even community as a whole. The more an organization pursues excellence based on trust and business ethics, the higher the probability that mobbing will be averted or stopped.

  8. Development of a psychological test to measure ability-based emotional intelligence in the Indonesian workplace using an item response theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajrianthi; Zein, Rizqy Amelia

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to develop an emotional intelligence (EI) test that is suitable to the Indonesian workplace context. Airlangga Emotional Intelligence Test (Tes Kecerdasan Emosi Airlangga [TKEA]) was designed to measure three EI domains: 1) emotional appraisal, 2) emotional recognition, and 3) emotional regulation. TKEA consisted of 120 items with 40 items for each subset. TKEA was developed based on the Situational Judgment Test (SJT) approach. To ensure its psychometric qualities, categorical confirmatory factor analysis (CCFA) and item response theory (IRT) were applied to test its validity and reliability. The study was conducted on 752 participants, and the results showed that test information function (TIF) was 3.414 (ability level = 0) for subset 1, 12.183 for subset 2 (ability level = −2), and 2.398 for subset 3 (level of ability = −2). It is concluded that TKEA performs very well to measure individuals with a low level of EI ability. It is worth to note that TKEA is currently at the development stage; therefore, in this study, we investigated TKEA’s item analysis and dimensionality test of each TKEA subset. PMID:29238234

  9. Development of a psychological test to measure ability-based emotional intelligence in the Indonesian workplace using an item response theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajrianthi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fajrianthi,1 Rizqy Amelia Zein2 1Department of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, 2Department of Personality and Social Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, Universitas Airlangga, Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia Abstract: This study aimed to develop an emotional intelligence (EI test that is suitable to the Indonesian workplace context. Airlangga Emotional Intelligence Test (Tes Kecerdasan Emosi Airlangga [TKEA] was designed to measure three EI domains: 1 emotional appraisal, 2 emotional recognition, and 3 emotional regulation. TKEA consisted of 120 items with 40 items for each subset. TKEA was developed based on the Situational Judgment Test (SJT approach. To ensure its psychometric qualities, categorical confirmatory factor analysis (CCFA and item response theory (IRT were applied to test its validity and reliability. The study was conducted on 752 participants, and the results showed that test information function (TIF was 3.414 (ability level = 0 for subset 1, 12.183 for subset 2 (ability level = -2, and 2.398 for subset 3 (level of ability = -2. It is concluded that TKEA performs very well to measure individuals with a low level of EI ability. It is worth to note that TKEA is currently at the development stage; therefore, in this study, we investigated TKEA’s item analysis and dimensionality test of each TKEA subset. Keywords: categorical confirmatory factor analysis, emotional intelligence, item response theory 

  10. Development of a psychological test to measure ability-based emotional intelligence in the Indonesian workplace using an item response theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajrianthi; Zein, Rizqy Amelia

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to develop an emotional intelligence (EI) test that is suitable to the Indonesian workplace context. Airlangga Emotional Intelligence Test (Tes Kecerdasan Emosi Airlangga [TKEA]) was designed to measure three EI domains: 1) emotional appraisal, 2) emotional recognition, and 3) emotional regulation. TKEA consisted of 120 items with 40 items for each subset. TKEA was developed based on the Situational Judgment Test (SJT) approach. To ensure its psychometric qualities, categorical confirmatory factor analysis (CCFA) and item response theory (IRT) were applied to test its validity and reliability. The study was conducted on 752 participants, and the results showed that test information function (TIF) was 3.414 (ability level = 0) for subset 1, 12.183 for subset 2 (ability level = -2), and 2.398 for subset 3 (level of ability = -2). It is concluded that TKEA performs very well to measure individuals with a low level of EI ability. It is worth to note that TKEA is currently at the development stage; therefore, in this study, we investigated TKEA's item analysis and dimensionality test of each TKEA subset.

  11. 10 CFR 26.65 - Pre-access drug and alcohol testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... rely on the results of those drug and alcohol tests to meet the requirements for pre-access testing in... authorization until the drug test results are received. (2) The licensee or other entity need not conduct pre... tests; or (iii) If the individual is selected for pre-access testing under this paragraph, the licensee...

  12. Drug susceptibility testing of M. tuberculosis with the help of test system of Sensititre MycoTB TREK Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Makarova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents efficiency comparison of Sensititre test system and culture methods of Bactec 960 and Lowenstein-Jensen medium for drug susceptibility testing of tuberculosis mycobacteria.Cultures of M. tuberculosis of 137 patients have been studied. It has been found out that the part of coinciding results is fairly big for drug susceptibility testing by test system of Sensititre MycoTB and other methods. This system has the advantages related to standard procedures and capacity of drug susceptibility testing (degree to 12 drugs simultaneously within a short period of time (7-14 days. Drug susceptibility testing of M. tuberculosis by testing system of Sensititre MycoTB is simpler from technical point of view compared to all other systems. Sensititre MycoTB has been tested abroad and in MSPCT and certified and it can be used for the clinical practice. 

  13. 21 CFR 862.3645 - Neuroleptic drugs radioreceptor assay test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neuroleptic drugs radioreceptor assay test system. 862.3645 Section 862.3645 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology...

  14. Test systems in drug discovery for hazard identification and risk assessment of human drug-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Richard J; Betts, Catherine; Blomme, Eric A G; Gerets, Helga H J; Gjervig Jensen, Klaus; Hewitt, Philip G; Juhila, Satu; Labbe, Gilles; Liguori, Michael J; Mesens, Natalie; Ogese, Monday O; Persson, Mikael; Snoeys, Jan; Stevens, James L; Walker, Tracy; Park, B Kevin

    2017-07-01

    The liver is an important target for drug-induced toxicities. Early detection of hepatotoxic drugs requires use of well-characterized test systems, yet current knowledge, gaps and limitations of tests employed remains an important issue for drug development. Areas Covered: The current state of the science, understanding and application of test systems in use for the detection of drug-induced cytotoxicity, mitochondrial toxicity, cholestasis and inflammation is summarized. The test systems highlighted herein cover mostly in vitro and some in vivo models and endpoint measurements used in the assessment of small molecule toxic liabilities. Opportunities for research efforts in areas necessitating the development of specific tests and improved mechanistic understanding are highlighted. Expert Opinion: Use of in vitro test systems for safety optimization will remain a core activity in drug discovery. Substantial inroads have been made with a number of assays established for human Drug-induced Liver Injury. There nevertheless remain significant gaps with a need for improved in vitro tools and novel tests to address specific mechanisms of human Drug-Induced Liver Injury. Progress in these areas will necessitate not only models fit for application, but also mechanistic understanding of how chemical insult on the liver occurs in order to identify translational and quantifiable readouts for decision-making.

  15. Depression in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Depression In The Workplace Depression In The Workplace Clinical depression has become one ... will die by suicide vi . Employees' Attitudes Towards Depression Often times a depressed employee will not seek ...

  16. Sports drug testing using complementary matrices: Advantages and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Geyer, Hans; Tretzel, Laura; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2016-10-25

    Today, routine doping controls largely rely on testing whole blood, serum, and urine samples. These matrices allow comprehensively covering inorganic as well as low and high molecular mass organic analytes relevant to doping controls and are collecting and transferring from sampling sites to accredited anti-doping laboratories under standardized conditions. Various aspects including time and cost-effectiveness as well as intrusiveness and invasiveness of the sampling procedure but also analyte stability and breadth of the contained information have been motivation to consider and assess values potentially provided and added to modern sports drug testing programs by alternative matrices. Such alternatives could be dried blood spots (DBS), dried plasma spots (DPS), oral fluid (OF), exhaled breath (EB), and hair. In this review, recent developments and test methods concerning these alternative matrices and expected or proven contributions as well as limitations of these specimens in the context of the international anti-doping fight are presented and discussed, guided by current regulations for prohibited substances and methods of doping as established by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Focusing on literature published between 2011 and 2015, examples for doping control analytical assays concerning non-approved substances, anabolic agents, peptide hormones/growth factors/related substances and mimetics, β2-agonists, hormone and metabolic modulators, diuretics and masking agents, stimulants, narcotics, cannabinoids, glucocorticoids, and beta-blockers were selected to outline the advantages and limitations of the aforementioned alternative matrices as compared to conventional doping control samples (i.e. urine and blood/serum). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Health promotion in the workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan T Al-Otaibi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this review was to describe the scientific evidence for coordinating health promotion at the workplace and to discuss the required future research in this field. Literature review from March 1990 to November 2014 was performed. Using the keywords ′health, promotion, worksite and workplace′, literature was searched in the following databases: Medline, PubMed and Google Scholar; with no time limit. There is emerging evidence that workplace health promotion enhances the effectiveness of effort to promote and protect workers′ health. It proves both cost-effective and cost-beneficial to health promotion at the worksite and subsequently further reduces absenteeism. However, future research is needed to identify the impact of other factors such as age, gender and race on workers′ exposure. There is also a need to develop valid tests to measure the outcome of these programmes at the workplace. Health promotion should be central to workplace planning and should be recognised as an integral part of proactive occupational health. Indeed, the workplace is viewed as one of the most popular venues for promoting health and preventing diseases among employees.

  18. Full-course drug challenge test in the diagnosis of delayed allergic reactions to penicillin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Jakob E; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Drug challenge test (DCT) has long been the most sensitive test in the allergological work-up when investigating for penicillin allergy.......Drug challenge test (DCT) has long been the most sensitive test in the allergological work-up when investigating for penicillin allergy....

  19. In vitro tests for drug hypersensitivity reactions : an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayorga, C.; Celik, G.; Rouzaire, P.; Whitaker, P.; Bonadonna, P.; Rodrigues-Cernadas, J.; Vultaggio, A.; Brockow, K.; Caubet, J. C.; Makowska, J.; Nakonechna, A.; Romano, A.; Montanez, M. I.; Laguna, J. J.; Zanoni, G.; Gueant, J. L.; Oude Elberink, H.; Fernandez, J.; Viel, S.; Demoly, P.; Torres, M. J.

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) are a matter of great concern, both for outpatient and in hospital care. The evaluation of these patients is complex, because invivo tests have a suboptimal sensitivity and can be time-consuming, expensive and potentially risky, especially drug provocation

  20. Improving the workplace environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gledhill, Irvy MA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Research has shown that companies with more diversity and a better workplace perform better. So what makes a good workplace in physics, where women and men can work to their full potential? In the Improving the Workplace Environment workshop...

  1. Five year results of an international proficiency testing programme for measurement of antifungal drug concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lempers, V.J.C.; Alffenaar, J.W.C.; Touw, D.J.; Burger, D.M.; Uges, D.R.A.; Aarnoutse, R.E.; Brüggemann, R.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Since 2007 the Dutch Association for Quality Assessment in Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (KKGT) has organized an international interlaboratory proficiency testing (PT) programme for measurement of antifungal drugs in plasma. We describe the 5 year results of the laboratories' performance.

  2. College Athletes and Drug Testing: Attitudes and Behaviors by Gender and Sport

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Dona; Morris, Joyce

    1993-01-01

    We surveyed varsity athletes at a Big East university to assess attitudes toward a mandatory drug education and testing program and examined whether there were differences in drug-related attitudes and behaviors based on gender or varsity sport. We found no statistically significant differences in personal drug use behaviors based on gender or team affiliation. Attitudes about drug use and knowledge of a teammate using drugs did show significant differences based on varsity sport. Tennis play...

  3. Evaluating Workplace English Language Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekkens, Kristin; Winke, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Companies across the United States provide workplace English classes to non-native-English-speaking employees to increase productivity, retention, and on-the-job safety. Institutions that financially support the programs often require evidence of learning through standardized tests as a prerequisite for continued funding. However, the tests…

  4. Women's opinions of legal requirements for drug testing in prenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker Edmonds, Brownsyne; Mckenzie, Fatima; Austgen, MacKenzie B; Carroll, Aaron E; Meslin, Eric M

    2017-07-01

    To explore women's attitudes and perceptions regarding legal requirements for prenatal drug testing. Web-based survey of 500 US women (age 18-45) recruited from a market research survey panel. A 24-item questionnaire assessed their opinion of laws requiring doctors to routinely verbal screen and urine drug test patients during pregnancy; recommendations for consequences for positive drug tests during pregnancy; and opinion of laws requiring routine drug testing of newborns. Additional questions asked participants about the influence of such laws on their own care-seeking behaviors. Data were analyzed for associations between participant characteristics and survey responses using Pearson's chi-squared test. The majority of respondents (86%) stated they would support a law requiring verbal screening of all pregnant patients and 73% would support a law requiring universal urine drug testing in pregnancy. Fewer respondents were willing to support laws that required verbal screening or urine drug testing (68% and 61%, respectively) targeting only Medicaid recipients. Twenty-one percent of respondents indicated they would be offended if their doctors asked them about drug use and 14% indicated that mandatory drug testing would discourage prenatal care attendance. Women would be more supportive of policies requiring universal rather than targeted screening and testing for prenatal drug use. However, a noteworthy proportion of women would be discouraged from attending prenatal care - a reminder that drug testing policies may have detrimental effects on maternal child health.

  5. Recreational Drug Use and Fluctuating Asymmetry: Testing the Handicap Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Borkowska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Zahavi's handicap principle suggests that only organisms with good genetic quality can afford to engage in costly behaviors. Recreational drug use can be harmful to one's health and therefore might be viewed as a costly signal of one's genetic quality. One of the measurements of genetic quality is bodily symmetry assessed by fluctuating asymmetry. If unhealthy drug use is a behavioral example of Zahavi's handicap principle, then men who use different stimulants or recreational drugs should be more symmetrical than men who do not use them at all or use them only in low quantity. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between drug use and fluctuating asymmetry. The subjects were 190 young women and 202 young men. Six bilaterally symmetrical traits were measured: length of II–V digits, wrist breadth, and ear height. Questionnaires included questions about smoking, alcohol drinking, drug use, and designer drug use. There was no relationship between bodily symmetry and smoking frequency, alcohol drinking frequency, drug or designer drug use, total substance use, age of smoking initiation, or reason of this initiation. The results indicate that drug use does not reflect genetic quality and does not necessarily relate to the handicap hypothesis.

  6. 78 FR 72684 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... standards of the Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs (Mandatory Guidelines... lists until such time as it is restored to full certification under the Mandatory Guidelines. If any... notice is also available on the Internet at http://www.workplace.samhsa.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  7. 78 FR 54903 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... standards of the Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs (Mandatory Guidelines... lists until such time as it is restored to full certification under the Mandatory Guidelines. If any... notice is also available on the Internet at http://www.workplace.samhsa.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  8. 78 FR 66034 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... standards of the Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs (Mandatory Guidelines... lists until such time as it is restored to full certification under the Mandatory Guidelines. If any... notice is also available on the Internet at http://www.workplace.samhsa.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  9. Development and evaluation of a test program for Y-site compatibility testing of total parenteral nutrition and intravenous drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Staven, Vigdis; Wang, Siri; Gr?nlie, Ingrid; Tho, Ingunn

    2016-01-01

    Background There is no standardized procedure or consensus to which tests should be performed to judge compatibility/incompatibility of intravenous drugs. The purpose of this study was to establish and evaluate a test program of methods suitable for detection of physical incompatibility in Y-site administration of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and drugs. Methods Eight frequently used methods (dynam...

  10. Visible but Unseen? A Workplace Study of Blood-Test Icons on Electronic Emergency-Department Whiteboard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torkilsheyggi, Arnvør Martinsdóttir á; Hertzum, Morten

    2015-01-01

    of its work with blood tests. We investigate this use of the whiteboard through observations and in-formal interviews in the ED and analyze the ability of the whiteboard to support coordination and awareness in the work with blood tests. Our findings show limitations in the ability of the whiteboard...... to support awareness in a setting where the users are (locally) mobile, specifically in regard to information that requires continuous monitoring. We do however also find that the whiteboard safeguarded the work with blood tests against some risks by making blood-test information socially visible...

  11. Preclinical testing of new drugs for tuberculosis: current challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaerts, Anne J; Degroote, Mary Ann; Orme, Ian M

    2008-02-01

    The continuing global epidemic of tuberculosis, the increasing rate of multidrug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis and the more recent emergence of extensively drug resistant (XDR) tuberculosis are great causes for concern. A major international effort is currently underway to optimize current drug therapies and to discover new drugs that are active against these organisms. This effort has created a pipeline of new candidate drugs at various stages of preclinical and early clinical evaluations. Major challenges still exist, however, varying from the standardization and application of current animal models and their application to drug discovery and characterization to the fact that our knowledge about the basic biology of the MDR and XDR strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is minimal at best.

  12. The current status of community drug testing via the analysis of drugs and drug metabolites in sewage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm J. Reid

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years the analysis of drug residues in sewage has been promoted as a means of estimating the level of drug use in communities. Measured drug residue concentrations in the sewage are used to determine the load (total mass of the drug being used by the entire community. Knowledge of the size or population of the community then allows for the calculation of drug-use relative to population (typically drug-mass/day/1000 inhabitants which facilitates comparisons between differing communities or populations. Studies have been performed in many European countries, including Norway, as well as in the US and Australia. The approach has successfully estimated the use of cocaine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, MDMA, cannabis, nicotine and alcohol. The analysis of biomarkers of drug use in sewage has great potential to support and complement existing techniques for estimating levels of drug use, and as such has been identified as a promising development by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA; www.emcdda.europa.eu/wastewater-analysis. The approach is not without its challenges, and ongoing collaboration across Europe aims at agreeing upon best-practice and harmonising the methods being used. In Norway development is being performed through the NFR RUSMIDDEL funded DrugMon (www.niva.no/drugmon project that has led to the development of many new techniques, significantly improved our understanding of the uncertainties associated with the approach and allowed the coordination of Europe wide collaboration which has included all important intercalibration exercises. Application of the technique can provide evidence-based and real-time estimates of collective drug use with the resulting data used to improve the much needed estimates of drug use and dependency.

  13. FDA, companies test RFID tracking to prevent drug counterfeiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John S

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. has an apparently growing problem with fake, counterfeit drugs entering the mainstream drug supply, and being fraudulently sold at full price in regular pharmacies and hospitals; some have no active ingredient, or too little, or substitute a cheap drug for an expensive one. The FDA has asked drug manufacturers to develop technology to track all shipments electronically as they move through the distribution chain; currently, RFID (radio frequency identification) is the preferred method for doing so. This article explains what is happening, and why we do not believe that this use of RFID is a privacy threat--though other privacy issues are among the most important questions we face today.

  14. 49 CFR 40.13 - How do DOT drug and alcohol tests relate to non-DOT tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... respects. (b) DOT tests must take priority and must be conducted and completed before a non-DOT test is... a blood or urine specimen collected by the employee's physician or a DNA test result purporting to... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How do DOT drug and alcohol tests relate to non...

  15. Cost-effectiveness of rapid susceptibility testing against second-line drugs for tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dowdy, D. W.; van't Hoog, A.; Shah, M.; Cobelens, F.

    2014-01-01

    Drug susceptibility testing (DST) against second-line tuberculosis drugs (SLDs) is essential for improving outcomes among multidrug-resistant (MDR-) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) cases. To evaluate the potential cost-effectiveness of rapid DST for SLDs. We constructed a

  16. Substance Abuse and the Workplace. Technical Assistance Packet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    According to the United States Department of Labor, 73% of drug users in 1997 were employed. Numerous studies, reports, and surveys suggest that substance abuse is having a negative effect on the workplace in terms of decreased productivity; increased accidents; absenteeism; turnover; and medical costs. However, workplace substance abuse is a…

  17. Global Trends in Workplace Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lung-Sheng; Lai, Chun-Chin

    2012-01-01

    The paradigm of human resource development has shifted to workplace learning and performance. Workplace can be an organization, an office, a kitchen, a shop, a farm, a website, even a home. Workplace learning is a dynamic process to solve workplace problems through learning. An identification of global trends of workplace learning can help us to…

  18. Latex allergy in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toraason, M; Sussman, G; Biagini, R; Meade, J; Beezhold, D; Germolec, D

    2000-11-01

    While less than 1% of the general population is sensitized to latex, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration estimates that 8-12% of health-care workers are sensitized. The major source of workplace exposure is powdered natural rubber latex (NRL) gloves. NRL is harvested from HEVEA: brasiliensis trees and ammoniated to prevent coagulation resulting in the hydrolysis of the latex proteins. Prior to use in manufacturing, the latex is formulated by the addition of multiple chemicals. Thus, human exposure is to a mixture of residual chemicals and hydrolyzed latex peptides. Clinical manifestations include irritant contact dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis (type IV), and type I immediate hypersensitivity response. Type I (IgE-mediated) NRL allergy includes contact urticaria, systemic urticaria, angioedema, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, bronchospasm, and anaphylaxis. Taking an accurate history, including questions on atopic status, food allergy, and possible reactions to latex devices makes diagnosis of type-I latex allergy possible. To confirm a diagnosis, either in vivo skin prick testing (SPT) or in vitro assays for latex-specific IgE are performed. While the SPT is regarded as a primary confirmatory test for IgE-mediated disease, the absence of a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-licensed HEVEA: brasiliensis latex extract has restricted its use in diagnosis. Serological tests have, therefore, become critically important as alternative diagnostic tests. Three manufacturers currently have FDA clearance for in vitro tests, to detect NRL-specific IgE. The commercially available assays may disagree on the antibody status of an individual serum, which may be due to the assay's detecting anti-NRL IgEs to different allergenic NRL proteins. Sensitized individuals produce specific IgE antibody to at least 10 potent HEVEA: allergens, Hev b 1-Hev b 10, each of which differs in its structure, size, and net charge. The relative content and ratios of Hevs in the

  19. Evaluation of patch test in identification of causative agent in drug rashes due to antiepileptics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vatve Maneesha

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Patch test was evaluated for the identification of causative agent in cutaneous eruptions due to antiepileptics. Patch tests were carried out in twenty patients and ten controls with carbamazepine, phenytoin sodium, phenobarbitone and sodium valproate. Sodium valproate was found tobe irritant in 1 and 5% concentration and further dilution is recommended for patch testing. Patch test was positive in 14 (70% patients and in 7 with suspected drug alone, and remaining 7 were positive with more than one antiepileptic drug. We recommended patch test for identification of causative drug in rashes due to antiepileptics.

  20. A Laminated Microfluidic Device for Comprehensive Preclinical Testing in the Drug ADME Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fan; Qu, Yueyang; Luo, Yong; Fang, Ning; Liu, Yang; Gao, Zhigang; Zhao, Weijie; Lin, Bingcheng

    2016-01-01

    New techniques are urgently needed to replace conventional long and costly pre-clinical testing in the new drug administration process. In this study, a laminated microfluidic device was fabricated to mimic the drug ADME response test in vivo. This proposed device was loaded and cultured with functional cells for drug response investigation and organ tissues that are involved in ADME testing. The drug was introduced from the top of the device and first absorbed by the Caco-2 cell layer, and then metabolized by the primary hepatocyte layer. It subsequently interacted with the MCF-7 cell layer, distributed in the lung, heart and fat tissues, and was finally eliminated through the dialysis membrane. Throughout this on-chip ADME process, the proposed device can be used as a reliable tool to simultaneously evaluate the drug anti-tumor activity, hepatotoxicity and pharmacokinetics. Furthermore, this device was proven to be able to reflect the hepatic metabolism of a drug, drug distribution in the target tissues, and the administration method of a drug. Furthermore, this microdevice is expected to reduce the number of drug candidates and accelerate the pre-clinical testing process subject to animal testing upon adaptation in new drug discovery. PMID:27122192

  1. Cholestatic jaundice caused by cloxacillin: macrophage inhibition factor test in preventing rechallenge with hepatotoxic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enat, R; Pollack, S; Ben-Arieh, Y; Livni, E; Barzilai, D

    1980-01-01

    Severe intrahepatic cholestasis occurred in a patient after taking nitrofurantoin, ampicillin, and cloxacillin. As only nitrofurantoin was known to cause cholestasis she was given cloxacillin again two years later. The cholestasis reappeared at once. A macrophage inhibition factor test confirmed that cloxacillin was the offending drug. Cloxacillin should be added to the growing list of drugs causing cholestasis. Inadvertent rechallenge with hepatototoxic drugs might be prevented by routine use of the macrophage inhibition factor test. Images p982-a PMID:7417768

  2. Flow cytometry susceptibility testing for conventional antifungal drugs and Comparison with the NCCLS Broth Macrodilution Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Najafzadeh

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: During the last decade, the incidence of fungal infection has been increased in many countries. Because of the advent of resistant to antifungal agents, determination of an efficient strategic plan for treatment of fungal disease is an important issue in clinical mycology. Many methods have been introduced and developed for determination of invitro susceptibility tests. During the recent years, flow cytometry has developed to solving the problem and many papers have documented the usefulness of this technique. Materials and methods: As the first step, the invitro susceptibility of standard PTCC (Persian Type of Culture Collection strain and some clinical isolates of Candida consisting of Candida albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. kefyer and C. parapsilosis were evaluated by macrodilution broth method according to NCCLS (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards guidelines and flow cytometry susceptibility test. Results:  The data indicated that macro dilution broth methods and flow cytometry have the same results in determination of MIC (Minimum Inhibitory Concentration for amphotericin B, clotrimazole, fluconazole, ketoconazole and miconazole in C. albicans PTCC 5027 as well as clinical Candida isolates, such as C.albicans, C.dubliniensis, C.glabrata C.kefyr, and C.parapsilosis. Discussion: Comparing the results obtained by macrodilution broth and flow cytometry methods revealed that flow cytometry was faster. It is suggested that flow cytometry susceptibility test can be used as a powerful tool for determination of MIC and administration of the best antifungal drug in treatment of patients with Candida infections.

  3. Workplace Preparedness for Terrorism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ursano, Robert J

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive workplace preparedness for terrorism must address and integrate the psychological and behavioral aspects of terrorism preparedness and response in order to address issues of human continuity...

  4. Researching workplace learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms; Warring, Niels

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical and methodological framework for understanding and researching learning in the workplace. The workplace is viewed in a societal context and the learner is viewed as more than an employee in order to understand the learning process in relation to the learner......'s life history.Moreover we will explain the need to establish a 'double view' by examining learning in the workplace both as an objective and as a subjective reality. The article is mainly theoretical, but can also be of interest to practitioners who wish to understand learning in the workplace both...

  5. Workplace Ergonomics Reference Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workplace Ergonomics Reference Guide 2 nd Edition A Publication of the Computer/Electronic Accommodations Program Real Solutions for Real ... Table of Contents.................................................................................................................................. ... Checklist ........................................................................................................................... 3 Ergonomic ...

  6. Urine and oral fluid drug testing in support of pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Tai C; Magnani, Barbarajean; Moore, Christine

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, the abuse of opioid drugs has resulted in greater prevalence of addiction, overdose, and deaths attributable to opioid abuse. The epidemic of opioid abuse has prompted professional and government agencies to issue practice guidelines for prescribing opioids to manage chronic pain. An important tool available to providers is the drug test for use in the initial assessment of patients for possible opioid therapy, subsequent monitoring of compliance, and documentation of suspected aberrant drug behaviors. This review discusses the issues that most affect the clinical utility of drug testing in chronic pain management with opioid therapy. It focuses on the two most commonly used specimen matrices in drug testing: urine and oral fluid. The advantages and disadvantages of urine and oral fluid in the entire testing process, from specimen collection and analytical methodologies to result interpretation are reviewed. The analytical sensitivity and specificity limitations of immunoassays used for testing are examined in detail to draw attention to how these shortcomings can affect result interpretation and influence clinical decision-making in pain management. The need for specific identification and quantitative measurement of the drugs and metabolites present to investigate suspected aberrant drug behavior or unexpected positive results is analyzed. Also presented are recent developments in optimization of test menus and testing strategies, such as the modification of the standard screen and reflexed-confirmation testing model by eliminating some of the initial immunoassay-based tests and proceeding directly to definitive testing by mass spectrometry assays.

  7. Testing an explanatory model of nurses' intention to report adverse drug reactions in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, Alessia De; Pancani, Luca; Steca, Patrizia; Colaceci, Sofia; Giusti, Angela; Tibaldi, Laura; Alvaro, Rosaria; Ausili, Davide; Vellone, Ercole

    2017-05-01

    To test an explanatory model of nurses' intention to report adverse drug reactions in hospital settings, based on the theory of planned behaviour. Under-reporting of adverse drug reactions is an important problem among nurses. A cross-sectional design was used. Data were collected with the adverse drug reporting nurses' questionnaire. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to test the factor validity of the adverse drug reporting nurses' questionnaire, and structural equation modelling was used to test the explanatory model. The convenience sample comprised 500 Italian hospital nurses (mean age = 43.52). Confirmatory factor analysis supported the factor validity of the adverse drug reporting nurses' questionnaire. The structural equation modelling showed a good fit with the data. Nurses' intention to report adverse drug reactions was significantly predicted by attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control (R² = 0.16). The theory of planned behaviour effectively explained the mechanisms behind nurses' intention to report adverse drug reactions, showing how several factors come into play. In a scenario of organisational empowerment towards adverse drug reaction reporting, the major predictors of the intention to report are support for the decision to report adverse drug reactions from other health care practitioners, perceptions about the value of adverse drug reaction reporting and nurses' favourable self-assessment of their adverse drug reaction reporting skills. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. 'Getting checked and having the test': drug injectors' perceptions of HIV testing - findings from qualitative research conducted in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Rhidian

    2002-04-01

    If HIV and AIDS policy initiatives are to be successful in tackling the spread of infection it is important to understand more about the ways in which people perceive HIV and AIDS. HIV testing is a policy initiative that will work when people take the test and make appropriate changes to their behaviour as a result. This paper is based on a study that used in-depth interviews and a vignette with drug injectors to explore drug injectors' perceptions of HIV risk outside and inside prison. HIV testing was an integral part of drug injectors' perceptions of risk. Three main themes emerged from the analysis of these data: first, reasons for not taking a test; second, reasons for taking a test; and third, the impact of testing upon subsequent behaviour. The paper ends with a summary and conclusions highlighting implications for future research and policy development. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. HIV resistance testing and detected drug resistance in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultze, Anna; Phillips, Andrew N.; Paredes, Roger; Battegay, Manuel; Rockstroh, Jürgen K.; Machala, Ladislav; Tomazic, Janez; Girard, Pierre M.; Januskevica, Inga; Gronborg-Laut, Kamilla; Lundgren, Jens D.; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Losso, M.; Kundro, M.; Vetter, N.; Zangerle, R.; Karpov, I.; Vassilenko, A.; Mitsura, V. M.; Paduto, D.; Clumeck, N.; de Wit, S.; Delforge, M.; Florence, E.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Kostov, K.; Begovac, J.; Machala, L.; Jilich, D.; Sedlacek, D.; Nielsen, J.; Kronborg, G.; Benfield, T.; Larsen, M.; Gerstoft, J.; Katzenstein, T.; Pedersen, C.; Møller, N. F.; Ostergaard, L.; Dragsted, U. B.; Nielsen, L. N.; Zilmer, K.; Smidt, Jelena; Ristola, M.; Katlama, C.; Pradier, C.; Dabis, F.; Neau, D.; Duvivier, C.; Rockstroh, J.; Schmidt, R.; van Lunzen, J.; Degen, O.; Stefan, C.; Bogner, J.; Fatkenheuer, G.; Chkhartishvili, N.; Kosmidis, J.; Gargalianos, P.; Xylomenos, G.; Perdios, J.; Sambatakou, H.; Banhegyi, D.; Gottfredsson, M.; Mulcahy, F.; Yust, I.; Turner, D.; Burke, M.; Shahar, E.; Hassoun, G.; Elinav, H.; Haouzi, M.; Sthoeger, Z. M.; d'Arminio, A.; Esposito, R.; Mazeu, I.; Mussini, C.; Pristera, R.; Mazzotta, F.; Gabbuti, A.; Vullo, V.; Lichtner, M.; Zaccarelli, M.; Reiss, P.; Ormaasen, V.; Maeland, A.; Bruun, J.; Knysz, B.; Gasiorowski, J.; Inglot, M.; Horban, A.; Bakowska, E.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Flisiak, R.; Parczewski, M.; Pynka, M.; Maciejewska, K.; Beniowski, M.; Mularska, E.; Smiatacz, T.; Jablonowska, E.; Malolepsza, E.; Wojcik, K.; Mozer-Lisewska, I.; Doroana, M.; Caldeira, L.; Mansinho, K.; Maltez, F.; Radoi, R.; Oprea, C.; Babes, Victor; Rakhmanova, A.; Trofimora, T.; Khromova, I.; Kuzovatova, E.; Jevtovic, D.; Shunnar, A.; Stanekova, D.; Tomazic, J.; Moreno, S.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Clotet, B.; Jou, A.; Paredes, R.; Tural, C.; Puig, J.; Bravo, I.; Gatell, J. M.; Miro, J. M.; Domingo, P.; Gutierrez, M.; Mateo, G.; Sambeat, M. A.; Laporte, J. M.; Blaxhult, A.; Flamholc, L.; Thalme, A.; Sonnerborg, A.; Ledergerber, B.; Weber, R.; Cavassini, M.; Calmy, A.; Furrer, H.; Battegay, M.; Elzi, L.; Schmid, P.; Kravchenko, E.; Chentsova, N.; Frolov, V.; Kutsyna, G.; Baskakov, I.; Kuznetsova, A.; Kyselyova, G.; Gazzard, B.; Johnson, A. M.; Simons, E.; Edwards, S.; Phillips, A.; Johnson, M. A.; Mocroft, A.; Orkin, C.; Weber, J.; Scullard, G.; Fisher, M.; Leen, C.; Gatell, J.; Monforte, A. d'Arminio; Lundgren, J.; DeWit, S.; Kirk, O.; Grarup, J.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Thiebaut, R.; Burger, D.; Peters, L.; Podlekareva, D.; Nielsen, J. E.; Matthews, C.; Fischer, A. H.; Bojesen, A.; Raben, D.; Kristensen, D.; Laut, K. Grønborg; Larsen, J. F.; Grint, D.; Shepherd, L.; Schultze, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe regional differences and trends in resistance testing among individuals experiencing virological failure and the prevalence of detected resistance among those individuals who had a genotypic resistance test done following virological failure. Design: Multinational cohort

  10. HIV resistance testing and detected drug resistance in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultze, A.; Phillips, A.N.; Paredes, R.; Battegay, M.; Rockstroh, J.K.; Machala, L.; Tomazic, J.; Girard, P.M.; Januskevica, I.; Gronborg-Laut, K.; Lundgren, J.D.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Burger, D.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe regional differences and trends in resistance testing among individuals experiencing virological failure and the prevalence of detected resistance among those individuals who had a genotypic resistance test done following virological failure. DESIGN: Multinational cohort

  11. Miracle drug: Brazil approves never-tested cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchenbecker, Ricardo S; Mota, Daniel M

    2017-07-01

    Background Brazil recently approved synthetic phosphoetanolamine, a popularly dubbed 'cancer pill', a substance that has been shown to kill cancer cells in lab animal models but was not yet formally accessed in humans, and thus despite the existence of any evidence of its efficacy and safety. Methods The authors describe the recent decision of Brazil to aprove phosphoetanolamine in the context of growing 'judicialization' to promote access to medicines and thus reinforcing a growing sense of legal uncertainty. Results The approval of phosphoetanolamine despite the existence of any evidence of its efficacy and safety represents to the authors one of the saddest and surrealistic episodes in Brazil's recent public health history. Brazil's current economic crisis is fueling the 'judicialization' to promote access to medicines and thus reinforcing a growing sense of legal uncertainty in the context of rising economic constrains and a progressive failing state. The authors state that the Phosphoetanolamine's approval bill violates current legal prohibition of commercialisation of drugs without the Brazilian national drug regulatory agency's approval and thus may represent a potential menace to Brazil's pharmacogovernance and the country's governance to health technology assessment at the Brazilian national health systems. Conclusion Phosphoetanolamine's approval illustrates that the combination of flawed decision making, economic crisis and political interference may threaten weak governance mechanisms for drug regulation and health technology assessment and thus representing an extra burden in the sustainability of universal access-based national health systems.

