WorldWideScience

Sample records for workforce survey ii

  1. The North American yoga therapy workforce survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Marlysa; Leach, Matthew; Snow, James; Moonaz, Steffany

    2017-04-01

    To describe the personal, professional, practice, service and consumer characteristics of the North American yoga therapy workforce. Cross-sectional, descriptive survey developed and informed by the contemporary workforce literature. A link to the e-survey was distributed to members of the International Association of Yoga Therapists. 367 members responded (∼20% of eligible participants). Most were aged 40-69 years (88%) and female (91%). Almost half (42%) identified as a "seasoned yoga therapist" and few (9%) graduated from an accredited 800-h yoga therapy program. An average of 8h/week was spent in clinical practice with many (41%) earning an annual income of yoga therapy. Practice was informed by twenty different styles of yoga. Urban (39%) and suburban (38.1%) regions were the most common locations of practice. Most therapists conducted therapeutic yoga classes (91%) and 1:1 sessions (94%), with more than half delivering 1-10 therapeutic classes/month (53%) and 1-10 1:1 sessions/month (52%). Conditions seen most frequently were anxiety (77%), back/neck pain (77%) and joint pain/stiffness (67%). While yoga therapists shared demographic characteristics with other complementary and integrative health (CIH) providers, they tended to work less and earn less than their CIH counterparts. Yoga therapists were less likely to work in rural settings, possibly contributing to the underutilization of yoga in underserved populations. Improving access to yoga therapy services, identifying common core components across the various styles of yoga, and building a stronger evidence-base for key health indications may increase acceptance of, and demand for, yoga therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Med-Peds Hospitalist Workforce: Results From the American Academy of Pediatrics Workforce Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Michael J; Lubrano, Lauren; Radabaugh, Carrie L; Lukela, Michael P; Friedland, Allen R; Ruch-Ross, Holly S

    2015-11-01

    There is no published literature about the med-peds hospitalist workforce, physicians dually trained in internal medicine and pediatrics. Our objective was to analyze this subset of physicians by using data from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) workforce survey to assess practice patterns and workforce demographics. We hypothesized that demographic differences exist between hospitalists and nonhospitalists. The AAP surveyed med-peds physicians from the Society of Hospital Medicine and the AAP to define workforce demographics and patterns of practice. We compared self-identified hospitalists with nonhospitalist physicians on multiple characteristics. Almost one-half of the hospitalists self-identified as being both primary care physicians and hospitalists; we therefore also compared the physicians self-identifying as being both primary care physicians and hospitalists with those who identified themselves solely as hospitalists. Of 1321 respondents, 297 physicians (22.4%) self-reported practicing as hospitalists. Hospitalists were more likely than nonhospitalists to have been practicing50 hours per week (PMed-peds hospitalists are more likely to be newer to practice and be employed by a health care organization than nonhospitalists and to report satisfaction that their training sufficiently prepared them to see adults and children in practice. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. The 2017 ACR Commission on Human Resources Workforce Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluth, Edward I; Bansal, Swati; Bender, Claire E

    2017-07-29

    The ACR Commission on Human Resources conducts an annual workforce survey to determine the makeup of the radiology workforce and to identify potential plans for hiring new staff in an attempt to understand our profession better. The Practice of Radiology Environment Database group leaders were asked to complete an electronic survey regarding the makeup of their present workforce by subspecialty, as well as the numbers and types of subspecialists hired in 2016 and the numbers and types of subspecialists expected to be hired in 2017 and 2020. They were also asked about midlevel practitioners. Twenty-six percent of practice leaders (477) representing 11,056 radiologists, 33% of all practicing radiologists in the United States, responded to the survey. The workforce distribution by practice type and radiologists' ages has been relatively stable since 2012. Six percent of the practicing workforce is over the age of 65 years. Sixteen percent of radiologists work part-time, and 21.5% of radiologists are female. The survey results indicate that 1,569 to 2,037 radiologists were hired in 2016. In 2017, 1,826 to 2,370 new job opportunities are anticipated, a 14.1% increase compared with 2016. For 2017, the subspecialists most recruited will be neuroradiologists, general interventionalists, after-hours radiologists, and body imagers. Approximately 2,156 midlevel practitioners are presently working and supervised by radiologists. The 2017 ACR workforce study shows an optimistic picture and outlook for those seeking jobs as practicing radiologists in 2017. For practice leaders, the market will be much more competitive than it has been in past years. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The 2015 ACR Commission on Human Resources Workforce Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluth, Edward I; Cox, Jan; Bansal, Swati; Green, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The ACR Commission on Human Resources continues to conduct its annual electronic survey to better understand the present workforce scenario for radiologists. The Practice of Radiology Environment Database was used to identify group leads, who were asked to complete an electronic survey developed by the Commission on Human Resources. The survey asked group leaders to report the number of radiologists they currently employ or supervise, the number hired in 2014, and the numbers they plan to hire in 2015 and 2018. The leaders were asked to report the subspecialty area used as the main reason for hiring each physician, as well as the ages and genders of their current workforce. Thirty-two percent of group leaders responded to the survey, corresponding to 12,079 radiologists or 39% of all practicing radiologists. Twenty-one percent of the workforce is female and 79% is male. Ten percent of radiologists older than 65 years are women, while 32% younger than 35 are women. Twelve percent of radiologists work part-time, corresponding to a breakdown of 10% of men and 24% of women working part-time. The current workforce is 13% general radiologists and 87% subspecialists. In 2015, a projected 1,131 to 1,484 jobs will be available for radiologists. Job opportunities for radiologists seem to be increasing compared with 2013 and are relatively similar to 2014. Radiologists continue to subspecialize in greater numbers, but only 39% of radiologists practice more than 50% of the time in their subspecialties. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Canadian Paediatric Neurology Workforce Survey and Consensus Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doja, Asif; Orr, Serena L; McMillan, Hugh J; Kirton, Adam; Brna, Paula; Esser, Michael; Tang-Wai, Richard; Major, Philippe; Poulin, Chantal; Prasad, Narayan; Selby, Kathryn; Weiss, Shelly K; Yeh, E Ann; Callen, David Ja

    2016-05-01

    Little knowledge exists on the availability of academic and community paediatric neurology positions. This knowledge is crucial for making workforce decisions. Our study aimed to: 1) obtain information regarding the availability of positions for paediatric neurologists in academic centres; 2) survey paediatric neurology trainees regarding their perceptions of employment issues and career plans; 3) survey practicing community paediatric neurologists 4) convene a group of paediatric neurologists to develop consensus regarding how to address these workforce issues. Surveys addressing workforce issues regarding paediatric neurology in Canada were sent to: 1) all paediatric neurology program directors in Canada (n=9) who then solicited information from division heads and from paediatric neurologists in surrounding areas; 2) paediatric neurology trainees in Canada (n=57) and; 3) community paediatric neurologists (n=27). A meeting was held with relevant stakeholders to develop a consensus on how to approach employment issues. The response rate was 100% from program directors, 57.9% from residents and 44% from community paediatric neurologists. We found that the number of projected positions in academic paediatric neurology is fewer than the number of paediatric neurologists that are being trained over the next five to ten years, despite a clinical need for paediatric neurologists. Paediatric neurology residents are concerned about job availability and desire more career counselling. There is a current and projected clinical demand for paediatric neurologists despite a lack of academic positions. Training programs should focus on community neurology as a viable career option.

  6. The 2016 ACR Commission on Human Resources Workforce Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluth, Edward I; Bansal, Swati

    2016-10-01

    The ACR Commission on Human Resources conducts an annual electronic survey to better understand the present workforce scenario for radiologists. The Practice of Radiology Environment Database was used to identify group leads, who were asked to complete an electronic survey developed by the Commission on Human Resources. The survey asked group leads to report the number of radiologists they currently employ or supervise, the number hired in 2015, and the numbers they plan to hire in 2016 and 2019. Leaders were asked to report the subspecialty area used as the main reason for hiring each physician, as well the ages and genders of their current workforce. Thirty-two percent of group leaders, corresponding to 13,074 radiologists or 39% of all practicing radiologists, responded to this survey. The percentage of practicing radiologists who are male is 78.6%, compared with 21.4% who are female. Six percent of radiologists are older than 65 years, and 22% are between the ages of 56 and 65 years. Nineteen percent of radiologists older than 65 years retired in 2015. Fifteen percent of all radiologists work part-time. Among the part-time radiologists, 9% are male and 30% are female. General radiologists now make up only 13.3% of the radiologist workforce. In 2015, 45% of new hires moved from existing jobs; 55% were first-time hires. In 2016, it is projected that between 1,713 and 2,223 new jobs will be available, a 16.2% increase from hiring in 2015. Job opportunities for radiologists have continued to increase since 2013. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Society of Pediatric Psychology Workforce Survey: Development of Survey Methods, Sample Characteristics, and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Tim; Brosig, Cheryl L; Hilliard, Marisa E

    2016-03-01

    There are few detailed workforce studies of specialty fields within professional psychology, and none have been reported for pediatric psychology since 2006. Availability of such data could facilitate more-informed decision making by students and trainees, psychologists pursuing employment opportunities, and psychologists involved in employment or compensation negotiations. This article describes the work of a task force of the American Psychological Association (APA) Division 54 (Society of Pediatric Psychology) in the design, construction, pretesting, distribution, and data management for the Society of Pediatric Psychology (SPP) Workforce Survey. The 18-member task force was established to design and implement a workforce survey that balanced needs for breadth, clarity, brevity, and protection of confidentiality. The survey solicits information about demographic characteristics; training, licensure and certifications; employment settings, responsibilities, and productivity metrics; compensation; and employment satisfaction. A survey link was distributed via e-mail to full members of the SPP in June 2015. A total of 404 members (32.3% return rate) completed the survey. This article focuses on the development, methodology, and respondent characteristics for this 1st administration of the workforce survey. Separate articles will report detailed analyses of the survey results such as compensation and work satisfaction. Future distributions of the survey will enable compilation of a longitudinal database to track changes in the profession. SPP members and others may propose additional analyses of these data. This work may provide guidance to other groups of specialized psychologists who may wish to implement similar initiatives.

  8. Society of Pediatric Psychology Workforce Survey: Development of Survey Methods, Sample Characteristics, and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Tim; Brosig, Cheryl L.; Hilliard, Marisa E.

    2016-01-01

    There are few detailed workforce studies of specialty fields within professional psychology, and none have been reported for pediatric psychology since 2006. Availability of such data could facilitate more-informed decision making by students and trainees, psychologists pursuing employment opportunities, and psychologists involved in employment or compensation negotiations. This article describes the work of a task force of the American Psychological Association (APA) Division 54 (Society of Pediatric Psychology) in the design, construction, pretesting, distribution, and data management for the Society of Pediatric Psychology (SPP) Workforce Survey. The 18-member task force was established to design and implement a workforce survey that balanced needs for breadth, clarity, brevity, and protection of confidentiality. The survey solicits information about demographic characteristics; training, licensure and certifications; employment settings, responsibilities, and productivity metrics; compensation; and employment satisfaction. A survey link was distributed via e-mail to full members of the SPP in June 2015. A total of 404 members (32.3% return rate) completed the survey. This article focuses on the development, methodology, and respondent characteristics for this 1st administration of the workforce survey. Separate articles will report detailed analyses of the survey results such as compensation and work satisfaction. Future distributions of the survey will enable compilation of a longitudinal database to track changes in the profession. SPP members and others may propose additional analyses of these data. This work may provide guidance to other groups of specialized psychologists who may wish to implement similar initiatives. PMID:28066693

  9. Surveying Lab II site

    CERN Document Server

    1974-01-01

    The network of survey reference points on the Lab II site was extended to meet the geodetic needs of the SPS and its North Experimental Area. The work was greatly eased by a geodolite, a measuring instrument on loan from the Fermi Laboratory, which uses a modulated laser beam. (See CERN Courier 14 (1974) p. 247.)

  10. A comparison of survey methods in studies of the nurse workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, O Ed; Anderson, Mary Ann

    2013-03-01

    To compare and contrast postal and internet surveys in studies of nurse workforces. There is little research that examines the advantages and disadvantages of different surveys in studies of nurse workforces. Previous studies that used different approaches to disseminate surveys. There are advantages and disadvantages to using postal or internet surveys for nurse workforce studies. Factors researchers may wish to consider in selecting survey methods include research topic, costs, coverage, timing and the characteristics of potential respondents. Response rate, data quality and adequate coverage of the population being studied can be optimised if the researcher selects an appropriate survey method.

  11. What is a microbiologist? A survey exploring the microbiology workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, James; Verran, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Microbiology has a long tradition of making inspirational, world-changing discovery. Microbiology now plays essential roles in many disciplines, leading to some microbiologists raising concern over the apparent loss of identity. An electronic survey was undertaken to capture the scientific identity (based on scientific discipline) of people for whom microbiology forms a part of their profession, in addition to information regarding their first degree (title, country and year in which the degree was completed) and the sector in which they currently work. A total of 447 responses were collected, representing 52 countries from which they gained their first degree. Biology was the most common first degree title (of 32 titles provided), while microbiologist was the most common scientific identity (of 26 identities provided). The data collected in this study gives a snapshot of the multidisciplinarity, specialism and evolving nature of the microbiology academic workforce. While the most common scientific identity chosen in this study was that of a microbiologist, it appears that the microbiological workforce is contributed to by a range of different disciplines, highlighting the cross-cutting, multidisciplined and essential role microbiology has within scientific endeavour. Perhaps, we should be less concerned with labels, and celebrate the success with which our discipline has delivered. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Identifying advanced practice: A national survey of a nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Glenn; Duffield, Christine; Doubrovsky, Anna; Adams, Margaret

    2016-03-01

    The size and flexibility of the nursing workforce has positioned nursing as central to the goals of health service improvement. Nursing's response to meeting these goals has resulted in proliferation of advanced practice nursing with a confusing array of practice profiles, titles and roles. Whilst numerous models and definitions of advanced practice nursing have been developed there is scant published research of significant scope that supports these models. Consequently there is an ongoing call in the literature for clarity and stability in nomenclature, and confusion in the health industry on how to optimise the utility of advanced practice nursing. To identify and delineate advanced practice from other levels of nursing practice through examination of a national nursing workforce. A cross-sectional electronic survey of nurses using the validated Advanced Practice Role Delineation tool based on the Strong Model of Advanced Practice. Study participants were registered nurses employed in a clinical service environment across all states and territories of Australia. A sample of 5662 registered nurses participated in the study. Domain means for each participant were calculated then means for nursing position titles were calculated. Position titles were grouped by delineation and were compared with one-way analysis of variance on domain means. The alpha for all tests was set at 0.05. Significant effects were examined with Scheffe post hoc comparisons to control for Type 1 error. The survey tool was able to identify position titles where nurses were practicing at an advanced level and to delineate this cohort from other levels of nursing practice, including nurse practitioner. The results show that nurses who practice at an advanced level are characterised by high mean scores across all Domains of the Strong Model of Advanced Practice. The mean scores of advanced practice nurses were significantly different from nurse practitioners in the Direct Care Domain and

  13. Society of Pediatric Psychology Workforce Survey: Factors Related to Compensation of Pediatric Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosig, Cheryl L; Hilliard, Marisa E; Williams, Andre; Armstrong, F Daniel; Christidis, Peggy; Kichler, Jessica; Pendley, Jennifer Shroff; Stamm, Karen E; Wysocki, Tim

    2017-05-01

    To summarize compensation results from the 2015 Society of Pediatric Psychology (SPP) Workforce Survey and identify factors related to compensation of pediatric psychologists. All full members of SPP ( n  = 1,314) received the online Workforce Survey; 404 (32%) were returned with usable data. The survey assessed salary, benefits, and other income sources. The relationship between demographic and employment-related factors and overall compensation was explored.   Academic rank, level of administrative responsibility, and cost of living index of employment location were associated with compensation. Compensation did not vary by gender; however, women were disproportionately represented at the assistant and associate professor level. Compensation of pediatric psychologists is related to multiple factors. Longitudinal administration of the Workforce Survey is needed to determine changes in compensation and career advancement for this profession over time. Strategies to increase the response rate of future Workforce Surveys are discussed.

  14. Morale in the English mental health workforce: questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sonia; Osborn, David P J; Araya, Ricardo; Wearn, Elizabeth; Paul, Moli; Stafford, Mai; Wellman, Nigel; Nolan, Fiona; Killaspy, Helen; Lloyd-Evans, Brynmor; Anderson, Emma; Wood, Stephen J

    2012-09-01

    High-quality evidence on morale in the mental health workforce is lacking. To describe staff well-being and satisfaction in a multicentre UK National Health Service (NHS) sample and explore associated factors. A questionnaire-based survey (n = 2258) was conducted in 100 wards and 36 community teams in England. Measures included a set of frequently used indicators of staff morale, and measures of perceived job characteristics based on Karasek's demand-control-support model. Staff well-being and job satisfaction were fairly good on most indicators, but emotional exhaustion was high among acute general ward and community mental health team (CMHT) staff and among social workers. Most morale indicators were moderately but significantly intercorrelated. Principal components analysis yielded two components, one appearing to reflect emotional strain, the other positive engagement with work. In multilevel regression analyses factors associated with greater emotional strain included working in a CMHT or psychiatric intensive care unit (PICU), high job demands, low autonomy, limited support from managers and colleagues, age under 45 years and junior grade. Greater positive engagement was associated with high job demands, autonomy and support from managers and colleagues, Black or Asian ethnic group, being a psychiatrist or service manager and shorter length of service. Potential foci for interventions to increase morale include CMHTs, PICUs and general acute wards. The explanatory value of the demand-support-control model was confirmed, but job characteristics did not fully explain differences in morale indicators across service types and professions.

  15. A 2012 survey of the Australasian clinical medical physics and biomedical engineering workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, W H

    2013-06-01

    A survey of the medical physics and biomedical engineering workforce in Australia and New Zealand was carried out in 2012 following on from similar surveys in 2009 and 2006. 761 positions (equivalent to 736 equivalent full time (EFT) positions) were captured by the survey. Of these, 428 EFT were in radiation oncology physics, 63 EFT were in radiology physics, 49 EFT were in nuclear medicine physics, 150 EFT were in biomedical engineering and 46 EFT were attributed to other activities. The survey reviewed the experience profile, the salary levels and the number of vacant positions in the workforce for the different disciplines in each Australian state and in New Zealand. Analysis of the data shows the changes to the workforce over the preceding 6 years and identifies shortfalls in the workforce.

  16. Policy challenges for the pediatric rheumatology workforce: Part II. Health care system delivery and workforce supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrickson Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The United States pediatric population with chronic health conditions is expanding. Currently, this demographic comprises 12-18% of the American child and youth population. Affected children often receive fragmented, uncoordinated care. Overall, the American health care delivery system produces modest outcomes for this population. Poor, uninsured and minority children may be at increased risk for inferior coordination of services. Further, the United States health care delivery system is primarily organized for the diagnosis and treatment of acute conditions. For pediatric patients with chronic health conditions, the typical acute problem-oriented visit actually serves as a barrier to care. The biomedical model of patient education prevails, characterized by unilateral transfer of medical information. However, the evidence basis for improvement in disease outcomes supports the use of the chronic care model, initially proposed by Dr. Edward Wagner. Six inter-related elements distinguish the success of the chronic care model, which include self-management support and care coordination by a prepared, proactive team. United States health care lacks a coherent policy direction for the management of high cost chronic conditions, including rheumatic diseases. A fundamental restructure of United States health care delivery must urgently occur which places the patient at the center of care. For the pediatric rheumatology workforce, reimbursement policies and the actions of health plans and insurers are consistent barriers to chronic disease improvement. United States reimbursement policy and overall fragmentation of health care services pose specific challenges for widespread implementation of the chronic care model. Team-based multidisciplinary care, care coordination and self-management are integral to improve outcomes. Pediatric rheumatology demand in the United States far exceeds available workforce supply. This article reviews the career

  17. The Use of Online Surveys to Measure Satisfaction in Job Training and Workforce Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Steve; Strachota, Elaine; Conceicao, Simone

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines two empirical studies that used online surveys to collect data to measure satisfaction in job training and workforce development. A description of each study, findings related to response rate, the processes used in online survey development and implementation, as well as recommendations for the future use of online surveys…

  18. The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey: The First National Survey of State Health Agency Employees

    OpenAIRE

    Sellers, Katie; Leider, Jonathon P.; Harper, Elizabeth; Castrucci, Brian C.; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Liss-Levinson, Rivka; Jarris, Paul E.; Hunter, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Public health practitioners, policy makers, and researchers alike have called for more data on individual worker's perceptions about workplace environment, job satisfaction, and training needs for a quarter of a century. The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) was created to answer that call. Objective: Characterize key components of the public health workforce, including demographics, workplace environment, perceptions about national trends, and perceived tr...

  19. The global pediatric nephrology workforce: a survey of the International Pediatric Nephrology Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Dorey; Ocegueda, Sophie; Nazareth, Meaghan; Zhong, Yi; Weinstein, Adam; Primack, William; Cochat, Pierre; Ferris, Maria

    2016-07-15

    The global pediatric nephrology workforce is poorly characterized. The objectives of our study were to assess pediatric nephrologists' perceptions of the adequacy of the pediatric nephrology workforce, and understand regional challenges to fellow recruitment and job acquisition. Perceptions regarding optimal length of training and research requirements were also queried. A 17-question web-based survey comprised of 14 close-ended and 3 open-ended questions was e-mailed to members of the International Pediatric Nephrology Association. Quantitative and qualitative analyses were performed. We received 341 responses from members of the International Pediatric Nephrology Association from 71 countries. There was a high degree of overall perceived workforce inadequacy with 67 % of all respondents reporting some degree of shortage. Perceived workforce shortage ranged from 20 % in Australia/New Zealand to 100 % in Africa. Respondents from Africa (25 %) and North America (22.4 %) reported the greatest difficulty recruiting fellows. Respondents from Australia/New Zealand (53.3 %) and Latin America (31.3 %) reported the greatest perceived difficulty finding jobs as pediatric nephrologists after training. Low trainee interest, low salary, lack of government or institutional support, and few available jobs in pediatric nephrology were the most frequently reported obstacles to fellow recruitment and job availability. Globally, there is a high level of perceived inadequacy in the pediatric nephrology workforce. Regional variability exists in perceived workforce adequacy, ease of recruitment, and job acquisition. Interventions to improve recruitment targeted to specific regional barriers are suggested.

  20. The Pediatric Heart Failure Workforce: An International, Multicenter Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Scott R; Everitt, Melanie D; Butts, Ryan J; Rosenthal, David N; Law, Yuk M

    2018-02-01

    Our objective was to understand the scope of pediatric heart failure (HF) and the current staffing environment of HF programs. An online survey was distributed to members of the Pediatric Heart Transplant Study and the Pediatric Council of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. All participants received the primary 23-question survey. Additionally, HF program directors received a 32-question supplemental survey. Of 235 invitations sent, there were 69 (29%) primary surveys and 34 program director surveys completed (24 U.S. programs, 9 outside non-U.S., and one non-specified location). A formal HF program was reported by 88% of directors. There were 150 [IQR 50-200] outpatients/institution and 40% [25-50] of patients had congenital heart disease. Inpatient HF census was 3 [2-4] patients. Most programs (70%) used a consulting service model to provide HF specialty care, while only 10 (30%) utilized an inpatient HF service. Inpatient HF service programs had a higher daily inpatient census versus consult service model programs (4 [3-7] vs. 2 [1-4], respectively; p = 0.022) and had a higher number of full-time equivalents dedicated to HF (5.5 [2-7] vs. 2.5 [1-4], respectively; p = 0.024). Only 47% of programs report a general fellowship rotation devoted to HF. Advanced practice providers (APP) were utilized in 15 programs, nurse coordinators in 2, and both in 3. Most HF programs are formalized, utilize APP, and have inadequate HF staffing to utilize a separate inpatient HF service. Exposure of general pediatric cardiology fellows to HF care is variable between institutions.

  1. A Systematic Survey Instrument Translation Process for Multi-Country, Comparative Health Workforce Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Allison; Aiken, Linda H.; van den Heede, Koen; Sermeus, Walter; Bruyneel, Luk; Lindqvist, Rikard; Schoonoven, Lisette; Stromseng, Ingeborg; Busse, Reinhard; Brozstek, Tomas; Ensio, Anneli; Moreno-Casbas, Mayte; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Schubert, Maria; Zikos, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    Background As health services research (HSR) expands across the globe, researchers will adopt health services and health worker evaluation instruments developed in one country for use in another. This paper explores the cross-cultural methodological challenges involved in translating HSR in the language and context of different health systems. Objectives To describe the pre-data collection systematic translation process used in a twelve country, eleven language nursing workforce survey. Design & Settings We illustrate the potential advantages of Content Validity Indexing (CVI) techniques to validate a nursing workforce survey developed for RN4CAST, a twelve country (Belgium, England, Finland, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland), eleven language (with modifications for regional dialects, including Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Italian, Norwegian, Polish, Spanish, and Swedish), comparative nursing workforce study in Europe. Participants Expert review panels comprised of practicing nurses from twelve European countries who evaluated cross-cultural relevance, including translation, of a nursing workforce survey instrument developed by experts in the field. Methods The method described in this paper used Content Validity Indexing (CVI) techniques with chance correction and provides researchers with a systematic approach for standardizing language translation processes while simultaneously evaluating the cross-cultural applicability of a survey instrument in the new context. Results The cross-cultural evaluation process produced CVI scores for the instrument ranging from .61 to .95. The process successfully identified potentially problematic survey items and errors with translation. Conclusions The translation approach described here may help researchers reduce threats to data validity and improve instrument reliability in multinational health services research studies involving comparisons across

  2. Western Australia facing critical losses in its midwifery workforce: a survey of midwives' intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Judith D; Twigg, Diane E; Martin, Tracy L; Rai, Tapan

    2013-05-01

    the ongoing attrition of the midwifery workforce frustrates future workforce planning and the provision of maternity services in Western Australia. This project determined factors contributing to the intention of the midwives to move jobs and/or leave the profession. a cross-sectional survey approach was taken for this descriptive research utilising a self-administered questionnaire developed by the Nursing and Midwifery Office, Department of Health, Western Australia. public and private health sectors in Western Australia, April-May 2010. 1,600 midwives employed in the public and private health sectors throughout Western Australia were invited to participate: 712 responded (44.5%), one-fifth of the state's registered midwives. most midwives worked part-time in a clinical role in public hospitals. Almost half intended moving jobs within 5 years and/or leaving midwifery. Excluding midwives of retirement age, the most common reasons for intending to move jobs were family commitments, working conditions and role dissatisfaction. Those intending to leave midwifery cited work-life balance, career change and family commitments. Midwives thought addressing the following issues would improve midwifery retention: flexible work arrangements, remuneration, staffing and caseload, workplace culture, professional development and models of care. retaining the midwifery workforce requires attention to workforce practices particularly flexible work arrangements and workloads; models of care to strengthen midwives' relationships with clients and colleagues; and accessible professional development. a review of workplace practices at unit and institution levels is urgently required in Western Australia so that midwives can achieve work-life balance and practice to the full extent of their professional role. These changes are necessary to forestall premature retirement of skilled and experienced midwives from the profession and workforce churn. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by

  3. The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey: The First National Survey of State Health Agency Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Katie; Leider, Jonathon P; Harper, Elizabeth; Castrucci, Brian C; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Liss-Levinson, Rivka; Jarris, Paul E; Hunter, Edward L

    2015-01-01

    Public health practitioners, policy makers, and researchers alike have called for more data on individual worker's perceptions about workplace environment, job satisfaction, and training needs for a quarter of a century. The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) was created to answer that call. Characterize key components of the public health workforce, including demographics, workplace environment, perceptions about national trends, and perceived training needs. A nationally representative survey of central office employees at state health agencies (SHAs) was conducted in 2014. Approximately 25,000 e-mail invitations to a Web-based survey were sent out to public health staff in 37 states, based on a stratified sampling approach. Balanced repeated replication weights were used to account for the complex sampling design. A total of 10,246 permanently employed SHA central office employees participated in PH WINS (46% response rate). Perceptions about training needs; workplace environment and job satisfaction; national initiatives and trends; and demographics. Although the majority of staff said they were somewhat or very satisfied with their job (79%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 78-80), as well as their organization (65%; 95% CI, 64-66), more than 42% (95% CI, 41-43) were considering leaving their organization in the next year or retiring before 2020; 4% of those were considering leaving for another job elsewhere in governmental public health. The majority of public health staff at SHA central offices are female (72%; 95% CI, 71-73), non-Hispanic white (70%; 95% CI, 69-71), and older than 40 years (73%; 95% CI, 72-74). The greatest training needs include influencing policy development, preparing a budget, and training related to the social determinants of health. PH WINS represents the first nationally representative survey of SHA employees. It holds significant potential to help answer previously unaddressed questions in public health

  4. Society of Pediatric Psychology Workforce Survey: Development of Survey Methods, Sample Characteristics, and Lessons Learned

    OpenAIRE

    Wysocki, Tim; Brosig, Cheryl L.; Hilliard, Marisa E.

    2016-01-01

    There are few detailed workforce studies of specialty fields within professional psychology, and none have been reported for pediatric psychology since 2006. Availability of such data could facilitate more-informed decision making by students and trainees, psychologists pursuing employment opportunities, and psychologists involved in employment or compensation negotiations. This article describes the work of a task force of the American Psychological Association (APA) Division 54 (Society of ...

  5. Pediatric Psychologists' Career Satisfaction: 2015 Society of Pediatric Psychology Workforce Survey Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Marisa E; Brosig, Cheryl; Williams, Andre A A; Valenzuela, Jessica; Kaugars, Astrida; Robins, Paul M; Christidis, Peggy; Stamm, Karen E; Wysocki, Tim

    2017-12-01

    Little is known about the career satisfaction of pediatric psychologists, who specialize in psychological research, teaching, and clinical service in the context of pediatric healthcare. As part of the larger Society of Pediatric Psychology Workforce Survey and in collaboration with the American Psychological Association Center for Workforce Studies, this study aimed to: (1) describe the career domains which pediatric psychologists perceive to be important and their satisfaction in each domain, and (2) compare satisfaction of pediatric psychologists across work settings, number of positions, appointment duration, professional roles, career stage, academic rank, and gender. Responses from 336 pediatric psychologists demonstrated high career satisfaction. Domains of career satisfaction that received mean scores indicating high importance include balance of work and personal lives, peer/collegial support, and flexibility and choice in the workplace, but on average respondents reported being only somewhat satisfied in these domains. Total satisfaction scores were significantly higher among pediatric psychologists in 9-10 month appointments, primarily research careers, and at higher academic ranks, but scores were similar across employment settings and genders. To enhance career satisfaction and retention, pediatric psychologists may seek additional mentorship or explore new employment roles, and administrators and managers may consider adopting workplace policies or making environmental changes that could address specific areas of need. This study suggests that overall, pediatric psychologists are highly satisfied with their employment. However, there may be some important aspects of their work that could be more satisfying. The findings have implications for identifying professional development strategies that can maintain or enhance satisfaction.

  6. Characterizing the Business Skills of the Public Health Workforce: Practical Implications From the Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornfeld, Julie; Sznol, Joshua; Lee, David

    2015-01-01

    Public health financial competencies are often overlooked or underrepresented in public health training programs. These skills are important for public health workforce members who are involved in managing resources and strategic planning and have been defined as key competencies by several national entities. To characterize business skills among state health agency employees and examine self-reported skill levels and their association with job satisfaction, worksite training and development opportunities, and annual salary. A cross-sectional survey, the Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS), of state health agency central office employees was conducted in 2014. Multivariable logistic regression analyses, controlling for job classification, supervisory status, years of public health practice, annual compensation, educational attainment, geographic region, and sociodemographic status, were used to assess the relationship between business skills and training environment and job satisfaction. Linear regression was used to correlate business skills and annual compensation. A total of 10,246 state health agency staff completed a Web-based survey. Self-reported proficiency in business skills, job satisfaction, opportunities for training, and annual salary. The workforce reported high levels of proficiency in applying quality improvement concepts and managing change (67.5% and 69.2%, respectively). Half of the respondents reported proficiency in budget skills (49.3%). Participants who were proficient in applying quality improvement concepts were significantly more likely to report job satisfaction (OR = 1.27). A supportive training environment was significantly associated with business competencies (range of OR = 1.08-1.11). Managing change (β = .15) and budget skill proficiency (β = .37) were significantly associated with increased yearly compensation. Public health workers who self-report proficiency with business skills report increased job

  7. Perceptions in health and medical research careers: the Australian Society for Medical Research Workforce Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavallaris, Maria; Meachem, Sarah J; Hulett, Mark D; West, Catherine M; Pitt, Rachael E; Chesters, Jennifer J; Laffan, Warren S; Boreham, Paul R; Khachigian, Levon M

    2008-05-05

    To report on the sentiments of the Australian health and medical research (HMR) workforce on issues related to employment and funding opportunities. In August 2006, the Australian Society for Medical Research (ASMR) invited all of its members to participate in an online survey. The survey took the form of a structured questionnaire that focused on career aspirations, career development and training opportunities, attitudes toward moving overseas to work, and employment conditions for medical researchers. Researchers' views on career opportunities, funding opportunities, salary and quality of the working environment; impact of these views on retaining a skilled medical research workforce in Australia. Of the 1258 ASMR members, 379 responded (30% response rate). Ninety-six per cent of respondents were currently based in Australia; 70% had a PhD or equivalent; and 58% were women. Most respondents worked at hospital research centres (37%), independent research institutes (28%) or university departments (24%). Sixty-nine per cent had funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council, with the remainder funded by other sources. Over the previous 5 years, 6% of respondents had left active research and 73% had considered leaving. Factors influencing decisions about whether to leave HMR included shortage of funding (91%), lack of career development opportunities (78%) and poor financial rewards (72%). Fifty-seven per cent of respondents were directly supported by grants or fellowships, with only 16% not reliant on grants for their continuing employment; 62% believed that funding had increased over the previous 5 years, yet only 30% perceived an increase in employment opportunities in HMR. Among the respondents, twice as many men as women held postgraduate qualifications and earned >or= dollars 100 000 a year. Employment insecurity and lack of funding are a cause of considerable anxiety among Australian health and medical researchers. This may have important

  8. Workforce Survey of Pediatric Interfacility Transport Systems in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanem, Justinn; Triscari, David; Chan, Melina; Meyer, Michael T

    2016-06-01

    The interfacility transport of pediatric patients requires a highly skilled and well-trained workforce, of which little is known. The primary study purpose was to characterize the current state of pediatric interfacility transport in the United States including, but not limited to, which team models predominate, what team configurations are used, team training standards, and the use of quality assurance metrics. A descriptive and qualitative Web-based survey questionnaire was developed. Potential participants were identified, and 1 survey was completed per team. In total, 179 teams with pediatric transport capabilities were identified, and 111 responses were recorded (response rate, 62%), of which dedicated teams comprised 77% and unit-based teams comprised 16%. Over 98% reported using a registered nurse as a team member, in comparison to 66% for respiratory therapists and 42% for paramedics. Less than 5% reported utilizing an associate level provider or physician for pediatric transports. The most common team composition was a registered nurse-respiratory therapist combination (30%). Over 55% of the respondents reported performing less than 500 pediatric transports per year. Quality assurance activities were performed by 96% of the respondents. The team composition and training for interfacility transport of pediatric patients is a complex and not well-characterized process; furthermore, the varying organizational models, team composition, and training requirements for teams have not been previously reported. These results will aid in the future development of team standards for pediatric transport and help guide further improvements in this field.

  9. Practice and research in Australian massage therapy: a national workforce survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, Jonathan L.; Barnett, Rebecca; Adams, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Background Massage is the largest complementary medicine profession in Australia, in terms of public utilisation, practitioner distribution, and number of practitioners, and is being increasingly integrated into the Australian health care system. However, despite the increasing importance of massage therapists in Australian health care delivery, or the increased practice and education obligations this may entail, there has been little exploration of practice, research, and education characteristics of the Australian massage therapist workforce. Purpose To identify practice, research, and education characteristics among the Australian massage therapist workforce. Settings The Australian massage therapy profession. Participants 301 randomly selected members of the Association of Massage Therapists (Australia). Research Design A 15-item, cross-sectional telephone survey. Main Outcomes Measures Massage therapists’ demographic information, practice characteristics, and education and research characteristics. Results Most respondents (73.8%) worked 20 hours per week or less practising massage, nearly half of all respondents (46.8%) treated fewer than 10 massage clients per week, and over three-quarters (81.7%) of respondents were self-employed. Massage therapy was the sole source of income for just over half (55.0%) of the study respondents. Only 5.7% of respondents earned over the average wage ($50,000) through their massage activities. Nearly half of all respondents (43.3%) reported regularly exceeding their continuing professional education (CPE) quota mandated by their professional association. However, 21.1% reported struggling to achieve their CPE quota each year. Over one-third of respondents (35.6%) were not interested in acquiring further CPE points beyond minimum requirements. Respondents were significantly more likely to have an active approach to research if they had higher income (p = .015). Multivariate analysis showed factors associated with access to

  10. Survey of the rural allied health workforce in New South Wales to inform recruitment and retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Sheila; Smith, Tony; Lincoln, Michelle; Fisher, Karin

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the demographics, employment, education and factors affecting recruitment and retention of New South Wales (NSW) rural allied health professionals. Descriptive study, cross-sectional survey. Regional, rural and remote areas of NSW, Australia. The sample includes 1879 respondents from more than 21 different allied health occupations. Variables included gender, age, marital status, employment sector, hours worked, community size, highest qualification, rural origin and continuing education, as well as others. Certain variables were compared for profession and gender. Women made up 70% of respondents, with a mean age of 42 years. Men were older, with more experience. Sixty per cent were of rural origin and 74% partnered, most with their partner also working. Eighty-four per cent worked in centres of 10,000 or more people. The public sector accounted for 46% of positions and the private sector 40%. Eleven per cent worked across multiple sectors and 18% were self-employed. Two-thirds worked 35 hours or more per week, although only 49% were employed full-time. Job satisfaction was high but 56% intended leaving within 10 years, 28% to retire. Over 90% of respondents qualified in Australia and more than 80% held a degree or higher qualification. Almost half were dissatisfied with access to continuing education. The NSW rural allied health workforce is strongly feminised, mature and experienced. Recruitment should target rural high school students and promote positive aspects of rural practice, such as diversity and autonomy. Retention strategies should include flexible employment options and career development opportunities. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  11. Characterizing Informatics Roles and Needs of Public Health Workers: Results From the Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Brian E; McFarlane, Timothy D; Dearth, Shandy; Grannis, Shaun J; Gibson, P Joseph

    2015-01-01

    To characterize public health workers who specialize in informatics and to assess informatics-related aspects of the work performed by the public health workforce. Using the nationally representative Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS), we characterized and compared responses from informatics, information technology (IT), clinical and laboratory, and other public health science specialists working in state health agencies. Demographics, income, education, and agency size were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Weighted medians and interquartile ranges were calculated for responses pertaining to job satisfaction, workplace environment, training needs, and informatics-related competencies. Of 10,246 state health workers, we identified 137 (1.3%) informatics specialists and 419 (4.1%) IT specialists. Overall, informatics specialists are younger, but share many common traits with other public health science roles, including positive attitudes toward their contributions to the mission of public health as well as job satisfaction. Informatics specialists differ demographically from IT specialists, and the 2 groups also differ with respect to salary as well as their distribution across agencies of varying size. All groups identified unmet public health and informatics competency needs, particularly limited training necessary to fully utilize technology for their work. Moreover, all groups indicated a need for greater future emphasis on leveraging electronic health information for public health functions. Findings from the PH WINS establish a framework and baseline measurements that can be leveraged to routinely monitor and evaluate the ineludible expansion and maturation of the public health informatics workforce and can also support assessment of the growth and evolution of informatics training needs for the broader field. Ultimately, such routine evaluations have the potential to guide local and national informatics workforce development

  12. The sloan digital sky survey-II supernova survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5° wide...... the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327...... spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during...

  13. Illinois State Plan: Adult Education and Family Literacy. Under Title II of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, Adult Education and Family Literacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Community College Board, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This document contains Illinois' State Plan for Adult Education and Family Literacy under Title II of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 for July 1, 1999, through June 30, 2015. The plan is comprised of the following sections: (1) Eligible agency certifications and assurances; (2) Description of the steps to ensure direct and equitable access;…

  14. Pediatric dentistry workforce in Puerto Rico: results of a 2011 survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo, Oscar; Saman, Daniel M; Tabares, Miguel; Sotomayor, Lauramar; Hernández, Ana

    2013-03-01

    Determine the socio-demographic and educational characteristics of and develop a profile of practice for Pediatric Dentists (PDs) in Puerto Rico. A 34-item questionnaire assessing 3 dimensions: socio-demographic and education, practice profile, and level of satisfaction/desire to relocate, was developed and pre-tested for comprehensiveness, validity, and reliability. Data were collected through telephone interviews by a calibrated interviewer, entered and tabulated using Excel (Microsoft Office 2010) and exported to SPSS v. 17 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). Descriptive statistical analyses were conducted. Eighty percent (80%) of all of the licensed PDs in PR participated in our study. The typical PD in PR has been in practice for 19 years, is 48 years old, and spends 31 hours/week providing clinical care. Female PDs, who comprise 70% of the PD workforce, devote more time to clinical and managerial activities than do their male counterparts. Seventy-three percent (73%) of the current PD workforce will be retiring within the next 20 years and 70% are solo-practitioners. Most PDs (65%) participate in the government-subsidized dental insurance program "Mi Salud," which represents as much as 48% of their income. PDs beginning or ending their careers were more likely to be participating providers for "Mi Salud" than were those in mid-career. In evaluating the adequacy of the pediatric dentistry workforce in Puerto Rico, the socio-demographic information of the PDs and the characteristics of their practices must be taken into account. These variables must be examined in relation to epidemiological indicators as well as environmental factors, including the comprehensiveness of dental benefits and the adequacy of reimbursement levels by third-party payers, which when inadequate may lead to decreased access to care.

  15. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment, Phase II, Post-Secondary Education Profile: Solid Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    Educational programs in solid waste management offered by 16 schools in 9 states were surveyed. These programs represent a sample, only, of the various programs available nationwide. Enrollment and graduate statistics are presented. Overall, 116 full-time and 124 part-time faculty were involved in the programs surveyed. Curricula and sources of…

  16. The involvement of midwives' associations in policy and planning about the midwifery workforce: A global survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Sofia Castro; Titulaer, Patricia; Bokosi, Martha; Homer, Caroline S E; ten Hoope-Bender, Petra

    2015-11-01

    a fit-for-purpose midwifery workforce is needed to respond to the current and future needs in sexual, reproductive, maternal and newborn health and to achieve universal health coverage. Evidence-based policy and planning that involves all stakeholders, including professional associations can assist with the development of such a workforce. The aim of the study was to explore how and when midwives' associations are involved in the planning processes for the midwifery workforce and which tools and approaches the associations perceived were used to support human resources for health policy. all 108 member associations of the International Confederation of Midwives were invited to participate. A questionnaire collected data including: the involvement of the association in the national planning dialogue, processes and methods for participation and engagement; mechanisms to guide and inform decision-making; and, the tools, data and evidence used to influence human resources for health policy. A descriptive analysis was conducted and comparisons were made by country group based on national income strata. 73 (68%) midwives' associations participated in the study, representing 67 (71%) countries. In most (95%) countries, the planning process to determine the provision of reproductive, maternal and newborn health was centralised at the ministry of health level and included midwives' associations amongst others. Less than two thirds of associations reported involvement in planning and policy. The planning processes in which they took part were the reproductive, maternal and newborn plan (63%), the national health plan (58%), and the human resources for health plan (52%). Planning was more frequently undertaken at national than sub-national levels in middle- and low-income countries than in high-income countries. Midwives associations were often unaware of the human resources for health approaches used to calculate the number of midwives required, and reported low use of

  17. Exploring Student-to-Workforce Transitions with the National Geoscience Exit Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, L. M.; Keane, C. M.; Houlton, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    In 2011, the American Geological Institute (AGI) launched the first pilot of a National Geoscience Exit Survey in collaboration with 32 geoscience university departments. The survey collects data about demographics, high school and community college coursework, university degrees, financial aid, field and research experiences, internships, and when and why the student chose to pursue a geosciences degree. Additionally, the survey collects information about students' future academic and career plans, and gives participants the option to take part in a longitudinal survey to track long-term career trajectories of geosciences graduates. The survey also provides geoscience departments with the ability to add customized questions to collect data about important departmental-level topics. The National Geoscience Exit Survey will be available to all U.S. geoscience programs at two- and four-year colleges and universities by the end of the 2011-2012 academic year. We use the results of the National Geoscience Exit Survey to examine student preparation and transition into geosciences and non-geoscience careers. Preliminary results from the pilot survey indicated future academic and career trajectories for geoscience Bachelor's degree recipients included graduate school (53%) and pursuit of a geoscience career (45%), with some undergraduates keeping their options open for either trajectory. Twelve percent of Bachelor's degree recipients already accepted job offers with geoscience employers. For geoscience Master's degree recipients, 17% planned to continue in graduate school, 35% were seeking a geoscience job, and 42% had already accepted job offers with geoscience employers. Furthermore, the majority of those geoscience graduates who already accepted geoscience job offers had also interned previously with the employer.

  18. Workforce and Salary Survey Trends: Opportunities and Challenges for the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Michael D., E-mail: mdmill03@exchange.louisville.edu

    2015-07-01

    The American Association of Medical Dosimetrists (AAMD) designed and directed 2 surveys of the AAMD membership. The first was in 2011 and the second in 2014. There were a number of questions common to both surveys, and this article seeks to evaluate these common questions to determine trends among the professional membership of the AAMD. It is demonstrated that the observed trends are consistent with the goals and objectives established by the leadership of the AAMD and the Medical Dosimetry Certification Board (MDCB) for the medical dosimetry community. In addition, certain challenges and opportunities involving the scope of practice for the medical dosimetry profession are discussed.

  19. Workforce Perceptions of Hospital Safety Culture: Development and Validation of the Patient Safety Climate in Healthcare Organizations Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara; Meterko, Mark; Baker, Laurence; Gaba, David; Falwell, Alyson; Rosen, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Objective To describe the development of an instrument for assessing workforce perceptions of hospital safety culture and to assess its reliability and validity. Data Sources/Study Setting Primary data collected between March 2004 and May 2005. Personnel from 105 U.S. hospitals completed a 38-item paper and pencil survey. We received 21,496 completed questionnaires, representing a 51 percent response rate. Study Design Based on review of existing safety climate surveys, we developed a list of key topics pertinent to maintaining a culture of safety in high-reliability organizations. We developed a draft questionnaire to address these topics and pilot tested it in four preliminary studies of hospital personnel. We modified the questionnaire based on experience and respondent feedback, and distributed the revised version to 42,249 hospital workers. Data Collection We randomly divided respondents into derivation and validation samples. We applied exploratory factor analysis to responses in the derivation sample. We used those results to create scales in the validation sample, which we subjected to multitrait analysis (MTA). Principal Findings We identified nine constructs, three organizational factors, two unit factors, three individual factors, and one additional factor. Constructs demonstrated substantial convergent and discriminant validity in the MTA. Cronbach's α coefficients ranged from 0.50 to 0.89. Conclusions It is possible to measure key salient features of hospital safety climate using a valid and reliable 38-item survey and appropriate hospital sample sizes. This instrument may be used in further studies to better understand the impact of safety climate on patient safety outcomes. PMID:17850530

  20. Urinary incontinence, work, and intention to leave current job: A cross sectional survey of the Australian nursing and midwifery workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Heather; Perry, Lin; Gallagher, Robyn; Chiarelli, Pauline

    2017-09-01

    To determine the prevalence and severity of urinary incontinence (UI) in a group of female nurses and midwives, and to examine the relationship between UI, work and intention to leave current job. An electronic survey "Fit for the future" was distributed to nurses and midwives in NSW, Australia between May 2014 and February 2015. UI was investigated using the International Consultation on Incontinence UI-Short Form. Examined work characteristics included: work role, location, setting, contract, shift, job satisfaction, and plans to leave current job. Logistic regression modelling was performed to determine whether the severity of UI had an independent effect on intention to leave. Of 5041 survey responses, 68.5% answered the question on urine leakage. Of the included female sample (n = 2,907) the prevalence of UI was 32.0% (95% CI: 30-34%): of these 40.5% experienced moderate and 4.4% "severe or very severe" symptoms. UI was more likely to be reported in nurses or midwives working part-time or days only (not shifts). Those with "severe or very severe UI" were more likely to indicate an intention to leave at 12 months (OR: 2.68; 95% CI: 1.18-6.06) than those with slight or moderate symptoms, after accounting for age, body mass index, parity, pelvic organ prolapse, anxiety, depression, work contract, shift, and job satisfaction. UI is a condition of high prevalence and significant severity in female nurses and midwives. In this workforce, severe UI was associated with intentions related to future employment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Evaluating the health and economic impact of osteoarthritis pain in the workforce: results from the National Health and Wellness Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDonald Margaret

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been increasing recognition that osteoarthritis (OA affects younger individuals who are still participants in the workforce, but there are only limited data on the contribution of OA pain to work productivity and other outcomes in an employed population. This study evaluated the impact of OA pain on healthcare resource utilization, productivity and costs in employed individuals. Methods Data were derived from the 2009 National Health and Wellness Survey. Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to characterize employed individuals (full-time, part-time, or self-employed ≥20 years of age who were diagnosed with OA and had arthritis pain in the past month relative to employed individuals not diagnosed with OA or not experiencing arthritis pain in the past month. Work productivity was assessed using the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI questionnaire; health status was assessed using the physical (PCS and mental component summary (MCS scores from the SF-12v2 Health Survey and SF-6D health utilities; and healthcare utilization was evaluated by type and number of resources within the past 6 months. Direct and indirect costs were estimated and compared between the two cohorts. Results Individuals with OA pain were less likely to be employed. Relative to workers without OA pain (n = 37,599, the OA pain cohort (n = 2,173 was significantly older (mean age 52.1 ± 11.5 years vs 41.4 ± 13.2 years; P P P P P P Conclusions A substantial proportion of workers suffer from OA pain. After controlling for confounders, the impact of OA pain was significant, resulting in lower productivity and higher costs.

  2. Foreign students as a resource of skilled workforce in the region (on materials of sociological survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubinskaya Eteri, D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific and technical revolution leads to permanent changes in the structure of social production. As a consequence, in employment increased the demand for specialists in a specific profile, depending on the development of science and industry at this stage. Russian post-industrial economy is impossible without a sufficient number of qualified professionals required by the economy. One of the effective ways to ensure country qualified professionals is foreign graduates who have received after graduation the opportunity to stay and work in the labor market of the host country. The paper presents results of sociological survey of international students in the Southern Federal University. The objectives of the survey was to determine the migration attractiveness of the Rostov region, conditions of adaptation and integration of foreign students, as well as identifying the prospects of their involvement in the regional labour market after receiving education. On the basis of generalization of the results in the paper drawn conclusions, given recommendations for improving conditions to attract of foreign students at the regional level.

  3. Measuring success: Results from a national survey of recruitment and retention initiatives in the nursing workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carthon, J. Margo Brooks; Nguyen, Thai-Huy; Chittams, Jesse; Park, Elizabeth; Guevara, James

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to identify common components of diversity pipeline programs across a national sample of nursing institutions and determine what effect these programs have on increasing underrepresented minority enrollment and graduation. Design Linked data from an electronic survey conducted November 2012 to March 2013 and American Association of Colleges of Nursing baccalaureate graduation and enrollment data (2008 and 2012). Participants Academic and administrative staff of 164 nursing schools in 26 states, including Puerto Rico in the United States. Methods Chi-square statistics were used to (1) describe organizational features of nursing diversity pipeline programs and (2) determine significant trends in underrepresented minorities’ graduation and enrollment between nursing schools with and without diversity pipeline programs Results Twenty percent (n = 33) of surveyed nursing schools reported a structured diversity pipeline program. The most frequent program measures associated with pipeline programs included mentorship, academic, and psychosocial support. Asian, Hispanic, and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander nursing student enrollment increased between 2008 and 2012. Hispanic/Latino graduation rates increased (7.9%–10.4%, p = .001), but they decreased among Black (6.8%–5.0%, p = .004) and Native American/Pacific Islander students (2.1 %–0.3%, p ≥ .001). Conclusions Nursing diversity pipeline programs are associated with increases in nursing school enrollment and graduation for some, although not all, minority students. Future initiatives should build on current trends while creating targeted strategies to reverse downward graduation trends among Black, Native American, and Pacific Island nursing students. PMID:24880900

  4. Health impacts of exposure to second hand smoke (SHS amongst a highly exposed workforce: survey of London casino workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmore Anna B

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Casino workers are exposed to high levels of secondhand smoke (SHS at work, yet remain at risk of being excluded from smoke-free legislation around the world. If the prime motivation for smoke-free legislation is the protection of workers, then a workforce experiencing ill-health associated with SHS exposure should not be excluded from legislation. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of respiratory and sensory irritation symptoms among a sample of casino workers, to identify any association between the reporting of symptoms and exposure to SHS at work, and to compare the prevalence of symptoms with that in other workers exposed to SHS. Methods A postal questionnaire survey of 1568 casino workers in London. Using multivariate analysis we identified predictors of respiratory and sensory irritation symptoms. Results 559 workers responded to the questionnaire (response of 36%. 91% of casino workers reported the presence of one or more sensory irritation symptoms in the previous four weeks, while the figure was 84% for respiratory symptoms. The presence of one or more sensory irritation symptoms was most strongly associated with reporting the highest exposure to SHS at work (OR 3.26; 1.72, 6.16. This was also true for reporting the presence of one or more respiratory irritation symptoms (OR 2.24; 1.34, 3.74. Prevalence of irritation symptoms in the casino workers was in general appreciably higher than that reported in studies of bar workers. Conclusion Our research supports the need for comprehensive smoke-free legislation around the world, covering all indoor workplaces including casinos.

  5. The Extended Northern ROSAT Galaxy Cluster Survey (NORAS II). I. Survey Construction and First Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung; Trümper, Joachim [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Retzlaff, Jörg [ESO, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Meisenheimer, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schartel, Norbert [ESAC, Camino Bajo del Castillo, Villanueva de la Cañada, E-28692 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-05-01

    As the largest, clearly defined building blocks of our universe, galaxy clusters are interesting astrophysical laboratories and important probes for cosmology. X-ray surveys for galaxy clusters provide one of the best ways to characterize the population of galaxy clusters. We provide a description of the construction of the NORAS II galaxy cluster survey based on X-ray data from the northern part of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. NORAS II extends the NORAS survey down to a flux limit of 1.8 × 10{sup −12} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2} (0.1–2.4 keV), increasing the sample size by about a factor of two. The NORAS II cluster survey now reaches the same quality and depth as its counterpart, the southern REFLEX II survey, allowing us to combine the two complementary surveys. The paper provides information on the determination of the cluster X-ray parameters, the identification process of the X-ray sources, the statistics of the survey, and the construction of the survey selection function, which we provide in numerical format. Currently NORAS II contains 860 clusters with a median redshift of z  = 0.102. We provide a number of statistical functions, including the log N –log S and the X-ray luminosity function and compare these to the results from the complementary REFLEX II survey. Using the NORAS II sample to constrain the cosmological parameters, σ {sub 8} and Ω{sub m}, yields results perfectly consistent with those of REFLEX II. Overall, the results show that the two hemisphere samples, NORAS II and REFLEX II, can be combined without problems into an all-sky sample, just excluding the zone of avoidance.

  6. The CLASS blazar survey - II. Optical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caccianiga, A; Marcha, MJ; Anton, S; Mack, KH; Neeser, MJ

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the optical properties of the objects selected in the CLASS blazar survey. Because an optical spectrum is now available for 70 per cent of the 325 sources present in the sample, a spectral classification, based on the appearance of the emission/absorption lines, is possible. A

  7. Pajarito Plateau archaeological surveys and excavations. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, C R

    1982-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory continues its archaeological program of data gathering and salvage excavations. Sites recently added to the archaeological survey are described, as well as the results of five excavations. Among the more interesting and important discoveries are (1) the apparently well-established local use of anhydrous lime, and (2) a late pre-Columbian use of earlier house sites and middens for garden plots. Evidence indicated that the local puebloan population was the result of an expansion of upper Rio Grande peoples, not an influx of migrants.

  8. SURVEY OF GROSS ALPHA AND BETA RADIOACTIVITY ii WELL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-07-03

    Jul 3, 2005 ... SURVEY OF GROSS ALPHA AND BETA RADIOACTIVITY ii. WELL WATER FROM ZARIA AND ITS ENVIRONS. R. A. Onoja, T. C. Akpa", S. P. Mallam and l. G. E. lbeanu, . Health Physics and Radiation Biophysics Section,. Centre for Energy Research and Training, Ahmadu Bel/o University, Zaria, Nigeria.

  9. Wind Energy Workforce Development & Jobs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, Suzanne

    2016-11-08

    The United States needs a skilled and qualified wind energy workforce to produce domestic clean power. To assist with wind energy workforce development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory are engaged with several efforts.This presentation by Suzanne Tegen describes these efforts, including a wind industry survey, DOE's Wind Career Map, the DOE Wind Vision report, and an in-depth discussion of the Jobs & Economic Development Impacts Model.

  10. The Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; C. Becker, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey conducted between 2005 and 2007. Light curves, spectra, classifications, and ancillary data are presented for 10,258 variable and transient sources discovered through repeat ugriz imaging of SDSS......, making this the largest sample of supernova candidates ever compiled. We present a new method for SN host-galaxy identification and derive host-galaxy properties including stellar masses, star-formation rates, and the average stellar population ages from our SDSS multi-band photometry. We derive SALT2...

  11. A survey of engagement and competence levels in interventions and activities in a community mental health workforce in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang Linda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background National Health Service (NHS mental health workforce configuration is at the heart of successful delivery, and providers are advised to produce professional development strategies. Recent policy changes in England have sharpened the focus on competency based role development. We determined levels of intervention activities, engagement and competence and their influencing factors in a community-setting mental health workforce. Methods Using a modified questionnaire based on the Yorkshire Care Pathways Model we investigated 153 mental health staff working in Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust. A median score of competence was computed across 10 cluster activities. Low engagement and competence levels were examined in a logistic regression model. Results In 220 activities, Monitoring risk was the highest rate of engagement (97.6% and Group psychological therapy/Art/Drama therapy was the lowest engagement (3.6%. The median competence level based on all activities was 3.95 (proficient. There were significant differences in the competence level among professional groups; non-qualified support group (3.00 for competent, Counsellor/Psychologist/Therapist (3.38, Occupational therapists (3.76, Nurses (4.01, Medical staff (4.05, Social workers (4.25 and Psychologists (4.62 for proficient/expert. These levels varied with activity clusters; the lowest level was for Counsellor/Psychologist/Therapist in the accommodation activity (1.44 novice/advance beginner and the highest for Occupational therapists in personal activity (4.94 expert. In a multivariate analysis, low competence was significantly related to non-qualified community support professions, late time of obtaining first qualification, more frequencies of clinical training, and training of cognitive behavioural therapy. The associations were similar in the analysis for 10 activity clusters respectively. Conclusions There was a reasonable competence level in the community

  12. Status of the Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Matthew; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Alcock, Charles; Castro Chacón, Joel; Chen, Wen-Ping; Chu, You-Hua; Cook, Kem H.; Figueroa, Liliana; Geary, John C.; Hernandez, Benjamin; Huang, Chung-Kai; Norton, Timothy; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Yen, Wei-Ling; Zhang, Zhi-Wei

    2017-10-01

    The Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II) will aim to detect occultations of stars by small (~1 km diameter) objects in the Kuiper Belt and beyond. Such events are very rare (<0.001 events per star per year) and short in duration (~200 ms), so many stars must be monitored at a high readout cadence. TAOS II will operate three 1.3 meter telescopes at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional at San Pedro Mártir in Baja California, México. With a 2.3 square degree field of view and a high speed camera comprising CMOS imagers, the survey will monitor 10,000 stars simultaneously with all three telescopes at a readout cadence of 20 Hz. Construction of the site began in the fall of 2013 and was completed this summer. Telescope installation began in August 2017. This poster will provide an update on the status of the survey development and the schedule leading to the beginning of survey operations.

  13. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington; Choi, Changsu; /Seoul Natl. U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, Darren L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hogan, Craig J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Marshall, Jennifer L.; /Ohio State U.; McGinnis,; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Pennsylvania U.

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

  14. Survey of biomass gasification. Volume II. Principles of gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, T.B. (comp.)

    1979-07-01

    Biomass can be converted by gasification into a clean-burning gaseous fuel that can be used to retrofit existing gas/oil boilers, to power engines, to generate electricity, and as a base for synthesis of methanol, gasoline, ammonia, or methane. This survey describes biomass gasification, associated technologies, and issues in three volumes. Volume I contains the synopsis and executive summary, giving highlights of the findings of the other volumes. In Volume II the technical background necessary for understanding the science, engineering, and commercialization of biomass is presented. In Volume III the present status of gasification processes is described in detail, followed by chapters on economics, gas conditioning, fuel synthesis, the institutional role to be played by the federal government, and recommendations for future research and development.