  12. Proactive Copyright: Workplace Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rebecca P.; Parker, Preston

    2009-01-01

    Oftentimes, copyright is addressed in the workplace only after a blatant infringement is discovered or a cease-and-desist letter is received. Then, too, some workplaces may feel that they are immune to copyright issues due to their educational nature; while private organizations, businesses, and industry may feel that the term "fair use" will…

  13. Combating Workplace Ageism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reio, Thomas G., Jr.; Sanders-Reio, Joanne

    1999-01-01

    Age discrimination in the workplace is widespread and often based on stereotypes. Research has demonstrated that older workers learn and perform well. Adult educators should eliminate ways in which educational practices perpetuate ageism, raise awareness of it in the workplace, and help older workers continue learning. (SK)

  14. Canadian Chefs' Workplace Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier-MacBurnie, Paulette; Doyle, Wendy; Mombourquette, Peter; Young, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the formal and informal workplace learning of professional chefs. In particular, it considers chefs' learning strategies and outcomes as well as the barriers to and facilitators of their workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach: The methodology is based on in-depth, face-to-face, semi-structured…

  15. Team awareness for workplace substance abuse prevention: the empirical and conceptual development of a training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, J B; Lehman, W E; Reynolds, G S

    2000-09-01

    This paper describes the empirical and theoretical development of a workplace training program to help reduce/prevent employee alcohol and drug abuse and enhance aspects of the work group environment that support ongoing prevention. The paper (1) examines the changing social context of the workplace (e.g., teamwork, privacy issues) as relevant for prevention, (2) reviews studies that assess risks and protective factors in employee substance abuse (work environment, group processes, and employee attitudes), (3) provides a conceptual model that focuses on work group processes (enabling, neutralization of deviance) as the locus of prevention efforts, (4) describes an enhanced team-oriented training that was derived from previous research and the conceptual model, and (5) describes potential applications of the program. It is suggested that the research and conceptual model may help prevention scientists to assess the organizational context of any workplace prevention strategy. The need for this team-oriented approach may be greater among employees who experience psychosocial risks such as workplace drinking climates, social alienation, and policies that emphasize deterrence (drug testing) over educative prevention. Limitations of the model are also discussed.

  16. A P-gp vesicular transport inhibition assay - optimization and validation for drug-drug interaction testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herédi-Szabó, Krisztina; Palm, Johan E; Andersson, Tommy B; Pál, Ákos; Méhn, Dóra; Fekete, Zsolt; Beéry, Erzsébet; Jakab, Katalin Tauberné; Jani, Márton; Krajcsi, Peter

    2013-07-16

    Accurate determination of potential drug-drug interaction mediated by efflux transporters (tDDI) is crucial to assess the risk of pharmacokinetic interaction and toxicity of drugs. Passive permeability and uptake transporter mediated transport are important covariates of cell-based inhibition assays that need to be taken into consideration when performing kinetic analysis of data. Vesicular uptake inhibition has been considered by regulatory agencies as a viable alternative for testing tDDI potential of low passive permeability drugs in particular. Membranes prepared from a P-gp overexpressing human cell line has superior transport properties over membranes prepared from Sf9 cells and cholesterol enriched Sf9 membranes. P-gp expressed in this membrane effluxes N-methyl-quinidine (NMQ) with high affinity (K(m) is 3.65 μM) and a high rate (V(max) is 656 pmol/mg protein/min). Digoxin, vinblastine and paclitaxel, established P-gp substrates inhibited transport of NMQ with estimated K(i) values of 250, 0.1 and 0.6 μM, respectively. A panel of 11 drugs that have been listed by regulatory agencies as reference inhibitors were used to validate the assay to predict clinical inhibition potential. All the drugs that have been implicated in P-gp mediated DDI were found to be inhibitors in a relevant concentration range. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Psychometric properties of the Turkish versions of the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) and the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10) in the prison setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evren, Cuneyt; Ogel, Kultegin; Evren, Bilge; Bozkurt, Muge

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate psychometric properties of the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) and the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10) in prisoners with (n = 124) or without (n = 78) drug use disorder. Participants were evaluated with the DUDIT, the DAST-10, and the Addiction Profile Index-Short (API-S). The DUDIT and the DAST-10 were found to be psychometrically sound drug abuse screening measures with high convergent validity when compared with each other (r = 0.86), and API-S (r = 0.88 and r = 0.84, respectively), and to have a Cronbach's α of 0.93 and 0.87, respectively. In addition, a single component accounted for 58.28% of total variance for DUDIT, whereas this was 47.10% for DAST-10. The DUDIT had sensitivity and specificity scores of 0.95 and 0.79, respectively, when using the optimal cut-off score of 10, whereas these scores were 0.88 and 0.74 for the DAST-10 when using the optimal cut-off score of 4. Additionally, both the DUDIT and the DAST-10 showed good discriminant validity as they differentiated prisoners with drug use disorder from those without. Findings support the Turkish versions of both the DUDIT and the DAST-10 as reliable and valid drug abuse screening instruments that measure unidimensional constructs.

  18. In vitro tests for drug hypersensitivity reactions: an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, C; Celik, G; Rouzaire, P; Whitaker, P; Bonadonna, P; Rodrigues-Cernadas, J; Vultaggio, A; Brockow, K; Caubet, J C; Makowska, J; Nakonechna, A; Romano, A; Montañez, M I; Laguna, J J; Zanoni, G; Gueant, J L; Oude Elberink, H; Fernandez, J; Viel, S; Demoly, P; Torres, M J

    2016-08-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) are a matter of great concern, both for outpatient and in hospital care. The evaluation of these patients is complex, because in vivo tests have a suboptimal sensitivity and can be time-consuming, expensive and potentially risky, especially drug provocation tests. There are several currently available in vitro methods that can be classified into two main groups: those that help to characterize the active phase of the reaction and those that help to identify the culprit drug. The utility of these in vitro methods depends on the mechanisms involved, meaning that they cannot be used for the evaluation of all types of DHRs. Moreover, their effectiveness has not been defined by a consensus agreement between experts in the field. Thus, the European Network on Drug Allergy and Drug Allergy Interest Group of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology has organized a task force to provide data and recommendations regarding the available in vitro methods for DHR diagnosis. We have found that although there are many in vitro tests, few of them can be given a recommendation of grade B or above mainly because there is a lack of well-controlled studies, most information comes from small studies with few subjects and results are not always confirmed in later studies. Therefore, it is necessary to validate the currently available in vitro tests in a large series of well-characterized patients with DHR and to develop new tests for diagnosis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Cholestatic jaundice caused by cloxacillin: macrophage inhibition factor test in preventing rechallenge with hepatotoxic drugs.

    OpenAIRE

    Enat, R; Pollack, S.; Ben-Arieh, Y; Livni, E; Barzilai, D

    1980-01-01

    Severe intrahepatic cholestasis occurred in a patient after taking nitrofurantoin, ampicillin, and cloxacillin. As only nitrofurantoin was known to cause cholestasis she was given cloxacillin again two years later. The cholestasis reappeared at once. A macrophage inhibition factor test confirmed that cloxacillin was the offending drug. Cloxacillin should be added to the growing list of drugs causing cholestasis. Inadvertent rechallenge with hepatototoxic drugs might be prevented by routine us...

  20. European recommendations for the clinical use of HIV drug resistance testing: 2011 update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Camacho, Ricardo J; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    the following recommendations concerning the indications for resistance testing: for HIV-1 (i) test earliest sample for protease and reverse transcriptase drug resistance in drug-naive patients with acute or chronic infection; (ii) test protease and reverse transcriptase drug resistance at virologic failure......The European HIV Drug Resistance Guidelines Panel, established to make recommendations to clinicians and virologists, felt that sufficient new information has become available to warrant an update of its recommendations, explained in both pocket guidelines and this full paper. The Panel makes......) consider testing earliest detectable plasma RNA when a successful nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-containing therapy was inappropriately interrupted; (v) genotype source patient when postexposure prophylaxis is considered; for HIV-2, (vi) consider resistance testing where treatment change...

  1. Tetrazepam drug sensitivity -- usefulness of the patch test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirker, C; Misic, A; Brinkmeier, T; Frosch, P J

    2002-09-01

    The muscle relaxant tetrazepam may cause severe cutaneous adverse effects. We report 4 cases of varying intensity: Stevens-Johnson syndrome, erythema-multiforme-like exanthema, maculopapular and maculo-urticarial exanthema. Patch testing with tetrazepam (10% in petrolatum) was strongly positive in the 2 patients with severe skin eruptions and weakly positive in the other 2. Oral rechallenge with tetrazepam was positive in 3 patients (1 not done). Diazepam, with a similar chemical structure to tetrazepam, was negative on patch testing and on oral challenge testing in 2 patients. Although the optimal patch test concentration of tetrazepam has still to be determined, it is a useful diagnostic tool to confirm sensitization, particularly in patients with severe bullous eruptions.

  2. Drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to fluoroquinolones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, I S; Larsen, A R; Sandven, P

    2003-01-01

    In the first attempt to establish a quality assurance programme for susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to fluoroquinolones, 20 strains with different fluoroquinolone susceptibility patterns were distributed by the Supranational Reference Laboratory in Stockholm to the other...

  3. Army Drug Development Program. Phase I. Clinical Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    34 " Donald Giancoli 457 Physical 7 Interview -:1 ’p Vital signs 100 Lab tests < Dose 750mg -3- ZA9-2~ ~ j~I l ~~I~Ii Assay ,-9 .- 2 ’ii Stuart Varner 458...3 9 2 -2J 2 ~ J~~~ Donald Giancoli 7 Physical // Interview___j/ <- Vital signs__- /7 Lab tests ZEN-/ f Dose 1500mng ~4,~747~/ Assay 91 _-L’ 2 A_ XJ I_

  4. Rapid enzymatic test for phenotypic HIV protease drug resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, D.; Assfalg-Machleidt, Irmgard; Nitschko, H; Helm, K. von der; Koszinowski, U.; Machleidt, Werner

    2003-01-01

    A phenotypic resistance test based on recombinant expression of the active HIV protease in E. coli from patient blood samples was developed. The protease is purified in a rapid onestep procedure as active enzyme and tested for inhibition by five selected synthetic inhibitors (amprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir, and saquinavir) used presently for chemotherapy of HIVinfected patients. The HPLC system used in a previous approach was replaced by a continuous fluorogenic assay suitable f...

  5. Outcomes of a prospective trial of student-athlete drug testing: the Student Athlete Testing Using Random Notification (SATURN) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Linn; Elliot, Diane L; MacKinnon, David P; Moe, Esther L; Kuehl, Kerry S; Yoon, Myeongsun; Taylor, Aaron; Williams, Jason

    2007-11-01

    To assess the effects of random drug and alcohol testing (DAT) among high school athletes. This was a 2-year prospective randomized controlled study of a single cohort among five intervention high schools with a DAT policy and six schools with a deferred policy, serially assessed by voluntary, confidential questionnaires. DAT school athletes were at risk for random testing during the full academic year. Positive test results were reported to parents or guardians, with mandatory counseling. Indices of illicit drug use, with and without alcohol use, were assessed at the beginning and end of each school year for the past month and prior year. Potential mediating variables were evaluated. Student-athletes from intervention and control schools did not differ in past 1-month use of illicit drug or a combination of drug and alcohol use at any of the four follow-up periods. At the end of the initial school year and after 2 full school years, student-athletes at DAT schools reported less drug use during the past year (p < .01) compared to athletes at the deferred policy schools. Combining past year drug and alcohol use together, student-athletes at DAT schools reported less use at the second and third follow-up assessments (p < .05). Paradoxically, DAT athletes across all assessments reported less athletic competence (p < .001), less belief authorities were opposed to drug use (p < .01), and indicated greater risk-taking (p < .05). At the final assessment, DAT athletes believed less in testing benefits (p < .05) and less that testing was a reason not to use drugs (p < .01). No DAT deterrent effects were evident for past month use during any of four follow-up periods. Prior-year drug use was reduced in two of four follow-up self-reports, and a combination of drug and alcohol use was reduced at two assessments as well. Overall, drug testing was accompanied by an increase in some risk factors for future substance use. More research is needed before DAT is considered an

  6. The evaluation of drug provocation tests in pediatric allergy clinic: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezir, Emine; Erkocoglu, Mustafa; Civelek, Ersoy; Kaya, Aysenur; Azkur, Dilek; Akan, Aysegül; Ozcan, Celal; Toyran, Muge; Ginis, Tayfur; Misirlioglu, Emine Dibek; Kocabas, Can Naci

    2014-01-01

    Drug provocation tests (DPTs) are gold standard to diagnose drug allergy. Our goal was to evaluate the results and safety of diagnostic methods including DPTs during childhood. Between January 2010 and February 2013 DPTs were performed and evaluated, prospectively, in children who attended our pediatric allergy clinic with a suspected drug hypersensitivity reaction. One hundred ninety-eight suspected drug reactions in 175 patients (88 boys and 87 girls) were evaluated. The median age of the subjects at the time of the suspected drug-induced hypersensitivity reaction and at the time of the study was 56 (interquartile range [IQR] = 24-120 months) months and 76 (IQR = 35-149 months) months, respectively. Suspected drugs were beta-lactam antibiotics in 108 cases (54.5%), non-beta-lactam antibiotics in 22 cases (11.1%), and nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs in 52 cases (26.3%). The history was compatible with immediate-type reactions in 69 cases (34.8%). Skin-prick tests were not positive in any of the cases. Intradermal tests were positive in three cases (4%). DPTs were positive in 13 (6.8%) of 191 provocation cases, which were performed with culprit drugs. Our results suggest that a positive clinical history is not enough to make a diagnosis of drug allergy, which highlights the significance of undertaking further diagnostic evaluation especially for DPTs.

  7. A cluster randomised trial introducing rapid diagnostic tests into registered drug shops in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Magnussen, Pascal; Lal, Sham

    2015-01-01

    the impact of introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria (mRDTs) in registered drug shops in Uganda, with the aim to increase appropriate treatment of malaria with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in patients seeking treatment for fever in drug shops. METHODS: A cluster-randomized trial...

  8. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R.; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; van Zyl, Gert U.; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Wallis, Carole L.; Gupta, Ravindra K.; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; de Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Wainberg, Mark A.; Richman, Douglas D.; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E.; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in

  9. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations : Potential applications for point-of-care Genotypic resistance testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhee, Soo Yon; Jordan, Michael R.; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zy, Gert U.; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L.; De Wit, Tobias F Rinke; Wallis, Carole L.; Gupta, Ravindra K.; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30817724X; Gallant, Joel E.; Wainberg, Mark A.; Richman, Douglas D.; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E.; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in

  10. Levels and types of alcohol biomarkers in DUI and clinic samples for estimating workplace alcohol problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Paul R

    2012-02-01

    Widespread concern about illicit drugs as an aspect of workplace performance potentially diminishes attention on employee alcohol use. Alcohol is the dominant drug contributing to poor job performance; it also accounts for a third of the worldwide public health burden. Evidence from public roadways--a workplace for many--provides an example of work-related risk exposure and performance lapses. In most developed countries, alcohol is involved in 20-35% of fatal crashes; drugs other than alcohol are less prominently involved in fatalities. Alcohol biomarkers can improve detection by extending the timeframe for estimating problematic exposure levels and thereby provide better information for managers. But what levels and which markers are right for the workplace? In this paper, an established high-sensitivity proxy for alcohol-driving risk proclivity is used: an average eight months of failed blood alcohol concentration (BAC) breath tests from alcohol ignition interlock devices. Higher BAC test fail rates are known to presage higher rates of future impaired-driving convictions (driving under the influence; DUI). Drivers in alcohol interlock programmes log 5-7 daily BAC tests; in 12 months, this yields thousands of samples. Also, higher programme entry levels of alcohol biomarkers predict a higher likelihood of failed interlock BAC tests during subsequent months. This paper summarizes the potential of selected biomarkers for workplace screening. Markers include phosphatidylethanol (PEth), percent carbohydrate deficient transferrin (%CDT), gammaglutamyltransferase (GGT), gamma %CDT (γ%CDT), and ethylglucuronide (EtG) in hair. Clinical cut-off levels and median/mean levels of these markers in abstinent people, the general population, DUI drivers, and rehabilitation clinics are summarized for context. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. A review of guidelines on home drug testing web sites for parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Yukiko; Fairfax-Columbo, Jaymes; Ball, Emily; Cassey, Heather; Arria, Amelia M; Bresani, Elena; Curtis, Brenda L; Kirby, Kimberly C

    2014-01-01

    To update and extend prior work reviewing Web sites that discuss home drug testing for parents, and assess the quality of information that the Web sites provide, to assist them in deciding when and how to use home drug testing. We conducted a worldwide Web search that identified 8 Web sites providing information for parents on home drug testing. We assessed the information on the sites using a checklist developed with field experts in adolescent substance abuse and psychosocial interventions that focus on urine testing. None of the Web sites covered all the items on the 24-item checklist, and only 3 covered at least half of the items (12, 14, and 21 items, respectively). The remaining 5 Web sites covered less than half of the checklist items. The mean number of items covered by the Web sites was 11. Among the Web sites that we reviewed, few provided thorough information to parents regarding empirically supported strategies to effectively use drug testing to intervene on adolescent substance use. Furthermore, most Web sites did not provide thorough information regarding the risks and benefits to inform parents' decision to use home drug testing. Empirical evidence regarding efficacy, benefits, risks, and limitations of home drug testing is needed.

  12. HIV resistance testing and detected drug resistance in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultze, Anna; Phillips, Andrew N; Paredes, Roger

    2015-01-01

    calculated using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations. RESULTS: Compared to 74.2% of ART-experienced individuals in 1997, only 5.1% showed evidence of virological failure in 2012. The odds of resistance testing declined after 2004 (global P 

  13. [Reduction of animal experiments in experimental drug testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrensdorf-Nicol, H; Krämer, B

    2014-10-01

    In order to ensure the quality of biomedical products, an experimental test for every single manufactured batch is required for many products. Especially in vaccine testing, animal experiments are traditionally used for this purpose. For example, efficacy is often determined via challenge experiments in laboratory animals. Safety tests of vaccine batches are also mostly performed using laboratory animals. However, many animal experiments have clear inherent disadvantages (low accuracy, questionable transferability to humans, unclear significance). Furthermore, for ethical reasons and animal welfare aspects animal experiments are also seen very critical by the public. Therefore, there is a strong trend towards replacing animal experiments with methods in which no animals are used ("replacement"). If a replacement is not possible, the required animal experiments should be improved in order to minimize the number of animals necessary ("reduction") and to reduce pain and suffering caused by the experiment to a minimum ("refinement"). This "3R concept" is meanwhile firmly established in legislature. In recent years many mandatory animal experiments have been replaced by alternative in vitro methods or improved according to the 3R principles; numerous alternative methods are currently under development. Nevertheless, the process from the development of a new method to its legal implementation takes a long time. Therefore, supplementary regulatory measures to facilitate validation and acceptance of new alternative methods could contribute to a faster and more consequent implementation of the 3R concept in the testing of biomedical products.

  14. HIV resistance to antiretroviral drugs: Mechanisms, genotypic and phenotypic resistance testing in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Blaise, Pierre; Clevenbergh, P.; Vaira, Dolorès; Moutschen, Michel; Dellamonica, P

    2002-01-01

    HIV resistance to antiretroviral agents is a major contributory cause of treatment failure. The dynamics of HIV replication, together with patient-, physician-, and drug-related factors, lead to emergence of HIV resistant strains in most of the patients. Phenotypic assays look for an increase in the antiretroviral drug (ARV) concentration that inhibits 50% of the growth of the tested HIV strain (IC50), comparatively with a reference strain cultivated in parallel. Genotypic tests detect resist...

  15. European recommendations for the clinical use of HIV drug resistance testing: 2011 update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Camacho, Ricardo J; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    the following recommendations concerning the indications for resistance testing: for HIV-1 (i) test earliest sample for protease and reverse transcriptase drug resistance in drug-naive patients with acute or chronic infection; (ii) test protease and reverse transcriptase drug resistance at virologic failure......) consider testing earliest detectable plasma RNA when a successful nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-containing therapy was inappropriately interrupted; (v) genotype source patient when postexposure prophylaxis is considered; for HIV-2, (vi) consider resistance testing where treatment change...... is needed after treatment failure. The Panel recommends genotyping in most situations, using updated and clinically evaluated interpretation systems. It is mandatory that laboratories performing HIV resistance tests take part regularly in external quality assurance programs, and that they consider storing...

  16. Alcohol and drug testing of health professionals following preventable adverse events: a bad idea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banja, John

    2014-01-01

    Various kinds of alcohol and drug testing, such as preemployment, routine, and for-cause testing, are commonly performed by employers. While healthcare organizations usually require preemployment drug testing, they vary on whether personnel will be subjected to further testing. Recently, a call has gone out for postincident testing among physicians who are involved in serious, preventable events, especially ones leading to a patient's death. This article will offer a number of counterarguments to that proposal and discuss an alternate approach: that health institutions can better improve patient safety and employees' well-being by implementing an organizational policy of "speaking up" when system operators notice work behaviors or environmental factors that threaten harm or peril. The article will conclude with a description of various strategies that facilitate speaking up, and why the practice constitutes a superior alternative to mandatory alcohol and drug testing in the wake of serious, harm-causing medical error.

  17. Medical Marijuana in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targino, Marcelo C.; Fanciullo, Gilbert J.; Martin, Douglas W.; Hartenbaum, Natalie P.; White, Jeremy M.; Franklin, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Although possession and use of marijuana is prohibited by federal law, legalization in four states (Alaska, Colorado, Oregon, and Washington) and allowance for palliation and therapy in 19 others may reposition the drug away from the fringes of society. This evolving legal environment, and growing scientific evidence of its effectiveness for select health conditions, requires assessment of the safety and appropriateness of marijuana within the American workforce. Although studies have suggested that marijuana may be used with reasonable safety in some controlled environments, there are potential consequences to its use that necessitate employer scrutiny and concern. Several drug characteristics must be considered, including Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC, or THC) concentration, route of administration, dose and frequency, and pharmacokinetics, as well as the risks inherent to particular workplace environments. PMID:25951421

  18. Drug target mining and analysis of the Chinese tree shrew for pharmacological testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    Full Text Available The discovery of new drugs requires the development of improved animal models for drug testing. The Chinese tree shrew is considered to be a realistic candidate model. To assess the potential of the Chinese tree shrew for pharmacological testing, we performed drug target prediction and analysis on genomic and transcriptomic scales. Using our pipeline, 3,482 proteins were predicted to be drug targets. Of these predicted targets, 446 and 1,049 proteins with the highest rank and total scores, respectively, included homologs of targets for cancer chemotherapy, depression, age-related decline and cardiovascular disease. Based on comparative analyses, more than half of drug target proteins identified from the tree shrew genome were shown to be higher similarity to human targets than in the mouse. Target validation also demonstrated that the constitutive expression of the proteinase-activated receptors of tree shrew platelets is similar to that of human platelets but differs from that of mouse platelets. We developed an effective pipeline and search strategy for drug target prediction and the evaluation of model-based target identification for drug testing. This work provides useful information for future studies of the Chinese tree shrew as a source of novel targets for drug discovery research.

  19. Cost-effectiveness analysis of introducing malaria diagnostic testing in drug shops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Clarke, Siân E.; Lal, Sham

    2017-01-01

    Background Private sector drug shops are an important source of malaria treatment in Africa, yet diagnosis without parasitological testing is common among these providers. Accurate rapid diagnostic tests for malaria (mRDTs) require limited training and present an opportunity to increase access...... to correct diagnosis. The present study was a cost-effectiveness analysis of the introduction of mRDTs in Ugandan drug shops. Methods Drug shop vendors were trained to perform and sell subsidised mRDTs and artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) in the intervention arm while vendors offered ACTs...... following presumptive diagnosis of malaria in the control arm. The effect on the proportion of customers with fever ‘appropriately treated of malaria with ACT’ was captured during a randomised trial in drug shops in Mukono District, Uganda. Health sector costs included: training of drug shop vendors...

  20. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA): testing a proposed MCDA framework for orphan drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schey, C; Krabbe, P F M; Postma, M J; Connolly, M P

    2017-01-17

    Since the introduction of the orphan drugs legislation in Europe, it has been suggested that the general method of assessing drugs for reimbursement is not necessarily suitable for orphan drugs. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence indicated that several criteria other than cost and efficacy could be considered in reimbursement decisions for orphan drugs. This study sought to explore the multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) framework proposed by (Orphanet J Rare Dis 7:74, 2012) to a range of orphan drugs, with a view to comparing the aggregate scores to the average annual cost per patient for each product, and thus establishing the merit of MCDA as a tool for assessing the value of orphan drugs in relation to their pricings. An MCDA framework was developed using the nine criteria proposed by (Orphanet J Rare Dis 7:74, 2012) for the evaluation of orphan drugs, using the suggested numerical scoring system on a scale of 1 to 3 for each criterion. Correlations between the average annual cost of the drugs and aggregate MCDA scores were tested and plotted graphically. Different weightings for each of the attributes were also tested. A further analysis was conducted to test the impact of including the drug cost as an attribute in the aggregate index scores. In the drugs studied, the R (2), that statistically measures how close the data are to the fitted regression line was 0.79 suggesting a strong correlation between the drug scores and the average annual cost per patient. Despite several limitations of the proposed model, this quantitative study provided insight into using MCDA and its relationship to the average annual costs of the products.

  1. Toxicity testing and drug screening using iPSC-derived hepatocytes, cardiomyocytes, and neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csöbönyeiová, Mária; Polák, Štefan; Danišovič, L'uboš

    2016-07-01

    Unexpected toxicity in areas such as cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and neurotoxicity is a serious complication of clinical therapy and one of the key causes for failure of promising drug candidates in development. Animal studies have been widely used for toxicology research to provide preclinical security evaluation of various therapeutic agents under development. Species differences in drug penetration of the blood-brain barrier, drug metabolism, and related toxicity contribute to failure of drug trials from animal models to human. The existing system for drug discovery has relied on immortalized cell lines, animal models of human disease, and clinical trials in humans. Moreover, drug candidates that are passed as being safe in the preclinical stage often show toxic effects during the clinical stage. Only around 16% drugs are approved for human use. Research on induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) promises to enhance drug discovery and development by providing simple, reproducible, and economically effective tools for drug toxicity screening under development and, on the other hand, for studying the disease mechanism and pathways. In this review, we provide an overview of basic information about iPSCs, and discuss efforts aimed at the use of iPSC-derived hepatocytes, cardiomyocytes, and neural cells in drug discovery and toxicity testing.

  2. Sexual harassment in the workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Joni Hersch

    2015-01-01

    Workplace sexual harassment is internationally condemned as sex discrimination and a violation of human rights, and more than 75 countries have enacted legislation prohibiting it. Sexual harassment in the workplace increases absenteeism and turnover and lowers workplace productivity and job satisfaction. Yet it remains pervasive and underreported, and neither legislation nor market incentives have been able to eliminate it. Strong workplace policies prohibiting sexual harassment, workplace tr...

  3. Patient-reported multiple drug reactions: Clinical profile and results of challenge testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramam M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some patients report hypersensitivity reactions to many drugs making it difficult to prescribe medications when they fall ill. Aim: To describe the clinical profile of multiple drug hypersensitivity and the results of challenge testing in a large teaching hospital.Methods: We performed a five-year retrospective review of the records of patients who complained of reactions to two or more unrelated drugs and avoided medication because of a fear of developing reactions. Oral challenge testing was carried out in hospital with drugs suspected by the patient to cause reactions and/or commonly prescribed medications. A positive reaction was diagnosed when symptoms and signs resembled previously experienced episodes and there was no such reaction with placebo. Results: Twenty three patients (aged 14-65 years; 19 females underwent challenge testing. Their complaints had been present for 1-30 years, with 2-40 drug reaction episodes reported. Antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs were most commonly implicated, and urticaria/angioedema were the most often reported manifestations. The patients underwent 3-27 challenges with 1-24 drugs. Three had positive challenge reactions with various NSAIDs, 13 developed symptoms and signs that were judged not to be true reactions, and 7 had no reactions. None of our patients qualified for a diagnosis of true multiple drug hypersensitivity. Conclusion: Patients who believe they are allergic to multiple, pharmacologically unrelated drugs are usually mistaken. Challenge testing is a reliable way of demonstrating this and providing patients with a list of safe drugs.

  4. 49 CFR 40.273 - What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test? 40... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Alcohol Testing § 40.273 What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test? (a) A cancelled alcohol test is neither positive nor negative. (1) As...

  5. Annual banned-substance review-analytical approaches in human sports drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Kuuranne, Tiia; Geyer, Hans

    2017-11-17

    A number of high profile revelations concerning anti-doping rule violations over the past 12 months has outlined the importance of tackling prevailing challenges and reducing the limitations of the current anti-doping system. At this time, the necessity to enhance, expand and improve analytical test methods in response to the substances outlined in the World Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA) Prohibited List represents an increasingly crucial task for modern sports drug testing programs. The ability to improve analytical testing methods often relies on the expedient application of novel information regarding superior target analytes for sports drug testing assays, drug elimination profiles, alternative test matrices, together with recent advances in instrumental developments. This annual banned-substance review evaluates literature published between October 2016 and September 2017 offering an in-depth evaluation of developments in these arenas and their potential application to substances reported in WADA's 2017 Prohibited List. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Annual banned-substance review: analytical approaches in human sports drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Kuuranne, Tiia; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    There has been an immense amount of visibility of doping issues on the international stage over the past 12 months with the complexity of doping controls reiterated on various occasions. Hence, analytical test methods continuously being updated, expanded, and improved to provide specific, sensitive, and comprehensive test results in line with the World Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA) 2016 Prohibited List represent one of several critical cornerstones of doping controls. This enterprise necessitates expediting the (combined) exploitation of newly generated information on novel and/or superior target analytes for sports drug testing assays, drug elimination profiles, alternative test matrices, and recent advances in instrumental developments. This paper is a continuation of the series of annual banned-substance reviews appraising the literature published between October 2015 and September 2016 concerning human sports drug testing in the context of WADA's 2016 Prohibited List. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. [Drug patch tests in the investigation of a fixed drug eruption subsequent to 2 courses of cyclophosphamide in combination with mesna].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaigue, S; Boye, T; Pasquine, C; Guetta, K; Alla, P; Ponte-Astoul, J; Morand, J-J

    2015-01-01

    When fixed drug eruption occurs following use of cyclophosphamide and mesna, it is difficult to establish which drug is responsible. We report a new case of patch tests that resulted in withdrawal of mesna and enabled continued treatment with cyclophophamide. A 57-year-old female patient with multiple sclerosis presented increasingly severe cutaneous lesions after successive courses of cyclophosphamide. Twenty-four hours after her latest treatment, she presented at the ER with a worse eruption than those to date and including facial lesions. The clinical diagnosis was a fixed drug eruption, and patch tests for mesna one month later were positive. Fixed drug eruption always occurs after recurrent treatment and the investigation must be precise. Patch tests may be used to determine which drug could be responsible. The most conclusive test comprises withdrawal of the incriminated drug with no further signs of drug eruption on resumption of the other medication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. European recommendations for the clinical use of HIV drug resistance testing: 2011 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Camacho, Ricardo J; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; de Luca, Andreu; Palmisano, Lucia; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Paredes, Roger; Poljak, Mario; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Soriano, Vincent; Walter, Hauke; Sönnerborg, Anders

    2011-01-01

    The European HIV Drug Resistance Guidelines Panel, established to make recommendations to clinicians and virologists, felt that sufficient new information has become available to warrant an update of its recommendations, explained in both pocket guidelines and this full paper. The Panel makes the following recommendations concerning the indications for resistance testing: for HIV-1 (i) test earliest sample for protease and reverse transcriptase drug resistance in drug-naive patients with acute or chronic infection; (ii) test protease and reverse transcriptase drug resistance at virologic failure, and other drug targets (integrase and envelope) if such drugs were part of the failing regimen; (iii) consider testing for CCR5 tropism at virologic failure or when a change of therapy has to be made in absence of detectable viral load, and in the latter case test DNA or last detectable plasma RNA; (iv) consider testing earliest detectable plasma RNA when a successful nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-containing therapy was inappropriately interrupted; (v) genotype source patient when postexposure prophylaxis is considered; for HIV-2, (vi) consider resistance testing where treatment change is needed after treatment failure. The Panel recommends genotyping in most situations, using updated and clinically evaluated interpretation systems. It is mandatory that laboratories performing HIV resistance tests take part regularly in external quality assurance programs, and that they consider storing samples in situations where resistance testing cannot be performed as recommended. Similarly, it is necessary that HIV clinicians and virologists take part in continuous education and discuss problematic clinical cases. Indeed, resistance test results should be used in the context of all other clinically relevant information for predicting therapy response.

  9. A review of chemical 'spot' tests: A presumptive illicit drug identification technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philp, Morgan; Fu, Shanlin

    2017-09-15

    Chemical 'spot' tests are a presumptive illicit drug identification technique commonly used by law enforcement, border security personnel, and forensic laboratories. The simplicity, low cost, and rapid results afforded by these tests make them particularly attractive for presumptive identification globally. In this paper, we review the development of these long-established methods and discuss color test recommendations and guidelines. A search of the scientific literature revealed the chemical reactions occurring in many color tests are either not actively investigated or reported as unknown. Today, color tests face many challenges, from the appearance of new psychoactive substances to concerns regarding selectivity, sensitivity, and safety. Advances in technology have seen color test reagents used in digital image color analysis, solid sensors, and microfluidic devices for illicit drug detection. This summarizes current research and suggests the future of presumptive color testing. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. 14 CFR 120.123 - Drug testing outside the territory of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Drug testing outside the territory of the... the territory of the United States. (a) No part of the testing process (including specimen collection, laboratory processing, and MRO actions) shall be conducted outside the territory of the United States. (1...

  11. Drug Testing US Student-Athletes for Performance-Enhancing Substance Misuse: A Flawed Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrke, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    The author argues that drug testing of U.S. high school students for performance-enhancing substance misuse is invasive, expensive, and the low number of positive test results do not justify the costs, especially in financially strapped school districts where this money would be better spent on injury prevention for athletes and the education of all students.

  12. Policing, massive street drug testing and poly-substance use chaos in Georgia - a policy case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otiashvili, David; Tabatadze, Mzia; Balanchivadze, Nino; Kirtadze, Irma

    2016-01-16

    Since early 2000, intensive policing, wide scale street drug testing, and actions aimed at limiting the availability of specific drugs have been implemented in Georgia. Supporters of this approach argue that fear of drug testing and resulting punishment compels drug users to stop using and prevents youth from initiating drug use. It has been also stated that reduction in the availability of specific drugs should be seen as an indication of the overall success of counter-drug efforts. The aim of the current review is to describe the drug-related law enforcement response in Georgia and its impact on illicit drug consumption and drug-related harm. We reviewed relevant literature that included peer-reviewed scientific articles, stand-alone research reports, annual drug situation reports, technical reports and program data. This was also supplemented by the review of relevant legislation and judicial practices for the twelve year period between 2002 and 2014. Every episode of reduced availability of any "traditional" injection drug was followed by the discovery/introduction of a new injection preparation. The pattern of drug consumption was normally driven by users' attempts to substitute their drug of choice through mixing together available alternative substances. Chaotic poly-substance use and extensive utilization of home-made injection drugs, prepared from toxic precursors, became common. Massive random street drug testing had little or no effect on the prevalence of problem drug use. Intensive harassment of drug users and exclusive focus on reducing the availability of specific drugs did not result in reduction of the prevalence of injecting drug use. Repressive response of Georgian anti-drug authorities relied heavily on consumer sanctions, which led to shifts in drug users' behavior. In most cases, these shifts were associated with the introduction and use of new toxic preparations and subsequent harm to the physical and mental health of drug consumers.

  13. [Workplace-related anxiety, workplace phobia and disorders of participation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschalla, B; Linden, M

    2009-06-01

    Work is an important domain of life. It is therefore clear that problems at the workplace and mental disorders will have negative interactions. Job-related anxieties are of special importance as any workplace causes or intensifies anxiety by its very nature. A common final pathway of mental disorders in general and workplace-related anxieties in particular is workplace phobia. Similarly to agoraphobia, it is characterised by panic when approaching or even thinking of the stimulus, in this case the workplace. Workplace phobia has serious negative consequences for the further course of illness. It impairs the ability to work, and can lead to sick leave and early retirement. It requires special therapeutic interventions. This paper describes workplace-related anxieties and workplace phobia and gives a conceptual framework for their understanding.

  14. Attitudes about Advances in Sweat Patch Testing in Drug Courts: Insights from a Case Study in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzer, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Drug courts are reinventing the drug testing framework by experimenting with new methods, including use of the sweat patch. The sweat patch is a band-aid like strip used to monitor drug court participants. The validity and reliability of the sweat patch as an effective testing method was examined, as well as the effectiveness, meaning how likely…

  15. Pill testing or drug checking in Australia: Acceptability of service design features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Monica J; Bruno, Raimondo; Ezard, Nadine; Ritter, Alison

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to determine design features of a drug-checking service that would be feasible, attractive and likely to be used by Australian festival and nightlife attendees. Web survey of 851 Australians reporting use of psychostimulants and/or hallucinogens and attendance at licensed venues past midnight and/or festivals in the past year (70% male; median age 23 years). A drug-checking service located at festivals or clubs would be used by 94%; a fixed-site service external to such events by 85%. Most (80%) were willing to wait an hour for their result. Almost all (94%) would not use a service if there was a possibility of arrest, and a majority (64%) would not use a service that did not provide individual feedback of results. Drug-checking results were only slightly more attractive if they provided comprehensive quantitative results compared with qualitative results of key ingredients. Most (93%) were willing to pay up to $5, and 68% up to $10, per test. One-third (33%) reported willingness to donate a whole dose for testing: they were more likely to be male, younger, less experienced, use drugs more frequently and attend venues/festivals less frequently. In this sample, festival- or club-based drug-checking services with low wait times and low cost appear broadly attractive under conditions of legal amnesty and individualised feedback. Quantitative analysis of ecstasy pills requiring surrender of a whole pill may appeal to a minority in Australia where pills are more expensive than elsewhere. [Barratt MJ, Bruno R, Ezard N, Ritter A. Pill testing or drug checking in Australia: Acceptability of service design features. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;00:000-000]. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  16. The workplace window view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lottrup, Lene Birgitte Poulsen; Stigsdotter, Ulrika K.; Meilby, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Office workers’ job satisfaction and ability to work are two important factors for the viability and competitiveness of most companies, and existing studies in contexts other than workplaces show relationships between a view of natural elements and, for example, student performance and neighbourh......Office workers’ job satisfaction and ability to work are two important factors for the viability and competitiveness of most companies, and existing studies in contexts other than workplaces show relationships between a view of natural elements and, for example, student performance...... satisfaction, and that high view satisfaction was related to high work ability and high job satisfaction. Furthermore, the results indicated that job satisfaction mediated the effect of view satisfaction on work ability. These findings show that a view of a green outdoor environment at the workplace can...... be an important asset in workforce work ability and job satisfaction....

  17. 49 CFR 40.271 - How are alcohol testing problems corrected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How are alcohol testing problems corrected? 40.271... WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Alcohol Testing § 40.271 How are alcohol testing problems corrected? (a) As a BAT or STT, you have the responsibility of trying to complete successfully an...

  18. 49 CFR 40.267 - What problems always cause an alcohol test to be cancelled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What problems always cause an alcohol test to be... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Alcohol Testing § 40.267 What problems... alcohol test if any of the following problems occur. These are “fatal flaws.” You must inform the DER that...

  19. A cost-effective smartphone-based antimicrobial susceptibility test reader for drug resistance testing (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Steve W.; Tseng, Derek; Di Carlo, Dino; Garner, Omai B.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-03-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is commonly used for determining microbial drug resistance, but routine testing, which can significantly reduce the spread of multi-drug resistant organisms, is not regularly performed in resource-limited and field-settings due to technological challenges and lack of trained diagnosticians. We developed a portable cost-effective smartphone-based colorimetric 96-well microtiter plate (MTP) reader capable of automated AST without the need for a trained diagnostician. This system is composed of a smartphone used in conjunction with a 3D-printed opto-mechanical attachment, which holds a set of inexpensive light-emitting-diodes and fiber-optic cables coupled to the 96-well MTP for enabling the capture of the transmitted light through each well by the smartphone camera. Images of the MTP plate are captured at multiple exposures and uploaded to a local or remote server (e.g., a laptop) for automated processing/analysis of the results using a custom-designed smartphone application. Each set of images are combined to generate a high dynamic-range image and analyzed for well turbidity (indicative of bacterial growth), followed by interpretative analysis per plate to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and drug susceptibility for the specific bacterium. Results are returned to the originating device within 1 minute and shown to the user in tabular form. We demonstrated the capability of this platform using MTPs prepared with 17 antibiotic drugs targeting Gram-negative bacteria and tested 82 patient isolate MTPs of Klebsiella pneumoniae, achieving well turbidity accuracy of 98.19%, MIC accuracy of 95.15%, and drug susceptibility interpretation accuracy of 99.06%, meeting the FDA defined criteria for AST.

  20. Drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium Avium subsp. Avium isolates from naturally infected domestic pigeons to avian tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Parvandar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: We suggest drug susceptibility testing for more nontuberculous mycobateria, particularly M. avium complex isolated from infected birds and humans, as well as molecular basics of drug sensitivity in order to detect resistance genes of pathogenic M. avium subsp. avium.

  1. NC-TEST: noncontact thermal emissions screening technique for drug and alcohol detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokoski, Francine J.

    1997-01-01

    Drug abuse is highly correlated with criminal behavior. The typical drug-using criminal commits hundreds of crimes per year. The crime rate cannot be significantly reduced without a reduction in the percentage of the population abusing drugs and alcohol. Accurate and timely estimation of that percentage is important for policy decisions concerning crime control, public health measures, allocation of intervention resources for prevention and treatment, projections of criminal justice needs, and the evaluation of policy effectiveness. Such estimation is particularly difficult because self reporting is unreliable; and physical testing has to date required blood or urine analysis which is expensive and invasive, with the result that too few people are tested. MIKOS Ltd. has developed a non-contact, passive technique with the potential for automatic, real- time screening for drug and alcohol use. The system utilizes thermal radiation which is spontaneously and continuously emitted by the human body. Facial thermal patterns and changes in patterns are correlated with standardized effects of specific drugs and alcohol. A portable system incorporating the collection and analysis technique can be used episodically to collect data for estimating drug and alcohol use by general unknown populations such as crowds at airports, or it can be used for repetitive routine screening of specific known groups such as airline pilots, military personnel, school children, or persons on probation or parole.

  2. Evaluation of MGIT 960 System for the Second-Line Drugs Susceptibility Testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyejin Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many laboratories validate DST of the second-line drugs by BACTEC MGIT 960 system. The objective of this study is to evaluate the critical concentration and perform DST for the 2nd line drugs. We evaluated 193 clinical strains of M. tuberculosis isolated from patients in South Korea. Testing the critical concentration of six second-line drugs was performed by MGIT 960 and compared with L-J proportion method. The critical concentration was determined to establish the most one that gave the difference between drug resistance and susceptibility in MGIT960 system. Good agreement of the following concentrations was found: Concordance was 95% for 0.5 μg/mL of moxifloxacin; 93.6%, 1.0 μg/mL of levofloxacin; 97.5%, 2.5 μg/mL of kanamycin; 90.6%, 2.5 μg/mL of capreomycin; 86.2%, 5.0 μg/mL of ethionamide; and 90.8%, 2.0 μg/mL of ρ-aminosalicylic acid. The critical concentrations of the four drugs, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, kanamycin, and capreomycin, were concordant and reliable for testing 2nd line drug resistance. Further study of ethionamide and ρ-aminosalicylic acid is required.

  3. Test Sample for the Spatially Resolved Quantification of Illicit Drugs on Fingerprints Using Imaging Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramoto, Shin; Forbes, Thomas P; van Asten, Arian C; Gillen, Greg

    2015-01-01

    A novel test sample for the spatially resolved quantification of illicit drugs on the surface of a fingerprint using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was demonstrated. Calibration curves relating the signal intensity to the amount of drug deposited on the surface were generated from inkjet-printed arrays of cocaine, methamphetamine, and heroin with a deposited-mass ranging nominally from 10 pg to 50 ng per spot. These curves were used to construct concentration maps that visualized the spatial distribution of the drugs on top of a fingerprint, as well as being able to quantify the amount of drugs in a given area within the map. For the drugs on the fingerprint on silicon, ToF-SIMS showed great success, as it was able to generate concentration maps of all three drugs. On the fingerprint on paper, only the concentration map of cocaine could be constructed using ToF-SIMS and DESI-MS, as the signals of methamphetamine and heroin were completely suppressed by matrix and substrate effects. Spatially resolved quantification of illicit drugs using imaging mass spectrometry is possible, but the choice of substrates could significantly affect the results.

  4. Amoxicillin allergy in children: five-day drug provocation test in the diagnosis of nonimmediate reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Francesca; Cianferoni, Antonella; Barni, Simona; Pucci, Neri; Rossi, Maria Elisabetta; Novembre, Elio

    2015-01-01

    The drug provocation test (DPT) is the gold standard to rule out drug hypersensitivity. There are standardized DPT protocols to diagnose immediate reactions to drugs, but not for nonimmediate reactions. The aim of this study was to show the sensitivity and specificity of an allergy work-up that included a 5-day DPT in children with histories of nonimmediate reactions to amoxicillin through focusing on a pediatric population with histories of immediate and nonimmediate reactions to amoxicillin. Two hundred consecutive patients with histories of amoxicillin reactions referred to the Allergy Unit of Anna Meyer Children's Hospital for suspected drug allergy from 2008 to 2011 underwent in vivo tests with the culprit drug according to European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology guidelines. Moreover, most of those children, regardless of the skin tests results, were challenged with amoxicillin for a total of 5 days. In 4 years, 200 patients were evaluated for a history of drug hypersensitivity to amoxicillin. The majority of patients (76%) had a history of mild nonimmediate reactions. All 200 patients underwent skin tests, and 9 of 200 tested positive. A total of 177 DPTs were performed with amoxicillin for 5 days in each child. Diagnosis of amoxicillin allergy was confirmed by a DPT in 17 patients (9.6%); 14/17 had history of nonimmediate reactions; 4/14 (26.6%) reacted on day 5. According to our results, a long-term DPT protocol increases the sensitivity of the allergy work-up, and it should be recommended for patients with a history of amoxicillin nonimmediate reaction. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria into registered drug shops in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Clarke, Sîan E; Lal, Sham

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malaria is a major public health problem in Uganda and the current policy recommends introduction of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria (RDTs) to facilitate effective case management. However, provision of RDTs in drug shops potentially raises a new set of issues, such as adherence...... to RDTs results, management of severe illnesses, referral of patients, and relationship with caretakers. The main objective of the study was to examine the impact of introducing RDTs in registered drug shops in Uganda and document lessons and policy implications for future scale-up of malaria control...... in the private health sector. METHODS: A cluster-randomized trial introducing RDTs into registered drug shops was implemented in central Uganda from October 2010 to July 2012. An evaluation was undertaken to assess the impact and the processes involved with the introduction of RDTs into drug shops, the lessons...

  6. Specimen Validity Testing SVT) - Effects of Oxidizing Agents on Drugs in Urine and Procedures for Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, B D; Dunkley, C S

    2007-07-01

    Since the inception of the drug-testing program in the U.S. Armed Forces in 1982, urine adulteration with the intent to conceal drug use has been a serious problem to forensic scientists. Initially, drug users tried almost anything that was available at the collection sites. Soon they recognized that certain chemicals could be used to destroy some drugs and interfere with the testing procedures. Some drug analytes, in particular morphine and 11-nor-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid, a metabolite of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, could not be detected in presence of some oxidizing agents. As the use of adulterants increased, specimen validity testing was introduced by the Department of Health and Human Services in 2004. While specific reagents could be used to test nitrite, chromate, and iodine, test procedures for many other oxidizing agents were not available. In an attempt to detect most oxidants, a different approach has been introduced to identify urines adulterated with oxidizing adulterants. In this approach, the oxidizing property of normal urine is compared with that of urine containing oxidizing agents. In the procedure, samples are allowed to interact with excess ferrous (Fe2+) ions and then with chromogenic compounds. In the presence of oxidants, Fe2+ ions with low reduction potential (E0 0.771 V) are immediately oxidized to ferric (Fe3+) ions, which then change the chromogenic compounds to colored chromogens. Specific spectral pattern and intensity are the keys in quantification of oxidants in urine (milliEquivalent/liter, mE/L). The method appeared to be promising in differentiating normal urine from urine adulterated with oxidizing agents. Some oxidizing adulterants in urine are unstable. If reduced, it could be reconverted to the oxidizing agents and tested by the general oxidant test. Copyright © 2007 Central Police University.

  7. Evaluation of sampling methods for measuring exposure to volatile inorganic acids in workplace air. Part 1: sampling hydrochloric acid (HCl) and nitric acid (HNO₃) from a test gas atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Alan; Musgrove, Darren; Breuer, Dietmar; Gusbeth, Krista; Moritz, Andreas; Demange, Martine; Oury, Véronique; Rousset, Davy; Dorotte, Michel

    2011-08-01

    Historically, workplace exposure to the volatile inorganic acids hydrochloric acid (HCl) and nitric acid (HNO(3)) has been determined mostly by collection on silica gel sorbent tubes and analysis of the corresponding anions by ion chromatography (IC). However, HCl and HNO(3) can be present in workplace air in the form of mist as well as vapor, so it is important to sample the inhalable fraction of airborne particles. As sorbent tubes exhibit a low sampling efficiency for inhalable particles, a more suitable method was required. This is the first of two articles on "Evaluation of Sampling Methods for Measuring Exposure to Volatile Inorganic Acids in Workplace Air" and describes collaborative sampling exercises carried out to evaluate an alternative method for sampling HCl and HNO(3) using sodium carbonate-impregnated filters. The second article describes sampling capacity and breakthrough tests. The method was found to perform well and a quartz fiber filter impregnated with 500 μL of 1 M Na(2)CO(3) (10% (m/v) Na(2)CO(3)) was found to have sufficient sampling capacity for use in workplace air measurement. A pre-filter is required to remove particulate chlorides and nitrates that when present would otherwise result in a positive interference. A GSP sampler fitted with a plastic cone, a closed face cassette, or a plastic IOM sampler were all found to be suitable for mounting the pre-filter and sampling filter(s), but care has to be taken with the IOM sampler to ensure that the sampler is tightly closed to avoid leaks. HCl and HNO(3) can react with co-sampled particulate matter on the pre-filter, e.g., zinc oxide, leading to low results, and stronger acids can react with particulate chlorides and nitrates removed by the pre-filter to liberate HCl and HNO(3), which are subsequently collected on the sampling filter, leading to high results. However, although there is this potential for both positive and negative interferences in the measurement, these are unavoidable

  8. Thoroughfares, crossroads and cul-de-sacs: drug testing of welfare recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincup, Emma

    2014-09-01

    Over the past five years, proposals to introduce drug testing for welfare recipients have proliferated across the globe. In England, it was included in the Welfare Reform Act 2009 (yet never implemented) and in 2013, the New Zealand government introduced legislation which requires claimants to take pre-employment drug tests when requested by a prospective employer or training provider. Similarly, in over 20 US states there have been attempts to initiate drug testing of welfare recipients as a condition of eligibility for welfare, although frequently these controversial plans have either stalled or once introduced they have been halted through legal challenge. This article examines the process of introducing drug testing of welfare claimants in the UK as part of a broader strategy to address worklessness among problem drug users. Using Hudson and Lowe's (2004) multi-level analytic framework, which disputes 'top down' rational models of policy-making, it explores the mechanisms used for challenging drug testing policies. In so doing, it identifies the key policy actors involved, noting the alliances forged and strategies adopted to persuade the government to pursue alternative policies. Whilst the primary focus of the article is on the UK, consideration of the US and New Zealand facilitates comparison of the types of policy networks which emerge to oppose similar policies proposed in different socio-political contexts, and the forms of argument and/or evidence they inject into policy discussions. It is argued that a heavy reliance on rights-based arguments was a feature of opposing drug testing in the UK, US and New Zealand, and these featured more heavily than attempts to refute evidence underpinning these policies. However, there were important differences between jurisdictions in relation to the mechanisms used to challenge drug testing policies. These do not simply reflect the nature of the policies proposed but instead are reflective of different modes of

  9. Teacher learning as workplace learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imants, J.; Van Veen, K.

    2010-01-01

    Against the background of increasing attention in teacher professional development programs for situating teacher learning in the workplace, an overview is given of what is known in general and in educational workplace learning literature on the characteristics and conditions of the workplace.

  10. Testing the Question-Behavior Effect of Self-Administered Surveys Measuring Youth Drug Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briney, John S; Brown, Eric C; Kuklinski, Margaret R; Oesterle, Sabrina; Hawkins, J David

    2017-09-29

    Concern that asking about a specific behavior could elicit that behavior is often cited as a reason that communities and schools should not administer surveys about youth drug use. In this study, we investigated if this question-behavior effect exists related to substance use. We examined if simply asking a student about their current drug use leads to an increase in drug use 1 year later. This study tests the validity of the question-behavior effect on youth drug use in a longitudinal panel of 2,002 elementary school students. The sample of students was drawn from the Community Youth Development Study, a community-randomized test of the Communities That Care prevention system. If the prevalence of self-reported drug use in sixth grade in a sample surveyed in fifth and sixth grades was higher than in an accretion sample surveyed only in sixth grade, the difference could indicate a question-behavior effect. Results from logistic regression analyses did not provide any evidence of a question-behavior effect on 30-day or lifetime prevalence of alcohol, tobacco, inhalant, or marijuana use reported in sixth grade. Asking youth about drug use in a survey did not increase the rates of self-reported drug use measured 1 year later. The absence of evidence of a question-behavior effect should ease concerns of communities and schools when administering surveys asking youth about their drug use. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effectiveness of saliva and fingerprints as alternative specimens to urine and blood in forensic drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwayama, Kenji; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Yamamuro, Tadashi; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    In forensic drug testing, it is important to immediately take biological specimens from suspects and victims to prove their drug intake. We evaluated the effectiveness of saliva and fingerprints as alternative specimens to urine and blood in terms of ease of sampling, drug detection sensitivity, and drug detection periods for each specimen type. After four commercially available pharmaceutical products were administered to healthy subjects, each in a single dose, their urine, blood, saliva, and fingerprints were taken at predetermined sampling times over approximately four weeks. Fourteen analytes (the administered drugs and their main metabolites) were extracted from each specimen using simple pretreatments, such as dilution and deproteinization, and were analyzed using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Most of the analytes were detected in saliva and fingerprints, as well as in urine and blood. The time-courses of drug concentrations were similar between urine and fingerprints, and between blood and saliva. Compared to the other compounds, the acidic compounds, for example ibuprofen, acetylsalicylic acid, were more difficult to detect in all specimens. Acetaminophen, dihydrocodeine, and methylephedrine were detected in fingerprints at later sampling times than in urine. However, a relationship between the drug structures and their detection periods in each specimen was not found. Saliva and fingerprints could be easily sampled on site without using special techniques or facilities. In addition, fingerprints could be immediately analyzed after simple and rapid treatment. In cases where it would be difficult to immediately obtain urine and blood, saliva and fingerprints could be effective alternative specimens for drug testing. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Development and evaluation of a test program for Y-site compatibility testing of total parenteral nutrition and intravenous drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staven, Vigdis; Wang, Siri; Grønlie, Ingrid; Tho, Ingunn

    2016-03-22

    There is no standardized procedure or consensus to which tests should be performed to judge compatibility/incompatibility of intravenous drugs. The purpose of this study was to establish and evaluate a test program of methods suitable for detection of physical incompatibility in Y-site administration of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and drugs. Eight frequently used methods (dynamic light scattering, laser diffraction, light obscuration, turbidimetry, zeta potential, light microscopy, pH-measurements and visual examination using Tyndall beams), were scrutinized to elucidate strengths and weaknesses for compatibility testing. The responses of the methods were tested with samples containing precipitation of calcium phosphate and with heat destabilized TPN emulsions. A selection of drugs (acyclovir, ampicillin, ondansetron and paracetamol) was mixed with 3-in-1 TPN admixtures (Olimel® N5E, Kabiven® and SmofKabiven®) to assess compatibility (i.e. potential precipitates and emulsion stability). The obtained compatibility data was interpreted according to theory and compared to existing compatibility literature to further check the validity of the methods. Light obscuration together with turbidimetry, visual inspection and pH-measurements were able to capture signs of precipitations. For the analysis of emulsion stability, light obscuration and estimation of percent droplets above 5 μm (PFAT5) seemed to be the most sensitive method; however laser diffraction and monitoring changes in pH might be a useful support. Samples should always be compared to unmixed controls to reveal changes induced by the mixing. General acceptance criteria are difficult to define, although some limits are suggested based on current experience. The experimental compatibility data was supported by scattered reports in literature, further confirming the suitability of the test program. However, conflicting data are common, which complicates the comparison to existing literature. Testing of

  13. Increased adverse drug reactions to cephalosporins in penicillin allergy patients with positive penicillin skin test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Miguel A; Koch, Cody A; Klemawesch, Patrick; Joshi, Avni; Li, James T

    2010-01-01

    Cephalosporin administration in patients with a history of penicillin allergy is controversial. Studies looking at the safety of cephalosporin in patients with a history of penicillin allergy lacked a control group, had a small number of patients, and/or lacked confirmation of penicillin allergy by penicillin skin testing. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patients with penicillin allergy were at increased risk of adverse drug reactions when administered cephalosporin. A cohort study of patients with a history of penicillin allergy and a positive or negative penicillin skin test when administered cephalosporin was conducted. Charts were reviewed for adverse drug reactions to cephalosporin after penicillin skin testing. Eighty-five patients with a history of penicillin allergy and positive penicillin skin test and 726 patients with a history of penicillin allergy and negative penicillin skin test were administered cephalosporin. Five (6%) of 85 cases had an adverse drug reaction to cephalosporin as compared to 5 (0.7%) of 726 of the referent population (p = 0.0019). The rate of presumed IgE-mediated adverse drug reactions to the cephalosporins amongst the cases was 2 (2%) of 85 compared to 1 (0.1%) of 726 amongst the referent population (p = 0.0304). A greater risk of an adverse drug reaction to cephalosporin exists in patients with penicillin allergy. We recommend penicillin skin testing if cephalosporin, especially a first-generation cephalosporin, is to be administered to patients with a history of penicillin allergy. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. [Ergonomically designed radiology workplace].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knogler, T; Ringl, H

    2014-01-01

    An ergonomically designed radiology workplace is a key factor for concentrated work during the whole day and is essential in preventing negative long-term effects due to inappropriate physical strain. To avoid such negative effects it is of paramount importance to know the factors that might cause strain on the radiologist, the appropriate application for workplace design to address these factors and how work-related disorders emerge. To minimize physical strain due to long-lasting and repetitive movements, the workspace must be adapted to the physical needs of the radiologist. Adjustable settings for the work desk and seat, together with correct screen positioning and distance from the screen, are examples of such important factors in an ergonomic workplace design. In addition, adjustable ambient light, an adjustable conditioned climate, an appropriate color design for the environment and a reduction of unnecessary noise are also crucial factors for an ergonomic workplace. This review gives an overview about the factors that influence the radiology workspace and summarizes the current literature on this topic.

  15. Perspective Taking in Workplaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zappalà Salvatore

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Workplaces are often described as places in which individuals are motivated by their self-interests and in which negative events like time pressure, anxiety, conflict with co-workers, miscomprehensions, difficulties in solving problems, not-transmitted or not-exchanged information that lead to mistakes, and in some cases to injuries, stress or control, are part of everyday life (Dormann & Zapf, 2002; Schabracq, Winnubst and Cooper, 2003. Such situations are often the result of the limited comprehension of needs, skills, or information available to colleagues, supervisors, subordinates, clients or providers. However, workplaces are also places in which employees take care of clients, support colleagues and subordinates (Rhoades & Eisenberger, 2002, are enthusiastic about their job (Bakker et al., 2008, are motivated by leaders that encourage employees to transcend their own self-interests for the good of the group or the organization and provide them with the confidence to perform beyond expectations (Bass, 1997. Thus positive relationships at work are becoming a new interdisciplinary domain of inquiry (Dutton & Ragins, 2006. Within this positive relationships framework, in this paper we focus on a positive component of workplaces, and particularly on an individual cognitive and emotional process that has an important role in the workplace because it facilitates interpersonal relations and communications: it is the perspective taking process. In order to describe perspective taking, we will refer to some empirical studies and particularly to the review published by Parker, Atkins and Axtell in 2008 on the International Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

  16. Benchmarking of workplace performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Voordt, Theo; Jensen, Per Anker

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to present a process model of value adding corporate real estate and facilities management and to discuss which indicators can be used to measure and benchmark workplace performance.

    In order to add value to the organisation, the work environment has to provide value for

  17. Making the Workplace Work

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-01

    This podcast demonstrates the importance of workplace support in managing diabetes in a corporate diabetes program.  Created: 11/1/2007 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 11/8/2007.

  18. Diversity in the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996

    This document contains three papers presented at a symposium on diversity in the workplace moderated by Sandra Johnson at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD). "Diversity and Development: An Assessment of Equal Opportunities and the Role of HRD in the Police Service" (Rashmi Biswas, Penny Dick) examines…

  19. Workplace Safety and Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-11

    This women's health podcast focuses on four important issues for women at work: job stress, work schedules, reproductive health, and workplace violence.  Created: 5/11/2009 by Office of Women's Health (OWH) and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 5/11/2009.

  20. Envy in the workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Manna, Ester

    2016-01-01

    I study how envy in the workplace affects the optimal employment contract when employees differ in their productivity and this is their private information. The employees' envy towards their colleagues distorts the levels of effort exerted by the less productive employees. However, when employees are also envious towards their boss this distortion is mitigated.

  1. Shaping an ethical workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, S M

    1998-12-01

    Ethical choices in business are often troublesome because business ethics are not simply an extension of personal ethics. Moral standards learned from private experiences may not translate to the business world. This article analyzes choices in the workplace and offer suggestions to move toward more ethical business practices.

  2. 77 FR 10666 - Pipeline Safety: Post Accident Drug and Alcohol Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... transmission pipeline owned and operated by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company ruptured in a residential area... in the final report of the NTSB--Pacific Gas and Electric Company Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline...-related covered employee. Key Regulatory Sections Applicable to Post-Accident Drug and Alcohol Testing The...

  3. Test Sample for the Spatially Resolved Quantification of Illicit Drugs on Fingerprints Using Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muramoto, S.; Forbes, T.P.; van Asten, A.C.; Gillen, G.

    2015-01-01

    A novel test sample for the spatially resolved quantification of illicit drugs on the surface of a fingerprint using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was demonstrated. Calibration curves relating the signal

  4. Screening for Drug Abuse Among College Students: Modification of the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannell, M. Barry; Favazza, Armando R.

    1978-01-01

    Modified version of the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test was anonymously given to 245 college students on two Midwestern university campuses. Cutoff score for suspected drug abuse was set at five points. The percent of students scoring five or more points was 25 and 22 from campuses A and B respectively. (Author)

  5. Interlaboratory drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by a radiometric procedure and two conventional methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqi, S.H.; Hawkins, J.E.; Laszlo, A.

    1985-12-01

    A total of 224 recent isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from 163 patients selected to have multidrug resistance were tested against streptomycin (SM), isoniazid, rifampin, and ethambutol (EMB) by the rapid radiometric BACTEC method and two conventional proportion methods: the World Health Organization (WHO) method, using Lowenstein-Jensen medium; and the Veterans Administration reference laboratory for mycobacteria (VA) method, using Middlebrook 7H10 agar medium. The results were compared, focusing on the concentrations of the drugs in all three methods. Among the four drugs tested, most of the discrepancies in measured activity were observed with SM and EMB, generally because of differences in the drug concentrations used by the three methods. A 4-micrograms amount of SM in the BACTEC method was found to be slightly less active than 10 micrograms in the VA method and significantly more active than 4 micrograms of dihydrostreptomycin in the WHO method. With EMB, 2.5 micrograms in BACTEC was similar to 5 micrograms in the VA method and 2 micrograms in the WHO method, while 10 micrograms in the BACTEC method was found to be more active than 10 and 2 micrograms in the VA and WHO methods, respectively. To attain close agreement, drug concentrations used in the BACTEC method should be carefully selected when a comparison is to be made with any conventional method employed in a laboratory. Standardization of in vitro susceptibility testing is greatly needed to achieve uniformity among the test methods used to evaluate tuberculosis therapeutics.

  6. Cost and Efficacy Assessment of an Alternative Medication Compliance Urine Drug Testing Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Kelly; Strathmann, Frederick G

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the frequency at which quantitative results provide additional clinical benefit compared to qualitative results alone. A comparison between alternative urine drug screens and conventional screens including the assessment of cost-to-payer differences, accuracy of prescription compliance or polypharmacy/substance abuse was also included. In a reference laboratory evaluation of urine specimens from across the United States, 213 urine specimens with provided prescription medication information (302 prescriptions) were analyzed by two testing algorithms: 1) conventional immunoassay screen with subsequent reflexive testing of positive results by quantitative mass spectrometry; and 2) a combined immunoassay/qualitative mass-spectrometry screen that substantially reduced the need for subsequent testing. The qualitative screen was superior to immunoassay with reflex to mass spectrometry in confirming compliance per prescription (226/302 vs 205/302), and identifying non-prescription abuse (97 vs 71). Pharmaceutical impurities and inconsistent drug metabolite patterns were detected in only 3.8% of specimens, suggesting that quantitative results have limited benefit. The percentage difference between the conventional testing algorithm and the alternative screen was projected to be 55%, and a 2-year evaluation of test utilization as a measure of test order volume follows an exponential trend for alternative screen test orders over conventional immunoassay screens that require subsequent confirmation testing. Alternative, qualitative urine drug screens provide a less expensive, faster, and more comprehensive evaluation of patient medication compliance and drug abuse. The vast majority of results were interpretable with qualitative results alone indicating a reduced need to automatically reflex to quantitation or provide quantitation for the majority of patients. This strategy highlights a successful approach using an alternative strategy for both the

  7. In vitro anticancer drug test: A new method emerges from the model of glioma stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Riva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a grade IV astrocytoma and the most common malignant brain tumor. Current therapies provide a median survival of 12–15 months after diagnosis, due to the high recurrence rate. The failure of current therapies may be due to the presence, within the tumor, of cells characterized by enhanced self-renewal capacity, multilineage differentiation potential and elevated invasive behavior, called glioma stem cells (GSCs. To evaluate the pharmacological efficacy of selected drugs on six GSC lines, we set up a multiple drug responsivity assay based on the combined evaluation of cytomorphological and functional parameters, including the analysis of polymorphic nuclei, mitotic index and cell viability. In order to understand the real pharmacological efficacy of the tested drugs, we assigned a specific drug responsivity score to each GSC line, integrating the data produced by multiple assays. In this work we explored the antineoplastic effects of paclitaxel (PTX, an inhibitor of microtubule depolymerization, utilized as standard treatment in several cancers, and of valproic acid (VPA, an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs with multiple anticancer properties. We classified the six GSC lines as responsive or resistant to these drugs, on the basis of their responsivity scores. This method can also be useful to identify the best way to combine two or more drugs. In particular, we utilized the pro-differentiating effect of VPA to improve the PTX effectiveness and we observed a significant reduction of cell viability compared to single treatments.

  8. Malaria drug-susceptibility testing. HRP2-based assays: current data, future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noedl, Harald; Wernsdorfer, Walther H; Kollaritsch, Herwig; Looareesuwan, Sornchai; Miller, Robert S; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda

    2003-01-01

    In past decades, malaria in-vitro drug-susceptibility assays have become an indispensable tool for the development of novel drugs, as well as for the surveillance of antimalarial drug resistance. The traditional in-vitro assays, however, remain tedious procedures, which, depending on the method employed, require a high degree of expertise, sophisticated laboratory infra-structure, skills and patience. We therefore developed a new drug sensitivity assay for Plasmodium falciparum based on the measurement of histidine-rich protein II (HRP2), a histidine and alanine-rich protein produced by P. falciparum. The assay uses a simple HRP2 double-site sandwich ELISA to quantify parasite growth and its inhibition. The complete ELISA takes about 2-3 hours to perform and requires little technical equipment. In our experiments with laboratory strains of P. falciparum against common antimalarials, the results closely parallel those obtained from the isotope assay and from WHO schizont maturation tests (P advantage. The data closely parallel those obtained with the traditional WHO assay (Mean difference on the log scale: 0.033; R = 0.942; P < 0.001). The assay is currently being further validated under field conditions. It has proved to be a valuable tool for a wide range of applications, from epidemiological field studies to the screening of new drugs, and may therefore have the potential to replace traditional in-vitro drug-sensitivity techniques.