  15. Practice patterns, satisfaction, and demographics of reproductive endocrinologists: results of the 2014 Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Workforce Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Kurt T; Nakajima, Steven T; Puscheck, Elizabeth; Price, Thomas M; Baker, Valerie L; Segars, James

    2016-05-01

    To identify the current and future state of the practice of reproductive medicine. Cross-sectional survey. Not applicable. None. Not applicable. The survey included 57 questions designed to assess practice patterns/metrics and professional satisfaction and morale. A total of 336/1,100 (31%) responded, and they were 38% women, 61% men, and 76% Caucasian, with a mean age of 54. Respondents averaged 2.3 jobs and averaged 53 hours of work per week: 44% work in academia and 50% in private groups. Average practice size was 5.5, with an average of 470 fresh IVF cycles performed per year. Percent effort included 63% infertility, 10% endocrinology, 10% surgery, and 9% research. Respondents performed an average of 13 major surgeries, 69 minor surgeries, and 128 oocyte retrievals per year. A total of 60% were salaried, and 40% were equity partners. Compensation was highly skewed. Greater than 84% had a positive morale and had a positive view of the future, and 92% would again choose REI as a career. The most satisfying areas of employment were patient interactions, intellectual stimulation, interactions with colleagues, and work schedule. The least satisfying areas were work schedule and financial compensation. Training was felt to be too focused on female factor infertility and basic research with insufficient training on embryology, genetics, male factor infertility, and clinical research. In the next 5 years, 57% suggested that the need for specialists would stay the same, while 20% predicted a decrease. A total of 58% felt we are training the correct number of fellows (37% felt we are training a surplus). Compared with academia, those in private practice reported higher compensation, less major surgery, more IVF, less endocrinology, and less research. Men worked more hours, conducted more surgery and IVF cycles, and had higher compensation than women. Morale was similar across age, gender, practice type, and geography. Our subspecialty has an extremely high morale. We

  16. The Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Masao; et al.

    2014-01-14

    This paper describes the data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey conducted between 2005 and 2007. Light curves, spectra, classifications, and ancillary data are presented for 10,258 variable and transient sources discovered through repeat ugriz imaging of SDSS Stripe 82, a 300 deg2 area along the celestial equator. This data release is comprised of all transient sources brighter than r~22.5 mag with no history of variability prior to 2004. Dedicated spectroscopic observations were performed on a subset of 889 transients, as well as spectra for thousands of transient host galaxies using the SDSS-III BOSS spectrographs. Photometric classifications are provided for the candidates with good multi-color light curves that were not observed spectroscopically. From these observations, 4607 transients are either spectroscopically confirmed, or likely to be, supernovae, making this the largest sample of supernova candidates ever compiled. We present a new method for SN host-galaxy identification and derive host-galaxy properties including stellar masses, star-formation rates, and the average stellar population ages from our SDSS multi-band photometry. We derive SALT2 distance moduli for a total of 1443 SN Ia with spectroscopic redshifts as well as photometric redshifts for a further 677 purely-photometric SN Ia candidates. Using the spectroscopically confirmed subset of the three-year SDSS-II SN Ia sample and assuming a flat Lambda-CDM cosmology, we determine Omega_M = 0.315 +/- 0.093 (statistical error only) and detect a non-zero cosmological constant at 5.7 sigmas.

  17. Next generation workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    The health care industry has become a very complex business. CQsts are rising and resources such as funding and human capital are diminishing. Human capital resources are about to reach true crisis proportions. The vital workforce we have counted on is expected to begin thinning as large numbers of Boomers retire. Not only does this deplete the workforce from a pure numbers perspective, but it also affects intellectual capital and institutional memory. Generational trends and characteristics have affected the workforce environment and will continue to do so as another generation continues to enter the workforce. Generation Y, also tagged Nexter, offers core values that can bring positive changes to the health care workforce. Technology continues to change at lightning speed. Embracing new technology and using it to refine the way we do business will help deliver success. Meaningful strategic plans are needed to change the model of business delivery and employee care in our future workforce.

  18. Integrated Workforce Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Gary P.

    2000-01-01

    There are several computer-based systems, currently in various phases of development at KSC, which encompass some component, aspect, or function of workforce modeling. These systems may offer redundant capabilities and/or incompatible interfaces. A systems approach to workforce modeling is necessary in order to identify and better address user requirements. This research has consisted of two primary tasks. Task 1 provided an assessment of existing and proposed KSC workforce modeling systems for their functionality and applicability to the workforce planning function. Task 2 resulted in the development of a proof-of-concept design for a systems approach to workforce modeling. The model incorporates critical aspects of workforce planning, including hires, attrition, and employee development.

  19. The Public Health Nurse Workforce in U.S. State and Local Health Departments, 2012

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beck, Angela J; Boulton, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    .... An advisory committee convened by the University of Michigan Center of Excellence in Public Health Workforce Studies developed the Public Health Nurse Workforce Survey and disseminated it in 2012...

  20. Determinants of emergency response willingness in the local public health workforce by jurisdictional and scenario patterns: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnett Daniel J

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The all-hazards willingness to respond (WTR of local public health personnel is critical to emergency preparedness. This study applied a threat-and efficacy-centered framework to characterize these workers' scenario and jurisdictional response willingness patterns toward a range of naturally-occurring and terrorism-related emergency scenarios. Methods Eight geographically diverse local health department (LHD clusters (four urban and four rural across the U.S. were recruited and administered an online survey about response willingness and related attitudes/beliefs toward four different public health emergency scenarios between April 2009 and June 2010 (66% response rate. Responses were dichotomized and analyzed using generalized linear multilevel mixed model analyses that also account for within-cluster and within-LHD correlations. Results Comparisons of rural to urban LHD workers showed statistically significant odds ratios (ORs for WTR context across scenarios ranging from 1.5 to 2.4. When employees over 40 years old were compared to their younger counterparts, the ORs of WTR ranged from 1.27 to 1.58, and when females were compared to males, the ORs of WTR ranged from 0.57 to 0.61. Across the eight clusters, the percentage of workers indicating they would be unwilling to respond regardless of severity ranged from 14-28% for a weather event; 9-27% for pandemic influenza; 30-56% for a radiological 'dirty' bomb event; and 22-48% for an inhalational anthrax bioterrorism event. Efficacy was consistently identified as an important independent predictor of WTR. Conclusions Response willingness deficits in the local public health workforce pose a threat to all-hazards response capacity and health security. Local public health agencies and their stakeholders may incorporate key findings, including identified scenario-based willingness gaps and the importance of efficacy, as targets of preparedness curriculum development efforts and

  1. National Youth Survey US: Wave II (NYS-1977)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Youth data for the second wave of the National Youth Survey are contained in this data collection. The first wave was conducted in 1976. Youths were interviewed in...

  2. The American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology workforce assessment: Part 1-Current state of the workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hord, Jeffrey; Shah, Mona; Badawy, Sherif M; Matthews, Dana; Hilden, Joanne; Wayne, Alan S; Salsberg, Edward; Leavey, Patrick S

    2018-02-01

    The American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (ASPHO) recognized recent changes in medical practice and the potential impact on pediatric hematology-oncology (PHO) workforce. ASPHO surveyed society members and PHO Division Directors between 2010 and 2016 and studied PHO workforce data collected by the American Board of Pediatrics and the American Medical Association to characterize the current state of the PHO workforce. The analysis of this information has led to a comprehensive description of PHO physicians, professional activities, and workplace. It is important to continue to collect data to identify changes in composition and needs of the PHO workforce. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The Faint Sky Variability Survey II: Initial Results

    OpenAIRE

    Everett, M. E.; Huber, M.E.; Howell, S. B.

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the first results from the Faint Sky Variability Survey (Groot et al. 2000). The data consist of V-band light curves, BVI colours, astrometry, and morphology information on several hundred thousand point and extended sources in the magnitude range V=17-25. We discuss the first 30 survey fields covering an area of 8.4 square degrees towards moderate and high galactic latitudes. We analyse the quality of and discuss our differential photometry light curves. We employ statistical meth...

  4. Rotating Workforce Scheduling

    OpenAIRE

    Granfeldt, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Several industries use what is called rotating workforce scheduling. This often means that employees are needed around the clock seven days a week, and that they have a schedule which repeats itself after some weeks. This thesis gives an introduction to this kind of scheduling and presents a review of previous work done in the field. Two different optimization models for rotating workforce scheduling are formulated and compared, and some examples are created to demonstrate how the addition of...

  5. Innovation in Workforce Incentives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-13

    Secretary of Defense and Service Secretaries should implement clearer, more tangible recognition, incentives , and enhanced promotion ...May 13, 2015 Innovation in Workforce Incentives Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection...Innovation in Workforce Incentives 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  6. A Type II Supernova Hubble Diagram from the CSP-I, SDSS-II, and SNLS Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jaeger, T.; González-Gaitán, S.; Hamuy, M.; Galbany, L.; Anderson, J. P.; Phillips, M. M.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Carlberg, R. G.; Sullivan, M.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. Andrew; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Folatelli, G.; Pritchet, C.; Basa, S.

    2017-02-01

    The coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will restrict spectroscopic follow-up in the vast majority of cases, and hence new methods based solely on photometric data must be developed. Here, we construct a complete Hubble diagram of Type II supernovae (SNe II) combining data from three different samples: the Carnegie Supernova Project-I, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II SN, and the Supernova Legacy Survey. Applying the Photometric Color Method (PCM) to 73 SNe II with a redshift range of 0.01-0.5 and with no spectral information, we derive an intrinsic dispersion of 0.35 mag. A comparison with the Standard Candle Method (SCM) using 61 SNe II is also performed and an intrinsic dispersion in the Hubble diagram of 0.27 mag, I.e., 13% in distance uncertainties, is derived. Due to the lack of good statistics at higher redshifts for both methods, only weak constraints on the cosmological parameters are obtained. However, assuming a flat universe and using the PCM, we derive the universe’s matter density: {{{Ω }}}m={0.32}-0.21+0.30 providing a new independent evidence for dark energy at the level of two sigma. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes, with the du Pont and Swope telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; and the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Program N-2005A-Q-11, GN-2005B-Q-7, GN-2006A-Q-7, GS-2005A-Q-11, GS-2005B-Q-6, and GS-2008B-Q-56). Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programmes 076.A-0156,078.D-0048, 080.A-0516, and 082.A-0526).

  7. The Quality of Nurses' Work Environment and Workforce Outcomes From the Perspective of Swiss Allied Healthcare Assistants and Registered Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacher, Stefanie; De Geest, Sabina; Denhaerynck, Kris; Trede, Ines; Ausserhofer, Dietmar

    2015-09-01

    Anticipating nursing shortages, the Swiss healthcare system recently introduced the position of allied healthcare assistant (AHA). However, indicators of AHAs' integration and stability, particularly their perceptions of their work environment quality and related outcomes (i.e., burnout, job satisfaction, and intention to leave), remain unclear. (a) To describe AHAs' ratings of the quality of the nurse work environment, job satisfaction, burnout, and intention to leave their workplaces; (b) to compare AHAs' and registered nurses' (RNs') work environment quality ratings and related outcomes; and (c) to assess links between AHAs' work environment quality ratings and related workforce outcomes. A secondary analysis of RN4CAST data (October 2009 to June 2010) on 61 AHAs and 466 RNs in 13 Swiss acute care hospitals. We used descriptive statistics to summarize data of AHAs and RNs on their units and hospitals. Via binary logistic regression models, we compared AHAs and RNs and identified associations between work environment ratings and workforce outcomes. AHAs' work environment quality ratings were significantly higher than those of RNs, and were associated with lower odds of burnout and intention to leave their current job and higher odds of reported job satisfaction. This study provides primary evidence linking AHAs' work environment quality ratings to burnout, job satisfaction, and intention to leave in acute care hospitals. Given the increasing importance of AHAs for nursing care provision, hospitals should assess the quality of nurse work environment and nurse outcomes from the perspective of all nurses. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  8. A SURVEY ON ANALYZING THE IMPACT OF BASEL II STANDARDS OVER SMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEVİN YÖRÜK

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Basel-II is a comprehensive arrangement that determines the standards of capital adequacy of banks and brings risk management in the foreground. It will be performed in European Union and G-10 countries beginning from 2009 and in our country beginning from 2009. The targets of Basel-II standards are increasing the risk measurement and capacity of banks and in this way providing to have a stronger banking system. However Basel-II arrangements are intended for banking and finance system, it concerns SMEs closely that want to use credit from system. Crossing from process of traditional credit granting to process of risk focused credit granting with Basel-II, period, volume, price and guarentee of credits that will be used by SMEs will be affected. A survey was conducted for determining SMEs’ level of understanding and performing the international Basel-II standards that are planned to put into practice in Turkey beginning from 2007, for determining the financing problems of firms in process of transition to Basel-II, for researching the potential competition between SMEs created by Basel-II standards. According to results of survey the SMEs of Amasya have knowledge about Basel-II criteria and think that they will not face any problems in the process of transition.

  9. The STREGA survey - II. Globular cluster Palomar 12★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musella, I.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Marconi, M.; Raimondo, G.; Ripepi, V.; Cignoni, M.; Bono, G.; Brocato, E.; Dall'Ora, M.; Ferraro, I.; Grado, A.; Iannicola, G.; Limatola, L.; Molinaro, R.; Moretti, M. I.; Stetson, P. B.; Capaccioli, M.; Cioni, M.-R. L.; Getman, F.; Schipani, P.

    2018-01-01

    In the framework of the STREGA (STRucture and Evolution of the GAlaxy) survey, two fields around the globular cluster Pal 12 were observed with the aim of detecting the possible presence of streams and/or an extended halo. The adopted stellar tracers are the main sequence, turn-off and red giant branch stars. We discuss the luminosity function and the star counts in the observed region covering about 2 tidal radii, confirming that Pal 12 appears to be embedded in the Sagittarius Stream. Adopting an original approach to separate cluster and field stars, we do not find any evidence of significant extra-tidal Pal 12 stellar populations. The presence of the Sagittarius stream seems to have mimicked a larger tidal radius in previous studies. Indeed, adopting a King model, a redetermination of this value gives rT = 0.22 ± 0.1 deg.

  10. The Medical Physics Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhauser, Wayne D

    2017-02-01

    The medical physics workforce comprises approximately 24,000 workers worldwide and approximately 8,200 in the United States. The occupation is a recognized, established, and mature profession that is undergoing considerable growth and change, with many of these changes being driven by scientific, technical, and medical advances. Presently, the medical physics workforce is adequate to meet societal needs. However, data are emerging that suggest potential risks of shortages and other problems that could develop within a few years. Some of the governing factors are well established, such as the increasing number of incident cancers thereby increasing workload, while others, such as the future use of radiation treatments and changes in healthcare economic policies, are uncertain and make the future status of the workforce difficult to forecast beyond the next several years. This review examines some of the major factors that govern supply and demand for medical physicists, discusses published projections and their uncertainties, and presents other information that may help to inform short- and long-term planning of various aspects of the future workforce. It includes a description of the general characteristics of the workforce, including information on its size, educational attainment, certification, age distribution, etc. Because the supply of new workers is governed by educational and training pathways, graduate education, post-doctoral training, and residency training are reviewed, along with trends in state and federal support for research and education. Selected professional aspects of the field also are considered, including professional certification and compensation. We speculate on the future outlook of the workforce and provide recommendations regarding future actions pertaining to the future medical physics workforce.

  11. The Core Collapse Supernova Rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Matt; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Ben; Galbany, Lluis; Gupta, Ravi R.; Kessler, R.; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C.; Richmond, Michael; Schneider, Donald P.; Sollerman, Jesper

    2014-08-26

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SNS) data to measure the volumetric core collapse supernova (CCSN) rate in the redshift range (0.03 < z < 0.09). Using a sample of 89 CCSN, we find a volume-averaged rate of 1.06 ± 0.19 × 10(–)(4)((h/0.7)(3)/(yr Mpc(3))) at a mean redshift of 0.072 ± 0.009. We measure the CCSN luminosity function from the data and consider the implications on the star formation history.

  12. Greening of Human Resources: Environmental Awareness and Training Interests within the Workforce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2001-01-01

    The education and training of the workforce has long been recognised as an essential ingredient in promoting and implementing environmental management practices in business organisations. So far, however, even in leading companies, little information has been available on how environmental manage...... briefly describes the background of the overall project, and in more detail a questionnaire-based survey on environmental attitudes and training interests among Danish workers.......The education and training of the workforce has long been recognised as an essential ingredient in promoting and implementing environmental management practices in business organisations. So far, however, even in leading companies, little information has been available on how environmental...... management practice and related educational and training requirements is translated into the provision of training courses by educational institutions. To address this important question an EU-sponsored research project was initiated. The project has focused on i) senior environmental managers, (ii) middle...

  13. The future dental workforce?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, J E; Wilson, N H F

    2009-02-28

    The Editor-in-Chief of the BDJ has previously raised important questions about dental workforce planning and the implications for dental graduates of recent changes and pressures. It is now time to revisit this issue. Much has changed since the last workforce review in England and Wales, and the rate of change is in all probability set to increase. First, at the time of writing this paper the momentous step of including dental care professionals (DCPs) on General Dental Council (GDC) registers in the United Kingdom has recently been completed. Second, the Scope of Practice of all dental professionals has been under consultation by the General Dental Council, and research evidence suggests that greater use should be made of skill-mix in the dental team. Third, within England, Lord Darzi has just published the 'Final Report of the NHS Next Stage Review', which emphasises 'quality care' and 'team-working' as key features of healthcare; this report was accompanied by an important document entitled 'A High Quality Workforce', in which plans for local workforce planning within the NHS are outlined, placing responsibilities at national, local and regional levels. Fourth, policy makers across the UK are wrestling with addressing oral health needs, promoting health and facilitating access to dental care, all of which have implications for the nature and shape of the dental workforce. Fifth, with the impact of globalisation and European policies we are net gainers of dentists as well as having more in training. Sixth, although there have been reviews and policy initiatives by regulatory, professional and other bodies in support of shaping the dental workforce, there has been little serious consideration of skill-mix and funding mechanisms to encourage team-working. Together, these events demand that we enter a fresh debate on the future dental workforce which should extend beyond professional and national boundaries and inform workforce planning. This debate is of great

  14. THE CARNEGIE-IRVINE GALAXY SURVEY. II. ISOPHOTAL ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zhaoyu [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Barth, Aaron J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States); Peng, Chien Y. [NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2011-12-01

    The Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey (CGS) is a comprehensive investigation of the physical properties of a complete, representative sample of 605 bright (B{sub T} {<=} 12.9 mag) galaxies in the southern hemisphere. This contribution describes the isophotal analysis of the broadband (BVRI) optical imaging component of the project. We pay close attention to sky subtraction, which is particularly challenging for some of the large galaxies in our sample. Extensive crosschecks with internal and external data confirm that our calibration and sky subtraction techniques are robust with respect to the quoted measurement uncertainties. We present a uniform catalog of one-dimensional radial profiles of surface brightness and geometric parameters, as well as integrated colors and color gradients. Composite profiles highlight the tremendous diversity of brightness distributions found in disk galaxies and their dependence on Hubble type. A significant fraction of S0 and spiral galaxies exhibit non-exponential profiles in their outer regions. We perform Fourier decomposition of the isophotes to quantify non-axisymmetric deviations in the light distribution. We use the geometric parameters, in conjunction with the amplitude and phase of the m = 2 Fourier mode, to identify bars and quantify their size and strength. Spiral arm strengths are characterized using the m = 2 Fourier profiles and structure maps. Finally, we utilize the information encoded in the m = 1 Fourier profiles to measure disk lopsidedness. The databases assembled here and in Paper I lay the foundation for forthcoming scientific applications of CGS.

  15. The accuracy of general practitioner workforce projections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greuningen, M. van; Batenburg, R.S.; Velden, L.F.J. van der

    2013-01-01

    Background: Health workforce projections are important instruments to prevent imbalances in the health workforce. For both the tenability and further development of these projections, it is important to evaluate the accuracy of workforce projections. In the Netherlands, health workforce projections

  16. Workforce needs in veterinary medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources; Board on Higher Education and Workforce; Division on Earth and Life Studies; Policy and Global Affairs; National Research Council

    2013-01-01

    In a study of the issues related to the veterinary medical workforce, including demographics, workforce supply, trends affecting job availability, and capacity of the educational system to fill future...

  17. Photometry of Type II Cepheid Candidates from the Northern Part of the All Sky Automated Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Edward G.; Hemen, Brian; Rogalla, Danielle; Thacker-Lynn, Lauren

    2009-06-01

    We have obtained VR photometry of 282 Cepheid variable star candidates from the northern part of the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS). These together with data from the ASAS and the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS) were used to redetermine the periods of the stars. We divided the stars into four groups based on location in a plot of mean color, langV-Rrang, versus period. Two of the groups fell within the region of the diagram containing known type II Cepheids and yielded 14 new highly probable type II Cepheids. The properties of the remaining stars in these two groups are discussed but their nature remains uncertain. Unexplained differences exist between the sample of stars studied here and a previous sample drawn from the NSVS by Akerlof et al. This suggests serious biases in the identification of variables in different surveys.

  18. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey:Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Masao; /Pennsylvania U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, D.L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Craig, Hogan, J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U.; Richmond, Michael W.; /Rochester Inst.; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Smith, Mathew; /Portsmouth U.; SubbaRao, Mark; /Chicago U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg2 region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  19. Kentucky Workforce Pathways Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Karen L.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether the advent of healthcare information technology was a viable career pathway for the people of northeastern Kentucky. The qualitative study used the Delphi Method to conduct and examine interviews with nine experts in Kentucky's workforce development, economic development, education, and healthcare…

  20. Securing the Workforce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lisbeth; Kruuse, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    Japan is world renowned for its quality production and efficient management, lean. However, economic stagnation - and a bottom score in the OECD statistics on women participation in the workforce - has forced the Japanese government to focus on the economic benefits of diversity in Corporate Japan...

  1. The Chameleon Workforce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marfelt, Mikkel Mouritz

    Due to advancements in technology and the expansion of companies onto a global level, organizations have become increasingly aware of the need to understand and manage diverse workforces; that is, the need to understand and manage differences among employees across borders (such as geographical, ...

  2. Mg II-Absorbing Galaxies in the UltraVISTA Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroupe, Darren; Lundgren, Britt

    2018-01-01

    Light that is emitted from distant quasars can become partially absorbed by intervening gaseous structures, including galaxies, in its path toward Earth, revealing information about the chemical content, degree of ionization, organization and evolution of these structures through time. In this project, quasar spectra are used to probe the halos of foreground galaxies at a mean redshift of z=1.1 in the COSMOS Field. Mg II absorption lines in Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar spectra are paired with galaxies in the UltraVISTA catalog at an impact parameter less than 200 kpc. A sample of 77 strong Mg II absorbers with a rest-frame equivalent width ≥ 0.3 Å and redshift from 0.34 < z < 2.21 are investigated to find equivalent width ratios of Mg II, C IV and Fe II absorption lines, and their relation to the impact parameter and the star formation rates, stellar masses, environments and redshifts of their host galaxies.

  3. The Primary Care Physician Workforce in Massachusetts: Implications for the Workforce in Rural, Small Town America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, Joseph; Cashman, Suzanne B.; Savageau, Judith A.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Small towns across the United States struggle to maintain an adequate primary care workforce. Purpose: To examine factors contributing to physician satisfaction and retention in largely rural areas in Massachusetts, a state with rural pockets and small towns. Methods: A survey mailed in 2004-2005 to primary care physicians, practicing in…

  4. First-Year Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Results: Constraints on Nonstandard Cosmological Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollerman, J.; Mörtsell, E.; Davis, T. M.; Blomqvist, M.; Bassett, B.; Becker, A. C.; Cinabro, D.; Filippenko, A. V.; Foley, R. J.; Frieman, J.; Garnavich, P.; Lampeitl, H.; Marriner, J.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Richmond, M. W.; Sako, M.; Schneider, D. P.; Smith, M.; Vanderplas, J. T.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2009-10-01

    We use the new Type Ia supernovae discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II supernova survey, together with additional supernova data sets as well as observations of the cosmic microwave background and baryon acoustic oscillations to constrain cosmological models. This complements the standard cosmology analysis presented by Kessler et al. in that we discuss and rank a number of the most popular nonstandard cosmology scenarios. When this combined data set is analyzed using the MLCS2k2 light-curve fitter, we find that more exotic models for cosmic acceleration provide a better fit to the data than the ΛCDM model. For example, the flat Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model is ranked higher by our information-criteria (IC) tests than the standard model with a flat universe and a cosmological constant. When the supernova data set is instead analyzed using the SALT-II light-curve fitter, the standard cosmological-constant model fares best. This investigation of how sensitive cosmological model selection is to assumptions about, and within, the light-curve fitters thereby highlights the need for an improved understanding of these unresolved systematic effects. Our investigation also includes inhomogeneous Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models. While our LTB models can be made to fit the supernova data as well as any other model, the extra parameters they require are not supported by our IC analysis. Finally, we explore more model-independent ways to investigate the cosmic expansion based on this new data set.

  5. RESIS-II: An Updated Version of the Original Reservoir Sedimentation Survey Information System (RESIS) Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Katherine V.; Mixon, David M.; Sundquist, Eric T.; Stallard, Robert F.; Schwarz, Gregory E.; Stewart, David W.

    2009-01-01

    The Reservoir Sedimentation Survey Information System (RESIS) database, originally compiled by the Soil Conservation Service (now the Natural Resources Conservation Service) in collaboration with the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, is the most comprehensive compilation of data from reservoir sedimentation surveys throughout the conterminous United States (U.S.). The database is a cumulative historical archive that includes data from as early as 1755 and as late as 1993. The 1,823 reservoirs included in the database range in size from farm ponds to the largest U.S. reservoirs (such as Lake Mead). Results from 6,617 bathymetric surveys are available in the database. This Data Series provides an improved version of the original RESIS database, termed RESIS-II, and a report describing RESIS-II. The RESIS-II relational database is stored in Microsoft Access and includes more precise location coordinates for most of the reservoirs than the original database but excludes information on reservoir ownership. RESIS-II is anticipated to be a template for further improvements in the database.

  6. The personal assistance workforce: trends in supply and demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, H Stephen; Chapman, Susan; Newcomer, Robert J; Harrington, Charlene

    2006-01-01

    The workforce providing noninstitutional personal assistance and home health services tripled between 1989 and 2004, according to U.S. survey data, growing at a much faster rate than the population needing such services. During the same period, Medicaid spending for such services increased dramatically, while both workforce size and spending for similar services in institutional settings remained relatively stable. Low wage levels for personal assistance workers, which have fallen behind those of comparable occupations; scarce health benefits; and high job turnover rates highlight the need for greater attention to ensuring a stable and well-trained workforce to meet growing demand.

  7. Domestic Wind Energy Workforce; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, Suzanne

    2015-07-30

    A robust workforce is essential to growing domestic wind manufacturing capabilities. NREL researchers conducted research to better understand today's domestic wind workforce, projected needs for the future, and how existing and new education and training programs can meet future needs. This presentation provides an overview of this research and the accompanying industry survey, as well as the Energy Department's Career Maps, Jobs & Economic Development Impacts models, and the Wind for Schools project.

  8. Rail and multimodal freight: a problem-oriented survey (part II-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin MARINOV

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper includes the Part II-2 of the series of problem-oriented surveys on rail and multimodal freight transportation services, which aim is to reveal the current situation in this sector and raises looming questions for discussion. The particular objective of Part II-2 is to discuss recently published works and documents dedicated to Multi-actor chain management and control, Mode choice and pricing strategies, Intermodal transportation policy and planning as well as Miscellaneous. It should be noted that this paper is a problem oriented survey and does not explicitly focus on the available scientific instrumental that has been applied in dealing with rail and multimodal freight. However, throughout the description methods and concepts are addressed, where it is of interest.

  9. Forum on Workforce Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2010-01-01

    APPEL Mission: To support NASA's mission by promoting individual, team, and organizational excellence in program/project management and engineering through the application of learning strategies, methods, models, and tools. Goals: a) Provide a common frame of reference for NASA s technical workforce. b) Provide and enhance critical job skills. c) Support engineering, program and project teams. d) Promote organizational learning across the agency. e) Supplement formal educational programs.

  10. The Pathologist Workforce in the United States: II. An Interactive Modeling Tool for Analyzing Future Qualitative and Quantitative Staffing Demands for Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robboy, Stanley J; Gupta, Saurabh; Crawford, James M; Cohen, Michael B; Karcher, Donald S; Leonard, Debra G B; Magnani, Barbarajean; Novis, David A; Prystowsky, Michael B; Powell, Suzanne Z; Gross, David J; Black-Schaffer, W Stephen

    2015-11-01

    Pathologists are physicians who make diagnoses based on interpretation of tissue and cellular specimens (surgical/cytopathology, molecular/genomic pathology, autopsy), provide medical leadership and consultation for laboratory medicine, and are integral members of their institutions' interdisciplinary patient care teams. To develop a dynamic modeling tool to examine how individual factors and practice variables can forecast demand for pathologist services. Build and test a computer-based software model populated with data from surveys and best estimates about current and new pathologist efforts. Most pathologists' efforts focus on anatomic (52%), laboratory (14%), and other direct services (8%) for individual patients. Population-focused services (12%) (eg, laboratory medical direction) and other professional responsibilities (14%) (eg, teaching, research, and hospital committees) consume the rest of their time. Modeling scenarios were used to assess the need to increase or decrease efforts related globally to the Affordable Care Act, and specifically, to genomic medicine, laboratory consolidation, laboratory medical direction, and new areas where pathologists' expertise can add value. Our modeling tool allows pathologists, educators, and policy experts to assess how various factors may affect demand for pathologists' services. These factors include an aging population, advances in biomedical technology, and changing roles in capitated, value-based, and team-based medical care systems. In the future, pathologists will likely have to assume new roles, develop new expertise, and become more efficient in practicing medicine to accommodate new value-based delivery models.

  11. NEWLY IDENTIFIED EXTENDED GREEN OBJECTS (EGOs) FROM THE SPITZER GLIMPSE II SURVEY. I. CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xi; Gan, Cong-Gui; Shen, Zhi-Qiang [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Ellingsen, Simon P.; Titmarsh, Anita [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia); He, Jin-Hua, E-mail: chenxi@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Objects, Yunnan Astronomical Observatory/National Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming, 650011 Yunnan Province (China)

    2013-05-01

    We have produced a catalog containing 98 newly identified massive young stellar object (MYSO) candidates associated with ongoing outflows (known as extended green objects, or EGOs). These have been identified from the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) II data set and our new identifications increase the number of known EGOs to {approx}400 in our Galaxy, adding to the {approx}300 previously identified EGOs reported by Cyganowski et al. from the GLIMPSE I survey. The high detection rate ({approx}70%) of 95 GHz class I methanol masers achieved in a survey toward 57 of these new EGOs with the Mopra 22 m radio telescope demonstrates that the new EGOs are associated with outflows. Investigations of the mid-infrared properties and physical associations with other star formation tracers (e.g., infrared dark clouds, class I and II methanol masers, and millimeter Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey sources) reveal that the newly identified EGOs are very similar in nature to those in the sample of Cyganowski et al. All of the observational evidence supports the hypothesis that EGOs correspond to MYSOs at the earliest evolutionary stage, with ongoing outflow activity, and active rapid accretion.

  12. Canadian pediatric gastroenterology workforce: Current status, concerns and future projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinville, Véronique; Drouin, Éric; Lévesque, Dominique; Espinosa, Victor M; Jacobson, Kevan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is concern that the Canadian pediatric gastroenterology workforce is inadequate to meet health care demands of the pediatric population. The Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Pediatric Committee performed a survey to determine characteristics and future plans of the Canadian pediatric gastroenterology workforce and trainees. METHODS: Estimates of total and pediatric populations were obtained from the 2001 Census of Population, Statistics Canada (with estimates to July 1, 2005). Data on Canadian pediatric gastroenterologists, including clinical full-time equivalents, sex, work interests, opinions on workforce adequacy, retirement plans, fellowship training programs and future employment plans of fellows, were gathered through e-mail surveys and telephone correspondence in 2005 and 2006. RESULTS: Canada had an estimated population of 32,270,507 in 2005 (6,967,853 people aged zero to 17 years). The pediatric gastroenterology workforce was estimated at 9.2 specialists per million children. Women accounted for 50% of the workforce. Physician to pediatric population ratios varied, with Alberta demonstrating the highest and Saskatchewan the lowest ratios (1:69,404 versus 1:240,950, respectively). Between 1998 and 2005, Canadian pediatric gastroenterology fellowship programs trained 65 fellows (65% international trainees). Twenty-two fellows (34%) entered the Canadian workforce. CONCLUSIONS: The survey highlights the variable and overall low numbers of pediatric gastroenterologists across Canada, an increasingly female workforce, a greater percentage of part-time physicians and a small cohort of Canadian trainees. In conjunction with high projected retirement rates, greater demands on the work-force and desires to partake in nonclinical activities, there is concern for an increasing shortage of pediatric gastroenterologists in Canada in future years. PMID:17948136

  13. Management Satisfaction Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Chief Human Capital Officers' Managers' Satisfaction Survey asks managers to rate their perception of workforce planning, interaction with and levels of support...

  14. Who does nutrition prevention work in Queensland? An investigation of structural and political workforce reforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidgen, Helen Anna; Adam, Meg; Gallegos, Danielle

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed (i) to determine the change in the number of government-funded nutrition positions following structural and political reforms and (ii) to describe the remaining workforce available to do nutrition prevention work, including student placements, in Queensland. Positions funded by the Queensland government were counted using departmental human resource data and compared with data collected 4 years earlier. Positions not funded by the government were identified using formal professional networks and governance group lists. Both groups were sent an online survey that explored their position name, funding source, employer, qualifications, years of experience, work in prevention and ability to supervise students. There was a 90% reduction in the number of nutrition prevention positions funded by the government between 2009 (137 full time equivalents (FTE)) and 2013 (14 FTE). In 2013, 313 specialist (n = 92) and generalist (n = 221) practitioners were identified as potentially working in nutrition prevention throughout Queensland. A total of 30 permanent FTEs indicated over 75% of their work focused on prevention. This included the 14 FTE funded by the Queensland government and an additional 16 FTE from other sectors. Generalists did not consider themselves part of the nutrition workforce. Queensland experienced an extreme reduction in its nutrition prevention workforce as a result of political and structural reforms. This disinvestment by the Queensland government was not compensated for by other sectors, and has left marked deficits in public health nutrition capacity, including student placements. © 2015 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  15. Survey of accredited master of public health (MPH) programs with health education concentrations: a resource for strengthening the public health workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Lynn D; Auld, M Elaine; Livingood, William C; Mulligan, Lori A

    2006-04-01

    The authors designed survey research to assess accredited master of public health (MPH) programs with health education concentrations. A Web-based survey was distributed to program directors and was used to collect characteristics of program faculty, students, graduates, internships, employment, and competency development. Results indicate that students and graduates are diverse; 72% of students complete internships and 61% of graduates work in government or community public health-related agencies; 98% of faculty hold a doctoral degree and 67% have at least one degree from an accredited public health school or program; and 85% of programs build competencies in most of the Institute of Medicine-suggested areas. The authors conclude that accredited MPH programs with a concentration in health education train diverse public health practitioners highly likely to work in a government or community public health agency with competencies to enhance public health.

  16. Acquisition Workforce Annual Report 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — This is the Federal Acquisition Institute's (FAI's) Annual demographic report on the Federal acquisition workforce, showing trends by occupational series, employment...

  17. Acquisition Workforce Annual Report 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — This is the Federal Acquisition Institute's (FAI's) Annual demographic report on the Federal acquisition workforce, showing trends by occupational series, employment...

  18. Safeguards Workforce Repatriation, Retention and Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallucci, Nicholas [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Poe, Sarah [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory was tasked by NA-241 to assess the transition of former IAEA employees back to the United States, investigating the rate of retention and overall smoothness of the repatriation process among returning safeguards professionals. Upon conducting several phone interviews, study authors found that the repatriation process went smoothly for the vast majority and that workforce retention was high. However, several respondents expressed irritation over the minimal extent to which their safeguards expertise had been leveraged in their current positions. This sentiment was pervasive enough to prompt a follow-on study focusing on questions relating to the utilization rather than the retention of safeguards professionals. A second, web-based survey was conducted, soliciting responses from a larger sample pool. Results suggest that the safeguards workforce may be oversaturated, and that young professionals returning to the United States from Agency positions may soon encounter difficulties finding jobs in the field.

  19. Workforce Intermediation for Vulnerable Youth: Workforce Initiatives Discussion Paper #4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Academy for Educational Development, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper's intention is to spur discussion about the roles of "workforce intermediation" as it relates to youth development and employability. It is certainly not meant to be an exhaustive discussion about either topic. It does, however, intend to further the dialogue on international workforce initiatives and the requisite workforce…

  20. Otolaryngology workforce analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Charles Anthony; McMenamin, Patrick; Mehta, Vikas; Pillsbury, Harold; Kennedy, David

    2016-12-01

    The number of trained otolaryngologists available is insufficient to supply current and projected US health care needs. The goal of this study was to assess available databases and present accurate data on the current otolaryngology workforce, examine methods for prediction of future health care needs, and explore potential issues with forecasting methods and policy implementation based on these predictions. Retrospective analysis of research databases, public use files, and claims data. The total number of otolaryngologists and current practices in the United States was tabulated using the databases of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, American Medical Association, American Board of Otolaryngology, American College of Surgeons, Association of American Medical Colleges, National Center for Health Statistics, and Department of Health and Human Services. Otolaryngologists were identified as surgeons and classified into surgical groups using a combination of AMA primary and secondary self-reported specialties and American Board of Medical Specialties certifications. Data gathered were cross-referenced to rule out duplications to assess total practicing otolaryngologists. Data analyzed included type of practice: 1) academic versus private and 2) general versus specialty; and demographics: 1) urban versus rural, 2) patient age, 3) reason for visit (referral, new, established, surgical follow-up), 4) reason for visit (diagnosis), and 5) payer type. Analysis from the above resources estimates the total number of otolaryngologists practicing in the United States in 2011 to be 12,609, with approximately 10,522 fully trained practicing physicians (9,232-10,654) and 2,087 in training (1,318 residents and 769 fellows/others). Based on 2011 data, workforce projections would place the fully trained and practicing otolaryngology workforce at 11,088 in 2015 and 12,084 in 2025 unless changes in training occur. The AAO-HNS Physicians Resource Committee

  1. Seeking a State Workforce Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, David Jason; Mack, Melinda

    2015-01-01

    New York's workforce system is a complicated entity that engages nearly a dozen state agencies and myriad funding streams originating at the federal and state levels, and operates on the ground in ten economic development regions, 33 designated workforce investment areas, community-based organizations, labor unions and 62 counties. This report…

  2. Near-infrared spectroscopic survey of brown dwarfs using NIRSPEC on the Keck II Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Ian S.

    2003-02-01

    Since commissioning the near-infrared spectrometer (NIRSPEC) on the Keck II telescope in April 1999 we have been carrying out an extensive spectroscopic survey of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. At least two objects in every spectral sub-class from M6 to T8 have been observed in the J band at a resolution of R ~ 2,000. For a subset of these we have obtained complete near-infrared flux-calibrated spectra from 0.9 - 2.5 μm. In addition, J band spectra at even higher resolution (R ~ 20,000) have been obtained for many sub-classes. The results of the NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey (BDSS) are summarized in this paper and presented as an illustration of the progress in infrared technology and the scientific productivity of the Keck telescopes.

  3. Downsizing the physician workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClendon, B J; Politzer, R M; Christian, E; Fernandez, E S

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the need for downsizing the physician workforce in a changing health care environment. METHODS: First assuming that 1993 physician-to-population ratios would be maintained, the authors derived downsizing estimates by determining the annual growth in the supply of specialists necessary to maintain these ratios (sum of losses from death and retirement plus increase necessary to parallel population growth) and compared them with an estimate of the number of new physicians being produced (average annual number of board certificates issued between 1990 and 1994). Then, assuming that workforce needs would change in a system increasingly dominated by managed care, the authors estimated specialty-specific downsizing needs for a managed care dominated environment using data from several sources. RESULTS: To maintain the 1993 199.6 active physicians per 100,000 population ratio, 14,644 new physicians would be needed each year. Given that an average of 20,655 physicians were certified each year between 1990 and 1994, at least 6011 fewer new physicians were needed annually to maintain 1993 levels. To maintain the 132.2 ratio of active non-primary care physicians per 100,000 population, the system needed to produce 9698 non-primary care physicians per year, because an average of 14,527 new non-primary care physicians entered the workforce between 1990 and 1994, downsizing by 4829, or 33%, was needed. To maintain the 66.8 active primary care physicians per 100,000 population ratio, 4946 new primary care physicians were needed per year, since primary care averaged 6128 new certifications per year, a downsizing of 1182, or 20% was indicated. Only family practice, neurosurgery, otolaryngology, and urology did not require downsizing. Seventeen medical and hospital-based specialties, including 7 of 10 internal medicine subspecialties, needed downsizing by at least 40%. Less downsizing in general was needed in the surgical specialties and in psychiatry. A

  4. Application of a Taxonomy to Characterize the Public Health Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Angela J; Meit, Michael; Heffernan, Megan; Boulton, Matthew L

    2015-01-01

    A public health workforce taxonomy was published in 2014 to provide a standardized mechanism for describing public health worker characteristics. The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) used 7 of the taxonomy's 12 axes as a basis for its survey response choices, 3 of which are the focus of this analysis. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative utility, reliability, and accuracy of the public health workforce taxonomy in categorizing local and state public health workers using a survey tool. This specifically included the goal of reducing the number of responses classified as "other" occupation, certification, or program area by recoding responses into taxonomy categories and determining potential missing categories for recommendation to the advisory committee that developed the taxonomy. Survey questions associated with the occupation, certification, and program area taxonomy axes yielded qualitative data from respondents who selected "other." The "other" responses were coded by 2 separate research teams at the University of Michigan Center of Excellence in Public Health Workforce Studies and NORC at the University of Chicago. Researchers assigned taxonomy categories to all analyzable qualitative responses and assessed the percentage of PH WINS responses that could be successfully mapped to taxonomy categories. Between respondent self-selection and research team recoding, the public health workforce taxonomy successfully categorized 95% of occupation responses, 75% of credential responses, and 83% of program area responses. Occupational categories that may be considered for inclusion in the taxonomy in the future include disease intervention specialists and occupations associated with regulation, certification, and licensing. The public health workforce taxonomy performed remarkably well in categorizing worker characteristics in its first use in a national survey. The analysis provides some recommendations for future

  5. Alchemical poetry in medieval and early modern Europe: a preliminary survey and synthesis. Part II - Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Didier

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a preliminary description of medieval and early modern alchemical poetry composed in Latin and in the principal vernacular languages of western Europe. It aims to distinguish the various genres in which this poetry flourished, and to identify the most representative aspects of each cultural epoch by considering the medieval and early modern periods in turn. Such a distinction (always somewhat artificial) between two broad historical periods may be justified by the appearance of new cultural phenomena that profoundly modified the character of early modern alchemical poetry: the ever-increasing importance of the prisca theologia, the alchemical interpretation of ancient mythology, and the rise of neo-Latin humanist poetry. Although early modern alchemy was marked by the appearance of new doctrines (notably the alchemical spiritus mundi and Paracelsianism), alchemical poetry was only superficially modified by criteria of a scientific nature, which therefore appear to be of lesser importance. This study falls into two parts. Part I provides a descriptive survey of extant poetry, and in Part II the results of the survey are analysed in order to highlight such distinctive features as the function of alchemical poetry, the influence of the book market on its evolution, its doctrinal content, and the question of whether any theory of alchemical poetry ever emerged. Part II is accompanied by an index of the authors and works cited in both parts.

  6. Measuring the Rheumatology Workforce in Canada: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Julie; Marshall, Deborah A; Badley, Elizabeth M; Hanly, John G; Averns, Henry; Ellsworth, Janet; Pope, Janet E; Barber, Claire E H

    2016-06-01

    The number of rheumatologists per capita has been proposed as a performance measure for arthritis care. This study reviews what is known about the rheumatologist workforce in Canada. A systematic search was conducted in EMBASE and MEDLINE using the search themes "rheumatology" AND "workforce" AND "Canada" from 2000 until December 2014. Additionally, workforce databases and rheumatology websites were searched. Data were abstracted on the numbers of rheumatologists, demographics, retirement projections, and barriers to healthcare. Twenty-five sources for rheumatology workforce information were found: 6 surveys, 14 databases, 2 patient/provider resources, and 3 epidemiologic studies. Recent estimates say there are 398 to 428 rheumatologists in Canada, but there were limited data on allocation of time to clinical practice. Although the net number of rheumatologists has increased, the mean age was ≥ 47.7 years, and up to one-third are planning to retire in the next decade. There is a clustering of rheumatologists around academic centers, while some provinces/territories have suboptimal ratios of rheumatologists per capita (range 0-1.1). Limited information was found on whether rural areas are receiving adequate services. The most consistent barrier reported by rheumatologists was lack of allied health professionals. In Canada there are regional disparities in access to rheumatologist care and an aging rheumatologist workforce. To address these workforce capacity issues, better data are needed including information on clinical full-time equivalents, delivery of care to remote communities, and use of alternative models of care to increase clinical capacity.

  7. Wage and workforce adjustments in the economic crisis in Germany and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijdens, K.; van Klaveren, M.; Bispinck, R.; Dribbusch, H.; Öz, F.

    2014-01-01

    This study uses data from a continuous employee web-survey to investigate the trade-off between wage and workforce adjustments and the role of industrial relations in firm-level responses to the economic crisis in Germany and the Netherlands. Workforce adjustments seemed to be a continuous

  8. Paediatrician workforce in Nigeria and impact on child health | Ekure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the number and distribution of paediatricians in Nigeria. It also aims to determine the association between paediatrician workforce and under five mortality (U5MR) and immunization coverage across the six geopolitical zones of the country. Methods: The part II fellowship examination pass list of the ...

  9. Addressing the workforce pipeline challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard Bond; Kevin Kostelnik; Richard Holman

    2006-11-01

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundations to enable future economic growth. To meet this goal the next generation energy workforce in the U.S., in particular those needed to support instrumentation, controls and advanced operations and maintenance, is a critical element. The workforce is aging and a new workforce pipeline, to support both current generation and new build has yet to be established. The paper reviews the challenges and some actions being taken to address this need.

  10. An Assessment of the Current US Radiation Oncology Workforce: Methodology and Global Results of the American Society for Radiation Oncology 2012 Workforce Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vichare, Anushree; Washington, Raynard; Patton, Caroline; Arnone, Anna [ASTRO, Fairfax, Virginia (United States); Olsen, Christine [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, (United States); Fung, Claire Y. [Commonwealth Newburyport Cancer Center, Newburyport, Massachusetts (United States); Hopkins, Shane [William R. Bliss Cancer Center, Ames, Iowa (United States); Pohar, Surjeet, E-mail: spohar@netzero.net [Indiana University Health Cancer Center East, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the characteristics, needs, and concerns of the current radiation oncology workforce, evaluate best practices and opportunities for improving quality and safety, and assess what we can predict about the future workforce. Methods and Materials: An online survey was distributed to 35,204 respondents from all segments of the radiation oncology workforce, including radiation oncologists, residents, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, medical physicists, nurse practitioners, nurses, physician assistants, and practice managers/administrators. The survey was disseminated by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) together with specialty societies representing other workforce segments. An overview of the methods and global results is presented in this paper. Results: A total of 6765 completed surveys were received, a response rate of 19%, and the final analysis included 5257 respondents. Three-quarters of the radiation oncologists, residents, and physicists who responded were male, in contrast to the other segments in which two-thirds or more were female. The majority of respondents (58%) indicated they were hospital-based, whereas 40% practiced in a free-standing/satellite clinic and 2% in another setting. Among the practices represented in the survey, 21.5% were academic, 25.2% were hospital, and 53.3% were private. A perceived oversupply of professionals relative to demand was reported by the physicist, dosimetrist, and radiation therapist segments. An undersupply was perceived by physician's assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses. The supply of radiation oncologists and residents was considered balanced. Conclusions: This survey was unique as it attempted to comprehensively assess the radiation oncology workforce by directly surveying each segment. The results suggest there is potential to improve the diversity of the workforce and optimize the supply of the workforce segments. The survey also provides a benchmark for

  11. THE COORDINATED RADIO AND INFRARED SURVEY FOR HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION. II. SOURCE CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purcell, C. R.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.; Urquhart, J. S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, E.C. Stoner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Cotton, W. D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Chandler, C. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Array Operations Center, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States); Churchwell, E. B. [The University of Wisconsin, Department of Astronomy, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Diamond, P.; Fuller, G.; Garrington, S. T. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, The Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Rd, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dougherty, S. M. [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, British Columbia V2A 6J9 (Canada); Fender, R. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Gledhill, T. M. [Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Goldsmith, P. F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Hindson, L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Jackson, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Kurtz, S. E. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico - Morelia, Apartado Postal 3-72, C.P. 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Marti, J., E-mail: C.R.Purcell@leeds.ac.uk [Departamento de Fisica, EPSJ, Universidad de Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas s/n, Edif. A3, E-23071 Jaen (Spain); and others

    2013-03-01

    The CORNISH project is the highest resolution radio continuum survey of the Galactic plane to date. It is the 5 GHz radio continuum part of a series of multi-wavelength surveys that focus on the northern GLIMPSE region (10 Degree-Sign < l < 65 Degree-Sign ), observed by the Spitzer satellite in the mid-infrared. Observations with the Very Large Array in B and BnA configurations have yielded a 1.''5 resolution Stokes I map with a root mean square noise level better than 0.4 mJy beam{sup -1}. Here we describe the data-processing methods and data characteristics, and present a new, uniform catalog of compact radio emission. This includes an implementation of automatic deconvolution that provides much more reliable imaging than standard CLEANing. A rigorous investigation of the noise characteristics and reliability of source detection has been carried out. We show that the survey is optimized to detect emission on size scales up to 14'' and for unresolved sources the catalog is more than 90% complete at a flux density of 3.9 mJy. We have detected 3062 sources above a 7{sigma} detection limit and present their ensemble properties. The catalog is highly reliable away from regions containing poorly sampled extended emission, which comprise less than 2% of the survey area. Imaging problems have been mitigated by down-weighting the shortest spacings and potential artifacts flagged via a rigorous manual inspection with reference to the Spitzer infrared data. We present images of the most common source types found: H II regions, planetary nebulae, and radio galaxies. The CORNISH data and catalog are available online at http://cornish.leeds.ac.uk.

  12. Workforce Information Cubes for NASA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Workforce Information Cubes for NASA, sourced from NASA's personnel/payroll system, gives data about who is working where and on what. Includes records for every...

  13. The Current State of Pediatric Sports Medicine: A Workforce Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Glenn; Koutures, Chris; Provance, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric sports medicine is an evolving pediatric subspecialty. No workforce data currently exists describing the current state of pediatric sports medicine. The goal of this survey is to contribute information to the practicing pediatric sports medicine specialist, employers and other stakeholders regarding the current state of pediatric sports medicine. The Workforce Survey was conducted by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Division of Workforce and Medical Education Policy (WMEP) and included a 44-item standard questionnaire online addressing training, clinical practice and demographic characteristics as well as the 24-item AAP Council on Sports Medicine and Fitness (COSMF) questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize all survey responses. Bivariate relationships were tested for statistical significance using Chi square. 145 surveys were returned, which represented a 52.7% response rate for eligible COSMF members and board certified non-council responders. The most common site of employment among respondents was university-based clinics. The respondents board certified in sports medicine were significantly more likely to perform fracture management, casting and splinting, neuropsychological testing and injections compared to those not board certified in sports medicine. A large proportion of respondents held an academic/medical school appointment. Increases were noted in both patient volume and the complexity of the injuries the specialists were treating. This pediatric sports medicine workforce study provides previously unappreciated insight into practice arrangements, weekly duties, procedures, number of patients seen, referral patterns, and potential future trends of the pediatric sports medicine specialist.

  14. Health workforce acquisition, retention and turnover in southwest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Skill mix of health professionals, staff acquisition and turnover rate are among the major challenges for the delivery of quality health care. This study assessed the health workforce acquisition, retention, turnover rate and their intention to leave. Methods: A cross-sectional survey with quantitative and qualitative ...

  15. Environmental monitoring survey of oil and gas fields in Region II in 2009. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-03-15

    The oil companies Statoil ASA, ExxonMobil Exploration and Production Norway AS, Total E&P Norge AS, Talisman Energy Norge AS and Marathon Petroleum Norge AS commissioned Section of Applied Environmental Research at UNI RESEARCH AS to undertake the monitoring survey of Region II in 2009. Similar monitoring surveys in Region II have been carried out in 1996, 2000, 2003 and 2006. The survey in 2009 included in total 18 fields: Rev, Varg, Sigyn, Sleipner Vest, Sleipner OEst, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Vale, Skirne, Byggve, Heimdal, Volve, Vilje og Alvheim. Sampling was conducted from the vessel MV Libas between May 18 and May 27. Samples were collected from in totally 137 sampling sites, of which 15 were regional sampling sites. Samples for chemical analysis were collected at all sites, whereas samples for benthos analysis were collected at 12 fields. As in previous surveys, Region II is divided into natural sub-regions. One sub-region is shallow (77-96 m) sub-region, a central sub-region (107-130 m) and a northern subregion (115-119 m). The sediments of the shallow sub-region had relatively lower content of TOM and pelite and higher content of fine sand than the central and northern sub-regions. Calculated areas of contamination are shown for the sub-regions in Table 1.1. The fields Sigyn, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Skirne, Byggve, Vilje og Alvheim showed no contamination of THC. At the other fields there were minor changes from 2006. The concentrations of barium increased in the central sub-region from 2006 to 2009, also at fields where no drilling had been undertaken during the last years. The same laboratory and methods are used during the three last regional investigations. The changes in barium concentrations may be due to high variability of barium concentrations in the sediments. This is supported by relatively large variations in average barium concentrations at the regional sampling sites in

  16. Regional and Gender Differences and Trends in the Anesthesiologist Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Matthew; Daugherty, Lindsay; Kumar, Krishna B; Arifkhanova, Aziza

    2015-11-01

    Concerns have long existed about potential shortages in the anesthesiologist workforce. In addition, many changes have occurred in the economy, demographics, and the healthcare sector in the last few years, which may impact the workforce. The authors documented workforce trends by region of the United States and gender, trends that may have implications for the supply and demand of anesthesiologists. The authors conducted a national survey of American Society of Anesthesiologists members (accounting for >80% of all practicing anesthesiologists in the United States) in 2007 and repeated it in 2013. The authors used logistic regression analysis and Seemingly Unrelated Regression to test across several indicators under an overarching hypothesis. Anesthesiologists in Western states had markedly different patterns of practice relative to anesthesiologists in other regions in 2007 and 2013, including differences in employer type, the composition of anesthesia teams, and the time spent on monitored anesthesia care. The number and proportion of female anesthesiologists in the workforce increased between 2007 and 2013, and females differed from males in employment arrangements, compensation, and work hours. Regional differences remained stable during this time period although the reasons for these differences are speculative. Similarly, how and whether the gender difference in work hours and shift to younger anesthesiologists during this period will impact workforce needs is uncertain.

  17. Research lessons from implementing a national nursing workforce study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, T; Brzyski, P; Kózka, M; Squires, A; Przewoźniak, L; Cisek, M; Gajda, K; Gabryś, T; Ogarek, M

    2015-09-01

    National nursing workforce studies are important for evidence-based policymaking to improve nursing human resources globally. Survey instrument translation and contextual adaptation along with level of experience of the research team are key factors that will influence study implementation and results in countries new to health workforce studies. This study's aim was to describe the pre-data collection instrument adaptation challenges when designing the first national nursing workforce study in Poland while participating in the Nurse Forecasting: Human Resources Planning in Nursing project. A descriptive analysis of the pre-data collection phase of the study. Instrument adaptation was conducted through a two-phase content validity indexing process and pilot testing from 2009 to September 2010 in preparation for primary study implementation in December 2010. Means of both content validation phases were compared with pilot study results to assess for significant patterns in the data. The initial review demonstrated that the instrument had poor level of cross-cultural relevance and multiple translation issues. After revising the translation and re-evaluating using the same process, instrument scores improved significantly. Pilot study results showed floor and ceiling effects on relevance score correlations in each phase of the study. The cross-cultural adaptation process was developed specifically for this study and is, therefore, new. It may require additional replication to further enhance the method. The approach used by the Polish team helped identify potential problems early in the study. The critical step improved the rigour of the results and improved comparability for between countries analyses, conserving both money and resources. This approach is advised for cross-cultural adaptation of instruments to be used in national nursing workforce studies. Countries seeking to conduct national nursing workforce surveys to improve nursing human resources policies may

  18. Hydra II: A Faint and Compact Milky Way Dwarf Galaxy Found in the Survey of the Magellanic Stellar History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Nicolas F.; Nidever, David L.; Besla, Gurtina; Olsen, Knut; Walker, Alistair R.; Vivas, A. Katherina; Gruendl, Robert A.; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Blum, Robert D.; Saha, Abhijit; Conn, Blair C.; Bell, Eric F.; Chu, You-Hua; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L.; de Boer, Thomas J. L.; Gallart, Carme; Jin, Shoko; Kunder, Andrea; Majewski, Steven R.; Martinez-Delgado, David; Monachesi, Antonela; Monelli, Matteo; Monteagudo, Lara; Noël, Noelia E. D.; Olszewski, Edward W.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Zaritsky, Dennis

    We present the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Hydra II, found serendipitously within the data from the ongoing Survey of the Magellanic Stellar History conducted with the Dark Energy Camera on the Blanco 4 m Telescope. The new satellite is compact ({{r}h}=68 ± 11 pc) and faint ({{M}V}=-4.8 ± 0.3),

  19. A multi-institutional survey evaluating patient related QA – phase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teichmann Tobias

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In phase I of the survey a planning intercomparison of patient-related QA was performed at 12 institutions. The participating clinics created phantom based IMRT and VMAT plans which were measured utilizing the ArcCheck diode array. Mobius3D (M3D was used in phase II. It acts as a secondary dose verification tool for patient-specific QA based on average linac beam data collected by Mobius Medical Systems. All Quasimodo linac plans will be analyzed for the continuation of the intercomparison. We aim to determine if Mobius3D is suited for use with diverse treatment techniques, if beam model customization is needed. Initially we computed first Mobius3D results by transferring all plans from phase I to our Mobius3D server. Because of some larger PTV mean dose differences we checked if output factor customization would be beneficial. We performed measurements and output factor correction to account for discrepancies in reference conditions. Compared to Mobius3D's preconfigured average beam data values, these corrected output factors differed by ±1.5% for field sizes between 7x7cm2 and 30x30cm2 and to −3.9% for 3x3cm2. Our method of correcting the output factors turns out good congruence to M3D's reference values for these medium field sizes.

  20. Nurses' perception of nursing workforce and its impact on the managerial outcomes in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi-Chun; Chen, Jih-Chang; Chiu, Hsiao-Ting; Shen, Hsi-Che; Chang, Wen-Yin

    2010-06-01

    (1) To understand nurses' subjective perceptions of the current nursing workforce in their emergency departments, (2) to examine the relationship between nurses' workforce perceptions and its impact on the managerial outcomes and (3) to analyse the correlation between nurses' characteristics and the scores on workforce perception. While the association between workforce perceptions and nurse outcomes is well-documented, few studies have examined how emergency department nurses perceive current workforce and related outcomes. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey. A self-reported workforce perception questionnaire was used to survey 538 registered nurses in the emergency departments of 19 hospitals in northern Taiwan, during May to October 2006. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, chi-square test, independent t-test, Pearson correlation and one-way anova. The mean score of workforce perception was 6.28 points (total = 10 points). Both overtime (p = 0.02) and number of callbacks on days off (p = 0.01) were significantly correlated to current nursing workforce and hospital level. Older nurses tended to have more emergency department experience (r = 0.37; p = 0.01) and those with more emergency department experience tended to have vacation accumulation (r = 0.09; p = 0.04), overtime (r = 0.10; p = 0.03) and better perception of their emergency department's current workforce (r = 0.09; p = 0.05). Although nurses' perceptions were found to be only moderate, overtime and number of callbacks on days off are potential problems that should be addressed by nursing leaders to benefit future emergency nurses. The findings can help drive strategies to ensure adequate staffing, to stabilise the nursing workforce and to prevent nurses from burnout factors such as working long hours, unpredictable schedules and a stressful work environment that may impact both the quality of emergency care and the quality of the nurses' work environment.

  1. 75 FR 14633 - Veterans Workforce Investment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ...' Employment and Training Service Veterans Workforce Investment Program AGENCY: Veterans' Employment and...' Workforce Investment Program (VWIP) for Program Year (PY) 2010, as authorized under section 168 of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998. This Solicitation for Grant Applications (SGA) notice contains all...

  2. Integration of the ageing workforce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krenn, M.; Oehlke, P.; Kees, H.; Leonard, L.; Wendelen, E.; Linkola, P.; Neubauer, G.; Vries, S. de; O'Kelly, K.P.

    2001-01-01

    The age structure in Europe and other industrialized countries is changing as a result of declining birth rates and continuous rise in life expectancy. This report shows the facts and figures of an ageing workforce. It also describes the predjudices, personnel policies and problems connected to the

  3. Defense Acquisition Workforce: Actions Needed to Guide Planning Efforts and Improve Workforce Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    address gaps in numbers, skills, and competencies; • building the capabilities needed to support workforce strategies through steps that ensure the...Planning Efforts and Improve Workforce Capability Why GAO Did This Study GAO and others have found that DOD needs to take steps to ensure DOD...its acquisition workforce , (2) identify workforce competencies and mitigate any skill gaps, and (3) plan for future workforce needs. GAO analyzed

  4. Estimated dietary intakes and sources of flavanols in the German population (German National Nutrition Survey II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzoglou, Anna; Heuer, Thorsten; Mulligan, Angela A; Lentjes, Marleen A H; Luben, Robert N; Kuhnle, Gunter G C

    2014-01-01

    Data from intervention studies suggest a beneficial effect of flavanols on vascular health. However, insufficient data on their intake have delayed the assessment of their health benefits. The aim of this study was to estimate intake of flavanols and their main sources among people living in Germany. Data from diet history interviews of the German National Nutrition Survey II for 15,371 people across Germany aged 14-80 years were analyzed. The FLAVIOLA Flavanol Food Composition Database was compiled using the latest US Department of Agriculture and Phenol-Explorer Databases and expanded to include recipes and retention factors. Mean intake of total flavanols, flavan-3-ol monomers, proanthocyanidins (PA), and theaflavins in Germany was 386, 120, 196, and 70 mg/day, respectively. Women had higher intakes of total flavanols (399 mg/day) than men (372 mg/day) in all age groups, with the exception of the elderly. Similar results were observed for monomers (108 mg/day for men, 131 mg/day for women) and PA (190 mg/day; 203 mg/day), although intake of theaflavins was higher in men (74 mg/day; 66 mg/day). There was an age gradient with an increase in total flavanols, monomers, and theaflavins across the age groups. The major contributor of total flavanols in all subjects was pome fruits (27%) followed by black tea (25%). This study demonstrated age- and sex-related variations in the intake and sources of dietary flavanols in Germany. The current analysis will provide a valuable tool in clarifying and confirming the potential health benefits of flavanols.