  9. 78 FR 77196 - Random Drug and Alcohol Testing Percentage Rates of Covered Aviation Employees for the Period of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... testing rate is based on the reported random drug test positive rate for the entire aviation industry. If... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Random Drug and Alcohol Testing Percentage Rates of Covered Aviation Employees for the Period of January 1, 2014, Through December 31, 2014 AGENCY: Federal Aviation...

  10. 77 FR 71669 - Random Drug and Alcohol Testing Percentage Rates of Covered Aviation Employees for the Period of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... testing rate is based on the reported random drug test positive rate for the entire aviation industry. If... Federal Aviation Administration Random Drug and Alcohol Testing Percentage Rates of Covered Aviation Employees for the Period of January 1, 2013, Through December 31, 2013 AGENCY: Federal Aviation...

  11. 76 FR 74843 - Random Drug and Alcohol Testing Percentage Rates of Covered Aviation Employees for the Period of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... testing rate is based on the reported random drug test positive rate for the entire aviation industry. If... Federal Aviation Administration Random Drug and Alcohol Testing Percentage Rates of Covered Aviation Employees for the Period of January 1, 2012, Through December 31, 2012 AGENCY: Federal Aviation...

  12. A Microfluidic Channel Method for Rapid Drug-Susceptibility Testing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yoshimi; Grushnikov, Andrey; Kikuchi, Kazuma; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Yagi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The recent global increase in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and lack of development of new therapeutic agents emphasize the importance of selecting appropriate antimicrobials for the treatment of infections. However, to date, the development of completely accelerated drug susceptibility testing methods has not been achieved despite the availability of a rapid identification method. We proposed an innovative rapid method for drug susceptibility testing for Pseudomonas aeruginosa that provides results within 3 h. The drug susceptibility testing microfluidic (DSTM) device was prepared using soft lithography. It consisted of five sets of four microfluidic channels sharing one inlet slot, and the four channels are gathered in a small area, permitting simultaneous microscopic observation. Antimicrobials were pre-introduced into each channel and dried before use. Bacterial suspensions in cation-adjusted Mueller–Hinton broth were introduced from the inlet slot and incubated for 3 h. Susceptibilities were microscopically evaluated on the basis of differences in cell numbers and shapes between drug-treated and control cells, using dedicated software. The results of 101 clinically isolated strains of P. aeruginosa obtained using the DSTM method strongly correlated with results obtained using the ordinary microbroth dilution method. Ciprofloxacin, meropenem, ceftazidime, and piperacillin caused elongation in susceptible cells, while meropenem also induced spheroplast and bulge formation. Morphological observation could alternatively be used to determine the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to these drugs, although amikacin had little effect on cell shape. The rapid determination of bacterial drug susceptibility using the DSTM method could also be applicable to other pathogenic species, and it could easily be introduced into clinical laboratories without the need for expensive instrumentation. PMID:26872134

  13. A Microfluidic Channel Method for Rapid Drug-Susceptibility Testing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimi Matsumoto

    Full Text Available The recent global increase in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and lack of development of new therapeutic agents emphasize the importance of selecting appropriate antimicrobials for the treatment of infections. However, to date, the development of completely accelerated drug susceptibility testing methods has not been achieved despite the availability of a rapid identification method. We proposed an innovative rapid method for drug susceptibility testing for Pseudomonas aeruginosa that provides results within 3 h. The drug susceptibility testing microfluidic (DSTM device was prepared using soft lithography. It consisted of five sets of four microfluidic channels sharing one inlet slot, and the four channels are gathered in a small area, permitting simultaneous microscopic observation. Antimicrobials were pre-introduced into each channel and dried before use. Bacterial suspensions in cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth were introduced from the inlet slot and incubated for 3 h. Susceptibilities were microscopically evaluated on the basis of differences in cell numbers and shapes between drug-treated and control cells, using dedicated software. The results of 101 clinically isolated strains of P. aeruginosa obtained using the DSTM method strongly correlated with results obtained using the ordinary microbroth dilution method. Ciprofloxacin, meropenem, ceftazidime, and piperacillin caused elongation in susceptible cells, while meropenem also induced spheroplast and bulge formation. Morphological observation could alternatively be used to determine the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to these drugs, although amikacin had little effect on cell shape. The rapid determination of bacterial drug susceptibility using the DSTM method could also be applicable to other pathogenic species, and it could easily be introduced into clinical laboratories without the need for expensive instrumentation.

  14. Evaluation of the pentylenetetrazole seizure threshold test in epileptic mice as surrogate model for drug testing against pharmacoresistant seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töllner, Kathrin; Twele, Friederike; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a major problem in epilepsy therapy, so that development of more effective AEDs is an unmet clinical need. Several rat and mouse models of epilepsy with spontaneous difficult-to-treat seizures exist, but because testing of antiseizure drug efficacy is extremely laborious in such models, they are only rarely used in the development of novel AEDs. Recently, the use of acute seizure tests in epileptic rats or mice has been proposed as a novel strategy for evaluating novel AEDs for increased antiseizure efficacy. In the present study, we compared the effects of five AEDs (valproate, phenobarbital, diazepam, lamotrigine, levetiracetam) on the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) seizure threshold in mice that were made epileptic by pilocarpine. Experiments were started 6 weeks after a pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. At this time, control seizure threshold was significantly lower in epileptic than in nonepileptic animals. Unexpectedly, only one AED (valproate) was less effective to increase seizure threshold in epileptic vs. nonepileptic mice, and this difference was restricted to doses of 200 and 300 mg/kg, whereas the difference disappeared at 400mg/kg. All other AEDs exerted similar seizure threshold increases in epileptic and nonepileptic mice. Thus, induction of acute seizures with PTZ in mice pretreated with pilocarpine does not provide an effective and valuable surrogate method to screen drugs for antiseizure efficacy in a model of difficult-to-treat chronic epilepsy as previously suggested from experiments with this approach in rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria into drug shops in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Magnussen, Pascal; Chandler, Clare Ir

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An intervention was designed to introduce rapid diagnostics tests for malaria (mRDTs) into registered drug shops in Uganda to encourage rational and appropriate treatment of malaria with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). We conducted participatory training of drug shop...... through a cluster randomized trial. In this paper, we present detailed design, implementation and evaluation experiences in order to help inform future studies of a complex nature. METHODS: Three preparatory studies (formative, baseline and willingness-to-pay) were conducted to explore perceptions...

  16. The importance of patch tests in the differential diagnosis of adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travassos, Ana Rita; Pacheco, David; Antunes, Joana; Silva, Raquel; Almeida, Luís Soares; Filipe, Paulo

    2011-01-01

    Exudative erythema multiforme is an acute self-limited skin disease often associated with infections (usually viral), and also with systemic diseases and drugs. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus, who presented at the emergency clinic with exudative erythema multiforme which started 10 days after taking amoxicillin and clavulanic acid for tonsillitis together (almost simultaneously) with the pneumococcal vaccine. Rowell's syndrome was also considered to be a possibility. Skin patch tests were carried with the standard battery of patches (GPEDC) and the active ingredients of the suspected drugs (Chemotechnique ®), with readings at D2 and D3. The tests were positive for amoxicillin 10% pet (++), ampicillin 10% pet (+ +) and penicillin G potassium 10% pet (+). We accepted the diagnosis of erythema multiforme due to amoxicillin, confirmed by patch testing.

  17. 49 CFR 40.269 - What problems cause an alcohol test to be cancelled unless they are corrected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What problems cause an alcohol test to be... Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Alcohol Testing § 40.269 What problems cause an alcohol test to be cancelled unless they are corrected? As a BAT...

  18. 49 CFR 40.261 - What is a refusal to take an alcohol test, and what are the consequences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Alcohol Testing § 40.261 What is a refusal to take an alcohol test, and what are the consequences? (a) As an... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is a refusal to take an alcohol test, and...

  19. Workplace ageism: discovering hidden bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Sanna; Johnston, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND/STUDY CONTEXT: Research largely shows no performance differences between older and younger employees, or that older workers even outperform younger employees, yet negative attitudes towards older workers can underpin discrimination. Unfortunately, traditional "explicit" techniques for assessing attitudes (i.e., self-report measures) have serious drawbacks. Therefore, using an approach that is novel to organizational contexts, the authors supplemented explicit with implicit (indirect) measures of attitudes towards older workers, and examined the malleability of both. This research consists of two studies. The authors measured self-report (explicit) attitudes towards older and younger workers with a survey, and implicit attitudes with a reaction-time-based measure of implicit associations. In addition, to test whether attitudes were malleable, the authors measured attitudes before and after a mental imagery intervention, where the authors asked participants in the experimental group to imagine respected and valued older workers from their surroundings. Negative, stable implicit attitudes towards older workers emerged in two studies. Conversely, explicit attitudes showed no age bias and were more susceptible to change intervention, such that attitudes became more positive towards older workers following the experimental manipulation. This research demonstrates the unconscious nature of bias against older workers, and highlights the utility of implicit attitude measures in the context of the workplace. In the current era of aging workforce and skill shortages, implicit measures may be necessary to illuminate hidden workplace ageism.

  20. Hair drug testing of children suspected of exposure to the manufacture of methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farst, Karen; Reading Meyer, J A; Mac Bird, T; James, Laura; Robbins, James M

    2011-04-01

    This study compares hair color and age in children tested for methamphetamine by hair analysis due to suspicion of exposure to the manufacture of methamphetamine by their caregivers. A retrospective analysis evaluated differences in hair drug testing results of 107 children less than 12 years of age tested due to clinical suspicion of having been exposed to the manufacture of methamphetamine. Results (confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy) were compared for differences in likelihood of testing positive in relation to the subject's age and having light or dark colored hair and reported with crude and adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Of 107 children, 103 had a sufficient hair specimen for analysis. A third (36%) of the study population was less than 3 years of age. Almost half (45%) of the children tested positive for methamphetamine. 15% of the total study population tested positive for methamphetamine in combination with amphetamine indicating some degree of systemic exposure. No children were positive for amphetamine without also being positive for methamphetamine. Children less than 3 years of age were more likely to test positive. Positive hair drug tests for the combination of methamphetamine and amphetamine occurred in children with both light and dark colored hair. Children living in homes where methamphetamine is being manufactured can have drug identified in their hair regardless of hair color. This testing can aid in illuminating the child's presence in an at-risk environment and a family in need of services. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  1. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Yon Rhee

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs. This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy.

  2. Systematic review of the performance of rapid rifampicin resistance testing for drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Arentz

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Rapid tests for rifampicin resistance may be useful for identifying isolates at high risk of drug resistance, including multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB. However, choice of diagnostic test and prevalence of rifampicin resistance may both impact a diagnostic strategy for identifying drug resistant-TB. We performed a systematic review to evaluate the performance of WHO-endorsed rapid tests for rifampicin resistance detection. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Library through January 1, 2012. For each rapid test, we determined pooled sensitivity and specificity estimates using a hierarchical random effects model. Predictive values of the tests were determined at different prevalence rates of rifampicin resistance and MDR-TB. RESULTS: We identified 60 publications involving six different tests (INNO-LiPA Rif. TB assay, Genotype MTBDR assay, Genotype MTBDRplus assay, Colorimetric Redox Indicator (CRI assay, Nitrate Reductase Assay (NRA and MODS tests: for all tests, negative predictive values were high when rifampicin resistance prevalence was ≤ 30%. However, positive predictive values were considerably reduced for the INNO-LiPA Rif. TB assay, the MTBDRplus assay and MODS when rifampicin resistance prevalence was < 5%. LIMITATIONS: In many studies, it was unclear whether patient selection or index test performance could have introduced bias. In addition, we were unable to evaluate critical concentration thresholds for the colorimetric tests. DISCUSSION: Rapid tests for rifampicin resistance alone cannot accurately predict rifampicin resistance or MDR-TB in areas with a low prevalence of rifampicin resistance. However, in areas with a high prevalence of rifampicin resistance and MDR-TB, these tests may be a valuable component of an MDR-TB management strategy.

  3. Pediatric Exposure to Drugs of Abuse by Hair Testing: Monitoring 15 Years of Evolution in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Pichini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hair testing is a useful tool to investigate the prevalence of unsuspected chronic exposure to drugs of abuse in pediatric populations and it has been applied to three different cohorts of children from Barcelona, Spain along fifteen years to evaluate eventual changes in this exposure. Children were recruited from three independent studies performed at Hospital del Mar (Barcelona, Spain and approved by the local Ethics Committee. Hair samples were collected from the first 187 children cohort (around 4 years of age in 1998, from the second 90 children cohort (1.5–5 years of age in 2008 and from the third 114 children cohort (5–14 years of age in 2013. Hair samples were analysed for the presence of opiates, cocaine, amphetamines, and cannabis by validated methodologies using gas or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Familiar sociodemographics and eventual consumption of drugs of abuse by parents, and caregivers were recorded. Hair samples from 24.6% children in 1998 were positive for any drug of abuse (23.0% cocaine, 25.5% in 2008 (23.3% cocaine, and 28.1% in 2013 (20.1% cocaine and 11.4% cannabis. In none of the cohorts, parental sociodemographics were associated with children exposure to drugs of abuse. The results of the three study cohorts demonstrated a significant prevalence of unsuspected pediatric exposure to drugs of abuse which mainly involved cocaine maintained along fifteen years in Barcelona, Spain. We recommend to be aware about unsuspected passive exposure to drugs of abuse in general population and to use general or selected hair screening to disclose exposure to drugs of abuse in children from risky environments to provide the basis for specific social and health interventions.

  4. Drug testing at the 10th Asian Games and 24th Seoul Olympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J; Park, S; Lho, D; Choo, H P; Chung, B; Yoon, C; Min, H; Choi, M J

    1990-01-01

    Drug testing (doping test) procedures in the 1986 10th Asian Olympic Games and 1988 24th Seoul Olympic Games are reported. The International Olympic Committee Medical Commission (IOC-MC) conducted its first doping tests at the 1968 Olympics in Grenoble. With the guidance of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the Olympic Council of Asia (OCA) introduced doping tests at the 1986 10th Asian Olympic Games in Seoul, Korea, September 21st to October 5th, 1986. 585 samples were tested at the Doping Control Center, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (DCC/KAIST), for stimulants, narcotics, anabolic steroids, and beta-blockers by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, high pressure liquid chromatography, and fluorescence polarization immunoassay. These tests covered about 100 different drugs and another 400 as metabolites in addition to pharmacologically related substances. For the Seoul Olympic Games from September 17 to October 2, 1988, the IOC-MC with the DCC/KAIST conducted doping tests on 1601 samples for stimulants, narcotics, beta-blockers, diuretics, and anabolic steroids using GC, HPLC, GC/MSD, GC/MS, LC/MS, and TDx.

  5. Managing Workplace Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Andrew Patrick

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Diversity management is a process intended to create and maintain a positive work environment where the similarities and differences of individuals are valued. The literature on diversity management has mostly emphasized on organization culture; its impact on diversity openness; human resource management practices; institutional environments and organizational contexts to diversity-related pressures, expectations, requirements, and incentives; perceived practices and organizational outcomes related to managing employee diversity; and several other issues. The current study examines the potential barriers to workplace diversity and suggests strategies to enhance workplace diversity and inclusiveness. It is based on a survey of 300 IT employees. The study concludes that successfully managing diversity can lead to more committed, better satisfied, better performing employees and potentially better financial performance for an organization.

  6. Human engineered heart tissue as a model system for drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Alexandra; Vollert, Ingra; Hansen, Arne; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-01-15

    Drug development is time- and cost-intensive and, despite extensive efforts, still hampered by the limited value of current preclinical test systems to predict side effects, including proarrhythmic and cardiotoxic effects in clinical practice. Part of the problem may be related to species-dependent differences in cardiomyocyte biology. Therefore, the event of readily available human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (CM) has raised hopes that this human test bed could improve preclinical safety pharmacology as well as drug discovery approaches. However, hiPSC-CM are immature and exhibit peculiarities in terms of ion channel function, gene expression, structural organization and functional responses to drugs that limit their present usefulness. Current efforts are thus directed towards improving hiPSC-CM maturity and high-content readouts. Culturing hiPSC-CM as 3-dimensional engineered heart tissue (EHT) improves CM maturity and anisotropy and, in a 24-well format using silicone racks, enables automated, multiplexed high content readout of contractile function. This review summarizes the principal technology and focuses on advantages and disadvantages of this technology and its potential for preclinical drug screening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Alcohol and the Workplace. WHO Regional Publications, European Series, No. 67.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Marion; Hutcheson, Graeme; Davies, John

    Alcohol is the most widely used drug in the world and its use in the workplace can have serious consequences on safety, productivity, working relationships, and absenteeism. Some of the effects of alcohol consumption on the workplace, along with the types of responses that companies can make, are covered in this review. The text opens with a…

  8. Expanding analytical options in sports drug testing: Mass spectrometric detection of prohibited substances in exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Krug, Oliver; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2017-08-15

    Continuously refining and advancing the strategies and methods employed in sports drug testing is critical for efficient doping controls. Besides improving and expanding the spectrum of target analytes, alternative test matrices have warranted in-depth evaluation as they commonly allow for minimal-/non-invasive and non-intrusive sample collection. In this study, the potential of exhaled breath (EB) as doping control specimen was assessed. EB collection devices employing a non-woven electret-based air filter unit were used to generate test specimens, simulating a potential future application in doping controls. A multi-analyte sports drug testing approach configured for a subset of 12 model compounds that represent specific classes of substances prohibited in sports (anabolic agents, hormone and metabolic modulators, stimulants, and beta-blockers) was established using unispray liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and applied to spiked and elimination study EB samples. The test method was characterized concerning specificity, assay imprecision, and limits of detection. The EB collection device allowed for retaining and extracting all selected model compounds from the EB aerosol. Following elution and concentration, LC/MS/MS analysis enabled detection limits between 5 and 100 pg/filter and imprecisions ranging from 3% to 20% for the 12 selected model compounds. By means of EB samples from patients and participants of administration studies, the elimination of relevant compounds and, thus, their traceability in EB for doping control purposes, was investigated. Besides stimulants such as methylhexaneamine and pseudoephedrine, also the anabolic-androgenic steroid dehydrochloromethyltestosterone, the metabolic modulator meldonium, and the beta-blocker bisoprolol was detected in exhaled breath. The EB aerosol has provided a promising proof-of-concept suggesting the expansion of this testing strategy as a complement to currently utilized sports drug

  9. Defining workplace bullying behaviour professional lay definitions of workplace bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Paula; Huynh, Amy; Goodman-Delahunty, Jane

    2007-01-01

    As is commonly the case in new areas of research, workplace bullying researchers and practitioners have struggled to establish a single agreed-upon definition of this phenomenon. As a consequence, there are numerous definitions of workplace bullying currently in use around the world to investigate this serious workplace issue, to educate the workforce about this form of harassment and to assess claims involving allegations of workplace bullying. Additionally, little is known about how employees and people in general define workplace bullying behaviour, and whether current researcher, practitioner and legal definitions coincide with lay definitions of bullying. To compare researcher, practitioner and legal definitions of workplace bullying with lay definitions, the content of definitions composed by adults from diverse personal and professional backgrounds (N=1095) was analysed. Results confirmed that components commonly used by researchers and practitioners, including the occurrence of harmful and negative workplace behaviours, were frequently cited by participants as central defining components of bullying behaviour. In addition, lay definitions often included themes of fairness and respect. The emergence of these themes has important consequences for organisations responding to, and attempting to prevent the occurrence of workplace bullying behaviour in that organisations in which bullying is tolerated may violate both local laws as well as their ethical responsibility to provide employees with a safe, professional and respectful workplace.

  10. Near infrared spectroscopy to monitor drug release in-situ during dissolution tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarraguça, Mafalda Cruz; Matias, Rita; Figueiredo, Raquel; Ribeiro, Paulo Roberto S; Martins, Ana Teixeira; Lopes, João Almeida

    2016-11-20

    Dissolution tests can be used to demonstrate suitable in vivo drug release through in vivo/in vitro correlations. This work explores the possibility of using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to monitor in-situ dissolution tests. It aims at expanding surrogate methods in quality control of drug products. Laboratory designed tablets of an immediate-release formulation containing folic acid and four excipients were used as case study. The dissolution tests were performed on a 1L vessel filled with 500ml of Milli-Q water with a rotating paddle apparatus (apparatus 2, Ph. Eur.) at 50rpm and 37±0.5°C. Near infrared (NIR) spectra were acquired in-situ with a transflectance probe connected to a Fourier-transform near infrared spectrometer. NIR spectra were regressed against folic acid concentration by partial least squares (PLS) regression. Folic acid concentrations during dissolution tests were obtained by periodically sampling the dissolution vessel and resourcing to an UV method. The proposed real-time NIR method was tested on a validation run yielding a root mean squared error of 0.25μgml(-1) (0.16μgml(-1) for the calibration runs) and a R(2) of 0.93 (0.95 for the calibration runs). The results suggest that NIRS is a suitable analytical technique for monitoring in-situ dissolution tests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug-resistance testing: challenges, recent developments and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, T; Miotto, P; Köser, C U; Viveiros, M; Böttger, E; Cambau, E

    2017-03-01

    Drug-resistance testing, or antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), is mandatory for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in cases of failure on standard therapy. We reviewed the different methods and techniques of phenotypic and genotypic approaches. Although multiresistant and extensively drug-resistant (MDR/XDR) tuberculosis is present worldwide, AST for M. tuberculosis (AST-MTB) is still mainly performed according to the resources available rather than the drug-resistance rates. Phenotypic methods, i.e. culture-based AST, are commonly used in high-income countries to confirm susceptibility of new cases of tuberculosis. They are also used to detect resistance in tuberculosis cases with risk factors, in combination with genotypic tests. In low-income countries, genotypic methods screening hot-spot mutations known to confer resistance were found to be easier to perform because they avoid the culture and biosafety constraint. Given that genotypic tests can rapidly detect the prominent mechanisms of resistance, such as the rpoB mutation for rifampicin resistance, we are facing new challenges with the observation of false-resistance (mutations not conferring resistance) and false-susceptibility (mutations different from the common mechanism) results. Phenotypic and genotypic approaches are therefore complementary for obtaining a high sensitivity and specificity for detecting drug resistances and susceptibilities to accurately predict MDR/XDR cure and to gather relevant data for resistance surveillance. Although AST-MTB was established in the 1960s, there is no consensus reference method for MIC determination against which the numerous AST-MTB techniques can be compared. This information is necessary for assessing in vitro activity and setting breakpoints for future anti-tuberculosis agents. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 49 CFR Appendix H to Part 40 - DOT Drug and Alcohol Testing Management Information System (MIS) Data Collection Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., App. H Appendix H to Part 40—DOT Drug and Alcohol Testing Management Information System (MIS) Data... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false DOT Drug and Alcohol Testing Management Information System (MIS) Data Collection Form H Appendix H to Part 40 Transportation Office of the Secretary...

  13. 75 FR 76069 - Random Drug and Alcohol Testing Percentage Rates of Covered Aviation Employees for the Period of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... aviation industry. If the reported random drug test positive rate is less than 1.00%, the Administrator may... Federal Aviation Administration Random Drug and Alcohol Testing Percentage Rates of Covered Aviation Employees for the Period of January 1, 2011, Through December 31, 2011 AGENCY: Federal Aviation...

  14. An overview of forensic drug testing methods and their suitability for harm reduction point-of-care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Lane; Powell, Jeff; Pijl, Em M

    2017-07-31

    Given the current opioid crisis around the world, harm reduction agencies are seeking to help people who use drugs to do so more safely. Many harm reduction agencies are exploring techniques to test illicit drugs to identify and, where possible, quantify their constituents allowing their users to make informed decisions. While these technologies have been used for years in Europe (Nightlife Empowerment & Well-being Implementation Project, Drug Checking Service: Good Practice Standards; Trans European Drugs Information (TEDI) Workgroup, Factsheet on Drug Checking in Europe, 2011; European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction, An Inventory of On-site Pill-Testing Interventions in the EU: Fact Files, 2001), they are only now starting to be utilized in this context in North America. The goal of this paper is to describe the most common methods for testing illicit substances and then, based on this broad, encompassing review, recommend the most appropriate methods for testing at point of care.Based on our review, the best methods for point-of-care drug testing are handheld infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and ion mobility spectrometry; mass spectrometry is the current gold standard in forensic drug analysis. It would be prudent for agencies or clinics that can obtain the funding to contact the companies who produce these devices to discuss possible usage in a harm reduction setting. Lower tech options, such as spot/color tests and immunoassays, are limited in their use but affordable and easy to use.

  15. Workplace Health Promotion in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Brandberg, Rikard

    2014-01-01

    The rapidly aging population in Japan constitutes a problem as public health expenditure is expected to increase. At the same time, the working part of the population is decreasing straining the health insurance scheme. Since the workplace is a setting that influences a large part of the adults for a long part of their lives, workplace health promotion has potential to improve the situation. This paper examines how workplaces in Japan are used for health promotion. Deductive content analysis ...

  16. Workplace flexibility across the lifespan

    OpenAIRE

    Bal, Pieter; Jansen, Paul G W

    2016-01-01

    As demographic changes impact the workplace, governments, organizations and workers arelooking for ways to sustain optimal working lives at higher ages. Workplace flexibility has beenintroduced as a potential way workers can have more satisfying working lives until theirretirement ages. This paper presents a critical review of the literature on workplace flexibilityacross the lifespan. It discusses how flexibility has been conceptualized across differentdisciplines, and postulates a definitio...

  17. Fialuridine induces acute liver failure in chimeric TK-NOG mice: a model for detecting hepatic drug toxicity prior to human testing.

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Xu; Toshi Nishimura; Sachiko Nishimura; Haili Zhang; Ming Zheng; Ying-Ying Guo; Marylin Masek; Michie, Sara A.; Jeffrey Glenn; Gary Peltz

    2014-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Before new drugs are approved for clinical use, they undergo extensive preclinical (laboratory-based) and clinical testing. In the preclinical studies, scientists investigate the causes of diseases, identify potential new drugs, and test promising drug candidates in animals. Animal testing is performed to determine whether the new drug is likely to work, and to screen for drug-induced toxicity. In preclinical toxicology studies, new drugs are given to two or more a...

  18. Workplace Based Assessment in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Devrim Basterzi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Workplace based assessment refers to the assessment of working practices based on what doctors actually do in the workplace, and is predominantly carried out in the workplace itself. Assessment drives learning and it is therefore essential that workplace-based assessment focuses on important attributes rather than what is easiest to assess. Workplacebased assessment is usually competency based. Workplace based assesments may well facilitate and enhance various aspects of educational supervisions, including its structure, frequency and duration etc. The structure and content of workplace based assesments should be monitored to ensure that its benefits are maximised by remaining tailored to individual trainees' needs. Workplace based assesment should be used for formative and summative assessments. Several formative assessment methods have been developed for use in the workplace such as mini clinical evaluation exercise (mini-cex, evidence based journal club assesment and case based discussion, multi source feedback etc. This review discusses the need of workplace based assesments in psychiatry graduate education and introduces some of the work place based assesment methods.

  19. Diagnostic evaluation and risk factors for drug allergies in children: from clinical history to skin and challenge tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikoglu, Tugba; Aslan, Gulen; Batmaz, Sehra Birgul; Eskandari, Gulcin; Helvaci, Ilter; Kuyucu, Semanur

    2015-08-01

    Parent or self-reported drug allergy claims frequently overestimate the real incidence of hypersensitivity reactions. A detailed and algorithmic diagnostic evaluation of drug reactions may allow a proper diagnosis. The aim of this study was to determine the confirmation rates and risk factors for confirmed allergic drug reactions in children. Mersin University Hospital in Turkey. The study consisted of children between ages of 8 months and 18 years with the history of suspected drug allergy as reported by the clinician or the patients. Parents were interviewed by a clinician to complete questionnaires that included questions about demographic data and characteristics of index drug reaction. Immediate reactions (IRs) were assessed with immediate-reading skin prick (SPT) and intradermal tests (IDT). Nonimmediate reactions (NIRs) were assessed with SPT, both early and delayed reading of IDT and patch tests. In case of negative skin tests, drug provocation tests were performed. The possible risk factors for confirmed drug allergy in univariate analysis (p Parent or self-reported drug allergy should be evaluated with a standardized diagnostic work-up before strict prohibitions are made. In addition, family and personal histories of drug allergy were significant risk factors related to allergic drug reactions in children.

  20. Robotic Production of Cancer Cell Spheroids with an Aqueous Two-phase System for Drug Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Stephanie Lemmo; Atefi, Ehsan; Fyffe, Darcy; Tavana, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell spheroids present a relevant in vitro model of avascular tumors for anti-cancer drug testing applications. A detailed protocol for producing both mono-culture and co-culture spheroids in a high throughput 96-well plate format is described in this work. This approach utilizes an aqueous two-phase system to confine cells into a drop of the denser aqueous phase immersed within the second aqueous phase. The drop rests on the well surface and keeps cells in close proximity to form a single spheroid. This technology has been adapted to a robotic liquid handler to produce size-controlled spheroids and expedite the process of spheroid production for compound screening applications. Spheroids treated with a clinically-used drug show reduced cell viability with increase in the drug dose. The use of a standard micro-well plate for spheroid generation makes it straightforward to analyze viability of cancer cells of drug-treated spheroids with a micro-plate reader. This technology is straightforward to implement both robotically and with other liquid handling tools such as manual pipettes. PMID:25939084

  1. A Modified Murine Embryonic Stem Cell Test for Evaluating the Teratogenic Effects of Drugs on Early Embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxing Yu

    Full Text Available Mammalian fetal development is easily disrupted by exogenous agents, making it essential to test new drug candidates for embryotoxicity and teratogenicity. To standardize the testing of drugs that might be used to treat pregnant women, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA formulated special grade categories, labeled A, B, C, D and X, that define the level of risk associated with the use of a specific drug during pregnancy. Drugs in categories (Cat. D and X are those with embryotoxic and/or teratogenic effects on humans and animals. However, which stages of pregnancy are affected by these agents and their molecular mechanisms are unknown. We describe here an embryonic stem cell test (EST that classifies FDA pregnancy Cat.D and Cat.X drugs into 4 classes based on their differing effects on primitive streak formation. We show that ~84% of Cat.D and Cat.X drugs target this period of embryogenesis. Our results demonstrate that our modified EST can identify how a drug affects early embryogenesis, when it acts, and its molecular mechanism. Our test may thus be a useful addition to the drug safety testing armamentarium.

  2. Experienced teachers' informal workplace learning and perceptions of workplace conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, A.; Korthagen, F.; Brekelmans, M.; Beijaard, D.; Imants, J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore in detail how teachers' perceptions of workplace conditions for learning are related to their informal workplace learning activities and learning outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: From a sample of 32 teachers, a purposeful sampling technique of

  3. Labeling and effectiveness testing; sunscreen drug products for over-the-counter human use. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing this document to address labeling and effectiveness testing for certain over-the counter (OTC) sunscreen products containing specified active ingredients and marketed without approved applications. This document addresses labeling and effectiveness testing issues raised by the nearly 2,900 submissions that we received in response to the sunscreen proposed rule of August 27, 2007 (2007 proposed rule). The document also identifies specific claims that render a product that is subject to this rule misbranded or would not be allowed on any OTC sunscreen product marketed without an approved application. The document does not address issues related to sunscreen active ingredients or certain other issues regarding the GRASE determination for sunscreen products. The document requires OTC sunscreen products to comply with the content and format requirements for OTC drug labeling contained in the 1999 Drug Facts final rule (published in the Federal Register of March 17, 1999, by lifting the delay of implementation date for that rule that we published on September 3, 2004).

  4. The Use of Endometrial Cancer Patient–Derived Organoid Culture for Drug Sensitivity Testing Is Feasible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girda, Eugenia; Huang, Eric C.; Leiserowitz, Gary S.; Smith, Lloyd H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Patient-derived organoids (PDOs), used in multiple tumor types, have allowed evaluation of tumor characteristics from individual patients. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of applying PDO in vitro culture for endocrine-based and drug sensitivity testing in endometrial cancer. Methods Endometrial cancer cells were enzymatically dissociated from tumors retrieved from fresh hysterectomy specimens and cultured within basement membrane extract in serum-free medium. An organoid growth assay was developed to assess the inhibitory effects of a variety of drugs including endocrine treatments. Organoid cultures were also prepared for histological and immunohistochemical comparison to the tumors of origin. Results Fifteen endometrial cancer specimens were successfully cultured as PDOs. Small spherical structures formed within 24 hours, and many continued to grow to larger, denser organoids, providing the basis for an organoid growth assay. The STAT3 transcription factor inhibitor, BBI608 (Napabucasin), strongly inhibited growth in almost all PDO cultures, suggesting that stemness programing is involved in organoid formation and/or growth. Inhibition by different growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors was observed in several PDO specimens. Four cultures were inhibited by fulvestrant, implying the importance of estrogen-receptor signaling in some PDO cultures. Organoids closely resembled their tumors of origin in both histomorphology and immunohistochemical expression. Conclusions The use of endometrial cancer PDO cultures for development of drug sensitivity testing for individual patient tumors is feasible. The potential value of the PDO model for clinical decision making will require clinical trial evaluation. PMID:28683005

  5. Workplace Bullying in Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Mary; Young, Christopher J; Shepherd, Heather L; Mak, Cindy; Saw, Robyn P M

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the extent and nature of workplace bullying among General Surgery trainees and consultants in Australia. An online questionnaire survey of General Surgery trainees and consultant surgeons in Australia was conducted between March and May 2012. Prevalence of bullying was measured using both a definition of workplace bullying and the revised Negative Acts Questionnaire (NAQ-R). Sources of bullying were also examined, as well as the barriers and outcomes of formal reporting of bullying. The response rate was 34 % (370/1084) with 41 % (n = 152) of respondents being trainees. Overall, 47 % (n = 173) of respondents reported having been bullied to some degree and 68 % (n = 250) reported having witnessed bullying of surgical colleagues in the last 12 months. The prevalence of bullying was significantly higher in trainees and females, with 64 % of trainees and 57 % of females experiencing some degree of bullying. The majority of respondents (83 %) had experienced at least one negative behavior in the last 12 months, but 38 % experienced at least one negative behavior on a weekly or daily basis. The persistent negative behaviors that represent work-related bullying most commonly experienced were 'having opinions ignored' and 'being exposed to an unmanageable workload.' Consultant surgeons were the most common source of bullying for both trainees and consultants, with administration the next common source. Of those who reported being bullied, only 18 % (n = 32) made a formal complaint. Despite increased awareness and interventions, workplace bullying remains a significant problem within General Surgery in Australia. The findings in this study serve as a baseline for future questionnaires to monitor the effectiveness of implemented anti-bullying interventions.

  6. Structured evaluation of rodent behavioral tests used in drug discovery research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders eHånell

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A large variety of rodent behavioral tests are currently being used to evaluate traits such as sensory-motor function, social interactions, anxiety-like and depressive-like behavior, substance dependence and various forms of cognitive function. Most behavioral tests have an inherent complexity, and their use requires consideration of several aspects such as the source of motivation in the test, the interaction between experimenter and animal, sources of variability, the sensory modality required by the animal to solve the task as well as costs and required work effort. Of particular importance is a test’s validity because of its influence on the chance of successful translation of preclinical results to clinical settings. High validity may, however, have to be balanced against practical constraints and there are no behavioral tests with optimal characteristics. The design and development of new behavioral tests is therefore an ongoing effort and there are now well over one hundred tests described in the contemporary literature. Some of them are well established following extensive use, while others are novel and still unproven. The task of choosing a behavioral test for a particular project may therefore be daunting and the aim of the present review is to provide a structured way to evaluate rodent behavioral tests aimed at drug discovery research.

  7. Use of salivary caffeine tests to assess the inducer effect of a drug on hepatic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, J; Sacristan, J A; Alsar, M J

    1996-01-01

    To validate the use of successive salivary caffeine tests in evaluating how long inducer drugs affect hepatic metabolism. The time course of the inducer effect of rifampin found in other studies using different methodologies was chosen as the time course of reference. Open-label, prospective, longitudinal study. A university hospital. Five healthy volunteers. Rifampin 600 mg/d was administered for 21 days. Anhydrous caffeine 300 mg was concurrently administered on each study day. Salivary caffeine tests were carried out on the following days: predose (baseline), and days 1, 5, 9, 13, and 17. Salivary tests were performed for up to 13 days after the last dose of rifampin (study days 21, 25, 29, and 33). The mean systemic caffeine clearance was increased for up to 17 days after the intake of rifampin, reaching the maximum inducer effect between days 5 and 9, and returning to previous values progressively during several days after rifampin was discontinued. Our results suggest that successive salivary caffeine measurements could be a safe, reliable, noninvasive, and suitable test for exploring the time course of the inducer effect of drugs on hepatic metabolism activity.

  8. Outpatient penicillin use after negative skin testing and drug challenge in a pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Matthieu; Paradis, Louis; Nguyen, Mélanie; Bégin, Philippe; Paradis, Jean; Des Roches, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The practice of elective penicillin skin testing could be compromised by the fact that patients, their parents, or their physicians remain reluctant to reuse penicillin-class antibiotics (PCAs) despite a negative evaluation by an allergist. This study addresses reuse of PCAs in a pediatric population after negative penicillin skin testing and drug challenge and factors associated with its reluctance. All children evaluated for a history of penicillin allergy at the CHU Sainte-Justine Allergy Clinic between January 1998 and June 2000 with negative skin testing and drug challenge were included in the study. A telephone survey was conducted between May and October 2002 to assess the perception of the initial reaction by the parents, subsequent use of antibiotics, and antibiotic-related adverse reactions. Among the 200 children selected, parents of 170 (85%) children completed the survey. Since the allergist evaluation, 130 (76%) children had received antibiotics. PCA was used in 59 (45%) children. Parents of 24 (18%) children refused PCAs because they still feared an adverse reaction. They were more likely to have been very frightened by their child's allergic reaction than other parents whose children had used PCAs (p = 0.008). Although elective penicillin skin testing is useful and safe in the pediatric population, a significant proportion of parents still refuse PCAs even though they are needed. Identification of parents that were very frightened by their children's allergic reactions and additional reassurance could improve this situation.

  9. Full-course drug challenge test in the diagnosis of delayed allergic reactions to penicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borch, Jakob E; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Drug challenge test (DCT) has long been the most sensitive test in the allergological work-up when investigating for penicillin allergy. To improve sensitivity of the diagnostic work-up in diagnosing penicillin allergics with histories of allergic reactions on day 2 or later in the course of penicillin treatment. A full-course DCT was added to the current protocol if specific IgE, skin tests and DCT were all negative in patients who had a nonimmediate reaction to penicillin treatment. Sixteen patients with a history of an immediate reaction to penicillin treatment underwent testing with negative outcomes. Fifty percent of patients undergoing full-course DCT experienced a cutaneous adverse drug reaction. None of the controls reacted (p = 0.001). The mean time of reaction was 6 days. Penicillin V accounted for most reactions. Urticaria was the most frequent clinical reaction observed. Full-course DCT offers an improvement of sensitivity and predictive values of the diagnostic work-up of allergic reactions to penicillin occurring on day 2 of penicillin treatment or later. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. 48 CFR 223.570 - Drug-free work force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 223.570 Section 223.570 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM... TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 223.570 Drug-free work force. ...

  11. Cognitive Motivations for Drug Use among Adolescents: Longitudinal Tests of Gender Differences and Predictors of Change in Drug Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Michael D.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined cognitive motivations for alcohol and cannabis use among adolescents. Identified four factors for drug use. Boys were more motivated to use alcohol and cannabis for Social Cohesion and cannabis for Enhancing Positive Affect and Creativity than girls. Older, more than younger, adolescents used drugs to Reduce Negative Affect. All…

  12. Determining safe antibiotics for drug hypersensitive patients with the alternative method of double-triple test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaya, G; Isik, S R; Kalyoncu, A F

    2008-01-01

    Allergic reactions to antibiotics are common in daily clinical allergy practice. Oral drug provocation tests (ODPT) are used to determine safe alternative antibiotics in addition to diagnostic purposes. In one of our previous studies, we have shown that triple test was a safe, time-saving and cost-effective method for determining safe alternatives for patients with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) hypersensitivity. Our aim was to investigate the safety of one day two or three antibiotic ODPT performed to find safe alternative antibiotics in antibiotic/NSAID hypersensitive patients, as a cost effective and time saving alternative to conventional one day one antibiotic ODPT. Fifty-three patients were enrolled into this survey between 1 September 2005 and 31 December 2006. Double and triple tests are defined as performing ODPT with two and three antibiotics consecutively on the same day. Mean age of the patients was 41.3 +/- 11.7 years and 71.7 % were females. Beta-lactams (41.5 %) were the antibiotics most commonly causing reactions and the most common reaction was urticaria (68.8 %). Double test was performed in 26 (ciprofloxacin + clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin + tetracyline, clarithromycin + tetracycline, ciprofloxacin + ampicillin and ciprofloxacin + roxithromycin) and triple test in 27 patients (ciprofloxacin + tetracycline + clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin + tetracycline + ampicillin, clarithromycin + tetracycline + clindamycin and clarithromycin + ciprofloxacin + ampicillin). Only four patients had positive reactions during triple and double tests. There were no serious adverse reactions. Sixty-five days have been spent with triple-double tests where it would be 136 days with the conventional method. The triple-double ODPT performed with antibiotics in antibiotic/NSAID hypersensitive patients with the purpose of determining a safe alternative antibiotic could be a safe, cost-effective and time-saving alternative to conventional one day one antibiotic

  13. Workplace disability diversity and job-related well-being in Britain: a WERS2004 based analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Haile, Getinet A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to establish empirically whether there is a link between workplace disability and employee job-related well-being. Using nationally representative linked employer-employee data for Britain, I employ alternative econometric techniques to account for unobserved workplace heterogeneity. I find that workplace disability diversity is associated with lower employee well-being among people with no reported disability. Tests conducted also indicate that workplace equality policies...

  14. Direct antimicrobial drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the radiometric method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libonati, J.P.; Stager, C.E.; Davis, J.R.; Siddiqi, S.H.

    1988-05-01

    Direct-drug-susceptibility tests were performed on clinical specimens positive for acid-fast bacilli by either Ziehl-Neelsen or fluorochrome staining. The results of conventional agar dilution and a modified radiometric (BACTEC) method were compared. A total of 580 smear-positive specimens were tested by the BACTEC method at three separate sites. Three hundred and seventy-seven of these were culture positive for M. tuberculosis, and 343 (91%) yielded acceptable direct-susceptibility-test results. We used the conventional method to determine that 343 of 519 smear-positive specimens were culture positive for M. tuberculosis, and 212 (62%) produced acceptable results within 3 wks. Conventional results were reported in 3-4 wks, while the time required to obtain results with the BACTEC method ranged from 5 to 21 days (average 11.5 days). Results indicate that the radiometric method provides reportable results more frequently with time savings as compared to the conventional method.

  15. ACADEMIC DISHONESTY AND WORKPLACE DISHONESTY. AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Octavian RUJOIU; Valentina RUJOIU

    2014-01-01

    It is known by many names...unethical behavior in higher education, academic fraud, academic misconduct. It takes many forms...plagiarism, cheating on tests or exams, cybercheating. But all describe the characteristics of the same phenomenon: academic dishonesty. It is met in all societies and in the academic environments since ancient times. The aim of this overview was to analyze the major studies and research having as central points of discussion academic dishonesty and workplace dishones...

  16. HIV Testing in Non-Injection Drug Users: Prevalence and Associated Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves Guimarães, Rafael; Lucchese, Roselma; Lara Fernandes, Inaina; Vera, Ivânia; Goulart Rodovalho, Aurélio; Alves Guimarães, Vanessa; Cristina Silva, Graciele; Lopes de Felipe, Rodrigo; Alexandre de Castro, Paulo; Martins Ferreira, Priscilla

    2017-05-24

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of and identify factors associated with lifetime testing for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in non-injection drug users (NIDU). A cross-sectional study was conducted with 323 individuals in clinics for chemical dependency in the state of Goiás in the Central-West region of Brazil. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with lifetime HIV testing. Testing for HIV was associated with age, female gender, crack use, history of sexually transmitted infections, acquaintance with people living with HIV/AIDS and/or who had died from AIDS, and history of having received some instruction on HIV/AIDS prevention methods. It was found that only 26.6% reported having access to the HIV rapid test. We concluded determinants for HIV testing must be taken into account when planning prevention and programming strategies. These include the widening of testing coverage among NIDU, educational health actions, establishment of links between sexually transmitted infection prevention services and addiction treatment services, and the use of rapid tests to help people who are in contact with the virus learn about their HIV status, enter treatment, and improve their quality of life.

  17. Emotion in the library workplace

    CERN Document Server

    Matteson, Miriam; Hines, Samantha Schmehl

    2017-01-01

    Authors explore application of the study of emotion in the library workplace and look at future trends in the area. Library managers will take away knowledge about how the library workplace can and should operate with consideration toward emotion, and will glean ideas for implementation with their own staff and services.

  18. Workplace Environment towards Emotional Health

    OpenAIRE

    Zafir Mohd Makhbul

    2013-01-01

    Workplace ergonomics, such as air quality, lighting, furniture and tools, acoustics and building’s general environment, have a significant relationship between worker’s satisfaction and performance. Poor workplace ergonomics or organization comfort level has significant economic implications for the organizations through employee dissatisfaction, lowered productivity and lowered emotional and physical health of the employees. Lower emotional health leads to psychological distress, depression ...

  19. Convenience Store Workplace Literacy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duzer, Carol; Mansoor, Inaam

    The Convenience Store Workplace Literacy Curriculum was developed for English-as-a-Second-Language classes offered by the Southland Corporation, 7-Eleven stores, through a national workplace literacy grant. It is based on an analysis of the tasks and interactions common to a convenience store worksite. Store employees, managers, field consultants,…

  20. The Toll of Workplace Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killoren, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Bullying may be more common than most people think. According to a study commissioned by the Workplace Bullying Institute, one in three employees experience bullying in the workplace either as a victim or as a witness suffering collateral damage. Bullying is a serious problem. Directors, managers, and staff members need to ensure that it does not…

  1. Union Roles in Workplace Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Stephen Michael

    1993-01-01

    Discusses roles for labor unions in resolving workforce deficiencies, suggesting that labor, management, and government must work together to develop cooperative training initiatives. Describes labor's historic role in basic and workplace literacy training, lists skills workers need in the "new" workplace, describes exemplary union-management…

  2. Health correlates of workplace bullying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Gullander, Maria; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine the course of workplace bullying and health correlates among Danish employees across a four-year period. METHODS: In total, 7502 public service and private sector employees participated in a 3-wave study from 2006 through 2011. Workplace bullying over the past...... adjusting for bullying during follow-up, all health correlates except poor sleep quality persisted up to four years. CONCLUSION: Self-reported health correlates of workplace bullying including sick-listing, poor self-rated health, depressive symptoms, and a diagnosis of depression tend to persist...... for several years regardless of whether bullying is discontinued or not. Independent measures of bullying and outcomes are needed to learn whether these findings reflect long lasting health consequences of workplace bullying or whether self-labelled workplace bullying and health complaints are correlated...

  3. Utility of humanized BLT mice for analysis of dengue virus infection and antiviral drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias-Staheli, Natalia; Dorner, Marcus; Marukian, Svetlana; Billerbeck, Eva; Labitt, Rachael N; Rice, Charles M; Ploss, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the cause of a potentially life-threatening disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The lack of a small animal model that mimics the symptoms of DENV infection in humans has slowed the understanding of viral pathogenesis and the development of therapies and vaccines. Here, we investigated the use of humanized "bone marrow liver thymus" (BLT) mice as a model for immunological studies and assayed their applicability for preclinical testing of antiviral compounds. Human immune system (HIS) BLT-NOD/SCID mice were inoculated intravenously with a low-passage, clinical isolate of DENV-2, and this resulted in sustained viremia and infection of leukocytes in lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs. In addition, DENV infection increased serum cytokine levels and elicited DENV-2-neutralizing human IgM antibodies. Following restimulation with DENV-infected dendritic cells, in vivo-primed T cells became activated and acquired effector function. An adenosine nucleoside inhibitor of DENV decreased the circulating viral RNA when administered simultaneously or 2 days postinfection, simulating a potential treatment protocol for DENV infection in humans. In summary, we demonstrate that BLT mice are susceptible to infection with clinical DENV isolates, mount virus-specific adaptive immune responses, and respond to antiviral drug treatment. Although additional refinements to the model are required, BLT mice are a suitable platform to study aspects of DENV infection and pathogenesis and for preclinical testing of drug and vaccine candidates. IMPORTANCE Infection with dengue virus remains a major medical problem. Progress in our understanding of the disease and development of therapeutics has been hampered by the scarcity of small animal models. Here, we show that humanized mice, i.e., animals engrafted with components of a human immune system, that were infected with a patient-derived dengue virus strain developed clinical symptoms of the disease and mounted

  4. Drug susceptibility testing of clinical isolates of streptococci and enterococci by the Phoenix automated microbiology system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokeng Gertrude

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug resistance is an emerging problem among streptococcal and enterococcal species. Automated diagnostic systems for species identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST have become recently available. We evaluated drug susceptibility of clinical isolates of streptococci and enterococci using the recent Phoenix system (BD, Sparks, MD. Diagnostic tools included the new SMIC/ID-2 panel for streptococci, and the PMIC/ID-14 for enterococci. Two-hundred and fifty isolates have been investigated: β-hemolytic streptococci (n = 65, Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 50, viridans group streptococci (n = 32, Enterococcus faecium (n = 40, Enterococcus faecalis (n = 43, other catalase-negative cocci (n = 20. When needed, species ID was determined using molecular methods. Test bacterial strains were chosen among those carrying clinically-relevant resistance determinants (penicillin, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, glycopeptides. AST results of the Phoenix system were compared to minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC values measured by the Etest method (AB Biodisk, Solna, Sweden. Results Streptococci: essential agreement (EA and categorical agreement (CA were 91.9% and 98.8%, respectively. Major (ME and minor errors (mE accounted for 0.1% and 1.1% of isolates, respectively. No very major errors (VME were produced. Enterococci: EA was 97%, CA 96%. Small numbers of VME (0.9%, ME (1.4% and mE (2.8% were obtained. Overall, EA and CA rates for most drugs were above 90% for both genera. A few VME were found: a teicoplanin and high-level streptomycin for E. faecalis, b high-level gentamicin for E. faecium. The mean time to results (± SD was 11.8 ± 0.9 h, with minor differences between streptococci and enterococci. Conclusion The Phoenix system emerged as an effective tool for quantitative AST. Panels based on dilution tests provided rapid and accurate MIC values with regard to clinically-relevant streptococcal and enterococcal

  5. Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Test-Retest Reliability of the Alcohol and Drug Confrontation Scale (ADCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcin, Douglas L; Galloway, Gantt P; Bond, Jason; Korcha, Rachael; Greenfield, Thomas K

    2009-09-01

    The addiction field lacks an accepted definition and reliable measure of confrontation. The Alcohol and Drug Confrontation Scale (ADCS) defines confrontation as warnings about the potential consequences of substance use. To assess psychometric properties, 323 individual entering recovery houses in U.S. urban and suburban areas were interviewed between 2003 and 2005 (20% women, 68% white). Analyses included test-retest reliability, confirmatory factor analysis, and measures of internal consistency. Findings support the ADCS as a reliable way of assessing two factors: Internal Support and External intensity. Confrontation was experienced as supportive, accurate and helpful. Additional studies should assess confrontation in different contexts.

  6. Psychometric properties of the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) with substance abusers in outpatient and residential treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voluse, Andrew C; Gioia, Christopher J; Sobell, Linda Carter; Dum, Mariam; Sobell, Mark B; Simco, Edward R

    2012-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT), an 11-item self-report questionnaire developed to screen individuals for drug problems, are evaluated. The measure, developed in Sweden and evaluated there with individuals with severe drug problems, has not been evaluated with less severe substance abusers or with clinical populations in the United States. Participants included 35 drug abusers in an outpatient substance abuse treatment program, 79 drug abusers in a residential substance abuse treatment program, and 39 alcohol abusers from both treatment settings who did not report a drug abuse problem. The DUDIT was found to be a psychometrically sound drug abuse screening measure with high convergent validity (r=.85) when compared with the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10), and to have a Cronbach's alpha of .94. In addition, a single component accounted for 64.91% of total variance, and the DUDIT had sensitivity and specificity scores of .90 and .85, respectively, when using the optimal cut-off score of 8. Additionally, the DUDIT showed good discriminant validity as it significantly differentiated drug from alcohol abusers. These findings support the DUDIT as a reliable and valid drug abuse screening instrument that measures a unidimensional construct. Further research is warranted with additional clinical populations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Preliminary evaluation of anti-tuberculosis potential of siderophores against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis by mycobacteria growth indicator tube-drug sensitivity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokarn, Karuna; Pal, Ramprasad B

    2017-03-21

    Alternative treatment strategies have become essential in overcoming the problem of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In this preliminary in vitro study, the anti-tuberculosis (anti-TB) activity of exogenous iron chelators (xenosiderophores) such as Exochelin-MS (Exo-MS) and Deferoxamine-B (DFO-B) was evaluated against ten multi-drug-resistant (MDR) and seven pyrazinamide-resistant (PZA R ) Mtb isolates. Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube-Drug Susceptibility Test was used to assess the anti-TB effect of Exo-MS or DFO-B individually and their combinations with isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RIF) and pyrazinamide (PZA). For the MDR-Mtb isolates, Exo-MS alone inhibited two out of the five isolates tested. Whereas, DFO-B alone inhibited nine out of the ten MDR isolates tested. For PZA-resistant Mtb isolates, both Exo-MS and DFO-B individually inhibited five out of the seven isolates. The MIC of Exo-MS in combination with INH, RIF and PZA remained the same. The MIC of DFO-B decreased when tested in combination with INH, RIF and PZA. Exo-MS and DFO-B were shown to have activity against drug-resistant Mtb isolates. Therefore, these xenosiderophores may be useful adjuncts to antibiotics in overcoming the problem of drug-resistant Mtb in clinical setting.

  8. Is a positive history of non-anaesthetic drug allergy a predictive factor for positive allergy tests to anaesthetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagau, Natalia; Gherman-Ionica, Nadia; Hagau, Denisa; Tranca, Sebastian; Sfichi, Manuela; Longrois, Dan

    2012-03-01

    International recommendations stipulate not performing screening skin tests to a drug in the absence of a clinical history consistent with that specific drug allergy. Nevertheless, two publications showed that a positive history of non-anaesthetic drug allergy was the only predictive factor for a positive skin test when screening for allergy to anaesthetic drugs was done. We selected from a surgical population 40 volunteers with a prior history of allergy to non-anaesthetic drugs in order to analyse the prevalence of positive allergy tests to anaesthetics. The selected adult patients were tested for 11 anaesthetic drugs using in vivo tests: skin prick (SPT) and intradermal (IDT) tests and in vitro tests: the basophil activation test (BAT) and detection of drug-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE). The prevalence for the positive SPT and IDT was 1.6% and 5.8% respectively. The result of flow cytometry agreed with the SPT in five out of seven positive SPT (71%). IgEs confirmed two positive SPT with corresponding positive BAT. Ten per cent of the patients had a positive prick test to neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA). For midazolam none of the SPT was positive, but 11 patients had positive IDT nonconfirmed by BAT. The prevalence of positive in vivo and in vitro allergy tests to NMBAs is higher in our study population. This could be an argument for pre-operative SPT to NMBAs for the surgical population with reported non-anaesthetic drug allergies. A larger prospective study is needed to validate changes in clinical practice. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. A decade of an HIV workplace programme in armed conflict zones; a social responsibility response of the International Committee of the Red Cross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Mortier, Stéphane; Mukangu, Silas; Sagna, Charles; Nyffenegger, Laurent; Aebischer Perone, Sigiriya

    2016-01-01

    The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) works in fragile States and in armed conflict zones. Some of them are affected by the HIV pandemic. Within the framework of its social responsibility programme concerning HIV affecting its staff members, the organization has implemented an HIV workplace programme since 2004. We carried out a retrospective analysis over 10 years. Data collected were initially essentially qualitative and process-oriented, but were complemented over the years by data on annual voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) uptake and on direct annual costs covering awareness, testing and antiretroviral therapy. The number of people covered by the programme grew from none in 2003 to 4,438 in 2015, with an increase in annual VCT uptake over the years increasing from 376 persons (14 %) in 2007 to 2,663 in 2015 (60 %). Over the years, the services were expanded from awareness raising to bringing VCT to the workplace, as well as offering testing and health coverage of other conditions and innovative approaches to facing challenges linked to situations of violence. Within its social responsibility framework, the ICRC has shown the importance and feasibility of a workplace HIV programme in conflict zones. A sustainable workplace programme in these conflict settings requires constant adaptation, with regular follow-up given the relatively high turnover of staff, and ensuring sustainable stocks of condoms and antiretroviral drugs.

  10. 77 FR 27591 - Labeling and Effectiveness Testing; Sunscreen Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use; Delay...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... compliance dates; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is delaying the... the previously-published delay of implementation of the Drug Facts labeling requirements for OTC... final rule''). The 2011 final rule established labeling and effectiveness testing requirements for...

  11. 21 CFR 211.84 - Testing and approval or rejection of components, drug product containers, and closures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... manner designed to prevent contamination of their contents and contamination of other components, drug... manufacturer, a certificate of testing may be accepted from the supplier, provided that at least a visual... examined. (5) Each lot of a component, drug product container, or closure that is liable to contamination...

  12. A novel dissolution media for testing drug release from a nanostructured polysaccharide-based colon specific drug delivery system: an approach to alternative colon media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotla, Niranjan G; Singh, Sima; Maddiboyina, Balaji; Sunnapu, Omprakash; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel microbially triggered and animal-sparing dissolution method for testing of nanorough polysaccharide-based micron granules for colonic drug delivery. In this method, probiotic cultures of bacteria present in the colonic region were prepared and added to the dissolution media and compared with the performance of conventional dissolution methodologies (such as media with rat cecal and human fecal media). In this study, the predominant species (such as Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus species, Eubacterium and Streptococcus) were cultured in 12% w/v skimmed milk powder and 5% w/v grade "A" honey. Approximately 10(10)-10(11) colony forming units m/L of probiotic culture was added to the dissolution media to test the drug release of polysaccharide-based formulations. A USP dissolution apparatus I/II using a gradient pH dissolution method was used to evaluate drug release from formulations meant for colonic drug delivery. Drug release of guar gum/Eudragit FS30D coated 5-fluorouracil granules was assessed under gastric and small intestine conditions within a simulated colonic environment involving fermentation testing with the probiotic culture. The results with the probiotic system were comparable to those obtained from the rat cecal and human fecal-based fermentation model, thereby suggesting that a probiotic dissolution method can be successfully applied for drug release testing of any polysaccharide-based oral formulation meant for colonic delivery. As such, this study significantly adds to the nanostructured biomaterials' community by elucidating an easier assay for colonic drug delivery.

  13. Molecular characterization and antiviral activity test of common drugs against echovirus 18 isolated in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park KwiSung

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic diversity and antiviral activity for five common antiviral drugs of echovirus (ECV 5 isolated in Korea have been described. The present study extended these tests to a Korean ECV 18 isolate. An outbreak of aseptic meningitis caused by the ECV 18 isolate was reported in Korea in 2005, marking the first time this virus had been identified in the country since enterovirus surveillance began in 1993. Using a sample isolated from stool specimen of a 5-year-old male patient with aseptic meningitis, the complete genome sequence was obtained and was compared it with the Metcalf prototype strain. Unlike the ECV5 isolate, the 3' untranslated region had the highest identity value (94.2% at the nucleotide level, while, at the amino acid level, the P2 region displayed the highest identity value (96.9%. These two strains shared all cleavage sites, with the exception of the 2B/2C site, which was RQ/NN in the Metcalf strain but RQ/NS in the Korean ECV 18 isolate. In Vero cells infected with the Korean ECV 18 isolate, no cytotoxicity was observed in the presence of azidothymidine, acyclovir, amantadine, lamivudine, or ribavirin, when the drugs were administered at a CC50 value >100 μg/mL. Of the five drugs, only amantadine (IC50: 4.97 ± 0.77 μg/mL, TI: 20.12 and ribavirin (IC50: 7.63 ± 0.87 μg/mL, TI: 13.11 had any antiviral activity against the Korean ECV 18 isolate in the five antiviral drugs. These antiviral activity effects were similar with results of the Korean ECV5 isolate.

  14. Spillover effects of HIV testing policies: changes in HIV testing guidelines and HCV testing practices in drug treatment programs in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jemima A. Frimpong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the extent to which state adoption of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC 2006 revisions to adult and adolescent HIV testing guidelines is associated with availability of other important prevention and medical services. We hypothesized that in states where the pretest counseling requirement for HIV testing was dropped from state legislation, substance use disorder treatment programs would have higher availability of HCV testing services than in states that had maintained this requirement. Methods We analyzed a nationally representative sample of 383 opioid treatment programs from the 2005 and 2011 National Drug Abuse Treatment System Survey (NDATSS. Data were collected from program directors and clinical supervisors through telephone surveys. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to measure associations between state adoption of CDC recommended guidelines for HIV pretest counseling and availability of HCV testing services. Results The effects of HIV testing legislative changes on HCV testing practices varied by type of opioid treatment program. In states that had removed the requirement for HIV pretest counseling, buprenorphine-only programs were more likely to offer HCV testing to their patients. The positive spillover effect of HIV pretest counseling policies, however, did not extend to methadone programs and did not translate into increased availability of on-site HCV testing in either program type. Conclusions Our findings highlight potential positive spillover effects of HIV testing policies on HCV testing practices. They also suggest that maximizing the benefits of HIV policies may require other initiatives, including resources and programmatic efforts that support systematic integration with other services and effective implementation.

  15. Drug-addiction and boundaries of the Self A psychoanalytical reading through the Rorschach test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Marfisi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present research intends to analyse the phenomenon of drug addiction through the Rorschach test. The protocols, analysed according to the French School Method, have been administered to a sample of 10 subjects. The data have been evaluated integrating quantitative and qualitative aspects, which have revealed the main dimensions of the drug addicted personality, mainly regarding the functioning modes of the narcissistic personality based on the over-investment of limits. The results show an impoverished cognitive set where the capacity of the investment in the imaginary activity is absent and a certain rigidity of thinking is revealed. The investment in the formal aspects of the table provides justification of the emotional isolation where the attention to the external reality acts as a defence from an internal reality whose impoverishment is perceived as threatening and distressing. Interesting outcomes are evident in relation to the emotional sphere and the attempt of social adaptation from some indexes such as the quantity of human responses which result to be in the normative range. The Rorschach test provided an important contribution in this evaluation/understanding of the drug addicted personality: if on the one hand it confirmed some basic traits of the functioning of these subjects, on the other hand it provided the possibility to research new and unexpected frontiers that,  from the closure and the over investment of the boundaries of the Self (predominance of formal responses, of “reponses peau”, reaches an attempt of psychic stimulation addressing a “primitive” emotional sphere, in the form of specular relations (reflection responses or partial (Hd.

  16. 77 FR 72905 - Pipeline Safety: Random Drug Testing Rate; Contractor MIS Reporting; and Obtaining DAMIS Sign-In...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline Safety: Random Drug Testing Rate; Contractor MIS Reporting; and Obtaining DAMIS Sign-In Information AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

  17. Cancer therapy. Ex vivo culture of circulating breast tumor cells for individualized testing of drug susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min; Bardia, Aditya; Aceto, Nicola; Bersani, Francesca; Madden, Marissa W; Donaldson, Maria C; Desai, Rushil; Zhu, Huili; Comaills, Valentine; Zheng, Zongli; Wittner, Ben S; Stojanov, Petar; Brachtel, Elena; Sgroi, Dennis; Kapur, Ravi; Shioda, Toshihiro; Ting, David T; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Getz, Gad; Iafrate, A John; Benes, Cyril; Toner, Mehmet; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A

    2014-07-11

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are present at low concentrations in the peripheral blood of patients with solid tumors. It has been proposed that the isolation, ex vivo culture, and characterization of CTCs may provide an opportunity to noninvasively monitor the changing patterns of drug susceptibility in individual patients as their tumors acquire new mutations. In a proof-of-concept study, we established CTC cultures from six patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Three of five CTC lines tested were tumorigenic in mice. Genome sequencing of the CTC lines revealed preexisting mutations in the PIK3CA gene and newly acquired mutations in the estrogen receptor gene (ESR1), PIK3CA gene, and fibroblast growth factor receptor gene (FGFR2), among others. Drug sensitivity testing of CTC lines with multiple mutations revealed potential new therapeutic targets. With optimization of CTC culture conditions, this strategy may help identify the best therapies for individual cancer patients over the course of their disease. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Selection of excipients for extended release formulations of glipizide through drug-excipient compatibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rajan K; Garg, Sanjay

    2005-07-15

    For the development of extended release formulations of glipizide, techniques of thermal and isothermal stress testing (IST) were used to assess the compatibility of glipizide with selected excipients. Initially, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was used to evaluate the compatibility. IR spectrum of drug-excipient mixture was also compared with that of pure drug and excipient. Compatibility of excipients defined in the prototype formula was tested using IST. Based on the DSC results alone, magnesium stearate, meglumine, TRIS buffer, and lactose, were found to exhibit interaction with glipizide. Stressed binary mixtures (stored at 50 degrees C for 3 weeks) of glipizide and meglumine showed yellow coloration indicating potential incompatibility. Based on the results of DSC, IR, and/or HPLC, excipients defined in the prototype formula were found to be compatible with glipizide. The optimized formulation developed using the compatible excipients were found to be stable after 3 months of accelerated stability studies (40 degrees C and 75% RH). Overall, compatibility of excipients with glipizide was successfully evaluated using the combination of thermal and IST methods and the formulations developed using the compatible excipients was found to be stable.

  19. International harmonization of generic drugs: in vitro dissolution tests for Japanese and American generic tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Makoto; Tomita, Hisako; Otsuka, Kuniko; Kamae, Isao; Jorgenson, James A

    2006-01-01

    Ibuprofen tablets on the market in Japan and the USA were compared by manual- and automatic-dissolution tests according to USP24 criteria. Dissolution test were performed in 900 ml of phosphate buffer of pH 7.2 at 37.0+/-0.5 degrees C at 50 rpm for 60 min, and the time required for 70% dissolution (T70%) and 5% dissolution after 60 min (A60) were evaluated. The dissolution profiles of both Japanese and American tablets by the automatic-method showed almost the same profiles as those of the manual method. T70% of the American and Japanese tablets by the manual method were not significantly different (p>0.05) from the automatic-method at various sampling positions. The A60 of the American and Japanese tablets by the manual-method was not significantly different (p>0.05) except at one position. The results indicate that the automatic-method was more reproducible than the manual-method, and also that systematic error was negligible. The T70% and A60 of the American tablets were significantly different (p<0.05) from the Japanese tablets. The American tablets were a film-coated over-the-counter drug and the Japanese tablets were a sugar-coated prescription drug. There was a difference in dissolution behavior between the dosage forms of the two countries.

  20. Workplace bullying in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovayolu, Ozlem; Ovayolu, Nimet; Karadag, Gulendam

    2014-09-01

    This research was designed to determine whether nurses are bullied by other staff members and the effects of such behaviors on the nurse victims. This study reports on nurses' interpersonal workplace relationships in a culturally unique environment. The study was conducted with 260 nurses working in three public hospitals. Data were collected using a questionnaire. The majority of nurses were female with bachelor's degrees and reported being assigned duties outside their usual responsibilities, held responsible for coworkers' mistakes, and criticized for job performance although they thought they had done their work properly. Most of the nurses who were bullied experienced health and sleep problems,did not want to go to work, and had communication problems with other staff members. Nearly all of the study nurses received psychological support to solve their problems and believed that the best way to prevent bullying was education.

  1. Urine Toxicology Screen in Multiple Sleep Latency Test: The Correlation of Positive Tetrahydrocannabinol, Drug Negative Patients, and Narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzodzomenyo, Samuel; Stolfi, Adrienne; Splaingard, Deborah; Earley, Elizabeth; Onadeko, Oluwole; Splaingard, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Drugs can influence results of multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT). We sought to identify the effect of marijuana on MSLT results in pediatric patients evaluated for excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Methods: This is a retrospective study of urine drug screens performed the morning before MSLT in 383 patients narcolepsy, 0% consistent with idiopathic hypersomnia, 29% other, and 29% normal. This was statistically different from those with (−) screens (24% narcolepsy, 20% idiopathic hypersomnia, 6% other, 50% normal), and those (+) for drugs other than THC (17% narcolepsy, 33% idiopathic hypersomnia, 4% other, 46% normal (p = 0.01). Six percent (6/93) of patients with MSLT findings consistent with narcolepsy were drug screen (+) for THC; 71% of patients with drug screen (+) for THC had multiple sleep onset REM periods (SOREMS). There were no (+) urine drug screens in patients Many pediatric patients with (+) urine drug screens for THC met MSLT criteria for narcolepsy or had multiple SOREMs. Drug screening is important in interpreting MSLT findings for children ≥ 13 years. Citation: Dzodzomenyo S, Stolfi A, Splaingard D, Earley E, Onadeko O, Splaingard M. Urine toxicology screen in multiple sleep latency test: the correlation of positive tetrahydrocannabinol, drug negative patients, and narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(2):93–99. PMID:25348245

  2. Treatment of fevers prior to introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in registered drug shops in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K.; Lal, Sham; Cundill, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    shops on presenting symptoms, the consultation process, treatment received, and malaria diagnoses. Malaria diagnosis made by drug shop vendors were confirmed by the study team through microscopy examination of a blood slide to ascertain whether appropriate treatment was received. RESULTS: Among febrile......BACKGROUND: Since drug shops play an important role in treatment of fever, introducing rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria at drug shops may have the potential of targeting anti-malarial drugs to those with malaria parasites and improve rational drug use. As part of a cluster randomized trial...... to examine impact on appropriate treatment of malaria in drug shops in Uganda and adherence to current malaria treatment policy guidelines, a survey was conducted to estimate baseline prevalence of, and factors associated with, appropriate treatment of malaria to enable effective design and implementation...