  5. The Effect of Host Galaxies on Type Ia Supernovae in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampeitl, Hubert; /Portsmouth U., ICG; Smith, Mathew; /Cape Town U. /Portsmouth U., ICG; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U., ICG; Bassett, Bruce; /South African Astron. Observ. /Cape Town U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Foley, Ryan J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Goobar, Ariel; /Stockholm U., OKC; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2010-05-01

    We present an analysis of the host galaxy dependencies of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the full three year sample of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. We re-discover, to high significance, the strong correlation between host galaxy type and the width of the observed SN light curve, i.e., fainter, quickly declining SNe Ia favor passive host galaxies, while brighter, slowly declining Ia's favor star-forming galaxies. We also find evidence (at between 2 to 3{sigma}) that SNe Ia are {approx_equal} 0.1 magnitudes brighter in passive host galaxies, than in star-forming hosts, after the SN Ia light curves have been standardized using the light curve shape and color variations: This difference in brightness is present in both the SALT2 and MCLS2k2 light curve fitting methodologies. We see evidence for differences in the SN Ia color relationship between passive and star-forming host galaxies, e.g., for the MLCS2k2 technique, we see that SNe Ia in passive hosts favor a dust law of R{sub V} {approx_equal} 1, while SNe Ia in star-forming hosts require R{sub V} {approx} 2. The significance of these trends depends on the range of SN colors considered. We demonstrate that these effects can be parameterized using the stellar mass of the host galaxy (with a confidence of > 4{sigma}) and including this extra parameter provides a better statistical fit to our data. Our results suggest that future cosmological analyses of SN Ia samples should include host galaxy information.

  6. ALMA Survey of Class II Disks in the Young Stellar Cluster IC 348

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Dary; Cieza, Lucas; Williams, Jonathan; Andrews, Sean; Principe, David

    2018-01-01

    We present a 1.3 mm continuum survey of the young (2-3 Myr) stellar cluster IC 348 at a distance of 270 pc, which is dominated by low-mass stars. We observed 146 Class II sources (disks that are optically thick in the infrared) at 0.8 '' (200 au) resolution with a 3σ sensitivity of 0.2 MEarth. We detect 46 of the targets and construct a disk luminosity function. We compare the disk mass distribution in IC 348 to those of younger and older regions, taking into account the dependence on stellar mass. We find a clear evolution in disk masses from 1 to 5-10 Myr. The disk masses in IC 348 are significantly lower than those in Taurus (1-2 Myr) and Lupus (1-3 Myr), similar to those of Chamaleon I, (2-3 Myr) and σ-Ori (3-5 Myr) and significantly higher than in Upper Scorpius (5-10 Myr). About 20 disks in our sample (~5% of the cluster members) have estimated masses (dust + gas) of >1 MJUP. and might be the precursors of giant planets in the cluster. Some of the most massive disks include transition objects with inner opacity holes based on their infrared SEDs. From an stacking analysis of the 90 non-detections, we find that these disks have a typical dust mass of just ≤ 0.1 MEarth, even though the vast majority of their infrared SEDs remain optically thick and show little signs of evolution. Such low-mass disks are likely to be the precursors of the small rocky planets found by Kepler around M-type stars.

  7. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume III, Part II. Cultural Resources Survey, Pine and Wah Wah Valleys, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    including horse, camel, mammoth, Ertm E-TR-48-III-II 20 musk ox, and certain species of bison, goat, and bear, which had previously inhabited the marsh and...34 - - -9,$.. 𔄃 Im I I I Si to * Location lype/Contents Affiliation 42B@644 rid e over cr ek - P/J depression, cleared areas, Fr elon (f4-5-18-92) ground

  8. The epidemiology of noise exposure in the Australian workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warwick Williams

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work considers an alternate methodology for the estimation of the noise exposed population of the Australian workforce. Previous methods relied on the statistics from the annual rate of application for worker′s hearing loss compensation claims, the generalization of small scale surveys to the broader population or larger scale telephone surveys. This proposed method takes measured noise exposure data from sampled industries and combines that with official demographic information on the numbers employed in the respective industries. From the Australian data, it is estimated that around 20.1% of the workforce regularly work in noise above the recommended exposure standard (L Aeq, 8 h = 85 dB and 9.4% above and exposure of 90 dB. These figure lie within the range of estimates derived from other methodologies.

  9. Orthopedic manifestations in patients with muco­polysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome enrolled in the Hunter Outcome Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Link

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II or Hunter syndrome is a rare, inherited disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. As a result of this deficiency, glycosaminoglycans accumulate in lysosomes in many tissues, leading to progressive multisystemic disease. The cardiopulmonary and neurological problems associated with MPS II have received considerable attention. Orthopedic manifestations are common but not as well characterized. This study aimed to characterize the prevalence and severity of orthopedic manifestations of MPS II and to determine the relationship of these signs and symptoms with cardiovascular, pulmonary and central nervous system involvement. Orthopedic manifestations of MPS II were studied using cross-sectional data from the Hunter Outcome Survey (HOS. The HOS is a global, physician-led, multicenter observational database that collects information on the natural history of MPS II and the long-term safety and effectiveness of enzyme replacement therapy. As of January 2009, the HOS contained baseline data on joint range of motion in 124 males with MPS II. In total, 79% of patients had skeletal manifestations (median onset, 3.5 years and 25% had abnormal gait (median onset, 5.4 years. Joint range of motion was restricted for all joints assessed (elbow, shoulder, hip, knee and ankle. Extension was the most severely affected movement: the exception to this was the shoulder. Surgery for orthopedic problems was rare. The presence of orthopedic manifestations was associated with the presence of central nervous system and pulmonary involvement, but not so clearly with cardiovascular involvement. Orthopedic interventions should be considered on an individual-patient basis. Although some orthopedic manifestations associated with MPS II may be managed routinely, a good knowledge of other concurrent organ system involvement is essential. A multidisciplinary approach is required.

  10. Assessing the Education and Training Needs of Nebraska?s Public Health Workforce

    OpenAIRE

    Grimm, Brandon L.; Johansson, Patrik; Nayar, Preethy; Apenteng, Bettye A.; Opoku, Samuel; Nguyen, Anh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In 2012, the Great Plains Public Health Training Center (Grant #UB6HP22821) conducted an online survey of state and local health departments and the American Indian (tribal clinics, tribal health departments, and urban Indian clinic) public health workforce across three professional levels. The objectives of the needs assessment were to determine the competency levels of the state’s public health workforce, assess gaps in public health competencies, identify public health trai...

  11. Assessing the Education and Training Needs of Nebraska's Public Health Workforce

    OpenAIRE

    Grimm, Brandon L.; Patrik eJohansson; Preethy eNayar; Betty eApenteng; Samuel eOpoku; Anh eNguyen

    2015-01-01

    IntroductionIn 2012, the Great Plains Public Health Training Center (Grant #UB6HP22821) conducted an online survey of state and local health departments and the American Indian (tribal clinics, tribal health departments and urban Indian clinic) public health workforce across three professional levels. The objectives of the needs assessment were to, determine the competency levels of the state’s public health workforce, assess gaps in public health competencies, identify public health trainin...

  12. Practice Patterns and Projections for the US Pediatric Otolaryngology Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jason R; Ruch-Ross, Holly; Hotaling, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    This study represents up-to-date information on the current status of and future projections for the pediatric otolaryngology workforce. To provide an update on the practice patterns of and projections for the US pediatric otolaryngology workforce. An online survey was sent to all 172 members of the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and fielded from May 29, 2014, to September 17, 2014. Current status of and perceived trends in the pediatric otolaryngology workforce. Eighty-four (48.8%) of the 172 members responded to the survey. Not all respondents answered all questions, and so totals and percentages might not reflect a total of 84 for any given response. The demographics and practice characteristics of the responding pediatric otolaryngologists were similar to those noted in a 1997 workforce survey. Fifty-four percent of respondents (n = 38) planned to continue full-time work over the next 5 years, and 47% (n = 31) believed that the number of patients in their practice was increasing. The proportion of those who believed that the need for pediatric otolaryngologists in their community was increasing (31%; n = 21) or decreasing (13%; n = 9) remained relatively constant from the 1997 survey (34% and 12%, respectively). Forty-nine percent (n = 35) reported believing that the number of pediatric otolaryngologists being trained was appropriate and that the need in their community was stable. Eighty-three percent (n = 55) reported believing that employment opportunities for pediatric otolaryngologists in the United States would be plentiful in the near future. The overall state of the pediatric otolaryngology workforce appears stable. The perceived current and future needs for pediatric otolaryngologists appear to be met by the current number of trainees. Employment opportunities appear promising for future pediatric otolaryngologists based on our respondents' opinions. This represents up

  13. Invigorating Entrepreneurial Spirit among Workforce

    OpenAIRE

    AL MUTAIRI ANED O; AL MUTAIRI ALYA O.

    2013-01-01

    With the key intent of stimulating entrepreneurial spirit among the workforce, this paper identifies the diverse entrepreneurial qualities required to propel the entrepreneurial spirit unremittingly. These relevant personal skills and strategies of New Venture Creation further aid in the successful creation and subsequent maintenance of an entrepreneur business. Prior to application of the identified skills, this paper vividly demonstrates the importance of such skills to any entrepreneurial ...

  14. Fitness of the US workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, Nicolaas P

    2015-03-18

    Fitness matters for the prevention of premature death, chronic diseases, productivity loss, excess medical care costs, loss of income or family earnings, and other social and economic concerns. The workforce may be viewed as a corporate strategic asset, yet its fitness level appears to be relatively low and declining. Over the past half-century, obesity rates have doubled, physical activity levels are below par, and cardiorespiratory fitness often does not meet minimum acceptable job standards. During this time, daily occupational energy expenditure has decreased by more than 100 calories. Employers should consider best practices and design workplace wellness programs accordingly. Particular attention should be paid to human-centered cultures. Research should address ongoing surveillance needs regarding fitness of the US workforce and close gaps in the evidence base for fitness and business-relevant outcomes. Policy priorities should consider the impact of both state and federal regulations, adherence to current regulations that protect and promote worker health, and the introduction of incentives that allow employers to optimize the fitness of their workforce through supportive legislation and organizational policies.

  15. Workforce planning for reconfiguration and downsizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahlman, E.J.; Lewis, R.E.; Ross, T.L.

    1993-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was tasked by the Department of Energy Albuquerque Field Office (DOE-AL) to develop a workforce assessment and transition planning tool to support integrated decision making at a single DOE installation. The planning tool permits coordinated, integrated workforce planning to manage growth, decline, or transition within a DOE installation. The tool enhances the links and provides commonality between strategic, programmatic, and operations planners and human resources. Successful development and subsequent scent complex-wide implementation of the model also will facilitate planning at the national level by enforcing a consistent format on data that are now collected by installations in corporate-specific formats that are not amenable to national-level analyses. The workforce assessment and transition planning tool consists of two components: the Workforce Transition Model and the Workforce Budget Constraint Model. The Workforce Transition Model, the preponderant of the two, assists decision makers identify and evaluate alternatives for transitioning the current workforce to meet the skills required to support projected workforce requirements. The Workforce Budget Constraint Model helps estimate the number of personnel that will be effected by a given a workforce budget increase or decrease and assists in identifying how the corresponding hirings or layoffs should be distributed across the COCS occupations.

  16. Educational Attainment of the Public Health Workforce and Its Implications for Workforce Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leider, Jonathon P; Harper, Elizabeth; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Castrucci, Brian C

    2015-01-01

    Educational attainment is a critical issue in public health workforce development. However, relatively little is known about the actual attainment of staff in state health agencies (SHAs). Ascertain the levels of educational attainment among SHA employees, as well as the correlates of attainment. Using a stratified sampling approaching, staff from SHAs were surveyed using the Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) instrument in late 2014. A nationally representative sample was drawn across 5 geographic (paired adjacent HHS) regions. Descriptive and inferential statistics were analyzed using balanced repeated replication weights to account for complex sampling. A logistic regression was conducted with attainment of a bachelor's degree as the dependent variable and age, region, supervisory status, race/ethnicity, gender, and staff type as independent variables. Web-based survey of SHA central office employees. Educational attainment overall, as well as receipt of a degree with a major in public health. A total of 10,246 permanently-employed SHA central office staff participated in the survey (response rate 46%). Seventy-five percent (95% confidence interval [CI], 74-77) had a bachelor's degree, 38% (95% CI, 37-40) had a master's degree, and 9% (95% CI, 8%-10%) had a doctoral degree. A logistic regression showed Asian staff had the highest odds of having a bachelor's degree (odds ratio [OR] = 2.8; 95% CI, 2.2-3.7) compared with non-Hispanic whites, and Hispanic/Latino staff had lower odds (OR = 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4-0.8). Women had lower odds of having a bachelor's degree than men (OR = 0.5; 95% CI, 0.4-0.6). About 17% of the workforce (95% CI, 16-18) had a degree in public health at any level. Educational attainment among SHA central office staff is high, but relatively few have formal training of any sort in public health. This makes efforts to increase availability of on-the-job training and distance learning all the more critical.

  17. Health policy thoughtleaders' views of the health workforce in an era of health reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelan, Karen; Buerhaus, Peter I; DesRoches, Catherine; Burke, Sheila P

    2010-01-01

    Although registered nurses rank similarly with physicians in the public's esteem, physicians are more visible than nurses in media coverage, public policy, and political spheres. Thus, nursing workforce issues are overshadowed by those of other health priorities, including Medicare and health reform. The purpose of this research was to understand the visibility and salience of the health workforce in general, gain an understanding about the effectiveness of messages concerning the nursing workforce in particular, and to understand why nursing workforce issues do not appear to have gained more traction in national health care policymaking. The National Survey of Thoughtleaders about the Health Workforce was administered via mail, telephone and online to health workforce and policy thoughtleaders from August 2009-October 2009. Of 301 thoughtleaders contacted, 123 completed questionnaires for a response rate of 41%. Thoughtleaders agree that nurses are critical to the quality and safety of our healthcare system, that there are current nursing shortages, and that nursing shortages will be intensified by health reform. Thoughtleaders reported that while they do hear about nursing issues frequently, they do not view most sources of information as proposing effective policy solutions. This study highlights a critical gap in effective policy advocacy and leadership to advance nurse workforce issues higher on the national health agenda. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Australian Complementary Medicine Workforce: A Profile of 1,306 Practitioners from the PRACI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Amie; Leach, Matthew; Wardle, Jon; Sibbritt, David; Schloss, Janet; Diezel, Helene; Adams, Jon

    2018-01-02

    This study aims to describe the Australian complementary medicine (CM) workforce, including practice and professional characteristics. National cross-sectional survey. Australia. Any individual who self-identified as a practitioner qualified in any one of 14 CM professions and working in any state or territory of Australia was eligible to participate in the survey. A 19-item online survey was developed following a review of existing CM workforce data and in alignment with other CM workforce survey projects in progress at the time. The survey items were presented under three main constructs: demographic characteristics, professional characteristics, and practice characteristics. Descriptive statistical analysis, including frequencies and percentages, of multiple choice survey items was used. Open response items were analyzed to determine the mean, standard deviation (SD), minimum, and maximum. The demographic data were evaluated for representativeness based on previously reported CM workforce figures. The survey was completed by 1306 CM practitioners and was found to be nationally representative compared with the most recent registrant data from the Chinese Medicine Board of Australia. Participants primarily practiced in the most populous Australian states and worked in at least one urban clinical location. Most participants held an Advanced Diploma qualification or lower, obtained their qualification ten more years ago, and practiced in a clinical environment alongside at least one other practitioner from another health profession. Participants reported diverse clinical practice specialties and occupational roles. Per week, participants worked an average of 3.7 days and treated 23.6 clients. The results from this survey of practitioners from most complementary professions in Australia provide new insights into the national complementary medicine workforce. Further exploration of the CM workforce is warranted to inform all who provide patient care and develop health

  19. International Geoscience Workforce Trends: More Challenges for Federal Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groat, C. G.

    2005-12-01

    Concern about the decreasing number of students entering undergraduate geoscience programs has been chronic and, at times, acute over the past three decades. Despite dwindling populations of undergraduate majors, graduate programs have remained relatively robust, bolstered by international students. With Increasing competition for graduate students by universities in Europe, Japan, Australia, and some developing countries, and with procedural challenges faced by international students seeking entry into the United States and its universities, this supply source is threatened. For corporations operating on a global scale, the opportunity to employ students from and trained in the regions in which they operate is generally a plus. For U.S. universities that have traditionally supplied this workforce, the changing situation poses challenges, but also opportunities for creative international partnerships. Federal government science agencies face more challenges than opportunities in meeting workforce needs under both present and changing education conditions. Restrictions on hiring non-U.S. citizens into the permanent workforce have been a long-standing issue for federal agencies. Exceptions are granted only where they can document the absence of eligible U.S.-citizen candidates. The U.S. Geological Survey has been successful in doing this in its Mendenhall Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program, but there has been no solution to the broader limitation. Under current and forecast workforce recruitment conditions, creativity, such as that evidenced by the Mendenhall program,will be necessary if federal agencies are to draw from the increasingly international geoscience talent pool. With fewer U.S. citizens in U.S. geoscience graduate programs and a growing number of advanced-degreed scientists coming from universities outside the U.S., the need for changes in federal hiring policies is heightened. The near-term liklihood of this is low and combined with the decline in

  20. Towards an integrated workforce management system

    OpenAIRE

    Landa-Silva, Dario; Castillo, Arturo; Bowie, Leslie; Johnston, Hazel

    2010-01-01

    We describe progress towards a workforce management system in which personnel scheduling is integrated with other important processes such as payroll processing, attendance and absence recording, staffing forecast and planning, etc. Our focus is on customeroriented sectors in which a considerable proportion of the available workforce is part-time. First, we discuss the importance of having an integrated workforce management strategy and then, we address the particular aspects of shift pattern...

  1. Combining Operations Management and Information Systems Curricula: Assessing Alumni Preparations for the Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, David; McFadden, Kathleen L.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore how well a curriculum that combines operations management and information systems uniquely prepares students for the workforce. To address our research questions, a Web-based survey was developed. We sent our survey to 203 alumni that graduated from the Department of Operations Management and Information…

  2. Hunting for stellar streams in the solar neighbourhood with the SDSS and GSC-II kinematic survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re Fiorentin, P.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Smart, R. L.; Spagna, A.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Beers, T. C.; Zwitter, T.

    The growing awareness of the importance of the fossil record in the Milky Way for constraining galaxy formation theory is reflected by the increasing number of new ground- and space-based surveys designed to unravel the formation history of the Galaxy. Recently, a new kinematic survey has been produced by means of spectro-photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-DR7) and high-quality proper motions derived from multiepoch positions from the Guide Star Catalogue II (GSC-II). In this framework, we assembled a sample of ~ 30 000 FGK nearby metal-poor (sub)dwarfs for which selection and distance estimates take advantage of accurate stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity and metallicity) derived from SDSS spectra. Here, as one of the most interesting applications of this catalogue, we consider the feasibility of probing fossil signatures of the formation of the Milky Way by selecting and analysing subsamples of stars as tracers of the seven-dimensional space distribution (full phase-space coordinates plus chemical abundance) of the Galactic halo population within a few kiloparsecs from the Sun. Preliminary results exhibit statistical evidence for discrete overdensities localised in kinematics and in the space of adiabatic invariants (angular momentum and energy). By examination of their intrinsic properties, we suggest that they may be possible fossil signatures of past mergers or other accretion events.

  3. Professional training of the workforce: Human resources strategies of employers

    OpenAIRE

    Marina Krasilnikova; Natalia Bondarenko

    2009-01-01

    Considered is the situation on the Russian job market before the onset of the economic crisis in 2008. The analysis bases on the results of sample surveys of employers performed for a number of years by the Levada center. The surveys have been ordered by the HSE in the framework of the Education Economic Monitoring program. It is shown that despite the claims of managers about the workforce shortages in the pre-crisis period, a majority of employers do not consider it relevant to take measure...

  4. Materials used to restore class II lesions in primary molars: a survey of California pediatric dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pair, Rebecca Lee; Udin, Richard D; Tanbonliong, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which materials were most commonly used by pediatric dentists in California to restore Class II lesions in the primary dentition. A questionnaire consisting of 18 multiple-choice questions was mailed to all 440 active members of the California Society of Pediatric Dentistry (CSPD). The questions related to the practitioners' material of choice for restoring Class II lesions in primary molars. A 66% response rate was received. For 57% of the respondents, amalgam was the material of choice for restoration of Class II lesions in primary molars. Twenty-nine percent selected composite, 5% glass ionomer, 6% compomer, and 1% (1 practitioner) stainless steel crowns. Sixty-eight percent responded that amalgam has historically proven to be a safe, reliable, and affordable material. The main reasons cited for using composite resin were "patient preference" (86%) and "better esthetics" (78%). Most practitioners used either a single-step (fifth-generation) or 2-step (fourth-generation) bonding agent (53% and 35%, respectively). When using a nonamalgam restorative material, 49% of practitioners used a traditional Class II amalgam preparation. The role of dental literature in treatment decision-making was not significantly related to the restorative material used. While amalgam was the most common material used for Class II restorations, nonamalgam materials were significantly popular among California pediatric dentists.

  5. A representative survey of the dynamics and energetics of FR II radio galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ineson, J.; Croston, J. H.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Mingo, B.

    2017-05-01

    We report the first large, systematic study of the dynamics and energetics of a representative sample of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio galaxies with well-characterized group/cluster environments. We used X-ray inverse-Compton and radio synchrotron measurements to determine the internal radio-lobe conditions, and these were compared with external pressures acting on the lobes, determined from measurements of the thermal X-ray emission of the group/cluster. Consistent with previous work, we found that FR II radio lobes are typically electron dominated by a small factor relative to equipartition, and are overpressured relative to the external medium in their outer parts. These results suggest that there is typically no energetically significant proton population in the lobes of FR II radio galaxies (unlike for FR Is), and so for this population, inverse-Compton modelling provides an accurate way of measuring total energy content and estimating jet power. We estimated the distribution of Mach numbers for the population of expanding radio lobes, finding that at least half of the radio galaxies are currently driving strong shocks into their group/cluster environments. Finally, we determined a jet power-radio luminosity relation for FR II radio galaxies based on our estimates of lobe internal energy and Mach number. The slope and normalization of this relation are consistent with theoretical expectations, given the departure from equipartition and environmental distribution for our sample.

  6. North Dakota Energy Workforce Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Drake [Bismarck State College, Bismarck, ND (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Bismarck State College, along with its partners (Williston State College, Minot State University and Dickinson State University), received funding to help address the labor and social impacts of rapid oilfield development in the Williston Basin of western North Dakota. Funding was used to develop and support both credit and non-credit workforce training as well as four major symposia designed to inform and educate the public; enhance communication and sense of partnership among citizens, local community leaders and industry; and identify and plan to ameliorate negative impacts of oil field development.

  7. Galactic bulge population II Cepheids in the VVV survey: period-luminosity relations and a distance to the Galactic centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Rejkuba, M.; Minniti, D.; Surot, F.; Valenti, E.; Zoccali, M.; Gonzalez, O. A.; Romaniello, M.; Kanbur, S. M.; Singh, H. P.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Multiple stellar populations of different ages and metallicities reside in the Galactic bulge that trace its structure and provide clues to its formation and evolution. Aims: We present the near-infrared observations of population II Cepheids in the Galactic bulge from VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) survey. The JHKs photometry together with optical data from Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) survey provide an independent estimate of the distance to the Galactic centre. The old, metal-poor and low-mass population II Cepheids are also investigated as useful tracers for the structure of the Galactic bulge. Methods: We identify 340 population II Cepheids in the VVV survey Galactic bulge catalogue based on their match with the OGLE-III Catalogue. The single-epoch JH and multi-epoch Ks observations complement the accurate periods and optical (VI) mean-magnitudes from OGLE. The sample consisting of BL Herculis and W Virginis subtypes is used to derive period-luminosity relations after correcting mean-magnitudes for the extinction. Our Ks-band period-luminosity relation, Ks = -2.189(0.056) [log (P)-1] + 11.187(0.032), is consistent with published work for BL Herculis and W Virginis variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Results: We present a combined OGLE-III and VVV catalogue with periods, classification, mean magnitudes, and extinction for 264 Galactic bulge population II Cepheids that have good-quality Ks-band light curves. The absolute magnitudes for population II Cepheids and RR Lyraes calibrated using Gaia and Hubble Space Telescope parallaxes, together with calibrated magnitudes for Large Magellanic Cloud population II Cepheids, are used to obtain a distance to the Galactic centre, R0 = 8.34 ± 0.03(stat.) ± 0.41(syst.), which changes by with different extinction laws. While noting the limitation of small number statistics, we find that the present sample of population II Cepheids in the Galactic bulge shows a nearly spheroidal

  8. PAs in primary care: Current status and workforce implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplan, Bettie; Smith, Noel; Cawley, James F

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the PA primary care workforce is an initial step toward greater use of primary care PAs in new healthcare delivery models. This study sought to describe primary care PA practice as it compares with PA practice in other specialties. Data from two 2015 national American Academy of Physician Assistants surveys were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Statistically significant differences between primary care and specialty PAs were assessed using tests of column proportions and tests of column means. Compared with PAs in specialties, primary care PAs were older, saw more patients per week, and spent less time consulting with physicians. In addition, higher percentages were Hispanic, had a record of military service, and had plans to leave their specialty or retire. Primary care PAs appear to possess unique strengths; however, challenges to maintaining a primary care PA workforce are substantial.

  9. Weekly Hospital Workforce Data: A Data Visualisation Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yang; Khanna, Sankalp; Good, Norm; Boyle, Justin

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying the health workforce in terms of overall staff numbers and their ratio to patients under their care can strengthen analytical studies designed to inform policy regarding how hospital services are delivered. Information about staffing is traditionally obtained via location-specific audits or self-reported information gleaned from surveys which hold potential biases around time-dependence and recall. In contrast, work presented in this paper describes the derivation of useful workforce metrics from routine hospital financial and clinical information systems that overcome these biases. Staffing data is aggregated, visualised and linked to patient demand to gain insight into spatial and temporal variations in hospital staffing and workload. Overall, hospital staff resourcing varies noticeably across a week, with staff numbers and staff-to-patient ratios dropping to low levels at night and across a weekend. Exploration of staff-to-staff ratios allows further insight into staff dynamics across a week and the variation of supervision level.

  10. Level II contamiant survey of the Tallahatchie National Wildlife Refuge, Quitman, Tallahatchie, and Grenada Counties, Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report contains findings of tissue and sediment samples for organic and inorganic contaminants as part of a preaquistion survey for Tallahatchie NWR. Elevated levels...

  11. Environmental monitoring survey of oil and gas fields in Region II in 2009. Summary report; Miljoeovervaaking av olje- og gassfelt i Region II i 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-03-15

    The oil companies Statoil ASA, ExxonMobil Exploration and Production Norway AS, Total E&P Norge AS, Talisman Energy Norge AS and Marathon Petroleum Norge AS commissioned Section of Applied Environmental Research at UNI RESEARCH AS to undertake the monitoring survey of Region II in 2009. Similar monitoring surveys in Region II have been carried out in 1996, 2000, 2003 and 2006. The survey in 2009 included in total 18 fields: Rev, Varg, Sigyn, Sleipner Vest, Sleipner OEst, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Vale, Skirne, Byggve, Heimdal, Volve, Vilje og Alvheim. Sampling was conducted from the vessel MV Libas between May 18 and May 27. Samples were collected from in totally 137 sampling sites, of which 15 were regional sampling sites. Samples for chemical analysis were collected at all sites, whereas samples for benthos analysis were collected at 12 fields. As in previous surveys, Region II is divided into natural sub-regions. One sub-region is shallow (77-96 m) sub-region, a central sub-region (107-130 m) and a northern subregion (115-119 m). The sediments of the shallow sub-region had relatively lower content of TOM and pelite and higher content of fine sand than the central and northern sub-regions. Calculated areas of contamination are shown for the sub-regions in Table 1.1. The fields Sigyn, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Skirne, Byggve, Vilje og Alvheim showed no contamination of THC. At the other fields there were minor changes from 2006. The concentrations of barium increased in the central sub-region from 2006 to 2009, also at fields where no drilling had been undertaken during the last years. The same laboratory and methods are used during the three last regional investigations. The changes in barium concentrations may be due to high variability of barium concentrations in the sediments. This is supported by relatively large variations in average barium concentrations at the regional sampling sites in

  12. Environmental monitoring survey of oil and gas fields in Region II in 2009. Summary report; Miljoeovervaaking av olje- og gassfelt i Region II i 2009. Sammendragsrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-03-15

    The oil companies Statoil ASA, ExxonMobil Exploration and Production Norway AS, Total E&P Norge AS, Talisman Energy Norge AS and Marathon Petroleum Norge AS commissioned Section of Applied Environmental Research at UNI RESEARCH AS to undertake the monitoring survey of Region II in 2009. Similar monitoring surveys in Region II have been carried out in 1996, 2000, 2003 and 2006. The survey in 2009 included in total 18 fields: Rev, Varg, Sigyn, Sleipner Vest, Sleipner Oest, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Vale, Skirne, Byggve, Heimdal, Volve, Vilje og Alvheim. Sampling was conducted from the vessel MV Libas between May 18 and May 27. Samples were collected from in totally 137 sampling sites, of which 15 were regional sampling sites. Samples for chemical analysis were collected at all sites, whereas samples for benthos analysis were collected at 12 fields. As in previous surveys, Region II is divided into natural sub-regions. One sub-region is shallow (77-96 m) sub-region, a central sub-region (107-130 m) and a northern subregion (115-119 m). The sediments of the shallow sub-region had relatively lower content of TOM and pelite and higher content of fine sand than the central and northern sub-regions. Calculated areas of contamination are shown for the sub-regions in Table 1.1. The fields Sigyn, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Skirne, Byggve, Vilje og Alvheim showed no contamination of THC. At the other fields there were minor changes from 2006. The concentrations of barium increased in the central sub-region from 2006 to 2009, also at fields where no drilling had been undertaken during the last years. The same laboratory and methods are used during the three last regional investigations. The changes in barium concentrations may be due to high variability of barium concentrations in the sediments. This is supported by relatively large variations in average barium concentrations at the regional sampling sites in

  13. Study of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy from the DART Ca II triplet survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battaglia, G.; Tolstoy, E.; Helmi, A.; Irwin, M.; Parisi, P.; Hill, V.; Jablonka, P.

    We use Very Large Telescope (VLT)/Fibre Large Array Multi Element Spectrograph (FLAMES) intermediate-resolution (R˜ 6500) spectra of individual red giant branch stars in the near-infrared Ca II triplet (CaT) region to investigate the wide-area metallicity properties and internal kinematics of the

  14. Employee Engagement: Motivating and Retaining Tomorrow's Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuck, Michael Bradley; Wollard, Karen Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Tomorrow's workforce is seeking more than a paycheck; they want their work to meet their needs for affiliation, meaning, and self-development. Companies willing to meet these demands will capture the enormous profit potential of a workforce of fully engaged workers. This piece explores what engagement is, why it matters, and how human resource…

  15. Workforce Education and Two Important Viewpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Dawn Holley; Hudson, Clemente Charles

    2007-01-01

    Workforce Education appears to be a goldmine in the state of Florida. As of December 2003, annual job growth statistics reveal that Florida ranked number one in the nation in new jobs and tied for number one in percent change relative to other populous states (Georgia, Texas, New Jersey, and New York). The purpose of Florida's Workforce Education…

  16. Workshop: health workforce governance and integration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batenburg, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Health workforce governance is increasingly recognized as a burning policy issue and focused on workforce shortages. Yet the most pressing problem is to solve maldistributions through governance and integration. Poor management of health 242 European Journal of Public Health, Vol. 24,

  17. Wide-Field Survey around Local Group Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Leo II: Spatial Distribution of Stellar Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Yutaka; Doi, Mamoru; Furusawa, Hisanori; Hamabe, Masaru; Imi, Katsumi; Kimura, Masahiko; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nakata, Fumiaki; Okada, Norio; Okamura, Sadanori; Ouchi, Masami; Sekiguchi, Maki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Yagi, Masafumi; Yasuda, Naoki

    2007-08-01

    We carried out a wide-field V, I imaging survey of the Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxy Leo II using the Subaru Prime Focus Camera on the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope. The survey covered an area of 26.67×26.67 arcmin2, far beyond the tidal radius of Leo II (8.63'), down to the limiting magnitude of V~=26, which is roughly 1 mag deeper than the turnoff point of the main-sequence stars of Leo II. Radial number density profiles of bright and faint red giant branch (RGB) stars were found to change their slopes at around the tidal radius, and extend beyond the tidal radius with shallower slopes. A smoothed surface brightness map of Leo II suggests the existence of a small substructure (4×2.5 arcmin2, 270×170 pc 2 in physical size) of globular cluster luminosity beyond the tidal radius. We investigated the properties of the stellar population by means of a color-magnitude diagram. The horizontal branch (HB) morphology index shows a radial gradient in which red HB stars are more concentrated than blue HB stars, which is common to many Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The color distribution of RGB stars around the mean RGB sequence shows a larger dispersion at the center than in the outskirts, indicating a mixture of stellar populations at the center and a more homogeneous population in the outskirts. Based on the age estimation using subgiant branch stars, we found that although the major star formation took place ~8 Gyr ago, a considerable stellar population younger than 8 Gyr is found at the center; such a younger population is insignificant in the outskirts. The following star formation history is suggested for Leo II. Star-forming activity occurred more than ~8 Gyr ago throughout the galaxy at a modest star formation rate. The star-forming region gradually shrank from the outside toward the center, and star-forming activity finally dropped to ~0 by ~4 Gyr ago, except for the center, where a small population younger than 4 Gyr is present. Based on data collected

  18. Deconstructing dwarf galaxies: a Suprime-Cam survey of Andromeda II

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnachie, Alan W.; Arimoto, Nobuo; Irwin, Mike

    2007-07-01

    We present deep, subhorizontal-branch, multicolour photometry of the Andromeda II dwarf spheroidal (And II dSph) taken with the Subaru Suprime-Cam wide-field camera. We identify a red clump population in this galaxy, the first time this feature has been detected in an M31 dSph, which are normally characterized as having no significant intermediate-age populations. We construct radial profiles for the various stellar populations and show that the horizontal branch (HB) has a nearly constant density spatial distribution out to large radius, whereas the reddest red giant branch stars are centrally concentrated in an exponential profile. We argue that these populations trace two distinct structural components in And II, and show that this assumption provides a good match to the overall radial profile of this galaxy. The extended component dominates the stellar populations at large radius, whereas the exponential component dominates the inner few arcminutes. By examining colour-magnitude diagrams in these regions, we show that the two components have very different stellar populations; the exponential component has an average age of ~7-10 Gyr, is relatively metal-rich ([Fe/H] ~ -1) but with a significant tail to low metallicities, and possesses a red clump. The extended component, on the other hand, is ancient (~13 Gyr), metal-poor ([Fe/H] ~ -1.5) with a narrower dispersion σ[Fe/H] ~= 0.28, and has a well-developed blue HB. The extended component contains approximately three-quarters of the light of And II and its unusual density profile is unique in Local Group dwarf galaxies. This suggests that its formation and/or evolution may have been quite different from other dwarf galaxies. The obvious chemodynamical complexity of And II lends further support to the accumulating body of evidence which shows that the evolutionary histories of faint dSph galaxies can be every bit as complicated as their brighter and more massive counterparts. Based on data collected at Subaru

  19. Mobile learning: a workforce development strategy for nurse supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Digital technology provides opportunities for using mobile learning strategies in healthcare environments. To realise the vision of the National Workforce Development Strategy there needs to be innovation of health professionals to further develop knowledge and skills of clinical supervisors to access and gain an understanding of the value of mobile learning at the workplace. The use of digital technology by clinical supervisors was explored in 2012 as part of a teaching development grant to evaluate the use of Web 2.0 technology to develop a community of practice about clinical supervision. Prior to developing the virtual network of clinical supervisors, feedback about the use of Web 2.0 technology by clinicians was sought via an online survey. Over 90% of respondents used social media, 85% understood what a blog and wiki were and approximately half of the respondents used smart phones. More than one-third indicated they would participate in a virtual community of practice and would like to receive information about clinical facilitation at least once per week. Findings indicate both inhibitors and opportunities for workforce development within healthcare environments that need to be addressed. Support of graduate-ready nurses can be achieved through an integrated outlook that enables health professionals within organisations to undertake mobile learning in situ. A flexible and collaborative approach to continuing professional development within organisations could enhance practice development and could positively impact on workforce development.

  20. Multiple Challenges of Flexible Workforce Management: the contract managers experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Torres de Magalhães

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a survey that had the purpose to evaluate the human resources (HR practices adopted by a Brazilian industrial corporation from the viewpoint of contracting out managers to deal with four flexible workforce management challenges: qualification; quality; commitment; standardization of outsourcing services. These HR practices are still little discussed by scholars. So, this is the main contribution of this article. It is also virtually nonexistent in the literature studies that encompass analysis about HR practices to deal with major challenges of outsourcing throughout the viewpoint of contracting out managers. We performed 15 semi-structured interviews with contracting out managers. It was also performed a documental analysis about the rules of outsourcing practices of the corporation. We found management practices to deal with each of the four challenges presented. The management of contracts and the provision of training programs were the most prominent of the related practices. The results show that Brazillian labor laws contribute to the segregation of temporary workers, because the companies avoid a more direct relationship fearing legal constraints. Although several efforts were put to improve the work conditions of the flexible workforce, these workers are still stigmatized, seen and treated as less important than direct employers; this causes negative impacts on commitment. The decision to use flexible workforce by companies is still mainly due to cost savings. Therefore, there is still a long way to improve HR practices related to temporary workers in order to avoid losses for all the social actors envolved.

  1. Leadership and professional workforce development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Peter F; Madaan, Vishal

    2008-03-01

    On an average, 4% of medical students from medical schools in the United States choose psychiatry as an option. Although in recent years psychiatry residency match statistics have improved, in general terms it is less competitive to enter this specialty. Most psychiatrists practice as generalists, either in private practice or in the public mental health system. There are marked shortages in child psychiatry and in upcoming new subspecialties. There are ongoing efforts to enhance the core competency of psychiatrists-in-training, with particular emphasis on research literacy to foster lifelong learning skills and (for some) to stimulate interest in a research career track. This article chronicles the trajectory of workforce development and professional growth in psychiatry.

  2. Clinical evaluation and grading practices in schools of nursing: national survey findings part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oermann, Marilyn H; Yarbrough, Suzanne S; Saewert, Karen J; Ard, Nell; Charasika, Margie E

    2009-01-01

    To better understand how nurse educators evaluate and grade students' clinical practice, the Evaluation of Learning Advisory Council of the National League for Nursing conducted a survey of faculty (N = 1,573) in all types of prelicensure RN programs. This article describes the findings of that survey in relation to clinical evaluation and grading clinical practice. Nearly all faculty used a clinical evaluation tool to rate students' performance in the clinical setting (n = 1,534, 98 percent); most programs had the same basic tool in all courses, but modified to reflect the unique aspects of each course (n = 1,095, 70 percent). Faculty (n = 1,116, 83 percent) reported using pass/fail for grading in clinical courses rather than a letter or numerical grade.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Survey of Centaurus A's Baryonic Structures II. (Taylor+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M. A.; Puzia, T. H.; Munoz, R. P.; Mieske, S.; Lancon, A.; Zhang, H.; Eigenthaler, P.; Bovill, M. S.

    2018-01-01

    The Survey of Centaurus A's Baryonic Structures is an optical survey of the nearby giant elliptical galaxy NGC5128 (Centaurus A) using the Dark Energy Camera. This work focussed on identifying globular cluster candidates of 22 sq. degrees centred on NGC5128. In doing so we produced a list of ~4.4x105 point, and point-like sources in the optical u'g'r'i'z' bands with 50/90% completeness limits of at least 24.08/23.62, 22.67/22.27, 22.46/22.00, 22.05/21.63, and 21.71/21.34 AB mags, respectively. The same data is also included for a list of ~3000 highly probable globular cluster candidates Positional data is typically accurate to at least 0.5". (4 data files).

  4. The infrared medium-deep survey. II. How to trigger radio AGNs? Hints from their environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Jeon, Yiseul; Choi, Changsu; Hong, Jueun; Hyun, Minhee; Jun, Hyunsung David; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Yongjung; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Duho; Park, Won-Kee; Taak, Yoon Chan; Yoon, Yongmin [CEOU—Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Chapman, Scott [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Pak, Soojong [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Edge, Alastair, E-mail: mkarouzos@astro.snu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-10

    Activity at the centers of galaxies, during which the central supermassive black hole is accreting material, is nowadays accepted to be rather ubiquitous and most probably a phase of every galaxy's evolution. It has been suggested that galactic mergers and interactions may be the culprits behind the triggering of nuclear activity. We use near-infrared data from the new Infrared Medium-Deep Survey and the Deep eXtragalactic Survey of the VIMOS-SA22 field and radio data at 1.4 GHz from the FIRST survey and a deep Very Large Array survey to study the environments of radio active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over an area of ∼25 deg{sup 2} and down to a radio flux limit of 0.1 mJy and a J-band magnitude of 23 mag AB. Radio AGNs are predominantly found in environments similar to those of control galaxies at similar redshift, J-band magnitude, and (M{sub u} – M{sub r} ) rest-frame color. However, a subpopulation of radio AGNs is found in environments up to 100 times denser than their control sources. We thus preclude merging as the dominant triggering mechanism of radio AGNs. By fitting the broadband spectral energy distribution of radio AGNs in the least and most dense environments, we find that those in the least dense environments show higher radio-loudness, higher star formation efficiencies, and higher accretion rates, typical of the so-called high-excitation radio AGNs. These differences tend to disappear at z > 1. We interpret our results in terms of a different triggering mechanism for these sources that is driven by mass loss through winds of young stars created during the observed ongoing star formation.

  5. Physicians' attitudes toward homosexuality and HIV: survey of a California Medical Society- revisited (PATHH-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Davey M; Mathews, Wm Christopher

    2007-01-01

    In 1982, Mathews et al. surveyed San Diego County Medical Society's (SDCMS) physicians about their attitudes toward homosexuality. They found significant differences in prevalence of homophobic attitudes by gender, year of medical school graduation, specialty, and practice setting. To assess current physicians' attitudes toward homosexuality and persons with HIV infection, an anonymous, self-administered, 17-item survey was mailed to all 4,385 members of the SDCMS and 1,271 UCSD physicians. The survey included items measuring attitudes toward homosexuality and toward entry to medical school and referral patterns, conditional on sexual orientation and HIV status of hypothetical referents. Only 3% of respondents would not admit a highly qualified homosexual applicant to medical school compared with 30% in 1982. Similarly, 9% would discontinue referrals to a gay pediatrician compared with 46% of respondents in 1982. Forty-two percent would not admit a "highly qualified but asymptomatic HIV-infected applicant with excellent response to antiretroviral therapy to medical school" and 66% would discontinue referral to a general surgeon known to be HIV infected. In multiple logistic regression analyses controlling for sex and medical school affiliation, significant (p attitudes toward homosexuals and year of graduation from medical school appear to be significant predictors of attitudes toward persons with HIV infection.

  6. The Crossroads between Workforce and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kathryn; Lower, Christi L; Rudman, William J

    2016-01-01

    Concern is growing among industry leaders that students may not be obtaining the necessary skills for entry into the labor market. To gain an understanding of the perceived disconnect in the skill set of graduates entering the health information workforce, a survey was developed to examine the opinions of educators and employers related to graduate preparedness. The concern related to graduate preparedness is supported by findings in this research study, in which those working in industry and those in academia noted a disconnect between academic training and preparedness to enter the labor market. A statistically significant difference was found between labor leaders and academics in their assessment of graduates' preparation in the areas of technical, communication, and leadership skills. Educators noted higher levels of preparedness of students with regard to professional and technical skills and leadership skills, while both educators and industry respondents noted a need for improved employability skills (e.g., communication skills and workplace etiquette). No difference was found between the two groups with regard to the need to increase apprenticeships and professional practice experience to cover this gap in formal training. Finally, when asked how the federal government might assist with preparing students, more than half of the respondents noted the importance of apprenticeships and funding for these opportunities.

  7. The Crossroads between Workforce and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kathryn; Lower, Christi L.; Rudman, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Concern is growing among industry leaders that students may not be obtaining the necessary skills for entry into the labor market. To gain an understanding of the perceived disconnect in the skill set of graduates entering the health information workforce, a survey was developed to examine the opinions of educators and employers related to graduate preparedness. The concern related to graduate preparedness is supported by findings in this research study, in which those working in industry and those in academia noted a disconnect between academic training and preparedness to enter the labor market. A statistically significant difference was found between labor leaders and academics in their assessment of graduates' preparation in the areas of technical, communication, and leadership skills. Educators noted higher levels of preparedness of students with regard to professional and technical skills and leadership skills, while both educators and industry respondents noted a need for improved employability skills (e.g., communication skills and workplace etiquette). No difference was found between the two groups with regard to the need to increase apprenticeships and professional practice experience to cover this gap in formal training. Finally, when asked how the federal government might assist with preparing students, more than half of the respondents noted the importance of apprenticeships and funding for these opportunities. PMID:27134612

  8. The New York State optometry workforce study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Mort

    2012-04-01

    This study presents an analysis of the current optometry workforce, both as a unique profession and more broadly within the context of all eye care providers (optometry and ophthalmology) in New York State. The supply and distribution of eye care practitioners provides useful information for policy makers while providing insights as to the impact of the one optometry school within the state. Several databases were employed and a web based survey was developed for completion by all optometrists. The questionnaire included demographic data, whether they were actively practicing in New York State or any other state, were they full time or part time, their primary mode of practice, or if they provided care within institutional settings. Access to care was gauged by the respondents' availability for appointments during evenings or weekends. Access to eye care services in New York State has improved significantly during the past 30 years as the supply of optometrists increased. Before this study was conducted it was generally believed that there were more optometrists than ophthalmologists in every state of the nation except New York, Maryland and the District of Columbia. Findings of this study demonstrate there are 37% more optometrists in New York State than ophthalmologists and more evenly distributed as optometrists are located in almost every county of the state. Sixteen counties have no ophthalmologists. This is attributed to the presence of the College of Optometry established in 1971. More than 60% of all optometrists in the state are SUNY College of Optometry graduates.

  9. Socioeconomic correlates of generalized anxiety disorder and major depression in primary care: the GADIS II study (Generalized Anxiety and Depression Impact Survey II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansseau, Marc; Fischler, Benjamin; Dierick, Michel; Albert, Adelin; Leyman, Sophie; Mignon, Annick

    2008-01-01

    A previous Generalized Anxiety Disorder Impact Survey (GADIS I) performed on 15,399 Belgian patients consulting their primary care physicians, revealed high prevalences of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depression (MD) with important regional differences. The objective of this study (GADIS II) was to replicate previous findings and to evaluate the role of socioeconomic factors in the diagnoses of GAD and MD. A large-scale cross-sectional survey was conducted in a random sample of 377 general practitioners distributed geographically over Belgium and Luxemburg. Each physician was asked to screen 40 consecutive patients at predefined time periods for the presence of GAD and MD using sections of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Socioeconomic parameters were collected. The level of impairment was assessed using the Sheehan Disability Scale. In a sample of 13,699 patients, point prevalences of GAD and of MD were found to be 13.4 and 11.0%, respectively. Overall, 17.8% of the population was positive for GAD and/or MD. Both disorders were significantly more frequent in women than in men. Marked regional differences were observed with prevalences for GAD and/or MD of 24.2% in Brussels, 22.7% in Wallonia, 13.6% in Luxemburg and 12.9% in Flanders. Several socioeconomic factors were significantly associated with positive diagnoses: living alone, a low level of education and unemployment. However, regional differences remained significant even after controlling for socioeconomic factors. The study confirms the high prevalence of GAD and MD in primary care and the role of several socioeconomic and regional factors in the illnesses.

  10. Health information technology workforce needs of rural primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Susan M; Andrilla, C Holly A; Patterson, Davis G; Fenton, Susan H; Ostergard, Stefanie J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed electronic health record (EHR) and health information technology (HIT) workforce resources needed by rural primary care practices, and their workforce-related barriers to implementing and using EHRs and HIT. Rural primary care practices (1,772) in 13 states (34.2% response) were surveyed in 2012 using mailed and Web-based questionnaires. EHRs or HIT were used by 70% of respondents. Among practices using or intending to use the technology, most did not plan to hire new employees to obtain EHR/HIT skills and even fewer planned to hire consultants or vendors to fill gaps. Many practices had staff with some basic/entry, intermediate and/or advanced-level skills, but nearly two-thirds (61.4%) needed more staff training. Affordable access to vendors/consultants who understand their needs and availability of community college and baccalaureate-level training were the workforce-related barriers cited by the highest percentages of respondents. Accessing the Web/Internet challenged nearly a quarter of practices in isolated rural areas, and nearly a fifth in small rural areas. Finding relevant vendors/consultants and qualified staff were greater barriers in small and isolated rural areas than in large rural areas. Rural primary care practices mainly will rely on existing staff for continued implementation and use of EHR/HIT systems. Infrastructure and workforce-related barriers remain and must be overcome before practices can fully manage patient populations and exchange patient information among care system partners. Efforts to monitor adoption of these skills and ongoing support for continuing education will likely benefit rural populations. © 2014 National Rural Health Association.

  11. The Rise and Fall of Type Ia Supernova Light Curves in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, Brian T.; /Notre Dame U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Kessler, Richard; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Frieman, Joshua A.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Jha, Saurabh W.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Kasen, Daniel; /UC, Santa Cruz; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U., ICG /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the rise and fall times of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. From a set of 391 light curves k-corrected to the rest-frame B and V bands, we find a smaller dispersion in the rising portion of the light curve compared to the decline. This is in qualitative agreement with computer models which predict that variations in radioactive nickel yield have less impact on the rise than on the spread of the decline rates. The differences we find in the rise and fall properties suggest that a single 'stretch' correction to the light curve phase does not properly model the range of SN Ia light curve shapes. We select a subset of 105 light curves well observed in both rise and fall portions of the light curves and develop a '2-stretch' fit algorithm which estimates the rise and fall times independently. We find the average time from explosion to B-band peak brightness is 17.38 {+-} 0.17 days, but with a spread of rise times which range from 13 days to 23 days. Our average rise time is shorter than the 19.5 days found in previous studies; this reflects both the different light curve template used and the application of the 2-stretch algorithm. The SDSS-II supernova set and the local SNe Ia with well-observed early light curves show no significant differences in their average rise-time properties. We find that slow-declining events tend to have fast rise times, but that the distribution of rise minus fall time is broad and single peaked. This distribution is in contrast to the bimodality in this parameter that was first suggested by Strovink (2007) from an analysis of a small set of local SNe Ia. We divide the SDSS-II sample in half based on the rise minus fall value, t{sub r} - t{sub f} {approx}< 2 days and t{sub r} - t{sub f} > 2 days, to search for differences in their host galaxy properties and Hubble residuals; we find no difference in host galaxy properties or Hubble

  12. Deep Chandra Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud. II. Timing Analysis of X-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, JaeSub; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Haberl, Frank; Sasaki, Manami; Drake, Jeremy J.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Laycock, Silas

    2017-09-01

    We report the timing analysis results of X-ray pulsars from a recent deep Chandra survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We analyzed a total exposure of 1.4 Ms from 31 observations over a 1.2 deg2 region in the SMC under a Chandra X-ray Visionary Program. Using the Lomb-Scargle and epoch-folding techniques, we detected periodic modulations from 20 pulsars and a new candidate pulsar. The survey also covered 11 other pulsars with no clear sign of periodic modulation. The 0.5-8 keV X-ray luminosity (L X ) of the pulsars ranges from 1034 to 1037 erg s-1 at 60 kpc. All of the Chandra sources with L X ≳ 4 × 1035 erg s-1 exhibit X-ray pulsations. The X-ray spectra of the SMC pulsars (and high-mass X-ray binaries) are in general harder than those of the SMC field population. All but SXP 8.02 can be fitted by an absorbed power-law model with a photon index of Γ ≲ 1.5. The X-ray spectrum of the known magnetar SXP 8.02 is better fitted with a two-temperature blackbody model. Newly measured pulsation periods of SXP 51.0, SXP 214, and SXP 701, are significantly different from the previous XMM-Newton and RXTE measurements. This survey provides a rich data set for energy-dependent pulse profile modeling. Six pulsars show an almost eclipse-like dip in the pulse profile. Phase-resolved spectral analysis reveals diverse spectral variations during pulsation cycles: e.g., for an absorbed power-law model, some exhibit an (anti)-correlation between absorption and X-ray flux, while others show more intrinsic spectral variation (I.e., changes in photon indices).

  13. The Chandra planetary nebula survey (CHANPLANS). II. X-ray emission from compact planetary nebulae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, M.; Kastner, J. H. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Montez, R. Jr. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Balick, B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Frew, D. J.; De Marco, O.; Parker, Q. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Macquarie Research Centre for Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Jones, D. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Atacama, Copayapu 485, Copiapó (Chile); Miszalski, B. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory, 7935 (South Africa); Sahai, R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 183-900, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Blackman, E.; Frank, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Chu, Y.-H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Guerrero, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, IAA-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, Granada, E-18008 (Spain); Lopez, J. A. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Ensenada, Apdo. Postal 22860, Ensenada, B. C. (Mexico); Zijlstra, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bujarrabal, V. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Corradi, R. L. M. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Nordhaus, J. [NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Fellow, Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); and others

    2014-10-20

    We present results from the most recent set of observations obtained as part of the Chandra X-ray observatory Planetary Nebula Survey (CHANPLANS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood (i.e., within ∼1.5 kpc of the Sun). The survey is designed to place constraints on the frequency of appearance and range of X-ray spectral characteristics of X-ray-emitting PN central stars and the evolutionary timescales of wind-shock-heated bubbles within PNe. CHANPLANS began with a combined Cycle 12 and archive Chandra survey of 35 PNe. CHANPLANS continued via a Chandra Cycle 14 Large Program which targeted all (24) remaining known compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.4 pc), young PNe that lie within ∼1.5 kpc. Results from these Cycle 14 observations include first-time X-ray detections of hot bubbles within NGC 1501, 3918, 6153, and 6369, and point sources in HbDs 1, NGC 6337, and Sp 1. The addition of the Cycle 14 results brings the overall CHANPLANS diffuse X-ray detection rate to ∼27% and the point source detection rate to ∼36%. It has become clearer that diffuse X-ray emission is associated with young (≲ 5 × 10{sup 3} yr), and likewise compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.15 pc), PNe with closed structures and high central electron densities (n{sub e} ≳ 1000 cm{sup –3}), and is rarely associated with PNe that show H{sub 2} emission and/or pronounced butterfly structures. Hb 5 is one such exception of a PN with a butterfly structure that hosts diffuse X-ray emission. Additionally, two of the five new diffuse X-ray detections (NGC 1501 and NGC 6369) host [WR]-type central stars, supporting the hypothesis that PNe with central stars of [WR]-type are likely to display diffuse X-ray emission.

  14. ONLINE PORNOGRAPHY AND SEXUALITY: SOME RESULTS OF EU KIDS ONLINE SURVEY II IN THE ROMANIAN CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VALENTINA MARINESCU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present article intends to analyze the exposure of Romanian children and teens to sexually explicit message and the so-called „sexting” activities they perform in the online environment. The main research topic to which we try to find some answers is: are young people more exposed to risks because they view sexually explicit content online and send sexual messages to others? Our results validate the risk migration hypothesis, the blurring boundaries between the online and offline worlds enabling the migration of risk from the real world to the internet and the reverse. At the same time, the date of EU Kinds Online II validate the vulnerability hypothesis, according to which the harm declared by the children following the exposure to sexually explicit images and the receiving the sexual messages is the result of their socio-demographic vulnerabilities

  15. The X-Shooter Lens Survey - II. Sample presentation and spatially-resolved kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiniello, C.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Trager, S. C.; Barnabè, M.; Treu, T.; Czoske, O.; Vegetti, S.; Bolton, A.

    2015-09-01

    We present the X-Shooter Lens Survey (XLENS) data. The main goal of XLENS is to disentangle the stellar and dark matter content of massive early-type galaxies (ETGs), through combined strong gravitational lensing, dynamics and spectroscopic stellar population studies. The sample consists of 11 lens galaxies covering the redshift range from 0.1 to 0.45 and having stellar velocity dispersions between 250 and 380 km s-1. All galaxies have multiband, high-quality HST imaging. We have obtained long-slit spectra of the lens galaxies with X-Shooter on the VLT. We are able to disentangle the dark and luminous mass components by combining lensing and extended kinematics data sets, and we are also able to precisely constrain stellar mass-to-light ratios and infer the value of the low-mass cut-off of the initial mass functions (IMF), by adding spectroscopic stellar population information. Our goal is to correlate these IMF parameters with ETG masses and investigate the relation between baryonic and non-baryonic matter during the mass assembly and structure formation processes. In this paper, we provide an overview of the survey, highlighting its scientific motivations, main goals and techniques. We present the current sample, briefly describing the data reduction and analysis process, and we present the first results on spatially-resolved kinematics.

  16. Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Workforce Agenda: Optimizing Capabilities and Capacity to Address Workforce Demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Kathleen R

    2016-01-01

    The mental health service delivery transformation has created models of care that generate demand for a workforce with particular competencies. This article develops a psychiatric mental health (PMH) nursing workforce agenda in light of demand generated by new models of care and the capacity/capabilities of the PMH RN and advanced practice nurse (APN) workforce. Examine the current capacity of the PMH nursing workforce and how health care reform and related service delivery models create demand for a particular set of behavioral health workforce competencies. PMH RNs and APNs have an educational background that facilitates development of competencies in screening, care coordination, leveling care, and wellness education. PMH RNs are a large workforce but the size of the PMH APN group is inadequate to meet demand. The specialty must strategize on how to build requisite PMH RN and APN competencies for the evolving service landscape. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Trends in dermatology practices and the implications for the workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Alison; Kostecki, James; Olkaba, Helen

    2017-10-01

    The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) practice profile surveys have been conducted for more than a decade to gauge trends in our workforce supply and demand. To update the trends and current workforce issues for the field of dermatology. The AAD Practice Profile Survey is sent by both e-mail and postal mail to a random sample of practicing dermatologists who are AAD members. Shifts are noted in the primary practice setting; fewer dermatologists are in solo practice and more are in group practices than in previous years. Teledermatology use trended upward from 7% to 11% between 2012 and 2014. The implementation of electronic health records increased from 51% in 2011 to 70% in 2014. There is potential for response bias and inaccurate self-reporting. Survey responses collected may not be representative of all geographic areas. The demand for dermatology services remains strong. Shifts in the practice setting may be related to increases in overhead costs that are partially associated with the implementation of technology-based medical records. Integration of electronic health records and utilization of telemedicine are increasing. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The academic radiography workforce: Age profile, succession planning and academic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, K M; Wright, C; Clarke, H; McAnulla, S J; Nightingale, J M

    2017-09-01

    Academia is one area of practice in which radiographers can specialise; they compile approximately 2% of the total radiography profession in the UK, but are highly influential and essential for the education and development of the workforce in addition to undertaking research. However, the academic environment is very different to clinical practice and a period of transition is required. Data were collated to explore the age and retirement profile of the academic radiography workforce in the UK; to understand the research time allocated to this workforce; the time required to develop a clinical radiographer into an academic and the mentorship and succession planning provisions nationally. An online UK wide survey was conducted and sent to all 24 Universities delivering radiography education within the UK. Eighteen out of 24 Universities in the UK responded to the survey. Approximately 30% of radiography academics are due to retire over the next 10 years, with over 25% of radiographers who currently hold a doctorate qualification included within this figure. Those entering academia have notably lower qualifications as a group than those who are due to retire. Developing clinical radiographers into academics was thought to take 1-3 years on average, or longer if they are required to undertake research. There is vulnerability in the academic radiography workforce. Higher education institutions need to invest in developing the academic workforce to maintain research and educational expertise, which is underpinned by master's and doctorate level qualifications. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Oral health workforce planning. Part 1: Data available in a sample of FDI member countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamalik, Nermin; Ensaldo-Carrasco, Eduardo; Bourgeois, Denis

    2013-12-01

    Workforce planning is a resource to measure and compare current versus future workforce. Organised dentistry needs to focus on the benefits and the determinants and various systems of workforce planning together with the challenges, new trends and threats. The aim of the study was to identify data sources from countries relating to a selection of oral health indicators in a sample of FDI member countries. The potential for differences between developed and developing countries was also examined. A cross-sectional survey study was carried out among FDI member countries classified in developed and developing countries between October 2011 and January/February 2012. A questionnaire was developed addressing the availability of 40 selected indicators distributed in four domains. Mann-Whitney U-tests to identify differences between developed and developing countries and chi-square tests for the degree of information regularly available were carried out. There is an important lack of information about indicators relevant to oral health between FDI participating countries regardless of their level of economic development. Although not significant, the availability of indicators for developing countries showed higher variability and minimum values of zero for all domains. Surveys were the source of information more frequently reported. Standardised and reliable methodologies are needed to gather information for successful workforce planning. It is of utmost importance to increase the awareness and understanding of the member National Dental Associations regarding the role, basic elements, benefits, challenges, models and critical elements of an ideal workforce planning system.

  20. Civilians in World War II and DSM-IV mental disorders: results from the World Mental Health Survey Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frounfelker, Rochelle; Gilman, Stephen E; Betancourt, Theresa S; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Alonso, Jordi; Bromet, Evelyn J; Bruffaerts, Ronny; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Gluzman, Semyon; Gureje, Oye; Karam, Elie G; Lee, Sing; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Ono, Yutaka; Pennell, Beth-Ellen; Popovici, Daniela G; Ten Have, Margreet; Kessler, Ronald C

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the effects of war on mental disorders is important for developing effective post-conflict recovery policies and programs. The current study uses cross-sectional, retrospectively reported data collected as part of the World Mental Health (WMH) Survey Initiative to examine the associations of being a civilian in a war zone/region of terror in World War II with a range of DSM-IV mental disorders. Adults (n = 3370) who lived in countries directly involved in World War II in Europe and Japan were administered structured diagnostic interviews of lifetime DSM-IV mental disorders. The associations of war-related traumas with subsequent disorder onset-persistence were assessed with discrete-time survival analysis (lifetime prevalence) and conditional logistic regression (12-month prevalence). Respondents who were civilians in a war zone/region of terror had higher lifetime risks than other respondents of major depressive disorder (MDD; OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1, 1.9) and anxiety disorder (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1, 2.0). The association of war exposure with MDD was strongest in the early years after the war, whereas the association with anxiety disorders increased over time. Among lifetime cases, war exposure was associated with lower past year risk of anxiety disorders (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2, 0.7). Exposure to war in World War II was associated with higher lifetime risk of some mental disorders. Whether comparable patterns will be found among civilians living through more recent wars remains to be seen, but should be recognized as a possibility by those projecting future needs for treatment of mental disorders.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: California-Kepler Survey (CKS). II. Properties (Johnson+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. A.; Petigura, E. A.; Fulton, B. J.; Marcy, G. W.; Howard, A. W.; Isaacson, H.; Hebb, L.; Cargile, P. A.; Morton, T. D.; Weiss, L. M.; Winn, J. N.; Rogers, L. A.; Sinukoff, E.; Hirsch, L. A.