  3. Workplace Communication Practices and Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirilova, Marta; Angouri, Jo

    2017-01-01

    This chapter addresses the issue of communication policy in the workplace. Modern workplaces are multinational and multilingual. Both white and blue collar employees interact in languages other than their L1 as part of their daily reality at work. At the same time a number of workplaces have...... introduced a ‘one language policy’ as a strategy to manage linguistic diversity as well as to encourage integration and, allegedly, shared decision making. Research has repeatedly shown, however, that this is a political and ideological decision rather than a purely linguistic one. Languages have different...

  4. Predicting workplace aggression and violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barling, Julian; Dupré, Kathryne E; Kelloway, E Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Consistent with the relative recency of research on workplace aggression and the considerable media attention given to high-profile incidents, numerous myths about the nature of workplace aggression have emerged. In this review, we examine these myths from an evidence-based perspective, bringing greater clarity to our understanding of the predictors of workplace aggression. We conclude by pointing to the need for more research focusing on construct validity and prevention issues as well as for methodologies that minimize the likelihood of mono-method bias and that strengthen the ability to make causal inferences.

  5. Advancing the vesosome, a multifunctional drug delivery platform, toward applied in vivo testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Benjamin J.

    An optimal drug delivery vehicle should circulate long enough to reach the site of illness or disease, possess a large drug loading capacity, retain its contents over the course of treatment, and be able deliver its contents at a rate appropriate for maximum therapeutic benefit at the site of interest. The vesosome, a large lipid bilayer enclosing multiple, smaller liposomes, is our solution to addressing these needs. The external lipid bilayer offers a second barrier of protection for interior components and can also serve as the anchor for active targeting components. Furthermore, internal compartmentalization permits customization of separate environments for multiple therapeutics and release triggers. Previous work established the ability of the vesosome to retain its contents in vitro an order of magnitude longer than liposomes. To be viable in vivo, the vesosome must be functionalized for biocompatibility and tracking, and its synthetic procedure must be repeatable, reliable and result in a purified product. The vesosome was functionalized by introducing biocompatible polymers, such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and fluorescent dyes in their lipid-bound forms into the external membrane of the vesosome. The external vesosomal membrane is formed from large, flat lipid sheets in the interdigitated (L betaI) phase which, when heated, are used to encapsulate smaller drug-containing vesicles. Through X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FF-TEM), we established that the molar amounts of functionalized lipid required to label the vesosome for tracking and biocompatibility (˜5--7mol% total) did not prevent the formation of the interdigitated phase. Thus, functionalization of the external vesosome membrane can be achieved through functionalization of interdigitated sheets. For in vivo testing, functionalized vesosomes must be separated from unencapsulated vesicles and purification was performed using size exclusion

  6. Lipid-drug conjugate nanoparticles of the hydrophilic drug diminazene-cytotoxicity testing and mouse serum adsorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olbrich, C.; Gessner, A.; Schroder, W.; Kayser, Oliver; Muller, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    Sleeping sickness is a widely distributed disease in great parts of Africa. It is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and rhodiense, transmitted by the Tse-Tse fly. After a hemolymphatic stage, the parasites enter the central nervous system where they cannot be reached by hydrophilic drugs. To

  7. Local tolerance testing of parenteral drugs: how to put into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochims, Karin; Kemkowski, Joerg; Nolte, Thomas; Bartels, Thomas; Heusener, Alexander

    2003-10-01

    Notwithstanding that there are national and international guidelines about local tolerance testing of parenteral drugs in animals, in particular to mention CPMP/SWP/2145/00 (Note for Guidance on Non-Clinical Local Tolerance Testing of Medicinal Products), very heterogeneous study designs have been established in the past. A working group including experts of the leading pharmaceutical industry from German-language countries, named "Arbeitskreis Lokale Verträglichkeit," has been intensively discussing the experimental procedures in detail for a period of six years and has been considering their pros and cons. This team of experts now feels confident to give some recommendations for study conduct besides describing different materials and methods for this type of toxicological study. Special knowledge from toxicologists as well as pathologists from our working group has been taken into account. This paper deals with choice of species, number of animals used, controls, administration sites, volumes, rate and frequency, length of observation period, termination, clinical, macroscopic and histopathological examinations and, finally, overall assessment criteria and conclusion. Our purpose is that this paper may be of value for: *The study director who is inexperienced in the conduction of local tolerance testing and who may need a standard design as his first step into this new field. *The well-versed study director who would like to know how others have done in the past, who may examine self-critically his own practice and who is open to our team's recommendations, tips and tricks from practice. *The specialist at a regulatory authority who, finally, reviews study reports, assesses their format and content and, above all, decides on the approval of a drug product.

  8. Evaluation of rapid alternative methods for drug susceptibility testing in clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Mengatto

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to compare the performance of a commercial method (MGIT and four inexpensive drug susceptibility methods: nitrate reductase assay (NRA, microscopic observation drug susceptibility (MODS assay, MTT test, and broth microdilution method (BMM. A total of 64 clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were studied. The Lowenstein-Jensen proportion method (PM was used as gold standard. MGIT, NRA, MODS, and MTT results were available on an average of less than 10 days, whereas BMM results could be reported in about 20 days. Most of the evaluated tests showed excellent performance for isoniazid and rifampicin, with sensitivity and specificity values > 90%. With most of the assays, sensitivity for ethambutol was low (62-87% whereas for streptomycin, sensitivity values ranged from 84 to 100%; NRA-discrepancies were associated with cultures with a low proportion of EMB-resistant organisms while most discrepancies with quantitative tests (MMT and BMM were seen with isolates whose minimal inhibitory concentrations fell close the cutoff. MGIT is reliable but still expensive. NRA is the most inexpensive and easiest method to perform without changing the organization of the routine PM laboratory performance. While MODS, MTT, and BMM, have the disadvantage from the point of view of biosafety, they offer the possibility of detecting partial resistant strains. This study shows a very good level of agreement of the four low-cost methods compared to the PM for rapid detection of isoniazid, rifampicin and streptomycin resistance (Kappa values > 0.8; more standardization is needed for ethambutol.

  9. Profiles of Urine Drug Test in Clinical Pain Patients vs Pain Research Study Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-ting; Vo, Trang T; Cohen, Abigail S; Ahmed, Shihab; Zhang, Yi; Mao, Jianren; Chen, Lucy

    2016-04-01

    To examine similarities and differences in urine drug test (UDT) results in clinical pain patients and pain subjects participating in pain research studies. An observational study with retrospective chart review and data analysis. We analyzed 1,874 UDT results obtained from 1) clinical pain patients (Clinical Group; n = 1,529) and 2) pain subjects consented to participate in pain research studies (Research Group; n = 345). Since several medications such as opioids used in pain management are drugs of abuse (DOA) and can result in a positive UDT, we specifically identified those cases of positive UDT due to nonprescribed DOA and designated these cases as positive UDT with DOA (PUD). We found that 1) there was a higher rate of PUD in clinical pain patients (41.3%) than in pain research study subjects (14.8%); 2) although subjects in the Research Group were informed ahead of time that UDT will be conducted as a screening test, a substantial number (14.8%) of pain research study subjects still showed PUD; 3) there were different types of DOA between clinical pain patients (cannabinoids as the top DOA) and research study subjects (cocaine as the top DOA); and 4) a common factor associated with PUD was opioid therapy in both Clinical Group and Research Group. These results support previous findings that PUD is a common finding in clinical pain patients, particularly in those prescribed opioid therapy, and we suggest that UDT be used as routine screening testing in pain research studies. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Development of the Personal Workplace Safety Instrument for Emergency Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchill, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Much of the research on violence committed by patients and family members against healthcare providers in the hospital focus on the frequency and severity of incidents plus personal, perpetrator, and hospital characteristics. The literature lacks research on those factors that make healthcare providers in hospitals feel safe from workplace violence committed by patients and family members. The objective of this project is to design an instrument to measure the perceptions of personal safety of emergency nurses in the workplace. To develop the Personal Workplace Safety Instrument for Emergency Nurses (PWSI EN) an extensive review of the literature was conducted and recurrent themes identified. Informal focus groups of emergency nurses and discussions with administrators were conducted to confirm these themes. A review by workplace violence experts and a pilot test with emergency nurses was conducted. The instrument has 31 Likert-scale items to measure the factors of workplace countermeasures, patient-nurse interactions, and administrative and judicial support measures. Fifteen demographic questions were developed to measure characteristics of the nurse and hospital. Results of the expert panel review yielded high content validity (cumulative validity index = 0.98). The instrument is valid to measure the perceptions of personal safety in the workplace with emergency nurses.

  11. 49 CFR 40.347 - What functions may C/TPAs perform with respect to administering testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Roles and Responsibilities of Service... employers and may assist (i.e., through contracting with laboratories or collection sites, conducting collections) employers with other types of testing (e.g., pre-employment, post-accident, reasonable suspicion...

  12. Patterns of gender equality at workplaces and psychological distress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Elwér

    Full Text Available Research in the field of occupational health often uses a risk factor approach which has been criticized by feminist researchers for not considering the combination of many different variables that are at play simultaneously. To overcome this shortcoming this study aims to identify patterns of gender equality at workplaces and to investigate how these patterns are associated with psychological distress. Questionnaire data from the Northern Swedish Cohort (n = 715 have been analysed and supplemented with register data about the participants' workplaces. The register data were used to create gender equality indicators of women/men ratios of number of employees, educational level, salary and parental leave. Cluster analysis was used to identify patterns of gender equality at the workplaces. Differences in psychological distress between the clusters were analysed by chi-square test and logistic regression analyses, adjusting for individual socio-demographics and previous psychological distress. The cluster analysis resulted in six distinctive clusters with different patterns of gender equality at the workplaces that were associated to psychological distress for women but not for men. For women the highest odds of psychological distress was found on traditionally gender unequal workplaces. The lowest overall occurrence of psychological distress as well as same occurrence for women and men was found on the most gender equal workplaces. The results from this study support the convergence hypothesis as gender equality at the workplace does not only relate to better mental health for women, but also more similar occurrence of mental ill-health between women and men. This study highlights the importance of utilizing a multidimensional view of gender equality to understand its association to health outcomes. Health policies need to consider gender equality at the workplace level as a social determinant of health that is of importance for reducing

  13. Patterns of gender equality at workplaces and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwér, Sofia; Harryson, Lisa; Bolin, Malin; Hammarström, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Research in the field of occupational health often uses a risk factor approach which has been criticized by feminist researchers for not considering the combination of many different variables that are at play simultaneously. To overcome this shortcoming this study aims to identify patterns of gender equality at workplaces and to investigate how these patterns are associated with psychological distress. Questionnaire data from the Northern Swedish Cohort (n = 715) have been analysed and supplemented with register data about the participants' workplaces. The register data were used to create gender equality indicators of women/men ratios of number of employees, educational level, salary and parental leave. Cluster analysis was used to identify patterns of gender equality at the workplaces. Differences in psychological distress between the clusters were analysed by chi-square test and logistic regression analyses, adjusting for individual socio-demographics and previous psychological distress. The cluster analysis resulted in six distinctive clusters with different patterns of gender equality at the workplaces that were associated to psychological distress for women but not for men. For women the highest odds of psychological distress was found on traditionally gender unequal workplaces. The lowest overall occurrence of psychological distress as well as same occurrence for women and men was found on the most gender equal workplaces. The results from this study support the convergence hypothesis as gender equality at the workplace does not only relate to better mental health for women, but also more similar occurrence of mental ill-health between women and men. This study highlights the importance of utilizing a multidimensional view of gender equality to understand its association to health outcomes. Health policies need to consider gender equality at the workplace level as a social determinant of health that is of importance for reducing differences in health

  14. Drug and alcohol task force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordey, T. [ConocoPhillips Canada Resources Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada); Sunstrum, M. [Enform, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Worker absenteeism due to substance abuse costs the Alberta economy approximately $720 million a year. It is estimated that 20 per cent of all drivers in fatal crashes were using alcohol, and the use of cannabis and cocaine in Alberta has more than doubled over the last 15 years. In addition, 1 in 10 Alberta workers have reported using alcohol while at work and 4 per cent have reported using alcohol 4 hours prior to coming to work during the previous 12 months. In an effort to ensure appropriate health and safety for workers in the Canadian petroleum industry, 6 trade associations in the sector have joined together as the Enform Alcohol and Drug Initiative and are now working to develop a common approach to drug and alcohol guidelines and workplace rules. The task group will determine if existing policies and guidelines are sufficient to ensure a safe workplace and will consider standardizing the testing, application and rehabilitation of workers with respect to the use of drugs and alcohol. In the past, disciplinary actions have often been reversed because employers have not been consistent or did not follow established alcohol and drug policies or test to specific standards. Various work rules for inappropriate alcohol and drug use were reviewed, as well as education and communication strategies regarding policy content. Standards for testing criteria were discussed, as well as issues concerning duty-to-accommodate circumstances. An excerpt of concentration standards was presented. It was concluded that a matrix for companies to assess and determine safety sensitive positions is needed. refs., tabs., figs.

  15. Growing Concerns With Workplace Incivility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Natasha Renee; Rogers, Bonnie

    2017-11-01

    Workplace incivility (WPI) is a growing issue across all public and private sectors. Occupational and environmental health nurses can educate employees and management about WPI, its risk factors and characteristics, and ways to reduce incidents of WPI.

  16. Physical Separation in the Workplace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stea, Diego; Foss, Nicolai Juul; Holdt Christensen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Physical separation is pervasive in organizations, and has powerful effects on employee motivation and organizational behaviors. However, research shows that workplace separation is characterized by a variety of tradeoffs, tensions, and challenges that lead to both positive and negative outcomes....

  17. Workplaces as Transformative Learning Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maslo, Elina

    2010-01-01

    words: learning, lifelong learning, adult learning, workplace learning, transformative learning spaces During many years of research on lifelong foreign language learning with very different groups of learners, we found some criteria, which make learning process successful. Since then we tried to find......Abstract to the Vietnam Forum on Lifelong Learning: Building a Learning Society Hanoi, 7-8 December 2010 Network 2: Competence development as Workplace Learning Title of proposal: Workplaces as Transformative Learning Spaces Author: Elina Maslo, dr. paed., University of Latvia, elina@latnet.lv Key...... some other examples on “successful learning” from the formal, informal and non-formal learning environments, trying to prove those criteria. This presentation provides a view on to new examples on transformative learning spaces we discovered doing research on Workplace Learning in Latvia as a part...

  18. [Evaluation of a workplace health promotion program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forette, Françoise; Brieu, Marie-Anne; Lemasson, Hervé; Salord, Jean-Claude; Le Pen, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Some studies suggest that a workplace prevention programme could reduce health inequalities related to education level and improve the health status of the employees. The objective of the study was to demonstrate the advantages for a company to implement a health prevention programme in the workplace in order to: 1-improve health literacy 2 - change health-related behaviours 3-improve the company image. A "before - after" methodology was used in a population of 2153 employees of three companies. Three areas of prevention were considered: nutrition, physical activity and prevention of back pain. The successive steps of the EBS programme included general communication, group workshops and individual coaching. Data collection was carried out using anonymous questionnaires sent by e-mail. A global assessment was performed based on the companies' pooled data, with separate analysis according to the steps of the programme. The programme mobilized employees with participation rates ranging from 25% to 45.5%. After completion of the full programme, 77.5% of respondents reported an improvement of their health knowledge versus 50.3% of those who only received general communication. Behavioural modification was observed, especially in the fields of nutrition and back pain.. EBS can be considered to be a vector of the company image for almost 7 out of 10 employees. A health prevention education programme provided by the company in the workplace mobilizes employees and contributes to improvement of health knowledge and behaviour change. All approaches tested were important and applicable to various types of companies or workers.

  19. Nanoparticle exposure at nanotechnology workplaces: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göhler Daniel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Risk, associated with nanomaterial use, is determined by exposure and hazard potential of these materials. Both topics cannot be evaluated absolutely independently. Realistic dose concentrations should be tested based on stringent exposure assessments for the corresponding nanomaterial taking into account also the environmental and product matrix. This review focuses on current available information from peer reviewed publications related to airborne nanomaterial exposure. Two approaches to derive realistic exposure values are differentiated and independently presented; those based on workplace measurements and the others based on simulations in laboratories. An assessment of the current available workplace measurement data using a matrix, which is related to nanomaterials and work processes, shows, that data are available on the likelihood of release and possible exposure. Laboratory studies are seen as an important complementary source of information on particle release processes and hence for possible exposure. In both cases, whether workplace measurements or laboratories studies, the issue of background particles is a major problem. From this review, major areas for future activities and focal points are identified.

  20. Status and the evaluation of workplace deviance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Hannah Riley; Gelfand, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Bias in the evaluation of workplace misbehavior is hotly debated in courts and corporations, but it has received little empirical attention. Classic sociological literature suggests that deviance by lower-status actors will be evaluated more harshly than deviance by higher-status actors. However, more recent psychological literature suggests that discrimination in the evaluation of misbehavior may be moderated by the relative status of the evaluator because status influences both rule observance and attitudes toward social hierarchy. In Study 1, the psychological experience of higher status decreased rule observance and increased preferences for social hierarchy, as we theorized. In three subsequent experiments, we tested the hypothesis that higher-status evaluators would be more discriminating in their evaluations of workplace misbehavior, evaluating fellow higher-status deviants more leniently than lower-status deviants. Results supported the hypothesized interactive effect of evaluator status and target status on the evaluation of workplace deviance, when both achieved status characteristics (Studies 2a and 2b) and ascribed status characteristics (i.e., race and gender in Study 3) were manipulated.

  1. Hair testing to assess both known and unknown use of drugs amongst ecstasy users in the electronic dance music scene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamar, Joseph J; Salomone, Alberto; Gerace, Enrico; Di Corcia, Daniele; Vincenti, Marco; Cleland, Charles M

    2017-10-01

    Data on both known and unknown drug use in the electronic dance music (EDM) scene is important to inform prevention and harm reduction. While surveys are the most common method of querying drug use, additional biological data can help validate use and detect unknown/unintentional use of drugs such as new psychoactive substances (NPS). We sought to determine the extent of both known and unknown use of various substances in this high-risk scene. We hair-tested 90 self-reported past-year ecstasy/MDMA/Molly users attending EDM parties in New York City during the summer of 2016 using UHPLC-MS/MS. Results were compared to self-reported past-year use. Three quarters (74.4%) tested positive for MDMA, a third (33.3%) tested positive for an NPS, and 27.8% tested positive specifically for one or more synthetic cathinones (e.g., butylone, ethylone, pentylone, methylone, alpha-PVP). Half (51.1%) of participants tested positive for a drug not self-reported, with most testing positive for synthetic cathinones (72.0%), methamphetamine (69.0%), other NPS stimulants (e.g., 4-FA, 5/6-APB; 66.7%), or new dissociatives (e.g., methoxetamine, diphenidine; 60.0%). Attending parties every other week or more often, reporting higher-frequency ecstasy pill use, having tested one's ecstasy, and having found out one's ecstasy was adulterated, were risk factors for testing positive for synthetic cathinones and NPS in general. Hair testing appears to be a valuable addition to drug epidemiology studies. Many EDM party attendees-even those who test their ecstasy-are unknowingly using NPS and/or other drugs. Prevention information and harm reduction may help reduce unknown/unintentional use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Visual ergonomics in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshel, Jeffrey R

    2007-10-01

    This article provides information about visual function and its role in workplace productivity. By understanding the connection among comfort, health, and productivity and knowing the many options for effective ergonomic workplace lighting, the occupational health nurse can be sensitive to potential visual stress that can affect all areas of performance. Computer vision syndrome-the eye and vision problems associated with near work experienced during or related to computer use-is defined and solutions to it are discussed.

  3. LGBT Workplace Climate in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudi, B. S.; Danner, R.; Dixon, W. V.; Henderson, C. B.; Kay, L. E.

    2013-01-01

    The AAS Working Group on LGBTIQ Equality (WGLE) held a town hall meeting at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage to explore the workplace climate for LGBTIQ individuals working in Astronomy and related fields. Topics of discussion included anti-discrimination practices, general workplace climate, and pay and benefit policies. Four employment sectors were represented: industry, the federal government, private colleges, and public universities. We will summarize and expand on the town hall discussions and findings of the panel members.

  4. GENDER ISSUES IN WORKPLACE VIOLENCE

    OpenAIRE

    STAICULESCU Ana Rodica

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a response to the problem of workplace gender violence and the power relationships between males and females in organizational theory. Victimization based on gender is afflicting society as a whole, but is also relevant to the construction of social attitudes at the workplace. Thus, we will present how the context of work relationships can be affected by acts of verbal and physical intimidation engaged by gender inequality and what are the consequences for managers. Moreover, we...

  5. The Ethics of Workplace Interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Peter; Limborg, Hans Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    A discussion of the ethical dilemmas confronting occupational health and safety professionals when they are involved in workplace interventions. Case stories from the Danish occupational health service are used as the emperical point of departure for paper.......A discussion of the ethical dilemmas confronting occupational health and safety professionals when they are involved in workplace interventions. Case stories from the Danish occupational health service are used as the emperical point of departure for paper....

  6. HIV Testing, Care, and Treatment Among Women Who Use Drugs From a Global Perspective: Progress and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metsch, Lisa; Philbin, Morgan M; Parish, Carrigan; Shiu, Karen; Frimpong, Jemima A; Giang, Le Minh

    2015-06-01

    The article reviews data on HIV testing, treatment, and care outcomes for women who use drugs in 5 countries across 5 continents. We chose countries in which the HIV epidemic has, either currently or historically, been fueled by injection and non-injection drug use and that have considerable variation in social structural and drug policies: Argentina, Vietnam, Australia, Ukraine, and the United States. There is a dearth of available HIV care continuum outcome data [ie, testing, linkage, retention, antiretroviral therapy (ART) provision, viral suppression] among women drug users, particularly among noninjectors. Although some progress has been made in increasing HIV testing in this population, HIV-positive women drug users in 4 of the 5 countries have not fully benefitted from ART nor are they regularly engaged in HIV care. Issues such as the criminalization of drug users, HIV-specific criminal laws, and the lack of integration between substance use treatment and HIV primary care play a major role. Strategies that effectively address the pervasive factors that prevent women drug users from engaging in HIV care and benefitting from ART and other prevention services are critical. Future success in enhancing the HIV continuum for women drug users should consider structural and contextual level barriers and promote social, economic, and legal policies that overhaul the many years of discrimination and stigmatization faced by women drug users worldwide. Such efforts must emphasis the translation of policies into practice and approaches to implementation that can help HIV-infected women who use drugs engage at all points of the HIV care continuum.

  7. Cost-effectiveness analysis of introducing malaria diagnostic testing in drug shops: A cluster-randomised trial in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Clarke, Siân E; Lal, Sham; Magnussen, Pascal; Mbonye, Anthony K

    2017-01-01

    Private sector drug shops are an important source of malaria treatment in Africa, yet diagnosis without parasitological testing is common among these providers. Accurate rapid diagnostic tests for malaria (mRDTs) require limited training and present an opportunity to increase access to correct diagnosis. The present study was a cost-effectiveness analysis of the introduction of mRDTs in Ugandan drug shops. Drug shop vendors were trained to perform and sell subsidised mRDTs and artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) in the intervention arm while vendors offered ACTs following presumptive diagnosis of malaria in the control arm. The effect on the proportion of customers with fever 'appropriately treated of malaria with ACT' was captured during a randomised trial in drug shops in Mukono District, Uganda. Health sector costs included: training of drug shop vendors, community sensitisation, supervision and provision of mRDTs and ACTs to drug shops. Household costs of treatment-seeking were captured in a representative sample of drug shop customers. The introduction of mRDTs in drug shops was associated with a large improvement of diagnosis and treatment of malaria, resulting in low incremental costs for the health sector at US$0.55 per patient appropriately treated of malaria. High expenditure on non-ACT drugs by households contributed to higher incremental societal costs of US$3.83. Sensitivity analysis showed that mRDTs would become less cost-effective compared to presumptive diagnosis with increasing malaria prevalence and lower adherence to negative mRDT results. mRDTs in drug shops improved the targeting of ACTs to malaria patients and are likely to be considered cost-effective compared to presumptive diagnosis, although the increased costs borne by households when the test result is negative are a concern.

  8. Drug testing athletes to prevent substance abuse: background and pilot study results of the SATURN (Student Athlete Testing Using Random Notification) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Linn; Elliot, Diane L; MacKinnon, David P; Moe, Esther; Kuehl, Kerry S; Nohre, Liva; Lockwood, Chondra M

    2003-01-01

    To assess the deterrent effect of mandatory, random drug testing among high school (HS) athletes in a controlled setting. Two high schools, one with mandatory drug testing (DT) consent before sports participation, and a control school (C), without DT, were assessed during the 1999-2000 school year. Athletes (A) and nonathletes (NA) in each school completed confidential (A) or anonymous (NA) questionnaires developed for this study, respectively, at the beginning and end of the school year. Positive alcohol or drug tests required parent notification and mandatory counseling without team or school suspension. Thirty percent of the DT athletes were tested. Data were analyzed using the end of the school year measure, adjusted for the initial questionnaire results. Demographics of the athlete sample revealed that mean age was 15.5 years with 81.5% white, 9.6% Hispanic, 4.5% Asian, 2.6% American Indian/Native Alaskan, 1.3% African-American, and 1.3% Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander. A (n = 276) and NA (n = 507) were assessed at the beginning (baseline) and at the end of the school year (A, n = 159; NA, n = 338). The past 30-day index of illicit drugs (4-fold difference) and athletic enhancing substances (3-fold difference) were lower (p athletes at follow-up without difference in alcohol use. However, most drug use risk factors, including norms of use, belief in lower risk of drugs, and poorer attitudes toward the school, increased among DT athletes (p drug use index was present among nonathletes at the DT school, at the end of the school year, it did not achieve statistical significance (p athletes. However, worsening of risk factors and small sample size suggests caution to this drug prevention approach. A larger long-term study to confirm these findings is necessary. Copyright Society for Adolescent Medicine, 2003

  9. Generalized reactions during skin testing with clindamycin in drug hypersensitivity: a report of 3 cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakonstantinou, Eleni; Müller, Sabine; Röhrbein, Jan H; Wieczorek, Dorothea; Kapp, Alexander; Jakob, Thilo; Wedi, Bettina

    2018-01-22

    The diagnostic approach to drug hypersensitivity includes a detailed medical history, clinical examination, and skin testing and/or oral challenge with a culprit or alternative drug, depending on the type of reaction and the suspected drugs. Although skin testing is considered to be rather safe, cutaneous and systemic, including fatal, reactions have been described. To report 3 cases with generalized delayed reactions after skin testing with clindamycin, and to review the existing literature. Thorough clinical examination, blood tests and prick, intradermal and patch tests were performed in 3 patients. All patients experienced generalized maculopapular exanthema after intradermal and patch testing with clindamycin and amoxicillin in the first patient, and clindamycin alone in the second and third patients. None of the patients showed immediate reactions to skin tests, while positive intradermal reactions after 24 h to amoxicillin and clindamycin were observed in the first patient, and positive intradermal reactions after 24 h to clindamycin were observed in the second and third patients. Skin testing with clindamycin in the diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity carries some risk of adverse reactions. A stepwise and individual diagnostic work-up, considering potential risk factors, and testing in a specialized centre with emergency equipment available is highly recommended. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Tuberculin skin testing in intravenous drug users: differences between HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portu, José J; Aldamiz-Etxebarria, Mikel; Agud, José M; Arévalo, José M; Almaraz, María J; Ayensa, Cándido

    2002-04-01

    The prevalence of tuberculin skin test reactions among intravenous drug abusers and differences in tuberculin skin test positivity between HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative subjects were evaluated in a cross-sectional study of 1131 subjects. They were recruited from a therapeutic community, from those who attended the centre for the treatment of drug addiction and from those who visited for any reason an acute tertiary-care hospital in Vitoria-Gasteiz, Basque Country (Spain). All subjects underwent skin testing with purified protein derivative (PPD) tuberculin and testing for HIV antibodies. CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count was determined in HIV-seropositive individuals. Positive PPD tests were recorded in 35% of drug users who were HIV-seropositive and in 65% in those who were HIV-seronegative. In the HIV-infected group, there was a significant association between results of the tuberculin test and CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count. When the CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count was > or = 500 cells/mm(3), percentages of positive PPD tests were similar in HIV-seropositives and HIV-seronegatives (47% versus 65%) but when the CD4(+) count was < 500 cells/mm(3), positive PPD tests occurred in only 21% of HIV-seropositives. The PPD test showed a decreased sensitivity for detecting tuberculosis infection in HIV-infected intravenous drug users with CD4(+) T-lymphocyte counts fewer than 500 cells/mm(3).

  11. Current Status of Point-of-Care Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Horacio A; Panpradist, Nuttada; Beck, Ingrid A; Lutz, Barry; Lai, James; Kanthula, Ruth M; Kantor, Rami; Tripathi, Anubhav; Saravanan, Shanmugam; MacLeod, Iain J; Chung, Michael H; Zhang, Guoqing; Yang, Chunfu; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2017-12-01

    Healthcare delivery has advanced due to the implementation of point-of-care testing, which is often performed within minutes to hours in minimally equipped laboratories or at home. Technologic advances are leading to point-of-care kits that incorporate nucleic acid-based assays, including polymerase chain reaction, isothermal amplification, ligation, and hybridization reactions. As a limited number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with clinically significant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance, assays to detect these mutations have been developed. Early versions of these assays have been used in research. This review summarizes the principles underlying each assay and discusses strategic needs for their incorporation into the management of HIV infection. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Do prenatally methamphetamine-exposed adult male rats display general predisposition to drug abuse in the conditioned place preference test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šlamberová, R; Pometlová, M; Schutová, B; Hrubá, L; Macúchová, E; Nová, E; Rokyta, R

    2012-01-01

    Drug abuse of pregnant women is a growing problem. The effect of prenatal drug exposure may have devastating effect on development of the offsprings that may be long-term or even permanent. One of the most common drug abused by pregnant women is methamphetamine (MA), which is also the most frequently abused illicit drug in the Czech Republic. Our previous studies demonstrated that prenatal MA exposure alters behavior, cognition, pain and seizures in adult rats in sex-specific manner. Our most recent studies demonstrate that prenatal MA exposure makes adult rats more sensitive to acute injection of the same or related drugs than their controls. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of prenatal MA exposure on drug-seeking behavior of adult male rats tested in the Conditioned place preference (CPP). Adult male rats were divided to: prenatally MA-exposed (5 mg/kg daily for the entire prenatal period), prenatally saline-exposed (1 ml/kg of physiological saline) and controls (without maternal injections). The following drugs were used in the CPP test in adulthood: MA (5 mg/kg), amphetamine (5 mg/kg), cocaine (5 and 10 mg/kg), morphine (5 mg/kg), MDMA (5 mg/kg) and THC (2 mg/kg). Our data demonstrated that prenatally MA-exposed rats displayed higher amphetamine-seeking behavior than both controls. MA as well as morphine induced drug-seeking behavior of adult male rats, however this effect did not differ based on the prenatal MA exposure. In contrast, prenatal MA exposure induced rather tolerance to cocaine than sensitization after the conditioning in the CPP. MDMA and THC did not induce significant effects. Even though the present data did not fully confirmed our hypotheses, future studies are planned to test the drug-seeking behavior also in self-administration test.

  13. Changing families, changing workplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Suzanne M

    2011-01-01

    American families and workplaces have both changed dramatically over the past half-century. Paid work by women has increased sharply, as has family instability. Education-related inequality in work hours and income has grown. These changes, says Suzanne Bianchi, pose differing work-life issues for parents at different points along the income distribution. Between 1975 and 2009, the labor force rate of mothers with children under age eighteen increased from 47.4 percent to 71.6 percent. Mothers today also return to work much sooner after the birth of a child than did mothers half a century ago. High divorce rates and a sharp rise in the share of births to unmarried mothers mean that more children are being raised by a single parent, usually their mother. Workplaces too have changed, observes Bianchi. Today's employees increasingly work nonstandard hours. The well-being of highly skilled workers and less-skilled workers has been diverging. For the former, work hours may be long, but income has soared. For lower-skill workers, the lack of "good jobs" disconnects fathers from family obligations. Men who cannot find work or have low earnings potential are much less likely to marry. For low-income women, many of whom are single parents, the work-family dilemma is how to care adequately for children and work enough hours to support them financially. Jobs for working-class and lower middle-class workers are relatively stable, except in economic downturns, but pay is low, and both parents must work full time to make ends meet. Family income is too high to qualify for government subsidized child care, but too low to afford high-quality care in the private market. These families struggle to have a reasonable family life and provide for their family's economic well-being. Bianchi concludes that the "work and family" problem has no one solution because it is not one problem. Some workers need more work and more money. Some need to take time off around the birth of a child

  14. Towards a clinical practice guide in pharmacogenomics testing for functional polymorphisms of drug-metabolising enzymes. Gene/drug pairs and barriers perceived in Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A G Agúndez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of clinical practice recommendations or guidelines for the clinical use of biomarkers is an issue of great importance with regard to adverse drug reactions. The potential of pharmacogenomic biomarkers has been extensively investigated in recent years. However, several barriers to implementing the use of pharmacogenomics testing exist. We conducted a survey among members of the Spanish Societies of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacology to obtain information about the perception of such barriers and to compare the perceptions of participants about the relative importance of major gene/drug pairs.Of 11 potential barriers, the highest importance was attributed to lack of institutional support for pharmacogenomics testing, and to the issues related to the lack of guidelines. Of the proposed gene/drug pairs the highest importance was assigned to HLA-B/abacavir, UGT1A1/irinotecan and CYP2D6/tamoxifen. In this perspective article we compare the relative importance of 29 gene/drug pairs in the Spanish study with that of the same pairs in the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics study, and we provide suggestions and areas of focus to develop a guide for clinical practice in pharmacogenomics testing.