    2017-11-01

    The California-Kepler Survey (CKS) project and goals are described in detail in Paper I (Petigura et al. 2017, Cat. J/AJ/154/107) of this series. In brief, between 2012 and 2015, we obtained high-resolution (R~50000) spectra of 1305 stars identified as Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) with Keck/HIRES. We used an exposure meter to achieve a uniform signal-to-noise ratio ~45 per HIRES pixel on blaze near 5500Å. Using these spectra, we derived effective temperature (Teff), surface gravity (logg), metallicity ([Fe/H]), and projected stellar rotation velocity (vsini). In this work, we convert the observed spectroscopic properties of Paper I (Petigura et al. 2017, Cat. J/AJ/154/107) into physical stellar and planetary properties. (2 data files).

  2. Survey of fish impingement at power plants in the United States. Volume II. Inland waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, III, Richard F.; Sharma, Rajendra K.

    1977-03-01

    Impingement of fish at cooling-water intakes of 33 power plants located on inland waters other than the Great Lakes has been surveyed and data are presented. Descriptions of site, plant, and intake design and operation are provided. Reports in this volume summarize impingement data for individual plants in tabular and histogram formats. Information was available from differing sources such as the utilities themselves, public documents, regulatory agencies, and others. Thus, the extent of detail in the reports varies greatly from plant to plant. Histogram preparation involved an extrapolation procedure that has inadequacies. The reader is cautioned in the use of information presented in this volume to determine intake-design acceptability or intensity of impacts on ecosystems. No conclusions are presented herein; data comparisons are made in Volume IV.

  3. Redshifts for fainter galaxies in the first CfA survey slice. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Gary; Thorstensen, John R.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1990-01-01

    Redshifts were measured for 96 galaxies in right ascension alpha between 8h and 17h declination delta between 30 and 31 deg, and with m(Zwicky) in the range 15.6-15.7. These correspond to 94 of the 96 entries in the Zwicky-Nilson merged catalog. The declination range delta between 29 deg and 31 deg is now complete to m(Zwicky) = 15.7. The structures in the first 6-deg-wide slice of the Center for Astrophysics redshift survey slice (delta between 26.5 and 32.5 deg are clearly defined in the 2-deg-wide slightly deeper sample; the fainter galaxies trace the structures defined by the brighter ones.

  4. THE SWIFT AGN AND CLUSTER SURVEY. II. CLUSTER CONFIRMATION WITH SDSS DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bregman, Joel N., E-mail: Rhiannon.D.Griffin-1@ou.edu, E-mail: xdai@ou.edu, E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: jbregman@umich.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We study 203 (of 442) Swift AGN and Cluster Survey extended X-ray sources located in the SDSS DR8 footprint to search for galaxy over-densities in three-dimensional space using SDSS galaxy photometric redshifts and positions near the Swift cluster candidates. We find 104 Swift clusters with a >3σ galaxy over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmation as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, and X-ray luminosity. We also detect red sequences in ∼85% of the 104 confirmed clusters. The X-ray luminosity and optical richness for the SDSS confirmed Swift clusters are correlated and follow previously established relations. The distribution of the separations between the X-ray centroids and the most likely BCG is also consistent with expectation. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≲ 0.3 and is still 80% complete up to z ≃ 0.4, consistent with the SDSS survey depth. These analysis results suggest that our Swift cluster selection algorithm has yielded a statistically well-defined cluster sample for further study of cluster evolution and cosmology. We also match our SDSS confirmed Swift clusters to existing cluster catalogs, and find 42, 23, and 1 matches in optical, X-ray, and Sunyaev–Zel’dovich catalogs, respectively, and so the majority of these clusters are new detections.

  5. Training for Tomorrow: Developing a Native Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asfour, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Although demographics are shifting, American Indians continue to suffer from a grossly disproportionate unemployment rate. By partnering with business and government, tribal colleges can alter such trends through workforce development.

  6. The fundamental structure of axis II personality disorders assessed in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Brian J; Sareen, Jitender; Enns, Murray W; Clara, Ian; Grant, Bridget F

    2007-12-01

    Little is known about the fundamental structure of core personality disorder psychopathology in the general population. The current study employed confirmatory factor analysis to evaluate competing models of patterns of personality disorder diagnoses in a nationally representative sample. DSM-IV and alternate models of the structure of personality disorder psychopathology were evaluated using data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions conducted between 2001 and 2002 (N = 43,093). Dimensional versus categorical representations of DSM-IV personality disorder structure were also tested. Face-to-face interviews were conducted in the United States. Participants were community-based respondents aged 18 years and older. Diagnoses and dimensional scores were made for antisocial, avoidant, dependent, histrionic, obsessive-compulsive, paranoid, and schizoid personality disorders. Multiple goodness-of-fit indicators provided support for a DSM-IV-based hierarchical model of personality disorders. In this model, the individual personality disorders were viewed as belonging to 1 of 3 latent factors or clusters (A, B, or C). In all of the models, the individual personality disorders were allowed to be an indicator for only a single latent cluster, and errors were not allowed to correlate with each other. In turn, these 3 clusters were viewed as comprising a single higher-order "Axis II personality disorder factor." The DSM-IV model was largely invariant across gender, Axis I comorbidity, and treatment-seeking status. A dimensionally based form of assessment of the DSM-IV personality disorders produced excellent goodness-of-fit indicators and produced low Akaike information criterion values (which are indicative of better-fitting models). The results from this confirmatory factor analysis in a large, nationally representative mental health survey supported the DSM-IV hierarchical organization of Axis II personality disorders. This model was

  7. Army Contracting Command Workforce Model Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    College), and he has taught visiting seminars at American University in Cairo, and Instituto de Empresas in Madrid. Dr. Reed retired after 21 years...Advisory Panel, 2007, p. 7) not only points toward a strained workforce that lacks the requisite market expertise, but also to other factors that...climate. (Gates, 2009, p. 5) The RAND investigation found that given the lack of available information on workforce requirements, size, quality, and mix

  8. Nurses who work in rural and remote communities in Canada: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Martha L P; Stewart, Norma J; Kulig, Judith C; Anguish, Penny; Andrews, Mary Ellen; Banner, Davina; Garraway, Leana; Hanlon, Neil; Karunanayake, Chandima; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Koren, Irene; Kosteniuk, Julie; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Mix, Nadine; Moffitt, Pertice; Olynick, Janna; Penz, Kelly; Sluggett, Larine; Van Pelt, Linda; Wilson, Erin; Zimmer, Lela

    2017-05-23

    In Canada, as in other parts of the world, there is geographic maldistribution of the nursing workforce, and insufficient attention is paid to the strengths and needs of those providing care in rural and remote settings. In order to inform workforce planning, a national study, Nursing Practice in Rural and Remote Canada II, was conducted with the rural and remote regulated nursing workforce (registered nurses, nurse practitioners, licensed or registered practical nurses, and registered psychiatric nurses) with the intent of informing policy and planning about improving nursing services and access to care. In this article, the study methods are described along with an examination of the characteristics of the rural and remote nursing workforce with a focus on important variations among nurse types and regions. A cross-sectional survey used a mailed questionnaire with persistent follow-up to achieve a stratified systematic sample of 3822 regulated nurses from all provinces and territories, living outside of the commuting zones of large urban centers and in the north of Canada. Rural workforce characteristics reported here suggest the persistence of key characteristics noted in a previous Canada-wide survey of rural registered nurses (2001-2002), namely the aging of the rural nursing workforce, the growth in baccalaureate education for registered nurses, and increasing casualization. Two thirds of the nurses grew up in a community of under 10 000 people. While nurses' levels of satisfaction with their nursing practice and community are generally high, significant variations were noted by nurse type. Nurses reported coming to rural communities to work for reasons of location, interest in the practice setting, and income, and staying for similar reasons. Important variations were noted by nurse type and region. The proportion of the rural nursing workforce in Canada is continuing to decline in relation to the proportion of the Canadian population in rural and remote

  9. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Derek; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Hoyos, Carlos; Den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of a HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially-completed survey still covers approximately 50% of the core high density region in Coma. Observations were performed for twenty-five fields with a total coverage area of 274 aremin(sup 2), and extend over a wide range of cluster-centric radii (approximately 1.75 Mpe or 1 deg). The majority of the fields are located near the core region of Coma (19/25 pointings) with six additional fields in the south-west region of the cluster. In this paper we present SEXTRACTOR source catalogs generated from the processed images, including a detailed description of the methodology used for object detection and photometry, the subtraction of bright galaxies to measure faint underlying objects, and the use of simulations to assess the photometric accuracy and completeness of our catalogs. We also use simulations to perform aperture corrections for the SEXTRACTOR Kron magnitudes based only on the measured source flux and its half-light radius. We have performed photometry for 76,000 objects that consist of roughly equal numbers of extended galaxies and unresolved objects. Approximately two-thirds of all detections are brighter than F814W=26.5 mag (AB), which corresponds to the 10sigma, point-source detection limit. We estimate that Coma members are 5-10% of the source detections, including a large population of compact objects (primarily GCs, but also cEs and UCDs), and a wide variety of extended galaxies from cD galaxies to dwarf low surface brightness galaxies. The initial data release for the HST-ACS Coma Treasury program was made available to the public in August 2008. The images and catalogs described in this study relate to our second data release.

  10. Fuel Quality/Processing Study. Volume II. Appendix, Task I, literature survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, J B; Bela, A; Jentz, N E; Klumpe, H W; Kessler, R E; Kotzot, H T; Loran, B I

    1981-04-01

    This activity was begun with the assembly of information from Parsons' files and from contacts in the development and commercial fields. A further more extensive literature search was carried out using the Energy Data Base and the American Petroleum Institute Data Base. These are part of the DOE/RECON system. Approximately 6000 references and abstracts were obtained from the EDB search. These were reviewed and the especially pertinent documents, approximately 300, were acquired in the form of paper copy or microfiche. A Fuel Properties form was developed for listing information pertinent to gas turbine liquid fuel properties specifications. Fuel properties data for liquid fuels from selected synfuel processes, deemed to be successful candidates for near future commercial plants were tabulated on the forms. The processes selected consisted of H-Coal, SRC-II and Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal liquefaction processes plus Paraho and Tosco shale oil processes. Fuel properties analyses for crude and distillate syncrude process products are contained in Section 2. Analyses representing synthetic fuels given refinery treatments, mostly bench scale hydrotreating, are contained in Section 3. Section 4 discusses gas turbine fuel specifications based on petroleum source fuels as developed by the major gas turbine manufacturers. Section 5 presents the on-site gas turbine fuel treatments applicable to petroleum base fuels impurities content in order to prevent adverse contaminant effects. Section 7 relates the environmental aspects of gas turbine fuel usage and combustion performance. It appears that the near future stationary industrial gas turbine fuel market will require that some of the synthetic fuels be refined to the point that they resemble petroleum based fuels.

  11. The HIX galaxy survey II: HI kinematics of HI eXtreme galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, K. A.; Kilborn, V. A.; Koribalski, B. S.; Catinella, B.; Józsa, G. I. G.; Wong, O. I.; Stevens, A. R. H.; Obreschkow, D.; Dénes, H.

    2018-02-01

    By analysing a sample of galaxies selected from the HI Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS) to contain more than 2.5 times their expected HI content based on their optical properties, we investigate what drives these HI eXtreme (HIX) galaxies to be so HI-rich. We model the H I kinematics with the Tilted Ring Fitting Code TiRiFiC and compare the observed HIX galaxies to a control sample of galaxies from HIPASS as well as simulated galaxies built with the semi-analytic model DARK SAGE. We find that (1) H I discs in HIX galaxies are more likely to be warped and more likely to host H I arms and tails than in the control galaxies, (2) the average H I and average stellar column density of HIX galaxies is comparable to the control sample, (3) HIX galaxies have higher H I and baryonic specific angular momenta than control galaxies, (4) most HIX galaxies live in higher-spin haloes than most control galaxies. These results suggest that HIX galaxies are H I-rich because they can support more H I against gravitational instability due to their high specific angular momentum. The majority of the HIX galaxies inherits their high specific angular momentum from their halo. The H I content of HIX galaxies might be further increased by gas-rich minor mergers. This paper is based on data obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) through the large program C 2705.

  12. ACCCN Workforce Standards for Intensive Care Nursing: Systematic and evidence review, development, and appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Diane; Pollock, Wendy; Fulbrook, Paul

    2017-12-12

    The intensive care nursing workforce plays an essential role in the achievement of positive healthcare outcomes. A growing body of evidence indicates that inadequate nurse staffing and poor skill mix are associated with negative outcomes for patients, and potentially compromises nurses' ability to maintain the safety of those in their care. In Australia, the Australian College of Critical Care Nurses (ACCCN) has previously published a position statement on intensive care staffing. There was a need for a stronger more evidence based document to support the intensive nursing workforce. To undertake a systematic and evidence review of the evidence related to intensive care nurse staffing and quality of care, and determine evidence-based professional standards for the intensive care nursing workforce in Australia. The National Health and Medical Research Council standard for clinical practice guidelines methodology was employed. The English language literature, for the years 2000-2015 was searched. Draft standards were developed and then peer- and consumer-reviewed. A total of 553 articles was retrieved from the initial searches. Following evaluation, 231 articles met the inclusion criteria and were assessed for quality using established criteria. This evidence was used as the basis for the development of ten workforce standards, and to establish the overall level of evidence in support of each standard. All draft standards and their subsections were supported multi-professionally (median score >6) and by consumers (85-100% agreement). Following minor revisions, independent appraisal using the AGREE II tool indicated that the standards were developed with a high degree of rigour. The ACCCN intensive care nursing nurse workforce standards are the first to be developed using a robust, evidence-based process. The standards represent the optimal nurse workforce to achieve the best patient outcomes and to maintain a sustainable intensive care nursing workforce for Australia

  13. Internationally educated nurses in Canada: predictors of workforce integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covell, Christine L; Primeau, Marie-Douce; Kilpatrick, Kelley; St-Pierre, Isabelle

    2017-04-04

    Global trends in migration accompanied with recent changes to the immigrant selection process may have influenced the demographic and human capital characteristics of internationally educated nurses (IENs) in Canada and in turn the assistance required to facilitate their workforce integration. This study aimed to describe the demographic and human capital profile of IENs in Canada, to explore recent changes to the profile, and to identify predictors of IENs' workforce integration. A cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational survey design was used. Eligible IENs were immigrants, registered and employed as regulated nurses in Canada. Data were collected in 2014 via online and paper questionnaires. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the data by year of immigration. Logistic regression modeling was employed to identify predictors of IENs' workforce integration measured as passing the licensure exam to acquire professional recertification and securing employment. The sample consisted of 2280 IENs, representative of all Canadian provincial jurisdictions. Since changes to the immigrant selection process in 2002, the IEN population in Canada has become more racially diverse with greater numbers emigrating from developing countries. Recent arrivals (after 2002) had high levels of human capital (knowledge, professional experience, language proficiency). Some, but not all, benefited from the formal and informal assistance available to facilitate their workforce integration. Professional experience and help studying significantly predicted if IENs passed the licensure exam on their first attempt. Bridging program participation and assistance from social networks in Canada were significant predictors if IENs had difficulty securing employment. Nurses will continue to migrate from a wide variety of countries throughout the world that have dissimilar nursing education and health systems. Thus, IENs are not a homogenous group, and a "one size fits all" model may not be

  14. Al Ain community survey of psychiatric morbidity II. Sex differences in the prevalence of depressive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daradkeh, Tewfik K; Ghubash, Rafia; Abou-Saleh, Mohammed T

    2002-11-01

    To examine sex differences in the prevalence of depressive disorders in an Arab community. One thousand three hundred and ninety-four subjects (n=1394) were systematically sampled from the general population in Al-Ain city, United Arab Emirates. All subjects were interviewed and assessed with the modified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) and a specially designed socio-demographic questionnaire. The lifetime male and female prevalence rates were estimated. Multivariate logistic regression of various socio-demographic variables was carried out to assess independent risk factors for depression. Statistical significance of sex differences in rates of depression by various socio-demographic groups were also assessed. The lifetime rates in males and females were 2.8 and 10.3%, respectively. F:M ratio found in this study is highest reported ratio in the literature. Sex, life events, chronic difficulties and to a certain extent age were found to be risk factors for depression in the studied community. The prevalence rates of depression were higher in females in all above categories but such differences reached statistical significance in age category before 55, regardless of marital status, when the number of children is four or more and among those exposed to recent life events and chronic difficulties. Females were found to to be more exposed to chronic life difficulties but only depressed females were significantly more subjected to recent life events. Sex differences in depression is a robust finding but more studies are needed to explain the high F:M ratio found in this survey.

  15. Bright Metal-Poor Stars from the Hamburg/ESO Survey. II. A Chemodynamical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Placco, Vinicius M.; Carollo, Daniela; Rossi, Silvia; Lee, Young Sun; Frebel, Anna; Norris, John E.; Dietz, Sarah; Masseron, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We obtain estimates of stellar atmospheric parameters for a previously published sample of 1777 relatively bright (9Hamburg/ESO Survey. The original Frebel et al. analysis of these stars was able to derive estimates of [Fe/H] and [C/Fe] only for a subset of the sample, due to limitations in the methodology then available. A new spectroscopic analysis pipeline has been used to obtain estimates of {T}{eff}, {log} g, [Fe/H], and [C/Fe] for almost the entire data set. This sample is very local—about 90% of the stars are located within 0.5 kpc of the Sun. We consider the chemodynamical properties of these stars in concert with a similarly local sample of stars from a recent analysis of the Bidelman and MacConnell “weak metal” candidates by Beers et al. We use this combined sample to identify possible members of the halo stream of stars suggested by Helmi et al. and Chiba & Beers, as well as stars that may be associated with stripped debris from the putative parent dwarf of the globular cluster Omega Centauri, suggested to exist by previous authors. We identify a clear increase in the cumulative frequency of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars with declining metallicity, as well as an increase in the fraction of CEMP stars with distance from the Galactic plane, consistent with previous results. We also identify a relatively large number of CEMP stars with kinematics consistent with the metal-weak thick-disk population, with possible implications for its origin.

  16. CALIFA, the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area survey. II. First public data release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husemann, B.; Jahnke, K.; Sánchez, S. F.; Barrado, D.; Bekerait*error*ė, S.; Bomans, D. J.; Castillo-Morales, A.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; García-Benito, R.; González Delgado, R. M.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Johnson, B. D.; Kupko, D.; López-Fernandez, R.; Lyubenova, M.; Marino, R. A.; Mast, D.; Miskolczi, A.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Gil de Paz, A.; Pérez, E.; Pérez, I.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Ruiz-Lara, T.; Schilling, U.; van de Ven, G.; Walcher, J.; Alves, J.; de Amorim, A. L.; Backsmann, N.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Cortijo, C.; Dettmar, R.-J.; Demleitner, M.; Díaz, A. I.; Enke, H.; Florido, E.; Flores, H.; Galbany, L.; Gallazzi, A.; García-Lorenzo, B.; Gomes, J. M.; Gruel, N.; Haines, T.; Holmes, L.; Jungwiert, B.; Kalinova, V.; Kehrig, C.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Klar, J.; Lehnert, M. D.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Márquez, I.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Mollá, M.; del Olmo, A.; Meidt, S. E.; Papaderos, P.; Puschnig, J.; Quirrenbach, A.; Roth, M. M.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Spekkens, K.; Singh, R.; Stanishev, V.; Trager, S. C.; Vilchez, J. M.; Wild, V.; Wisotzki, L.; Zibetti, S.; Ziegler, B.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first public data release (DR1) of the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey. It consists of science-grade optical datacubes for the first 100 of eventually 600 nearby (0.005 characteristics and data structure of the CALIFA datasets that should be taken into account for scientific exploitation of the data, in particular the effects of vignetting, bad pixels and spatially correlated noise. The data quality test for all 100 galaxies showed that we reach a median limiting continuum sensitivity of 1.0 × 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 Å-1 arcsec-2 at 5635 Å and 2.2 × 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 Å-1 arcsec-2 at 4500 Å for the V500 and V1200 setup respectively, which corresponds to limiting r and g band surface brightnesses of 23.6 mag arcsec-2 and 23.4 mag arcsec-2, or an unresolved emission-line flux detection limit of roughly 1 × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2 and 0.6 × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2, respectively. The median spatial resolution is 3farcs7, and the absolute spectrophotometric calibration is better than 15% (1σ). We also describe the available interfaces and tools that allow easy access to this first publicCALIFA data at http://califa.caha.es/DR1 Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max- Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA) and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).

  17. Hungaria Asteroid Region Telescopic Spectral Survey (HARTSS) II: Spectral Homogeneity Among Hungaria Family Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Michael P.; Emery, Joshua; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Lindsay, Sean S.; MacLennan, Eric M.; Cartwright, Richard; Reddy, Vishnu; Sanchez, Juan A.; Thomas, Cristina A.; Lorenzi, Vania

    2017-10-01

    Spectral observations of asteroid family members provide valuable information regarding parent body interiors, the source regions of near-Earth asteroids, and the link between meteorites and their parent bodies. Hungaria family asteroids constitute the closest samples to the Earth from a collisional family (~1.94 AU), permitting observations of smaller fragments than accessible for Main Belt families. We have carried out a ground-based observational campaign - Hungaria Asteroid Region Telescopic Spectral Survey (HARTSS) - to record reflectance spectra of these preserved samples from the inner-most primordial asteroid belt. During HARTSS phase one (Lucas et al. [2017]. Icarus 291, 268-287) we found that ~80% of the background population is comprised of stony S-complex asteroids that exhibit considerable spectral and mineralogical diversity. In HARTSS phase two, we turn our attention to family members and hypothesize that the Hungaria collisional family is homogeneous. We test this hypothesis through taxonomic classification, albedo estimates, and spectral properties.During phase two of HARTSS we acquired near-infrared (NIR) spectra of 50 new Hungarias (19 family; 31 background) with SpeX/IRTF and NICS/TNG. We analyzed X-type family spectra for NIR color indices (0.85-J J-K), and a subtle ~0.9 µm absorption feature that may be attributed to Fe-poor orthopyroxene. Surviving fragments of an asteroid collisional family typically exhibit similar taxonomies, albedos, and spectral properties. Spectral analysis of X-type Hungaria family members and independently calculated WISE albedo determinations for 428 Hungaria asteroids is consistent with this scenario. Furthermore, ~1/4 of the background population exhibit similar spectral properties and albedos to family X-types.Spectral observations of 92 Hungaria region asteroids acquired during both phases of HARTSS uncover a compositionally heterogeneous background and spectral homogeneity down to ~2 km for collisional family

  18. Factors Influencing Pediatric Nephrology Trainee Entry into the Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, Kimberly; Norwood, Victoria F.; Mahan, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Emerging needs in pediatric nephrology (PN) have made the number of nephrologists entering the workforce of critical importance. This study aimed to discern factors that influence PN fellows to choose their career path and decide to enter the PN workforce. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A survey was sent to the American Society of Pediatric Nephrology list of PN fellows (n = 103) in 2008. The 57 fellows (55%) who completed the survey were representative of the group. Results: The majority decided on a career in PN as senior residents, most commonly due to their interest in renal physiology and academics. They felt residents chose other fields due to lack of interest/exposure to PN, financial constraints, and perceived PN workload. Fellows identified workload and their perception of faculty dissatisfaction as important concerns with PN. None of the respondents planned to leave fellowship, but 21% have considered this. Twenty-eight percent knew a PN fellow who resigned, thought to be due to workload, personal conflicts, and perceived faculty dissatisfaction. Conclusions: Exposing residents to PN earlier in training and emphasizing positive features may create greater interest in PN. PN programs should be cognizant of workload and the influence of faculty dissatisfaction. Ongoing evaluation of PN fellow perceptions can assist in efforts to enhance recruitment and retention. PMID:20576826

  19. Will the RN Workforce Weather the Retirement of the Baby Boomers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, David I; Buerhaus, Peter I; Staiger, Douglas O

    2015-10-01

    After forecasts made more than a decade ago suggested dire nursing shortages, enrollment in nursing schools doubled. The implications of this unprecedented change for the nursing workforce have not yet been fully explored. To forecast the size and age distribution of the nursing workforce to the year 2030 and to compare to demand recently projected by the Health Resources and Services Agency. A retrospective cohort analysis of employment trends by birth year and age were used to project age and employment of registered nurses (RNs) through 2030. Data on employed RNs from the United States Bureau of the Census Current Population Survey (1979-2000, N=72,222) and American Community Survey (2001-2013, N=342,712). RNs between the ages of 23 and 69 years. Annual full-time equivalent (FTE) employment of RNs in total and by single year of age. Annual retirements from the nursing workforce will accelerate from 20,000 a decade ago to near 80,000 in the next decade as baby boomer RNs continue to age. We project that this outflow will be more than offset by continued strong entry of new RNs into the workforce. Overall, we project that the registered nursing workforce will increase from roughly 2.7 million FTE RNs in 2013 to 3.3 million in 2030. We also find that the workforce will reach its peak average age in 2015 at 44.4. This increase in workforce size, which was not expected in forecasts made a decade ago, is contingent on new entry into nursing continuing at its current rate. Even then, supply would still fall short of demand as recently projected by the Health Resources and Services Agency in the year 2025 by 128,000 RNs (4%). The unexpected surge of entry of new RNs into the workforce will lead to continued net growth of the nursing workforce, both in absolute FTE and FTE per capita. While this growth may not be sufficient to meet demand, such projections are uncertain in the face of a rapidly evolving health care delivery system.

  20. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey. IV. Scaling Relations for Ultraviolet, Ca ii K, and Energetic Particle Fluxes from M Dwarfs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblood, Allison; France, Kevin; Loyd, R. O. Parke; Mason, James P. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 600 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Brown, Alexander [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Schneider, P. Christian [European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESA/ESTEC), Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Tilley, Matt A. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351310, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Kowalski, Adam [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 2000 Colorado Ave., Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Buccino, Andrea; Mauas, Pablo J. D. [Dpto. de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (FCEN), Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Froning, Cynthia S. [Department of Astronomy/McDonald Observatory, C1400, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hawley, Suzanne L. [Astronomy Department, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Redfield, Seth [Astronomy Department and Van Vleck Observatory, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Miguel, Yamila [Observatoire de la Cote d’Azur, Boulevard de l’Observatoire, CS 34229 F-06304 NICE Cedex 4 (France); Newton, Elisabeth R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rugheimer, Sarah, E-mail: allison.youngblood@colorado.edu [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of St. Andrews, Irvine Building, North Street, St. Andrews, KY16 9AL (United Kingdom); and others

    2017-07-01

    Characterizing the UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of an exoplanet host star is critically important for assessing its planet’s potential habitability, particularly for M dwarfs, as they are prime targets for current and near-term exoplanet characterization efforts and atmospheric models predict that their UV radiation can produce photochemistry on habitable zone planets different from that on Earth. To derive ground-based proxies for UV emission for use when Hubble Space Telescope ( HST ) observations are unavailable, we have assembled a sample of 15 early to mid-M dwarfs observed by HST and compared their nonsimultaneous UV and optical spectra. We find that the equivalent width of the chromospheric Ca ii K line at 3933 Å, when corrected for spectral type, can be used to estimate the stellar surface flux in ultraviolet emission lines, including H i Ly α . In addition, we address another potential driver of habitability: energetic particle fluxes associated with flares. We present a new technique for estimating soft X-ray and >10 MeV proton flux during far-UV emission line flares (Si iv and He ii) by assuming solar-like energy partitions. We analyze several flares from the M4 dwarf GJ 876 observed with HST and Chandra as part of the MUSCLES Treasury Survey and find that habitable zone planets orbiting GJ 876 are impacted by large Carrington-like flares with peak soft X-ray fluxes ≥10{sup −3} W m{sup −2} and possible proton fluxes ∼10{sup 2}–10{sup 3} pfu, approximately four orders of magnitude more frequently than modern-day Earth.

  1. Food consumption of adults in Germany: results of the German National Nutrition Survey II based on diet history interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Thorsten; Krems, Carolin; Moon, Kilson; Brombach, Christine; Hoffmann, Ingrid

    2015-05-28

    The second German National Nutrition Survey (NVS II) aimed to evaluate food consumption and other aspects of nutritional behaviour of a representative sample of the German population, using a modular design with three different dietary assessment methods. To assess usual food consumption, 15,371 German speaking subjects 14-80 years of age completed a diet history interview between November 2005 and November 2006. With reference to the guidelines of the German Nutrition Society (DGE), NVS II observed that the German population did not eat enough foods of plant origin, especially vegetables and consumed too much of meat and meat products. While generally similar food consumption is observed in other European countries, consumption of bread, fruit juices/nectars and beer is higher in Germany. On average, men consumed two times more meat and soft drinks as well as six times more beer than women did, whereas the consumption of vegetables, fruit as well as herbal/fruit tea was higher in women. Older participants showed a lower consumption of meat, fruit juice/nectars, soft drinks and spirits as well as a higher consumption of fish, vegetables, fruit, and herbal/fruit tea than adolescents and younger adults did. There are also differences in food consumption with regard to socio-economic status (SES). Persons with higher SES consumed more vegetables, fruit, fish, water, coffee/tea and wine, while persons with lower SES consumed more meat and meat products, soft drinks and beer. In general, the food consumption of women, the elderly and the higher SES group tends to be closer to the official dietary guidelines in Germany.

  2. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey. IV. Scaling Relations for Ultraviolet, Ca II K, and Energetic Particle Fluxes from M Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblood, Allison; France, Kevin; Parke Loyd, R. O.; Brown, Alexander; Mason, James P.; Schneider, P. Christian; Tilley, Matt A.; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Buccino, Andrea; Froning, Cynthia S.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Linsky, Jeffrey; Mauas, Pablo J. D.; Redfield, Seth; Kowalski, Adam; Miguel, Yamila; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Rugheimer, Sarah; Segura, Antígona; Roberge, Aki; Vieytes, Mariela

    2017-07-01

    Characterizing the UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of an exoplanet host star is critically important for assessing its planet’s potential habitability, particularly for M dwarfs, as they are prime targets for current and near-term exoplanet characterization efforts and atmospheric models predict that their UV radiation can produce photochemistry on habitable zone planets different from that on Earth. To derive ground-based proxies for UV emission for use when Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations are unavailable, we have assembled a sample of 15 early to mid-M dwarfs observed by HST and compared their nonsimultaneous UV and optical spectra. We find that the equivalent width of the chromospheric Ca II K line at 3933 Å, when corrected for spectral type, can be used to estimate the stellar surface flux in ultraviolet emission lines, including H I Lyα. In addition, we address another potential driver of habitability: energetic particle fluxes associated with flares. We present a new technique for estimating soft X-ray and >10 MeV proton flux during far-UV emission line flares (Si IV and He II) by assuming solar-like energy partitions. We analyze several flares from the M4 dwarf GJ 876 observed with HST and Chandra as part of the MUSCLES Treasury Survey and find that habitable zone planets orbiting GJ 876 are impacted by large Carrington-like flares with peak soft X-ray fluxes ≥10-3 W m-2 and possible proton fluxes ˜102-103 pfu, approximately four orders of magnitude more frequently than modern-day Earth.

  3. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...

  4. Presenteeism in the New Zealand senior medical workforce-a mixed-methods analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Charlotte; Frampton, Chris; Barclay, Murray

    2017-01-27

    To estimate rates of presenteeism in the New Zealand senior medical workforce and identify reasons why this workforce feels pressured to work through illness. A cross-sectional survey was returned by 1,806/3,740 publically employed senior doctors and dentists (48%). Relationships between rates of presenteeism, sick leave and demographic factors were explored alongside views on cultural and professional norms. Presenteeism was reported by 88% of respondents. Women and younger doctors had highest rates of presenteeism. Reasons for presenteeism included difficulties accessing short-term sickness cover and concern for the impact of sick leave on patients as well as sociocultural norms. Presenteeism is a widespread behavioural norm in this medical workforce. Choosing whether to work through illness reflects the high value placed on duty of care, but also tensions around defining responsible behaviour in this regard.

  5. Cutting-edge technology for public health workforce training in comparative effectiveness research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Miranda, Abraham A; Nash, Michelle C; Salemi, Jason L; Mbah, Alfred K; Salihu, Hamisu M

    2013-06-01

    A critical mass of public health practitioners with expertise in analytic techniques and best practices in comparative effectiveness research is needed to fuel informed decisions and improve the quality of health care. The purpose of this case study is to describe the development and formative evaluation of a technology-enhanced comparative effectiveness research learning curriculum and to assess its potential utility to improve core comparative effectiveness research competencies among the public health workforce. Selected public health experts formed a multidisciplinary research collaborative and participated in the development and evaluation of a blended 15-week comprehensive e-comparative effectiveness research training program, which incorporated an array of health informatics technologies. Results indicate that research-based organizations can use a systematic, flexible, and rapid means of instructing their workforce using technology-enhanced authoring tools, learning management systems, survey research software, online communities of practice, and mobile communication for effective and creative comparative effectiveness research training of the public health workforce.

  6. Career retention in the dental hygiene workforce in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, G H; Gutmann, M E; DeWald, J P; Nunn, M E

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that influence the retention and attrition of dental hygienists within the workforce in Texas. Respondents' perception of the role of employee benefits and practice of dental hygiene on career retention were explored. Demographic descriptors, including educational level, marital status, age, employment setting, and practice statuses, were also examined. A questionnaire modified from the American Dental Hygienists' Association Extension Study: Retention of Dental Hygienists in the Workforce Final Report, April 1992, was mailed to a systematic sample of licensed Texas dental hygienists in March 1999. Descriptive statistics were computed for dental hygienists currently in practice in Texas and those not in practice at the time of the survey. Differences in demographics, benefits, and attitudes between dental hygienists currently in practice in Texas and dental hygienists not in practice at the time of the survey were tested using independent t-tests for interval data and chi-squared tests for categorical data. All statistical analyses were conducted using the Statistical Package for Social Scientists (SPSS v. 9, Chicago, Illinois). A response rate of 68.1% was obtained. Results revealed the primary reasons for remaining in the practice of dental hygiene were salary, family responsibility, professional collaboration, and variety of work. The primary reasons for leaving dental hygiene practice were family responsibility, boredom, salary, and lack of benefits. Secondary and tertiary reasons stated for staying in clinical practice revealed additional factors including benefits, participation in decision-making, and a safe environment. Dental hygienists in clinical practice were more likely to be employed by a dentist in a single practice and see more patients per day, have a certificate or associate's degree, be unmarried, have fewer children, and be younger than dental hygienists not in practice. The findings suggest

  7. Pathway to better patient care and nurse workforce outcomes in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrín, Olga F; Kang, Youjeong; Aiken, Linda H

    2017-06-02

    Unlike the Magnet Recognition Program, the newer Pathway to Excellence Program designed to improve work environments in a broader range of organizations has not yet been the focus of substantial research. The purpose of the study was to examine the association of Pathway to Excellence Program Standards with better patient care quality and workforce outcomes in home care. Cross-sectional survey of registered nurses yielded informants from 871 home care agencies in the United States. Variables representing each of the 12 Pathway Standards were entered into logistic regression models to determine associations with better patient care and nurse workforce outcomes. All Pathway Standards are strongly and significantly associated with better patient care and better workforce outcomes. Home care agencies with better-rated professional work environments consistently had better patient care and nurse workforce outcomes. This study validates the Pathway to Excellence Standards as important to patient care quality and nursing workforce outcomes in home care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Workforce Investment Act: Coordination between TANF Programs and One-Stop Centers Is Increasing, but Challenges Remain. Statement of Sigurd R. Nilsen, Director, Education, Workforce, and Income Security Issues [to the] Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness, Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Sigurd R.

    The General Accounting Office assessed the extent to which states were coordinating their Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) services with their one-stop centers. Data were gathered through the following activities: (1) an autumn 2001 survey of workforce development agency officials in all 50 states and a similar survey conducted in…

  9. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2012 Workforce Study: the radiation oncologists' and residents' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohar, Surjeet; Fung, Claire Y; Hopkins, Shane; Miller, Robert; Azawi, Samar; Arnone, Anna; Patton, Caroline; Olsen, Christine

    2013-12-01

    The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) conducted the 2012 Radiation Oncology Workforce Survey to obtain an up-to-date picture of the workforce, assess its needs and concerns, and identify quality and safety improvement opportunities. The results pertaining to radiation oncologists (ROs) and residents (RORs) are presented here. The ASTRO Workforce Subcommittee, in collaboration with allied radiation oncology professional societies, conducted a survey study in early 2012. An online survey questionnaire was sent to all segments of the radiation oncology workforce. Respondents who were actively working were included in the analysis. This manuscript describes the data for ROs and RORs. A total of 3618 ROs and 568 RORs were surveyed. The response rate for both groups was 29%, with 1047 RO and 165 ROR responses. Among ROs, the 2 most common racial groups were white (80%) and Asian (15%), and the male-to-female ratio was 2.85 (74% male). The median age of ROs was 51. ROs averaged 253.4 new patient consults in a year and 22.9 on-treatment patients. More than 86% of ROs reported being satisfied or very satisfied overall with their career. Close to half of ROs reported having burnout feelings. There was a trend toward more frequent burnout feelings with increasing numbers of new patient consults. ROs' top concerns were related to documentation, reimbursement, and patients' health insurance coverage. Ninety-five percent of ROs felt confident when implementing new technology. Fifty-one percent of ROs thought that the supply of ROs was balanced with demand, and 33% perceived an oversupply. This study provides a current snapshot of the 2012 radiation oncology physician workforce. There was a predominance of whites and men. Job satisfaction level was high. However a substantial fraction of ROs reported burnout feelings. Perceptions about supply and demand balance were mixed. ROs top concerns reflect areas of attention for the healthcare sector as a whole. Copyright

  10. The MUSE Hubble Ultra Deep Field Survey. II. Spectroscopic redshifts and comparisons to color selections of high-redshift galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, H.; Bacon, R.; Brinchmann, J.; Richard, J.; Contini, T.; Conseil, S.; Hamer, S.; Akhlaghi, M.; Bouché, N.; Clément, B.; Desprez, G.; Drake, A. B.; Hashimoto, T.; Leclercq, F.; Maseda, M.; Michel-Dansac, L.; Paalvast, M.; Tresse, L.; Ventou, E.; Kollatschny, W.; Boogaard, L. A.; Finley, H.; Marino, R. A.; Schaye, J.; Wisotzki, L.

    2017-11-01

    We have conducted a two-layered spectroscopic survey (1' × 1' ultra deep and 3' × 3' deep regions) in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE). The combination of a large field of view, high sensitivity, and wide wavelength coverage provides an order of magnitude improvement in spectroscopically confirmed redshifts in the HUDF; i.e., 1206 secure spectroscopic redshifts for Hubble Space Telescope (HST) continuum selected objects, which corresponds to 15% of the total (7904). The redshift distribution extends well beyond z> 3 and to HST/F775W magnitudes as faint as ≈ 30 mag (AB, 1σ). In addition, 132 secure redshifts were obtained for sources with no HST counterparts that were discovered in the MUSE data cubes by a blind search for emission-line features. In total, we present 1338 high quality redshifts, which is a factor of eight increase compared with the previously known spectroscopic redshifts in the same field. We assessed redshifts mainly with the spectral features [O II] at zhttp://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/608/A2

  11. Comparison of two dietary assessment methods by food consumption: results of the German National Nutrition Survey II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisinger-Watzl, Marianne; Straßburg, Andrea; Ramünke, Josa; Krems, Carolin; Heuer, Thorsten; Hoffmann, Ingrid

    2015-04-01

    To further characterise the performance of the diet history method and the 24-h recalls method, both in an updated version, a comparison was conducted. The National Nutrition Survey II, representative for Germany, assessed food consumption with both methods. The comparison was conducted in a sample of 9,968 participants aged 14-80. Besides calculating mean differences, statistical agreement measurements encompass Spearman and intraclass correlation coefficients, ranking participants in quartiles and the Bland-Altman method. Mean consumption of 12 out of 18 food groups was higher assessed with the diet history method. Three of these 12 food groups had a medium to large effect size (e.g., raw vegetables) and seven showed at least a small strength while there was basically no difference for coffee/tea or ice cream. Intraclass correlations were strong only for beverages (>0.50) and revealed the least correlation for vegetables (food group, Bland-Altman plots showed that the agreement of both methods weakened with increasing consumption. The cognitive effort essential for the diet history method to remember consumption of the past 4 weeks may be a source of inaccurateness, especially for inhomogeneous food groups. Additionally, social desirability gains significance. There is no assessment method without errors and attention to specific food groups is a critical issue with every method. Altogether, the 24-h recalls method applied in the presented study, offers advantages approximating food consumption as compared to the diet history method.

  12. The Hispanic and Latino dentist workforce in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Elizabeth; Wides, Cynthia; Calvo, Jean; Gates, Paul

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the Hispanic/Latino (H/L) dentist workforce, their general practice patterns, and their contributions to oral health care for H/L and underserved patients. A national sample survey of underrepresented minority dentists was conducted in 2012 and received a 35.4 percent response rate for self-reported H/L dentists. Data were weighted for selection and response bias to be nationally representative. A workforce profile of H/L dentists was created using descriptive and multivariable statistics and published data. Among all H/L dentists (weighted n = 5,748), 31.9 percent self-identify their origin as Mexican, 13.4 percent as Puerto Rican, 13.0 percent as Cuban, and 41.7 percent as another H/L group. The largest share of H/L dentists are male, married, and have children under age 18. Fifty percent of H/L dentists are foreign-born and 25 percent are foreign-trained. H/L dentists report higher than average educational debt, with those completing International Dentist Programs reporting the highest debt load. Sixty-nine percent of clinically active H/L dentists own their own practices, and 85 percent speak Spanish in their practice. Among clinical H/L dentists, 7 percent work in safety-net settings, 40 percent primarily treat underserved populations, and, on average, 42 percent of their patient population is H/L. H/L dental providers are underrepresented in the dentist population, and those that are in practice shoulder a disproportionate share of dental care for minority and underserved communities. Improving the workforce diversity of dental providers is a critical part of strategy to address the high burden of dental disease in the H/L population. © 2016 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  13. Exploring Scholarship and the Emergency Medicine Educator: A Workforce Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jaime; Coates, Wendy C; Clarke, Samuel; Runde, Daniel P; Fowlkes, Emilie; Kurth, Jacqueline; Yarris, Lalena M

    2017-01-01

    Recent literature calls for initiatives to improve the quality of education studies and support faculty in approaching educational problems in a scholarly manner. Understanding the emergency medicine (EM) educator workforce is a crucial precursor to developing policies to support educators and promote education scholarship in EM. This study aims to illuminate the current workforce model for the academic EM educator. Program leadership at EM training programs completed an online survey consisting of multiple choice, completion, and free-response type items. We calculated and reported descriptive statistics. 112 programs participated. Mean number of core faculty/program: 16.02 ± 7.83 [14.53-17.5]. Mean number of faculty full-time equivalents (FTEs)/program dedicated to education is 6.92 ± 4.92 [5.87-7.98], including (mean FTE): Vice chair for education (0.25); director of medical education (0.13); education fellowship director (0.2); residency program director (0.83); associate residency director (0.94); assistant residency director (1.1); medical student clerkship director (0.8); assistant/associate clerkship director (0.28); simulation fellowship director (0.11); simulation director (0.42); director of faculty development (0.13). Mean number of FTEs/program for education administrative support is 2.34 ± 1.1 [2.13-2.61]. Determination of clinical hours varied; 38.75% of programs had personnel with education research expertise. Education faculty represent about 43% of the core faculty workforce. Many programs do not have the full spectrum of education leadership roles and educational faculty divide their time among multiple important academic roles. Clinical requirements vary. Many departments lack personnel with expertise in education research. This information may inform interventions to promote education scholarship.

  14. The Hispanic and Latino Dentist Workforce in the United State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Elizabeth; Wides, Cynthia; Calvo, Jean; Gates, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this paper is to describe the Hispanic/Latino (H/L) dentist workforce, their general practice patterns, and their contributions to oral health care for H/L and underserved patients. Methods A national sample survey of underrepresented minority dentists was conducted in 2012 and received a 35.4% response rate for self-reported H/L dentists. Data were weighted for selection and response bias to be nationally representative. A workforce profile of H/L dentists was created using descriptive and multivariable statistics and published data. Results Among all H/L dentists (weighted n=5,748), 31.9% self-identify their origin as Mexican, 13.4% as Puerto Rican, 13.0% as Cuban, and 41.7% as another H/L group. The largest share of H/L dentists are male, married, and have children under age 18. Fifty percent of H/L dentists are foreign-born and 25% are foreign-trained. H/L dentists report higher than average educational debt, with those completing International Dentist Programs reporting the highest debt load. Sixty-nine percent of clinically active H/L dentists own their own practices, and 85% speak Spanish in their practice. Among clinical H/L dentists, 7% work in safety-net settings, 40% primarily treat underserved populations, and, on average, 42% of their patient population is H/L. Conclusions H/L dental providers are drastically underrepresented in the dentist population, and those that are in practice shoulder a disproportionate share of dental care for minority and underserved communities. Improving the workforce diversity of dental providers is a critical part of strategy to address the unacceptably high burden of dental disease in the H/L population. PMID:28025830

  15. The Changing Global Context of Virtual Workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Ejiwale

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The technological revolution occurring in today’s market place has made it possible for many companies to be innovative about the way and where work is done. To get the job done, due to digital revolution, companies have turned to virtual workforce to harness the benefits of connectivity and effective information sharing among stakeholders to get the job done. More important, the success of coordinating work among a virtual workforce for profitability in a rapidly changing global environment depends on “effective indirect communication” between the leadership and the virtual workforce. This article will address the importance of effective communication as a necessary tool for the success of e-leadership, productivity improvement in virtual work environment.

  16. Building the biomedical data science workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Michelle C; Bourne, Philip E

    2017-07-01

    This article describes efforts at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) from 2013 to 2016 to train a national workforce in biomedical data science. We provide an analysis of the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) training program strengths and weaknesses with an eye toward future directions aimed at any funder and potential funding recipient worldwide. The focus is on extramurally funded programs that have a national or international impact rather than the training of NIH staff, which was addressed by the NIH's internal Data Science Workforce Development Center. From its inception, the major goal of BD2K was to narrow the gap between needed and existing biomedical data science skills. As biomedical research increasingly relies on computational, mathematical, and statistical thinking, supporting the training and education of the workforce of tomorrow requires new emphases on analytical skills. From 2013 to 2016, BD2K jump-started training in this area for all levels, from graduate students to senior researchers.

  17. Geographic Analysis of the Radiation Oncology Workforce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aneja, Sanjay [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Cancer Outcomes, Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States); Department of General Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Roberts, Kenneth [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Yu, James B., E-mail: james.b.yu@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate trends in the geographic distribution of the radiation oncology (RO) workforce. Methods and Materials: We used the 1995 and 2007 versions of the Area Resource File to map the ratio of RO to the population aged 65 years or older (ROR) within different health service areas (HSA) within the United States. We used regression analysis to find associations between population variables and 2007 ROR. We calculated Gini coefficients for ROR to assess the evenness of RO distribution and compared that with primary care physicians and total physicians. Results: There was a 24% increase in the RO workforce from 1995 to 2007. The overall growth in the RO workforce was less than that of primary care or the overall physician workforce. The mean ROR among HSAs increased by more than one radiation oncologist per 100,000 people aged 65 years or older, from 5.08 per 100,000 to 6.16 per 100,000. However, there remained consistent geographic variability concerning RO distribution, specifically affecting the non-metropolitan HSAs. Regression analysis found higher ROR in HSAs that possessed higher education (p = 0.001), higher income (p < 0.001), lower unemployment rates (p < 0.001), and higher minority population (p = 0.022). Gini coefficients showed RO distribution less even than for both primary care physicians and total physicians (0.326 compared with 0.196 and 0.292, respectively). Conclusions: Despite a modest growth in the RO workforce, there exists persistent geographic maldistribution of radiation oncologists allocated along socioeconomic and racial lines. To solve problems surrounding the RO workforce, issues concerning both gross numbers and geographic distribution must be addressed.

  18. Geoscience and the 21st Century Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C. A.; Bralower, T. J.; Blockstein, D.; Keane, C. M.; Kirk, K. B.; Schejbal, D.; Wilson, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    Geoscience knowledge and skills play new roles in the workforce as our society addresses the challenges of living safely and sustainably on Earth. As a result, we expect a wider range of future career opportunities for students with education in the geosciences and related fields. A workshop offered by the InTeGrate STEP Center on 'Geoscience and the 21st Century Workforce' brought together representatives from 24 programs with a substantial geoscience component, representatives from different employment sectors, and workforce scholars to explore the intersections between geoscience education and employment. As has been reported elsewhere, employment in energy, environmental and extractive sectors for geoscientists with core geology, quantitative and communication skills is expected to be robust over the next decade as demand for resources grow and a significant part of the current workforce retires. Relatively little is known about employment opportunities in emerging areas such as green energy or sustainability consulting. Employers at the workshop from all sectors are seeking the combination of strong technical, quantitative, communication, time management, and critical thinking skills. The specific technical skills are highly specific to the employer and employment needs. Thus there is not a single answer to the question 'What skills make a student employable?'. Employers at this workshop emphasized the value of data analysis, quantitative, and problem solving skills over broad awareness of policy issues. Employers value the ability to articulate an appropriate, effective, creative solution to problems. Employers are also very interested in enthusiasm and drive. Participants felt that the learning outcomes that their programs have in place were in line with the needs expressed by employers. Preparing students for the workforce requires attention to professional skills, as well as to the skills needed to identify career pathways and land a job. This critical

  19. Sultanate of Oman: building a dental workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Jennifer E; Manickam, Sivakumar; Wilson, Nairn H F

    2015-06-22

    A medium- and long-term perspective is required in human resource development to ensure that future needs and demands for oral healthcare are met by the most appropriate health professionals. This paper presents a case study of the Sultanate of Oman, one of the Gulf States with a current population of 3.8 million, which has initiated dental training through the creation of a dental college. The objectives of this paper are first to describe trends in the dental workforce in Oman from 1990 to date and compare the dental workforce with its medical counterparts in Oman and with other countries, and second, to consider future dental workforce in the Sultanate. Data were collected from published sources, including the Ministry of Health (MoH), Ministry of Manpower (MoM), and Ministry of National Economy (MoNE)-Sultanate of Oman; the World Health Organization (WHO); World Bank; and the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Dentist-to-population ratios were compared nationally, regionally and globally for medicine and dentistry. Dental graduate outputs were mapped onto the local supply. Future trends were examined using population growth predictions, exploring the expected impact in relation to global, regional and European workforce densities. Population growth in Oman is increasing at a rate of over 2% per year. Oman has historically been dependent upon an expatriate dental workforce with only 24% of the dentist workforce Omani in 2010 (n = 160). Subsequent to Oman Dental College (ODC) starting to qualify dental (BDS) graduates in 2012, there is an increase in the annual growth of the dentist workforce. On the assumption that all future dental graduates from ODC have an opportunity to practise in Oman, ODC graduates will boost the annual Omani dentist growth rate starting at 28% per annum from 2012 onwards, building capacity towards global (n = 1711) and regional levels (Gulf State: n = 2167) in the medium term. The output of dental graduates from Oman Dental College is

  20. The Prevalence of Coworker Conflict Including Bullying in a Unionized U.S. Public Sector Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, Jane; London, Matt; McPhaul, Kate M; Ghaziri, Mazen El; Lydecker, Alyson; Geiger-Brown, Jeanne; Johnson, Jeffrey V

    2015-01-01

    Workplace violence is an enormous problem worldwide; incidents where the perpetrator is a current or former employee are an important dimension. This large cross-sectional survey examined the prevalence of this problem among a U.S. state government unionized public sector workforce. Using participatory action research methods, we conducted a web-based survey of members of that workforce from a single northeast U.S. state, receiving 11,874 completed surveys (response rate: 71.8%). Overall, 10.0% of the respondents indicated that they had been bullied at work during the prior 6 months, with 71.9% of those who reported regular bullying identifying the perpetrator as a supervisor and/or top management. The prevalence of bullying was similar to the rates reported in Europe and Scandinavia (5%-30%). Those reports also identified the person(s) responsible for the behavior as being predominantly of higher status within the organization.

  1. Change in the height of Korean children and adolescents: analysis from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Survey II and V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, Na Yung; Shin, Ha Young; Kim, Jae Hyun; Moon, Jin Soo; Lee, Chong Guk

    2015-09-01

    The mean adult height of Koreans has increased since nationwide anthropological measurements began in 1967. The objective of this study was to evaluate differences in heights of Korean late adolescents and young adults within and between the Second and Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES II and V). Koreans aged ≤22 years with available measurements of height were enrolled from the KNHANES surveys (KNHANES II: n=3,372 [1,732 males and 1,640 females]; KNHANES V: n=6,190 [3,198 males and 2,992 females]). Differences in the height of KNHANES respondents within and between surveys were evaluated according to age and sex. In KNHANES II, there was no significant difference in height between males aged 17-19 years and those aged 20-22 years (174.3±0.5 cm vs. 174.3±0.6 cm, P=0.995). Females aged 20-22 years were taller than those aged 17-19 years (159.8±0.4 cm vs. 161.0±0.4 cm, P=0.017). Females aged 17-19 years were significantly taller in KNHANES V than in KNHANES II (161.2±0.3 cm vs. 159.8±0.4 cm, P=0.004). Respondents aged 20-22 years were taller in KNHANES V than in KNHANES II, although not significantly so; the difference was 0.3±0.8 cm in males (P=0.721) and 0.5±0.6 cm in females (P=0.386). Koreans appear to continue growing even in their late adolescence and early twenties. Consequently, it may be necessary to expand the reference age ranges of the Korean growth chart. Additionally, a longitudinal growth survey is needed to determine growth patterns and secular trend in height among Koreans.

  2. National Wildlife Refuge System : Strategic Workforce Planning Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to describe the current and future workforce challenges and workforce development efforts underway by the Refuge System to address...

  3. Interdisciplinary transportation education and workforce development modules (ITEWDM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The transportation industry will face a shortage of skilled workforce to manage future advanced transportation systems as the current workforce begins to retire. Education and training of future transportation professionals is critical in view of the...

  4. Public health nutrition in Europe : workforce development and policy change

    OpenAIRE

    Kugelberg, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Public health nutrition workforce development is an important prerequisite for developing a nation’s capacity to achieve public health nutrition objectives. Presently, there is a lack of knowledge about public health nutrition workforce development in Europe, in particular, about how governments have developed strategies for promoting a skilled and adaptable public health nutrition workforce and about the current workforce in terms of roles, competencies and functions. The aim of this t...

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AzTEC survey of the SHADES fields. II. (Michalowski+, 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalowski, M. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Ivison, R. J.; Cirasuolo, M.; Caputi, K. I.; Aretxaga, I.; Arumugam, V.; Austermann, J. E.; Chapin, E. L.; Chapman, S. C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Egami, E.; Hughes, D. H.; Ibar, E.; Mortier, A. M. J.; Schael, A. M.; Scott, K. S.; Smail, I.; Targett, T. A.; Wagg, J.; Wilson, G. W.; Xu, L.; Yun, M.

    2013-04-01

    We utilized the JCMT/AzTEC 1.1mm maps and catalogues from Austermann et al. (2010, Cat. J/MNRAS/401/160). These data cover 0.7deg2 to an rms depth of 0.9-1.7mJy/beam. We selected all 148 sources presented by Austermann et al. (2010, Cat. J/MNRAS/401/160) with signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) > 3.5, and adopted the statistically deboosted 1.1mm flux densities. The VLA 1.4GHz and GMRT 0.61GHz radio data were taken from Ivison et al. (2005MNRAS.364.1025I, 2007, Cat. J/MNRAS/380/199) and Ibar et al. (2009, Cat. J/MNRAS/397/281, 2010MNRAS.401L..53I), respectively. The mid-IR Spitzer data in the Lockman Hole East field are from programmes PID 81 (PI: G. Rieke) and PID 50249 (PI: E. Egami), described in Egami et al. (2004ApJS..154..130E) and Dye et al. (2008MNRAS.386.1107D), whereas in the UDS field the mid-IR data are from the Spitzer Public Legacy Survey of the UKIDSS UDS (PI: J. Dunlop, http://ssc.spitzer.caltech.edu/spitzermission/observingprograms/ legacy/spuds/) described in Caputi et al. (2011MNRAS.413..162C). The optical data in both fields were obtained with Subaru/SuprimeCam, as described in Dye et al. (2006MNRAS.372.1227D) and Furusawa et al. (2008, Cat. J/ApJS/176/1). The near-IR data in both fields are provided by the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS; Lawrence et al. 2007, Cat. II/314) with the SXDF/UDS field benefitting from the ultradeep J, H, K coverage provided by the UDS (e.g. Cirasuolo et al. 2010MNRAS.401.1166C), while the Lockman Hole East field is part of the somewhat shallower UKIDSS DXS (Warren et al., 2007MNRAS.375..213W). (5 data files).

  6. A Measurement of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Bender, Ralf; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ.; Castander, Francisco; /Barcelona, IEEC; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Galbany, Lluis; /Barcelona, IFAE; Garnavich, Peter; /Notre Dame U.; Goobar, Ariel; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Hopp, Ulrich; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ. /Tokyo U.

    2010-03-01

    We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z {le} 0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 {le} z {le} 0.3. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of (0.37{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.17+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.55{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.13+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} (SNux = 10{sup -12}L{sub x{circle_dot}}{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be (0.31{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.18+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.49{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.15+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be (2.04{sub -1.11-0.04}{sup +1.99+0.07}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.36{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.84+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is 1.94{sub -0.91-0.015}{sup +1.31+0.043} and 3.02{sub -1.03-0.048}{sup +1.31+0.062}, for C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift, which probes the late time SN Ia delay distribution, shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find r{sub L} = [(0.49{sub -0.14}{sup +0.15}) + (0.91{sub -0.81}{sup +0.85}) x z] SNuB h{sup 2}. A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies. With an observation of at most 3 hostless, intra-cluster SNe Ia, we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe that are

  7. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF 3C RADIO SOURCES WITH z < 0.3. II. COMPLETING THE SNAPSHOT SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Tremblay, G. R. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Harris, D. E.; O' Dea, C. P. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kharb, P.; Axon, D. [Department of Physics, Rochester Institute of Technology, Carlson Center for Imaging Science 76-3144, 84 Lomb Memorial Dr., Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Balmaverde, B.; Capetti, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Baum, S. A. [Carlson Center for Imaging Science 76-3144, 84 Lomb Memorial Dr., Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, F. D.; Sparks, W. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martine Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gilli, R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Giovannini, G. [INAF-Istituto di Radioastronomia di Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Grandi, P.; Torresi, E. [INAF-IASF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e fisica Cosmica di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Risaliti, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    We report on the second round of Chandra observations of the 3C snapshot survey developed to observe the complete sample of 3C radio sources with z < 0.3 for 8 ks each. In the first paper, we illustrated the basic data reduction and analysis procedures performed for the 30 sources of the 3C sample observed during Chandra Cycle 9, while here we present the data for the remaining 27 sources observed during Cycle 12. We measured the X-ray intensity of the nuclei and of any radio hot spots and jet features with associated X-ray emission. X-ray fluxes in three energy bands, i.e., soft, medium, and hard, for all the sources analyzed are also reported. For the stronger nuclei, we also applied the standard spectral analysis, which provides the best-fit values of the X-ray spectral index and absorbing column density. In addition, a detailed analysis of bright X-ray nuclei that could be affected by pile-up has been performed. X-ray emission was detected for all the nuclei of the radio sources in our sample except for 3C 319. Among the current sample, there are two compact steep spectrum radio sources, two broad-line radio galaxies, and one wide angle tail radio galaxy, 3C 89, hosted in a cluster of galaxies clearly visible in our Chandra snapshot observation. In addition, we also detected soft X-ray emission arising from the galaxy cluster surrounding 3C 196.1. Finally, X-ray emission from hot spots has been found in three FR II radio sources and, in the case of 3C 459, we also report the detection of X-ray emission associated with the eastern radio lobe as well as X-ray emission cospatial with radio jets in 3C 29 and 3C 402.

  8. Assessment of the pharmacist workforce in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Abstract. Background: Health workers are recognized as the cornerstone for the success of the health sector programs. In this regard, proper planning of the development of health workers including pharmacists based on evidence is critical. Aim: To assess the pharmacist workforce in Ethiopia. Method: A national facility ...

  9. Evaluating Number Sense in Workforce Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Dorothea A.

    2015-01-01

    Earlier institution-sponsored research revealed that about 20% of students in community college basic math and pre-algebra programs lacked a sense of part-whole relationships with whole numbers. Using the same tool with a group of 86 workforce students, about 75% placed five whole numbers on an empty number line in a way that indicated lack of…

  10. FORUM Models for increasing the health workforce

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    professional councils cannot be effected, increased operational costs. (especially transport costs linked to distant clinical training), and a dwindling academic health workforce. Although the Infrastructure and Efficiency Grant and Clinical Training Grant earmarked for increasing the quantity of health professional graduates ...

  11. A guide to managing workforce transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staring, S; Taylor, C

    1997-12-01

    Recognizing leadership styles and team-building interventions that work help nurse managers change skills and strategies to meet the demands of a workforce reorganization. Three key strategies are identified: emotional management, professional empowerment and empowerment by values. All members involved in the reorganization were given room to grow, to make mistakes and to learn from them.

  12. Growing Our Workforce through Business and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauley, Douglas R.; Davidchik, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    In 2004, Central Community College (CCC) established the Mechatronics Education Center (MEC), a regional center of excellence, to help the state address the shortage of skilled technicians in the area of industrial automation. The MEC addresses the needs of the current and future workforce through the implementation of its three main components:…

  13. Wind Energy Technology: Training a Sustainable Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Kimberly W.; Graham, Bruce; Underbakke, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Through innovative teaching and technology, industry and educational institution partnerships, Cloud County Community College is preparing a qualified workforce for the emerging wind industry estimated to create 80,000 jobs by 2020. The curriculum blends on-campus, on-line and distance learning, land-lab, and field training opportunities for…

  14. Information Literacy and the Workforce: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a review of reports on information literacy and the workforce. There is a substantial body of literature on information literacy in K-16 educational settings, but there is much less literature on implications for the workplace and job-related lifelong learning. The topical categories of the reports are: the importance of information…

  15. Return to the workforce following infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butt, Jawad H.; Kragholm, Kristian; Dalager-Pedersen, Michael

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ability to return to work after infective endocarditis (IE) holds important socioeconomic consequences for both patients and society, yet data on this issue are sparse. We examined return to the workforce and associated factors in IE patients of working age. METHODS: Using Danish ...

  16. Building a Cybersecurity Workforce with Remote Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nancy; Woodward, Belle

    2013-01-01

    Now more than ever, cybersecurity professionals are in demand and the trend is not expected to change anytime soon. Currently, only a small number of educational programs are funded and equipped to educate cybersecurity professionals and those few programs cannot train a workforce of thousands in a relatively short period of time. Moreover, not…

  17. Strategies for Managing a Multigenerational Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iden, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The multigenerational workforce presents a critical challenge for business managers, and each generation has different expectations. A human resource management study of organizations with more than 500 employees reported 58% of the managers experiencing conflict between younger and older workers. The purpose of this single case study was to…

  18. The impact after 50 years of a new medical education programme with a regional workforce mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Richard; Bowles, Sarah; Brown, Terry; Lawler, Anthony; Vickers, James

    2017-12-01

    Tasmania established its medical programme in 1965 to produce graduates to address medical workforce recruitment challenges. Many Tasmanian graduates work in Tasmania, but workforce problems continue. This paper reports the workforce outcomes of the first 42 graduating cohorts. A database for all University of Tasmania medical graduates from the years 1970 to 2011 was developed by combining information from university, registration and local workforce survey databases. A total of 2012 doctors graduated from 1971 to 2011 and 1707 (85%) were registered, most commonly in general practice (45.8%), medicine (13%), anaesthetics (7.9%), surgery (7.5%), psychiatry (4.3%), emergency medicine (35, 3.5%), paediatrics (3.4%) and pathology (3.3%). While 41.9% worked in Tasmania, they comprised 35.6% of the local workforce and were clustered around the two larger cities. The proportion entering general practice has fallen since 1980s. The contribution of the Tasmanian medical programme is substantial but appears less than other regional medical schools. Relatively few work in smaller communities, particularly in specialties other than general practice. Lifestyle choices and the availability of training opportunities and career positions might be contributing factors. The medical school has established clinical schools in rural communities, promoted admission of rural applicants and increased rural clinical placement opportunities, with some early signs of success. The Tasmanian medical programme is important in this regional, island economy, but the rural and remote communities have not benefited as much as the two larger cities. Sustaining a regional workforce mission over time might require frequent adjustments to admissions and curriculum processes. © 2017 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  19. Assessing fear of hypoglycemia among adults with type 1 diabetes – psychometric properties of the Norwegian version of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey II questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Graue

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoglycemia is common in type 1 diabetes, but the overall frequency of both mild and severe hypoglycemia is difficult to estimate. The Hypoglycemia Fear Survey II (HFS-II is often used to assess the fear of hypoglycemia. Material and methods: The aim of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Norwegian version of the HFS-II for adults, including the behavior (HFS-B and worry (HFS-W subscales, among 235 adults in Norway with type 1 diabetes. We assessed associations between HFS-II scores and other rating scales and demographic and clinical variables. Results: The Norwegian version of HFS-II had an acceptable factor structure in relation to HFS-W, whereas the structure within HFS-B was more questionable. The expected relationships between HFS-II subscales and measures of related constructs administered concurrently demonstrated adequate convergent and discriminant validity. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were satisfactory. Conclusion: Access to reliable and valid self-report instruments enables the early detection of psychosocial problems. HFS-W performs well, whereas HFS-B needs to be further examined and developed.

  20. Tracking the workforce: the American Society of Clinical Oncology workforce information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, M Kelsey; Kosty, Michael P; Bajorin, Dean F; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Goldstein, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    In anticipation of oncologist workforce shortages projected as part of a 2007 study, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) worked with a contractor to create a workforce information system (WIS) to assemble the latest available data on oncologist supply and cancer incidence and prevalence. ASCO plans to publish findings annually, reporting on new data and tracking trends over time. THE WIS REPORT IS COMPOSED OF THREE SECTIONS: supply, new entrants, and cancer incidence and prevalence. Tabulations of the number of oncologists in the United States are derived mainly from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. Information on fellows and residents in the oncology workforce pipeline come from published sources such as Journal of the American Medical Association. Incidence and prevalence estimates are published by the American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute. The WIS reports a total of 13,084 oncologists working in the United States in 2011. Oncologists are defined as those physicians who designate hematology, hematology/oncology, or medical oncology as their specialty. The WIS compares the characteristics of these oncologists with those of all physicians and tracks emerging trends in the physician training pipeline. Observing characteristics of the oncologist workforce over time allows ASCO to identify, prioritize, and evaluate its workforce initiatives. Accessible figures and reports generated by the WIS can be used by ASCO and others in the oncology community to advocate for needed health care system and policy changes to help offset future workforce shortages.

  1. Workforce planning for DOE/EM: Assessing workforce demand and supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, R.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.

    1993-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has committed to bringing its facilities into regulatory compliance and restoring the environment of sites under its control by the year 2019. Responsibility for accomplishing this goal is vested with the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). Concerns regarding the availability of workers with the necessary technical skills and the prospect of retraining workers from other programs within DOE or other industries are addressed in this report in several ways. First, various workforce projections relevant to EM occupations are compared to determine common findings and resolve inconsistencies. Second, case studies, interviews, and published data are used to examine the potential availability of workers for these occupations via occupational mobility, training/retraining options, and salary adjustments. Third, demand and supply factors are integrated in a framework useful for structuring workforce analyses. The analyses demonstrate that workforce skills are not anticipated to change due to the change in mission; science, engineering, and technician occupations tend to be mobile within and across occupational categories; experience and on-the-job training are more crucial to issues of worker supply than education; and, the clarity of an organization`s mission, budget allocation process, work implementation and task assignment systems are critical determinants of both workforce need and supply. DOE is encouraged to create a more stable platform for workforce planning by resolving organizational and institutional hindrances to accomplishing work and capitalizing on workforce characteristics besides labor {open_quotes}supply{close_quotes} and demographics.

  2. Tracking the Workforce: The American Society of Clinical Oncology Workforce Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, M. Kelsey; Kosty, Michael P.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Goldstein, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In anticipation of oncologist workforce shortages projected as part of a 2007 study, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) worked with a contractor to create a workforce information system (WIS) to assemble the latest available data on oncologist supply and cancer incidence and prevalence. ASCO plans to publish findings annually, reporting on new data and tracking trends over time. Methods: The WIS report is composed of three sections: supply, new entrants, and cancer incidence and prevalence. Tabulations of the number of oncologists in the United States are derived mainly from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. Information on fellows and residents in the oncology workforce pipeline come from published sources such as Journal of the American Medical Association. Incidence and prevalence estimates are published by the American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute. Results: The WIS reports a total of 13,084 oncologists working in the United States in 2011. Oncologists are defined as those physicians who designate hematology, hematology/oncology, or medical oncology as their specialty. The WIS compares the characteristics of these oncologists with those of all physicians and tracks emerging trends in the physician training pipeline. Conclusion: Observing characteristics of the oncologist workforce over time allows ASCO to identify, prioritize, and evaluate its workforce initiatives. Accessible figures and reports generated by the WIS can be used by ASCO and others in the oncology community to advocate for needed health care system and policy changes to help offset future workforce shortages. PMID:23633965

  3. The Chinese-American Workforce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissen, S.H.

    1990-05-01

    The current study focused on a group of Chinese-American professionals working in a scientific environment in the San Francisco Bay area. One of the goals of the present study is to determine to what extent do the Chinese cultural values impact job performance, interpersonal relationships and perception of job satisfaction. This was carried out by identifying the important motivational factors and optimal working conditions which provided career satisfaction for the Chinese-American professionals. Comparisons were made between the US born and foreign-born respondents to determine differences, if any, in their perceptions relative to career satisfaction due to varying acculturation levels. In addition, this study identified barriers to career advancement and compared these barriers with the results of another survey on the Chinese-American professionals working in government, industry and private sector in the Bay area. A structured survey questionnaire was designed by the investigator and sent to 167 Chinese-American professionals, composed of both US-born and foreign-born. 41 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Understanding the pediatric dermatology workforce shortage: mentoring matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admani, Shehla; Caufield, Maura; Kim, Silvia S; Siegfried, Elaine C; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2014-02-01

    To target pediatric dermatologists directly in order to evaluate their current demographics and the most important motivating factors that influenced their career choice. Pediatric dermatology is one of the pediatric subspecialties with an inadequate supply to meet current patient needs. A survey was designed to evaluate the training pathway, employment status, participation in teaching, and clinical practice characteristics of pediatric dermatologists. The survey was administered to attendants of the 2010 Society for Pediatric Dermatology annual meeting. Any remaining board certified pediatric dermatologists who had not previously responded were queried via Survey Monkey. There was a 71% response rate. The majority chose a career in pediatric dermatology early, often prior to starting a dermatology residency. The vast majority of respondents noted mentorship as the most important influence on their decision to pursue a career in pediatric dermatology. The most common obstacles cited by respondents were financial hardship and resistance of some dermatology programs to accept applicants previously trained in pediatrics. Our survey provides evidence to support the importance of early exposure to the field and, most importantly, to committed pediatric dermatologists who can serve as mentors. This information may be helpful in approaching solutions to the workforce shortage in the field of pediatric dermatology. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Influence of Multigenerational Workforce in Effective Informal Team Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roza Marsaulina Sibarani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The urgency of this research arises from the convergence of two dynamics that are transforming the workplace and impacting organization performance. The first is multigenerational workforce work side by side in the same organization even in the same team. The second is informal learning, a major mode of learning in an organization. Therefore, this paper aims to explore the influence of generational background of Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y in relation to informal team learning in the Indonesian business environment. Both, qualitative and quantitative studies were conducted with 21 interviewees and 184 survey respondents representing a total of 191 multigenerational teams participating in this research. The findings suggest that generational background influence informal learner and effective informal team learning, but have no direct impact on team climate. Understanding generational differences will enable individuals to learn informally and create a conducive team climate that will lead to effective informal team learning.

  6. Skilled labour shortage : implications, recruitment and workforce planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charette, A. [Canadian Council of Human Resources Association, St. Catherines, ON (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This presentation provides information on how a long-term recruitment strategy can affect the viability of the oil and gas industry, which is currently facing a shortage of skilled labour in Canada. The problem poses a threat to the competitiveness of the industry and the problem will likely worsen unless action is taken now to prevent a crisis in the near future. A survey of business owners in 2002 indicated that 186,000 of 265,000 jobs remained vacant for at least 4 months. As the aging workforce of baby boomers reaches retirement age, the labour shortage is likely to be more pronounced by 2010 to 2015. The consequences of changing labour demographics affect costs, attracting and retaining talented workers, productivity, culture, creativity and competitiveness. figs.

  7. Generalism workforce planning. Definitional, pragmatic and transformational issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarella, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Generalist primary care medical practitioners have been the cornerstone of healthcare systems through general practice. Internationally and within Australia, calls to strengthen generalist primary care medical practice have increased with the ever growing burden on the health system from the demand and workforce sides. Professional bodies have called for further work to quantify and predict generalist workforce requirements and distribution as a matter of urgency. Despite recent Australian health workforce planning analysis and modelling predicting workforce number requirements, definitional, pragmatic and transformational issues confront generalism workforce planning. This article describes the challenges involved in generalist workforce planning and suggests potential solutions. We argue for a generalist workforce capability-based model that seeks to identify how to prepare, support and sustain core capabilities required for generalists to ensure team-based primary care is safe and effective within and across sectors and settings.

  8. Environment, Training and the Workforce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    companies. Therefore, a research project has been initiated aimed at identifying general trends in the introduction of environmental management in leading European companies and the educational and training needs this will require in future. Similarly, initiatives related to environmental issues carried out......It has long been realised that education and training are essential factors in promoting environmental management in business organisations. So far, however, there has been little information about environmental management practice and related educational and training requirements in even leading...... at various educational and training institutions should be identified. This paper briefly describes the background of the project and in more details the main results from a questionnaire-based survey on environmental attitudes and training interests among Danish workers....

  9. Measurements of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift z < ~0.3 from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Smith, Mathew; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /Portsmouth U.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Bender, Ralf; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ.; Castander, Francisco; /Barcelona, IEEC; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; /UC, Berkeley; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Galbany, Lluis; /Barcelona, IFAE; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.

    2010-01-01

    We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The adopted sample of supernovae (SNe) includes 516 SNe Ia at redshift z {approx}< 0.3, of which 270 (52%) are spectroscopically identified as SNe Ia. The remaining 246 SNe Ia were identified through their light curves; 113 of these objects have spectroscopic redshifts from spectra of their host galaxy, and 133 have photometric redshifts estimated from the SN light curves. Based on consideration of 87 spectroscopically confirmed non-Ia SNe discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey, we estimate that 2.04{sub -0.95}{sup +1.61}% of the photometric SNe Ia may be misidentified. The sample of SNe Ia used in this measurement represents an order of magnitude increase in the statistics for SN Ia rate measurements in the redshift range covered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. If we assume a SN Ia rate that is constant at low redshift (z < 0.15), then the SN observations can be used to infer a value of the SN rate of r{sub V} = (2.69{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.34+0.21}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} at a mean redshift of {approx} 0.12, based on 79 SNe Ia of which 72 are spectroscopically confirmed. However, the large sample of SNe Ia included in this study allows us to place constraints on the redshift dependence of the SN Ia rate based on the SDSS-II Supernova Survey data alone. Fitting a power-law model of the SN rate evolution, r{sub V} (z) = A{sub p} x ((1+z)/(1+z{sub 0})){sup {nu}}, over the redshift range 0.0 < z < 0.3 with z{sub 0} = 0.21, results in A{sub p} = (3.43{sub -0.15}{sup +0.15}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} and {nu} = 2.04{sub -0.89}{sup +0.90}.

  10. A look at the thoracic surgery workforce in Canada: how demographics and scope of practice may impact future workforce needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondin, Sean C.; Schieman, Colin; Kelly, Elizabeth; Darling, Gail; Maziak, Donna; Mackay, Moné Palacios; Gelfand, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to describe the demographics, training and practice characteristics of physicians performing thoracic surgery across Canada to better assess workforce needs. Methods We developed a questionnaire using a modified Delphi process to generate questionnaire items. The questionnaire was administered to all Canadian thoracic surgeons via email (n = 102) or mail (n = 35). Results In all, 97 surgeons completed the survey (71% response rate). The mean age of respondents was 47.7 (standard deviation 9.1) years; 10.3% were older than 60. Ninety respondents (88.7%) were men, 95 (81.1%) practised in English and 93 (76%) were born in Canada. Most (90.4%) had a medical school affiliation, with an equal proportion practising in community or university teaching hospitals. Only 18% of respondents reported working fewer than 60 hours per week, and 34% were on call more than 1 in 3. Three-quarters of work hours were devoted to clinical care, with the remaining time split among research, administration and teaching. Malignant lung disease accounted for 61.2% of practice time, with the remaining time equally split between benign and malignant thoracic diseases. Preoperative testing (49.4%) and insufficient operating time (49.5%) were the most common factors delaying delivery of care. More than 80% of respondents reported being satisfied with their careers, with 62.1% planning on retiring after age 60. Conclusion This survey characterizes Canadian thoracic surgeons by providing specific demographic, satisfaction and scope of practice information. Despite challenges in obtaining adequate resources for providing timely care, job satisfaction remains high, with a balanced workforce supply and demand anticipated for the foreseeable future. PMID:23883508

  11. Workforce insights on how health promotion is practised in an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Kathryn; Devine, Sue; Judd, Jenni; Nichols, Nina; Watt, Kerrianne

    2017-07-01

    Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services deliver holistic and culturally appropriate primary health care to over 150 communities in Australia. Health promotion is a core function of comprehensive primary health care; however, little has been published on what enables or challenges health promotion practice in an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service. Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima) delivers primary health care to 11 remote north Queensland communities. The workforce includes medical, allied health, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers and health practitioners and corporate support staff. This study aimed to identify current health promotion practices at Apunipima, and the enablers and challenges identified by the workforce, which support or hinder health promotion practice. Sixty-three staff from across this workforce completed an online survey in February 2015 (42% response rate). Key findings were: (1) health promotion is delivered across a continuum of one-on-one approaches through to population advocacy and policy change efforts; (2) the attitude towards health promotion was very positive; and (3) health promotion capacity can be enhanced at both individual and organisational levels. Workforce insights have identified areas for continued support and areas that, now identified, can be targeted to strengthen the health promotion capacity of Apunipima.

  12. European Socio-cultural Change and Generational Diversity in the Post-Soviet Workforce.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madara APSALONE

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In times of increased retirement age and senior employees staying in workforce longer, successfully managing generational differences in the workforce forms an increasingly important challenge for modern day management. In many ways, generations may vary in attitudes and approaches, reflecting deeper differences in their core values. This might be particularly true for the Post-Soviet countries, where earlier generations were educated and started their careers within a completely different socio-economic system. In this study we explore differences in approaches towards values and attitudes amongst four generations of retail sector employees – starting from those, who were still to great extent exposed to pre-Soviet values, continuing with employees, who started their careers during the Soviet times, and ending with those, who were educated and entered the workforce after the collapse of the Soviet Union. 208 Latvian service employees were surveyed to assess their personal values and likelihood of dishonest and unethical behavior from four generations currently active in the workforce - Post-War generation, Early Gen X, Transition generation and Millennials. We confirmed that despite dual morality and ambiguous ethics in the Soviet Union, older generations reported higher likelihood of honest behavior than younger generations. And Post-War and Early Generation X also rated honesty and responsibility higher as their personal values. We also found significant differences between Early Generation X and the Transition generation in a post-Soviet context.

  13. A Wide-Field View of Leo II: A Structural Analysis Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Matthew G.; Jordi, Katrin; Rix, Hans-Walter; Grebel, Eva K.; Koch, Andreas

    2007-11-01

    Using SDSS I data, we have analyzed the stellar distribution of the Leo II dwarf spheroidal galaxy (distance of 233 kpc) to search for evidence of tidal deformation. The existing SDSS photometric catalog contains gaps in regions of high stellar crowding, hence we filled the area at the center of Leo II using the DAOPHOT algorithm applied to the SDSS images. The combined DAOPHOT-SDSS data set contains three-filter photometry over a 4 × 4 deg2 region centered on Leo II. By defining a mask in three-filter color-magnitude space, we removed the majority of foreground field stars. We have measured the following Leo II structural parameters: a core radius of rc = 2.64' ± 0.19' (178 ± 13 pc), a tidal radius of rt = 9.33' ± 0.47' (632 ± 32 pc), and a total V-band luminosity of LV = (7.4 ± 2.0) × 105 Lodot (MV = -9.9 ± 0.3). Our comprehensive analysis of the Leo II structure did not reveal any significant signs of tidal distortion. The internal structure of this object contains only mild isophotal twisting. A small overdensity was discovered approximately 4.5 tidal radii from the Leo II center; however, we conclude that it is unlikely to be material tidally stripped from Leo II based on its stellar population and is most likely a foreground overdensity of stars. Our results indicate that the influence of the Galactic gravitational field on the structure of Leo II has been relatively mild. We rederived the mass-to-light ratio of this system using existing kinematic data combined with our improved structural measurements, and we favor the scenario in which Leo II is strongly dominated by dark matter with (M/L)V ~ 100 in solar units.

  14. Workforce mobility: Contributing towards smart city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, N. M.; Wahap, N. A.

    2014-02-01

    Smart cities gained importance as a means of making ICT enabled services and applications available to the citizens, companies and authorities that form part of a city's system. It aims at increasing citizen's quality of life, and improving the efficiency and quality of the services provided by governing entities and businesses. This perspective requires an integrated vision of a city and of its infrastructures in all components. One of the characteristics of a smart city is mobility. The concept of mobility, especially for the workforce, is studied through a research carried out on a daily work undertaken as a prototype in the administrative town of Putrajaya, Malaysia. Utilizing the location track from GNSS integrated with mobile devices platform, information on movement and mobility was analysed for quality and efficiency of services rendered. This paper will highlight the research and outcomes that were successfully carried out and will suggest that workforce mobility management can benefit the authorities towards implementing a smart city concept.

  15. Multi generations in the workforce: Building collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanthi Srinivasan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Organisations the world over in today's rapid growth context are faced with the challenge of understanding a multi-generational workforce and devising policies and processes to build collaboration between them. In its first part, this article synthesises the literature on generational studies, with emphasis on the definition of generations and the characteristics of the generational cohorts. It emphasises that such studies are embedded in the socio-economic-cultural-context and India-specific scholarship must take into account the demographic and economic variations across the country. It then discusses the challenges of multi-generations in the Indian workforce, their impact on leadership styles and managerial practices, and the task of building inter-generational collaboration with an eminent panel of practitioners and researchers.

  16. The Federal Workforce: Characteristics and Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    three Cabinet departments—the Departments of Defense (DOD), Veterans Affairs ( DVA ), and Homeland Security (DHS)—accounted for about 60% of the 2.1... DVA , and the Department of Health and Human Services. Civilian employment in other departments and agencies has declined since 1998 (the first year...federal workforce, but the legislation exempts DOD, DVA , and DHS. The number of employees in blue-collar and clerical federal jobs declined between

  17. Identification of Key Barriers in Workforce Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-03-31

    This report documents the identification of key barriers in the development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project, being performed under a Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration grant. Many barriers exist that prevent the development of an adequate number of propertly trained national security personnel. Some barriers can be eliminated in a short-term manner, whereas others will involve a long-term strategy that takes into account public policy.

  18. Shaping the Navy’s Acquisition Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    1. Three Major Challenges Facing the Acquisition Workforce .........17 a. Aging AW and the Bathtub Effect...p. 7) ............................12 Figure 2 Downsizing the AW (FY1990–FY1999) (From DoD IG, 2000, p. 4) ............13 Figure 3 The Bathtub ... Bathtub Effect The Department of Defense (DoD) is facing a crisis that can dramatically affect our Nation’s ability to provide warfighters with

  19. Multi generations in the workforce: Building collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Vasanthi Srinivasan

    2012-01-01

    Organisations the world over in today's rapid growth context are faced with the challenge of understanding a multi-generational workforce and devising policies and processes to build collaboration between them. In its first part, this article synthesises the literature on generational studies, with emphasis on the definition of generations and the characteristics of the generational cohorts. It emphasises that such studies are embedded in the socio-economic-cultural-context and India-specific...

  20. Modeling the cardiac surgery workforce in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderby, Sonia A; Carter, Michael W; Latham, Timothy; Ouzounian, Maral; Hassan, Ansar; Tang, Gilbert H; Teng, Carolyn J; Kingsbury, Kori; Feindel, Christopher M

    2010-08-01

    Limited employment opportunities for recently trained cardiac surgeons are deterring medical students from entering cardiac surgery residency programs. Given the lengthy training period and the aging of both the general population and currently practicing cardiac surgeons, this reduced enrollment raises concerns about the adequacy of the future cardiac surgery workforce. A workforce model was developed to explore the future need for cardiac surgeons in Canada. A novel system dynamics model was developed to simulate the supply and demand for cardiac surgery in Canada between 2008 and 2030 to identify whether an excess or shortage of surgeons would exist. Several different scenarios were examined, including varying surgeon productivity, revascularization rates, and residency enrollment rates. The simulation results of various scenarios are presented. In the base case, a surgeon shortage is expected to develop by 2025, although this depends on surgeons' response to demand-supply gap changes. An alternative scenario in which residency enrollment directly relates to the presence of unemployed surgeons also projects substantial shortages after 2021. The model results indicate that if residency enrollment rates remain at the 2009 level an alarming shortage may develop soon, possibly reaching almost 50% of the Canadian cardiac surgical workforce. These workforce model results project an eventual cardiac surgeon shortage in Canada. This study highlights the possibility of a crisis in cardiac surgery and emphasizes the urgency with which enrollment into cardiac surgery training programs and the employability of recently trained cardiac surgery graduates need to be addressed. Copyright 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Efforts to Address the Aging Academic Workforce: Assessing Progress through a Three-Stage Model of Institutional Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskie, Brian; Walker, Mark; Andersson, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    The aging of the academic workforce is becoming more relevant to policy discussions in higher education. Yet there has been no formal, large-scale analysis of institutional efforts to develop policies and programs for aging employees. We fielded a representative survey of human resource specialists at 187 colleges and universities across the…

  2. Building the biomedical data science workforce.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C Dunn

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article describes efforts at the National Institutes of Health (NIH from 2013 to 2016 to train a national workforce in biomedical data science. We provide an analysis of the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K training program strengths and weaknesses with an eye toward future directions aimed at any funder and potential funding recipient worldwide. The focus is on extramurally funded programs that have a national or international impact rather than the training of NIH staff, which was addressed by the NIH's internal Data Science Workforce Development Center. From its inception, the major goal of BD2K was to narrow the gap between needed and existing biomedical data science skills. As biomedical research increasingly relies on computational, mathematical, and statistical thinking, supporting the training and education of the workforce of tomorrow requires new emphases on analytical skills. From 2013 to 2016, BD2K jump-started training in this area for all levels, from graduate students to senior researchers.

  3. Workforce Resources for Health in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tollman Stephen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available With increased globalization and interdependence among countries, sustained health worker migration and the complex threats of rapidly spreading infectious diseases, as well as changing lifestyles, a strong health workforce is essential. Building the human resources for health should not only include healthcare professionals like physicians and nurses, but must take into consideration community health workers, mid-level workers and strengthened primary healthcare systems to increase coverage and address the basic health needs of societies. This is especially true in low and middle-income countries where healthcare access is a critical challenge.There is a global crisis in the health workforce, expressed in acute shortages and maldistribution of health workers, geographically and professionally. This massive global shortage, though imprecise quantitatively, is estimated at more than 4 million workers. To respond to this crisis, policies and actions are needed to address the dynamics of the health labour market and the production and management of the health workforce, and to strengthen the performance of existing health systems. Schools of public health need to develop the range of capacity and leadership in addition to the traditional training of healthcare managers and researchers. Countries should first identify their health problems in order to properly address their health worker needs, retention, recruitment and training, if they are to come close to reaching the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs for health.

  4. A scoping review of nursing workforce planning and forecasting research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Allison; Jylhä, Virpi; Jun, Jin; Ensio, Anneli; Kinnunen, Juha

    2017-11-01

    This study will critically evaluate forecasting models and their content in workforce planning policies for nursing professionals and to highlight the strengths and the weaknesses of existing approaches. Although macro-level nursing workforce issues may not be the first thing that many nurse managers consider in daily operations, the current and impending nursing shortage in many countries makes nursing specific models for workforce forecasting important. A scoping review was conducted using a directed and summative content analysis approach to capture supply and demand analytic methods of nurse workforce planning and forecasting. The literature on nurse workforce forecasting studies published in peer-reviewed journals as well as in grey literature was included in the scoping review. Thirty six studies met the inclusion criteria, with the majority coming from the USA. Forecasting methods were biased towards service utilization analyses and were not consistent across studies. Current methods for nurse workforce forecasting are inconsistent and have not accounted sufficiently for socioeconomic and political factors that can influence workforce projections. Additional studies examining past trends are needed to improve future modelling. Accurate nursing workforce forecasting can help nurse managers, administrators and policy makers to understand the supply and demand of the workforce to prepare and maintain an adequate and competent current and future workforce. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The state of the surgical workforce in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Mário C; Guilloux, Aline G A; Matijasevich, Alicia; Massenburg, Benjamin B; Saluja, Saurabh; Alonso, Nivaldo

    2017-02-01

    A critical insufficiency of surgeons, anesthesiologists, and obstetricians exists around the world, leaving billions of people without access to safe operative care. The distribution of the surgical workforce in Brazil, however, is poorly described and rarely assessed. Though the surgical workforce is only one element in the surgical system, this study aimed to map and characterize the distribution of the surgical workforce in Brazil in order to stimulate discussion on future surgical policy reforms. The distribution of the surgical workforce was extracted from the Brazilian Federal Medical Board registry as of July 2014. Included in the surgical workforce were surgeons, anesthesiologists, and obstetricians. There are 95,169 surgeons, anesthesiologists, and obstetricians in the surgical workforce of Brazil, creating a surgical workforce density of 46.55/100,000 population. This varies from 20.21/100,000 population in the North Region up to 60.32/100,000 population in the South Region. A total of 75.2% of the surgical workforce is located in the 100 biggest cities in Brazil, where only 40.4% of the population lives. The average age of a physician in the surgical workforce is 46.6 years. Women make up 30.0% of the surgical workforce, 15.8% of surgeons, 36.6% of anesthesiologists, and 53.8% of obstetricians and gynecologists. Brazil has a substantial surgical workforce, but inequalities in its distribution are concerning. There is an urgent need for increased surgeons, anesthesiologists, and obstetricians in states like Pará, Amapá, and Maranhão. Female surgeons and anesthesiologists are particularly lacking in the surgical workforce, and incentives to recruit these physicians are necessary. Government policies and leadership from health organizations are required to ensure that the surgical workforce will be more evenly distributed in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cardiovascular prevention guidelines in daily practice: a comparison of EUROASPIRE I, II, and III surveys in eight European countries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kotseva, Kornelia

    2009-03-14

    The first and second EUROASPIRE surveys showed high rates of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease. The third EUROASPIRE survey was done in 2006-07 in 22 countries to see whether preventive cardiology had improved and if the Joint European Societies\\' recommendations on cardiovascular disease prevention are being followed in clinical practice.

  7. The CHESS spectral survey of star forming regions : Peering into the protostellar shock L1157-B1. II. Shock dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Codella, C.; Lefloch, B.; Ceccarelli, C.; Cernicharo, J.; Caux, E.; Lorenzani, A.; Viti, S.; Hily-Blant, P.; Parise, B.; Maret, S.; Nisini, B.; Caselli, P.; Cabrit, S.; Pagani, L.; Benedettini, M.; Boogert, A.; Gueth, F.; Melnick, G.; Neufeld, D.; Pacheco, S.; Salez, M.; Schuster, K.; Bacmann, A.; Baudry, A.; Bell, T.; Bergin, E. A.; Blake, G.; Bottinelli, S.; Castets, A.; Comito, C.; Coutens, A.; Crimier, N.; Dominik, C.; Demyk, K.; Encrenaz, P.; Falgarone, E.; Fuente, A.; Gerin, M.; Goldsmith, P.; Helmich, F.; Hennebelle, P.; Henning, Th.; Herbst, E.; Jacq, T.; Kahane, C.; Kama, M.; Klotz, A.; Langer, W.; Lis, D.; Lord, S.; Pearson, J.; Phillips, T.; Saraceno, P.; Schilke, P.; Tielens, X.; van der Tak, F.; van der Wiel, M.; Vastel, C.; Wakelam, V.; Walters, A.; Wyrowski, F.; Yorke, H.; Borys, C.; Delorme, Y.; Kramer, C.; Larsson, B.; Mehdi, I.; Ossenkopf, V.; Stutzki, J.; Pardo, J. R.; Bachiller, R.; De lange, G.; Lai, R.; Maiwald, F. W.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Siegel, P.; Wunsch, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first results of the unbiased survey of the L1157-B1 bow shock, obtained with HIFI in the framework of the key program Chemical HErschel Survey of Star forming regions (CHESS). The L1157 outflow is driven by a low-mass Class 0 protostar and is considered the prototype of the so-called

  8. The Exoplanet Mass-Ratio Function From the MOA-II Survey: Discovery of a Break and Likely Peak at a Neptune Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, D.; Bennett, D. P.; Sumi, T.; Bond, I. A.; Rogers, L. A.; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Bhattacharya, A.; Donachie, M.; Freeman, M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of the statistical analysis of planetary signals discovered in MOA-II microlensing survey alert system events from 2007 to 2012. We determine the survey sensitivity as a function of planet star mass ratio, q, and projected planet star separation, s, in Einstein radius units. We find that the mass-ratio function is not a single power law, but has a change in slope at q approx.10(exp -4), corresponding to approx. 20 Stellar Mass for the median host-star mass of approx. 0.6 M. We find significant planetary signals in 23 of the 1474 alert events that are well-characterized by the MOA-II survey data alone. Data from other groups are used only to characterize planetary signals that have been identified in the MOA data alone. The distribution of mass ratios and separations of the planets found in our sample are well fit by a broken power-law model. We also combine this analysis with the previous analyses of Gould et al. and Cassan et al., bringing the total sample to 30 planets. The unbroken power-law model is disfavored with a p-value of 0.0022, which corresponds to a Bayes factor of 27 favoring the broken power-law model. These results imply that cold Neptunes are likely to be the most common type of planets beyond the snow line.

  9. First Annual LGBT Health Workforce Conference: Empowering Our Health Workforce to Better Serve LGBT Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Nelson F; Sánchez, John Paul; Lunn, Mitchell R; Yehia, Baligh R; Callahan, Edward J

    2014-03-01

    The Institute of Medicine has identified significant health disparities and barriers to health care experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations. By lowering financial barriers to care, recent legislation and judicial decisions have created a remarkable opportunity for reducing disparities by making health care available to those who previously lacked access. However, the current health-care workforce lacks sufficient training on LGBT-specific health-care issues and delivery of culturally competent care to sexual orientation and gender identity minorities. The LGBT Healthcare Workforce Conference was developed to provide a yearly forum to address these deficiencies through the sharing of best practices in LGBT health-care delivery, creating LGBT-inclusive institutional environments, supporting LGBT personal and professional development, and peer-to-peer mentoring, with an emphasis on students and early career professionals in the health-care fields. This report summarizes the findings of the first annual LGBT Health Workforce Conference.

  10. Human resources for health (and rehabilitation): Six Rehab-Workforce Challenges for the century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Tiago S; Landry, Michel D; Dussault, Gilles; Fronteira, Inês

    2017-01-23

    People with disabilities face challenges accessing basic rehabilitation health care. In 2006, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) outlined the global necessity to meet the rehabilitation needs of people with disabilities, but this goal is often challenged by the undersupply and inequitable distribution of rehabilitation workers. While the aggregate study and monitoring of the physical rehabilitation workforce has been mostly ignored by researchers or policy-makers, this paper aims to present the 'challenges and opportunities' for guiding further long-term research and policies on developing the relatively neglected, highly heterogeneous physical rehabilitation workforce. The challenges were identified through a two-phased investigation. Phase 1: critical review of the rehabilitation workforce literature, organized by the availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality (AAAQ) framework. Phase 2: integrate reviewed data into a SWOT framework to identify the strengths and opportunities to be maximized and the weaknesses and threats to be overcome. The critical review and SWOT analysis have identified the following global situation: (i) needs-based shortages and lack of access to rehabilitation workers, particularly in lower income countries and in rural/remote areas; (ii) deficiencies in the data sources and monitoring structures; and (iii) few exemplary innovations, of both national and international scope, that may help reduce supply-side shortages in underserved areas. Based on the results, we have prioritized the following 'Six Rehab-Workforce Challenges': (1) monitoring supply requirements: accounting for rehabilitation needs and demand; (2) supply data sources: the need for structural improvements; (3) ensuring the study of a whole rehabilitation workforce (i.e. not focused on single professions), including across service levels; (4) staffing underserved locations: the rising of education, attractiveness and

  11. Pediatric rheumatology consultant workforce in Australia and New Zealand: the current state of play and challenges for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Angela; Piper, Sue; Singh-Grewal, Davinder

    2017-05-01

    There have been no formal assessments of current levels of the pediatric rheumatology workforce in Australia and New Zealand. Despite this it is felt that we fall well behind international guidelines placing children and adolescents with rheumatic diseases at risk of suboptimal care. Overcoming this shortfall in specialist pediatric rheumatology care requires documentation and recognition of the shortfall and a commitment from the health system to support improvements to supplement the current specialist workforce. The purpose of this survey was to assess the current state of play of the pediatric rheumatology workforce in Australia and New Zealand. The Australian Paediatric Rheumatology Group (APRG) conducted a survey, which examined the current pediatric rheumatology workforce in Australia and New Zealand. The survey was sent via email link to a survey hosted by Zoomerang™ to 49 physicians known to treat patients with pediatric rheumatic diseases and they were asked to forward the survey to any others who they knew saw children with rheumatic disease. Currently there is a shortfall in the pediatric rheumatology workforce of 68% based on minimum requirements and a shortfall of 225% based on an ideal scenario. Currently in Australia and New Zealand we fail to provide the level of care to children with pediatric rheumatic diseases comparable to other developed health economies worldwide. The current deficiency requires an increase in resource allocation to clinical service and speciality training to overcome this disparity and ensure children in Australia and New Zealand receive internationally recognized standards of care. © 2016 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. The Black dentist workforce in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Elizabeth; Calvo, Jean; Wides, Cynthia; Gates, Paul

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the Black dentist workforce, the practice patterns of providers, and their contributions to oral health care for minority and underserved patients. A national sample survey of underrepresented minority dentists was conducted in 2012 and received a 32.6 percent response rate for self-reported Black dentists. Data were weighted for selection and response bias to be nationally representative. Descriptive and multivariable statistics were computed to provide a workforce profile of Black dentists. National comparisons are provided from published data. Among all Black dentists (weighted n = 6,254), 76.6 percent self-identify as African-American, 13.2 percent as African, and 10.3 percent as Afro-Caribbean. The largest share of Black dentists are male, married, heterosexual, born in the United States and raised in a medium to large city. One third of Black dentists were the first in their family to graduate from college. Black dentists report higher average educational debt than all dental students, with graduates from International Dentist Programs having the greatest debt. Traditional practices (i.e., private practices) dominate, with 67.1 percent of Black dentists starting out in this setting and 73.5 percent currently in the setting. Black dentists care for a disproportionate share of Black patients, with an average patient mix that is 44.9 percent Black. Two in five Black dentists reported their patient pool is made up of more than 50 percent Black patients. The underrepresentation for Black dentists is extraordinary, and the Black dentists that are in practice are shouldering a disproportionate share of dental care for minority and underserved communities. © 2016 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  13. The Black Dentist Workforce in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Elizabeth; Calvo, Jean; Wides, Cynthia; Gates, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this paper is to describe the Black dentist workforce, the practice patterns of providers, and their contributions to oral health care for minority and underserved patients. Methods A national sample survey of underrepresented minority dentists was conducted in 2012 and received a 32.6% response rate for self-reported Black dentists. Data were weighted for selection and response bias to be nationally representative. Descriptive and multivariable statistics were computed to provide a workforce profile of Black dentists. National comparisons are provided from published data. Results Among all Black dentists (weighted n=6,254), 76.6% self-identify as African-American, 13.2% as African, and 10.3% as Afro-Caribbean. The largest share of Black dentists are male, married, heterosexual, born in the U.S. and raised in a medium to large city. One third of Black dentists were the first in their family to graduate from college. Black dentists report higher average educational debt than all dental students, graduates from International Dentist Programs having the greatest debt. Traditional practices (i.e., private practices) dominate, with 67.1% of Black dentists starting out in this setting and 73.5% currently in the setting. Black dentists care for a disproportionate share of Black patients, with an average patient mix that is 44.9% Black. Two in five Black dentists reported their patient pool is made up of more than 50% Black patients. Conclusions The underrepresentation for Black dentists is extraordinary, and the Black dentists that are in practice are shouldering a disproportionate share of dental care for minority and underserved communities. PMID:27966789

  14. Building the Social Work Workforce: Saving Lives and Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Briar-Lawson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article depicts a journey over the decades to address some of the needs of children and families in the child welfare system. Recounting a few key milestones and challenges in the past 40 years, it is argued that workforce development is one key to improved outcomes for abused and neglected children and their families. Major events and several turning points are chronicled. Emerging workforce needs in aging are also cited as lessons learned from child welfare have implications for building a gero savvy social work workforce. Funding streams involving IV-E and Medicaid are discussed. It is argued that workforce development can be a life and death issue for some of these most vulnerable populations. Thus, the workforce development agenda must be at the forefront of the social work profession for the 21st century. Key funding streams are needed to foster investments in building and sustaining the social work workforce.

  15. Workforce in the pharmaceutical services of the primary health care of SUS, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marselle Nobre; Álvares, Juliana; Costa, Karen Sarmento; Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis; Costa, Ediná Alves; Guibu, Ione Aquemi; Soeiro, Orlando Mario; Karnikowski, Margô Gomes de Oliveira; Leite, Silvana Nair

    2017-11-13

    To characterize the workforce in the pharmaceutical services in the primary care of the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS). METHODS This is a cross-sectional and quantitative study, with data from the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos - Serviços, 2015 (PNAUM - National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines - Services, 2015). For the analysis, we considered the data stratification into geographical regions. We analyzed the data on workers in the municipal pharmaceutical services management and in the medicine dispensing units, according to the country's regions. For the statistical association analysis, we carried out a Pearson correlation test for the categorical variables. We analyzed 1,175 pharmacies/dispensing units, 507 phone interviews (495 pharmaceutical services coordinators), and 1,139 professionals responsible for medicine delivery. The workforce in pharmaceutical services was mostly constituted by women, aged from 18 to 39 years, with higher education (90.7% in coordination and 45.5% in dispensing units), having permanent employment bonds (public tender), being for more than one year in the position or duty, and with weekly work hours above 30h, working both in municipal management and in medicine dispensing units. We observed regional differences in the workforce composition in dispensing units, with higher percentage of pharmacists in the Southeast and Midwest regions. The professionalization of municipal management posts in primary health care is an achievement in the organization of the workforce in pharmaceutical services. However, significant deficiencies exist in the workforce composition in medicine dispensing units, which may compromise the medicine use quality and its results in population health.

  16. Prevalence of HIV in workforces in southern Africa, 2000-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evian, Clive; Fox, Matthew; MacLeod, William; Slotow, Sarah Jane; Rosen, Sydney

    2004-02-01

    Most data on HIV prevalence in low-risk populations in sub-Saharan Africa are drawn from sentinel surveys of pregnant women attending antenatal clinics and are not representative of formal sector workforces. We surveyed workforces in southern Africa to determine HIV prevalence among formally employed, largely male populations. Voluntary, anonymous, unlinked seroprevalence surveys of 34 workforces with 44,000 employees were carried out in South Africa, Botswana, and Zambia in 2000-2001. Results were stratified to obtain estimates of prevalence by industrial sector, location, age, sex, and job level. Average HIV prevalence for the entire sample was 16.6% (95% CI: 16.3-17.0%). Country-wide prevalence was 14.5% (14.1-14.9%) in South Africa, 17.9% (17.1-18.7%) in Zambia, and 24.6% (23.6-25.7%) in Botswana. Among industrial sectors, mining (18.0%, 17.6-18.5%) and metal processing (17.3%, 15.9-18.7%) had the highest infection rates. Males, who comprised 85% of participants of known sex, were more likely (16.3%, 15.3-17.4%) to be infected than were females (10.7%, 8.7-12.7%). Contract (23%, 21.9-24.1%), unskilled (18.3%, 17.5-19.1%), and semi-skilled workers (18.7%, 18.1-19.4%) were much more likely to be infected than were skilled workers (10.5%, 9.5-11.4%) and managers (4.5%, 3.4-5.6%). Participation in the surveys averaged 63% of eligible employees. HIV prevalence among formally employed workers in southern Africa shows different patterns than among antenatal clinic attendees. Anonymous workplace surveys generate prevalence estimates for demographic groups that are not represented in antenatal surveys and can strengthen support for prevention and treatment interventions.

  17. An Organizational Climate Assessment of the Army Contracting Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    unlimited. 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) The intent of this research is to assess the Army’s contracting workforce on... Distribution is unlimited. AN ORGANIZATIONAL CLIMATE ASSESSMENT OF THE ARMY CONTRACTING WORKFORCE Magen L. McKeithen, Major, United...and education is an essential element in recruiting, developing, and retaining a competent contracting workforce. In a Defense AT&L article, the

  18. Workforce Transition Modeling Environment user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahlman, E.J.; Oens, M.A.; Lewis, R.E.

    1993-10-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was tasked by the US Department of Energy Albuquerque Field Office (DOE-AL) to develop a workforce assessment and transition planning tool to support integrated decision making at a single DOE installation. The planning tool permits coordinated, integrated workforce planning to manage growth, decline, or transition within a DOE installation. The tool enhances the links and provides commonality between strategic, programmatic, and operations planners and human resources. Successful development and subsequent complex-wide implementation of the model also will facilitate planning at the national level by enforcing a consistent format on data that are now collected by installations in corporate-specific formats that are not amenable to national-level analyses. The workforce assessment and transition planning tool, the Workforce Transition Modeling Environment (WFTME), consists of two components: the Workforce Transition Model and the Workforce Budget Constraint Model. The Workforce Transition Model, the preponderant of the two, assists decision makers identify and evaluate alternatives for transitioning the current workforce to meet the skills required to support projected workforce requirements. The Workforce Budget Constraint Model helps estimate the number of personnel that will be affected by a given workforce budget increase or decrease and assists in identifying how the corresponding hirings or layoffs should be distributed across the Common Occupation Classification System (COCS) occupations. This user`s guide describes the use and operation of the WFTME. This includes the functions of modifying data and running models, interpreting output reports, and an approach for using the WFTME to evaluate various workforce transition scenarios.

  19. Getting to the Source: a Survey of Quantitative Data Sources Available to the Everyday Librarian: Part II: Data Sources from Specific Library Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Goddard

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This is the second part of a two-part article that provides a survey of data sources which are likely to be immediately available to the typical practitioner who wishes to engage in statistical analysis of collections and services within his or her own library. Part I outlines the data elements which can be extracted from web server logs, and discusses web log analysis tools. Part II looks at logs, reports, and data sources from proxy servers, resource vendors, link resolvers, federated search engines, institutional repositories, electronic reference services, and the integrated library system.

  20. Gemini NIFS survey of feeding and feedback processes in nearby active galaxies - II. The sample and surface mass density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, R. A.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Riffel, R.; Davies, R.; Bianchin, M.; Diniz, M. R.; Schönell, A. J.; Burtscher, L.; Crenshaw, M.; Fischer, T. C.; Dahmer-Hahn, L. G.; Dametto, N. Z.; Rosario, D.

    2018-02-01

    We present and characterize a sample of 20 nearby Seyfert galaxies selected for having BAT 14-195 keV luminosities LX ≥ 1041.5 erg s-1, redshift z ≤ 0.015, being accessible for observations with the Gemini Near-Infrared Field Spectrograph (NIFS) and showing extended [O III]λ5007 emission. Our goal is to study Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) feeding and feedback processes from near-infrared integral-field spectra, which include both ionized (H II) and hot molecular (H2) emission. This sample is complemented by other nine Seyfert galaxies previously observed with NIFS. We show that the host galaxy properties (absolute magnitudes MB, MH, central stellar velocity dispersion and axial ratio) show a similar distribution to those of the 69 BAT AGN. For the 20 galaxies already observed, we present surface mass density (Σ) profiles for H II and H2 in their inner ˜500 pc, showing that H II emission presents a steeper radial gradient than H2. This can be attributed to the different excitation mechanisms: ionization by AGN radiation for H II and heating by X-rays for H2. The mean surface mass densities are in the range (0.2 ≤ ΣH II ≤ 35.9) M⊙ pc-2, and (0.2 ≤ ΣH2 ≤ 13.9)× 10-3 M⊙ pc-2, while the ratios between the H II and H2 masses range between ˜200 and 8000. The sample presented here will be used in future papers to map AGN gas excitation and kinematics, providing a census of the mass inflow and outflow rates and power as well as their relation with the AGN luminosity.

  1. FY17 Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training (EWDJT) Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    This notice announces the availability of funds and solicits proposals from eligible entities, including nonprofit organizations, to deliver Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training programs.

  2. Listening to the voices of children in foster care: youths speak out about child welfare workforce turnover and selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica; Kollar, Sharon; Trinkle, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Child welfare workforce turnover rates across private and public child welfare agencies are concerning. Although research about the causes of child welfare workforce turnover has been plentiful, empirical studies on the effects of turnover on child outcomes are sparse. Furthermore, the voices and experiences of youths within the system have been largely overlooked.The purpose ofthis study was, first, to explore the experiences and opinions about child welfare workforce turnover and retention of youths in the child welfare system; second, to explore a relationship between the number of caseworkers a youth has had and his or her number of foster care placements; and third, to harness the suggestions of youths in resolving the turnover problem. Youths in the child welfare system (N = 25) participated in focus groups and completed a small demographic survey. Findings suggest that youths experience multiple effects of workforce turnover, such as lack of stability; loss of trusting relationships; and, at times, second chances. The article concludes with suggestions for caseworkers, state trainers, local and state administrators, and social work researchers on engaging with youths in relationships that facilitate genuine systems change around social work practice and the child welfare workforce crisis.

  3. The National Workforce Assistance Collaborative: A New Institution with Plans To Improve Workforce Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Terri

    The National Workforce Assistance Collaborative (NWAC) was established by the National Alliance of Business to provide assistance to community colleges and other organizations that offer programs to increase business productivity. The NWAC is charged with building the capacity of service providers that work with small and mid-sized companies in…

  4. Preparing our Workforce (POW) Initiative: Utilizing Moodle to Prepare Students for the Geoscience Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlton, H. R.; Keane, C. M.; Wilson, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    Bridging the workforce supply gap is an increasing concern among the geoscience community as our current geoscience professionals approach retirement age. To ensure the sustainability of our future workforce, the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) developed a program called the Preparing our Workforce (POW) Initiative to discuss the diverse career opportunities with geoscience students. These discussion-based, student-led talks bring together geoscience students and working professionals that emphasize the importance of integrating transferrable skills and outside interests to bolster one's career. Through the Geoscience Online Learning Initiative, (GOLI) sponsored by AGI and the American Institute of Professional Geologists (AIPG), nation-wide implementation is currently underway by employing Moodle to train geoscience professionals to host POW discussions with students in their area. The POW course currently utilizes many of Moodle's features including video streaming, discussion forums, assessments, databases and restricted access to materials. This talk will address the innovative structure, goals and implementation of the POW Initiative. Additionally, it will discuss future courses in Moodle that will address workforce needs and how to become more formally involved in the POW Initiative.

  5. The National Higher Education and Workforce Initiative: Strategy in Action: Building the Cybersecurity Workforce in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Business-Higher Education Forum, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Business-Higher Education Forum (BHEF) has achieved particular success in operationalizing the National Higher Education and Workforce Initiative (HEWI) in Maryland around cybersecurity. Leveraging its membership of corporate CEOs, university presidents, and government agency leaders, BHEF partnered with the University System of Maryland to…

  6. Measuring galaxy [O ii] emission line doublet with future ground-based wide-field spectroscopic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparat, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Bacon, Roland; Mostek, Nick J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Schlegel, David J.; Yèche, Christophe

    2013-11-01

    The next generation of wide-field spectroscopic redshift surveys will map the large-scale galaxy distribution in the redshift range 0.7 ≤ z ≤ 2 to measure baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO). The primary optical signature used in this redshift range comes from the [Oii] emission line doublet, which provides a unique redshift identification that can minimize confusion with other single emission lines. To derive the required spectrograph resolution for these redshift surveys, we simulate observations of the [Oii] (λλ 3727, 3729) doublet for various instrument resolutions, and line velocities. We foresee two strategies for the choice of the resolution for future spectrographs for BAO surveys. For bright [Oii] emitter surveys ([Oii] flux ~30 × 10-17 erg cm-2 s-1 like SDSS-IV/eBOSS), a resolution of R ~ 3300 allows the separation of 90 percent of the doublets. The impact of the sky lines on the completeness in redshift is less than 6 percent. For faint [Oii] emitter surveys ([Oii] flux ~10 × 10-17 erg cm-2 s-1 like DESi), the detection improves continuously with resolution, so we recommend the highest possible resolution, the limit being given by the number of pixels (4k by 4k) on the detector and the number of spectroscopic channels (2 or 3).

  7. Tracking the Health of the Geoscience Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, L. M.; Keane, C. M.; Martinez, C. M.

    2008-12-01

    Increased demands for resources and environmental activities, relative declines in college students entering technical fields, and expectations of growth commensurate with society as a whole challenge the competitiveness of the U.S. geoscience workforce. Because of prior business cycles, more than 50% of the workforce needed in natural resource industries in 10 years is currently not in the workforce. This issue is even more acute in government at all levels and in academic institutions. Here, we present a snapshot of the current status of the geoscience profession that spans geoscientists in training to geoscience professionals in government, industry, and academia to understand the disparity between the supply of and demand for geoscientists. Since 1996, only 1% of high school SAT test takers plan to major in geosciences at college. Although the total number of geoscience degrees granted at community colleges have increased by 9% since 1996 , the number of geoscience undergraduate degrees has decreased by 7%. The number of geoscience master's and doctoral degrees have increased 4% and 14% respectively in the same time period. However, by 2005, 68 geoscience departments were consolidated or closed in U.S. universities. Students who graduate with geoscience degrees command competitive salaries. Recent bachelors geoscience graduates earned an average salary of 31,366, whereas recent master's recipients earned an average of 81,300. New geosciences doctorates commanded an average salary of 72,600. Also, fFederal funding for geoscience research has increase steadily from 485 million in 1970 to $3.5 billion in 2005. Economic indicators suggest continued growth in geoscience commodity output and in market capitalization of geoscience industries. Additionally, the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 19% increase in the number of geoscience jobs from 2006 to 2016. Despite the increased demand for geoscientists and increase in federal funding of geoscience research

  8. AN INTEGER PROGRAMMING MODEL FOR HIERARCHICAL WORKFORCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BANU SUNGUR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The model presented in this paper is based on the model developed by Billionnet for the hierarchical workforce problem. In Billionnet’s Model, while determining the workers’ weekly costs, weekly working hours of workers are not taken into consideration. In our model, the weekly costs per worker are reduced in proportion to the working hours per week. Our model is illustrated on the Billionnet’s Example. The models in question are compared and evaluated on the basis of the results obtained from the example problem. A reduction is achieved in the total cost by the proposed model.

  9. Sultanate of Oman: building a dental workforce

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Jennifer E.; Manickam, Sivakumar; Wilson, Nairn HF

    2015-01-01

    Background A medium- and long-term perspective is required in human resource development to ensure that future needs and demands for oral healthcare are met by the most appropriate health professionals. This paper presents a case study of the Sultanate of Oman, one of the Gulf States with a current population of 3.8 million, which has initiated dental training through the creation of a dental college. Objectives The objectives of this paper are first to describe trends in the dental workforce...

  10. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2012 Workforce Study: The Radiation Oncologists' and Residents' Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohar, Surjeet, E-mail: spohar@iuhealth.org [Indiana University Health East, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Fung, Claire Y. [Commonwealth Newburyport Cancer Center, Newburyport, Massachusetts (United States); Hopkins, Shane [William R. Bliss Cancer Center, Ames, Iowa (United States); Miller, Robert [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Azawi, Samar [VA Veteran Hospital/University of California Irvine, Newport Beach, California (United States); Arnone, Anna; Patton, Caroline [ASTRO, Fairfax, Virginia (United States); Olsen, Christine [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) conducted the 2012 Radiation Oncology Workforce Survey to obtain an up-to-date picture of the workforce, assess its needs and concerns, and identify quality and safety improvement opportunities. The results pertaining to radiation oncologists (ROs) and residents (RORs) are presented here. Methods: The ASTRO Workforce Subcommittee, in collaboration with allied radiation oncology professional societies, conducted a survey study in early 2012. An online survey questionnaire was sent to all segments of the radiation oncology workforce. Respondents who were actively working were included in the analysis. This manuscript describes the data for ROs and RORs. Results: A total of 3618 ROs and 568 RORs were surveyed. The response rate for both groups was 29%, with 1047 RO and 165 ROR responses. Among ROs, the 2 most common racial groups were white (80%) and Asian (15%), and the male-to-female ratio was 2.85 (74% male). The median age of ROs was 51. ROs averaged 253.4 new patient consults in a year and 22.9 on-treatment patients. More than 86% of ROs reported being satisfied or very satisfied overall with their career. Close to half of ROs reported having burnout feelings. There was a trend toward more frequent burnout feelings with increasing numbers of new patient consults. ROs' top concerns were related to documentation, reimbursement, and patients' health insurance coverage. Ninety-five percent of ROs felt confident when implementing new technology. Fifty-one percent of ROs thought that the supply of ROs was balanced with demand, and 33% perceived an oversupply. Conclusions: This study provides a current snapshot of the 2012 radiation oncology physician workforce. There was a predominance of whites and men. Job satisfaction level was high. However a substantial fraction of ROs reported burnout feelings. Perceptions about supply and demand balance were mixed. ROs top concerns reflect areas of attention

  11. Training and career development for comparative effectiveness research workforce development: CTSA Consortium Strategic Goal Committee on comparative effectiveness research workgroup on workforce development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroenke, Kurt; Kapoor, Wishwa; Helfand, Mark; Meltzer, David O; McDonald, Mary Anne; Selker, Harry

    2010-10-01

    As comparative effectiveness research (CER) increasingly becomes a national priority, there are increased needs for training and workforce development in this area. Particularly important CER competencies include clinical epidemiology, biomedical informatics, economic analyses, systematic reviews, clinical practice guideline development, use of large databases and electronic health records for research, practice-based research, implementation and dissemination, health services research, and decision analysis. Institutions funded by Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSAs) should be one of the central stakeholders in providing training and career development in CER. Survey results regarding the current CER capacity and needs of CTSAs are presented, and recommendations are provided. Volume 5: 258-262. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Domestic violence and immigration status among Latina mothers in the child welfare system: findings from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being II (NSCAW II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbonnaya, Ijeoma Nwabuzor; Finno-Velasquez, Megan; Kohl, Patricia L

    2015-01-01

    Many children involved with the child welfare system witness parental domestic violence. The association between children's domestic violence exposure and child welfare involvement may be influenced by certain socio-cultural factors; however, minimal research has examined this relationship. The current study compares domestic violence experiences and case outcomes among Latinas who are legal immigrants (n=39), unauthorized immigrants (n=77), naturalized citizens (n=30), and US-born citizen mothers (n=383) reported for child maltreatment. This analysis used data from the second round of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being. Mothers were asked about whether they experienced domestic violence during the past year. In addition, data were collected to assess if (a) domestic violence was the primary abuse type reported and, if so, (b) the maltreatment allegation was substantiated. Results show that naturalized citizens, legal residents, and unauthorized immigrants did not differ from US-born citizens in self-reports of domestic violence; approximately 33% of mothers reported experiences of domestic violence within the past year. Yet, unauthorized immigrants were 3.76 times more likely than US-born citizens to have cases with allegations of domestic violence as the primary abuse type. Despite higher rates of alleged domestic violence, unauthorized citizens were not more likely than US-born citizens to have these cases substantiated for domestic violence (F(2.26, 153.99)=0.709, p=.510). Findings highlight that domestic violence is not accurately accounted for in families with unauthorized immigrant mothers. We recommend child welfare workers are trained to properly assess and fulfill the needs of immigrant families, particularly as it relates to domestic violence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The sloan lens acs survey. II. Stellar populations and internal structure of early-type lens galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treu, Tommaso; Koopmans, Léon V.; Bolton, Adam S.; Burles, Scott; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2006-01-01

    We use HST images to derive effective radii and effective surface brightnesses of 15 early-type (E+S0) lens galaxies identified by the SLACS Survey. Our measurements are combined with stellar velocity dispersions from the SDSS database to investigate for the first time the distribution of lens

  14. Spectroscopic survey of the Galaxy with Gaia - II. The expected science yield from the Radial Velocity Spectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, MI; Vallenari, A; Turon, C; Munari, U; Katz, D; Bono, G; Cropper, M; Helmi, A; Robichon, N; Thevenin, F; Vidrih, S; Zwitter, T; Arenou, F; Baylac, MO; Bertelli, G; Bijaoui, A; Boschi, F; Castelli, F; Crifo, F; David, M; Gomboc, A; Gomez, A; Haywood, M; Jauregi, U; de Laverny, P; Lebreton, Y; Marrese, P; Marsh, T; Mignot, S; Morin, D; Pasetto, S; Perryman, M; Prsa, A; Recio-Blanco, A; Royer, F; Sellier, A; Siviero, A; Sordo, R; Soubiran, C; Tomasella, L; Viala, Y

    2005-01-01

    The Gaia mission is designed as a Galaxy explorer, and will measure simultaneously, in a survey mode, the five or six phase-space parameters of all stars brighter than 20th magnitude, as well as providing a description of their astrophysical characteristics. These measurements are obtained by

  15. Combining spectroscopic and photometric surveys using angular cross-correlations - II. Parameter constraints from different physical effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Martin; Gaztañaga, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    Future spectroscopic and photometric surveys will measure accurate positions and shapes of an increasing number of galaxies. In the previous paper of this series, we studied the effects of redshift space distortions (RSD), baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and weak gravitational lensing (WL) using angular cross-correlation. Here, we provide a new forecast that explores the contribution of including different observables, physical effects (galaxy bias, WL, RSD, BAO) and approximations (non-linearities, Limber approximation, covariance between probes). The radial information is included by using the cross-correlation of separate narrow redshift bins. For the auto-correlation the separation of galaxy pairs is mostly transverse, while the cross-correlation also includes a radial component. We study how this information adds to our figure of merit (FoM), which includes the dark energy equation of state w(z) and the growth history, parametrized by γ. We show that the Limber approximation and galaxy bias are the most critical ingredients to the modelling of correlations. Adding WL increases our FoM by 4.8, RSD by 2.1 and BAO by 1.3. We also explore how overlapping surveys perform under the different assumptions and for different FoMs. Our qualitative conclusions depend on the survey choices and scales included, but we find some clear tendencies that highlight the importance of combining different probes and can be used to guide and optimize survey strategies.

  16. A CFH12k lensing survey of X-ray luminous galaxy clusters - II. Weak lensing analysis and global correlations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardeau, S.; Soucail, G.; Kneib, J.-P.; Czoske, O.; Ebeling, H.; Hudelot, P.; Smail, I.; Smith, G. P.

    Aims. We present a wide-field multi-color survey of a homogeneous sample of eleven clusters of galaxies for which we measure total masses and mass distributions from weak lensing. This sample, spanning a small range in both X-ray luminosity and redshift, is ideally suited to determining the

  17. Industry Wage Surveys: Banking and Life Insurance, December 1976. Part I--Banking. Part II--Life Insurance. Bulletin 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Carl

    This report presents the results of a survey conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics to determine wages and related benefits in (1) the banking industry and (2) for employees in home offices and regional head offices of life insurance carriers. Part 1 discusses banking industry characteristics and presents data for tellers and selected…

  18. National Survey of American Attitudes on Substance Abuse II: Teens and Their Parents Conducted by Luntz Research Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

    Illegal drug use by adolescents is on the rise. This alarming trend was quantified in this national survey of the attitudes of teens and their parents (1,200 teens and 1,166 parents, including 819 sets of teens and parents from the same households) towards cigarettes, alcohol, inhalants, marijuana, LSD, cocaine, heroin, and other illegal drugs.…

  19. Human Trafficking in the United States. Part II. Survey of U.S. Government Web Resources for Publications and Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigabutra-Roberts, Anchalee

    2012-01-01

    This second part of a two-part series is a survey of U.S. government web resources on human trafficking in the United States, particularly of the online publications and data included on agencies' websites. Overall, the goal is to provide an introduction, an overview, and a guide on this topic for library staff to use in their research and…

  20. An Aging Workforce: Employment Opportunities and Obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Full Professor, Institute of Economic Sciences

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed significant changes in the structure of unemployment in the global labour market. This is corroborated by the fact that the global workforce is rapidly aging and the share of people aged 50 and over in the structure of the labour market is increasing. In line with this trend, unemployment issues should be considered as a global problem that cannot be fully resolved at the level of any individual country separately.The main objective of this paper is to throw some light on the aging workforce and the elderly population’s opportunity to realise their right to work and be treated equally with younger age groups. Hence, the paper simultaneously focuses on the age and gender discrimination of elderly population in terms of their employment prospects. The aim of our research is not only to point out certain stereotypes concerning the elderly labour force, but also to stress that unless preconditions for overcoming these stereotypes are created and employment opportunities are given to this segment of the labour force, full employment as an ultimate goal of global economic policy cannot be achieved. It is in accordance with these considerations that we offer a model to achieve this goal.