  15. [Gender differences in workplace bullying].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanini, P; Punzi, Silvia; Carissimi, Emanuela; Gilioli, R

    2006-01-01

    Despite the attention that international Agencies give to the gender issue in situations of workplace bullying, few investigations have been performed on this topic. The aim of the study is describe the gender differences in victims of workplace bullying observed in an Italian survey. A total of 243 subjects (124 males and 119 females) were examined at the Centre for Occupational Stress and Harassment of the "Clinica del Lavoro Luigi Devoto" (University of Milan and IRCCS Foundation); they were selected among patients who met the criteria for being considered victims of negative actions at work leading to workplace bullying. Data regarding the person, workplace and the workplace bullying situation were collected by means of an ad hoc questionnaire. Analysis of the data, compared with those of IS-TAT 2002, showed a higher prevalence of females subjected to negative actions at work. In women, the risk of being subjected to negative actions leading to workplace bullying was shown to increase in the 34-44 age range and to decrease in higher age ranges; in men the risk remained elevated also after 55 years of age. In general, women were victims of negative actions regarding personal values related to emotional-relational factors, while men were attacked on their work performance. Sexual harassment, may mark the onset of other types of psychological harassment or can be one of its components.

  16. Interpretation of urine drug testing results in patients using transdermal buprenorphine preparations for the treatment of chronic noncancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markman, John D; Barbosa, William A; Gewandter, Jennifer S; Frazer, Maria; Rast, Shirley; Dugan, Michelle; Nandigam, Kiran; Villareal, Armando; Kwong, Tai C

    2015-06-01

    To determine whether the prevailing liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectroscopy assay (LC-MS/MS) assay designed to monitor buprenorphine compliance of the sublingual formulation used in the substance abuse treatment setting can be extrapolated to the transdermal formulation used in the chronic pain treatment setting, which is 1000-fold less concentrated. Retrospective chart review. Self-reported compliant patients using the transdermal or sublingual formulations of buprenorhphine. Transdermal patch application was also visually confirmed during clinic visits. Urine drug test results from a LC-MS/MS were compared between samples from transdermal and sublingual patients. While all sublingual patients tested positive for at least one metabolite of buprenorphine, only 69% of the transdermal patients did so. In addition, the most abundant metabolite in the transdermal patients was buprenorphine-glucuronide, as compared with norbuprenorphine-glucuronide in sublingual patients. These data suggest that currently available urine drug tests for buprenorphine, including the more expensive LC-MS/MS based assays, may not be sufficiently sensitive to detect the metabolites from transdermal buprenorphine patients. This study highlights the need to evaluate the value and sensitivity of urine drug tests given the wide range of buprenorphine dosing in clinical practice. These results underscore the need for additional cost benefit analyses comparing different confirmatory drug testing techniques including many commercially available drug testing options. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A Study on the Reliability of an On-Site Oral Fluid Drug Test in a Recreational Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Gentili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of DrugWipe 5A on site test for principal drugs of abuse (cannabis, amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates detection in oral fluid was assessed by comparing the on-site results with headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis on samples extracted by the device collection pad. Oral fluid samples were collected at recreational settings (e.g., discos, pubs, and music bars of Rome metropolitan area. Eighty-three club goers underwent the on-site drug screening test with one device. Independently from the result obtained, a second device was used just to collect another oral fluid sample subsequently extracted and analyzed in the laboratory following HS-SPME procedure, gas chromatographic separation by a capillary column, and MS detection by electron impact ionization. DrugWipe 5A on-site test showed 54 samples (65.1% positive to one or more drugs of abuse, whereas 75 samples (90.4% tested positive for one or more substances following GC-MS assay. Comparing the obtained results, the device showed sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy around 80% for amphetamines class. Sensitivity (67 and 50% was obtained for cocaine and opiates, while both sensitivity and accuracy were unsuccessful (29 and 53%, resp. for cannabis, underlying the limitation of the device for this latter drug class.

  18. Validation of diagnostic tests for depressive disorder in drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lemos Zingano, Bianca; Guarnieri, Ricardo; Diaz, Alexandre Paim; Schwarzbold, Marcelo Liborio; Bicalho, Maria Alice Horta; Claudino, Lucia Sukys; Markowitsch, Hans J; Wolf, Peter; Lin, Katia; Walz, Roger

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Depression subscale (HADS-D) as diagnostic tests for depressive disorder in drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS). One hundred three patients with drug-resistant MTLE-HS were enrolled. All patients underwent a neurological examination, interictal and ictal video-electroencephalogram (V-EEG) analyses, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Psychiatric interviews were based on DSM-IV-TR criteria and ILAE Commission of Psychobiology classification as a gold standard; HRSD, BDI, HADS, and HADS-D were used as psychometric diagnostic tests, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine the optimal threshold scores. For all the scales, the areas under the curve (AUCs) were approximately 0.8, and they were able to identify depression in this sample. A threshold of ≥9 on the HRSD and a threshold of ≥8 on the HADS-D showed a sensitivity of 70% and specificity of 80%. A threshold of ≥19 on the BDI and HADS-D total showed a sensitivity of 55% and a specificity of approximately 90%. The instruments showed a negative predictive value of approximately 87% and a positive predictive value of approximately 65% for the BDI and HADS total and approximately 60% for the HRSD and HADS-D. HRSD≥9 and HADS-D≥8 had the best balance between sensitivity (approximately 70%) and specificity (approximately 80%). However, with these thresholds, these diagnostic tests do not appear useful in identifying depressive disorder in this population with epilepsy, and their specificity (approximately 80%) and PPV (approximately 55%) were lower than those of the other scales. We believe that the BDI and HADS total are valid diagnostic tests for depressive disorder in patients with MTLE-HS, as

  19. Ombuds’ corner: Workplace incivility

    CERN Document Server

    Vincent Vuillemin

    2012-01-01

    In this series, the Bulletin aims to explain the role of the Ombuds at CERN by presenting practical examples of misunderstandings that could have been resolved by the Ombuds if he had been contacted earlier. Please note that, in all the situations we present, the names are fictitious and used only to improve clarity.   In 2011, the Canadian HR Reporter published several articles by Sharone Bar-David on workplace incivility (I would encourage you to read them here). These articles can shed some light on an internal issue here at CERN: what happens when there are violations of the Code of Conduct that we may face every day? Such incivilities can fly under the organizational radar and are not up to the level of any administrative or disciplinary action foreseen in the CERN Staff Rules and Regulations. However, if such breaches in respectful behaviour are tolerated continuously and nothing is done about them, they can create a toxic work climate. Furthermore, such a distortion of human relations...

  20. Substance Use, Symptom, and Employment Outcomes of Persons With a Workplace Mandate for Chemical Dependency Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisner, Constance; Lu, Yun; Hinman, Agatha; Monahan, John; Bonnie, Richard J.; Moore, Charles D.; Chi, Felicia W.; Appelbaum, Paul S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study examined the role of workplace mandates to chemical dependency treatment in treatment adherence, alcohol and drug abstinence, severity of employment problems, and severity of psychiatric problems. Methods The sample included 448 employed members of a private, nonprofit U.S. managed care health plan who entered chemical dependency treatment with a workplace mandate (N=75) or without one (N=373); 405 of these individuals were followed up at one year (N=70 and N=335, respectively), and 362 participated in a five-year follow up (N=60 and N=302, respectively). Propensity scores predicting receipt of a workplace mandate were calculated. Logistic regression and ordinary least-squares regression were used to predict length of stay in chemical dependency treatment, alcohol and drug abstinence, and psychiatric and employment problem severity at one and five years. Results Overall, participants with a workplace mandate had one- and five-year outcomes similar to those without such a mandate. Having a workplace mandate also predicted longer treatment stays and improvement in employment problems. When other factors related to outcomes were controlled for, having a workplace mandate predicted abstinence at one year, with length of stay as a mediating variable. Conclusions Workplace mandates can be an effective mechanism for improving work performance and other outcomes. Study participants who had a workplace mandate were more likely than those who did not have a workplace mandate to be abstinent at follow-up, and they did as well in treatment, both short and long term. Pressure from the workplace likely gets people to treatment earlier and provides incentives for treatment adherence. PMID:19411353

  1. A Statistical Analysis of the Deterrence Effects of the Military Services' Drug Testing Policies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martinez, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    .... Using data from the 1995 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors Among Military Personnel and the 1995 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, illicit drug use rates are modeled...

  2. Drug susceptibility testing in microaerophilic parasites: Cysteine strongly affects the effectivities of metronidazole and auranofin, a novel and promising antimicrobial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Leitsch

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The microaerophilic parasites Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Giardia lamblia annually cause hundreds of millions of human infections which are treated with antiparasitic drugs. Metronidazole is the most often prescribed drug but also other drugs are in use, and novel drugs with improved characteristics are constantly being developed. One of these novel drugs is auranofin, originally an antirheumatic which has been relabelled for the treatment of parasitic infections. Drug effectivity is arguably the most important criterion for its applicability and is commonly assessed in susceptibility assays using in vitro cultures of a given pathogen. However, drug susceptibility assays can be strongly affected by certain compounds in the growth media. In the case of microaerophilic parasites, cysteine which is added in large amounts as an antioxidant is an obvious candidate because it is highly reactive and known to modulate the toxicity of metronidazole in several microaerophilic parasites.In this study, it was attempted to reduce cysteine concentrations as far as possible without affecting parasite viability by performing drug susceptibility assays under strictly anaerobic conditions in an anaerobic cabinet. Indeed, T. vaginalis and E. histolytica could be grown without any cysteine added and the cysteine concentration necessary to maintain G. lamblia could be reduced to 20%. Susceptibilities to metronidazole were found to be clearly reduced in the presence of cysteine. With auranofin the protective effect of cysteine was extreme, providing protection to concentrations up to 100-fold higher as observed in the absence of cysteine. With three other drugs tested, albendazole, furazolidone and nitazoxanide, all in use against G. lamblia, the effect of cysteine was less pronounced. Oxygen was found to have a less marked impact on metronidazole and auranofin than cysteine but bovine bile which is standardly used in growth media for G

  3. Ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography-(tandem) mass spectrometry in human sports drug testing: possibilities and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Thomas, Andreas; Pop, Valentin; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2013-05-31

    Doping control analytical laboratories for human sports predominantly employ nowadays chromatographic-mass spectrometric test methods for routine, high throughput screening and confirmation assays concerning low and high molecular mass analytes. Liquid chromatography-(tandem) mass spectrometry [(LC-MS(/MS)] and particularly ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC)-MS/MS instruments have become devices of choice due to their indispensable capabilities that compensate for limitations inherent to other commonly used strategies such as immunological and gas chromatography-(tandem) mass spectrometry [(GC-MS(/MS)]-based detection methods. UHPLC-MS/MS-based assays at low mass spectrometric resolution have been established allowing for fast and sensitive targeted analyses focusing on pre-selected target analytes with diagnostic precursor-product ion pairs. Combining UHPLC to high resolution/high accuracy MS(/MS) further expanded the targeted approach (i.e., plotting extracted ion chromatograms of protonated or deprotonated molecules as well as product ions measured with accurate masses) toward non-targeted analyses enabling also retrospective data mining. In this review, recent applications of UHPLC-MS/MS in sports drug testing procedures published between 2008 and 2012 are presented and advantages as well as limitations in a short- and long-term perspective are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Racial/Ethnic Workplace Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Laura J.; Ornelas, India J.; Lyles, Courtney R.; Williams, Emily C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Experiences of discrimination are associated with tobacco and alcohol use, and work is a common setting where individuals experience racial/ethnic discrimination. Few studies have evaluated the association between workplace discrimination and these behaviors, and none have described associations across race/ethnicity. Purpose To examine the association between workplace discrimination and tobacco and alcohol use in a large, multistate sample of U.S. adult respondents to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey Reactions to Race Module (2004–2010). Methods Multivariable logistic regression analyses evaluated cross-sectional associations between self-reported workplace discrimination and tobacco (current and daily smoking) and alcohol use (any and heavy use, and binge drinking) among all participants and stratified by race/ethnicity, adjusting for relevant covariates. Data were analyzed in 2013. Results Among respondents, 70,080 completed the workplace discrimination measure. Discrimination was more common among black non-Hispanic (21%), Hispanic (12%), and other race respondents (11%) than white non-Hispanics (4%) (p<0.001). In the total sample, discrimination was associated with current smoking (risk ratio [RR]=1.32, 95% CI=1.19, 1.47), daily smoking (RR=1.41, 95% CI=1.24, 1.61), and heavy drinking (RR=1.11, 95% CI=1.01, 1.22), but not binge or any drinking. Among Hispanics, workplace discrimination was associated with increased heavy and binge drinking, but not any alcohol use or smoking. Workplace discrimination among black non-Hispanics and white Non-Hispanics was associated with increased current and daily smoking, but not alcohol outcomes. Conclusions Workplace discrimination is common, associated with smoking and alcohol use, and merits further policy attention given the impact of these behaviors on morbidity and mortality. PMID:25441232

  5. Spirituality in the Healthcare Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donia Baldacchino

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Spirituality involves a sense of connectedness, meaning making and transcendence. There is abundant published research that focuses on the importance of spirituality to patients and their families during times of illness and distress. However over the last decade there has also been a growing awareness about the importance of considering the need to address peoples’ spiritual needs in the workplace. Engaging in ones own personal spirituality involves connecting with the inner self, becoming more self aware of ones humanity and limitations. Engaging with ones personal spirituality can also mean that people begin to greater find meaning and purpose in life and at work. This may be demonstrated in the workplace by collegial relationships and teamwork. Those who engage with their own spirituality also engage more easily with others through a connectedness with other staff and by aligning their values with the respective organization if they fit well with ones personal values. Workplace spirituality is oriented towards self-awareness of an inner life which gives meaning, purpose and nourishment to the employees’ dynamic relationships at the workplace and is eventually also nourished by meaningful work. Exercising ones personal spirituality contributes towards generating workplace spirituality. Essentially acting from ones own personal spirituality framework by being in doing can contribute towards a person becoming a healing and therapeutic presence for others, that is nourishing in many workplaces. Personal spirituality in healthcare can be enhanced by: reflection in and on action; role-modeling; taking initiative for active presence in care; committing oneself to the spiritual dimension of care; and, integrating spirituality in health caregivers’ education. As spirituality is recognized as becoming increasingly important for patients in healthcare, increasing educational opportunities are now becoming available for nurses internationally that

  6. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test for identification of new therapeutics and drug combinations against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Weingarten, Rebecca A; Xu, Miao; Southall, Noel; Dai, Sheng; Shinn, Paul; Sanderson, Philip E; Williamson, Peter R; Frank, Karen M; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Current antimicrobial susceptibility testing has limited screening capability for identifying empirical antibiotic combinations to treat severe bacterial infections with multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms. We developed a new antimicrobial susceptibility assay using automated ultra-high-throughput screen technology in combination with a simple bacterial growth assay. A rapid screening of 5170 approved drugs and other compounds identified 25 compounds with activities against MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae. To further improve the efficacy and reduce the effective drug concentrations, we applied a targeted drug combination approach that integrates drugs' clinical antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints, achievable plasma concentrations, clinical toxicities and mechanisms of action to identify optimal drug combinations. Three sets of three-drug combinations were identified with broad-spectrum activities against 10 MDR clinical isolates including K. pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia coli. Colistin–auranofin–ceftazidime and colistin–auranofin–rifabutin suppressed >80% growth of all 10 MDR strains; while rifabutin–colistin–imipenem inhibited >75% of these strains except two Acinetobacter baumannii isolates. The results demonstrate this new assay has potential as a real-time method to identify new drugs and effective drug combinations to combat severe clinical infections with MDR organisms. PMID:27826141

  7. The Role of Perceived Workplace Development Opportunities in Enhancing Individual Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Mattia; Cavenago, Dario

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the effects on workers' employability of workplace development opportunities during employment as perceived by the workers themselves. Data was collected through a survey conducted in 2012 in Italy using a sample of 558 workers. The aim was to test the effects of participation in training courses, workplace learning…

  8. Patch testing and cross sensitivity study of adverse cutaneous drug reactions due to anticonvulsants: A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiny, T N; Mahajan, Vikram K; Mehta, Karaninder S; Chauhan, Pushpinder S; Rawat, Ritu; Sharma, Rajni

    2017-03-26

    To evaluate the utility of patch test and cross-sensitivity patterns in patients with adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) from common anticonvulsants. Twenty-four (M:F = 13:11) patients aged 18-75 years with ACDR from anticonvulsants were patch tested 3-27 mo after complete recovery using carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbitone, lamotrigine, and sodium valproate in 10%, 20% and 30% conc. in pet. after informed consent. Positive reactions persisting on D3 and D4 were considered significant. Clinical patterns were exanthematous drug rash with or without systemic involvement (DRESS) in 18 (75%), Stevens-Johnsons syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) overlap and TEN in 2 (8.3%) patients each, SJS and lichenoid drug eruption in 1 (4.2%) patient each, respectively. The implicated drugs were phenytoin in 14 (58.3%), carbamazepine in 9 (37.5%), phenobarbitone in 2 (8.3%), and lamotrigine in 1 (4.7%) patients, respectively. Twelve (50%) patients elicited positive reactions to implicated drugs; carbamazepine in 6 (50%), phenytoin alone in 4 (33.3%), phenobarbitone alone in 1 (8.3%), and both phenytoin and phenobarbitone in 1 (8.33%) patients, respectively. Cross-reactions occurred in 11 (92%) patients. Six patients with carbamazepine positive patch test reaction showed cross sensitivity with phenobarbitone, sodium valproate and/or lamotrigine. Three (75%) patients among positive phenytoin patch test reactions had cross reactions with phenobarbitone, lamotrigine, and/or valproate. Carbamazepine remains the commonest anticonvulsant causing ACDRs and cross-reactions with other anticonvulsants are possible. Drug patch testing appears useful in DRESS for drug imputability and cross-reactions established clinically.

  9. A cross-sectional study of workplace social capital and blood pressure: a multilevel analysis at Japanese manufacturing companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Yoshihisa; Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Kunimoto, Masamizu; Tabata, Hidetoshi; Tsuchiya, Takuto; Kadowaki, Koji; Nakamura, Takehiro; Oyama, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    We examined the contextual effect of workplace social capital on systolic blood pressure (SBP). Cross-sectional. A conglomerate from 58 workplaces in Japan. Of the 5844 workers at a Japanese conglomerate from 58 workplaces, 5368 were recruited. Individuals who received drugs for hypertension (n=531) and who lacked information on any variable (n=167) were excluded from the analyses, leaving 4735 individuals (3281 men and 1454 women) for inclusion. Systolic blood pressure. The contextual effect of workplace social capital on SBP was examined using a multilevel regression analysis with a random intercept. Coworker support had a contextual effect at the workplace level (coefficient=-1.97, p=0.043), while a lack of trust for coworkers (coefficient=0.27, p=0.039) and lack of helpfulness from coworkers were associated with SBP (coefficient=0.28, p=0.002). The present study suggested that social capital at the workplace level has beneficial effects on SBP.

  10. Predictors of workplace violence among female sex workers in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsulis, Yasmina; Durfee, Alesha; Lopez, Vera; Robillard, Alyssa

    2015-05-01

    For sex workers, differences in rates of exposure to workplace violence are likely influenced by a variety of risk factors, including where one works and under what circumstances. Economic stressors, such as housing insecurity, may also increase the likelihood of exposure. Bivariate analyses demonstrate statistically significant associations between workplace violence and selected predictor variables, including age, drug use, exchanging sex for goods, soliciting clients outdoors, and experiencing housing insecurity. Multivariate regression analysis shows that after controlling for each of these variables in one model, only soliciting clients outdoors and housing insecurity emerge as statistically significant predictors for workplace violence. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Drug and alcohol abuse: The pattern and magnitude of the problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajayi, P.A.

    1996-12-31

    In the last 12 months, many more cases of alcohol and drug (substance) abuse in the workplace were seen in the Escravos operations of Chevron Nigeria Limited than in previous years. This called the attention to the rising prevalence of drug and alcohol abuse in contradistinction to reports from similar organizations in other parts of the world. Chevron Nigeria has a written Drug and Alcohol Policy which has been dormant for some time because of the apparent rarity of the problem of substance abuse in the workplace. This Policy is being reviewed to broaden its scope and make it more effective. A total of 30 employees were tested for drugs and alcohol .6 exceeded the legal limits of Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) and 5 tested positive for drugs. Tests were mainly post-accident, reasonable cause and random. The common substances abused were alcohol, cannabis, cocaine and morphine in that order. The findings are compared with those of similar organizations in UK and USA. Efforts to control substance abuse in the workplace are being put into place.

  12. Drug-laboratory interaction between beta-lactam antibiotics and the galactomannan antigen test used to detect mould infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otting, Kristin A; Stover, Kayla R; Cleary, John D

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that piperacillin/tazobactam produces a false-positive result for the galactomannan antigen test. However, the most recent literature has demonstrated that this interaction is no longer a concern. There is little information regarding the drug-laboratory interaction with the generics of piperacillin/tazobactam or other broad-spectrum beta-lactams, such as ceftaroline, doripenem, imipenem/cilastatin, and meropenem. The purpose of this study was to determine if a drug-laboratory interaction exists with these antibiotics. Tests showed that one lot of imipenem/cilastatin by Hospira Healthcare India Private Limited produced a false-positive result for the galactomannan antigen test. All other medications tested, including piperacillin/tazobactam from seven manufacturers and imipenem/cilastatin by Hospira Inc., did not produce positive results. Since the reason for this drug-laboratory interaction with imipenem/cilastatin is unknown, more studies are needed to further investigate this interaction. Providers also should be educated of these findings: no drug-laboratory interaction with piperacillin/tazobactam and a possible drug-laboratory interaction with imipenem/cilastatin (Hospira Healthcare India Private Limited). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Engineering Macaca fascicularis cytochrome P450 2C20 to reduce animal testing for new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rua, Francesco; Sadeghi, Sheila J; Castrignanò, Silvia; Di Nardo, Giovanna; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2012-12-01

    In order to develop in vitro methods as an alternative to P450 animal testing in the drug discovery process, two main requisites are necessary: 1) gathering of data on animal homologues of the human P450 enzymes, currently very limited, and 2) bypassing the requirement for both the P450 reductase and the expensive cofactor NADPH. In this work, P450 2C20 from Macaca fascicularis, homologue of the human P450 2C8 has been taken as a model system to develop such an alternative in vitro method by two different approaches. In the first approach called "molecular Lego", a soluble self-sufficient chimera was generated by fusing the P450 2C20 domain with the reductase domain of cytochrome P450 BM3 from Bacillus megaterium (P450 2C20/BMR). In the second approach, the need for the redox partner and also NADPH were both obviated by the direct immobilization of the P450 2C20 on glassy carbon and gold electrodes. Both systems were then compared to those obtained from the reconstituted P450 2C20 monooxygenase in presence of the human P450 reductase and NADPH using paclitaxel and amodiaquine, two typical drug substrates of the human P450 2C8. The K(M) values calculated for the 2C20 and 2C20/BMR in solution and for 2C20 immobilized on electrodes modified with gold nanoparticles were 1.9 ± 0.2, 5.9 ± 2.3, 3.0 ± 0.5 μM for paclitaxel and 1.2 ± 0.2, 1.6±0.2 and 1.4 ± 0.2 μM for amodiaquine, respectively. The data obtained not only show that the engineering of M. fascicularis did not affect its catalytic properties but also are consistent with K(M) values measured for the microsomal human P450 2C8 and therefore show the feasibility of developing alternative in vitro animal tests. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The cost-effectiveness of testing for hepatitis C in former injecting drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelnuovo, E; Thompson-Coon, J; Pitt, M; Cramp, M; Siebert, U; Price, A; Stein, K

    2006-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of testing for hepatitis C (HCV) among former injecting drug users (IDUs). Electronic databases 1996-October 2004. Trent Regional Database Study. Routine UK mortality data. A decision analytic model was developed to investigate the impact of case-finding and treatment on progression of HCV disease in a hypothetical cohort of 1000 people. This was compared with a cohort in whom no systematic case-finding is implemented but spontaneous presentation for testing is allowed to occur. A group of epidemiological and clinical experts informed the structure of the model, which has three main components: (1) testing and diagnosis, (2) treatment, and (3) long-term consequences of infection. A fourth component, case-finding strategies, examines the potential impact of case-finding in three settings: prisons, general practice and drug services. Case-finding for HCV is likely to prevent, for 1000 people approached, three cases of decompensated cirrhosis, three deaths due to HCV and one case of hepatocellular cancer (at 30 years). Twenty-five additional people are likely to undergo combination therapy as a result of initial case-finding. One liver transplant is likely to be prevented for 10,000 people included in case-finding. Case-finding is likely to cost, in the general case, around pounds sterling 760,000 more than a policy of not case-finding. The total cost of either strategy is high and driven predominantly by the cost of treatment with combination therapy (the costs of long-term consequences are heavily discounted owing to the duration of the model). Systematically offering testing to 1000 people would cost around pounds sterling 70,000. In terms of life-years gained, case-finding is likely to result in an additional life-year gained for an investment of pounds sterling 20,084. Taking impacts on quality of life into account gives an estimate for the cost-utility of case-finding as pounds sterling 16,514 per QALY. The

  15. FDA-approved drugs that are spermatotoxic in animals and the utility of animal testing for human risk prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayburn, Elizabeth R; Gao, Liang; Ding, Jiayi; Ding, Hongxia; Shao, Jun; Li, Haibo

    2017-10-24

    This study reviews FDA-approved drugs that negatively impact spermatozoa in animals, as well as how these findings reflect on observations in human male gametes. The FDA drug warning labels included in the DailyMed database and the peer-reviewed literature in the PubMed database were searched for information to identify single-ingredient, FDA-approved prescription drugs with spermatotoxic effects. A total of 235 unique, single-ingredient, FDA-approved drugs reported to be spermatotoxic in animals were identified in the drug labels. Forty-nine of these had documented negative effects on humans in either the drug label or literature, while 31 had no effect or a positive impact on human sperm. For the other 155 drugs that were spermatotoxic in animals, no human data was available. The current animal models are not very effective for predicting human spermatotoxicity, and there is limited information available about the impact of many drugs on human spermatozoa. New approaches should be designed that more accurately reflect the findings in men, including more studies on human sperm in vitro and studies using other systems (ex vivo tissue culture, xenograft models, in silico studies, etc.). In addition, the present data is often incomplete or reported in a manner that prevents interpretation of their clinical relevance. Changes should be made to the requirements for pre-clinical testing, drug surveillance, and the warning labels of drugs to ensure that the potential risks to human fertility are clearly indicated.

  16. WWC Quick Review of the Article "Outcomes of a Prospective Trial of Student-Athlete Drug Testing: The Student Athlete Testing Using Random Notification ('SATURN') Study"

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This study examines whether the Student Athlete Testing Using Random Notification ("SATURN") program affects illicit drug and alcohol use among student athletes. The study experienced high rates of sample attrition. Seven of the 18 study schools (39%) left the study and were not included in the analysis. Some students at the remaining…

  17. HIV Testing and awareness of HIV status among people who inject drugs in greater Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazazi, Alexander R; Vijay, Aishwarya; Crawford, Forrest W; Heimer, Robert; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L

    2018-01-01

    HIV testing services are the gateway into HIV treatment and are critical for monitoring the epidemic. HIV testing is recommended at least annually in high-risk populations, including people who inject drugs (PWID). In Malaysia, the HIV epidemic is concentrated among PWID, but their adherence to testing recommendations and the proportion of HIV-positive PWID who are aware of their status remain unknown. We recruited 460 PWID in Greater Kuala Lumpur using respondent-driven sampling and conducted HIV testing. We examined past testing behaviors, estimating testing frequency, correlates of testing in the past 12 months, and the proportion of those living with HIV who were aware of their status. Results showed that most PWID living with HIV (90.4%, 95% CI: 83.6%-95.9%) were aware of their status. Among those never previously diagnosed with HIV, few had accessed HIV testing in the past 12 months (14.3%, 95% CI: 11.1%-18.0%). Prison (57.0%) and compulsory drug detention centers (36.1%) were the primary locations where PWID reported ever being HIV tested, and the main correlate of recent testing in regression was recent criminal justice involvement. Although awareness of HIV status may be high among PWID living with HIV in Kuala Lumpur, testing occurs primarily in prisons and compulsory drug detention centers, where it is involuntary and linkage to care is limited. A shift in HIV testing policy is needed to align health and human rights objectives, replacing mandatory testing with voluntary testing in settings where individuals can be rapidly linked to HIV care.

  18. Development of a novel in vitro method for drug development for fish; application to test efficacy of antimicrosporidian compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, M; Kumar, G; Abdel-Baki, A-A; Dkhil, M; El-Matbouli, M; Al-Quraishy, S

    2014-12-06

    Few drugs are approved for treating diseases caused by parasites in minor species such as fish. This is due, in part, to the expense of drug development and to the comparatively small market. In vivo effectiveness trials for antiparasitic drugs are costly, time consuming and require ethics approval, therefore an in vitro screening approach is a cost-effective alternative to finding promising drug candidates. We developed an in vitro testing system to test antimicrosporidial compounds against a microsporidian pathogen Heterosporis saurida. Five antiparasitic compounds, albendazole, fumagillin, TNP-70, nitazoxanide and lufenuron, were assayed for antimicrosporidial activity. All compounds reduced the number of H saurida spores in infected cells when applied at a concentration that did not appear to be toxic to the host cells. Albendazole inhibited replication of H saurida by >60 per cent, fumagillin and its analogue TNP-470 inhibited H saurida >80 per cent, nitazoxanide and lufenuron inhibited growth >70 per cent. The data suggest that both fumagillin and its analogous TNP-70 hold the best promise as therapeutic agents against H saurida. The ability to use fish cell cultures to assess drugs against H saurida demonstrates an approach that may be helpful to evaluate other drugs on different microsporidia and host cells. British Veterinary Association.

  19. On-site test for cannabinoids in oral fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, Nathalie A; Lee, Dayong; Schwope, David M; Milman, Garry; Barnes, Allan J; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2012-10-01

    Oral fluid (OF) testing offers noninvasive sample collection for on-site drug testing; however, to date, test performance for Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) detection has had unacceptable diagnostic sensitivity. On-site tests must accurately identify cannabis exposure because this drug accounts for the highest prevalence in workplace drug testing and driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) programs. Ten cannabis smokers (9 males, 1 female) provided written informed consent to participate in this institutional review board-approved study and smoked 1 6.8%-THC cigarette ad libitum. OF was collected with the Draeger DrugTest(®) 5000 test cassette and Quantisal™ device 0.5 h before and up to 22 h after smoking. Test cassettes were analyzed within 15 min (n = 66), and Quantisal GC-MS THC results obtained within 24 h. Final THC detection times and test performances were assessed at different cannabinoid cutoffs. Diagnostic sensitivity, diagnostic specificity, and efficiency at DrugTest 5000's 5 μg/L screening cutoff and various THC confirmation cutoffs were 86.2-90.7, 75.0-77.8, and 84.8-87.9%, respectively. Last detection times were >22 h, longer than previously suggested. Confirmation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC, absent in THC smoke, minimized the potential for passive OF contamination and still provided 22-h windows of detection, appropriate for workplace drug testing, whereas confirmation of cannabidiol, and/or cannabinol yielded shorter 6-h windows of detection, appropriate for DUID OF testing. The DrugTest 5000 on-site device provided high diagnostic sensitivity for detection of cannabinoid exposure, and the selection of OF confirmation analytes and cutoffs provided appropriate windows of detection to meet the goals of different drug testing programs. © 2012 American Association for Clinical Chemistry

  20. Workplace bullying and sickness presenteeism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conway, Paul Maurice; Clausen, Thomas; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate exposure to workplace bullying as a potential risk factor for sickness presenteeism (SP), i.e., working while ill. Methods: This study is based on data collected through self-reported questionnaires in a 2-year prospective study on employees...... with missing values, the final samples were composed of 2,865 and 1,331participants in the cross-sectional and prospective analyses, respectively. Results: Modified poisson regression analyses showed that frequent (i.e., daily or weekly) exposure to workplace bullying was associated with reporting 8 or more...... indications of a significant relationship between exposure to frequent workplace bullying and SP, although causal connections could not be established. Methodological and theoretical considerations about study findings are provided, which could be of benefit to future studies examining the impact of being...

  1. Risk mitigation for children exposed to drugs during gestation: A critical role for animal preclinical behavioral testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Irving

    2017-06-01

    Many drugs with unknown safety profiles are administered to pregnant women, placing their offspring at risk. I assessed whether behavioral outcomes for children exposed during gestation to antidepressants, anxiolytics, anti-seizure, analgesic, anti-nausea and sedative medications can be predicted by more extensive animal studies than are part of the FDA approval process. Human plus rodent data were available for only 8 of 33 CNS-active drugs examined. Similar behavioral and cognitive deficits, including autism and ADHD emerged in human offspring and in animal models of these disorders after exposure to fluoxetine, valproic acid, carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and acetaminophen. Rodent data helpful in identifying and predicting adverse effects of prenatal drug exposure in children were first generated many years after drugs were FDA-approved and administered to pregnant women. I recommend that enhanced behavioral testing of rodent offspring exposed to drugs prenatally should begin during preclinical drug evaluation and continue during Phase I clinical trials, with findings communicated to physicians and patients in drug labels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Annular phased array transducer for preclinical testing of anti-cancer drug efficacy on small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawska, Tamara; Secomski, Wojciech; Byra, Michał; Postema, Michiel; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2017-04-01

    A technique using pulsed High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to destroy deep-seated solid tumors is a promising noninvasive therapeutic approach. A main purpose of this study was to design and test a HIFU transducer suitable for preclinical studies of efficacy of tested, anti-cancer drugs, activated by HIFU beams, in the treatment of a variety of solid tumors implanted to various organs of small animals at the depth of the order of 1-2cm under the skin. To allow focusing of the beam, generated by such transducer, within treated tissue at different depths, a spherical, 2-MHz, 29-mm diameter annular phased array transducer was designed and built. To prove its potential for preclinical studies on small animals, multiple thermal lesions were induced in a pork loin ex vivo by heating beams of the same: 6W, or 12W, or 18W acoustic power and 25mm, 30mm, and 35mm focal lengths. Time delay for each annulus was controlled electronically to provide beam focusing within tissue at the depths of 10mm, 15mm, and 20mm. The exposure time required to induce local necrosis was determined at different depths using thermocouples. Location and extent of thermal lesions determined from numerical simulations were compared with those measured using ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging techniques and verified by a digital caliper after cutting the tested tissue samples. Quantitative analysis of the results showed that the location and extent of necrotic lesions on the magnetic resonance images are consistent with those predicted numerically and measured by caliper. The edges of lesions were clearly outlined although on ultrasound images they were fuzzy. This allows to conclude that the use of the transducer designed offers an effective noninvasive tool not only to induce local necrotic lesions within treated tissue without damaging the surrounding tissue structures but also to test various chemotherapeutics activated by the HIFU beams in preclinical studies on small animals

  3. A Low Cost/Low Power Open Source Sensor System for Automated Tuberculosis Drug Susceptibility Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyukwang Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research an open source, low power sensor node was developed to check the growth of mycobacteria in a culture bottle with a nitrate reductase assay method for a drug susceptibility test. The sensor system reports the temperature and color sensor output frequency change of the culture bottle when the device is triggered. After the culture process is finished, a nitrite ion detecting solution based on a commercial nitrite ion detection kit is injected into the culture bottle by a syringe pump to check bacterial growth by the formation of a pigment by the reaction between the solution and the color sensor. Sensor status and NRA results are broadcasted via a Bluetooth low energy beacon. An Android application was developed to collect the broadcasted data, classify the status of cultured samples from multiple devices, and visualize the data for the end users, circumventing the need to examine each culture bottle manually during a long culture period. The authors expect that usage of the developed sensor will decrease the cost and required labor for handling large amounts of patient samples in local health centers in developing countries. All 3D-printerable hardware parts, a circuit diagram, and software are available online.