  1. Does State Legislation Improve Nursing Workforce Diversity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Jasmine; Smaldone, Arlene; Cohn, Elizabeth Gross

    2015-08-01

    A health-care workforce representative of our nation's diversity is a health and research priority. Although racial and ethnic minorities represent 37% of Americans, they comprise only 16% of the nursing workforce. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of state legislation on minority recruitment to nursing. Using data from the National Conference of State Legislatures, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and U.S. census, we compared minority enrollment in baccalaureate nursing programs of states (Texas, Virginia, Michigan, California, Florida, Connecticut, and Arkansas) before and 3 years after enacting legislation with geographically adjacent states without legislation. Data were analyzed using descriptive and chi-square statistics. Following legislation, Arkansas (13.8%-24.5%), California (3.3%-5.4%), and Michigan (8.0%-10.0%) significantly increased enrollment of Blacks, and Florida (11.8%-15.4%) and Texas (11.2%-13.9%) significantly increased enrollment of Hispanic baccalaureate nursing students. States that tied legislation to funding, encouragement, and reimbursement had larger enrollment gains and greater minority representation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Strategies for Managing a Multigenerational Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iden, Ronald

    The multigenerational workforce presents a critical challenge for business managers, and each generation has different expectations. A human resource management study of organizations with more than 500 employees reported 58% of the managers experiencing conflict between younger and older workers. The purpose of this single case study was to explore the multigenerational strategies used by 3 managers from a Franklin County, Ohio manufacturing facility with a population size of 6 participants. The conceptual framework for this study was built upon generational theory and cohort group theory. The data were collected through face-to-face semistructured interviews, company documents, and a reflexive journal. Member checking was completed to strengthen the credibility and trustworthiness of the interpretation of participants' responses. A modified van Kaam method enabled separation of themes following the coding of data. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) required multigenerational managerial skills, (b) generational cohort differences, (c) most effective multigenerational management strategies, and (d) least effective multigenerational management strategies. Findings from this study may contribute to social change through better understanding, acceptance, and appreciation of the primary generations in the workforce, and, in turn, improve community relationships.

  3. Current Workforce Characteristics and Burnout in Pediatric Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Marc H; Schremmer, Robert; Ruch-Ross, Holly; Radabaugh, Carrie; Selbst, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Changes in health care delivery and graduate medical education have important consequences for the workforce in pediatric emergency medicine (PEM). This study compared career preparation and potential attrition of the PEM workforce with the prior assessment from 1998. An e-mail survey was sent to members of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Section on EM and to non-AAP members board certified in PEM. Information on demographics, practice characteristics and professional activities, career preparation, future plans, and burnout (using two validated screening questions) was analyzed using standard descriptive statistics. Of 2,120 surveys mailed, 895 responses were received (40.8% response). Over half (53.7%) of respondents were female, compared with 44% in 1998. The majority (62.9%) practiced in the emergency department (ED) of a free-standing children's hospital. The distribution of professional activities was similar to that reported in 1998, with the majority of time (60%) spent in direct patient care. Half indicated involvement in research, and almost half had dedicated time for other activities, including emergency medical services (7.3%), disaster (6.9%), child abuse (5.0%), transport (3.6%), toxicology (2.3% of respondents), and other (13.6%); additionally, 21.3% had dedicated time for quality/safety. Respondents were highly satisfied (95.6%) with fellowship preparation for clinical care, but less satisfied with preparation for research (49.2%) and administration (38.7%). However, satisfaction with nonclinical training was higher for those within 10 years of medical school graduation. Forty-six percent plan to change clinical activity in the next 5 years, including reducing hours, changing shifts, or retiring. Overall, 11.9% of all respondents, including 20.1% of women and 2.6% of men (p burnout are prevalent, and there is likely to be substantial attrition of PEM providers in the near future. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  4. Exploration of an allied health workforce redesign model: quantifying the work of allied health assistants in a community workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Lisa; Davis, Annette; Milne, Sarah; Terrill, Desiree; Philip, Kathleen

    2017-07-25

    The Victorian Assistant Workforce Model (VAWM) enables a systematic approach for the identification and quantification of work that can be delegated from allied health professionals (AHPs) to allied health assistants (AHAs). The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of implementation of VAWM in the community and ambulatory health care setting. Data captured using mixed methods from allied health professionals working across the participating health services enabled the measurement of opportunity for workforce redesign in the community and ambulatory allied health workforce. A total of 1112 AHPs and 135 AHAs from the 27 participating organisations took part in the present study. AHPs identified that 24% of their time was spent undertaking tasks that could safely be delegated to an appropriately qualified and supervised AHA. This equates to 6837h that could be redirected to advanced and expanded AHP practice roles or expanded patient-centred service models. The VAWM demonstrates potential for more efficient implementation of assistant workforce roles across allied health. Data outputs from implementation of the VAWM are vital in informing strategic planning and sustainability of workforce change. A more efficient and effective workforce promotes service delivery by the right person, in the right place, at the right time.What is known about this topic? There are currently workforce shortages that are predicted to grow across the allied health workforce. Ensuring that skill mix is optimal is one way to address these shortages. Matching the right task to right worker will also enable improved job satisfaction for both allied health assistants and allied health professionals. Workforce redesign efforts are more effective when there is strong data to support the redesign.What does this paper add? This paper builds on a previous paper by Somerville et al. with a case study applying the workforce redesign model to a community and ambulatory health care setting

  5. Return to the workforce following coronary artery bypass grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butt, Jawad H; Rørth, Rasmus; Kragholm, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Returning to the workforce after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) holds important socioeconomic consequences not only for patients, but the society as well. Yet data on this issue are limited. We examined return to the workforce and associated factors in patients of working age...

  6. The Civil Defense Acquisition Workforce: Enhancing Recruitment Through Hiring Flexibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-22

    The Civil Defense Acquisition Workforce: Enhancing Recruitment Through Hiring Flexibilities Kathryn A. Francis Analyst in Government...Organization and Management November 22, 2016 Congressional Research Service 7-5700 www.crs.gov R44695 The Civil Defense Acquisition Workforce: Hiring...establishment of new flexibilities, staff knowledge of appropriate use, budgetary constraints, and efforts to balance hiring speed with equity. The Civil

  7. Challenges of Broadening Participation in the Geospatial Technology Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBiase, D.

    2015-12-01

    In this presentation I'll describe the geospatial technology industry and its workforce needs, in relation to the geosciences. The talk will consider the special challenge of recruiting and retaining women and under-represented minorities in high tech firms like Esri. Finally, I'll discuss what my company is doing to help realize the benefits of a diverse workforce.

  8. The State of the Psychology Health Service Provider Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Daniel S.; Kohout, Jessica L.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous efforts to describe the health service provider or clinical workforce in psychology have been conducted during the past 30 years. The American Psychological Association (APA) has studied trends in the doctoral education pathway and the resultant effects on the broader psychology workforce. During this period, the creation and growth of…

  9. Workforce cultural factors in TQM/CQI implementation in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huq, Z; Martin, T N

    2000-01-01

    One of the major obstacles to successful implementation of TQM/CQI in hospitals has been management's failure to consider the workforce cultural situation. This quasi-qualitative study investigates eight workforce cultural factors in seven midwestern hospitals. Results reveal only one of the seven hospitals successfully implementing TQM/CQI.

  10. Operational workforce planning for check-in counters at airports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolletz, Raik

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses operation models for workforce planning for check-in systems at airports. We characterize different tasks of the hierarchical workforce planning problem with time-dependent demand. A binary linear programming formulation is developed for the fortnightly tour scheduling problem...

  11. Investigation of Malaysian Higher Education Quality Culture and Workforce Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hairuddin Mohd; Musah, Mohammed Borhandden

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the quality culture and workforce performance in the Malaysian higher education sector. The study also aims to test and validate the psychometric properties of the quality culture and workforce performance instruments used in the study. Design/methodology/approach: A total…

  12. The public health workforce: An assessment in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jambroes, M.

    2015-01-01

    The public health workforce is a key resource of population health. How many people work in public health in the Netherlands, what are their characteristics and who does what? Remarkably, such information about the size and composition of the public health workforce in the Netherlands is lacking. A

  13. [Hungarian Diet and Nutritional Status Survey -- the OTAP2009 study. II. Energy and macronutrient intake of the Hungarian population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkadi Nagy, Eszter; Bakacs, Márta; Illés, Eva; Zentai, Andrea; Lugasi, Andrea; Martos, Eva

    2012-07-08

    The Hungarian Diet and Nutritional Status Survey is the fourth in the row of the Hungarian national dietary surveys conducted by the Institute for Food and Nutrition Science. The present study was performed to provide valid, up-to-date data on energy and nutrient intakes and dietary habits of the Hungarian adult population. The energy and nutrient intakes were calculated on validated three-day dietary records of a representative sample by age and gender of the Hungarian population aged ≥ 18 ys. The energy percentage of fat was too high (39 E% for men and 36 E% for women), that of carbohydrate was too low (45 E% for men and 48 E% for women), whereas that of protein met the recommendation (15 E% for men and 15 E% for women). Reduction of the nutritional risk factors would greatly reduce the mortality and morbidity rates of nutrition-related diseases.

  14. Emergence of dengue virus 4 genotype II in Guangzhou, China, 2010: Survey and molecular epidemiology of one community outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Qin-Long

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The re-emergence of dengue virus 4 (DENV-4 has become a public health concern in South America, Southeast Asia and South Asia. However, it has not been known to have caused a local outbreak in China for the past 20 years. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the epidemiology of one local community outbreak caused by DENV-4 in Guangzhou city, China, in 2010; and to determine the molecular characteristics of the genotype II virus involved. Case presentations During September and October of 2010, one imported case, a Guangzhou resident who travelled back from Thailand, resulted in 18 secondary autochthonous cases in Guangzhou City, with an incidence rate of 5.53 per 10,000 residents. In indigenous cases, 14 serum samples tested positive for IgM against DENV and 7 for IgG from a total of 15 submitted serum samples, accompanied by 5 DENV-4 isolates. With identical envelope gene nucleotide sequences, the two isolates (D10168-GZ from the imported index case and Guangzhou 10660 from the first isolate in the autochthonous cases were grouped into DENV-4 genotype II after comparison to 32 previous DENV-4 isolates from GenBank that originated from different areas. Conclusions Based on epidemiological and phylogenetic analyses, the outbreak, which was absent for 20 years after the DENV-4 genotype I outbreak in 1990, was confirmed as DENV-4 genotype II and initially traced to the imported index case, a Guangzhou resident who travelled back from Thailand.

  15. Combining spectroscopic and photometric surveys using angular cross-correlations II: Parameter constraints from different physical effects

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksen, M.B.; Gaztañaga, E.

    2015-01-01

    Future spectroscopic and photometric surveys will measure accurate positions and shapes of an increasing number of galaxies. In the previous paper of this series we studied the effects of Redshift Space Distortions (RSD), baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and Weak gravitational Lensing (WL) using angular cross-correlation. Here, we provide a new forecast that explores the contribution of including different observables, physical effects (galaxy bias, WL, RSD, BAO) and approximations (non-lin...

  16. The California-Kepler Survey. II. Precise Physical Properties of 2025 Kepler Planets and Their Host Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, John Asher; Petigura, Erik A.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard; Hebb, Leslie; Cargile, Phillip A.; Morton, Timothy D.; Weiss, Lauren M.; Winn, Joshua N.; Rogers, Leslie A.; Sinukoff, Evan; Hirsch, Lea A.

    2017-01-01

    We present stellar and planetary properties for 1305 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) hosting 2025 planet candidates observed as part of the California-Kepler Survey. We combine spectroscopic constraints, presented in Paper I, with stellar interior modeling to estimate stellar masses, radii, and ages. Stellar radii are typically constrained to 11%, compared to 40% when only photometric constraints are used. Stellar masses are constrained to 4%, and ages are constrained to 30%. We verify the ...

  17. Nurses who work in rural and remote communities in Canada: a national survey

    OpenAIRE

    MacLeod, Martha L. P.; Stewart, Norma J.; Kulig, Judith C.; Anguish, Penny; Andrews, Mary Ellen; Banner, Davina; Garraway, Leana; Hanlon, Neil; Karunanayake, Chandima; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Koren, Irene; Kosteniuk, Julie; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Mix, Nadine; Moffitt, Pertice

    2017-01-01

    Background In Canada, as in other parts of the world, there is geographic maldistribution of the nursing workforce, and insufficient attention is paid to the strengths and needs of those providing care in rural and remote settings. In order to inform workforce planning, a national study, Nursing Practice in Rural and Remote Canada II, was conducted with the rural and remote regulated nursing workforce (registered nurses, nurse practitioners, licensed or registered practical nurses, and regist...

  18. The Einstein@Home Gamma-ray Pulsar Survey. II. Source Selection, Spectral Analysis, and Multiwavelength Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Clark, C. J.; Pletsch, H. J.; Guillemot, L.; Johnson, T. J.; Torne, P.; Champion, D. J.; Deneva, J.; Ray, P. S.; Salvetti, D.; Kramer, M.; Aulbert, C.; Beer, C.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Bock, O.; Camilo, F.; Cognard, I.; Cuéllar, A.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Ferrara, E. C.; Kerr, M.; Machenschalk, B.; Ransom, S. M.; Sanpa-Arsa, S.; Wood, K.

    2018-02-01

    We report on the analysis of 13 gamma-ray pulsars discovered in the Einstein@Home blind search survey using Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) Pass 8 data. The 13 new gamma-ray pulsars were discovered by searching 118 unassociated LAT sources from the third LAT source catalog (3FGL), selected using the Gaussian Mixture Model machine-learning algorithm on the basis of their gamma-ray emission properties being suggestive of pulsar magnetospheric emission. The new gamma-ray pulsars have pulse profiles and spectral properties similar to those of previously detected young gamma-ray pulsars. Follow-up radio observations have revealed faint radio pulsations from two of the newly discovered pulsars and enabled us to derive upper limits on the radio emission from the others, demonstrating that they are likely radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars. We also present results from modeling the gamma-ray pulse profiles and radio profiles, if available, using different geometric emission models of pulsars. The high discovery rate of this survey, despite the increasing difficulty of blind pulsar searches in gamma rays, suggests that new systematic surveys such as presented in this article should be continued when new LAT source catalogs become available.

  19. Health promotion funding, workforce recruitment and turnover in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Sarah A; Egan, Richard; Robertson, Lindsay; Hicks, Karen

    2015-06-01

    Almost a decade on from the New Zealand Primary Health Care Strategy and amidst concerns about funding of health promotion, we undertook a nationwide survey of health promotion providers. To identify trends in recruitment and turnover in New Zealand's health promotion workforce. Surveys were sent to 160 organisations identified as having a health focus and employing one or more health promoter. Respondents, primarily health promotion managers, were asked to report budget, retention and hiring data for 1 July 2009 through 1 July 2010. Responses were received from 53% of organisations. Among respondents, government funding for health promotion declined by 6.3% in the year ended July 2010 and health promoter positions decreased by 7.5% (equalling 36.6 full-time equivalent positions). Among staff who left their roles, 79% also left the field of health promotion. Forty-two organisations (52%) reported employing health promoters on time-limited contracts of three years or less; this employment arrangement was particularly common in public health units (80%) and primary health organisations (57%). Among new hires, 46% (n=55) were identified as Maori. Low retention of health promoters may reflect the common use of limited-term employment contracts, which allow employers to alter staffing levels as funding changes. More than half the surveyed primary health organisations reported using fixed-term employment contracts. This may compromise health promotion understanding, culture and institutional memory in these organisations. New Zealand's commitment to addressing ethnic inequalities in health outcomes was evident in the high proportion of Maori who made up new hires.

  20. EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES FROM THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE PROBING EVOLUTION AND REIONIZATION SPECTROSCOPICALLY (PEARS) GRISM SURVEY. II. THE COMPLETE SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirzkal, Nor; Rothberg, Barry; Ly, Chun; Grogin, Norman A.; Dahlen, Tomas; Noeske, Kai G.; Bellini, Andrea [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21210 (United States); Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Cohen, Seth H.; Mechtley, Matthew; Windhorst, Rogier A. [School of Earth And Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Meurer, Gerhardt R. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Walsh, Jeremy R. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hathi, Nimish P. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Holwerda, Benne W. [ESA-ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Straughn, Amber N. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-07-20

    We present a full analysis of the Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) slitess grism spectroscopic data obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board Hubble Space Telescope. PEARS covers fields within both the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) North and South fields, making it ideal as a random survey of galaxies, as well as the availability of a wide variety of ancillary observations complemented by the spectroscopic results. Using the PEARS data, we are able to identify star-forming galaxies (SFGs) within the redshift volume 0 < z < 1.5. Star-forming regions in the PEARS survey are pinpointed independently of the host galaxy. This method allows us to detect the presence of multiple emission-line regions (ELRs) within a single galaxy. We identified a total of 1162 H{alpha}, [O III], and/or [O II] emission lines in the PEARS sample of 906 galaxies to a limiting flux of {approx}10{sup -18} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The ELRs have also been compared to the properties of the host galaxy, including morphology, luminosity, and mass. From this analysis, we find three key results: (1) the computed line luminosities show evidence of a flattening in the luminosity function with increasing redshift; (2) the star-forming systems show evidence of complex morphologies with star formation occurring predominantly within one effective (half-light) radius. However, the morphologies show no correlation with host stellar mass. (3) Also, the number density of SFGs with M{sub *} {>=} 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} decreases by an order of magnitude at z {<=} 0.5 relative to the number at 0.5 < z < 0.9, supporting the argument of galaxy downsizing.

  1. Geriatric medicine workforce planning: a giant geriatric problem or has the tide turned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, James M; Garside, Mark; Hunt, Kelly; Lo, Nelson

    2014-04-01

    The UK's population is ageing and an adequately staffed geriatric medicine workforce is essential for high quality care. We evaluated the current and future geriatric medicine workforce, drawing on data relating to the UK population, current geriatric medicine consultants and trainees, recruitment into the specialty and trainee career progression. Data were derived from various sources, including the British Geriatrics Society Education and Training Committee biannual survey of training posts. The demographic of consultant geriatricians is changing and so too are their job plans, with more opting to work less than full time. The number of applicants to geriatric medicine training is increasing, yet increasing numbers of posts remain unfilled (4.7% in November 2010 and 14.1% in May 2013). The majority of geriatric medicine trainees secure a substantive consultant post within 6 months of obtaining their certificate of completion of training This work highlights challenges for the future: potential barriers to trainee recruitment, unfilled training posts and an ageing population and workforce.

  2. The US pediatric nephrology workforce: a report commissioned by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, William A; Meyers, Kevin E; Kirkwood, Suzanne J; Ruch-Ross, Holly S; Radabaugh, Carrie L; Greenbaum, Larry A

    2015-07-01

    The US pediatric nephrology workforce is poorly characterized. This report describes clinical and nonclinical activities, motivations and disincentives to a career in pediatric nephrology, future workforce needs, trainee recruitment, and possible explanations for personnel shortages. An e-mail survey was sent in 2013 to all identified US-trained or -practicing pediatric nephrologists. Of 504 respondents, 51% are men, 66% are US graduates, and 73% work in an academic setting. About 20% of trained pediatric nephrologists no longer practice pediatric nephrology. Among the 384 respondents practicing pediatric nephrology full or part-time in the United States, the mean work week was 56.1±14.3 hours, with time divided between patient care (59%), administration (13%), teaching (10%), clinical research (9%), basic research (6%), and other medical activities (3%). Most (>85%) care for dialysis and transplantation patients. The median number of weeks annually on call is 16, and 29% work with one or no partner. One-third of US pediatric nephrologists (n=126) plan to reduce or stop clinical nephrology practice in the next 5 years, and 53% plan to fully or partially retire. Almost half the division chiefs (47%) report inadequate physician staffing. Ongoing efforts to monitor and address pediatric nephrology workforce issues are needed. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An Innovative Interactive Modeling Tool to Analyze Scenario-Based Physician Workforce Supply and Demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Gupta BPharm

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective physician workforce management requires that the various organizations comprising the House of Medicine be able to assess their current and future workforce supply. This information has direct relevance to funding of graduate medical education. We describe a dynamic modeling tool that examines how individual factors and practice variables can be used to measure and forecast the supply and demand for existing and new physician services. The system we describe, while built to analyze the pathologist workforce, is sufficiently broad and robust for use in any medical specialty. Our design provides a computer-based software model populated with data from surveys and best estimates by specialty experts about current and new activities in the scope of practice. The model describes the steps needed and data required for analysis of supply and demand. Our modeling tool allows educators and policy makers, in addition to physician specialty organizations, to assess how various factors may affect demand (and supply of current and emerging services. Examples of factors evaluated include types of professional services (3 categories with 16 subcategories, service locations, elements related to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, new technologies, aging population, and changing roles in capitated, value-based, and team-based systems of care. The model also helps identify where physicians in a given specialty will likely need to assume new roles, develop new expertise, and become more efficient in practice to accommodate new value-based payment models.

  4. Clean Technology Evaluation & Workforce Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patricia Glaza

    2012-12-01

    The overall objective of the Clean Technology Evaluation portion of the award was to design a process to speed up the identification of new clean energy technologies and match organizations to testing and early adoption partners. The project was successful in identifying new technologies targeted to utilities and utility technology integrators, in developing a process to review and rank the new technologies, and in facilitating new partnerships for technology testing and adoption. The purpose of the Workforce Development portion of the award was to create an education outreach program for middle & high-school students focused on clean technology science and engineering. While originally targeting San Diego, California and Cambridge, Massachusetts, the scope of the program was expanded to include a major clean technology speaking series and expo as part of the USA Science & Engineering Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

  5. Health care reform: preparing the psychology workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozensky, Ronald H

    2012-03-01

    This article is based on the opening presentation by the author to the Association of Psychologists in Academic Health Centers' 5th National Conference, "Preparing Psychologists for a Rapidly Changing Healthcare Environment" held in March, 2011. Reviewing the patient protection and affordable care act (ACA), that presentation was designed to set the stage for several days of symposia and discussions anticipating upcoming changes to the healthcare system. This article reviews the ACA; general trends that have impacted healthcare reform; the implications of the Act for psychology's workforce including the growing focus on interprofessional education, training, and practice, challenges to address in order to prepare for psychology's future; and recommendations for advocating for psychology's future as a healthcare profession.

  6. Training the next generation's nephrology workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Jeffrey S; Ellison, David H; Linas, Stuart L; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2014-09-05

    The subspecialty of nephrology faces several critical challenges, including declining interest among medical students and internal medicine residents and worrisome declines in the number of applicants for nephrology fellowships. There is an urgent need to more clearly define the subspecialty and its scope of practice, reinvigorate meaningful research training and activities among trainees, and ensure that fellows who complete training and enter the practice of nephrology are experts in the broad scope of nephrology. This need requires a critical look at fellowship training programs and training requirements. A new workforce analysis is also needed that is not focused on primarily meeting estimated future clinical needs but rather, ensuring that there is alignment of supply and demand for nephrology trainees, which will ensure that those entering nephrology fellowships are highly qualified and capable of becoming outstanding nephrologists and that there are desirable employment opportunities for them when they complete their training. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  7. Workforce reductions: low morale, reduced quality care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, M

    1997-01-01

    As the number of positions decreases, the workload becomes more stressful for nurses left to pick up the slack. Mistakes are made, patient complaints increase as tensions rise, and the quality of nursing care decreases. The use of contingency staffing and overtime may increase as the workforce is reduced. Lack of job security forces acceptance of overtime, leaving less time for family life which may lead to resentment. The success of an organization is linked to employees' willingness to perform and use their skills. With deteriorating attitudes, employees will not perform at maximum effectiveness. Services do not meet established standards or customer expectations and are reflected in negative customer feedback and decreasing revenues. "There are no quick fixes. Tossing out last month's 'cure' to usher in this month's idea is a big waste of time" (Austin, 1994, p. 19). The impact from layoffs has long-lasting effects on employees, their families, and the community. Support for those displaced, and for those retained, provides a release for pent-up emotions and allows employees to get on with the work at hand. Workforce reductions will continue with the decrease in funding and the decline in patient census, but it is imperative that the quality of care be maintained. Registered nurses cannot be replaced at the bedside by UAP who do not have the specialized knowledge and skills required to provide safe and effective care (Thomas, 1995). Efforts to cut costs should be directed toward decreasing waste and eliminating redundant work, not at decreasing the number of RNs. The RN must remain the primary caregiver at the bedside to maintain quality care. Changes that remove the RN from the bedside will influence the quality of care that patients receive in the future. Increased demands and fewer, less-experienced staff result in less time for patient care. One negative patient outcome can be much more costly, directly and indirectly, than the salaries of several staff

  8. European accreditation and the future public health workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Julien D; Muckelbauer, Rebecca; Müller-Nordhorn, Jacqueline; Cavallo, Franco; Kalediene, Ramune; Kuiper, Tom; Otok, Robert

    2015-12-01

    In 2011 the Agency for Public Health Education Accreditation (APHEA) was initially launched focusing on Master level (second cycle) education. Between 2012 and 2013 the Association of Schools of Public Health in the European Region, APHEA and partner schools conducted a study on the compliance of Master level programmes of public health to the accreditation criteria. A web-based survey of second cycle programmes of public health across 29 countries was conducted using the APHEA criteria. The 29 countries were categorized into four regions: Northern, Southern, Central and Eastern and Western. We applied a Chi square test to identify regional differences with regard to the compliance of the programmes to the criteria. Data from 51 out of 71 schools contacted were analyzed. The compliance to the two themes of student and faculty exchange and quality management were lowest for programmes of public health throughout the EHEA. There were significant differences in the compliance between the regions with higher compliance in the Northern European region. Student and faculty exchange and quality management are essential for schools and programmes of public health to improve the quality of their education through expanding international knowledge and the pertinence of skills taught within European and national contexts. The results show that there are intrinsic issues with exchange and quality management as well as the role of national accreditation agencies in defining public health education for the future workforce. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  9. Constraints on the Geometry of the Obscuring Torus from the NuSTAR Survey of the Local Seyfert II Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balokovic, Mislav; Harrison, Fiona; Brightman, Murray

    2017-08-01

    The obscuring torus is one of the main components of the basic unified model of active galactic nuclei (AGN), needed to create anisotropy in obscuration as a function of the viewing angle. We present the first study of the geometrical properties of the AGN torus in a large and representative sample of type II Seyfert nuclei. The sample consists of 124 AGN selected in the hard X-ray band from the Swift/BAT 70-month catalog and observed simultaneously with NuSTAR and Swift/XRT. These data enable us to explore the constraints that observed spectra place on the properties of the obscuring torus in individual AGN and in the local population of Seyfert II nuclei. We make use of empirically motivated spectral models for X-ray reprocessing in approximately toroidal geometry for constraining the distribution of the average column density of the torus, and the distribution of the torus covering factor within this sample. We find that the torus-averaged column density is independent of the line-of-sight column density, with typical column density that is borderline Compton-thick, i.e., around the unity optical depth for Compton scattering. The distribution of torus covering factors is broad but shows a preference for high covering, peaking around the covering factor of 90%, with the median at 70%, in agreement with recent sample studies in the infrared band. We also examine the dependence of the covering factor on intrinsic luminosity, finding that the median covering factor peaks around the intrinsic X-ray luminosity of 10^42.5 erg/s and decreases toward both lower and higher luminosities.

  10. He II emitters in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey: Population III star formation or peculiar stellar populations in galaxies at 2 < z < 4.6?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassata, P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Cucciati, O.; Garilli, B.; Zamorani, G.; Adami, C.; Bardelli, S.; Le Brun, V.; Lemaux, B.; Maccagni, D.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Zucca, E.

    2013-08-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to identify He II emitters at 2 1200 km s-1), 3 active galactic nuclei (AGN), and an additional 12 possible He II emitters. The properties of the individual broad emitters are in agreement with expectations from a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) model. Instead, the properties of the narrow emitters are not compatible with this model, nor with predictions of gravitational cooling radiation produced by gas accretion, unless this is severely underestimated by current models by more than two orders of magnitude. Rather, we find that the EW of the narrow He II line emitters are in agreement with expectations for a Population III (PopIII) star formation, if the episode of star formation is continuous, and we calculate that a PopIII star formation rate (SFR) of 0.1-10 M⊙ yr-1 alone is enough to sustain the observed He II flux. Conclusions: We conclude that narrow He II emitters are powered either by the ionizing flux from a stellar population rare at z ~ 0 but much more common at z ~ 3, or by PopIII star formation. As proposed by Tornatore and collaborators, incomplete interstellar medium mixing may leave some small pockets of pristine gas at the periphery of galaxies from which PopIII may form, even down to z ~ 2 or lower. If this interpretation is correct, we measure at z ~ 3 a star formation rate density in PopIII stars of 10-6 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3, higher than, but qualitatively comparable to the value predicted by Tornatore and collaborators. Figures 2-8, and 12 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgBased on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, under Large Programs 070.A-9007 and 177.A-0837. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche

  11. The gendered health workforce: mixed methods analysis from four fragile and post-conflict contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, Sophie; Namakula, Justine; Wurie, Haja; Chirwa, Yotamu; So, Sovanarith; Vong, Sreytouch; Ros, Bandeth; Buzuzi, Stephen; Theobald, Sally

    2017-12-01

    It is well known that the health workforce composition is influenced by gender relations. However, little research has been done which examines the experiences of health workers through a gender lens, especially in fragile and post-conflict states. In these contexts, there may not only be opportunities to (re)shape occupational norms and responsibilities in the light of challenges in the health workforce, but also threats that put pressure on resources and undermine gender balance, diversity and gender responsive human resources for health (HRH). We present mixed method research on HRH in four fragile and post-conflict contexts (Sierra Leone, Zimbabwe, northern Uganda and Cambodia) with different histories to understand how gender influences the health workforce. We apply a gender analysis framework to explore access to resources, occupations, values, decision-making and power. We draw largely on life histories with male and female health workers to explore their lived experiences, but complement the analysis with evidence from surveys, document reviews, key informant interviews, human resource data and stakeholder mapping. Our findings shed light on patterns of employment: in all contexts women predominate in nursing and midwifery cadres, are under-represented in management positions and are clustered in lower paying positions. Gendered power relations shaped by caring responsibilities at the household level, affect attitudes to rural deployment and women in all contexts face challenges in accessing both pre- and in-service training. Coping strategies within conflict emerged as a key theme, with experiences here shaped by gender, poverty and household structure. Most HRH regulatory frameworks did not sufficiently address gender concerns. Unless these are proactively addressed post-crisis, health workforces will remain too few, poorly distributed and unable to meet the health needs of vulnerable populations. Practical steps need to be taken to identify gender

  12. Phase II Characterization Survey of the USNS Bridge (T-AOE 10), Military Sealift Fleet Support Command, Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALTIC, NICK A

    2012-08-30

    In March 2011, the USNS Bridge was deployed off northeastern Honshu, Japan with the carrier USS Ronald Reagan to assist with relief efforts after the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. During that time, the Bridge was exposed to air-borne radioactive materials leaking from the damaged Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant. The proximity of the Bridge to the air-borne impacted area resulted in the contamination of the ship’s air-handling systems and the associated components, as well as potential contamination of other ship surfaces due to either direct intake/deposition or inadvertent spread from crew/operational activities. Preliminary surveys in the weeks after the event confirmed low-level contamination within the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ductwork and systems, and engine and other auxiliary air intake systems. Some partial decontamination was performed at that time. In response to the airborne contamination event, Military Sealift Fleet Support Command (MSFSC) contracted Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under provisions of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, to assess the radiological condition of the Bridge. Phase I identified contamination within the CPS filters, ventilation systems, miscellaneous equipment, and other suspect locations that could not accessed at that time (ORAU 2011b). Because the Bridge was underway during the characterization, all the potentially impacted systems/spaces could not be investigated. As a result, MSFSC contracted with ORAU to perform Phase II of the characterization, specifically to survey systems/spaces previously inaccessible. During Phase II of the characterization, the ship was in port to perform routine maintenance operations, allowing access to the previously inaccessible systems/spaces.

  13. Multigenerational workforce issues and their implications for leadership in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, David

    2010-10-01

    With many countries facing current or impending nursing shortages, considering the impact of the multigenerational workforce, their needs and behaviours may impact on efforts to recruit and retain nurses. As the nursing workforce changes, with ageing nurses, an increased demand for nursing care and an ageing population, greater emphasis is placed on an understanding of the workforce's needs and the differences highlighted by various generational groups. Offered is a literature review and definitions of the four different generational groups evident in the current nursing workforce. These are offered as an insight into the different needs and attitudes that multigenerational groups bring to the nursing workforce. Making the most of the multigenerational workforce and offering recommendations for meeting their unique challenges. Understanding the different generational groups may allow nursing leaders and managers to consider what drives, motivates or hinders nurses from different generations. Recruiting and retaining a workforce increasingly made up of nurses from many generational groups is a challenge that can be tackled with a deeper understanding of each of the commonly identified generational groups. © 2010 The Author. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Dynamic simulation for effective workforce management in new product development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mutingi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective planning and management of workforce for new product development (NPD projects is a great challenge to many organisations, especially in the presence of engineering changes during the product development process. The management objective in effective workforce management is to recruit, develop and deploy the right people at the right place at the right time so as to fulfill organizational objectives. In this paper, we propose a dynamic simulation model to address the workforce management problem in a typical NPD project consisting of design, prototyping, and production phases. We assume that workforce demand is a function of project work remaining and the current available skill pool. System dynamics simulation concepts are used to capture the causality relationships and feedback loops in the workforce system from a systems thinking. The evaluation of system dynamics simulation reveals the dynamic behaviour in NPD workforce management systems and shows how adaptive dynamic recruitment and training decisions can effectively balance the workforce system during the NPD process.

  15. CAM practitioners in the Australian health workforce: an underutilized resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background CAM practitioners are a valuable but underutilizes resource in Australian health care. Despite increasing public support for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) little is known about the CAM workforce. Apart from the registered professions of chiropractic, osteopathy and Chinese medicine, accurate information about the number of CAM practitioners in the workforce has been difficult to obtain. It appears that many non-registered CAM practitioners, although highly qualified, are not working to their full capacity. Discussion Increasing public endorsement of CAM stands in contrast to the negative attitude toward the CAM workforce by some members of the medical and other health professions and by government policy makers. The marginalisation of the CAM workforce is evident in prejudicial attitudes held by some members of the medical and other health professions and its exclusion from government policy making. Inconsistent educational standards has meant that non-registered CAM practitioners, including highly qualified and competent ones, are frequently overlooked. Legitimising their contribution to the health workforce could alleviate workforce shortages and provide opportunities for redesigned job roles and new multidisciplinary teams. Priorities for better utilisation of the CAM workforce include establishing a guaranteed minimum education standard for more CAM occupation groups through national registration, providing interprofessional education that includes CAM practitioners, developing courses to upgrade CAM practitioners' professional skills in areas of indentified need, and increasing support for CAM research. Summary Marginalisation of the CAM workforce has disadvantaged those qualified and competent CAM practitioners who practise evidence-informed medicine on the basis of many years of university training. Legitimising and expanding the important contribution of CAM practitioners could alleviate projected health workforce shortages

  16. PROBING THE PHYSICS OF NARROW LINE REGIONS IN ACTIVE GALAXIES. II. THE SIDING SPRING SOUTHERN SEYFERT SPECTROSCOPIC SNAPSHOT SURVEY (S7)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Davies, Rebecca; Kewley, Lisa; Hampton, Elise; Sutherland, Ralph [RSAA, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Shastri, Prajval; Kharb, Preeti; Jose, Jessy; Bhatt, Harish; Ramya, S. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala 2 B Block, Bangalore 560034 (India); Scharwächter, Julia [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UMR 8112, 61 Avenue de l’Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Jin, Chichuan [Qian Xuesen Laboratory for Space Technology, Beijing (China); Banfield, Julie [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping NSW, 1710 Australia (Australia); Zaw, Ingyin [New York University (Abu Dhabi), 70 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Juneau, Stéphanie [CEA-Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); James, Bethan [Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Srivastava, Shweta, E-mail: Michael.Dopita@anu.edu.au [Astronomy and Astrophysics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380009 (India)

    2015-03-15

    Here we describe the Siding Spring Southern Seyfert Spectroscopic Snapshot Survey (S7) and present results on 64 galaxies drawn from the first data release. The S7 uses the Wide Field Spectrograph mounted on the ANU 2.3 m telescope located at the Siding Spring Observatory to deliver an integral field of 38 × 25 arcsec at a spectral resolution of R = 7000 in the red (530–710 nm), and R = 3000 in the blue (340–560 nm). From these data cubes we have extracted the narrow-line region spectra from a 4 arcsec aperture centered on the nucleus. We also determine the Hβ and [O iii] λ5007 fluxes in the narrow lines, the nuclear reddening, the reddening-corrected relative intensities of the observed emission lines, and the Hβ and [O iii] λ5007 luminosities determined from spectra for which the stellar continuum has been removed. We present a set of images of the galaxies in [O iii] λ5007, [N ii] λ6584, and Hα, which serve to delineate the spatial extent of the extended narrow-line region and also to reveal the structure and morphology of the surrounding H ii regions. Finally, we provide a preliminary discussion of those Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies that display coronal emission lines in order to explore the origin of these lines.

  17. [Hungarian Diet and Nutritional Status Survey - OTÁP2014. II. Energy and macronutrient intake of the Hungarian population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkadi Nagy, Eszter; Bakacs, Márta; Illés, Éva; Nagy, Barbara; Varga, Anita; Kis, Orsolya; Schreiberné Molnár, Erzsébet; Martos, Éva

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study was to assess and monitor the dietary habits and nutrient intake of Hungarian adults. Three-day dietary records were used for dietary assessment, the sample was representative for the Hungarian population aged ≥18ys by gender and age. The mean proportion of energy from fat was higher (men: 38 energy%, women: 37 energy%), that from carbohydrates was lower (men: 45 energy%, women: 47 energy%) than recommended, the protein intake is adequate. Unfavorable change compared to the previous survey in 2009 was the increase of fat and saturated fatty acid energy percent in women, the decrease in fruit and vegetable consumption, which explains the decreased fiber intake. An increasing trend in added sugar energy percent in each age groups of both genders was observed compared to 2009. Interventions focusing on the promotion of fruit and vegetable consumption and decreasing of saturated fat and added sugar intake are needed. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(15), 587-597.

  18. THE GOULD’S BELT DISTANCES SURVEY (GOBELINS). II. DISTANCES AND STRUCTURE TOWARD THE ORION MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kounkel, Marina; Hartmann, Lee [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 S. University Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Loinard, Laurent; Ortiz-León, Gisela N.; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Pech, Gerardo; Rivera, Juana L. [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, Morelia 58089 (Mexico); Mioduszewski, Amy J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Domenici Science Operations Center, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Dzib, Sergio A. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Torres, Rosa M. [Centro Universitario de Tonalá, Universidad de Guadalajara, Avenida Nuevo Perifrico No. 555, Ejido San José, Tatepozco, C.P. 48525, Tonalá, Jalisco, México (Mexico); Galli, Phillip A. B. [Université Grenoble Alpes, IPAG, F-38000, Grenoble (France); Boden, Andrew F. [Division of Physics, Math and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Evans II, Neal J. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Briceño, Cesar [Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Tobin, John J., E-mail: mkounkel@umich.edu [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 West Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    We present the results of the Gould’s Belt Distances Survey of young star-forming regions toward the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex. We detected 36 young stellar objects (YSOs) with the Very Large Baseline Array, 27 of which have been observed in at least three epochs over the course of two years. At least half of these YSOs belong to multiple systems. We obtained parallax and proper motions toward these stars to study the structure and kinematics of the Complex. We measured a distance of 388 ± 5 pc toward the Orion Nebula Cluster, 428 ± 10 pc toward the southern portion L1641, 388 ± 10 pc toward NGC 2068, and roughly ∼420 pc toward NGC 2024. Finally, we observed a strong degree of plasma radio scattering toward λ Ori.

  19. Job Satisfaction: A Critical, Understudied Facet of Workforce Development in Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Elizabeth; Castrucci, Brian C; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Sellers, Katie

    2015-01-01

    The field of public health faces multiple challenges in its efforts to recruit and retain a robust workforce. Public health departments offer salaries that are lower than the private sector, and government bureaucracy can be a deterrent for those seeking to make a difference. The objective of this research was to explore the relationship between general employee satisfaction and specific characteristics of the job and the health agency and to make recommendations regarding what health agencies can do to support recruitment and retention. This is a cross-sectional study using data collected from the 2014 Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS). A nationally representative sample was constructed from 5 geographic (paired adjacent HHS [US Department of Health and Human Services]) regions and stratified by population and state governance type. Descriptive and inferential statistics were analyzed using the balanced repeated replication method to account for the complex sampling design. A multivariate linear regression was used to examine job satisfaction and factors related to supervisory and organizational support adjusting for relevant covariates. PH WINS data were collected from state health agency central office employees using an online survey. Level of job satisfaction using the Job in General Scale (abridged). State health agency central office staff (n = 10,246) participated in the survey (response rate 46%). Characteristics related to supervisory and organizational support were highly associated with increased job satisfaction. Supervisory status, race, organization size, and agency tenure were also associated with job satisfaction. Public health leaders aiming to improve levels of job satisfaction should focus on workforce development and training efforts as well as adequate supervisory support, especially for new hires and nonsupervisors.

  20. Status of Educational Efforts in National Security Workforce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-03-31

    This report documents the status of educational efforts for the preparation of a national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project, being performed by the Arrowhead Center of New Mexico State University under a DOE/NNSA grant. The need to adequately train and educate a national security workforce is at a critical juncture. Even though there are an increasing number of college graduates in the appropriate fields, many of these graduates choose to work in the private sector because of more desirable salary and benefit packages. This report includes an assessment of the current educational situation for the national security workforce.

  1. The personnel economics approach to public workforce research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Michael

    2009-11-01

    This article argues that the relatively new field of personnel economics (PE) holds strong potential as a tool for studying public sector workforces. This subfield of labor economics is based on a strong foundation of microeconomics, which provides a robust theoretical foundation for studying workforce and organizational design issues. PE has evolved on this foundation to a strong practical emphasis, with theoretical insights designed for practical use and with strong focus on empirical research. The field is also characterized by creative data entrepreneurship. The types of datasets that personnel economists use are described. If similar datasets can be obtained for public sector workforces, PE should be a very useful approach for studying them.

  2. Supernova studies in the SDSS-II/SNe survey spectroscopy of the peculiar SN 2007qd, and photometric properties of Type-Ia supernovae as a function of the distance to the host galaxy /

    OpenAIRE

    Galbany i Gonzàlez, Lluís

    2012-01-01

    Descripció del recurs: el 01 setembre 2012 Aquesta tesi engloba el treball fet durant els ultims quatre anys com a estudiant de doctorat a l'Institut de Física d'Altes Energies (IFAE), emmarcat dins de la col·labaració Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova (SDSS-II/SNe) Survey. Al primer capítol (§1) s'introdueixen els principals conceptes del Model Estàndar de Cosmologia, presentant els seus orígens, les propietats dels seus continguts, i les mesures de distància i brillantor. També es re...

  3. Transcriptome-Wide Survey and Expression Profile Analysis of Putative Chrysanthemum HD-Zip I and II Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiping Song

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip transcription factor family is a key transcription factor family and unique to the plant kingdom. It consists of a homeodomain and a leucine zipper that serve in combination as a dimerization motif. The family can be classified into four subfamilies, and these subfamilies participate in the development of hormones and mediation of hormone action and are involved in plant responses to environmental conditions. However, limited information on this gene family is available for the important chrysanthemum ornamental species (Chrysanthemum morifolium. Here, we characterized 17 chrysanthemum HD-Zip genes based on transcriptome sequences. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that 17 CmHB genes were distributed in the HD-Zip subfamilies I and II and identified two pairs of putative orthologous proteins in Arabidopsis and chrysanthemum and four pairs of paralogous proteins in chrysanthemum. The software MEME was used to identify 7 putative motifs with E values less than 1e-3 in the chrysanthemum HD-Zip factors, and they can be clearly classified into two groups based on the composition of the motifs. A bioinformatics analysis predicted that 8 CmHB genes could be targeted by 10 miRNA families, and the expression of these 17 genes in response to phytohormone treatments and abiotic stresses was characterized. The results presented here will promote research on the various functions of the HD-Zip gene family members in plant hormones and stress responses.

  4. Health and Productivity of Sandia National Laboratories Workforce Follow-Up Study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Renee L. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Frey, Jodi [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This Executive Summary provides highlights from the company's full report quantifying the link between health conditions and their business outcomes based on 828 employee survey responses (8% of the workforce) to the HPQ-Select employee questionnaire. These highlights provide key findings on the magnitude of lost productivity, the prevalence of key chronic conditions, their treatment, key conditions driving lost productivity and the potential business impacts of improvements. Details on each of these dimensions can be found in the full report.

  5. Wind Energy Workforce: Who Are We Today and Where Do We Need to Go Tomorrow?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, Suzanne

    2017-06-01

    Suzanne Tegen's presentation at the 2017 WINDPOWER Conference & Exhibition provided a description of the wind energy workforce by industry and occupation, a discussion of the level of difficulty in finding qualified applicants (from an industry survey), and an overview of the level of education preferred by people hiring for the industry. The presentation also covers available training programs and ways that the Energy Department and its National Renewable Energy Laboratory are working to bridge the gap in the industry and facilitate more motivated, well-educated wind industry workers.

  6. Changes in public health workforce composition: proportion of part-time workforce and its correlates, 2008-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leider, Jonathon P; Shah, Gulzar H; Castrucci, Brian C; Leep, Carolyn J; Sellers, Katie; Sprague, James B

    2014-11-01

    State and local public health department infrastructure in the U.S. was impacted by the 2008 economic recession. The nature and impact of these staffing changes have not been well characterized, especially for the part-time public health workforce. To estimate the number of part-time workers in state and local health departments (LHDs) and examine the correlates of change in the part-time LHD workforce between 2008 and 2013. We used workforce data from the 2008 and 2013 National Association of County and City Health Officials (n=1,543) and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (n=24) profiles. We employed a Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the possible and plausible proportion of the workforce that was part-time, over various assumptions. Next, we employed a multinomial regression assessing correlates of the change in staffing composition among LHDs, including jurisdiction and organizational characteristics, as well measures of community involvement. Nationally representative estimates suggest that the local public health workforce decreased from 191,000 to 168,000 between 2008 and 2013. During that period, the part-time workforce decreased from 25% to 20% of those totals. At the state level, part-time workers accounted for less than 10% of the total workforce among responding states in 2013. Smaller and multi-county jurisdictions employed relatively more part-time workers. This is the first study to create national estimates regarding the size of the part-time public health workforce and estimate those changes over time. A relatively small proportion of the public health workforce is part-time and may be decreasing. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical survey of the patients with temporomandibular joint disorders, using Research Diagnostic Criteria (Axis II) for TMD: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Kyun; Kim, Su-Gwan; Im, Jae-Hyung; Yun, Pil-Young

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the nonspecific physical and psychological symptoms in patients who suffered from temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) using the Research Diagnosis Criteria (Axis II) for TMD diagnosis (RDC/TMD). A total of 317 patients were included (M: 75, F: 242). The signs and symptoms of physical, psychological and behavioral factors were evaluated using questionnaires in the RDC/TMD. The patients were examined through clinical and radiological method and diagnosed by the same investigator. Patients were divided into 3 different groups such as: the osteoarthritis group (group 1), the internal derangement (group 2) and the myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome group (MPDS, group 3). In the analysis of depression and vegetative symptoms, patients in the internal derangement group revealed a high ratio of 'normal'. In patients with MPDS, they appeared to suffer highly. According to nonspecific physical symptoms, there have been tendencies of a higher ratio of 'severe' patients with MPDS. In subjects aged 25 years or younger, the internal derangement group was the greatest, while the osteoarthritis group was the greatest for subjects over 40-years old. In the evaluation of depression and vegetative symptoms, the internal derangement group showed a relative normal value while the MPDS group showed a serious extent in comparison. According to the result of this study, MPDS group showed more severe depressive and nonspecific physical symptoms than internal derangement group. When making TMD diagnosis and treatment, it is thought to be important to analyze psychometric properties and nonspecific physical symptoms. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Survey of eight dimensions quality of life for patients with diabetes type II, referred to Sanandaj diabetes center in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnaz Khaledi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Diabetes is a chronic disease; the patients suffer from diabetes needs a special care. One of the programs to help these kinds of patients is to analyze their quality of life, which was carried out through a nursing disciplinary program by a cross sectional study during 2009. Materials & Methods: 198 type II diabetic patients who were referred to diabetic center of an educational hospital, affiliated to Sanandaj medical university were selected randomly, they were interviewed and obtained a written permission to join this study, then asked to fill up SF-36 questionnaires, and finally, the data from the questionnaires were analyzed by the SPSS software program. Results: The results showed the quality of life of diabetes patients (55.6% with respect to their physical fitness were acceptable. Whereas, in case of play in the physical role 67.7% were not acceptable but in case of the physical pain 45.3% had physical pain and effects on public health 45.6% were moderately effected, in case of energy and vitality 35.4% were not acceptable, in case of social functioning 38.5% were favorable, in case of emotional role 75.8% were undesirable and finally considering psycho mental health 49.5% were in the desirable limit. Statistical analysis for evaluation of relationship between quality of life and demographic data, were carried out by using "ANOVA” test. Conclusion: This study showed that the quality of life in all the group of study were at moderate level. In order to improve the quality of life in diabetes patients it is suggested that planners and managers should pay enough attention to support the physical, mental and social well being of the diabetes patients.

  9. NuSTAR Hard X-Ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region. II. X-Ray Point Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, JaeSub; Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first survey results of hard X-ray point sources in the Galactic Center (GC) region by NuSTAR. We have discovered 70 hard (3-79 keV) X-ray point sources in a 0.6 deg2 region around Sgr A* with a total exposure of 1.7 Ms, and 7 sources in the Sgr B2 field with 300 ks. We identify...... persistent luminous X-ray binaries (XBs) and the likely run-away pulsar called the Cannonball. New source-detection significance maps reveal a cluster of hard (>10 keV) X-ray sources near the Sgr. A diffuse complex with no clear soft X-ray counterparts. The severe extinction observed in the Chandra spectra...... indicate that the X-ray spectra of the NuSTAR sources should have kT > 20 keV on average for a single temperature thermal plasma model or an average photon index of Gamma = 1.5-2 for a power-law model. These findings suggest that the GC X-ray source population may contain a larger fraction of XBs with high...

  10. A Deep Proper Motion Catalog Within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Footprint. II. The White Dwarf Luminosity Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Jeffrey A.; Harris, Hugh C.; von Hippel, Ted; Kilic, Mukremin; Liebert, James W.; Williams, Kurtis A.; DeGennaro, Steven; Jeffery, Elizabeth; Dame, Kyra; Gianninas, A.; Brown, Warren R.

    2017-01-01

    A catalog of 8472 white dwarf (WD) candidates is presented, selected using reduced proper motions from the deep proper motion catalog of Munn et al. Candidates are selected in the magnitude range 16Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging footprint. Distances, bolometric luminosities, and atmospheric compositions are derived by fitting SDSS ugriz photometry to pure hydrogen and helium model atmospheres (assuming surface gravities {log} {\\text{}}g=8). The disk white dwarf luminosity function (WDLF) is constructed using a sample of 2839 stars with 5.5< {M}{bol}< 17, with statistically significant numbers of stars cooler than the turnover in the luminosity function. The WDLF for the halo is also constructed, using a sample of 135 halo WDs with 5< {M}{bol}< 16. We find space densities of disk and halo WDs in the solar neighborhood of 5.5+/- 0.1× {10}-3 {{pc}}-3 and 3.5+/- 0.7× {10}-5 {{pc}}-3, respectively. We resolve the bump in the disk WDLF due to the onset of fully convective envelopes in WDs, and see indications of it in the halo WDLF as well.

  11. An evaluation of New Zealand's iterative Workforce Service Reviews: a new way of thinking about health workforce planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarella, Lucio; Greenstock, Louise; Wraight, Brenda

    2013-05-01

    To ensure New Zealand's health workforce was fit for purpose, Health Workforce New Zealand (HWNZ) funded Workforce Service Reviews (WSRs) to develop visions for service reconfiguration and workforce for 2020. This paper describes what makes the WSR processes work, for whom, and in what circumstances. Semi-structured interviews informed by a realist evaluation approach were conducted to obtain perceptions and experiences of WSR participants from four WSRs: eye health, palliative care, anaesthesia and aged care. The WSR process was a successful means of bringing together professionals from across the health disciplines and building sector capacity to develop new ways of thinking about service and workforce planning. WSRs were constrained by: mixed signals about process and outcomes; being challenged not milestone focussed; lacking clarity about ownership of visions; and variable clarity about next steps. WSRs were optimised by having: a lead clinician with policy know-how, ability to inspire, bring people together, distil ideas into coherent frameworks; and a project manager with project enablement skill sets and expertise in complex systems, implementation, change management. Evidence now exists at a point in time about what makes the WSR processes work. Implications for HWNZ are presented using a capacity-building framework to inform future decision making regarding WSRs. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC? More appropriate workforce planning is required to meet the challenges facing the health workforce, from both the demand and the workforce side. To ensure New Zealand's healthcare workforce was fit for purpose, HWNZ initiated an iterative WSR process in topic specific areas. The WSRs process was designed to develop a vision of the relevant health service and workforce for 2020, and models of care that were patient-centred and team-based. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD? The paper provides evidence that the WSR process was a successful means for bringing together

  12. The global health workforce shortage: role of surgeons and other providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, George F; Ricketts, Thomas C; Charles, Anthony; King, Jennifer; Fraher, Erin P; Meyer, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    The debate over the status of the physician workforce seems to be concluded. It now is clear that a shortage of physicians exists and is likely to worsen. In retrospect it seems obvious that a static annual production of physicians, coupled with a population growth of 25 million persons each decade, would result in a progressively lower physician to population ratio. Moreover, Cooper has demonstrated convincingly that the robust economy of the past 50 years correlates with demand for physician services. The aging physician workforce is an additional problem: one third of physicians are over 55 years of age, and the population over the age of 65 years is expected to double by 2030. Signs of a physician and surgeon shortage are becoming apparent. The largest organization of physicians in the world (119,000 members), the American College of Physicians, published a white paper in 2006 titled, "The Impending Collapse of Primary Care Medicine and Its Implications for the State of the Nation's Health Care" [37]. The American College of Surgeons, the largest organization of surgeons, has published an article on access to emergency surgery [38], and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science has published a book on the future of emergency care (Fig. 10). The reports document diminished involvement and availability of emergency care by general surgeons, neurologic surgeons, orthopedists, hand surgeons, plastic surgeons, and others. The emergency room has become the primary care physician after 5 PM for much of the population. A survey done by the Commonwealth Fund revealed that less than half of primary care practices have an on-call arrangement for after-hours care. Other evidence of evolving shortage are reports of long wait times for appointments, the hospitalist movement, and others. The policies for the future should move beyond dispute over whether or not a shortage exists. The immediate need is for the United States, as a society, to commit to

  13. Consensus on the competencies required for public health nutrition workforce development in Europe - the JobNut project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, Svandis; Hughes, Roger; Thorsdottir, Inga; Yngve, Agneta

    2011-08-01

    To assess and develop consensus among a European panel of public health nutrition stakeholders regarding the competencies required for effective public health nutrition practice and the level of proficiency required in different practice contexts. A modified Delphi study involving three rounds of questionnaires. European Union. Public health nutrition workforce development stakeholders, including academics, practitioners and employers, from twenty European countries. A total of fifty-two expert panellists (84 % of an initial panel of sixty-two Delphi participants) completed all three rounds of the Delphi study. The panellists rated the importance of fifty-seven competency units possibly required of a public health nutritionist to effectively practice (Essential competencies). Twenty-nine of the fifty-seven competency units (51 %) met the consensus criteria (≥66·7 % agreement) at the second round of the Delphi survey, with the highest agreement for competencies clustered within the Nutrition science, Professional, Analytical and Public health services competency domains. Ratings of the level of competencies required for different levels in the workforce indicated that for a public health nutrition specialist, advanced-level competency was required across almost all the twenty-nine competencies rated as essential. There were limited differences in rating responses between academics and employer panellists throughout the Delphi study. Competencies identified as essential can be used to review current public health nutrition practices and provide the basis for curriculum design and re-development, continuing education and workforce quality assurance systems in Europe. These are all important tools for systematic and strategic workforce development.

  14. The Workforce for the 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry O'Lawrence

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: In today’s changing economy, economic growth depends on career and technical programs for skill training. Background: This study discusses the key area in promoting individual learning and skill training and discusses the importance of career education and training as a way of promoting economic growth. Methodology\t: This study uses a qualitative study approach to investigate and report on the status and influence of Workforce Education and Development and its economic importance. Contribution: This report contributes to the knowledge base common to all work settings that can solve many human performance problems in the workplace. Findings: This study also justifies and validates the ideas on the importance of workforce education and development in the 21st century as a way of developing economic growth and providing learning to make individuals competitive in the global economy. Recommendations for Practitioners\t: For practitioners, this study suggests that we must always have discussions of what leads to career success and understanding that there is not enough high-skill/high-wage employment to go around. Therefore, developing these skills requires a decision about a career or related group of jobs to prepare to compete for them; we have to provide training needed in order to be competitive in global economy. Recommendation for Researchers: Researchers have to develop strategies to promote career direction with willingness to evaluate the level of academic interest, level of career focus and readiness for life away from home (attitudes, skills and knowledge of self. Impact on Society: Institutions must regularly evaluate curriculum to reflect the rapid technological changes and the globalization of world markets that reflect their mission and develop students’ mindset to always think big and think outside the box in order to be competitive in the global market. Change is external, transition is internal. It is important

  15. DOE Advanced Scientific Advisory Committee (ASCAC): Workforce Subcommittee Letter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Barbara [University of Houston; Calandra, Henri [Total SA; Crivelli, Silvia [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Davis; Dongarra, Jack [University of Tennessee; Hittinger, Jeffrey [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Lathrop, Scott A. [NCSA, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign; Sarkar, Vivek [Rice University; Stahlberg, Eric [Advanced Biomedical Computing Center; Vetter, Jeffrey S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Williams, Dean [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2014-07-23

    Simulation and computing are essential to much of the research conducted at the DOE national laboratories. Experts in the ASCR ¬relevant Computing Sciences, which encompass a range of disciplines including Computer Science, Applied Mathematics, Statistics and domain Computational Sciences, are an essential element of the workforce in nearly all of the DOE national laboratories. This report seeks to identify the gaps and challenges facing DOE with respect to this workforce. This letter is ASCAC’s response to the charge of February 19, 2014 to identify disciplines in which significantly greater emphasis in workforce training at the graduate or postdoctoral levels is necessary to address workforce gaps in current and future Office of Science mission needs.

  16. Dynamic simulation for effective workforce management in new product development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. Mutingi

    2012-01-01

    Effective planning and management of workforce for new product development (NPD) projects is a great challenge to many organisations, especially in the presence of engineering changes during the product development process...

  17. Future U.S. workforce for Geospatial Intelligence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Board on Earth Sciences and Resources; Division on Earth and Life Studies; Board on Higher Education and Workforce; Policy and Global Affairs; National Research Council

    .... The challenge for NGA is to maintain a workforce that can deal with evolving threats to national security, ongoing scientific and technological advances, and changing skills and expectations of workers. Future U.S...

  18. Culture change, leadership and the grass-roots workforce

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edwards, Mark; Penlington, Clare; Kalidasan, Varadarajan; Kelly, Tony

    2014-01-01

    .... The complexity of modern healthcare requires that we evolve our approach to the workforce and enhance our understanding of the styles of leadership that are required in order to bring about this cultural change...

  19. Networking and Information Technology Workforce Study: Final Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — This report presents the results of a study of the global Networking and Information Technology NIT workforce undertaken for the Networking and Information...

  20. Who is the nutrition workforce in the Western Cape?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-12-21

    Dec 21, 2010 ... Steyn NP, Chief Research Specialist, Centre for the Study of the Social and Environmental Determinants of Nutrition. Human ... the workforce is central to advancing health”.1 In the context of the. Millennium .... and dental.