  4. Assessment of Substances Abuse in Burn Patients by Using Drug Abuse Screening Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobra Gaseminegad

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There has been an increase in the frequency of substance abuse among hospitalized burn injury patients. However, few studies have investigated substance abuse among burn patients. This study was aimed to identify the incidence of substance abuse in burn injury patients using the "Drug Abuse Screening Test" (DAST-20. We determined the validity of DAST-20 in spring 2010. Subsequently, this descriptive study was performed on 203 burn injury patients who fit the study's inclusion criteria. We chose a score of 6 as the cutoff and thus achieved a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 85% for the DAST-20. During the study, we gathered demographic data, burn features and DAST-20 results for all patients. Patients with scores of 6 or more were considered to be substances abusers. A statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS v16 software. According to the DAST-20 results, 33% of the patients were in the user group. The mean score of DAST-20 was significantly higher among users than it was among nonusers (P<0.05. The level of substance abuse was severe in 77% of users. No significant differences were found among the substances, with the exception of alcohol. Substance abuse is an important risk factor for burn patients. In addition, this study showed that DAST-20 is a valid screening measure for studies on burn patients.

  5. A Low Cost/Low Power Open Source Sensor System for Automated Tuberculosis Drug Susceptibility Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyukwang; Kim, Hyeong Keun; Lim, Hwijoon; Myung, Hyun

    2016-01-01

    In this research an open source, low power sensor node was developed to check the growth of mycobacteria in a culture bottle with a nitrate reductase assay method for a drug susceptibility test. The sensor system reports the temperature and color sensor output frequency change of the culture bottle when the device is triggered. After the culture process is finished, a nitrite ion detecting solution based on a commercial nitrite ion detection kit is injected into the culture bottle by a syringe pump to check bacterial growth by the formation of a pigment by the reaction between the solution and the color sensor. Sensor status and NRA results are broadcasted via a Bluetooth low energy beacon. An Android application was developed to collect the broadcasted data, classify the status of cultured samples from multiple devices, and visualize the data for the end users, circumventing the need to examine each culture bottle manually during a long culture period. The authors expect that usage of the developed sensor will decrease the cost and required labor for handling large amounts of patient samples in local health centers in developing countries. All 3D-printerable hardware parts, a circuit diagram, and software are available online. PMID:27338406

  6. Deformable microparticles with multiple functions for drug delivery and device testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thula, Taili T.

    Since the HIV epidemic of the 1990s, researchers have attempted to develop a red blood cell analog. Even though some of these substitutes are now in Phase III of clinical trials, their use is limited by side effects and short half-life in the human body. As a result, there is still a need for an effective erythrocyte analog with minimum immunogenic and side effects, so that it can be used for multiple applications. Finding new approaches to develop more efficient blood substitutes will not only bring valuable advances in the clinical approach, but also in the area of in vitro testing of medical devices. We examined the feasibility of creating a deformable multi-functional, biodegradable, biocompatible particle for applications in drug delivery and device testing. As a preliminary evaluation, we synthesized different types of microcapsules using natural and synthetic polymers, various cross-linking agents, and diverse manufacturing techniques. After fully characterizing of each system, we determined the most promising red blood cell analog in terms of deformability, stability and toxicity. We also examined the encapsulation and release of bovine serum albumin (BSA) within these deformable particles. After removal of cross-linkers, zinc- and copper-alginate microparticles surrounded by multiple polyelectrolyte layers of chitosan oligosaccharide and alginate were deformable and remained stable under physiological pressures applied by the micropipette technique. In addition, multiple coatings decreased toxicity of heavy-metal crosslinked particles. BSA encapsulation and release from chitosan-alginate microspheres were contingent on the crosslinker and number of polyelectrolyte coatings, respectively. Further rheological studies are needed to determine how closely these particles simulate the behavior of erythrocytes. Also, studies on the encapsulation and release of different proteins, including hemoglobin, are needed to establish the desired controlled release of

  7. The Workplace as Family, the Family as Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entin, Alan D.

    Studies have shown that work-related stressors are compounded by the stressors that employees bring to the workplace. Although interdisciplinary interest in the work-family relationship has increased during the past 2 decades, a conceptual understanding of how work affects the family or the reciprocal relationship between family and work has yet…

  8. Workplace Bullying: Curing the Cancer of the American Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, Peter M.

    2001-01-01

    A literature review concluded that supervisor/supervisee relationships are critical to job satisfaction; workplace bullying in the form of a management style of aggressive and intimidating behaviors is widespread; certain types of organizations foster bullying; and bullying has high costs for the targeted employee and the organization. (Contains…

  9. Implementation of the national tuberculosis guidelines on culture and drug sensitivity testing in Guatemala, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samayoa-Peláez, Maritza; Ayala, Nancy; Yadon, Zaida E; Heldal, Einar

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the National Tuberculosis Program (NTP) guidelines for culture and drug sensitivity testing (DST) in Guatemala were successfully implemented, particularly in cases of smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) or previously treated TB, by documenting notification rates by department (geographic area), disease type and category, and culture and DST results. Methods This was a cross-sectional, operational research study that merged and linked all patients registered by the NTP and the National Reference Laboratory in 2013, eliminating duplicates. The proportions with culture (for new smear negative pulmonary cases) and culture combined with DST (for previously treated patients) were estimated and analyzed by department. Data were analyzed using EpiData Analysis version 2.2. Results There were 3 074 patients registered with TB (all forms), for a case notification rate of 20/100 000 population. Of these, 2 842 had new TB, of which 2 167 (76%) were smear-positive pulmonary TB (PTB), 385 (14%) were smear-negative PTB, and 290 (10%) were extrapulmonary TB. There were 232 (8%) previously treated cases. Case notification rates (all forms) varied by department from 2-68 per 100 000 population, with the highest rates seen in the southwest and northeast part of Guatemala. Of new TB patients, 136 had a culture performed and 55 had DST of which the results were 33 fully sensitive, 9 monoresistant, 3 polyresistant, and 10 multidrug resistant TB (MDR-TB). Only 21 (5%) of new smear-negative PTB patients had cultures. Of 232 previously treated patients, 54 (23%) had a culture and 47 (20%) had DST, of which 29 were fully sensitive, 7 monoresistant, 2 polyresistant, and 9 MDR-TB. Of 22 departments (including the capital), culture and DST was performed in new smear-negative PTB in 7 departments (32%) and in previously treated TB in 13 departments (59%). Conclusions Despite national guidelines, only 5% of smear-negative PTB cases had a culture and only 20% of

  10. Hair and urine testing to assess drugs of abuse consumption in couples undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichini, Simona; De Luca, Roberto; Pellegrini, Manuela; Marchei, Emilia; Rotolo, Maria Concetta; Spoletini, Roberta; D'Aloja, Paola; Pacifici, Roberta; Mortali, Claudia; Scaravelli, Giulia

    2012-05-10

    For the first time in Europe hair and urine testing have been applied to assess drugs of abuse consumption in couples undergoing assisted reproductive technology and the eventual association of toxic habits with other lifestyle, health status and sociodemographic factors was also investigated. Couples attending five assisted reproduction centers in Rome were invited to join the study. When they presented at the Centre for the visit, they were asked to answer a structured questionnaire concerning sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle habits, and at the same time to provide hair and urine samples. Hair and urine testing for drugs of abuse, urinary profile of principal endogenous steroids involved in fertility process (testosterone, epitestosterone, androsterone, etiocholanolone and dehydroepiandrosterone) and of alcohol and tobacco smoke biomarkers were performed with validated methodologies. Of the 594 enrolled individuals (297 couples), 352 (164 couples and 24 single individuals from the couple) completed the questionnaire and gave both hair and urine samples, apart from 3 bald men, who only gave urine samples. Urine testing showed an overall 4.8% (17 individuals) positivity to drugs of abuse: 4.2% to cannabinoids, 1.4% to cocaine and 0.85% to both drugs. Results of 4cm segment hair samples testing matched those from urine samples. Thus, taking together, results of urine and hair testing confirmed repeated use of cannabis, cocaine and both drugs in 3.7, 0.85 and 0.57% examined individuals, respectively. Drug consumers were in a statistically higher percentage active smokers and alcohol drinkers, less prone to physical activity and with a trend towards higher weight than non consumers. Finally, repeated drug consumption was associated with significant lower concentration of urinary testosterone in males and of urinary dehydroepiandrosterone in females. The findings of the present study confirm the suitability of urine testing to disclose recent drugs of

  11. Gratitude in Workplace Research: A Rossian Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Workplace learning is complex in form. It is explorative, social and creative enquiry, and because it is carried out in the socio-political domain of the workplace, it is potentially exploitative of all who contribute. This paper suggests that the workplace researcher might conceptualise the contributions of participants as benefits and/or gifts,…

  12. Workplace Counselling in Nigeria: Problems and Prospects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... counsellor competency problem, workplace counselling as a victimization tool, management of client information, workplace counselling as an excuse or avoidance route, making workplaces mental-health friendly, display of care, preventive mechanism, a risk management tool, and a medium of organizational change.

  13. Workplace Learning of High Performance Sports Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynne, Steven B.; Mallett, Clifford J.; Tinning, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The Australian coaching workplace (to be referred to as the State Institute of Sport; SIS) under consideration in this study employs significant numbers of full-time performance sport coaches and can be accurately characterized as a genuine workplace. Through a consideration of the interaction between what the workplace (SIS) affords the…

  14. Mobbing: Workplace Violence in the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, Jeanmarie; McDermott, J. Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Incidents of workplace violence are becoming all too common at colleges and universities. Generally, one thinks of shootings and assaults in relation to campus workplace violence. However, mobbing and bullying of faculty by other faculty are types of workplace violence that, while very common, are rarely discussed or reported. This article raises…

  15. Firefighter Workplace Learning: An Exploratory Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite there being a significant amount of research investigating workplace learning, research exploring firefighter workplace learning is almost nonexistent. The purpose of this qualitative multi-case study was to explore how firefighters conceptualize, report, and practice workplace learning. The researcher also investigated how firefighters…

  16. From concept to in vivo testing: Microcontainers for oral drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzoni, Chiara; Tentor, Fabio; Andersen, Sophie Strindberg

    2017-01-01

    This work explores the potential of polymeric micrometer sized devices (microcontainers) as oral drug delivery systems (DDS). Arrays of detachable microcontainers (D-MCs) were fabricated on a sacrificial layer to improve the handling and facilitate the collection of individual D-MCs. A model drug...

  17. A Review of In Vitro Drug Release Test Methods for Nano-Sized Dosage Forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan D’Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the methods used to study real-time (37°C drug release from nanoparticulate drug delivery systems and establish an IVIVC. Since no compendial standards exist, drug release is currently assessed using a variety of methods including sample and separate (SS, continuous flow (CF, dialysis membrane (DM methods, and a combination thereof, as well as novel techniques like voltametry and turbidimetry. This review describes the principle of each method along with their advantages and disadvantages, including challenges with set-up and sampling. The SS method allows direct measurement of drug release with simple set-up requirements, but sampling is cumbersome. With the CF method, sampling is straightforward but the set-up is time consuming. Set-up as well as sampling is easier with the DM, but it may not be suitable for drugs that bind to the membrane. Novel methods offer the possibility of real-time drug release measurement but may be restricted to certain types of drugs. Of these methods, Level A IVIVCs have been obtained with dialysis, alone or in combination with the sample and separate technique. Future efforts should focus on developing mathematical models that describe drug release mechanisms as well as facilitate formulation development of nano-sized dosage forms.

  18. Workplace stress: what is the role of positive mental health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Kathryn M; Milner, Allison J; Martin, Angela; Turrell, Gavin; Giles-Corti, Billie; LaMontagne, Anthony D

    2014-08-01

    To examine whether positive mental health (PMH)-a positively focused well-being construct-moderates the job stress-distress relationship. Longitudinal regression was used to test two waves of matched, population-level data from a sample of older, working Australian adults (n = 3291) to see whether PMH modified the relationship between work stress and later psychological distress. Time 1 work stress was positively associated with distress at both time points. Positive mental health was negatively associated with work stress at both time points. Positive mental health modified the impact of work stress on psychological distress. This effect only occurred for those with the highest levels of PMH. Positive mental health may help protect workers from the effect of workplace stress but only in a small proportion of the population. Therefore, to improve workplace mental health, workplaces need to both prevent stress and promote PMH.

  19. Workplace violence against K-12 teachers: implementation of preventive programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Jill M; Gerding, Gail; Hong, OiSaeng

    2004-05-01

    Decreasing both workplace and school violence needs to be a priority of individuals, families, communities, and workplaces for the effort to be successful. Key factors associated with school and workplace violence such as parental influences, school staff and police involvement, peer pressure, student influences such as drug and alcohol abuse and a preoccupation with weapons, and the mass media have all been identified as possible factors associated with violence against teachers. In addition, individual student characteristics such as gender, socioeconomic status, and a history of prior violence may play a role. However, none of these factors can be identified or singled out as the reason for violence. Violence against teachers occurs as a result of a combination of these factors. Understanding how these factors interact should be a goal of every community and school. Occupational health nurses have the unique opportunity to partner with communities, school nurses, and the school system to develop effective violence prevention programs. Working in schools is an area of expansion for occupational health nurses. They have the expertise to perform worksite assessments and to identify key areas of weakness throughout the facility. Their expertise in reviewing and analyzing workplace injury data and developing cost effectiveness analysis for proposed interventions is unique. Occupational health nurses also have the skills to network with school officials and other key stakeholders to develop interventions to impact the substantial implications of violence in the schools.

  20. Interpersonal conflict and sarcasm in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, K R

    2000-11-01

    Violence and aggression in the workplace are problems that most Americans confront on a daily basis. The present study is an exploration of the predisposition to conflict in a work environment in which personality traits responsible for increased sarcasm and increased anger in response to sarcasm are identified. Participants represented two subdepartments within a city general hospital. The Keirsey Temperament Sorter (D. Keirsey, 1998) test for departmental temperament and a sarcasm survey designed by the author were used to test for frequency of sarcasm and anger in relation to differing categories of sarcasm. Angry reactions were gauged in relation to sarcasm directed at job performance, personal life, behavior, and appearance. Conclusions from this study point to many variables as causes for workplace anger; these include influences from organizational culture, work environment, psychological defense mechanisms, leadership decisions, stress, task orientation, and personality differences. Sarcasm trigger points leading to anger may be predicted based on a work group's personality composition. A homogeneous personality composition within a work group may involve factors such as personality characteristics common to a particular profession, organizational demands, and hiring practices.

  1. Workplace Culture Emotional Intelligence and Trust in the Prediction of Workplace Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stough, C.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There were two aims of this study. The first was to assess the reliability of a new measure of emotional intelligence (EI, the Workplace Culture version of the Swinburne University Emotional Intelligence Test (SUEIT which was designed to measure EI at a group level. The second aim of the study was to investigate the pre-conditions required for the formation of an emotionally intelligent group culture. Specifically, the study proposed that team leader trustworthiness at the leader/member dyad level was required for the formation of an emotionally intelligent culture at the group level. The sample comprised of 142 participants, of which 54 were male and 88 were female. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing perceptions of group EI, leader trustworthiness, job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Results of the study showed that the Workplace Culture SUEIT was reliable and predicted job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Furthermore, trustworthiness of the team leader was found to be significantly correlated to dimensions of group level EI, job satisfaction and organizational commitment. It was concluded that the Workplace Culture SUEIT is a valid and useful tool for measuring group level EI. Furthermore, it was concluded that there is a significant relationship between group level EI and leader/member trust. Implications of the results and future research concerning group and leader EI are discussed.

  2. Listening Skills in the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grognet, Allene; Van Duzer, Carol

    This article examines the listening process and factors affecting listening. It also suggests general guidelines for teaching and assessing listening and gives examples of activities for practicing and developing listening skills for the workplace. Listening is a demanding process that involves the listener, speaker, message content, and…

  3. Diversity in the Workplace. Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    Three papers comprise this symposium on diversity in the workplace. "Factors That Assist and Barriers That Hinder the Success of Diversity Initiatives in Multinational Corporations" (Rose Mary Wentling) reports that factors that assisted in the success were classified under diversity department, human, and work environment; barriers were…

  4. Flipped Learning in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederveld, Allison; Berge, Zane L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to serve as a summary of resources on flipped learning for workplace learning professionals. A recent buzzword in the training world is "flipped". Flipped learning and the flipped classroom are hot topics that have emerged in K-12 education, made their way to the university and are now being noticed…

  5. Internet Gambling in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to overview the issues, concerns and challenges relating to gambling--and more specifically internet gambling--in the workplace. Design/methodology/approach: Using psychological literature, this paper outlines a number of important and inter-related areas including brief overviews of gambling and problem gambling,…

  6. Rapid, automated, nonradiometric susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex to four first-line antituberculous drugs used in standard short-course chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Isik Somuncu; Thomsen, Vibeke Østergaard; Marjamäki, Merja

    2004-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis necessitates rapid and accurate susceptibility testing. The nonradiometric BACTEC Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube 960 (MGIT) system for susceptibility testing was evaluated on 222 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates...... MGIT system is a rapid and reliable alternative for susceptibility testing of M. tuberculosis complex to first-line drugs....

  7. Repositioning of drugs using open-access data portal DTome: A test case with probenecid (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohammad U; Bennett, Dylan J; Hsieh, Tze-Chen; Doonan, Barbara B; Ahmed, Saba; Wu, Joseph M

    2016-01-01

    The one gene-one enzyme hypothesis, first introduced by Beadle and Tatum in the 1940s and based on their genetic analysis and observation of phenotype changes in Neurospora crassa challenged by various experimental conditions, has witnessed significant advances in recent decades. Much of our understanding of the association between genes and their phenotype expression has benefited from the completion of the human genome project, and has shown continual transformation guided by the effort directed at the annotation and characterization of human genes. Similarly, the idea of one drug‑one primary disease indication that traditionally has been the benchmark for the labeling and usage of drugs has also undergone evident progressive refinements; in recent years the science and practice of pharmaceutical development has notable success in the strategy of drug repurposing. Drug repurposing is an innovative approach where, instead of de novo synthesis and discovery of new drugs with novel indications, drug candidates with the desired usage are identified by a process of re‑profiling using an open‑source database or knowledge of known or failed drugs already in existence. In the present study, the repurposing drug strategy employing open‑access data portal drug‑target interactome (DTome) is applied to the uncovering of new clinical usage for probenecid.

  8. Opioid Hypersensitivity: Predictors of Allergy and Role of Drug Provocation Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Philip H; Ue, Kok Loong; Wagner, Annette; Rutkowski, Ryszard; Rutkowski, Krzysztof

    True IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to opioids is rare and many reactions are due to direct mast cell degranulation. Opioid drug provocation testing (DPT) is the gold standard for diagnosis but is underutilized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and predictors of opioid hypersensitivity, as well as outcomes of opioid DPT. Patients referred for opioid DPT over the past 9 years were studied. Patient characteristics, indications for opioid use, symptoms of index reaction, and outcomes of DPT were analyzed. Association analysis was performed to study variables associated with a diagnosis of opioid hypersensitivity. Of the total of 98 patients referred with suspected opioid hypersensitivity, 15 (15%) were diagnosed with opioid allergy. Angioedema (odds ratio [OR]: 5.66; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.49-21.47; P = .011) and hypotension (OR: 5.00; 95% CI: 1.15-21.70; P = .032) were significantly more frequent in opioid allergic patients than those with a negative DPT. Patients who received opioids during anesthesia were significantly more likely to be opioid allergic (OR: 6.74; 95% CI: 2.05-22.13; P = .001). In contrast, a negative association was identified with patients who received opioids for analgesia (OR: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.08-0.86; P = .008). Only 15% of our cohort were diagnosed with opioid allergy, emphasizing the importance of DPT in preventing erroneous overdiagnosis. Patients with a history of angioedema or hypotension as their index reaction were significantly more likely to be opioid allergic. DPT are safe when performed by experienced clinicians after risk stratification and using individualized protocols. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria into registered drug shops in Uganda: lessons learned and policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Clarke, Sîan E; Lal, Sham; Chandler, Clare I; Hutchinson, Eleanor; Hansen, Kristian S; Magnussen, Pascal

    2015-11-14

    Malaria is a major public health problem in Uganda and the current policy recommends introduction of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria (RDTs) to facilitate effective case management. However, provision of RDTs in drug shops potentially raises a new set of issues, such as adherence to RDTs results, management of severe illnesses, referral of patients, and relationship with caretakers. The main objective of the study was to examine the impact of introducing RDTs in registered drug shops in Uganda and document lessons and policy implications for future scale-up of malaria control in the private health sector. A cluster-randomized trial introducing RDTs into registered drug shops was implemented in central Uganda from October 2010 to July 2012. An evaluation was undertaken to assess the impact and the processes involved with the introduction of RDTs into drug shops, the lessons learned and policy implications. Introducing RDTs into drug shops was feasible. To scale-up this intervention however, drug shop practices need to be regulated since the registration process was not clear, supervision was inadequate and record keeping was poor. Although initially it was anticipated that introducing a new practice of record keeping would be cumbersome, but at evaluation this was not found to be a constraint. This presents an important lesson for introducing health management information system into drug shops. Involving stakeholders, especially the district health team, in the design was important for ownership and sustainability. The involvement of village health teams in community sensitization to the new malaria treatment and diagnosis policy was a success and this strategy is recommended for future interventions. Introducing RDTs into drug shops was feasible and it increased appropriate treatment of malaria with artemisinin-based combination therapy. It is anticipated that the lessons presented will help better implementation of similar interventions in the private sector.

  10. Workshop III: Improving the Workplace Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, Igle; Butcher, Gillian

    2015-12-01

    Research has shown that companies with more diversity and a better workplace perform better. So what makes a good workplace in physics, where women and men can work to their full potential? In the Improving the Workplace Environment workshop of the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics, participants heard about initiatives taking place in Canada, the UK, Japan, and India to improve the workplace environment and shared good practices from around the world. Some of the less tangible aspects of the workplace environment, such as unconscious bias and accumulation of advantage and disadvantage, were explored.

  11. Workplace bullying: an emergent issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essen, S Donovan; Esquivel, Cynthia; Jha, Pankaj

    2014-09-01

    All companies, including dentists, rely on their staff to represent their firms in the most positive and effective manner. Today's managers face a multitude of issues, and as such, they must walk a fine line of fostering a productive, harmonious and safe working environment for their employees. Over the last several decades it is apparent that on the- job sexual harassment is no longer the leading issue of employee complaints. Rather, the organization issue which was investigated is workplace bullying, also commonly referred to as employee harassment. Risk management is no longer limited to avoiding malpractice issues but also preventing litigation created by poor organizational behavior. The primary purpose of this paper is to explore the background of workplace bullying and how it affects today's managers and their employees, customers and suppliers. In other words, the scope of this paper will feature research on past studies, results and conclusions. Since workplace bullying affects all levels of a corporation, it must be stated that the concern and focus of this paper is for today's manager to understand the background and history of workplace bullying, and what they can do to foster a safe working environment and prevent the bully from creating mental and physical harm to their employees. This paper details the history of workplace bullying and how management, employees and suppliers deal with and address the issue. Lastly, this treatise looks at risk management from a manger/dentist's perspective, the assessment/conclusion summarizes the implications for managers regarding how they must handle the issue or risk harm to the employee and/or serious legal ramifications.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of HIV drug resistance testing to inform switching to second line antiretroviral therapy in low income settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Andrew; Cambiano, Valentina; Nakagawa, Fumiyo

    2014-01-01

    outcomes were assessed over 2015-2025 in terms of viral suppression, first line failure, switching to second line regimen, death, HIV incidence, disability-adjusted-life-years averted and costs. Potential future low costs of resistance tests ($30) were used. RESULTS: The most effective strategy, in terms......BACKGROUND: To guide future need for cheap resistance tests for use in low income settings, we assessed cost-effectiveness of drug resistance testing as part of monitoring of people on first line ART - with switching from first to second line ART being conditional on NNRTI drug resistance mutations...... being identified. METHODS: An individual level simulation model of HIV transmission, progression and the effect of ART which accounts for adherence and resistance development was used to compare outcomes of various potential monitoring strategies in a typical low income setting in sub-Saharan Africa...

  13. Workplace bullying: concerns for nurse leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Susan L; Rea, Ruth E

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe nurses' experiences with and characteristics related to workplace bullying. Although the concept of workplace bullying is gaining attention, few studies have examined workplace bullying among nurses. This was a descriptive study using a convenience sample of 249 members of the Washington State Emergency Nurses Association. The Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised was used to measure workplace bullying. Of the sample, 27.3% had experienced workplace bullying in the last 6 months. Most respondents who had been bullied stated that they were bullied by their managers/directors or charge nurses. Workplace bullying was significantly associated with intent to leave one's current job and nursing. In seeking remedies to the problem of workplace bullying, nurse leaders need to focus on why this bullying occurs and on ways to reduce its occurrence. This is a critical issue, since it is linked with nurse attrition.

  14. Workplace Bullying and Presenteeism: The Path Through Emotional Exhaustion and Psychological Wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Mariana; Ferreira, Aristides I; Martinez, Luis F; Ferreira, Paula C

    2017-06-01

    Workplace bullying is an increasing phenomenon that concerns managers and employees. However, few studies have investigated how workplace bullying relates with work-related exhaustion and indicators of productivity loss due to presenteeism. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine the intervening variables of emotional exhaustion and psychological wellbeing in the direct and indirect relationships between workplace bullying and indicators of productivity loss due to presenteeism. In a cross-sectional study, we tested a structural equation model using web survey data of 353 workers from a service company, with the variables: workplace bullying (Quine, 1999), emotional exhaustion (Maslach Burnout Inventory; MBI), psychological wellbeing (GHQ-28), and indicators of productivity loss due to presenteeism (SPS-6). All variables presented acceptable psychometric evidence. The final model revealed a reasonable fit. Workplace bullying was significantly and positively related to emotional exhaustion, which in turn, was significantly related to the loss of psychological wellbeing. Workplace bullying, emotional exhaustion, and the loss of psychological wellbeing were negatively related to concentration (avoiding distraction). Emotional exhaustion and psychological wellbeing mediated the studied structural relationships. Our study contributes to theory and practice, since occupational health professionals should be aware that burnout and the loss of wellbeing may be related to workplace bullying and that productivity loss due to presenteeism may be a warning sign. Leaders can understand the underlying mechanism that explains employees' productivity loss due to presenteeism by addressing workplace bullying and its negative relation with emotional exhaustion and wellbeing.

  15. Workplace Harassment and Morbidity Among US Adults: Results from the National Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khubchandani, Jagdish; Price, James H

    2015-06-01

    Most research on workplace harassment originates from European countries.Prevalence of workplace harassment and associated morbidity has not been well studied in the United States. The purpose of this study was to assess in a sample of US workers the prevalence of workplace harassment and the psychological and physical health consequences of workplace harassment. The 2010 National Health Interview Survey data were analyzed in 2014 for this study. We computed the prevalence of workplace harassment, assessed the demographic and background characteristics of victims of harassment, and tested the association between harassment and selected health risk factors by using logistic regression analysis. Statistical significance was established as p workplace in the past 12 months. The odds of harassment were significantly higher for females (OR 1.47, p gender and distinct health risk patterns for men and women victims were observed. Workplace harassment in the US is associated with significant health risk factors and morbidity. Workplace policies and protocols can play a significant role in reducing harassment and the associated negative health outcomes.

  16. Screening, testing, and reporting for drug and alcohol use on labor and delivery: a survey of Maryland birthing hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Catherine; Lanham, Amy; Welsh, Christopher; Ramanadhan, Shaalini; Terplan, Mishka

    2014-01-01

    Recent amendments to the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act tie the receipt of federal block grants to mandatory reporting of substance-exposed newborns. To determine rates of screening, testing, and reporting of drug and alcohol use at the time of delivery, we administered a telephone survey of nursing managers and perinatal social workers at Maryland birthing hospitals. Of the 34 hospitals, 31 responded (response rate 91%). Although 97% of hospitals reported universal screening, only 6% used a validated instrument. Testing was reported by 94% with 45% reporting universal maternal testing and 7% universal newborn testing. Only 32% reported obtaining maternal consent prior to testing. There is significant heterogeneity in screening and testing for substance use in birthing hospitals. Given federal reporting mandates, state-level practices need to be standardized.

  17. De-labelling self-reported penicillin allergy within the emergency department through the use of skin tests and oral drug provocation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwood, Joseph; Aguirrebarrena, Gonzalo; Kerr, Stephen; Welch, Susan A; Rimmer, Janet

    2017-10-01

    Self-reported penicillin allergy is common among patients attending the ED, but is a poor predictor of true immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillin. We hypothesise that with a combination of skin testing and drug provocation testing, selected patients can be safely de-labelled of their allergy. This prospective study enrolled a sample of patients presenting to an urban academic ED between 2011 and 2016 with a self-reported allergy to penicillin. Standardised skin prick and intradermal testing with amoxicillin and both major and minor determinants of penicillin was performed in the department. If negative, testing was followed by a graded oral challenge of amoxicillin over 9 days. The primary end point was the allergy status of participants at the end of the study. A total of 100 patients (mean age 42; standard deviation 14 years; 54% women) completed the testing. Of these, 81% (95% confidence interval 71.9-88.2) showed no hypersensitivity to penicillin and were labelled non-allergic. The majority (16/19) of allergies were confirmed by skin testing, with three suspected allergies detected by the oral challenge. Women were more likely than men to have a true penicillin allergy, with odds ratio of 4.0 (95% confidence interval 1.23-13.2). There were no serious adverse events. Selected patients in the ED who self-report an allergy to penicillin can be safely tested there for penicillin allergy, using skin tests and oral drug provocation testing. This testing allows a significant de-labelling of penicillin allergy, with the majority of these patients able to tolerate penicillin without incident. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  18. Resolution of methamphetamine stereoisomers in urine drug testing: urinary excretion of R(-)-methamphetamine following use of nasal inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, R L; Ramos, J M; Bogema, S C; Poklis, A

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether R(-)-methamphetamine inhaled from nasal inhalers produces positive methamphetamine results in currently used urine drug screening procedures and to present a rapid method for distinguishing the optical isomers of methamphetamine. Urine from three subjects inhaling from a Vicks Nasal Inhaler every 20 min for six hours tested positive for methamphetamine by EMIT, Toxilab, TDx, and GC/MS. The chiral derivatizing reagent N-trifluoroacetyl-L-prolyl chloride (L-TPC) was used to form methamphetamine diastereomers allowing rapid identification of each stereoisomer of methamphetamine present in the urine samples. Urine samples positive for amphetamines during routine drug screening were determined to consist of a racemic mixture of methamphetamine. The isomeric composition of methamphetamine present in a urine sample indicates the probable source of the drug.

  19. Development of paper-based color test-strip for drug detection in aquatic environment: Application to oxytetracycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Helena I A S; Sales, M Goreti F

    2015-03-15

    The wide use of antibiotics in aquaculture has led to the emergence of resistant microbial species. It should be avoided/minimized by controlling the amount of drug employed in fish farming. For this purpose, the present work proposes test-strip papers aiming at the detection/semi-quantitative determination of organic drugs by visual comparison of color changes, in a similar analytical procedure to that of pH monitoring by universal pH paper. This is done by establishing suitable chemical changes upon cellulose, attributing the paper the ability to react with the organic drug and to produce a color change. Quantitative data is also enabled by taking a picture and applying a suitable mathematical treatment to the color coordinates given by the HSL system used by windows. As proof of concept, this approach was applied to oxytetracycline (OXY), one of the antibiotics frequently used in aquaculture. A bottom-up modification of paper was established, starting by the reaction of the glucose moieties on the paper with 3-triethoxysilylpropylamine (APTES). The so-formed amine layer allowed binding to a metal ion by coordination chemistry, while the metal ion reacted after with the drug to produce a colored compound. The most suitable metals to carry out such modification were selected by bulk studies, and the several stages of the paper modification were optimized to produce an intense color change against the concentration of the drug. The paper strips were applied to the analysis of spiked environmental water, allowing a quantitative determination for OXY concentrations as low as 30ng/mL. In general, this work provided a simple, method to screen and discriminate tetracycline drugs, in aquaculture, being a promising tool for local, quick and cheap monitoring of drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Hepatic cell lines for drug hepatotoxicity testing: limitations and strategies to upgrade their metabolic competence by gene engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, M Teresa; Jover, Ramiro; Gómez-Lechón, M José

    2013-11-01

    One key issue in the pharmaceutical development of new compounds is knowledge on metabolism, the enzymes involved and the potential hepatotoxicity of a drug. Primary cultured hepatocytes are a valuable in vitro model for drug metabolism studies. However, human hepatocytes show phenotypic instability and have restricted accessibility and high batch-to-batch functional variability, which seriously complicates their use in routine testing. Therefore, several liver-derived cell models have been developed for drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity screening to circumvent these drawbacks. Hepatoma cell lines offer important advantages, availability, an unlimited life span and a stable phenotype, thus rendering them suitable models for such studies. However, currently available human hepatoma cell lines are not a good alternative to cultured hepatocytes as they show very limited expression for most drug-metabolising enzymes. Other approaches have been developed to generate immortalised hepatic cells with metabolic competence (use of plasmids encoding immortalising genes to transform human hepatocytes, cell lines obtained from transgenic animals, hepatocytomes or hydrid cells). Recombinant models heterologously expressing cytochrome P450 enzymes in hepatoma cells have also been generated, and are widely used in drug metabolism and toxicity evaluations. In recent years, new approaches to up-regulate the expression of drug-biotransformation enzymes in human cell lines (i.e., transfection with the expression vectors encoding key hepatic transcription factors) have also been investigated. This paper reviews the features of liver-derived cell lines, their suitability for drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity studies, and the state-of-the-art strategies pursued to generate metabolically competent hepatic cell lines.