  1. Survey results of corroding problems at biological treatment plants, Stage II Protection of concrete - State of the Art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Ylva (CBI, Boraas (Sweden)); Henriksson, Gunilla (SP, Boraas (Sweden))

    2011-07-01

    A pilot study on the degradation and corrosion of concrete in biological treatment plants was conducted in 2009/2010 in a Waste Refinery Project WR-27 'Survey results of corroding problems at biological treatment plants'. The results showed that the concrete does not have sufficient resistance in the current aggressive plant environment. Furthermore, it is stated that some form of surface protection system is needed to ensure the good performance of concrete constructions, and that the system must withstand the aggressive environment and the traffic that occurs on site. Consequently, a new study was proposed in order to develop specifications for surface protection of concrete in aggressive food waste environments. Results from that study are presented in this report. The report includes various types of waterproofing/protection coating for concrete in biological treatment plants. A number of proposals from the industry are presented in the light of results from project WR-27, i.e., the materials must, among other things, withstand the aggressive leachate from waste food at temperatures up to 70 deg C, and some degree of wear. Some systems are compared in terms of technical material properties as reported by the manufacturer. It turns out that different testing methods were used, and the test results are thus generally not directly comparable. A proposal for a test program has been developed, focusing on chemical resistance and wear resistance. A test solution corresponding to leachate is specified. Laboratory tests for verification of the proposed methodology and future requirements are proposed, as well as test sites and follow-up in the field

  2. The Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey. II. The Type Ia Supernova Rate in High-redshift Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbary, K.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Brodwin, M.; Connolly, N.; Dawson, K. S.; Doi, M.; Eisenhardt, P.; Faccioli, L.; Fadeyev, V.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Gilbank, D. G.; Gladders, M. D.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Hattori, T.; Hsiao, E.; Huang, X.; Ihara, Y.; Kashikawa, N.; Koester, B.; Konishi, K.; Kowalski, M.; Lidman, C.; Lubin, L.; Meyers, J.; Morokuma, T.; Oda, T.; Panagia, N.; Perlmutter, S.; Postman, M.; Ripoche, P.; Rosati, P.; Rubin, D.; Schlegel, D. J.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stanford, S. A.; Strovink, M.; Suzuki, N.; Takanashi, N.; Tokita, K.; Yasuda, N.; Supernova Cosmology Project

    2012-01-01

    We report a measurement of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate in galaxy clusters at 0.9 z z > 0.9 SNe. Finding 8 ± 1 cluster SNe Ia, we determine an SN Ia rate of 0.50+0.23 -0.19 (stat) +0.10 -0.09 (sys) h 2 70 SNuB (SNuB ≡ 10-12 SNe L -1 ⊙, B yr-1). In units of stellar mass, this translates to 0.36+0.16 -0.13 (stat) +0.07 -0.06 (sys) h 2 70 SNuM (SNuM ≡ 10-12 SNe M -1 ⊙ yr-1). This represents a factor of ≈5 ± 2 increase over measurements of the cluster rate at z influence of younger stellar populations by calculating the rate specifically in cluster red-sequence galaxies and in morphologically early-type galaxies, finding results similar to the full cluster rate. Finally, the upper limit of one hostless cluster SN Ia detected in the survey implies that the fraction of stars in the intra-cluster medium is less than 0.47 (95% confidence), consistent with measurements at lower redshifts. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Institute. STScI is operated by the association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under the NASA contract NAS 5-26555. The observations are associated with program GO-10496.

  3. Research on Building Education & Workforce Capacity in Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    engineered a hybrid vehicle (mail truck) with an electric motor capable of regenerative braking . At other institutions, student teams worked...Research on Building Education & Workforce Capacity in Systems Engineering Final Technical Report SERC-2011-TR-008-3 October 31, 2011...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Research on Building Education & Workforce Capacity in Systems Engineering 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  4. Leveraging multi-generational workforce values in interactive information societies

    OpenAIRE

    Sophie van der Walt; Tanya du Plessis

    2010-01-01

    Background: The success of organisations relies on various factors including the ability of its multi-generational workforce to collaborate within the interactive information society. By developing an awareness of the different values of a diverse workforce, organisations may benefit from diversity. Various diversity factors, such as ethnicity, age and gender, impact on the way people interact, especially in the interactive information society.Objectives: This article advocates the need for g...

  5. Policies to sustain the nursing workforce: an international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, J; Twigg, D; Dussault, G; Duffield, C; Stone, P W

    2015-06-01

    Examine metrics and policies regarding nurse workforce across four countries. International comparisons inform health policy makers. Data from the OECD were used to compare expenditure, workforce and health in: Australia, Portugal, the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States (US). Workforce policy context was explored. Public spending varied from less than 50% of gross domestic product in the US to over 80% in the UK. Australia had the highest life expectancy. Portugal has fewer nurses and more physicians. The Australian national health workforce planning agency has increased the scope for co-ordinated policy intervention. Portugal risks losing nurses through migration. In the UK, the economic crisis resulted in frozen pay, reduced employment, and reduced student nurses. In the US, there has been limited scope to develop a significant national nursing workforce policy approach, with a continuation of State based regulation adding to the complexity of the policy landscape. The US is the most developed in the use of nurses in advanced practice roles. Ageing of the workforce is likely to drive projected shortages in all countries. There are differences as well as variation in the overall impact of the global financial crisis in these countries. Future supply of nurses in all four countries is vulnerable. Work force planning is absent or restricted in three of the countries. Scope for improved productivity through use of advanced nurse roles exists in all countries. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  6. Using competences and competence tools in workforce development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Tess; Dickerson, Claire; Blass, Eddie

    The NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework (KSF) has been a driving force in the move to competence-based workforce development in the NHS. Skills for Health has developed national workforce competences that aim to improve behavioural performance, and in turn increase productivity. This article describes five projects established to test Skills for Health national workforce competences, electronic tools and products in different settings in the NHS. Competences and competence tools were used to redesign services, develop job roles, identify skills gaps and develop learning programmes. Reported benefits of the projects included increased clarity and a structured, consistent and standardized approach to workforce development. Findings from the evaluation of the tools were positive in terms of their overall usefulness and provision of related training/support. Reported constraints of using the competences and tools included issues relating to their availability, content and organization. It is recognized that a highly skilled and flexible workforce is important to the delivery of high-quality health care. These projects suggest that Skills for Health competences can be used as a 'common currency' in workforce development in the UK health sector. This would support the need to adapt rapidly to changing service needs.

  7. Apical Periodontitis and Endodontic Treatment in Patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus: Comparative Cross-sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadi, Leena

    2017-05-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of apical periodontitis (AP) in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients compared with nondiabetic patients and to examine the effect of glycemic control on the prevalence of AP. Radiographs of a group of DM patients were compared with those of a matched nondiabetic group to identify AP. The diabetic group was subdivided according to the level of glycemic control into two subgroups: A well-controlled DM and a poorly controlled DM. The periapical index score was used to assess the periapical status. All groups were compared in regard to the presence of AP lesions, the number of end-odontically treated teeth (ET), and the percentage of failure of endodontically treated teeth (AP/ET ratio). Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 20.0, Chicago, Illinois, USA) was used for all the analyses; p ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The prevalence of AP was higher in diabetic group than in the nondiabetic group (13.5 vs 11.9% respectively). Diabetic group had more teeth with endodontic treatment ET compared with nondiabetic group (4.18 vs 1.82% respectively); this difference was statistically significant (p = 0.001) along with higher AP/ET ratio (27.7 vs 19.3 respectively). The poorly controlled DM group had a higher prevalence of AP lesions compared with the well-controlled DM group (18.29 vs 9.21 respectively). This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.001); they also had a higher percentage of ET (5.55 vs 3.13% respectively) and AP/ ET ratio (32.0 vs 21.8% respectively). This survey demonstrates a higher prevalence of AP in DM patients compared with nondiabetic group, with an increased prevalence of persistent chronic AP. Compared with a well-controlled diabetic group, a poor glycemic control may be associated with a higher prevalence of AP and increased rate of endodontic failures. Counseling diabetic patients, particularly those with poor glycemic control, about the risk of

  8. EPA, the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability in Atlanta, Atlanta Workforce Development Agency and Local Partners Announce the Proctor Creek Trash Free Waters Community Workforce Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA News Release: EPA, the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability in Atlanta, Atlanta Workforce Development Agency and Local Partners Announce the Proctor Creek Trash Free Waters Community Workforce Program

  9. Organizational Change Around an Older Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Phyllis; Kojola, Erik; Schaefers, Kate

    2017-10-01

    Demographic, economic, political, and technological transformations-including an unprecedented older workforce-are challenging outdated human resource logics and practices. Rising numbers of retirement-eligible Boomers portend a loss of talent, skills, and local knowledge. We investigate organizational responses to this challenge-institutional work disrupting age-graded mindsets and policies. We focus on innovative U.S. organizations in the Minneapolis-St. Paul region in the state of Minnesota, a hub for businesses and nonprofits, conducting in-depth interviews with informants from a purposive sample of 23 for-profit, nonprofit, and government organizations. Drawing on an organizational change theoretical approach, we find organizations are leading change by developing universal policies and practices, not ones intentionally geared to older workers. Both their narratives and strategies-opportunities for greater employee flexibility, training, and scaling back time commitments-suggest deliberate disrupting of established age-graded logics, replacing them with new logics valuing older workers and age-neutral approaches. Organizations in the different sectors studied are fashioning uniform policies regardless of age, exhibiting a parallel reluctance to delineate special policies for older workers. Developing new organizational logics and practices valuing, investing in, and retaining older workers is key 21st century business challenges. The flexibility, training, and alternative pathways offered by the innovative organizations we studied point to fruitful possibilities for large-scale replacement of outdated age-biased templates of work, careers, and retirement.

  10. Wind Energy Workforce Development: Engineering, Science, & Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesieutre, George A.; Stewart, Susan W.; Bridgen, Marc

    2013-03-29

    Broadly, this project involved the development and delivery of a new curriculum in wind energy engineering at the Pennsylvania State University; this includes enhancement of the Renewable Energy program at the Pennsylvania College of Technology. The new curricula at Penn State includes addition of wind energy-focused material in more than five existing courses in aerospace engineering, mechanical engineering, engineering science and mechanics and energy engineering, as well as three new online graduate courses. The online graduate courses represent a stand-alone Graduate Certificate in Wind Energy, and provide the core of a Wind Energy Option in an online intercollege professional Masters degree in Renewable Energy and Sustainability Systems. The Pennsylvania College of Technology erected a 10 kilowatt Xzeres wind turbine that is dedicated to educating the renewable energy workforce. The entire construction process was incorporated into the Renewable Energy A.A.S. degree program, the Building Science and Sustainable Design B.S. program, and other construction-related coursework throughout the School of Construction and Design Technologies. Follow-on outcomes include additional non-credit opportunities as well as secondary school career readiness events, community outreach activities, and public awareness postings.

  11. Developing Physician Migration Estimates for Workforce Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, George M; Fraher, Erin P

    2017-02-01

    To understand factors affecting specialty heterogeneity in physician migration. Physicians in the 2009 American Medical Association Masterfile data were matched to those in the 2013 file. Office locations were geocoded in both years to one of 293 areas of the country. Estimated utilization, calculated for each specialty, was used as the primary predictor of migration. Physician characteristics (e.g., specialty, age, sex) were obtained from the 2009 file. Area characteristics and other factors influencing physician migration (e.g., rurality, presence of teaching hospital) were obtained from various sources. We modeled physician location decisions as a two-part process: First, the physician decides whether to move. Second, conditional on moving, a conditional logit model estimates the probability a physician moved to a particular area. Separate models were estimated by specialty and whether the physician was a resident. Results differed between specialties and according to whether the physician was a resident in 2009, indicating heterogeneity in responsiveness to policies. Physician migration was higher between geographically proximate states with higher utilization for that specialty. Models can be used to estimate specialty-specific migration patterns for more accurate workforce modeling, including simulations to model the effect of policy changes. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  12. Assessing the Education and Training Needs of Nebraska's Public Health Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Brandon L; Johansson, Patrik; Nayar, Preethy; Apenteng, Bettye A; Opoku, Samuel; Nguyen, Anh

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, the Great Plains Public Health Training Center (Grant #UB6HP22821) conducted an online survey of state and local health departments and the American Indian (tribal clinics, tribal health departments, and urban Indian clinic) public health workforce across three professional levels. The objectives of the needs assessment were to determine the competency levels of the state's public health workforce, assess gaps in public health competencies, identify public health training interests, needs, and preferences, and to determine the barriers and motivators to participate in public health training. The assessment was developed using the Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public Health Practice, Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals survey (1). The final assessment was created and piloted by numerous individuals representing practice and academia. Respondents identified cultural competency and communication skills as the two most important public health competency domains. Although the public health professionals perceived that they were least proficient in the area of policy development and program planning, participants identified the greatest needs for training in financial planning and management skills and analytical/assessment skills. In general, respondents preferred instructor-led interactive training sessions offered as onsite multi-day workshops or computer-based courses. Respondents identified obesity, health disparities, physical activity, chronic diseases, and diabetes as the top five public health topical areas. These priorities align with State and National public health plans. The findings of the needs assessment were used to tailor educational opportunities to build the capacity of Nebraska's public health system. Additionally, the results were used to develop workforce development plans for numerous local health departments throughout Nebraska.

  13. Establishing physician to patient ratios and predicting workforce needs for Canadian pediatric hematology-oncology programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halton, Jacqueline M; Hand, Jack; Byron, Patricia; Strother, Douglas; Blanchette, Victor

    2013-04-01

    A Human Resources (HR) Committee of C17, the national network of Canadian academic pediatric hematology/oncology programs, obtained comprehensive data enabling analysis and planning for the physician workforce. This study establishes physician to patient ratios and predicts workforce needs for Canadian pediatric hematology/oncology programs. Over a 10-year period, six surveys were sent to the 17 pediatric tertiary care centers treating children with cancer and blood disorders. Data were obtained on physician demographics, full time equivalent (FTE) positions, and time spent in clinical, research, education, and administrative activities. Survey results were debated at the C17 national meetings to obtain consensus on workload ratios. Since 1999, the pediatric hematologist/oncologist workforce has increased from 71 FTE (43 oncology, 20 hematology, 8 BMT) to 109.5 FTE positions (69.7 oncology, 29.4 hematology, and 10.4 BMT). The median age of pediatric hematologists/oncologists increased from 46 years to 52 years and the male to female ratio changed from 1.8:1 to 0.9:1. The 2011 job profile showed the median time spent on activities was 60% clinical, 15% education, 15% research, and 10% administration. After assessing workload, models of care, and optimal physician FTE per program, the C17 HR Committee recommended a ratio of one oncologist per 15 newly diagnosed patients with malignancy and a ratio of one BMT physician per 15 transplants. For every 2.5 oncologists, a 1.0 hematologist is the minimum required. Physician staffing ratios for pediatric hematology/oncology programs have been established and should be adopted across Canadian academic institutions as a standard. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Assessing the Education and Training Needs of Nebraska's Public Health Workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L Grimm

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionIn 2012, the Great Plains Public Health Training Center (Grant #UB6HP22821 conducted an online survey of state and local health departments and the American Indian (tribal clinics, tribal health departments and urban Indian clinic public health workforce across three professional levels. The objectives of the needs assessment were to, determine the competency levels of the state’s public health workforce, assess gaps in public health competencies, identify public health training interests, needs and preferences and, determine the barriers and motivators to participating in public health training.MethodsThe assessment was developed using the Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public Health Practice, Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals survey (Council of Linkages, 2010. The final assessment was created and piloted by numerous individuals representing practice and academia. ResultsRespondents identified cultural competency and communication skills as the two most important public health competency domains. Although the public health professionals perceived that they were least proficient in the area of policy development and program planning, participants identified the greatest needs for training in financial planning & management skills and analytical/assessment skills. In general, respondents preferred instructor-led interactive training sessions offered as onsite multi-day workshops or computer-based courses. Respondents identified obesity, health disparities, physical activity, chronic diseases and diabetes as the top five public health topical areas. ConclusionThese priorities align with State and National public health plans. The findings of the needs assessment were used to tailor educational opportunities to build the capacity of Nebraska’s public health system. Additionally, the results were used to develop workforce development plans for numerous local health departments throughout Nebraska.

  15. The Bayer Facts of Science Education XVI: US STEM Workforce Shortage— Myth or Reality? Fortune 1000 Talent Recruiters on the Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer Corporation

    2014-10-01

    A major debate is currently underway in the USA about whether there is, in fact, a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce shortage in the country or not. This is the subject of the Bayer Facts of Science Education XVI: US STEM Workforce Shortage—Myth or Reality? Fortune 1000 Talent Recruiters on the Debate. An ongoing public opinion research project commissioned by Bayer Corporation, the Bayer Facts surveys examine US STEM education, diversity and workforce issues. The 16th in the series, the newest survey asks talent recruiters at some of the country's largest employers—those included in the Fortune 1000—to weigh in on current and future demand for new hires with 2- and 4-year STEM degrees. As professionals responsible for scouting, recruiting and hiring talent at Fortune 1000 companies, both STEM and non-STEM alike, these individuals are on the frontlines, tasked with assessing and filling their companies' workforce needs. The survey asks the recruiters whether new hires with 2- and 4-year STEM degrees are as, more or less in demand than their peers without STEM degrees? Are more new STEM jobs being created at their companies than non-STEM jobs? Can they find adequate numbers of qualified candidates in a timely manner and how fierce is the competition for STEM degree holders? To answer these and other questions, the survey polled 150 talent recruiters at Fortune 1000 companies, both STEM and non-STEM alike. The survey also asks the recruiters about diversion in STEM, workforce diversity in the pipeline, the role of community colleges in developing the STEM pipeline and the desired skills and competencies of new hires.

  16. Undergraduate Neuroscience Majors: A Missed Opportunity for Psychiatry Workforce Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Matthew N; Krystal, John H

    2017-04-01

    This study sought to determine whether and to what extent medical students with an undergraduate college major in neuroscience, relative to other college majors, pursue psychiatry relative to other brain-based specialties (neurology and neurosurgery) and internal medicine. The authors analyzed data from AAMC matriculation and graduation surveys for all students who graduated from US medical schools in 2013 and 2014 (n = 29,714). Students who majored in neuroscience, psychology, and biology were compared to all other students in terms of their specialty choice at both time points. For each major, the authors determined rates of specialty choice of psychiatry, neurology, neurosurgery, and, for comparison, internal medicine. This study employed Chi-square statistic to compare odds of various specialty choices among different majors. Among medical students with an undergraduate neuroscience major (3.5% of all medical students), only 2.3% preferred psychiatry at matriculation, compared to 21.5% who chose neurology, 13.1% neurosurgery, and 11% internal medicine. By graduation, psychiatry specialty choice increased to 5.1% among neuroscience majors while choice of neurology and neurosurgery declined. Psychology majors (OR = 3.16, 95% CI 2.60-4.47) but not neuroscience majors (OR 1.28, 0.92-1.77) were more likely than their peers to choose psychiatry. Psychiatry struggles to attract neuroscience majors to the specialty. This missed opportunity is an obstacle to developing the neuroscience literacy of the workforce and jeopardizes the neuroscientific future of our field. Several potential strategies to address the recruitment challenges exist.

  17. The child neurology clinical workforce in 2015: Report of the AAP/CNS Joint Taskforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter B; Bale, James F; Mintz, Mark; Joshi, Sucheta M; Gilbert, Donald L; Radabaugh, Carrie; Ruch-Ross, Holly

    2016-09-27

    More than a decade has passed since the last major workforce survey of child neurologists in the United States; thus, a reassessment of the child neurology workforce is needed, along with an inaugural assessment of a new related field, neurodevelopmental disabilities. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the Child Neurology Society conducted an electronic survey in 2015 of child neurologists and neurodevelopmental disabilities specialists. The majority of respondents participate in maintenance of certification, practice in academic medical centers, and offer subspecialty care. EEG reading and epilepsy care are common subspecialty practice areas, although many child neurologists have not had formal training in this field. In keeping with broader trends, medical school debts are substantially higher than in the past and will often take many years to pay off. Although a broad majority would choose these fields again, there are widespread dissatisfactions with compensation and benefits given the length of training and the complexity of care provided, and frustrations with mounting regulatory and administrative stresses that interfere with clinical practice. Although not unique to child neurology and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such issues may present barriers for the recruitment of trainees into these fields. Creative approaches to enhance the recruitment of the next generation of child neurologists and neurodevelopmental disabilities specialists will benefit society, especially in light of all the exciting new treatments under development for an array of chronic childhood neurologic disorders. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. The U.S. Pediatric Dermatology Workforce: An Assessment of Productivity and Practice Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Alexander L; Teng, Joyce M C

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric dermatology has always played an important role in children's healthcare, but there has been a shortage of pediatric dermatologists nationwide for more than a decade, and few metrics of productivity and practice patterns exist. This study sought to provide insight into these and other factors of the pediatric dermatology workforce. Electronic surveys were distributed to all 226 U.S. board-certified pediatric dermatologists. A total of 108/226 (48%) of the electronic surveys were returned. Sixty percent of respondents were employed full- or part-time in academic environments and 81% were salaried. Respondents reported that children constituted 79.5% of their practice, and the average respondent spent 3.8 days/week treating 92.6 patients, considerably lower than the 136.3 patients/week that the average general dermatologist sees. The academic practice environment was associated with children constituting a larger proportion of the practice (p dermatology practice environments and between pediatric and general dermatology. This study provides important information for workforce planning and care availability assessments and baseline information for future studies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Hawai'i physician workforce assessment 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withy, Kelley; Dall, Tim; Sakamoto, David

    2012-04-01

    National policy experts have estimated that the United States will be 15-20% short of physicians by the year 2020. In 2008, the Big Island of Hawai'i was found to be 15% short of physicians. The current article describes research to determine the physician supply and demand across the State of Hawai'i. The researchers utilized licensure lists, all available sources of physician practice location information, and contacted provider offices to develop a database of practicing physicians in Hawai'i. A statistical model based on national utilization of physician services by age, ethnicity, gender, insurance, and obesity rates was used to estimate demand for services. Using number of new state licenses per year, the researchers estimated the number of physicians who enter the Hawai'i workforce annually. Physician age data were used to estimate retirements. Researchers found 2,860 full time equivalents of practicing, non-military, patient-care physicians in Hawai'i (excluding those still in residency or fellowship programs). The calculated demand for physician services by specialty indicates a current shortage of physicians of over 600. This shortage may grow by 50 to 100 physicians per year if steps are not taken to reverse this trend. Physician retirement is the single largest element in the loss of physicians, with population growth and aging playing a significant role in increasing demand. Study findings indicate that Hawai'i is 20% short of physicians and the situation is likely to worsen if mitigating steps are not taken immediately.

  20. A strategic approach to workforce development for local public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Beverley; Ward, Megan

    2017-11-09

    In 2009, Peel Public Health set a vision to transform the work of public health from efficient delivery of public health services as defined by provincial mandate to the robust analysis of the health status of the local population and selection and implementation of programming to achieve best health outcomes. A strategic approach to the workforce was a key enabler. PPH is a public health unit in Ontario that serves 1.4 million people. An organization-wide strategic workforce development program was instituted. It is theory-based, evidence-informed and data-driven. A first step was a conceptual framework, followed by interventions in workforce planning, human resources management, and capacity development. The program was built on evidence reviews, theory, and public health core competencies. Interventions spread across the employee work-life span. Capacity development based on the public health core competencies is a main focus, particularly analytical capacity to support decision-making. Employees gain skill and knowledge in comprehensive population health. Leadership evolves as work shifts to the analysis of health status and development of interventions. Effective human resource processes ensure appropriate job design, recruitment and orientation. Analysis of the workforce leads to vigorous employee development to ensure a strong pool of potential leadership successors. Theory, research evidence, and data provide a robust foundation for workforce development. Competencies are important inputs to job descriptions, recruitment, training, and human resource processes. A comprehensive workforce development strategy enables the development of a skilled workforce capable of responding to the needs of the population it serves.

  1. Women in medical physics: a preliminary analysis of workforce and research participation in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, S B; Kairn, T

    2016-06-01

    invited or keynote speakers (28 % and 13 % from female authors) and the gender balance of certified and chief physicists (28 % and 21 % female). The representation of women in the ACPSEM journal does not differ substantially between authorship of proffered versus invited work (22 % and 19 % from female authors). While this work was limited to evaluating the membership, annual conference and official journal of the ACPSEM (rather than evaluating the entire medical physics workforce and the contributions of male and female physicists to international conferences and publications), this study nonetheless led to the following recommendations: that a longitudinal study analysing correlations between age, period of service, seniority and gender should be undertaken and that future ACPSEM workforce surveys should include analyses of gender representation.

  2. Health workforce development planning in the Sultanate of Oman: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Basu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Oman's recent experience in health workforce development may be viewed against the backdrop of the situation just three or four decades ago, when it had just a few physicians and nurses (mostly expatriate. All workforce categories in Oman have grown substantially over the last two decades. Increased self-reliance was achieved despite substantial growth in workforce stocks. Stocks of physicians and nurses grew significantly during 1985–2007. This development was the outcome of well-considered national policies and plans. This case outlines how Oman is continuing to turn around its excessive dependence on expatriate workforce through strategic workforce development planning. Case description The Sultanate's early development initiatives focused on building a strong health care infrastructure by importing workforce. However, the policy-makers stressed national workforce development for a sustainable future. Beginning with the formulation of a strategic health workforce development plan in 1991, the stage was set for adopting workforce planning as an essential strategy for sustainable health development and workforce self-reliance. Oman continued to develop its educational infrastructure, and began to produce as much workforce as possible, in order to meet health care demands and achieve workforce self-reliance. Other policy initiatives with a beneficial impact on Oman's workforce development scenario were: regionalization of nursing institutes, active collaboration with universities and overseas specialty boards, qualitative improvement of the education system, development of a strong continuing professional development system, efforts to improve workforce management, planned change management and needs-based micro/macro-level studies. Strong political will and bold policy initiatives, dedicated workforce planning and educational endeavours have all contributed to help Oman to develop its health workforce stocks and gain

  3. Health workforce development planning in the Sultanate of Oman: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Basu

    2009-06-11

    Oman's recent experience in health workforce development may be viewed against the backdrop of the situation just three or four decades ago, when it had just a few physicians and nurses (mostly expatriate). All workforce categories in Oman have grown substantially over the last two decades. Increased self-reliance was achieved despite substantial growth in workforce stocks. Stocks of physicians and nurses grew significantly during 1985-2007. This development was the outcome of well-considered national policies and plans. This case outlines how Oman is continuing to turn around its excessive dependence on expatriate workforce through strategic workforce development planning. The Sultanate's early development initiatives focused on building a strong health care infrastructure by importing workforce. However, the policy-makers stressed national workforce development for a sustainable future. Beginning with the formulation of a strategic health workforce development plan in 1991, the stage was set for adopting workforce planning as an essential strategy for sustainable health development and workforce self-reliance. Oman continued to develop its educational infrastructure, and began to produce as much workforce as possible, in order to meet health care demands and achieve workforce self-reliance. Other policy initiatives with a beneficial impact on Oman's workforce development scenario were: regionalization of nursing institutes, active collaboration with universities and overseas specialty boards, qualitative improvement of the education system, development of a strong continuing professional development system, efforts to improve workforce management, planned change management and needs-based micro/macro-level studies. Strong political will and bold policy initiatives, dedicated workforce planning and educational endeavours have all contributed to help Oman to develop its health workforce stocks and gain self-reliance. Oman has successfully innovated workforce

  4. Health workforce development planning in the Sultanate of Oman: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Basu

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Oman's recent experience in health workforce development may be viewed against the backdrop of the situation just three or four decades ago, when it had just a few physicians and nurses (mostly expatriate). All workforce categories in Oman have grown substantially over the last two decades. Increased self-reliance was achieved despite substantial growth in workforce stocks. Stocks of physicians and nurses grew significantly during 1985–2007. This development was the outcome of well-considered national policies and plans. This case outlines how Oman is continuing to turn around its excessive dependence on expatriate workforce through strategic workforce development planning. Case description The Sultanate's early development initiatives focused on building a strong health care infrastructure by importing workforce. However, the policy-makers stressed national workforce development for a sustainable future. Beginning with the formulation of a strategic health workforce development plan in 1991, the stage was set for adopting workforce planning as an essential strategy for sustainable health development and workforce self-reliance. Oman continued to develop its educational infrastructure, and began to produce as much workforce as possible, in order to meet health care demands and achieve workforce self-reliance. Other policy initiatives with a beneficial impact on Oman's workforce development scenario were: regionalization of nursing institutes, active collaboration with universities and overseas specialty boards, qualitative improvement of the education system, development of a strong continuing professional development system, efforts to improve workforce management, planned change management and needs-based micro/macro-level studies. Strong political will and bold policy initiatives, dedicated workforce planning and educational endeavours have all contributed to help Oman to develop its health workforce stocks and gain self-reliance. Discussion and

  5. Improving health workforce recruitment and retention in rural and remote regions of Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awofeso, Niyi

    2010-01-01

    As highlighted by the 2006 World Health Report, Nigeria is one of 36 sub-Saharan African countries in the midst of a health workforce crisis. Inadequacy of optimal numbers of health workers with the appropriate skills-set is most pronounced in the rural and remote regions of Nigeria where 52% of the population live. Mortality and morbidity data from limited surveys of Nigeria indicate greater unmet health needs in rural and remote regions than in urban areas. Spartan living conditions, non-existent rural workforce policies and strategies, and an inadequate number of health staff with skills appropriate to the health priorities of rural areas are several of the many factors attributable to the steady decline in Nigeria's rural and remote health system. Based on 7 years' experience as a public health physician in rural and remote northern Nigeria, the author provides a perspective on factors hindering health workforce recruitment and retention, and proposes approaches to sustainably improving the current unsatisfactory health workforce situation in Africa's most populous nation. This article posits that out-migration of health workers is not a critical contributor to health workforce shortages in Nigeria's rural and remote areas. More important factors include contraction of government health spending as a percentage of GDP despite deteriorating health conditions, public health management systems that operate by default rather than by design, spartan living conditions outside urban areas, inadequate training of appropriate cadres of health staff, limited facilities and medications for effective delivery of clinical services, and burnout of overworked and underpaid rural-based clinicians. Most current health policy and strategy documents in Nigeria do not adequately account for the unique demographic features and health issues which vary according to remoteness from major cities. Addressing rural and remote health workforce shortages in Nigeria should begin with the

  6. Prevalence and correlates of psychological distress in a large and diverse public sector workforce: baseline results from Partnering Healthy@Work

    OpenAIRE

    Jarman, Lisa; Martin, Angela; Venn, Alison; Otahal, Petr; Taylor, Roscoe; Teale, Brook; Sanderson, Kristy

    2014-01-01

    Background Depressive and anxiety disorders are common among working adults and costly to employers and individuals. Mental health screening is often an important initial strategy, but the resultant data are often of unknown representativeness and difficult to interpret. In a public sector workforce, this study used a brief screener for depression/anxiety to: a) compare prevalence of high psychological distress obtained from a researcher survey with an employer survey and population norms and...

  7. Characterizing the Hospice and Palliative Care Workforce in the U.S.: Clinician Demographics and Professional Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Arif H; Bull, Janet; Wolf, Steven; Samsa, Gregory P; Swetz, Keith M; Myers, Evan R; Shanafelt, Tait D; Abernethy, Amy P

    2016-03-01

    Palliative care services are growing at an unprecedented pace. Yet, the characteristics of the clinician population who deliver these services are not known. Information on the roles, motivations, and future plans of the clinician workforce would allow for planning to sustain and grow the field. To better understand the characteristics of clinicians within the field of hospice and palliative care. From June through December 2013, we conducted an electronic survey of American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine members. We queried information on demographics, professional roles and responsibilities, motivations for entering the field, and future plans. We compared palliative care and hospice populations alongside clinician roles using chi-square analyses. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify predictors of leaving the field early. A total of 1365 persons, representing a 30% response rate, participated. Our survey findings revealed a current palliative care clinician workforce that is older, predominantly female, and generally with less than 10 years clinical experience in the field. Most clinicians have both clinical hospice and palliative care responsibilities. Many cite personal or professional growth or influential experiences during training or practice as motivations to enter the field. Palliative care clinicians are a heterogeneous group. We identified motivations for entering the field that can be leveraged to sustain and grow the workforce. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Translating legal research on mental and behavioral health during emergencies for the public health workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkow, Lainie; Vernick, Jon S; Semon, Natalie L; Flowers, Artensie; Errett, Nicole A; Links, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    Translation strategies are critical for sharing research with public health practitioners. To disseminate our analyses of legal issues that arise relative to mental and behavioral health during emergencies, we created 10 brief translational tools for members of the public health workforce. In consultation with an interdisciplinary project advisory group (PAG), we identified each tool's topic and format. PAG members reviewed draft and final versions of the tools. We then worked with local health departments throughout the country to distribute the tools along with a brief survey to determine practitioners' perceived utility of the tools. Through survey responses, we learned that practitioners believed the tools provided information that would be useful during the planning, response, and recovery phases of an emergency. This article describes the creation of the PAG, the development of the tools, and lessons learned for those seeking to translate legal and ethical research findings for practitioner audiences.

  9. Hawai'i's nursing workforce: keeping pace with healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVasseur, Sandra A; Qureshi, Kristine

    2015-02-01

    Nursing is the largest segment of the healthcare workforce, but over the next decade even more nurses will be required. Changing population demographics, new technologies, and evolving models of healthcare will stimulate expansion of nursing roles and the need for a highly educated nursing workforce. The current nursing workforce is aging, and large numbers of retirements are anticipated. By 2025, the United States is expected to experience a nursing shortage; in Hawai'i this shortfall is forecast to be 3,311 professional nurses. Currently there are nine nursing programs across the state in public and private universities and colleges. These programs are partnering to implement the Institute of Medicine's recommendations for the future of nursing. In Hawai'i, nursing practice is being expanded; different pathways to advanced nursing education are being implemented; and nurses are partnering with other groups to reshape healthcare. The Hawai'i State Center for Nursing collects ongoing data on the nursing workforce to inform strategic planning. Current gaps in nursing specialty education include school health and mental health. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of Hawai'i's nursing workforce in relationship to statewide population demographics, healthcare needs and gaps, and then outline steps being taken by the profession to address these needs and gaps while implementing the Institute of Medicine recommendations.

  10. Oral health workforce planning part 2: figures, determinants and trends in a sample of World Dental Federation member countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamalik, Nermin; Ensaldo-Carrasco, Eduardo; Cavalle, Edoardo; Kell, Kathyrn

    2014-06-01

    A range of factors needs to be taken into account for an ideal oral health workforce plan. The figures related to dentists, specialists, auxiliaries, practice patterns, undergraduate and continuing dental education, laws/regulations, the attitudes of oral health-care providers and the general trends affecting the practice patterns, work conditions and preferences of oral health-care providers are among such determinants. Thus, the aim of the present study was to gather such information from a sample of World Dental Federation (FDI) member countries with different characteristics. A cross-sectional survey study was carried out among a sample of FDI member countries between March 2, 2012 and March 27, 2012. A questionnaire was developed addressing some main determinants of oral health workforce, such as its structure, involvement of the public/private sector to provide oral health-care services, specialty services, dental schools, trends in workforce and compliance with oral health needs, and a descriptive analysis was performed. The countries were classified as developed and developing countries and Mann-Whitney U-tests and chi-square tests were used to identify potential significant differences (P > 0.05) between developed and developing countries. All data were processed in SPSS v.19. In the18 questionnaires processed, the median number of dentists (P = 0.005), dental practices (P = 0.002), hygienists (P = 0.005), technicians (P = 0.013) and graduates per year (P = 0.037) was higher in developed countries. Only 12.5% of developed and 22.2% of developing countries reported having optimal number of graduates per year. It was noted that 66.7% of developing countries had more regions lacking enough dentists to meet the demand (P = 0.050) and 77.8% lacked the necessary specialist care (P = 0.015). Although developing countries reported mostly an oversupply of dentists, regardless of the level of development most countries did not report an oversupply of specialists

  11. The pediatric neurosurgical workforce: defining the current supply. Clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Susan R; Lane, Jessica R; Shipman, Scott A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine a reliable estimate of the size, demographic, and practice characteristics of the current pediatric neurosurgical workforce. The authors also sought to differentiate pediatric from nonpediatric neurosurgical practitioners and compare the demographic and practice characteristics of these 2 groups. The term "pediatric practitioner" will be used in this study to describe a practitioner whose practice is > 75% pediatric patients in accordance with the American Board of Pediatric Neurological Surgery (ABPNS) requirements for board certification in pediatric neurosurgery. Those practitioners with sex, and practice setting on survey responses. A total of 342 practitioners received the survey, and 267 responded (78.1% response rate); 158 pediatric practitioners and 92 nonpediatric practitioners were identified. Seventeen respondents were excluded from analysis. Pediatric practitioners were more likely to be women, ABPNS certified, have completed a pediatric fellowship, do fewer operative cases per year, have a more frequent call schedule, practice in a freestanding children's hospital, be in academic practice, and in need of recruiting additional faculty. Pediatric practitioners spent fewer hours per week in patient care, and were less likely to have a productivity-based salary or salary incentive based on relative value unit-production. Among pediatric practitioners, American Board of Neurological Surgery and ABPNS certification rates differed significantly among age groups, with older age groups being more likely to be certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery and ABPNS. The rate of pediatric fellowship completion was significantly higher in the younger age groups. Anticipating retirement by age 65 was significantly more likely in the younger age groups, and hours spent per week spent in teaching and administrative duties were lower in the younger age groups. There were 27 female and 131 male pediatric

  12. MANAGING HUMAN TALENT. WORKFORCE DIVERSITY VS. INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES. CHALLENGES OF THE WORKFORCE MOTIVATION AND RETENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Boldea

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Each day presents a new set of challenges and risks to companies operating in this age ofboth a global economy and of multiculturalism, i.e. a fast-changing marketplace. Globalcompetition and escalating economic pressures make the business environment bothdynamic and difficult, especially given the workforce diversity which has to be managed soas to achieve the highest levels of task performance and job satisfaction; managers must beprepared to respect alternative cultures and value diversity. Based on this background ourpaper has as starting point the consideration that organizations are seeking out methods torefine their operations in order to navigate often-difficult economic terrain effectively,analyzing the organizations’ ability to being responsive to changing market conditions,competitive threats, and new market opportunities, therefore focusing on an organization’screative and innovative ability, highlighting the people component of a business process, aswith so much emphasis on automation, it’s easy to overlook the human element, anoversight which – in most cases – hinders efficient business process management.Considering that processes don’t do work, but people do, our research highlights the factthat a “want to motivate” attitude by the employee can be encouraged, even if pastmanagerial efforts have rather concentrated on “how to motivate” the employee, trying toshed some light on how BPM with a hint of the Six Sigma method offers a clearer path toan increasing number of organizations hoping to best the challenges they have to face, thisoften translating into workforce motivation and retention, by creating positive workenvironments in which the cultural and demographic diversity of members helps to createcompetitive advantage.

  13. Policy challenges for the pediatric rheumatology workforce: Part III. the international situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrickson Michael

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Survival dominates current pediatric global health priorities. Diseases of poverty largely contribute to overall mortality in children under 5 years of age. Infectious diseases and injuries account for 75% of cause-specific mortality among children ages 5-14 years. Twenty percent of the world's population lives in extreme poverty (income below US $1.25/day. Within this population, essential services and basic needs are not met, including clean water, sanitation, adequate nutrition, shelter, access to health care, medicines and education. In this context, musculoskeletal disease comprises 0.1% of all-cause mortality in children ages 5-14 years. Worldwide morbidity from musculoskeletal disease remains generally unknown in the pediatric age group. This epidemiologic data is not routinely surveyed by international agencies, including the World Health Organization. The prevalence of pediatric rheumatic diseases based on data from developed nations is in the range of 2,500 - 3,000 cases per million children. Developing countries' needs for musculoskeletal morbidity are undergoing an epidemiologic shift to chronic conditions, as leading causes of pediatric mortality are slowly quelled. A global crisis of health care providers and human resources stems from insufficient workforce production, inability to retain workers in areas of greatest need, distribution disparity and poor management of both health care systems and health workforce. Internationally, the pediatric rheumatology workforce will also be in very short supply for the foreseeable future relative to projected demand. Physician extenders are an essential resource to meet this demand in underserved regions. They can be trained in common aspects of musculoskeletal medicine and rheumatic conditions. Innovative strategies have been introduced in the United Kingdom to address musculoskeletal medicine educational deficiencies. Telemedicine offers an important capacity to improve access to

  14. Challenges and Opportunities in Developing the Hawaiian Scientific and Technical Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, James R.

    2012-01-01

    In searching for dark skies, persistently clear weather, and minimal atmospheric interference, astronomical observing sites are generally located in remote, mountainous locations, and usually far from large communities. Such locations often have weak economies, and shallow workforce pools in the technical and administrative areas generally needed by the observatories. This leads to a problem, and an opportunity, for both the observatories and their local communities. Importing employees from far away locations is costly, leads to high turnover, and deprives the community of economic benefits and the sense of fealty with the observatories that would naturally result if local people occupied these comparatively good paying jobs. While by no means unique, the observatories on Mauna Kea Hawai`i are a clear example of this dual dilemma. This presentation will report findings from a model workforce needs assessment survey of all the Mauna Kea observatories, which has establish likely annual staffing requirements in several categories of technological and administrative support, including the educational entrance requirements. Results indicated that through 2023, 80% of observatory job openings on Hawai`i Island will be in technology and administration. Furthermore, the vast majority of these jobs will require only a two-year or four-year college degree in a relevant field as an entrance requirement. Efforts to realign the existing resources to better meet these common needs will be discussed, including the highly successful partnership between County of Hawai`i Workforce Development Board, the Mauna Kea observatories, the local K-12 systems, Hawai`i Community College, the University of Hawai`i Hilo, and a number of informal education and workplace experience programs. This collaboration has resulted in no fewer than three, interlocked, community programs have stepped up to meet this challenge to the benefit of both the local community and the observatories.

  15. The American Indian and Alaska Native Dentist Workforce in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Elizabeth; Wides, Cynthia; Gates, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this paper is to describe the American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) dentist workforce, the general practice patterns of these providers, and their contributions to oral health care for AI/AN and underserved patients. Methods A national sample survey of underrepresented minority dentists was conducted in 2012 and received a 34.0% response rate for self-reported AI/AN dentists. Data were weighted for selection and response bias to be nationally representative. Descriptive and multivariable statistics were computed to provide a workforce profile. Comparisons to Census data and published information on dental students and dentists were used to examine practice patterns. Results The AI/AN dentist workforce (weighted n=442) is very diverse with 55 reported individual tribal affiliations. Tribal heritage was provided by 96.4% of AI/AN dentists (n=426), and of these, 93.9% (n=400) reported an affiliation with only one tribe. The largest share of AI/AN dentists were born in the U.S. (98.2%, n=434), married (75.6%, n=333), and had dependent children under age 18 (52.0%, n=222). Only 0.9% (n=4) of AI/AN dentists spoke a traditional AI/AN language in patient care, while 10.6% (n=46) were raised on tribal land or reservation. Initial practice in the Indian Health Service was reported by 15.8% of AI/AN dentists while 16.2% report currently practicing in a safety-net setting, and 42.0% report working in a practice that primarily serves underserved patients. Conclusions AI/AN dentists provide a disproportionate share of care for AI/AN populations, yet the number of AI/AN dentists would need to increase 7.4 fold in order to meet population parity. PMID:27922723

  16. Knowing Where Public Health Is Going: Levels and Determinants of Workforce Awareness of National Public Health Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Gulzar H; Madamala, Kusuma

    2015-01-01

    Several recent developments are trending in public health, providing an important window into the future of policy and practice in the field. The extent to which public health workforce is aware of these trends has not been assessed. This research examined the extent to which the public health workforce is familiar with 8 important developments and trends in public health and explored factors associated with variation in awareness levels. This study characterizes an observational cross-sectional design, based on analysis of secondary data collected by the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials through the Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS). Our study used data from those states for which representative samples for the local health department (LHD) employees were also available. We included survey responses from employees of state health agencies' central offices and LHDs. The primary outcome variable for the analysis was the level of awareness about emerging public health trends in the public health workforce. Awareness of emerging trends was lowest for Public Health Systems and Services Research; roughly 1 in 4 employees were aware of this trend. The second least heard of trends were Health in All Policies, and cross-jurisdictional sharing. The public health trends about which the highest proportion of public health employees had heard were implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and evidence-based public health practice. Awareness about public health trends was generally higher among state health agency employees than among LHD employees. Work environment, supervisory status, employee education, and female gender were significantly associated with higher awareness levels for both state health agency and LHD employees. Public health trends that are important for health agencies should be brought to the spotlight in national dialogue in order to increase practitioner involvement in those initiatives.

  17. Health workforce competencies needed for a digital world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovenga, Evelyn J S

    2013-01-01

    The health workforce constitutes a very significant health system building block. As such it needs to have the capacity to influence how health data are captured, processed and used at all levels of decision making. This requires a national strategy that ensures all new health professional graduates are adequately prepared and that the existing workforce is developed to make the best possible use of all available digital technologies. This chapter provides an argument for why and how the health workforce should be contributing to health information governance, followed by an historical overview of various initiatives undertaken, the results achieved and issues identified during these processes. It concludes with an exploration of strategies that may be adopted to bring about change and achieve improvements.

  18. Sustainability and the Tourism and Hospitality Workforce: A Thematic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Baum

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about the position of workforce and employment considerations within the sustainable tourism narrative. The paper aims to address the relative neglect of this area within the discourse of sustainable tourism and highlights references to the workforce within the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The discussion follows the emerging field of sustainable human resource management and the contribution that this can make to meeting both the UN Sustainable Development Goals and to enhancing the recognition of workforce and employment issues within the related debate in tourism. The body of the paper highlights examples of key dimensions of work and employment across varied tourism contexts, where sustainability is of increasing consequence and significance. The paper concludes by drawing together the implications of these “mini-cases” and locating them within key principles of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

  19. The global nephrology workforce: emerging threats and potential solutions!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Muhammad U.; Elsayed, Mohamed E.; Stack, Austin G.

    2016-01-01

    Amidst the rising tide of chronic kidney disease (CKD) burden, the global nephrology workforce has failed to expand in order to meet the growing healthcare needs of this vulnerable patient population. In truth, this shortage of nephrologists is seen in many parts of the world, including North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Asia and the African continent. Moreover, expert groups on workforce planning as well as national and international professional organizations predict further reductions in the nephrology workforce over the next decade, with potentially serious implications. Although the full impact of this has not been clearly articulated, what is clear is that the delivery of care to patients with CKD may be threatened in many parts of the world unless effective country-specific workforce strategies are put in place and implemented. Multiple factors are responsible for this apparent shortage in the nephrology workforce and the underpinning reasons may vary across health systems and countries. Potential contributors include the increasing burden of CKD, aging workforce, declining interest in nephrology among trainees, lack of exposure to nephrology among students and residents, rising cost of medical education and specialist training, increasing cultural and ethnic disparities between patients and care providers, increasing reliance on foreign medical graduates, inflexible work schedules, erosion of nephrology practice scope by other specialists, inadequate training, reduced focus on scholarship and research funds, increased demand to meet quality of care standards and the development of new care delivery models. It is apparent from this list that the solution is not simple and that a comprehensive evaluation is required. Consequently, there is an urgent need for all countries to develop a policy framework for the provision of kidney disease services within their health systems, a framework that is based on accurate projections of disease burden, a

  20. Governing the mixed health workforce: learning from Asian experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Kabir; Josyula, Lakshmi K; Zhang, Xiulan; Bigdeli, Maryam; Ahmed, Syed Masud

    2017-01-01

    Examination of the composition of the health workforce in many low and middle-income countries (LMICs) reveals deep-seated heterogeneity that manifests in multiple ways: varying levels of official legitimacy and informality of practice; wide gradation in type of employment and behaviour (public to private) and diverse, sometimes overlapping, systems of knowledge and variably specialised cadres of providers. Coordinating this mixed workforce necessitates an approach to governance that is responsive to the opportunities and challenges presented by this diversity. This article discusses some of these opportunities and challenges for LMICs in general, and illustrates them through three case studies from different Asian country settings.

  1. Estimating Workforce Disposal in the Italian Labour Market

    OpenAIRE

    Contini, Bruno; Grand, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Italy's labour market suffers from a serious pathology, in addition to the increasing precariousness of the young workforce common to all EU member countries: flows from regular employment to non-employment are very often dead-ends. A vast number of young individuals who lose their job only a few months or years after their first hire enter the ranks of the long-term unemployed or leave the workforce altogether, never to regain regular employment even after as long as twenty years. Many join ...

  2. Type Ia Supernova Properties as a Function of the Distance to the Host Galaxy in the SDSS-II SN Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbany, Lluis [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies (IFAE), Barcelona (Spain); et al.

    2012-08-20

    We use type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey to search for dependencies between SN Ia properties and the projected distance to the host galaxy center, using the distance as a proxy for local galaxy properties (local star-formation rate, local metallicity, etc.). The sample consists of almost 200 spectroscopically or photometrically confirmed SNe Ia at redshifts below 0.25. The sample is split into two groups depending on the morphology of the host galaxy. We fit light-curves using both MLCS2k2 and SALT2, and determine color (AV, c) and light-curve shape (delta, x1) parameters for each SN Ia, as well as its residual in the Hubble diagram. We then correlate these parameters with both the physical and the normalized distances to the center of the host galaxy and look for trends in the mean values and scatters of these parameters with increasing distance. The most significant (at the 4-sigma level) finding is that the average fitted AV from MLCS2k2 and c from SALT2 decrease with the projected distance for SNe Ia in spiral galaxies. We also find indications that SNe in elliptical galaxies tend to have narrower light-curves if they explode at larger distances, although this may be due to selection effects in our sample. We do not find strong correlations between the residuals of the distance moduli with respect to the Hubble flow and the galactocentric distances, which indicates a limited correlation between SN magnitudes after standardization and local host metallicity.

  3. Factors associated with stage of change in smoker in relation to smoking cessation based on the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey II-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Ah Young; Han, Chang Hoon; Ahn, Chul Min; Lee, Sang Haak; Kim, Jae Yeol; Chun, Eun Mi; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Jung, Ji Ye

    2017-01-01

    Despite a decrease in incidence, smoking remains the most serious public health problem worldwide. Identification of the factors contributing to changes in willingness to quit smoking may aid the development of strategies that encourage smoking cessation. Pooled cross-sectional data from 11,924 smokers from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey II-V were analyzed. The stages of change in smoking cessation were categorized as pre-contemplation, contemplation, and preparation. Baseline characteristics, socioeconomic factors, quality of life, psychological status, and smoking-related factors were compared between groups. The smokers were grouped as follows: 32.4% pre-contemplation, 54.4% contemplation, and 13.1% preparation. The proportion of smokers in the pre-contemplation group decreased (from 37.4% to 28.4%) from 2001 to 2012, while the proportion in the preparation group increased (from 6.4% to 18.1%). Compared with the preparation group, after adjusting for confounding factors, the pre-contemplation group was older [≥65 years-old; odds ratio (OR) = 1.40], more often single (OR = 1.38), less educated (elementary school or lower; OR = 1.93), less physically active in terms of walking (OR = 1.38) or performing strengthening exercises (OR = 1.61), smoked more heavily (≥20 cigarettes per day; OR = 4.75), and had a lower prevalence of chronic disease (OR = 0.76). Moreover, smokers who had never received education on smoking cessation were less willing to quit than those who had (OR = 0.44). In Korean smokers, the stages of change for smoking cessation were associated with age, education, marital status, chronic diseases, physical activity, and participation in smoking cessation programs.

  4. Comparison of food consumption and nutrient intake assessed with three dietary assessment methods: results of the German National Nutrition Survey II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straßburg, Andrea; Eisinger-Watzl, Marianne; Krems, Carolin; Roth, Alexander; Hoffmann, Ingrid

    2017-11-30

    Comparison of food consumption, nutrient intake and underreporting of diet history interviews, 24-h recalls and weighed food records to gain further insight into specific strength and limitations of each method and to support the choice of the adequate dietary assessment method. For 677 participants (14-80 years) of the German National Nutrition Survey II confidence intervals for food consumption and nutrient intake were calculated on basis of bootstrapping samples, Cohen's d for the relevance of differences, and intraclass correlation coefficients for the degree of agreement of dietary assessment methods. Low energy reporters were identified with Goldberg cut-offs. In 7 of 18 food groups diet history interviews showed higher consumption means than 24-h recalls and weighed food records. Especially mean values of food groups perceived as socially desirable, such as fruit and vegetables, were highest for diet history interviews. For "raw" and "cooked vegetables", the diet history interviews showed a mean consumption of 144 and 109 g/day in comparison with 68 and 70 g/day in 24-h recalls and 76 and 75 g/day in weighed food records, respectively. For "fruit", diet history interviews showed a mean consumption of 256 g/day in comparison with 164 g/day in 24-h recalls and 147 g/day in weighed food records. No major differences regarding underreporting of energy intake were found between dietary assessment methods. With regard to estimating food consumption and nutrient intake, 24-h recalls and weighed food records showed smaller differences and better agreement than pairwise comparisons with diet history interviews.

  5. Comparison of physical and mental health status between cancer survivors and the general population: a Korean population-based survey (KNHANES II-IV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyae Hyung; Cho, Young Youn; Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Ju Hyun; Ko, Young-Jin; Park, Sang Min

    2013-12-01

    To compare the physical and mental health status of the general population with that of cancer survivors in South Korea. We analyzed 19,035 subjects (age ≥40 years), who participated in the 2001-2009 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey II-IV. We compared metabolic syndrome components, health behaviors, and mental health outcomes between cancer survivors and non-cancer controls. Cancer survivors accounted for 1.68 % (n = 316) of total population. Cancer survivors did not show low occurrence of hypertension and diabetes compared to the control group. Both cancer survivors and the general population had high risks of physical inactivity (75.4 % and 75.5 %, respectively) and inadequate sleep (52.5 % and 60.7 %, respectively). In the unadjusted model, depression was more common in cancer survivors (odds ratio [OR], 1.61; 95 % CI, 1.22-2.74), so was suicidal ideation (OR, 1.51; 95 % CI, 0.16-1.96) than non-cancer controls. After adjustment for attributable socioeconomic factors, the elevated adjusted odds ratios (aORs) among cancer survivors were reduced by 23 % in depression and 45 % in suicidal thought. Cancer survivors at physical and mental health of South Korean cancer survivors was not optimal. Their control rates of modifiable risk factors were similar or even lower than those for the non-cancer groups. Depression was highly prevalent in cancer survivors which can be ascribed, at least in part, to socioeconomic environment. A better-targeted intervention to improve the health of this population may be needed.

  6. Estimating workforce development needs for high-speed rail in California : [research brief].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    It is critical to understand the emergent workforce characteristics for the California High-Speed Rail (HSR) network. Knowledge about the size and characteristics of this workforce, including its training and education needs, is required to guide the...

  7. Workforce Development and Succession Planning to Prepare the Rural Transit Industry for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    As Americas transportation workforce continues to age, there is an increased need to invest in workforce development to combat the impending retirement tsunami. This is especially true within the small urban and rural transit industry. A literatur...

  8. Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs—Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neil, Lori Ross; Assante, Michael; Tobey, D. H.; Conway, T. J.; Vanderhorst, Jr, T. J.; Januszewski, III, J.; Leo, R.; Perman, K.

    2013-07-01

    This document is a summarization of the report, Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs, the final report for phase 2 of the SPSP (DOE workforce study) project.

  9. An assessment of the eye care workforce in Enugu State, south-eastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, Boniface Ikenna; Maduka-Okafor, Ferdinand Chinedu

    2009-05-12

    The availability and distribution of an appropriate eye care workforce are fundamental to reaching the goals of "VISION 2020: The right to sight", the global initiative for the elimination of avoidable blindness launched jointly by the World Health Organization and the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness with an international membership of nongovernmental organizations, professional associations, eye care institutions and corporations. Periodic evaluation of these parameters is important in the journey towards achieving these goals. The objectives of the study were to determine the availability and distribution of human resources for eye care delivery in Enugu Urban, south-eastern Nigeria. The study was designed as a cross-sectional descriptive survey, the setting for which was all public and privately owned eye care facilities in Enugu Urban, Enugu State, south-eastern Nigeria, in October 2006. The health map of Enugu Urban and the hospital register of the Public Health Department of the Enugu State Ministry of Health were used to identify the eye health care facilities in Enugu Urban. A structured, pretested, researcher-administered questionnaire was used to capture data on cadre and distribution of the eye care personnel in these facilities.Relevant population data were obtained from the Enugu Regional Office of the National Population Commission. Descriptive statistical analysis was used to generate percentages and proportions. Eye care personnel-to-population ratios were calculated and compared to World Health Organization recommendations. Out of Enugu State's population of three million, Enugu Urban accounts for 22%. The population of Enugu Urban is distributed between the three-component Local Government Areas comprising Enugu North (31%), Enugu South (30%) and Enugu East (39%). There are 45 eye care facilities (public: 31 (69%); private: 14 (31%)) employing 252 eye care workers (public: 226 (90%); private: 26 (10%)) aged 18 to 63 (mean=36

  10. Status of the anesthesia workforce in 2011: evolution during the last decade and future outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Armin; Eckhout, Gifford V; Ngo, Anh L; Tremper, Kevin K; Peterson, Mary D

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to present a comprehensive assessment of the anesthesia workforce during the past decade and attempt forecasting the future based on present knowledge. The supply of anesthesiologists has gradually recovered from a deficit in the mid to late 1990 s. Current entry rates into our specialty are the highest in more than a decade, but are still below the level they were in 1993. These factors along with slower surgical growth and less capital available for expanding anesthetizing locations have resulted in greater availability of anesthesiologists in the labor market. Despite these recent events, the intermediate-term outlook of a rapidly aging population and greater access of previously uninsured patients portends the need to accommodate increasing medical and surgical procedures requiring anesthesia, barring disruptive industry innovations. Late in the decade, nationwide surveys found shortages of anesthesiologists and certified registered nurse anesthetists to persist. In response to increasing training program output with stagnant surgical growth, compensation increases for these allied health professionals have moderated in the present. Future projections anticipate increased personnel availability and, possibly, less compensation for this group. It is important to understand that many of the factors constraining current demand for anesthesia personnel are temporary. Anesthesiologist supply constrained by small graduation growth combined with generation- and gender-based decrements in workforce contribution is unlikely to keep pace with the substantial population and public policy-generated growth in demand for service, even in the face of productivity improvements and innovation.

  11. The Health Equity Leadership Institute (HELI): Developing workforce capacity for health disparities research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, James; Fryer, Craig S; Ward, Earlise; Westaby, Katelyn; Adams, Alexandra; Esmond, Sarah L; Garza, Mary A; Hogle, Janice A; Scholl, Linda M; Quinn, Sandra C; Thomas, Stephen B; Sorkness, Christine A

    2017-06-01

    Efforts to address health disparities and achieve health equity are critically dependent on the development of a diverse research workforce. However, many researchers from underrepresented backgrounds face challenges in advancing their careers, securing independent funding, and finding the mentorship needed to expand their research. Faculty from the University of Maryland at College Park and the University of Wisconsin-Madison developed and evaluated an intensive week-long research and career-development institute-the Health Equity Leadership Institute (HELI)-with the goal of increasing the number of underrepresented scholars who can sustain their ongoing commitment to health equity research. In 2010-2016, HELI brought 145 diverse scholars (78% from an underrepresented background; 81% female) together to engage with each other and learn from supportive faculty. Overall, scholar feedback was highly positive on all survey items, with average agreement ratings of 4.45-4.84 based on a 5-point Likert scale. Eighty-five percent of scholars remain in academic positions. In the first three cohorts, 73% of HELI participants have been promoted and 23% have secured independent federal funding. HELI includes an evidence-based curriculum to develop a diverse workforce for health equity research. For those institutions interested in implementing such an institute to develop and support underrepresented early stage investigators, a resource toolbox is provided.

  12. The FAA Health Awareness Program: Results of the 1998 Customer Service Assessment Survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hilton, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the results of an agency-wide survey of employee health and wellness to determine workforce involvement in and satisfaction with the Federal Aviation Administration's Health Awareness Program (HAP...

  13. Measuring the attractiveness of rural communities in accounting for differences of rural primary care workforce supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrail, Matthew R; Wingrove, Peter M; Petterson, Stephen M; Humphreys, John S; Russell, Deborah J; Bazemore, Andrew W

    2017-01-01

    Many rural communities continue to experience an undersupply of primary care doctor services. While key professional factors relating to difficulties of recruitment and retention of rural primary care doctors are widely identified, less attention has been given to the role of community and place aspects on supply. Place-related attributes contribute to a community's overall amenity or attractiveness, which arguably influence both rural recruitment and retention relocation decisions of doctors. This bi-national study of Australia and the USA, two developed nations with similar geographic and rural access profiles, investigates the extent to which variations in community amenity indicators are associated with spatial variations in the supply of rural primary care doctors. Measures from two dimensions of community amenity: geographic location, specifically isolation/proximity; and economics and sociodemographics were included in this study, along with a proxy measure (jurisdiction) of a third dimension, environmental amenity. Data were chiefly collated from the American Community Survey and the Australian Census of Population and Housing, with additional calculated proximity measures. Rural primary care supply was measured using provider-to-population ratios in 1949 US rural counties and in 370 Australian rural local government areas. Additionally, the more sophisticated two-step floating catchment area method was used to measure Australian rural primary care supply in 1116 rural towns, with population sizes ranging from 500 to 50 000. Associations between supply and community amenity indicators were examined using Pearson's correlation coefficients and ordinary least squares multiple linear regression models. It was found that increased population size, having a hospital in the county, increased house prices and affluence, and a more educated and older population were all significantly associated with increased workforce supply across rural areas of both countries

  14. Preparing Students for Jobs: Ensuring Student Success in the Workforce. Data for Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data Quality Campaign, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Why do workforce data matter? A strong education prepares students to succeed in their chosen careers, but education, training, and employment pathways are changing. Individuals take multiple paths into the workforce. Some get jobs after completing high school, some after earning a college degree. To develop and support a strong workforce,…

  15. 20 CFR 661.430 - Under what conditions may the Governor submit a Workforce Flexibility Plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... a Workforce Flexibility Plan? 661.430 Section 661.430 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... the Governor submit a Workforce Flexibility Plan? (a) A State may submit to the Secretary, and the Secretary may approve, a workforce flexibility (work-flex) plan under which the State is authorized to waive...

  16. 76 FR 54829 - The First Semi-Annual Aviation Workforce Management Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... aviation workforce and its management, with the ultimate goal of a healthier industry for all.'' A copy of... Office of the Secretary of Transportation The First Semi-Annual Aviation Workforce Management Conference... Transportation, announces the First Semi-Annual Aviation Workforce Management Conference which will be held in...

  17. Professionalizing the Nation's Cybersecurity Workforce?: Criteria for Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Professionalizing the Nation's Cybersecurity Workforce? Criteria for Decision-Making" considers approaches to increasing the professionalization of the nation's cybersecurity workforce. This report examines workforce requirements for cybersecurity and the segments and job functions in which professionalization is most needed;…

  18. General practitioner workforce planning: assessment of four policy directions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Teljeur, Conor

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Estimating the supply of GPs into the future is important in forecasting shortages. The lengthy training process for medicine means that adjusting supply to meet demand in a timely fashion is problematic. This study uses Ireland as a case study to determine the future demand and supply of GPs and to assess the potential impact of several possible interventions to address future shortages. METHODS: Demand was estimated by applying GP visit rates by age and sex to national population projections. Supply was modelled using a range of parameters derived from two national surveys of GPs. A stochastic modelling approach was adopted to determine the probable future supply of GPs. Four policy interventions were tested: increasing vocational training places; recruiting GPs from abroad; incentivising later retirement; increasing nurse substitution to enable practice nurses to deliver more services. RESULTS: Relative to most other European countries, Ireland has few GPs per capita. Ireland has an ageing population and demand is estimated to increase by 19% by 2021. Without intervention, the supply of GPs will be 5.7% less than required in 2021. Increasing training places will enable supply to meet demand but only after 2019. Recruiting GPs from overseas will enable supply to meet demand continuously if the number recruited is approximately 0.8 per cent of the current workforce per annum. Later retirement has only a short-term impact. Nurse substitution can enable supply to meet demand but only if large numbers of practice nurses are recruited and allowed to deliver a wide range of GP services. CONCLUSIONS: A significant shortfall in GP supply is predicted for Ireland unless recruitment is increased. The shortfall will have numerous knock-on effects including price increases, longer waiting lists and an increased burden on hospitals. Increasing training places will not provide an adequate response to future shortages. Foreign recruitment has ethical considerations

  19. Envisioning an oral healthcare workforce for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David A

    2012-10-01

    Health is critical to human well-being. Oral health is an integral component of health. One is not healthy without oral health. As health is essential to human flourishing, it is important that an oral healthcare delivery system and workforce be developed and deployed which can help ensure all citizens have the potential to access oral health care. As such access does not generally exist today, it is imperative to advance the realization of this goal and to develop a vision of an oral healthcare workforce to functionally support access. Public funding of basic oral health care is an important element to improving access. However, funding is only economically feasible if a workforce exists that is structured in a manner such that duties are assigned to individuals who have been uniquely trained to fulfill specific clinical responsibilities. An essential element of any cost-effective organizational system must be the shared responsibility of duties. Delegation must occur in the oral health workforce if competent, cost-effective care is to be provided. Desirable members of the oral health team in an efficient and effective system are as follows: generalist dentists who are educated as physicians of the stomatognathic system (oral physicians), specialist dentists, dental therapists, dental hygienists, dually trained hygienists/therapists (oral health therapists), oral prosthetists (denturists), and expanded function dental assistants (dental nurses). © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. optimum workforce-size model using dynamic programming approach

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    This paper presents an optimum workforce-size model which determines the minimum number of excess workers (overstaffing) as well as the minimum total recruitment cost during a specified planning horizon. The model is an extension of other existing dynamic programming models for manpower planning in the sense ...

  1. Optimum workforce-size model using dynamic programming approach

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This paper presents an optimum workforce-size model which determines the minimum number of excess workers (overstaffing) as well as the minimum total recruitment cost during a specified planning horizon. The model is an extension of other existing dynamic programming models for manpower planning in the ...

  2. Workforce and Economic Development Annual Report, 2011-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The California Community Colleges Workforce and Economic Development program (WED program) helps students, incumbent workers, business partners and industries develop skilled competencies in critical industry sectors. As a source for developing and implementing training and curriculum, the WED program is instrumental in helping the community…

  3. Economic and Workforce Development Program Annual Report, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2014

    2014-01-01

    California's community colleges continue to play a crucial role in the state's economy by providing students with the skills and knowledge to succeed and by advancing the economic growth and global competitiveness of California and its regional economies through the Economic and Workforce Development Program (EWD). The EWD program invests in the…

  4. Economic and Workforce Development Program Annual Report, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The California Community Colleges, through the Economic and Workforce Development Program (EWD), continue to propel the California economy forward by providing students with skills to earn well-paying jobs. At the same time, EWD helps provide California companies with the talent they need to compete on a global scale. This annual report for…

  5. Workforce Training and Economic Development Fund: 2015 Annual Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Education, Division of Community Colleges, will annually provide the State Board of Education with The Workforce Training and Economic Development (WTED) Fund Annual Progress Report. Administration and oversight responsibility for the fund was transferred from the Iowa Economic Development Authority to the Iowa Department of…

  6. Reshaping the American Workforce in a Changing Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Harry J., Ed.; Nightingale, Demetra Smith, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    What directions should workforce policy in the U.S. take over the next few decades in light of major labor market developments that will likely occur--such as the retirements of baby boomers and continuing globalization? This new volume edited by Harry J. Holzer and Demetra Smith Nightingale presents fresh thoughts on the topic. This book offers…

  7. Job Insecurity in the Younger Spanish Workforce: Causes and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiro, Jose M.; Sora, Beatriz; Caballer, Amparo

    2012-01-01

    The Spanish labor market is currently an example of a flexible labor market. However, it involves a set of detrimental conditions for its workforce, such as lower employability in the labor market and underemployment (i.e. over-qualification and underemployment in time). In this study, we assume that all these conditions promote higher job…

  8. Making Decisions about Workforce Development in Registered Training Organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, Geof

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research activity is to understand further how large and small registered training organisations (RTOs) make decisions about the allocation of resources for developing their workforces. Six registered training organisations--four technical and further education (TAFE) institutes and two private providers--were selected for…

  9. Characteristics of the Navy Laboratory Warfare Center Technical Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-29

    Astronomy & Space Sci. 1330 Cartography 1370 Chemistry 1320 Gen. Physical Science 1301 Geodesy 1372 Geology 1350 Geophysics 1313 Health Physics 1306...workforce was sub-divided into six broad occupational groups: Life Science, Physical Science, Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Science and Information...occupational groups: Life Science (Life), Physical Science ( Physical ), Engineering (Engineering), Mathematics (Math), Computer Science and

  10. Comprehensive health workforce planning: re-consideration of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comprehensive health workforce planning: re-consideration of the primary health care approach as a tool for addressing the human resource for health crisis in low and middle ... A descriptive literature review of selected case studies in middle and low income countries reinforced with the evidence from Tanzania was used.

  11. The health workforce crisis: the brain drain scourge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ike, Samuel O

    2007-01-01

    The magnitude of the health workforce crisis engendered by brain drain particularly in Africa, and nay more especially Nigeria, has been assuming increasingly alarming proportions in the past three decades. The challenge it poses in meeting the manpower needs in the healthcare sector as well as in the larger economy of the sending countries is enormous. This paper thus sets out to highlight the scope of this brain drain, its effects and the reasons sustaining it, as well as makes concrete suggestions to help stern the tide. A review of the literature on brain drain with particular emphasis on the health workforce sector was done, with focus on Africa, and specifically Nigeria. Literature search was done using mainly the Medline, as well as local journals. The historical perspectives, with the scope of external and internal brain drain are explored. The glaring effects of brain drain both in the global workforce terrain and specifically in the health sectors are portrayed. The countries affected most and the reasons for brain drain are outlined. Strategic steps to redress the brain drain crisis are proffered in this paper. The health workforce crisis resulting from brain drain must be brought to the front-burner of strategic policy decisions leading to paradigm shift in political, social and economic conditions that would serve as incentives to curb the scourge.

  12. ORTEC Predicts the Payback Period for its Workforce Scheduling Software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van Asperen (Eelco); R. Dekker (Rommert); P. van der Schalk (Patrick)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractORTEC is a Netherlands-based software company selling decision support systems based on operations research models. One of her products is HARMONY, a workforce scheduling package. We developed a model to predict its return on investment for a specific customer. The model uses a database

  13. New Report Predicts Shortage of Geoscientists in the Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-06-01

    By the end of the next decade, there may be a shortage of 135,000 geoscientists in the workforce, according to a report issued by the American Geosciences Institute on 29 May. This shortage is predicted despite rising enrollment in the geosciences and rising salaries for students graduating with bachelor's, master's, and doctorate degrees.

  14. The globalization of the nursing workforce: Pulling the pieces together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cheryl B; Sherwood, Gwen D

    2014-01-01

    The "globalization" of health care creates an increasingly interconnected workforce spanning international boundaries, systems, structures, and processes to provide care to and improve the health of peoples around the world. Because nurses comprise a large sector of the global health workforce, they are called upon to provide a significant portion of nursing and health care and thus play an integral role in the global health care economy. To meet global health care needs, nurses often move within and among countries, creating challenges and opportunities for the profession, health care organizations, communities, and nations. Researchers, policy makers, and industry and academic leaders must, in turn, grapple with the impacts of globalization on the nursing and health care workforce. Through this special issue, several key areas for discussion are raised. Although far from exhaustive, our intent is to expand and stimulate intra- and interprofessional conversations raising awareness of the issues, uncover unanticipated consequences, and offer solutions for shaping the nursing and health care workforce of the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. syNErgy: A Case Study in Workforce Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, John; Grosskopf, Kevin R.

    2013-01-01

    With high unemployment and structural changes to industry, workforce development in the United States is a growing concern. Many semiskilled workers lack knowledge, skills, and abilities to be competitive for reemployment to green jobs. Nebraska's syNErgy research grant was introduced to address the training needs of unemployed and underemployed…

  16. Developing a National STEM Workforce Strategy: A Workshop Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alper, Joe

    2016-01-01

    The future competitiveness of the United States in an increasingly interconnected global economy depends on the nation fostering a workforce with strong capabilities and skills in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). STEM knowledge and skills enable both individual opportunity and national competitiveness, and the nation needs…

  17. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Texas. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater, and…

  18. Helping Managers and Employees Cope with Work-Force Cutbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Gene L.

    1983-01-01

    Steps can be taken to reduce the need for work-force cutbacks and to prepare in advance by planning activities, defining severance awards, reducing anxiety, setting layoff criteria, providing outplacement services, and handling the timing, logistics, and aftermath of layoffs with sensitivity. (SK)

  19. Modernizing the Education Workforce: A Perspective from Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozga, Jenny

    2005-01-01

    This article argues that there are global pressures for modernization of the education workforce that produce broadly similar policy responses and pressures on the teaching profession. It suggests, however that these "travelling" policies are mediated by the "embedded" practices and cultures of different systems to produce…

  20. Let's Stop Playing Monopoly with the Child Welfare Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Robin Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Although the National Child Welfare Workforce Institute (NCWWI) is a specific focus of Stoesz's article, a more expansive and thought-provoking critique is made of the NCWWI within the context of a purported overreliance and dependency on the Children's Bureau, concerns regarding the quality of social work education, and the development of a…

  1. Workforce Training and Economic Development Fund: 2014 Annual Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Workforce Training and Economic Development (WTED) Fund was established in 2003 as part of the Grow Iowa Values Fund and is currently funded through the Iowa Skilled Worker and Job Creation Fund. This fund has become an important source of financing for community college new program innovation, development, and capacity building, particularly…

  2. Strategic workforce planning for a multihospital, integrated delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datz, David; Hallberg, Colleen; Harris, Kathy; Harrison, Lisa; Samples, Patience

    2012-01-01

    Banner Health has long recognized the need to anticipate, beyond the immediate operational realities or even the annual budgeting projection exercises, the necessary workforce needs of the future. Thus, in 2011, Banner implemented a workforce planning model that included structures, processes, and tools for predicting workforce needs, with particular focus on identified critical systemwide practice areas. The model represents the incorporation of labor management tools and processes with more strategic, broad-view, long-term assessment and planning mechanisms. The sequential tying of the workforce planning lifecycle with the organization's strategy and financial planning process supports alignment of goals, objectives, and resource allocation. Collaboration among strategy, finance, human resources, and operations has provided us with the ability to identify critical position groups based on 3-year strategic priorities. By engaging leaders from across the organization, focusing on activities at facility, regional, and system levels, and building in mechanisms for accountability, we are now engaged in continuous evaluations of our delivery models, the competencies and preparations necessary for the staff to effectively function within those delivery models, and developing and implementing action plans designed to ensure adequate numbers of the staff whose competencies will be suited to the work expected of them.

  3. Anaesthesia workforce and infrastructure in a north central state of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anaesthesia has evolved over the decades to have become a specialty in medicine. The dearth of personnel and unavailability of required equipment world over has made safe delivery of anaesthesia difficult. This study evaluated workforce situation and availability of anaesthetic drugs/equipment in public ...

  4. The critical care nursing workforce in Western Cape hospitals - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. A global shortage of registered nurses (RNs) has been reported internationally, and confirmed in South Africa by the National Audit of Critical Care services. Critical care nurses (CCNs) especially are in great demand and short supply. Purpose. The purpose of this study was to quantify the nursing workforce ...

  5. Informed policies for Europe’s health workforce of tomorrow.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batenburg, R.

    2010-01-01

    Although it is widely acknowledged that health workforce planning is critical for health care systems, it is probably one of the least strategically planned resources. One could argue that there are good reasons for this: demand and supply of the health labour market are in constant flux, and policy

  6. "New Professionalism," Workforce Remodeling and the Restructuring of Teachers' Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Howard; Carter, Bob; Passy, Rowena

    2007-01-01

    Since its election in 1997 the Labour government's policy has sought to promote a "new professionalism" amongst teachers. First mooted at the time when new performance management arrangements were introduced, the discourse of new professionalism has now become closely associated with the "workforce remodeling" agenda in which…

  7. State Sector Strategies: The New Workforce Development in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakes, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Neoliberal governments consider global business competitiveness to be thwarted by costly bureaucratic regulation and programme duplication. In an effort to downsize the costs of operating a state, the governors now streamline job training functions via a coordinated workforce and economic development effort known as sector strategies, with…

  8. Systems Engineering Research Needs and Workforce Development Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-31

    Systems Engineering Research Needs and Workforce Development Assessment Technical Report SERC-2018-TR-102 31 January 2018...Pallas, Stevens Institute of Technology Sponsor: DASD (SE) – Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense ( Systems Engineering ) Report No. SERC-2018-TR... Systems Engineering Research Center The Systems Engineering Research Center (SERC) is a federally funded University Affiliated Research Center

  9. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Region V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report represents a detailed summation of existing workforce levels, training programs, career potential, and staffing level projections through 1981 for EPA Region V. This region serves the six east-north central states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The specific pollution programs considered include air,…

  10. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Illinois. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,…

  11. Higher Education Sustainability Staffing Survey, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows that despite national unemployment rates that hovered near 10 percent in 2010, those with positions in the higher education sustainability workforce report a sense of job security and feel satisfied with the work they are doing. With 433 completed surveys, the results offer a comprehensive look at the demographics, roles, salaries…

  12. Parenting responsibility expectations of senior Australian dental students: do the next generations' family responsibilities impact workforce planning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharif, Ala'a; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Over the past twenty-five years, there has been a substantial increase in work-based demands, thought to be due to an intensifying, competitive work environment. However, more recently, the question of work-life balance is increasingly attracting attention. The purpose of this study was to discover the attitudes of the next generation of dentists in Australia to parenting responsibility and work-life balance perceptions. Questionnaires on work-life balance were distributed to all fourth-year students at three dental schools in Australia. A total of 137 (76 percent) surveys were completed and returned. Most respondents indicated that they would take time off to focus on childcare, and just over half thought childcare should be shared by both parents. Thirty-seven percent felt that a child would have a considerable effect on their careers. Differences were seen in responses when compared by gender. The application of sensitivity analysis to workforce calculations based around changing societal work-life expectations can have substantial effects on predicting workforce data a decade into the future. It is not just the demographic change to a more feminized workforce in Australia that can have substantial effect, but also the change in social expectations of males in regards to parenting.

  13. Beyond Human Capital Development: Balanced Safeguards Workforce Metrics and the Next Generation Safeguards Workforce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbank, Roberta L.; Frazar, Sarah L.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Shergur, Jason M.; Scholz, Melissa A.; Undem, Halvor A.

    2014-03-28

    Since its establishment in 2008, the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) has achieved a number of objectives under its five pillars: concepts and approaches, policy development and outreach, international nuclear safeguards engagement, technology development, and human capital development (HCD). As a result of these efforts, safeguards has become much more visible as a critical U.S. national security interest across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. However, limited budgets have since created challenges in a number of areas. Arguably, one of the more serious challenges involves NGSI’s ability to integrate entry-level staff into safeguards projects. Laissez fair management of this issue across the complex can lead to wasteful project implementation and endanger NGSI’s long-term sustainability. The authors provide a quantitative analysis of this problem, focusing on the demographics of the current safeguards workforce and compounding pressures to operate cost-effectively, transfer knowledge to the next generation of safeguards professionals, and sustain NGSI safeguards investments.

  14. Building an engaged workforce at Cleveland Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrnchak JM

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Joseph M PatrnchakCleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Employee engagement is widely recognized as a critical factor in organizational performance. This article examines an ongoing cultural development initiative at Cleveland Clinic designed to significantly increase employee engagement. Key components of this initiative include the introduction of serving leadership, new caregiver wellness and recognition programs, “Cleveland Clinic Experience” training focused on the institution’s core mission, and changes in the institutional vocabulary. Since 2008, the results include a dramatic improvement in engagement, as measured by the Gallup Q12 survey, with parallel improvements in patient satisfaction, as measured by the clinic's scores on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS survey. In addition to a discussion of the key components of the clinic’s engagement initiative, the article provides a partial review of the literature focused on employee engagement as well as a summary of “lessons learned” that may serve as a guide for others facing the challenge of increasing employee engagement in large, mature health care institutions.Keywords: health care, employee engagement, culture change, hospital performance, patient satisfaction

  15. Retention priorities for the intergenerational nurse workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieck, K Lynn; Dols, Jean; Landrum, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Retention of senior, Gen-X, and Millennial nurses is influenced by manager interactions and efforts to create a satisfying work experience. The purpose of this project was a generational assessment of job satisfaction, work environment, and desired characteristics of managers in an effort to improve nurse retention. Data from staff nurses at 22 southern hospitals collected by online survey included measures of job satisfaction and perceptions of safety, the Nurse Manager Desired Traits survey, and the Nursing Work Index-Revised. The satisfaction with work environment scores for the whole group (n = 1,773) were high. Subscale scores showed highest satisfaction with nurse/physician relationships; lowest was nurse control of practice. A specific satisfaction question showed the younger nurses were less satisfied than those over age 40. Nurse safety concerns were expressed by 40% of the sample. One third of Millennial nurses plan to leave their job within the next 2 years. Over two thirds plan to be gone within the next 5 years. Especially alarming is the fact that 61% of the nurse group stated they plan to leave their current jobs within 10 years. (a) Create model managers; (b) empower staff nurse councils; (c) stabilize staffing; (d) revamp incentives; and (e) focus on safety.

  16. Sunday in the Park with Infectious Disease: Workforce Mismatch in a Colorful Universe of Possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas; Dembry, Louise-Marie; Saag, Michael S

    2017-09-15

    The decline in applications for infectious diseases (ID) fellowships has been an area of active introspection for the leadership of the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA). This prompted actions to address the problem, including surveys of current and former fellows. Ironically, the decline in applications to ID programs is occurring at a time when the need for ID providers has never been greater and the excitement and variety in the practice of ID has never been higher. Data regarding the current ID workforce are presented here, along with perspectives about the future of the profession in the decades to come. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Effort-reward imbalance at work and the risk of antidepressant treatment in the Danish workforce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Maj Britt D.; Madsen, Ida E. H.; Aust, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown that high effort-reward imbalance (ERI) at work is a risk factor for the onset of self-reported depressive symptoms. In this study, we examined whether ERI predicts risk of treatment with antidepressant medication in a representative sample of the Danish...... workforce. Methods: We linked survey data on ERI and covariates of 4541 participants from the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study 2000 with the Danish National Prescription Registry that includes all legally purchased prescription drugs at pharmacies in Denmark since 1995. Participants with a history...... of antidepressant treatment or with self-reported depressive symptoms at baseline were excluded. Using Cox proportional hazard analyses we examined the prospective association between ERI at baseline and incident antidepressant treatment while adjusting for potential confounders. Time of follow-up was 5 years...

  18. The Public Health Nurse Workforce in U.S. State and Local Health Departments, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Angela J; Boulton, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Public health nurses (PHNs) represent the single largest group of public health practitioners working in U.S. state and local health departments. Despite the important role of PHNs in the delivery and administration of public health services, little research has been conducted on this group and relatively little is known about PHN education, training, and retirement intentions. We describe the findings of a nationally representative survey of PHNs working in state and local health departments by characterizing their educational background and plans for retirement. An advisory committee convened by the University of Michigan Center of Excellence in Public Health Workforce Studies developed the Public Health Nurse Workforce Survey and disseminated it in 2012 to 50 U.S. state and 328 local health departments. The 377 responding state and local health departments reported an estimated 34,521 full-time equivalent registered nurses in their employ, with PHNs or community health nurses as the largest group of workers (63%). Nearly 20% of state health department PHNs and 31% of local health department PHNs were educated at the diploma or associate's degree level. Approximately one-quarter of PHNs were determined to be eligible for retirement by 2016. Professional development and promotion opportunities, competitive benefits and salary, and hiring procedures were among the recruitment and retention issues reported by health departments. PHNs were reported to have highly variable occupational classifications and educational backgrounds in health departments. Additional training opportunities are needed for PHNs with diploma and associate's degrees. A shortage of PHNs is possible due to retirement eligibility and administrative barriers to recruitment and retention.

  19. Perceived Workforce Challenges among Clinical Social Workers in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickney Ferguson, Stacy; Randall, Jill; Dabney, Jane; Kalbacker, Marion E; Boyle, Nancy; Thao, Viengneesee; Murphy, Elizabeth A; Denzen, Ellen M

    2017-12-27

    Clinical social workers are psychosocial care experts who provide interventions that aim to address the emotional, relational, financial, and logistical challenges that arise throughout the hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) treatment and recovery process. Interventions that contribute to better patient outcomes can include cognitive behavioral therapy and counseling for adaptation to illness, family planning for 24/7 caregiver availability and strategies to support patient activities of daily living, instruction on guided imagery and relaxation techniques for symptom management and to decrease anxiety, psychoeducation on the treatment trajectory, and linkage with financial resources. A Social Work Workforce Group (SWG) was established through the System Capacity Initiative, led by the National Marrow Donor Program/Be The Match, to characterize the current social work workforce capacity and challenges. The SWG conducted a web-based survey of HCT clinical social workers in the United States. The response rate was 57% (n = 90), representing 76 transplant centers. Survey results indicated that the clinical social worker role and scope of practice varies significantly between centers; less than half of respondents reported that their clinical social work expertise was used to its fullest potential. With an estimated 3-fold increase in HCT patient volume by 2020, the need for specialized psychosocial health services will increase. The SWG makes recommendations to build capacity for the psychosocial care of HCT patients and to more fully integrate the social worker as a core member of the HCT team. The SWG created a Blood and Marrow Transplant (BMT) Clinical Social Worker role description that can be used by transplant centers to educate healthcare professionals, benchmark utilization of clinical social workers, and improve comprehensive psychosocial health programs. Copyright © 2018 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by

  20. Apartheid in deaf education: examining workforce diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Laurene; Rusher, Melissa; Andrews, Jean F; Coryell, Judy

    2008-01-01

    A survey of 3,227 professionals in 313 deaf education programs found that 22.0% of teachers and 14.5% of administrators were deaf--a less than 10% increase in deaf professionals since 1993. Additionally, 21.7% of teachers and 6.1% of administrators were professionals of color. Of these minority teachers, only 2.5% were deaf persons of color. Only 3 deaf administrators of color were identified. The study describes how "apartheid" or "intellectual oppression" may result from unchanged hiring practices in K-12 programs for the deaf and in postsecondary institutions. Using a bottle metaphor, the researchers describe how deaf persons of color are often stuck in "a bottleneck on the highway to opportunity." Relevant data underscore that the field of deaf education must diversify its professional force in order to utilize the intellectual, linguistic, and multicultural proficiencies of hearing teachers of color, deaf teachers, and deaf teachers of color.

  1. Emergency Medicine Clerkship Directors: Current Workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Wald

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The emergency medicine clerkship director serves an important role in the education of medical students. The authors sought to update the demographic and academic profile of the emergency medicine clerkship director. Methods: We developed and implemented a comprehensive questionnaire, and used it to survey all emergency medicine clerkship directors at United States allopathic medical schools accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education. We analyzed and interpreted data using descriptive statistics. Results: One hundred seven of 133 (80.4% emergency medicine clerkship directors completed the survey. Clerkship Director’s mean age was 39.7 years (SD-7.2, they were more commonly male 68.2%, of Caucasian racial backgrounds and at the instructor or assistant professor (71.3% level. The mean number of years of experience as clerkship director was 5.5 (SD-4.5. The mean amount of protected time for clerkship administration reported by respondents was 7.3 hours weekly (SD-5.1, with the majority (53.8% reporting 6 or more hours of protected time per week. However, 32.7% of emergency medicine clerkship directors reported not having any protected time for clerkship administration. Most clerkship directors (91.6% held additional teaching responsibilities beyond their clerkship and many were involved in educational research (49.5%. The majority (79.8%, reported being somewhat or very satisfied with their job as clerkship director. Conclusion: Most clerkship directors were junior faculty at the instructor or assistant professor rank and were involved with a variety of educational endeavors beyond the clerkship. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(4:398–403.

  2. The Green Bank Telescope 350 MHz Drift-scan Survey II: Data Analysis and the Timing of 10 New Pulsars, Including a Relativistic Binary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynch, R.S.; Boyles, J.; Ransom, S.M.; Stairs, I.H.; Lorimer, D.R.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Kaspi, V.M.; Kondratiev, V.I.; Archibald, A.M.; Berndsen, A.; Cardoso, R.F.; Cherry, A.; Epstein, C.R.; Karako-Argaman, C.; McPhee, C.A.; Pennucci, T.; Roberts, M.S.E.; Stovall, K.; van Leeuwen, J.

    2013-01-01

    We have completed a 350 MHz Drift-scan Survey using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope with the goal of finding new radio pulsars, especially millisecond pulsars that can be timed to high precision. This survey covered ~10,300 deg2 and all of the data have now been fully processed. We have

  3. Workforce capacity to address obesity: a Western Australian cross-sectional study identifies the gap between health priority and human resources needed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Begley

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The disease burden due to poor nutrition, physical inactivity and obesity is high and increasing. An adequately sized and skilled workforce is required to respond to this issue. This study describes the public health nutrition and physical activity (NAPA practice priorities and explores health managers and practitioner’s beliefs regarding workforce capacity to deliver on these priorities. Methods A workforce audit was conducted including a telephone survey of all managers and a postal survey of practitioners working in the area of NAPA promotion in Western Australia in 2004. Managers gave their perspective on workforce priorities, current competencies and future needs, with a 70 % response rate. Practitioners reported on public health workforce priorities, qualifications and needs, with a 56 % response rate. Results The top practice priorities for managers were diabetes (35 %, alcohol and other drugs (33 %, and cardiovascular disease (27 %. Obesity (19 %, poor nutrition (15 % and inadequate physical activity (10 % were of lower priority. For nutrition, managers identified lack of staff (60.4 %, organisational and management factors (39.5 % and insufficient financial resources (30.2 % as the major barriers to adequate service delivery. For physical activity services, insufficient financial resources (41.7 % and staffing (35.4 % and a lack of specific physical activity service specifications (25.0 % were the main barriers. Practitioners identified inadequate staffing as the main barrier to service delivery for nutrition (42.3 % and physical activity (23.3 %. Ideally, managers said they required 152 % more specialist nutritionists in the workforce and 131 % specialists for physical activity services to meet health outcomes in addition to other generalist staff. Conclusion Human and financial resources and organisational factors were the main barriers to meeting obesity, and public health nutrition and

  4. Workforce characteristics of mohs surgery fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Josephine C; Jacobson, Christine C; Rehmus, Wingfield; Kimball, Alexa B

    2004-02-01

    Anecdotal evidence from program directors and Mohs surgeons suggests that Mohs fellowships are becoming increasingly popular and competitive among dermatology trainees. To assess the characteristics and investigate the motivating factors of those pursuing Mohs fellowships. Anonymous surveys were distributed to recent dermatology residency graduates taking a board exam review course in years 1999-2002. In 2002, 2001, and 1999, the percentages of recently trained dermatologists pursuing Mohs fellowships were 9.4%, 8.5%, and 8.8%, respectively. There were no significant differences between Mohs fellows and the rest of the recently graduated dermatologists in terms of debt levels, marital status, parenting status, and spousal employment status. The Mohs fellows were slightly more likely to be male than their non-Mohs counterparts. The factor considered the most important by both groups when choosing a job was location. Further research is needed to discover potential factors that may be playing a role in the increased popularity of Mohs surgery. The number of Mohs surgeons is increasing and is likely to expand over time. It remains to be seen what effect the growth will have on the supply of Mohs surgery and whether it will outpace the increased demand for services.

  5. Blended learning: emerging best practices in allied health workforce development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Barbara F; Quake-Rapp, Cindee; Shanedling, Janet; Spannaus-Martin, Donna; Martin, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    To remain dynamic and viable, academic institutions preparing the future workforce need to convert to a more accessible and convenient pathway for students. The need for responsiveness is especially true when considering strategies to prepare an allied health workforce in areas of shortages and to meet the needs of the underserved. A blended or hybrid learning model that strategically uses web-based and face-to-face teaching/learning methods is an innovative and strategic way that promotes learner-centered higher education and facilitates a higher learning experience. A model and emerging best practices for implementation are presented from our experience at the Center for Allied Health Programs at the University of Minnesota.

  6. Multigenerational Challenges: Team-Building for Positive Clinical Workforce Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jill M; Everly, Marcee; Bauer, Renee

    2016-05-31

    Patient acuity in hospital settings continues to increase, and there is greater emphasis on patient outcomes. The current nursing workforce is comprised of four distinct generational cohorts that include veterans, baby boomers, millennials, and generation Xers. Each group has unique characteristics that add complexity to the workforce and this can add challenges to providing optimal patient care. Team building is one strategy to increase mutual understanding, communication, and respect, and thus potentially improve patient outcomes. In this article, we first briefly define generational cohorts by characteristics, and discuss differing expectations for work/life balance and potential negative outcomes. Our discussion offers team building strategies for positive outcomes, a case scenario, and concludes with resources for team building and organizational opportunities.

  7. Do ICTs Affect Workforce Productivity in Egyptian Industrial Organizations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Elsaadani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to investigate the influence of Information Communication Technologies-ICTs’ dimensions (Information Technology (IT, Management Information System (MIS, Office automation (OA, Intranet and Internet on workforce productivity for a group of industrial organizations in Alexandria - Egypt. The population of the study included managers and staff members working in different areas related to ICTs in selected industrial organizations at various managerial levels. A descriptive-statistical combined research study was conducted. Simple random sampling was used for the selection of the participating industrial organization. A questionnaire was used as the data collection method. Expert comments were used to check the validity of study instrument, and the reliability of questions was calculated as 79% using Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient. Single variable t-test, Friedman and variance analysis tests were used for the analysis. Study findings revealed that the specified dimensions of ICTs positively affect workforce productivity of industrial organizations in Alexandria - Egypt.

  8. Interdisciplinary training to build an informatics workforce for precision medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc S. Williams

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The proposed Precision Medicine Initiative has the potential to transform medical care in the future through a shift from interventions based on evidence from population studies and empiric response to ones that account for a range of individual factors that more reliably predict response and outcomes for the patient. Many things are needed to realize this vision, but one of the most critical is an informatics workforce that has broad interdisciplinary training in basic science, applied research and clinical implementation. Current approaches to informatics training do not support this requirement. We present a collaborative model of training that has the potential to produce a workforce prepared for the challenges of implementing precision medicine.

  9. Looking into tomorrow. Health workforce issues confronting physician assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehn, R W; Cawley, J F

    2000-11-01

    An important issue facing the physician assistant (PA) profession is how it can achieve a balance between supply of, and demand for, the services that PAs provide in the health workforce of the future. Recently, there has been debate and discussion about the implications of the recent expansion of the supply of PAs. In this article, we review and discuss (1) workforce data on physicians, PAs, and nurse practitioners and (2) projections of the number of these clinicians who will be trained in the future. We then analyze (1) data that describe the past 11 years of PA education and (2) data that address the experience of recent graduates of PA education programs who have sought employment. Some evidence suggests that, although demand has kept pace with expanding supply, a perception clearly exists that the PA job market may be tightening in some regions of the United States.

  10. What the emerging workforce wants in its leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieck, K Lynn; Prydun, Margaret; Walsh, Terri

    2002-01-01

    To describe desired traits as perceived by emerging and entrenched workforce members. A national sample of nursing students (n = 108) and a sample of Midwestern American hospital managers (n = 126) were categorized by age and asked to rank the traits desired in their leaders. Participants ranked the most desired and least desired traits of leaders. Rankings were compared between groups as well as with desired traits from leadership studies in the 1990s. A high degree of congruency was found between emerging and entrenched health care workforce respondents. However, these findings showed little congruence with previous studies. Congruence of expectations facilitates mentoring relationships, so finding no difference between the older and younger groups bodes well for the mentoring of young nurse leaders. The key implication is the challenge to recruit and retain such leaders in the nursing profession in a systematic, logical, and generation-friendly way.

  11. Planning for the future workforce in hematology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoots, W Keith; Abkowitz, Janis L; Coller, Barry S; DiMichele, Donna M

    2015-04-30

    The medical research and training enterprise in the United States is complex in both its scope and implementation. Accordingly, adaptations to the associated workforce needs present particular challenges. This is particularly true for maintaining or expanding national needs for physician-scientists where training resource requirements and competitive transitional milestones are substantial. For the individual, these phenomena can produce financial burden, prolong the career trajectory, and significantly influence career pathways. Hence, when national data suggest that future medical research needs in a scientific area may be met in a less than optimal manner, strategies to expand research and training capacity must follow. This article defines such an exigency for research and training in nonneoplastic hematology and presents potential strategies for addressing these critical workforce needs. The considerations presented herein reflect a summary of the discussions presented at 2 workshops cosponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the American Society of Hematology.

  12. Assessing the midwifery workforce demand: Utilising Birthrate Plus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jiasi; Zhu, Xiu; Lu, Hong

    2016-11-01

    To assess the ability of the Birthrate Plus Workforce Planning Methodology (BR+) to forecast midwifery workforce demand in Chinese settings. A retrospective analysis of medical records. ten hospitals in Beijing District. Hospitals were selected using stratified sampling methods. The client category and midwife hours in each hospital were analysed over 1 month in consecutive three years (2013, 2014, and 2015). Client category allocation varied between different hospital levels; Clients in higher category tended to need longer midwife hours; Mean birthrate of the ten hospitals was 154.30 (SD=40.700). Seven out of the ten hospitals were in need of more midwives. Birthrate Plus was proved to be effective and efficient in Chinese settings; Gaps between available and needed midwives were large and prevalent in Chinese hospitals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A 1.4 deg2 blind survey for C II], C III] and C IV at z ˜ 0.7-1.5 - I. Nature, morphologies and equivalent widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroe, Andra; Sobral, David; Matthee, Jorryt; Calhau, João; Oteo, Ivan

    2017-11-01

    While traditionally associated with active galactic nuclei (AGN), the properties of the C II] (λ = 2326 Å), C III] (λ, λ = 1907, 1909 Å) and C IV (λ, λ = 1549, 1551 Å) emission lines are still uncertain as large, unbiased samples of sources are scarce. We present the first blind, statistical study of C II], C III] and C IV emitters at z ˜ 0.68, 1.05, 1.53, respectively, uniformly selected down to a flux limit of ˜4 × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-1 through a narrow-band survey covering an area of ˜1.4 deg2 over COSMOS and UDS. We detect 16 C II], 35 C III] and 17 C IV emitters, whose nature we investigate using optical colours as well as Hubble Space Telescope (HST), X-ray, radio and far-infrared data. We find that z ˜ 0.7 C II] emitters are consistent with a mixture of blue (UV slope β = -2.0 ± 0.4) star-forming (SF) galaxies with discy HST structure and AGN with Seyfert-like morphologies. Bright C II] emitters have individual X-ray detections as well as high average black hole accretion rates (BHARs) of ˜0.1 M⊙ yr-1. C III] emitters at z ˜ 1.05 trace a general population of SF galaxies, with β = -0.8 ± 1.1, a variety of optical morphologies, including isolated and interacting galaxies and low BHAR (frame equivalent widths (EWs) that could be as large as 50-100 Å. AGN or spatial offsets between the UV continuum stellar disc and the line-emitting regions may explain the large EW. These bright C II], C III] and C IV emitters are ideal candidates for spectroscopic follow-up to fully unveil their nature.

  14. A supply model for nurse workforce projection in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abas, Zuraida Abal; Ramli, Mohamad Raziff; Desa, Mohamad Ishak; Saleh, Nordin; Hanafiah, Ainul Nadziha; Aziz, Nuraini; Abidin, Zaheera Zainal; Shibghatullah, Abdul Samad; Rahman, Ahmad Fadzli Nizam Abdul; Musa, Haslinda

    2017-08-18

    The paper aims to provide an insight into the significance of having a simulation model to forecast the supply of registered nurses for health workforce planning policy using System Dynamics. A model is highly in demand to predict the workforce demand for nurses in the future, which it supports for complete development of a needs-based nurse workforce projection using Malaysia as a case study. The supply model consists of three sub-models to forecast the number of registered nurses for the next 15 years: training model, population model and Full Time Equivalent (FTE) model. In fact, the training model is for predicting the number of newly registered nurses after training is completed. Furthermore, the population model is for indicating the number of registered nurses in the nation and the FTE model is useful for counting the number of registered nurses with direct patient care. Each model is described in detail with the logical connection and mathematical governing equation for accurate forecasting. The supply model is validated using error analysis approach in terms of the root mean square percent error and the Theil inequality statistics, which is mportant for evaluating the simulation results. Moreover, the output of simulation results provides a useful insight for policy makers as a what-if analysis is conducted. Some recommendations are proposed in order to deal with the nursing deficit. It must be noted that the results from the simulation model will be used for the next stage of the Needs-Based Nurse Workforce projection project. The impact of this study is that it provides the ability for greater planning and policy making with better predictions.

  15. Strengthening Psychology’s Workforce for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, Michael A.; Karel, Michele J.; Zeiss, Antonette M.; Alegria, Margarita; Moye, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Professional psychology faces an urgent crisis, which the following facts paint in stark relief. Adults over age 65 will rise to 20% of the U.S. population over the next 15 years and already account for a third of the country’s health care expenditures. Up to 8 million older adults experience mental health and substance use conditions in a given year, yet most psychologists receive no training in their assessment and treatment. No more than an estimated 4%, or 3,000, psychologists nationwide specialize in geropsychology; a ratio approaching 3,000 to 1. A small group of advocates within the profession have sounded the alarm and worked to strengthen geropsychology as a specialty, but this has had very limited impact on the actual supply of psychologists qualified to provide services to this population. In 2012, an Institute of Medicine (IOM) committee released a report on the crisis regarding the mental health and substance use workforce for older adults. Drawing on that report, a team composed of geropsychologists, along with psychologists who served on the IOM committee, identifies in this article priority areas for workforce development. The authors assess the progress of psychology in each of these areas and offer a set of recommendations for future efforts by this profession to develop its own workforce and to strengthen the ability of other caregivers to address the behavioral health needs of older adults. Strengthening its own workforce and responding to the needs of this population is imperative if psychology is to maintain its relevance as a health profession and meet its ethical obligations to an increasingly diverse society. PMID:25844650

  16. Analysis of Generation Y Workforce Motivation Using Multiattribute Utility Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    the Berlin Wall, the induction of music television (MTV) into society, Columbine High School shootings, 9/11 terrorist attacks, more frequent... high inflation of the 1980s (Dries et al., 2008; Crumpacker & Crumpacker, 2007; Weingarten, 2009). 66 Analysis of Generation Y Workforce Motivation...January 2011 and abhors slowness (Weingarten, 2009). To some, Generation Y’s work values and attributes paint a picture of being high main- tenance

  17. KC-46 Workforce Requirements for Depot Maintenance Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Research DHL : Dalsey, Hillblom & Lynn D&SWS: Develop & Sustain War Fighting ETOPS: Extended Twin Engine Operating System EWIS: Electrical...establishing a framework that the depot can use for further expansion of its workforce to meet future demands of its customer , the Air Force...time and made each of the organizations these men controlled successful but, “three forces… customers , competition and change,” brought about a

  18. An Intelligent Decision Support System for Workforce Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    independently. • The group is less comfortable with more psychological methods. • Individuals in the group may repress ideas because of timidity or dominance...changes in workforce demographics by: • Occupation • Grade level, • Organizational structure, • Race/national origin, • Gender, • Age... grades , and locations. To be effective for comparison, the data and competencies in the supply and demand analysis phases need to be developed in

  19. Designing Incentives for Marine Corps Cyber Workforce Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    CORPS CYBER WORKFORCE RETENTION 6. AUTHOR(S) Lucas F. Hemandez and Derek K. Jolmson 7. PERFORMING OR GANI ZATION NA:i\\ IIE (S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval...bureaucracy). These fmdings were incmporated into a Design Thinking process that resulted in three prototype solutions to cyber retention. This study...that resulted in three prototype solutions to cyber retention. This study demonstrates how the unique characteristics of cyber personnel require

  20. Leveraging multi-generational workforce values in interactive information societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie van der Walt

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The success of organisations relies on various factors including the ability of its multi-generational workforce to collaborate within the interactive information society. By developing an awareness of the different values of a diverse workforce, organisations may benefit from diversity. Various diversity factors, such as ethnicity, age and gender, impact on the way people interact, especially in the interactive information society.Objectives: This article advocates the need for generational awareness and addresses how this awareness presents benefits to companies, such as, increased productivity, improved succession planning policies and strategies to recruit and retain a diverse workforce. The research problem is directed at how diversity management influences Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y in terms of their work performance and co-worker relationships.Method: The research design combines Critical Theory and Generational Theory within the mixed-method paradigm. The sequential exploratory design was decided upon as it studies the unknown relationships between different generations of employees. The literature review was followed by a quantitative empirical research component and data was collected by means of a questionnaire. Results: The findings highlight specific differences between generations regarding their perspectives on work values and co-worker relationships, rewards, work-life balance and retirement.Conclusion: The article concludes with recommendations on the role diversity management plays in terms of work performance and co-worker relationships. By leveraging generational awareness in the interactive information society organizations with a multi-generational workforce will succeed in the competitive business environment.

  1. Retention of Millennial Employees in the Army Acquisition Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-07

    Winograd and Hais (2014) estimated that by 2025 the Millennials may constitute up to 75 percent of the workforce, dominating workplaces and shifting... Millennials When considering workplace preferences of the Millennial generation, it is important to ensure that the environment is open, casual, and...Williams, J. (2011). Millennials at work: Reshaping the workplace . Retrieved from http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/managing-tomorrows-people/future-of

  2. Title V Workforce Development in the Era of Health Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Lewis; Mullenix, Amy; Apostolico, Alexsandra A; Fehrenbach, Lacy M; Cilenti, Dorothy

    2017-11-01

    Purpose The National Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development Center at UNC Chapel Hill (the Center), funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, provides Title V state/jurisdiction leaders and staff and partners from other sectors with opportunities to develop skills in quality improvement, systems mapping and analysis, change management, and strategies to enhance access to care to leverage and implement health transformation opportunities to improve the health of women and children. Description Since 2013, the Center has utilized a variety of learning platforms to reach state and jurisdiction Title V leaders. In the intensive training program, new skills and knowledge are applied to a state-driven health transformation project and include distance-based learning opportunities, multi-day, in-person training and/or onsite consultation, as well as individualized coaching to develop workforce skills. Assessment The first intensive cohort of eight states reported enhanced skills in the core areas of quality improvement, systems mapping and analysis, change management, and strategies to enhance access to care which guided changes at state system and policy levels. In addition, teams reported new and/or enhanced partnerships with many sectors, thereby leveraging Title V resources to increase its impact. Conclusion The Center's provision of core workforce skills and application to state-defined goals has enabled states to undertake projects and challenges that not only have a positive impact on population health, but also encourage collaborative, productive partnerships that were once found to be challenging-creating a workforce capable of advancing the health and wellbeing of women and children.

  3. Workforce scheduling: A new model incorporating human factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Othman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The majority of a company’s improvement comes when the right workers with the right skills, behaviors and capacities are deployed appropriately throughout a company. This paper considers a workforce scheduling model including human aspects such as skills, training, workers’ personalities, workers’ breaks and workers’ fatigue and recovery levels. This model helps to minimize the hiring, firing, training and overtime costs, minimize the number of fired workers with high performance, minimize the break time and minimize the average worker’s fatigue level.Design/methodology/approach: To achieve this objective, a multi objective mixed integer programming model is developed to determine the amount of hiring, firing, training and overtime for each worker type.Findings: The results indicate that the worker differences should be considered in workforce scheduling to generate realistic plans with minimum costs. This paper also investigates the effects of human fatigue and recovery on the performance of the production systems.Research limitations/implications: In this research, there are some assumptions that might affect the accuracy of the model such as the assumption of certainty of the demand in each period, and the linearity function of Fatigue accumulation and recovery curves. These assumptions can be relaxed in future work.Originality/value: In this research, a new model for integrating workers’ differences with workforce scheduling is proposed. To the authors' knowledge, it is the first time to study the effects of different important human factors such as human personality, skills and fatigue and recovery in the workforce scheduling process. This research shows that considering both technical and human factors together can reduce the costs in manufacturing systems and ensure the safety of the workers.

  4. Demographics of the Contracting Workforce within the Army Contracting Command

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-25

    Empresas in Madrid. Dr. Reed retired from Active Military Service in 2008 after 21 years in the Air Force. Dr. Reed held various assignments in...and Local Government, business, and marketing applications, it focuses on human resource planning and the difficulties of expanding and contracting...testimony indicated the use of these tools could have a significant effect on reducing the workforce, allowing for a change in the skills and mix of

  5. Comments on Reauthorization of The Workforce Investment Act: Submitted to the Education and Workforce Committee, U.S. House of Representatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobs for the Future, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This document includes comments on the adult provisions of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA), informed by research conducted with employers, employer organizations, and others on the strengths and weaknesses of the current workforce development system from the perspective of employers and low-wage, low-skill employees. Jobs for the Future is…

  6. Foundational workplace safety and health competencies for the emerging workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, Andrea H; Guerin, Rebecca J; Schulte, Paul A

    2016-12-01

    Young workers (aged 15-24) suffer disproportionately from workplace injuries, with a nonfatal injury rate estimated to be two times higher than among workers age 25 or over. These workers make up approximately 9% of the U.S. workforce and studies have shown that nearly 80% of high school students work at some point during high school. Although young worker injuries are a pressing public health problem, the critical knowledge and skills needed to prepare youth for safe and healthy work are missing from most frameworks used to prepare the emerging U.S. workforce. A framework of foundational workplace safety and health knowledge and skills (the NIOSH 8 Core Competencies) was developed based on the Health Belief Model (HBM). The proposed NIOSH Core Competencies utilize the HBM to provide a framework for foundational workplace safety and health knowledge and skills. An examination of how these competencies and the HBM apply to actions that workers take to protect themselves is provided. The social and physical environments that influence these actions are also discussed. The NIOSH 8 Core Competencies, grounded in one of the most widely used health behavior theories, fill a critical gap in preparing the emerging U.S. workforce to be cognizant of workplace risks. Integration of the NIOSH 8 Core Competencies into school curricula is one way to ensure that every young person has the foundational workplace safety and health knowledge and skills to participate in, and benefit from, safe and healthy work. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Recent trends in the urology workforce in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruthi, Raj S; Neuwahl, Simon; Nielsen, Matthew E; Fraher, Erin

    2013-11-01

    The present study examines the current status of urology physician manpower in the United States, in the context of trends in the demographics, geographic distribution, and practice make-up of urologists. Physicians were identified as surgeons and classified into surgical groups using a combination of American Medical Association primary and secondary self-reported specialties and American Board of Medical Specialties certifications. From these groups, urologic surgeons were isolated for analysis. The supply of urologists per capita has declined since 1981 - most dramatically since 1991. With an average age of 52.5 years, urology is one of the oldest surgical specialties. Over 7% of urologists are older than 70 years and 44% are older than 55 years, suggesting an aging urology workforce. The number of female urologists has grown almost a 1000-fold and represents a growing and younger cohort of the workforce. The number of rural urologists and the number of international medical graduates have continued to decline since 1981. Over the past 10 years, an increasing number of urologists are now in group practices (over 60%), and these tended to be younger and in urban settings. In contrast to most other surgical specialties, there has been a decrease in the supply of urologists relative to population growth, which is expected to be exacerbated by an aging and relatively older urology physician workforce, particularly in rural areas, a slight increase in female urologists, and the gravitation of younger urologists toward group practice in urban areas. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Education and Training Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, Charles A.; Peters, Jane S.; Albers, Nathaniel; Stuart, Elizabeth; Fuller, Merrian C.

    2010-03-19

    This report provides a baseline assessment of the current state of energy efficiency-related education and training programs and analyzes training and education needs to support expected growth in the energy efficiency services workforce. In the last year, there has been a significant increase in funding for 'green job' training and workforce development (including energy efficiency), through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Key segments of the energy efficiency services sector (EESS) have experienced significant growth during the past several years, and this growth is projected to continue and accelerate over the next decade. In a companion study (Goldman et al. 2009), our research team estimated that the EESS will increase two- to four-fold by 2020, to 220,000 person-years of employment (PYE) (low-growth scenario) or up to 380,000 PYE (high-growth scenario), which may represent as many as 1.3 million individuals. In assessing energy efficiency workforce education and training needs, we focus on energy-efficiency services-related jobs that are required to improve the efficiency of residential and nonresidential buildings. Figure ES-1 shows the market value chain for the EESS, sub-sectors included in this study, as well as the types of market players and specific occupations. Our assessment does not include the manufacturing, wholesale, and retail distribution subsectors, or energy efficiency-focused operations and maintenance performed by facility managers.

  9. Health workforce policy and Turkey's health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agartan, Tuba I

    2015-12-01

    The health care industry is labor intensive and depends on well-trained and appropriately deployed health professionals to deliver services. This article examines the health workforce challenges in the context of Turkey's recent health reform initiative, Health Transformation Program (HTP). Reformers identified shortages, imbalances in the skills-mix, and inequities in the geographical distribution of health professionals as among the major problems. A comprehensive set of policies was implemented within the HTP framework to address these problems. The article argues that these policies addressed some of the health workforce challenges, while on the other hand exacerbating others and hence may have resulted in increasing the burden on the workforce. So far HTP's governance reforms and health human resource policy have not encouraged meaningful participation of other key stakeholders in the governance of the health care system. Without effective participation of health professionals, the next stages of HTP implementation that focus on managerial reforms such as restructuring public hospitals, improving the primary care system and implementing new initiatives on quality improvement could be very difficult. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The status of adolescent medicine: Building a global adolescent workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lana; Upadhya, Krishna K; Matson, Pamela; Adger, Hoover; Trent, Maria E

    2016-01-01

    Remarkable public health achievements to reduce infant and child mortality and improve the health and well-being of children worldwide have successfully resulted in increased survival and a growing population of young people aged 10–24 years. Population trends indicate that the current generation of 1.8 billion young people is the largest in history, but there is a scarcity of dedicated resources available to effectively meet the health needs of adolescents and young adults worldwide. Growing recognition of the pivotal roles young people play in the cultures, societies, and countries in which they live has spurred an expanding global movement to address the needs of this special population. Building an effective global workforce of highly-skilled adolescent health professionals who understand the unique biological, psychological, behavioral, social, and environmental factors that impact the health of adolescents is a critical step in addressing the health needs of the growing cohort of young people. In this review, we aim to: 1) Define a global assessment of the health needs for adolescents around the world; 2) Describe examples of current training programs and requirements in Adolescent Medicine; 3) Identify existing gaps and barriers to develop an effective adolescent health workforce; and 4) Develop a call for targeted actions to build capacity of the adolescent health workforce, broaden culturally relevant research and evidence-based intervention strategies, and reinforce existing interdisciplinary global networks of youth advocates and adolescent health professionals to maximize the opportunities for training, research, and care delivery. PMID:26167974

  11. Department of Energy: Nuclear S&T workforce development programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Michelle [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bala, Marsha [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Beierschmitt, Kelly [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Steele, Carolyn [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sattelberger, Alfred P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bruozas, Meridith A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories use their expertise in nuclear science and technology (S&T) to support a robust national nuclear S&T enterprise from the ground up. Traditional academic programs do not provide all the elements necessary to develop this expertise, so the DOE has initiated a number of supplemental programs to develop and support the nuclear S&T workforce pipeline. This document catalogs existing workforce development programs that are supported by a number of DOE offices (such as the Offices of Nuclear Energy, Science, Energy Efficiency, and Environmental Management), and by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Naval Reactor Program. Workforce development programs in nuclear S&T administered through the Department of Homeland Security, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Department of Defense are also included. The information about these programs, which is cataloged below, is drawn from the program websites. Some programs, such as the Minority Serving Institutes Partnership Programs (MSIPPs) are available through more than one DOE office, so they appear in more than one section of this document.

  12. Workforce Optimization for Bank Operation Centers: A Machine Learning Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefik Ilkin Serengil

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Online Banking Systems evolved and improved in recent years with the use of mobile and online technologies, performing money transfer transactions on these channels can be done without delay and human interaction, however commercial customers still tend to transfer money on bank branches due to several concerns. Bank Operation Centers serve to reduce the operational workload of branches. Centralized management also offers personalized service by appointed expert employees in these centers. Inherently, workload volume of money transfer transactions changes dramatically in hours. Therefore, work-force should be planned instantly or early to save labor force and increase operational efficiency. This paper introduces a hybrid multi stage approach for workforce planning in bank operation centers by the application of supervised and unsu-pervised learning algorithms. Expected workload would be predicted as supervised learning whereas employees are clus-tered into different skill groups as unsupervised learning to match transactions and proper employees. Finally, workforce optimization is analyzed for proposed approach on production data.

  13. Workforce Transition Model for DOE-AL non-nuclear reconfiguration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahlman, E.J.; Lewis, R.E.

    1993-10-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was tasked by the US Department of Energy Albuquerque Field Office (DOE-AL) to develop a workforce assessment and transition planning tool to support integrated decision making at a single DOE installation. The planning tool permits coordinated, integrated workforce planning to manage growth, decline, or transition within a DOE installation. The tool enhances the links and provides commonality between strategic, programmatic, and operations planners and human resources. Successful development and subsequent complex-wide implementation of the model will also facilitate planning at the national level by enforcing a consistent format on data that are now collected by installations in corporate-specific formats that are not amenable to national-level analyses. The workforce assessment and transition planning tool consists of two components: the Workforce Transition Model and the Workforce Budget Constraint Model. The Workforce Transition Model, the preponderant of the two, assists decision makers to identify and evaluates alternatives for transitioning the current workforce to meet the skills required to support projected workforce requirements. The Workforce Budget Constraint Model helps estimate the number of personnel that will be affected given a workforce budget increase or decrease and assists in identifying how the corresponding hiring or layoffs should be distributed across the common occupational classification system (COCS) occupations. The conceptual models and the computer implementation are described.

  14. Characteristics and practice profiles of migrant dentist groups in Australia: implications for dental workforce policy and planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Madhan; Spencer, A John; Short, Stephanie D; Watkins, Keith; Chrisopoulos, Sergio; Brennan, David S

    2015-06-01

    Migrants comprise a growing proportion of the dental workforce in Australia. To date, research on migrant dentists is limited, raising policy questions regarding the motivations for migration, demographic profiles and work patterns. The purpose of this paper was to present findings from the first national survey of migrant dentists in Australia. All dentists with a primary dental qualification from an overseas institution and registered with the Australian Dental Association (n=1,872) or enrolled as a graduate student in any of the nine dental schools in Australia (n=105) were surveyed between January and May 2013. A total of 1,022 participants (response rate=54.5%) were classifiable into three migrant dentist groups: direct recognition (n=491); Australian Dental Council (ADC) (n=411); and alternative pathway (n=120). Overall, 41.8% of migrant dentists were female. More than half of the ADC group (54.1%) were from lower middle income countries. The most frequent motivation for migration according to the direct recognition group (21.1%) was 'adventure', whereas other groups migrated for 'better opportunity'. The majority of ADC respondents (65%) were under 45 years of age, and a larger proportion worked in the most disadvantaged areas (12.4%), compared with other groups. Gender, marital status, years since arrival in Australia and having children varied between the groups (chi square; PDentist groups migrate to Australia for different reasons. The large proportion of the migrant dentist workforce sourced from lower middle income countries points towards deficiencies in oral health systems both for these countries and for Australia. The feminisation of the migrant dentist profile could in future affect dentist-practice activity patterns in Australia. Further research, especially on the settlement experiences of these dentists, can provide better insights into issues faced by these dentists, the nature of support that migrant dentists receive in Australia, the

  15. A special report of current state of the medical physicist workforce - results of the 2012 ASTRO Comprehensive Workforce Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Erli; Arnone, Anna; Sillanpaa, Jussi K; Yu, Yan; Mills, Michael D

    2015-05-08

    The medical physics profession is undergoing significant changes. Starting in 2014, candidates registering for certification exams by the American Board of Radiology must have completed a CAMPEP-accredited residency. This requirement, along with tightened state regulations, uncertainty in future reimbursement, and a stronger emphasis on board certification, have raised questions concerning the state of the medical physics workforce and its ability to adapt to changing requirements. In 2012, ASTRO conducted a workforce study of the comprehensive field of radiation oncology. This article reviews the findings of the medical physics section of the study, including age and gender distribution, educational background, workload, and primary work setting. We also report on job satisfaction, the perceived supply and demand of medical physicists, and the medical physicists' main concerns pertaining to patient safety and quality assurance.

  16. Mobile use planning by Workforce-Management. Optimization of operational processes; Mobile Einsatzplanung durch Workforce-Management. Optimierung der Betriebsablaeufe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocoll, N.; Homburg, A. [Redaktionsbuero Stutensee (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    Because of the complexity involved, optimising operational processes related to a power supply company's transmission system is only feasible with workforce management (WFM) solutions. This is the only way to ensure the efficient deployment of personnel and resources. The authors present the work4utility WFM system of Emprise Consulting Duesseldorf GmbH. This system is interlinked with existing geoinformation systems and business management systems.

  17. Managing equality and cultural diversity in the health workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Beverley

    2007-12-01

    This article offers practical strategies to managers and others for supporting overseas trained nurses and managing cultural diversity in the health workforce. Widespread nursing shortages have led managers to recruit nurses from overseas, mainly from developing countries. This paper draws on evidence from the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals study reported elsewhere in this issue, which indicates that overseas trained nurses encountered widespread discriminatory practices including an overuse of complaints and grievances against them. The researchers also found that the overseas trained nurses responded to their experiences by using various personal strategies to resist or re-negotiate and overcome such discriminatory practices. A research workshop was held in June 2005 at the midpoint of the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals study. Twenty-five participants attended the workshop. They were the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals study researchers, advisory group members, including the author of this paper and other researchers in the field of migration. The overall aim of the workshop was to share emerging research data from the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals and related studies. The final session of the workshop on which this paper is based, was facilitated by the author, with the specific aim of asking the participants to discuss and determine the challenges to managers when managing a culturally diverse workforce. The discussion yielded four main themes collated by the author from which a framework of strategies to facilitate equality and cultural diversity management of the healthcare workers may be developed. The four themes are: assumptions and expectations; education and training to include

  18. Workplace violence and gender discrimination in Rwanda's health workforce: Increasing safety and gender equality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    d'Arc Kanakuze Jeanne

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Workplace violence has been documented in all sectors, but female-dominated sectors such as health and social services are at particular risk. In 2007-2008, IntraHealth International assisted the Rwanda Ministries of Public Service and Labor and Health to study workplace violence in Rwanda's health sector. This article reexamines a set of study findings that directly relate to the influence of gender on workplace violence, synthesizes these findings with other research from Rwanda, and examines the subsequent impact of the study on Rwanda's policy environment. Methods Fifteen out of 30 districts were selected at random. Forty-four facilities at all levels were randomly selected in these districts. From these facilities, 297 health workers were selected at random, of whom 205 were women and 92 were men. Researchers used a utilization-focused approach and administered health worker survey, facility audits, key informant and health facility manager interviews and focus groups to collect data in 2007. After the study was disseminated in 2008, stakeholder recommendations were documented and three versions of the labor law were reviewed to assess study impact. Results Thirty-nine percent of health workers had experienced some form of workplace violence in year prior to the study. The study identified gender-related patterns of perpetration, victimization and reactions to violence. Negative stereotypes of women, discrimination based on pregnancy, maternity and family responsibilities and the 'glass ceiling' affected female health workers' experiences and career paths and contributed to a context of violence. Gender equality lowered the odds of health workers experiencing violence. Rwandan stakeholders used study results to formulate recommendations to address workplace violence gender discrimination through policy reform and programs. Conclusions Gender inequality influences workplace violence. Addressing gender discrimination and

  19. Workplace violence and gender discrimination in Rwanda's health workforce: Increasing safety and gender equality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Constance J; de Vries, Daniel H; d'Arc Kanakuze, Jeanne; Ngendahimana, Gerard

    2011-07-19

    Workplace violence has been documented in all sectors, but female-dominated sectors such as health and social services are at particular risk. In 2007-2008, IntraHealth International assisted the Rwanda Ministries of Public Service and Labor and Health to study workplace violence in Rwanda's health sector. This article reexamines a set of study findings that directly relate to the influence of gender on workplace violence, synthesizes these findings with other research from Rwanda, and examines the subsequent impact of the study on Rwanda's policy environment. Fifteen out of 30 districts were selected at random. Forty-four facilities at all levels were randomly selected in these districts. From these facilities, 297 health workers were selected at random, of whom 205 were women and 92 were men. Researchers used a utilization-focused approach and administered health worker survey, facility audits, key informant and health facility manager interviews and focus groups to collect data in 2007. After the study was disseminated in 2008, stakeholder recommendations were documented and three versions of the labor law were reviewed to assess study impact. Thirty-nine percent of health workers had experienced some form of workplace violence in year prior to the study. The study identified gender-related patterns of perpetration, victimization and reactions to violence. Negative stereotypes of women, discrimination based on pregnancy, maternity and family responsibilities and the 'glass ceiling' affected female health workers' experiences and career paths and contributed to a context of violence. Gender equality lowered the odds of health workers experiencing violence. Rwandan stakeholders used study results to formulate recommendations to address workplace violence gender discrimination through policy reform and programs. Gender inequality influences workplace violence. Addressing gender discrimination and violence simultaneously should be a priority in workplace violence

  20. Herschel/PACS Survey of Protoplanetary Disks in Taurus/Auriga-Observations of [O I] and [C II], and Far-infrared Continuum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howard, Christian D.; Sandell, Goeran; Vacca, William D.; Duchene, Gaspard; Mathews, Geoffrey; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Barrado, David; Dent, William R. F.; Eiroa, Carlos; Grady, Carol; Kamp, Inga; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Menard, Francois; Pinte, Christophe; Podio, Linda; Riviere-Marichalar, Pablo; Roberge, Aki; Thi, Wing-Fai; Vicente, Silvia; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory was used to observe similar to 120 pre-main-sequence stars in Taurus as part of the GASPS Open Time Key project. Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer was used to measure the continuum as well as several gas tracers such as [O I] 63 mu m, [O I] 145 mu m, [C II